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Sample records for army size military

  1. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  2. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  3. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  4. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.328...

  5. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.326...

  6. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.326...

  7. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.328...

  8. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.326...

  9. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.326...

  10. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.326...

  11. U.S. Army Corrosion Office's storage and quality requirements for military MEMS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III; Skelton, D. R.

    2007-04-01

    As the Army transforms into a more lethal, lighter and agile force, the technologies that support these systems must decrease in size while increasing in intelligence. Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are one such technology that the Army and DOD will rely on heavily to accomplish these objectives. Conditions for utilization of MEMS by the military are unique. Operational and storage environments for the military are significantly different than those found in the commercial sector. Issues unique to the military include; high G-forces during gun launch, extreme temperature and humidity ranges, extended periods of inactivity (20 years plus) and interaction with explosives and propellants. The military operational environments in which MEMS will be stored or required to function are extreme and far surpass any commercial operating conditions. Security and encryption are a must for all MEMS communication, tracking, or data reporting devices employed by the military. Current and future military applications of MEMS devices include safety and arming devices, fuzing devices, various guidance systems, sensors/detectors, inertial measurement units, tracking devices, radio frequency devices, wireless Radio Frequency Identifications (RFIDs) and network systems, GPS's, radar systems, mobile base systems and information technology. MEMS embedded into these weapons systems will provide the military with new levels of speed, awareness, lethality, and information dissemination. The system capabilities enhanced by MEMS will translate directly into tactical and strategic military advantages.

  12. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  13. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Excessing Army military and Air Force property. 644.475 Section 644.475 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for...

  14. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  15. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property. 644.475 Section 644.475 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for...

  16. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army Board for Correction of Military Records. 581.3 Section 581.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. (a)...

  17. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Board for Correction of Military Records. 581.3 Section 581.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. (a)...

  18. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  19. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  20. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  1. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  2. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  3. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  4. Military Beliefs and PTSD in Active Duty U.S. Army Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Loew, Benjamin; Carter, Sarah; Allen, Elizabeth; Markman, Howard; Stanley, Scott; Rhoades, Galena

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic distress after military combat is a major cost of war. One under-investigated factor potentially associated with PTSD symptoms is specific beliefs about one’s military service. This study examined post-deployment self-reports from 272 active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, to investigate potential associations between military-related PTSD symptom severity and three beliefs about the military: the importance and value ascribed to one’s own work in the Army, to current military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and to military service in general. Higher scores on these three beliefs were negatively correlated with military-related PTSD symptom severity. However, in a combined regression model that controlled for recent combat exposure, only the belief about current military operations had a significant, unique association with PTSD symptom severity. That is, more positive beliefs about the value of operations in Iraq or Afghanistan were associated with lower PTSD symptoms. PMID:25530729

  5. The U.S. Army Person-Event Data Environment: A Military-Civilian Big Data Enterprise.

    PubMed

    Vie, Loryana L; Scheier, Lawrence M; Lester, Paul B; Ho, Tiffany E; Labarthe, Darwin R; Seligman, Martin E P

    2015-06-01

    This report describes a groundbreaking military-civilian collaboration that benefits from an Army and Department of Defense (DoD) big data business intelligence platform called the Person-Event Data Environment (PDE). The PDE is a consolidated data repository that contains unclassified but sensitive manpower, training, financial, health, and medical records covering U.S. Army personnel (Active Duty, Reserve, and National Guard), civilian contractors, and military dependents. These unique data assets provide a veridical timeline capturing each soldier's military experience from entry to separation from the armed forces. The PDE was designed to afford unprecedented cost-efficiencies by bringing researchers and military scientists to a single computerized repository rather than porting vast data resources to individual laboratories. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania Positive Psychology Center joined forces with the U.S. Army Research Facilitation Laboratory, forming the scientific backbone of the military-civilian collaboration. This unparalleled opportunity was necessitated by a growing need to learn more about relations between psychological and health assets and health outcomes, including healthcare utilization and costs-issues of major importance for both military and civilian population health. The PDE represents more than 100 times the population size and many times the number of linked variables covered by the nation's leading sources of population health data (e.g., the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). Following extensive Army vetting procedures, civilian researchers can mine the PDE's trove of information using a suite of statistical packages made available in a Citrix Virtual Desktop. A SharePoint collaboration and governance management environment ensures user compliance with federal and DoD regulations concerning human subjects' protections and also provides a secure

