Science.gov

Sample records for arm central facility

  1. Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM SGP) Central Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, Joseph J.; Min, Qilong; Barnard, James C.; Marchand, Roger T.; Pilewskie, Peter

    2003-04-30

    In this study, a data analysis is performed to determine the area-averaged, spectral albedo at ARM's SGP central facility site. The spectral albedo is then fed into radiation transfer models to show that the diffuse discrepancy is diminished when the spectral albedo is used (as opposed to using the broadband albedo).

  2. Cloud and aerosol characterization for the ARM central facility: Multiple remote sensor techniques development

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.

    1992-04-30

    This research project designed to investigate how atmospheric remote sensing technology can best be applied to the characterization of the cloudy atmosphere. Our research program addresses basic atmospheric remote sensing questions, but at the same time is clearly directed toward providing information crucial to the ARM (Atmospheric Remote Sensing) program and for application to the Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART). The instrumentation that is being brought into play includes a variety of art-of-the-art sensors. Available at NOAA WPL are polarization Doppler K{sub a}-band (0.86 mm) and X-band (3.2 cm) radars, a C0{sub 2}(10.6 {mu}m) Doppler lidar with sequential ' polarization measurement capabilities, a three-channel (20.6, 31.65 and 90 GHz) microwave radiometer, and variety of visible and infrared radiometers. Instrumentation at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) includes a polarization ruby (0.643 {mu}m) lidar, a narrow-beam (0.14{degree}) mid-infrared (9.5--11.5 {mu}m) radiometer coaligned with the lidar, several other radiometers in the visible and infrared spectral regions, and an advanced two-color (1.06 and 0.532 {mu}m), four-channel Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) and all-sky video imaging system that have only recently been developed under the ARM IDP.

  3. A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Central Facility. Part II; Cloud Fraction and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Minnis, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Data collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility are analyzed for determining the variability of cloud fraction and radiative forcing at several temporal scales between January 1997 and December 2002. Cloud fractions are estimated for total cloud cover and for single-layer low (0-3 km), middle (3-6 km), and high clouds (greater than 6 km) using ARM SGP ground-based paired lidar-radar measurements. Shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and net cloud radiative forcings (CRF) are derived from up- and down-looking standard precision spectral pyranometers and precision infrared radiometer measurements. The annual averages of total, and single-layer, nonoverlapped low, middle and high cloud fractions are 0.49, 0.11, 0.03, and 0.17, respectively. Total and low cloud amounts were greatest from December through March and least during July and August. The monthly variation of high cloud amount is relatively small with a broad maximum from May to August. During winter, total cloud cover varies diurnally with a small amplitude, mid-morning maximum and early evening minimum, and during summer it changes by more than 0.14 over the daily cycle with a pronounced early evening minimum. The diurnal variations of mean single-layer cloud cover change with season and cloud height. Annual averages of all-sky, total, and single-layer high, middle, and low LW CRFs are 21.4, 40.2, 16.7, 27.2, and 55.0 Wm(sup -2), respectively; and their SW CRFs are -41.5, -77.2, -37.0, -47.0, and -90.5 Wm(sup -2). Their net CRFs range from -20 to -37 Wm(sup -2). For all-sky, total, and low clouds, the maximum negative net CRFs of -40.1, -70, and -69.5 Wm(sup -2), occur during April; while the respective minimum values of -3.9, -5.7, and -4.6 Wm(sup -2), are found during December. July is the month having maximum negative net CRF of -46.2 Wm(sup -2) for middle clouds, and May has the maximum value of -45.9 Wm(sup -2) for high clouds. An

  4. Cloud and aerosol characterization for the ARM central facility: Multiple remote sensor techniques development. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.

    1992-04-30

    This research project designed to investigate how atmospheric remote sensing technology can best be applied to the characterization of the cloudy atmosphere. Our research program addresses basic atmospheric remote sensing questions, but at the same time is clearly directed toward providing information crucial to the ARM (Atmospheric Remote Sensing) program and for application to the Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART). The instrumentation that is being brought into play includes a variety of art-of-the-art sensors. Available at NOAA WPL are polarization Doppler K{sub a}-band (0.86 mm) and X-band (3.2 cm) radars, a C0{sub 2}(10.6 {mu}m) Doppler lidar with sequential ` polarization measurement capabilities, a three-channel (20.6, 31.65 and 90 GHz) microwave radiometer, and variety of visible and infrared radiometers. Instrumentation at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) includes a polarization ruby (0.643 {mu}m) lidar, a narrow-beam (0.14{degree}) mid-infrared (9.5--11.5 {mu}m) radiometer coaligned with the lidar, several other radiometers in the visible and infrared spectral regions, and an advanced two-color (1.06 and 0.532 {mu}m), four-channel Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) and all-sky video imaging system that have only recently been developed under the ARM IDP.

  5. The DOE ARM Aerial Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Hubbe, John M.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Chand, Duli; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Andrews, Elisabeth; Biraud, S.; McFarquhar, Greg

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a climate research user facility operating stationary ground sites that provide long-term measurements of climate relevant properties, mobile ground- and ship-based facilities to conduct shorter field campaigns (6-12 months), and the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF). The airborne observations acquired by the AAF enhance the surface-based ARM measurements by providing high-resolution in-situ measurements for process understanding, retrieval-algorithm development, and model evaluation that are not possible using ground- or satellite-based techniques. Several ARM aerial efforts were consolidated into the AAF in 2006. With the exception of a small aircraft used for routine measurements of aerosols and carbon cycle gases, AAF at the time had no dedicated aircraft and only a small number of instruments at its disposal. In this "virtual hangar" mode, AAF successfully carried out several missions contracting with organizations and investigators who provided their research aircraft and instrumentation. In 2009, AAF started managing operations of the Battelle-owned Gulfstream I (G-1) large twin-turboprop research aircraft. Furthermore, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided funding for the procurement of over twenty new instruments to be used aboard the G-1 and other AAF virtual-hangar aircraft. AAF now executes missions in the virtual- and real-hangar mode producing freely available datasets for studying aerosol, cloud, and radiative processes in the atmosphere. AAF is also engaged in the maturation and testing of newly developed airborne sensors to help foster the next generation of airborne instruments.

  6. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains Central Facility

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Gaustad, Krista L.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Long, Charles N.; Delamere, Jennifer

    2011-09-01

    We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs), four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated) can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  7. Cloud and aerosol characterization for the ARM central facility: Multiple remote sensor techniques development. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.

    1993-11-01

    In support of the initial phase of the Instrument Development Program (IDP) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, the authors have researched the means by which multiple remote sensing techniques could be best applied to characterizing the cloudy atmosphere. This research has directly supported the short-term goal of aiding in the selection of the most appropriate instrumentation for ARM Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites, but also has more long-term consequences for the application of remote sensing for measuring cloud properties of crucial concern to general circulation and climate models. To accomplish the goals they have (1) developed a mobile, state-of-the-art, scanning polarization diversity lidar (PDL) to test a variety of techniques for cloud remote sensing, including simultaneous dual-wavelength and dual-polarization, and high-speed variable field-of-view operations; (2) successfully participated in field projects using the PDL along with other remote sensors and instrumented aircraft to obtain detailed datasets for the testing of instrument techniques; (3) in collaboration with researchers at the NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory, used numerical cloud modeling and empirical studies to develop and refine remote sensing approaches for cloud property retrieval.

  8. TACS Central Control Facility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-12

    Central Control Facility 6 3. System Management Data Flow 7 B. Hardware Operating Environment 9 1. Computer 9 2. TACS Interfaces 9 3. Other Central...TERMINATION TIMING 131 Appendix C SYSTEM MANAGEMENT DATA FORMATS 135 Appendix D FIVE- AND NINE-SLOT SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION DIFFERENCES 147 Appendix E...control burst management ) 26 2-7 Call Progress Messages 29 2-8 Flowchart of Assignment/Blockage Decision Process for All-Member Net Requests 30 2-9

  9. ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect

    J. Voyles

    2005-12-31

    Through the ARM Program, the DOE funded the development of several highly instrumented ground stations for studying cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer, and for measuring other parameters that determine the radiative properties of the atmosphere. This scientific infrastructure, and resultant data archive, is a valuable national and international asset for advancing scientific knowledge of Earth systems. In fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE designated ARM sites as a national scientific user facility: the ARM Climate Research (ACRF). The ACRF has enormous potential to contribute to a wide range interdisciplinary science in areas such as meteorology, atmospheric aerosols, hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, and satellite validation, to name only a few.

  10. Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

  11. ARM mobile facility surface meteorology (MET) handbook.

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsche, M. T.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-04-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility Surface Meteorology station (MET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-min statistics of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity (RH), barometric pressure, and rainrate. Additional sensors may be added to or removed from the base set of sensors depending upon the deployment location, climate regime, or programmatic needs. In addition, sensor types may change depending upon the climate regime of the deployment. These changes/additions are noted in Section 3.

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Aerial Facility

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM data is collected both through permanent monitoring stations and field campaigns around the world. Airborne measurements required to answer science questions from researchers or to validate ground data are also collected. To find data from all categories of aerial operations, follow the links from the AAF information page at http://www.arm.gov/sites/aaf. Tables of information will provide start dates, duration, lead scientist, and the research site for each of the named campaigns. The title of a campaign leads, in turn, to a project description, contact information, and links to the data. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  13. Charter for the ARM Climate Research Facility Science Board

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, W

    2013-03-08

    The objective of the ARM Science Board is to promote the Nation’s scientific enterprise by ensuring that the best quality science is conducted at the DOE’s User Facility known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. The goal of the User Facility is to serve scientific researchers by providing unique data and tools to facilitate scientific applications for improving understanding and prediction of climate science.

  14. ARM Operations and Engineering Procedure Mobile Facility Site Startup

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, Jimmy W

    2015-05-01

    This procedure exists to define the key milestones, necessary steps, and process rules required to commission and operate an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF), with a specific focus toward on-time product delivery to the ARM Data Archive. The overall objective is to have the physical infrastructure, networking and communications, and instrument calibration, grooming, and alignment (CG&A) completed with data products available from the ARM Data Archive by the Operational Start Date milestone.

  15. Quality Assurance of ARM Program Climate Research Facility Data

    SciTech Connect

    Peppler, RA; Kehoe, KE; Sonntag, KL; Bahrmann, CP; Richardson, SJ; Christensen, SW; McCord, RA; Doty, DJ; Wagener, Richard; Eagan, RC; Lijegren, JC; Orr, BW; Sisterson, DL; Halter, TD; Keck, NN; Long, CN; Macduff, MC; Mather, JH; Perez, RC; Voyles, JW; Ivey, MD; Moore, ST; Nitschke, DL; Perkins, BD; Turner, DD

    2008-03-01

    This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) data quality assurance program as it existed in 2008. The performance of ACRF instruments, sites, and data systems is measured in terms of the availability, usability, and accessibility of the data to a user. First, the data must be available to users; that is, the data must be collected by instrument systems, processed, and delivered to a central repository in a timely manner. Second, the data must be usable; that is, the data must be inspected and deemed of sufficient quality for scientific research purposes, and data users must be able to readily tell where there are known problems in the data. Finally, the data must be accessible; that is, data users must be able to easily find, obtain, and work with the data from the central repository. The processes described in this report include instrument deployment and calibration; instrument and facility maintenance; data collection and processing infrastructure; data stream inspection and assessment; the roles of value-added data processing and field campaigns in specifying data quality and haracterizing the basic measurement; data archival, display, and distribution; data stream reprocessing; and engineering and operations management processes and procedures. Future directions in ACRF data quality assurance also are presented.

  16. Two-arm master/slave manipulator for nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Tomizawa, F.; Iwatsuka, N.; Suzuki, M.; Senoh, M.; Sugiyama, S.

    1988-01-01

    Several kinds of one-arm manipulators have been developed for remote maintenance in nuclear facilities to reduce personnel radiation exposure and to keep plant availability as high as possible. In those maintenance tasks, however, there are many that need two arms, e.g., one arm holds the work object and the other arm cuts it with a plasma torch. To answer this need, a dexterous two-arm master/slave manipulator has been developed based on the technology for one-arm manipulators. A prototype two-arm/slave manipulator is shown. The specifications for master and slave manipulators are listed. The prototype two-arm manipulator is undergoing laboratory performance tests. Preliminary results showed the maximum static operating forces were 0.4 N for the all-direct drive (DD)-type arm and 1.1 N for the semi-DD type. The payload for each arm of the slave manipulator was confirmed as 10 kg/sub f/, using mock pieces. The decommissioning tasks of cutting pipes and steel plates were successfully carried out.

  17. ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, J.

    2004-12-31

    Like a rock that slowly wears away beneath the pressure of a waterfall, planet earth?s climate is almost imperceptibly changing. Glaciers are getting smaller, droughts are lasting longer, and extreme weather events like fires, floods, and tornadoes are occurring with greater frequency. Why? Part of the answer is clouds and the amount of solar radiation they reflect or absorb. These two factors clouds and radiative transfer represent the greatest source of error and uncertainty in the current generation of general circulation models used for climate research and simulation. The U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 established an interagency program within the Executive Office of the President to coordinate U.S. agency-sponsored scientific research designed to monitor, understand, and predict changes in the global environment. To address the need for new research on clouds and radiation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. As part of the DOE?s overall Climate Change Science Program, a primary objective of the ARM Program is improved scientific understanding of the fundamental physics related to interactions between clouds and radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere.

  18. Measurement Capabilities of the DOE ARM Aerial Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, B.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Comstock, J. M.; Kluzek, C. D.; Chand, D.; Pekour, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a climate research user facility operating stationary ground sites in three important climatic regimes that provide long-term measurements of climate relevant properties. ARM also operates mobile ground- and ship-based facilities to conduct shorter field campaigns (6-12 months) to investigate understudied climate regimes around the globe. Finally, airborne observations by ARM's Aerial Facility (AAF) enhance the surface-based ARM measurements by providing high-resolution in situ measurements for process understanding, retrieval algorithm development, and model evaluation that is not possible using ground-based techniques. AAF started out in 2007 as a "virtual hangar" with no dedicated aircraft and only a small number of instruments owned by ARM. In this mode, AAF successfully carried out several missions contracting with organizations and investigators who provided their research aircraft and instrumentation. In 2009, the Battelle owned G-1 aircraft was included in the ARM facility. The G-1 is a large twin turboprop aircraft, capable of measurements up to altitudes of 7.5 km and a range of 2,800 kilometers. Furthermore the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided funding for the procurement of seventeen new instruments to be used aboard the G-1 and other AAF virtual-hangar aircraft. AAF now executes missions in the virtual- and real-hangar mode producing freely available datasets for studying aerosol, cloud, and radiative processes in the atmosphere. AAF is also heavily engaged in the maturation and testing of newly developed airborne sensors to help foster the next generation of airborne instruments. In the presentation we will showcase science applications based on measurements from recent field campaigns such as CARES, CALWATER and TCAP.

  19. AMF3 ARM's Research Facility at Oliktok Point Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helsel, F.; Lucero, D. A.; Ivey, M.; Dexheimer, D.; Hardesty, J.; Roesler, E. L.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific Infrastructure To Support Atmospheric Science And Aerosol Science For The Department Of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Programs Mobile Facility 3 Located At Oliktok Point, Alaska.The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Mobile Facility 3 (AMF3) located at Oliktok Point, Alaska is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site. The site provides a scientific infrastructure and data archives for the international Arctic research community. The infrastructure at Oliktok is designed to be mobile and it may be relocated in the future to support other ARM science missions. AMF-3 instruments include: scanning precipitation Radar-cloud radar, Raman Lidar, Eddy correlation flux systems, Ceilometer, Balloon sounding system, Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL), Millimeter cloud radar along with all the standard metrological measurements. Data from these instruments is placed in the ARM data archives and are available to the international research community. This poster will discuss what instruments are at AMF3 and the challenges of powering an Arctic site without the use of grid power.

  20. ARM Climate Research Facility: Outreach Tools and Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, L.; Jundt, R.

    2009-12-01

    Sponsored by the Department of Energy, the ARM Climate Research Facility is a global scientific user facility for the study of climate change. To publicize progress and achievements and to reach new users, the ACRF uses a variety of Web 2.0 tools and strategies that build off of the program’s comprehensive and well established News Center (www.arm.gov/news). These strategies include: an RSS subscription service for specific news categories; an email “newsletter” distribution to the user community that compiles the latest News Center updates into a short summary with links; and a Facebook page that pulls information from the News Center and links to relevant information in other online venues, including those of our collaborators. The ACRF also interacts with users through field campaign blogs, like Discovery Channel’s EarthLive, to share research experiences from the field. Increasingly, field campaign Wikis are established to help ACRF researchers collaborate during the planning and implementation phases of their field studies and include easy to use logs and image libraries to help record the campaigns. This vital reference information is used in developing outreach material that is shared in highlights, news, and Facebook. Other Web 2.0 tools that ACRF uses include Google Maps to help users visualize facility locations and aircraft flight patterns. Easy-to-use comment boxes are also available on many of the data-related web pages on www.arm.gov to encourage feedback. To provide additional opportunities for increased interaction with the public and user community, future Web 2.0 plans under consideration for ACRF include: evaluating field campaigns for Twitter and microblogging opportunities, adding public discussion forums to research highlight web pages, moving existing photos into albums on FlickR or Facebook, and building online video archives through YouTube.

  1. ARM Mobile Facility Surface Meteorology Handbook - October 2008

    SciTech Connect

    MT Ritsche

    2008-10-30

    The ARM Mobile Facility Surface Meteorology station (AMF MET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute statistics of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, and rain-rate. Additional sensors may be added to or removed from the base set of sensors depending upon the deployment location, climate regime or programmatic needs. Additionally, sensor types may change depending upon the climate regime of the deployment. These changes/additions are noted in the Deployment Locations and History section.

  2. Central Computational Facility CCF communications subsystem options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, K. B.

    1979-01-01

    A MITRE study which investigated the communication options available to support both the remaining Central Computational Facility (CCF) computer systems and the proposed U1108 replacements is presented. The facilities utilized to link the remote user terminals with the CCF were analyzed and guidelines to provide more efficient communications were established.

  3. Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies: 2015 ARM Climate Research Facility Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, CR; Santanello, JA; Gentine, P

    2015-11-01

    Matching observed diurnal cycles is a fundamental yet extremely complex test for models. High temporal resolution measurements of surface turbulent heat fluxes and boundary layer properties are required to evaluate the daytime evolution of the boundary layer and its sensitivity to land-atmosphere coupling. To address this need, (12) one-day intensive observing periods (IOP) with enhanced radiosonding will be carried out at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) during summer 2015. Each IOP will comprise a single launch to correspond with the nighttime overpass of the A-Train of satellites (~0830 UTC) and hourly launches during daytime beginning from 1130 UTC and ending at 2130 UTC. At 3-hourly intervals (i.e., 1140 UTC, 1440 UTC, 1740 UTC, and 2040 UTC) a duplicate second radiosonde will be launched 10 minutes subsequent to launch of the on-hour radiosonde for the purpose of assessing horizontal atmospheric variability. In summary, each IOP will have a 14-sounding supplement to the 6-hourly operational sounding schedule at the ARM-SGP CF. The IOP days will be decided before sunset on the preceding day, according to the judgment of the PI’s and taking into consideration daily weather forecasts and the operability of complimentary ARM-SGP CF instrumentation. An overarching goal of the project is to address how ARM could better observe land-atmosphere coupling to support the evaluation and refinement of coupled weather and climate models.

  4. DECOMMISSIONING AND ENVRIONMENTAL CLEANUP OF SMALL ARMS TRAINING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetz, T.

    2012-12-04

    USDOE performed a (CERCLA) non-time critical removal (NTCR) action at the Small Arms Training Area (SATA) Site Evaluation Area (SEA) located at the Savannah River Site (SRS), in Aiken, South Carolina. From 1951 to May 2010, the SATA was used as a small weapons practice and qualifying firing range. The SATA consisted of 870.1 ha (2,150 ac) of woodlands and open field, of which approximately 2.9 ha (7.3 ac) were used as a firing range. The SATA facility was comprised of three small arms ranges (one static and two interactive), storage buildings for supplies, a weapons cleaning building, and a control building. Additionally, a 113- m (370-ft) long earthen berm was used as a target backstop during live-fire exercises. The berm soils accumulated a large amount of spent lead bullets in the berm face during the facilities 59- years of operation. The accumulation of lead was such that soil concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) residential and industrial worker regional screening levels (RSLs). The RSL threshold values are based on standardized exposure scenarios that estimate contaminant concentrations in soil that the USEPA considers protective of humans over a lifetime. For the SATA facility, lead was present in soil at concentrations that exceed both the current residential (400 mg/kg) and industrial (800 mg/kg) RSLs. In addition, the concentration of lead in the soil exceeded the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 261.24) regulatory limit. The TCLP analysis simulates landfill conditions and is designed to determine the mobility of contaminants in waste. In addition, a principal threat source material (PTSM) evaluation, human health risk assessment (HHRA), and contaminant migration (CM) analysis were conducted to evaluate soil contamination at the SATA SEA. This evaluation determined that there were no contaminants present that constitute PTSM and the CM analysis revealed that no

  5. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Giesbrecht, Alan

    2015-03-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA) located in Butte County, Idaho at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell 1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell 2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell 3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5 acre land application site that utilizes a center pivot irrigation sprinkler system. The purpose of this current study is to update the analysis and conclusions of the December 2013 study. In this current study, the new seepage rate and influent flow rate data have been used to update the calculations, model, and analysis.

  6. Mineral facilities of Northern and Central Eurasia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric; Soto-Viruet, Yadira

    2010-01-01

    This map displays almost 900 records of mineral facilities within the countries that formerly constituted the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recent published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2

  7. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mark R. Cole

    2013-12-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

  8. Observations of Mammatus from a Deep Convective Anvil over the ARM Climate Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangrande, S. E.; Jensen, M. P.; Straka, J.; Kollias, P.; Johnson, K. L.; Collis, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Mammatus clouds forming on the base of a convective anvil were observed over the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility located around Lamont, Oklahoma. New ARM instruments documented an unique example of mammatus clouds, providing unprecedented dynamical and microphysical insights on mammatus formation and evolution. It is believed that this dataset is the first to combine high-resolution vertically-pointing cloud radar Doppler spectra and moment observations (35 GHz) with novel scanning weather radar modes (3 cm and 5 cm wavelength) to explore mammatus cloud fields and offer additional 2D and 3D characterization. The suite of ARM facility platforms visually documented the mammatus field overhead and included multiple radiosonde releases at 3-hour separation to capture the thermodynamic structure of the environment in the immediate vicinity of these mammatus. Additional ARM resources (profiler, ceilometer, lidar) are consulted to confirm the quality of the ARM radar observations and assess radar capabilities to reliably designate mammatus cloud features. The wealth of ARM observations is compared to the results of high-resolution numerical simulations of mammatus, having initial conditions forced using ARM radiosonde observations and ARM continuous model forcing datasets.

  9. Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Combination Smokestack, Water Tank & Privies, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  10. Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Brick Storage Vaults under Jones Street, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  11. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information April 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2010-05-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information December 2009

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2010-12-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  13. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information March 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2010-04-19

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report August 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2010-09-28

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information February 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2010-03-25

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  16. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report September 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2010-10-18

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  17. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report June 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2010-07-13

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  18. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report July 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2010-08-18

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  19. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report May 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2010-06-21

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  20. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information January 2010

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  1. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information October 2009

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, Chitra

    2013-07-31

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

  3. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, Chitra

    2014-01-14

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

  4. Use of ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) Data to Study Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhanqing

    2012-12-19

    General goals: 1) Facilitating the deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and Ancillary Facility (AAF) in China in 2008, 2) Processing, retrieving, improving and analyzing observation data from ground-based, air-borne and space-borne instruments; 3) Conducting a series of studies to gain insights into the direct and indirect effects of these aerosols on radiation, clouds, and precipitation using both

  5. New observational capabilities on atmospheric sciences of the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) Graciosa island ARM facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitschke, Kim; Ortega, Paul; Azevedo, Eduardo; Miller, Mark

    2016-04-01

    One source of uncertainty that thwarts accurate and comprehensive representation of the present and future climate in models is the response of shallow cloud systems to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols. Low clouds systems that prevail over subtropical oceans, in particular, play a critical role in boundary layer dynamics and in the global climate, despite being poorly represented in climate models. The Azores have been identified as an optimal site to conduct research aimed at better understanding the physical processes and life cycle of marine stratocumulus and other marine boundary layer clouds. The United States Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Program has been providing data to advance research from atmospheric observations at diverse climatic regimes around the world (http://www.arm.gov/) for over 20 years. Since 2009, the Azores has been included in this global program. The campaign of the ARM Mobile Facility at Graciosa Island, Azores, in the context of the Clouds, Aerosol and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) project, added the most extensive and comprehensive dataset of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds to date. Solid preliminary findings from this valuable data set have been used to understand interactions between the cloud microphysical and macrophysical processes in marine boundary layer clouds that play a fundamental role in the cloud dynamics and precipitation, which in turn determine cloud radiative properties that impact on the energy balance of the Earth. Based upon the design and siting from the previous ARM Mobile Facility in support of CAP-MBL, the new Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) fixed site joined the global network of ARM Climate Research Facilities in October 2013. Since then, this user facility has augmented its baseline measurement capability to include a Ka-/W-Band scanning cloud radar, an X-Band precipitation radar and Raman and Doppler lidars. Coupled

  6. Toward a Conceptual Framework for Operational Arms Control in Europe’s Central Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    AD-A214 057 Toward a Conceptual Framework for Operational Arms Control in Europe’s Central Region Paul K. Davis DTIG ELECTEfl NOVO TIM D A Report...USDP toCVED Toward A Conceptual Framework for Operational interim IIAArms Control in Europe’s Central Region PE. 0IORMING OJIG RIE UMUER 111"hI 7...CLAgOIIFCA11N OPP TWOS PA441WhOM 0... 4CR.,.aI 177 R-3704-USDP Toward a Conceptual Framework for Operational Arms Control in Europe’s Central Region Paul

  7. Volatile organic compound emissions from dairy facilities in central California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dairy facilities are thought to be an important contributor to high ozone levels in central California, but emissions inventories from these sources contain significant uncertainties. In this work, VOC emissions were measured at two central Califor...

  8. 12 CFR 741.210 - Central liquidity facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Central liquidity facility. 741.210 Section 741.210 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS... Unions That Also Apply to Federally Insured State-Chartered Credit Unions § 741.210 Central...

  9. [For the history of creation of central anatomicopathological facility of the Ministry of Defence].

    PubMed

    Chirskiĭ, V S; Sibirev, S A; Bushurov, S E

    2012-12-01

    The system of anatomicopathological facilities was created in 30s of XX century and first years of the Great Patriotic War. The goal of this system was to increase the effectiveness of Sanitary Corps of the Red Army. These anatomicopathological facilities analyzed causes of death of injured soldiers during all stages of the system of treatment-evacuative support of troops and mistakes made by medical specialists during first aid treatment. Organisational forms of anatomicopathological activity were changed and developed according to acquired battle experience. The main stage of formation of anatomicopathological service of the Red Army, and in fact the finished period in organisational formation of anatomicopathological service, was establishment of Central anatomicopathological facility - main methodological, organisational, coordinating and monioring center of anatomicopathological activity of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

  10. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cialella, A.; Gregory, L.; Lazar, K.; Liang, M.; Ma, L.; Tilp, A.; Wagener, R.

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  11. Fire hazards analysis for the Center for National Security and Arms Control (CNSAC) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Klamerus, E.W.; Ross, S.B.

    1993-07-01

    This Fire Hazards Analysis is sponsored by Plant Engineering and is prepared to support the Safety Assessment for the CNSAC Facility. This is a preliminary fire hazards analysis of a yet to be constructed facility and is based upon the current building design and the current understanding of the potential occupancy hazards. The governing occupancy for this building is personnel offices. The CNSAC facility will be dedicated primarily to two activities: (1) arms control and verification technology and (2) intelligence. This report supplements the Safety Assessment for the CNSAC facility and follows the guidance of DOE Memorandum EH-31.3 and meets the objectives of paragraph 4 of DOE Order 5480.7A, ``Fire Protection.`` This analysis demonstrates that under ``worst case`` assumptions a fire in the CNSAC facility will result in consequences which are below DOE offsite guidelines for accident conditions. This report is based upon preliminary design information and any major changes to the building design may require additional analyses.

  12. ELECTRICAL LINES ARRIVE FROM CENTRAL FACILITIES AREA, SOUTH OF MTR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ELECTRICAL LINES ARRIVE FROM CENTRAL FACILITIES AREA, SOUTH OF MTR. EXCAVATION RUBBLE IN FOREGROUND. CONTRACTOR CRAFT SHOPS, CRANES, AND OTHER MATERIALS ON SITE. CAMERA FACES EAST, WITH LITTLE BUTTE AND MIDDLE BUTTE IN DISTANCE. INL NEGATIVE NO. 335. Unknown Photographer, 7/1/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Abduction of Arm Facilitates Correction of Kinked Peel-Away Sheath During Subclavian Central Line Placement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghoon

    2015-12-01

    A tunneled central line catheter placement using a subclavian vein approach can be complicated by an occurrence of peel-away sheath kink which prevents the advancement of the catheter through the sheath. The kink is created due to the angular junction of subclavian and brachiocephalic veins which meet at 90 degree angle. A technique is described which corrects the peel-away sheath kink by extending the subclavian/brachiocephalic vein angle to greater than 90 degrees by abducting the patient's arm.

  14. FUEL HANDLING FACILITY BACKUP CENTRAL COMMUNICATIONS ROOM SPACE REQUIREMENTS CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    B. SZALEWSKI

    2005-03-22

    The purpose of the Fuel Handling Facility Backup Central Communications Room Space Requirements Calculation is to determine a preliminary estimate of the space required to house the backup central communications room in the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF). This room provides backup communications capability to the primary communication systems located in the Central Control Center Facility. This calculation will help guide FHF designers in allocating adequate space for communications system equipment in the FHF. This is a preliminary calculation determining preliminary estimates based on the assumptions listed in Section 4. As such, there are currently no limitations on the use of this preliminary calculation. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Design and Engineering and are intended solely for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the FHF Backup Central Communications Room Space Requirements. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Design and Engineering should be consulted before the use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

  15. Heliostat characterization at the Central Receiver Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. L.; Arvizu, D. E.

    1981-05-01

    The Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) operated for the Department of Energy by Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM was constructed for the purpose of evaluating solar central receiver design concepts. At this facility working experience with the CRTF heliostat field has been gained and an extensive heliostat evaluation capability has evolved. Valuable information has been gained at the CRTF that will help in the future design and specification of heliostats. This paper summarizes the work that led to the current state of heliostat evaluation capability and includes; a description of the CRTF heliostat, measurements of environmental degradation of mirror reflectance, heliostat beam measurements with an instrumented sweeping bar, beam quality and tracking accuracy data obtained with the newly developed Beam Characterization System (BCS) and comparisons of measured beam data with the heliostat computer model HELIOS.

  16. Status of Centralized Environmental Creep Testing Facility Preparation and Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Battiste, Rick

    2006-10-01

    Because the ASME Codes do not cover environmental issues that are crucial in the design and construction of VHTR system, investigation of long-term impure helium effects on metallurgical stability and properties becomes very important. The present report describes the development of centralized environmental creep testing facility, its close collaborations with the experiments in low velocity helium recirculation loop, important lessons learned, upgrades in system design in FY06, and current status of the development.

  17. Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

    1995-03-01

    The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6{degrees}K and LN{sub 2} for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed.

  18. Technical evaluation of proposed Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, R.; Glukhov, A.; Markowski, F.

    1996-06-01

    This technical report is a comprehensive evaluation of the proposal by the Ukrainian State Committee on Nuclear Power Utilization to create a central facility for radioactive waste (not spent fuel) processing. The central facility is intended to process liquid and solid radioactive wastes generated from all of the Ukrainian nuclear power plants and the waste generated as a result of Chernobyl 1, 2 and 3 decommissioning efforts. In addition, this report provides general information on the quantity and total activity of radioactive waste in the 30-km Zone and the Sarcophagus from the Chernobyl accident. Processing options are described that may ultimately be used in the long-term disposal of selected 30-km Zone and Sarcophagus wastes. A detailed report on the issues concerning the construction of a Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility (CRWPF) from the Ukrainian Scientific Research and Design institute for Industrial Technology was obtained and incorporated into this report. This report outlines various processing options, their associated costs and construction schedules, which can be applied to solving the operating and decommissioning radioactive waste management problems in Ukraine. The costs and schedules are best estimates based upon the most current US industry practice and vendor information. This report focuses primarily on the handling and processing of what is defined in the US as low-level radioactive wastes.

  19. Gamma radiation monitoring at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), Graciosa Island ARM facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana; Miranda, Pedro; Azevedo, Eduardo B.; Nitschke, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of gamma radiation is often performed in nuclear facilities and industrial environments as a way to control the ambient radioactivity and give warning of potential accidents. However, gamma radiation is also ubiquitous in the natural environment. The main sources are i) cosmic radiation from space, including secondary radiation from the interaction with atoms in the atmosphere, ii) terrestrial sources from mineral grains in soils and rocks, particularly Potassium (K-40), Uranium (U-238) and Thorium (Th-232) and their decay products (e.g. Radium, Ra-226) , and iii) airborne Radon gas (Rn-222), which is the dominant source of natural environmental radioactivity. The temporal variability of this natural radiation background needs to be well understood and quantified in order to discriminate non-natural sources of radiation in the environment and artificial radionuclides contamination. To this end, continuous gamma radiation monitoring is being performed at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility located in the Graciosa island (Azores, 39N; 28W), a fixed site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programme (ARM), established and supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of America with the collaboration of the local government and University of the Azores. The site is unique for the study of the natural radioactivity background on one hand due to the remote oceanic geographical location, in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean and clear of direct continental influence, and on the other hand because of the comprehensive dataset of atmospheric parameters that is available for enhancing the interpretation of the radiation measurements, as a result of the vast array of very detailed and high-quality atmospheric measurements performed at the ARM-ENA facility. Gamma radiation in the range 475 KeV to 3000 KeV is measured continuously with a 3" x 3" NaI(Tl) scintillator. The campaign started started in May 2015, with gamma

  20. Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An Arm Mobile Facility Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Rémillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L.; O’Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-03-01

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) 38 deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009-December 2010) 39 comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric 40 Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is 41 to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the 42 marine boundary layer. 43 Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the 44 Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and 45 cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus 46 occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar 47 echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-48 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide 49 range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of 50 sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way 51 interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation 52 and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. 53 The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety 54 of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they 55 reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, 56 but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to 57 be a long-term ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  1. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, Christine; Mann, Julia; O Connor, Ewan; Hogan, Robin; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palinkonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  2. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM Mobile Facility Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L.; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-01-01

    Capsule: A 21-month deployment to Graciosa Island in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean is providing an unprecedented record of the clouds, aerosols and meteorology in a poorly-sampled remote marine environment The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009- December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1- 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a

  3. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    DOE PAGES

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; ...

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulusmore » and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.« less

  4. Decommissioning and Environmental Cleanup of a Small Arms Training Facility - 13225

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Karen M.; Kmetz, Thomas F.; Smith, Sandra B.; Blount, Gerald C.

    2013-07-01

    US DOE performed a (CERCLA) non-time critical removal (NTCR) action at the Small Arms Training Area (SATA) Site Evaluation Area (SEA) located at the Savannah River Site (SRS), in Aiken, South Carolina. From 1951 to May 2010, the SATA was used as a small weapons practice and qualifying firing range. The SATA consisted of 870.1 ha (2,150 ac) of woodlands and open field, of which approximately 2.9 ha (7.3 ac) were used as a firing range. The SATA facility was comprised of three small arms ranges (one static and two interactive), storage buildings for supplies, a weapons cleaning building, and a control building. Additionally, a 113- m (370-ft) long earthen berm was used as a target backstop during live-fire exercises. The berm soils accumulated a large amount of spent lead bullets in the berm face during the facilities 59- years of operation. The accumulation of lead was such that soil concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) residential and industrial worker regional screening levels (RSLs). The RSL threshold values are based on standardized exposure scenarios that estimate contaminant concentrations in soil that the USEPA considers protective of humans over a lifetime. For the SATA facility, lead was present in soil at concentrations that exceed both the current residential (400 mg/kg) and industrial (800 mg/kg) RSLs. In addition, the concentration of lead in the soil exceeded the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 261.24) regulatory limit. The TCLP analysis simulates landfill conditions and is designed to determine the mobility of contaminants in waste. In addition, a principal threat source material (PTSM) evaluation, human health risk assessment (HHRA), and contaminant migration (CM) analysis were conducted to evaluate soil contamination at the SATA SEA. This evaluation determined that there were no contaminants present that constitute PTSM and the CM analysis revealed that no

  5. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Dairy Facilities in Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, A. S.; Ogunjemiyo, S. O.; Trabue, S.; Middala, S. R.; Ashkan, S.; Scoggin, K.; Vu, K. K.; Addala, L.; Olea, C.; Nana, L.; Scruggs, A. K.; Steele, J.; Shelton, T. C.; Osborne, B.; McHenry, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dairy facilities are thought to be an important contributor to high ozone levels in Central California, but emissions inventories from these sources contain significant uncertainties. In this work, VOC emissions were measured at two Central California dairies during 2010 and 2011. Isolation flux chambers were used to measure direct emissions from specific dairy sources, and upwind/downwind ambient profiles were measured from ground level up to heights of 60 m. Samples were collected using a combination of canisters and sorbent tubes, and were analyzed by GC-MS. Additional in-situ measurements were made using infra-red photoaccoustic detectors and Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy. Temperature and ozone profiles up to 250 m above ground level were also measured using a tethersonde. Substantial fluxes of a number of VOCs including alcohols, volatile fatty acids and esters were observed at both sites. Implications of these measurements for regional air quality will be discussed.

  6. Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    SciTech Connect

    SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

    2008-09-30

    The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

  7. Central Facilities Area Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Central Facilities Area facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facilityspecific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  8. Testing the Correlation between Spiral Arm Pitch Angle and Central Black Hole Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Hughes, J. Adam; Barrows, Scott R.; Davis, Ben; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Ring, William; Seigar, Marc

    2010-11-01

    In order to address the ``cosmic downsizing problem,'' or the underpopulation of highly massive quasars in the current epoch, the Arkansas Galaxy Evolution Survey is exploring a correlation, the M-P relation, between the pitch angle of a galaxy's spiral arms and the mass of its central supermassive black hole (SMBH). The goal is to add to the census of SMBH masses using only images, without relying on spectra. We present the null correlation between the pitch angle of spiral arms and redshift. The data set includes 225 galaxies from the GOODS North and South fields with redshifts out to z~1.2. There does not appear to be any dependence of pitch angle on redshift. Consequently, if the relationship between pitch angle and SMBH mass has not evolved since z~1.2, then the mean mass of SMBH has also remained constant. If, on the other hand, the relationship has evolved, then the mean mass has evolved inversely with the relationship. This conclusion is subject to further studies on possible selection effects. Additionally, we present preliminary results testing the M-P relation by comparing the masses of a sample of active spiral galaxies as calculated by the pitch angle method with those calculated by the mass scaling relationship.

  9. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Fourth Quarter: July 1–September 30, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, C

    2012-11-13

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

  10. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report First Quarter: October 01-December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, C

    2012-02-28

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

  11. Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility Project-(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Takashima, Y.; Katoh, M.; Hosaka, M.; Takami, K.; Morimoto, H.; Hori, Y.; Sasaki, S.; Koda, S.; Ito, T.; Sakurai, I.; Hara, H.; Okamoto, W.; Watanabe, N.; Takeda, Y.

    2010-06-01

    A synchrotron radiation facility that is used not only for basic research, but also for engineering and industrial research and development has been proposed to be constructed in the Central area of Japan. The key equipment of this facility is a compact electron storage ring that is able to supply hard X-rays. The circumference of the storage ring is 72 m with the energy of 1.2 GeV, the beam current of 300 mA, and the natural emittance of about 53 nm-rad. The configuration of the storage ring is based on four triple bend cells, and four of the twelve bending magnets are 5 T superconducting ones. The bending angle and critical energy are 12 degree and 4.8 keV, respectively. For the top-up operation, the electron beam will be injected from a booster synchrotron with the full energy. Currently, six beamlines are planned for the first phase starting from 2012.

  12. Atmospheric Electric Field measurements at Eastern North Atlantic ARM Climate Research Facility: Global Electric Circuit Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Francisco; Silva, Hugo; Nitschke, Kim; Azevedo, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility of the ARM programme (established an supported by the U.S. Department of Energy with the collaboration of the local government and University of the Azores), is located at Graciosa Island of the Azores Archipelago (39° N; 28° W). It constitutes a strategic observatory for Atmospheric Electricity since it is located in the Atlantic Ocean basin exposed to clean marine aerosol conditions which reduces the well known spectral signature of atmospheric pollution and enables the study of the so called Global Electrical Circuit (GEC). First evidences of the existence of a GEC affecting the Earth's Electric Environment has retrieved by the Carnegie cruise expedition, in what became known as the Carnegie Curve. Those measurements were made in the Ocean in several campaigns and the present studies aims at reconsidering measurements in similar conditions but in a long-term basis, at least 5 years. This will contribute to the understanding of the long-term evolution of the Ionospheric Potential (IP). In literature there is theoretical evidence that it is decreasing IP in strength, but that conjecture is still lacking valid experimental evidence. Moreover, to clearly identify the GEC signal two effects must be taken into account: the effect of surface radon gas variation, because the Azores Archipelago is a seismic active region the possible influence of Earthquakes cannot be discarded easily; the effect of short-term solar activity on the Atmospheric Electricity modulation, solar flares emitting solar particles (e.g., solar energetic protons) need to be considered in this study.

