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Sample records for army cold regions

  1. Cold Roller-Compacted Concrete for Roads and Hardstands on Army Installations in Cold Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Barna, and Charles Smith Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center 72 Lyme Road Hanover...plant. While typical RCC mixes incorporate supplemental cementitious material (SCM), or waste by-products to offset the quantity of cement used...staff in charge of roads and grounds maintenance. This was supplemented by a visit to the field site by one of the authors approximately 100 days

  2. Cold Memories: An Examination of U.S. Army Doctrine for Combat in Cold Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-14

    enormous loss of combat. power due to cold injuries caused a massive study by the Surgeon General’s office before the invasion of Italy, and the immediate...dense cold air. and the trapping of the cold air by temperature inversions. These cause local concentrations of extremely low ambient. air...temperatures. Thus. short days can cause the subarctic regions of Siberia, Alaska, and Canada to produce the coldest temperatures on Earth’. CoM Rl•iimx Pbemwena

  3. Cold regions hydrology and hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, W.L. ); Crissman, R.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This monograph addresses a narrow aspect of cold regions engineering, namely the effects of cold weather on the traditional civil engineering disciplines of hydrology and hydraulics. Hydrologic and hydraulic considerations in the design, construction, and operation of civil works are very important. Many of the problems encountered in the design and construction of buildings, transportation systems, water supply facilities, waste treatment facilities, and hazardous waste disposal facilities, for example are closely tied to the characteristics of the site hydrology.

  4. Improvement of the U.S. Army Intermediate Cold Wet Boot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    thermal comfort of the human foot during exposure to cold ambient temperatures. 33-5 Figure 4. Photograph showing human volunteers during the 1990 ICWB...boot indicating that it would provide an increased level of thermal comfort . The then-current U.S. Army Intermediate Cold-Wet Boot, 34 33 32 31 E 30 E...has been recommended that the U.S. Army continue to evaluate future improvements in these materials designed to increase individual thermal comfort and

  5. Cold dust in hot regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenilayam, Gopika; Fich, Michel; Ade, Peter; Bintley, Dan; Chapin, Ed; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jenness, Tim; Dunlop, James S.; Holland, Wayne S.; Ivison, Rob; Gibb, Andy; Halpern, Mark; Scott, Douglas; Greaves, Jane S.; Robson, Ian

    2014-03-01

    We mapped five massive star-forming regions with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Temperature and column density maps are obtained from the SCUBA-2 450 and 850 μm images. Most of the dense clumps we find have central temperatures below 20 K, with some as cold as 8 K, suggesting that they have no internal heating due to the presence of embedded protostars. This is surprising, because at the high densities inferred from these images and at these low temperatures such clumps should be unstable, collapsing to form stars and generating internal heating. The column densities at the clump centers exceed 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, and the derived peak visual extinction values are from 25 to 500 mag for β = 1.5-2.5, indicating highly opaque centers. The observed cloud gas masses range from ∼10 to 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}. The outer regions of the clumps follow an r {sup –2.36±0.35} density distribution, and this power-law structure is observed outside of typically 10{sup 4} AU. All these findings suggest that these clumps are high-mass starless clumps and most likely contain high-mass starless cores.

  6. Inflammation in cold complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dirckx, M; Stronks, D L; van Bodegraven-Hof, E A M; Wesseldijk, F; Groeneweg, J G; Huygen, F J P M

    2015-07-01

    In patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), the temperature of the affected side often differs from that of the contralateral side. In the acute phase, the affected side is usually warmer than the contralateral side, the so-called 'warm' CRPS. This thermal asymmetry can develop into a colder affected side, the so-called 'cold' CRPS. In contrast to cold CRPS, in warm CRPS, inflammation is generally assumed to be present. However, there are reports of cold CRPS patients, successfully treated with vasodilatation therapy, who subsequently displayed warm CRPS. It seems that inflammation could be 'hidden' behind vasomotor disturbance. This study was designed to test this hypothesis. A retrospective analysis was made of patients in our CRPS database. We defined three types of CRPS: cold CRPS, neither cold nor warm (intermediate) CRPS, and warm CRPS. Of these patients, the difference between the level of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 (Δ IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (Δ TNF-α) in the affected extremity and that in the contralateral extremity was determined. The bilateral difference of the level of these cytokines did not differ among patients with cold CRPS, intermediate CRPS, or those with warm CRPS. Inflammation may be involved in cold CRPS. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Relevance of the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) to the Post Cold War Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    states the strategy as follows: "... regional dangers, asymmetric challenges, trans- national threats and wild cards . The National Military Strategy...and uncertain. In the event that pretrained manpower is required, the IRR may well be the Army’s wild card . Thus, senior leaders should recognize...role is changing and more each day, it becomes the Army’s global " wild card ". The question for additional research is, how relevant do leaders want

  8. Bibliography on Cold Regions Science and Technology. Volume 41. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    numbers under which the report was prepared. 11. Contract/Grant Number. Insert contract or grant number under which report was prepared. 12. Sponsoring...ice model assumes a con- stant ice thickness and considers only the variations of ice com- pactness under the effect of the atmospheric and oceanic...Brittleness of reinforced concrete structures under arctic conditions. Kivtklls. L., et al, U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, May

  9. Cold Regions - Environmental Testing of Individual Soldier Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-17

    This Test Operations Procedure (TOP) provides testing guidelines for individual Soldier cold weather clothing and footwear in a cold regions...Cold weather clothing test Cold weather footwear test Environmental clothing test Environmental footwear test 16...1983; TOP 10-3-512 Cold Regions Environmental Test of Boot and Similar Footwear , dated 9 May 1980; and TOP 10-4-005 Arctic Environmental Test of

  10. Retrospective analysis of the ethnic origins of male British army soldiers with peripheral cold weather injury.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J E; Macfarlane, F

    2009-03-01

    To determine if African Americans, Pacific Islanders and Gurkhas have a different incidence and severity of peripheral cold injury when compared to Caucasians in the British Army. The design was a retrospective analysis of those British male army personnel aged over 18 assessed at the Institute of Naval Medicine Cold Injury Clinic. The participants were 311 patients assessed on first attendance at the UK Institute of Naval Medicine. After excluding those classed as normal, African Americans had a relative incidence of 30.36 (95% CI 25.82 -35.70) when compared to Caucasians; Pacific Islanders a relative incidence of 2.58 (CI 1.24 - 5.38), again against Caucasians. Being of Gurkha ethnicity proved protective, with no abnormal cases found on assessment. The African Americans were more severely affected than Caucasians, with mean scores of 5.39 (SD 1.767) against 4.24 (SD 1.994) for Caucasians. The severity of Pacific Islanders were similar to Caucasians. The ages of African Americans, Pacific Islander and Caucasians had similar means of 26.05, 26.30 and 26.68 respectively, but with a broader age range for Caucasians; SDs 3.428, 2.958 and 7.735. Young male African Americans in the British Army are at 30 times greater chance of developing peripheral cold injury and are more severely affected than their Caucasian counterparts following similar climatic exposure, using similar clothing and equipment. Pacific Islanders are at a 2.6 times increased risk, while being a Gurkha is protective.

  11. Cold Regions Test of Tracked and Wheeled Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-11

    specific and general procedures for testing tracked and wheeled vehicles in a Cold Regions environment. The common characteristics of a cold region...Operations Procedure (TOP) provides specific and general procedures for testing tracked and wheeled vehicles in a cold regions environment. The common ...Seals. a. Fluid seeps and minor leaks are common when first operating these systems in the cold . Exposure to extreme temperature changes can

  12. Accumulation, Characterization, and Stabilization of Sludges for Cold Regions Lagoons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    aide If necesary and Identify by block number) Cold regions Lagoons Sanitary engineering Sewage Sludge 20 ASTIACT’ (CVtha sm etam aM N rnemind i...regions sludge accumulates during cold winter months but digests sufficiently during the warmer summer months to maintain the desired balance ...benthic sludge accumulation zone for only 2 to 4 months per year. If excess sludge in sewage lagoons is accumulating, then sludge volume and

  13. Enabling the Future Force: The Use of Regional Alignment, Mission Command and Cultural Competence to Create an Operationally Adaptive Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    58 v ACRONYMS ACFLS Army Culture and Foreign Language Strategy...also dictated that regionally aligned forces focus on language and cultural training to enable operations in their assigned regions. The Army’s...individuals Source: Created by the author. Army Cultural Requirements The 2009 Army Culture and Foreign Language Strategy (ACFLS) describes how

  14. Observations of cold ion heating inside the magnetospheric separatrix region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo Redondo, Sergio; Andre, Mats; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Lavraud, Benoit; Graham, Daniel; Divin, Andrey; Aunai, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have shown that cold ions (energies up to tens of eV) of ionospheric origin can be found in different regions of the magnetosphere, including the dayside magnetopause. They can be very abundant, up to ~100 cc, e.g. plasmaspheric plumes, and become the dominant population of the magnetosphere. Cold ions, when present, participate in magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause, mass loading the magnetospheric side and adding a new length-scale into the system owing to their smaller gyroradius. At the same time, reconnection accelerates and heats the cold ions. Based on multi-spacecraft observations, we report observations of cold ion heating inside the separatrix region when reconnection is ongoing and study the mechanisms that energize the cold ions. The heating is not always observed and our observations indicate that cold ion heating is more effective next to the X-line. We find that large electric field gradients and wave-particle interactions are consistent with the heating observed.

  15. Anthropometric Cockpit Compatibility Assessment of US Army Aircraft for Large and Small Personnel Wearing A Cold Weather, Armored Vest, Chemical Defense Protective Clothing Configuration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    identify by block number) Anthropometry, Aircraft, Cockpit-Compatibility, Chemical Defense, Cold Weather Clothing, Helicopters, Fixed- Wing Aircraft...5th percentiles of the Army male population were placed in the cockpits of all current US ArmY helicopters (except AAH-64) and fixed- wing aircraft, and...Fixed Wing Aircraft .... 0........................ 24 References.o........*..e.......o......o............ 29 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURES 1 . Up pe r B o dy

  16. What caused the 2009 cold event in the Atlantic cold tongue region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Kristin; Brandt, Peter; Lübbecke, Joke F.

    2016-04-01

    The tropical Atlantic (TA) exhibits sea surface temperature (SST) variability on seasonal to inter-annual time scales. This variability is associated with changes of atmospheric dynamics, linking it to severe flooding or droughts in South America and West Africa. This study investigates processes in the TA that might have caused the extreme cold event in the Atlantic cold tongue (ACT) region in 2009. During boreal spring, a strong negative Atlantic meridional mode event developed in the TA associated with northwesterly wind anomalies along the equator. Contrary to what would be expected from ENSO-like dynamics, these wind anomalies did not lead to a warming in the eastern equatorial Atlantic in boreal summer. Instead, from May to August 2009, an abrupt cooling took place in the ACT region resulting in the coldest August ACT SST on record. In the literature, two processes - equatorial wave reflection and meridional advection of subsurface temperatures - are discussed as potential causes of such an event. Whereas previous studies are mainly based on satellite data, reanalysis products and model output, we here use in situ measurements (data from Argo floats, PIRATA buoys, and TACE moorings, as well as CTD data of various ship cruises) in addition to satellite and reanalysis products to investigate the contribution of both processes to the strong surface cooling in the ACT region in 2009. Results based on the Argo float data confirm previous findings that equatorial wave reflection contributed to the cold event in the ACT region in 2009. They further indicate that higher baroclinic mode waves played an important role. The analysis of in situ and reanalysis temperature and velocity data does not suggest a significant contribution of meridional advection of subsurface temperatures for the onset of the 2009 cold event. The results indicate an asymmetry in the importance of meridional advection for non-ENSO-like cold and warm events with warm events more strongly affected

  17. HOT AND COLD DUST NEAR H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenilayam, Gopika; Fich, Michel

    2011-07-15

    We estimate the mass, temperature, and luminosity of the hot ({>=}100 K), cool (20-40 K), and cold ({<=}20 K) dust in the environs of Galactic H II regions using Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and Submillimeter Common User Bolometric Array (SCUBA) data. A total of 83 clouds have been examined using IRAS data. A two-component model spectral energy distribution (SED) of hot and cool dust is used to fit the IRAS data. All of the SEDs use a graphite/silicate mix of grains in an MRN distribution. A three-component model SED is fitted to combined SCUBA and IRAS data for 15 clouds near H II regions to measure the cold dust component. Surprisingly, the ratio of the bolometric luminosity of the cool dust to the hot dust appears to be the same (2.8) in virtually all objects. The cool dust has typically four-five orders of magnitude greater mass than the hot dust. However, the mass in cold dust is much greater than the mass in cool and hot dust. We also find some evidence for a relationship between the cool and cold dust masses. These results may prove useful for using IR observations for estimating gas masses in extragalactic systems with active high-mass star formation.

  18. Tele-orthopaedics: United States Army European Regional Medical Command.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jeffrey; Walker, Shaka; Melaas, David; Crane, Maria; Bacahui, Jacob; Boedeker, Ben H

    2012-01-01

    Telemedicine is the provision of medical care over long distances by way of videoconferencing and other communication technologies. Staff at Vilseck U.S. Army Clinic set up a 3-month pilot real-time tele-orthopaedic clinic to determine if it was feasible to extend Orthopaedic specialty care over long distances. A full time physician assistant was located at the patient site and an orthopaedic surgeon was located at the Landstuhl or Heidelberg site. Patients were initially evaluated by the PA. Complex consults were reviewed by the PA and Orthopaedic surgeon via telephone or VTC. Patients meeting possible indications for surgery were then scheduled for a VTC consult with a surgeon.

  19. The Prevalence of Lip Injury during U. S. Army Cold-Weather Exercises,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-22

    Continue n reverse aide if neceseary end identify by block number) The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of complexion on acute, L.J cold...Perhaps there is a threshold effect of the temperature, i.e., a level below which lip damage is markedly increased even with minimal exposure, and above...based on both the hot weather (2) and cold weather survey data. S, . . . . . .• . : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 The modifying effects of

  20. Creating an Effective Regional Alignment Strategy for the U.S. Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    official temporary duty, military-to-military exchanges, ex- tended leisure travel , familial connections, etc. HRC then used the granular talent data...problematic, the Army has no mechanism to identify relevant regional talents or experiences such as cultural fluencies, foreign contacts, or travel

  1. A Preliminary Assessment of the Regionally Aligned Forces (RAF) Concept’s Implications for Army Personnel Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    staff, Army. RAND RR1065-1.1 0 10 20 30Years Functional and combat skill training Key developmental assignments in red Developmental and broadening...spectrum management. 20 A Preliminary Assessment of the RAF Concept’s Implications for Army Personnel Management regional depth. Under the RCA, the...that is, soldiers not assigned to units) account necessary to enable the Army to both man its forma - tions and provide additional training. Costs

  2. The Army Before Last: Military Transformation and the Impact of Nuclear Weapons on the US Army During the Early Cold War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    deterrent rather than increasing investment in nuclear weapons and delivery systems .9 This thinking was based on the Army’s belief that nuclear weapons...War .................................................. 21 Table 2. US Army Cannon Delivery System (Nuclear Capable)....................... 42 Table 3...US Army Rocket & Missile Systems 1953-1991................................. 43 x THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY

  3. Sensitization to domestic mites in a cold temperate region.

    PubMed

    Wickman, M; Nordvall, S L; Pershagen, G; Korsgaard, J; Johansen, N

    1993-07-01

    Factors favoring sensitization to house dust mites (HDM) were studied in a cold, temperate climate in northern Sweden. Sixty-five children previously found to react positively to a skin prick test (SPT) to HDM were included. The SPT to HDM was repeated, and serum IgE antibodies to D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae were determined. HDM, Euroglyphus maynei, Tarsonemus, or storage mites occurred in mattress dust samples from 23 of the 65 homes, and in 10 homes more than 100 HDM/g of mattress dust were found. Mites were more prevalent in mattress dust from the basement and ground levels than from the upper floors. Sensitization to HDM was strongly with the presence of domestic mites in mattress and floor dust. Previous longer stays in southern Sweden or Europe were also associated with present sensitization to HDM, and this was independent of occurrence of mites in the residence. The results indicate that HDM growth and potential for sensitization in cold, temperate regions is highly dependent on the microhabitat, and that sensitization to HDM should be possible to prevent in such climatic regions.

  4. United States Army Regionally Aligned Forces: Opportunities for the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    force participation in regional alignment a matter of mathematical necessity. 34 As with any operation in the land domain, the soldiers that...commissioning classes matriculate , the narrative of linguistic valuation will be reinforced. Within a generation of officers, few will remember that there was

  5. To Determine the Method of Scheduling Surgery to Optimize Utilization of Surgical Resources at Landstuhl Army Regional Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    DETERMINE THE METHOD VF SCHEDULING SURGERY TO OPTIMIZE UTILIZATION OF SURGICAL RESOURCES AT LANDSTUHL ARMY REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR...GROUP Health Care, Surgery Scheduling 19, ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) This study was conducted to determine...the optimum method of scheduling surgery to make maximum use of the surgical facilities at Landstuhl Army Regional Medical Center. Current scheduling

  6. Cold Regions Environmental Test of Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Decontamination Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    6502, Engine, Cold-starting and Warmup Tests. (2) Decontaminant mixing/filling. Evaluate ease of filling and mixing decontaminants at low temperatures...2. TOP 2-2-650, Engine Cold-Starting and Warmup Tests, 18 July 1980. 3. TOP 8-4-015, Cold Regions Logistics, Supportability Testing of Chemical

  7. Fuel cell power source for a cold region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, B. K.; Velayutham, G.; Goud, A. Prasad

    operation. Based on the results of these experiments, the design of the fuel cell power source for cold region application has been finalised. The paper deals with the design criteria and design factors to be considered for the fuel cell power source for cold region application and details of tests and test results that led to the final design concept for such an application. The paper also deals with a proposed hybrid power plant taking into account the exploitation of wind energy with a fuel cell and generation of hydrogen by an electrolyser and provision of hydrogen storage.

  8. Regional collaborative research on cold tolerance of exotic biofuel grasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cold tolerance is a selectable trait for many exotic grasses, even those of tropical or subtropical origin. We are conducting cold tolerance assessments on an array of perennial biofuel grasses at Booneville, AR. In study one (published), we reported that two sugarcane clones (US84-1028 and US84-1...

  9. Three-scale structure of diffusion region in the presence of cold ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divin, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Vaivads, A.; André, M.; Toledo-Redondo, S.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-12-01

    Kinetic simulations and spacecraft observations typically display the two-scale structure of collisionless diffusion region (DR), with electron and ion demagnetization scales governing the spatial extent of the DR. Recent in situ observations of the nightside magnetosphere, as well as investigation of magnetic reconnection events at the Earth's magnetopause, discovered the presence of a population of cold (tens of eV) ions of ionospheric origin. We present two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection in multicomponent plasma with ions consisting of hot and cold populations. We show that a new cold ion diffusion region scale is introduced in between that of hot ions and electrons. Demagnetization scale of cold ion population is several times (˜4-8) larger than the initial cold ion gyroradius. Cold ions are accelerated and thermalized during magnetic reconnection and form ion beams moving with velocities close to the Alfvén velocity.

  10. Personnel Management for Executives, Army Regional Training Center, Central Atlantic Region, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    COLD , INSENSITIVE, & UNCARING DEALS WITH INTERPERSONAL CONFLICT MAY APPEAR INSINCERE & UNAFFECTIONATE LOGICALLY BY ANALYZING WHAT SHOULD BE FELT...listeners, and communicators. We must rely more and more on interpersonal skills in a world of voluminous impersonal information systems. With the high tech...invasion comes an increasing need for interpersonal communication to compensa te for the impersonal interaction of computer systems. The Myers-Briggs

  11. Cold Regions Environmental Test of CB Protective Masks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    Question 23: a. When you put your mask on and cleared it, did the mask lenses become foggy? (Note: fog means moisture on the inside or outside of the...have any frost form on the lenses ? (note: frost means moisture /ice.) Yes No b. If yes, what was the problem and under what circumstances did you...cold-wet uniform is designed to afford maximum protection against the hazards of changing temperatures, rain, wet snow, mud, and slush of a cold-wet

  12. Simulating cold-region hydrology in an intensively drained agricultural watershed in Manitoba, Canada, using the Cold Regions Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordeiro, Marcos R. C.; Wilson, Henry F.; Vanrobaeys, Jason; Pomeroy, John W.; Fang, Xing; The Red-Assiniboine Project Biophysical Modelling Team

    2017-07-01

    Etrophication and flooding are perennial problems in agricultural watersheds of the northern Great Plains. A high proportion of annual runoff and nutrient transport occurs with snowmelt in this region. Extensive surface drainage modification, frozen soils, and frequent backwater or ice-damming impacts on flow measurement represent unique challenges to accurately modelling watershed-scale hydrological processes. A physically based, non-calibrated model created using the Cold Regions Hydrological Modelling platform (CRHM) was parameterized to simulate hydrological processes within a low slope, clay soil, and intensively surface drained agricultural watershed. These characteristics are common to most tributaries of the Red River of the north. Analysis of the observed water level records for the study watershed (La Salle River) indicates that ice cover and backwater issues at time of peak flow may impact the accuracy of both modelled and measured streamflows, highlighting the value of evaluating a non-calibrated model in this environment. Simulations best matched the streamflow record in years when peak and annual discharges were equal to or above the medians of 6.7 m3 s-1 and 1.25 × 107 m3, respectively, with an average Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) of 0.76. Simulation of low-flow years (below the medians) was more challenging (average NSE < 0), with simulated discharge overestimated by 90 % on average. This result indicates the need for improved understanding of hydrological response in the watershed under drier conditions. Simulation during dry years was improved when infiltration was allowed prior to soil thaw, indicating the potential importance of preferential flow. Representation of in-channel dynamics and travel time under the flooded or ice-jam conditions should also receive attention in further model development efforts. Despite the complexities of the study watershed, simulations of flow for average to high-flow years and other components of the water

  13. Regionally Aligned Forces: DOD Could Enhance Army Brigades’ Efforts in Africa by Improving Activity Coordination and Mission-Specific Preparation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    REGIONALLY ALIGNED FORCES DOD Could Enhance Army Brigades’ Efforts in Africa by Improving Activity Coordination and...Brigades’ Efforts in Africa by Improving Activity Coordination and Mission-Specific Preparation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...report to congressional committees August 2015 REGIONALLY ALIGNED FORCES DOD Could Enhance Army Brigades’ Efforts in Africa by Improving

  14. Bibliography on Cold Regions Science and Technology. Volume 42

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    growth, lee forasatloa. Water flow. 42-1708 Frceslag fracture of water pipes la low temperature. Salto , H., et al. International Symposium on Cold...Edited by K.C. Cheng, V.J. Lunardini and N. Seki, New York, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1987, p.183-187, 8 refs. Inaba, H., Salto , H...undetectable in the bulk of the ice. However, at the junctions where three grains met ( triple -junctions), lulphur was found in concentrations

  15. Cold Regions Environmental Test of CB Protective Masks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-28

    become foggy? (Note: fog means moisture on the inside or outside of the lenses ) Yes No b. If yes, how much time went by before the fogging disappeared? 6...the weather like and what were you doing? Question 24: a. Did you ever have any frost form on the lenses ? (note: frost means moisture /ice.) Yes No b...basis, some degree of flexibility in uniform requirements is necessary. The cold-wet uniform is designed to afford maximum protection against the hazards

  16. From Vietnam to Beyond the Cold War: The Evolution of U.S. Army Engineer Forces, 1973-1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-06

    Eauloment. Washington DC. Office of the Chief of Military History, 1958. Crump, Irving , Our Army Engineers. NY: Dodd, Meade and Co., 1954. Davis... Kirsch , Robert S. and Magness, Thomas H. "Iron Sappers." The Military Engineer. November-December, 1991, pp. 25-27. Matthews, William. "World Changes Turn

  17. THE COLD SHOULDER: EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACTIVE REGION CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.

    2012-09-10

    The coronal heating mechanism for active region core loops is difficult to determine because these loops are often not resolved and cannot be studied individually. Rather, we concentrate on the 'inter-moss' areas between loop footpoints. We use observations from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer and the X-Ray Telescope to calculate the emission measure distributions of eight inter-moss areas in five different active regions. The combined data sets provide both high- and low-temperature constraints and ensure complete coverage in the temperature range appropriate for active regions. For AR 11113, the emission can be modeled with heating events that occur on timescales less than the cooling time. The loops in the core regions appear to be close to equilibrium and are consistent with steady heating. The other regions studied, however, appear to be dominated by nanoflare heating. Our results are consistent with the idea that active region age is an important parameter in determining whether steady or nanoflare heating is primarily responsible for the core emission, that is, older regions are more likely to be dominated by steady heating, while younger regions show more evidence of nanoflares.

  18. Arctic atmospheric circulation patterns responsible for dry and cold air inflows to the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Piia; Sepp, Mait

    2015-04-01

    Essential changes have taken place in atmospheric circulation over the Northern Atlantic in winter and spring during the second half of the 20th century. The winter temperature rise in Europe is frequently attributed to the intensification of zonal flow on the Northern Atlantic region and the same is valid for the Baltic Sea region. Intensification of zonal circulation and its expression through NAO and AO indices have been thoroughly studied, but less is known about mechanisms causing declination from the zonality of flow. Extremely cold weather in winter and spring in Baltic Sea region is related to the radiative cooling or advection of cold air masses. In both cases, the typical western flow is blocked and the region is directly influenced by atmospheric circulation conditions in the Arctic through the cold air advection events. Our aim is to study which large scale atmospheric circulation patterns are responsible for this kind of cold air advection to the Baltic Sea region in winter and spring (from December to May). The second task is to identify if this kind of circulation has become less frequent in the region under research beginning from the last half of the 20th century till now. Describing the atmospheric circulation patterns we use several classifications of atmospheric circulation on daily level. The domain of the classifications covers Atlantic-European sector of the Arctic, including area between Greenland and Novaya Zemlya archipelago. Manual classifications by Vangengeim-Girs and Dzerdzejevski are used, but also several newly calculated ones, that apply different classification methods from cost733class software. For the latter ones geopotential height fields at 500 hPa level from NCEP-NCAR reanalysis are classified for the period 1948-2013. The cold air advection events are determined by daily temperature drops by at least 3°C during 24 hours. The circulation types that bring advection of cold Arctic air to the Baltic Sea region are analysed in

  19. Diviner lunar radiometer observations of cold traps in the moon's south polar region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paige, D.A.; Siegler, M.A.; Zhang, J.A.; Hayne, P.O.; Foote, E.J.; Bennett, K.A.; Vasavada, A.R.; Greenhagen, B.T.; Schofield, J.T.; McCleese, D.J.; Foote, M.C.; DeJong, E.; Bills, B.G.; Hartford, W.; Murray, B.C.; Allen, C.C.; Snook, K.; Soderblom, L.A.; Calcutt, S.; Taylor, F.W.; Bowles, N.E.; Bandfield, J.L.; Elphic, R.; Ghent, R.; Glotch, T.D.; Wyatt, M.B.; Lucey, P.G.

    2010-01-01

    Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment surface-temperature maps reveal the existence of widespread surface and near-surface cryogenic regions that extend beyond the boundaries of persistent shadow. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) struck one of the coldest of these regions, where subsurface temperatures are estimated to be 38 kelvin. Large areas of the lunar polar regions are currently cold enough to cold-trap water ice as well as a range of both more volatile and less volatile species. The diverse mixture of water and high-volatility compounds detected in the LCROSS ejecta plume is strong evidence for the impact delivery and cold-trapping of volatiles derived from primitive outer solar system bodies.

  20. Diviner Lunar Radiometer observations of cold traps in the Moon's south polar region.

    PubMed

    Paige, David A; Siegler, Matthew A; Zhang, Jo Ann; Hayne, Paul O; Foote, Emily J; Bennett, Kristen A; Vasavada, Ashwin R; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Schofield, John T; McCleese, Daniel J; Foote, Marc C; DeJong, Eric; Bills, Bruce G; Hartford, Wayne; Murray, Bruce C; Allen, Carlton C; Snook, Kelly; Soderblom, Laurence A; Calcutt, Simon; Taylor, Fredric W; Bowles, Neil E; Bandfield, Joshua L; Elphic, Richard; Ghent, Rebecca; Glotch, Timothy D; Wyatt, Michael B; Lucey, Paul G

    2010-10-22

    Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment surface-temperature maps reveal the existence of widespread surface and near-surface cryogenic regions that extend beyond the boundaries of persistent shadow. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) struck one of the coldest of these regions, where subsurface temperatures are estimated to be 38 kelvin. Large areas of the lunar polar regions are currently cold enough to cold-trap water ice as well as a range of both more volatile and less volatile species. The diverse mixture of water and high-volatility compounds detected in the LCROSS ejecta plume is strong evidence for the impact delivery and cold-trapping of volatiles derived from primitive outer solar system bodies.

  1. Commercial Travel Offices: Lessons Learned in the Fifth U.S. Army Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    jurisdiction of the Army and are relatively easy to solve. Keywords: Passenger traffic, Service contracting; Travel agency ; Travel contracting; Travel...management; Travel service; Commercial travel office; Travel service contractor; Travel support; Commercial travel services; Commercial travel agency .

  2. Regional Alignment of Army National Guard Brigades: Employing the Guard for Success in Building Partner Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-04

    12 42 GEN Ray Odierno blog 43 GEN Craig R. McKinley, The National Guard: A Great Value for America, July 2010, 7. 44 An Agribusiness Development...Team (ADT) composed of Army National Guard soldiers with backgrounds and expertise in various sectors of the agribusiness field has been formed to...The ARNG has employed the Agribusiness Development Team (ADT) concept successfully in Central America for approximately 20 years. (2008 Army Posture

  3. Proposed Force Structure for the Australian Army to Perform Maneuver Operations in the Littoral Environment within the Region of Interest

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-18

    2001, 143). Like Indonesia , Philippine society is dominated by a political and military structure that does not favor absolute democracy. Rather...PROPOSED FORCE STRUCTURE FOR THE AUSTRALIAN ARMY TO PERFORM MANEUVER OPERATIONS IN THE LITTORAL ENVIRONMENT WITHIN THE REGION OF INTEREST...ii MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE THESIS APPROVAL PAGE Name of Candidate: Major Anthony J. Egan Thesis Title: The Recommended Force Structure

  4. Overview of Modular Design Strategy of the Shipping Container Architecture in Cold Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zexin; Mei, Hongyuan; Ni, Ruixian

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, the shipping container architecture, as an emerging green building mode, has grown in popularity. In this article, we analyse the advantages of applying shipping container architecture in cold regions, such as shortening the construction cycle, saving construction materials, reducing energy consumption and adapting to diverse sites. Then we analyze the modular design strategy and the modular design strategy in architecture. In the end we introduce the modular design strategy of shipping container architecture in cold regions with the technology roadmap, classification and combination.

  5. Linking glacial, periglacial and paraglacial processes: the challenge of cold regions geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, M. S.; Gärtner-Roer, I. G.-R.; Lukas, S. L.

    2012-04-01

    High latitude and high altitude areas, here collectively called "cold regions", are the theatre of several geomorphological processes that lead to the formation of a variety of landforms. Classically, in Geomorphology, these processes are studied in three separate disciplines: glacial, periglacial and paraglacial geomorphology. However, the more these fields have evolved, the more it becomes evident that it is only from the integration of them into a common interdisciplinary approach that the geomorphology of cold regions can be fully understood. The overlaps between glacial, periglacial and paraglacial processes is evident both in time and space. Temporally, these processes overlap when, for instance, an active valley glacier could be found next to a rock glacier developing from a tributary valley and slope movements of previously-deposited lateral moraines could also be occurring along the flank of the same main valley. Spatially, glacial, periglacial and paraglacial geomorphology tend to affect the same regions (the cold regions of above). Moreover, their spatial overlap could be such that they link to each other. For instance, this would happen when an advancing glacier might override and somewhat incorporate a rock glacier. Or when paraglacial movements of previously deposited glacial sediments might feed a now-lowered valley glacier, thus determining an "anomalous" increase of glacier sediment discharge at the valley glacier margin. In this paper we advocate a more integrated, interdisciplinary approach to the study of cold regions by presenting examples from the recent literature that show the importance of such an approach.

  6. Optimization of Domestic-Size Renewable Energy System Designs Suitable for Cold Climate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Itoro Etim; Sasaki, Masafumi; Endoh, Noboru

    Five different kinds of domestic-size renewable energy system configurations for very cold climate regions were investigated. From detailed numerical modeling and system simulations, it was found that the consumption of fuel oil for the auxiliary boiler in residential-type households can almost be eliminated with a renewable energy system that incorporates photovoltaic panel arrays for electricity generation and two storage tanks: a well-insulated electric water storage tank that services the hot water loads, and a compact boiler/geothermal heat pump tank for room heating during very cold seasons. A reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) of about 28% was achieved for this system compared to an equivalent conventional system. The near elimination of the use of fuel oil in this system makes it very promising for very cold climate regions in terms of energy savings because the running cost is not so dependent on the unstable nature of global oil prices.

  7. Warming effects on the urban hydrology in cold climate regions.

    PubMed

    Järvi, L; Grimmond, C S B; McFadden, J P; Christen, A; Strachan, I B; Taka, M; Warsta, L; Heimann, M

    2017-07-19

    While approximately 338 million people in the Northern hemisphere live in regions that are regularly snow covered in winter, there is little hydro-climatologic knowledge in the cities impacted by snow. Using observations and modelling we have evaluated the energy and water exchanges of four cities that are exposed to wintertime snow. We show that the presence of snow critically changes the impact that city design has on the local-scale hydrology and climate. After snow melt, the cities return to being strongly controlled by the proportion of built and vegetated surfaces. However in winter, the presence of snow masks the influence of the built and vegetated fractions. We show how inter-year variability of wintertime temperature can modify this effect of snow. With increasing temperatures, these cities could be pushed towards very different partitioning between runoff and evapotranspiration. We derive the dependency of wintertime runoff on this warming effect in combination with the effect of urban densification.

  8. The role of cold season processes on soil erosion in the Great Lakes Region

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of cold season processes on soil erosion is becoming increasingly important for sustainable management of soil resources, especially in regions where agricultural land use is dominant. Few tools exist that can help quantify this effect at scales relevant for resource management and enviro...

  9. Utilization of Sewage Sludge for Terrain Stabilization in Cold Regions. Part 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    terrain stabilization in cold regions. In 13 of the 14 plots the variables studied were nutrient source ( fertilizer , sludge and primary wastewater...and vegetation (three grasses and to legumes). The control plot was left bare of seed, fertilizer and erosion control material for comparison. A 20,000

  10. Glacial Isostatic Adjustment - a hot topic in cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, Pippa

    2016-04-01

    Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) modelling tackles the classic geodynamical problem of determining the solid Earth response to surface load changes by ice and ocean water whilst at the same time solving for the gravitationally-consistent redistribution of ice sheet meltwater across the global ocean. Understanding this process is important for quantifying both present-day ice mass balance and the response of ice sheets to past and future climatic change. The two fundamental unknowns in this problem are (i) the rheology of the solid Earth, and (ii) the history of global ice sheet change. In this talk I will discuss the myriad of approaches that are used to constrain these two components. In particular, I will focus on Antarctica, where the presence of a continuously-evolving ice sheet, situated on top of one of the most rheologically-diverse regions of the planet, provides us with a challenge that can only be resolved by drawing on knowledge from across the fields of geodynamics, glaciology, geology, geodesy and seismology.

  11. Technological methods in research for icy meteorites on cold region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, F.

    2008-09-01

    Amongst the less known cosmic origin matters, which are showering our planet Earth are these of icy meteorites, which due to their height temperature on impact largely and completely melt in any zonal temperatures, exception being the two polar zones hence their findings and gathering is only possible these in Antarctica these cosmic sending in bedded in the frozen ice rivers, glaciers are however there and detectable. It is imperative to use an up to date technology for the detection, finding and investigation of these objects as being found preserved in their state of arrivals and embedded in the glaciers. The radioactive isotope content of these so called dirty ice balls and their possible content of organic chemicals could in some way enrich and modify of our concept from the formation of environment of our planet Earth. The same technology could also be used for the mapping of crevices of the two polar regions of the Moon. Our observations obtained from the Hungaria One and Two small planets, shows that there surface beehive as if they were two hinge sizes of ice meteorites.

  12. Characteristic Analysis of Continuous Hailfall in the context of Cold Vortex in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Cold vortex is firstly defined. Using weather maps from April to September during 2000-2011,the temporal-spatial distribution and life characteristics of cold vortex are studied. Disaster weather data from 176 stations in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region from April to September during 2000-2011 and NCEP 1°1°reanalysis data are used to analyze the temporal-spatial distribution characteristics of continuous hailfall of Beijing, Tianjin,Hebei region and its relation with cold vortex. The results showed that: The number of cold vortex mainly occurred from Northeast China to the east of Lake Baikal, and long-lived cold vortex accounted for 70%; It was long-lived vortex that caused continuous haifall in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region and Continuous hail in the context of cold vortex exhibited significant diurnal variation .and occurred more in mountainous area than on the plains, more in north area than the south area; Continuous hail mainly occurred to the south of vortex center, and could occur in any period of cold vortex; . The distance between Continuous hail and cold vortex was about 200-1200km .The continuous hailfall were mainly affected by t the cold vortex and its rear transverse trough; Continuous hail occurred in different positionCorresponding to cold vortex with different speed. Keywords: cold vortex; continuous hail; statistics; storm-relative composites

  13. Simulating cold regions hydrological processes using a modular model in the west of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Pomeroy, John W.; Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Guodong; Wang, Genxu; Chen, Chong

    2014-02-01

    The Cold Regions Hydrological Model platform (CRHM), a flexible object-oriented modeling system, was devised to simulate cold regions hydrological processes and predict streamflow by its capability to compile cold regions process modules into purpose-built models. In this study, the cold regions hydrological processes of two basins in western China were evaluated using CRHM models: Binggou basin, a high alpine basin where runoff is mainly caused by snowmelt, and Zuomaokong basin, a steppe basin where the runoff is strongly affected by soil freezing/thawing. The flexibility and modular structure of CRHM permitted model structural intercomparison and process falsification within the same model framework to evaluate the importance of snow energy balance, blowing snow and frozen soil infiltration processes to successful modeling in the cold regions of western China. Snow accumulation and ablation processes were evaluated at Binggou basin by testing and comparing similar models that contained different levels of complexity of snow redistribution and ablation modules. The comparison of simulated snow water equivalent with observations shows that the snow accumulation/ablation processes were simulated much better using an uncalibrated, physically based energy balance snowmelt model rather than with a calibrated temperature index snowmelt model. Simulated seasonal snow sublimation loss was 138 mm water equivalent in the alpine region of Binggou basin, which accounts for 47 % of 291 mm water equivalent of snowfall, and half of this sublimation loss is attributed to 70 mm water equivalent of sublimation from blowing snow particles. Further comparison of simulated results through falsification of different snow processes reveals that estimating blowing snow transport processes and sublimation loss is vital for accurate snowmelt runoff calculations in this region. The model structure with the energy balance snowmelt and blowing snow components performed well in reproducing the

  14. The Chilean Army, Its History, Organization, Regional Environment and Challenges Over the Next 25 Years

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-09

    estadisticas financieras/fpublica.asp 20 See more in Cheyre, Juan Emilio, (actual CINC of the Army) Medidas de Confianza Mutua: Casos de Am6rica...1997, at http://www.defensa.cl Ministerio de Hacienda de Chile, Direcci6n del Presupuesto (Chilean Finance Minister Budget Directorate) Estadisticas de...las finanzas publicas 2000 - 2001 http://www.dipres.cl/ASP/ estadisticas financieras/fpublica.asp Ministerio de Hacienda de Chile, Direcci6n del

  15. Landpower 2020: Enabling Regionally Aligned US Army Forces with Threat-Based Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    situation, EUCOM has prioritized BPC as a tenet of its theater strategy, and it is the only command to have submitted the requirement for additional...Army forces to enable BPC as part of the annual GCC’s submission of integrated priorities to the joint staff.27 In fact, EUCOM has requested...perform BPC tasks in the AOR. However, United States Central Command (CENTCOM) indicated a vulnerability to effectively respond to emerging

  16. Utilization of Sewage Sludge for Terrain Stabilization in Cold Regions. Part II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    sludge, commercial fertilizer and cultivation techniques for Terrain stabilization in cold regions. Twenty-seven test plots on a 16 degrees west-facing... fertilizer ), (3) mulching agent (wood fiber mulch or peat moss), and (4) tacking agent (terra Tack III or Curasol). The plots were seeded in either the...from 3580 to 5073 lb/acre. Fertilizer treated plots had slightly less average soil loss than those treated with sludge (1.79 vs 2.21 tons/acre). The

  17. Wolf Creek Research Basin Cold REgion Process Studies - 1992-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowicz, R.; Hedstrom, N.; Pomeroy, J.; Granger, R.; Carey, S.

    2004-12-01

    The development of hydrological models in northern regions are complicated by cold region processes. Sparse vegetation influences snowpack accumulation, redistribution and melt, frozen ground effects infiltration and runoff and cold soils in the summer effect evapotranspiration rates. Situated in the upper Yukon River watershed, the 195 km2 Wolf Creek Research Basin was instrumented in 1992 to calibrate hydrologic flow models, and has since evolved into a comprehensive study of cold region processes and linkages, contributing significantly to hydrological and climate change modelling. Studies include those of precipitation distribution, snowpack accumulation and redistribution, energy balance, snowmelt infiltration, and water balance. Studies of the spatial variability of hydrometeorological data demonstrate the importance of physical parameters on their distribution and control on runoff processes. Many studies have also identified the complex interaction of several of the physical parameters, including topography, vegetation and frozen ground (seasonal or permafrost) as important. They also show that there is a fundamental, underlying spatial structure to the watershed that must be adequately represented in parameterization schemes for scaling and watershed modelling. The specific results of numerous studies are presented.

  18. Isolated cold plasma regions: Observations and their relation to possible production mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Chen, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Regions of enhanced cold plasma, isolated from the main plasmasphere along the Explorer 45 orbit on the equatorial plane, are reported using the sheath induced potentials seen by the electric field experiment. The occurrence of these regions has a strong correlation with negative enhancements of Dst, and their locations are primarily in the noon-dusk quadrant. The data support the concept that changes in large scale convection play a dominant role in the formation of these regions. Plasmatails that are predicted from enhancements of large scale convection electric fields in general define where these regions may be found. More localized processes are necessary to account for the exact configuration and structure seen in these regions and may eventually result in detachment from the main plasmasphere.