  6. The U.S. Army Person-Event Data Environment: A Military-Civilian Big Data Enterprise.

    PubMed

    Vie, Loryana L; Scheier, Lawrence M; Lester, Paul B; Ho, Tiffany E; Labarthe, Darwin R; Seligman, Martin E P

    2015-06-01

    This report describes a groundbreaking military-civilian collaboration that benefits from an Army and Department of Defense (DoD) big data business intelligence platform called the Person-Event Data Environment (PDE). The PDE is a consolidated data repository that contains unclassified but sensitive manpower, training, financial, health, and medical records covering U.S. Army personnel (Active Duty, Reserve, and National Guard), civilian contractors, and military dependents. These unique data assets provide a veridical timeline capturing each soldier's military experience from entry to separation from the armed forces. The PDE was designed to afford unprecedented cost-efficiencies by bringing researchers and military scientists to a single computerized repository rather than porting vast data resources to individual laboratories. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania Positive Psychology Center joined forces with the U.S. Army Research Facilitation Laboratory, forming the scientific backbone of the military-civilian collaboration. This unparalleled opportunity was necessitated by a growing need to learn more about relations between psychological and health assets and health outcomes, including healthcare utilization and costs-issues of major importance for both military and civilian population health. The PDE represents more than 100 times the population size and many times the number of linked variables covered by the nation's leading sources of population health data (e.g., the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). Following extensive Army vetting procedures, civilian researchers can mine the PDE's trove of information using a suite of statistical packages made available in a Citrix Virtual Desktop. A SharePoint collaboration and governance management environment ensures user compliance with federal and DoD regulations concerning human subjects' protections and also provides a secure

  7. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a)...

  8. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a)...

  9. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a)...

  10. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a)...

  11. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a)...

  12. Old Age, the Ancient Military, and Alexander's Army: Positive Examples for a Graying America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebric, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Presents examples from ancient Greece and Rome illustrating working aged and intergenerational dependence. Describes normal active participation of elderly as officers and common soldiers in ancient military as example of their capabilities. Notes that Alexander the Great's army, in particular, depended on contributions of older men. (Author/NB)

  13. Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-06-14

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

  14. Military positions and post-service occupational mobility of Union Army veterans, 1861–1880

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chulhee

    2009-01-01

    Although the Civil War has attracted a great deal of scholarly attention, little is known about how different wartime experiences of soldiers influenced their civilian lives after the war. This paper examines how military rank and duty of Union Army soldiers while in service affected their post-service occupational mobility. Higher ranks and non-infantry duties appear to have provided more opportunities for developing skills, especially those required for white-collar jobs. Among the recruits who were unskilled workers at the time of enlistment, commissioned and non-commissioned officers were much more likely to move up to a white-collar job by 1880. Similarly, unskilled recruits assigned to white-collar military duties were more likely to enter a white-collar occupation by 1880. The higher occupational mobility of higher-ranking soldiers is likely to have resulted from disparate human capital accumulations offered by their military positions rather than from their superior abilities. PMID:20234792

  15. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334.855 Section 334.855 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone....

  16. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334.855 Section 334.855 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone....

  17. The Adjustment of New Recruits to Military Life in the Chinese Army: The Longitudinal Predictive Power of MMPI-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lijun; Han, Jing; Han, Jian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the findings of two studies analyzing new recruits' adjustment to army life in the Chinese military. In the first exploratory study, we developed a scale to measure new recruits' adjustment to military life, and found that new soldiers' adaptation could be divided into two distinct types: interpersonal…

  18. The role of the US Army Veterinary Corps in military family pet health.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Johnson, Nancy A

    2013-01-01

    Even though privately-owned pet care is a lower priority mission than military working dog care, food inspection,and the public health mission, it is still very important,and the one that many Veterinary Corps officers, civil-ian veterinarians, and technicians enjoy the most. The vast majority of veterinarians and technicians went into veterinary medicine because of a love for animals. It is fulfilling to offer guidance to a client with a new puppy or kitten, see a sick pet improve after treatment, and interact with dozens of animals and clients in a day. The services provided by the Army Veterinary Corps in car-ing for pets has expanded over the years and the standard of care has improved as well. It is truly a privilege to serve those who dedicate themselves to the protection of our Nation. The Army Veterinary Corps is indeed proud to provide care to the pets of Warfighters of the Army,Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard; their family members; and our military retirees.