  13. Deployment of ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.

    2016-03-31

    Atmospheric aerosols influence global climate by scattering and absorbing sunlight (direct effects) and by changing the microphysical structure, lifetime, and coverage of clouds (indirect effects). While it is widely accepted that aerosol indirect effects act to cool the Earth-atmosphere system by increasing cloud reflectivity and coverage, the magnitudes of the indirect effects are poorly quantified. One key aerosol property for understanding aerosol indirect effects is the ability of aerosol particles to form cloud droplets at atmospheric relevant supersaturations—i.e., cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity. For particles consisting of typical atmospheric inorganic compounds, their CCN activity is well understood and can be effectively predicted using Köhler theory based on physicochemical properties of the solute, such as its mass, molar volume, and activity coefficient. However, atmospheric aerosols often consist of hundreds of organic species, which can contribute ~20-90% to the total fine aerosol mass. Depending on their properties, organic species can significantly influence the ability of aerosol particles to act as CCN and form cloud droplets. This project focuses on the CCN activity of secondary organic aerosol compounds formed from key biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under representative conditions, and the relationship between the hygroscopicity and composition of organic aerosols. The ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) scanning mobility particles sizer (SMPS) was deployed during a ~ 6 week intensive measurement campaign, taking place June 15-July 31 2015 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Simulation Chamber. The SMPS was operated with a CCN counter. Aerosol particles were first classified by the differential mobility analyzer inside the SMPS; the classified aerosol will then be simultaneously characterized by a condensation particle counter (part of the SMPS) and the CCN counter.

  14. Catheter malplacement during central venous cannulation through arm veins in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Arvind; Bithal, Parmod K; Dash, Harihar; Chauhan, Rajendra S; Mohanty, Bibekanand

    2003-07-01

    For successful catheter placement, central venous cannulation (CVC) through internal jugular vein and subclavian vein has been recommended in both adult and pediatric patients. But it carries a risk of serious complications, such as pneumothorax, carotid, or subclavian artery puncture, which can be life-threatening, particularly in critically ill children. So a prospective study was carried out to determine the success rate of correct catheter tip placement during CVC through antecubital veins in pediatric neurosurgical patients. A total of 200 pediatric patients (age 1-15 years) of either sex were studied. Basilic or cephalic veins of either arm were selected. All the patients were cannulated in the operation room under general anesthesia. Single lumen, proper size catheters (with stillete) were used for cannulation. The catheter was inserted in supine position with the arm abducted at right angle to the body and neck turned ipsilaterally. The length of insertion was determined from cubital fossa to the right second intercostal space. The exact position of the tip of the catheter was confirmed radiologically in ICU. Correct catheter tip placement was achieved in 98 (49%) patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of data shows that there was no statistically significant difference among correct and incorrect catheter tip placement in relation to factors including sex, side of cannulation (left or right), and type of vein (basilic or cephalic). The analysis of correct catheter tip placement in relation to age showed that the highest success rate was achieved in children of age group 6 to 10 years (60.2%) followed by 30.6% in the 11 to 15 year group. The lowest success rate of tip placement of only 9.2% was observed in younger children of age 1 to 5 years, which is statistically significant (P = 0.001). Of 102 incorrect placements reported, 37% were in 1 to 5 year age group versus 9.2% correct tip placements. The most common unsatisfactory placements were

  15. Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report

    SciTech Connect

    M Jensen; K Johnson; JH Mather

    2009-07-14

    Clouds represent a critical component of the Earth’s atmospheric energy balance as a result of their interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation and a redistribution of heat through convective processes and latent heating. Despite their importance, clouds and the processes that control their development, evolution and lifecycle remain poorly understood. Consequently, the simulation of clouds and their associated feedbacks is a primary source of inter-model differences in equilibrium climate sensitivity. An important step in improving the representation of cloud process simulations is an improved high-resolution observational data set of the cloud systems including their time evolution. The first order quantity needed to understand the important role of clouds is the height of cloud occurrence and how it changes as a function of time. To this end, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) suite of instrumentation has been developed to make the observations required to improve the representation of cloud systems in atmospheric models.

  16. Strategy for Improving Measurement Uncertainty and Data Quality Information for Observations at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Research Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comstock, J. M.; Sisterson, D.; Kehoe, K.

    2015-12-01

    Quantified uncertainty estimates on measured quantities are required for providing prior information for cloud property retrieval algorithms and constraining model parameterizations and simulations. Methodologies for determining uncertainty can be complex and can include instrument accuracy and precision estimates, and random and systematic errors. Measurement uncertainty is also impacted by environmental and field factors that can be introduced when operating instruments outside the laboratory setting, which impacts both uncertainty and data quality. The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program operates over 100 unique instruments at fixed, mobile, and aerial facilities in diverse climatic regimes around the world. The ARM program is in the process of standardizing how it currently reports measurement uncertainty and developing a new strategy for improving the determination of measurement uncertainty and communicating both the uncertainty and data quality information to users. We will present ARMs plan to standardize the method of reporting measurement uncertainty, as well as share ARMs overall strategies to standardize uncertainty assessment across instrument classes, improving calibration approaches, and providing more consistent data quality assessments to specifically address measurement bias corrections. Our goal is to provide an open forum for discussing the necessary and sufficient elements needed to meet the requirements for retrieval algorithm and model simulation development activities.

  17. Error characterization of retrievals for active remote Sensing instruments in the ARM climate research facility at the Southern Great Plains site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, C. V.; Hardin, J. C.; Jensen, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys a network of highly instrumented ground stations, including both mobile and aerial facilities to support the study of global climate change by the national and international research community. The Southern Great Plains facility (SGP) hosts a network of C, X, and K band radars; some are in scanning mode and some are in vertically pointing mode. As an example, the Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) (Jensen, et al. 2011), was a joint DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and NASA Global Precipitation Measurements (GPM) field campaign which took place from April - June 2011 in Central Oklahoma centered at the ARM SGP site. This paper presents retrieval methodologies for the ARM instrument suite with a focus on the error characterization for the radar measurements and the retrievals. There is extensive literature on retrieval algorithms for precipitation and cloud parameters from single frequency, dual-polarization radar systems. Multiple radar deployments are becoming more common, and the MC3E is a text book example of such a deployment. Additionally, networked deployments are becoming more common (Chandrasekar, et al. 2010), resulting in networked retrievals, initially used for attenuation mitigation. Since then, networked retrievals have expanded to include DSDs from networked X-band or Ku-band radars (Yoshikawa, et al., 2012). The above retrieval methodologies were for homogeneous, single frequency systems; the multi frequency nature of the deployment during the MC3E program is the motivation for the integrated formulation and error characterization presented in this paper. The set of radars consists of the NASA NPOL radar at S-band, as well as the C and X-band radars from the ARM program, namely the C-SAPR and X-SAPR family. This paper presents a comprehensive integrated retrieval methodology focusing on error characterization to obtain microphysical retrieval including drop size

  18. The Central Raman Laser Facility at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    medina, C.; Mayotte, E.; Wiencke, L. R.; Rizi, V.; Grillo, A.

    2013-12-01

    We describe the newly upgraded Central Raman Laser Facility (CRLF) located close to the center of the Piere Auger observatory (PAO) in Argentina. The CRLF features a Raman Lidar receiver, a 335 nm wavelength solid state laser, a robotic beam energy calibration system, and a weather station, all powered by solar energy and operated autonomously using a single board computer. The system optics are arranged to direct the laser beam into the atmosphere in steered and vertical modes with adjustable polarization settings,and it is measured in a bi-static configuration by the 4 fluorescence stations of the Pierre Auger observatory. Additionally the system optics can be easily switched to provide a fixed vertical beam that is measured by a Raman Lidar receiver in mono-static configuration,allowing an independent measurement of the aerosol optical depth τ(z,t) and other properties of the atmosphere. A description of the CLRF's installation, hardware and software integration, initial operations and examples of data collected, will also be presented.

  19. Testing the Correlation between Spiral Arm Pitch Angle and Central Black Hole Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Hughes, J. A.; Barrows, R. S.; Berrier, J.; Davis, B.; Kennefick, D.; Kennefick, J.; Ring, W.; Seigar, M.; Galaxy Evolution Survey, Arkansas

    2010-01-01

    In order to address the "cosmic downsizing problem," or the underpopulation of highly massive quasars in the current epoch, we are exploring a correlation between the pitch angle of a galaxy's spiral arms and the mass of its central supermassive black hole (SMBH). The goal is to generate a census of SMBH masses using only photographic images. This study presents preliminary results testing the relationship between mass and pitch angle by comparing the masses of a sample of active spiral galaxies as calculated by the pitch angle method with those calculated by the mass scaling relationship. Additionally, we present the null correlation between the pitch angle of spiral galaxies and redshift. The data set includes 225 galaxies from the GOODS North and South fields with redshifts out to z 1. There does not appear to be any dependence of pitch angle on redshift. Consequently, if the relationship between pitch angle and SMBH mass has not evolved since z 1, then the mean mass of SMBH has also remained constant. If, on the other hand, the relationship has evolved, then the mean mass has evolved inversely with the relationship. This conclusion is subject to further studies on possible selection effects. This research was funded by NASA/EPSCOR.

  20. Unmanned Aerial Systems, Moored Balloons, and the U.S. Department of Energy ARM Facilities in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivey, Mark; Verlinde, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its scientific user facility, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, provides scientific infrastructure and data to the international Arctic research community via its research sites located on the North Slope of Alaska. Facilities and infrastructure to support operations of unmanned aerial systems for science missions in the Arctic and North Slope of Alaska were established at Oliktok Point Alaska in 2013. Tethered instrumented balloons will be used in the near future to make measurements of clouds in the boundary layer including mixed-phase clouds. The DOE ARM Program has operated an atmospheric measurement facility in Barrow, Alaska, since 1998. Major upgrades to this facility, including scanning radars, were added in 2010. Arctic Observing Networks are essential to meet growing policy, social, commercial, and scientific needs. Calibrated, high-quality arctic geophysical datasets that span ten years or longer are especially important for climate studies, climate model initializations and validations, and for related climate policy activities. For example, atmospheric data and derived atmospheric forcing estimates are critical for sea-ice simulations. International requirements for well-coordinated, long-term, and sustained Arctic Observing Networks and easily-accessible data sets collected by those networks have been recognized by many high-level workshops and reports (Arctic Council Meetings and workshops, National Research Council reports, NSF workshops and others). The recent Sustaining Arctic Observation Network (SAON) initiative sponsored a series of workshops to "develop a set of recommendations on how to achieve long-term Arctic-wide observing activities that provide free, open, and timely access to high-quality data that will realize pan-Arctic and global value-added services and provide societal benefits." This poster will present information on opportunities for members of the

  1. Thermal Nondestructive Evaluation Report: Inspection of the Refurbished Manipulator Arm System in the Manipulator Development Facility at Johnson Space Center 10-12 January 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott

    2002-01-01

    On 4 December 2002, a failure of the Refurbished Manipulator Arm System (RMAS) occurred in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) at Johnson Space Center. When the Test Director commanded a should pitch maneuver to lift the arm from its payload bay pedestal, the yaw controls failed. This, coupled with a gravitational forces (due to the angle of the shoulder joint with respect to vertical), resulted in uncontrolled arm motion. The shoulder yaw joint moved approximately 20 degrees, causing the extended arm to strike and severely damage the port side MDF catwalk handrails. The arm motion stopped after impact with the handrails. On 10-12 January 2001, inspections were performed on the port face of the lower and upper arms of the RMAS using a infrared thermography developed at Langley Research Center. This paper presents the results of those nondestructive inspections and provides a complete description of the anomalies found and their locations.

  2. Aerosol properties and their influences on marine boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei at the ARM mobile facility over the Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Timothy; Xi, Baike; Dong, Xiquan

    2014-04-01

    A multiplatform data set from the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) Graciosa, Azores, 2009-2010 field campaign was used to investigate how continental aerosols can influence MBL cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration (NCCN). The seasonal variations of aerosol properties have shown that the winter and early spring months had the highest mean surface wind speed (> 5 m s-1) and greatest contribution of sea salt to aerosol optical depth (AOD), while continental fine mode aerosols were the main contributors to AOD during the warm season months (May-September). Five aerosol events consisting of mineral dust, pollution, biomass smoke, and volcanic ash particles were selected as case studies using Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) mobile facility measurements. The aerosols in Case I were found to primarily consist of coarse mode, Saharan mineral dust. For Case II, the aerosols were also coarse mode but consisted of volcanic ash. Case III had fine mode biomass smoke and pollution aerosol influences while Cases IV and V consisted of mixtures of North American pollution and Saharan dust that was advected by an extratropical cyclone to the Azores. Cases I, IV, and V exhibited weak correlations between aerosol loading and NCCN due to mineral dust influences, while Cases II and III had a strong relationship with NCCN likely due to the sulfate content in the volcanic ash and pollution particles. The permanent Eastern North Atlantic ARM facility over the Azores will aid in a future long-term study of aerosol effects on NCCN.

  3. A central tower solar test facility /RM/CTSTF/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, S.; Gislon, R.

    The considered facility is intended for the conduction of test work in connection with studies of receivers, thermodynamic cycles, heliostats, components, and subassemblies. Major components of the test facility include a mirror field with a reflecting surface of 800 sq m, a 40 m tower, an electronic control system, a data-acquisition system, and a meteorological station. A preliminary experimental program is discussed, taking into account investigations related to facility characterization, an evaluation of advanced low-cost heliostats, materials and components tests, high-concentration photovoltaic experiments, and a study of advanced solar thermal cycles.

  4. The design and licensing status of the Central Interstate Compact facility: An above-grade LLRW disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, J.E.; Sabbe, M.A.; Schulman, R.F.; DeOld, J.H.

    1997-07-01

    The Central Interstate Compact (CIC) low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facility being developed near Butte, Nebraska, is scheduled to be the first operational commercial above-grade LLRW disposal facility in the United States. The facility will dispose of LLRW generated by nuclear power plants, industrial facilities, hospitals, and universities from the CIC member states of Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The CIC Commission has contracted with US Ecology and its prime subcontractor, Bechtel National Inc., to develop this LLRW disposal facility. The facility is being sited, designed, constructed, operated, closed, and monitored in accordance with Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality Title 194, which is similar to 10 CFR 61 but has some additional requirements that are specific to the State of Nebraska. One of these is that Nebraska regulations specifically exclude the use of traditional shallow-land burial as practiced prior to 1979. The facility will use above-grade earth-mounded concrete structures for disposal of the LLRW. An environmental report (ER) has been prepared that follows the guidance contained in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 4.18. A Safety Analysis Report (SAR) has been prepared that conforms to the guidance contained in NUREG 1199, Both the SAR and the ER were submitted in July 1990. Present plans calls for the facility to be operational approximately 2 years after receipt of the license.

  5. Validation of GOES-10 Satellite-derived Cloud and Radiative Properties for the MASRAD ARM Mobile Facility Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaiyer, M. M.; Doelling, D. R.; Palikonda, R.; Mordeen, M. L.; Minnis, P.

    2007-01-01

    This poster presentation reviews the process used to validate the GOES-10 satellite derived cloud and radiative properties. The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment at Pt Reyes, CA as part of the Marine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle experiment (MASRAD), 14 March - 14 September 2005 provided an excellent chance to validate satellite cloud-property retrievals with the AMF's flexible suite of ground-based remote sensing instruments. For this comparison, NASA LaRC GOES10 satellite retrievals covering this region and period were re-processed using an updated version of the Visible Infrared Solar-Infrared Split-Window Technique (VISST), which uses data taken at 4 wavelengths (0.65, 3.9,11 and 12 m resolution), and computes broadband fluxes using improved CERES (Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System)-GOES-10 narrowband-to-broadband flux conversion coefficients. To validate MASRAD GOES-10 satellite-derived cloud property data, VISST-derived cloud amounts, heights, liquid water paths are compared with similar quantities derived from available ARM ground-based instrumentation and with CERES fluxes from Terra.

  6. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Instrument Report Fourth Quarter: October 1–December 30, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  7. Central and peripheral hemodynamics in exercising humans: leg vs arm exercise.

    PubMed

    Calbet, J A L; González-Alonso, J; Helge, J W; Søndergaard, H; Munch-Andersen, T; Saltin, B; Boushel, R

    2015-12-01

    In humans, arm exercise is known to elicit larger increases in arterial blood pressure (BP) than leg exercise. However, the precise regulation of regional vascular conductances (VC) for the distribution of cardiac output with exercise intensity remains unknown. Hemodynamic responses were assessed during incremental upright arm cranking (AC) and leg pedalling (LP) to exhaustion (Wmax) in nine males. Systemic VC, peak cardiac output (Qpeak) (indocyanine green) and stroke volume (SV) were 18%, 23%, and 20% lower during AC than LP. The mean BP, the rate-pressure product and the associated myocardial oxygen demand were 22%, 12%, and 14% higher, respectively, during maximal AC than LP. Trunk VC was reduced to similar values at Wmax. At Wmax, muscle mass-normalized VC and fractional O2 extraction were lower in the arm than the leg muscles. However, this was compensated for during AC by raising perfusion pressure to increase O2 delivery, allowing a similar peak VO2 per kg of muscle mass in both extremities. In summary, despite a lower Qpeak during arm cranking the cardiovascular strain is much higher than during leg pedalling. The adjustments of regional conductances during incremental exercise to exhaustion depend mostly on the relative intensity of exercise and are limb-specific.

  8. Scientific Infrastructure To Support Manned And Unmanned Aircraft, Tethered Balloons, And Related Aerial Activities At Doe Arm Facilities On The North Slope Of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivey, M.; Dexheimer, D.; Hardesty, J.; Lucero, D. A.; Helsel, F.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its scientific user facility, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facilities, provides scientific infrastructure and data to the international Arctic research community via its research sites located on the North Slope of Alaska. DOE has recently invested in improvements to facilities and infrastructure to support operations of unmanned aerial systems for science missions in the Arctic and North Slope of Alaska. A new ground facility, the Third ARM Mobile Facility, was installed at Oliktok Point Alaska in 2013. Tethered instrumented balloons were used to make measurements of clouds in the boundary layer including mixed-phase clouds. A new Special Use Airspace was granted to DOE in 2015 to support science missions in international airspace in the Arctic. Warning Area W-220 is managed by Sandia National Laboratories for DOE Office of Science/BER. W-220 was successfully used for the first time in July 2015 in conjunction with Restricted Area R-2204 and a connecting Altitude Reservation Corridor (ALTRV) to permit unmanned aircraft to operate north of Oliktok Point. Small unmanned aircraft (DataHawks) and tethered balloons were flown at Oliktok during the summer and fall of 2015. This poster will discuss how principal investigators may apply for use of these Special Use Airspaces, acquire data from the Third ARM Mobile Facility, or bring their own instrumentation for deployment at Oliktok Point, Alaska. The printed poster will include the standard DOE funding statement.

  9. The ARM Southern Great Plains Central Facility Best Estimate Radiative Flux CD

    SciTech Connect

    Long, CN

    2002-04-01

    The BEFlux VAP directly compares data from the three Normal Incidence Perheliometers, shaded pyranometers, and shaded pyrgeometers at the SGP CF. Extensive analysis with several years of data has produced limits of typical ranges of agreement when these instruments are performing as expected. These limits are used to screen the data, and then the average is taken of the two that agree best, given that at least two instruments agree to within the established limits. This is done for the downwelling direct normal and diffuse shortwave, and the downwelling longwave. The total (global) downwelling shortwave is then the sum of the direct and diffuse components.

  10. Radon progeny monitoring at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), Graciosa Island ARM facility and a potential earthquake precursory signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana; Mendes, Virgilio B.; Azevedo, Eduardo B.

    2016-04-01

    Radon has been considered a promising earthquake precursor, the main rationale being an expected increase in radon exhalation in soil and rocks due to stress associated with the preparatory stages of an earthquake. However, the precursory nature of radon is far from being convincingly demonstrated so far. A major hindrance is the many meteorological and geophysical factors diving radon temporal variability, including the geophysical parameters influencing its emanation (grain size, moisture content, temperature), as well as the meteorological factors (atmospheric pressure, moisture, temperature, winds) influencing its mobility. Despite the challenges, radon remains one of the strongest candidates as a potential earthquake precursor, and it is of crucial importance to investigate the many factors driving its variability and its potential association with seismic events. Continuous monitoring of radon progeny is performed at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility located in the Graciosa island (Azores, 39N; 28W), a fixed site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programme (ARM), established and supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of America with the collaboration of the local government and University of the Azores. The Azores archipelago is associated with a complex geodynamic setting on the Azores triple junction where the American, Eurasian and African litospheric plates meet, resulting in significant seismic and volcanic activity. A considerable advantage of the monitoring site is the availability of a comprehensive dataset of concurrent meteorological observations performed at the ENA facility and freely available from the ARM data archive, enabling a detailed analysis of the environmental factors influencing the temporal variability of radon's progeny. Gamma radiation is being measured continuously every 15 minutes since May 2015. The time series of gamma radiation counts is dominated by sharp peaks lasting a few hours and

  11. Long-term Observations of the Convective Boundary Layer Using Insect Radar Returns at the SGP ARM Climate Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, A S; Kollias, P; Giangrande, S E; Klein, S A

    2009-08-20

    A long-term study of the turbulent structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility is presented. Doppler velocity measurements from insects occupying the lowest 2 km of the boundary layer during summer months are used to map the vertical velocity component in the CBL. The observations cover four summer periods (2004-08) and are classified into cloudy and clear boundary layer conditions. Profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and mass flux are estimated to study the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer during these conditions. A conditional sampling method is applied to the original Doppler velocity dataset to extract coherent vertical velocity structures and to examine plume dimension and contribution to the turbulent transport. Overall, the derived turbulent statistics are consistent with previous aircraft and lidar observations. The observations provide unique insight into the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer and the role of increased cloudiness in the turbulent budget of the subcloud layer. Coherent structures (plumes-thermals) are found to be responsible for more than 80% of the total turbulent transport resolved by the cloud radar system. The extended dataset is suitable for evaluating boundary layer parameterizations and testing large-eddy simulations (LESs) for a variety of surface and cloud conditions.

  12. The ARM Climate Research Facility in the Amazon Basin. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Scot T.

    2016-03-01

    The Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) Experiment was carried out in the environs of Manaus, Brazil, in the central region of the Amazon basin during two years from 1 January 2014 through 31 December 2015. The experiment focused on the complex interactions among vegetation, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol production on the one hand and their connections to aerosols, clouds, and precipitation on the other. The objective was to understand and quantify these linked processes, first under natural conditions to obtain a baseline and second when altered by the effects of human activities. To this end, the pollution plume from the Manaus metropolis, superimposed on the background conditions of the central Amazon basin, served as a natural laboratory. The present paper, as Introduction to the GoAmazon2014/5 Special Issue, presents the context and motivation of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The nine research sites, including the characteristics and instrumentation of each site, are presented. The sites range from time point zero (T0) upwind of the pollution, to T1 in the midst of the pollution, to T2 just downwind of the pollution, to T3 furthest downwind of the pollution (70 km). In addition to the ground sites, a low-altitude G-159 Gulfstream I (G1) observed the atmospheric boundary layer and low clouds, and a high-altitude Gulfstream G550 (HALO) operated in the free troposphere. During the two-year experiment, two Intensive Operating Periods (IOP1 and IOP2) also took place that included additional specialized research instrumentation at the ground sites as well as flights of the two aircraft. GoAmazon2014/5 IOP1 was carried out from 1 February to 31 March 2014 in the wet season. GoAmazon2014/5 IOP2 was conducted from 15 August to 15 October 2014 in the dry season. The G1 aircraft flew during both IOP1 and IOP2, and the HALO aircraft flew during IOP2. In the context of the Amazon basin, the two IOPs also correspond to the clean and

  13. Economic analysis of a centralized LLRW storage facility in New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Spath, J.P.; Voelk, H.; Brodie, H.

    1994-12-31

    In response to the possibility of no longer having access to out-of-State disposal facilities, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority) was directed by the New York State Legislature (1990-91 State Operation Budget Appropriations) to conduct a low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) storage study. One of the objectives of this study was to investigate the economic viability of establishing a separate Centralized Storage Facility for Class A LLRW from medical and academic institutions. This resulted in the conceptual design of a nominal Centralized Storage Facility capable of storing 100,000 cubic feet of dry-solid and liquid wastes and freezer storage capacity of 20,000 cubic feet for biological wastes. The facility itself includes office and laboratory space as well as receipt, inspection, and health physics monitoring stations. The Conceptual Design was initially developed to define the scope and detail of the cost parameters to be evaluated. It established a basis for conducting comparisons of the cost of four alternative project approaches and the sensitivity of unit storage costs to siting-related costs. In estimating costs of a Centralized Storage Facility, four cases were used varying assumptions with respect to parameters such as volume projections and freezer capacity; siting costs; and site acquisition costs.

  14. Final Environmental Assessment: Central Issue Facility at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    United States Geological Survey UST Underground storage tank UXO Unexploded ordnance VOC Volatile organic carbon Final...Tons per year TSP Total suspended particulate U.S. United States USACE United States Army Corps of Engineers Final EA for the Central Issue...Facility May 2013 Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst ii USAR United States Army Reserve USEPA United States Environmental Protection

  15. Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Norm Stanley

    2011-02-01

    This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

  16. Central Cardiovascular Responses of Quadriplegic Subjects to Arm Exercise at Varying Levels of Oxygen Uptake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figoni, Stephen F.

    The purpose of this study was to assess selected central cardiovascular functions of spinal cord injured, quadriplegic subjects at varying levels of oxygen uptake (VO sub 2). Subjects included 11 untrained, male college students with C5, C6, or C7 complete quadriplegia and 11 able-bodied reference subjects. Exercise was performed on a Monark cycle…

  17. Solar Cogeneration Facility: Cimarron River Station, Central Telephone and Utilities-Western Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    A site-specific conceptual design and evaluation of a solar central receiver system integrated with an existing cogeneration facility are described. The system generates electricity and delivers a portion of that electricity and process steam to a natural gas processing plant. Early in the project, tradeoff studies were performed to establish key system characteristics. As a result of these studies the use of energy storage was eliminated, the size of the solar facility was established at 37.13 MW (sub t), and other site-specific features were selected. The conceptual design addressed critical components and system interfaces. The result is a hybrid solar/fossil central receiver facility which utilizes a collector system of Department of Energy second generation heliostats.

  18. The impact of armed conflict on protected-area efficacy in Central Africa.

    PubMed

    de Merode, Emmanuel; Smith, Kes Hillman; Homewood, Katherine; Pettifor, Richard; Rowcliffe, Marcus; Cowlishaw, Guy

    2007-06-22

    What determines the vulnerability of protected areas, a fundamental component of biodiversity conservation, to political instability and warfare? We investigated the efficacy of park protection at Garamba National Park (Democratic Republic of Congo) before, during and after a period of armed conflict. Previous analysis has shown that bushmeat hunting in the park increased fivefold during the conflict, but then declined, in conjunction with changes in the sociopolitical structures (social institutions) that controlled the local bushmeat trade. We used park patrol records to investigate whether these changes were facilitated by a disruption to anti-poaching patrols. Contrary to expectation, anti-poaching patrols remained frequent during the conflict (as bushmeat offtake increased) and decreased afterwards (when bushmeat hunting also declined). These results indicate that bushmeat extraction was determined primarily by the social institutions. Although we found a demonstrable effect of anti-poaching patrols on hunting pressure, even a fourfold increase in patrol frequency would have been insufficient to cope with wartime poaching levels. Thus, anti-poaching patrols alone may not always be the most cost-effective means of managing protected areas, and protected-area efficacy might be enhanced by also working with those institutions that already play a role in regulating local natural-resource use.

  19. Feasibility Study for a Remote Terminal Central Computing Facility Serving School and College Institutions. Volume I, Functional Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Business Machines Corp., White Plains, NY.

    The economic and technical feasibility of providing a remote terminal central computing facility to serve a group of 25-75 secondary schools and colleges was investigated. The general functions of a central facility for an educational cluster were defined to include training in computer techniques, the solution of student development problems in…

  20. CAPER as central and crucial facility to support R/D with tritium at TLK

    SciTech Connect

    Demange, D.; Fanghaenel, E.; Fischer, S.; Le, T.L.; Priester, F.; Roellig, M.; Schloesser, M.; Simon, K.H.

    2015-03-15

    The CAPER facility at TLK (Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe) originally devoted to Research/Development on tokamak exhaust processing has been significantly upgraded over the last years. Beside new programs on highly tritiated water, CAPER is presently largely used to support satellite experiments, mainly those dedicated to research on advanced analytics. Mutation from Research/Development to part of the TLK tritium infrastructure necessitated new features to be installed in order to facilitate and optimize tritiated mixtures preparation and sample filling, and to enable satellites experiments to discharge their waste gas to CAPER for clean-up. This paper presents recent CAPER mutations to become a central and key facility at TLK. (authors)

  1. Central nervous system malformations in relation to two polyvinyl chloride production facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenman, K.D.; Rizzo, J.E.; Conomos, M.G.; Halpin, G.J. )

    1989-09-01

    A modified case-control study was conducted for selected birth defects that occurred among residents who lived in areas that surrounded two vinyl chloride polymerization facilities in New Jersey. Odds ratios for central nervous system defects (ICD 9, 740-742) decreased as the distance the mothers' residences were located from the facilities increased. Higher odds ratios for central nervous system birth defects were found in the areas around the plant that had higher vinyl chloride emissions. None of the odds ratios, however, were statistically significant. The differences in concentrations of emissions from the different plants may contribute to the discrepancies reported in previous studies wherein the risk of environmental exposure to vinyl chloride was assessed.

  2. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mike

    2014-09-01

    This renewal application for a Recycled Water Reuse Permit is being submitted in accordance with the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.17 “Recycled Water Rules” and the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 for continuing the operation of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The permit expires March 16, 2015. The permit requires a renewal application to be submitted six months prior to the expiration date of the existing permit. For the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, the renewal application must be submitted by September 16, 2014. The information in this application is consistent with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater and discussions with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality personnel.

  3. ARM Mentor Selection Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2015-10-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop several highly instrumented ground stations to study cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer. In 2003, the ARM Program became a national scientific user facility, known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. This scientific infrastructure provides for fixed sites, mobile facilities, an aerial facility, and a data archive available for use by scientists worldwide through the ARM Climate Research Facility—a scientific user facility. The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as lead mentors. Lead mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They must also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets. The ARM Climate Research Facility is seeking the best overall qualified candidate who can fulfill lead mentor requirements in a timely manner.

  4. Installation of the central production facilities deck for the Mokoko-Abana Field, Cameroon

    SciTech Connect

    Gatto, A.W.

    1988-05-01

    To reduce development costs at the Mokoko-Abana field, all production equipment was installed in deck units during fabrication and the equipment was precommissioned in the contractors' yards before loadout. The 5,000-ton (4500-Mg) central production facilities deck, however, exceeded lifting capabilities of available marine equipment, so a unique installation technique was developed that uses tidal changes and rapid barge ballasting to lower the completed deck onto a specially designed jacket.

  5. ARN Integrated Retail Module (IRM) System at Ft. Bliss - Central Issue Facility (CIF) Local Tariff

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-14

    Number SP0103-02-D-0018 / Delivery Order 0014 ARN Integrated Retail Module (IRM) System at Ft. Bliss Prepared for: Defense Logistics Agency March...February 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ARN Integrated Retail Module (IRM) System at Ft. Bliss - Central Issue Facility (CIF) Local Tariff 5. FUNDING...Visibility System (AAVS) and other databases over the Internet, and AdvanTech established ARN Integrated Retail Module (IRM) at Ft. Bliss, TX Page

  6. Characterization and reclamation assessment for the central shops diesel storage facility at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Hazen, T.C.; Bledsoe, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    The contamination of subsurface terrestrial environments by organic contaminants is a global phenomenon. The remediation of such environments requires innovative assessment techniques and strategies for successful cleanups. Using innovative approaches, the central Shops Diesel Storage Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was characterized to determine the extent of subsurface diesel fuel contamination. Effective bioremediation techniques for cleaning up of the contaminant plume were established.

  7. Wastewater Land Application Permit LA-000141 Renewal Information for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Laboratory, Idaho National

    1999-02-01

    On July 25, 1994, the State ofldaho Division of Environmental Quality (DEQ) issued a Wastewater Land Application Permit (WLAP) for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL, now the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory [INEEL]) Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Treatment Plant (STP). The permit expires August 7, 1999. In addition to the renewal application, this report was prepared to provide the following information as requested by DEQ.

  8. Fermilab Central Computing Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1986-11-12

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update under the provisions of DOE Document 6430.1, Chapter XIII-21, Section 14, paragraph a. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis and should be considered as a supplement to the Title I Design Report date March 1986 wherein energy related issues are discussed pertaining to building envelope and orientation as well as electrical systems design.

  9. Subclavian Vein Versus Arm Vein for Totally Implantable Central Venous Port for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Comparative Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Akahane, Akio Sone, Miyuki; Ehara, Shigeru; Kato, Kenichi; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare central venous ports (CVP) from two different routes of venous access-the subclavian vein and arm vein-in terms of safety for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods: Patients with HNC who underwent image-guided implantations of CVPs were retrospectively evaluated. All CVPs were implanted under local anesthesia. Primary outcome measurements were rates and types of adverse events (AEs). Secondary outcomes included technical success and rate and reason of CVP removal. Results: A total of 162 patients (subclavian port group, 47; arm port group, 115) were included in this study. Technical success was achieved in all patients. The median follow-up period was 94 (range, 1-891) days. Two patients in the subclavian port group experienced periprocedural complications. Postprocedural AEs were observed in 8.5 and 22.6% of the subclavian port and arm port group patients, respectively (P = 0.044). Phlebitis and system occlusions were observed only in the arm port group. The rate of infection was not significantly different between the two groups. The CVP was removed in 34 and 39.1% of the subclavian port and arm port patients, respectively. Conclusions: Both subclavian and arm CVPs are feasible in patients with HNC. AEs were more frequent in the arm port group; thus, the arm port is not recommended as the first choice for patients with HNC. However, further experience is needed to improve the placement technique and the maintenance of CVPs and a prospective analysis is warranted.

  10. The Shoal Arm Formation, north-central Newfoundland: Fe- and Mn-enriched sediments underlying black shales and flysch

    SciTech Connect

    Bruechert, V.; Delano, J.W.; Kidd, J.W.; William, S.F. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Middle Ordovician Shoal Arm Formation is located in the central volcanic belt of north-central Newfoundland and consists of a sequence of hematitic argillites overlain by grey cherts and then black shales directly underneath a late Ordovician/early Silurian flysch sequence. The hematitic argillites are enriched in Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Co. Geochemically definable components within related lithologic groups were discriminated using principal component analysis and factor analysis. These procedures indicate the presence of (1) biogenic, (2) mixed detrital, (3) hydrothermal, and (4) Mn-carbonate components. The base of the hematitic part is marked by a sharp increase in the hydrothermal component, which then decreases stratigraphically upward. The Mn-carbonate component also decreases upwards, but persists up to the grey cherts. The clastic component changes from mixed mafic/pelagic clay-like detritus to Zr-, Nb- and Y-rich detritus in the top hematitic part. The grey cherts mark a transitional stage between the hematitic sediments (oxic) and the black shales (anoxic). The change to increasingly O[sub 2]-deficient conditions is explained by (a) an increase of biological productivity and related O[sub 2]-drain by C[sub org]-oxidation and/or (b) diachronous subsidence of the basin floor into a deep-water anoxic layer as a result of the loading of the basin floor by an approaching thrust stack. The similar stratigraphic sequence and geochemistry of the Middle Ordovician sediments in the Taconic Allochthon of New York State suggest that these processes also acted at other locations along the continental margin of the Iapetus Ocean. This uniformity may reflect the strong influence of the warm Middle Ordovician climate on the sediment facies or, alternatively, the control by the specific tectonic environment.

  11. 2011 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Site description; (2) Facility and system description; (3) Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; (4) Status of special compliance conditions and activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 permit year, approximately 1.22 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  12. Satellite Data Support for the ARM Climate Research Facility, 8/01/2009 - 7/31/2015

    SciTech Connect

    Minnis, Patrick; Khaiyer, Mandana M

    2015-10-06

    This report summarizes the support provided by NASA Langley Research for the DOE ARM Program in the form of cloud and radiation products derived from satellite imager data for the period between 8/01/09 through 7/31/15. Cloud properties such as cloud amount, height, and optical depth as well as outgoing longwave and shortwave broadband radiative fluxes were derived from geostationary and low-earth orbiting satellite imager radiance measurements for domains encompassing ARM permanent sites and field campaigns during the performance period. Datasets provided and documents produced are listed.

  13. Wastewater Land Application Permit LA-000141 Renewal Information for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    On July 25, 1994, the State of ldaho Division of Environmental Quality issued a Wastewater Land Application Permit, #LA-000141-01, for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant. The permit expires August 7, 1999. This report is being submitted with the renewal application and specifically addresses; Wastewater flow; Wastewater characteristics; Impacts to vegetation in irrigation area; Impacts to soil in irrigation area; Evaluation of groundwater monitoring wells for Wastewater Land Application Permit purposes; Summary of trends observed during the 5-year reporting period; and Projection of changes and new processes.

  14. 2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

  15. 2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mike lewis

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  16. ARM Carbon Cycle Gases Flasks at SGP Site

    DOE Data Explorer

    Biraud, Sebastien

    2013-03-26

    Data from flasks are sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ARM, Southern Great Plains Site and analyzed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA, Earth System Research Laboratory ESRL. The SGP site is included in the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. The surface samples are collected from a 60 m tower at the ARM SGP Central Facility, usually once per week in the afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. The samples are collected by the ARM and LBNL Carbon Project.

  17. The design of a Phase I non site-specific Centralized Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Stringer, J.; Kane, D.

    1997-10-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) recently completed a Topical Safety Analysis Report (TSAR) for a Phase 1 non site specific Centralized Interim Storage Facility (CISF). The TSAR will be used in licensing the CISF when and if a site is designated. The combined Phase 1 and Phase 2 CISF will provide federal storage capability for 40,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) under the oversight of the DOE. The Phase 1 TSAR was submitted to the NRC on May 1, 1997 and is currently under review having been docketed on June 10, 1997. This paper generally describes the Phase 1 CISF design and its operations as presented in the CISF TSAR.

  18. Centralization of dairy farming facilities for improved economics and environmental quality.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Rokuta; Furuichi, Tohru; Komatsu, Toshihiro; Tanikawa, Noboru; Ishii, Kazuei

    2009-01-01

    In Japan, most farm animal excreta has been stored directly on farmland. Runoff from this storage has often caused water pollution. Biogasification is anticipated as an important technology to manage excreta properly, but complex problems hinder its introduction. Economic aspects of management have been especially difficult for dairy farmers. For this study, structural problems regarding introduction of biogasification into dairy farming were identified. Subsequently, a desirable system of dairy farming including biogasification was suggested, and an evaluation model of the financial balance was constructed. A case study using current financial balances of several systems of dairy farming was evaluated using the constructed model and actual data. The systems were based on several policy alternatives including the suggested system mentioned above. Results show that a farmer can obtain sufficient income from a system featuring centralization of dairy housing and biogasification facilities and coordinated management by over six farmers.

  19. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report January 1–March 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, C

    2011-06-14

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, and (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved.

  20. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Needle Path Overlay for Fluoroscopic-Guided Placement of Translumbar Central Venous Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Alda; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Rohm, Esther; Wallace, Michael J.

    2009-07-15

    C-arm cone beam computed tomography is an advanced 3D imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat-panel-based angiography systems. The overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real-time fluoroscopy. This overlay technology was used to guide the placement of three percutaneous translumbar inferior vena cava catheters.

  1. Feasibility of a medium-size central cogenerated energy facility, energy management memorandum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. W.

    1982-09-01

    The thermal-economic feasibility was studied of a medium-size central cogenerated energy facility designed to serve five varied industries. Generation options included one dual-fuel diesel and one gas turbine, both with waste heat boilers, and five fired boilers. Fuels included natural gas, and for the fired-boiler cases, also low-sulphur coal and municipal refuse. The fired-boiler cogeneration systems employed back-pressure steam turbines. For coal and refuse, the option of steam only without cogeneration was also assessed. The refuse-fired cases utilized modular incinerators. The options provided for a wide range of steam and electrical capacities. Deficient steam was assumed generated independently in existing equipment. Excess electrical power over that which could be displaced was assumed sold to Commonwealth Edison Company under PURPA (Public Utility Regulator Policies Act). The facility was assumed operated by a mutually owned corporation formed by the cogenerated power users. The economic analysis was predicted on currently applicable energy-investment tax credits and accelerated depreciation for a January 1985 startup date. Based on 100% equity financing, the results indicated that the best alternative was the modular-incinerator cogeneration system.