  19. Isolated cold plasma regions - Observations and their relation to possible production mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Chen, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Regions of enhanced cold plasma, isolated from the main plasmasphere along the Explorer 45 (53-A) orbit in the equatorial plane, have been detected by using the sheath-induced potentials seen by the electric field experiment. The occurrence of these regions has a strong correlation with negative enhancements of Dst, and their locations are primarily in the noon-dusk quadrant. The data support the concept that changes in large-scale convection play a dominant role in the formation of these regions. Plasma tails that are predicted from enhancements of large-scale convection electric fields in general define where these regions may be found. More localized processes are necessary to account for the exact configuration and structure seen in these regions and may eventually result in detachment from the main plasmasphere.

  20. Cold Spots in the Martian Polar Regions: Evidence of Carbon Dioxide Depletion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2000-01-01

    Regions of very low, rapidly varying brightness temperatures have been observed near the martian winter poles by several spacecraft. One possibility is that the CO2 condensation temperature is lowered by depletion of CO2 in the air at the surface. We estimate the rate at which this low-molecular-weight air would disperse into the high-molecular-weight air above and show that it is generally faster than the rate of supply. This dispersal could be prevented if there is a strong temperature inversion (warm air above colder air) near the surface. Without an inversion, the entire atmospheric column could become depleted. However, depleted columns take a long time to form, and they are inconsistent with the rapid fluctuations in the cold spot locations and temperatures. Because low-altitude temperature inversions cannot be ruled out by existing observations, CO2 depletion is still a viable explanation for the martian cold spots.

  1. Feasibility of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Rubberized Concrete in Cold Regions for High Volume Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Eid, Mahear A.

    There are many challenges faced with the use of Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) in cold regions, but with the inclusion of new technologies such as steel fibers and recycled tire crumb rubber efficient construction may be possible. Research was conducted on a modified concrete material that included both steel fibers and crumb rubber. The composite material was called Steel Fiber-Reinforced Rubberized Concrete (SFRRC). The objective of this investigation was to provide evidence showing that SFRRC can reduce tire rutting compared to asphaltic pavement. In addition, the research showed that the SFRRC could withstand freeze-thaw cycles and increase service life of roadways. Several tests were performed to determine the characteristics of the material. Freeze-thaw testing was performed to determine compressive strength loss and visual deterioration of the material. Wheel tracker rut testing was performed both with the standard steel wheel and with a modified studded rubber tire to determine plastic deformation and rut resistance. An experimental test slab was cast in place on a public approach to observe the construction procedures, the effects of studded tire wear and the frost actions in cold region conditions. Based on freeze-thaw and wheel tracker test results and observations of the experimental test slab, the SFRRC material shows viability in cold regions for resisting freeze-thaw actions. The freeze-thaw testing resulted in increased compressive strength after 300 freeze-thaw cycles and very low deterioration of material compared to standard PCC. The wheel tracker testing resulted in very low plastic deformation and minor material rutting with use of the studded rubber tire. The test slab showed very minor surface wear, no freeze-thaw cracking and no rutting after one winter of use. It is recommended that further testing of the material be conducted by means of a large-scale trial section. This would provide information with respect to cost analysis and

  2. Automated algorithm for mapping regions of cold-air pooling in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Jessica D.; Pepin, Nicholas; Rochford, Caitlin

    2008-11-01

    In complex terrain, air in contact with the ground becomes cooled from radiative energy loss on a calm clear night and, being denser than the free atmosphere at the same elevation, sinks to valley bottoms. Cold-air pooling (CAP) occurs where this cooled air collects on the landscape. This article focuses on identifying locations on a landscape subject to considerably lower minimum temperatures than the regional average during conditions of clear skies and weak synoptic-scale winds, providing a simple automated method to map locations where cold air is likely to pool. Digital elevation models of regions of complex terrain were used to derive surfaces of local slope, curvature, and percentile elevation relative to surrounding terrain. Each pixel was classified as prone to CAP, not prone to CAP, or exhibiting no signal, based on the criterion that CAP occurs in regions with flat slopes in local depressions or valleys (negative curvature and low percentile). Along-valley changes in the topographic amplification factor (TAF) were then calculated to determine whether the cold air in the valley was likely to drain or pool. Results were checked against distributed temperature measurements in Loch Vale, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado; in the Eastern Pyrenees, France; and in Yosemite National Park, Sierra Nevada, California. Using CAP classification to interpolate temperatures across complex terrain resulted in improvements in root-mean-square errors compared to more basic interpolation techniques at most sites within the three areas examined, with average error reductions of up to 3°C at individual sites and about 1°C averaged over all sites in the study areas.

  3. Hypomethylation of cytosine residues in cold-sensitive regions of Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Guarido, Paula Carolina Paes; de Paula, Adriano Alves; da Silva, Carlos Roberto Maximiano; Rodriguez, Carmen; Vanzela, André Luís Laforga

    2012-04-01

    Heterochromatin comprises a fraction of the genome usually with highly repeated DNA sequences and lacks of functional genes. This region can be revealed by using Giemsa C-banding, fluorochrome staining and cytomolecular tools. Some plant species are of particular interest through having a special type of heterochromatin denominated the cold-sensitive region (CSR). Independent of other chromosomal regions, when biological materials are subjected to low temperatures (about 0 °C), CSRs appear slightly stained and decondensed. In this study, we used Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae) to understand some aspects of CSR condensation associated with cytosine methylation levels, and to compare the behavior of different heterochromatin types of this species, when subjected to low temperatures.

  4. Hypomethylation of cytosine residues in cold-sensitive regions of Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Guarido, Paula Carolina Paes; de Paula, Adriano Alves; da Silva, Carlos Roberto Maximiano; Rodriguez, Carmen; Vanzela, André Luís Laforga

    2012-01-01

    Heterochromatin comprises a fraction of the genome usually with highly repeated DNA sequences and lacks of functional genes. This region can be revealed by using Giemsa C-banding, fluorochrome staining and cytomolecular tools. Some plant species are of particular interest through having a special type of heterochromatin denominated the cold-sensitive region (CSR). Independent of other chromosomal regions, when biological materials are subjected to low temperatures (about 0 °C), CSRs appear slightly stained and decondensed. In this study, we used Cestrum strigilatum (Solanaceae) to understand some aspects of CSR condensation associated with cytosine methylation levels, and to compare the behavior of different heterochromatin types of this species, when subjected to low temperatures. PMID:22888295

  5. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  6. Trends of Future Heavy Snowfall and Accumulated Freezing Indexes in Japanese Snowy Cold Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Matsuzawa, M.

    2015-12-01

    To achieve sufficient, effective winter road maintenance, it is important that long-term snow and ice hazard mitigation plans be examined and formulated by taking into consideration the influence of climate change. In this study, we have developed a method of predicting more accurately the indexes of heavy snowfall events that occur over short periods of time and future projections of winter temperatures based on the relationship of observed data to the climate model predicted values. The indexes for heavy snowfall were the maximum 24-hour snowfall and the frequency of 10-cm or more snowfall within a maximum 6-hour period. Indexes for cold weather were the accumulated freezing index in winter and the number of days of freeze-thaw days. Subsequently, we have applied this methodology for Japanese snowy cold regions, in order to clarify the trends for near future and century-end future period changes. The results indicate that current measures to mitigate the effects of extremely heavy snowfall in inland areas of Hokkaido may require enhancement of operational procedures. In addition, the possibility of pavement and concrete damage in the colder regions is expected to increase due to the increment in the number of freeze-thaw days. Based upon the results of this study, we will identify the road management issues associated with climate change using the recent trends and predictions for the near future and century-end future climate periods.

  7. Definition of initial conditions and soil profile depth for Hydrological Land Surface Models in Cold Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapriza-Azuri, G.; Gamazo, P. A.; Razavi, S.; Wheater, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    Earth system models are essential for the evaluation of the impact of climate change. At global and regional scales, General Circulation Models (GCM) and Regional Climate Models (RCM) are used to simulate climate change evolution. Hydrological Land Surface Models (HLSM) are used along with GCMs and RCMs (coupled or offline) to have a better representation of the hydrological cycle. All these models typically have a common implementation of the energy and water balance in the soil, known as the Land Surface Model (LSM). In general, a standard soil configuration with a depth of no more than 4 meters is used in all LSMs that are commonly implemented in GCMs, RCMs and HLSMs. For moderate climate conditions, this depth is sufficient to capture the intra-annual variability in the energy and water balance. However, for cold regions and for long-term simulations, deeper subsurface layers are needed in order to allow the heat signal to propagate through the soil to deeper layers and hence to avoid erroneous near-surface states and fluxes. Deeper soil/rock configurations create longer system memories, and as such, particular care should be taken to define the initial conditions for the subsurface system. In this work we perform a sensitivity analysis of the main factors that affect the subsurface energy and water balance for LSMs in cold regions - depth of soil, soil parameters, initial conditions and climate conditions for a warm-up period. We implement a 1D model using the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) LSM for a study area in northern Canada where measurements of soil temperature profiles are available. Results suggest that an adequate representation of the heat propagation process in the soil requires the simulation of a soil depth of greater than 25 meters. As for initial conditions we recommend to spin-up over a cycle of an average climate year and then use reconstructed climate time series with a length of more than 300 years.

  8. INTERFROST: a benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Christophe; Roux, Nicolas; Costard, François; Pessel, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Large focus was put recently on the impact of climate changes in boreal regions due to the large temperature amplitudes expected. Large portions of these regions, corresponding to permafrost areas, are covered by water bodies (lakes, rivers) with very specific evolution and water budget. These water bodies generate taliks (unfrozen zones below) that may play a key role in the context of climate change. Recent studies and modeling exercises showed that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is a minimal requirement to model and understand the evolution of the river and lake - soil continuum in a changing climate (e.g. Mc Kenzie et al., 2007; Bense et al 2009, Rowland et al 2011; Painter 2011; Grenier et al 2012; Painter et al 2012 and others from the 2012 special issue Hydrogeology Journal: "Hydrogeology of cold regions"). However, 3D studies are still scarce while numerical approaches can only be validated against analytical solutions for the purely thermal equation with conduction and phase change (e.g. Neumann, Lunardini). When it comes to the coupled TH system (coupling two highly non-linear equations), the only possible approach is to compare different codes on provided test cases and/or to have controlled experiments for validation. We propose here to join the INTERFROST benchmark exercise addressing these issues. We give an overview of some of its test cases (phase I) as well as provide the present stand of the exercise and invite other research groups to join. This initial phase of the benchmark consists of some test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. Mc Kenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones. Some experimental cases in cold room complement the validation approach. In view of a Phase II, the project is open as well to other test cases reflecting a numerical or a process oriented interest or answering a more general concern among the cold region community. A further purpose of the benchmark exercise is to propel discussions for the

  9. INTERFROST: a benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, C. F.; Roux, N.; Costard, F.; Pessel, M.

    2013-12-01

    Large focus was put recently on the impact of climate changes in boreal regions due to the large temperature amplitudes expected. Large portions of these regions, corresponding to permafrost areas, are covered by water bodies (lakes, rivers) with very specific evolution and water budget. These water bodies generate taliks (unfrozen zones below) that may play a key role in the context of climate change. Recent studies and modeling exercises showed that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is a minimal requirement to model and understand the evolution of the river and lake - soil continuum in a changing climate (e.g. Mc Kenzie et al., 2007; Bense et al 2009, Rowland et al 2011; Painter 2011; Grenier et al 2012; Painter et al 2012 and others from the 2012 special issue Hydrogeology Journal: 'Hydrogeology of cold regions'). However, 3D studies are still scarce while numerical approaches can only be validated against analytical solutions for the purely thermal equation with conduction and phase change (e.g. Neumann, Lunardini). When it comes to the coupled TH system (coupling two highly non-linear equations), the only possible approach is to compare different codes on provided test cases and/or to have controlled experiments for validation. We propose here to initiate a benchmark exercise, detail some of its planned test cases (phase I) and invite other research groups to join. This initial phase of the benchmark will consist of some test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. Mc Kenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones. Some experimental cases in cold room will complement the validation approach. In view of a Phase II, the project is open as well to other test cases reflecting a numerical or a process oriented interest or answering a more general concern among the cold region community. A further purpose of the benchmark exercise is to propel discussions for the optimization of codes and numerical approaches in order to develop validated and

  10. Effects of ice and floods on vegetation in streams in cold regions: implications for climate change.

    PubMed

    Lind, Lovisa; Nilsson, Christer; Weber, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Riparian zones support some of the most dynamic and species-rich plant communities in cold regions. A common conception among plant ecologists is that flooding during the season when plants are dormant generally has little effect on the survival and production of riparian vegetation. We show that winter floods may also be of fundamental importance for the composition of riverine vegetation. We investigated the effects of ice formation on riparian and in-stream vegetation in northern Sweden using a combination of experiments and observations in 25 reaches, spanning a gradient from ice-free to ice-rich reaches. The ice-rich reaches were characterized by high production of frazil and anchor ice. In a couple of experiments, we exposed riparian vegetation to experimentally induced winter flooding, which reduced the dominant dwarf-shrub cover and led to colonization of a species-rich forb-dominated vegetation. In another experiment, natural winter floods caused by anchor-ice formation removed plant mimics both in the in-stream and in the riparian zone, further supporting the result that anchor ice maintains dynamic plant communities. With a warmer winter climate, ice-induced winter floods may first increase in frequency because of more frequent shifts between freezing and thawing during winter, but further warming and shortening of the winter might make them less common than today. If ice-induced winter floods become reduced in number because of a warming climate, an important disturbance agent for riparian and in-stream vegetation will be removed, leading to reduced species richness in streams and rivers in cold regions. Given that such regions are expected to have more plant species in the future because of immigration from the south, the distribution of species richness among habitats can be expected to show novel patterns.

  11. A new benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Christophe; Roux, Nicolas; Costard, François

    2013-04-01

    Large focus was put recently on the impact of climate changes in boreal regions due to the large amplitudes expected. Large portions of these regions, corresponding to permafrost areas, are covered by water bodies (lakes, rivers) with very specific evolution and water budget. These water bodies generate taliks (unfrozen zones below) that may play a key role in the context of climate change. Recent studies and modeling exercises showed that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is required to understand and model the evolution of rivers and lakes in a changing climate. However, 3D studies are still scarce while all numerical approaches can only be validated against analytical solutions for a purely thermic equation with phase change (e.g. Neumann, Lunardini). When it comes to the coupled TH system (coupling two highly non-linear equations), the only possible approach is to compare different codes on provided test cases and/or to have controlled experiments for validation and propel discussions to try and improve the code performances. We propose here a benchmark exercise, detail some of its planned test cases and invite other research groups to join. The benchmark will consist of some test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. Mc Kenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones. Some experimental cases in cold room will complement the validation approach. The benchmark is open as well to new or alternative cases reflecting a numerical or a process oriented interest or answering a more general concern among the cold region community. A further purpose of the benchmark exercise is to propel discussions for the optimization of codes and numerical approaches in order to develop validated and optimized simulation tools allowing in the end for 3D realistic applications. A web site hosted by LSCE is under construction to allow easy interaction or downloading. Future prospects will be envisioned including organization of specific meetings or conference

  12. Effects of ice and floods on vegetation in streams in cold regions: implications for climate change

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Lovisa; Nilsson, Christer; Weber, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Riparian zones support some of the most dynamic and species-rich plant communities in cold regions. A common conception among plant ecologists is that flooding during the season when plants are dormant generally has little effect on the survival and production of riparian vegetation. We show that winter floods may also be of fundamental importance for the composition of riverine vegetation. We investigated the effects of ice formation on riparian and in-stream vegetation in northern Sweden using a combination of experiments and observations in 25 reaches, spanning a gradient from ice-free to ice-rich reaches. The ice-rich reaches were characterized by high production of frazil and anchor ice. In a couple of experiments, we exposed riparian vegetation to experimentally induced winter flooding, which reduced the dominant dwarf-shrub cover and led to colonization of a species-rich forb-dominated vegetation. In another experiment, natural winter floods caused by anchor-ice formation removed plant mimics both in the in-stream and in the riparian zone, further supporting the result that anchor ice maintains dynamic plant communities. With a warmer winter climate, ice-induced winter floods may first increase in frequency because of more frequent shifts between freezing and thawing during winter, but further warming and shortening of the winter might make them less common than today. If ice-induced winter floods become reduced in number because of a warming climate, an important disturbance agent for riparian and in-stream vegetation will be removed, leading to reduced species richness in streams and rivers in cold regions. Given that such regions are expected to have more plant species in the future because of immigration from the south, the distribution of species richness among habitats can be expected to show novel patterns. PMID:25505542

  13. Improving Snow Measurement Technology to Better Parameterise Cold Regions Hydrometeorology Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J.; Debeer, C.; Ellis, C.; Essery, R.; Helgason, W.; Kinar, N.; Link, T.; MacDonald, J.

    2008-12-01

    Marmot Creek Research Basin, in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, Canada constitutes a long term cold regions hydrometeorological observatory with over 45 years of intensive observations in alpine and forested zones. Recently, novel combinations of measurement technology to snow have been deployed in Marmot Creek to advance the understanding of snow processes and to improve hydrometeorological models of streamflow and atmospheric variables. One advance has been the development and application of portable acoustic reflectometry to measure the density and structure of seasonal snowpacks using an audible sound wave. This has permitted the non-invasive measurement of snow water equivalent for both stationary and snow survey applications. Another advance has been the use of oblique time-lapse digital photography which is corrected for elevation and view angle from a LiDAR DEM to produce daily orthogonal snow covered area images of the alpine zone. These images are used to calculate snowcovered area and to develop and test improved snowcover melt and depletion algorithms. Deployment of 3-axis ultrasonic anemometers and fast hygrometers with collection of 10 Hz data and full correction for non-stationarity, axis rotation and other effects has shown that horizontal turbulence is often advected into mountain clearings and causes failure of traditional bulk transfer calculations of latent and sensible heat. For forest snow a hanging, weighed spruce tree and hanging, weighed sub-canopy troughs are used to capture intercepted snow load and unloaded snow fluxes respectively. These quantities provide the information needed to test detailed models of the snow interception and unloading processes. To quantify variations in sub-canopy energy for snowmelt, infrared imaging radiometers and narrow beam radiometers are used to measure thermal radiation exitance from needles, stems and trunks in forests of varying structure. These measurements are being used to develop improved models of

  14. Low modulus polymer packaged optical fiber sensor for macrocrack monitoring in ice structures of cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Zhou, Zhi

    2014-09-01

    Ice structures provide load-bearing capability for energy exploitation and transportation in cold regions. Meanwhile, staff and facilities take a risk due to large amounts of distributed macrocracks in ice roads, ice bridges, and ice platforms. It is critical to monitor macrocracks for detecting and understanding the fracture process under such a harsh environment. Aiming to obtain real-time, long-term, and quantitative crack opening information for ice structures, this paper presents a feasibility study on monitoring macrocracks with a low modulus polymer packaged optical fiber sensor. Brillouin optical time-domain analysis-based sensing technology is utilized for the distributed strain measurement. According to in situ monitoring requirements, a type of silicone rubber material with appropriate mechanical properties is selected to fabricate the sensor. On this basis, a strain transfer analysis on the packaged and embedded sensor is carried out to derive the relation between the optical measurement and the increment of the crack width. The prototypes have been evaluated by demonstration tests on a tensile device and an ice road model. The experimental results show the sensor can survive in a cold environment and under the large strain resulting from the macrocrack opening. These measured data agree well with the linear calibration. The macrocracks opening in large-scale ice structures can be characterized based on the optical sensor.

  15. Imperial Parallels: Analyzing the U.S. Army Regionally Aligned Force Strategy in the Context of Historical Imperialism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE Strategic Studies by KEVIN WARD, MAJ, U.S. ARMY B.S., United States Military Academy, West Point, New York...10 History of United States Imperialism and Foreign Policy ........................................ 12 United ...ACRONYMS AAR After Action Review ABCT Armored Brigade Combat Team AFRICOM United States African Command AOR Area of Responsibility ASCC Army

  16. Future of Army Water Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Energy/ Water Nexus • Thermoelectric power • Geothermal • Biofuels • Solar-hot water • Hydropower • Carbon Capture • “ Fracking ” Regional Water Balance...patterns of seasonal and regional water distribution  Condition of distribution systems  Topography  Water quality  Non-point source pollution ...Future of Army Water Studies Marc Kodack Senior Fellow, Army Environmental Policy Institute/Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army

  17. Effects of modeling decisions on cold region hydrological model performance: snow, soil and streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musselman, Keith; Clark, Martyn; Endalamaw, Abraham; Bolton, W. Robert; Nijssen, Bart; Arnold, Jeffrey

    2017-04-01

    Cold regions are characterized by intense spatial gradients in climate, vegetation and soil properties that determine the complex spatiotemporal patterns of snowpack evolution, frozen soil dynamics, catchment connectivity, and streamflow. These spatial gradients pose unique challenges for hydrological models, including: 1) how the spatial variability of the physical processes are best represented across a hierarchy of scales, and 2) what algorithms and parameter sets best describe the biophysical and hydrological processes at the spatial scale of interest. To address these topics, we apply the Structure for Unifying Multiple Modeling Alternatives (SUMMA) to simulate hydrological processes at the Caribou - Poker Creeks Research Watershed in the Alaskan sub-arctic Boreal forest. The site is characterized by numerous gauged headwater catchments ranging in size from 5 sq. km to 106 sq. km with varying extents (3% to 53%) of discontinuous permafrost that permits a multi-scale paired watershed analysis of the hydrological impacts of frozen soils. We evaluate the effects of model decisions on the skill of SUMMA to simulate observed snow and soil dynamics, and the spatial integration of these processes as catchment streamflow. Decisions such as the number of soil layers, total soil column depth, and vertical soil discretization are shown to have profound impacts on the simulation of seasonal active layer dynamics. Decisions on the spatial organization (lateral connectivity, representation of riparian response units, and the spatial discretization of the hydrological landscape) are shown to be as important as accurate snowpack and soil process representation in the simulation of streamflow. The work serves to better inform hydrological model decisions for cold region hydrologic evaluation and to improve predictive capacity for water resource planning.

  18. Thermal environment analysis and energy conservation research of rural residence in cold regions of China based on BIM platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. Y.; Cheng, W.; Ma, C. P.; Xin, L. S.; Tan, Y. T.

    2017-06-01

    In order to study the issue of rural residential energy consumption in cold regions of China, modeled an architecture prototype based on BIM platform according to the affecting factors of rural residential thermal environment, and imported the virtual model which contains building information into energy analysis tools and chose the appropriate building orientation. By analyzing the energy consumption of the residential buildings with different enclosure structure forms, we designed the optimal energy-saving residence form. There is a certain application value of this method for researching the energy consumption and energy-saving design for the rural residence in cold regions of China.

  19. [Spatial and temporal variations of hydrological characteristic on the landscape zone scale in alpine cold region].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Gang; Hu, Jin-Fei; Xiao, Hong-Lang; Zou, Song-Bing; Yin, Zhen-Liang

    2013-10-01

    There are few studies on the hydrological characteristics on the landscape zone scale in alpine cold region at present. This paper aimed to identify the spatial and temporal variations in the origin and composition of the runoff, and to reveal the hydrological characteristics in each zone, based on the isotopic analysis of glacier, snow, frozen soil, groundwater, etc. The results showed that during the wet season, heavy precipitation and high temperature in the Mafengou River basin caused secondary evaporation which led to isotope fractionation effects. Therefore, the isotope values remained high. Temperature effects were significant. During the dry season, the temperature was low. Precipitation was in the solid state during the cold season and the evaporation was weak. Water vapor came from the evaporation of local water bodies. Therefore, less secondary evaporation and water vapor exchange occurred, leading to negative values of delta18O and deltaD. delta18O and deltaD values of precipitation and various water bodies exhibited strong seasonal variations. Precipitation exhibited altitude effects, delta18O = -0. 005 2H - 8. 951, deltaD = -0.018 5H - 34. 873. Other water bodies did not show altitude effects in the wet season and dry season, because the runoff was not only recharged by precipitation, but also influenced by the freezing and thawing process of the glacier, snow and frozen soil. The mutual transformation of precipitation, melt water, surface water and groundwater led to variations in isotopic composition. Therefore, homogenization and evaporation effect are the main control factors of isotope variations.

  20. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  1. Hot-gas cold-dust pumping for water masers associated with H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deguchi, S.

    1981-01-01

    A collisional pump with an internal sink is proposed for the water masers associated with H II regions, where the population inversion occurs due to the absorption by cold ice-mantle grains in a highly dusty cloud of the far-infrared line radiation of hot water vapor. A new escape probability method is developed to calculate the transfer of line radiation in dusty medium. The pump mechanism explains the power of usual maser sources associated with H II regions and the enormous power of the sources associated with W49 N and external galaxies. Models of maser clouds have a radius of 5 x 10 to the 15th-10 to the 16th cm, an H2 number density of 4 x 10 to the 9th/cu cm, an expansion velocity of 10-30 km/s, a kinetic temperature of 350 K, and a grain temperature of 100 K. Giant maser sources require grains of the size about 1 micron. The apparent size of the emission spots (approximately 10 to the 13th cm) observed by VLBI is interpreted as due to a fluctuation in the cloud, and the assembly of the spots is spread within a size of 10 to the 16th cm. The temperature difference between the dust and gas is due to a relaxation process after an infrared burst accompanying protostar formation.

  2. Hot-gas cold-dust pumping for water masers associated with H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Deguchi, S.

    1981-10-01

    A collisional pump with an internal sink is proposed for the water masers associated with H II regions, where the population inversion occurs due to the absorption by cold ice-mantle grains in a highly dusty cloud of the far-infrared line radiation of hot water vapor. A new escape probability method is developed to calculate the transfer of line radiation in dusty medium. The pump mechanism explains the power of usual maser sources associated with H II regions and the enormous power of the sources associated with W49 N and external galaxies. Models of maser clouds have a radius of 5 x 10/sup 15/--10/sup 16/ cm, an H/sub 2/ number density of 4 x 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/, an expansion velocity of 10--30 km s/sup -1/, a kinetic temperature of 350 K, and a grain temperature of 100 K. Giant maser sources require grains of the size about 1 ..mu..m. The apparent size of the emission spots (approx.10/sup 13/ cm) observed by VLBI is interpreted as due to fluctuation in the cloud, and the assembly of the spots is spread within a size of 10/sup 16/ cm. The temperature difference between the dust and gas is due to a relaxation process after an infrared burst accompanying protostar formation.

  3. Cryo-Pedotransfer Functions for Estimating Hydraulic Properties of Soils in Cold Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, D.; Mailapalli, D. R.; Thompson, A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the arduous tasks in engineering hydrology of cold regions is estimating the soil hydraulic properties such as soil freezing characteristics and hydraulic conductivity, which are important when studying transport process during freeze-thaw processes. Expensive data collection methods and existing isothermal models are limitations in understanding soil water dynamics in frozen soils. Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been effectively used in the earth and environmental related sciences to estimate soil physical and chemical properties easily, routinely, or cheaply for a specific non-frozen geographical region. Based on similarity between wetting and freezing processes in soil, we present a new approach to derive soil freezing characteristics from soil water characteristics of non-frozen soils using existing PTFs. We refer to these as the Cryo-PTFs. We consider a conventional soil water characteristic model and existing PTFs for determining the relationships; unfrozen water content vs. subzero temperature, and hydraulic conductivity vs. subzero temperature using Clapeyron equation. The proposed approach successfully simulated unfrozen water content and hydraulic conductivity for different soils including peat when compared with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, effect of soil bulk density and organic matter content on unfrozen water content and hydraulic conductivity at different subzero temperatures was analyzed for a range of soils.

  4. Cold Regions: Instrumentation Operation and Use. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 1-1-004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-10

    In general, synthetic fluids and lubricants are less affected by cold temperatures than petroleum -based fluids and lubricants. Chemical reactions...for cold conditions, cables and connectors are more susceptible to damage if overly flexed or strained, and radios or microwave telemetry systems...cold. Color films may also exhibit a color shift as one emulsion layer slows down more than another. c. The following considerations apply to

  5. Shedding Light on the Dark Continent: A Historical Perspective for U.S. Army Regional Alignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-10

    patterns of trade. He also notes that the colonial powers left their religions, languages , and cultural practices. Mamdani examines contemporary...had a requirement to establish authority in occupied regions sufficient to protect existing rights and freedom of trade and transit.59 The language ...beyond the regimes of Idi Amin Dada and Apolo Milton Obote to the colonial period where the seeds of endemic frailty were sown.90 However, prior to the

  6. An approach for modelling snowcover ablation and snowmelt runoff in cold region environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornes, Pablo Fernando

    Reliable hydrological model simulations are the result of numerous complex interactions among hydrological inputs, landscape properties, and initial conditions. Determination of the effects of these factors is one of the main challenges in hydrological modelling. This situation becomes even more difficult in cold regions due to the ungauged nature of subarctic and arctic environments. This research work is an attempt to apply a new approach for modelling snowcover ablation and snowmelt runoff in complex subarctic environments with limited data while retaining integrity in the process representations. The modelling strategy is based on the incorporation of both detailed process understanding and inputs along with information gained from observations of basin-wide streamflow phenomenon; essentially a combination of deductive and inductive approaches. The study was conducted in the Wolf Creek Research Basin, Yukon Territory, using three models, a small-scale physically based hydrological model, a land surface scheme, and a land surface hydrological model. The spatial representation was based on previous research studies and observations, and was accomplished by incorporating landscape units, defined according to topography and vegetation, as the spatial model elements. Comparisons between distributed and aggregated modelling approaches showed that simulations incorporating distributed initial snowcover and corrected solar radiation were able to properly simulate snowcover ablation and snowmelt runoff whereas the aggregated modelling approaches were unable to represent the differential snowmelt rates and complex snowmelt runoff dynamics. Similarly, the inclusion of spatially distributed information in a land surface scheme clearly improved simulations of snowcover ablation. Application of the same modelling approach at a larger scale using the same landscape based parameterisation showed satisfactory results in simulating snowcover ablation and snowmelt runoff with

  7. Effects of Land Management Practices on Cold Region Hydrological Processes in an Agricultural Prairie Basin (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, T. H.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Wheater, H. S.; Baulch, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Conservation tillage including zero and reduced tillage, crop rotation and upstream reservoirs are commonly implemented as beneficial management practices (BMPs) in the Canadian Prairies. However, their effects are strongly dependent on interactions with cold region hydrological processes, such as wind redistribution of snow, snowmelt, infiltration to frozen soils and evaporation, due to strong coupling between land surface characteristics and hydrology. These interactions are poorly understood and few studies have investigated them using a physically-based modeling framework. In this study, we deploy a physically-based, semi-distributed cold regions hydrological model (CRHM) to investigate the impacts of land management practices in the South Tobacco Creek Basin (STC) which forms part of the Red River Basin in southern Manitoba, Canada. The STC (~73 km2) is set in a gently rolling landscape of low relief (~200 m). Detailed field data such as crop type, tillage practices, crop residue and planting and harvesting dates are available from 1995 and are used to parameterize the model. While the majority of parameters are specified a priori, we have manually calibrated roughness and initial soil water storage parameters to compare the simulations with runoff observations at multiple scales (upstream catchment, mid-basin gauge and outlet gauge) and snow observations during 2000-2001 water year. The calibrated model based on the 2000-2001 period is further evaluated over the 2001-2011 period, which includes high inter-annual variability. The results suggest good agreement between observations and simulations and provide insight into hydrological controls. Snowmelt runoff is a major contributor to streamflow while the contribution of summer rainfall runoff is highly variable. The evaporative fraction is high during dry years (2002-2004) indicating a vertical flux controlled mass balance while the runoff fraction dominates during wet years (2005-2011), suggesting overland

  8. Terrestrial cold-desert analogs: Antarctic landforms and implications for regional glaciation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.; Marchant, D. R.; Dickson, J. L.; Baker, D. M.; Mackay, S.; Lamp, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) are generally classified as a hyper-arid, cold-polar desert. The region has long been considered an important terrestrial analog for Mars because of its cold and dry climate and because it contains a suite of landforms at macro-, meso-, and microscales that closely resemble those occurring on the martian surface. The extreme hyperaridity of both Mars and the ADV has focused attention on the importance of salts and brines on soil development, phase transitions from liquid water to ice, and ultimately, on process geomorphology and landscape evolution at a range of scales on both planets. The ADV can be subdivided into three microclimate zones: a coastal thaw zone, an inland mixed zone, and a stable upland zone; zones are defined on the basis of summertime measurements of atmospheric temperature, soil moisture, and relative humidity. Subtle variations in these climate parameters result in considerable differences in the distribution and morphology of: (1) macroscale features (e.g., slopes and gullies); (2) mesoscale features (e.g., polygons, including ice-wedge, sand-wedge, and sublimation-type polygons, as well as viscous-flow features, including solifluction lobes, gelifluction lobes, and debris-covered glaciers); and (3) microscale features (e.g., rock-weathering processes/features, including salt weathering, wind erosion, and surface pitting). Equilibrium landforms are those features that formed in balance with environmental conditions within fixed microclimate zones. We report on our multi-year field and instrument analysis of four important ADV landforms: 1) sublimation polygons and relation to buried ice, 2) gullies and the environmental controls responsible for their episodic activity, 3) slope streaks, the role of water and brines in their formation and the timing of their activity, and 4) debris-covered glaciers and their three-dimensional geometry, mode and rates of formation. The relative geomorphic and climate stability for

  9. Remote sensing hydrology experiment in cold regions of the Heihe watershed allied telemetry experimental research (HiWATER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Tao; Li, Hongyi; Jin, Rui; Li, Xin; Liu, Shaomin; Ma, Mingguo; Wang, Weizhen; Huang, Chunlin; Kang, Jiang

    2017-04-01

    This presenation reports an integrated hydrological experiment which has the core objective to address the improvement of observations, utilities of remote sensing data, and modeling and assimilation of hydrological processes in cold regions. The distributed automatic meteorological stations (AMS), wireless sensors network (WSN), and runoff (including isotope) measurements were established to obtain the distribution and heterogeneity of near surface meteorological and hydrological variables in spatial and temporal. A snow observation superstation was set up to obtain the snow accumulation and ablation process in typical mountain region, while a frozen ground observation superstation was set up to obtain the water and heat balance in a typical seasonal frozen ground region. A large number of field measurements are designed to develop and validate the remote sensing data products, in particular the snow cover area (SCA) and snow cover fraction (SCF) and soil temperature and soil moisture. The integrated experiment will support the interdisciplinary research in cold regions.

  10. Correlation and causation in tree-ring-based reconstruction of paleohydrology in cold semiarid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshorbagy, Amin; Wagener, Thorsten; Razavi, Saman; Sauchyn, David

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses ways in which the tree-ring-based reconstruction of paleohydrology can be better understood and better utilized to support water resource management, especially in cold semiarid regions. The relationships between tree growth as represented by tree ring chronologies (TRCs), runoff (Q), precipitation (P), and evapotranspiration (ET) are discussed and analyzed within both statistical and hydrological contexts. Data from the Oldman River Basin (OMRB), Alberta, Canada, are used to demonstrate the relevant issues. Instrumental records of Q and P data were available while actual ET was estimated using a lumped conceptual hydrological model developed in this study. Correlation analysis was conducted to explore the relationships between TRCs and each of Q, P, and ET over the entire historical record (globally) as well as locally in time within the wet and dry subperiods. Global and local correlation strengths and linear relationships appear to be substantially different. This outcome particularly affects tree-ring-based inferences about the hydrology of wet and dry episodes when reconstructions are made using regression models. Important findings include (i) reconstruction of paleo-runoff may not be as credible as paleo-precipitation and paleo-evapotranspiration; (ii) a moving average window of P and ET larger than 1 year might be necessary for reconstruction of these variables; and (iii) the long-term mean of reconstructed P, Q, and ET leads us to conclude that there is uncertainty about the past climate. Finally, we suggest using the topographic index to prejudge side suitability for dendrohydrological analysis.

  11. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-01

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28–0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes.

  12. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-01-01

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28–0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes. PMID:28322258

  13. Improving the understanding and diagnosis of Earth system changes in cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    I review key hydrological state variables and fluxes relevant to cold regions, specifically snow, permafrost and seasonally frozen soils, lakes, and wetlands, and comment on the ability of current models to represent the associated processes, and the quality of the data sets upon which model development and diagnosis efforts rest. Although snow processes are relatively well represented in current generation land surface models, at least at large scales for deep mountain snowpacks, the representation of high latitude snow processes remain complicated by the role of snow redistribution, and of sublimation during the shoulder (especially spring) season. Most credible land surface models now include representations of permafrost, some of which perform well when forced with local climate data; however their performance over large areas is limited by spatial variability of key processes, including soil thermal characteristics. Likewise, many land surface models now represent the hydrology and energetics of lakes, which cover a substantial portion of the landscape in many high latitude environs. However, accurate representation of lakes requires knowledge of certain characteristics of their bathymetry and hydrological connectivity, information which is not always available. Likewise, the representation of wetlands in models, although improved in many cases, is limited by topography (and the role of microtopography, even at large scales). Nonetheless, increased attention to high latitude hydrological processes has demonstrably improved the fidelity of land surface representations over the last decade or so.

  14. The Relationship Between Walkability and Environment Characteristics in Cold Region Cities: Case Study in Harbin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yang; Fei, Teng; Mei, Hongyuan

    2017-05-01

    This study attempts to comprehensively and objectively understand whether the physical characteristic of urban space affect the walkability of Harbin city center. Besides, due to Harbin is located in the cold region, the temperature change a lot between winter and summer, this study also tried to find out whether the physical environment characteristics effect on walkability is different in winter and summer. Spatial feature and traffic management have been thought as the main determinate of walkability of urban space, however physical features and urban design details have been rarely mentioned. Yet, does physical quality deterioration of space decrease the walkability of urban center, does specific physical feature influence walkability differently in different season? To answer these question, users’ perception toward the physical features of mix-used streets, have been examined in this study. 14 physical characteristic problems have been identified in the studied area based on the understanding of pervious researches. Through observations and questionnaire surveys, the physical characteristics of each case study were evaluated and the physical problems were discovered. Additionally, users’ perception on the identified problems and their effects on walkability of the studied areas were found and defined, in both winter and summer.

  15. Changes in cold region flood regimes inferred from long-record reference gauging stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, Donald H.; Whitfield, Paul H.

    2017-04-01

    Variability and nonstationarity in flood regimes of cold regions are examined using data from hydrometric reference streamflow gauging stations from 27 natural watersheds in Canada and adjacent areas of the United States. Choosing stations from reference networks with nearly 100 years of data allows for the investigation of changes that span several phases of some of the atmospheric drivers that may influence flood behavior. The reference hydrologic networks include only stations considered to have good quality data and were screened to avoid the influences of regulation, diversions, or land use change. Changes and variations in flood regimes are complex and require a multifaceted approach to properly characterize the types of changes that have occurred and are likely to occur in the future. Peaks over threshold (POT) data are extracted from daily flow data for each watershed, and changes to the magnitude, timing, frequency, volume, and duration of threshold exceedences are investigated. Seasonal statistics are used to explore changes in the nature of the flood regime based on changes in the timing of flood threshold exceedences. A variety of measures are developed to infer flood regime shifts including from a nival regime to a mixed regime and a mixed regime to a more pluvial-dominated regime. The flood regime at many of the watersheds demonstrates increased prominence of rainfall floods and decreased prevalence of snowmelt contributions to flood responses. While some individual stations show a relationship between flood variables and climate indices, these relationships are generally weak.

  16. Assessing the performance of a cold region evapotranspiration landfill cover using lysimetry and electrical resistivity tomography.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, William E; Munk, Jens; Abichou, Tarek; Barnes, David; Lee, William; Pape, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In order to test the efficacy ofa cold-region evapotranspiration (ET) landfill cover against a conventional compacted clay (CCL) landfill cover, two pilot scale covers were constructed in side-by-side basin lysimeters (20m x 10m x 2m) at a site in Anchorage, Alaska. The primary basis of comparison between the two lysimeters was the percolation of moisture from the bottom of each lysimeter. Between 30 April 2005 and 16 May 2006, 51.5 mm of water percolated from the ET lysimeter, compared to 50.6 mm for the the CCL lysimeter. This difference was not found to be significant at the 95% confidence level. As part of the project, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was utilized to measure and map soil moisture in ET lysimeter cross sections. The ERT-generated cross sections were found to accurately predict the onset and duration of lysimeter percolation. Moreover, ERT-generated soil moisture values demonstrated a strong linear relationship to lysimeter percolation rates (R-Squared = 0.92). Consequently, ERT is proposed as a reliable tool for assessing the function of field scale ET covers in the absence of drainage measurement devices.

  17. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-21

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28-0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes.

  18. Processing of analogues of plume fallout in cold regions of Enceladus by energetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergantini, A.; Pilling, S.; Nair, B. G.; Mason, N. J.; Fraser, H. J.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Enceladus, a small icy moon of Saturn, is one of the most remarkable bodies in the solar system. This moon is a geologically active object, and despite the lower temperatures on most of its surface, the geothermally heated south polar region presents geysers that spouts a plume made of water (~90%), carbon dioxide, methane, ammonia, and methanol, among other molecules. Most of the upward-moving particles do not have the velocity to escape from the gravitational influence of the moon and fall back to the surface. The molecules in the ice are continuously exposed to ionizing radiation, such as UV and X-rays photons, cosmic rays, and electrons. Over time, the ionizing radiation promotes molecular bond rupture, destroying and also forming molecules, radicals, and fragments. Aims: We analyse the processing of an ice mixture analogue to the Enceladus fallout ice in cold resurfaced areas (north pole) by 1 keV electrons. The main goal is to search for complex species that have not yet been detected in this moon, and to determine relevant physico-chemical parameters, such as destruction and formation cross-sections and the half-life of the studied molecules in the ice. Methods: The experiment consisted of the electron irradiation of an Enceladus-like ice mixture (H2O:CO2:CH4:NH3:CH3OH) in an ultra-high vacuum chamber at 20 K. The analysis was made by infrared spectrometry in the mid-infrared region (4000-800 cm-1 or 2.5-12.5 μm). Results: The absolute dissociation cross-sections of the parent molecules, the formation cross-section of daughter species, and the half-life of the parental species in a simulated Enceladus irradiation scenario were determined. Among the produced species, CO (carbon monoxide), OCN- (cyanate anion), HCONH2 (formamide), and H2CO (formaldehyde) were tentatively detected.