  19. The role of the US Army Veterinary Corps in military family pet health.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Johnson, Nancy A

    2013-01-01

    Even though privately-owned pet care is a lower priority mission than military working dog care, food inspection,and the public health mission, it is still very important,and the one that many Veterinary Corps officers, civil-ian veterinarians, and technicians enjoy the most. The vast majority of veterinarians and technicians went into veterinary medicine because of a love for animals. It is fulfilling to offer guidance to a client with a new puppy or kitten, see a sick pet improve after treatment, and interact with dozens of animals and clients in a day. The services provided by the Army Veterinary Corps in car-ing for pets has expanded over the years and the standard of care has improved as well. It is truly a privilege to serve those who dedicate themselves to the protection of our Nation. The Army Veterinary Corps is indeed proud to provide care to the pets of Warfighters of the Army,Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard; their family members; and our military retirees. PMID:23277448

  20. Classifying U.S. Army Military Occupational Specialties Using the Occupational Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Gadermann, Anne M.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Nock, Matthew K.; Rosellini, Anthony J.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To derive job condition scales for future studies of the effects of job conditions on soldier health and job functioning across Army Military Occupation Specialties (MOSs) and Areas of Concentration (AOCs) using Department of Labor (DoL) Occupational Information Network (O*NET) ratings. Methods A consolidated administrative dataset was created for the “Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers” (Army STARRS) containing all soldiers on active duty between 2004 and 2009. A crosswalk between civilian occupations and MOS/AOCs (created by DoL and the Defense Manpower Data Center) was augmented to assign scores on all 246 O*NET dimensions to each soldier in the dataset. Principal components analysis was used to summarize these dimensions. Results Three correlated components explained the majority of O*NET dimension variance: “physical demands” (20.9% of variance), “interpersonal complexity” (17.5%), and “substantive complexity” (15.0%). Although broadly consistent with civilian studies, several discrepancies were found with civilian results reflecting potentially important differences in the structure of job conditions in the Army versus the civilian labor force. Conclusions Principal components scores for these scales provide a parsimonious characterization of key job conditions that can be used in future studies of the effects of MOS/AOC job conditions on diverse outcomes. PMID:25003860

  1. [Military Knowledge: War Sciences and Army Libraries in France in the 19th Century (c. 1800-c. 1900)].

    PubMed

    Thoral, Marie-Cecile

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the development of military knowledge in France in the 19th century, both in terms of production of knowledge (especially through the Dépôt de la Guerre) and of transmission through a network of army libraries. The strategic dimension of this form of knowledge required a direct intervention of the state, to control or restrict the publication of sensitive data. State intervention was also necessary to coordinate and generate a unified, applied military knowledge using data submitted by members of different army branches, or by civilians. The work of military librarians and bibliologists was all the more difficult because of the very wide range of sciences which could be used by the army. Growing state intervention and public funding were thus essential for the production and transmission of military knowledge.

  2. The mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH): a military and surgical legacy.

    PubMed Central

    King, Booker; Jatoi, Ismalil

    2005-01-01

    Operation Iraqi Freedom was perhaps the last military campaign that will ever utilize the services of a mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH). The Army has now essentially replaced the MASH with combat surgical hospitals (CSH) and forward surgical teams (FST). MASH units were designed as mobile, flexible, forward-deployed military hospitals, providing care for the wounded near the frontlines of the battlefield. These hospitals not only saved thousands of lives during war but also greatly influenced the delivery of trauma and critical care in civilian hospitals. The MASH was made popular by the television series of the 1970s, depicting the 4077th during the Korean War. Although a comical series, these television episodes provided viewers with a glimpse of life in a MASH during time of war. This article chronicles the history of the MASH from its inception during World War II to recent experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 p656-a PMID:15926641

  3. Military Services Fitness Database: Development of a Computerized Physical Fitness and Weight Management Database for the U.S. Army