  2. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Use in Skilled Nursing Facilities: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Vineet; Montoya, Ana; Joshi, Darius; Becker, Carol; Brant, Amy; McGuirk, Helen; Clark, Jordyn; Harrod, Molly; Kuhn, Latoya; Mody, Lona

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe patterns of use, care practices, and outcomes related to peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) use in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING Two community SNFs. PARTICIPANTS Adult SNF residents with PICCs (N = 56). MEASUREMENTS Information on indication for PICC use, device characteristics (e.g., lumens, gauge), and participant data (comorbidities, medications) were obtained from medical records. Care practices (e.g., frequency of flushing, dressing care) and problems related to PICCs were recorded. Major (central line–associated bloodstream infection, venous thromboembolism, catheter dislodgement) and minor (migration, dressing disruption, lumen occlusion, exit site infection) complications and process measures (flushing of PICC, assessment of necessity) were recorded. Bivariate analyses with t-tests, chi-square tests, or Fischer exact tests were used for continuous and categorical data. RESULTS Participants were enrolled from two SNFs. The most common indication for PICC use was intravenous antibiotic delivery. The average PICC dwell time was 43 days, and most devices were single-lumen PICCs. Major and minor complications were common and occurred in 11 (20%) and 18 (32%) participants, respectively. Occlusion (23%, n = 13), accidental dislodgement (12%, n = 7), and dressing disruption (11%, n = 6) were the commonest complications observed. Documentation regarding catheter care practices occurred in 41% of cases. CONCLUSION Quality improvement efforts that seek to benchmark practice, identify gaps, and institute efforts to improve PICC care and practice in SNFs appear necessary. PMID:26312402

  3. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Third Quarter: April 01–June 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, C

    2011-08-18

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive

  4. Field guide to the Mesozoic accretionary complex along Turnagain Arm and Kachemak Bay, south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight C.; Kusky, Timothy M.; Karl, Susan M.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    1997-01-01

    Turnagain Arm, just east of Anchorage, provides a readily accessible, world-class cross section through a Mesozoic accretionary wedge. Nearly continuous exposures along the Seward Highway, the Alaska Railroad, and the shoreline of Turnagain Arm display the two main constituent units of the Chugach terrane: the McHugh Complex and Valdez Group. In this paper we describe seven bedrock geology stops along Turnagain Arm, and two others in the Chugach Mountains just to the north (Stops 1-7 and 9), which will be visited as part of the May, 1997 field trip of the Alaska Geological Society. Outcrops along Turnagain Arm have already been described in two excellent guidebook articles (Clark, 1981; Winkler and others 1984), both of which remain as useful and valid today as when first published. Since the early 1980's, studies along Turnagain Arm have addressed radiolarian ages of chert and conodont ages of limestone in the McHugh Complex (Nelson and others, 1986, 1987); geochemistry of basalt in the McHugh Complex (Nelson and Blome, 1991); post-accretion brittle faulting (Bradley and Kusky, 1990; Kusky and others, 1997); and the age and tectonic setting of gold mineralization (Haeussler and others, 1995). Highlights of these newer findings will described both in the text below, and in the stop descriptions.Superb exposures along the southeastern shore of Kachemak Bay show several other features of the McHugh Complex that are either absent or less convincing along Turnagain Arm. While none of these outcrops can be reached via the main road network, they are still reasonably accessible - all are within an hour by motorboat from Homer, seas permitting. Here, we describe seven outcrops along the shore of Kachemak Bay that we studied between 1989 and 1993 during geologic mapping of the Seldovia 1:250,000- scale quadrangle. These outcrops (Stops 61-67) will not be part of the 1997 itinerary, but are included here tor the benefit of those who may wish to visit them later.

  5. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Fourth Quarter: July 01–September 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, C

    2011-11-02

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive. New information is highlighted in blue text. New information about processed data by the developer is highlighted in red text.

  6. The development and operation of the international solar-terrestrial physics central data handling facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtonen, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program is committed to the development of a comprehensive, multi-mission ground data system which will support a variety of national and international scientific missions in an effort to study the flow of energy from the sun through the Earth-space environment, known as the geospace. A major component of the ISTP ground data system is an ISTP-dedicated Central Data Handling Facility (CDHF). Acquisition, development, and operation of the ISTP CDHF were delegated by the ISTP Project Office within the Flight Projects Directorate to the Information Processing Division (IPD) within the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD). The ISTP CDHF supports the receipt, storage, and electronic access of the full complement of ISTP Level-zero science data; serves as the linchpin for the centralized processing and long-term storage of all key parameters generated either by the ISTP CDHF itself or received from external, ISTP Program approved sources; and provides the required networking and 'science-friendly' interfaces for the ISTP investigators. Once connected to the ISTP CDHF, the online catalog of key parameters can be browsed from their remote processing facilities for the immediate electronic receipt of selected key parameters using the NASA Science Internet (NSI), managed by NASA's Ames Research Center. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to describe how the ISTP CDHF was successfully implemented and operated to support initially the Japanese Geomagnetic Tail (GEOTAIL) mission and correlative science investigations, and (2) to describe how the ISTP CDHF has been enhanced to support ongoing as well as future ISTP missions. Emphasis will be placed on how various project management approaches were undertaken that proved to be highly effective in delivering an operational ISTP CDHF to the Project on schedule and

  7. 2015 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Michael George

    2016-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2014, through October 31, 2015.

  8. The Supreme Court Permits Religious Groups To Use Public School Facilities: Good News Club v. Milford Central School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Charles J.; Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews basis for U.S. Supreme Court's June 2001 decision in "Good News Club v. Milford Central School," where Court held that the Christian religious club for students had the Constitutional right under the Free Speech Clause to use public school facilities after school hours. Explains impact of decision on board of education policy.…

  9. 2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

  10. High energy diode-pumped solid-state laser development at the Central Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paul D.; Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Ertel, Klaus; Phillips, P. Jonathan; Butcher, Thomas; Smith, Jodie; De Vido, Mariastefania; Chekhlov, Oleg; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Edwards, Chris; Collier, John

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we review the development of high energy, nanosecond pulsed diode-pumped solid state lasers within the Central Laser Facility (CLF) based on cryogenic gas cooled multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG amplifier technology. To date two 10J-scale systems, the DiPOLE prototype amplifier and an improved DIPOLE10 system, have been developed, and most recently a larger scale system, DiPOLE100, designed to produce 100 J pulses at up to 10 Hz. These systems have demonstrated amplification of 10 ns duration pulses at 1030 nm to energies in excess of 10 J at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate, and over 100 J at 1 Hz, with optical-to-optical conversion efficiencies of up to 27%. We present an overview of the cryo-amplifier concept and compare the design features of these three systems, including details of the amplifier designs, gain media, diode pump lasers and the cryogenic gas cooling systems. The most recent performance results from the three systems are presented along with future plans for high energy DPSSL development within the CLF.

  11. Mid-upper arm circumference is associated with biochemically determined nutritional status indicators among adolescent girls in Central Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Kulathinal, Sangita; Freese, Riitta; Korkalo, Liisa; Ismael, Carina; Mutanen, Marja

    2016-08-01

    Biochemically determined nutritional status measurements in low-income countries are often too expensive. Therefore, we hypothesized that some anthropometrical or functional measurements (handgrip) could reflect nutritional status measured by specific biochemical indicators. We did a population-based study from 1 urban area and 2 rural districts in Zambézia Province of Mozambique. The participants (n=386) were non-pregnant adolescent girls between 15 and 18 years of age. 96% had a normal BMI-for-age score. Weight and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) were highly correlated (r>0.8) with each other and with total body muscle mass, body mass index (BMI), and with waist circumference, as well as with skinfolds (r>0.6). Upper and total arm lengths were correlated (r>0.7) with height and with each other, and right and left handgrip were correlated only with each other, as were triceps and subscapular skinfolds (r>0.7). Serum albumin correlated negatively with waist circumference (P<.001) and positively with MUAC (P=.007). Stepwise regressions showed that waist circumference, MUAC, weight, and handgrip were important nutritional status indicators in the models using hemoglobin, serum albumin, ferritin, zinc, and plasma retinol concentrations as dependent variables. MUAC could be a valuable anthropometric marker of the overall nutritional status of adolescent girls in low-income countries. When nutrition transition proceeds, waist circumference together with MUAC could form tools for the prediction of worsening of nutritional status.

  12. Characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis EsxA membrane insertion: roles of N- and C-terminal flexible arms and central helix-turn-helix motif.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yue; Keil, Verena; Sun, Jianjun

    2015-03-13

    EsxA (ESAT-6), an important virulence factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, plays an essential role in phagosome rupture and bacterial cytosolic translocation within host macrophages. Our previous study showed that EsxA exhibits a unique membrane-interacting activity that is not found in its ortholog from nonpathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis. However, the molecular mechanism of EsxA membrane insertion remains unknown. In this study, we generated truncated EsxA proteins with deletions of the N- and/or C-terminal flexible arm. Using a fluorescence-based liposome leakage assay, we found that both the N- and C-terminal arms were required for membrane disruption. Moreover, we found that, upon acidification, EsxA converted into a more organized structure with increased α-helical content, which was evidenced by CD analysis and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. Finally, using an environmentally sensitive fluorescent dye, we obtained direct evidence that the central helix-turn-helix motif of EsxA inserted into the membranes and formed a membrane-spanning pore. A model of EsxA membrane insertion is proposed and discussed.

  13. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  14. Characterization and reclamation assessment for the Central Shops Diesel Storage Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Hazen, T.C.; Bledsoe, H.

    1993-10-01

    The contamination of subsurface terrestrial environments by organic contaminants is a global phenomenon. The remediation of such environments requires innovative assessment techniques and strategies for successful clean-ups. Central Shops Diesel Storage Facility at Savannah River Site was characterized to determine the extent of subsurface diesel fuel contamination using innovative approaches and effective bioremediation techniques for clean-up of the contaminant plume have been established.

  15. 2014 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mike

    2015-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2013, through October 31, 2014. The report contains, as applicable, the following information; Site description; Facility and system description; Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; Status of compliance conditions and activities; and Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. The current permit expires on March 16, 2015. A permit renewal application was submitted to Idaho Department of Environmental Quality on September 15, 2014. During the 2014 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. Seepage testing of the three lagoons was performed between August 26, 2014 and September 22, 2014. Seepage rates from Lagoons 1 and 2 were below the 0.25 inches/day requirement; however, Lagoon 3 was above the 0.25 inches/day. Lagoon 3 has been isolated and is being evaluated for future use or permanent removal from service.

  16. Idiopathic Central Precocious Puberty Associated with 11 Mb De Novo Distal Deletion of the Chromosome 9 Short Arm

    PubMed Central

    Cisternino, Mariangela; Della Mina, Erika; Losa, Laura; Madè, Alexandra; Rossetti, Giulia; Bassi, Lorenzo Andrea; Pieri, Giovanni; Bayindir, Baran; Messa, Jole; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Ciccone, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    We report a girl with a de novo distal deletion of 9p affected by idiopathic central precocious puberty and intellectual disability. Genome-wide array-CGH revealed a terminal deletion of about 11 Mb, allowing to define her karyotype as 46; XX, del(9)(p23-pter). To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of precocious puberty associated with 9p distal deletion. A third case associates precocious puberty with a more proximal 9p deletion del(9)(p12p13,3). In our case, more than 40 genes were encompassed in the deleted region, among which, DMRT1 which is gonad-specific and has a sexually dimorphic expression pattern and ERMP1 which is required in rats for the organization of somatic cells and oocytes into discrete follicular structures. Although we cannot exclude that precocious puberty in our del(9p) patient is a coincidental finding, the report of the other two patients with 9p deletions and precocious puberty indeed suggests a causative relationship. PMID:23984122

  17. Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia P. Tuttle

    2012-01-31

    This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic

  18. Robotic arm

    DOEpatents

    Kwech, Horst

    1989-04-18

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel.

  19. Verification and transparency in future arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, J.F.

    1996-09-01

    Verification`s importance has changed dramatically over time, although it always has been in the forefront of arms control. The goals and measures of verification and the criteria for success have changed with the times as well, reflecting such factors as the centrality of the prospective agreement to East-West relations during the Cold War, the state of relations between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the technologies available for monitoring. Verification`s role may be declining in the post-Cold War period. The prospects for such a development will depend, first and foremost, on the high costs of traditional arms control, especially those associated with requirements for verification. Moreover, the growing interest in informal, or non-negotiated arms control does not allow for verification provisions by the very nature of these arrangements. Multilateral agreements are also becoming more prominent and argue against highly effective verification measures, in part because of fears of promoting proliferation by opening sensitive facilities to inspectors from potential proliferant states. As a result, it is likely that transparency and confidence-building measures will achieve greater prominence, both as supplements to and substitutes for traditional verification. Such measures are not panaceas and do not offer all that we came to expect from verification during the Cold war. But they may be the best possible means to deal with current problems of arms reductions and restraints at acceptable levels of expenditure.

  20. 33 CFR 154.510 - Loading arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Loading arms. 154.510 Section 154... FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Equipment Requirements § 154.510 Loading arms. (a) Each mechanical loading arm used for transferring oil or hazardous material and placed into...

  1. 33 CFR 154.510 - Loading arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loading arms. 154.510 Section 154... FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Equipment Requirements § 154.510 Loading arms. (a) Each mechanical loading arm used for transferring oil or hazardous material and placed into...

  2. 33 CFR 154.510 - Loading arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Loading arms. 154.510 Section 154... FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Equipment Requirements § 154.510 Loading arms. (a) Each mechanical loading arm used for transferring oil or hazardous material and placed into...

  3. 33 CFR 154.510 - Loading arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Loading arms. 154.510 Section 154... FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Equipment Requirements § 154.510 Loading arms. (a) Each mechanical loading arm used for transferring oil or hazardous material and placed into...

  4. 33 CFR 154.510 - Loading arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Loading arms. 154.510 Section 154... FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Equipment Requirements § 154.510 Loading arms. (a) Each mechanical loading arm used for transferring oil or hazardous material and placed into...

  5. Gynecologic disorders diagnosed during deployment to Southwest/Central Asia, active component females, U.S. Armed Forces, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    Service women in the U.S. Armed Forces face unique challenges that may lead to or exacerbate gynecologic disorders - particularly during deployment. This report documented that approximately one in 10 military women who served in Southwest/Central Asia were diagnosed with a gynecologic disorder at least once during deployment. In addition, gynecologic disorders accounted for approximately one of every 20 medical evacuations of female service members from the war zone. A majority of clinically significant gynecologic disorder cases were attributable to irregular menstruation/bleeding or unspecified inflammation or pain of the female genital organs. Incidence rates of gynecologic disorder diagnoses were higher among black, non-Hispanic service women, among younger women, and among those in the Army and in motor transport and communications/intelligence occupations. Approximately 50% of gynecologic disorder cases had received gynecologic care within 6 months prior to deployment and nearly 90% had received care within 2 years of deployment. Despite pre-deployment care, it is apparent from this report that service women need continuous access to gynecologic care during deployment, particularly if conditions during deployment lead to and exacerbate gynecologic disorders.

  6. Clear Sky Identification Using Data From Remote Sensing Systems at ARM's Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect

    Delle Monache, L.; Rodriguez, D.; Cederwall, R.

    2000-06-27

    Clouds profoundly affect our weather and climate due, in large part, to their interactions with radiation. Unfortunately, our understanding of these interactions is, at best, incomplete, making it difficult to improve the treatment of atmospheric radiation in climate models. The improved treatment of clouds and radiation, and a better understanding of their interaction, in climate models is one of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's major goals. To learn more about the distribution of water and ice, i.e., clouds, within an atmospheric column, ARM has chosen to use the remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols at its three climatologically-diverse sites as its primary observational method. ARM's most heavily instrumented site, which has operated continuously for more than a decade, is its Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility, located near Lamont, OK. Cloud-observing instruments at the Central Facility include the Whole Sky Imager, ceilometers, lidar, millimeter cloud radar, microwave radiometers and radiosondes.

  7. Modification of Central Solenoid Model Coil Test Facility for Rapid Testing of CICC

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Daniel R; Miller, John L; Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Kenney, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    This document describes preliminary design modifications to the CSMC Test Facility in JAEA, Naka, Japan that will allow rapid test and change-out of CS conductor samples while simultaneously achieving more precise and reliable characterization of those samples than is presently achievable elsewhere. The current philosophy for CS conductor testing is to test an Insert in CSMC followed by SULTAN testing. The SULTAN facility has very short length in field and a short length between the High Field Zone and the joints. This makes it difficult to obtain uniform distribution of current in the cable at low voltage levels, which defines the current sharing temperature. In a real magnet, like ITER CS, there is a long length of conductor in the highest field. Such conditions provide a more uniform current distribution near current sharing. The modified facility will serve as an economical tool for ITER conductor testing. The test item will be a three turn sample, approximately 15 m long, placed in the background field of the CSMC. This new mode of operation will reduce the time of cool-down, warm-up and installation of the sample into the CSMC facility, which should significantly reduce the cost of a test per sample.

  8. Repositioning the Facilities in Technical College Workshops for Efficiency: A Case Study of North Central Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umar, Ibrahim Y.; Ma'aji, Abdullahi S.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on assessing the facilities in Government Technical College workshops in the context of a developing country. A descriptive survey design was adopted. Two research questions and a hypothesis were formulated to guide the study. A 35-item questionnaire was developed based on the National Board for Technical Education (NBTE)…

  9. Investigating Preterm Care at the Facility Level: Stakeholder Qualitative Study in Central and Southern Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gondwe, Austrida; Munthali, Alister; Ashorn, Per; Ashorn, Ulla

    2016-07-01

    Objectives Malawi is estimated to have one of the highest preterm birth rates in the world. However, care of preterm infants at facility level in Malawi has not been explored. We aimed to explore the views of health stakeholders about the care of preterm infants in health facilities and the existence of any policy protocol documents guiding the delivery of care to these infants. Methods We conducted 16 in-depth interviews with health stakeholders (11 service providers and 5 policy makers) using an interview guide and asked for any existing policy protocol documents guiding care for preterm infants in the health facilities in Malawi. The collected documents were reviewed and all the interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and translated. All data were analysed using content analysis approach. Results We identified four policy protocol documents and out of these, one had detailed information explaining the care of preterm infants. Policy makers reported that policy protocol documents to guide care for preterm infants were available in the health facilities but majority (63.6 %) of the service providers lacked knowledge about the existence of these documents. Health stakeholders reported several challenges in caring for preterm infants including lack of trained staff in preterm infant care, antibiotics, space, supervision and poor referral system. Conclusions Our study highlights that improving health care service provider knowledge of preterm infant care is an integral part in preterm child birth. Our findings suggests that policy makers and health decision makers should retain those trained in preterm new born care in the health facility's preterm unit.

  10. Recent progress in siting low-level waste disposal facilities in the Southwestern Compact and the Central Interstate Compact

    SciTech Connect

    DeOld, J.H.; Shaffner, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    US Ecology is the private contractor selected to develop and operate low-level waste disposal facilities in the Southwestern and the Central Interstate Compacts. These initiatives have been proceeding for almost a decade in somewhat different regulatory and political climates. This paper chronicles recent events in both projects. In both cases there is reason for continued optimism that low-level waste facilities to serve the needs of waste generators in these two compacts will soon be a reality. When the California Department of Health Services issued a license for the proposed Ward Valley LLRW disposal facility on September 16, 1993, it represented a significant step in implementation of a new generation of regional LLRW disposal facilities. While limited scope land transfer hearings were on the horizon, project beneficiaries were confident that the disposal site would be operational by 1995. Since then, however, political initiatives championed by Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA) have clouded the federal land transfer process and left the commencement date of operations indeterminant. Since 1993, the biomedical community, waste generators most affected by delays, have been petitioning the current administration to emphasize the need for a timely solution. These efforts are aimed at Clinton administration officials responsible for current delays, who apparently have not recognized the importance of the Ward Valley facility to California`s economy, nor the national ramifications of their delaying actions. The current status of challenges to the Ward Valley license and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) documentation is also provided. The presentation also discusses the recently completed National Academy of Science evaluation of reports critical of the Ward Valley development process.

  11. Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Perkoulidis, G.; Papageorgiou, A.; Karagiannidis, A.; Kalogirou, S.

    2010-07-15

    The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased

  12. Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Perkoulidis, G; Papageorgiou, A; Karagiannidis, A; Kalogirou, S

    2010-07-01

    The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased

  13. The effects of buffer strips and bioretention facilities on agricultural productivity and environmental quality in Central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilroy, Kristin L.; McCuen, Richard H.

    2010-05-01

    SummaryLand degradation is a growing concern in Central Africa as poor management practices continue to cause erosion and increase water runoff in agricultural fields. The implementation of best management practices (BMPs) is needed; however, productivity is often indirectly related to the environmental benefits of such practices and resource constraints often exist. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of bioretention facilities and buffer strips on environmental quality with productivity and resources as constraints. A water quantity and quality model for an agricultural field in Central Africa was developed. Analyses were conducted to assess the marginal benefits of each BMP, the effect of different BMP combinations on environmental quality and productivity, and the effect of data uncertainty and location uncertainty on model predictions. The results showed that bioretention pits were more effective than buffer strips in increasing environmental quality. Productivity was shown to be directly related to bioretention pits, thus environmental quality can be attained without sacrificing productivity. Data uncertainties resulted in changes in the environmental quality values, but trends remained the same. Guidelines were provided to assist design engineers in developing BMP scenarios that provide the greatest productivity and environmental quality for the constraints involved. The results of this study will bring awareness to the ability of attaining environmental quality without sacrificing productivity as well as the need for accurate data in Central Africa.

  14. Nuclear-nuclear collision centrality determination by the spectators calorimeter for the MPD setup at the NICA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Golubeva, M. B.; Guber, F. F.; Ivashkin, A. P.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Kurepin, A. B.; Litvinenko, A. G. Litvinenko, E. I.; Migulina, I. I.; Peresedov, V. F.

    2013-01-15

    The work conditions of the hadron calorimeter for spectators registration (Zero Degree Calorimeter, ZDC) were studied for the heavy nuclei collisions with the several GeV invariant energy. The ZDC simulations were performed for the MPD (Multi-Purpose Detector) at the NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) collider, which are under developement at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna). Taking into account the spectator nuclear fragments leads to a nonmonotonic dependence of the ZDC response on the impact parameter. The reason for this dependence studied with several event generators is the primary beam hole in the ZDC center. It is shown, that the ZDC signal should be combined with a data from other MPD-NICA detector subsystems to determine centrality.

  15. Coordination and establishment of centralized facilities and services of the University of Alaska ERTS survey of the Alaskan environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belon, A. E. (Principal Investigator); Miller, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The objective of this project is to provide a focus for the entire University of Alaska ERTS-1 effort (12 projects covering 10 disciplines and involving 8 research institutes and science departments). Activities have been concentrated on the implementation of the project's three primary functions: (1) coordination and management of the U of A ERTS-1 program, including management of the flow of data and data products; (2) acquisition, installation, test, operation, and maintanence of centralized facilities for processing ERTS-1, aircraft, and ground truth data; and (3) development of photographic and digital techniques for processing and interpreting ERTS-1 and aircraft data. With minor exceptions these three functions are now well-established and working smoothly.

  16. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the arm area, called ...

  17. Addendum to the Environmental Assessment for the Armed Forces Reserve Center and Operational Maintenance Facility for the 63rd Regional Support Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-29

    Force Base, prepared by Dames & Moore, January 1995. 4. Giancoli , Douglas C., " Physics , Principals with Application", Third Edition, Prentice Hall...classrooms, library, learning center, assembly hall, arms vaults, woodworking shop, kitchen, medical examination rooms, medical storage, physical ...2: What is your source? Response: Physics , Principles with Application, Third Edition, Prentice Hall, 1992. CommentS: Page 49, Figure 3-7: Not

  18. ARM Lead Mentor Selection Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2013-03-13

    The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as Instrument Mentors. Instrument Mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets.

  19. JPRS Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    dangerous because the measure of control by central political organs of the state over conventional weapons and their military use is substan...It is always under the control and guidance of governments of the interested parties, it is the most manageable and has the least inertia. It...JPRS-TAC-89-001 10 JANUARY 1989 —JPRS Report— Arms Control nTSTRJBUTlON STATEMfcwTA Approved for public release; Distribution Unlimited n

  20. Feasibility of a Short-Arm Centrifuge for Mouse Hypergravity Experiments.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hironobu; Obata, Koji; Abe, Chikara; Shiba, Dai; Shirakawa, Masaki; Kudo, Takashi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the pure impact of microgravity on small mammals despite uncontrolled factors that exist in the International Space Station, it is necessary to construct a 1 g environment in space. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency has developed a novel mouse habitat cage unit that can be installed in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility in the Kibo module of the International Space Station. The Cell Biology Experiment Facility has a short-arm centrifuge to produce artificial 1 g gravity in space for mouse experiments. However, the gravitational gradient formed inside the rearing cage is larger when the radius of gyration is shorter; this may have some impact on mice. Accordingly, biological responses to hypergravity induced by a short-arm centrifuge were examined and compared with those induced by a long-arm centrifuge. Hypergravity induced a significant Fos expression in the central nervous system, a suppression of body mass growth, an acute and transient reduction in food intake, and impaired vestibulomotor coordination. There was no difference in these responses between mice raised in a short-arm centrifuge and those in a long-arm centrifuge. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using a short-arm centrifuge for mouse experiments.

  1. ARM User Survey Report

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, LR

    2010-06-22

    The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to, among other things, determine how to organize the exponentially growing data within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, and identify users’ preferred data analysis system. The survey findings appear to have met this objective, having received approximately 300 responses that give insight into the type of work users perform, usage of the data, percentage of data analysis users might perform on an ARM-hosted computing resource, downloading volume level where users begin having reservations, opinion about usage if given more powerful computing resources (including ability to manipulate data), types of tools that would be most beneficial to them, preferred programming language and data analysis system, level of importance for certain types of capabilities, and finally, level of interest in participating in a code-sharing community.

  2. Radiation exposure and central nervous system cancers: A case-control study among workers at two nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, A.V.; Flanders, W.D.; Frome, E.L.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Fry, S.A.

    1987-03-01

    A nested case-control study was conducted among workers employed between 1943 and 1977 at two nuclear facilities to investigate the possible association of primary malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS) with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. Eighty-nine white male and female workers, who according to the information on death certificates dies of primary CNS cancers, were identified as cases. Four matched controls were selected for each case. External radiation exposure data were available from film badge readings for individual workers, whereas radiation dose to lung from internally deposited radionuclides, mainly uranium, was estimated from area and personnel monitoring data and was used in analyses in lieu of the dose to the brain. Matched sets were included in the analyses only if information was available for the case and at least one of the corresponding controls. Thus, the analyses of external radiation included 27 cases and 90 matched controls, and 47 cases and 120 matched controls were analyzed for the effects of radiation from internally deposited uranium. No association was observed between deaths fron CNS cancers and occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external or internal sources. However, due to the small number of monitored subjects and low doses, a weak association could not be ruled out. 43 refs., 1 fig., 15 tabs.

  3. Improved earthquake monitoring in the central and eastern United States in support of seismic assessments for critical facilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leith, William S.; Benz, Harley M.; Herrmann, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of seismic monitoring capabilities in the central and eastern United States for critical facilities - including nuclear powerplants - focused on specific improvements to understand better the seismic hazards in the region. The report is not an assessment of seismic safety at nuclear plants. To accomplish the evaluation and to provide suggestions for improvements using funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey examined addition of new strong-motion seismic stations in areas of seismic activity and addition of new seismic stations near nuclear power-plant locations, along with integration of data from the Transportable Array of some 400 mobile seismic stations. Some 38 and 68 stations, respectively, were suggested for addition in active seismic zones and near-power-plant locations. Expansion of databases for strong-motion and other earthquake source-characterization data also was evaluated. Recognizing pragmatic limitations of station deployment, augmentation of existing deployments provides improvements in source characterization by quantification of near-source attenuation in regions where larger earthquakes are expected. That augmentation also supports systematic data collection from existing networks. The report further utilizes the application of modeling procedures and processing algorithms, with the additional stations and the improved seismic databases, to leverage the capabilities of existing and expanded seismic arrays.

  4. ARM Standards Policy Committee Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cialella, A; Jensen, M; Koontz, A; McFarlane, S; McCoy, R; Monroe, J; Palanisamy, G; Perez, R; Sivaraman, C

    2012-09-19

    Data and metadata standards promote the consistent recording of information and are necessary to ensure the stability and high quality of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility data products for scientific users. Standards also enable automated routines to be developed to examine data, which leads to more efficient operations and assessment of data quality. Although ARM Infrastructure agrees on the utility of data and metadata standards, there is significant confusion over the existing standards and the process for allowing the release of new data products with exceptions to the standards. The ARM Standards Policy Committee was initiated in March 2012 to develop a set of policies and best practices for ARM data and metadata standards.

  5. Comparison of AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) and ETCA (Etablissement Technique Central de l’Armament) Dosimetry Measurements at AFRRI TRIGA (Training Research Isotopes General Atomic) Reactor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Figure 5 are similar data taken by ETCA at the SILENE reactor (5). The neutron depth dose data show exponential attenuation until about 26 cm into...TECHNICAL REPORT Comparison of AFRRI and ETCA dosimetry measurements at AFRRI TRIGA reactor M. Dooley G. H. Zeman DEFENSE NUCLEAR AGENCY ARMED...Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) A series of irradiations was performed at the AFRRI TRIG A reactor on 10-12

  6. Mystery Spiral Arms Explained?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-04-01

    Using a quartet of space observatories, University of Maryland astronomers may have cracked a 45-year mystery surrounding two ghostly spiral arms in the galaxy M106. The Maryland team, led by Yuxuan Yang, took advantage of the unique capabilities of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory, and data obtained almost a decade ago with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. NGC X-ray Image NGC 4258 X-ray Image M106 (also known as NGC 4258) is a stately spiral galaxy 23.5 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici. In visible-light images, two prominent arms emanate from the bright nucleus and spiral outward. These arms are dominated by young, bright stars, which light up the gas within the arms. "But in radio and X-ray images, two additional spiral arms dominate the picture, appearing as ghostly apparitions between the main arms," says team member Andrew Wilson of the University of Maryland. These so-called "anomalous arms" consist mostly of gas. "The nature of these anomalous arms is a long-standing puzzle in astronomy," says Yang. "They have been a mystery since they were first discovered in the early 1960s." By analyzing data from XMM-Newton, Spitzer, and Chandra, Yang, Bo Li, Wilson, and Christopher Reynolds, all at the University of Maryland at College Park, have confirmed earlier suspicions that the ghostly arms represent regions of gas that are being violently heated by shock waves. Previously, some astronomers had suggested that the anomalous arms are jets of particles being ejected by a supermassive black hole in M106's nucleus. But radio observations by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Long Baseline Array, and the Very Large Array in New Mexico, later identified another pair of jets originating in the core. "It is highly unlikely that an active galactic nucleus could have more than one pair of jets," says Yang. In 2001, Wilson, Yang, and Gerald Cecil

  7. Conceptualization and design of a variable-gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The goal is to provide facilities for the study of the effects of variable-gravity levels in reducing the physiological stresses upon the humans of long-term stay time in zero-g. The designs studied include: twin-tethered two module system with a central despun module with docking port and winch gear; and rigid arm tube facility using shuttle external tanks. Topics examined included: despun central capsule configuration, docking clearances, EVA requirements, crew selection, crew scheduling, food supply and preparation, waste handling, leisure use, biomedical issues, and psycho-social issues.

  8. ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases

    DOE Data Explorer

    Torn, Margaret

    2008-01-15

    Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2 concentration and CO2 stable isotope ratios (13CO2 and C18OO) from flasks collected at the SGP site. The flask samples are collected at 2m, 4m, 25m, and 60m along the 60m tower.

  9. Geochemical information for the West Chestnut Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility for low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, F.G.; Kelmers, A.D.

    1984-06-01

    Geochemical support activities for the Central Waste Disposal Facility (CWDF) project included characterization of site materials, as well as measurement of radionuclide sorption and desorption isotherms and apparent concentration limit values under site-relevant laboratory test conditions. The radionuclide sorption and solubility information is needed as input data for the pathways analysis calculations to model expected radioactivity releases from emplaced waste to the accessible environment under various release scenarios. Batch contact methodology was used to construct sorption and desorption isotherms for a number of radionuclides likely to be present in waste to be disposed of at the site. The sorption rates for uranium and europium were rapid (> 99.8% of the total radionuclide present was adsorbed in approx. 30 min). With a constant-pH isotherm technique, uranium, strontium, cesium, and curium exhibited maximum Rs values of 4800 to > 30,000 L/kg throughout the pH range 5 to 7. Sorption ratios were generally lower at higher or lower pH levels. Retardation factors for uranium, strontium, and cesium, explored by column chromatographic tests, were consistent with the high sorption ratios measured in batch tests for these radionuclides. The addition of as little as 0.01 M organic reagent capable of forming strong soluble complexes with metals (e.g., ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or citric acid) was found to reduce the sorption ratio for uranium by as much as two orders of magnitude. Substitution of an actual low-level waste site trench water for groundwater in these tests was found to give a similar reduction in the sorption ratio.

  10. Radionuclide migration pathways analysis for the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility on the West Chestnut Ridge site

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Lee, D.W.; Cannon, J.B.; Ketelle, R.H.

    1984-10-01

    A dose-to-man pathways analysis is performed for disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the Central Waste Disposal Facility on the West Chestnut Ridge Site. Both shallow land burial (trench) and aboveground (tumulus) disposal methods are considered. The waste volumes, characteristics, and radionuclide concentrations are those of waste streams anticipated from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The site capacity for the waste streams is determined on the basis of the pathways analysis. The exposure pathways examined include (1) migration and transport of leachate from the waste disposal units to the Clinch River (via the groundwater medium for trench disposal and Ish Creek for tumulus disposal) and (2) those potentially associated with inadvertent intrusion following a 100-year period of institutional control: an individual resides on the site, inhales suspended particles of contaminated dust, ingests vegetables grown on the plot, consumes contaminated water from either an on-site well or from a nearby surface stream, and receives direct exposure from the contaminated soil. It is found that either disposal method would provide effective containment and isolation for the anticipated waste inventory. However, the proposed trench disposal method would provide more effective containment than tumuli because of sorption of some radionuclides in the soil. Persons outside the site boundary would receive radiation doses well below regulatory limits if they were to ingest water from the Clinch River. An inadvertent intruder could receive doses that approach regulatory limits; however, the likelihood of such intrusions and subsequent exposures is remote. 33 references, 31 figures, 28 tables.

  11. Intensive archaeological survey of the proposed Central Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.K.; Sassaman, K.E.

    1993-11-01

    The project area for the proposed Central Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Facility on the Savannah River Site includes a six-acre tract along Fourmile Branch and 18 mi of trunk line corridors. Archaeological investigations of the six-acre parcel resulted in the discovery of one small prehistoric site designated 38AK465. This cultural resource does not have the potential to add significantly to archaeological knowledge of human occupation in the region. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) therefore recommends that 38AK465 is not eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and further recommends a determination of no effect. Archaeological survey along the trunk line corridors implicated previously recorded sites 38AK92, 38AK145, 38AK415, 38AK417, 38AK419, and 38AK436. Past disturbance from construction had severely disturbed 38AK92 and no archaeological evidence of 38AK145, 38AK419, and 38AK436 was recovered during survey. Lacking further evidence for the existence of these sites, the SRARP recommends that 38AK92, 38AK145, 38AK419, and 38AK436 are not eligible for nomination to the NRHP and thus warrant a determination of no effect. Two of these sites, 38Ak415 and 38AK417, required further investigation to evaluate their archaeological significance. Both of the sites have the potential to yield significant data on the prehistoric period occupation of the Aiken Plateau and the SRARP recommends that they are eligible for nomination to the NRHP. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program recommends that adverse effects to sites 38AK415 and 38AK417 from proposed construction can be mitigated through avoidance.

  12. Phoenix Robotic Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A vital instrument on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is the robotic arm, which will dig into the icy soil and bring samples back to the science deck of the spacecraft for analysis. In September 2006 at a Lockheed Martin Space Systems clean room facility near Denver, spacecraft technician Billy Jones inspects the arm during the assembly phase of the mission.

    Using the robotic arm -- built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena -- the Phoenix mission will study the history of water and search for complex organic molecules in the ice-rich soil.

    The Phoenix mission is led by Principal Investigator Peter H. Smith of the University of Arizona, Tucson, with project management at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and development partnership with Lockheed Martin Space Systems. International contributions for Phoenix are provided by the Canadian Space Agency, the University of Neuchatel (Switzerland), the University of Copenhagen, and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. ARESE (ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment) Science Plan [Atmospheric Radiation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, F.P.J.; Schwartz, S.E.; Cess, R.D.; Ramanathan, V.; Collins, W.D.; Minnis, P.; Ackerman, T.P.; Vitko, J.; Tooman, T.P.

    1995-09-27

    Several recent studies have indicated that cloudy atmospheres may absorb significantly more solar radiation than currently predicted by models. The magnitude of this excess atmospheric absorption, is about 50% more than currently predicted and would have major impact on our understanding of atmospheric heating. Incorporation of this excess heating into existing general circulation models also appears to ameliorate some significant shortcomings of these models, most notably a tendency to overpredict the amount of radiant energy going into the oceans and to underpredict the tropopause temperature. However, some earlier studies do not show this excess absorption and an underlying physical mechanism that would give rise to such absorption has yet to be defined. Given the importance of this issue, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is sponsoring the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) to study the absorption of solar radiation by clear and cloudy atmospheres. The experimental results will be compared with model calculations. Measurements will be conducted using three aircraft platforms (ARM-UAV Egrett, NASA ER-2, and an instrumented Twin Otter), as well as satellites and the ARM central and extended facilities in North Central Oklahoma. The project will occur over a four week period beginning in late September, 1995. Spectral broadband, partial bandpass, and narrow bandpass (10nm) solar radiative fluxes will be measured at different altitudes and at the surface with the objective to determine directly the magnitude and spectral characteristics of the absorption of shortwave radiation by the atmosphere (clear and cloudy). Narrow spectral channels selected to coincide with absorption by liquid water and ice will help in identifying the process of absorption of radiation. Additionally, information such as water vapor profiles, aerosol optical depths, cloud structure and ozone profiles, needed to use as input in radiative

  14. Use of Sandia's Central Receiver Test Facility as a high-intensity heat source for testing missile nose-cone (Radome) radar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, D.R.

    1981-09-01

    A series of tests at Sandia's Central Receiver Test Facility in support of the US Navy's SM-2 Blk 2 Radome Improvement Program is described. The CRTF was the source of high-intensity solar radiation for testing onboard radar-tracking systems under heating conditions intended to simulate those that occur in supersonic flight. Also discussed are the hardware used and the software developed at the CRTF.

  15. Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility. Part 1; Technique, Validation, and Comparison to Satellite-derived Diagnostic Quantities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Benson, Sally; Sonntag, Karen L.; Kato, Seiji; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Twohy, Cynthia H.; Poellot, Michael; Dong, Xiquan; Long, Charles; Zhang, Qiuqing; Doelling, David R.

    2006-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that continuous ground-based remote sensing measurements from active and passive remote sensors combined with regular soundings of the atmospheric thermodynamic structure can be combined to describe the effects of clouds on the clear sky radiation fluxes. We critically test that hypothesis in this paper and a companion paper (Part II). Using data collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, we explore an analysis methodology that results in the characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric profile at time resolutions of five minutes and vertical resolutions of 90 m. The description includes thermodynamics and water vapor profile information derived by merging radiosonde soundings with ground-based data, and continues through specification of the cloud layer occurrence and microphysical and radiative properties derived from retrieval algorithms and parameterizations. The description of the atmospheric physical state includes a calculation of the infrared and clear and cloudy sky solar flux profiles. Validation of the methodology is provided by comparing the calculated fluxes with top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface flux measurements and by comparing the total column optical depths to independently derived estimates. We find over a 1-year period of comparison in overcast uniform skies, that the calculations are strongly correlated to measurements with biases in the flux quantities at the surface and TOA of less than 10% and median fractional errors ranging from 20% to as low as 2%. In the optical depth comparison for uniform overcast skies during the year 2000 where the optical depth varies over 3 orders of magnitude we find a mean positive bias of 46% with a median bias of less than 10% and a 0.89 correlation coefficient. The slope of the linear regression line for the optical depth comparison is 0.86 with a normal deviation of 20% about this

  16. Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-06-18

    The scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) is a polarimetric Doppler radar consisting of three different radar designs based on operating frequency. These are designated as follows: (1) X-band SACR (X-SACR); (2) Ka-band SACR (Ka-SACR); and (3) W-band SACR (W-SACR). There are two SACRs on a single pedestal at each site where SACRs are deployed. The selection of the operating frequencies at each deployed site is predominantly determined by atmospheric attenuation at the site. Because RF attenuation increases with atmospheric water vapor content, ARM's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites use the X-/Ka-band frequency pair. The Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites field the Ka-/W-band frequency pair. One ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) has a Ka/W-SACR and the other (AMF2) has a X/Ka-SACR.

  17. C-Band Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar (C-SAPR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N

    2012-11-13

    The C-band scanning ARM precipitation radar (C-SAPR) is a scanning polarimetric Doppler radar transmitting simultaneously in both H and V polarizations. With a 350-kW magnetron transmitter, this puts 125 kW of transmitted power for each polarization. The receiver for the C-SAPR is a National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) -developed Hi-Q system operating in a coherent-on-receive mode. The ARM Climate Research Facility operates two C-SAPRs; one of them is deployed near the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility near the triangular array of X-SAPRs, and the second C-SAPR is deployed at ARM’s Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea.

  18. Environmental assessment: Solid waste retrieval complex, enhanced radioactive and mixed waste storage facility, infrastructure upgrades, and central waste support complex, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to take action to: retrieve transuranic (TRU) waste because interim storage waste containers have exceeded their 20-year design life and could fail causing a radioactive release to the environment provide storage capacity for retrieved and newly generated TRU, Greater-than-Category 3 (GTC3), and mixed waste before treatment and/or shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP); and upgrade the infrastructure network in the 200 West Area to enhance operational efficiencies and reduce the cost of operating the Solid Waste Operations Complex. This proposed action would initiate the retrieval activities (Retrieval) from Trench 4C-T04 in the 200 West Area including the construction of support facilities necessary to carry out the retrieval operations. In addition, the proposed action includes the construction and operation of a facility (Enhanced Radioactive Mixed Waste Storage Facility) in the 200 West Area to store newly generated and the retrieved waste while it awaits shipment to a final disposal site. Also, Infrastructure Upgrades and a Central Waste Support Complex are necessary to support the Hanford Site`s centralized waste management area in the 200 West Area. The proposed action also includes mitigation for the loss of priority shrub-steppe habitat resulting from construction. The estimated total cost of the proposed action is $66 million.

  19. Data Management Facility Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, Nicole N

    2014-06-30

    The Data Management Facility (DMF) is the data center that houses several critical Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility services, including first-level data processing for the ARM Mobile Facilities (AMFs), Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Southern Great Plains (SGP), and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, as well as Value-Added Product (VAP) processing, development systems, and other network services.