  19. Cold Regions Logistic Supportability Testing of Construction, Support and Service Equipment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    0.1 second (less than 1% error) Temperature measuring devices +10 Qt(+2 Anemometer +2% 2.4 References 2.4.1 Army Regulation 70-101, Test and... measurement and diagnostic equipment (TMDE) and the adequacy of new equipment training are continually being evaluated. The following is a brief...presented in appendix D. a. Data Required. The demonstrated quantitative measures of the logistic supportaility are recorded within this subelement. To

  20. Common garden experiments to characterize cold acclimation responses in plants from different climatic regions.

    PubMed

    Malyshev, Andrey V; Henry, Hugh A L; Kreyling, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Cold acclimation is a crucial factor to consider in the context of ongoing climate change. Maladaptation with regard to frost damage and use of the growing season may occur depending on cold acclimation cues. Importance of photoperiod and preceding temperatures as cues needs therefore to be evaluated within (ecotypes) and among species. Common garden designs, in particular the (1) establishment of multiple common gardens along latitudinal/altitudinal gradients, (2) with in situ additional climate manipulations and (3) with manipulations in climate chambers are proposed as tools for the detection of local adaptations and relative importance of temperature and photoperiod as cues for cold adaptation. Here, we discuss issues in species and ecotype selection, establishment of common gardens including manipulations of temperature and photoperiod, and quantification of cold adaptation.

  1. Understanding the Army Environmental Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Army and Depart- ment of Defense (DOD) positions; share ideas and innova - tions; leverage regional, state, and local environmental management resources...Department of the Army, major commands, and commanders world- wide, including leadership, focus, direction, and innova - tive solutions to the

  2. Identifying key hydrological and biochemical processes for predicting field scale nitrate and ammonia export in agricultural cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, D.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Wheater, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    Nutrient runoff from agricultural cold regions such as the Canadian Prairies is impairing the ecological function of regional lakes and contributing to massive algal blooms such as found in Lake Winnipeg. Improving catchment model predictions of nutrient export in cold regions requires a better understanding and representation of the main processes controlling nutrient exports at multiple scales. Popular state-of-the-art models often have deficient representation of processes at smaller scales and lack the temporal resolution required to capture important solute transport phenomena, such as preferential elution of ions from the melting snowpack, solute infiltration to frozen soils, and transport during rain-on-snow events. Important processes in the Canadian Prairies that are often neglected are wind redistributed snowpacks and the impacts of their heterogeneous snowcover depletion on nutrient transport. In this research, physical evidence from high frequency field measurements were used to develop a process-based nutrient model for field-scale prediction of nitrate-nitrite (NO3-NO2) and ammonia (NH3) concentrations in both spring snowmelt and summer rainfall driven runoff. The process-based, modular Cold Regions Hydrological Model (CRHM) was used to simulate the main hydrological drivers such as snow redistribution, snowmelt, infiltration into frozen and unfrozen soils, evapotranspiration and subsurface and surface runoff generation. Field observations and a model application to the South Tobacco Creek sub-basin of the Red River in Manitoba, Canada, suggests that the transport of nutrients can be divided in five phases of dominant transport mechanisms due to the available nutrient sources progressively changing from the snowpack to the thawing frozen soil during melt. The vertical distribution of nutrient in the snowpack also varies due to ion exclusion processes at the snow crystal-air interface. Such findings are an important step towards more accurate and

  3. Larger Units: Theater Army, Army Group, Field Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    LARGER UNITS: Theater Army, Army Group , Field Army St Fort LeawiivfoW, Kansas /A ’j>’" /\\(7 ’"VX <\\,» •«:-•$-(••’•.•->’-:-j Report...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1984 to 00-00-1984 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Larger Units: Theater Army, Army Group , Field Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Bibliography No. 4 LARGER UNITS: THEATER ARMY—ARMY GROUP —FIELD ARMY by LTC Gary L. Bounds Combat Studies Institute U.S. Army Command and General Staff

  4. Future Indonesia-East Timor Relations: An Analysis of the Regional Security Practices in the Cold War and After

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    Indonesia In the fourteenth century, long before the arrival of Dutch and Portuguese colonizers, the era of Majapahit rule the old Javanese Hindu...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. FUTURE INDONESIA -EAST TIMOR...from... to) ("DD MON YYYY") Title and Subtitle FUTURE INDONESIA -EAST TIMOR RELATIONS: AN ANALYSIS OF THE REGIONAL SECURITY PRACTICES IN THE COLD WAR

  5. Army Medical Imaging System - ARMIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-08

    The Army Medical Imaging System (ARMIS) would use optical data cards, discs and small computers to perform the required functions of image...a filmless medical imaging system based on stimulable x-ray phosphors and optical data cards. Advantages of the system would be elimination of film

  6. Ices on Mercury: Chemistry of volatiles in permanently cold areas of Mercury's north polar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Paige, D. A.; Siegler, M. A.; Harju, E. R.; Schriver, D.; Johnson, R. E.; Travnicek, P.

    2017-01-01

    Observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its flyby and orbital observations of Mercury in 2008-2015 indicated the presence of cold icy materials hiding in permanently-shadowed craters in Mercury's north polar region. These icy condensed volatiles are thought to be composed of water ice and frozen organics that can persist over long geologic timescales and evolve under the influence of the Mercury space environment. Polar ices never see solar photons because at such high latitudes, sunlight cannot reach over the crater rims. The craters maintain a permanently cold environment for the ices to persist. However, the magnetosphere will supply a beam of ions and electrons that can reach the frozen volatiles and induce ice chemistry. Mercury's magnetic field contains magnetic cusps, areas of focused field lines containing trapped magnetospheric charged particles that will be funneled onto the Mercury surface at very high latitudes. This magnetic highway will act to direct energetic protons, ions and electrons directly onto the polar ices. The radiation processing of the ices could convert them into higher-order organics and dark refractory materials whose spectral characteristics are consistent with low-albedo materials observed by MESSENGER Laser Altimeter (MLA) and RADAR instruments. Galactic cosmic rays (GCR), scattered UV light and solar energetic particles (SEP) also supply energy for ice processing. Cometary impacts will deposit H2O, CH4, CO2 and NH3 raw materials onto Mercury's surface which will migrate to the poles and be converted to more complex Csbnd Hsbnd Nsbnd Osbnd S-containing molecules such as aldehydes, amines, alcohols, cyanates, ketones, hydroxides, carbon oxides and suboxides, organic acids and others. Based on lab experiments in the literature, possible specific compounds produced may be: H2CO, HCOOH, CH3OH, HCO, H2CO3, CH3C(O)CH3, C2O, CxO, C3O2, CxOy, CH3CHO, CH3OCH2CH2OCH3, C2H6, CxHy, NO2, HNO2, HNO3, NH2OH, HNO, N2H2, N3, HCN, Na2O, Na

  7. Asphalt Concrete for Cold Regions, A Comparative Laboratory Study and Analysis of Mixtures Containing Soft and Hard Grades of Asphalt Cement,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    ilto n aggregate ................................................................................................. ... 4 4 . B razil test eq u ipm en...t .................................................................................................... 5 5. D iagram o f B razil test...80 B J1 DEMPSEY, J INGERSOLL, T CJOHNSON UNCLAS7SIFIED CRREL-80-5 N ’~EVEL. Asphalt concrete tor cold regions Cold DTIC o , ELECTE i i L MAR 2 5 1980

  8. Health assessment for Anniston Army Depot, Bynum, Calhoun County, Alabama, Region 4. CERCLIS No. AL3210020027. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-29

    The Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) facility, which occupies 15,200 acres in northeast Alabama, was originally an ammunition storage depot. Contaminants of concern include trichloroethylene (TCE), cis- and trans-dichloroethylene, methylene chloride, metals, and phenol in groundwater. Based on the available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances.

  9. Army Corps of Engineers and Gulf Region Division Contingency Contracting in Iraq/Afghanistan: Sustaining Civilian Voluntary Workforce

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    authority they need for the planning effort. In addition to a lack of specific guidance, data, and modeling tools, other 7 barriers included...shifting from the old “Institutional Army”6 model to a more modern “Operational Army” model , the Army acquisition workforce has found itself stretched thin... model . Respondents mention financial incentives most often as motivators for volunteering. This may be because the market research e-mail

  10. Characterization of cold hardiness in quince: potential pear rootstock candidates for northern pear production regions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The US pear industry lacks a size-controlling, precocious rootstock for pear production. Commercially available selections of quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.) have been reported to possess insufficient cold tolerance for northern latitude sites. Fifty in-situ clonal quince accessions with diverse orig...

  11. European cold wave during February 2012 and impacts in wine growing regions of Moldavia (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planchon, Olivier; Quénol, Hervé; Irimia, Liviu; Patriche, Cristi

    2015-05-01

    A severe cold wave hits a large part of Europe between late January and mid-February 2012 and caused damages in the vineyard of Moldavia in Northeastern Romania. During the cold wave, the daily minimum temperature fell near -30 °C at some weather stations in Moldavia, but the hilly terrain caused strong temperature differences at small scales: up to 10 °C in a few kilometres. Three main cold spells with very low minimum temperatures were identified in association with the succession of three circulation types (according to the Hess-Brezowsky classification): Fennoscandian high anticyclonic (HFA, January 29-February 4), Central European ridge (BM, February 5-7) and northeast anticyclonic NEA (NEA, February 8-11). A multi-scale agroclimatic analysis in the vineyard of Cotnari (Moldavia, Romania) was carried out in the particular meteorological context of the early 2012 European cold wave. The results especially pointed out the local-scale (topoclimatic) effects on the high spatial variability of temperature and consequently a contrasting spatial distribution of damage on grape vine. The analysis of data recorded from temperature loggers installed in several test sites in the vineyard of Cotnari, depending on its topographical features, and of the observations of frost damage on grape vines (on vine buds, vine canes and even vine arms and trunks) pointed out a significant correlation between the topographic position and the grape vine variety.

  12. Precise Landslide Displacement Time Series from Continuous GPS Observations in Tectonically Active and Cold Regions: A Case Study in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddus, Y.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past 15 years, Global Positioning System (GPS) has been frequently used as a scientific tool to detect potential earth mass movements and to track creeping landslides. In this study, we investigated four-years of continuous GPS data (September 2006-July 2010) recorded at a landslide site in Alaska. This GPS station (AC55) was installed on an un-identified creeping site by the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) project, which was funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation. The landslide moves with a steady horizontal velocity of 5.5 cm/year toward NEE, and had a subsidence rate of 2.6 cm/year. There was a considerable correlation between annual snow loading and melting cycles and seasonal variations of the landslide displacements. The seasonal movements vary year to year with an average peak-to-peak amplitude of 1.5 cm and 1.0 cm in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. This study addresses three challenging issues in applying GPS for landslide monitoring in tectonically active and cold regions. The three challenges include (1) detecting GPS-derived positions that could be contaminated by the snow and ice accumulated on GPS antennas during cold seasons, (2) establishing a precise local reference frame and assessing its accuracy, and (3) excluding local seasonal ground motions from GPS-derived landslide displacements. The methods introduced in this study will be useful for GPS landslide monitoring in other tectonically active and/or cold regions.

  13. Army dreamers.

    PubMed

    1988-05-14

    The birth of the Army Nursing Service took place in 1854, when Florence Nightingale, at the request of the Secretary of State for War, recruited and took to Scutari Hospital 38 women to tend the wounded of the Crimean war.

  14. [An apothecary from the Cévennes region on the rolls of Oriental Pyrenees Army in 1793].

    PubMed

    Guibert, Marie-Sophie

    2015-01-01

    In 1793 during the french Revolution, the decret of February 23rd orders a big recruitment of 300 000 people. The city of Alès (Cevennes) has to supply ninety-seven soldiers to establish the battalion of the Gard. They will be allocated to the "Armée des Pyrénées-Orientales" (Army of the Eastern Pyrenees) which is going to defend the border with Spain. These armies have to face the influx of wounded persons but especially the devastation of the epidemics. Besides the soldiers, are enlisted the officers of health, the doctors, the surgeons and the pharmacists. So the city of Alès indicates to be of use to this army the youngest of the doctors, freshly honed of the university of Montpellier and two old pharmacists (51 y. and 61 y. old). They were allocated to the hospital of Narbonne where they worked to fight against the epidemics, in particular by the disinfection of rooms. The oldest of them succumbed to the disease. Two others, safe and sound income in their home town, played a notables' role.

  15. Army Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    SOLDIER PUBLIC AFFAIRS 16 COMMON OPERATING ENVIRONMENT Sensors move the Army one step closer to foundational software architecture . BY EDRIC THOMPSON...coming from smart sensors continues to be a scientific chal- lenge. Researchers are developing solutions to introduce a common architecture that...pressure and cognitive delays from lack of sleep . The Chief of Staff of the Army vision has mentioned, “Our modernization programs will remain

  16. Storms or cold fronts: what is really responsible for the extreme waves regime in the Colombian Caribbean coastal region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, L. J.; Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Ruiz-Merchan, J. K.; Higgins, A. E.; Henriquez, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the contribution and importance of cold fronts and storms to extreme waves in different areas of the Colombian Caribbean in an attempt to determine the extent of the threat posed by the flood processes to which these coastal populations are exposed. Furthermore, the study wishes to establish the actions to which coastal engineering constructions should be subject. In the calculation of maritime constructions, the most important parameter is the height of the wave. For this reason, it is necessary to establish the design wave height to which a coastal engineering structure should be resistant. This wave height varies according to the return period considered. The significant height values for the areas focused on in the study were calculated in accordance with Gumbel's extreme value methodology. The methodology was evaluated using data from the reanalysis of the spectral National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WAVEWATCH III® (WW3) model for 15 points along the 1600 km of the Colombian Caribbean coastline (continental and insular) between the years 1979 and 2009. The results demonstrated that the extreme waves caused by tropical cyclones and those caused by cold fronts have different effects along the Colombian Caribbean coast. Storms and hurricanes are of greater importance in the Guajira Peninsula (Alta Guajira). In the central area (consisting of Baja Guajira, and the cities of Santa Marta, Barranquilla, and Cartagena), the strong impact of cold fronts on extreme waves is evident. However, in the southern region of the Colombian Caribbean coast (ranging from the Gulf of Morrosquillo to the Gulf of Urabá), the extreme values of wave heights are lower than in the previously mentioned regions, despite being dominated mainly by the passage of cold fronts. Extreme waves in the San Andrés and Providencia insular region present a different dynamic from

  17. Blasting and Blast Effects in Cold Regions. Part 3. Explosions in Ground Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    Laboratory. The work was done under DA Project 4A762730AT42, Design, Construction, and Operations Technology for Cold Re,-ions; Task Area CS, Combat...strength. This can affect the economics of a large- the limited data for frozen materials have to be in- scale mining operation that is efficient...rocks and soils. dinary blasting operations for excavation and con- In this report, explosion effects in solid ground struction. materials are

  18. A reassessment of surface friction model for maximum cold fusion reactions in superheavy mass region

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, A.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M.; Nasirov, A.; Aritomo, Y.

    2007-02-26

    We have made a study on the capture process of 40,48Ca+ 208Pb systems with a dynamical approach based on the surface friction model. The deformation of the nuclei due to the mutual excitation is taken into account. We have calculated the capture cross sections for several values of the friction coefficients. It was shown that, in the cold fusion reactions, the friction parameters of the surface friction model needs to be reexamined.

  19. Bibliography on Cold Regions Science and Technology. Volume 40, Part 1, 1986

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    by the large stature of the plants, because of increased annual productivity of aenal parts, and by the deep green color of the leaves resulting...Wave propaga- tion. 40-335 Arctic hydro-climatic measurements and database— associate to the hydro-power Investigations In Green - land. Andersen...Simulated physical effects uf shallow soil heat extrac - tion. Lundin, L.-C, Cold rtgions science and tcchnulogy. July 1985, 11(1), p.45-61, 21 refs Soil

  20. QUANTITATIVE CHANGES IN REGIONAL CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW INDUCED BY COLD, HEAT AND ISCHEMIC PAIN: A CONTINUOUS ARTERIAL SPIN LABELING STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Frölich, Michael A.; Deshpande, Hrishikesh; Ness, Timothy; Deutsch, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Background The development of arterial spin labeling methods, has allowed measuring regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) quantitatively and to show the pattern of cerebral activity associated with any state such as a sustained pain state or changes due to a neurotropic drug. Methods We studied the differential effects of three pain conditions in ten healthy subjects on a 3T scanner during resting baseline, heat, cold and ischemic pain using continuous arterial spin labeling. Results Cold pain showed the greatest absolute rCBF increases in left anterior cingulate cortex, left amygdala, left angular gyrus, and Brodmann Area 6, and a significant rCBF decrease in the cerebellum. Changes in rCBF were characteristic of the type of pain condition: cold and heat pain showed increases, while the ischemic condition showed a reduction in mean absolute gray matter flow compared to rest. An association of subjects’ pain tolerance and cerebral blood flow was noted. Conclusions The observation that quantitative rCBF changes are characteristic of the pain task employed and that there is a consistent rCBF change in Brodman area 6, an area responsible for the integration of a motor response to pain, should provide extremely useful information in the quest to develop an imaging biomarker of pain. Conceivably, response in BA6 may serve as an objective measure of analgesic efficacy. PMID:22913924

  1. Army - Air Force Cooperation: Looking Backward to Move Forward

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-26

    were successful. The same year, the end of the Cold War eliminated the Soviet Union as the peer competitor AirLand Battle was designed to defeat...Since the end of the Cold War the Army and the Air Force have been transforming themselves to meet potential enemies of the future. The strategic...17 The Post- Cold War Era, 1991-Present

  2. Regional methamphetamine use among U.S. Army personnel stationed in the continental United States and Hawaii: a six-year retrospective study (2000-2005).

    PubMed

    Lacy, Benjamin W; Ditzler, Thomas F; Wilson, Raymond S; Martin, Thomas M; Ochikubo, Jon T; Roussel, Robert R; Pizarro-Matos, Jose M; Vazquez, Raymond

    2008-04-01

    Substance use disorders constitute a serious and persistent threat to military readiness and to the health and safety of military personnel and their families. Methamphetamine is among the most addictive and damaging of commonly abused drugs; this is of great concern for military health providers in Hawaii due to the unusually high prevalence in the local community. The effect of regional drug use on active duty subpopulations has not been previously studied. This study includes a 6-year retrospective sample of laboratory-confirmed methamphetamine-, cocaine-, and marijuana-positive drug tests among Army soldiers stationed in Hawaii and western and eastern continental U.S. installations. The findings suggest that active duty members are significantly affected by the local drug climate. However, current military drug policies also deter use as evidenced by low absolute drug-positive rates even in regions of high civilian prevalence.

  3. Health assessment for Savanna Army Depot, Savanna, Carroll County, Illinois, Region 5. CERCLIS No. IL0213820376. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-19

    The Savanna Army Depot Activity (SADA) is on the National Priorities List. The 13,000-acre facility is an Army munitions plant engaged in munitions renovation and loading, and demolition and burning. About 20 areas within the facility have been identified as potential sources of hazardous waste. The environmental contamination on-site (maximum concentrations reported) consists of chloroform (20 ppb), trinitrotoluene or TNT (29 percent), trinitrobenzene or TNB (2,770 ppb), 2,6-dinitrotoluene or 2,6-DNT (1,400 ppb), 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (300,000 ppb), and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (94,200 ppb) in sediment; TNB (1,400 ppb), TNT (314 ppb), 2,4-DNT (113 ppb), trichloroethylene or TCE (20 ppb), chloroform (20 ppb), and nickel (185 ppb) in ground water; TNT (50 percent), 2,4-DNT (673 ppb), and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine or RDX (12,300 ppb), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs (greater than 59,000,000 ppb) in soil; and RDX (36,900 ppb) and TNT (16,600 ppb) in surface water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ground water, surface water, soil, sediment, and air.

  4. Bibliography on Cold Regions Science and Technology. Volume 52. Part 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    tunnel model studies of roof snow loads resulting basin [1997, eng] 52-5537 52-5657 from multiple snowstorms [1997, eag] 52-318 Mitro France Michell , FL...P.FJ. Vachon ,P.W. Palaeolithic landscapes of Europe and environs, 150,000- Comment on "On the magnitude of transport out of the Satellite...Dependence of surface albedo in the Arctic on surface charae- [1997,eng] 52-1575 Plan now for cold-weather operation of cooling towers. Michell , teristics

  5. Improvement through low cost biofilm carrier in anaerobic tubular digestion in cold climate regions.

    PubMed

    Martí-Herrero, J; Alvarez, R; Rojas, M R; Aliaga, L; Céspedes, R; Carbonell, J

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the increase of biogas production with low cost tubular digesters in cold climates using PET rings inside the reactor. Two similar digesters have been operated and monitored in cold weather conditions and have been fed with cow manure. Digester 1 was filled with PET - rings as a biofilm carrier, Digester 2 was kept as a reference. Through the PET - rings the functional surface could be increased by a factor 4.2. The results show that 44% more biogas per Kg SV has been produced with the biofilm carrier in use (0.33 m(3)/kg SV) (reference digester -0.23 m(3)/kg SV), at an organic load rate of 0.26 kg SV/m(3)/d. The thermal performance shows that with an adaptation of the low cost tubular digester the slurry temperature can be raised up to 16.6°C (average) by surrounding temperature of 6.1°C (average) without using any active heating system.

  6. Modelling and Analysis of Hydrodynamics and Water Quality for Rivers in the Northern Cold Region of China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Gula; Zhu, Yunqiang; Wu, Guozheng; Li, Jing; Li, Zhao-Liang; Sun, Jiulin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the Mudan River, which is the most typical river in the northern cold region of China was selected as the research object; Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) was adopted to construct a new two-dimensional water quality model for the urban sections of the Mudan River, and concentrations of CODCr and NH3N during ice-covered and open-water periods were simulated and analyzed. Results indicated that roughness coefficient and comprehensive pollutant decay rate were significantly different in those periods. To be specific, the roughness coefficient in the ice-covered period was larger than that of the open-water period, while the decay rate within the former period was smaller than that in the latter. In addition, according to the analysis of the simulated results, the main reasons for the decay rate reduction during the ice-covered period are temperature drop, upstream inflow decrease and ice layer cover; among them, ice sheet is the major contributor of roughness increase. These aspects were discussed in more detail in this work. The model could be generalized to hydrodynamic water quality process simulation researches on rivers in other cold regions as well. PMID:27070631

  7. Modelling and Analysis of Hydrodynamics and Water Quality for Rivers in the Northern Cold Region of China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gula; Zhu, Yunqiang; Wu, Guozheng; Li, Jing; Li, Zhao-Liang; Sun, Jiulin

    2016-04-08

    In this study, the Mudan River, which is the most typical river in the northern cold region of China was selected as the research object; Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) was adopted to construct a new two-dimensional water quality model for the urban sections of the Mudan River, and concentrations of COD(Cr) and NH₃N during ice-covered and open-water periods were simulated and analyzed. Results indicated that roughness coefficient and comprehensive pollutant decay rate were significantly different in those periods. To be specific, the roughness coefficient in the ice-covered period was larger than that of the open-water period, while the decay rate within the former period was smaller than that in the latter. In addition, according to the analysis of the simulated results, the main reasons for the decay rate reduction during the ice-covered period are temperature drop, upstream inflow decrease and ice layer cover; among them, ice sheet is the major contributor of roughness increase. These aspects were discussed in more detail in this work. The model could be generalized to hydrodynamic water quality process simulation researches on rivers in other cold regions as well.

  8. An integrated numerical framework for water quality modelling in cold-region rivers: A case of the lower Athabasca River.

    PubMed

    Shakibaeinia, Ahmad; Kashyap, Shalini; Dibike, Yonas B; Prowse, Terry D

    2016-11-01

    There is a great deal of interest to determine the state and variations of water quality parameters in the lower Athabasca River (LAR) ecosystem, northern Alberta, Canada, due to industrial developments in the region. As a cold region river, the annual cycle of ice cover formation and breakup play a key role in water quality transformation and transportation processes. An integrated deterministic numerical modelling framework is developed and applied for long-term and detailed simulation of the state and variation (spatial and temporal) of major water quality constituents both in open-water and ice covered conditions in the lower Athabasca River (LAR). The framework is based on the a 1D and a 2D hydrodynamic and water quality models externally coupled with the 1D river ice process models to account for the cold season effects. The models are calibrated/validated using available measured data and applied for simulation of dissolved oxygen (DO) and nutrients (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus). The results show the effect of winter ice cover on reducing the DO concentration, and a fluctuating temporal trend for DO and nutrients during summer periods with substantial differences in concentration between the main channel and flood plains. This numerical frame work can be the basis for future water quality scenario-based studies in the LAR.

  9. Health assessment for Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Grand Island, Nebraska, Region 7. CERCLIS No. NE2213820234. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-31

    The Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant is listed on the National Priorities List. The government-owned plant is located 2 miles west of Grand Island, Nebraska, and occupies 18.7 square miles. During World War II and the Korean and Vietnamese conflicts, the plant was operated by contractors for the production of conventional munitions. The primary contaminants that have been identified are cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its impurities/degradation products: 2,4-dinitrotoluene (24DNT), 2,6-dinitrotoluene (26DNT), and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (135TNB). The site is considered to be of potential health concern because of the risk to human health caused by possible exposure to hazardous substances via contact with on-site contaminated soils and the use of contaminated ground water for the irrigation of consumable crops and livestock watering.

  10. A comprehensive evaluation of high friction overlay systems on bridge decks in cold climate regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostick, Robert D.

    In recent history the Minnesota Department of Transportation has looked to improve the safety of bridge decks by installing high friction overlays (HFO). A comprehensive study researched four different proprietary HFO systems placed on fourteen bridge decks throughout Minnesota. Research was split into three separate tasks: (1) laboratory testing of aggregate properties, (2) field observations and testing, and (3) a comprehensive analysis of crash data investigated crash rates on bridges with HFO systems. Field observations and testing revealed that the use of snowplows quickly abrades HFO systems. Abrasion, among other factors, causes a reduction in surface friction values, and reduces the life of HFO systems. Furthermore, improving crash rate trends cannot be directly correlated to the installation of HFO systems. Research concludes that HFO systems should not be used in Minnesota. Other cold climate transportation agencies should conduct research emulated after this study to assess HFO systems in their jurisdiction.

  11. Bibliography on Cold Regions Science and Technology, Volume 45, Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    94 , enM 45-2653 On the use of brine and high-density immiscible liquis fo Lynch, DL acay D sryice removal (19,p.575-581, cog] liquis6fo 2-13 micron...parameters in a forced air stream [ 199 1, pt.383-393, eng] 45-9% Cold temperature properties of polymer-modified asphalt p. 1009-1017, eng] 45-3022 Palm ...and 1989 t1 99 1, 78p., nor3 45-3856 water (1 9 9 1, p.681 6 - 68 2 6, eng] 45.2776 1989. Data report E1 99 0 , 122p., eng3 451 Ost-eng, W. Palms , T

  12. The Changing Cold Regions Network: Atmospheric, Cryospheric, Ecological and Hydrological Change in the Saskatchewan and Mackenzie River Basins, Canada (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.; DeBeer, C.

    2013-12-01

    The cold interior of Northwestern Canada has one of the world's most extreme and varied climates and, as with other regions across the Arctic, is experiencing rapid environmental change. The Changing Cold Regions Network (CCRN) is a new Canadian research network devoted to addressing key challenges and globally-important issues facing the Arctic by improving the understanding of past and ongoing changes in climate, land, vegetation, and water, and predicting their future integrated responses, with a geographic focus on the Saskatchewan and Mackenzie River Basins. The network is funded for 5 years (2013-18) by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and combines the unique expertise of 36 Canadian scientists representing 8 universities and 4 Federal government agencies, as well as 15 international researchers from the United States, China, Australia, the UK, France, and Germany. The network will also involve the World Climate Research Programme, NASA, the Canadian Space Agency, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. CCRN will integrate existing and new experimental data with modelling and remote sensing products to understand, diagnose and predict changing land, water and climate, and their interactions and feedbacks, for Northwestern Canada's cold interior. It will use a network of world class observatories to study the detailed connections among changing climate, ecosystems and water in the permafrost regions of the Sub-arctic, the Boreal Forest, the Western Cordillera, and the Prairies. Specifically, the network will: 1. Document and evaluate observed Earth system change, including hydrological, ecological, cryospheric and atmospheric components over a range of scales from local observatories to biome and regional scales; 2. Improve understanding and diagnosis of local-scale change by developing new and integrative knowledge of Earth system processes, incorporating these processes into a suite of process-based integrative

  13. Intercomparison of Global Reanalyses and Regional Simulations of Cold Season Water Budgets in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun; Han, Jongil; Roads, John O.

    2003-12-01

    Estimating water budgets of river basins in the western U.S. is a challenge because of the effects of complex terrain and lack of comprehensive observational datasets. This study aims at understanding the uncertainty in estimating water budgets of the Columbia River (CRB) and Sacramento-San Joaquin (SSJ) River basins. An intercomparison was performed based on the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis I (NRA1), NCEP/DOE Reanalysis II (NRA2), ECMWF reanalyses (ERA), regional climate simulations produced by the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) and NCEP Regional Spectral Model (RSM), and two precipitation datasets gridded at 2.5 and 1/8 degree for seven years between 1986 and 1993 to study the effects of spatial resolutions, model configurations and parameterizations, and large-scale conditions on basin-scale water budgets. Results showed that overall, the regional simulations were superior in terms of simulating the spatial distributions of mean precipitation and precipitation anomalies compared to the global reanalyses. However, cold season precipitation was generally amplified through downscaling using the regional models such that basin mean precipitations were typically higher than the observed, while the opposite was true for the reanalyses. The amplification was the largest in the RSM simulation driven by NRA2, which showed the biggest difference between the large-scale and regional-scale basin mean precipitations. ERA and the MM5 simulation driven by ERA provided the best basin mean precipitation estimates when compared to the 1/8o observational dataset.

  14. Restriction to large-scale gene flow vs. regional panmixia among cold seep Escarpia spp. (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae).

    PubMed

    Cowart, Dominique A; Huang, Chunya; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Carney, Susan L; Fisher, Charles R; Schaeffer, Stephen W

    2013-08-01

    The history of colonization and dispersal in fauna distributed among deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems remains enigmatic and poorly understood because of an inability to mark and track individuals. A combination of molecular, morphological and environmental data improves understanding of spatial and temporal scales at which panmixia, disruption of gene flow or even speciation may occur. Vestimentiferan tubeworms of the genus Escarpia are important components of deep -sea cold seep ecosystems, as they provide long-term habitat for many other taxa. Three species of Escarpia, Escarpia spicata [Gulf of California (GoC)], Escarpia laminata [Gulf of Mexico (GoM)] and Escarpia southwardae (West African Cold Seeps), have been described based on morphology, but are not discriminated through the use of mitochondrial markers (cytochrome oxidase subunit 1; large ribosomal subunit rDNA, 16S; cytochrome b). Here, we also sequenced the exon-primed intron-crossing Haemoglobin subunit B2 intron and genotyped 28 microsatellites to (i) determine the level of genetic differentiation, if any, among the three geographically separated entities and (ii) identify possible population structure at the regional scale within the GoM and West Africa. Results at the global scale support the occurrence of three genetically distinct groups. At the regional scale among eight sampling sites of E. laminata (n = 129) and among three sampling sites of E. southwardae (n = 80), no population structure was detected. These findings suggest that despite the patchiness and isolation of seep habitats, connectivity is high on regional scales.

  15. Tree-Ring Proxies of Hydroclimate Variability in the Great Lakes Region during Cold Excursions Back to 15ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyushkina, I. P.; Leavitt, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    A decade-long investigation of subfossil wood buried in glacio-fluvial, fluvial and lacustrine deposits from the U.S. Great Lakes region has resulted in a Great Lakes tree-ring network (GLTRN) comprising 47 sites dated from ca. 15 ka to 3ka. The GLTRN provides high-resolution proxies for exploration of local and regional responses to hydroclimate change at inter-annual scales during the transition from the Late Pleistocene to the Holocene. Classification of radiometric ages of GLTRN wood with relative cumulative-probability function delineates intervals and importance of hydrological changes in time and space. The overwhelming majority of wood burial events correlate with generally cold climate excursions. Forest-stand deterioration and tree mortality events at the studied sites are demonstrated to result from flooding, via river aggradation (identifying occurrence of extreme hydrologic events), rise of water table, or lake inundation. To better evaluate the special patterns of hydrological change back to 15ka, we developed four floating d13C chronologies from spruce tree rings. The length of these tree-ring proxy series that capture high-frequency moisture variability of the Great Lakes area ranges from 120 to 250 years. Our data indicate progressive wet intervals during the cold excursions precisely dated with 14C tree-ring wiggles at 13.7ka, 12.1ka, and 11.3ka that fall in the Bølling-Allerød and Pre-Boreal Interstadials, and Younger Dryas Stadial. The inter-annual and decadal variability of tree-ring moisture proxies are similar across the studied locations and time intervals. Such coherence of respective proxies may result from both local ecological stability of spruce communities or regional response to a common source of moisture at the studied time intervals and locations. This study demonstrates a potential of GLTRN proxies for modeling hydroclimatic changes at the North American continent back 15 ka.

  16. Sulfur biogeochemistry of cold seeps in the Green Canyon region of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formolo, Michael J.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2013-10-01

    Cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico provide a natural laboratory to study biogeochemical cycling of sulfur, carbon, and oxygen at hydrate- and hydrocarbon-rich deep marine settings with obvious additional relevance to studies of diverse modern and ancient seeps. Of particular interest are the sulfur isotope signatures of microbial sulfate reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane and other non-methane liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. Whereas most of the published sulfur isotope data from cold seep systems pertain to pore-water species, our study integrates both solid and dissolved sulfur: acid-volatile sulfides (SAVS), pyrite (Spy), elemental sulfur (S°), dissolved sulfate and ΣH2S. Modeled and 35SO42- reduction rates and δ13C and δ18O data for authigenic carbonates are integrated within this sulfur framework. Our results indicate extreme variability over narrow spatial and temporal scales within short distances (meters) from active seeps. High rates of microbial sulfate reduction can lead to complete consumption of the sulfate within the upper few centimeters of burial, while meters away the sulfate profile shows little depletion. Such small-scale variability must reflect the structure and temporal dynamics of hydrocarbon migration in the presence of low amounts of background organic matter. Our past work demonstrated that electron donors other than methane drive significant levels of microbial activity at these seeps, and very recent work has demonstrated that oxidation of higher chain volatile hydrocarbons can contribute to the high levels of microbial activity. These findings are consistent with our new results. Elevated concentrations of pyrite and diagenetic carbonate relative to background sediments are diagnostic of active seepage, yet the S isotopes tell more complex stories. Low levels of the transient, 'instantaneous' products of S cycling-AVS and S°-show high δ34S values that increase with depth. Most of the pyrite formation, however, seems

  17. Project COLD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Sacramento Army Depot, Operable Unit 4, Sacramento, CA. (Third remedial action), September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The 485-acre Sacramento Army Depot (SAAD) site is a military facility in Sacramento County, California. Land use in the area is predominantly commercial and light industrial, with wetlands in the vicinity of several oxidation lagoons. The estimated 56,398 people who live within 2 to 3 miles of the site use municipal water as their drinking water supply. From 1950 to 1972, the lagoons received mostly industrial waste water from metal plating processes and domestic wastewater. The selected remedial action for the site includes excavating and treating approximately 15,500 cubic yards of contaminated soil onsite using soil washing; dewatering and then backfilling the treated soil onsite in the excavation areas, and storing the rinsate temporarily in onsite holding tanks for recycling; treating rinsate from the treatment process using chemical precipitation, clarification/flocculation, and chemical coagulation to remove metals, prior to discharge into the sanitary sewer; dewatering the sludge containing the precipitated metals, and stabilizing this if necessary, followed by disposal in an RCRA landfill or recovery at an offsite reclamation unit. The estimated present worth cost for this remedial action is $5,020,000. There are no O M costs associated with the remedial action.

  19. Simplifications of Simulation on Energy Balances and Estimations of a Hybrid Renewable Energy System for Use in Cold Climate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Itoro Etim; Sasaki, Masafumi; Endoh, Noboru

    A simplified double grade meteorological data model for the simulation of the annual performance of a domestic-size renewable energy system is proposed. With the model, only two representative days (clearest and cloudiest) during each season of the year are necessary to estimate annual energy balances, carbon emissions and the running costs. The model was chosen in preference to other simplified models based on the error distributions from the results of the continuous simulations in a test period. Detailed numerical simulation studies show that the carbon emissions from the renewable energy system are about 16%of a comparable conventional system. The thermal energy produced by a solar collector during the winter season, however, is insufficient to meet all the loads so that frequent heat pump operations and the auxiliary boiler are necessary in cold climate regions.

  20. Cold War and the environment: the role of Finland in international environmental politics in the Baltic Sea region.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Tuomas; Laakkonen, Simo

    2007-04-01

    The Convention on the Protection of the Marine Environment of the Baltic Sea Area signed in 1974 in Helsinki is probably the most important environmental agreement consummated in the Baltic Sea region. This article is the first study that explores the history of this agreement, also known as the Helsinki Convention, by using primary archival sources. The principal sources are the archives of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland. We examine the role of Finland in the process that led to the signing of the Helsinki Convention from the perspective of international politics. The study focuses primarily on Finnish, Swedish, and Soviet state-level parties from the end of the 1960s to 1974. We show that Cold War politics affected in several ways negotiations and contents of the Helsinki Convention. We also argue that the Soviet Union used the emerging international environmental issues as a new tool of power politics.

  1. Army Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-07

    Army Robotics 07 October 2009 Dr. Grant Gerhart, Senior Research Scientist Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A... Robots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Grant Gerhart; Bernard Theisen 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...CBRNE • IED Defeat Systems • Disarm / Disrupt • Reconnaissance • Investigation • Explosive Sniffer • Common Robotic Kit • EOD • Convoy • Log

  2. Can constructed wetlands reduce the diffuse phosphorus loads to eutrophic water in cold temperate regions?

    PubMed

    Braskerud, B C; Tonderski, K S; Wedding, B; Bakke, R; Blankenberg, A-G B; Ulén, B; Koskiaho, J

    2005-01-01

    Construction of wetlands is a possible supplement to best management practices (BMP) at the field level to mitigate phosphorus (P) pollution from agricultural areas. In this paper, annual results from 17 intensively studied wetlands in the cold temperate or boreal climatic zone are reported and analyzed. Surface areas varied from 0.007 to 8.7% of the catchment area. The average total phosphorus (TP) retention varied from 1 to 88%, and the dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) retention from -19 to 89%. Retention varied substantially from site to site, indicating the existence of site-specific factors in the catchment and wetlands that influenced the P removal. Factors important for P retention in wetlands were evaluated through multiple statistical analyses by dividing P into two fractions: particulate phosphorus (PP) and DRP. Both relative (%) PP and DRP retention increased with wetland surface area. However, PP retention was not as sensitive as DRP in terms of wetland size and retention: specific PP retention (gram P retention per m(2) and year) decreased as wetland area (A(w)) increased, suggesting the existence of a site-specific optimal wetland to catchment area (A(c)) ratio. Particulate P retention decreased with increasing DRP to TP ratio, while the opposite was found for DRP. Dissolved reactive P retention was higher in new than in old wetlands, while increasing age did not influence PP retention negatively. Effective BMP in the catchment is important to keep the P loss low, because the outlet concentration of P from wetlands is often positively correlated to the input concentration. However, wetlands act as the last buffer in a catchment, since the retention often increases as the P concentration in streams increases.

  3. Hydrologic Assessment of Remotely Sensed High Resolution Precipitation Products over Cold-Mountainous Regions, and Analysis of the GPM Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrangi, A.; Andreadis, K.; Fisher, J. B.; Turk, F. J.; Painter, T. H.; Granger, S. L.; Das, N. N.; Stephens, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing of precipitation in mountainous and snow-fed basins is challenging, but critical for hydrometeorological applications and water resources management. This study is part of the ongoing effort to develop a Regional Hydrological Extremes Assessment System (RHEAS). Five commonly used satellite-based high-resolution precipitation products (HRPPs) over several basins in the mountainous western United States are investigated. The products (TRMM 3B42, TRMM 3B42-RT, CMORPH, PERSIANN, and PERSIANN-CCS) are analyzed using ground gauge and gauge-adjusted radar precipitation data. In order to diagnose the sources of errors, level 2 products are also explored (AMSR, AMSU, TRMM TMI, TRMM PR, and CloudSat). CloudSat provided useful insight on light rain and snowfall and was used as an additional resource to improve the analysis. For hydrologic assessment, the skill of HRPPs and the resulting streamflow simulations from the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model is cross-compared. It was found that over the mountainous west US basins, HRPPs often capture major precipitation events, but seldom capture the observed magnitude of precipitation, especially during winter when snowfall is dominant. Bias adjustment is found to be effective in enhancing the HRPPs and resulting streamflow simulations. The results using collocated AMSR-E, CloudSat, and AMSU suggest that current limitations in retrieving snowfall, precipitation from systems that lack frozen hydrometeors, and systems over frozen land contribute largely to the observed errors transferred to HRPPs. In light of the operation of the GPM mission, further opportunities for enhancing snowfall retrieval and hydrology of cold and mountainous regions are becoming available. We provide some initial assessment of the latest GPM observations and discuss about the impact of GPM over cold-mountainous basins.