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Donald A.; Bathalon, Gaston P.; Sigrist, Lori D.; Allen, H. Raymond; Friedl, Karl E.; Young, Andrew J.; Martin, Corby K.; Stewart, Tiffany M.; Burrell, Lolita; Han, Hongmei; Hubbard, Van S.; Ryan, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has mandated development of a system to collect and manage data on the weight, percent body fat (%BF), and fitness of all military personnel. This project aimed to (1) develop a computerized weight and fitness database to track individuals and Army units over time allowing cross-sectional and longitudinal evaluations and (2) test the computerized system for feasibility and integrity of data collection over several years of usage. The computer application, the Military Services Fitness Database (MSFD), was designed for (1) storage and tracking of data related to height, weight, %BF for the Army Weight Control Program (AWCP) and Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) scores and (2) generation of reports using these data. A 2.5-year pilot test of the MSFD indicated that it monitors population and individual trends of changing body weight, %BF, and fitness in a military population. PMID:19216292

  4. Cypriot and greek army military boot cushioning: ground reaction forces and subjective responses.

    PubMed

    Paisis, Panagiotis; Hanley, Brian; Havenetidis, Konstantinos; Bissas, Athanassios

    2013-04-01

    Lower limb injuries are a continual and serious issue for military personnel. Such injuries have been associated with the requirement to train in military boots (MBs) and might be offset with commercial insoles. In this study, ground reaction forces were measured in seven male participants wearing running shoes (RS), MBs commonly used by Cypriot and Greek Army personnel, and the MBs with two types of shock-absorbing insole. The participants performed 4-min trials at walking pace (5 km·h-1) and running pace (10 km·h-1) at a 5% gradient on a treadmill under all four shod conditions. The treadmill incorporated two force plates under its belt, which provided measurements of key kinetic variables. During walking, RS showed significantly lower values for impact peak force (p < 0.01), maximum force (p < 0.05), and push-off rate (p < 0.05) compared with other conditions, although no significant differences were found during running. Although the RS were rated significantly more comfortable than any other condition, neither insole made the MBs more comfortable to wear. With little evidence to support wholesale adoption of insoles in MBs, their use by military personnel can only be recommended on a case-by-case basis.

  5. HIV infection among U.S. Army and Air Force military personnel: sociodemographic and genotyping analysis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Darrell E; Bautista, Christian T; O'Connell, Robert J; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Agan, Brian K; Kijak, Gustavo H; Hakre, Shilpa; Sanchez, Jose L; Sateren, Warren B; McCutchan, Francine E; Michael, Nelson L; Scott, Paul T

    2010-08-01

    Since 1985, the U.S. Department of Defense has periodically screened all military personnel for HIV allowing for the monitoring of the infection in this dynamic cohort population. A nested case-control study was performed to study sociodemographics, overseas assignment, and molecular analysis of HIV. Cases were newly identified HIV infections among U.S. Army and Air Force military personnel from 2000 to 2004. Controls were frequency matched to cases by gender and date of case first positive HIV screening test. Genotyping analysis was performed using high-throughput screening assays and partial genome sequencing. HIV was significantly associated with black race [odds ratio (OR) = 6.65], single marital status (OR = 4.45), and age (OR per year = 1.07). Ninety-seven percent were subtype B and 3% were non-B subtypes (A3, CRF01_AE, A/C recombinant, G, CRF02_AG). Among cases, overseas assignment in the period at risk prior to their first HIV-positive test was associated with non-B HIV subtype infection (OR = 8.44). Black and single military personnel remain disproportionately affected by HIV infection. Most non-B HIV subtypes were associated with overseas assignment. Given the increased frequency and length of assignments, and the expanding HIV genetic diversity observed in this population, there is a need for active HIV genotyping surveillance and a need to reinforce primary HIV prevention efforts.