  20. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, S.; Jensen, M.; McCoy, R. B.; Klein, S. A.; Cederwall, R. T.; Wiscombe, W. J.; Clothiaux, E. E.; Gaustad, K. L.; Golaz, J.-C.; Hall, S.; Johnson, K. L.; Lin, Y.; Long, C. N.; Mather, J. H.; McCord, R. A.; McFarlane, S. A.; Palanisamy, G.; Shi, Y.; Turner, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (www.arm.gov) was created in 1989 to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. A central activity is the acquisition of detailed observations of clouds and radiation, as well as related atmospheric variables for climate model evaluation and improvement. Since 1992, ARM has established six permanent ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites and deployed an ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) in diverse climate regimes around the world (Fig. 1) to perform long-term continuous field measurements. The time record of ACRF data now exceeds a decade at most ACRF fixed sites and ranges from several months to one year for AMF deployments. Billions of measurements are currently stored in millions of data files in the ACRF Data Archive. The long-term continuous ACRF data provide invaluable information to improve our understanding of the interaction between clouds and radiation, and an observational basis for model validation and improvement and climate studies. Given the huge number of data files and current diversity of archived ACRF data structures, however, it can be difficult for an outside user such as a climate modeler to quickly find the ACRF data product(s) that best meets their research needs. The required geophysical quantities may exist in multiple data streams, and over the history of ACRF operations, the measurements could be obtained by a variety of instruments, reviewed with different levels of data quality assurance, or derived using different algorithms. In addition, most ACRF data are stored in daily-based files with a temporal resolution that ranges from a few seconds to a few minutes, which is much finer than that sought by some users. Therefore, it is not as convenient for data users to perform quick comparisons over large spans of data, and this

  1. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 6: Specification for EOS Central Data Processing Facility (CDPF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The specifications and functions of the Central Data Processing (CDPF) Facility which supports the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) are discussed. The CDPF will receive the EOS sensor data and spacecraft data through the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) and the Operations Control Center (OCC). The CDPF will process the data and produce high density digital tapes, computer compatible tapes, film and paper print images, and other data products. The specific aspects of data inputs and data processing are identified. A block diagram of the CDPF to show the data flow and interfaces of the subsystems is provided.

  2. Arm Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of them are in your arm; the humerus, radius and ulna. Your arms are also made up of muscles, joints, tendons and other connective tissue. Injuries to any of these parts of the arm can occur during sports, a fall or an accident. Types of arm injuries ...

  3. A Unified Approach for Reporting ARM Measurement Uncertainties Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, E; Sisterson, DL

    2015-10-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is observationally based, and quantifying the uncertainty of its measurements is critically important. With over 300 widely differing instruments providing over 2,500 datastreams, concise expression of measurement uncertainty is quite challenging. The ARM Facility currently provides data and supporting metadata (information about the data or data quality) to its users through a number of sources. Because the continued success of the ARM Facility depends on the known quality of its measurements, the Facility relies on instrument mentors and the ARM Data Quality Office (DQO) to ensure, assess, and report measurement quality. Therefore, an easily-accessible, well-articulated estimate of ARM measurement uncertainty is needed.

  4. Hanford facility dangerous waste Part A, Form 3 and Part B permit application documentation, Central Waste Complex (WA7890008967)(TSD: TS-2-4)

    SciTech Connect

    Saueressig, D.G.

    1998-05-20

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the Central Waste Complex (this document, DOE/RL-91-17). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needed by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the Central Waste Complex permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the Central Waste Complex permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this Central Waste Complex permit application documentation is current as of May 1998.

  5. Chemical exposures and central nervous system cancers: a case-control study among workers at two nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, A.V.; Flanders, W.D.; Frome, E.L.; Tankersley, W.G.; Fry, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    In a nested case-control study of workers employed between 1943 and 1977 at two nuclear facilities, we evaluated the possible association of primary CNS cancers with occupational exposure to chemicals. Seventy-two white male and 17 white female workers who, according to the information on death certificates, died of primary CNS cancers were identified as cases. For each case, four controls were matched on race, sex, facility at which initially employed (cohort), year of birth, and year of hire. Each job title/department combination was subjectively evaluated for potential exposure to each of 26 chemicals or chemical groups. Statistically significant associations were not found between CNS cancer deaths and any of the 26 chemicals. An increased risk of CNS cancer occurrence was observed among subjects employed for more than 20 yr (OR = 7.0, 95% CI = 1.2,41.1, cases = 9).

  6. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  7. Force Sensor for Large Robot Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Primus, H. C.; Scheinman, V. D.

    1985-01-01

    Modified Maltese-cross force sensor larger and more sensitive than earlier designs. Measures inertial forces and torques exerted on large robot arms during free movement as well as those exerted by claw on manipulated objects. Large central hole of sensor allows claw drive mounted inside arm instead of perpendicular to its axis, eliminating potentially hazardous projection. Originally developed for Space Shuttle, sensor finds applications in large industrial robots.

  8. Evolution of robotic arms.

    PubMed

    Moran, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of surgical robotics is in the development of the robotic arm. This is a thorough review of the literature on the nature and development of this device with emphasis on surgical applications. We have reviewed the published literature and classified robotic arms by their application: show, industrial application, medical application, etc. There is a definite trend in the manufacture of robotic arms toward more dextrous devices, more degrees-of-freedom, and capabilities beyond the human arm. da Vinci designed the first sophisticated robotic arm in 1495 with four degrees-of-freedom and an analog on-board controller supplying power and programmability. von Kemplen's chess-playing automaton left arm was quite sophisticated. Unimate introduced the first industrial robotic arm in 1961, it has subsequently evolved into the PUMA arm. In 1963 the Rancho arm was designed; Minsky's Tentacle arm appeared in 1968, Scheinman's Stanford arm in 1969, and MIT's Silver arm in 1974. Aird became the first cyborg human with a robotic arm in 1993. In 2000 Miguel Nicolalis redefined possible man-machine capacity in his work on cerebral implantation in owl-monkeys directly interfacing with robotic arms both locally and at a distance. The robotic arm is the end-effector of robotic systems and currently is the hallmark feature of the da Vinci Surgical System making its entrance into surgical application. But, despite the potential advantages of this computer-controlled master-slave system, robotic arms have definite limitations. Ongoing work in robotics has many potential solutions to the drawbacks of current robotic surgical systems.

  9. Worldwide Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Research Service, 1000 North Glebe Road, Arlington, Virginia 22201. JPRS-TAC-86-023 11 March 1986 WORLDWIDE REPORT ARMS CONTROL CONTENTS SDI AND SPACE ...ARMS Soviet Journal Reviews SIPRI Books on Arms Race in Outer Space (I. Kuznetsova, Yu. Orlov; Moscow INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS, No 12, Dec 85) 1...Moscow KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 8 Feb 86) 59 TASS: INF Accord Possible Without Space Arms Connection (Moscow TASS, 7 Feb 86) 62 TASS: U.S. Officials

  10. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    on nuclear and space arms cannot be described as "equitable" even with most unrestrained imagination. ’Gray Hawk’ PM131006 Moscow IZVESTIYA in...WORLDWIDE REPORT ARMS CONTROL CONTENTS SDI AND SPACE ARMS Effectiveness of U.S. SDI Effort Downplayed ’ (Peter Bretschneider; Karl-Marx-Stadt...MEZHDUNARODNYYE OTNOSHENIYA, No 7, Jul 85) 53 - b - JPRS-TAO85-064 13 December 1985 SDI AND SPACE ARMS EFFECTIVENESS OF U.S. SDI EFFORT

  11. A bill to amend title 10, United States Code, to permit the use of commissary and exchange facilities by former members of the Armed Forces who were retired or separated for physical disability.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Begich, Mark [D-AK

    2010-11-17

    11/17/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Armed Services. (text of measure as introduced: CR S7972) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. TCLS Arm for Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Benoit; Helfers, Tim; Poupat, Jean-Luc

    2015-09-01

    The TCLS ARM FOR SPACE proposal was an answer to the H2020 topic “COMPET-6-2014: Bottom-up Space Technologies at low TRL”. This paper presents this H2020 TCLS ARM FOR SPACE initiative led by Airbus DS and which aims at fostering the use of European technology such as ARM processing for Space.

  13. Floor Plans Engine Removal Platform, Hold Down Arm Platform, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans - Engine Removal Platform, Hold Down Arm Platform, Hydraulic Equipment Platforms, Isometric Cutaway of Engine Removal Platform, Isometric Cutaway of Hold Down Arm Platform, Isometric Cutaway of Hydraulic Platforms and Engine Support System Access - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V S-IC Static Test Facility, West Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  14. X-band Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar (X-SAPR) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N

    2012-10-29

    The X-band scanning ARM cloud radar (X-SAPR) is a full-hemispherical scanning polarimetric Doppler radar transmitting simultaneously in both H and V polarizations. With a 200 kW magnetron transmitter, this puts 100 kW of transmitted power for each polarization. The receiver for the X-SAPR is a Vaisala Sigmet RVP-900 operating in a coherent-on-receive mode. Three X-SAPRs are deployed around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility in a triangular array. A fourth X-SAPR is deployed near Barrow, Alaska on top of the Barrow Arctic Research Center.

  15. The how and why of arm swing during human walking.

    PubMed

    Meyns, Pieter; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Duysens, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    Humans walk bipedally, and thus, it is unclear why they swing their arms. In this paper, we will review the mechanisms and functions of arm swinging in human gait. First, we discuss the potential advantages of having swinging arms. Second, we go into the detail on the debate whether arm swing is arising actively or passively, where we will conclude that while a large part of arm swinging is mechanically passive, there is an active contribution of muscles (i.e. an activity that is not merely caused by stretch reflexes). Third, we describe the possible function of the active muscular contribution to arm swinging in normal gait, and discuss the possibility that a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) generates this activity. Fourth, we discuss examples from pathological cases, in which arm swinging is affected. Moreover, using the ideas presented, we suggest ways in which arm swing may be used as a therapeutic aid. We conclude that (1) arm swing should be seen as an integral part of human bipedal gait, arising mostly from passive movements, which are stabilized by active muscle control, which mostly originates from locomotor circuits in the central nervous system (2) arm swinging during normal bipedal gait most likely serves to reduce energy expenditure and (3) arm swinging may be of therapeutic value.

  16. A New Spiral Arm of the Galaxy: The Far 3 kpc Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, T. M.; Thaddeus, P.

    2008-08-01

    We report the detection in CO of the far-side counterpart of the well-known expanding 3 kpc arm in the central region of the Galaxy. In a CO longitude-velocity map at b = 0° the far 3 kpc arm can be followed over at least 20° of Galactic longitude as a faint lane at positive velocities running parallel to the near arm. The far arm crosses l = 0° at +56 km s-1, quite symmetric with the -53 km s-1 expansion velocity of the near arm. In addition to their symmetry in longitude and velocity, we find that the two arms have line widths (~21 km s-1), linear scale heights (~103 pc FWHM), and H2 masses per unit length (~4.3 × 106 M⊙ kpc-1) that agree to 26% or better. Guided by the CO, we have also identified the far arm in high-resolution 21 cm data and find, subject to the poorly known CO-to-H2 ratio in these objects, that both arms are predominately molecular by a factor of 3-4. The detection of these symmetric expanding arms provides strong support for the existence of a bar at the center of our Galaxy and should allow better determination of the bar's physical properties.

  17. Distribution and health risk assessment of some organic and inorganic substances in a petroleum facility in central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Serrano, R. M.; Torres, L. G.; Flores, C.; Castro, A.; Iturbe, R.

    An oil distribution and storage station was subjected to an Environmental Auditory and results showed soil contamination in part of the surface. An assessment of the site was required in order to fulfill a complete characterization of the contaminants present in soil and groundwater, as well as to establish the probable sources of contamination. Besides, a health risk assessment was performed to set remediation goals. The aim of this work is to show how the entire characterization and risk assessment process performed in this storage station from central Mexico, regarding to subsoil and groundwater. Thirty sample points were examined. Total petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations in soil were in a very low range (20-268 mg/kg). Ethylbenzene, methyl tert-butyl ether, tert-amyl methyl ether, and lead were identified in one sampling point. Iron and zinc were found in all soil samples. There was no correlation between total petroleum hydrocarbons and any of the metals or between both metals. Only two out of four monitoring wells showed total petroleum hydrocarbons levels (1.4 and 66 mg/L, respectively). Regarding lead, all four monitored wells showed lead concentrations (0.043-0.15 mg/L). Results suggested that metal concentrations were not associated to petroleum contamination, but to iron scrap deposits placed over the soil; nevertheless more data is needed to make a clear conclusion. Health risk assessment showed that none of the evaluated contaminants represented a risk either for the on-site or the off-site receptors, since the hazardous quotients estimated did not exceed the acceptable values.

  18. Octopus arm choice is strongly influenced by eye use.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Ruth A; Kuba, Michael J; Meisel, Daniela V; Griebel, Ulrike; Mather, Jennifer A

    2006-09-25

    This study aims to investigate the octopus' eye and arm coordination and raises the question if visual guidance determines choice of arm use. Octopuses possess eight seemingly identical arms but have recently been reported to show a preference as to which arm they use to initiate contact with objects. These animals also exhibit lateralized eye use, therefore, a connection between eye and arm preference seems possible. Seven Octopus vulgaris were observed during approach, contact initiation and exploration of plastic objects that were positioned on three different levels in the water column. The subjects most commonly used an arm to initiate contact with an object that was in a direct line between the eye used to look at the object, and the object itself. This indicates that choice of arm use is spatially rather opportunistic when depending on visual guidance. Additionally, first contact with an object was usually established by the central third of the arm and in arm contact sequences neighboring arms were the most likely to follow an arm already touching the object. Although results point towards strong eye/arm coordination, we did not find lateralized behavior in this experiment. Results are discussed from a neuro-anatomical, behavioral and ecological perspective.

  19. One regional ARM guide for climatic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.M.

    1990-04-01

    One of the early tasks of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program is to provide climatic guides for site selection purposes including possible continental, regional, local and on-site locations. The first guide A Preliminary ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluations'' provided some climate data on a continental scale; this one is an attempt to show the variability that exists over a region. Kansas was chosen for this particular guide because it satisfies most of the requirements given in the ARM Program Plan, i.e., climatic significance, potential for synergism with other programs and scientific and logistical viability. Kansas has extreme climatic variations, is centrally located, is compatible with other large scale programs (Fife), has good airfields and accommodations to minimize time and effort in planning and operating an ARM site for continuous use and special campaigns.

  20. One regional ARM guide for climatic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.M.

    1990-04-01

    One of the early tasks of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program is to provide climatic guides for site selection purposes including possible continental, regional, local and on-site locations. The first guide ``A Preliminary ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluations`` provided some climate data on a continental scale; this one is an attempt to show the variability that exists over a region. Kansas was chosen for this particular guide because it satisfies most of the requirements given in the ARM Program Plan, i.e., climatic significance, potential for synergism with other programs and scientific and logistical viability. Kansas has extreme climatic variations, is centrally located, is compatible with other large scale programs (Fife), has good airfields and accommodations to minimize time and effort in planning and operating an ARM site for continuous use and special campaigns.

  1. Selection, training and retention of an armed private security department.

    PubMed

    Hollar, David B

    2009-01-01

    To arm or not to arm security officers? One hospital which has opted for arming its officers is Cook Children's Healthcare System, Fort Worth, TX, an integrated pediatric healthcare facility with over 4000 employees. Because of its location in a major metropolitan area and based on several factors including demographics, exterior risk assessments and crime statistics, the hospital's Administration and its Risk Manager supported the decision to operate as an armed security force, according to the author. In this article he shares its current program and presents some thoughts and ideas that may benefit others who are considering this important step.

  2. The arms race

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, M.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive examination of the nature of the contemporary arms race, the forces that encourage arms competition, and the means by which these forces can be controlled. The author provides analyses of such specific issues as the viability of arms control agreements; the possibilities for nuclear disarmament; the means of deterrence, detection, and defense; and the methods of destruction themselves - nuclear, conventional, chemical, and space weapons.

  3. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    North Glebe Road, Arlington, Virginia 22201. JPRS-TAC-85-065 16 December 1985 WORLDWIDE REPORT ARMS CONTROL CONTENTS SDI AND SPACE ARMS French...34U.S.-USSR Geneva Talks" for "European Conferences". JPRS-TAO85-065 16 December 1985 SDI AND SPACE ARMS FRENCH PRIME MINISTER DISCUSSES SDI...imbalances in conventional weapons can really be discussed. As far as space is concerned, we want to avoid the emergence of weapons which are highly

  4. Radial arm strike rail

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1991-01-01

    The radial arm strike rail assembly is a system for measurement of bearings, directions, and stereophotography for geologic mapping, particularly where magnetic compasses are not appropriate. The radial arm, pivoting around a shaft axis, provides a reference direction determination for geologic mapping and bearing or direction determination. The centerable and levelable pedestal provide a base for the radial arm strike rail and the telescoping camera pedestal. The telescoping feature of the radial arm strike rail allows positioning the end of the rail for strike direction or bearing measurement with a goniometer.

  5. Robotic Arm Comprising Two Bending Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehling, Joshua S.; Difler, Myron A.; Ambrose, Robert O.; Chu, Mars W.; Valvo, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    accommodate all eight tendons at the same diameter along the arm. The threaded links have central bores through which power and video wires can be strung (1) from a charge-coupled-device camera mounted on the tip of the arms (2) back along the interior of the arm into the housing and then (3) from within the housing to an external video monitor.

  6. Application of pathways analyses for site performance prediction for the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Oblow, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility for shallow-land burial of low-level radioactive waste is evaluated using pathways analyses. The analyses rely on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Conceptual and numerical models are developed using data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations and are used to simulate the long-term transport of contamination to man. Conservatism is built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events have to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics exist. Maximum potential doses to man are calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. The sites are found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations. Conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability are drawn. In reaching these conclusions, some consideration is given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Cherry picker at end of Train Shed with arm fully ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cherry picker at end of Train Shed with arm fully extended and photographer in bucket - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  8. Overview of ARM observations during the ARM MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, S. A.; Long, C. N.; Feng, Z.; Comstock, J. M.; Sivaraman, C.; Bharadwaj, N.; Johnson, K. L.; Orr, B. W.; Ritsche, M.; Collis, S. M.; Schumacher, C.; Ellis, S.; Powell, S.

    2012-12-01

    The US Department of Energy funded Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) was performed in association with the DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) and CINDY-2011 (Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011) campaigns to study MJO initiation in the Indian Ocean. AMIE included measurements with the second ARM mobile facility (AMF2) on Addu City, the Maldives, and measurements at the permanent ARM site on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea. The dual-pronged nature of the AMIE experiment allowed observation of both MJO convective initiation in the Indian Ocean (at the Maldives site) and the mature phase of the MJO as it passed over the maritime continent (at the Manus site). The AMF2 consists of a full suite of atmospheric instrumentation including surface meteorological instruments, broadband radiometers, microwave radiometers, vertically pointing ceilometer, cloud radar and lidar, scanning cloud radar, and a 2D video disdrometer. At Manus, a similar suite of instruments, including a C-band precipitation radar, is available at the permanent ARM facility. A key aspect of the AMIE deployment was 8/day radiosonde launches at both the Maldives and Manus sites to document the evolution of the thermodynamic structure with the passage of the MJO over the sites. In this presentation, we give an overview of the available ARM thermodynamic, cloud, and precipitation observations during AMIE; show some preliminary ARM value added products; and present some initial comparisons of the ARM and DYNAMO radars.aily cloud frequency observed by the Ka ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) at the Gan site during AMIE.

  9. Determinants of anemia among pregnant mothers attending antenatal care in Dessie town health facilities, northern central Ethiopia, unmatched case -control study

    PubMed Central

    Seid, Omer; G/Mariam, Yemane; Fekadu, Abel; Wasihun, Yitbarek; Endris, Kedir; Bitew, Abebayehu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Anemia affects around 38.2% and 22% of pregnant women at a global and national level respectively. In developing countries, women start pregnancy with already depleted body stores of iron and other vitamins with significant variation of anemia within and between regions. Objective To identify the determinants of anemia among pregnant mothers attending antenatal care in Dessie town health facilities, northern central Ethiopia. Methods A health facility based unmatched case control study was conducted among 112 cases and 336 controls from January to March 2016 G.C. The sample size was determined by using Epi Info version 7.1.5.2. Study subjects were selected using consecutive sampling technique. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire, entered using Epi Data version 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression model was used to see the determinants of anemia. Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and p-value<0.05 were used to see the significant association. Results Failure to take dark green leafy vegetables per two weeks (AOR = 5.02, 95% CI: 2.16, 11.71), didn’t take chicken per two weeks (AOR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.22, 5.86), 1st trimester (AOR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.12, 3.84), 3rd trimester (AOR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.53, 5.72), HIV infection (AOR = 6.78, 95% CI: 2.28, 20.18) and medication (AOR = 3.57 95% CI: 1.60, 7.98) were positively associated with anemia. Conclusions Inadequate intake of dark green leafy vegetables, inadequate consumption of chicken, trimester of the current pregnancy, HIV infection and medication were the determinants of anemia among pregnant women. Therefore, anemia prevention strategy should include promotion of adequate intake of dark green leafy vegetables and chicken, increase meal pattern during the entire pregnancy and strengthen the prevention of mother to child HIV transmission/antenatal care programs. PMID:28288159

  10. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    by S. Kulik U.S. Commitment to Space Arms Reagan Cited Weinberger Hit on ABM Treaty SDI, ABM Testing Violates Accords Said to Undermine ABM Treaty...that the creation of a large scale ABM system with outer space based elements is "a justified approach" to arms control. Yet the implementation of...countries agree that this is a new, long-term round of the arms race, and that the development of ABM weapons and the defense" system as a whole will

  11. Worldwide Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Service, 1000 North Glebe Road, Arlington, Virginia 22201. JPRS-TAC-86-013 1 February 1986 WORLDWIDE REPORT ARMS CONTROL CONTENTS SDI AND SPACE ...ARMS LE SOIR on Possible European Space Defense (Pierre Lefevre; Brussels LE SOIR, 12 Dec 85) 1 SALT/START ISSUES USSR Hits U.S. Accusations of...PRS«TAO86*013 1 February 1986 SDI AND SPACE ARMS LE SOIR ON POSSIBLE EUROPEAN SPACE DEFENSE Brussels LE SOIR in French 12 Dec 85 p 8 [Article by

  12. MVACS Robotic Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonitz, R.; Slostad, J.; Bon, B.; Braun, D.; Brill, R.; Buck, C.; Fleischner, R.; Haldeman, A.; Herman, J.; Hertzel, M.; Noon, D.; Pixler, G.; Schenker, P.; Ton, T.; Tucker, C.; Zimmerman, W.

    2000-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor (MVACS) Robotic Arm is to support to the other MVACS science instruments by digging trenches in the Martian soil; acquiring and dumping soil samples into the thermal evolved gas analyzer (TEGA); positioning the Soil Temperature Probe (STP) in the soil: positioning the Robotic Arm Air Temperature Sensor (RAATS) at various heights above the surface, and positioning the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) for taking images of the surface, trench, soil samples, magnetic targets and other objects of scientific interest within its workspace.

  13. ARM Operations Quarterly Report - April - June 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2012-07-18

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  14. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  15. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S. C.; Tom, M. S.; Sweeney, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 5-year multi-institution and multi-agency airborne study of atmospheric composition and carbon cycling at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, with scientific objectives that are central to the carbon-cycle and radiative-forcing goals of the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) SGP region; 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative-forcing, convective processes, and CO2 concentrations over the ARM SGP region, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  16. JPRS Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-23

    GDR, handguns , ammunition, explo- sives, communications and pioneer technology, certain ships, and military supplies are produced. In 1989, 1...appointed by the interior minister, and the defense, trade, and foreign ministers can issue licenses for arms traders to sign contracts. In disputed...Impossible Thought The group of politicians, diplomats, and soldiers who want to use arms control and disarmament to further their Own concealed

  17. Worldwide Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    ABM (Moscow TASS, 9, 10 Nov 85) 5 .U.S. ’New Interpretation’ 5 U.S. Posture Unchanged 5 PRAVDA 27 Oct Review of Week’s International Events...Space Arms Race (Beijing XINHUA, 8 Nov 85) ........................... 34 Briefs Senators Hit ABM Change 35 CSSR Representative Addresses UN...SDI AND SPACE ARMS TASS REPORTS NITZE NOVEMBER REMARKS ON SDI, ABM U.S. ’New Interpretation’ LD901421 Moscow TASS in English 1334 GMT 9 Nov 85

  18. Worldwide Report. Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    knowledgeable people and came to the conclusion that the Pentagon official who has taught his son from infancy to fear and hate the USSR has influenced...missile. The U.S. Administration fears that defeat of the. MX in Congress could undermine the U.S. position>at the arms talks here. The Soviet delegation...swaggering. Behind this there is not only the fear that the gigantic arms ex- penditure could bring about a deficit crisis of enormous proportions

  19. ARM for Platform Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patte, Mathieu; Poupat, Jean-Luc; Le Meur, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    The activities described in this paper are part of the CNES R&T “Study of a Cortex-R ARM based architecture” performed by Airbus DS Space System & Electronics in 2014. With the support of CNES, Airbus DS has performed the porting of a representative space application software on an ARM based demonstration platform. This paper presents the platform itself, the activities performed at software level and the first results on this evaluation study.

  20. JPRS Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    past 23 years, Senate President Jovito Salonga said yesterday. In an interview on government television, Salonga said the presence of nuclear arms...date and place not given] [Excerpts] The Bulgarian Government recently announced that it will reduce its armed forces by 10,000 soldiers, 200 tanks...unambiguous and does not leave any room for any kind of speculation, not even in Bonn’s government statement. Corresponding to the GDR’s peace

  1. Hello to Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image highlights the hidden spiral arms (blue) that were discovered around the nearby galaxy NGC 4625 by the ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer.

    The image is composed of ultraviolet and visible-light data, from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the California Institute of Technology's Digitized Sky Survey, respectively. Near-ultraviolet light is colored green; far-ultraviolet light is colored blue; and optical light is colored red.

    As the image demonstrates, the lengthy spiral arms are nearly invisible when viewed in optical light while bright in ultraviolet. This is because they are bustling with hot, newborn stars that radiate primarily ultraviolet light.

    The youthful arms are also very long, stretching out to a distance four times the size of the galaxy's core. They are part of the largest ultraviolet galactic disk discovered so far.

    Located 31 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4625 is the closest galaxy ever seen with such a young halo of arms. It is slightly smaller than our Milky Way, both in size and mass. However, the fact that this galaxy's disk is forming stars very actively suggests that it might evolve into a more massive and mature galaxy resembling our own.

    The armless companion galaxy seen below NGC 4625 is called NGC 4618. Astronomers do not know why it lacks arms but speculate that it may have triggered the development of arms in NGC 4625.

  2. Look at my Arms!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image shows the hidden spiral arms that were discovered around the galaxy called NGC 4625 (top) by the ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. An armless companion galaxy called NGC 4618 is pictured below.

    Though the lengthy spiral arms are nearly invisible when viewed in optical light, they glow brightly in ultraviolet. This is because they are bustling with hot, newborn stars that radiate primarily ultraviolet light.

    The youthful arms are also very long, stretching out to a distance four times the size of the galaxy's core. They are part of the largest ultraviolet galactic disk discovered so far.

    Located 31 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4625 is the closest galaxy ever seen with such a young halo of arms. It is slightly smaller than our Milky Way, both in size and mass. However, the fact that this galaxy's disk is forming stars very actively suggests that it might evolve into a more massive and mature galaxy resembling our own.

    Astronomers do not know why NGC 4618 lacks arms but speculate that it may have triggered the development of arms in NGC 4625.

  3. Kinematically redundant arm formulations for coordinated multiple arm implementations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Robert W.; Quiocho, Leslie J.; Cleghorn, Timothy F.

    1990-01-01

    Although control laws for kinematically redundant robotic arms were presented as early as 1969, redundant arms have only recently become recognized as viable solutions to limitations inherent to kinematically sufficient arms. The advantages of run-time control optimization and arm reconfiguration are becoming increasingly attractive as the complexity and criticality of robotic systems continues to progress. A generalized control law for a spatial arm with 7 or more degrees of freedom (DOF) based on Whitney's resolved rate formulation is given. Results from a simulation implementation utilizing this control law are presented. Furthermore, results from a two arm simulation are presented to demonstrate the coordinated control of multiple arms using this formulation.

  4. Modulation of cutaneous reflexes in human upper limb muscles during arm cycling is independent of activity in the contralateral arm.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Timothy J; Zehr, E Paul; Collins, David F

    2005-02-01

    The amplitudes and signs of cutaneous reflexes are modulated during rhythmic movements of the arms and legs (during walking and arm or leg cycling for instance). This reflex modulation is frequently independent of the background muscle activity and may involve central pattern generator (CPG) circuits. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the nature and degree of coupling between the upper limbs during arm cycling, with regard to the regulation of cutaneous reflexes. Responses to electrical stimulations of the right, superficial radial nerve (five 1 ms pulses, 300 Hz) were recorded bilaterally in six arm muscles of eight participants during arm cycling involving only the limb ipsilateral to the stimulation, only the limb contralateral to the stimulation, and bilateral movement when the limbs were both in-phase and 180 degrees out of phase. The pattern of cutaneous reflex modulation throughout the arm cycle was independent of the functional state of the limb contralateral to the recording site, irrespective of whether recordings were made ipsilateral or contralateral to the stimulation. Furthermore, cutaneous reflexes were significantly (p<0.05) modulated with arm position in only 8% of cases in which the limb containing the responding muscle was either stationary or being moved passively by the experimenter. The results show that there is relatively weak coupling between the arms with regard to the regulation of cutaneous reflexes during rhythmic, cyclical arm movements. This suggests a loose connection between the CPGs for each arm that regulate muscle activity and reflex amplitude during rhythmic movement.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Specific Instruments Used in the ARM Program

    DOE Data Explorer

    ARM is known for its comprehensive set of world-class, and in some cases, unique, instruments available for use by the global scientific community. In addition to the ARM instruments, the ARM Climate Research Facility identifies and acquires a wide variety of data including model, satellite, and surface data, from "external instruments," to augment the data being generated within the program. External instruments belong to organizations that are outside of the ARM Program. Field campaign instruments are another source of data used to augment routine observations. The huge archive of ARM data can be organized by instrument categories into twelve "collections:" Aerosols, Airborne Observations, Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric Profiling, Cloud Properties, Derived Quantities and Models, Ocean Observations, Radiometric, Satellite Observations, Surface Meteorology, Surface/Subsurface Properties, and Other. Clicking on one of the instrument categories leads to a page that breaks that category down into sub-categories. For example, "Atmospheric Profiling" is broken down into ARM instruments (with 11 subsets), External Instruments (with 6 subsets), and Field Campaign Instruments (with 42 subsets). Each of the subset links, in turn, leads to detailed information pages and links to specific data streams. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading.

  6. Cloud Properties Derived From GOES-7 for Spring 1994 ARM Intensive Observing Period Using Version 1.0.0 of ARM Satellite Data Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.; Ayers, J. Kirk; Doelling, David R.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the initial formulation (Version 1.0.0) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program satellite data analysis procedures. Techniques are presented for calibrating geostationary satellite data with Sun synchronous satellite radiances and for converting narrowband radiances to top-of-the-atmosphere fluxes and albedos. A methodology is documented for combining geostationary visible and infrared radiances with surface-based temperature observations to derive cloud amount, optical depth, height, thickness, temperature, and albedo. The analysis is limited to two grids centered over the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility in north-central Oklahoma. Daytime data taken during 5 Apr. - 1 May 1994, were analyzed on the 0.3 deg and 0.5 deg latitude-longitude grids that cover areas of 0.9 deg x 0.9 deg and 10 deg x 14 deg, respectively. Conditions ranging from scattered low cumulus to thin cirrus and thick cumulonimbus occurred during the study period. Detailed comparisons with hourly surface observations indicate that the mean cloudiness is within a few percent of the surface-derived sky cover. Formats of the results are also provided. The data can be accessed through the World Wide Web computer network.

  7. Arm coordination in octopus crawling involves unique motor control strategies.

    PubMed

    Levy, Guy; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2015-05-04

    To cope with the exceptional computational complexity that is involved in the control of its hyper-redundant arms [1], the octopus has adopted unique motor control strategies in which the central brain activates rather autonomous motor programs in the elaborated peripheral nervous system of the arms [2, 3]. How octopuses coordinate their eight long and flexible arms in locomotion is still unknown. Here, we present the first detailed kinematic analysis of octopus arm coordination in crawling. The results are surprising in several respects: (1) despite its bilaterally symmetrical body, the octopus can crawl in any direction relative to its body orientation; (2) body and crawling orientation are monotonically and independently controlled; and (3) contrasting known animal locomotion, octopus crawling lacks any apparent rhythmical patterns in limb coordination, suggesting a unique non-rhythmical output of the octopus central controller. We show that this uncommon maneuverability is derived from the radial symmetry of the arms around the body and the simple pushing-by-elongation mechanism by which the arms create the crawling thrust. These two together enable a mechanism whereby the central controller chooses in a moment-to-moment fashion which arms to recruit for pushing the body in an instantaneous direction. Our findings suggest that the soft molluscan body has affected in an embodied way [4, 5] the emergence of the adaptive motor behavior of the octopus.

  8. Estimating Groundwater Concentrations from Mass Releases to the Aquifer at Integrated Disposal Facility and Tank Farm Locations Within the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2005-06-09

    This report summarizes groundwater-related numerical calculations that will support groundwater flow and transport analyses associated with the scheduled 2005 performance assessment of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site. The report also provides potential supporting information to other ongoing Hanford Site risk analyses associated with the closure of single-shell tank farms and related actions. The IDF 2005 performance assessment analysis is using well intercept factors (WIFs), as outlined in the 2001 performance assessment of the IDF. The flow and transport analyses applied to these calculations use both a site-wide regional-scale model and a local-scale model of the area near the IDF. The regional-scale model is used to evaluate flow conditions, groundwater transport, and impacts from the IDF in the central part of the Hanford Site, at the core zone boundary around the 200 East and 200 West Areas, and along the Columbia River. The local-scale model is used to evaluate impacts from transport of contaminants to a hypothetical well 100 m downgradient from the IDF boundaries. Analyses similar to the regional-scale analysis of IDF releases are also provided at individual tank farm areas as additional information. To gain insight on how the WIF approach compares with other approaches for estimating groundwater concentrations from mass releases to the unconfined aquifer, groundwater concentrations were estimated with the WIF approach for two hypothetical release scenarios and compared with similar results using a calculational approach (the convolution approach). One release scenario evaluated with both approaches (WIF and convolution) involved a long-term source release from immobilized low-activity waste glass containing 25,550 Ci of technetium-99 near the IDF; another involved a hypothetical shorter-term release of {approx}0.7 Ci of technetium over 600 years from the S-SX tank farm area. In addition, direct simulation results for both release

  9. Arms Industry limited

    SciTech Connect

    Wulf, H.

    1993-12-31

    The intent of this study is to give an overview of the present state of the world arms industry. It is an empirical account of the size of the industry and particularly its present problems. The authors examine the economic pressures that affect the international arms trade. Specifically, it raises the question of how dependent the industry is on weapons production and exports, and whether there are any alternatives. Export dependence of the major weapons producing countries is a major focus. The book focus`s on private industry as opposed to examination of national governments. Despite the passing of the Cold War and some brief post-Gulf War euphoria about the possibility of greater restrain on the part of weapons exporters, the conventional arms trade is alive and well, albeit with new variations.

  10. Robotic Arm Unwrapped

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken shortly after NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander touched down on the surface of Mars, shows the spacecraft's robotic arm in its stowed configuration, with its biobarrier successfully unpeeled. The 'elbow' of the arm can be seen at the top center of the picture, and the biobarrier is the shiny film seen to the left of the arm.

    The biobarrier is an extra precautionary measure for protecting Mars from contamination with any bacteria from Earth. While the whole spacecraft was decontaminated through cleaning, filters and heat, the robotic arm was given additional protection because it is the only spacecraft part that will directly touch the ice below the surface of Mars.

    Before the arm was heated, it was sealed in the biobarrier, which is made of a trademarked film called Tedlar that holds up to baking like a turkey-basting bag. This ensures that any new bacterial spores that might have appeared during the final steps before launch and during the journey to Mars will not contact the robotic arm.

    After Phoenix landed, springs were used to pop back the barrier, giving it room to deploy.

    The base of the lander's Meteorological Station can be seen in this picture on the upper left. Because only the base of the station is showing, this image tells engineers that the instrument deployed successfully.

    The image was taken on landing day, May 25, 2008, by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Worldwide Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    means and ofI large-scale system of so-called ABM defense coupled with the buildup of strategic offensive arms is also aimed at smashing the strategic...strategic defense". On this basis they assert, firstly, that there is as yet no real threat of an all-embracing ABM system being deployed, and, se- PnlifUÜf...States is not violating any of its commitments on arms limitations, above all those envisaged under the ABM treaty. It is common knowledge that

  12. Worldwide Report Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-04

    GMT 4 Jan 87 LD] /9738 CSO: 5200/1128 11 U.S.«-USSR NUCLEAR AND SPACE ARMS TALKS GORBACHEV, REAGAN NEW YEAR MESSAGES ON DISARMAMENT Reagan to...Moscow PRAVDA in Russian 28 Dec 86 First Edition p 4 [Vitaliy Korionov "International Review"] [Excerpts] Only a few days remain until the New Year...105063 JPRS-TAC-87-OlO 4 FEBRUARY 1987 Worldwide Report ARMS CONTROL ’DUO QUALITY BFSPSSTEP * 19980515 022 FBIS FOREIGN BROADCAST■1NFORMAtlÖN

  13. Facility Focus: Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses design and architectural features of two new science facilities at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida, and a new graduate research tower the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Notes the important convenience associated with interior windows in these facilities, which allow researchers, faculty, and students to see…

  14. Quality assurance procedures for environmental control and monitoring in plant growth facilities. Report of the North Central Regional 101 Committee on Growth Chamber Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    This report includes procedures for ensuring the quality of the environment provided for plant growth in controlled environment facilities. Biologists and engineers may use these procedures for ensuring quality control during experiments or for ensuring quality control in the design of plant growth facilities. Environmental monitoring prior to and during experiments is included in these procedures. Specific recommendations cover control, acquisition, and calibration for sensor types for the separate parameters of radiation (light), temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide, and air movement.

  15. EEG sLORETA functional imaging during hypnotic arm levitation and voluntary arm lifting.

    PubMed

    Cardeña, Etzel; Lehmann, Dietrich; Faber, Pascal L; Jönsson, Peter; Milz, Patricia; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Kochi, Kieko

    2012-01-01

    This study (N = 37 with high, medium, and low hypnotizables) evaluated depth reports and EEG activity during both voluntary and hypnotically induced left-arm lifting with sLORETA functional neuroimaging. The hypnotic condition was associated with higher activity in fast EEG frequencies in anterior regions and slow EEG frequencies in central-parietal regions, all left-sided. The voluntary condition was associated with fast frequency activity in right-hemisphere central-parietal regions and slow frequency activity in left anterior regions. Hypnotizability did not have a significant effect on EEG activity, but hypnotic depth correlated with left hemisphere increased anterior slow EEG and decreased central fast EEG activity. Hypnosis had a minimal effect on depth reports among lows, a moderate one among mediums, and a large one among highs. Because only left-arm data were available, the full role of the hemispheres remains to be clarified.

  16. Smooth dark spiral arms in the flocculent galaxy NGC2841

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, David L.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    1996-06-01

    OPTICAL images of the arms of spiral galaxies invariably show massive blue stars forming in ridges of interstellar gas and dust1. These are particularly striking in 'grand-design' galaxies, in which the stellar positions are influenced by spiral density waves1. By contrast, many galaxies have a 'flocculent' appearance, with no obvious evidence of spiral structure at visible wavelengths. Here we report infrared observations of the prototype flocculent galaxy NGC2841, which reveal a remarkable system of long, dark spiral arms. These arms arise from concentrations of dust; they are hidden at optical wavelengths by light scattered from the dust. The mechanism that has organized the gas and dust into these dark arms is at present unclear; the arms might be highly sheared dense clouds, or they might correspond to density waves in the interstellar medium driven by an elongated central bulge, which would not affect the stable stellar disk.

  17. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-28

    Dec 85 [Text] Moscow, December 3 TASS —TASS political news analyst valerity Vavilov writes: The defence ministers of the twelve West European NATO...that during the second Taiwan crisis of 1958, the use of nuclear arms against China was very close to reality. (In August of that year, the U.S. 7th

  18. JPRS Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    34military activities, whether in the armed forces, their civilian sectors, or in the ’defence’ indus- try". In another paper Professor Carl Sagan ...spurring the development of new weapons. Star Wars is a case in point. As Carl Sagan puts it, the idea is doomed: "SDI is ruinously expensive, it can

  19. Worldwide Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-12

    thai, in the long run one cannot oven tell to willy frandi’and fgon fahr . ’r’ho Soviets arc thus evoking the suspicion that they are playing dirty...material resources and the knowledge of scientists in combatting diseases , if the resources were spent on it that are taken up by the arms race

  20. JPRS Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Joint-Stock Company"] [Text] A constituent conference of the "Ural- Kosmos " closed joint-stock company [aktsionernoye obshchestvo zakrytogo tipa] has...due to be destroyed under arms cuts. Their warheads will be replaced by communications satellites. The founders of the "Ural- Kosmos " company note

  1. Effects of spiral arms on star formation in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-09-01

    We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the effect of spiral arms on the star formation rate (SFR) in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies. We find that spiral arms can be an efficient means of gas transport from the outskirts to the central parts, provided that the arms are rotating slower than the bar. While the ring star formation in models with no arms or corotating arms is active only during around the bar growth phase, arm-driven gas accretion both significantly enhances and prolongs the ring star formation in models with slow-rotating arms. The arm-enhanced SFR is larger by a factor of ∼3-20 than in the no-arm model, with larger values corresponding to stronger and slower arms. Arm-induced mass inflows also make dust lanes stronger. Nuclear rings in slow-arm models are ∼45% larger than in the no-arm counterparts. Star clusters that form in a nuclear ring exhibit an age gradient in the azimuthal direction only when the SFR is small, whereas no notable age gradient is found in the radial direction for models with arm-induced star formation.