  4. Human Adaptations to Heat and Cold Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    Heat and Cold Stress Michael N. Sawka, Ph.D. US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine 42 Kansas Street Natick, MA 01760-5007, USA John W...Castellani, Ph.D. US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine 42 Kansas Street Natick, MA 01760-5007, USA Kent B. Pandolf, Ph.D. US Army...Research Institute of Environmental Medicine 42 Kansas Street Natick, MA 01760-5007, USA Andrew J. Young, Ph.D. US Army Research Institute of Environmental

  5. Geomembrane applications for controlling diffusive migration of petroleum hydrocarbons in cold region environments.

    PubMed

    McWatters, Rebecca S; Rutter, Allison; Rowe, R Kerry

    2016-10-01

    Laboratory permeation tests examine the migration of aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX)) at 2, 7 and 14 °C through three different types of geomembrane (high density polyethylene (HDPE), linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)). Tests on both virgin and exhumed field samples provide permeation parameters (partitioning (Sgf), diffusion (Dg), and permeation (Pg) coefficients) for the three geomembranes. These results are combined with published values for the same geomembranes at 23 °C to establish an Arrhenius relationship that can be used to estimate diffusion parameters at temperatures other than those for which tests were conducted. Tests on an HDPE geomembrane sample exhumed after 3 years from a landfill site in the Canadian Arctic showed no significant difference in diffusion characteristics compared to an otherwise similar unaged and unexposed HDPE geomembrane. Contaminant transport modeling for benzene through HDPE, LLPDE and PVC in a simulated landfill cover show that for the conditions examined the presence of any of the three geomembranes below the 2 m thick soil cover substantially reduced the contaminant flux compared to the soils alone for realistic degrees of saturation in the cover soil. For these same realistic cold climate cases, of the three geomembranes examined, the HDPE geomembrane was the most effective at controlling the contaminant flux out of the landfill. An increase in soil cover and liner temperature by 2 °C (from potential climate change effects) above those currently measured at an Arctic landfill showed an increase in contaminant transport through the cover system for all geomembranes due to the increase surface temperature (especially in the summer months). Modeling of the addition of an extra 0.5 m of soil cover, as a mitigation measure for the effects of climate change, indicates that the main benefit of adding this unsaturated soil was to reduce the

  6. Controlling Factors of the Surface Energy and Water Balances in cities located in cold climate regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvi, L.; Grimmond, S. B.; Christen, A.; McFadden, J. P.; Strachan, I. B.

    2016-12-01

    Urban effects on climate are often pronounced in winter due to large anthropogenic heat releases and differences in snow cover between urban and surrounding rural areas. In this study, we simulate energy and water balances in cities characterized by cold winter climates with snow. Eleven urban sites from Helsinki (Finland), Basel (Switzerland), Montreal (Canada) and Minneapolis (USA) are analysed. The sites were selected based on the availability of either measured turbulent fluxes (from eddy covariance) or surface runoff to be used for model evaluation. The sites vary with respect to land cover fractions, irrigation habits and population densities. For example, the plan area fraction of impervious surface varies from 5% in Minneapolis to 84% in Basel. To simulate urban energy and water balances, we use the Surface Urban Energy and Water balance Scheme (SUEWS) model, which has been designed to minimize the number of required input variables and model parameters. For each site, the model is run in an offline mode using measured hourly meteorological data with a time step of 5-min. As the modelled time periods range from one (Basel) to 7.5 years (Helsinki), a wide range of meteorological conditions occur. Our results show how both evaporation and surface runoff are highly dependent on the fraction of impervious surface cover (r > |0.8|) during snow-free periods. However, high year-to-year variability in simulated evaporation and runoff indicates that climatological factors are also important. In winter, the amount and duration of snow cover become import controlling factor in determining the two components of water balance. The shorter the snow cover period is, the larger the cumulative runoff tends to be. Thus, our results suggest that warmer winters with less snow will increase the stress on drainage systems and modify the urban ecosystem via changes in evaporation and Bowen ratio. Also, our results indicate that simply using the fraction of impervious or pervious

  7. EXPERIENCE IN REDUCING ELECTRON CLOUD AND DYNAMIC PRESSURE RISE IN WARM AND COLD REGIONS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; AHRENS,L.; ALLESI, J.; BAI, M.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; DREES, A.; FISCHER, W.; GULLOTTA, J.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; HUANG, H.; LEE, R.; LITVINENKO, V.; MACKAY, W.W.; MONTAG, C.; NICOLETTI, A.; OERTER, B.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; SATOGATA, T.; SMART, L.; SYNDSTRUP, L.; TEPIKIAN, S.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; WEI, J.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-23

    The large scale application of non-evaporable getter coating in RHIC has been effective in reducing the electron cloud. Since beams with higher intensity and smaller bunch spacing became possible in operation, the emittance growth is of concern. Study results are reported together with experiences of machine improvements: saturated NEG coatings, anti-grazing ridges in warm sections, and the pre-pumping in cryogenic regions.

  8. On improving cold region hydrological processes in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganji, Arman; Sushama, Laxmi; Verseghy, Diana; Harvey, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Regional and global climate model simulated streamflows for high-latitude regions show systematic biases, particularly in the timing and magnitude of spring peak flows. Though these biases could be related to the snow water equivalent and spring temperature biases in models, a good part of these biases is due to the unaccounted effects of non-uniform infiltration capacity of the frozen ground and other related processes. In this paper, the treatment of frozen water in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS), which is used in the Canadian regional and global climate models, is modified to include fractional permeable area, supercooled liquid water and a new formulation for hydraulic conductivity. The impact of these modifications on the regional hydrology, particularly streamflow, is assessed by comparing three simulations performed with the original and two modified versions of CLASS, driven by atmospheric forcing data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis (ERA-Interim) for the 1990-2001 period over a northeast Canadian domain. The two modified versions of CLASS differ in the soil hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations, with one version being based on formulations from a previous study and the other one is newly proposed. Results suggest statistically significant decreases in infiltration and therefore soil moisture during the snowmelt season for the simulation with the new hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations and fractional permeable area concept compared to the original version of CLASS, which is also reflected in the increased spring surface runoff and streamflows in this simulation with modified CLASS over most of the study domain. The simulated spring peaks and their timing in this simulation are also in better agreement to those observed. This study thus demonstrates the importance of treatment of frozen water for realistic simulation of streamflows.

  9. Characteristics of organic soil in black spruce forests: Implications for the application of land surface and ecosystem models in cold regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yi, S.; Manies, K.; Harden, J.; McGuire, A.D.

    2009-01-01

    Soil organic layers (OL) play an important role in landatmosphere exchanges of water, energy and carbon in cold environments. The proper implementation of OL in land surface and ecosystem models is important for predicting dynamic responses to climate warming. Based on the analysis of OL samples of black spruce (Picea mariana), we recommend that implementation of OL for cold regions modeling: (1) use three general organic horizon types (live, fibrous, and amorphous) to represent vertical soil heterogeneity; (2) implement dynamics of OL over the course of disturbance, as there are significant differences of OL thickness between young and mature stands; and (3) use two broad drainage classes to characterize spatial heterogeneity, as there are significant differences in OL thickness between dry and wet sites. Implementation of these suggestions into models has the potential to substantially improve how OL dynamics influence variability in surface temperature and soil moisture in cold regions. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophys.ical Union.

  10. Large Scale Observatories for Changing Cold Regions - Recent Progress and Future Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Carey, S. K.; DeBeer, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Observatories are at the core of hydrological science and a critical resource for the detection and analysis of environmental change. The combination of multiple pressures on the water environment and new scientific opportunities provides a context where a broader vision is urgently needed. Human activities are increasingly affecting land and water management at multiple scales, so our observatories now need to more fully include the human dimensions of water, including their integration across jurisdictional boundaries and at large basin scales. And large scales are also needed to diagnose and predict impacts of climate change at regional and continental scales, and to address land-water-atmosphere interactions and feedbacks. We argue the need to build on the notable past successes of the World Climate Research Programme and move forward to a new era of globally-distributed large scale observatories. This paper introduces 2 such observatories in rapidly warming western Canada - the 405,000 km2 Saskatchewan and the 1.8 million km2 Mackenzie river basins. We review progress in these multi-scale observatories, including the use of point and small basin-scale observatory sites to observe and diagnose complex regional patterns of hydrological change. And building on new opportunities for observational systems and data assimilation, we present a vision for a pan-Canadian observing system to support the science needed for the management of future societal risk from extreme events and environmental change.

  11. Venezuelan equine encephalitis and Oropouche virus infections among Peruvian army troops in the Amazon region of Peru.

    PubMed

    Watts, D M; Lavera, V; Callahan, J; Rossi, C; Oberste, M S; Roehrig, J T; Cropp, C B; Karabatsos, N; Smith, J F; Gubler, D J; Wooster, M T; Nelson, W M; Hayes, C G

    1997-06-01

    An outbreak of a febrile illness characterized by headache, ocular pain, myalgia, and arthralgia occurred during June 1994 among Peruvian army troops in Northern Peru. On June 14-16, 1994, clinical data and blood samples were obtained from eight soldiers with a febrile illness, and from 26 others who had a history of febrile illness during the past three months. A follow-up blood sample was obtained 107 days later from four of the febrile and seven of the afebrile soldiers. Serum samples were tested for dengue (DEN), Oropouche (ORO), and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) IgM and IgG antibodies by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Virus isolation was performed by inoculation of newborn mice and Vero cell cultures. Viral isolates were identified by immunofluorescence, ELISA, and nucleotide sequencing. A VEE virus infection was confirmed in three of the eight febrile soldiers, two by virus isolation, and one by serology. Antigenic analysis indicated that one of the virus isolates was similar to VEE subtype I, variety ID, viruses previously isolated in Colombia and Venezuela. Nucleotide sequence data showed that both viral isolates were identical to one another and closely related to VEE ID viruses previously isolated in Peru, Colombia, and Venezuela. Serologic results showed that two of 26 afebrile soldiers had IgM antibody to VEE and four had IgG antibody to VEE; two febrile soldiers had IgG antibody in their first serum samples. Oropouche-specific IgM antibody was detected in one of the eight febrile and five of the afebrile soldiers, and 18 of the 34 soldiers had low titers of ORO IgG antibody titers, which did not meet the diagnostic criteria for confirmed cases. All soldiers were negative for DEN IgM antibody, and 10 had flavivirus IgG antibody that reacted with DEN antigens. These data indicated that VEE ID virus was one of the causes of illness among Peruvians soldiers and that this was the first association of this VEE subtype with human disease

  12. The Impact of the Atlantic Cold Tongue on West African Monsoon Onset in Regional Model Simulations for 1998-2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyan, Leonard M.; Fulakeza, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    The Atlantic cold tongue (ACT) develops during spring and early summer near the Equator in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Guinea. The hypothesis that the ACT accelerates the timing of West African monsoon (WAM) onset is tested by comparing two regional climate model (RM3) simulation ensembles. Observed sea surface temperatures (SST) that include the ACT are used to force a control ensemble. An idealized, warm SST perturbation is designed to represent lower boundary forcing without the ACT for the experiment ensemble. Summer simulations forced by observed SST and reanalysis boundary conditions for each of five consecutive years are compared to five parallel runs forced by SST with the warm perturbation. The article summarizes the sequence of events leading to the onset of the WAM in the Sahel region. The representation of WAM onset in RM3 simulations is examined and compared to Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and reanalysis data. The study evaluates the sensitivity of WAM onset indicators to the presence of the ACT by analysing the differences between the two simulation ensembles. Results show that the timing of major rainfall events and therefore theWAM onset in the Sahel are not sensitive to the presence of the ACT. However, the warm SST perturbation does increase downstream rainfall rates over West Africa as a consequence of enhanced specific humidity and enhanced northward moisture flux in the lower troposphere.

  13. Diversity and cold adaptation of culturable endophytic fungi from bryophytes in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Li, Hai-Long; Su, Jing; Zhao, Li-Xun; Yu, Li-Yan

    2013-04-01

    Endophytic fungi associated with three bryophyte species in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica, that is, the liverwort Barbilophozia hatcheri, the mosses Chorisodontium aciphyllum and Sanionia uncinata, were studied by culture-dependent method. A total of 128 endophytic fungi were isolated from 1329 tissue segments of 14 samples. The colonization rate of endophytic fungi in three bryophytes species were 12.3%, 12.1%, and 8.7%, respectively. These isolates were identified to 21 taxa, with 15 Ascomycota, 5 Basidiomycota, and 1 unidentified fungus, based on morphological characteristics and sequence analyses of ITS region and D1/D2 domain. The dominant fungal endophyte was Hyaloscyphaceae sp. in B. hatcheri, Rhizoscyphus sp. in C. aciphyllum, and one unidentified fungus in S. uncinata; and their relative frequencies were 33.3%, 32.1%, and 80.0%, respectively. Furthermore, different Shannon-Weiner diversity indices (0.91-1.99) for endophytic fungi and low endophytic fungal composition similarities (0.19-0.40) were found in three bryophyte species. Growth temperature tests indicated that 21 taxa belong to psychrophiles (9), psychrotrophs (11), and mesophile (1). The results herein demonstrate that the Antarctic bryophytes are an interesting source of fungal endophytes and the endophytic fungal composition is different among the bryophyte species, and suggest that these fungal endophytes are adapted to cold stress in Antarctica.

  14. Lidar Temperature Measurements During the SOLVE Campaign and the Absence of PSCs from Regions of Very Cold Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; McGee, Thomas; Hoegy, Walt; Newman, Paul; Lait, Leslie; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Heaps, William; Hostetler, Chris; Neuber, Roland; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Airborne Raman Ozone, Temperature and Aerosol Lidar (AROTEL) measured extremely cold temperatures during all three deployments (December 1-16, 1999, January 14-29, 2000 and February 27-March 15, 2000) of the Sage III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE). Temperatures were significantly below values observed in previous years with large regions regularly below 191 K and frequent temperature retrievals yielding values at or below 187 K. Temperatures well below the saturation point of type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were regularly encountered but their presence was not well correlated with PSCs observed by the NASA Langley Research Center's Aerosol Lidar co-located with AROTEL. Temperature measurements by meteorological sondes launched within areas traversed by the DC-8 showed minimum temperatures consistent in time and vertical extent with those derived from AROTEL data. Calculations to establish whether PSCs could exist at measured AROTEL temperatures and observed mixing ratios of nitric acid and water vapor showed large regions favorable to PSC formation. On several occasions measured AROTEL temperatures up to 10 K below the NAT saturation temperature were insufficient to produce PSCs even though measured values of nitric acid and water were sufficient for their formation.

  15. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  16. Coupling of the simultaneous heat and water model with a distributed hydrological model and evaluation of the combined model in a cold region watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To represent the effects of frozen soil on hydrology in cold regions, a new physically based distributed hydrological model has been developed by coupling the simultaneous heat and water model (SHAW) with the geomorphology based distributed hydrological model (GBHM), under the framework of the water...

  17. Army Personnel System Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-12-01

    Allen Mr. Mike Redgrave PAMSIM Applied Research, Inc. OPXAA LTC Delyle Redmond Army Aviation OPAR LTC William Rousse Aviator Assignment OPXAA LTC Billy...Rutherford Army Aviation OPEN MAJ Thomas Sands Army Aviation OPAT LTC John Schnibben Army Aviation OPIN LTC Daniel Sharp Officer Assignment- DATCOM

  18. Element concentrations in cold-water gorgonians and black coral from Azores region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimundo, Joana; Vale, Carlos; Caetano, Miguel; Anes, Bárbara; Carreiro-Silva, Marina; Martins, Inês; Matos, Valentina de; Porteiro, Filipe M.

    2013-12-01

    Seamounts are thought to support high biodiversity and special biological communities, including corals. Corals incorporate minor and trace elements and have been suggested as possible bioindicators of their availability in the environment. Forty specimens of five gorgonian species (Alcyonacea) and a black coral (Antipatharia) were collected in 12 sites in the Azores region. Concentrations of Ca, Mg, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd and Pb were determined in skeleton and attached tissue of each individual from each species. Leiopathes sp. had higher Cr, Ni, Se and Pb concentrations than the gorgonians. Enhanced Cu and Cd values were registered in Leiopathes and Acanthogorgia hirsuta. Specimens of A. hirsuta also presented elevated concentrations of Zn and Co. Linear relationships between Cd and Cu, Zn and Se point to response mechanisms in corals, possibly related to the induction of proteins enlarging the capacity to incorporate further quantities of essential elements. Results obtained in this study suggest the existence of an additional source of Cd in waters off Azores Islands associated with natural hydrothermal activities.

  19. Development of An Enthalpy-based Frozen Soil Model and Its Validation in A Cold Region in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, H.

    2015-12-01

    A physically-based frozen soil model was developed based on the Water and Energy Budget-based Distributed Hydrological model (WEB-DHM) for the simulation of water and energy transfer in cold regions. In order to simulate the soil freezing/thawing processes stably and efficiently, a two-step algorithm is applied to solve the non-linear energy governing equations: 1) the thermal diffusion equation is used to simulate the heat fluxes between soil layers without considering liquid-ice phase change; 2) a freezing/thawing scheme is used to derive soil temperature, liquid water content and ice content from enthalpy conservation, mass conservation, and freezing point depression equations. In the algorithm, a parameterization set is adopted to update hydraulic and thermal properties by considering the presence of ice and low soil temperatures. The performance of the frozen soil model was validated at point scale in a typical mountainous permafrost region of Binggou Watershed, Heihe Basin, Northwest China. Results show that the model can achieve a convergent solution at a typical time step (hourly) and layer sizes (centimeters) of current land process models. It is able to reproduce the observed soil freezing/thawing processes and hydrological processes. The simulated profiles of soil temperature, liquid water content, ice content and thawing front depth are in good agreement with the observations and the characteristics of permafrost. The freeze-thaw cycle in frozen soil evolution was continuously represented by the contour map of soil temperature and ice content of all soil layers. Therefore, this model can be coupled with hydrological, ecological and climate models to deepen our physical understanding in permafrost regions.

  20. Advances in RUC LSM snow component to address cold biases in snow-covered regions in RAP and HRRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, T. G.; Benjamin, S.; Brown, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    RUC Land-Surface Model (LSM), a Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) LSM option, is used as a land surface component in the operational Rapid Refresh (RAP) over North America domain and in the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) over CONUS domain. It was also added to the land-surface model suite available in NASA Land Information System (LIS), and work has been started to implement it in the Next Generation Global Prediction System (NGGPS) as part of the RAP/HRRR physics suite. The RUC LSM performance has been evaluated for almost two decades within the real-time operational weather prediction systems focused on storm-scale predictions for severe weather and safer aviation. And in the recent couple of years it has been more and more extensively utilized by the WRF community in different parts of the world, including Arctic regions, and for different applications. Valuable feedback from the National Weather Prediction forecast offices and the WRF community has motivated further advances towards better representation of processes in snow-covered regions. The new treatment has been implemented for grid cells partially covered with snow. It considers snow-covered and non-snow-covered portions of a grid cell independently, and independently determined surface fluxes are aggregated to feed back into the surface-layer scheme at the end of each time step. This new "mosaic" approach removes the constraint of keeping skin temperature of partially covered with snow grid cells at or below the freezing point, and helps to reduce cold biases in these regions. Comparison results from experiments with the new and old approaches will be presented at the meeting. Also, techniques impemented in RAP/HRRR for optimal initialization of snow cover on the ground will be presented.

  1. Maturity group classification and maturity locus genotyping of early-maturing soybean varieties from high-latitude cold regions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongchang; Jiang, Bingjun; Wu, Cunxiang; Lu, Wencheng; Hou, Wensheng; Sun, Shi; Yan, Hongrui; Han, Tianfu

    2014-01-01

    With the migration of human beings, advances of agricultural sciences, evolution of planting patterns and global warming, soybeans have expanded to both tropical and high-latitude cold regions (HCRs). Unlike other regions, HCRs have much more significant and diverse photoperiods and temperature conditions over seasons or across latitudes, and HCR soybeans released there show rich diversity in maturity traits. However, HCR soybeans have not been as well classified into maturity groups (MGs) as other places. Therefore, it is necessary to identify MGs in HCRs and to genotype the maturity loci. Local varieties were collected from the northern part of Northeast China and the far-eastern region of Russia. Maturity group reference (MGR) soybeans of MGs MG000, MG00, and MG0 were used as references during field experiments. Both local varieties and MGR soybeans were planted for two years (2010-2011) in Heihe (N 50°15', E 127°27', H 168.5 m), China. The days to VE (emergence), R1 (beginning bloom) and R7 (beginning maturity) were recorded and statistically analyzed. Furthermore, some varieties were further genotyped at four molecularly-identified maturity loci E1, E2, E3 and E4. The HCR varieties were classified into MG0 or even more early-maturing. In Heihe, some varieties matured much earlier than MG000, which is the most early-maturing known MG, and clustered into a separate group. We designated the group as MG0000, following the convention of MGs. HCR soybeans had relatively stable days to beginning bloom from emergence. The HCR varieties diversified into genotypes of E1, E2, E3 and E4. These loci had different effects on maturity. HCRs diversify early-maturing MGs of soybean. MG0000, a new MG that matures much earlier than known MGs, was developed. HCR soybean breeding should focus more on shortening post-flowering reproductive growth. E1, E2, E3, and E4 function differentially.

  2. Cold Spray Aluminum for Magnesium Gearbox Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Cold Spray Aluminum for Magnesium Gearbox Repair Phillip F Leyman . US Army Research Laboratory Weapons & Materials Research Directorate...AND SUBTITLE Cold Spray Aluminum for Magnesium Gearbox Repair 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...tirogram ec ves • Develop the densest, thinnest, most corrosion resistant Aluminum -based Cold Spray coating ith th t t dh i b d t th tw e grea es

  3. Development of an enthalpy-based frozen soil model and its validation in a cold region in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiyi; Koike, Toshio; Yang, Kun; Wang, Lei; Shrestha, Maheswor; Lawford, Peter

    2016-05-01

    An enthalpy-based frozen soil model was developed for the simulation of water and energy transfer in cold regions. To simulate the soil freezing/thawing processes stably and efficiently, a three-step algorithm was applied to solve the nonlinear governing equations: (1) a thermal diffusion equation was implemented to simulate the heat conduction between soil layers; (2) a freezing/thawing scheme used a critical temperature criterion to judge the phase status and introduced enthalpy and total water mass into freezing depression equation to represent ice formation/melt and corresponding latent heat release/absorption; and (3) a water flow scheme was employed to describe the liquid movement within frozen soil. In addition, a parameterization set of hydraulic and thermal properties was updated by considering the frozen soil effect. The performance of the frozen soil model was validated at point scale in a typical mountainous permafrost basin of China. An ice profile initialization method is proposed for permafrost modeling. Results show that the model can achieve a convergent solution at a time step of hourly and a surface layer thickness of centimeters that are typically used in current land surface models. The simulated profiles of soil temperature, liquid water content, ice content and thawing front depth are in good agreement with the observations and the characteristics of permafrost. The model is capable of continuously reproducing the diurnal and seasonal freeze-thaw cycle and simulating frozen soil hydrological processes.

  4. Vernalization Requirement and the Chromosomal VRN1-Region can Affect Freezing Tolerance and Expression of Cold-Regulated Genes in Festuca pratensis

    PubMed Central

    Ergon, Åshild; Melby, Tone I.; Höglind, Mats; Rognli, Odd A.

    2016-01-01

    Plants adapted to cold winters go through annual cycles of gain followed by loss of freezing tolerance (cold acclimation and deacclimation). Warm spells during winter and early spring can cause deacclimation, and if temperatures drop, freezing damage may occur. Many plants are vernalized during winter, a process making them competent to flower in the following summer. In winter cereals, a coincidence in the timing of vernalization saturation, deacclimation, downregulation of cold-induced genes, and reduced ability to reacclimate, occurs under long photoperiods and is under control of the main regulator of vernalization requirement in cereals, VRN1, and/or closely linked gene(s). Thus, the probability of freezing damage after a warm spell may depend on both vernalization saturation and photoperiod. We investigated the role of vernalization and the VRN1-region on freezing tolerance of meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds.), a perennial grass species. Two F2 populations, divergently selected for high and low vernalization requirement, were studied. Each genotype was characterized for the copy number of one of the four parental haplotypes of the VRN1-region. Clonal plants were cold acclimated for 2 weeks or vernalized/cold acclimated for a total of 9 weeks, after which the F2 populations reached different levels of vernalization saturation. Vernalized and cold acclimated plants were deacclimated for 1 week and then reacclimated for 2 weeks. All treatments were given at 8 h photoperiod. Flowering response, freezing tolerance and expression of the cold-induced genes VRN1, MADS3, CBF6, COR14B, CR7 (BLT14), LOS2, and IRI1 was measured. We found that some genotypes can lose some freezing tolerance after vernalization and a deacclimation–reacclimation cycle. The relationship between vernalization and freezing tolerance was complex. We found effects of the VRN1-region on freezing tolerance in plants cold acclimated for 2 weeks, timing of heading after 9 weeks of

  5. Army War College Review: Student Publications. Volume 2, Issue 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    four post- Cold War presidents share three things in common with regard to the promotion of democracy: all embraced it as an American responsibility...United States Army Democracy Promotion in the Post- Cold War Era 11 Mr. Stewart C. Eales United States Department of State Public Disclosure...grand strategy since the Cold War strategy of Containment. He claims current U.S. policies towards Iran, Russia, and China remain unchanged—the

  6. Cold Regions Environmental Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-03

    Vegetation types in the subarctic are primarily forest-tundra, taiga , and open woodlands. The northern edge of the Subarctic MOE (the boundary between the...continuous discontinuous Soils (sediments, loess, dust) very limited limited abundant Vegetation (boreal forest, taiga ) not present not present present...you can hear and see exceptionally well over open snow-covered terrain. However, in a deep snow-covered forest ( taiga ), it becomes extremely dark

  7. Maturity Group Classification and Maturity Locus Genotyping of Early-Maturing Soybean Varieties from High-Latitude Cold Regions

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wencheng; Hou, Wensheng; Sun, Shi; Yan, Hongrui; Han, Tianfu

    2014-01-01

    Background With the migration of human beings, advances of agricultural sciences, evolution of planting patterns and global warming, soybeans have expanded to both tropical and high-latitude cold regions (HCRs). Unlike other regions, HCRs have much more significant and diverse photoperiods and temperature conditions over seasons or across latitudes, and HCR soybeans released there show rich diversity in maturity traits. However, HCR soybeans have not been as well classified into maturity groups (MGs) as other places. Therefore, it is necessary to identify MGs in HCRs and to genotype the maturity loci. Methods Local varieties were collected from the northern part of Northeast China and the far-eastern region of Russia. Maturity group reference (MGR) soybeans of MGs MG000, MG00, and MG0 were used as references during field experiments. Both local varieties and MGR soybeans were planted for two years (2010-2011) in Heihe (N 50°15′, E 127°27′, H 168.5 m), China. The days to VE (emergence), R1 (beginning bloom) and R7 (beginning maturity) were recorded and statistically analyzed. Furthermore, some varieties were further genotyped at four molecularly-identified maturity loci E1, E2, E3 and E4. Results The HCR varieties were classified into MG0 or even more early-maturing. In Heihe, some varieties matured much earlier than MG000, which is the most early-maturing known MG, and clustered into a separate group. We designated the group as MG0000, following the convention of MGs. HCR soybeans had relatively stable days to beginning bloom from emergence. The HCR varieties diversified into genotypes of E1, E2, E3 and E4. These loci had different effects on maturity. Conclusion HCRs diversify early-maturing MGs of soybean. MG0000, a new MG that matures much earlier than known MGs, was developed. HCR soybean breeding should focus more on shortening post-flowering reproductive growth. E1, E2, E3, and E4 function differentially. PMID:24740097

  8. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  9. Cold Urticaria

    MedlinePlus

    ... throat when consuming cold food or drink Severe reactions may include: A whole-body response (anaphylaxis), which ... to cold water. The majority of cold urticaria reactions occur when skin is exposed to temperatures lower ...

  10. Remotely sensing a cold region dune field using airborne LiDAR and high resolution aerial photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughman, C. A.; Jones, B. M.; Babcock, E.; Bodony, K. L.; Mann, D. H.; Larson, C. F.; Smith, J.

    2016-12-01

    Sand dunes and sheets respond to global and regional climatic changes, ecological succession, and disturbance events. Approximately 100,000 km2 of active and stable sand sheets occur in the Arctic and Subarctic today. These cold regions dunes are also subject to changes in permafrost conditions. Permafrost can influence soil moisture and vegetation, which then influences sand availability and transport. This study describes the morphometry and dynamics of the Nogahabara Dunes of interior Alaska's discontinuous permafrost zone and local permafrost conditions using 2015 airborne LiDAR, historic aerial photography, ground penetrating radar, and historical climate data. Average active dune height is 10 meters, with a maximum dune height of 28 meters. Dune spacing is approximately 130 meters. Where dunes are irregularly shaped and have variable orientation, dune spacing ranges from 40 to 200+ meters. Average dune migration between 1952 and 2015 is 63cm yr-1. Dune migration direction was variable; however, the predominant direction of movement was to the southeast. This agrees with historical wind records. Despite substantial within-field movement, the overall extent of the active dune field has not changed in 60 years. Small blow-out features were observed in the aftermath of fires that occurred in the vegetated portion of the dune field in 2015. Inferred reflectors in GPR data show that permafrost is present within the active dune field 2-4 meters below ground surface, but there does not appear to be any morphometric features directly related to permafrost. Depth-to-permafrost is shallower within the inactive dunes adjacent to the active dune field due to surface stability and cover by vegetation and insulating soil organics. Recent fire on the inactive dunes has the potential to reactivate dormant dunes through the degradation of underlying permafrost however long term monitoring will be required to validate this scenario. Acquisition of contemporary airborne Li

  11. Influence of site and soil properties on the DRIFT spectra of northern cold-region soils [Influence of site and soil properties on the mid-infrared spectra of northern cold-region soils

    DOE PAGES

    Matamala, Roser; Calderon, Francisco J.; Jastrow, Julie D.; ...

    2017-06-05

    information contained in MidIR spectra of bulk soil integrates the quantity and chemical composition of soil organic matter with soil forming factors and highlights the potential for using this information to assess the degradation state of organic matter stored in northern cold-region soils.« less

  12. Army Airmobility Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-03-01

    8217 - . . . ’ B s v ia l C p Best Available Copy DEPARTMENT OF THI ARMY "ARI FIELD UNIT. BENNING U ARMY HLSLARCH INSTITUTE FOR 7HE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES...and Army flare aircraft should be on station for immediate employment. Search light helicopters (Lightning Bug , see Glossary) may be used and assigned...may be provided by Lightning Bug aircraft or illuminating flares from mortars, artillery, or Air Force/Army aircraft. (2) Artillery should be used more

  13. Army Efficiency Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-28

    directed the military services to incorporate Total Quality Management ( TQM ) principles throughout their organizations. Beginning in 1992, Total Army...Quality (TAQ) was the Army’s new management philosophy, responding to the DOD TQM mandate. This was a significant change of the Army’s culture. In...business practices to meet the Army’s current challenges, it must be determined if TQM is an effective management tool and more importantly if TAQ is

  14. Army Posture Statement 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-14

    and overhead. We are now well underway in deploying the Lean Six Sigma methodology as a vehicle to seek continuous process improvement, eliminate...and morale. • Implemented Lean Six Sigma methodology within all Army Commands, Direct Reporting Units, Army Service Components of Joint Commands...between 2007 and 2013. • Implemented Lean Six Sigma methodology within all Army Commands, Direct Reporting Units, Army Service Components of Joint

  15. Cold-Air Pools and Regional Warming in the Lake Tahoe Region, Central Sierra Nevada of California—Observations and Considerations regarding the Future of Climate-Change Refugia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettinger, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Naturally occurring climate refugia, specifically in the form of cold-air pools (CAPs) in mountain basins, are increasingly discussed as potential safe havens against some impacts of global warming on western ecosystems and cold-adapted species. A key concern in these discussions should be: How will CAPs react to regional warming? Several broad possibilities exist: CAPs may "resist" regional warming, remaining as cool as ever despite warming of their surroundings. CAPs may "reflect" regional warming, experiencing temperature increases that are roughly equal to the warming of their surroundings but that leave the CAP as cool relative to their surroundings as ever. Or CAPs might "disintegrate" in the face of regional warming, losing their special cool status relative to surroundings and in the process warming much more than their surroundings. An evaluation of historical observations of wintertime cold-air pooling in the Lake Tahoe basin and adjacent Truckee drainage offers examples of CAPs that have resisted regional warming (Tahoe) and that have reflected regional warming (Truckee). These two CAP responses to warming suggest that no single fate awaits all CAPs in the Sierra Nevada. Rather, different CAPs will likely evolve in different ways, depending on their topographic configurations (e.g., closed vs draining basins), topographic depths, CAP areas, and even (in the case of the Tahoe basin) thermal conditions at the base of the CAP. These CAP examples also suggest a need for research on the possibility of equivalent future responses by other, non-CAP climate refugia in a warming world.

  16. Cold adaptations.

    PubMed

    Launay, Jean-Claude; Savourey, Gustave

    2009-07-01

    Nowdays, occupational and recreational activities in cold environments are common. Exposure to cold induces thermoregulatory responses like changes of behaviour and physiological adjustments to maintain thermal balance either by increasing metabolic heat production by shivering and/or by decreasing heat losses consecutive to peripheral cutaneous vasoconstriction. Those physiological responses present a great variability among individuals and depend mainly on biometrical characteristics, age, and general cold adaptation. During severe cold exposure, medical disorders may occur such as accidental hypothermia and/or freezing or non-freezing cold injuries. General cold adaptations have been qualitatively classified by Hammel and quantitatively by Savourey. This last classification takes into account the quantitative changes of the main cold reactions: higher or lower metabolic heat production, higher or lesser heat losses and finally the level of the core temperature observed at the end of a standardized exposure to cold. General cold adaptations observed previously in natives could also be developed in laboratory conditions by continuous or intermittent cold exposures. Beside general cold adaptation, local cold adaptation exists and is characterized by a lesser decrease of skin temperature, a more pronounced cold induced vasodilation, less pain and a higher manual dexterity. Adaptations to cold may reduce the occurrence of accidents and improve human performance as surviving in the cold. The present review describes both general and local cold adaptations in humans and how they are of interest for cold workers.

  17. Army Programs: Army Lessons Learned Program: System Development and Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-10

    Army Regulation 11–33 Army Programs Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application Headquarters Department of the Army Washington...Army Programs: Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s...Pages 14 SUMMARY of CHANGE AR 11–33 Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application This revision-- o Establishes a system to identify

  18. Widespread and rapid thermokarst development in a region of very cold continuous permafrost in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, L. M.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Cable, W.; Walker, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Climate warming in regions of ice-rich permafrost can result in widespread thermokarst development which can have drastic impacts on ecosystem processes and human infrastructure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that local permafrost degradation is occurring in areas of relatively "warm" permafrost, yet few have acknowledged nor documented the vulnerability of cold permafrost to degradation. In this study we present the first dataset coupling observations of ice-wedge degradation and thermokarst development with on-site continuous ground temperature data. We show evidence of widespread permafrost degradation at three monitoring sites underlain by continuous permafrost, in the Canadian High Arctic (73 to 79°N). Across all sites, the lack of a substantial organic protective layer makes the permafrost vulnerable to increases in summer temperature. At the start of our ground observation period, ice wedges at each site showed little to no evidence of degradation, suggesting that this recent disturbance is unprecedented during the Holocene. During the last decade, at all sites, we observed a warming trend for climate and ground temperature, leading to an increase in active layer depth, ice-wedge melting, and subsequent ground subsidence. Between 2005 and 2013, active layer depth increased at Isachsen, Mould Bay and Green Cabin by up to 20, 30, and 40 cm respectively. This lead to trough deepening at Green Cabin and new development followed by further deepening of troughs at Mould Bay and Isachsen. To measure elevation changes caused by thermokarst development, and establish a baseline for future monitoring, we used structure from motion (SfM) photogrammetry to derive a high spatial resolution digital terrain model at each site. Local distribution of thermokarst landforms were quantified using high-resolution spectral satellite imagery at an annual resolution between 2010 and 2015 and indicate that ice-wedge trough development is widespread within at least a 1 km

  19. Variable regions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum strains identified by comparative genomics: application to selective breeding for cold water disease resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial cold water disease is one of the most frequent causes of elevated loss in juvenile salmonids, and the development of effective control strategies is a high priority to aquaculturists, management agencies, and conservationists. Since 2005, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) have been bred ...

  20. The InterFrost benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology - first inter-comparison phase results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Christophe; Rühaak, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    Climate change impacts in permafrost regions have received considerable attention recently due to the pronounced warming trends experienced in recent decades and which have been projected into the future. Large portions of these permafrost regions are characterized by surface water bodies (lakes, rivers) that interact with the surrounding permafrost often generating taliks (unfrozen zones) within the permafrost that allow for hydrologic interactions between the surface water bodies and underlying aquifers and thus influence the hydrologic response of a landscape to climate change. Recent field studies and modeling exercises indicate that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is required to understand and model past and future evolution such units (Kurylyk et al. 2014). However, there is presently a paucity of 3D numerical studies of permafrost thaw and associated hydrological changes, which can be partly attributed to the difficulty in verifying multi-dimensional results produced by numerical models. A benchmark exercise was initialized at the end of 2014. Participants convened from USA, Canada, Europe, representing 13 simulation codes. The benchmark exercises consist of several test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. McKenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones (Kurylyk et al. 2014; Grenier et al. in prep.; Rühaak et al. 2015). They range from simpler, purely thermal 1D cases to more complex, coupled 2D TH cases (benchmarks TH1, TH2, and TH3). Some experimental cases conducted in a cold room complement the validation approach. A web site hosted by LSCE (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement) is an interaction platform for the participants and hosts the test case databases at the following address: https://wiki.lsce.ipsl.fr/interfrost. The results of the first stage of the benchmark exercise will be presented. We will mainly focus on the inter-comparison of participant results for the coupled cases TH2 & TH3. Both cases

  1. The InterFrost benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology - first inter-comparison results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Christophe; Roux, Nicolas; Anbergen, Hauke; Collier, Nathaniel; Costard, Francois; Ferrry, Michel; Frampton, Andrew; Frederick, Jennifer; Holmen, Johan; Jost, Anne; Kokh, Samuel; Kurylyk, Barret; McKenzie, Jeffrey; Molson, John; Orgogozo, Laurent; Rivière, Agnès; Rühaak, Wolfram; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Therrien, René; Vidstrand, Patrik

    2015-04-01

    The impacts of climate change in boreal regions has received considerable attention recently due to the warming trends that have been experienced in recent decades and are expected to intensify in the future. Large portions of these regions, corresponding to permafrost areas, are covered by water bodies (lakes, rivers) that interact with the surrounding permafrost. For example, the thermal state of the surrounding soil influences the energy and water budget of the surface water bodies. Also, these water bodies generate taliks (unfrozen zones below) that disturb the thermal regimes of permafrost and may play a key role in the context of climate change. Recent field studies and modeling exercises indicate that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is required to understand and model the past and future evolution of landscapes, rivers, lakes and associated groundwater systems in a changing climate. However, there is presently a paucity of 3D numerical studies of permafrost thaw and associated hydrological changes, and the lack of study can be partly attributed to the difficulty in verifying multi-dimensional results produced by numerical models. Numerical approaches can only be validated against analytical solutions for a purely thermic 1D equation with phase change (e.g. Neumann, Lunardini). When it comes to the coupled TH system (coupling two highly non-linear equations), the only possible approach is to compare the results from different codes to provided test cases and/or to have controlled experiments for validation. Such inter-code comparisons can propel discussions to try to improve code performances. A benchmark exercise was initialized in 2014 with a kick-off meeting in Paris in November. Participants from USA, Canada, Germany, Sweden and France convened, representing altogether 13 simulation codes. The benchmark exercises consist of several test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. McKenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones. They

  2. Army Programs: The Army Respiratory Protection Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    leak testing • 3–5, page 4 Maintenance and care of respirators • 3–6, page 4 Procedures for routine worksite inspections • 3–7, page 4 Air quality • 3–8...training provided the DA safety policy for training in smoke is observed. (b) When training and field operations require entrance into con- fined spaces...the Army Respiratory Protection Program as required by law and AR 385–10. 2–3. Commanders of major Army commands Commanders of major Army commands

  3. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 10): Umatilla Army Depot (lagoons), soils operable Unit 2, Hermiston, OR. (First remedial action), September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-25

    The Umatilla Army Depot lagoons site is located in the center of the 19,700-acre U.S. Army Depot Activity, Umatilla (UMDA), 5 miles west of Hermiston, in Morrow and Umatilla Counties, Oregon. From the 1950's through 1965, UMDA operated an onsite explosives washout plant, which processed munitions to remove and recover explosives using a pressurized hot water system. An estimated 85,000,000 gallons of effluent were discharged to the lagoons during plant operations. The ROD provides a final remedy for the soil present at the lagoons. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are inorganics and explosives, including DNB, 2, 4-DNT, HMX, NB, TNB, TNT, and RDX.

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Marathon Battery, Cold Spring, NY. (Third remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    The Marathon Battery site is a former battery-manufacturing plant in Cold Spring, Putnam County, New York. The site is composed of three study areas: Area I, which consists of East Foundry Cove Marsh and Constitution Marsh; Area II, which encompasses the former plant, presently a book-storage warehouse, the surrounding grounds, and a vault with cadmium contaminated sediment dredged from East Foundry Cove; and Area III, which includes East Foundry Cove (48 acres), West Foundry Cove and the Hudson River in the vicinity of Cold Spring pier and a sewer outfall. Contamination in Area III emanates from plant waste water that was discharged via the city sewer system into the Hudson River at Cold Spring Pier or, in some instances, through a storm sewer into East Foundry Cove. A Record of Decision (ROD) was signed for Area I in September 1986 with cleanup activities to include dredging the East Foundry Cove Marsh. The second ROD for the site was signed in September 1988 and included decontamination of the battery plant and soil excavation in Area II. The 1989 ROD represents the third and final operable unit for the site and addresses sediment contamination in Area III. The primary contaminants of concern affecting sediment at the site are metals, including cadmium and nickel.

  5. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 6): Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, IHAAP 12 and 16 Landfills, Karnack, TX, September 27, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected Early Interim Remedial Action for the LHAAP 12 and 16 landfills, Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant (LHAAP), Karnack, Texas. The Record of Decision for the sites addresses an Early Interim Remedial Action. The selected remedy consists of a multilayer landfill cap section which includes the following components: Foundation soil layer, Sodium Bentonite Geocomposite Liner, Geosynthetic Membrane Liner, Final soil cover, and Perimeter berms and drainage swales.

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): USA Anniston Army Depot, (Groundwater Operable Unit), Calhoun County, Anniston, AL. (First remedial action), September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-26

    The 15,200-acre USA Anniston Army Depot site is an active equipment rework facility for the U.S. Army in Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama. The site is divided into several areas including a southeast industrial area, which is the focus of the Record of Decision (ROD). Land use in the area is predominantly residential. In 1990, the Army completed and began operating a ground water pumping and treatment system. The ROD addresses an interim remedy for ground water contamination beneath the southeast industrial area as the first operable unit. Future RODs may address further contamination in the southeast industrial portion of the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including PCE and TCE; other organics including phenols; and metals including chromium. The selected remedial action for the site includes continued use of the existing ground water pumping and treatment system using air stripping to remove VOCs, followed by charcoal filtration to remove phenols; and discharging the treated ground ater onsite to surface water.