  2. MAGIC: Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, ER; Wiscombe, WJ; Albrecht, BA; Bland, GL; Flagg, CN; Klein, SA; Kollias, P; Mace, G; Reynolds, RM; Schwartz, SE; Siebesma, AP; Teixeira, J; Wood, R; Zhang, M

    2012-10-03

    The second Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF2) will be deployed aboard the Horizon Lines cargo container ship merchant vessel (M/V) Spirit for MAGIC, the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds. The Spirit will traverse the route between Los Angeles, California, and Honolulu, Hawaii, from October 2012 through September 2013 (except for a few months in the middle of this time period when the ship will be in dry dock). During this field campaign, AMF2 will observe and characterize the properties of clouds and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; standard meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric structure. There will also be two intensive observational periods (IOPs), one in January 2013 and one in July 2013, during which more detailed measurements of the atmospheric structure will be made.

  3. Robotic Arm of Rover 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    JPL engineers examine the robotic arm of Mars Exploration Rover 1. The arm is modeled after a human arm, complete with joints, and holds four devices on its end, the Rock Abrasion Tool which can grind into Martian rocks, a microscopic imager, and two spectrometers for elemental and iron-mineral identification.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Site.

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is one of the four fixed sites. It consists of three climate research facilities; the Manus facility on Los Negros Island in Manus, Papua New Guinea (established in 1996); the Nauru facility on Nauru Island, Republic of Nauru (1998); and the Darwin facility in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia (2002). The operations are supported by government agencies in each host country. Covering the area roughly between 10 degrees N and 10 degrees S of the equator and from 130 degrees E to 167 degrees E, the TWP locale includes a region that plays a large role in the interannual variability observed in the global climate system. More than 250,000 TWP data sets from 1996 to the present reside in the ARM Archive. Begin at the TWP information page for links or access data directly from the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, October 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-11-04

    Aerosol Observing System Upgraded--The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) at the SGP central facility recently received maintenance and was upgraded to improve its performance. The AOS measures the properties of the aerosol particles around it. Several AOS components were removed, repaired, and calibrated to operate within specifications. The system continuously gathers information about the way minute aerosol particles interact with solar radiation. A better understanding of these interactions will help climate change researchers integrate aerosol effects more accurately into global climate computer models. Polar Bears Make Work Dangerous at ARM North Slope of Alaska Site--The late development of seasonal sea ice has increased polar bear sitings at ARM's Barrow site. The bears were recently seen next to the ARM instrument towers at Barrow, making the normal work day a bit more tricky for the technicians who are at the site year-round. Polar bears are not afraid of people and will attack and kill. The bears usually spend most of their time on off-shore ice floes hunting seals. This season, a large storm pushed the floes out to sea while the bears were ashore at Barrow, leaving them to forage for food on land until the sea ice reforms with the onset of colder weather. The hungry bears have made working at the Barrow CART site a dangerous proposition. ARM workers carry shotguns with them at all times for protection. On a recent journey to the site, ARM instrument mentor Michael Ritsche encountered the animals. ''You become much more aware of your surroundings,'' said Ritsche after returning safely to Argonne. Barrow residents protect themselves by shooting warning shells to scare the bears away from developed areas. Hearing the firing in the early mornings and late evenings at Barrow reminded Ritsche that he was in a more dangerous world.

  6. Microelectromechanical safe arm device

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W [Tijeras, NM

    2012-06-05

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus and methods for operating, for preventing unintentional detonation of energetic components comprising pyrotechnic and explosive materials, such as air bag deployment systems, munitions and pyrotechnics. The MEM apparatus comprises an interrupting member that can be moved to block (interrupt) or complete (uninterrupt) an explosive train that is part of an energetic component. One or more latching members are provided that engage and prevent the movement of the interrupting member, until the one or more latching members are disengaged from the interrupting member. The MEM apparatus can be utilized as a safe and arm device (SAD) and electronic safe and arm device (ESAD) in preventing unintentional detonations. Methods for operating the MEM apparatus include independently applying drive signals to the actuators coupled to the latching members, and an actuator coupled to the interrupting member.

  7. Robot arm apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, Henry D.

    1992-12-01

    A robot arm apparatus is provided for inspecting and/or maintaining an interior of a steam generator which has an outside wall and a port for accessing the interior of the steam generator. The robot arm apparatus includes a flexible movable conduit for conveying inspection and/or maintenance apparatus from outside the steam generator to the interior of the steam generator. The flexible conduit has a terminal working end which is translated into and around the interior of the steam generator. Three motors located outside the steam generator are employed for moving the terminal working end inside the steam generator in "x", "y", and "z" directions, respectively. Commonly conducted inspection and maintenance operations include visual inspection for damaged areas, water jet lancing for cleaning sludge deposits, core boring for obtaining sludge deposits, and scrubbing of internal parts.

  8. Robot arm apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    A robot arm apparatus is provided for inspecting and/or maintaining an interior of a steam generator which has an outside wall and a port for accessing the interior of the steam generator. The robot arm apparatus includes a flexible movable conduit for conveying inspection and/or maintenance apparatus from outside the steam generator to the interior of the steam generator. The flexible conduit has a terminal working end which is translated into and around the interior of the steam generator. Three motors located outside the steam generator are employed for moving the terminal working end inside the steam generator in "x", "y", and "z" directions, respectively. Commonly conducted inspection and maintenance operations include visual inspection for damaged areas, water jet lancing for cleaning sludge deposits, core boring for obtaining sludge deposits, and scrubbing of internal parts.

  9. Robot arm apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Nachbar, H.D.

    1990-12-31

    A robot arm apparatus is provided for inspecting and/or maintaining an interior of a steam generator which has an outside wall and a port for accessing the interior of the steam generator. The robot arm apparatus includes a flexible movable conduit for conveying inspection and/or maintenance apparatus from outside the steam generator to the interior of the steam generator. The flexible conduit has a terminal working end which is translated into and around the interior of the steam generator. Three motors located outside the steam generator are employed for moving the terminal working end inside the steam generator in ``x,`` ``y,`` and ``z`` directions, respectively. Commonly conducted inspection and maintenance operations include visual inspection for damaged areas, water jet lancing for cleaning sludge deposits, core boring for obtaining sludge deposits, and scrubbing of internal parts.

  10. Industrial Processes to Reduce Generation of Hazardous Waste at DoD Facilities. Phase III Report. Appendix C. Workshop Manual Centralized Vehicle Wash Racks and Scheduled Maintenance Facilities, Fort Lewis, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    facility described above are centrallyo one settled, treated by an oil removal device, and subjected to intermittent sand filtration. The sludges from the...solids and grease and oil content. e. Solid Waste Disposal: (1) Special Wastes Developed: sludges from sedimentation chambers and periodic scrapings...to - collect the waste oil from vehicles and place it directly into a storage tank . To eliminate the need for detergents and maintenance cleaning, low

  11. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of its missiles in Western Europe is a continuation of the policy of upsetting the established approximate equilibrium in the illusory hope of...measures in Europe. The Soviet Union advocates a sharp reduction in the level of medium-range nuclear means, with strict observance of equilibrium ...maintaining strategic equilibrium and its stability. But if this happens, the case in point will be a new round of the arms race. As is known, there were no

  12. Small arms ammunition

    DOEpatents

    Huerta, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    An elongate projectile for small arms use has a single unitary mass with a hollow nose cavity defined by a sharp rigid cutting edge adapted to make initial contact with the target surface and cut therethrough. The projectile then enters the target mass in an unstable flight mode. The projectile base is substantially solid such that the nose cavity, while relatively deep, does not extend entirely through the base and the projectile center of gravity is aft of its geometric center.

  13. JPRS Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    negotiations on all weapons categories. He said on Sunday in the ZDF [second German television] program "Bonn Direkt " that German foreign policy has...JPRS-TAC-89-021 25 MAY 1989 fflflBBl FOREIGN BROADCAST INFORMATION SERVICE JPRS Report— Arms Control A99S07A51® REPRODUCED BY U.S...Libyan Envoy Requests Meeting [THAI RAT 14 May] 16 Paper Criticizes U.S. Warning [MATICHON 13 May] 17 Foreign Minister Interviewed [Bangkok Radio

  14. JPRS Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    19980715 176 REPRODUCED BY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE SPRINGFIELD, VA. 22161 DTIC QUALITY INSPECTED X Arms...South Korean authorities are not in a position, for some reasons, to respond to our proposal right now, they should take at least practical measures...prevented, he said, nuclear weapons and their delivery vehicles should be removed. But, if the United States is not prepared for this right now, we

  15. Coat of Arms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bryan

    1998-01-01

    Describes an activity, the "coat of arms," that can serve as an ice-breaker or warm-up for the first day of an English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language class, as a motivating start to the week, or act as an innovative segue between skill lessons. The technique can be adapted for students ranging from elementary school to adult language learners of all…

  16. Robotic Arm End Effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Image illustrates the tools on the end of the arm that are used to acquire samples, image the contents of the scoop, and perform science experiments.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. JPRS Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    have to be comprehensively reduced before NATo cuts back on its arms. Those in the West, who attribute all progress to Gor- bachev’s behavior , have...disarmament expert Werner Hoyer stressed that there should not be any delay in beginning negotiations on this, from the German point of view. All...information or assistance, call FBIS, (202) 338-6735,or write to PO Box 2604, Washington, D.C. 20013. Department of Defense consumers are required to

  18. Worldwide Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-30

    Viewed, by Tang Tianri 29 Issues Assessed, by Tang Xiushan 31 SPACE ARMS USSR: Reports, Comments on Bush Trip to Europe To Push SDI (Various...85) 99 Indian Prime Minister Criticizes ’Star Wars’ (Bombay THE TIMES OF INDIA, 7 Jun 85) 101 Briefs USSR: U.S. Laser Test Planned 103 TASS...a tangible political disagree- ment. The Norwegian defense minister does not think that an attack will come of out of the blue . The foreign

  19. Worldwide Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    effective measures to feelings of those Americans who are demanding effective measures to limit the arms race, Weinberger hypocritically said that the...way to conduct effective negotiations." Mr Weinberger knows very well that speaking the language of diktat to the Soviet Union is an activity with...the ABM Treaty"] [Text] The Soviet-American Treaty on the Limitation of ABM Systems, concluded in May 1972, has now been in effect for more than 13

  20. JPRS Report, Arms Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    JPRS-TAC-89-025 21 JUNE 1989 !■■■■■ FOREIGN BROADCAST INFORMATION SERVICE -/P/? S #;# Arms Control \\ɘIÜ REPRODUCED BY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF...Compromise on SNF Issue [ S . Gjoka; ZERIIPOPULLIT 31 May] 11 U.S. Troop Reduction Proposals Critiqued [ S . Beqari; ZERI I POPULLIT 7 Jun] 12 BULGARIA...Petrov; RABOTNICHESKO DELO 7 Jun] 16 CZECHOSLOVAKIA Commentary Critiques Bush CFE, SNF Proposals [B. Zagar ; Bratislava PRAVDA 3 Jun] 18

  1. Sdi and arms control

    SciTech Connect

    DeWolf, H.G.

    1989-11-01

    President Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative, or SDI, and the pursuit of defenses to protect against ballistic missile attack are issues of significant debate. Some praise the proposal, first made in a presidential address to the nation on 23 March 1983, as a grand vision that will abolish nuclear blackmail by adopting a totally defensive posture. Others condemn it as being destabilizing, a Pandora's box of strategic transition that could precipitate armed conflict.

  2. Languages of arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Sherr, A.B.

    1985-11-01

    The author points out that the distinction between a component and subcomponent and a matter of Russian-English translation must be resolved if the Reagan-Gorbachev talks were to progress. The Reagan Administration did not create the problem of what is a component and what is a subcomponent; that was left unresolved in 1972. But the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization approach surely exacerbates it at a most inopportune time for arms control. US protestations that SDI does nothing to undermine the ABM Treaty ring hollow indeed when the professed aim of developing and testing various subcomponents is to arrive at a point of full systems development. If the Soviets were taking this same approach, no US arms control expert, in or out of government, would condone it once the activity had been identified by national technical means as probably ABM-related. The US would place the burden on the Soviets to explain, if they could, why it was not. The scope of the SDI program throws an entirely new factor into the equation. The price for pursuing SDI will be a stalemate in arms control negotiations for an indefinite future, increasing charges of cheating by both sides, and continuation of the chill in US-Soviet relations. Unless this prospect is reversed, good intentions and hopes for peace will be illusory. 7 references.

  3. 8. VIEW OF E3 WORK STATION WITH MANIPULATOR ARMS IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF E-3 WORK STATION WITH MANIPULATOR ARMS IN EAST OPERATING GALLERY LOOKING INTO THE HOT BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  4. 7. VIEW OF E5 WORK STATION AND MANIPULATOR ARMS WITHIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF E-5 WORK STATION AND MANIPULATOR ARMS WITHIN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE HOT BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  5. Charter for the ARM Atmospheric Modeling Advisory Group

    SciTech Connect

    Advisory Group, ARM Atmospheric Modeling

    2016-05-01

    The Atmospheric Modeling Advisory Group of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is guided by the following: 1. The group will provide feedback on the overall project plan including input on how to address priorities and trade-offs in the modeling and analysis workflow, making sure the modeling follows general best practices, and reviewing the recommendations provided to ARM for the workflow implementation. 2. The group will consist of approximately 6 members plus the PI and co-PI of the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) pilot project. The ARM Technical Director, or his designee, serves as an ex-officio member. This size is chosen based on the ability to efficiently conduct teleconferences and to span the general needs for input to the LASSO pilot project.

  6. [Protection of medical personnel in contemporary armed conflicts].

    PubMed

    Goniewicz, Krzysztof; Goniewicz, Mariusz; Pawłowski, Witold

    2016-01-01

    International humanitarian law provides special protection devices and medical personnel during armed conflicts. In today's wars it became more frequent lack of respect for the protective emblems of the red cross and red crescent and the lack of respect for medical activities. The paper presents selected issues of humanitarian law with a particular emphasis on the rules concerning the protection of medical services and victims of armed conflicts. All countries that have ratified the Geneva Conventions and Additional Protocols, are required to comply in time of war the principles contained in them and their dissemination in peacetime. Education societies in the field of international humanitarian law can help to eliminate attacks on medical facilities and personnel and significantly improve the fate of the victims of armed conflict and mitigate the cruelty of war. Knowledge of humanitarian law does not prevent further wars, but it can cause all parties to any armed conflict will abide by its rules during such activities.

  7. Armed conflict and child health

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Michael; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    Summary Armed conflict has a major impact on child health throughout the world. One in six children worldwide lives in an area of armed conflict and civilians are more likely to die than soldiers as a result of the conflict. In stark contrast to the effect on children, the international arms trade results in huge profits for the large corporations involved in producing arms, weapons and munitions. Armed conflict is not inevitable but is an important health issue that should be prevented. PMID:21393303

  8. Development of a model for geomorphological assessment at U.S. DOE chemical/radioactive waste disposal facilities in the central and eastern United States; Weldon spring site remedial action project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Rockaway, J.D.; Smith, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Landform development and long-term geomorphic stability is the result of a complex interaction of a number of geomorphic processes. These processes may be highly variable in intensity and duration under different physiographic settings. This limitation has influenced the applicability of previous geomorphological stability assessments conducted in the arid or semi-arid western United States to site evaluations in more temperate and humid climates. The purpose of this study was to develop a model suitable for evaluating both long-term and short-term geomorphic processes which may impact landform stability and hence the stability of disposal facilities located in the central and eastern United States. The model developed for the geomorphological stability assessment at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) near St. Louis, Missouri, included an evaluation of existing landforms and consideration of the impact of both long-term and short-term geomorphic processes. These parameters were evaluated with respect to their impact and contribution to three assessment criteria considered most important with respect to the stability analysis; evaluation of landform age, evaluation of present geomorphic process activity and ; determination of the impact of the completed facility on existing geomorphic processes. The geomorphological assessment at the Weldon Spring site indicated that the facility is located in an area of excellent geomorphic stability. The only geomorphic process determined to have a potential detrimental effect on long-term facility performance is an extension of the drainage network. A program of mitigating measures has been proposed to minimize the impact that future gully extension could have on the integrity of the facility.

  9. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    2012-10-25

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  10. Results from the first ARM diffuse horizontal shortwave irradiance comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J J.; Dolce, R; Dutton, E. G.; Haeffelin, Martial; Major, G; Schlemmer, J A.; Slater, Donald W. ); Hickey, J R.; Jeffries, W Q.; Los, A; Mathias, D; McArthur, LJ B.; Philipona, R; Reda, I; Stoffel, T

    2003-02-07

    The first intensive observation period (IOP) dedicated exclusively to the measurement of diffuse horizontal shortwave irradiance was held in the Fall 2001 at the central facility of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site with the cooperation of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) community. Fourteen simultaneous measurements were obtained over a two-week period under mostly clear skies with low to moderate aerosol loading. Overcast data were obtained during the morning of one day. The purpose of the comparison was to assess the level of agreement in diffuse irradiance measurements among most commercial pyranometers and a few prototypes calibrated independently using current practices. The hope was to achieve a consensus for this measurement with the goal of improving the uncertainty of shortwave diffuse irradiance measurements. All diffuse broadband measurements were made using the same type of two-axis tracker with the direct beam blocked by shading balls. Tracking was very good during the IOP with no outages associated with tracker problems. Five of the measurements are reproducible to about 2 W/m2 at the 95% confidence level. Four more agree with the most consistent group to about 4 W/m2 at the 95% confidence level after correction for thermal offsets. The prototypes agree less well with the most consistent group.

  11. External Tank GH2 Vent Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, G. E.; Glassburn, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Because the venting of free hydrogen gas to the atmosphere presents an extremely hazardous situation, it was necessary to devise a means for safe, controlled venting of the shuttle external tank gaseous hydrogen during and after liquid hydrogen tank loading. Several design concepts that were considered initially were discarded as unfeasible because of vehicle weight restrictions, high cost, and because the proposed structure was itself deemed a hazard due to the vehicle's nonvertical launch trajectory. These design concepts are discussed. A design employing a support structure/access arm attached to the fixed service structure was finally selected. The various design problems resolved included vent arm disconnect/drop interference, minimizing refurbishment due to launch damage, disconnect reliability, vehicle movement tracking, minimizing vent line pressure drop, and the presence of other vehicle services at the same centralized supply area. Six launches have proven the system to be reliable, efficient, and of nearly zero refurbishment cost.

  12. Comparison of Shortwave Cloud Radiative Forcing Derived from ARM SGP Surface and GOES-8 Satellite Measurements During ARESE I and ARESE II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, A. D.; Doelling, D. R.; Khaiyer, M. M.; Minnis, P.; Smith, W. L., Jr.; Nguyen, L.; Haeffelin, M. P.; Valero, F. P. J.; Asano, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the objectives of the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) is to investigate the absorption of solar radiation by clouds over the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility. A variety of techniques employing various combinations Of Surface, aircraft, and satellite data have been used to estimate the absorption empirically. During ARESE-I conducted during fall 1995, conflicting results were produced from different analyses of the combined datasets leading to the need for a more controlled experiment. ARESE-II was conducted during spring 2000. Improved calibrations, different sampling strategies, and broadband satellite data were all available to minimize some of the sources of uncertainty in the data. In this paper, cloud absorption or its parametric surrogates (e.g., Cess et al. 1995) are derived from collocated and coincident surface and satellite radiometer data from both ARESE-I and ARESE-II using the latest satellite and surface instrument calibrations.

  13. Electromyographic investigation of hypnotic arm levitation: differences between voluntary arm elevation and involuntary arm levitation.

    PubMed

    Peter, Burkhard; Schiebler, Philipp; Piesbergen, Christoph; Hagl, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Thirty-three volunteers were randomly exposed to 3 conditions: hypnotic arm levitation, holding up the arm voluntarily without hypnosis, and imagined arm lifting without hypnosis. Trapezius, deltoid, extensor digitorum, flexor digitorum profundus, biceps brachii, and triceps brachii muscles were measured. Strain and muscle activity during lifting and holding up the right arm for 3 minutes were used as dependent variables. During hypnotic arm levitation, the total muscle activity was lower than during holding it up voluntarily (p < .01); the activity in the deltoid was 27% lower (p < .001). Without hypnosis, the muscle activity showed a positive correlation with strain. However, there was no such correlation in the hypnotic condition. Apparently, it is possible to reduce strain and to objectively measure muscle activity in an uplifted arm through hypnotic arm levitation.

  14. Survival and arm abscission are linked to regional heterothermy in an intertidal sea star.

    PubMed

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Sanford, Eric; Helmuth, Brian

    2013-06-15

    Body temperature is a more pertinent variable to physiological stress than ambient air temperature. Modeling and empirical studies on the impacts of climate change on ectotherms usually assume that body temperature within organisms is uniform. However, many ectotherms show significant within-body temperature heterogeneity. The relationship between regional heterothermy and the response of ectotherms to sublethal and lethal conditions remains underexplored. We quantified within-body thermal heterogeneity in an intertidal sea star (Pisaster ochraceus) during aerial exposure at low tide to examine the lethal and sublethal effects of temperatures of different body regions. In manipulative experiments, we measured the temperature of the arms and central disc, as well as survival and arm abscission under extreme aerial conditions. Survival was related strongly to central disc temperature. Arms were generally warmer than the central disc in individuals that survived aerial heating, but we found the reverse in those that died. When the central disc reached sublethal temperatures of 31-35°C, arms reached temperatures of 33-39°C, inducing arm abscission. The absolute temperature of individual arms was a poor predictor of arm abscission, but the arms lost were consistently the hottest at the within-individual scale. Therefore, the vital region of this sea star may remain below the lethal threshold under extreme conditions, possibly through water movement from the arms to the central disc and/or evaporative cooling, but at the cost of increased risk of arm abscission. Initiation of arm abscission seems to reflect a whole-organism response while death occurs as a result of stress acting directly on central disc tissues.

  15. Controller arm for a remotely related slave arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, J. K., Jr. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A segmented controller arm configured and dimensioned to form a miniature kinematic replica of a remotely related slave arm is disclosed. The arm includes: (1) a plurality of joints for affording segments of the arm simultaneous angular displacement about a plurality of pairs of intersecting axes, (2) a plurality of position sensing devices for providing electrical signals indicative of angular displacement imparted to corresponding segments of the controller shaft about the axes, and (3) a control signal circuit for generating control signals to be transmitted to the slave arm. The arm is characterized by a plurality of yokes, each being supported for angular displacement about a pair of orthogonally related axes and counterbalanced against gravitation by a cantilevered mass.

  16. ARM Data Integrator

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-06

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Integrator (ADI) streamlines the development of scientific algorithms and analysis of time-series NetCDF data, and improves the content and consistency of the output data products produced by these algorithms. The framework automates the process of retrieving and preparing data for analysis, and allows users to design output data products through a graphical interface. It also provides a modular, flexible software development architecture that scientists can use to generate C, Python, and IDL source code templates that embed the pre and post processing logic allowing the scientist to focus on only their science. The input data, preprocessing, and output data specifications of algorithms are defined through a graphical interface and stored in a database. ADI implements workflow for data integration and supports user access to data through a library of software modules. Data preprocess capabilities supported include automated retrieval of data from input files, merging the retrieved data into appropriately sized chunks, and transformation of the data onto a common coordinate system grid. Through the graphical interface, users can view the details of both their data products and those in the ARM catalog and allows developers to use existing data product to build new data products. Views of the output data products include an overlay of how the design meets ARM archive’s data standards providing the user with a visual cue indicating where their output violates an archive standard. The ADI libraries access the information provided through the GUI via a Postgres database. The ADI framework and its supporting components can significantly decrease the time and cost of implementing scientific algorithms while improving the ability of scientists to disseminate their results.

  17. Worldwide Report, Arms Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    n r JPRS-TAC-85-057 25 November 1985 Worldwide Report ARMS CONTROL f-—*lf^ S ;.řS », ;r%^V; ,*’ \\i.*? 19980728 ■£*V’:: FBIS FOREIGN BROADCAST...why he had decided to extend a programme launched last year of aid to penetration techniques. He had asked the Atomic Energy Commisariat (CEA) for...ICBM s , i.e. for those systems which constitute the basis of the strategic potential of the USSR. No though restrictions are set for the systems in

  18. Phoenix Robotic Arm Rasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This photograph shows the rasp protruding from the back of the scoop on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm engineering model in the Payload Interoperability Testbed at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

    This is the position the rasp will assume when it drills into the Martian soil to acquire an icy soil sample for analysis.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Data on surface-water, streambed-interstitial water, and bed-sediment quality for selected locations in the small arms impact area of central Fort Gordon, Georgia, September 4-6, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Priest, Sheryln; Stamey, Timothy C.; Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    In September 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Environmental and Natural Resources Management Office of the U.S. Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon (U.S. Department of the Army), conducted a chemical assessment of surface water, streambed-interstitial water, and bed sediments within the small arms impact area of Fort Gordon Military Installation. The study was conducted in support of the development of an Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Fort Gordon, Georgia. An effective INRMP ensures that natural resources conservation measures and U.S. Army activities on the military base are integrated and consistent with Federal requirements to manage military installations on an ecosystem basis. Filtered water samples were collected from five sites along South Prong Creek and three sites along Marcum Branch Creek for chemical analyses of major ions, nutrients, and selected trace elements. On-site measurements of pH, temperature, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen were made at the eight sites. Filtered water collected showed varying concentrations in both surface- and streambed-interstitial water. Bed-sediment samples collected from South Prong Creek contain elevated levels of arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, selenium, vanadium, and total organic carbon relative to previous concentrations (McConnell and others, 2000). Bed-sediment samples collected from Marcum Branch Creek contain elevated levels of beryllium, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, selenium, and total organic carbon relative to previous concentrations (McConnell and others, 2000).

  20. Darwin : The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site /

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, William E.; Jones, L. A.; Baldwin, T.; Nitschke, K.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program began operations in its Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale in October 1996 when the first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) began collecting data on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Two years later, in November 1998, a second ARCS began operations on the island of Nauru in the Central Pacific. Now a third ARCS has begun collecting data in Darwin, Australia. The Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites are operated through collaborative agreements with the PNG National Weather Service, The Nauru Department of Industry and Economic Development (IED), and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Special Services Unit (SSU) respectively. All ARM TWP activities in the region are coordinated with the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) based in Apia, Samoa. The Darwin ARM site and its role in the ARM TWP Program are discussed.

  1. Robot Serviced Space Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, Lloyd R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A robot serviced space facility includes multiple modules which are identical in physical structure, but selectively differing in function. and purpose. Each module includes multiple like attachment points which are identically placed on each module so as to permit interconnection with immediately adjacent modules. Connection is made through like outwardly extending flange assemblies having identical male and female configurations for interconnecting to and locking to a complementary side of another flange. Multiple rows of interconnected modules permit force, fluid, data and power transfer to be accomplished by redundant circuit paths. Redundant modules of critical subsystems are included. Redundancy of modules and of interconnections results in a space complex with any module being removable upon demand, either for module replacement or facility reconfiguration. without eliminating any vital functions of the complex. Module replacement and facility assembly or reconfiguration are accomplished by a computer controlled articulated walker type robotic manipulator arm assembly having two identical end-effectors in the form of male configurations which are identical to those on module flanges and which interconnect to female configurations on other flanges. The robotic arm assembly moves along a connected set or modules by successively disconnecting, moving and reconnecting alternate ends of itself to a succession of flanges in a walking type maneuver. To transport a module, the robot keeps the transported module attached to one of its end-effectors and uses another flange male configuration of the attached module as a substitute end-effector during walking.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, February 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2001-03-08

    This newsletter consists of the following: (1) ARM Science Team Meeting Scheduled--The 11th Annual ARM Science Team meeting is scheduled for March 19-23, 2001, in Atlanta, Georgia. Members of the science team will exchange research results achieved by using ARM data. The science team is composed of working groups that investigate four topics: instantaneous radiative flux, cloud parameterizations and modeling, cloud properties, and aerosols. The annual meeting brings together the science team's 150 members to discuss issues related to ARM and its research. The members represent universities, government laboratories and research facilities, and independent research companies. (2) Communications to Extended Facilities Upgraded--New communications equipment has been installed at all of the SGP extended facilities. Shelters were installed to house the new equipment used to transfer data from instruments via the Internet to the site data system at the central facility. This upgrade has improved data availability from the extended facilities to 100% and reduced telephone costs greatly. (3) SGP Goes ''Buggy''--Steve Sekelsky, a researcher from the University of Massachusetts, is planning to bring a 95-GHz radar to the SGP central facility for deployment in March-October 2001. The radar will help to identify signals due to insects flying in the air. The ARM millimeter cloud radar, which operates at 35 GHz, is sensitive to such insect interference. Testing will also be performed by using a second 35-GHz radar with a polarized radar beam, which can differentiate signals from insects versus cloud droplets. (4) Winter Fog--Fog can add to hazards already associated with winter weather. Common types of fog formation include advection, radiation, and steam. Advection fog: An advection fog is a dense fog that forms when a warm, moist air mass moves into an area with cooler ground below. For example, fog can form in winter when warmer, water-saturated air from the south (associated

  3. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S

    2015-12-01

    From October 1 through September 30, 2016, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility will deploy the Cessna 206 aircraft over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, collecting observations of trace-gas mixing ratios over the ARM’s SGP facility. The aircraft payload includes two Atmospheric Observing Systems, Inc., analyzers for continuous measurements of CO2 and a 12-flask sampler for analysis of carbon cycle gases (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, 13CO2, 14CO2, carbonyl sulfide, and trace hydrocarbon species, including ethane). The aircraft payload also includes instrumentation for solar/infrared radiation measurements. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program and builds upon previous ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) missions. The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange at the SGP site, 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative forcing, convective processes and CO2 concentrations over the SGP site, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  4. Wright Research and Development Center Test Facilities Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    DIVISIONS: Defense Avionics (SNA) Aero Propulsion and Configuration (SNP) Structures and Materials (SNS) Technology Demonstration (SNT) TEHNOLOGY ...6553 (513) 255-6622 AV 785-6622 208 t W I: IP- FACILITY TYPE: Mobile Data Acquisition PURPOSE: Mobile data acquisition FACILITY NAME: Mobile Data...inovations FACILITY NAME: Mobility Development Laboratory PRIMARY CAPABILITIES: Dynamic Test Machine - whirling arm capable of testing subsystems

  5. ARM CLASIC ER2 CRS/EDOP

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Heymsfield

    2010-12-20

    Data was taken with the NASA ER-2 aircraft with the Cloud Radar System and other instruments in conjunction with the DOE ARM CLASIC field campaign. The flights were near the SGP site in north Central Oklahoma and targeted small developing convection. The CRS is a 94 GHz nadir pointing Doppler radar. Also on board the ER-2 was the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). Seven science flights were conducted but the weather conditions did not cooperate in that there was neither developing convection, or there was heavy rain.

  6. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  8. Axonemal Dynein Arms.

    PubMed

    King, Stephen M

    2016-11-01

    Axonemal dyneins form the inner and outer rows of arms associated with the doublet microtubules of motile cilia. These enzymes convert the chemical energy released from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis into mechanical work by causing the doublets to slide with respect to each other. Dyneins form two major groups based on the number of heavy-chain motors within each complex. In addition, these enzymes contain other components that are required for assembly of the complete particles and/or for the regulation of motor function in response to phosphorylations status, ligands such as Ca(2+), changes in cellular redox state and which also apparently monitor and respond to the mechanical state or curvature in which any given motor finds itself. It is this latter property, which is thought to result in waves of motor function propagating along the axoneme length. Here, I briefly describe our current understanding of axonemal dynein structure, assembly, and organization.

  9. Global arms proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, D.

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports that the United States delivered some US $11 billion of military hardware to Iran between 1969 and 1979, in the hopes of helping stabilize a volatile situation in the Middle East. That did not work. When Iran used the weapons against Iraq, the USSR, France, and a number of developing countries helped arm Iraq. It was this vast arsenal that Iraq deployed in its Kuwait-Persian Gulf War venture. Granted, those weapons were augmented by some U.S.-made equipment like TOW antitank missiles and Hawk antiaircraft missiles that were captured in the Iraqi attack on Kuwait. A report issued by the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) in June cited that chain of events to demonstrate that the U.S. and other major exporters are gradually losing control of the weapons transferred (to other countries) as well as the technology and industry necessary to produce and support them.

  10. Robotic Arm Biobarrier Cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander on the 14th Martian day of the mission (June 7, 2008), shows the cable that held the Robotic Arm's biobarrier in place during flight has snapped. The cable's springs retracted to release the biobarrier right after landing.

    To the lower right of the image a spring is visible. Extending from that spring is a length of cable that snapped during the biobarrier's release. A second spring separated from the cable when it snapped and has been photographed on the ground under the lander near one of the legs.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. The Neanderthal lower arm.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Isabelle

    2011-10-01

    Neanderthal forearms have been described as being very powerful. Different individual features in the lower arm bones have been described to distinguish Neanderthals from modern humans. In this study, the overall morphology of the radius and ulna is considered, and morphological differences among Neanderthals, Upper Paleolithic Homo sapiens and recent H. sapiens are described. Comparisons among populations were made using a combination of 3D geometric morphometrics and standard multivariate methods. Comparative material included all available complete radii and ulnae from Neanderthals, early H. sapiens and archaeological and recent human populations, representing a wide geographical and lifestyle range. There are few differences among the populations when features are considered individually. Neanderthals and early H. sapiens fell within the range of modern human variation. When the suite of measurements and shapes were analyzed, differences and similarities became apparent. The Neanderthal radius is more laterally curved, has a more medially placed radial tuberosity, a longer radial neck, a more antero-posteriorly ovoid head and a well-developed proximal interosseous crest. The Neanderthal ulna has a more anterior facing trochlear notch, a lower M. brachialis insertion, larger relative mid-shaft size and a more medio-lateral and antero-posterior sinusoidal shaft. The Neanderthal lower arm morphology reflects a strong cold-adapted short forearm. The forearms of H. sapiens are less powerful in pronation and supination. Many differences between Neanderthals and H. sapiens can be explained as a secondary consequence of the hyper-polar body proportions of the Neanderthals, but also as retentions of the primitive condition of other hominoids.

  12. How do octopuses use their arms?

    PubMed

    Mather, J A

    1998-09-01

    A taxonomy of the movement patterns of the 8 flexible arms of octopuses is constructed. Components consist of movements of the arm itself, the ventral suckers and their stalks, as well as the relative position of arms and the skin web between them. Within 1 arm, combinations of components result in a variety of behaviors. At the level of all arms, 1 group of behaviors is described as postures, on the basis of the spread of all arms and the web to make a 2-dimensional surface whose position differs in the 3rd dimension. Another group of arm behaviors is actions, more or less coordinated and involving several to all arms. Arm control appears to be based on radial symmetry, relative equipotentiality of all arms, relative independence of each arm, and separability of components within the arm. The types and coordination of arm behaviors are discussed with relationship to biomechanical limits, muscle structures, and neuronal programming.

  13. Tele/Autonomous Robot For Nuclear Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G.; Tso, Kam S.

    1994-01-01

    Fail-safe tele/autonomous robotic system makes it unnecessary for human technicians to enter nuclear-fuel-reprocessing facilities and other high-radiation or otherwise hazardous industrial environments. Used to carry out experiments as exchanging equipment modules, turning bolts, cleaning surfaces, and grappling turning objects by use of mixture of autonomous actions and teleoperation with either single arm or two cooperating arms. System capable of fully autonomous operation, teleoperation or shared control.

  14. Layers of Experience Using "Arms"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Laurinda; Coles, Alf; Ball, Derek; Morton, Pat; Coles, Matt; Ordman, Louise; Orr, Barry; Lam, Tung Ken

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the authors' personal accounts and their experiences in working on mathematics using "arms." "Arms" is an idea that first appeared as a program written by John Warwick and David Wooldridge in an ATM publication "Some Lessons in Mathematics with a Microcomputer," 1983. The introduction to…

  15. Arms control and the MX

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    By 1969, Soviet ballistic missile deployments led the United States to project the vulnerability of Minuteman Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) silos along with an imbalance in ICBM capabilities. The Nixon Administration planned two simultaneous responses: strategic arms negotiations, to limit the threat through mutually agreed restraints; and the Safeguard Anti-Ballistic Missile defense program, to defend, as necessary, the threatened ICBM force. The US succeeded in neither. The planned defense did not materialize, even though SALT failed to limit the growth of the Soviet threat. In the years after SALT I, the US planned, but again did not carry through, ICBM programs to enhance ICBM survivability and at the same time to approach essential equivalence with Soviet capabilities. This dissertation examines the relationship of the two US responses and how arms control affected the MX ICBM system. First, the effects of US arms control objectives and optimism on the MX are analyzed from the first MX systems study in 1974, supporting the new Strategic Arms Limitation Talks, to the deployment of MX in current Minuteman silos, supporting the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks. Here US arms control contributed to MX delays and highlighted ICBM capability over ICBM survivability. Second, the effect of specific arms control provisions are addressed topically for each strategic arms agreement. The framework they establish allowed ICBM capabilities to increase, but constrained ICBM survivability.

  16. Beyond Arms-Control Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Fung, Inez; Bowyer, Ted W.; Wofsy, Steven

    2013-02-15

    Expanded monitoring of the environment, everywhere and at all times, can advance arms control around the world, enhancing transparency among nations. In particular, improved characterization of the atmosphere now offers powerful opportunities for global monitoring, with multiple societal benefits. It may be useful to think of environmental monitoring as a long-term objective of arms-control verification.

  17. LISA Long-Arm Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James I.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of LISA Long-Arm Interferometry is presented. The contents include: 1) LISA Interferometry; 2) Constellation Design; 3) Telescope Design; 4) Constellation Acquisition; 5) Mechanisms; 6) Optical Bench Design; 7) Phase Measurement Subsystem; 8) Phasemeter Demonstration; 9) Time Delay Interferometry; 10) TDI Limitations; 11) Active Frequency Stabilization; 12) Spacecraft Level Stabilization; 13) Arm-Locking; and 14) Embarassment of Riches.

  18. Rendezvous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gehani, N.H.; Roome, W.D.

    1988-11-01

    The concurrent programming facilities in both Concurrent C and the Ada language are based on the rendezvous concept. Although these facilities are similar, there are substantial differences. Facilities in Concurrent C were designed keeping in perspective the concurrent programming facilities in the Ada language and their limitations. Concurrent C facilities have also been modified as a result of experience with its initial implementations. In this paper, the authors compare the concurrent programming facilities in Concurrent C and Ada, and show that it is easier to write a variety of concurrent programs in Concurrent C than in Ada.

  19. ARM User Survey Report: Data Access, Quality, and Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, JH; Roeder, LR; Sivaraman, C

    2012-06-28

    The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to determine how users of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Data Archive interact with the more than 2000 available types of datastreams. The survey also gathered information about data discovery and data quality. The Market and Competitive Analysis group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory worked with web administrators to develop a landing page from which users could access the survey. A survey invitation was sent by ARM via email to about 6100 users on February 22, 2012. The invitation was also posted on the ARM website and Facebook page. Reminders were sent via e-mail and posted on Facebook while the survey was open, February 22-March 23, 2012.

  20. The ARM program in the Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, W.E.; Barnes, F.J.; Ackerman, T.P.; Mather, J.H.

    1998-12-01

    The Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 as part of the US Global Change Research Program to improve the treatment of atmospheric radiative and cloud processes in computer models used to predict climate change. The overall goal of the ARM program is to develop and test parameterizations of important atmospheric processes, particularly cloud and radiative processes, for use in atmospheric models. This goal is being achieved through a combination of field measurements and modeling studies. Three primary locales were chosen for extensive field measurement facilities. These are the Southern Great Plains of the United States, the Tropical Western Pacific, and the North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. This paper describes the ARM program in the Tropical Western Pacific locale.

  1. Peripherally inserted central catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - dressing change ... You have a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). This is a tube that goes into a vein in your arm. It carries nutrients and medicines into your body. It may also ...

  2. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  3. S-IV-B Aft Swing Arm Cam Lever Stop Strain Guage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) played a crucial role in the development of the huge Saturn rockets that delivered humans to the moon in the 1960s. Many unique facilities existed at MSFC for the development and testing of the Saturn rockets. Affectionately nicknamed 'The Arm Farm', the Random Motion/ Lift-Off Simulator was one of those unique facilities. This facility was developed to test the swing arm mechanisms that were used to hold the rocket in position until liftoff. The Arm Farm provided the capability of testing the detachment and reconnection of various arms under brutally realistic conditions. The 18-acre facility consisted of more than a half dozen arm test positions and one position for testing access arms used by the Apollo astronauts. Each test position had two elements: a vehicle simulator for duplicating motions during countdown and launch; and a section duplicating the launch tower. The vehicle simulator duplicated the portion of the vehicle skin that contained the umbilical connections and personnel access hatches. Driven by a hydraulic servo system, the vehicle simulator produced relative motion between the vehicle and tower. On the Arm Farm, extreme environmental conditions (such as a launch scrub during an approaching Florida thunderstorm) could be simulated. The dramatic scenes that the Marshall engineers and technicians created at the Arm Farm permitted the gathering of crucial technical and engineering data to ensure a successful real time launch from the Kennedy Space Center. This photo depicts a close up of the S-IV-B aft swing arm cam lever stop strain guage.

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Field Campaigns or Intensive Operational Periods (IOP)

    DOE Data Explorer

    ARM Climate Research Facility users regularly conduct field campaigns to augment routine data acquisitions and to test and validate new instruments. Any field campaign which is proposed, planned, and implemented at one or more research sites is referred to as an intensive operational period (IOP). IOPs are held using the fixed and mobile sites; Southern Great Plains, North Slope of Alaska, Tropical Western Pacific, ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), and Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP). [Taken from http://www.arm.gov/science/fc.stm] Users may search with the specialized interface or browse campaigns/IOPs in table format. Browsing allows users to see the start date of the IOP, the status (Past, In Progress, etc.), the duration, the Principal Investigator, and the research site, along with the title of the campaign/IOP. Clicking on the title leads to a descriptive summary of the campaign, names of co-investigators, contact information, links to related websites, and a link to available data in the ARM Archive. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The URL to go directly to the ARM Archive, bypassing the information pages, is http://www.archive.arm.gov/. The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  6. Britain, America and arms control, 1921-37

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C.