  7. Cold Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Stephen I.; Soter, Nicholas A.; Center, David M.; Austen, K. Frank

    1977-01-01

    Sera were obtained from the venous effluents of cold-challenged arms of patients with idiopathic cold urticaria without plasma or serum cryoproteins; these sera exhibited increased neutrophil chemotactic activity without alterations of the complement system. A two- to fourfold augmentation of the base-line neutrophil chemotactic activity of serum from the immersed extremity began within 1 min, peaked at 2 min, and returned to base-line levels within 15 min, whereas there was no change in the serum chemotactic activity in the control arm. The augmented chemotactic activity in the serum specimens from the challenged arm of each patient appeared in a high molecular-weight region, as assessed by the difference in activity recovered after Sephadex G-200 gel filtration of the paired lesional and control specimens. Sequential purification of this high molecular-weight activity by anion- and cation-exchange chromatography revealed a single peak of activity at both steps. The partially purified material continued to exhibit a high molecular weight, being excluded on Sepharose 4B, and had a neutral isoelectric point. The partially purified material showed a preferential chemotactic activity for neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes, required a gradient for expression of this function, and exhibited a capacity to deactivate this cell type. This active principle, termed high molecular-weight neutrophil chemotactic factor, exhibited a time-course of release that could be superimposed upon that of histamine and the low molecular-weight eosinophil chemotactic factor and may represent another mast cell-derived mediator. PMID:874083

  8. The emission-line regions in the nucleus of NGC 1313 probed with GMOS-IFU: a supergiant/hypergiant candidate and a kinematically cold nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.

    2017-04-01

    NGC 1313 is a bulgeless nearby galaxy, classified as SB(s)d. Its proximity allows high spatial resolution observations. We performed the first detailed analysis of the emission-line properties in the nuclear region of NGC 1313, using an optical data cube obtained with the Gemini Multi-object Spectrograph. We detected four main emitting areas, three of them (regions 1, 2 and 3) having spectra typical of H II regions. Region 1 is located very close to the stellar nucleus and shows broad spectral features characteristic of Wolf-Rayet stars. Our analysis revealed the presence of one or two WC4-5 stars in this region, which is compatible with results obtained by previous studies. Region 4 shows spectral features (as a strong Hα emission line, with a broad component) typical of a massive emission-line star, such as a luminous blue variable, a B[e] supergiant or a B hypergiant. The radial velocity map of the ionized gas shows a pattern consistent with rotation. A significant drop in the values of the gas velocity dispersion was detected very close to region 1, which suggests that the young stars there were formed from this cold gas, possibly keeping low values of velocity dispersion. Therefore, although detailed measurements of the stellar kinematics were not possible (due to the weak stellar absorption spectrum of this galaxy), we predict that NGC 1313 may also show a drop in the values of the stellar velocity dispersion in its nuclear region.

  9. Interaction of the main cold shock protein CS7.4 (CspA) of Escherichia coli with the promoter region of hns.

    PubMed

    Brandi, A; Pon, C L; Gualerzi, C O

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli protein CS7.4 (CspA), homologous to the class of eukaryotic Y-box DNA-binding proteins, is a cold shock transcriptional activator of at least two genes, hns and gyrA. It was demonstrated that all or nearly all the elements necessary for the stimulation of hns transcription by CS7.4 protein are located in the proximal 110 bp DNA fragment of this gene with no additional elements being present in a longer fragment (660 bp) extending further upstream from the hns promoter. Protein CS7.4 bound strongly to the 110 bp segment of the hns promoter in crude extracts of cold shocked cells, but the purified protein displayed a weak interaction with the same DNA fragment. Purified CS7.4 protein also caused increased or decreased accessibility to DNase I at different sites of the 110 bp fragment of hns but the majority of these effects was seen only in the presence of RNA polymerase. Since gel shift experiments showed that protein CS7.4 stimulated the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter of hns and since it is known that there are similarities between CS7.4 and ssDNA-binding proteins, we suggest that formation of the open complex by the RNA polymerase or protein-protein contacts between CS7.4 and the RNA polymerase are prerequisites for and/or the effects of the interaction of CS7.4 with its DNA target. The presence of a conserved CCAAT element in the hns promoter region, on the other hand, was found not to be stringently required for cold shock activation since expression of E coli of an hns-cat fusion containing the Proteus vulgaris hns promoter lacking a CCAAT box increased over four-fold after cold shock.

  10. The Changing Cold Regions Network: Improving the Understanding and Prediction of Changing Land, Water, and Climate in the Mackenzie and Saskatchewan River Basins, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBeer, C. M.; Wheater, H. S.; Chun, K. P.; Shook, K.; Whitfield, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Within the cold interior of western and northern Canada, rapid and widespread environmental changes are taking place, which are of serious concern for society and have a range of implications from local to regional and global scales. From a scientific standpoint there is an urgent need to understand the changes and develop improved diagnostic and predictive modelling tools to deal with the uncertainty faced in the future. The Changing Cold Regions Network (CCRN) is a research consortium of over 50 Canadian university and government scientists and international researchers aimed at addressing these issues within the geographic domain of the Mackenzie and Saskatchewan River Basins. CCRN's primary focus is to integrate existing and new experimental data with modelling and remote sensing products to understand, diagnose and predict changing land, water and climate, and their interactions and feedbacks. To support these activities, the network utilizes a suite of 14 world-class water, ecosystem, cryosphere and climate (WECC) observatories across this region that provide exceptional opportunities to observe change, investigate processes and their dynamics, and develop and test environmental models. This talk will briefly describe the CCRN thematic components and WECC observatories, and will then describe some of the observed environmental changes and their linkages across the northern and mountainous parts of the network study domain. In particular, this will include changes in permafrost, terrestrial vegetation, snowcover, glaciers, and river discharge in relation to observed climatic changes across the region. The observations draw on a wide range of literature sources and statistical analyses of federal and provincial regional monitoring network data, while more detailed observations at some of the WECC observatories help to show how these regional changes are manifested at local scales and vice versa. A coordinated special observation and analysis period across all

  11. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000678.htm Common cold To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The common cold most often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, ...

  12. ARMY CYBER STRUCTURE ALIGNMENT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-16

    Meade , Maryland. USCYBERCOM also has operational command relationships with each of the services’ cyber components that include: Army Cyber Command...domains and deny the same to adversarial forces.36 Lt. Gen. George Flynn, the deputy commandant commanding the Marine Corps Combat Development Command at...www.arcyber.army.mil/Organization/ARCYBERHistory . 12 US Army Cyber Command, “ARCYBER the Next Battlefield,” briefing slides, Ft. Meade , MD, December 10, 2013

  13. Diving of great shearwaters (Puffinus gravis) in cold and warm water regions of the South Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Robert A; Ryan, Peter G; Ropert-Coudert, Yan

    2010-11-30

    Among the most widespread seabirds in the world, shearwaters of the genus Puffinus are also some of the deepest diving members of the Procellariiformes. Maximum diving depths are known for several Puffinus species, but dive depths or diving behaviour have never been recorded for great shearwaters (P. gravis), the largest member of this genus. This study reports the first high sampling rate (2 s) of depth and diving behaviour for Puffinus shearwaters. Time-depth recorders (TDRs) were deployed on two female great shearwaters nesting on Inaccessible Island in the South Atlantic Ocean, recording 10 consecutive days of diving activity. Remote sensing imagery and movement patterns of 8 males tracked by satellite telemetry over the same period were used to identify probable foraging areas used by TDR-equipped females. The deepest and longest dive was to 18.9 m and lasted 40 s, but most (>50%) dives were <2 m deep. Diving was most frequent near dawn and dusk, with <0.5% of dives occurring at night. The two individuals foraged in contrasting oceanographic conditions, one in cold (8 to 10°C) water of the Sub-Antarctic Front, likely 1000 km south of the breeding colony, and the other in warmer (10 to 16°C) water of the Sub-tropical Frontal Zone, at the same latitude as the colony, possibly on the Patagonian Shelf, 4000 km away. The cold water bird spent fewer days commuting, conducted four times as many dives as the warm water bird, dived deeper on average, and had a greater proportion of bottom time during dives. General patterns of diving activity were consistent with those of other shearwaters foraging in cold and warm water habitats. Great shearwaters are likely adapted to forage in a wide range of oceanographic conditions, foraging mostly with shallow dives but capable of deep diving.

  14. Diving of Great Shearwaters (Puffinus gravis) in Cold and Warm Water Regions of the South Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Ronconi, Robert A.; Ryan, Peter G.; Ropert-Coudert, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Background Among the most widespread seabirds in the world, shearwaters of the genus Puffinus are also some of the deepest diving members of the Procellariiformes. Maximum diving depths are known for several Puffinus species, but dive depths or diving behaviour have never been recorded for great shearwaters (P. gravis), the largest member of this genus. This study reports the first high sampling rate (2 s) of depth and diving behaviour for Puffinus shearwaters. Methodology/Principal Findings Time-depth recorders (TDRs) were deployed on two female great shearwaters nesting on Inaccessible Island in the South Atlantic Ocean, recording 10 consecutive days of diving activity. Remote sensing imagery and movement patterns of 8 males tracked by satellite telemetry over the same period were used to identify probable foraging areas used by TDR-equipped females. The deepest and longest dive was to 18.9 m and lasted 40 s, but most (>50%) dives were <2 m deep. Diving was most frequent near dawn and dusk, with <0.5% of dives occurring at night. The two individuals foraged in contrasting oceanographic conditions, one in cold (8 to 10°C) water of the Sub-Antarctic Front, likely 1000 km south of the breeding colony, and the other in warmer (10 to 16°C) water of the Sub-tropical Frontal Zone, at the same latitude as the colony, possibly on the Patagonian Shelf, 4000 km away. The cold water bird spent fewer days commuting, conducted four times as many dives as the warm water bird, dived deeper on average, and had a greater proportion of bottom time during dives. Conclusions/Significance General patterns of diving activity were consistent with those of other shearwaters foraging in cold and warm water habitats. Great shearwaters are likely adapted to forage in a wide range of oceanographic conditions, foraging mostly with shallow dives but capable of deep diving. PMID:21152089

  15. Army Space and Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    space mission area that stretches back to the 1940s. The Army established doctrine for conducting space operations in support of the Objective Force. This thesis explains why the Army is involved in space from historical, doctrinal and policy perspectives. The Army created force structure for Space Support Elements (SSE) at the tactical level and organic to Division headquarters, and has planned and proposed additional space elements at the Brigade, Corps and Army organizational levels. The FA40, (Space Operations), Career Field is a relatively new personnel category that

  16. Cold Sore

    MedlinePlus

    ... genitals. Most people who are infected with the virus that causes cold sores never develop signs and symptoms. Cold sores ... an infection — test positive for evidence of the virus that causes cold sores. People who have weakened immune systems are ...

  17. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (Operable Unit 1), AL. (First remedial action), December 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The 2,200-acre Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (AAAP) site was located in Talledega County, Alabama, near the junction of Talledega Creek and the Coosa River. AAAP was built in 1941 as a government-owned/contractor-operated facility that produced nitrocellulose, nitroaromatic explosives, and 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl methyl nitramine. Operations at AAAP were terminated in August 1945, and in 1973 several parcels of the original 13,233-acre property were sold. In 1978, the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA), managing the Army's Installation Restoration Program (IRP), identified soil, sediment, and ground water potentially contaminated by explosives, asbestos, and lead as a result of past site operations. During the RI/FS, the facility was divided into two general areas: the eastern area (Area A) and the western area (Area B). In 1985, investigations identified soil contamination by explosives, asbestos, and lead in Area A, and ground water contamination by these materials in Area B. Soil excavated from Area A was stockpiled in Area B in two covered buildings and on a concrete slab, which was subsequently covered with a membrane liner. A 1991 characterization study of Area B concluded that explosives, lead, and asbestos contamination were present above regulatory limits. The ROD addressed a final action for the contaminated soil in the Stockpile Soils Area (Area B). The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris were explosives, including 2,4,6-TNT, 2,4-DNT, 2,6-DNT, and tetryl; metals, including lead; and asbestos, an inorganic.

  18. Understanding and Representing Stable Boundary Layer Over Cold Regions Based on Observations and A New Diagnostic Turbulence Scheme in CanAm4 Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yanping; McFarlane, Norman; Monahan, Adam; Scinocca, John

    2017-04-01

    A new semi-empirical diagnostic turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) scheme is used in combination with observational analysis to understand and to represent stable boundary layers (SBL) over cold regions. Five year observations from Cabauw, Netherlands, demonstrate multiple regimes of turbulence, winds, and stratification under nighttime clear-sky conditions. Among observed SBL depth, approximately 10% are very shallow (<= 40m), and around 70% are 200m or deeper. This 10/70 fraction and the sharp regime transition of near-surface temperature inversions are common features in all seasons. The new TKE scheme is capable of reproducing the observed clear-sky S-shape relationship between near surface wind speed and stratification, and it reproduces a more realistic fraction of very shallow SBL than that of the operational one in the CanAM4 climate models. However, the number of weak SBL that are deeper than 200m is significantly underestimated over cold regions in both operational and new schemes. The key physical mechanism supporting the regime transition and the occurrence of deep SBLs will be summarized.

  19. Assessing the Army Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    pointed questions voiced during Unified Quest 2010 to General (Retired) Fred Franks and the Chief of Staff of the Army, General George Casey. The...Leading vs Leaving: Lack of Development Up the Chain Prompts Many Soldiers to Get Out,” Army Times, May 23, 2011, 16-17; Michelle Tan and Joe Gould , “Toxic

  20. Health assessment for Marathon Battery, Cold Springs, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD001959757. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-16

    The 11-acre Marathon Battery Site (MBS) Plant is located in Putnam County, Cold Springs, New York. The site is bordered to the east by a wooded area and to the south by a junkyard and Foundary Cove. Foundary Cove is a wetland marsh connected by several channels to the Hudson River. Various heavy metals have been identified on-site. They include arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, lead, nickel, and zinc. In addition, a previous ATSDR memorandum reports the results of a ground-water sample containing high concentrations of trichloroethylene. Based on the preliminary information reviewed concerning on-site and off-site contamination, MBS represents a potential public health threat to area residents.

  1. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.... Army Medical Command. (a) After consulting with the Commander USARCS on the selection of medical claims attorneys, the Commander of the U.S. Army MEDCOM, the European Medical Command, or other regional...

  2. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.... Army Medical Command. (a) After consulting with the Commander USARCS on the selection of medical claims attorneys, the Commander of the U.S. Army MEDCOM, the European Medical Command, or other regional...

  3. Romania and the New Cold War Security Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    world’s oceans, international airspace, outer space, and cyberspace as international commons .5 New Cold war: This title raised many controversies...ROMANIA AND THE NEW COLD WAR SECURITY CHALLENGES A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff...JUN 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Romania and The New Cold War Security Challenges 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  4. Using GIS to Help Support and Sustain U.S. Army Ranges - A Global Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    1 Using GIS to Help Support and Sustain U.S. Army Ranges - A Global Approach Robert Maple, GIS Program Manager Army Sustainable Range Program (SRP...to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Using GIS to Help Support and Sustain U.S. Army Ranges -A Global Approach 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...the Army since 1998  Previously called the SRP GIS Regional Support Center 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

  5. Tracking cold bottom water in the Gargano Peninsula and Bari Canyon regions of the Adriatic using seismic oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Warren; Book, Jeffrey; Carniel, Sandro; Lindwall, Dennis; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Hobbs, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Tracking cold, dense bottom water from conventional ship sampling is difficult - equipment safety concerns result in incomplete sampling near the seafloor, and lateral variability can be significant. Mooring time series are poor at mapping dense water vein spatial extents and can even completely miss sampling narrow veins. The relatively new technique of seismic oceanography (SO) could potentially provide a new way of identifying and characterizing these bottom waters that is not as subject to the constraints and difficulties of present methods. Furthermore, combining SO with conventional sampling is particularly appealing for better characterization of the quick and small scales of dense water cascades and bottom trapped phenomenon.. There is a relationship between oceanic temperatures and the seismic data such that seismic images can be made to represent a quantitative measure of vertical temperature gradient through much of the water column and even very near the seafloor. The SO technique involves towing a low frequency, broadband (20-250 Hz) sound source (such as an air gun array) and a long, 600-1200 m, array of hydrophones. SO uses much lower frequencies than conventional Acoustical Oceanography (AO) techniques, and is affected by the acoustic impedance (product of sound speed and density) directly, not via proxy such as impurities or biota in the water. The sound pulses reflect off the (mostly temperature) contrasts in the water, and are recorded on the hydrophone array, creating an image of temperature gradient. Because the reflection coefficients are small, signal-enhancing techniques such as synthetic aperture (common midpoint binning) processing is required. The images generated using SO allow for the tracking of very thin (less than 10 m thick) bottom currents provided that the temperature contrast between the bottom, and overlying water is strong enough (0.3 to 1.2 degrees C, depending on acoustic noise levels) and abrupt enough (10-15 meters). The

  6. [Effect of tillage patterns on the structure of weed communities in oat fields in the cold and arid region of North China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Li; Wu, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Jun-Jun

    2014-06-01

    In order to clarify the effects of tillage patterns on farmland weed community structure and crop production characteristics, based on 10 years location experiment with no-tillage, subsoiling and conventional tillage in the cold and arid region of North China, and supplementary experiment of plowing after 10 years no-tillage and subsoiling, oat was planted in 2 soils under different tillage patterns, and field weed total density, dominant weed types, weed diversity index, field weed biomass and oats yield were measured. The results showed that the regional weed community was dominated by foxtail weed (Setaira viridis); the weed density under long-term no-tillage was 2.20-5.14 times of tillage at different growing stages of oat, but there were no significant differences between conditional tillage and plowing after long-term no-tillage and subsoiling. Field weed Shannon diversity indices were 0.429 and 0.531, respectively, for sandy chestnut soil and loamy meadow soil under no-tillage conditions, and field weed biomass values were 1.35 and 2.26 times of plowing treatment, while the oat biomass values were only 2807.4 kg x hm(-2) and 4053.9 kg x hm(-2), decreased by 22.3% and 46.2%, respectively. The results showed that the weed community characteristics were affected by both tillage patterns and soil types. Long-term no-tillage farmland in the cold and arid region of North China could promote the natural evolution of plant communities by keeping more perennial weeds, and the plowing pattern lowered the annual weed density, eliminated perennial weeds with shallow roots, and stimulated perennial weeds with deep roots.

  7. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval...Program Information Program Name Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) DoD Component Army Responsible Office Program Manager References MAIS... management , execution, and close-out software system . ACWS will facilitate the standardization of Army Procurement business processes and streamline

  8. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Milan Army Ammunition Plant, operable units 3 and 4, Milan, TN, October 2, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the soil within the northern industrial area of Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Milan, Tennessee. The goal of the cleanup activities at the northern industrial areas of MAAP is to remove the soil contaminated with explosives compounds above risk-based levels. The excavated soil will be treated using a bioremediation process to reduce the concentrations of explosives compounds, the toxicity of the leachate, and the mobility of the remaining organic compounds. The treated soil will then be placed in an on-site solid waste landfill in compliance with State of Tennessee regulations. Additionally, in areas where excavation of the explosives-contaminated soil is infeasible, the soil will be covered with an engineered cap to prevent worker exposure to the explosives compounds and prevent leaching of these compounds to groundwater.

  9. The Implement of a Multi-layer Frozen Soil Scheme into SSiB3 and its Evaluation over Cold Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.

    2016-12-01

    The SSiB3 is a biophysics-based model of land-atmosphere interactions and is designed for global and regional studies. It has three soil layers, three snow layers, as well as one vegetation layer. Soil moisture of the three soil layers, interception water store for the canopy, subsurface soil temperature, ground temperature, canopy temperature and snow water equivalent are all predicted based on the water and energy balance at canopy, soil and snow. SSiB3 substantially enhances the model's capability for cold season studies and produces reasonable results compared with observations. However, frozen soil processes are ignored in the SSiB3 and may have effects on the interannual variability of soil temperature and deep soil memory. A multi-layer comprehensive frozen soil scheme (FSM), which is developed for climate study has been implemented into the SSiB3 to describe soil heat transfer and water flow affected by frozen processed in soil. In the coupled SSiB3-FSM, both liquid water and ice content have been taken into account in the frozen soil hydrologic and thermal property parameterization. The maximum soil layer depth could reach 10 meters thick depending on land conditions. To better evaluate the models' performance, the coupled offline SSiB3-FSM and SSiB3 have been driven from 1948 to 1958 by the Princeton global meteorological data set, respectively. For the 10yrs run, the coupled SSiB3-FSM almost captures the features over different regions, especially cold regions. In order to analysis and compare the differences of SSIB3-FSM and SSIB3 in detail, monthly mean surface temperature for different regions are compared with CAMS data. The statistical results of surface skin temperature show that high latitude regions, Africa, Eastern Australia, and North American monsoon regions have been greatly improved in SSIB3-FSM. For the global statistics, the RMSE of the surface temperature simulated by SSiB3-FSM can be improved about 0.6K compared to SSiB3. In this study

  10. Index to Army Times 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    1991; 51(26): p. 6. ARMY--REORGANIZATION Investigators chaLLenge cadre concept. Army Times; Sept. 30, 1991; 52(9): p. 6. ARROW (MISSILE)-- ISRAEL ...p. 10. NUTRITION--RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Tickling palates with pizza, pouch bread. Army Times; Nov. 18, 1991; 52(16): p. 10. OBESITY Poor...Aviators awarded. Army Times; June 24, 1991; 51(48): p. 15. Honoring Patriot crews in Israel . Army Times; Apr. 1, 1991; 51(35): p. 17. House passes

  11. Army thermophotovoltaic efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, John S.; Guazzoni, Guido; Nawrocki, Selma J.

    1999-03-01

    A presentation and description of the several efforts in Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) Energy Conversion for power generation supported/monitored by the Army is provided with their more recent technical status and results. The efforts are related to small business (SBIR, STTR) contracts, academic research grants (MURI), and contracts awarded as the result of specialized solicitations. This paper covers a number of Army potential uses of the TPV power generation and is an attempt to give a more cohesive and integrated picture of the various military interests in TPV. With the exception of low power (<10 W) units, all Army potential uses of TPV power sources will demand operation with logistically available fuels.

  12. Human whole body cold adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  13. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M.; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-08-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  14. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  15. Comparison of effects of cold-region soil/snow processes and the uncertainties from model forcing data on permafrost physical characteristics

    DOE PAGES

    Barman, Rahul; Jain, Atul K.

    2016-03-28

    Here, we used a land surface model to (1) evaluate the influence of recent improvements in modeling cold-region soil/snow physics on near-surface permafrost physical characteristics (within 0–3 m soil column) in the northern high latitudes (NHL) and (2) compare them with uncertainties from climate and land-cover data sets. Specifically, four soil/snow processes are investigated: deep soil energetics, soil organic carbon (SOC) effects on soil properties, wind compaction of snow, and depth hoar formation. In the model, together they increased the contemporary NHL permafrost area by 9.2 × 106 km2 (from 2.9 to 12.3—without and with these processes, respectively) and reducedmore » historical degradation rates. In comparison, permafrost area using different climate data sets (with annual air temperature difference of ~0.5°C) differed by up to 2.3 × 106 km2, with minimal contribution of up to 0.7 × 106 km2 from substantial land-cover differences. Individually, the strongest role in permafrost increase was from deep soil energetics, followed by contributions from SOC and wind compaction, while depth hoar decreased permafrost. The respective contribution on 0–3 m permafrost stability also followed a similar pattern. However, soil temperature and moisture within vegetation root zone (~0–1 m), which strongly influence soil biogeochemistry, were only affected by the latter three processes. The ecosystem energy and water fluxes were impacted the least due to these soil/snow processes. While it is evident that simulated permafrost physical characteristics benefit from detailed treatment of cold-region biogeophysical processes, we argue that these should also lead to integrated improvements in modeling of biogeochemistry.« less

  16. Comparison of effects of cold-region soil/snow processes and the uncertainties from model forcing data on permafrost physical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Rahul; Jain, Atul K.

    2016-03-01

    We used a land surface model to (1) evaluate the influence of recent improvements in modeling cold-region soil/snow physics on near-surface permafrost physical characteristics (within 0-3 m soil column) in the northern high latitudes (NHL) and (2) compare them with uncertainties from climate and land-cover data sets. Specifically, four soil/snow processes are investigated: deep soil energetics, soil organic carbon (SOC) effects on soil properties, wind compaction of snow, and depth hoar formation. In the model, together they increased the contemporary NHL permafrost area by 9.2 × 106 km2 (from 2.9 to 12.3—without and with these processes, respectively) and reduced historical degradation rates. In comparison, permafrost area using different climate data sets (with annual air temperature difference of ˜0.5°C) differed by up to 2.3 × 106 km2, with minimal contribution of up to 0.7 × 106 km2 from substantial land-cover differences. Individually, the strongest role in permafrost increase was from deep soil energetics, followed by contributions from SOC and wind compaction, while depth hoar decreased permafrost. The respective contribution on 0-3 m permafrost stability also followed a similar pattern. However, soil temperature and moisture within vegetation root zone (˜0-1 m), which strongly influence soil biogeochemistry, were only affected by the latter three processes. The ecosystem energy and water fluxes were impacted the least due to these soil/snow processes. While it is evident that simulated permafrost physical characteristics benefit from detailed treatment of cold-region biogeophysical processes, we argue that these should also lead to integrated improvements in modeling of biogeochemistry.

  17. Assessment of climate change impacts on watershed in cold-arid region: an integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, X. W.; Li, Y. P.; Huang, G. H.; Liu, J.

    2016-07-01

    An integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis (MGCM-SWG-SCA) method is developed, through incorporating multiple global climate models (MGCM), stochastic weather generator (SWG), and stepwise-clustered hydrological model (SCHM) within a general framework. MGCM-SWG-SCA can investigate uncertainties of projected climate changes as well as create watershed-scale climate projections from large-scale variables. It can also assess climate change impacts on hydrological processes and capture nonlinear relationship between input variables and outputs in watershed systems. MGCM-SWG-SCA is then applied to the Kaidu watershed with cold-arid characteristics in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of northwest China, for demonstrating its efficiency. Results reveal that the variability of streamflow is mainly affected by (1) temperature change during spring, (2) precipitation change during winter, and (3) both temperature and precipitation changes in summer and autumn. Results also disclose that: (1) the projected minimum and maximum temperatures and precipitation from MGCM change with seasons in different ways; (2) various climate change projections can reproduce the seasonal variability of watershed-scale climate series; (3) SCHM can simulate daily streamflow with a satisfactory degree, and a significant increasing trend of streamflow is indicated from future (2015-2035) to validation (2006-2011) periods; (4) the streamflow can vary under different climate change projections. The findings can be explained that, for the Kaidu watershed located in the cold-arid region, glacier melt is mainly related to temperature changes and precipitation changes can directly cause the variability of streamflow.

  18. Mass Balance of Stok Glacier in the Cold Arid Ladakh Region of Trans-Himalaya Using Temperature Index Model, and It's Reconstruction Since 1991-2016.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soheb, M.

    2016-12-01

    Glaciers in Ladakh region are very small yet they carry a lot of significance as they have a direct impact on the human society. Because of the arid climate, the glaciers and snow melt water is the only source for domestic and irrigation water use in the region. Ironically no study has been carried out in this region in terms of glacier mass balance and melt estimation so far. In 2015, mass balance study was started on Stok glacier located in Chhabe Nama basin of Zanskar Range, western Himalayas India. The glacier is a winter accumulation type glacier. It is the second largest glacier in the catchment and reserves around 20 % (0.023 Gt.) of ice where the ice reserve in the whole Stok village catchment is around 0.088 Gt. Sub-seasonal mass balance over entire ablation zone have been investigated for a period of over two months using direct glaciological method. During this period the ablation zone experienced a negative mass balance of -0.26 ± 0.40 m w.e. Temperature index model was used to reconstruct annual mass balance since 1999-2016. The model captured a negative glacier-wide mass balance over the entire period. The annual mass balances varied from -0.02 to -0.2 m w.e. with a cumulative mass balance of -0.94 and -1.38 m w.e. for 1991-99 and 2003-2016, respectively. The data scarcity is one of the major problem in this region, therefore temperature and precipitation data used is based on REMO model. The region is also losing mass despite of being in a cold and high altitude region, which can be attributed to the very low amount of annual precipitation (10 cm). However, the loss is comparatively lower than other glaciers in the southern part of western Himalayas. The study also reveals that ablation period in this region ends around a month earlier than other glaciers in the western Himalayas where ablation generally ends during early October. The retreat was different for each year but the retreat rate remained almost similar since 1991-2016. The retreat rate

  19. Genome-Wide Linkage and Regional Association Study of Blood Pressure Response to the Cold Pressor Test in Han Chinese: The GenSalt Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xueli; Gu, Dongfeng; He, Jiang; Hixson, James E.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Lu, Fanghong; Mu, Jianjun; Jaquish, Cashell E.; Chen, Jing; Huang, Jianfeng; Shimmin, Lawrence C.; Rice, Treva K.; Chen, Jichun; Wu, Xigui; Liu, Depei; Kelly, Tanika N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) response to cold pressor test (CPT) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We performed a genome-wide linkage scan and regional association analysis to identify genetic determinants of BP response to CPT. Methods and Results A total of 1,961 Chinese participants completed the CPT. Multipoint quantitative trait linkage analysis was performed, followed by single-marker and gene-based analyses of variants in promising linkage regions (logarithm of odds, LOD ≥ 2). A suggestive linkage signal was identified for systolic BP (SBP) response to CPT at 20p13-20p12.3, with a maximum multipoint LOD score of 2.37. Based on regional association analysis with 1,351 SNPs in the linkage region, we found that marker rs2326373 at 20p13 was significantly associated with mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses to CPT (P = 8.8×10−6) after FDR adjustment for multiple comparisons. A similar trend was also observed for SBP response (P = 0.03) and DBP response (P = 4.6×10−5). Results of gene-based analyses showed that variants in genes MCM8 and SLC23A2 were associated with SBP response to CPT (P = 4.0×10−5 and 2.7×10−4, respectively), and variants in genes MCM8 and STK35 were associated with MAP response to CPT (P = 1.5×10−5 and 5.0×10−5, respectively). Conclusions Within a suggestive linkage region on chromosome 20, we identified a novel variant associated with BP responses to CPT. We also found gene-based associations of MCM8, SLC23A2 and STK35 in this region. Further work is warranted to confirm these findings. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT00721721. PMID:25028485

  20. Ordinary High Flows and the Stage-Discharge Relationship in the Arid West Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Lindsey E. Dixon Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center 72 Lyme Road Hanover, NH 03755...from rainfall is a supplemental source of water for stream flow. Perennial A perennial stream has flowing water year-round during a typical year. The...is a supplemental source of water for stream flow. ERDC/CRREL TR-11-12 2 is defined by the ordinary high flow. This ordinary high discharge is a

  1. From chemicals to cold plasma: Non-thermal food processing technologies research at the USDA's Eastern Regional Research Center

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foodborne pathogens cause millions of illnesses every year. At the US Department of Agriculture’s Eastern Regional Research Center, scientists and engineers have focused on developing new ways to improve food safety and shelf life while retaining quality and nutritional value. A variety of technolog...

  2. Investigating the performance and energy saving potential of Chinese commercial building benchmark models for the hot humid and severe cold climate regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Lesley Anne

    2011-12-01

    The demand for energy in China is growing at an alarming rate. Buildings have become a significant component of the energy-demand mix accounting for nearly one-quarter of the country's total primary energy consumption. This study compares the building code standards for office and hotel buildings in the hot humid and severe cold climate regions of China and the United States. Benchmark office and hotel building models have been developed for Guangzhou and Harbin, China that meets China's minimum national and regional building energy codes with the integration of common design and construction practices for each region. These models are compared to the ASHRAE standard based US reference building models for Houston, Texas and Duluth, Minnesota which have similar climate conditions. The research further uses a building energy optimization tool to optimize the Chinese benchmarks using existing US products to identify the primary areas for potential energy savings. In the case of the Harbin models, an economic analysis has also been performed to determine the economic feasibility of alternative building designs. The most significant energy-saving options are then presented as recommendations for potential improvements to current China building energy codes.

  3. Two-dimensional finite difference model to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise in cold climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Babita; Adlakha, Neeru

    2015-02-01

    Thermoregulation is a complex mechanism regulating heat production within the body (chemical thermoregulation) and heat exchange between the body and the environment (physical thermoregulation) in such a way that the heat exchange is balanced and deep body temperatures are relatively stable. The external heat transfer mechanisms are radiation, conduction, convection and evaporation. The physical activity causes thermal stress and poses challenges for this thermoregulation. In this paper, a model has been developed to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise under cold climate. It is assumed that the subject is doing exercise initially and comes to rest at time t = 0. The human limb is assumed to be of cylindrical shape. The peripheral region of limb is divided into three natural components namely epidermis, dermis and subdermal tissues (SST). Appropriate boundary conditions have been framed based on the physical conditions of the problem. Finite difference has been employed for time, radial and angular variables. The numerical results have been used to obtain temperature profiles in the SST region immediately after continuous exercise for a two-dimensional unsteady state case. The results have been used to analyze the thermal stress in relation to light, moderate and vigorous intensity exercise.

  4. Global characteristics of the cold plasma in the equatorial plasmapause region as deduced from the geos 1 mutual impedance probe

    SciTech Connect

    Decreu, P.M.E.; Beghin, C.; Parrot, M.

    1982-02-01

    Thermal plasma parameters derived by the muntal impedance experiment on GEOS are described. The experiment is well suited to the measurement of the electron density and temperature of the outer plasmasphere (when kT/sub e//N/sub e/<1.6 eV/cm/sup 3/). This investigation of the whole set of data supplied by GEOS 1 (4regions: the plasmasphere, an intermediate region of ionospheric refilling, and the plasma trough. In the plasmasphere, we observe profiles with N/sub e/proportionalL/sup -4/, while T/sub e/ stands around 10,000 /sup 0/K or less. The intermediate region, situated next to the plasmasphere and above it, is always present in the day sector, where the ionospheric source plays a leading part. In that zone, the plasma parameters, poorly known up to now, exhibit N/sub e/ values approx.2 to 20 cm/sup -3/, together with T/sub e/ values of 20,000 /sup 0/K on the average, dispersed over a 5,000 to 100,000 /sup 0/K range during disturbances. In the night sector, the intermediate region is seen only during the recovery phase. The region of depleted density is observed at the higher L values in the night and morning MTL sectors. There, plasmas out of Maxwellian equilibrium are seen under disturbed conditions. The dynamic response of the thermal plasma parameters to temporal variations of the a/sub m/ index of magnetic activity follows a known scenario as concerns N/sub e/, making apparent a night-to-day, MTL dependent time delay. As concerns T/sub e/, the dynamical study reveals striking features, such as the persistance of the T/sub e/ modifications into the dusk sector, the interpretation of which remains to be clarified.

  5. Army Medical Robotics Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Army Medical Robotics Research Gary Gilbert, Ph.D., U.S. Army TATRC, Ph: (301) 619-4043, Fax: (301) 619-2518 gilbert@tatrc.org, www.tatrc.org...politically sensitive low intensity combat in urban terrain. Research progress has been made in the areas of robotics ; artificial intelligence...institutions have demonstrated intelligent robots that execute functions ranging from performing mechanical repairs to playing soccer. The military has

  6. Army Digitization Operational Impacts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    Army Digitization Operational Impacts Fred P. Stein MITRE Corporation HQS III Corps & Fort Hood ATTN: AFZF-DFCC Bldg. 1001, Rm. 316W Fort Hood, TX...one systems, necessary for minimum capability will be fielded to units at Fort Hood. This paper will describe the impact of these news systems on the...of the new technologies. Finally it will project the impact on the objective systems on the operational Army. This paper will provide a view of what

  7. Artic and subarctic environmental analyses utilizing ERTS-1 imagery. Cold regions environmental analysis based on ERTS-1 imagery (preprint)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. M. (Principal Investigator); Haugen, R. K.; Gatto, L. W.; Slaughter, C. W.; Marlar, T. L.; Mckim, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. An overriding problem in arctic and subarctic environmental research has been the absence of long-term observational data and the sparseness of geographical coverage of existing data. A first look report is presented on the use of ERTS-1 imagery as a major tool in two large area environmental studies: (1) investigation of sedimentation and other nearshore marine processes in Cook Inlet, Alaska; and (2) a regional study of permafrost regimes in the discontinuous permafrost zone of Alaska. These studies incorporate ground truth acquisition techniques that are probably similar to most ERTS investigations. Studies of oceanographic processes in Cook Inlet will be focused on seasonal changes in nearshore bathymetry, tidal and major current circulation patterns, and coastal sedimentation processes, applicable to navigation, construction, and maintenance of harbors. Analyses will be made of the regional permafrost distribution and regimes in the Upper Koyukuk-Kobuk River area located in NW Alaska.

  8. Central Issue Facility at Fort Benning and Related Army Policies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-21

    Neckerchief 1 0 0 No Cap, Cold Weather 1 0 0 No Balaclava or Neck Gaiter 1 0 0 No Inserts 2 0 2 No Gloves 1 0 1 No Drawers, Polypropylene 2 0 2...No Undershirts, Polypropylene 2 0 2 No Undershirts, Silk 2 0 0 No Drawers, Silk 2 0 0 No Shirt, Fleece 1 0 0 Yes Liner, Trousers 1 0 0 Yes Coat... business processes at the central issue facilities at Army installations. The module provides a standard Army-wide, automated system for the receipt

  9. Army Reserve Comprehensive Water Efficiency Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Kearney, Jaime

    2015-04-14

    The Army Reserve has partnered with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop comprehensive water assessments for numerous Army Reserve Centers in all five regions including the Pacific islands and Puerto Rico, and at Fort Buchanan and Fort Hunter Liggett. The objective of these assessments is to quantify water use at the site, and identify innovative water efficiency projects that can be implemented to help reduce water demand and increase efficiency. Several of these assessments have focused on a strategic plan for achieving net zero water to help meet the Army’s Net Zero Directive . The Army Reserve has also leveraged this approach as part of the energy conservation investment program (ECIP), energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs), and utility energy service contracts (UESCs). This article documents the process involved.

  10. Index to Army Times 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    task force told. Army Times; Mar. 14, 1988; 48(31): p. 52. DENTAL RECORDS Army behind in dental record effort. Army Times; Nov. 21, 1988; 49(15): p. 27...p. 17. MILITARY DEPENDENTS-- DENTAL CARE Dental insurance for military families may be expanded. Army Times; Aug. 22, 1988; 49(2): p. 24. MILITARY...compensation bill. Army Times; May 2, 1988; 48(38): p. 38. PENTAGON MEDITATION CLUB Meditators, Soviets munch pasta , push peace. Army Times; May 23, 1988; 48

  11. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon Chronic severe illness General poor health Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Problem with the hypothalamus (a part ...

  12. 78 FR 18473 - Army Privacy Act Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 505 Army Privacy Act Program AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army is amending its rule on notification of the Army... in Sec. 505.12. The address for notifying the Army Litigation Division of cases citing the...

  13. Army ants: an evolutionary bestseller?

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Stefanie M

    2003-09-02

    Army ants are characterized by a complex combination of behavioral and morphological traits. Molecular data now indicate that army ant behavior has a unique evolutionary origin and has been conserved for over more than 100 million years.

  14. Measurements and modeling of cold 13CH4 spectra in the 3750-4700 cm-1 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. R.; Nikitin, A. V.; Sung, K.; Rey, M.; Tashkun, S. A.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Crawford, T. J.; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    A new study of 13CH4 line intensities and positions was performed in the Octad region between 3750 and 4700 cm-1. Using 13C-enriched samples, spectra were recorded with both the McMath-Pierce FTS at Kitt Peak Observatory in Arizona and the Bruker IFS-125HR at JPL. Sample temperatures ranged between 80 and 296 K. Line positions and intensities of ~15,000 features were retrieved at different temperatures by non-linear least squares curve-fitting procedures. Intensities were used to estimate the lower state energies for 60% of the features in order to determine quantum assignments up to J=10. A preliminary analysis was performed using the effective Hamiltonian and the effective dipole transition moment expressed in terms of irreducible tensor operators adapted to spherical top molecules. Selected assignments were made up to J=10 for all 24 sub-vibrational states of the Octad; these were modeled for 4752 experimental line positions and 3301 selected line intensities fitted with RMS standard deviations of 0.004 cm-1 and 6.9%, respectively. Integrated intensities of the eight Octad bands are compared to ab initio variational calculations. A prediction of the 13CH4 is given, but further analysis to improve the calculation will be reported in the future.

  15. Index to Army Times 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    CHAMPUS to revise health-care rules. Army Times; Mar. 26, 1990; 50(33): p. 9. CHAMPUS- - CHIROPRACTIC TREATMENT Chiropractic coverage tested. Army Times...FORCES--PANAMA--AMERICAN INVASION, 1989-1990 Women’s action investigated. Army Times; Feb. 5, 1990; 50(26): p. 10. WOMEN IN THE ARMED FORCES-- PREGNANCY ... Pregnancy a growing problem in early outs. Army Times; Sept. 3, 1990; 51(4): p. 10. WOMEN IN THE ARMED FORCES--RECRUITING, ENLISTMENT, ETC. No special

  16. How the Army Resists Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    a December 2006 speech to the Commission on National Guard and Reserves, Army Chief of Staff General Schoomaker stated “Following 9/11, our Army...the Army Management Staff College. 7 But in a speech at the Citadel in December of 2001, President Bush stated “The need for military...6 General Peter Schoomaker, "The Official Homepage of the United States Army." Speeches . December 14, 2006

  17. Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increased in winter and in cold regions of the world. Cold temperatures make hypertension worse and trigger cardiovascular complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, etc.). Chronic or intermittent exposure to cold causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in animals. The purpose of this review is to provide the recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Cold temperatures increase the activities of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The SNS initiates CIH via the RAS. Cold exposure suppresses the expression of eNOS and formation of NO, increases the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), up-regulates ETA receptors, but down-regulates ETB receptors. The roles of these factors and their relations in CIH will be reviewed. PMID:20036896

  18. Cardiovascular responses to cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increased in winter and in cold regions of the world. Cold temperatures make hypertension worse and trigger cardiovascular complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, etc.). Chronic or intermittent exposure to cold causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in animals. The purpose of this review is to provide the recent advances in the mechanistic investigation of cold-induced hypertension (CIH). Cold temperatures increase the activities of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The SNS initiates CIH via the RAS. Cold exposure suppresses the expression of eNOS and formation of NO, increases the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1), up-regulates ETA receptors, but down-regulates ETB receptors. The roles of these factors and their relations in CIH will be reviewed.