    1987-01-01

    Arms control diplomacy as a central factor in superpower relations is not a new phenomenon. In this book the author traces the rise and fall of a previous arms limitation effort, the naval treaties of the inter-war years, which successfully controlled competition in the strategic weapons of that era - battleships and other vessels of the British, American and other great power navies. He shows the problems and their solutions - many of relevance today - which made the treaties possible, and their major role in the peaceful transfer of leadership of the West from the British Empire to the United States.

  7. Chemical arms treaty's effect on industry noted

    SciTech Connect

    Lois Ember

    1993-08-16

    The Chemical Weapons Convention is unique among arms control regimes in terms of its intrusive reach on private industry, especially chemical manufacturers. It requires, among other things, extensive reporting and, in some cases, on-site inspections of commercial facilities. Yet a surprising majority of affected companies are unaware of their obligations under the treaty that could become effective January 1995. A newly released background paper from the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) intends to correct this situation by fully documenting the effects of the treaty on the U.S. chemical industry. This paper summarizes some of the findings and outlines the legislation required to comply with the Chemical Weapons Convention while still protecting confidential business information and not creating a bureaucratic nightmare for the US chemical industry.

  8. Boundary Layer Cloudiness Parameterizations Using ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Albrecht

    2004-09-15

    This study used DOE ARM data and facilities to: (1) study macroscopic properties of continental stratus clouds at SGP and the factors controlling these properties, (2) develop a scientific basis for understanding the processes responsible for the formation of boundary layer clouds using ARM observations in conjunction with simple parametric models and LES, and (3) evaluate cumulus cloud characteristics retrieved from the MMCR operating at TWP-Nauru. In addition we have used high resolution 94 GHz observations of boundary layer clouds and precipitation to: (1) develop techniques for using high temporal resolution Doppler velocities to study large-eddy circulations and turbulence in boundary layer clouds and estimate the limitations of using current and past MMCR data for boundary layer cloud studies, (2) evaluate the capability and limitations of the current MMCR data for estimating reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral under low- signal-to-noise conditions associated with weak no n-precipitating clouds, (3) develop possible sampling modes for the new MMCR processors to allow for adequate sampling of boundary layer clouds, and (4) retrieve updraft and downdraft structures under precipitating conditions.

  9. Exoskeletal technology. [teleoperator arm system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Possible applications are considered of a master-sleeve teleoperator arm system, developed in exoskeletal space suit technology, as therapeutic aid, orthotic device, or for therapy on patients with neurological disorders.

  10. Arm transplantation: prospects and visions.

    PubMed

    Jones, N F; Schneeberger, S

    2009-03-01

    Based on the results of above-elbow replantation, it is possible that above-elbow arm transplantation will be successful and result in a superior functional outcome as defined by the Chen criteria. Above-elbow arm transplantation is probably technically simpler than distal forearm or wrist transplantation, especially since the macroanastomoses do not require microsurgical expertise. However, hand function depends on reinnervation of forearm muscles and the distance for nerves to regenerate for reinnervation of intrinsic muscles of the hand is significant. The vascularized bone marrow transplanted with the arm holds potential to induce chimerism and promote tolerance but could also make the recipient more susceptible to graft-versus-host disease. Prospective trials comparing the functional results after above-elbow arm transplantation with the functional results achieved by the best neuronal-controlled above-elbow prosthesis are warranted and will determine the gold standard of upper-extremity reconstruction.

  11. Unequal-Arms Michelson Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Armstrong, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Michelson interferometers allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the phase stability of the laser light injected into their two almost equal-length arms. If, however, the two arms are unequal, the laser fluctuations can not be removed by simply recombining the two beams. This is because the laser jitters experience different time delays in the two arms, and therefore can not cancel at the photo detector. We present here a method for achieving exact laser noise cancellation, even in an unequal-arm interferometer. The method presented in this paper requires a separate readout of the relative phase in each arm, made by interfering the returning beam in each arm with a fraction of the outgoing beam. By linearly combining the two data sets with themselves, after they have been properly time shifted, we show that it is possible to construct a new data set that is free of laser fluctuations. An application of this technique to future planned space-based laser interferometer detector3 of gravitational radiation is discussed.

  12. Unequal-Arms Michelson Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Armstrong, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Michelson interferometers allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the phase stability of the laser light injected into their two almost equal-length arms. If, however, the two arms are unequal, the laser fluctuations can not be removed by simply recombining the two beams. This is because the laser jitters experience different time delays in the two arms, and therefore can not cancel at the photo detector. We present here a method for achieving exact laser noise cancellation, even in an unequal-arm interferometer. The method presented in this paper requires a separate readout of the relative phase in each arm, made by interfering the returning beam in each arm with a fraction of the outgoing beam. By linearly combining the two data sets with themselves, after they have been properly time-shifted, we show that it is possible to construct a new data set that is free of laser fluctuations. An application of this technique to future planned space-based laser interferometer detectors of gravitational radiation is discussed.

  13. Naval arms control: The opposition

    SciTech Connect

    Blaker, J.R.

    1990-02-01

    The author observes that hope that naval arms control agreements might bolster Soviet mellowing and inhibit a return to confrontation must be balanced against the likelihood that whether or not the United States negotiates on naval arms control has little real effect on what happens in the Soviet Union and against the undesirability of being pinned down to a less advantageous military position if things go sour. The hope that U.S. willingness to formally limit and reduce American naval capabilities and options would compel the Soviets to reduce even further their potent land-based power on the Eurasian continent or their strategic nuclear power has to be balanced against the possibility that Soviet willingness to make such reductions is driven by factors that have very little to do with the naval relationship between the two nations. Ultimately, then, we are driven back to the dilemma faced by the professional military regarding naval arms control. Without compelling evidence that naval arms control proposals are beneficial in themselves, the author notes we need a clear exposition of how they fit with other negotiations to improve national security and a much better understanding of the role naval arms control negotiations should play in a comprehensive national arms control strategy.

  14. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-28

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is

  15. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-01

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  16. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data, A New Data Product for Climate Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata B.; Klein, Stephen A.; Cederwall, Richard T.; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Gaustad, Krista L.; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Shamblin, Stefanie H; Jensen, Michael P.; Johnson, Karen L.; Lin, Yanluan; Long, Charles N.; Mather, James H.; McCord, Raymond A; McFarlane, Sally A.; Palanisamy, Giri; Shi, Yan; Turner, David D.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (www.arm.gov) was created in 1989 to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. A central activity is the acquisition of detailed observations of clouds and radiation, as well as related atmospheric variables for climate model evaluation and improvement. Since 1992, ARM has established six permanent ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites and deployed an ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) in diverse climate regimes around the world (Fig. 1) to perform long-term continuous field measurements. The time record of ACRF data now exceeds a decade at most ACRF fixed sites and ranges from several months to one year for AMF deployments. Billions of measurements are currently stored in millions of data files in the ACRF Data Archive. The long-term continuous ACRF data provide invaluable information to improve our understanding of the interaction between clouds and radiation, and an observational basis for model validation and improvement and climate studies. Given the huge number of data files and current diversity of archived ACRF data structures, however, it can be difficult for an outside user such as a climate modeler to quickly find the ACRF data product(s) that best meets their research needs. The required geophysical quantities may exist in multiple data streams, and over the history of ACRF operations, the measurements could be obtained by a variety of instruments, reviewed with different levels of data quality assurance, or derived using different algorithms. In addition, most ACRF data are stored in daily-based files with a temporal resolution that ranges from a few seconds to a few minutes, which is much finer than that sought by some users. Therefore, it is not as convenient for data users to perform quick comparisons over large spans of data, and this

  17. A testbed for a unified teleoperated-autonomous dual-arm robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, S.; Lee, T.; Tso, K.; Backes, P.; Lloyd, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a complete robot control facility built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as part of NASA a telerobotics program to develop a state-of-the-art robot control environment for laboratory based space-like experiments. This system, which is now fully operational, has the following features: separation of the computing facilities into local and remote sites, autonomous motion generation in joint or Cartesian coordinates, dual-arm force reflecting teleoperation with voice interaction between the operator and the robots, shared control between the autonomously generated motions and operator controlled teleoperation, and dual-arm coordinated trajectory generation. The system has been used to carry out realistic experiments such as the exchange of an Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU), bolt turning, and door opening, using a mixture of autonomous actions and teleoperation, with either a single arm or two cooperating arms.

  18. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RADINFO

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Radiation Information Database (RADINFO). RADINFO contains information about facilities that are regulated by EPA for radiation and radioactivity. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to RADINFO facilities once the RADINFO data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs

  19. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when in the downward position, shall extend across... clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm shall start its downward motion not less...

  20. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... SYSTEMS Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when... maintained in a condition sufficient to be clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm...

  1. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... SYSTEMS Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when... maintained in a condition sufficient to be clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm...

  2. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when in the downward position, shall extend across... clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm shall start its downward motion not less...

  3. 49 CFR 234.223 - Gate arm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gate arm. 234.223 Section 234.223 Transportation... SYSTEMS Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.223 Gate arm. Each gate arm, when... maintained in a condition sufficient to be clearly viewed by approaching highway users. Each gate arm...

  4. Algorithms for Unequal-Arm Michelson Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giampieri, Giacomo; Hellings, Ronald W.; Tinto, Massimo; Bender, Peter L.; Faller, James E.

    1994-01-01

    A method of data acquisition and data analysis is described in which the performance of Michelson-type interferometers with unequal arms can be made nearly the same as interferometers with equal arms. The method requires a separate readout of the relative phase in each arm, made by interfering the returning beam in each arm with a fraction of the outgoing beam.

  5. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  6. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  7. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  8. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  9. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2005-11-30

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

  11. Visual gravity influences arm movement planning.

    PubMed

    Sciutti, Alessandra; Demougeot, Laurent; Berret, Bastien; Toma, Simone; Sandini, Giulio; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Pozzo, Thierry

    2012-06-01

    When submitted to a visuomotor rotation, subjects show rapid adaptation of visually guided arm reaching movements, indicated by a progressive reduction in reaching errors. In this study, we wanted to make a step forward by investigating to what extent this adaptation also implies changes into the motor plan. Up to now, classical visuomotor rotation paradigms have been performed on the horizontal plane, where the reaching motor plan in general requires the same kinematics (i.e., straight path and symmetric velocity profile). To overcome this limitation, we considered vertical and horizontal movement directions requiring specific velocity profiles. This way, a change in the motor plan due to the visuomotor conflict would be measurable in terms of a modification in the velocity profile of the reaching movement. Ten subjects performed horizontal and vertical reaching movements while observing a rotated visual feedback of their motion. We found that adaptation to a visuomotor rotation produces a significant change in the motor plan, i.e., changes to the symmetry of velocity profiles. This suggests that the central nervous system takes into account the visual information to plan a future motion, even if this causes the adoption of nonoptimal motor plans in terms of energy consumption. However, the influence of vision on arm movement planning is not fixed, but rather changes as a function of the visual orientation of the movement. Indeed, a clear influence on motion planning can be observed only when the movement is visually presented as oriented along the vertical direction. Thus vision contributes differently to the planning of arm pointing movements depending on motion orientation in space.

  12. Computing Relative Joint Positions of Robot Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.

    1986-01-01

    Vector-algebra method developed for extracting Denavit-Hartenberg parameters for any assembled robot arm. Method for extracting relative joint geometry of robot arms useful to researchers who need data for existing robot arms for either validation of mathematical models or for studies involving actual control of these devices. Method, does not require robot arm to be disassembled, also useful in recalibration of misalined or bent robot arm and becomes useful industrial procedure. Merit of method is errors not propagated.

  13. Proprioceptive Interaction between the Two Arms in a Single-Arm Pointing Task.

    PubMed

    Kigawa, Kazuyoshi; Izumizaki, Masahiko; Tsukada, Setsuro; Hakuta, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Proprioceptive signals coming from both arms are used to determine the perceived position of one arm in a two-arm matching task. Here, we examined whether the perceived position of one arm is affected by proprioceptive signals from the other arm in a one-arm pointing task in which participants specified the perceived position of an unseen reference arm with an indicator paddle. Both arms were hidden from the participant's view throughout the study. In Experiment 1, with both arms placed in front of the body, the participants received 70-80 Hz vibration to the elbow flexors of the reference arm (= right arm) to induce the illusion of elbow extension. This extension illusion was compared with that when the left arm elbow flexors were vibrated or not. The degree of the vibration-induced extension illusion of the right arm was reduced in the presence of left arm vibration. In Experiment 2, we found that this kinesthetic interaction between the two arms did not occur when the left arm was vibrated in an abducted position. In Experiment 3, the vibration-induced extension illusion of one arm was fully developed when this arm was placed at an abducted position, indicating that the brain receives increased proprioceptive input from a vibrated arm even if the arm was abducted. Our results suggest that proprioceptive interaction between the two arms occurs in a one-arm pointing task when the two arms are aligned with one another. The position sense of one arm measured using a pointer appears to include the influences of incoming information from the other arm when both arms were placed in front of the body and parallel to one another.

  14. Bimanual coupling effects during arm immobilization and passive movements.

    PubMed

    Garbarini, Francesca; Rabuffetti, Marco; Piedimonte, Alessandro; Solito, Gianluca; Berti, Anna

    2015-06-01

    When humans simultaneously perform different movements with both hands, each limb movement interferes with the contralateral limb movement (bimanual coupling). Previous studies on both healthy volunteers and patients with central or peripheral nervous lesions suggested that such motor constraints are tightly linked to intentional motor programs, rather than to movement execution. Here, we aim to investigate this phenomenon, by using a circles-lines task in which, when subjects simultaneously draw lines with the right hand and circles with the left hand, both the trajectories tend to become ovals (bimanual coupling effect). In a first group, we immobilized the subjects' left arm with a cast and asked them to try to perform the bimanual task. In a second group, we passively moved the subjects' left arm and asked them to perform voluntary movements with their right arm only. If the bimanual coupling arises from motor intention and planning rather than spatial movements, we would expect different results in the two groups. In the Blocked group, where motor intentionality was required but movements in space were prevented by immobilization of the arm, a significant coupling effect (i.e., a significant increase of the ovalization index for the right hand lines) was found. On the contrary, in the Passive group, where movements in space were present but motor intentionality was not required, no significant coupling effect was observed. Our results confirmed, in healthy subjects, the central role of the intentional and predictive operations, already evidenced in pathological conditions, for the occurrence of bimanual coupling.

  15. The Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing a robotic mission to visit a large near-Earth asteroid (NEA), collect a multi-ton boulder from its surface, and redirect it into a stable orbit around the Moon. Once returned to cislunar space in the mid-2020s, astronauts will explore the boulder and return to Earth with samples. This Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) is part of NASA's plan to advance the technologies, capabilities, and spaceflight experience needed for a human mission to the Martian system in the 2030s. Subsequent human and robotic missions to the asteroidal material would also be facilitated by its return to cislunar space. Although ARM is primarily a capability demonstration mission (i.e., technologies and associated operations), there exist significant opportunities to advance our knowledge of small bodies in the synergistic areas of science, planetary defense, asteroidal resources and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and capability and technology demonstrations. In order to maximize the knowledge return from the mission, NASA is organizing an ARM Investigation Team, which is being preceded by the Formulation Assessment and Support Team. These teams will be comprised of scientists, technologists, and other qualified and interested individuals to help plan the implementation and execution of ARM. An overview of robotic and crewed segments of ARM, including the mission requirements, NEA targets, and mission operations, will be provided along with a discussion of the potential opportunities associated with the mission.

  16. NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, Paul; Mazanek, Dan; Reeves, David; Naasz, Bo; Cichy, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing a robotic mission to visit a large near-Earth asteroid (NEA), collect a multi-ton boulder from its surface, and redirect it into a stable orbit around the Moon. Once returned to cislunar space in the mid-2020s, astronauts will explore the boulder and return to Earth with samples. This Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) is part of NASA’s plan to advance the technologies, capabilities, and spaceflight experience needed for a human mission to the Martian system in the 2030s. Subsequent human and robotic missions to the asteroidal material would also be facilitated by its return to cislunar space. Although ARM is primarily a capability demonstration mission (i.e., technologies and associated operations), there exist significant opportunities to advance our knowledge of small bodies in the synergistic areas of science, planetary defense, asteroidal resources and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and capability and technology demonstrations. In order to maximize the knowledge return from the mission, NASA is organizing an ARM Investigation Team, which is being preceded by the Formulation Assessment and Support Team. These teams will be comprised of scientists, technologists, and other qualified and interested individuals to help plan the implementation and execution of ARM. An overview of robotic and crewed segments of ARM, including the mission requirements, NEA targets, and mission operations, will be provided along with a discussion of the potential opportunities associated with the mission.

  17. Ram side of Wake Shield Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The ram side of the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) is in the grasp of the Space Shuttle Discovery's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm in this 70mm frame. Clouds over the Atlantic Ocean and the blackness of space share the backdrop for the picture.

  18. Arms Control past and future

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, T.R.

    1991-12-01

    I am going to talk today about Arms Control. First, I want to go over the recent history of the process. Five years ago, the pace of arms control changed dramatically. From an outsider it probably didn't appear that way -- but those working it, the shift from the historic glacial speed normally associated with this process to one of pressures -- political and economic -- national and global -- to actually conclude meaningful, verifiable agreements was a major change. Then, I want to spend a few minutes covering the future of arms control new that we have lost our enemy, and it is no longer a bipolar world. I also want to leave time for easy questions.

  19. Arms Control past and future

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, T.R.

    1991-12-01

    I am going to talk today about Arms Control. First, I want to go over the recent history of the process. Five years ago, the pace of arms control changed dramatically. From an outsider it probably didn`t appear that way -- but those working it, the shift from the historic glacial speed normally associated with this process to one of pressures -- political and economic -- national and global -- to actually conclude meaningful, verifiable agreements was a major change. Then, I want to spend a few minutes covering the future of arms control new that we have lost our enemy, and it is no longer a bipolar world. I also want to leave time for easy questions.

  20. Ergonomically neutral arm support system

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J; Chung, Jeffrey Y; Dellinges, Steven; Lafever, Robin E

    2005-08-02

    An ergonomic arm support system maintains a neutral position for the forearm. A mechanical support structure attached to a chair or other mounting structure supports the arms of a sitting or standing person. The system includes moving elements and tensioning elements to provide a dynamic balancing force against the forearms. The support structure is not fixed or locked in a rigid position, but is an active dynamic system that is maintained in equipoise by the continuous operation of the opposing forces. The support structure includes an armrest connected to a flexible linkage or articulated or pivoting assembly, which includes a tensioning element such as a spring. The pivoting assembly moves up and down, with the tensioning element providing the upward force that balances the downward force of the arm.

  1. Welcome to the U. S. arms superstore

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, W.D. )

    1993-09-01

    After the 1991 Gulf War, the [open quotes]Big Five[close quotes]--the United States, France, Britain, the Soviet Union, and China--initiated talks on limiting the flow of arms to the Middle East and the United Nations established an arms register as a way to promote a more open international dialogue concerning the problem of conventional arms proliferation. Two and a half years later, the promises about arms controls have been forgotten in favor of a policy to sell arms to any nation possessing sufficient cash to purchase them. The promises to curb the weapons trade may have been forgotten because of the new dynamics that are driving the arms trade in the post-Cold War era. This article seeks to define these dynamics and to suggest means of getting the arms control process back on track. The rationale behind the commercialization of arms and means of combatting the arms exportation problem are emphasized. 18 refs.

  2. Central-Office Real Estate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardini, Priscilla

    2003-01-01

    Describes how to upgrade a school district's central-office facilities without incurring taxpayer enmity. Includes case studies from Harford County, Maryland; Orange and Broward Counties, Florida; South Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Mt. Baker, Washington; Chicago, Illinois; and Rochester, New Hampshire. (PKP)

  3. ARM Data File Standards Version: 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, Kenneth; Beus, Sherman; Cialella, Alice; Collis, Scott; Ermold, Brian; Perez, Robin; Shamblin, Stefanie; Sivaraman, Chitra; Jensen, Mike; McCord, Raymond; McCoy, Renata; Moore, Sean; Monroe, Justin; Perkins, Brad; Shippert, Tim

    2014-04-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility performs routine in situ and remote-sensing observations to provide a detailed and accurate description of the Earth atmosphere in diverse climate regimes. The result is a diverse data sets containing observational and derived data, currently accumulating at a rate of 30 TB of data and 150,000 different files per month (http://www.archive.arm.gov/stats/storage2.html). Continuing the current processing while scaling this to even larger sizes is extremely important to the ARM Facility and requires consistent metadata and data standards. The standards described in this document will enable development of automated analysis and discovery tools for the ever-growing volumes of data. It also will enable consistent analysis of the multiyear data, allow for development of automated monitoring and data health status tools, and facilitate development of future capabilities for delivering data on demand that can be tailored explicitly to user needs. This analysis ability will only be possible if the data follows a minimum set of standards. This document proposes a hierarchy that includes required and recommended standards.

  4. Campaign datasets for ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, L. Ruby; Mei, Fan; Comstock, Jennifer; DeMott, Paul; Gero, Jonathan; Hubee, John; Matthews, Alyssa; Nalli, Nicholas; Pekour, Mikhail; Prather, Kimberly; Sedlackek, Arthur; Springston, Stephen; Tomlinson, Jason; Chand, Duli

    2015-08-12

    This campaign consisted of the deployment of the DOE ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) and the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) G-1 in a field campaign called ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX), which took place in conjunction with CalWater 2- a NOAA field campaign. The joint CalWater 2/ACAPEX field campaign aimed to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with ARs and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. The observational strategy consisted of the use of land and offshore assets to monitor: 1. the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development 2. the long-range transport of aerosols in the eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs 3. how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. West Coast where ARs make landfall and post-frontal clouds are frequent.

  5. Hand/Wrist/Arm Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor right away.Start OverDiagnosisYou may have TENDINITIS, inflammation of a tendon.Self CareUse an over- ... OverDiagnosisYour may have TENNIS ELBOW, a type of TENDINITIS.Self CareRest the arm, apply ice packs to ...

  6. Minorities in the Armed Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Anthony

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of the Congressional Black Caucus and the specially formed task force; reports that high ranking officers have pledged to attack racial discrimination; and describes an association of minority officers whose purpose is to enhance the image of the armed forces within the minority community. (Author/JM)

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operation quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2010-10-26

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. Scientists are using the information obtained from the permanent SGP site to improve cloud and radiative models and parameterizations and, thereby, the performance of atmospheric general circulation models used for climate research. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the SGP site. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions over the typical distribution of land uses within the site. The continuous observations at the SGP site are supplemented by intensive observation periods, when the frequency of measurements is increased and special measurements are added to address specific research questions. During such periods, 2 gigabytes or more of data (two billion bytes) are generated daily. SGP data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/ http. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  9. Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ben E.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

  10. The ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Dan; Bromwich, David; Vogelmann, Andrew; Verlinde, Johannes; Russell, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    West Antarctica is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, and its changing climate in both atmosphere and ocean is linked to loss of Antarctic ice mass and global sea level rise. The specific mechanisms for West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) warming are not fully understood, but are hypothesized to involve linkage between moisture from Southern Ocean storm tracks and the surface energy balance over the WAIS, and related teleconnections with subtropical and tropical meteorology. This present lack of understanding has motivated a climate science and cloud physics campaign jointly supported by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Energy (DOE), called the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE). The DOE's second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed to McMurdo Station on Ross Island in November 2015 and will operate through December 2016. The AMF2 includes (1) cloud research radars, both scanning and zenith, operating in the Ka- and X-bands, (2) high spectral resolution and polarized micropulse lidars, and (3) a suite of shortwave and longwave broadband and spectral radiometers. A second suite of instruments is deployed at the WAIS Divide Ice Camp on the West Antarctic plateau during December 2015 and January 2016. The WAIS instrument suite provides (1) measurement of all surface energy balance components, (2) a polarized micropulse lidar and shortwave spectroradiometer, (3) microwave total water column measurement, and (4) four times daily rawinsonde launches which are the first from West Antarctica since 1967. There is a direct linkage between the WAIS instrument suite and the AMF2 at McMurdo, in that air masses originating in Southern Ocean storm tracks that are driven up over the WAIS often subsequently descend over the Ross Ice Shelf and arrive at Ross Island. Preliminary data are already illustrating the prevalence of mixed-phase clouds and their role in the surface energy balance

  11. Clouds and more: ARM climate modeling best estimate data: A new data product for climate studies

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata B.; Klein, Stephen A.; ...

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (www.arm.gov) was created in 1989 to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation atmosphere. Here, a central activity is the acquisition of detailed observations of clouds and radiation, as well as related atmospheric variables for climate model evaluation and improvement.

  12. Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface Radar and Satellite Data in Support of ARM SCM Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guosheng

    2013-03-15

    water contents in support of cloud modeling activities. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) area measurement. That is, the study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements (particularly cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements) at the point of the ARM sites. We use the cloud ice water characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain a satellite retrieval algorithm, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the 3-D cloud ice water distributions within an 10° (latitude) x 10° (longitude) area. During the research period, we have developed, validated and improved our cloud ice water retrievals, and have produced and archived at ARM website as a PI-product of the 3-D cloud ice water contents using combined satellite high-frequency microwave and surface radar observations for SGP March 2000 IOP and TWP-ICE 2006 IOP over 10 deg. x 10 deg. area centered at ARM SGP central facility and Darwin sites. We have also worked on validation of the 3-D ice water product by CloudSat data, synergy with visible/infrared cloud ice water retrievals for better results at low ice water conditions, and created a long-term (several years) of ice water climatology in 10 x 10 deg. area of ARM SGP and TWP sites and then compared it with GCMs.

  13. New technologies and the arms race

    SciTech Connect

    Schaerf, C.; Reid, B.H.; Carlton, D.

    1989-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the International Conference on Technology, the Arms Race and Arms Control. Topics covered include: Cosmic space and the role of Europe and Non-military justification for investments in military technologies.

  14. Does Octopus vulgaris have preferred arms?

    PubMed

    Byrne, Ruth A; Kuba, Michael J; Meisel, Daniela V; Griebel, Ulrike; Mather, Jennifer A

    2006-08-01

    Previous behavioral studies in Octopus vulgaris revealed lateralization of eye use. In this study, the authors expanded the scope to investigate arm preferences. The octopus's generalist hunting lifestyle and the structure of their arms suggest that these animals have no need to designate specific arms for specific tasks. However, octopuses also show behaviors, like exploration, in which only single or small groups of arms are involved. Here the authors show that octopuses had a strong preference for anterior arm use to reach for and explore objects, which points toward a task division between anterior and posterior arms. Four out of 8 subjects also showed a lateral bias. In addition, octopuses had a preference for a specific arm to reach into a T maze to retrieve a food reward. These findings give evidence for limb-specialization in an animal whose 8 arms were believed to be equipotential.

  15. Low-cost robotic arm control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, John R.

    2008-04-01

    A low-cost robotic arm and controller system is presented. The controller is a desktop model of the robotic arm with the same degrees of freedom whose joints are equipped with sensors. Manipulating the controller by hand causes the robotic arm to mimic the movement in maser-slave fashion. The system takes advantage of the low cost and wide availability of hobby radio control components and uses a low-cost, easy-to-program microprocessor. The system is implemented with a video camera on the robotic arm, and the arm is mounted on an unmanned omnidirectional vehicle inspection robot. With a camera on the end of a robot arm, the vehicle inspection system can reach difficult to-access regions of the vehicle underbody. Learning to manipulate the robot arm with this controller is faster than learning with a traditional joystick. Limitations of the microcontroller are discussed, and suggestions for further development of the robot arm and control are made.

  16. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): SDWIS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). SDWIS contains information about public water systems and their violations of EPA's drinking water regulations. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to SDWIS facilities once the SDWIS data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website http://www.epa.gov/enviro/html/fii/index.html.

  17. Overcoming Robot-Arm Joint Singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.; Houck, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Kinematic equations allow arm to pass smoothly through singular region. Report discusses mathematical singularities in equations of robotarm control. Operator commands robot arm to move in direction relative to its own axis system by specifying velocity in that direction. Velocity command then resolved into individual-joint rotational velocities in robot arm to effect motion. However, usual resolved-rate equations become singular when robot arm is straightened.

  18. Who's bound by the former Soviet Union's arms control treaties

    SciTech Connect

    Rhinelander, J.B.; Bunn, G.

    1991-12-01

    A crucial issue raised by the disintegration of the Soviet central government is what happens to Soviet arms control obligations. As the Soviet government transforms or collapses in the wake of the failed August coup, which of the resulting entities will be bound by the treaties the Soviet Union entered into Under international law, the obligations of a state are not affected by even such dramatic changes in government. No one yet knows, however, what the end result of the ongoing devolution of power in the erstwhile Soviet Union will be. As illustrations of what could happen to Soviet arms control obligations - not predictions of the future - the authors pose two alternative scenarios. In the first, they assume that most of the current 12 republics, including all of the big four where substantial nuclear forces and the largest conventional forces are located (Russia, Ukraine, Khazakhstan, and Belarus), ultimately form a loose confederation with sufficient central authority to be called a nation-state and to carry out the essence of Soviet obligations under major arms control treaties. In the second, they assume that the union disintegrates further, with these four key republics seceding entirely and recognizing one another as independent states - a step which is apparently one of the US criteria for granting its own recognition. In this scenario, the Russian republic maintains its basic territory and replaces the central government as the power center for military and foreign affairs. In each of these cases, they will describe the general issues affecting the Soviet Union's international obligations, and consider specifically the two most important arms control agreements now in force - the multilateral nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT) and the bilateral Antiballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty.

  19. Human Arm-Like Robot Control Based on Human Multi-Joint Arm Viscoelastic Properties and A Modified Forward Gaze Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aihui; Deng, Mingcong

    In this paper, a human arm-like robot control scheme is proposed based on time-varying viscoelastic properties which consist of multi-joint stiffness and multi-joint viscosity during human arm movements and a modified forward gaze model. In general, in human multi-joint arm movements, the multi-joint torque is assumed to be a function of multi-joint stiffness matrix, multi-joint viscosity matrix, and motor command descending from central nervous system (CNS). In order to make the present human arm-like robot move like a human multi-joint arm, a feedback controller and a modified forward gaze model are presented in the human arm-like robot control system. That is, the feedback controller is designed to obtain desired motion mechanism based on real measured data from viscoelastic properties of human multi-joint arm, and the forward gaze model in which steering gains are modified using a cost function is used to compensate the term related to the effect of CNS. The effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed by the simulation results based on experimental data.

  20. Precipitation Estimation from the ARM Distributed Radar Network During the MC3E Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, A. K.; Giangrande, S. E.; Collis, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The DOE - NASA Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E) was the first demonstration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility scanning precipitation radar platforms. A goal for the MC3E field campaign over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility was to demonstrate the capabilities of ARM polarimetric radar systems for providing unique insights into deep convective storm evolution and microphysics. One practical application of interest for climate studies and the forcing of cloud resolving models is improved Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) from ARM radar systems positioned at SGP. This study presents the results of ARM radar-based precipitation estimates during the 2-month MC3E campaign. Emphasis is on the usefulness of polarimetric C-band radar observations (CSAPR) for rainfall estimation to distances within 100 km of the Oklahoma SGP facility. Collocated ground disdrometer resources, precipitation profiling radars and nearby surface Oklahoma Mesonet gauge records are consulted to evaluate potential ARM radar-based rainfall products and optimal methods. Rainfall products are also evaluated against the regional NEXRAD-standard observations.

  1. 32 CFR 935.134 - Arm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arm signals. 935.134 Section 935.134 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.134 Arm signals. (a) Any person operating a motor vehicle and... signal for a turn or stop is made by fully extending the left arm as follows: (1) Left turn—extend...

  2. 32 CFR 935.134 - Arm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arm signals. 935.134 Section 935.134 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.134 Arm signals. (a) Any person operating a motor vehicle and... signal for a turn or stop is made by fully extending the left arm as follows: (1) Left turn—extend...

  3. 32 CFR 935.134 - Arm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arm signals. 935.134 Section 935.134 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.134 Arm signals. (a) Any person operating a motor vehicle and... signal for a turn or stop is made by fully extending the left arm as follows: (1) Left turn—extend...

  4. 32 CFR 935.134 - Arm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arm signals. 935.134 Section 935.134 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.134 Arm signals. (a) Any person operating a motor vehicle and... signal for a turn or stop is made by fully extending the left arm as follows: (1) Left turn—extend...

  5. 32 CFR 935.134 - Arm signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arm signals. 935.134 Section 935.134 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.134 Arm signals. (a) Any person operating a motor vehicle and... signal for a turn or stop is made by fully extending the left arm as follows: (1) Left turn—extend...

  6. 77 FR 30875 - Armed Forces Day, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8823 of May 18, 2012 Armed Forces Day, 2012 By the President of the United... circumstances. On Armed Forces Day, we pay tribute to the unparalleled service of our Armed Forces and recall... Day. I direct the Secretary of Defense on behalf of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps,...

  7. Arm Tremor, Tardive Dyskinesia, and Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Emmerik, R. E. A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The arm tremor of adults (n=32) diagnosed as having mental retardation and/or tardive dyskinesia was examined through an analysis of the acceleration properties of several arm postures. The degree of arm acceleration was increased in all subjects compared to a control group without mental retardation. Effects of neuroleptic medication were noted.…

  8. Spirality: Spiral arm pitch angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Pfountz, Casey; Davis, Benjamin L.; Hartley, Matthew; Pour Imani, Hamed; Slade, Zac; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Spirality measures spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. Written in MATLAB, the code package also includes GenSpiral, which produces FITS images of synthetic spirals, and SpiralArmCount, which uses a one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to count the spiral arms of a galaxy after its pitch is determined.

  9. Self-recognition mechanism between skin and suckers prevents octopus arms from interfering with each other.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Nir; Levy, Guy; Grasso, Frank W; Hochner, Binyamin

    2014-06-02

    Controlling movements of flexible arms is a challenging task for the octopus because of the virtually infinite number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) [1, 2]. Octopuses simplify this control by using stereotypical motion patterns that reduce the DOFs, in the control space, to a workable few [2]. These movements are triggered by the brain and are generated by motor programs embedded in the peripheral neuromuscular system of the arm [3-5]. The hundreds of suckers along each arm have a tendency to stick to almost any object they contact [6-9]. The existence of this reflex could pose significant problems with unplanned interactions between the arms if not appropriately managed. This problem is likely to be accentuated because it is accepted that octopuses are "not aware of their arms" [10-14]. Here we report of a self-recognition mechanism that has a novel role in motor control, restraining the arms from interfering with each other. We show that the suckers of amputated arms never attach to octopus skin because a chemical in the skin inhibits the attachment reflex of the suckers. The peripheral mechanism appears to be overridden by central control because, in contrast to amputated arms, behaving octopuses sometime grab amputated arms. Surprisingly, octopuses seem to identify their own amputated arms, as they treat arms of other octopuses like food more often than their own. This self-recognition mechanism is a novel peripheral component in the embodied organization of the adaptive interactions between the octopus's brain, body, and environment [15, 16].

  10. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Eight fourth-year engineering design students formed two teams to study methods of varying the perceived gravity level in a variable gravity research facility. A tether system and an arm system were the chosen topics. Both teams have produced and built scale models of their design. In addition, a three-credit Special Topics Course (Aviation 370) was formed, as the project offers an excellent opportunity to build a multi-disciplinary program around the initial conceptualization process. Fifty students were registered in the Special Topics course. Each week during a three hour class, a guest lecturer covered one or more of the many areas associated with the concept of a variable-gravity facility. The students formed small groups organized on a multi-disciplinary basis (there were twelve separate disciplines represented by one or more students) where they discussed among themselves the various issues involved. These groups also met outside class for three or more hours each week. During class each group presented oral reports on their findings during a one-hour general question and answer period.

  11. Hot Galactic Arms Point To Vicious Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-12-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed the aftermath of a titanic explosion that wracked the elliptical galaxy known as NGC 4636. This eruption could be the latest episode in a cycle of violence that is triggered by gas falling into a central massive black hole. Chandra's images of NGC 4636 show spectacular symmetric arms, or arcs, of hot gas extending 25,000 light years into a huge cloud of multimillion-degree-Celsius gas that envelopes the galaxy. At a temperature of 10 million degrees, the arms are 30 percent hotter than the surrounding gas cloud. "The temperature jump, together with the symmetry and scale of the arms, suggests that we are observing the effects of a tremendous outburst that occurred in the center of the galaxy," said Christine Jones of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., lead author of a paper on these observations scheduled for publication in Astrophysical Journal Letters. "The energy of this explosion would be the equivalent of several hundred thousand supernovas." The arms appear to be the leading edges of a galaxy-sized shock wave that is racing outward at 700 kilometers per second, or 1.6 million miles per hour. At this speed, it would take 3 million years for the structures to attain their present size. Cavities detected in the hot gas cloud to the east and west of the center of the galaxy support the shockwave explanation. The authors suggest that the explosion is part of a majestic cosmic feedback process that keeps the galaxy in a state of turmoil. Over a period of a few million years, a hot gas cloud that envelops the stars in the galaxy cools and falls inward toward a central, massive black hole. The feeding of the black hole by the infalling material leads to an explosion that heats the hot gaseous envelope, starting the cycle anew. NGC 4636 NGC 4636 Background Subtracted This feedback cycle may explain one puzzling feature of the galaxy - the lack of a strong radio source of the type that is

  12. Canastota Renewable Energy Facility Project

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Jillian; Hunt, Allen

    2013-12-13

    The project was implemented at the Madison County Landfill located in the Town of Lincoln, Madison County, New York. Madison County has owned and operated the solid waste and recycling facilities at the Buyea Road site since 1974. At the onset of the project, the County owned and operated facilities there to include three separate landfills, a residential solid waste disposal and recycled material drop-off facility, a recycling facility and associated administrative, support and environmental control facilities. This putrescible waste undergoes anaerobic decomposition within the waste mass and generates landfill gas, which is approximately 50% methane. In order to recover this gas, the landfill was equipped with gas collection systems on both the east and west sides of Buyea Road which bring the gas to a central point for destruction. In order to derive a beneficial use from the collected landfill gases, the County decided to issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the future use of the generated gas.

  13. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  14. Cold warriors target arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, J.

    1995-09-01

    While disagreements over the conflict in Bosnia have strained US relations with Western Europe and Russia, these divisions will pale in comparison to the tensions that will arise if recent congressional arms control decisions become law. If the Republicans who dominate Congress are successful, a series of arms control agreements painstakingly negotiated by Republican and Democratic presidents could be consigned to the ash heap. This list includes the Start I and Start II nuclear reduction agreements, the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty and the ongoing negotiations to achieve a comprehensive test ban (CTB) by 1996. US leadership in the post-Cold War era will undermined as the international community, already skeptical about this country`s direction, will question the ability of the executive branch to surmount isolantionist impulses.

  15. Dual arm master controller development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuban, D. P.; Perkins, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    The advanced servomanipulator (ASM) slave was designed with an anthropomorphic stance gear/torque tube power drives, and modular construction. These features resulted in increased inertia, friction, and backlash relative to tape driven manipulators. Studies were performed which addressed to human factor design and performance tradeoffs associated with the corresponding master controller best suited for the ASM. The results of these studies, as well as the conceptual design of the dual arm master controller, are presented.

  16. VIEW LOOKING DOWN DUNCAN STREET FROM AYRES STREET, WITH FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING DOWN DUNCAN STREET FROM AYRES STREET, WITH FACILITY 712 ON RIGHT AND FACILITY 713 ON LEFT (CENTRAL-ENTRY SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING TYPE). VIEW FACING NORTHWEST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Wilikina Drive & Kunia Road, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  17. VIEW OF BUILDING 122 EXAMINATION FACILITIES THAT SUPPORT ROUTINE EMPLOYEE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BUILDING 122 EXAMINATION FACILITIES THAT SUPPORT ROUTINE EMPLOYEE AND SUBCONTRACTOR PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS. (10/85) - Rocky Flats Plant, Emergency Medical Services Facility, Southwest corner of Central & Third Avenues, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  18. Hand-arm vibration syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shixin (Cindy); House, Ronald A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide family physicians with an understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, symptoms, diagnosis, and management of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS), an important and common occupational disease in Canada. Sources of information A MEDLINE search was conducted for research and review articles on HAVS. A Google search was conducted to obtain gray literature relevant to the Canadian context. Additional references were obtained from the articles identified. Main message Hand-arm vibration syndrome is a prevalent occupational disease affecting workers in multiple industries in which vibrating tools are used. However, it is underdiagnosed in Canada. It has 3 components—vascular, in the form of secondary Raynaud phenomenon; sensorineural; and musculoskeletal. Hand-arm vibration syndrome in its more advanced stages contributes to substantial disability and poor quality of life. Its diagnosis requires careful history taking, in particular occupational history, physical examination, laboratory tests to rule out alternative diagnoses, and referral to an occupational medicine specialist for additional investigations. Management involves reduction of vibration exposure, avoidance of cold conditions, smoking cessation, and medication. Conclusion To ensure timely diagnosis of HAVS and improve prognosis and quality of life, family physicians should be aware of this common occupational disease and be able to elicit the relevant occupational history, refer patients to occupational medicine clinics, and appropriately initiate compensation claims. PMID:28292796

  19. High precision detector robot arm system

    DOEpatents

    Shu, Deming; Chu, Yong

    2017-01-31

    A method and high precision robot arm system are provided, for example, for X-ray nanodiffraction with an X-ray nanoprobe. The robot arm system includes duo-vertical-stages and a kinematic linkage system. A two-dimensional (2D) vertical plane ultra-precision robot arm supporting an X-ray detector provides positioning and manipulating of the X-ray detector. A vertical support for the 2D vertical plane robot arm includes spaced apart rails respectively engaging a first bearing structure and a second bearing structure carried by the 2D vertical plane robot arm.

  20. Political Activities by Members of the Armed Forces on Active Duty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-15

    an election day. 13. Solicit or otherwise engage in fundraising activities in Federal offices or facilities, including military reservations, for a...actively promote, political dinners and similar fundraising events. 18. Attend partisan political events as an official representative of the Armed Forces

  1. 32 CFR 705.35 - Armed Forces participation in events in the public domain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... other accommodations and facilities are available to all without regard to race, creed, color or... on race, creed, color or national origin. This does not bar participation in events sponsored by...) Department of Defense policy prohibits payment by the Armed Forces for rental of exhibit space, connection...