  19. Aeroacoustic research: An Army perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, H. A.; Schmitz, F. H.

    1978-01-01

    A short perspective of the Army aeroacoustic research program is presented that emphasizes rotary wing, aerodynamically generated noise. Exciting breakthroughs in experimental techniques and facilities are reviewed which are helping build a detailed understanding of helicopter external noise. Army and joint Army/NASA supported research programs in acoustics which promise to reduce the noise of future helicopters without severe performance penalties are included.

  20. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  1. Cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Claudy, A

    2001-11-01

    Cold urticaria is one form of urticaria that may be associated with other forms of physical urticarias. Frequency is generally estimated at two or three per 100. The triggering effect of cold is found at history taking in most of the cases. The urticaria is usually superficial, and more rarely associated with deep and/or mucosal urticaria. The diagnosis is based on history taking and the ice cube test. An exhaustive search for an etiologic factor is often unfruitful, and the presence of a cryopathy should lead to a complete work-up. Therapy of cold urticaria may prove to be difficult. In patients with secondary cold urticaria, underlying disease must be treated in order to resolve the skin symptoms. H1-antihistamines can be used but the clinical responses are highly variable. Short-time treatment with low concentration corticosteroids suppresses the symptoms only partially and temporarily. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be proposed but the procedure is difficult to carry out in daily life over an extended period. Key word: cryoglobulins.

  2. Army Ordnance Satellite Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1958-11-01

    movement, I n a 1958 a r t i c l e prepared f o r t h e Army Information Digest Prof, Oberth advocated j u s t t h i s type propulsion f o r a...p r o j e c t o n Before t h e s e 44. Maj. Gen. H. N, Toftoy, "Army Miss i l e development^" Amv Information Digest , Vole 11, No. 22, Dec...exhausted, 16 15. General Toftoy, Amy Information Digest , Dec. 1956, Vol, 11, No, 12, p. 25-27, ARGMA Technical Library f i l e s , 16, Throughout

  3. Factors Influencing Army Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    ARI Research Note 89-11 (N 00 Factors Influencing Army Maintenance LOloD Debra C. Evans and J. Thomas Roth Applied Science Associates, Inc. for...1.2.7 .2.7.C.1 11. TITLE (Include Security ClassifIcarIon) Factors Influencing Army Maintenance i2. FERSONAL AuTtiOR(S) Evans, Debra C., and Roth, J...y • ’ Factors and variables that influence maintenance for systems and related manpower, per- sonnel, and training (MPT) characteristics were

  4. Planning for Sustainable Water Supplies for US Army Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Risks in Operations October 31, 2011 Planning for Sustainable Water Supplies for US Army Installations Elisabeth Jenicek Mechanical Engineer/Regional...Planner Engineer Research and Development Center Planning for Sustainable  Water   Supplies  for US Army Installations Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Planning for Sustainable Water Supplies for US Army Installations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  5. Involvement of the 5'-untranslated region in cold-regulated expression of the rbpA1 gene in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis M3.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, N; Nakamura, A

    1998-01-01

    Transcript of the rbpA1 gene in Anabaena variabilis accumulates significantly at low growth temperatures below 28 degreesC. This accumulation was maximal at 16 degreesC. Accumulation of the rbpA1 transcript was completely abolished by rifampicin, but not by chloramphenicol. Photosynthesis was not required for this cold-induced accumulation. This accumulation of transcript was partly accounted for by increased stability of the rbpA1 transcript at low temperature. Expression of chimeric genes containing 3'-deleted rbpA1 sequences fused to the lacZ gene was regulated by low temperature when almost the entire 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) remained undeleted. Further deletion resulted in constitutive expression of the chimeric gene. The 5'-UTR sequence formed two types of complexes in vitro with protein extract from cells grown at 38 degreesC, but not with extract from the 22 degreesC grown cells. Affinity purification identified polypeptides of 75 and 32 kDa in Complex 1 and a 72 kDa polypeptide in Complex 2. These results are compatible with a model in which expression of the rbpA1 gene is regulated by transcriptional derepression at low temperature, although additional mechanisms, such as regulation of mRNA stability, might also contribute to temperature-dependent regulation. PMID:9547280

  6. [Effects of different organic matter mulching on water content, temperature, and available nutrients of apple orchard soil in a cold region].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiang-Tao; Lü, De-Guo; Qin, Si-Jun

    2014-09-01

    The effects of different organic matter covers on soil physical-chemical properties were investigated in a 'Hanfu' apple orchard located in a cold region. Four treatments were applied (weed mulching, rice straw mulching, corn straw mulching, and crushed branches mulching), and physical-chemical properties, including orchard soil moisture and nutrient contents, were compared among treatment groups and between organic matter-treated and untreated plots. The results showed that soil water content increased in the plots treated with organic matter mulching, especially in the arid season. Cover with organic matter mulch slowed the rate of soil temperature increase in spring, which was harmful to the early growth of fruit trees. Organic matter mulching treatments decreased the peak temperature of orchard soil in the summer and increased the minimum soil temperature in the fall. pH was increased in soils treated with organic matter mulching, especially in the corn straw mulching treatment, which occurred as a response to alleviating soil acidification to achieve near-neutral soil conditions. The soil organic matter increased to varying extents among treatment groups, with the highest increase observed in the weed mulching treatment. Overall, mulching increased alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium in the soil, but the alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen content in the rice straw mulching treatment was lower than that of the control.

  7. Distributed land surface modeling with utilization of multi-sensor satellite data: application for the vast agricultural terrain in cold region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzylev, E.; Uspensky, A.; Gelfan, A.; Startseva, Z.; Volkova, E.; Kukharsky, A.; Romanov, P.; Alexandrovich, M.

    2012-04-01

    A technique for satellite-data-based modeling water and heat regimes of a large scale area has been developed and applied for the 227,300 km2 agricultural region in the European Russia. The core component of the technique is the physically based distributed Remote Sensing Based Land Surface Model (RSBLSM) intended for simulating transpiration by vegetation and evaporation from bare soil, vertical transfer of water and heat within soil and vegetation covers during a vegetation season as well as hydrothermal processes in soil and snow covers during a cold season, including snow accumulation and melt, dynamics of soil moisture and temperature during soil freezing and thawing, infiltration into frozen soil. Processes in the "atmosphere-snow-frozen soil" system are critical for cold region agriculture, as they control crop development in early spring before the vegetation season beginning. For assigning the model parameters as well as for preliminary calibrating and validating the model, available multi-year data sets of soil moisture/temperature profiles, evaporation, snow and soil freezing depth measured at the meteorological stations located within the study region have been utilized. To provide an appropriate parametrization of the model for the areas where ground-based measurements are unavailable, estimates have been utilized for vegetation, meteorological and snow characteristics derived from the multispectral measurements of AVHRR/NOAA (1999-2010), MODIS/EOS Terra & Aqua (2002-2010), AMSR-E/Aqua (2003-2004; 2008-2010), and SEVIRI/Meteosat-9 (2009-2010). The technologies of thematic processing the listed satellite data have been developed and applied to estimate the land surface and snow cover characteristics for the study area. The developed technologies of AVHRR data processing have been adapted to retrieve land surface temperature (LST) and emissivity (E), surface-air temperature at a level of vegetation cover (TA), normalized vegetation index (NDVI), leaf

  8. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  9. Probing the cold and warm molecular gas in the Whirlpool Galaxy: Herschel SPIRE-FTS observations of the central region of M51 (NGC 5194)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirm, M. R. P.; Wilson, C. D.; Kamenetzky, J.; Parkin, T. J.; Glenn, J.; Maloney, P.; Rangwala, N.; Spinoglio, L.; Baes, M.; Boselli, A.; Cooray, A.; De Looze, I.; Fernández-Ontiveros, J. A.; Karczewski, O. Ł.; Wu, R.

    2017-10-01

    We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE)-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) intermediate-sampled mapping observations of the central ˜8 kpc (˜150 arcsec) of M51, with a spatial resolution of 40 arcsec. We detect four 12CO transitions (J = 4-3 to J = 7-6) and the [C i] 3P2-3P1 and 3P1-3P0 transitions. We supplement these observations with ground-based observations of 12CO J = 1-0 to J = 3-2 and perform a two-component non-local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis. We find that the molecular gas in the nucleus and centre regions has a cool component (Tkin ˜ 10-20 K) with a moderate but poorly constrained density (n(H2) ˜ 103-106 cm-3), as well as significant molecular gas in a warmer (Tkin ˜ 300-3000 K), lower density (n(H2) ˜ 101.6-102.5 cm-3) component. We compare our CO line ratios and calculated densities along with ratios of CO to total infrared luminosity to a grid of photon-dominated region (PDR) models and find that the cold molecular gas likely resides in PDRs with a field strength of G0 ˜ 102. The warm component likely requires an additional source of mechanical heating, from supernovae and stellar winds or possibly shocks produced in the strong spiral density wave. When compared to similar two-component models of other star-forming galaxies published as part of the Very Nearby Galaxies Survey (Arp 220, M82 and NGC 4038/39), M51 has the lowest density for the warm component, while having a warm gas mass fraction that is comparable to those of Arp 220 and M82, and significantly higher than that of NGC 4038/39.

  10. Male meiosis, morphometric analysis and distribution pattern of 2× and 4× cytotypes of Ranunculus hirtellus Royle, 1834 (Ranunculaceae) from the cold regions of northwest Himalayas (India)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Puneet; Singhal, Vijay Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we examined the chromosome number, detailed male meiosis, microsporogenesis, pollen fertility and morphological features and distribution of 2× and 4× cytotypes of Ranunculus hirtellus Royle, 1834. The majority of the populations scored now from cold regions of the northwest Himalayas showed tetraploid (n=16) meiotic chromosome count and one of the populations studied from the Manimahesh hills existed at diploid level (n=8). The individuals of diploid cytotype exhibited perfectly normal meiotic course resulting in 100% pollen fertility and pollen grains of uniform sizes. On the other hand, the plants of the tetraploid cytotype from all the populations in spite of showing normal bivalent formation and equal distribution to the opposite poles at anaphases showed various meiotic abnormalities. The most prominent among these meiotic abnormalities was the cytomixis which involved inter PMC (pollen mother cell) chromatin material transfer at different stages of meiosis-I. The phenomenon of cytomixis induced various meiotic abnormalities which include chromatin stickiness, pycnotic chromatin, laggards and chromatin bridges, out of plate bivalents at metaphase-I, disoriented chromatin material at anaphase/telophase and micronuclei. Consequently, these populations exhibited varying percentages of pollen sterility (24 - 77 %) and pollen grains of heterogeneous sizes. Analysis of various morphometric features including the stomata in 2× and 4× cytotypes showed that increase in ploidy level in the species is correlated with gigantism of vegetative and floral characters and the two cytotypes can be distinguished from each other on the basis of morphological characters. The distribution patterns of the 2× and 4× cytotypes now detected and 2×, 3×, 4× cytotypes detected earlier by workers from other regions of the Indian Himalayas have also been discussed. PMID:24260626

  11. Index to Army Times 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    1989; 50(6): p. 8. RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL--LAW AND LEGISLATION Bee swarm of bills: stingers or honey ? Army Times; Feb. 6, 1989; 49(26): p. 18...takes its tolL--even on drill sergeants. Army Times; Oct. 16, 1989; 50(10): p. 20. DRONE AIRCRAFT Unmanned scout plane planned to give infantry the big...50): p. 26. Plans overhauled for unmanned scout planes. Army Times; Aug. 7, 1989; 49(52): p. 28. Army drone may see action in drug war. Army Times; Oct

  12. Human monoclonal antibodies encoded by the V4-34 gene segment show cold agglutinin activity and variable multireactivity which correlates with the predicted charge of the heavy-chain variable region.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, S J; Turner, C E; Stevenson, F K; Spellerberg, M B; Thorpe, R; Natvig, J B; Thompson, K M

    1998-01-01

    We have characterized the reactivities of a panel of V4-34-encoded human IgM monoclonal antibodies (mAb) which bind the erythrocyte Rh D antigen, derived from an immunized individual. These were compared with the specificities of V4-34-encoded autoantibodies with I/i reactivity produced from patients with cold agglutinin disease (CAD), and other V4-34-encoded autoantibodies. The antibodies were evaluated for cold agglutinin activity using haemagglutination tests, immunofluorescence microscopy for reactivity with tissue components, and in solid phase radiobinding assays with purified antigens. We found that (i) cold agglutinin activity was a property of all the V4-34-encoded mAb (ii) the cold agglutinins from CAD patients were generally monospecific for I/i whereas most of the anti-D and the other V4-34-encoded mAb displayed multireactive properties, frequently binding to strongly acidic antigens (iii) computation of the net charge of the heavy-chain V regions showed that the multireactive mAb were generally more positively charged than the monospecific cold agglutinins, which could contribute to their multireactive phenotype. The involvement of charge interactions was further indicated by the effects of pH and ionic strength on the immunofluorescence staining patterns.

  13. NASA Teams With Army in Vortex Combustion Chamber Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photograph depicts one of over thirty tests conducted on the Vortex Combustion Chamber Engine at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) test stand 115, a joint effort between NASA's MSFC and the U.S. Army AMCOM of Redstone Arsenal. The engine tests were conducted to evaluate an irnovative, 'self-cooled', vortex combustion chamber, which relies on tangentially injected propellants from the chamber wall producing centrifugal forces that keep the relatively cold liquid propellants near the wall.

  14. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata…

  15. Branding the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-25

    be sure, a comprehensive recruitment campaign should leverage the strengths of incentives, recruiter saturation, and marketing to be successful ...recruitment campaign should leverage the strengths of incentives, recruiter saturation, and marketing to be successful . This monograph focuses...13 Selling the Army: The History of Marketing Successes and Failures ............................................ 15 The 1970s: A

  16. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata…

  17. Army Leader Transitions Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Initiate Organizational Communication (STRATCOM) Plan Step 3: Build and Sustain Knowledge Management Systems Step 4: Build Coalitions Internally and...Externally Step 5: Eliminate Needless Constraints PHASE VI: SUSTAINING (D+91+) Step 1: Manage Organizational Systems and Operations Step 2...field manuals and Army regulations and system -oriented technical manuals. Review Organizational Results Conduct a review of results oriented

  18. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  19. Cold Hands

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have a problem with the nerves or blood circulation or a problem with tissue damage in your hands or fingers. ... of causes. Having cold hands could signal a problem with your blood circulation or the blood vessels in your hands. Make ...

  20. Electrical Grounding in Cold Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    distribu- tion of shallow permafrost (Hoekstra et al. 1975, Arcone et al. 1979). These methods can be used year-round, whereas DC methods are difficult...for calculating the resistance of a vertical electrode in layered earth. Arcone (1977) calculated resistances in one- and two-layered earth for...vertical rods or horizontal wires and compared the results to the theoretical results of Sunde (1949). Arcone showed that a horizontal wire is preferable

  1. Great Lakes/Saint Lawrence Seaway Regional Transportation Study for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Phase II. Summary Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    ecology system and a risk to public health . VI-. Environmental and social issues have been identified by governmental bodies, individuals and...local or regional basis. This could cause Federal or local air cuality standards to be exceeded on a short- or long-term basis. VI-4 ! J (2) Water

  2. [Mediator effect analysis of the trait coping style on job stress and fatigue of the military personnel stationed in plateau and high cold region].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J J; Jia, J M; Tao, N; Song, Z X; Ge, H; Jiang, Y; Tian, H; Qiu, E C; Tang, J H; Liu, J W

    2017-03-20

    Objective: To investigate the fatigue status of military personnel stationed in plateau and high cold region, and to analyze the mediator effect of trait coping style on job stress and fatigue. Methods: In October 2010, with the method of cluster random sampling survey, 531 military personnel stationed in plateau and high cold region were chosen as subject. The fatigue status were evaluated by the Chinese version multidimensional fatigue inventory (MFI-20) , job stress were evaluated by the Job Stress Survey (JSS) , and trait coping style were evaluated by the Trait Coping Style Questionnaire (TCSQ) . Results: According to the information of different population characteristics, mean rank of physical fatigue about the urban (town) group were higher than that of rural group (Z=-2.200, P<0.05) ; mean rank of reduced motivation about the urban (town) group were higher than that of rural group (Z=-2.781, P<0.05) ; mean rank of general fatigue scores about the urban (town) group were higher than that of rural group (Z=-3.026, P<0.05) ; mean rank of physical fatigue about the up or equal 20-years old age group were higher than that of below 20-years old age group (Z=-4.045, P<0.05) ; mean rank of reduced motivation about the up or equal 20-years old age group were higher than that of below 20-years old age group (Z=-2.182, P<0.05) ; mean rank of mental fatigue about the up or equal 20-years old age group were higher than that of below 20-years old age group (Z=-2.879, P<0.05) ; mean rank of general fatigue scores about the up or equal 20-years old age group were higher than that of below 20-years old age group (Z=-3.647, P<0.05) ; mean rank of reduced motivation were significant statistical difference among the military officers, sergeancy and soldier group (F=18.965, P<0.05) ; mean rank of general fatigue scores were significant statistical difference among the military officers, sergeancy and soldier group (F=14.711, P<0.05) . The score of negative coping style were

  3. 76 FR 66282 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Educational Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... CFR 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: November 15, 2011. Place of Meeting:...

  4. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  5. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  6. Ocean-Atmosphere Environments of Antarctic-Region Cold-Air Mesocyclones: Evaluation of Reanalyses for Contrasting Adjacent 10-Day Periods ("Macro-Weather") in Winter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleton, A. M.; Auger, J.; Birkel, S. D.; Maasch, K. A.; Mayewski, P. A.; Claud, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale cyclones in cold-air outbreaks (mesocyclones) feature in the weather and climate of the Antarctic (e.g., Ross Sea) and sub-antarctic (Drake Passage). They adversely impact field operations, and influence snowfall, the ice-sheet mass balance, and sea-air energy fluxes. Although individual mesocyclones are poorly represented on reanalyses, these datasets robustly depict the upper-ocean and troposphere environments in which multiple mesocyclones typically form. A spatial metric of mesocyclone activity—the Meso-Cyclogenesis Potential (MCP)—used ERA-40 anomaly fields of: sea surface temperature (SST) minus marine air temperature (MAT), near-surface winds, 500 hPa air temperature, and the sea-ice edge location. MCP maps composited by teleconnection phases for 1979-2001, broadly correspond to short-period satellite "climatologies" of mesocyclones. Here, we assess 3 reanalysis datasets (CFSR, ERA-I and MERRA) for their reliably to depict MCP patterns on weekly to sub-monthly periods marked by strong regional shifts in mesocyclone activity (frequencies, track densities) occurring during a La Niña winter: June 21-30, 1999 (SE Indian Ocean) and September 1-10, 1999 (Ross Sea sector). All reanalyses depict the marked variations in upper ocean and atmosphere variables between adjacent 10-day periods. Slight differences may owe to model resolution or internal components (land surface, coupled ocean models), and/or how the observations are assimilated. For June 21-30, positive SST-MAT, southerly winds, proximity to the ice edge, and negative T500, accompany increased meso-cyclogenesis. However, for September 1-10, surface forcing does not explain frequent comma cloud "polar lows" north-east of the Ross Sea. Inclusion of the upper-level diffluence (e.g., from Z300 field) in the MCP metric, better depicts the observed mesocyclone activity. MCP patterns on these "macro-weather" time scales appear relatively insensitive to the choice of reanalysis.

  7. Simulation and Feasibility Study on a ‘Renewable Energy House’ with a Geothermal Heat Pump-Powered Floor Heating System in Cold Climate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Masafumi; Akpan, Itoro; Endoh, Noboru

    An actual renewable energy house, equipped with a geothermal heat pump (GHP)-powered floor heating system was investigated and analyzed. Daily annual monitoring between February 2005 ˜ February 2006 and real-time continuous system monitoring within selected periods during the winter season between November 2006 ˜ January 2007, were carried out in order to establish the actual performance of the system. It emerged that the GHP-powered floor heating system is sufficient for space heating, with the maintenance of near-uniform room temperatures even during the coldest days in a very cold region like Hokkaido, Japan. About 37% average of the floor heat losses are recoverable and more than 50% of the ventilation heat losses are recovered due to various innovative energy-saving techniques built into the system. Annual heat loss from the house estimated by the numerical simulation showed good agreement with the measured annual thermal demand for room heating. The simulation also estimated that annual running costs and Green House Gas (GHG) emissions reductions of 47% and 49% respectively, can be realized with this system compared to an equivalent conventional system. A detailed cost analysis for the GHP-only system revealed that if the cost of fuel oil increases by about 50% from the current value of ¥80/L, then the payback period for a GHP-powered renewable energy system is about 14 years. This payback period reduces to about 10 years if 30% of the initial cost of the GHP-powered system is externally funded.

  8. Characterization of regional cold-hydrothermal inflows enriched in arsenic and associated trace-elements in the southern part of the Duero Basin (Spain), by multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Forcada, Elena; Vega-Alegre, Marisol; Timón-Sánchez, Susana

    2017-09-01

    Naturally occurring arsenic in groundwater exceeding the limit for potability has been reported along the southern edge of the Cenozoic Duero Basin (CDB) near its contact with the Spanish Central System (SCS). In this area, spatial variability of arsenic is high, peaking at 241μg/L. Forty-seven percent of samples collected contained arsenic above the maximum allowable concentration for drinking water (10μg/L). Correlations of As with other hydrochemical variables were investigated using multivariate statistical analysis (Hierarchical Cluster Analysis, HCA and Principal Component Analysis, PCA). It was found that As, V, Cr and pH are closely related and that there were also close correlations with temperature and Na(+). The highest concentrations of arsenic and other associated Potentially Toxic Geogenic Trace Elements (PTGTE) are linked to alkaline NaHCO3 waters (pH≈9), moderate oxic conditions and temperatures of around 18°C-19°C. The most plausible hypothesis to explain the high arsenic concentrations is the contribution of deeper regional flows with a significant hydrothermal component (cold-hydrothermal waters), flowing through faults in the basement rock. Water mixing and water-rock interactions occur both in the fissured aquifer media (igneous and metasedimentary bedrock) and in the sedimentary environment of the CDB, where agricultural pollution phenomena are also active. A combination of multivariate statistical tools and hydrochemical analysis enabled the distribution pattern of dissolved As and other PTGTE in groundwaters in the study area to be interpreted, and their most likely origin to be established. This methodology could be applied to other sedimentary areas with similar characteristics and problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Reflecting on Hell in Anticipation of Armageddon: The Impact of Reflection and Adaptation on the Education of the US Army Officer Corps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-10

    resulted in victory during World War II and enhanced success during the Cold War. The Command and General Staff Course of the inter-war years and Cold ...SUBJECT TERMS Fort Leavenworth, Command and General Staff Course, Officer, Officer Corps, Professional Military Education, Langres, Cold War, School of...supporting the divisions, corps, and armies that resulted in victory during World War II and enhanced success during the Cold War. The Command and General

  10. Army Power and Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    2011 GreenGov Symposium Oct. 31 ‐ Nov. 2, 2011 Washington Hilton  Washington, DC Clean   Energy  – Session 5 Increasing the DoD Renewable Energy...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Clean   Energy  – Session 5 Increasing the DoD Renewable Energy Portfolio November 1, 2011 Army Energy in... Clean   Energy  – Session 5 Increasing the DoD Renewable Energy Portfolio November 1, 2011 3 Army Energy Consumption, 2010 Facilities Vehicles

  11. Army Sociocultural Performance Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    L. M. V., & Herman, J. L. (2007). Cross-cultural competency in Army leaders: A conceptual and empirical foundation (Study Report 2008-01). Arlington...2010). A framework for cross-cultural competence and learning recommendations. Orlando, FL: Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division...McCloskey, M. J., Grandjean, A., Behymer, K. J., & Ross, K. (2010). Assessing the development of cross-cultural competence in Soldiers. (Technical

  12. 2010 Army Modernization Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    leader. Over time, the Army will divest the various commercial- grade hand-held radios (commonly called Land Mobile Radios or LMRs), making them...both 7.62 and .50 Caliber sniper systems. The 7.62 sniper system was recently modernized with the fielding of the M110 Semiautomatic Sniper System...Terrain Container Handler Science and Technology Situational Awareness Soldier as a System Semiautomatic Sniper System Stryker Brigade Combat Team

  13. Army Contigency Contracting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    position of the United States Army. The pronouns "he," "his," and "him," when used in this publication represent both the masculine and feminine genders...comprehensive review of the literature base and interviews with gov- erment and industry personnel on the subjects of international contrac- ting...handling, container handling, machine tools, power generation, etc) are either in short supply or inadequate for the scope of work envisioned. The

  14. Army Public Service Advertising.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    34 Marketing and Media Decisions, January 1982, p. 63. 6U.S., General Accounting Office, " Advertising for Military Recruiting," p. 10. 7Dean L. Yarwood...talent and necessary training, they said. 4 8 An article in Marketing and Media Decisions 4 9 offered a brief synopsis of military recruitment advertising ...support, public relations, marketing research, and analysis. The N. W. Ayer field representative’s Army counterpart is the Advertising and Sales

  15. Army Strategic Energy Goals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-09

    3 Cells Modules Packs UNCLASSIFIED TARDEC’s End-to-End Energy Business: From Generation to Application 4UNCLASSIFIED Smart-Charging Micro-Grid...Installation of microgrid at Schofield Barracks, tied to critical infrastructure • Photovolatic array • Dedicated electric vehicle charging • Grid...Installation Forward Base / Camp Vehicle Battery-Fuel Cell Hybrid Battery-Battery Hybrid Soldier Soldier Army Advanced Energy Initiative: Concept for

  16. Returning to Army Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    Matthews and Dale E. Brown (Washington, DC: Pergamon- Brassey ‟ s , 1989), 3. 36 Ibid. 37 Ibid. 22 38 Ibid., 8. 39 Mary Blake French, ed., “Do We Need... S ) Colonel John M. Riley 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND...MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM( S ) U.S. Army War College 122 Forbes Avenue 122 Forbes Avenue

  17. Revolutionizing Army Leader Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    historical perspective . While it is relatively common knowledge that education and the military profession have been inherently intertwined since the...17013-5050 USAWC CLASS OF 2011 The U.S. Army War College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle State Association of...Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (215) 662-5606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting

  18. The American Armies: 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    implications of these changes for national sovereignty, identity, and security. Additionally, the study considers how proposed military reductions will...funded research and development center (FFRDC) for studies and analysis operated by RAND. The Arroyo Center provides the Army with objective, independent...chaired by the Vice Chief of Staff and by the Assistant Secretary for Research, Development, and Acquisition. Arroyo Center work is performed under

  19. Army Energy Security Implementation Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-13

    Army for Energy and Partnerships Washington, D.C. 20301-3140 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...Assistant Secretary of the Army for Energy and Partnerships ,Washington,DC,20301-3140 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING...Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Energy and Partnerships , DASA(E&P), at 703-692-9890. This page intentionally left blank. i

  20. Achieving Efficiencies in Army Installations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    34" ’■■"■" 1 USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT Achieving Efficiencies in Army Installations by Richard Fliss Col. Richard M. Meinhart Project...government agency. STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT ACHIEVING EFFICIENCIES IN ARMY INSTALLATIONS BY RICHARD FLISS DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved...for public release. Distribution is unlimited. DTIC QUALITY INSPECTED & USAWC CLASS OF 1998 U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE, CARLISLE BARRACKS, PA 17013-5050

  1. Index to Army Times, 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    10. DEPMEDS ff& DEPLOYABLE MEDICAL SYSTEM (DEPMEDS) S DESERT TORTOISE --NATIONAL TRAINING CENTER (NTC), FORT IRM.N, CA Tortoise vs. tank: No contest...Times; Sep. 13, 1993; 54(7): p. 8. Rangers in Somalia: Anatomy of a firefight (After-Action Review). Army Times; Nov. 15, 1993; 54(16): p. 14...TELEPHONE SERVICE International toLl-free numbers mushroom. Army Times; Oct. 11, 1993; 54(11): p. 18. TORTOISE SEE DESERT TORTOISE TOTAL ARMY

  2. 77 FR 9633 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries Advisory... in Military Service for America Memorial, Conference Room, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington,...

  3. Integration of Female Army Apprentices,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARMY TRAINING, *APPRENTICESHIP, * FEMALES , MILITARY TRAINING, MALES, AUSTRALIA, STRESS(PSYCHOLOGY), ATTITUDES(PSYCHOLOGY), ROLES(BEHAVIOR), ASSIMILATION, SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE, COMMERCE, INSTRUCTORS, WORK

  4. Index to Army Times 1992.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    Times; Apr. 27, 1992; 52(39): p. 6. CHILDBIRTH--ANALGESICS Childbirth painkiller to be made available. Army Times; Nov. 2, 1992; 53(14): p. 11...EPIDURAL BLOCK Childbirth painkiller to be made available. Army Times; Nov. 2, 1992; 53(14): p. 11. M1O9A (HOWITZER) Kuwaitis get took at Patadin. Army...Army Times; June 15, 1992; 52(46): p. 4. PA SEE PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS (PA) PAINKILLING DRUGS SEE ANALGESICS PALADIN SEE M109A6 (HOWITZER) PANAMA

  5. The Army’s Local Economic Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    31 Tables S . 1 . Army-Supported Economic Output and All Army Personnel and Additional Employment Congressional...the results of the analysis. Table S . 1 reports the range of results across the 435 congressional districts of the 113th Congress. All Army direct...effect of total, nationwide Army spending on each congressional district and state. Table S . 1 Army-Supported Economic Output and All Army Personnel

  6. Molecular markers associated with cold-hardiness in Camellia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers from expressed sequence tag-polymerase chain reaction (EST-PCR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were developed with the goal to separate cold hardy camellias from non-cold hardy ones. A total of 28 cold hardy and non-cold h...

  7. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  8. Improving Training Assistance from Army Schools to Army Training Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kille, Bruce R.

    U.S. Army service schools have been responsible for providing instructional reference materials to training managers of the Active Army and Reserve Components for many years. Regardless of what the service schools did however, it was apparent that far too many of those in charge of training were not aware of the assistance available to them.…

  9. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  10. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  11. Army Force Generation: Balancing Missions in the Army National Guard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-23

    National Guard input for Chief, National Guard Bureau Update brief for 30 January 2007, available from https://gkoportal.ngb.army.mil/sites/ JOP ...January 2007; available from https://gkoportal.ngb.army.mil/sites/ JOP /cngbbrief/default.aspx; Internet; accessed 28 January 2007. 55 U.S. General

  12. U.S. Army War College Key Strategic Issues List

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    Impacts of drought or other environmental stressors on Saharan and Sahelian security 9. Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR) programs... environmental trends (probability and consequence) will impact upon PACOM or the region? a. Regional climatic change/warming? b. Droughts...needs of the Army change. 27. What is the military’s role in controlling environmental impact on the modern battlefield? 28. Assess the

  13. Characteristics of organic soil in black spruce forests: implications for the application of land surface and ecosystem models in cold regions

    Treesearch

    Shuhua Yi; Kristen Manies; Jennifer Harden; David. McGuire

    2009-01-01

    Soil organic layers (OL) play an important role in land-atmosphere exchanges of water, energy and carbon in cold environments. The proper implementation of OL in land surface and ecosystem models is important for predicting dynamic responses to climate warming. Based on the analysis of OL samples of black spruce (Picea mariana), we recommend that...

  14. Using Army National Guard Combat Battalions for Peace Operations: A Viable Alternative for the Future.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    59Michael J. Hardesty and Jason D. Ellis, Training for Peace Operations: The Army Adapts to the Post-Cold War World, (Washington DC: US Institute of Peace...Component Capability and Credibility. Alexandria VA: Institute for Defense Analysis, 1996. Hardesty , Michael J. and Jason D. Ellis, Training for Peace

  15. 36 CFR 223.238 - Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Free use authorization to U.S... Instruments § 223.238 Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy. Subject to delegations of authority by the Chief, Regional Foresters may approve the harvest of special forest products by the U.S. Army and Navy...

  16. 36 CFR 223.238 - Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Free use authorization to U.S... Instruments § 223.238 Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy. Subject to delegations of authority by the Chief, Regional Foresters may approve the harvest of special forest products by the U.S. Army and Navy...

  17. 36 CFR 223.238 - Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Free use authorization to U.S... Instruments § 223.238 Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy. Subject to delegations of authority by the Chief, Regional Foresters may approve the harvest of special forest products by the U.S. Army and Navy...

  18. The Army Graduate Student Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    The Army Graduate Student Program is a financial assistance program sponsored by the Army to help college graduates who are qualified dietitians, physical therapists, and occupational therapists complete the requirements for a master's degree in their specialties. Dietitians selected for this program may do graduate work for a master's degree in…

  19. Army Transformation to Expeditionary Formations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    potatoes " of the United States Army. This is what our nation depends on and expects a land based anned force to be. No formation currently on this...is something to be said about form and functionality. Briefly this, kudos to Army leadership by reducing the level of maintenance ( starching , sewing

  20. Training the Afghan National Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    to mold the South Vietnamese Armed Forces (SVAF) into a conventional army in its own image only served to make them “incongruent with the culture it... Spore . “Big Push in Guerrilla Warfare.” Army, vol. 12, no. 8 (March 1962), 36. Obama, Barack H. “Obama’s Strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan

  1. Women in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-06

    22 The data in tables one through six speaks for itself. In the Health of the Army reports reviewed, the fact that women require more than twice the...campaigns. There was no draft. The average American had no radio to speak of, nor television, or telephone. Life was small town. America was unto family and...Thsrt scmaale1 Zt th Irsn enirdmnsrnt.B Y8 oe Wnofficer content is rnoewa aout .27 percent ohe toe offie tent is expected to be about 11.6 rercent. 13

  2. Evaluation of a patient with cold and cholinergic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Sigler, R W; Levinson, A I; Evans, R; Horakova, Z; Kaplan, A P

    1979-01-01

    A-20-year-old male Army paratrooper presented with a history of inducible urticaria associated with exercise as well as cold exposure. Upon evaluation, he not only had a positive ice cube test, but also had a positive mecholyl skin test with numberous satellite lesions and generalized punctate urticaria following exercise challenge. Thus, he appeared to have combined cold and cholinergic urticaria. When mediator release was examined during cold and exercise challenge, histamine release was observed in each instance; a rapid rise and fall of plasma histamine was seen after cold challenge, while a lag phase followed by sustained elevation of plasma histamine was associated with exercise challenge. This represents the fourth reported case of combined cold and cholinergic urticaria and is the first in whom mediator release was assessed. The time-course of histamine release was characteristic of each disorder.

  3. Army Aviation -- Back to Its Roots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-03

    2 Ibid., 5 – 11, and Richard P. Weinert , Jr., A History of Army Aviation – 1950-1962 (Fort Monroe, VA: U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, 1991...Doctrine, 75 – 76. 9 Richard P. Weinert , Jr., A History of Army Aviation – 1950-1962 (Fort Monroe, VA: U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, 1991

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Mid-State Disposal Landfill, Marathon Battery, Cold Spring, New York, (second remedial action), September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The Marathon Battery Company (MBC) site, a former battery manufacturing plant, is located in the Village of Cold Spring in Putnam, New York, approximately 40 miles north of New York City. The site operated from 1952 to 1979 producing military and commercial batteries. During this time the site changed ownership several times, finally operating as the MBC from 1969 to 1979. Before 1965, the plant's wastewater treatment system discharged into the Hudson River at the Cold Spring pier via the Cold Spring sewer system, except during periods of overload or system shutdown during which time the process effluent was discharged directly into East Foundry Cove Marsh (EFCM) to the southeast. Between November 1972 and July 1973, a limited cleanup was conducted by MBC and other responsible parties, to remove sediment from parts of Foundry Cove and surrounding areas contaminated with cadmium and nickel in excess of 900 mg/kg. The selected remedial action for Area II at this site includes: decontamination of the former battery facility; excavation; and offsite disposal.

  5. Investigation of the Cold Fusion Phenomenon in the Surface Region of Hydrogen Non-occlusive Metal Catalysts; W, Pt, and Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozima, Hideo; Mizuno, Tadahiko

    2009-03-01

    There are several experimental data sets showing occurrence of the cold fusion phenomenon (CFP) in such contact metallic catalysts which do not occlude hydrogen isotopes such as tungsten (W), platinum (Pt) and gold (Au). These metals do not occlude hydrogen isotopes and are different from such hydrogen occlusive transition metals usually used in the cold fusion (CF) experiments such as Ti, Ni, and Pd. The non-occlusive isotopes and give us precious information about mechanisms facilitating formation of specific matter for the CFP (CF matter) in the cold fusion material. In the electrolysis experiments with these metals as electrodes and with several electrolytes in light or heavy water, transmuted nuclides were observed in the surface layer of the electrodes. The generated nuclides were localized in areas with a diameter of around a few μm in the surface layer of thickness less than 103 nm. These specific nuclides observed in the host metals, W, Pt and Au, depend on the composition of the electrolyte.

  6. COLD-PCR amplification of bisulfite-converted DNA allows the enrichment and sequencing of rare un-methylated genomic regions.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Milbury, Coren A; Karatza, Elli; Chen, Clark C; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Merewood, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant hypo-methylation of DNA is evident in a range of human diseases including cancer and diabetes. Development of sensitive assays capable of detecting traces of un-methylated DNA within methylated samples can be useful in several situations. Here we describe a new approach, fast-COLD-MS-PCR, which amplifies preferentially un-methylated DNA sequences. By employing an appropriate denaturation temperature during PCR of bi-sulfite converted DNA, fast-COLD-MS-PCR enriches un-methylated DNA and enables differential melting analysis or bisulfite sequencing. Using methylation on the MGMT gene promoter as a model, it is shown that serial dilutions of controlled methylation samples lead to the reliable sequencing of un-methylated sequences down to 0.05% un-methylated-to-methylated DNA. Screening of clinical glioma tumor and infant blood samples demonstrated that the degree of enrichment of un-methylated over methylated DNA can be modulated by the choice of denaturation temperature, providing a convenient method for analysis of partially methylated DNA or for revealing and sequencing traces of un-methylated DNA. Fast-COLD-MS-PCR can be useful for the detection of loss of methylation/imprinting in cancer, diabetes or diet-related methylation changes.

  7. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold ... tos y el resfriado Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ...

  8. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing. Other symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts ...

  9. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold ... Someone Quit? Avoiding DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ...

  10. [Application of toxic substances in ancient Chinese Army].

    PubMed

    Gong, C

    1995-01-01

    Application of toxic substances as a weapon began in the Spring-Autumn Period. In 677 B.C. the people of Sui dropped poisons into water to expel army from Qi State. During the period of cold weapon in addition to toxic fumigation, poisons were also spread on spears, swords and arrows. Recipes for anti-toxic arrows were recorded in Chen Yanzhi's Xiao-pin-fang of the Western Jin Dynasty, Liu Juan-zi's Gui-Yi-fang of the Liu-Song Dynasty, Jin-chuang-mi-chuan-jin-fang of the Yuan Dynasty. As a rule, toxication through natural sources were emphasized as described in Tai-bai-yin-jing of the Tang Dynasty, etc, including selection of camping sites, quality of water supply. It was also mentioned that the general of an army should despatch order for antitoxicity during travelling.

  11. Transformation of the Army Depot Maintenance System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-28

    three, Internet accessed 18 January 2007. 21 Colonel Fred L. Hart, Jr., USA (Ret.), “ Lean Manufacturing and the Army Industrial Base,” Army Logistician...Six Sigma Available at http://www.amc.army.mil/lean/index.aspx, Internet accessed 18 January 2007. 24 Colonel Fred L. Hart, Jr., USA (Ret.), “ Lean ... Manufacturing and the Army Industrial Base”, 6. 25 Institute of Land Warfare, Association of the United States Army, Torchbearer, National Security

  12. Personnel Service Support (PSS) in Army Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-20

    UNCLASSIFIED N ACN 73765 PERSONNEL SERVICE SUPPORT (PSS) IN ARMY MODELS FINAL REPORT DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY TRAINING...Analysis 4-7 A-6 10 Theater Strategic Operational (TSO) Depths B-3 11 Constructing Interval Scales from Ordinal Data E-4 vii GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS ACN Army...Control Number AI Artificial Intelligence AIDS Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome ALB Airland Battle AMSAA Army Materiel Systems Analysis Agency ANSI

  13. The Institutional Army, FY1975-FY2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    INTRODUCTION This paper defines the Institutional Army in terms of its functions so that judgments can be made on its size and composition.1 In...broad terms , the Institutional Army is that part of the total Army that provides general or central support for other elements of the Army that support... term “Generating Force” to describe that part of the Army that creates and sustains the operating forces and the term “Deployment Support Force” for

  14. Cold confusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.

    1989-07-01

    On March 23 two chemists, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons startled the world with a press conference at the University of Utah where they announced that they had achieved nuclear fusion at room temperatures. As evidence they cited the production of ''excess'' amounts of heat in an electrochemical apparatus and observation of neutron production. While the production of heat in a chemical apparatus is not in itself unusual the observation of neutrons is certainly extraordinary. As it turned out, though, careful measurements of the neutron production in electrochemical apparatus similar to that used by Fleischmann and Pons carried out at dozens of other laboratories has shown that the neutron production fails by many orders of magnitude to support the assertion by Fleischmann and Pons that their discovery represents a new and cheap source of fusion power. In particular, independent measurements of the neutron production rate suggest that the actual rate of fusion energy production probably does not exceed 1 trillionth of a watt. This paper discusses the feasibility that cold fusion is actually being achieved. 7 refs.

  15. MISR Browse Images: Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-02

    ... MISR Browse Images: Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) These MISR Browse images provide a ... over the region observed during the NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). CLPX involved ground, airborne, and satellite measurements ...

  16. Hot and Cold

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-16

    This view shows Mercury's north polar region, colored by the maximum biannual surface temperature, which ranges from >400 K (red) to 50 K (purple). As expected for the Solar System's innermost planet, areas of Mercury's surface that are sunlit reach high temperatures, and hence most of this image is colored red! In contrast, some craters near Mercury's poles have regions that remain permanently in shadow, and in these regions even the maximum temperatures can be extremely low. Evidence from MESSENGER and Earth-based observations indicate that water ice deposits are present in these cold craters. The craters nearest Mercury' poles have surface temperatures less than 100 K (-173°C, -280°F), and water ice is stable on the surface, such as in Prokofiev. However, many craters near but somewhat farther from Mercury's poles have cold, permanently shadowed interiors, but the maximum temperature is too high for water ice to persist at the surface. In these craters, water ice is present but is buried beneath a thin, low-reflectance volatile layer likely consisting of organic-rich material, such as in Berlioz crater. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19247

  17. Transforming the Army Service Component Command to a Theater Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department...Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (215) 662-5606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional...2013 2. REPORT TYPE STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT .33 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Transforming the Army Service

  18. Cold H I in faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Begum, Ayesha

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a study of the amount and distribution of cold atomic gas, as well its correlation with recent star formation in a sample of extremely faint dwarf irregular galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey (FIGGS) and its extension, FIGGS2. We use two different methods to identify cold atomic gas. In the first method, line-of-sight H I spectra were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components and narrow Gaussian components were identified as cold H I. In the second method, the brightness temperature (TB ) is used as a tracer of cold H I. We find that the amount of cold gas identified using the TB method is significantly larger than the amount of gas identified using Gaussian decomposition. We also find that a large fraction of the cold gas identified using the TB method is spatially coincident with regions of recent star formation, although the converse is not true. That is only a small fraction of the regions with recent star formation are also covered by cold gas. For regions where the star formation and the cold gas overlap, we study the relationship between the star formation rate density and the cold H I column density. We find that the star formation rate density has a power-law dependence on the H I column density, but that the slope of this power law is significantly flatter than that of the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt relation.

  19. Turbulent Heat Fluxes during an Intense Cold-Air Outbreak over the Kuroshio Extension Region: Results from a High-Resolution Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-12

    agreement with AMTEX observa- tions and sensible and latent heat fluxes of 300 and 700 Wm 2, respectively, which are close to the observed values. Xue et...1,300 Wm 2, respectively. Modeling of cold-air outbreaks using a full three-dimensional coupled atmosphere–ocean model was done for the Gulf Stream for a...latent heat flux of 575 Wm 2. In this study, we present a case from 30 January through 6 February 2005 where the formation of cyclo- nes followed the

  20. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  1. Cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  2. Public health assessment addendum for Letterkenny Army Depot, USA Letterkenny Southeast Area, Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PA6213820503 and USA Letterkenny, Property Disposal Office Area, Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pennsylvania. CERCLIS No. PA2210090054. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-25

    The Letterkenny Army Depot (Letterkenny) is five miles north of Chambersburg, in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. The US Army Depot consists of two National Priorities List (NPL) sites: USA Letterkenny Southeast Area (hereafter referred to as the SE Area) and USA Letterkenny - Property Disposal Office Area (hereafter referred to as the PDO Area). A public health assessment of those combined sites was released by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry on September 30, 1988 (Appendix 1). The previous public health assessment combined discussion of both NPL sites due to similar contaminants and pathways. Since the release of the previous public health assessment, new environmental, community health concerns, and health outcome data have become available, warranting this addendum.

  3. Army Families and Soldier Readiness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    self -sufficiency while they are away on deployments. According to the measures in this study, Army personnel have a high level of individual... levels of confidence in the self -sufficiency of their spouses. There are indications that some Army situations affect well-being. For example...encompasses a broad range of dimensions ranging from emotional status to feelings of happiness or anxiety, self - esteem , global satisfaction, and

  4. US Army TARDEC: Robotics Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-25

    unclassified US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics 25 March 2010 Reference herein to any specific commercial...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Bernard... Robotics Industry Partnerships Academia PartnershipsGovernment Partnerships TRADOC Community Outreach • S&T Support to the RS-JPO • Develops and Fosters

  5. Army Occupational Health and AEHA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    of the complex environmental and occupational health problems facing the Army today. As new areas of concern are surfaced, I am sure we will be tasked...Army concern for general control of occupational health hazards occurred in August of 1938 when the Chief of Ordnance requested medical care for its...radiation protection programs beyond the traditional concern for x-ray protection., The Health Physics Division was established and presently exists to

  6. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in cold regions: Development of a pre-optimized biostimulation biopile-scale field assay in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Martínez Álvarez, L M; Ruberto, Lam; Lo Balbo, A; Mac Cormack, W P

    2017-03-02

    Bioremediation proved to be an effective approach to deal with soil contamination, especially in isolated, cold environments such as Antarctica. Biostimulation, involving the addition of macronutrients -mainly nitrogen and phosphorous- is considered the simplest and cheapest bioremediation process. Optimizing the levels of these nutrients is a key step prior to the application of a biostimulation strategy. In this work, N and P levels, optimized by Response Surface Methodology (RSM) at lab-scale, were applied to an Antarctic hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The process was performed on-site, using high density polyethylene geomembranes (800μm) to isolate treated soil from the surroundings and under environmental conditions at Carlini station (Antarctica) during 50days. Two 0.5ton biopiles were used as experimental units; a control biopile (CC), and a biostimulated system (BS), amended with N and P. At the end of the assay, hydrocarbon removal was significantly higher in BS system compared to CC (75.79% and 49.54% respectively), showing that the applied strategy was effective enough to perform a field-assay in Antarctica that significantly reduce soil contamination levels; and proving that RSM represents a fundamental tool for the optimization of nutrient levels to apply during bioremediation of fuel contaminated cold soils.

  7. Colds and the Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014October 2014familydoctor.org editorial staff OverviewWhat is the common cold and the flu?The common cold and the flu are viral infections of the ... have a cold or the flu?Although the common cold and the flu share many similar symptoms, they ...

  8. Cold remedies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sore throat, cough, stuffy nose, sneezing, runny nose, fever, chills, and muscle aches are all symptoms associated with the common cold. Over-the-counter medicines for a cold only alleviate cold symptoms but do not shorten the duration of a cold. As always, ...

  9. Army Reserve Expands Net Zero Energy, Water, Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.

    2015-04-14

    In 2012, the Army initiated a Net Zero (NZ) program to establish NZ energy, water, and/or waste goals at installations across the U.S. In 2013, the U.S. Army Reserve expanded this program to cover all three categories at different types of Reserve Centers (RCs) across 5 regions. Projects identified at 10 pilot sites resulted in an average savings potential from recommended measures of 90% for energy, 60% for water, and 83% for waste. This article provides results of these efforts.

  10. 75 FR 24930 - Fort Bliss (Texas) Army Growth and Force Structure Realignment Final Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ...-PWE, Building 624, Taylor Road, Fort Bliss, TX 79916-6812; e- mail: bliss.eis@conus.army.mil . FOR... libraries: In El Paso (TX), the Richard Burges Regional Library, 9600 Dyer; the Irving Schwartz Branch...

  11. Facts about the Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Influenza Facts About The Common Cold What Is a Cold? Colds are minor infections ... for 10 to 40 percent of colds. Other common cold viruses include coronavirus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) . ...

  12. 2014 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leader Findings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    feedback to learners . The level of rigor or challenge posed by all ix courses shows room for improvement, particularly courses offered entirely...The attributes represent the values and identity of Army leaders (character), how leaders are perceived by followers and others (presence), and...degree. Less than 10% attended a resident Army course, completed structured self-development, learned a foreign language , or engaged in other types of

  13. Raising the clinical standard of care for suicidal soldiers: an army process improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Archuleta, Debra; Jobes, David A; Pujol, Lynette; Jennings, Keith; Crumlish, Jennifer; Lento, Rene M; Brazaitis, Katherine; Moore, Bret A; Crow, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    From 2004 to 2008, the suicide rate among US Army Soldiers increased 80%, reaching a record high in 2008 and surpassing the civilian rate for the first time in recorded history. In recent years, the rate of Army suicides rose again; the year 2012 reflects the highest rate of military suicides on record. There is a need to assess current behavioral health practices to identify both effective and ineffective practices, and to adapt services to meet the needs of the Army behavioral health patient population. This paper discusses a process improvement initiative developed in an effort to improve clinical processes for suicide risk mitigation in an Army behavioral health clinic located in the catchment area of the US Army Southern Regional Medical Command.

  14. Cold weather injuries, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, July 2008-June 2013.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    From July 2012 through June 2013, the number of active and reserve component service members treated for cold injuries (n=479) was the lowest of the last five cold seasons (2008-2013). Over the last five years hypothermia was the most common cold injury among service members in the Marine Corps and Coast Guard, while frostbite was the most common type of cold injury in the other three Services. Consistent with trends from previous cold seasons, service members who were female, less than 20 years old, or of black, non-Hispanic race/ethnicity tended to have higher cold injury rates than their respective counterparts. Among service members overall, Army personnel accounted for the majority (62%) of cold injuries.

  15. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... organization, would require a specific Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license or Army Radiation... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the... revise its regulations concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires Non-Army...

  16. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... a specific Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license or Army Radiation Authorization (ARA). The... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the... regulation concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires non-Army agencies (including...

  17. Regionalization: The Cure for an Ailing Intelligence Career Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Regionalization: The Cure for an Ailing Intelligence Career Field by Colonel Enrique Camacho United States Army... United States Army War College Class of 2013 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: A Approved for Public Release Distribution is Unlimited... United States Army 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Colonel

  18. Preliminary thoughts concerning potential US Army threats/roles

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.A.; Solomon, K.A.; Miles, J.T.

    1991-06-01

    The rate at which the current world military/political perspective is changing demands consideration of a broader spectrum of potential threats then has been the case for the past few decades--during which the Soviet Union was the preeminent threat. Seemingly overnight, the cold war ceased, the requirement for massive U.S. military counters to the Soviet Union forces faded, and an era of constant (obvious) military threat disappeared. This situation has in turn been revolutionized by the Iraq invasion of Kuwait and the U.S. response. The paper addresses part of the problem facing military planners by defining a spectrum of threats that typify those the U.S. Army might face over the next decade or two. The purpose of the threat set is to support the evaluation of the effectiveness and usefulness, to the U.S. Army, of advanced technologies. The set of threats is intended to provide a complete set of characteristics rather then to be a complete list of the possibilities; it is illustrative rather than exhaustive. Although largely completed before the war with Iraq started, its content is still valid in that its purpose is to provide a framework for thinking about future U.S. Army technology needs.

  19. Sowing Seeds to Cultivate Future Army Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    U.S. Army has lost many of its core competencies and training skills. One of those degraded skills is officer professional development (OPD). Bearing...U.S. Army officer corps increasingly emphasize its professional development programs.

  20. A consistent structure of phytoplankton communities across the warm-cold regions of the water mass on a meridional transect in the East/Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jung Hyun; Han, Eunah; Lee, Sang Heon; Park, Hyun Je; Kim, Kyung-Ryul; Kang, Chang-Keun

    2017-09-01

    Three cruises were undertaken along a meridional transect in the East/Japan Sea (EJS) in spring (May 2007), summer (July 2009), and fall (October 2012) to determine the geographic variations in phytoplankton biomass and community composition. This study revealed a gradient of surface temperature and a fluctuation of hydrographic conditions along the transect. Although a subpolar front (SPF) formed between the warm- and cold-water masses (37-40°N), no significant differences in phytoplankton biomass and community composition were detected between the southern and northern parts of the EJS. These results disprove our initial hypothesis that different water masses may contain differently structured phytoplankton communities. In the present study, isothermal layers (≤ 12 °C) fluctuated over a depth of 50 m in both warm- and cold-water masses, depending on the SPF. In contrast, the nitracline (i.e. 2.5 μM nitrate isopleth) depth was recorded within a limited range of 20-40 m in spring, 30-50 m in summer, and 40-60 m in fall. The chlorophyll a concentrations at the subsurface chlorophyll maxima (SCM) were significantly higher in spring and summer (356 ± 233 and 270 ± 182 ng L-1, respectively) than in fall (117 ± 89 ng L-1). The relative contributions of individual phytoplankton groups to the depth-integrated chlorophyll a concentration conformed to the composition of the phytoplankton community in the SCM layer, showing a dominance of diatoms (58 ± 19% in spring, 48 ± 11% in summer, and 30 ± 20% in fall). Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the geographic structures of phytoplankton communities were strongly associated with the vertical structures of water temperature and nutrient concentration in the water column rather than with horizontal gradients of hydrographic conditions. Finally, our findings suggest that water column stability and light-nutrient availability in the euphotic zone play a key role in determining geographical consistency of

  1. Army Field-Oriented S&T Experimentation Venues: A Comparative Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    YTC), (2) tropical (the Tropic Regions Test Center, Panama Canal Zone), and (3) cold weather (CRTC, Bolio Lake Test Complex, AK. Special...make sure test equipment properly arrives at the test site.     27  UNCLASSIFIED  3.5.5 Cold Regions Test Center. CRTC, located at the Bolio Lake ...range of cold weather or temperate climate tests, depending on the season. The Bolio Lake Test Complex provides automotive cold start capabilities and

  2. IRTM brightness temperature maps of the Martian south polar region during the polar night: The cold spots don't move

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, D. A.; Crisp, D.; Santee, M. L.; Richardson, M. I.

    1993-01-01

    A series of infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) south polar brightness temperature maps obtained by Viking Orbiter 2 during a 35-day period during the southern fall season in 1978 was examined. The maps show a number of phenomena that have been identified in previous studies, including day to day brightness temperature variations in individual low temperature regions and the tendency for IRTM 11-micron channel brightness temperatures to also decrease in regions where low 20-micron channel brightness temperatures are observed. The maps also show new phenomena, the most striking of which is a clear tendency for the low brightness temperature regions to occur at fixed geographic regions. During this season, the coldest low brightness temperatures appear to be concentrated in distinct regions, with spatial scales ranging from 50 to 300 km. There are approximately a dozen of these concentrations, with the largest centered near the location of the south residual polar cap. Other concentrations are located at Cavi Angusti and close to the craters Main, South, Lau, and Dana. Broader, less intense regions appear to be well correlated with the boundaries of the south polar layered deposits and the Mountains of Mitchell. No evidence for horizontal motion of any of these regions has been detected.

  3. Green Remediation: Army Policy and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    treated on-site within a contained asphalt- lined former pH control pond and treated in 300 yard increments – Caustic soda was evenly spread on soil...Army installations and FUDS.  The examples presented are not representative of all Army efforts 11 Energy Example Former Nebraska Ordnance Plant ...Daugherty, mark.e.daugherty@us.army.mil 15 Land and Ecosystems Example #2 Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant (Excess) Cleanup Objective: Treat soil

  4. Fostering Creative Thinking in the Institutional Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    FOSTERING CREATIVE THINKING IN THE INSTITUTIONAL ARMY A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff...SUBTITLE Fostering Creative Thinking in the Institutional Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...leadership, more specifically the US Army, identified developing creative thinkers as an essential component to the concept of winning in a complex world

  5. Implementing Maneuver Theory in the Australian Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    AUSTRALIAN ARMY, A PROCESS OF IMPLEMENTING THIS PHILOSOPHY IS REQUIRED IF THE ARMY IS TO REALIZE ITS FULL BENEFITS . THIS PAPER EXPLORES THE MEANS BY WHICH...warfighting philosophy for the Australian Army, a process of implementing this philosophy is required if the Army is to realize its full benefits . Discussion...smallest of forces. It can be employed in battle and long before combat. It can even be utilized in the organisation and equipping of forces long

  6. Army Pacific Pathways: Comprehensive Assessment and Planning Needed to Capture Benefits Relative to Costs and Enhance Value for Participating Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    ARMY PACIFIC PATHWAYS Comprehensive Assessment and Planning Needed to Capture Benefits Relative to Costs and Enhance... PACIFIC PATHWAYS Comprehensive Assessment and Planning Needed to Capture Benefits Relative to Costs and Enhance Value for Participating Units What...GAO Found U.S. Army Pacific (USARPAC), the Army’s component command in the Asia- Pacific region, has identified Pacific Pathways costs and taken steps

  7. Characteristics of the atmospheric circulation associated with cold-season heavy rainfall and flooding over a complex terrain region in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, G. A.; Lolis, C. J.; Zoumakis, N. M.; Kassomenos, P.; Melas, D.

    2014-01-01

    Raingauge data from four meteorological stations in Chalkidiki peninsula (Greece) were used to identify the characteristics of the synoptic circulation patterns associated with cold-season heavy rainfall events and corresponding flooding over the area. Precipitation climatology over the complex topography of Chalkidiki is characterized by limited annual rainfall, but in the occurrence of heavy rainfall episodes daily accumulations are exceptionally high with increased precipitation rates, leading often to severe flooding. Fifty-five cases of high daily accumulations for the period of 1997 to 2010, mostly observed during December and October, were classified into eight clusters by applying S-Mode Factor Analysis and Cluster Analysis to the ERA-Interim grid point reanalysis data. The results revealed that, in most cases, intense rainfall and flooding is produced by synoptic scale disturbances that generate and sustain cyclonic activity over south Italy, the Ionian, and less frequently over the Aegean Sea. In particular, the atmospheric circulation patterns associated with heavy rainfall are characterized by the presence of a southeasterly-easterly low-level humid flow over Chalkidiki in conjunction with the potentially unstable lower troposphere influenced by mid-level cyclonic vorticity advection and enhanced low-level convergence over the complex terrain.

  8. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  9. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  10. [The army of the East and health services].

    PubMed

    Guivarc'h, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    A medical disaster due to the failure of a plan intended to free Belfort by an army of 90 000 men, formed by Bourbaki in Nevers, joined in Besancon by 40 000 men from Lyon and from Dijon. Envisaged in three days, the regrouping lasts three weeks. A gigantic railway blocking, by an icy cold, leaves in the trains of the soldiers without food, of the horses without irons nor fodder. A third of manpower is from the start inapt for the fights. The utter exhaustion of the men don't make possible to exploit the success of Villersexel's battle (January 9), nor to cross Lizaine. The medical army officers joined those of the civil ambulances formed in South-east, and that of Pamard. The care given with delay on the covered with snow ground, in precarious shelters or encumbered hospitals, is summary. Cold, gelures, walk feet, infection, associated variola, are the cause of a high mortality: 8 500 died, and much of casualties. Ordered by Bourbaki, the dramatic routed to Switzerland by Pontarlier and the Cluse collar, under the Prussian shells will add 15 000 killed. The Swiss ones collect sick and wounded in 200 ambulances along the border, and on 87 000 men to be disarmed in 9 000 hospitalize. Pamard will remain until March 18 at the Pontarlier' hospital.

  11. The Army National Guard Division Headquarters in the Army of 2020

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-26

    the RC to meet combatant commanders’ objectives. In response to the President’s refined national security strategy, the Army issued the 2013 Army...the nation’s ability to maintain a force structure at a lower cost capable of rapidly mobilizing to meet national security interests. World War I...THE ARMY NATIONAL GUARD DIVISION HEADQUARTERS IN THE ARMY OF 2020 A Monograph by Major Chris M. Mabis Army National

  12. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy....

  13. Systemic Army Environmental Issues: Perspectives and Interpretations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    satisfy today’s RCRA or HSWA [ Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 19841 based information needs" (Butts, 1991). Another observer noted that the Army...Headquarters HQDA Headquarters. Department of the Army HSWA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 MACOM Major Command MCA Military Construction. Army MS

  14. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-range character of environmental problems will be recognized, and, where consistent with national... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes broad...

  15. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-range character of environmental problems will be recognized, and, where consistent with national... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes broad...

  16. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-range character of environmental problems will be recognized, and, where consistent with national... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes broad...

  17. Suicide in the US Army

    PubMed Central

    Lineberry, Timothy W.; O'Connor, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

  18. Cold Weather Pet Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... accordingly. You will probably need to shorten your dog’s walks in very cold weather to protect you ... slipping and falling. Long-haired or thick-coated dogs tend to be more cold-tolerant, but are ...

  19. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  20. Vitamin C and colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... belief is that vitamin C can cure the common cold . However, research about this claim is conflicting. Although ... Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ...

  1. Cold medicines and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... aspx . Accessed July 26, 2016. Cherry JD. The common cold. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach ... 2014:chap 7. Miller EK, Williams JV. The common cold. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  2. Skin Reactions to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Talpash, Orest

    1976-01-01

    Although skin reactions to cold are seen surprisingly infrequently in Canada, it is important to manage them correctly when they do occur. Frostbite, cold urticarias, Raynaud's disease and phenomenon, and several miscellaneous changes are discussed. PMID:21308019

  3. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References American ...

  4. Systems Thinking in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    September 2011) Systems Thinking in the Army Presented by: MG. Nick Justice Commanding General RDECOM Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Systems Thinking in the Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...18 Why do  Systems   Thinking ?  Systems   Thinking : Outside the Box  Desired Capability: Space explora?on will require a wri?ng  implement that is

  5. ENSO's far reaching connection to Indian cold waves.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, J V; Behera, Swadhin K; Annamalai, H; Ratna, Satyaban B; Rajeevan, M; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-11-23

    During boreal winters, cold waves over India are primarily due to transport of cold air from higher latitudes. However, the processes associated with these cold waves are not yet clearly understood. Here by diagnosing a suite of datasets, we explore the mechanisms leading to the development and maintenance of these cold waves. Two types of cold waves are identified based on observed minimum surface temperature and statistical analysis. The first type (TYPE1), also the dominant one, depicts colder than normal temperatures covering most parts of the country while the second type (TYPE2) is more regional, with significant cold temperatures only noticeable over northwest India. Quite interestingly the first (second) type is associated with La Niña (El Niño) like conditions, suggesting that both phases of ENSO provide a favorable background for the occurrence of cold waves over India. During TYPE1 cold wave events, a low-level cyclonic anomaly generated over the Indian region as an atmospheric response to the equatorial convective anomalies is seen advecting cold temperatures into India and maintaining the cold waves. In TYPE2 cold waves, a cyclonic anomaly generated over west India anomalously brings cold winds to northwest India causing cold waves only in those parts.

  6. ENSO’s far reaching connection to Indian cold waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, J. V.; Behera, Swadhin K.; Annamalai, H.; Ratna, Satyaban B.; Rajeevan, M.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-11-01

    During boreal winters, cold waves over India are primarily due to transport of cold air from higher latitudes. However, the processes associated with these cold waves are not yet clearly understood. Here by diagnosing a suite of datasets, we explore the mechanisms leading to the development and maintenance of these cold waves. Two types of cold waves are identified based on observed minimum surface temperature and statistical analysis. The first type (TYPE1), also the dominant one, depicts colder than normal temperatures covering most parts of the country while the second type (TYPE2) is more regional, with significant cold temperatures only noticeable over northwest India. Quite interestingly the first (second) type is associated with La Niña (El Niño) like conditions, suggesting that both phases of ENSO provide a favorable background for the occurrence of cold waves over India. During TYPE1 cold wave events, a low-level cyclonic anomaly generated over the Indian region as an atmospheric response to the equatorial convective anomalies is seen advecting cold temperatures into India and maintaining the cold waves. In TYPE2 cold waves, a cyclonic anomaly generated over west India anomalously brings cold winds to northwest India causing cold waves only in those parts.

  7. ENSO’s far reaching connection to Indian cold waves

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, J. V.; Behera, Swadhin K.; Annamalai, H.; Ratna, Satyaban B.; Rajeevan, M.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    During boreal winters, cold waves over India are primarily due to transport of cold air from higher latitudes. However, the processes associated with these cold waves are not yet clearly understood. Here by diagnosing a suite of datasets, we explore the mechanisms leading to the development and maintenance of these cold waves. Two types of cold waves are identified based on observed minimum surface temperature and statistical analysis. The first type (TYPE1), also the dominant one, depicts colder than normal temperatures covering most parts of the country while the second type (TYPE2) is more regional, with significant cold temperatures only noticeable over northwest India. Quite interestingly the first (second) type is associated with La Niña (El Niño) like conditions, suggesting that both phases of ENSO provide a favorable background for the occurrence of cold waves over India. During TYPE1 cold wave events, a low-level cyclonic anomaly generated over the Indian region as an atmospheric response to the equatorial convective anomalies is seen advecting cold temperatures into India and maintaining the cold waves. In TYPE2 cold waves, a cyclonic anomaly generated over west India anomalously brings cold winds to northwest India causing cold waves only in those parts. PMID:27876871

  8. Army Net Zero Prove Out. Army Net Zero Training Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-20

    minimization plan, Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments, Green Procurement Plan, Environmental Management System Material Flow Installation...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) National Defense Center for Energy and Environment Operated by Concurrent Technologies Corporation 100 CTC Drive...of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations and Environment ) 5850 21st Street, Building 211 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5527 Program

  9. Army Training Study: Concepts of the Army Training System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-08

    Resources Laboratory, December 1976. Flfman, C. B. Personal interview, Fort Monroe, VA: 15 December 1977. Fwell, Julian J., and Hunt, Iva A. Jr...skill retencion by individuals and units has al- * ways been a matter of priority interest to the Army. The June 1975 Ad- vanced Training Technology

  10. Army Science Board 1991 Summer Study - Army Simulation Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    May 91, Mr. C. Hatfield, Lawrence Livermore Labor atory JANUS-Technology, 29 May 91, Mr. Paul Herman , Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Aviation...Development, 30 May 91, Mr. Mansur , US Army, Aviation Systems Command Crew Station Research and Development Facility Briefing and Demonstration, 30 May

  11. Characterizing convective cold pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drager, Aryeh J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2017-06-01

    Cold pools produced by convective storms play an important role in Earth's climate system. However, a common framework does not exist for objectively identifying convective cold pools in observations and models. The present study investigates convective cold pools within a simulation of tropical continental convection that uses a cloud-resolving model with a coupled land-surface model. Multiple variables are assessed for their potential in identifying convective cold pool boundaries, and a novel technique is developed and tested for identifying and tracking cold pools in numerical model simulations. This algorithm is based on surface rainfall rates and radial gradients in the density potential temperature field. The algorithm successfully identifies near-surface cold pool boundaries and is able to distinguish between connected cold pools. Once cold pools have been identified and tracked, composites of cold pool evolution are then constructed, and average cold pool properties are investigated. Wet patches are found to develop within the centers of cold pools where the ground has been soaked with rainwater. These wet patches help to maintain cool surface temperatures and reduce cold pool dissipation, which has implications for the development of subsequent convection.

  12. The common cold.

    PubMed

    2009-02-01

    1) Most colds are due to viruses and resolve spontaneously after a few days. Available drugs do not modify the course of a viral cold; 2) Some drugs used to treat colds carry a risk of serious adverse effects. This includes nasal sprays, especially vasoconstrictors such as pseudo-ephedrine and, in young children, menthol, camphor, and terpene derivatives.

  13. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... found inside the mouth.) What Causes Cold Sores? Cold sores are caused by a virus called herpes (say: HUR-peez). Herpes is one ... the world. The medical name for the specific virus that causes cold sores is herpes simplex. There are two types ...

  14. Boreal spring precipitation variability in the cold arid western Himalaya during the last millennium, regional linkages, and socio-economic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Akhilesh K.; Bräuning, Achim; Singh, Jayendra; Yadav, Ram R.

    2016-07-01

    Precipitation in the monsoon shadow zone of the western Himalayan region, largely under the influence of mid-latitude westerlies, is the dominant regional socioeconomic driver. Current knowledge of long-term regional precipitation variability is scarce due to spatially and temporally limited weather and high-resolution proxy climate records. We developed the first boreal spring precipitation reconstruction for the western Himalaya covering the last millennium (1030-2011 C.E.). The annually resolved reconstruction is based on a large tree-ring data set of Himalayan cedar (Cedrus deodara) and neoza pine (Pinus gerardiana) from 16 ecologically homogeneous moisture stressed settings in Kinnaur, western Indian Himalaya. The precipitation reconstruction revealed persistent long-term spring droughts from the 12th to early 16th century C.E. and pluvial from the late 16th century C.E. to recent decades. The late 15th and early 16th centuries (1490-1514 C.E.) displayed the driest episode, with precipitation being ∼15% lower than the long-term mean. The early 19th century (1820-1844 C.E.) was the wettest period of the past millennium, with mean precipitation ∼13% above the long-term mean. The reconstructed boreal spring precipitation from the western Himalaya revealed large-scale consistency with hydrological records from westerly dominated regions in Central Asia, indicating synoptic-scale changes in atmospheric circulation during the major part of the Medieval and Little Ice Age periods. Protracted droughts in Central Asia could have caused severe contraction of the regional economy, as indicated by striking coherence of reconstructed drought periods and historic social upheavals and invasions of India from Central and Western Asian invaders. Vulnerability to climatic extremes underpins the need to develop a better understanding of the temporal and spatial variability in regional hydroclimate in order to devise viable water resource management plans.

  15. Management: Army Management of the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    M 3. IRAC a. FAS b. SPS c. TSC d. ING M M M M M —- —- M M M 4. US BR National Committee M —- 5. US BR Study Groups (US BR SGs) a. SG-1 (Spectrum...management requirements in Army Sys- tems Acquisition Review Councils per AR 15-14. r. Provide the Army member to the IRAC and direct Army par...ticipation in IRAC activities. s. Provide the Army member to the Radio Communications Bu- reau (BR) and direct Army participation in BR study groups. t

  16. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Publications » DrugFacts » Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised ... syrup is sometimes diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines ...

  17. Cold Tolerance of Plants Used for Cold-Regions Revegetation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    water Mitochondrial 02 uptake Sweet potatot Decreased translocation, which can result in the desiccation of Chlorogenic acid Sweet potato Increased...Amino acids Bean Increased of toxic substances between the ice and the soil surface. Protein Bean Decreased Also, frozen soil and plant stems can prevent...warmer aerial plant parts. Oxalic acid Oxalis sp. Increased Chlorophyll Bean Decreased Frost heaving has been a concern in forestry and Organic acids

  18. Improving Army Operational Contract Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Management in Expeditionary Operations . And, this research reviews the DOD Contingency Contracting Handbook. The research recommends the Army improve...Program Management in Expeditionary Operations and the Department of Defense Office of Inspector General that pertain to recent contingency...Contracting and Contract Management in Expeditionary Operations . And, this research reviews the DOD Contingency Contracting Handbook. The research

  19. The Army Learning Organisation Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge Management DALO DSTO Army Learning Organisation DASS Defence Assisted Study Scheme DLOQ Dimensions of a Learning Organisation Questionnaire...realised. Facilitation was provided through external (academic/subject matter expert) and internal (DALO Research Team) providers. The external...being an organisational archetype characterised by the existence of certain internal conditions and proclivities which facilitate learning at

  20. Army Historic Preservation Campaign Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    economic viability of historic buildings • Ensure an accurate account of Army historic properties is available for planning purposes Goal - Improve The...options Ensure an accurate account of historic properties for planning purposes Promote strategies to improve economic viability of historic buildings

  1. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of…

  2. The Army word recognition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  3. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-18

    agreements throughout DoD DARPA, JIEDDO, DHS, FAA, DoE, NSA , NASA, SMDC, etc. Strategic Partnerships Benefit the Army Materiel Enterprise External... Neuroscience Network Sciences Hierarchical Computing Extreme Energy Science Autonomous Systems Technology Emerging Sciences Meso-scale (grain...scales • Improvements in Soldier-system overall performance → operational neuroscience and advanced simulation and training technologies

  4. Army Environmental Cleanup Strategic Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Serves an enduring document to guide future strategic plans – Establishes ISO 14001 framework for cleanup; complies w/GPRA  Army Environmental...follow ISO 14001 – Plan - Complete the FY10-11 Strategic Plan – Do - Implement Activities According to the Plan – Check - Evaluate Progress Against the

  5. Full Spectrum Army Officer Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-22

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Colonel Ronda G. Urey Department of Military...Lieutenant Colonel Thomas J. Edwards, Jr. United States Army Colonel Ronda G. Urey Project Adviser This SRP is submitted in

  6. Army Forces for Homeland Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Overview,” slide presentation at the RAND Corporation, Arlington, Va., June 19, 2002. Feiler , Jeremy, “National Guard Association: Governors Should...Challenge,” Carlisle, Pa.: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, 2001. Pirnie, Bruce R., and Corazon M. Francisco, Assessing Requirements for

  7. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of…

  8. Forecasting Army Enlisted ETS Losses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    civilian labor markets and Army officer retention,” Rand, Santa Monica, CA, 2011. [4] B. J. Asch , P. Heaton, J. Hosek, F. Martorell, C. Simon, and J...Behavioral and Social Sciences, Fort Belvoir, VA, 2010, vol. 1280. [6] J. R. Hosek, B. J. Asch , and M. G. Mattock, "Should the increase in military

  9. Sipping at the Straw: Planning for Sustainable Water Supplies for U.S. Army Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Thermoelectric power • Geothermal • Biofuels • Solar-hot water • Hydropower • Carbon Capture • “ Fracking ” Regional Water Balance?  Supply  Rivers...point source pollution  Wastewater treatment  Water storage planning  Climate change: temperature rise, increased variability of precipitation...Sipping at the Straw: Planning for Sustainable Water Supplies for U.S. Army Installations Marc Kodack Senior Fellow, Army Environmental Policy

  10. Rebalance to the Pacific: A Case for Greater Amphibious Capabilities in the US Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Rebalance to the Pacific: A Case for Greater Amphibious Capabilities in the US Army A...Amphibous Capabilities in the US Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) MAJ Edward M. Kim...requires a careful examination of current US military concepts and capabilities to protect US interests and ensure regional stability. However, the

  11. Strategic Analysis of the Asia-Pacific Region: Is a Forward-Based Aircraft Carrier Required in the Post-Cold War Era?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-07

    include Southeast Asia, Indonesia and Thailand (East Indian Ocean ) in the west, the Australian continent in the south to Northeast Asia the Kurile...purposes, the area bounded by western Indonesia and Thailand (East Indian Ocean /South Asia) in the west extending northwesterly to include the Arabian Sea...relations, regional stability, and freedom of oceanic trade routes. In Europe, the multilateral NATO military alliance protected free democracies against the

  12. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  13. 2009 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Behavioral Trust Inventory ( BTI ; Gillespie, 2003) were used to assess superior, peer, and subordinate trust among Army civilians:  23% of civilians...of senior leaders (GO and SES level) in the ATLDP study reported that from their vantage point supervisors and managers resist supporting leader

  14. Bibliography on Cold Regions Science and Technology. Cumulative Author Index. Volumes 28-32, Cumulative Subject Index. Volumes 28-32, Parts 1 and 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    honeysuckle buds of varied win, the last 250 years,’central southern Norway (1977, p.1-24, eoM ter hardiness in unfavorable media, causedby 2.4.5...overwintering qualities of two types of honeysuckle buds planted in the icefield region, Alaska-Canada (1975, 263p., eng 32-2772 Far North E1975, p.43...1974, p.364.367, overwintering qualities of two types of honeysuckle buds planted in the rul 30-766 Far North (1975, p.43-S0, rma 31-21 Moisture

  15. Assessment of cold-climate environmental research priorities

    SciTech Connect

    States, J.B.

    1983-04-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has consistently recognized that cold regions pose unique environmental problems. This report sets forth the conceptual framework and research plans for several high priority research areas. It provides the fundamental basis for implementation of the EPA Cold-Climate Environmental Research Program. This three- to five-year program encompasses both short- and long-term research of high relevance to the EPA and to the cold regions that it serves.

  16. 76 FR 70710 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries... Meeting: Women in Service to America Memorial, Conference Room, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington,...

  17. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 1 Fiscal Year 2017

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-27

    Army Hearing Program Status Report, Q1FY17 March 2017 i Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status...Report Q1 FY17 Clinical Public Health & Epidemiology Directorate Army Hearing Division 27 March 2017 Army Hearing Program Status...Report, Q1FY17 March 2017 i Table of Contents Introduction

  18. 78 FR 69077 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open-meeting rules...@us.army.mil , (831) 242-5828. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to 41 CFR 102-3.105(j) and 102-...

  19. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of...

  20. 77 FR 40030 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (41 CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: July 26,...

  1. 78 FR 64205 - Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... Defense cancelled the meeting of the U.S. Army Science Board on October 16, 2013. As a result, the... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: None. Brenda S. Bowen, Army Federal Register Liaison Officer. BILLING CODE 3710-08-P...

  2. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: February 23, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  3. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Dates of Meeting: May 16, 2013. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  4. 78 FR 38956 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open- meeting rules. FOR... Designated Federal Officer: ATFL- APO, Monterey, CA, 93944, Robert.Savukinas@us.army.mil , (831)...

  5. 77 FR 21977 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3.140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: May 3, 2012. Time(s)...

  6. 78 FR 24735 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3.140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting:...

  7. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... ] Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: May 31, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122...

  8. 77 FR 66823 - Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD... the Federal Regulations (41 CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date(s) of...

  9. 78 FR 73852 - Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB) Winter Plenary Session. Date: January 15.... Purpose of Meeting: The purpose of the meeting is for the Army Science Board to review the results of the...

  10. Security Force Assistance: An Institutional Recommendation for the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Release. Distribution is Unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Word Count: 6,901 14. ABSTRACT As the U.S. Army ends over a decade of war...36 Word Count: 6,901 Key Terms: Foreign Security Forces, Foreign Internal Defense, Counterinsurgency, Regionally...simulators are sufficient for now, but only if maintained. Military Operations in Urban Terrain ( MOUT ) sites along with driver’s training courses and

  11. Exploring the Complexities of Army Civilians and the Army Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    as the province of practitioners of a profession. For a fiduciary relationship , a profession manifests when the nature of the services provided...9. 94 “5 CFR 2636.305 - Compensation and Other Restrictions Relating to Professions Involving a Fiduciary Relationship ,” linked from The Legal...operations.9 The symbiotic relationship and necessity for Army civilians is apparent in generating land combat power and providing support for

  12. A comparison among root soil-conservation effects for nine herbs at the cold region highway in north-eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Wang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    High soil-conservation herbs are very important for slope vegetation restoration of a highway in serious sandstorm regions. In this study, nine common herbs in northeast China were selected and compared to study soil-conservation effects by using an undisturbed-soil trough scouring method for soil anti-scourability enhancement and hydrostatic collapse method for soil anti-erodibility. Further, principal components analysis was used to identify significant root features that affected soil erosion resistance. Results indicated that different herbs had distinct enhancement effects on soil erosion resistance. Soil anti-scourability enhancement index decreased with increases of soil depth, slope gradient and rainfall amount. Relationship between soil anti-erodibility enhancement index ( S) and immersion time ( t) is a cubic spline in each different herb type ( R 2 ≥ 0.88). Herb root features such as micro-aggregates, organic matter, net leaf weight, thick root length, fine root length and biomass contributed a leading role in soil erosion resistance enhancement effect, and all their common factor variances were more than 0.81. Descending order of soil erosion resistance enhancement effect in soil anti-scourability for nine herbs is Poa pratensis, Medicago sativa, Viola philippica, Rudbeckia hirta, Clematis heracleifolia, Kalimeris indica, Cosmos bipinnata, Hemerocallis fulva and Sedum elatinoides, while the sequence of soil anti-erodibility is M. sativa, S. elatinoides, P. pratensis, R. hirta, H. fulva, V. philippica, C. heracleifolia, C. bipinnata and K. indica. Therefore, we concluded that P. pratensis and M. sativa were the most suitable herbs for resisting soil erosion and recommended to be widely planted for road vegetation recovery in this region.

  13. Asymptomatic myocardial ischemia following cold provocation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, M.J.; Deanfield, J.E.; deLandsheere, C.M.; Wilson, R.A.; Kensett, M.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1987-09-01

    Cold is thought to provoke angina in patients with coronary disease either by an increase in myocardial demand or an increase in coronary vascular resistance. We investigated and compared the effects of cold pressor stimulation and symptom-limited supine bicycle exercise on regional myocardial perfusion in 35 patients with stable angina and coronary disease and in 10 normal subjects. Regional myocardial perfusion was assessed with positron emission tomography and rubidium-82. Following cold pressor stimulation 24 of 35 patients demonstrated significant abnormalities of regional myocardial perfusion with reduced cation uptake in affected regions of myocardium: 52 +/- 9 to 43 +/- 9 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Among these 24 patients only nine developed ST depression and only seven had angina. In contrast, 29 of 35 patients underwent supine exercise, and abnormal regional myocardial perfusion occurred in all 29, with a reduction in cation intake from 48 +/- 10 to 43 +/- 14 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Angina was present in 27 of 29 and ST depression in 25 of 29. Although the absolute decrease in cation uptake was somewhat greater following cold as opposed to exercise, the peak heart rate after cold was significantly lower than that after exercise (82 +/- 12 vs 108 +/- 16 bpm, p less than 0.05). Peak systolic blood pressures after cold and exercise were similar (159 +/- 24 vs 158 +/- 28). Thus, cold produces much more frequent asymptomatic disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion in patients with stable angina and coronary disease than is suggested by pain or ECG changes.

  14. Update: Cold weather injuries, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, July 2011-June 2016.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Francis L; Taubman, Stephen B

    2016-10-01

    From July 2015 through June 2016, a total of 447 members of the active (n=383) and reserve (n=64) components had at least one medical encounter with a primary diagnosis of cold injury. The numbers of affected individuals in both components were the lowest since the 2011-2012 cold season, when the total was 394. In the active component, the service-specific incidence rates for each of the four services were lower than the respective rates for the previous (2014-2015) cold season. Frostbite was the most common type of cold injury. During the five cold seasons in the surveillance period (2011-2016), rates tended to be higher among service members who were in the youngest age groups; female; black, non-Hispanic; or in the Army. The numbers of cold injuries associated with service in Iraq and Afghanistan have fallen precipitously in the past four cold seasons and included just 11 cases in the most recent year.

  15. Constraining the Depth of Polar Ice Deposits and Evolution of Cold Traps on Mercury with Small Craters in Permanently Shadowed Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Ariel N.; Head, James W.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    Earth-based radar observations revealed highly reflective deposits at the poles of Mercury [e.g., 1], which collocate with permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) detected from both imagery and altimetry by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft [e.g., 2]. MESSENGER also measured higher hydrogen concentrations at the north polar region, consistent with models for these deposits to be composed primarily of water ice [3]. Enigmatic to the characterization of ice deposits on Mercury is the thickness of these radar-bright features. A current minimum bound of several meters exists from the radar measurements, which show no drop in the radar cross section between 13- and 70-cm wavelength observations [4, 5]. A maximum thickness of 300 m is based on the lack of any statistically significant difference between the height of craters that host radar-bright deposits and those that do not [6]. More recently, this upper limit on the depth of a typical ice deposit has been lowered to approximately 150 m, in a study that found a mean excess thickness of 50 +/- 35 m of radar-bright deposits for 6 craters [7]. Refining such a constraint permits the derivation of a volumetric estimate of the total polar ice on Mercury, thus providing insight into possible sources of water ice on the planet. Here, we take a different approach to constrain the thickness of water-ice deposits. Permanently shadowed surfaces have been resolved in images acquired with the broadband filter on MESSENGER's wide-angle camera (WAC) using low levels of light scattered by crater walls and other topography [8]. These surfaces are not featureless and often host small craters (less than a few km in diameter). Here we utilize the presence of these small simple craters to constrain the thickness of the radar-bright ice deposits on Mercury. Specifically, we compare estimated depths made from depth-to-diameter ratios and depths from individual Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA

  16. Distributions of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers in surface soils of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau: implications of GDGT-based proxies in cold and dry regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, S.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Y.; He, Y.; Hou, J.; Chen, L.; He, J.-S.