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Niamey, Niger for the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) operates at non-permanent sites selected by the ARM Program. Sometimes these sites can become permanent ARM sites, as was the case with Graciosa Island in the Azores. It is now known as the Eastern North Atlantic permanent site. In January 2006 the AMF deployed to Niamey, Niger, West Africa, at the Niger Meteorological Office at Niamey International Airport. This deployment was timed to coincide with the field phases and Special Observing Periods of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA). The ARM Program participated in this international effort as a field campaign called "Radiative Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST).The primary purpose of the Niger deployment was to combine an extended series of measurements from the AMF with those from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) Instrument on the Meteosat operational geostationary satellite in order to provide the first well-sampled, direct estimates of the divergence of solar and thermal radiation across the atmosphere. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Niamey are available via a link from ARM's Niamey, Niger site information page. Other data can be found at the related websites mentioned above and in the ARM Archive. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  3. "Radiative Closure Studies for Clear Skies During the ARM 2003 Aerosol Intensive Observation Period"

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Michalsky, G. P. Anderson, J. Barnard, J. Delamere, C. Gueymard, S. Kato, P. Kiedron, A. McComiskey, and P. Ricchiazzi

    2006-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sponsored a large intensive observation period (IOP) to study aerosol during the month of May 2003 around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF) in north central Oklahoma. Redundant measurements of aerosol optical properties were made using different techniques at the surface as well as in vertical profile with sensors aboard two aircraft. One of the principal motivations for this experiment was to resolve the disagreement between models and measurements of diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance at the surface, especially for modest aerosol loading. This paper focuses on using the redundant aerosol and radiation measurements during this IOP to compare direct beam and diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance measurements and models at the surface for a wide range of aerosol cases that occurred during 30 clear-sky periods on 13 days of May 2003. Models and measurements are compared over a large range of solar-zenith angles. Six different models are used to assess the relative agreement among them and the measurements. Better agreement than previously achieved appears to be the result of better specification of input parameters and better measurements of irradiances than in prior studies. Biases between modeled and measured direct irradiances are less than 1%, and biases between modeled and measured diffuse irradiances are less than 2%.

  4. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Michael P.; Holdridge, Donna J.; Survo, Petteri; Lehtinen, Raisa; Baxter, Shannon; Toto, Tami; Johnson, Karen L.

    2016-06-20

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41 (fourth generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and pressure. In order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in north-central Oklahoma, USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results show that for most of the observed conditions the RS92 and RS41 measurements agree much better than the manufacturer-specified combined uncertainties with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the “wet-bulbing” effect appears to be mitigated for several cases in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements of temperature and humidity, with applied correction algorithms, also appear to show less sensitivity to solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions. For many science applications – such as atmospheric process studies, retrieval development, and weather forecasting and climate modeling – the differences between the RS92 and RS41 measurements should have little impact. However, for long-term trend analysis and other climate applications, additional characterization of the RS41 measurements and their relation to the long-term observational records will be required.

  5. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; Lehtinen, R.; Baxter, S.; Toto, T.; Johnson, K. L.

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturer specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.

  6. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    DOE PAGES

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; ...

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturermore » specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.« less

  7. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Michael P.; Holdridge, Donna J.; Survo, Petteri; Lehtinen, Raisa; Baxter, Shannon; Toto, Tami; Johnson, Karen L.

    2016-07-20

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41 (fourth generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and pressure. In order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in north-central Oklahoma, USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results show that for most of the observed conditions the RS92 and RS41 measurements agree much better than the manufacturer-specified combined uncertainties with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the “wet-bulbing” effect appears to be mitigated for several cases in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements of temperature and humidity, with applied correction algorithms, also appear to show less sensitivity to solar heating. In addition, these results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions. For many science applications – such as atmospheric process studies, retrieval development, and weather forecasting and climate modeling – the differences between the RS92 and RS41 measurements should have little impact. However, for long-term trend analysis and other climate applications, additional characterization of the RS41 measurements and their relation to the long-term observational records will be required.

  8. An Innovative Short Arm Centrifuge for Future Studies on the Effects of Artificial Gravity on the Human Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frett, Timo; Mayrhofer, Michael; Schwandtner, Johann; Anken, Ralf; Petrat, Guido

    2014-11-01

    In July 2013, the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Cologne, Germany, commissioned its new medical research facility :envihab. One central element of the facility is a new type of short radius centrifuge called DLR-SAHC 1 (formerly known as :enviFuge), which has been developed in collaboration with AMST Systemtechnik GmbH, Ranshofen, Austria. The shift of subjects above heart-level on a short arm centrifuge allows unique studies on, e.g., the cardiovascular regulation in surroundings with a high gradient of artificial gravity. Equipped with the capacity to move the four nacelles along the acceleration axis simultaneously and independently from each other, the centrifuge allows the possibility to perform up to four complex trials in parallel. The maximal acceleration is 6 g at the foot level and each nacelle can accomodate an up to 150kg payload. Additional equipment can be mounted on two payload bays with a capacity of 100kg each. Standard features of the centrifuge include a motion capturing system with six cameras and two triaxial force plates to study the kinematics of physical exercise (e.g., squatting, jumping or vibration training) under increased gravity. Future projects involving SAHC 1 will allow the development and testing of potential countermeasures and training methods against the negative effects of weightlessness in space on human physiology. Due to the centrifuge's capability to hold heavy equipment, carrying out a variety of non-human life science experiments requiring complex and heavy hardware is also fully feasible.

  9. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  10. Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find…

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Shouxian, China for the Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    DOE Data Explorer

    In a complex ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment, monitoring data was collected at four locations in China during 2008. The various sites are located in regions with different climate regimes and with high aerosol loadings of different optical, physical, and chemical properties. Measurements obtained at all the AMF sites during the 8-month deployment in China will help scientists to validate satellite-based findings, understand the mechanisms of the aerosol indirect effects in the region, and examine the roles of aerosols in affecting regional climate and atmospheric circulation, with a special focus on the impact of the East Asian monsoon system. As with other collections from the ARM Mobile Facility, the datasets are available from the ARM Archive. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  12. The Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, Paul; Gates, Michele; Johnson, Lindley; Chodas, Paul; Mazanek, Dan; Reeves, David; Ticker, Ronald

    2016-07-01

    To achieve its long-term goal of sending humans to Mars, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) plans to proceed in a series of incrementally more complex human spaceflight missions. Today, human flight experience extends only to Low-Earth Orbit (LEO), and should problems arise during a mission, the crew can return to Earth in a matter of minutes to hours. The next logical step for human spaceflight is to gain flight experience in the vicinity of the Moon. These cis-lunar missions provide a "proving ground" for the testing of systems and operations while still accommodating an emergency return path to the Earth that would last only several days. Cis-lunar mission experience will be essential for more ambitious human missions beyond the Earth-Moon system, which will require weeks, months, or even years of transit time. In addition, NASA has been given a Grand Challenge to find all asteroid threats to human populations and know what to do about them. Obtaining knowledge of asteroid physical properties combined with performing technology demonstrations for planetary defense provide much needed information to address the issue of future asteroid impacts on Earth. Hence the combined objectives of human exploration and planetary defense give a rationale for the Asteroid Re-direct Mission (ARM). Mission Description: NASA's ARM consists of two mission segments: 1) the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM), the first robotic mission to visit a large (greater than ~100 m diameter) near-Earth asteroid (NEA), collect a multi-ton boulder from its surface along with regolith samples, demonstrate a planetary defense technique, and return the asteroidal material to a stable orbit around the Moon; and 2) the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM), in which astronauts will take the Orion capsule to rendezvous and dock with the robotic vehicle, conduct multiple extravehicular activities to explore the boulder, and return to Earth with samples. NASA's proposed

  13. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  14. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  15. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  16. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  17. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  18. The use of robots for arms control treaty verification

    SciTech Connect

    Michalowski, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Many aspects of the superpower relationship now present a new set of challenges and opportunities, including the vital area of arms control. This report addresses one such possibility: the use of robots for the verification of arms control treaties. The central idea of this report is far from commonly-accepted. In fact, it was only encountered once in bibliographic review phase of the project. Nonetheless, the incentive for using robots is simple and coincides with that of industrial applications: to replace or supplement human activity in the performance of tasks for which human participation is unnecessary, undesirable, impossible, too dangerous or too expensive. As in industry, robots should replace workers (in this case, arms control inspectors) only when questions of efficiency, reliability, safety, security and cost-effectiveness have been answered satisfactorily. In writing this report, it is not our purpose to strongly advocate the application of robots in verification. Rather, we wish to explore the significant aspects, pro and con, of applying experience from the field of flexible automation to the complex task of assuring arms control treaty compliance. We want to establish a framework for further discussion of this topic and to define criteria for evaluating future proposals. The authors' expertise is in robots, not arms control. His practical experience has been in developing systems for use in the rehabilitation of severely disabled persons (such as quadriplegics), who can use robots for assistance during activities of everyday living, as well as in vocational applications. This creates a special interest in implementations that, in some way, include a human operator in the control scheme of the robot. As we hope to show in this report, such as interactive systems offer the greatest promise of making a contribution to the challenging problems of treaty verification. 15 refs.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan. Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Ellingson, Robert G.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Klein, Steve A.; McFarquhar, Gregory M.; Lamb, Peter J.; Long, Charles M.; Verlinde, Johannes

    2004-10-30

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years; Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square; Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds; Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations; Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites; Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale; and, Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote

  20. ASSEMBLY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF 8-ARM AND 12-ARM DNA BRANCHED JUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules can be assembled into objects and networks directed by sticky-ended cohesion. The connectivity of these species is limited by the number of arms flanking the branch point. To date, the only branched junctions constructed contain six or fewer arms. We report the construction of DNA branched junctions that contain either 8 or 12 double helical arms surrounding a branch point. The design of the 8-arm junction expoits the limits of a previous approach to thwart branch migration, but the design of the 12-arm junction uses a new to principle achieve this end. The 8-arm junction is stable with 16 nucleotide pairs per arm, but the 12-arm junction has been stabilized by 24 nucleotide pairs per arm. Ferguson analysis of these junctions in combination with three, four, five, and six-arm junctions indicates a linear increase in friction constant as the number of arms increases; the four-arm junction migrates anomalously at 4°C., suggesting stacking of its domains. All strands in both the 8-arm and 12-arm junctions show similar responses to hydroxyl radical autofootprinting analysis, indicating that they lack any dominant stacking structures. The stability of the 12-arm junction demonstrates that the number of arms in a junction is not limited to the case of having adjacent identical base pairs flanking the junction. The ability to construct eight-arm and twelve-arm junctions increases the number of objects, graphs and networks that can be built from branched DNA components. In principle, the stick structure corresponding to cubic close packing is now a possible target for assembly by DNA nanotechnology. PMID:17564446

  1. Arms Control: a Selected Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    THE REAGAN YEARS. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1987. (JX1974.7 R33 1987) Seaborg , Glenn T. STEMMING THE TIDE: ARMS CONTROL IN THE JOHNSON YEARS...William, and Seaborg , Glenn T. "Non-Nuclear States Move to End Testing." BULLETIN OF THE ATOMIC SCIENTISTS, Vol. 45, June 1989, pp. 36-37. "European...STRATEGIC OFFENSIVE FORCE REDUCTION PORTION OF THE NUCLEAR AND SPACE TALKS IN GENEVA, by Edward L. Warner, III, Glenn A. Kent, and Randall J. DeValk. Note N

  2. NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, P. A.; Mazanek, D. D.; Reeves, D. M.; Chodas, P. W.; Gates, M. M.; Johnson, L. N.; Ticker, R. L.

    2017-01-01

    Mission Description and Objectives: NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) consists of two mission segments: 1) the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM), a robotic mission to visit a large (greater than approximately 100 meters diameter) near-Earth asteroid (NEA), collect a multi-ton boulder from its surface along with regolith samples, and return the asteroidal material to a stable orbit around the Moon; and 2) the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM), in which astronauts will explore and investigate the boulder and return to Earth with samples. The ARRM is currently planned to launch at the end of 2021 and the ARCM is scheduled for late 2026.

  3. Python-ARM Radar Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Helmus, Scott Collis

    2013-03-17

    The Python-ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART) is a collection of radar quality control and retrieval codes which all work on two unifying Python objects: the PyRadar and PyGrid objects. By building ingests to several popular radar formats and then abstracting the interface Py-ART greatly simplifies data processing over several other available utilities. In addition Py-ART makes use of Numpy arrays as its primary storage mechanism enabling use of existing and extensive community software tools.

  4. ARM Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, L Ruby

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s ARM Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign contributes to CalWater 2015, a multi-agency field campaign that aims to improve understanding of atmospheric rivers and aerosol sources and transport that influence cloud and precipitation processes. The ultimate goal is to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of droughts and floods in California. With the DOE G-1 aircraft and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) well equipped for making aerosol and cloud measurements, ACAPEX focuses specifically on understanding how aerosols from local pollution and long-range transport affect the amount and phase of precipitation associated with atmospheric rivers. ACAPEX took place between January 12, 2015 and March 8, 2015 as part of CalWater 2015, which included four aircraft (DOE G-1, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] G-IV and P-3, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] ER-2), the NOAA research ship Ron Brown, carrying onboard the AMF2, National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored aerosol and precipitation measurements at Bodega Bay, and the California Department of Water Resources extreme precipitation network.

  5. Camera Inspection Arm for Boiling Water Reactors - 13330

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Scott; Rood, Marc

    2013-07-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) outage maintenance tasks can be time-consuming and hazardous. Reactor facilities are continuously looking for quicker, safer, and more effective methods of performing routine inspection during these outages. In 2011, S.A. Technology (SAT) was approached by Energy Northwest to provide a remote system capable of increasing efficiencies related to Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) internal inspection activities. The specific intent of the system discussed was to inspect recirculation jet pumps in a manner that did not require manual tooling, and could be performed independently of other ongoing inspection activities. In 2012, SAT developed a compact, remote, camera inspection arm to create a safer, more efficient outage environment. This arm incorporates a compact and lightweight design along with the innovative use of bi-stable composite tubes to provide a six-degree of freedom inspection tool capable of reducing dose uptake, reducing crew size, and reducing the overall critical path for jet pump inspections. The prototype camera inspection arm unit is scheduled for final testing in early 2013 in preparation for the Columbia Generating Station refueling outage in the spring of 2013. (authors)

  6. Characterizing and Filling Data Gaps in ARM Measurements for Carbon Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, R. A.; Hargrove, W. W.; Jager, H. I.; Brandt, C. C.; Hanan, N.

    2003-12-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data archive includes many of the measurements needed by carbon modelers to predict carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems, but data gaps limit the use of ARM data as input for simulation models. Because the DOE ARM Program records actual measurements, circumstances unavoidably arise when instrument and storage failures create gaps in the temporal stream of measurements. Most temporal gaps are short in duration and affect only one or a few related parameters. However, some rare failures, such as wide-area power outages or ice storms, occasionally affect many measurement streams at one or more ARM facilities simultaneously. We have statistically characterized the frequency of univariate temporal gap lengths in various ARM measurements, and have devised approaches for filling such data gaps in space and time. To make ARM measurements suitable as model input, we identified and eliminated outliers, removed values with known QA problems, aggregated the measurements to an appropriate temporal scale (hours), and filled gaps in the data record using univariate imputation methods across time and space. We have prepared a set of hourly aggregated, gap-filled products from ARM SIRS and SMOS data collected at the SGP site from 1996 through 2001. These products were designed to facilitate the use of ARM measurements as climate drivers for carbon simulations. In cases where no raw data were available, we imputed a replacement value from adjacent hours or sites. ARM measurements differed widely in predictability. Temperature and vapor pressure were easiest to impute, but precipitation was a challenge. Shortwave radiation was more difficult to impute than longwave radiation. Successful imputation created reasonable values and patterns that were indistinguishable from the surrounding measurements. The difficulty of imputation for each measurement could help prioritize instrument repair and operational triage during data collection.

  7. Magic - Marine Arm Gpci Investigation of Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, E. R.; Wiscombe, W. J.; Albrecht, B. A.; Bland, G.; Flagg, C. N.; Klein, S. A.; Kollias, P.; Mace, G. G.; Reynolds, M.; Schwartz, S. E.; Siebesma, P.; Teixeira, J.; Wood, R.; Zhang, M.

    2012-12-01

    MAGIC, the Marine ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program) GPCI Investigation of Clouds, will deploy the Second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) aboard the Horizon Lines cargo container ship M/V Spirit traversing the route between Los Angeles, CA and Honolulu, HI from October, 2012 through September, 2013 (except from a few months in the middle of this time period when the ship will be in dry dock). During this time AMF2 will observe and characterize the properties of clouds and precipitation, aerosols, and atmospheric radiation; standard meteorological and oceanographic variables; and atmospheric structure. There will also be Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs), one in January, 2013 and one in July, 2013 during which more detailed measurements of the atmospheric structure will be made. Clouds remain a major source of uncertainty in climate projections. In this context, subtropical marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds play a key role in cloud-climate feedbacks that are not well understood yet play a large role in biases both in seasonal coupled model forecasts and annual mean climate forecasts. In particular, current climate models do not accurately represent the transition from the stratocumulus (Sc) regime, with its high albedo and large impact on the global radiative balance of Earth, to shallow trade-wind cumulus (Cu), which play a fundamental role in global surface evaporation and also albedo. Climate models do not yet adequately parameterize the small-scale physical processes associated with turbulence, convection, and radiation in these clouds. Part of this inability results from lack of accurate data on these clouds and the conditions responsible for their properties, including aerosol properties, radiation, and atmospheric and oceanographic conditions. The primary objectives of MAGIC are to improve the representation of the Sc-to-Cu transition in climate models by characterizing the essential properties of this transition, and to produce the observed

  8. Gaseous Structures and Mass Drift in Spiral Galaxies: Effects of Arm Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Kim, W.-T.

    2015-10-01

    Stellar spiral arms in disk galaxies play an important role in the formation of gaseous substructures such as gaseous feathers as well as mass inflows/outflows in the radial direction. We study nonlinear responses of self-gravitating gas to an imposed stellar spiral potential in galactic disks with differing arm strength and pattern speed. We find that the extent and shapes of gaseous arms as well as the radial mass drift rate depend rather sensitively on the arm pattern speed. Quasi-steady spiral shocks can exist only when the normal Mach number is small. The pitch angle of gaseous arms is usually smaller than that of stellar arms. The mass drift rate to the central region is in the range of ˜0.05-3.0M⊙yr-1 , with larger values corresponding to stronger and/or slower-rotating arms. Using a normal-mode linear stability analysis together with nonlinear simulations, we show that wiggle instability of spiral shocks is due to the accumulation of potential vorticity at a perturbed shock front, rather than Kelvin-Helmholtz instability as previously suggested.

  9. Bioinspired locomotion and grasping in water: the soft eight-arm OCTOPUS robot.

    PubMed

    Cianchetti, M; Calisti, M; Margheri, L; Kuba, M; Laschi, C

    2015-05-13

    The octopus is an interesting model for the development of soft robotics, due to its high deformability, dexterity and rich behavioural repertoire. To investigate the principles of octopus dexterity, we designed an eight-arm soft robot and evaluated its performance with focused experiments. The OCTOPUS robot presented here is a completely soft robot, which integrates eight arms extending in radial direction and a central body which contains the main processing units. The front arms are mainly used for elongation and grasping, while the others are mainly used for locomotion. The robotic octopus works in water and its buoyancy is close to neutral. The experimental results show that the octopus-inspired robot can walk in water using the same strategy as the animal model, with good performance over different surfaces, including walking through physical constraints. It can grasp objects of different sizes and shapes, thanks to its soft arm materials and conical shape.

  10. Navy autonomy thwarts arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Arkin, W.M.

    1987-09-01

    During the past three decades the two superpowers have steadily modernized their naval forces, sent large numbers of nuclear weapons to sea, and engaged in provocative and potentially destabilizing operations. Currently the US is deploying new aircraft carriers, a new generation of fighter aircraft, and new surface ships with greater offensive and defensive power. The Soviet Union has deployed a new generation of attack submarines and is completing its first large aircraft carrier. And the Soviets are preparing to follow the US lead in deploying long-range, highly accurate sea-launched cruise missiles. These developments, accompanied by naval operations that increase the potential for superpower conflict at sea, should make naval arms control a high priority. But it has not been a focus of US-Soviet negotiations and only recently has garnered more interest from multilateral disarmament bodies. An examination of the record shows that bilateral efforts in this area have been minimal and impeded by strong opposition, particularly from the US Navy. The multilateral approach may be more promising because of five agreements affecting the seas that could offer precedents, but this will require improved coordination between the arms control and law of the sea processes. 10 references.

  11. Arms races between and within species.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, R; Krebs, J R

    1979-09-21

    An adaptation in one lineage (e.g. predators) may change the selection pressure on another lineage (e.g. prey), giving rise to a counter-adaptation. If this occurs reciprocally, an unstable runaway escalation or 'arms race' may result. We discuss various factors which might give one side an advantage in an arms race. For example, a lineage under strong selection may out-evolve a weakly selected one (' the life-dinner principle'). We then classify arms races in two independent ways. They may be symmetric or asymmetric, and they may be interspecific or intraspecific. Our example of an asymmetric interspecific arms race is that between brood parasites and their hosts. The arms race concept may help to reduce the mystery of why cuckoo hosts are so good at detecting cuckoo eggs, but so bad at detecting cuckoo nestlings. The evolutionary contest between queen and worker ants over relative parental investment is a good example of an intraspecific asymmetric arms race. Such cases raise special problems because the participants share the same gene pool. Interspecific symmetric arms races are unlikely to be important, because competitors tend to diverge rather than escalate competitive adaptations. Intraspecific symmetric arms races, exemplified by adaptations for male-male competition, may underlie Cope's Rule and even the extinction of lineages. Finally we consider ways in which arms races can end. One lineage may drive the other to extinction; one may reach an optimum, thereby preventing the other from doing so; a particularly interesting possibility, exemplified by flower-bee coevolution, is that both sides may reach a mutual local optimum; lastly, arms races may have no stable and but may cycle continuously. We do not wish necessarily to suggest that all, or even most, evolutionary change results from arms races, but we do suggest that the arms race concept may help to resolve three long-standing questions in evolutionary theory.

  12. Lever arm dysfunction in cerebral palsy gait.

    PubMed

    Theologis, Tim

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal structures act as lever arms during walking. Muscle activity and the ground reaction against gravity exert forces on the skeleton, which generate torque (moments) around joints. These lead to the sequence of movements which form normal human gait. Skeletal deformities in cerebral palsy (CP) affect the function of bones as lever arms and compromise gait. Lever arm dysfunction should be carefully considered when contemplating treatment to improve gait in children with CP.

  13. Dynamic analysis for robot arm control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Explicit state equations provide detailed analytic insight into the dynamic behavior of a robot arm and facilitate the understanding of the control problem. The analytic strength of explicit state equations is exemplified for a given robot arm. In fact, for the quoted example, the explicit and exact state equations involve considerably less computation than the use of the known most efficient general-purpose computational algorithm for robot arm dynamics.

  14. Simplified robot arm dynamics for control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Paul, R. P.

    1981-01-01

    A brief summary and evaluation is presented on the use of symbolic state equation techniques in order to represent robot arm dynamics with sufficient accuracy for controlling arm motion. The use of homogeneous transformations and the Lagrangian formulation of mechanics offers a convenient frame for the derivation, analysis and simplification of complex robot dynamics equations. It is pointed out that simplified state equations can represent robot arm dynamics with good accuracy.

  15. Introduction to Reading and Visualizing ARM Data

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, James

    2014-02-18

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program standard data format is NetCDF 3 (Network Common Data Form). The object of this tutorial is to provide a basic introduction to NetCDF with an emphasis on aspects of the ARM application of NetCDF. The goal is to provide basic instructions for reading and visualizing ARM NetCDF data with the expectation that these examples can then be applied to more complex applications.

  16. Facilities Enhancement for IPY at Barrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, G.; Brown, J.; Coakley, B.; Zak, B.

    2007-12-01

    In connection with the International Polar Year, research facilities at Barrow have been markedly enhanced. On June 1st, Sen. Ted Stevens cut the ribbon at the Grand Opening of the Barrow Arctic Research Center (BARC). The BARC currently covers 18,000 sq. ft, with future phases anticipated, including 8 research labs, a necropsy lab for animal studies, freezers for biological samples, a state-of-the-art-data system, a planned Internet II connection, meeting spaces, and offices. There is a platform on the roof of the facility for instrumentation, and a communications tower to provide WIFI connections to remote instrumentation located on the adjacent Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO). The BEO, which consists of 11 square miles of tundra and coastline set aside for environmental and ecological research, has also seen recent enhancements. A power line and a hard- surfaced trail now provide easy access to the interior of the BEO. Users of the BEO (and others) also have access to many different data sets continuously collected at the NOAA Global Monitoring Division Barrow Station and the DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Climate Research Facility (see http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/obop/brw.html and http://www.arm.gov/sites/nsa.stm respectively) also adjacent to the BEO. The National Weather Service Barrow Station also provides data of interest. Researchers submitting proposals to the National Science Foundation can include a request for the use of BARC and BEO facilities in their proposals. ARM facilities, recently augmented, can also be made available, but through arrangements made directly with ARM (BDZak@sandia.gov; 505-845-8631 or MDIvey@sandia.gov; 505-284-9092). BARC, BEO and ARM facilities are available to other agency and international users as well. For more information, see http://www.arcticscience.org, or contact Glenn Sheehan (907-852-4881, basc@arcticscience.org). The BEO consists of land owned by Ukpeagvik Inupiat Corporation, which is owned by

  17. Letter report: Ari Patrinos -- ARM summary

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, G.J.; Ruderman, M.A.; Treiman, S.B.

    1995-07-27

    This letter report provides a summary of the authors` views on ARM. ARM is a highly focused program designed to improve understanding of the transport of infrared and solar radiation through the atmosphere. The program pays particular attention to the interaction of radiation with the three phases of water. The goals of ARM are usually articulated in terms of improvements in climate models. The authors agree that ARM can indeed make significant contributions to the understanding of climate change. In addition they believe that the results of the program will have wide applicability to a broad range of problems, including more accurate short-term and seasonal weather forecasting.

  18. Arms Transfers to the Irish Republican Army.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    and Policy Sciences 3 • " . %" "i - .% *’ -.. " - ’ .’’" -W%" . ’% G " %,’’ .- "S.*" *’I % ’ %- ABSTRACT 1, - This -ia, describes the arms transfer...from the policy of divestiture added insult to injury. There were sharp increases in the late 󈨀s in both arms manufacturing and in the volume of...through arms transfers to the Irish rebels coincided in time with several relevant changes; (1) the coordination of Eastern bloc arms 45 transfer policies

  19. Changing patterns of US arms transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Salomone, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The thesis has three purposes. First is to explore the changing patterns of US arms transfers from Fiscal Year 1950 (FY 1950) through Fiscal Year 1980 (FY 1980). Second, is to describe and assess the decision-making process for arms transfers within the US Government. Third is to examine and critique the conventional wisdom concerning US arms transfers, to support that wisdom, or to offer an alternate empirically supported view. The conventional wisdom about US arms transfer is that they have been rising at an alarming rate, and that this is the result of an arms transfer decision-making process which is out of control. This belief is founded on an empirically based proposition that arms transfers have been rising at an alarming rate. However, this proposition has never been empirically validated. To explore this conventional wisdom, the author establishes the historical, political and defense policy contexts for US arms transfers over the period FY 1950 through FY 1980. The author critiques the conventional wisdom about US arms transfers, analyzes the many ways that arms transfers have been measured, and explores the impediments to accurate measurement and assessment of the phenomenon.

  20. Low friction high speed rocker arm

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, A.O.

    1987-07-28

    A valve train is described for an internal combustion engine comprising, a camshaft mounted close above the cylinder head face of the engine, a one-piece essentially U-shaped rocker arm mounted above the camshaft for an arcuate movement and defined by a bottom wall integral with a pair of laterally spaced upstanding side walls. The bottom wall has a cylindrical fulcrum surface projecting upwardly. A lash adjuster fixedly supports above the rocker arm against lateral movement and has a lower surface engaging the cylindrical fulcrum surface with a contact establishing a pure rolling motion without friction of the rocker arm upon the lash adjuster lower surface. A reciprocatingly mounted valve stem engages one end of the rocker arm for reciprocation of the valve. The other end of the rocker arm rotatably supports a dual function roller engagable with a cam lobe on the camshaft for arcuate pivoting of the rocker arm about its fulcrum upon rotation of the camshaft. Support means supports the roller for both an arcuate movement of its axis of rotation along a predetermined path providing a pure rolling motion of the rocker arm about its fulcrum upon the lash adjuster surface. This confines the roller and arm in a manner preventing a longitudinal sliding movement of the rocker arm fulcrum surface relative to the lash adjuster surface.

  1. Disk's Spiral Arms Point to Possible Planets

    NASA Video Gallery

    Simulations of young stellar systems suggest that planets embedded in a circumstellar disk can produce many distinctive structures, including rings, gaps and spiral arms. This video compares comput...

  2. Future Flight Central

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA 'Future Flight Central,' the world's first full-scale virtual airport control tower, opened December 13, 1999 at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. Constructed at a cost of $10 million, the two story facility was jointly funded by NASA and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The facility is designed to test ways to solve potential air and ground traffic problems at commercial airports under realistic airport conditions and configurations. The facility provides an opportunity for airlines and airports to mitigate passenger delays by fine tuning airport hub operations, gate management, ramp movement procedures, and various other airport improvements. Twelve rear projection screens provide a seamless 360 degree high- resolution view of the airport or other screens being depicted. The imaging system, powered by supercomputers, provides a realistic view of weather conditions, enviromental and seasonal effects and the movement of up to 200 active aircraft and ground vehicles.

  3. Evolution of Gas Across Spiral Arms in the Whirlpool Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Melissa Nicole

    HCO+ emission in M51 across the central 7 kpc disk and localized along a region of spiral arm. This work combines observations that were made with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and higher resolution data using the Combined Array for Research In Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). These observations show dense gas tracers are localized along the star forming spiral arms. In particular, there are regions where dense gas is present but there is no evidence of massive star formation. This may imply that the local environmental conditions, like temperature and velocity dispersion, or small scale physical processes, like turbulence and local gravitational collapse, are important for determining which gas will form stars. This new data also tests an existing relationship between dense gas and infrared emission. Previous work shows a linear relationship connecting distant galaxies and local star forming regions in our own galaxy. These new observations in M51 help fill in the four magnitude gap separating the galaxies and the star forming regions. The presence of an offset between observations in nearby galaxies suggest a change to the hypothesis of HCN tracing a `basic unit of star formation' by include a secondary effect regulated by either the conversion from mass to light or the star formation efficiency.

  4. Law of Armed Conflict Deskbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    important to be aware of cultural issues, such as Islamic traditions regarding treatment and handling of the dead. b. No cremation (except for religious...Burial or cremation sites or graves; iv. Medical facilities, medical equipment, medical supplies or transportation; v. Children’s toys or other

  5. Cortical Spiking Network Interfaced with Virtual Musculoskeletal Arm and Robotic Arm

    PubMed Central

    Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Zhou, Xianlian; Neymotin, Samuel A.; Przekwas, Andrzej; Francis, Joseph T.; Lytton, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Embedding computational models in the physical world is a critical step towards constraining their behavior and building practical applications. Here we aim to drive a realistic musculoskeletal arm model using a biomimetic cortical spiking model, and make a robot arm reproduce the same trajectories in real time. Our cortical model consisted of a 3-layered cortex, composed of several hundred spiking model-neurons, which display physiologically realistic dynamics. We interconnected the cortical model to a two-joint musculoskeletal model of a human arm, with realistic anatomical and biomechanical properties. The virtual arm received muscle excitations from the neuronal model, and fed back proprioceptive information, forming a closed-loop system. The cortical model was trained using spike timing-dependent reinforcement learning to drive the virtual arm in a 2D reaching task. Limb position was used to simultaneously control a robot arm using an improved network interface. Virtual arm muscle activations responded to motoneuron firing rates, with virtual arm muscles lengths encoded via population coding in the proprioceptive population. After training, the virtual arm performed reaching movements which were smoother and more realistic than those obtained using a simplistic arm model. This system provided access to both spiking network properties and to arm biophysical properties, including muscle forces. The use of a musculoskeletal virtual arm and the improved control system allowed the robot arm to perform movements which were smoother than those reported in our previous paper using a simplistic arm. This work provides a novel approach consisting of bidirectionally connecting a cortical model to a realistic virtual arm, and using the system output to drive a robotic arm in real time. Our techniques are applicable to the future development of brain neuroprosthetic control systems, and may enable enhanced brain-machine interfaces with the possibility for finer control of

  6. Cortical Spiking Network Interfaced with Virtual Musculoskeletal Arm and Robotic Arm.

    PubMed

    Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Zhou, Xianlian; Neymotin, Samuel A; Przekwas, Andrzej; Francis, Joseph T; Lytton, William W

    2015-01-01

    Embedding computational models in the physical world is a critical step towards constraining their behavior and building practical applications. Here we aim to drive a realistic musculoskeletal arm model using a biomimetic cortical spiking model, and make a robot arm reproduce the same trajectories in real time. Our cortical model consisted of a 3-layered cortex, composed of several hundred spiking model-neurons, which display physiologically realistic dynamics. We interconnected the cortical model to a two-joint musculoskeletal model of a human arm, with realistic anatomical and biomechanical properties. The virtual arm received muscle excitations from the neuronal model, and fed back proprioceptive information, forming a closed-loop system. The cortical model was trained using spike timing-dependent reinforcement learning to drive the virtual arm in a 2D reaching task. Limb position was used to simultaneously control a robot arm using an improved network interface. Virtual arm muscle activations responded to motoneuron firing rates, with virtual arm muscles lengths encoded via population coding in the proprioceptive population. After training, the virtual arm performed reaching movements which were smoother and more realistic than those obtained using a simplistic arm model. This system provided access to both spiking network properties and to arm biophysical properties, including muscle forces. The use of a musculoskeletal virtual arm and the improved control system allowed the robot arm to perform movements which were smoother than those reported in our previous paper using a simplistic arm. This work provides a novel approach consisting of bidirectionally connecting a cortical model to a realistic virtual arm, and using the system output to drive a robotic arm in real time. Our techniques are applicable to the future development of brain neuroprosthetic control systems, and may enable enhanced brain-machine interfaces with the possibility for finer control of

  7. Proprioceptive illusions created by vibration of one arm are altered by vibrating the other arm.

    PubMed

    Hakuta, Naoyuki; Izumizaki, Masahiko; Kigawa, Kazuyoshi; Murai, Norimitsu; Atsumi, Takashi; Homma, Ikuo

    2014-07-01

    There is some evidence that signals coming from both arms are used to determine the perceived position and movement of one arm. We examined whether the sense of position and movement of one (reference) arm is altered by increases in muscle spindle signals in the other (indicator) arm in blindfolded participants (n = 26). To increase muscle spindle discharge, we applied 70-80 Hz muscle vibration to the elbow flexors of the indicator arm. In a first experiment, proprioceptive illusions in the vibrated reference arm in a forearm position-matching task were compared between conditions in which the indicator arm elbow flexors were vibrated or not vibrated. We found that the vibration illusion of arm extension induced by vibration of reference arm elbow flexors was reduced in the presence of vibration of the indicator elbow flexors. In a second experiment, participants were asked to describe their perception of the illusion of forearm extension movements of the reference arm evoked by vibration of reference arm elbow flexors in response to on/off and off/on transitions of vibration of non-reference arm elbow flexors. When vibration of non-reference arm elbow flexors was turned on, they reported a sensation of slowing down of the illusion of the reference arm. When it was turned off, they reported a sensation of speeding up. To conclude, the present study shows that both the sense of limb position and the sense of limb movement of one arm are dependent to some extent on spindle signals coming from the other arm.

  8. Control and Calibration of a Staubli RX130 Robotic Arm for Construction of Surface Current Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanmeter, Patrick; Crawford, Christopher; Guler, Emre; Fugal, Mario; Irvin, Bradley

    2013-10-01

    Precision low energy neutron experiments require extremely uniform magnetic fields for manipulating the neutron spin. Such fields can be generated with surface current coils-precision 3-dimensional printed circuits. We are developing a facility to etch out these circuits on copper-plated curved forms using a high-speed spindle attached to the end-effector of a Staubli RX130 six-axis robotic arm. We describe our mathematical model of the robotic links and the software system we designed to control the motion of the arm and to prevent collisions during actuations. We developed a calibration procedure to achieve accuracy of 30 microns in the position of drill.

  9. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data - A new data product for climate modelers

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Klein, Stephen A.; Cederwall, Richard T.; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Gaustad, Krista L.; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hall, Stefanie; Jensen, Michael; Johnson, Karen L.; Lin, Yanluan; Long, Charles N.; Mather, James H.; McCord, Raymond A.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Palanisamy, Giriprakash; Shi, Yan; Turner, David D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of a new data product, named the Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) dataset, developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program in order to better serve the need of climate model developers and encourage greater use of ARM data by modelers. The CMBE dataset contains those quantities that are often used in model evaluation and reflect unique ARM measurements of clouds and radiation (e.g., cloud occurrence, liquid water path, and surface radiative fluxes) from the highest quality data that ARM has for many years. The data are averaged over one hour period, which is comparable to a typical temporal resolution used in climate model output. They are currently available at five ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites located at the Southern Great Plains, North Slope of Alaska, and Tropic Western Pacific, and can be obtained from the ACRF data archive. The long-term continuous ARM data provide invaluable information to improve our understanding of the interaction between clouds and radiation and a solid observational basis for model validation and improvement. This paper shows some examples to demonstrate its unique values in studies of cloud processes, climate variability and change, and climate modeling. Plans for future enhancements of the CMBE product are also discussed.

  10. Travis and Arms revisited: a second look at a widely used bioconcentration algorithm.

    PubMed

    Birak, P; Yurk, J; Adeshina, F; Lorber, M; Pollard, K; Choudhury, H; Kroner, S

    2001-06-01

    In 1988, Travis and Arms reviewed the literature and collected data to develop a relationship between the octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow) and the uptake of organic compounds into milk and beef (Travis and Arms, 1988). These equations have been utilized for predicting biotransfer factors for organic chemicals when empirical data are lacking. During the external peer review of the draft US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance entitled Human Health Risk Assessment Protocol for Hazardous Waste Combustion Facilities (US EPA, 1998) and the development of Superfund's Ecological Soil Screening Levels (US EPA, 2000b), questions challenging the derivation and use of these equations were raised. The primary questions raised were: 1) Are the equations presented in Travis and Arms (1988) for the estimation of transfer of organic compounds from contaminated feed to beef and milk technically valid and reproducible? If so, (2) are the equations appropriate across the entire log Kow range? For these reasons, this study was undertaken to validate the original Travis and Arms equations, to review more recent literature, and. if appropriate, to add to the original Travis and Arms data set to obtain updated equations. This paper presents an evaluation of the original Travis and Arms equations, limitations to their use, and steps to reduce uncertainties associated with their use by updating with more current literature.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)

    DOE Data Explorer

    In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

  12. Arm sway holds sway: locomotor-like modulation of leg reflexes when arms swing in alternation.

    PubMed

    Massaad, F; Levin, O; Meyns, P; Drijkoningen, D; Swinnen, S P; Duysens, J

    2014-01-31

    It has been argued that arm movements are important during human gait because they affect leg activity due to neural coupling between arms and legs. Consequently, one would expect that locomotor-like alternating arm swing is more effective than in-phase swing in affecting the legs' motor output. Other alternating movements such as trunk rotation associated to arm swing could also affect leg reflexes. Here, we assessed how locomotor-like movement patterns would affect soleus H-reflexes in 13 subjects performing arm swing in the sagittal plane (ipsilateral, contralateral and bilateral in-phase versus locomotor-like anti-phase arm movements) and trunk rotation with the legs stationary, and leg stepping with the arms stationary. Findings revealed that soleus H-reflexes were suppressed for all arm, trunk or leg movements. However, a marked reflex modulation occurred during locomotor-like anti-phase arm swing, as was also the case during leg stepping, and this modulation flattened out during in-phase arm swing. This modulation had a peculiar bell shape and showed maximum suppression at a moment where the heel-strike would occur during a normal walking cycle. Furthermore, this modulation was independent from electromyographic activity, suggesting a spinal processing at premotoneuronal level. Therefore, trunk movement can affect legs' output, and a special neural coupling occurs between arms and legs when arms move in alternation. This may have implications for gait rehabilitation.

  13. Should we embrace new drugs with open arms? Experience from a community-based, open-arm, randomized clinical trial of combination antiretroviral therapy in advanced HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Montaner, J S; Hogg, R; Srour, L F; Murphy, C; Barber, C G; Phillips, P; O'Shaughnessy, M; Schechter, M T

    1996-12-15

    The effect of an open arm in the enrollment to a randomized clinical trial comparing zidovudine (ZDV) plus didanosine (ddI) versus ZDV plus zalcitabine (ddC) was assessed. HIV-infected individuals were eligible to participate in this protocol if they were ddI and ddC naive, had CD4 counts of 50-350/mm3, and were residents of the province of British Columbia. Participating individuals could choose between open-label ZDV/ddI, ZDV/ddC, or randomization to open-label ZDV/ddI or ZDV/ ddC. Study drugs were made available free of charge for all participants through a centralized drug distribution system. There is no other source of these drugs in the province. Primary care physicians were required to renew the patient's prescription every 2 months. Enrollment was initiated in November 1992 and was closed in March 1994 when the randomized arm of the protocol met the predetermined target sample size of 120 evaluable participants. A total of 582 patients received combination therapy in the province through this protocol: 138 (28%) enrolled in the randomized arm and 444 (76%) in the open arm. In the latter group, 320 (72%) were initially prescribed ZDV/ddI and 124 (28%) were prescribed ZDV/ddC. The enrollment rate was strikingly higher in the open arm, with 168 patients enrolled in the first 2 months compared with 138 patients enrolled in the randomized arm over 17 months. Of the 78 study physicians, 69 enrolled patients in the open arm and 23 enrolled patients in the randomized arm of the study. Experienced physicians were more likely to refer patients for randomization (p = 0.025). No statistically significant differences were observed between patients enrolled in either study arm. Our results illustrate the challenge posed to recruitment into clinical trials by the coexistence of an open arm. This is despite the noncoercive, open-label and community-based nature of our randomized protocol and the high priority given to it by a variety of local and national organizations

  14. High spectral resolution measurements for the ARM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Revercomb, H.E.