    2015-01-01

    The methylation index of branched tetraethers (MBT) and cyclization ratio of branched tetraethers (CBT) based on the distribution of bacteria-derived branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (bGDGTs) are useful proxies for the reconstruction of continental paleotemperature and soil pH. Several calibrations of the MBT-CBT index have been proposed based on global and regional soils and lake sediments. However, little is known about the distribution and applicability of GDGTs proxies in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP), a critical region of the global climate system. Here, we investigated 33 surface soils covering a large area of the QTP. Redundancy analysis showed that soil pH was the most important factor affecting GDGT distributions, followed by mean annual precipitation (MAP) and mean annual air temperature (MAT). The branched-isoprenoid tetraether (BIT) index, an indicator for estimation of soil organic matter in aquatic environments, varied from 0.48 to 1 and negatively correlated with soil pH (r2 = 0.38), suggesting that the BIT index should be used with caution in the QTP. A transfer function of the CBT index-soil pH was established to estimate paleo-soil pH in the QTP: pH = 8.33-1.43 × CBT (r2 = 0.80, RMSE = 0.27 pH unit). The local calibration of MBT-CBT index presented a weak, still significant correlation with MAT (r2 = 0.36) mainly owing to the additional influence of MAP (r2 = 0.50). Combining our data with previously reported GDGTs for Chinese soils resulted in a new calibration of MBT/CBT-MAT: MAT = 2.68+26.14 × MBT-3.37 × CBT (r2 = 0.73; RMSE = 4.2 °C, n = 164). The correlation coefficient and residual error of this new transfer function is comparable with global calibrations, suggesting that MBT-CBT paleotemperature proxy is still valid in the QTP.

  17. Increased endothelin-1 and diminished nitric oxide levels in blister fluids of patients with intermediate cold type complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    PubMed Central

    Groeneweg, J George; Huygen, Frank JPM; Heijmans-Antonissen, Claudia; Niehof, Sjoerd; Zijlstra, Freek J

    2006-01-01

    Background In complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) pro-inflammatory mediators and vascular changes play an important role in the sustained development and outcome of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of vasoactive substances endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) during early chronic CRPS1. Methods Included were 29 patients with CRPS 1 who were diagnosed during the acute stage of their disease and observed during follow-up visits. Disease activity and impairment were determined and artificial suction blisters were made on the CRPS1 and the contralateral extremities for measurements of IL-6, TNF-α, ET-1 and nitrate/nitrite (NOx). Results The levels of IL-6, TNF-α and ET-1 in blister fluid in the CRPS1 extremity versus the contralateral extremity were significantly increased and correlated with each other, whereas NOx levels were decreased. Conclusion The NOx/ET-1 ratio appears to be disturbed in the intermediate stage of CRPS, resulting in vasoconstriction and consequently in a diminished tissue blood distribution. PMID:17137491

  18. LIP19, a basic region leucine zipper protein, is a Fos-like molecular switch in the cold signaling of rice plants.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hidekazu; Sato, Kazuhito; Berberich, Thomas; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Ozaki, Rei; Imai, Ryozo; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2005-10-01

    The rice low-temperature-induced lip19 gene encodes a 148-amino-acid basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) protein, termed LIP19. In this study we characterized LIP19 and showed that it lacks the usual ability of bZIP proteins to homodimerize and to bind DNA, as does the Fos protein in mammals. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, the cDNA clones whose products interact with LIP19 were screened. This search revealed a clone termed OsOBF1 (Oryza sativa OBF1) that encodes a new bZIP protein (OsOBF1). This protein forms a homodimer and binds to the hexamer motif sequence (5'-ACGTCA-3'). The protein-protein interaction in homo- and hetero-combinations between LIP19 and OsOBF1 was confirmed in vitro and in planta. LIP19 and OsOBF1 most likely interact with each other more strongly than OsOBF1 interacts with itself, and the resulting heterodimer binds to the C/G hybrid sequence but not to the hexamer sequence. Whereas the expression patterns of lip19 and OsOBF1 in response to low temperatures were totally opposite, the locations of their expression were almost identical. Based upon the presented data, we propose a model describing the low-temperature signal switching mediated by LIP19 in rice.

  19. [Cold-induced urticaria].

    PubMed

    Delorme, N; Drouet, M; Thibaudeau, A; Verret, J L

    2002-09-01

    Cold urticaria is characterized by the development of urticaria, usually superficial and/or angioedematous reaction after cold contact. It was found predominantly in young women. The diagnosis is based on the history and ice cube test. Patients with a negative ice cube test may have represented systemic cold urticaria (atypical acquired cold urticaria) induced by general body cooling. The pathogenesis is poorly understood. Cold urticaria can be classified into acquired and familial disorders, with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Idiopathic cold urticaria is most common type but the research of a cryopathy is necessary. Therapy is often difficult. It is essential that the patient be warned of the dangers of swimming in cold water because systemic hypotension can occur. H1 antihistamines can be used for treatment of cold urticaria but the clinical responses are highly variable. The combination with an H2 antagonists is more effective. Doxepin may be useful in the treatment. Leukotriene receptor antagonists may be a novel, promising drug entity. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be tried.

  20. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  1. ETL wins Army Lab Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Army Engineer Topographic Laboratories (ETL), located in Fort Belvoir, Va., was awarded the 1981 Department of the Army Most Improved Laboratory of the Year Award for ETL's scientific and technical achievements in mapping, military geographic information, and geographic intelligence systems.ETL, the largest topographic research and development organization of its kind in the world, specializes in mapping, geodesy, point positioning, and military geographic information. ETL addresses the full range of development from basic research to a final product in the topographic sciences. In addition, scientists at the laboratory have interpreted feedback from satellites, such as Landsat, to help pinpoint and improve ecological imbalance in some areas. ETL engineers are developing electronic systems to measure dams, while other ETL staff members are designing a pseudo-radar system for the Pershing II missile.

  2. Strategic Mobility, The Force Proejction Army, and the Ottawa Landmine Treaty: Can the Army Get There?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Accessed 27 October 2000. This theme was reiterated in the fiscal year 2001 Army Posture Statement. 70 Louis Caldera and Eric K. Shinseki, A Statement on the...Operations, III-21. 87 Ibid., III-4. 88 Louis Caldera and Eric K. Shinseki, A Statement on the Posture of the United States Army Fiscal Year 2001...October 2000. 50 Caldera , Louis and Eric K. Shinseki. A Statement on the Posture of the United States Army Fiscal Year 2001, (http://www.army.mil/aps

  3. Army Hardman Familiarization Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    0272 ATZI -NMS DO FORM 1473, 84 MAR 83 APR edition may be used until exhausted SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE All other editions are obsolete...34, -", ," ." ---- ,-., HARDMAN FAMILIARIZATION REPORT Soldier Support Center National Capital Region ATTN: ATZI -NCM (HARDMAN) 200 Stovall Street Alexandria...ATTN: - ATZI -NCM, 200 Stovall Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22332. B. MODULE 2 - SYSTEMS ANALYSIS. The Systems Analysis step developed the mission

  4. Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold Antihydrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-24

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012494 TITLE: Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold...part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP012489 thru ADP012577 UNCLASSIFIED Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold Antihydrogen G...and positrons. The antiprotons come initially from the new Antiproton Decel- erator facility at CERN. Good control of such cold antimatter plasmas is

  5. Management: Total Army Quality Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-15

    meet current and future customer needs . 3–2. Strategic planning a. Strategic planning is the process by which managers at higher levels envision their...framework for all Army organizations to measure how well they are meeting their stated goals and customer needs . It provides a systematic review that...business. (2) Customer-Driven – The organization’s focus is on its customers – ensuring its operations meet customer needs in the most efficient manner

  6. Social Media and the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    media from troops. Although the OPORD has limitations based on operational domain authority and application, the intent is clear: social media has...thoughts, and the latest on dit. Our Army has embraced the world of social media as the power of communication has taken a new turn. Typewriters...landlines, and beepers are communication tools of the past. A new generation of immediacy has created a firestorm of social media tools that encourage

  7. The Army Profession: A Narrative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-23

    Excellence in Character and Ethical Leadership2 MNF -I Multi-National Forces, Iraq TRADOC US Army Training and Doctrine Command US The United States of...America 1Formerly ACPME 22009 ACPME study conducted through surveys of MNF -I personnel. v...Iraq ( MNF -I) Commander, General David Petraeus. General Petraeus asked to have a study conducted to examine “factors that serve as determinants of

  8. Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    graphics, and any other works incorporated into this manuscript. A work of the United States Government is not subject to copyright, however further...Thompson, MAJ 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Command...project its forces globally. Getting personnel and equipment in position to operate effectively for long periods requires a variety of systems to work

  9. Army PCMH Initiative: Current Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-25

    Increasing accessibility and quality of healthcare • Improving Soldier and Family housing • Ensuring excellence in schools, youth services, and child ...2010 Enrollment vs. Capacity Care Continuity Appointment Availability Patient Satisfaction RMC TRICARE Operation Center ( TOC ) 04 OCT 10...2011 MHS Conference  35 Parent Sites  114 Child Sites  11 MTFs with 66 PCMH Teams  Level II NCQA Recognized PCMH: “0” PCMH in Army Inventory 10 of

  10. Tailored Training in Army Courses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    R . J . Sternberg , & R . G. Glasser (Eds.), Learning and individual differences: Advances in theory and research (pp. 13-59). New...tailoring. 41 References Bickley, W. R ., Pleban, R . J ., Diedrich, F., Sidman, J ., Semmens, R ., & Geyer, A. (2010). Army Institutional Training...interdisciplinary learning science (pp. 189-211). Oxford: Elsevier. Dyer, J . L., Fober, G. W., Wampler, R ., Blankenbeckler, N., Dlubac, M., & Centric, J

  11. The Army and Team Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Team Learning Commanders at every level in the Army continually search for a means to make their units more effective and, thereby, accomplish...nature of individual thought into his effective “collective phenomenon” required the interaction of individuals through discourse. Bohm spends a great...where discussion requires a certain amount of deconstruction. Both dialogue and discussion are required for effective discourse, but Senge builds

  12. Military Review: A Changing Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    The answer lies in recognizing the good and bad er, the bottom line is not negative. There has that came as a result of the normal functioning been an...patriotic, proud ly, this ismuch less an issue. The inspector gen- if their unit can serve with "the Regulars," partic- eral function is much more...34more productive" orga- functional capability in industry and supporting nizations were introduced. Maintenance per- the Army during war, analogous

  13. Army Occupational Health Program, 1978.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    conjunctivitis 3 Fungal infection 3 Infection of skin and subcutaneous tissue 3 Code 22: Dust Diseases of the Lungs (Pneumononioses) 2 Includes: Asbestosis 2...f - - - 5-- — -5-- ——5-- - --- -~~~~~~~~~~--5 Army Occupational Heal th Program , 1978 TABLE 16. CANCER SCREENING...oyee education program with much emphasis on Pulmonary Function Testing, Asbestos, Smoking and Lung Disease. A smok i ng withdrawal clini c was held

  14. Army junior dental officer retention.

    PubMed

    Mazuji, Nasrin; Chaffin, Jeffrey G; Beer, Ronald R; Mangelsdorff, A David

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of the survey were to quantify the extent of indebtedness of junior dental officers and to determine the impact of a loan repayment program on career decisions. We designed a customized survey instrument because no preexisting, validated, survey instrument was available. A query was performed in the Medical Operations Data System to identify all captains (0-3) currently on active duty in the Army (N = 348). The survey sample included 64 junior officers with a 2000 date of rank to captain (0-3), of whom only 52 were in the Medical Command Outlook address book or the Army Knowledge Online white pages. The questionnaire was sent out to these targeted junior dental officers through their official e-mail accounts. Dentists assigned to Korea and to dental field units do not use the same e-mail system as the rest of the Dental Command; therefore, their addresses were not available. In an attempt to increase response rates, commanders were asked to emphasize the importance of responding to the questionnaire. From the sample population of 52 officers who were queried directly, 34 responses were received, for a response rate of 65%. However, commanders forwarded the survey to all Dental Command captains and 102 responses were received. The respondents represented 30% of the total Army inventory of captains; 92% of respondents reported that they had dental school loans, with 43% reporting loans in excess of dollar 50,000. The average dental school indebtedness was approximately dollar 60,700. More than 60% of all respondents reported that loan repayment could change their minds about remaining on active duty. Officers not included in the original sample rated the impact of loan repayment statistically higher than did officers in the original sample. The findings were that the majority of junior Army dental officers had significant student loans and many of these officers indicated that they would consider remaining on active duty if loan repayment or other

  15. Plain English for Army Lawyers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    TELEPHONE (Include Arta Code) 22c. OFFICE SYMBOL Judy CI irk 207-475.1Ull I FA-AR 0D FRM 1473, 84 MAR 83 APR edition may be used until exhausted SE CURITY...instructions during courts- martial . Contractors and contracting officers outdo each other in blaming lawyers for problems that crop up in Government...of legal practice -- from courts- martial to client services and from business transac- tions to administrative regulations. Although Army clients may

  16. Army Engineers at Pearl Harbor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    the Honolulu Engi- neer District, then part of the South Pacific Division. Colonel Albert K.B. Lyman , a native Hawaiian who later attained the rank...aircraft dis- persal at Wheeler Field. On the civil side, Lieutenant Colonel Theodore Wyman, the Honolulu District Engineer, had offices employing 10...Army Engineers at Pearl Harbor Past in Review Native Hawaiian Colonel Albert K.B. Lyman , the Army’s Ha- waiian Department engineer during the attack

  17. Army Officer Duty Module Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    Registry of Officer Job Schedules Inclosure 6 Duty Modules for Tank Platoon Leader, Lieutenant Inclosure 7 Instructions for Participating in Duty...Institutes for Research LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT TECHNICAL AREA It2Dh1Af l U. S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences...neceea en ed Identify by block number) Officer Personnel Management Systems (OPMS), Job content description, Duty Modules, Armor Branch 20. A"rlTq ACT m

  18. Recruiting Effects of Army Advertising

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    large amount of newspaper advertising was bought through "groups," or aggregates of related newspapers whose space is marketed together. For example, ads ...im rm’ r .. . 2 advertising on private sector markets when firms attempt to influence consumers’ purchasing decisions. When it comes to research on... adding unique data describing the patterns and distribu- tion of Army advertising expenditures between 1981 and 1984. 3 The specific aims of the

  19. 2011 Army Strategic Planning Guidance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-25

    TESI ) of 22,000 Soldiers, the Army’s total force by the end of the mid-term period is programmed to be 520K (AC). We will achieve a more...dwell ratios, extending TESI authority to adequately man deploying units and sustain the All-Volunteer Force, right-sizing the generating force, and... TESI Temporary End-Strength Increase WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction 2011 ARMY STRATEGIC PLANNING GUIDANCE Page 19 2011

  20. Mars: Always Cold, Sometimes Wet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; McKay, Christoper P.

    2003-01-01

    A synthesis of a diverse suite of observations of H2O-related landforms that are possible Mars analogs from terrestrial polar regions (Devon Island in the Arctic; the Dry Valleys of Antarctica) put into question any requirement for extended episode(s) of warm and wet climate in Mars past. Geologically transient episodes of localized H2O cycling, forced by exogenic impacts, enhanced endogenic heat flow, and/or orbit-driven short-term local environmental change under an otherwise cold, low pressure (=10(exp 2) mbar) global climate, may be sufficient to account for the martian surface's exposed record of aqueous activity. A Mars that was only sometimes locally warm and wet while remaining climatically cold throughout its history is consistent with results (difficulties) encountered in modeling efforts attempting to support warm martian climate hypotheses. Possible analogs from terrestrial cold climate regions for the recent gully features on Mars also illustrate how transient localized aqueous activity might, under specific circumstances, also occur on Mars under the present frigid global climatic regime.

  1. Desiccant-Based Dehumidification for Army Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    desiccants are absorbei.ts; they physically zid/or chemically change as they pick up water. Triethylene glycol is a common liquid desiccant . Typically, liquid...AD-A263 305 fc USACERL Technical Report FE-93/10November 1992 Desiccant Cooling/Dehumidification for Army Facilities US A Imy Corps of Engineers...Construction Engineering Research Laboratory Desiccant -Based Dehumidification for Army Facilities by Gerald L. Cler The U.S. Army maintains over 1 billion

  2. Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction among Army Chaplains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-20

    or 20 MAY 1976 STUDY ’ PROJECT FACTORS INFLUENCING JOB SATISFACTION AMONG ARMY CHAPLAINS BY CHAPLAIN(COLONEL) KERMIT D. JOHNSON US ARMY WAR...job •atUfaction among US kxmy chaplain« it b«aad CO • mail aurvay raaponao of 998 chap Ulna out of 1411 in tha Army chaplaincy. Factors which...chaplaincy, and cosseand. Certain professional Irritants were singled out. By means of demographic information, comparisons were made as to how

  3. Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-28

    Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) AWCF Army Working Capital Fund CIP Construction-in-Progress DCD/ DCW DFAS...Warehouse (DCD/ DCW ). The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) (ASA[FM&C]) is responsible for the policies, procedures...entity’s information to automatically populate that indicator. As a result, IFS did not send DCD/ DCW correct information for determining the

  4. U.S. Army Sustainability Needs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-12

    Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) A family of armored fighting vehicles designed to survive IED attacks and ambushes 22,600 Total 299,032...the System Research and Testing Demonstrate Systems and Technologies 1 in 8 US Army casualties in Iraq was the result of protecting fuel...Army Aloha Microgrid #1 opens • Jan 2012 – US Army Aloha Microgrid #2 scheduled to be operational Microgrid Technology Achieving Efficiencies

  5. The Cultural Dimension of Army Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-06

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE CULTURAL DIMENSION OF ARMY TRANSITION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR( S ) ANGUS M. A. TILNEY 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...armies. Furthermore, according to the well-recognized “ dimensions of national culture ” studied by Geert Hofstede , Britain and the United States share...Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited The Cultural Dimension of Army Transition A Monograph by Major Angus Myles Arthur Tilney

  6. U.S. Army Social Media Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    should visit: www.army.mil/ socialmedia /. Regis- tering on the Army’s social media directory also provides other benefits. Once a site is approved, it...registration to www.army.mil/ socialmedia /. Set default view of your Facebook wall to show posts by only your organization. Make sure YouTube channels...http://www.army.mil/ socialmedia /) DoD Social Media Hub (http://socialmedia.defense.gov/) AKO Social Media Portal

  7. Distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers in surface soils of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau: implications of brGDGTs-based proxies in cold and dry regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, S.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Y.; He, Y.; Hou, J.; Chen, L.; He, J.-S.

    2015-06-01

    The methylation index of branched tetraethers (MBT) and cyclization ratio of branched tetraethers (CBT) based on the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGT) are useful proxies for the reconstruction of mean annual air temperature (MAT) and soil pH. Recently, a series of 6-methyl brGDGTs were identified which were previously co-eluted with 5-methyl brGDGTs. However, little is known about 6-methyl brGDGTs in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP), a critical region of the global climate system. Here, we analyze 30 surface soils covering a large area of the QTP, among which 6-methyl brGDGTs were the most abundant components (average 53 ± 17% of total brGDGT). The fractional abundance of 6-methyl brGDGTs showed a good correlation with soil pH, while the global MBT'5ME calibration overestimates MAT in the QTP. We therefore proposed a MBT5/6 index including both 5- and 6-methyl brGDGTs, presenting a strong correlation with MAT in QTP: MAT = -20.14 + 39.51 × MBT5/6 (n = 27, r2 = 0.82; RMSE = 1.3 °C). Another index, namely IBT (isomerization of branched tetraether), based on carbon skeleton isomerization of the 5-methyl to 6-methyl brGDGTs, is dependent on soil pH: pH = 6.77 - 1.56 × IBT (n = 27; r2 = 0.74, RMSE = 0.32). Our study suggests that changing the position of methyl group of brGDGTs may be another mechanism for some soil bacteria to adapt to the ambient pH change in addition to the well-known cyclization.

  8. Cold stress and the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Dee U; Michael, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This activity is easily adapted to an inquiry format that asks students to go to the scientific literature to learn about the test and then design a protocol for carrying out the test in classmates. The data collected are ideal for teaching graphical presentation of data and statistical analysis.

  9. A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Army Advertising Attributes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    that identifies the needs and characteristics of individuals in the Armys’ prime market , as well as their exposure to Army advertising . One way the Army...U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences N Research Report 1578 A Cross-Sectional Comparison I of Army Advertising ...62785A 791 2105 H01 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Army Advertising Attributes 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S

  10. 2012 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-23

    of the 2012 CASAL, and is meant to serve as a supporting document to the technical report of CASAL main findings (Riley, Hatfield, Paddock ...supporting document to the technical report of CASAL main findings (Riley, Hatfield, Paddock , & Fallesen, 2013). In 2005, the Annual Survey of Army...pertaining to attitudes, opinions and ratings of active duty uniformed leaders are made when useful or for confirmation (Riley, Hatfield, Paddock

  11. Chilling Out With Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your head hurts. You don't have the energy to even get out of bed. And you can't breathe out of your nose. What's wrong? You may have a cold! Having a cold is the #1 reason kids visit the doctor and stay home from school. Kids can get six to ten ...

  12. Exercise in the Cold

    PubMed Central

    Fudge, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hypothermia and frostbite injuries occur in cold weather activities and sporting events. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was used to identify original research and review articles related to cold, frostbite, and hypothermia. Inclusion was based on their relevance to prevention and treatment of cold-related injuries in sports and outdoor activities. Dates of review articles were limited to those published after 2010. No date limit was set for the most recent consensus statements or original research. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Frostbite and hypothermia are well-documented entities with good prevention strategies and prehospital treatment recommendations that have changed very little with time. A layered approach to clothing is the best way to prevent injury and respond to weather changes. Each athlete, defined as a participant in a cold weather sport or activity, will respond to cold differently depending on anthropometric measurements and underlying medical risk factors. An understanding of wind-chill temperatures, wetness, and the weather forecast allows athletes and event coordinators to properly respond to changing weather conditions. At the first sign of a freezing cold injury, ensure warm, dry clothes and move to a protected environment. Conclusion: Cold injuries can be prevented, and cold weather activities are safe with proper education, preparation, and response to changing weather conditions or injury. PMID:26857732

  13. Hot and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This article presents an overview of research in cold fusion research and development in cold fusion at the Tokomak Fusion Test Reactor at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, and at the inertial containment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. is described.

  14. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) A A A What's in this article? ... or around a person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't ...

  15. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  16. Cold-Weather Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold-Weather Sports Print A A A What's in this ... Equipment Ahh, winter! Shorter days. Frigid temperatures. Foul weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports ...

  17. Cold fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  18. The Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) Annual Survey of the Army Profession (CASAP FY15)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT CENTER FOR THE ARMY PROFESSION AND ETHIC Technical Report 2015-01 The Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE...CASAP FY15 September 2015 Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Authorized and approved for...distribution: JOHN A. VERMEESCH Colonel, U.S. Army Director, Center for the Army Profession and Ethic NOTICES

  19. The common cold.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Terho; Järvinen, Asko

    2003-01-04

    Despite great advances in medicine, the common cold continues to be a great burden on society in terms of human suffering and economic losses. Of the several viruses that cause the disease, the role of rhinoviruses is most prominent. About a quarter of all colds are still without proven cause, and the recent discovery of human metapneumovirus suggests that other viruses could remain undiscovered. Research into the inflammatory mechanisms of the common cold has elucidated the complexity of the virus-host relation. Increasing evidence is also available for the central role of viruses in predisposing to complications. New antivirals for the treatment of colds are being developed, but optimum use of these agents would require rapid detection of the specific virus causing the infection. Although vaccines against many respiratory viruses could also become available, the ultimate prevention of the common cold seems to remain a distant aim.

  20. United States Army, Sixth Army Field Order 74

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-01-01

    Sixth Amy Reserve; _!. llth Airborne Division: a.. Commander: -Major General Joseph M. Swing,’U.S.A. b_. Units and Staging: Annex 3h_« (i) Army...HEADQUARTERS SIXTH AMY . APO-442 - 19301 28 July 1945 ANNEX 3f to FO 74 , Troop List, 40th Infantry Division, reinforced (tentative) COMBAT UNITS Unit 40th’ inf...route SHIBUSHI - KA3DYA - TAKASU. • (4) The 281st signal Pigeon Compan;,’- will: (a) provide I, IX, and XI Corps-with, one combat section each prior to

  1. Army industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use

    SciTech Connect

    Stoughton, Kate McMordie; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  2. The Woman's Land Army: 1918-1920.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Margaret

    1994-01-01

    Describes the origins and work of the Women's Land Army, a World War I British volunteer agricultural production unit. Details similar program in the United States. Identifies the impact of the Women's Land Army including enhanced political, economic, and physical freedom for the participants and future generations of women. (CFR)

  3. The Employment Status of Army Spouses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    important implications for Army policy and pro- grams. Spouse employment programs aimed at increasing employment opportunities for unemployed Army wives...lower earnings. In particular, geographic location, younger ages and younger children of military wives appear to be important factors of observed work...military life. The results have important implications for retention and readiness to the extent that spouse satisfaction influences these outcomes

  4. An Analysis of the Army Officer Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullerton, Leroy Robert

    This study evaluated the advantages of formal higher education in establishing a second career for retired Army officers. Primary sources of data were Army officer students and recently retired officers. These were among the conclusions: (1) high response to the survey showed interest in, and career-related importance attached to, higher…

  5. Democratic civilian control of the Nepalese Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-14

    following are recommendations or principles the Army must institutionalize to guide it through the still-evolving civil-military relationship discussions...society. The following are recommendations or principles the Army must institutionalize to guide it through the still-evolving civil-military...REVIEW ..............................................................................6 Literature on Major CMR Theories

  6. Survey of Army Personnel Interested in Teaching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    Demographic prof’de CurrentActive Army Personnel rent Teachers Actie - ifl~ = -Employment Active Actve Active Outside Army Officers Enlted Educaion Base: 607...Base: 607 345 206 301 1144 2380 0^ PA Desire to work with young people 71 69 70 64 70 78 Value or significance of education in society 69 68 68 75

  7. Integration of New Technology in Army Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-02

    process- inc functions of each Army librsr,, Ine consolidnted or centralized’ at the installation level. "Intecration of New Technology in Army Libraries...34 determined the feasibility o-f installation-level networkinc of technical processinc activities, and develops the means throurh which new technology ...17 11. AUTOMATION REQUIREMENTS FOR TECHNICAL PROCESSING Use of Technology in Libraries ................................. 24

  8. Education and Training in the Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmoreland, W. C.

    Higher education and the military have much in common: both are vitally concerned with youth and in preparing young people for effective functioning in society. The army is heavily involved in education and training; in addition to West Point, there is an Army school system which consists of 2 colleges, 20 branch schools, and 11 specialist…

  9. Heat strain in cold.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, Hannu; Rissanen, Sirkka

    2006-07-01

    In spite of increased environmental cold stress, heat strain is possible also in a cold environment. The body heat balance depends on three factors: environmental thermal conditions, metabolic heat production and thermal insulation of clothing and other protective garments. As physical exercise may increase metabolic heat production from rest values by ten times or even more, the required thermal insulation of clothing may vary accordingly. However, in most outdoor work, and often in indoor cold work, too, the thermal insulation of clothing is impractical, difficult or impossible to adjust according to the changes in physical activity. This is especially true with whole body covering garments like chemical protective clothing. As a result of this imbalance, heat strain may develop. In cold all the signs of heat strain (core temperature above 38 degrees C, warm or hot thermal sensations, increased cutaneous circulation and sweating) may not be present at the same time. Heat strain in cold may be whole body heat strain or related only to torso or core temperature. Together with heat strain in torso or body core, there can be at the same time even cold strain in peripheral parts and/or superficial layers of the body. In cold environment both the preservation of insulation and facilitation of heat loss are important. Development of clothing design is still needed to allow easy adjustments of thermal insulation.

  10. Cements for Structural Concrete in Cold Regions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    ability to reduce the early evolu- tion of heat: slag and obsidian, pumicite and calcined shale, fly-ash , tuff and calcined diatomite , natural cement...and uncalcined diatomite . Variations in initial set times of cements can be controlled ‘cy varying the percentages of different cement mixtures . Wh it

  11. The Temporary Environment - Cold Regions Habitability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    not arrive at a final state of prcsentation for this report. Future research is neces- sary to determin~ e the matrix arrangement of synonurphs and the...34Why do a behavior setting survey ?" "Aren’t there msany easier ways to do such research ’?" For example, the set of questionnaires tecommended by...for tie ordinary designer or researcher to include all of the possible responses in his search for answers. Therd.fore. the behj- vior setting survey

  12. Hawaii Regional Sediment Management: Regional Sediment Budget for the Poipu Region of Kauai, HI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    originator. Hawaii Regional Sediment Management: Regional Sediment Budget for the Poipu Region of Kauai , HI Edited by Jessica H. Podoski PURPOSE...Island of Kauai , HI, as part of the Hawaii Regional Sediment Management (RSM) initiative funded by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) RSM Program...POH), is to investigate RSM opportunities along all shoreline regions in Hawaii . Initial RSM regions on Kauai include the Kekaha Region and the

  13. Hawaii Regional Sediment Management: Regional Sediment Budget for the Kekaha Region of Kauai, HI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    originator. Hawaii Regional Sediment Management: Regional Sediment Budget for the Kekaha Region of Kauai , HI Edited by Jessica H. Podoski PURPOSE...Island of Kauai , HI, as part of the Hawaii Regional Sediment Management (RSM) initiative funded by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) RSM Program...POH), is to investigate RSM opportunities along all shoreline regions in Hawaii . Initial RSM regions on Kauai include the Kekaha Region and the

  14. Dental care needs of Army recruits.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, W A; Mangelsdorff, A D; Brunner, D G

    1983-01-01

    To determine the prevalence amng current U.S. Army recruits of dental conditions requiring treatment, an assessment was done of the dental care needs of a 3 percent sample (N = 5,613) of incoming recruits at all seven U.S. Army reception stations that operate under a dental treatment planning concept. Both the treatment needs of the total sample and of each Army component--that is, Regular, Reserve, and National Guard forces--were quantified. The results indicated that the requirement for dental care among Army recruits currently being processed for training is approximately the same as it was for such recruits at the time that the Selective Service System draft was in effect, although the types of care needed have changed. Like the draft-based recruits, current Army recruits enter active-duty status with a substantial backlog of unmet dental care needs. PMID:6867262

  15. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply.

  16. Providing care for America's Army.

    PubMed

    Webb, Joseph G; von Gonten, Ann Sue; Luciano, W John

    2003-01-01

    The Army Dental Corps' three-part mission is to maintain soldiers fit for combat, promote health, and ensure the Dental Corps ability deploy and deliver in the field. Consistent with this mission, the corps is developing innovative dental delivery systems and promoting tobacco cessation, sealants, mouth guard use, cancer detection, and identification of child, elder, and other abuse. The corps' training programs include options and benefits at the dental student, postdoctoral residency, and specialty levels. Recent technology innovations include light-weight field equipment, an integrated computer database to manage treatment, rapid ordering and delivery of supplies, and distance education.

  17. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-04-05

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  18. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-08-09

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  19. Cold subcutaneous abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, R.; Stephens, L.; Kelly, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    Cold abscesses are defined as having no associated erythema, heat, or tenderness. They may be present in immunodeficiency disorders, deep mycoses, and other infectious diseases. As there is a dearth information on this subject in the dermatology, surgery, and infectious disease literature, we present a case of cold abscesses secondary to coccidioidomycosis and discuss the possible role of humoral immunity, cell-mediated immunity, prostaglandins, T cells, and other mediators in cold abscess pathogenesis. In addition, therapeutic guidelines for abscesses are reviewed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2280425

  20. Miniature cold gas thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzibziak, R. J., Sr.

    1992-07-01

    Cold gas thrusters provide a safe, inexpensive, lightweight and reliable means of propulsive control for small satellites, projectiles and maneuvering control systems. Moog Inc. has designed and developed a family of miniature cold gas thrusters for use on Strategic Defense Iniative flight simulation experiments, sounding rockets, small satellite applications, astronaut control systems, and close proximity maneuvering systems for Space System. Construction features such as coil assembly, core assembly, armature assembly, external housing and valve body are discussed. The design approach, performance characteristics and functional description of cold gas thrusters designed for various applications are presented.

  1. Update: Cold weather injuries, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, July 2007-June 2012.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    From July 2011 through June 2012, the number of active and reserve component service members treated for cold injuries (n=499) was lower than the number in each of the four previous one year periods. Over the last five years, frostbite was the most common type of cold injury in all the Services except for the Marine Corps, in which hypothermia was slightly more frequent. Service members who were female, less than 20 years old, or of black, non-Hispanic race/ethnicity tended to have higher cold injury rates than their respective counterparts. Army personnel accounted for the majority of cold injuries. Service members who train in and deploy to areas with wet and freezing conditions - and their supervisors at all levels - should be able to recognize the signs of cold injury and should know and implement the standard countermeasures against the threat of cold injury.

  2. Homeostatic Responses to Prolonged Cold Exposure: Human Cold Acclimatization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    cold acclimatization resulting from living and working in cold environments, and cold acclimation induced by unusual or experimental alterations in...reflects a greater thermal conductance resulting from increased metabolism, altered vasomotor responses, decreased physical insulation associated with low...vasoconstrictor response to cold is altered in circumpolar residents. For example, Brown and Page (9) measured hand blood flow in Inuits and

  3. Cold hardiness in molluscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansart, Armelle; Vernon, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    Molluscs inhabit all types of environments: seawater, intertidal zone, freshwater and land, and of course may have to deal with subzero temperatures. Ectotherm animals survive cold conditions by avoiding it by extensive supercooling (freezing avoidant species) or by bearing the freezing of their extracellular body fluids (freezing tolerant species). Although some studies on cold hardiness are available for intertidal molluscs, they are scarce for freshwater and terrestrial ones. Molluscs often exhibit intermediary levels of cold hardiness, with a moderate or low ability to supercool and a limited survival to the freezing of their tissues. Several factors could be involved: their dependence on water, their ability to enter dormancy, the probability of inoculative freezing in their environment, etc. Size is an important parameter in the development of cold hardiness abilities: it influences supercooling ability in land snails, which are rather freezing avoidant and survival to ice formation in intertidal organisms, which generally tolerate freezing.

  4. The cold reading technique.

    PubMed

    Dutton, D L

    1988-04-15

    For many people, belief in the paranormal derives from personal experience of face-to-face interviews with astrologers, palm readers, aura and Tarot readers, and spirit mediums. These encounters typically involve cold reading, a process in which a reader makes calculated guesses about a client's background and problems and, depending on the reaction, elaborates a reading which seems to the client so uniquely appropriate that it carries with it the illusion of having been produced by paranormal means. The cold reading process is shown to depend initially on the Barnum effect, the tendency for people to embrace generalized personality descriptions as idiosyncratically their own. Psychological research into the Barnum effect is critically reviewed, and uses of the effect by a professional magician are described. This is followed by detailed analysis of the cold reading performances of a spirit medium. Future research should investigate the degree to which cold readers may have convinced themselves that they actually possess psychic or paranormal abilities.

  5. Coping with Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... re hungry. And you might have heard that chicken soup can cure a cold. There's no real ... you have strep throat and need treatment with antibiotics. If your doctor does prescribe antibiotics, be sure ...

  6. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ... gov/pubmed/22962927 . Melio FR, Berge LR. Upper respiratory tract infections. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  7. Aviation medicine and the Army.

    PubMed

    Vyrnwy-Jones, P; Thornton, R

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this short series of articles is not to present the reader with a vast amount of technical data, soon to be forgotten, but to provide some items of general interest from the past, present, and future of Army aviation. Obviously there will be a concentration on medical matters, but the aim is to give the reader a feel for the rapid progress being made in helicopter design and the likely problems we may face in the future. The first article serves as an introduction to the series and three further articles will cover various aspects of the speciality. The second will be concerned with AAC helicopter accidents and will include accident investigation, crashworthiness and the contribution made by pilot error. The third article will cover major environmental problems of helicopters, particularly noise, vibration and thermal stress. The fourth article will examine ways in which microprocessors and modern technology will affect future helicopter and ancillary equipment development; for instance, a helicopter with no external windows has been suggested, 'The Iron Cockpit'. The fifth article will be concerned with the clinical aspects of Army Aviation medicine.

  8. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army claims mission. (a) Promptly investigate...

  9. Quality in Government: The Army Intern Intake Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungvarsky, Diane M.; Lilienthal, Richard A.

    The development of the Army Intern Intake Survey (AIIS) is described. The AIIS focuses on the Army civilian intern program, a vehicle for entry-level employees to progress in Army civilian jobs, which produces a profile of past and current interns. The AIIS will identify changes in intern quality over time and will make comparisons of Army interns…

  10. Improving Corrosion Prevention and Control in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Improving Corrosion Prevention and Control in the Army by Lieutenant Colonel Adalberto Morales United States Army Logistics...From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Improving Corrosion Prevention and Control in the Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...14. ABSTRACT The Army spends approximately 2.4 billion of dollars annually in corrosion prevention and corrective maintenance of tactical wheeled

  11. Army Basic Skills Provision: Whole Organisation Approach/Lessons Learnt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basic Skills Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Army began working in partnership with the Basic Skills Agency in 2000. This was formalised with the establishment of the Basic Skills Agency's National Support Project for the Army (2001) that contributes to the raising of basic skills standards in the Army by advising on, and assisting with, the development of the Army's basic skills policy…

  12. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army...

  13. Army Recruiters: "Counseling" High-Schoolers to Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrow, John

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with Army recruitment in high schools. Students get to ask questions and hear stories about life In the Army from a soldier of the year, officers, and recruiters. Some brave students will even get a physical taste of life in the Army. According to an Army officer, the primary reason why recruiters go on high school campuses is…

  14. 75 FR 38504 - Army Science Board Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: July 21, 2010. Time(s...

  15. 76 FR 43993 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: August 10...

  16. Army (MANTECH) Thrust Area Concept: Optics Thrust Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-01-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  17. Army (MANTECH) thrust area concept: Optics thrust area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-04-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  18. Army (MANTECH) Thrust Area Concept: Optics Thrust Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-01-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  19. A Spatially Resolved Study of Cold Dust, Molecular Gas, H ii Regions, and Stars in the z = 2.12 Submillimeter Galaxy ALESS67.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Hodge, J. A.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Walter, Fabian; Simpson, J. M.; Calistro Rivera, Gabriela; Bertoldi, F.; Brandt, W. N.; Chapman, S. C.; da Cunha, Elisabete; Dannerbauer, H.; De Breuck, C.; Harrison, C. M.; Ivison, R. J.; Karim, A.; Knudsen, K. K.; Wardlow, J. L.; Weiß, A.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2017-09-01

    We present detailed studies of a z = 2.12 submillimeter galaxy, ALESS67.1, using sub-arcsecond resolution ALMA, adaptive optics-aided VLT/SINFONI, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/CANDELS data to investigate the kinematics and spatial distributions of dust emission (870 μm continuum), 12CO(J = 3–2), strong optical emission lines, and visible stars. Dynamical modeling of the optical emission lines suggests that ALESS67.1 is not a pure rotating disk but a merger, consistent with the apparent tidal features revealed in the HST imaging. Our sub-arcsecond resolution data set allows us to measure half-light radii for all the tracers, and we find a factor of 4–6 smaller sizes in dust continuum compared to all the other tracers, including 12CO; also, ultraviolet (UV) and Hα emission are significantly offset from the dust continuum. The spatial mismatch between the UV continuum and the cold dust and gas reservoir supports the explanation that geometrical effects are responsible for the offset of the dusty galaxy on the IRX–β diagram. Using a dynamical method we derive an {α }{CO}=1.8+/- 1.0, consistent with other submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) that also have resolved CO and dust measurements. Assuming a single {α }{CO} value we also derive resolved gas and star formation rate surface densities, and find that the core region of the galaxy (≲ 5 kpc) follows the trend of mergers on the Schmidt–Kennicutt relationship, whereas the outskirts (≳ 5 kpc) lie on the locus of normal star-forming galaxies, suggesting different star formation efficiencies within one galaxy. Our results caution against using single size or morphology for different tracers of the star formation activity and gas content of galaxies, and therefore argue the need to use spatially resolved, multi-wavelength observations to interpret the properties of SMGs, and perhaps even for z> 1 galaxies in general.

  20. Aircraft observations of cold pools under marine stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terai, C. R.; Wood, R.

    2013-10-01

    Although typically associated with precipitating cumuli, cold pools also form under shallower stratocumulus. This study presents cold-pool observations as sampled by the NSF/NCAR C-130, which made cloud and boundary-layer measurements over the southeast Pacific stratocumulus region at an altitude of approximately 150 m during the VOCALS Regional Experiment. Ninety edges of cold pools are found in the C-130 measurements by identifying step-like changes in the potential temperature. Examination of their mesoscale environment shows that the observed cold pools tend to form under heavier precipitation, thicker clouds, and in cleaner environments. Cold pools are also found to form under clouds with high LWP values over the night of or before sampling. When they form, cold pools often form in clusters or on top of each other, rather than as separate, individual entities. Their sizes range from 2 km to 16 km (middle 50th percentile), where the largest of cold pools are associated with the greatest drops in temperature. Composites of various observed thermodynamic and chemical variables along the cold-pool edges indicate increased humidity, equivalent potential temperature, coarse-mode aerosol, and dimethyl sulfide concentration inside cold pools. The enhancements inside cold pools are consistent with increased static stability that traps fluxes from the ocean surface in the lowest levels of the boundary layer. By using pressure perturbations, the average cold pool is estimated to be approximately 300 m deep. The temperature depression in cold pools also leads to density-driven flows that drive convergence of horizontal winds and measurable, mechanically driven vertical wind velocity at the edges of cold pools.