    1992-05-22

    This report focuses on the design and fabrication of high spectral resolution FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) instrumentation for the CART sites of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The ultimate objective of this grant is to develop three different types of instruments, named the AERI, AERI-X, and SORT. The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) is the simplest. It will be available for early deployment at the first ARM site and will be deployable at several locations in the extended network to give horizontal coverage. The AERI will be an 0.5 cm{sup {minus}1} resolution instrument, which measures accurately calibrated radiance spectra for radiation studies and for remote sensing of atmospheric state variables. The AERI-X and the SORTI are higher spectral resolution instruments for obtaining the highest practical resolution for spectroscopy at the ARM central sites. The AERI-X, like the AERI will measure atmospheric emitted radiance, but with resolutions as high as 0.1 cm{sup {minus}1}. The Solar Radiance Transmission Interferometer will measure the total transmission of the atmosphere by tracking the sun through changes in atmospheric air mass. The large solar signal makes it practical for this instrument to offer the ultimate in spectral resolution, about 0.002 cm{sup {minus}1}.

  15. Films on the arms race

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, J.

    1983-01-01

    Films convey the historical perspectives, the biographical stories, the insights of the participants, and the horror of nuclear war - far better than can any physicist. While films are not very efficient for covering details, derivation, or numbers, they can not be beaten in showing what really happens in a nuclear explosion, in getting across general concepts, in illustrating the parameters of a problem, and the problem itself. Most importantly, films and TV can reach the people who must be informed about these issues if we are to resolve the problems. The author points out how films can contribute to an understanding of the issues of the arms race and nuclear war, with references to specific films. An annotated bibliography of 37 films is then presented.

  16. Sensory-Feedback Exoskeletal Arm Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Bin; Massie, Thomas H.; Vayner, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    An electromechanical exoskeletal arm apparatus has been designed for use in controlling a remote robotic manipulator arm. The apparatus, called a force-feedback exoskeleton arm master (F-EAM) is comfortable to wear and easy to don and doff. It provides control signals from the wearer s arm to a robot arm or a computer simulator (e.g., a virtual-reality system); it also provides force and torque feedback from sensors on the robot arm or from the computer simulator to the wearer s arm. The F-EAM enables the wearer to make the robot arm gently touch objects and finely manipulate them without exerting excessive forces. The F-EAM features a lightweight design in which the motors and gear heads that generate force and torque feedback are made smaller than they ordinarily would be: this is achieved by driving the motors to power levels greater than would ordinarily be used in order to obtain higher torques, and by providing active liquid cooling of the motors to prevent overheating at the high drive levels. The F-EAM (see figure) includes an assembly that resembles a backpack and is worn like a backpack, plus an exoskeletal arm mechanism. The FEAM has five degrees of freedom (DOFs) that correspond to those of the human arm: 1. The first DOF is that of the side-to-side rotation of the upper arm about the shoulder (rotation about axis 1). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 1 via drum 1 and a planar four-bar linkage. 2. The second DOF is that of the up-and-down rotation of the arm about the shoulder. The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 2 via drum 2. 3. The third DOF is that of twisting of the upper arm about its longitudinal axis. This DOF is implemented in a cable remote-center mechanism (CRCM). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 3, which drives the upper-arm cuff and the mechanism below it. A bladder inflatable by gas or liquid is placed between the cuff and the wearer s upper arm to compensate for misalignment

  17. 31 CFR 543.301 - Arms or any related materiel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arms or any related materiel. 543.301... Definitions § 543.301 Arms or any related materiel. The term arms or any related materiel means arms or... of arms and related materiel and technical training and assistance intended solely for support of...

  18. 31 CFR 543.301 - Arms or any related materiel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arms or any related materiel. 543.301... Definitions § 543.301 Arms or any related materiel. The term arms or any related materiel means arms or... of arms and related materiel and technical training and assistance intended solely for support of...

  19. 31 CFR 543.301 - Arms or any related materiel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arms or any related materiel. 543.301... Definitions § 543.301 Arms or any related materiel. The term arms or any related materiel means arms or... of arms and related materiel and technical training and assistance intended solely for support of...

  20. 31 CFR 543.301 - Arms or any related materiel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arms or any related materiel. 543.301... Definitions § 543.301 Arms or any related materiel. The term arms or any related materiel means arms or... of arms and related materiel and technical training and assistance intended solely for support of...

  1. Effort, success, and nonuse determine arm choice.

    PubMed

    Schweighofer, Nicolas; Xiao, Yupeng; Kim, Sujin; Yoshioka, Toshinori; Gordon, James; Osu, Rieko

    2015-07-01

    How do humans choose one arm or the other to reach single targets in front of the body? Current theories of reward-driven decisionmaking predict that choice results from a comparison of "action values," which are the expected rewards for possible actions in a given state. In addition, current theories of motor control predict that in planning arm movements, humans minimize an expected motor cost that balances motor effort and endpoint accuracy. Here, we test the hypotheses that arm choice is determined by comparison of action values comprising expected effort and expected task success for each arm, as well as a handedness bias. Right-handed subjects, in either a large or small target condition, were first instructed to use each hand in turn to shoot through an array of targets and then to choose either hand to shoot through the same targets. Effort was estimated via inverse kinematics and dynamics. A mixed-effects logistic-regression analysis showed that, as predicted, both expected effort and expected success predicted choice, as did arm use in the preceding trial. Finally, individual parameter estimation showed that the handedness bias correlated with mean difference between right- and left-arm success, leading to overall lower use of the left arm. We discuss our results in light of arm nonuse in individuals' poststroke.

  2. Dual-arm manipulators with adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The described and improved multi-arm invention of this application presents three strategies for adaptive control of cooperative multi-arm robots which coordinate control over a common load. In the position-position control strategy, the adaptive controllers ensure that the end-effector positions of both arms track desired trajectories in Cartesian space despite unknown time-varying interaction forces exerted through a load. In the position-hybrid control strategy, the adaptive controller of one arm controls end-effector motions in the free directions and applied forces in the constraint directions; while the adaptive controller of the other arm ensures that the end-effector tracks desired position trajectories. In the hybrid-hybrid control strategy, the adaptive controllers ensure that both end-effectors track reference position trajectories while simultaneously applying desired forces on the load. In all three control strategies, the cross-coupling effects between the arms are treated as disturbances which are compensated for by the adaptive controllers while following desired commands in a common frame of reference. The adaptive controllers do not require the complex mathematical model of the arm dynamics or any knowledge of the arm dynamic parameters or the load parameters such as mass and stiffness. Circuits in the adaptive feedback and feedforward controllers are varied by novel adaptation laws.

  3. 78 FR 30731 - Armed Forces Day, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8984 of May 17, 2013 Armed Forces Day, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Since the earliest days of our Union, America has been blessed with an..., liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And on Armed Forces Day, we honor those who serve bravely...

  4. 75 FR 28185 - Armed Forces Day, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8522 of May 14, 2010 Armed Forces Day, 2010 By the President of the United... Armed Forces Day, we pay tribute to these patriots who risk their lives, sometimes giving their last... days of independence. Today, we have the greatest military force in the history of the world because...

  5. Why we cannot grow a human arm.

    PubMed

    Ricci, John L

    2013-11-01

    There are several significant issues that prevent us from growing a human arm now, or within the next 10-20 years. From a tissue engineering perspective, while we can grow many of the components necessary for construction of a human arm, we can only grow them in relatively small volumes, and when scaled up to large volumes we lack the ability to develop adequate blood/nerve supply. From a genetic engineering perspective, we will probably never be able to turn on the specific genes necessary to "grow an arm" unless it is attached to a fetus and this presents enormous ethical issues related to farming of human organs and structures. Perhaps the most daunting problem facing the transplantation of a tissue engineered or transplanted arm is that of re-innervation of the structure. Since the sensory and motor nerve cells of the arm are located outside of the structure, re-innervation requires those nerves to regenerate over relatively large distances to repopulate the nervous system of the arm. This is something with which we have had little success. We can grow repair parts, but "growing an arm" presents too many insurmountable problems. The best we could possibly do with tissue engineering or genetic engineering would be the equivalent of a fetal arm and the technical problems, costs, and ethical hurdles are enormous. A more likely solution is a functional, permanent, neuroelectronically-controlled prosthesis. These are nearly a reality today.

  6. 21 CFR 890.3640 - Arm sling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arm sling. 890.3640 Section 890.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3640 Arm sling. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 890.3640 - Arm sling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arm sling. 890.3640 Section 890.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3640 Arm sling. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 890.3640 - Arm sling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arm sling. 890.3640 Section 890.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3640 Arm sling. (a) Identification....

  9. Design of a biomimetic robotic octopus arm.

    PubMed

    Laschi, C; Mazzolai, B; Mattoli, V; Cianchetti, M; Dario, P

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports the rationale and design of a robotic arm, as inspired by an octopus arm. The octopus arm shows peculiar features, such as the ability to bend in all directions, to produce fast elongations, and to vary its stiffness. The octopus achieves these unique motor skills, thanks to its peculiar muscular structure, named muscular hydrostat. Different muscles arranged on orthogonal planes generate an antagonistic action on each other in the muscular hydrostat, which does not change its volume during muscle contractions, and allow bending and elongation of the arm and stiffness variation. By drawing inspiration from natural skills of octopus, and by analysing the geometry and mechanics of the muscular structure of its arm, we propose the design of a robot arm consisting of an artificial muscular hydrostat structure, which is completely soft and compliant, but also able to stiffen. In this paper, we discuss the design criteria of the robotic arm and how this design and the special arrangement of its muscular structure may bring the building of a robotic arm into being, by showing the results obtained by mathematical models and prototypical mock-ups.

  10. 21 CFR 890.3640 - Arm sling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arm sling. 890.3640 Section 890.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3640 Arm sling. (a) Identification....

  11. 21 CFR 890.3640 - Arm sling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arm sling. 890.3640 Section 890.3640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3640 Arm sling. (a) Identification....

  12. Teaching Undergraduates about Nuclear Arms and Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear arms education is being addressed in many academic disciplines and can be approached from many viewpoints. Rationale, ethical issues, instructional strategies, European views, and course materials are considered. A syllabus and references are also included for a course titled "Physics of Nuclear Arms and Nuclear War." (DH)

  13. Research in lightweight elastic robotic arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nartker, T. A.

    1993-06-01

    The program involved a series of individual projects coordinated to develop controls for a flexible light weight robot arm. A hydraulically actuated 3-link robot arm was installed on a PRAB hydraulic base, and was designed of tubular steel. A PERT program chart was prepared (appendix B) on which various interrelated project milestones were projected.

  14. Whither the Third World Arms Producers?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    for 17 percent of the world arms market and 20 percent of the Third World market. The share of Third World arms exporters in 1984 reached almost 15...percent of the world market and about 18 percent of the Third World market. The present article examines these trends and some of their implications in greater detail.

  15. Small Arms Marksmanship Manual, NAVPERS 93863.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    The Navy's small arms marksmanship training program is designed to achieve proficiency for Navy personnel in handling the rifle, pistol andshotgun. The minimum objective of this program is to qualify Navy personnel as "Marksman," and ensure that personnel who are issued small arms for security, recreation, or competitions are fully qualified in…

  16. The leading joint hypothesis for spatial reaching arm motions.

    PubMed

    Ambike, Satyajit; Schmiedeler, James P

    2013-02-01

    The leading joint hypothesis (LJH), developed for planar arm reaching, proposes that the interaction torques experienced by the proximal joint are low compared to the corresponding muscle torques. The human central nervous system could potentially ignore these interaction torques at the proximal (leading) joint with little effect on the wrist trajectory, simplifying joint-level control. This paper investigates the extension of the LJH to spatial reaching. In spatial motion, a number of terms in the governing equation (Euler's angular momentum balance) that vanish for planar movements are non-trivial, so their contributions to the joint torque must be classified as net, interaction or muscle torque. This paper applies definitions from the literature to these torque components to establish a general classification for all terms in Euler's equation. This classification is equally applicable to planar and spatial motion. Additionally, a rationale for excluding gravity torques from the torque analysis is provided. Subjects performed point-to-point reaching movements between targets whose locations ensured that the wrist paths lay in various portions of the arm's spatial workspace. Movement kinematics were recorded using electromagnetic sensors located on the subject's arm segments and thorax. The arm was modeled as a three-link kinematic chain with idealized spherical and revolute joints at the shoulder and elbow. Joint torque components were computed using inverse dynamics. Most movements were 'shoulder-led' in that the interaction torque impulse was significantly lower than the muscle torque impulse for the shoulder, but not the elbow. For the few elbow-led movements, the interaction impulse at the elbow was low, while that at the shoulder was high, and these typically involved large elbow and small shoulder displacements. These results support the LJH and extend it to spatial reaching motion.

  17. Downgrading Nuclear Facilities to Radiological Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jarry, Jeffrey F.; Farr, Jesse Oscar; Duran, Leroy

    2015-08-01

    Based on inventory reductions and the use of alternate storage facilities, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) downgraded 4 SNL Hazard Category 3 (HC-3) nuclear facilities to less-than-HC-3 radiological facilities. SNL’s Waste Management and Pollution Prevention Department (WMPPD) managed the HC-3 nuclear facilities and implemented the downgrade. This paper will examine the downgrade process,

  18. Kinematic analysis of 7 DOF anthropomorphic arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreutz-Delgado, K.; Long, M.; Seraji, H.

    1990-01-01

    A kinematic analysis of anthropomorphic seven-degree-of-freedom serial link spatial manipulators with revolute joints is presented. To uniquely determine joint angles for a given end-effector position and orientation, the redundancy is parameterized by a scalar variable which corresponds to the angle between the arm plane and a reference plane. The forward kinematic mappings from joint-space to end-effector coordinates and arm angle and the augmented Jacobian matrix which gives end-effector and arm angle rates as functions of joint rates are given. Conditions under which the augmented Jacobian becomes singular are given and are shown to correspond to the arm being either at a kinematically singular configuration or at a nonsingular configuration for which the arm angle ceases to parameterize the redundancy.

  19. Anthropomorphic dual-arm space telemanipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.

    1990-01-01

    Dexterous dual-arm manipulations are feasible with the system described and illustrated in the paper. The structure is based on an extensible host arm that carries the dual-arm robot which comprises two 7-DOF arms each of which includes a hand with a thumb and three fingers with 4 DOF each. Joint compliance can be stiffened to any level, and the operator uses arm harnesses and gloves to utilize the robotics in an anthropomorphic fashion. The configuration eliminates coordinate-transformation computations, and the system is found to achieve a control-frequency rate of 1000 Hz for its direct man/machine interfaces based on fiber-optic cables. The electronics control for the system utilizes a sensory system consisting of force, position, and compliance sensors. The robotics system is expected to be a user-friendly device that permits assembly, repair, tethering, and other complex mechanical operations.

  20. Leg automaticity is stronger than arm automaticity during simultaneous arm and leg cycling.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Masanori; Tazoe, Toshiki; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Endoh, Takashi; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2014-04-03

    Recent studies indicate that human locomotion is quadrupedal in nature. An automatic rhythm-generating system is thought to play a crucial role in controlling arm and leg movements. In the present study, we attempted to elucidate differences between intrinsic arm and leg automaticity by investigating cadence variability during simultaneous arm and leg (AL) cycling. Participants performed AL cycling with visual feedback of arm or leg cadence. Participants were asked to focus their attention to match the predetermined cadence; this affects the automaticity of the rhythm-generating system. Leg cadence variability was only mildly affected when the participants intended to precisely adjust either their arm or leg cycling cadence to a predetermined value. In contrast, arm cadence variability significantly increased when the participants adjusted their leg cycling cadence to a predetermined value. These findings suggest that different neural mechanisms underlie the automaticities of arm and leg cycling and that the latter is stronger than the former during AL cycling.

  1. DOE national user facility in the Tropical Western Pacific.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L. A.; Porch, W. M.; Sisterson, Doug L.; Mather, J. H.; Long, C. N.

    2004-01-01

    In July 2003, the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research designated the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement sites as National User Facilities and renamed them the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF). As a result, the former ARM Cloud and Radiation Test bed (CART) sites are now collectively called Climate Research Sites. Part of the conditions associated with funding for ACRF is that the ARM program must attract new users. Located in Australia, and the island nations of Papua New Guinea and the Republic of Nauru, the three Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) research facilities offer unique scientific opportunities to prospective users. Although the locations of the facilities pose significant logistical challenges, particularly the two island sites, the TWP Office addresses these issues so that prospective users can focus on their research. The TWP Office oversees the operation of these sites by collaborating with the governments of Australia, Papua New Guinea, and the Republic of Nauru. Local observers are trained to effectively operate and maintain the facilities, and the state-side TWP Office offers supporting resources including daily instrument monitoring; equipment shipping, inventory tracking; customs coordination; and a readily deployable technical maintenance team at relatively minimal cost to prospective users. Satellite communications allow continuous, near-real time data from all three stations. The TWP Office also works diligently to maintain good local government and community relations with active outreach programs. This paper presents the TWP research facilities as the valuable resources they are to the scientific community.

  2. INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR WEST CENTRAL ELEVATOR LOBBY DETAIL VIEW, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR WEST CENTRAL ELEVATOR LOBBY DETAIL VIEW, FACING SOUTHEAST. - NASA Industrial Plant, Systems Integration & Checkout Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties over the ARM SGP Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Jonsson, H.; Strawa, A.; Provencal, B.; Covert, D.; Arnott, P.; Bucholtz, A.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rissman, T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to meet one of its goals - to relate observations of radiative fluxes and radiances to the atmospheric composition - the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has pursued measurements and modeling activities that attempt to determine how aerosols impact atmospheric radiative transfer, both directly and indirectly. However, significant discrepancies between aerosol properties measured in situ or remotely remain. To this end, the ARM program will conduct an Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in May 2003 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north central Oklahoma. The IOP involves airborne measurements from two airplanes over the heavily instrumented SGP site. We will give an overview of early airborne results obtained aboard Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. The aircraft will carry instrumentation to perform in-situ measurements of aerosol absorption, scattering, extinction and particle size including such novel techniques as the photoacoustic and cavity ring-down methods. Aerosol optical depth and extinction will be measured with the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel sunphotometer. Furthermore up- and downwelling solar (broadband and spectral) and infrared radiation will be measured using three different instruments. The up-looking radiation instruments will be mounted on a newly developed stabilized platform, which will keep the instruments level up to aircraft pitch and roll angles of 10 degrees. Additional effort will be directed toward measurement of cloud condensation nucleus concentration as a function of supersaturation and relating CCN concentration to aerosol composition and size distribution. This relation is central to description of the aerosol indirect effect.

  4. Phenotypic Mismatches Reveal Escape from Arms-Race Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Hanifin, Charles T; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2008-01-01

    Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts) and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes) to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were “ahead” of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race. PMID:18336073

  5. Anti-satellite weapons, countermeasures, and arms control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-09-01

    Anti-satellite weapons, countermeasures, and arms control; MILSATs, ASATs, and national security; ASAT capabilities and countermeasures; ASAT arms control: history; ASAT arms control: options; and a comparative evaluation of ASAT policy options are discussed.

  6. Wake Shield Facility in grasp of the Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A wintry scene of Lake Winnipeg and surrounding area in Manitoba, Canada forms the backdrop for the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) in the grasp of the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm. The image was exposed with a 35mm camera through one of the windows on Discovery's aft flight deck.

  7. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): TRI

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) System. TRI is a publicly available EPA database reported annually by certain covered industry groups, as well as federal facilities. It contains information about more than 650 toxic chemicals that are being used, manufactured, treated, transported, or released into the environment, and includes information about waste management and pollution prevention activities. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to TRI facilities once the TRI data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  8. The evolution of neuroArm.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Garnette R; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Lama, Sanju; Zarei-nia, Kourosh

    2013-01-01

    Intraoperative imaging disrupts the rhythm of surgery despite providing an excellent opportunity for surgical monitoring and assessment. To allow surgery within real-time images, neuroArm, a teleoperated surgical robotic system, was conceptualized. The objective was to design and manufacture a magnetic resonance-compatible robot with a human-machine interface that could reproduce some of the sight, sound, and touch of surgery at a remote workstation. University of Calgary researchers worked with MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates engineers to produce a requirements document, preliminary design review, and critical design review, followed by the manufacture, preclinical testing, and clinical integration of neuroArm. During the preliminary design review, the scope of the neuroArm project changed to performing microsurgery outside the magnet and stereotaxy inside the bore. neuroArm was successfully manufactured and installed in an intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging operating room. neuroArm was clinically integrated into 35 cases in a graded fashion. As a result of this experience, neuroArm II is in development, and advances in technology will allow microsurgery within the bore of the magnet. neuroArm represents a successful interdisciplinary collaboration. It has positive implications for the future of robotic technology in neurosurgery in that the precision and accuracy of robots will continue to augment human capability.

  9. Collecting Survey Data during Armed Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Axinn, William G.; Ghimire, Dirgha; Williams, Nathalie E.

    2012-01-01

    Surveys provide crucial information about the social consequences of armed conflict, but armed conflict can shape surveys in ways that limit their value. We use longitudinal survey data from throughout the recent armed conflict in Nepal to investigate the relationship between armed conflict events and survey response. The Chitwan Valley Family Study (CVFS) provides a rare window into survey data collection through intense armed conflict. The CVFS data reveal that with operational strategies tailored to the specific conflict, duration of the panel study is the main determinant of attrition from the study, just as in most longitudinal studies outside of conflict settings. Though minor relative to duration, different dimensions of armed conflict can affect survey response in opposing directions, with bombings in the local area reducing response rates but nationwide political events increasing response rates. This important finding demonstrates that survey data quality may be affected differently by various dimensions of armed conflict. Overall, CVFS response rates remained exceptionally high throughout the conflict. We use the CVFS experience to identify principles likely to produce higher quality surveys during periods of generalized violence and instability. PMID:23420645

  10. Is Negotiated Arms Control Possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panofsky, W. K. H.

    2014-11-01

    I had a very difficult time deciding on the topic of this talk, since Viki's interests cover such a broad range of activities with which I am also concerned. You can hear next week about the recent exciting work with the SLAC storage rings, a description of the design principles of such rings, and their future promise for new physics through Professor Richter's Loeb Lectures at Harvard. Talking about inelastic lepton scattering during an M.I.T. conference would be bringing coals to Newcastle, since the local M.I.T. physicists are primary agents in these experiments. Broad problems in high energy physics policy, for instance such questions as the relation between University users and the large laboratories, are matters of current concern to Viki and his friends in high energy physics, but I doubt whether many would sit still for a one-hour talk on that subject. I would therefore like to use the opportunity to express some personal views on certain current issues in arms control, since I know that there exists a wide spectrum of involvement and also opinion on this subject in the local community...

  11. The arms race between fishers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D.; Poos, Jan Jaap; Quirijns, Floor J.; HilleRisLambers, Reinier; De Wilde, Jan W.; Den Heijer, Willem M.

    An analysis of the changes in the Dutch demersal fishing fleet since the 1950s revealed that competitive interactions among vessels and gear types within the constraints imposed by biological, economic and fisheries management factors are the dominant processes governing the dynamics of fishing fleets. Double beam trawling, introduced in the early 1960s, proved a successful fishing method to catch deep burying flatfish, in particular sole. In less than 10 years, the otter trawl fleet was replaced by a highly specialised beam trawling fleet, despite an initial doubling of the loss rate of vessels due to stability problems. Engine power, size of the beam trawl, number of tickler chains and fishing speed rapidly increased and fishing activities expanded into previously lightly fished grounds and seasons. Following the ban on flatfish trawling within the 12 nautical mile zone for vessels of more than 300 hp in 1975 and with the restriction of engine power to 2000 hp in 1987, the beam trawl fleet bifurcated. Changes in the fleet capacity were related to the economic results and showed a cyclic pattern with a period of 6-7 years. The arms race between fishers was fuelled by competitive interactions among fishers: while the catchability of the fleet more than doubled in the ten years following the introduction of the beam trawl, a decline in catchability was observed in reference beam trawlers that remained the same. Vessel performance was not only affected by the technological characteristics but also by the number and characteristics of competing vessels.

  12. Breadboard Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    In the sixties, Chrysler was NASA's prime contractor for the Saturn I and IB test launch vehicles. The company installed and operated at Huntsville what was known as the Saturn I/IB Development Breadboard Facility. "Breadboard," means an array of electrical and electronic equipment for performing a variety of development and test functions. This work gave Chrysler a broad capability in computerized testing to assure quality control in development of solid-state electronic systems. Today that division is manufacturing many products not destined for NASA, most of them being associated with the company's automotive line. A major project is production and quality-control testing of the "lean-burn" engine, one that has a built-in Computer to control emission timing, and allow the engine to run on a leaner mixture of fuel and air. Other environment-related products include vehicle emission analyzers. The newest of the line is an accurate, portable solid state instrument for testing auto exhaust gases. The exhaust analyzers, now being produced for company dealers and for service

  13. Repetitive sensorimotor training for arm and hand in a patient with locked-in syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hummelsheim, H; Eickhof, C

    1999-12-01

    The locked-in syndrome is characterized by quadriplegia, preserved consciousness and inability to respond to the outside world. In recent years, the repetitive execution of identical movements has been demonstrated to be crucial for the recovery of arm and hand function in stroke patients. The present study aimed at investigating the efficiency of repetitive training in a patient suffering from locked-in syndrome due to an occlusion of the basilar artery. Seven months after the brainstem lesion and after a 15-week period of standard inpatient therapy, the repetitive training was applied to the (most affected) right upper extremity in addition to usual therapy. After 42 weeks of the repetitive training for the right arm, it was applied to the left arm. The ranges of active motion as well as functional motor capacity and muscle tone were regularly assessed. During those phases when the repetitive sensorimotor training was applied to the right or left arm, the ranges of active motion, muscle strength and functional motor capacity of the trained arm increased significantly accompanied by a continuous normalization of muscle tone in the flexor muscle groups. Since the prominent functional improvements of the right and left arms were observed during those phases when the repetitive training was applied, these effects were likely to be due to the training rather than to the standard rehabilitation program or extraneous influences. The repetitive sensorimotor training, therefore, appears to be appropriate to improve motor function of the arm and hand and to accelerate the time course of recovery even in patients with almost complete central paralysis of both arms.

  14. Indoor Lighting Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Koji; Saito, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Shigenori; Kawauchi, Takao; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Hirano, Rika; Tazuke, Fuyuki

    According to the statistics by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, the total floor space of all building construction started was 188.87 million m2 (1.5% increase y/y), marking the fourth straight year of increase. Many large-scale buildings under construction in central Tokyo become fully occupied by tenants before completion. As for office buildings, it is required to develop comfortable and functional office spaces as working styles are becoming more and more diversified, and lighting is also an element of such functionalities. The total floor space of construction started for exhibition pavilions, multipurpose halls, conference halls and religious architectures decreased 11.1% against the previous year. This marked a decline for 10 consecutive years and the downward trend continues. In exhibition pavilions, the light radiation is measured and adjusted throughout the year so as not to damage the artworks by lighting. Hospitals, while providing higher quality medical services and enhancing the dwelling environment of patients, are expected to meet various restrictions and requirements, including the respect for privacy. Meanwhile, lighting designs for school classrooms tend to be homogeneous, yet new ideas are being promoted to strike a balance between the economical and functional aspects. The severe economic environment continues to be hampering the growth of theaters and halls in both the private and public sectors. Contrary to the downsizing trend of such facilities, additional installations of lighting equipment were conspicuous, and the adoption of high efficacy lighting appliances and intelligent function control circuits are becoming popular. In the category of stores/commercial facilities, the construction of complex facilities is a continuing trend. Indirect lighting, high luminance discharge lamps with excellent color rendition and LEDs are being effectively used in these facilities, together with the introduction of lighting designs

  15. Method of making a rocker arm

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, M.; Kawamura, M.; Ishida, N.; Ito, M.

    1989-06-27

    A method of producing a rocker arm is described, comprising: forming a rocker arm having a valve contacting portion, a cam contacting portion and a pivot portion for contact with a pivot of a lash adjuster and entirely made of ceramics; processing the rocker arm by barrel finishing; and; grinding the pivot portion by using the valve contacting portion and the cam contacting portion as datum surfaces and thereby locating the pivot portion in position relative to the valve contacting portion and the cam contacting portion.

  16. Multiple caliper arms capable of independent movement

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, J.G.

    1992-02-11

    This patent describes a multiple arm caliper tool system for use in a well borehole. It comprises: an elongate tool body that adapted to be lowered and retrieved along a well borehole; at least a pari of caliper arms, each of the arms being a piston isolating the chamber; and means for compressing the hydraulic fluid within the chamber so that hydraulic fluid in the chamber is brought to a specified pressure wherein the hydraulic fluid acts on all of the push rods extending into the chamber.

  17. Robot arm dynamic model reduction for control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Lee, S.

    1983-01-01

    General methods are described by which the mathematical complexities of explicit and exact state equations of robot arms can be reduced to a simplified and compact state equation representation without introducing significant errors into the robot arm dynamic model. The model reduction methods are based on homogeneous coordinates and on the Langrangian algorithm for robot arm dynamics, and utilize matrix, vector and numeric analysis techniques. The derivation of differential vector representation of centripetal and Coriolis forces which has not yet been established in the literature is presented.

  18. Bullying and the UK Armed Forces.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, R H; Atkins, S; Gould, M

    2012-06-01

    There are certain characteristics of the culture and environment in the Armed Forces that may be conducive to bullying. In this article we examine the cultural and environmental factors that may encourage such behaviour and those that act as deterrents for victims to come forward. We will look at the scope of this problem within the UK Armed Forces specifically, before more generally considering the psychological impact of bullying. There appears to be an overall downward trend in bullying within the UK Armed Forces and a positive increase in complaints as more victims step forward. We conclude by highlighting some areas for further development.

  19. Facility management in German hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gudat, H

    2000-04-01

    Facility management and optimum building management offer for hospitals a chance to reduce costs and to increase quality, process sequences, employee motivation and customer satisfaction. Some years ago simple services such as cleaning, catering or laundry were outsourced. Now, German hospitals progress to more complex fields such as building and medical technology, clinical support processes such as pharmacy, central laboratory and sterilization, goods and logistics services.

  20. Understanding Land-Atmosphere Coupling and its Predictability at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Song, H. J.; Roundy, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Ten years ago, the Global Energy and Water EXchanges Global Land Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) spotlighted the Southern Great Plains (SGP) for being one of three hotspots globally for land-derived precipitation predictability. Since then, the GLACE results have served as the underlying motivation for numerous subsequent land-atmosphere (L-A) coupling studies over the SGP domain. The range of these studies includes: local point scale studies leveraging surface meteorological and flux measurements at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement SGP (ARM-SGP) Central Facility, regional pentad to monthly scale atmospheric moisture budget analyses based on atmospheric reanalysis, and regional limited duration (2-7 day) coupled model sensitivity experiments. This study has the following three objectives: (1) to provide the common historical context necessary for bridging past and future interdisciplinary characterizations of L-A coupling, (2) to isolate the mechanism(s) for the region's L-A coupling signal, and (3) to evaluate the short range (12-18hr) predictability of soil moisture-precipitation feedbacks. We produce a convective triggering potential—low-level humidity index (CTP-HI)—based climatology of L-A coupling at ARM-SGP for the period 1979-2014 using North American Regional Reanalysis and North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2 data. We link the underlying coupling regime classification timeseries to corresponding synoptic-mesoscale weather patterns and bulk atmospheric moisture budget analyses. On the whole, the region's precipitation variability is largely dependent on large-scale moisture transport and the role of the land is nominal. However, we show that surface sensible heat flux can play an important role in modulating diurnal precipitation cycle phase and amplitude—either directly (enhancing CTP) in water-limited conditions or indirectly (increasing HI) in energy-limited conditions. In fact, both 0700

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Eastern North Atlantic Site (ENA), Graciosa Island, Azores

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wood, Robert

    From May 2009 through December 2010, the ARM Mobile Facility obtained data from a location near the airport on Graciosa Island to support the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) field campaign. The campaign was led by principal investigator Robert Wood. Results from this campaign confirmed that the Azores have the ideal mix of conditions to study how clouds, aerosols, and precipitation interact. This new observation site will have significant enhancements to instruments previously deployed to the Azores, including a Ka-/W-band scanning cloud radar, precipitation radar, and Doppler lidar. It has the full support of the Azorean government and collaborators at the University of the Azores. Los Alamos National Laboratory will operate the site for the ARM Facility.

  2. "It's All About the Body": The Bodily Capital of Armed Response Officers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Diphoorn, Tessa

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I analyze the role of bodily capital in the daily policing practices of armed response officers, a specific type of private security officers, in Durban, South Africa. Based on 20 months of ethnographic fieldwork, I argue that the masculinized bodily capital of armed response officers is a key source of their sovereign power; it plays a central role in how they acquire and exert authority. Furthermore, I argue that an analysis of bodily capital should not solely analyze the actual flesh of the body, but must include particular equipment (such as bulletproof vests and firearms) that is experienced as a part of the body.

  3. Spatial and temporal variations in the atmospheric aerosol optical depth at the ARM CART Site

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.M.; Cheng, M.D.

    1998-02-01

    In an effort to better characterize the inputs to radiative transfer models and research-grade global climate simulation models (GCMs) the columnar aerosol loading, measured as the aerosol optical depth (AOD), has been computed for five facilities within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site. Characterization of the AOD reported here show clear evidence that the spatial and temporal gradient exists at a much finer linear scale than those of the CART site. The annual variations of median AOD are on the order of 0.30 at all five facilities. The Spearman correlation and varimax-rotated PCA indicated the AOD values vary consistently across the CART site. The Northwest corner facility (EF-1) was the single facility that behaved differently from the rest. This sub-GCM grid variation can not be ignored if the model is to be used to accurately predict future climate change.

  4. The ARM eddy correlation system for monitoring surface fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.L.; Cook, D.R.; Wesely, M.L.

    1998-12-31

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was established by the Department of Energy as part of the US Global Climate Change Research Program to improve methods of determining radiative transfer and cloud processes in large-scale models. The ARM observational facility in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the US uses various types of instrument systems to make continuous measurements of the state of the atmosphere, cloud properties, radiative transfer, and other forms of energy transfer. Most of the instrument systems for these continuous observations come from commercial sources; many are adaptations of systems that have been used previously, mostly in short-term field campaigns. Eddy correlation systems (ECORs) are used to measure the air-surface exchange rates of heat, moisture, and momentum at eight locations in the overall area (350 km by 400 km) of the SGP site. At most locations, measurements are made at a height of about three meters above the ground over tilled agricultural land. At 14 other locations, air-surface exchange is measured above grasslands with an energy balance Bowen ratio system.

  5. Galactic arm structure and gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    Unexpectedly high energy gamma radiation over a broad region of the galactic plane in the general direction of the galactic center was observed. A model is proposed wherein the galactic cosmic rays are preferentially located in the high matter density regions of galactic arm segments, as a result of the weight of the matter in these arms tieing the magnetic fields and hence the cosmic rays to these regions. The presently observed galactic gamma ray longitudinal distribution can be explained with the current estimate of the average galactic matter density: if the average arm to interarm matter ratio is five to one for the major arm segments toward the galactic center from the sun; and if the cosmic ray density normalized to its local value is assumed to be directly proportional to the matter density.

  6. MiniSAR composite gimbal arm development.

    SciTech Connect

    Klarer, Paul Richard; Winscott, Mark

    2005-01-01

    An exploratory effort in the application of carbon epoxy composite structural materials to a multi-axis gimbal arm design is described. An existing design in aluminum was used as a baseline for a functionally equivalent redesigned outer gimbal arm using a carbon epoxy composite material. The existing arm was analyzed using finite element techniques to characterize performance in terms of strength, stiffness, and weight. A new design was virtually prototyped. using the same tools to produce a design with similar stiffness and strength, but reduced overall weight, than the original arm. The new design was prototyped using Rapid Prototyping technology, which was subsequently used to produce molds for fabricating the carbon epoxy composite parts. The design tools, process, and results are discussed.

  7. Nonlinear feedback control of multiple robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Yun, X.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple coordinated robot arms are modeled by considering the arms: (1) as closed kinematic chains, and (2) as a force constrained mechanical system working on the same object simultaneously. In both formulations a new dynamic control method is discussed. It is based on a feedback linearization and simultaneous output decoupling technique. Applying a nonlinear feedback and a nonlinear coordinate transformation, the complicated model of the multiple robot arms in either formulation is converted into a linear and output decoupled system. The linear system control theory and optimal control theory are used to design robust controllers in the task space. The first formulation has the advantage of automatically handling the coordination and load distribution among the robot arms. In the second formulation, by choosing a general output equation, researchers can superimpose the position and velocity error feedback with the force-torque error feedback in the task space simultaneously.

  8. Arming and firing system for DISTANT RUNNER

    SciTech Connect

    Skenandore, L.H.; Johnson, J.P.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia A and F systems Division 1132 provided arming and firing support for the DISTANT RUNNER Test Program at White Sands Missile Range. This report describes the field support and the firing system that was used.

  9. JPRS report: Arms control, [May 17, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1989-05-17

    This document contains articles on arms control. Some topics discussed are chemical weapons, NATO, Warsaw Pact, military operations, socialism, disarmament, short range missiles, missile modernization, troop withdrawals, weapons manufacturing plants, nuclear testing, detonated weapons, and weapons modernization.

  10. Serpentine Robot Arm Contains Electromagnetic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moya, Israel A.; Studer, Philip A.

    1994-01-01

    Identical modules assembled into flexible robot arm configured in serpentlike fashion to manipulate objects while avoiding obstacles. Each module includes integral electromagnetic actuators energized selectively to produce variety of motions, stationary configurations, and combinations thereof.

  11. Facility Focus: Sports and Recreation Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines projects that demonstrate three different commitments administrators make to their athletic facilities: convenience; excellence; and comfort. Projects discussed involve a fitness center, a football stadium, and a multi-sport indoor practice facility. (GR)

  12. The molecular spiral arms of NGC 6946

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacconi, L. J.; Xie, S.

    1990-01-01

    From CO-12(J=1 to 0) observations at 45 seconds resolution Tacconi and Young (1989) have found evidence for enhancements in both the CO emissivity and the massive star formation efficiency (MSFE) on optical spiral arms of the bright spiral galaxy NGC 6946. In the optically luminous and well-defined spiral arm in the NE quadrant, there are enhancements in both the H2 surface density and MSFE relative to the interarm regions. In contrast, a poorly defined arm in the SW shows no arm-interarm contrast in the MSFE. To further investigate the molecular gas content of these two spiral arms, researchers have made CO-12 J=2 to 1 and 3 to 2 observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. In the J=2 to 1 line, they made observations of the NE and SW spiral arm and interarm regions in 4 x 9 10 seconds spaced grids (36 points per grid). Because of decreased sensitivity in the J=3 to 2 line, they were limited to mapping the two arm regions in 2 x 3 10 seconds spaced grids (6 points per grid). The centers of each of the grids lie 2.4 minutes to the NE and 2.3 minutes to the SW of the nucleus of NGC 6946. With the CO J=2 to 1 data researchers are able to fully resolve the two observed spiral arms in NGC 6946. In both cases the CO emission is largely confined to the optical spiral arm regions with the peak observed T asterisk sub A being up to 4 times higher on the spiral arms than in the interarm regions. Researchers are currently estimating massive star formation efficiencies on and off the spiral arms through direct comparison of the CO maps with an H alpha image. They are also comparing the CO J=2 to 1 data with an HI map made at similar resolution. Thus, they will be able to determine structure in all components of the IS on scales of less than 20 inches.

  13. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  14. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  15. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  16. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  17. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    DOE PAGES

    Jensen, Michael P.; Holdridge, Donna J.; Survo, Petteri; ...

    2016-07-20

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41 (fourth generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and pressure. In order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in north-central Oklahoma, USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results show that for most of the observed conditions the RS92 andmore » RS41 measurements agree much better than the manufacturer-specified combined uncertainties with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the “wet-bulbing” effect appears to be mitigated for several cases in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements of temperature and humidity, with applied correction algorithms, also appear to show less sensitivity to solar heating. In addition, these results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions. For many science applications – such as atmospheric process studies, retrieval development, and weather forecasting and climate modeling – the differences between the RS92 and RS41 measurements should have little impact. However, for long-term trend analysis and other climate applications, additional characterization of the RS41 measurements and their relation to the long-term observational records will be required.« less

  18. Regulation of flexible arms under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Siciliano, B.

    1993-08-01

    A simple controller is presented for the regulation problem of robot arms with flexible links under gravity. It consists of a joint PD feedback plus a constant feedforward. Global asymptotic stability of the reference equilibrium state is shown under a structural assumption about link elasticity and a mild condition on the proportional gain. The result holds also in the absence of internal damping of the flexible arm. A numerical case study is presented.

  19. Medical Services: Armed Forces Medical Examiner System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Armed Forces Medical Examiner system Procedural Guide. 3–4. Forensic dental identification The Forensic Dentistry Section of the Department of Oral...Pathology at AFIP and special consultants in forensic dentistry to the surgeons general of the Armed Forces will serve as the principal advisers to the...a. Courses and programs. (1) Forensic dentistry /odontology. (2) Aerospace pathology. (3) Basic forensic pathology. (4) Advanced forensic pathology

  20. Trajectory optimization for kinematically redundant arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, Craig R.

    1991-01-01

    A review of local optimization methods for resolving joint configurations in underconstrained manipulation tasks is conducted. A new approach is developed for observing joint limits and avoiding obstacles during the trajectory planning. The methodology is used in a four-link arm example to avoid a workspace singularity and is compared with results using the extended Moore-Penrose technique. An alternative measure of arm 'manipulability' based directly on the rank of the Jacobian is also introduced.