  6. Cypriot and greek army military boot cushioning: ground reaction forces and subjective responses.

    PubMed

    Paisis, Panagiotis; Hanley, Brian; Havenetidis, Konstantinos; Bissas, Athanassios

    2013-04-01

    Lower limb injuries are a continual and serious issue for military personnel. Such injuries have been associated with the requirement to train in military boots (MBs) and might be offset with commercial insoles. In this study, ground reaction forces were measured in seven male participants wearing running shoes (RS), MBs commonly used by Cypriot and Greek Army personnel, and the MBs with two types of shock-absorbing insole. The participants performed 4-min trials at walking pace (5 km·h-1) and running pace (10 km·h-1) at a 5% gradient on a treadmill under all four shod conditions. The treadmill incorporated two force plates under its belt, which provided measurements of key kinetic variables. During walking, RS showed significantly lower values for impact peak force (p < 0.01), maximum force (p < 0.05), and push-off rate (p < 0.05) compared with other conditions, although no significant differences were found during running. Although the RS were rated significantly more comfortable than any other condition, neither insole made the MBs more comfortable to wear. With little evidence to support wholesale adoption of insoles in MBs, their use by military personnel can only be recommended on a case-by-case basis. PMID:23707838

  7. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.388 Army military—screening, clearance, preliminary report...

  8. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.388 Army military—screening, clearance, preliminary report...

  9. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.388 Army military—screening, clearance, preliminary report...

  10. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.388 Army military—screening, clearance, preliminary report...

  11. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.388 Army military—screening, clearance, preliminary report...

  12. Military inpatient residential treatment of substance abuse disorders: the Eisenhower Army Medical Center experience.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Scott R; Horton, Philip A; Trakowski, John H; Lenard, Janet H; Barron, Mark R; Nave, Peggy V; Gautreaux, Melissa S; Lott, Heather D

    2014-06-01

    Opened in 2009, the Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center Inpatient Residential Treatment Facility (RTF) is the largest and most well-established inpatient substance use disorder treatment facility in the Department of Defense. The RTF is a 28-day inpatient treatment program that employs evidence-based practices and is based on Alcoholics/Narcotics Anonymous principles that are incorporated with a hybrid of military daily structure regime including early morning physical training. Family involvement is encouraged. The RTF is staffed by a multidisciplinary team specializing in addictions and admits Active/Activated Service Members (SMs) from all Service branches, typically those who have failed other military/civilian substance use disorder programs. Eighty-seven percent of SMs referred to the program successfully commenced, with continuous sobriety observed in over half of SMs 6 months later, and 1 year relapse rates comparable to other alcohol treatment programs. Limitations of our program evaluation efforts, lessons learned, and recommendations for the way ahead are shared.

  13. Advising and assisting an Iraqi Army medical clinic: observations of a U.S. military support mission.

    PubMed

    Lynn, David C; De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2011-09-01

    Medical civil-military operations are important for deployed military medical units engaged in counter-insurgency missions. There are few reports on military support for a host nation's military medical infrastructure, and we describe an initiative of the 21st Combat Support Hospital in 2010 during the postsurge phase of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn. The goal was to incrementally improve the quality of care provided by Iraqi 7th Army medical personnel using existing clinic infrastructure and a low budget. Direct bedside teaching to include screening and treatment of ambulatory patients (sick call), focused pharmacy and medical supply system support, medical records documentation, and basic infection control compliance were the objectives. Lessons learned include the requirement to implement culturally relevant changes, maintain focus on system processes, and maximize education and mentorship through multiple modalities. In summary, a combat hospital can successfully implement an advise and assist mission with minimal external resources. PMID:21987956

  14. Advising and assisting an Iraqi Army medical clinic: observations of a U.S. military support mission.

    PubMed

    Lynn, David C; De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2011-09-01

    Medical civil-military operations are important for deployed military medical units engaged in counter-insurgency missions. There are few reports on military support for a host nation's military medical infrastructure, and we describe an initiative of the 21st Combat Support Hospital in 2010 during the postsurge phase of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn. The goal was to incrementally improve the quality of care provided by Iraqi 7th Army medical personnel using existing clinic infrastructure and a low budget. Direct bedside teaching to include screening and treatment of ambulatory patients (sick call), focused pharmacy and medical supply system support, medical records documentation, and basic infection control compliance were the objectives. Lessons learned include the requirement to implement culturally relevant changes, maintain focus on system processes, and maximize education and mentorship through multiple modalities. In summary, a combat hospital can successfully implement an advise and assist mission with minimal external resources.

  15. An evidence-based vector control strategy for military deployments: the British Army experience.

    PubMed

    Croft, A M; Baker, D; von Bertele, M J

    2001-01-01

    We describe the British Army's current strategy for controlling arthropod vectors of disease during overseas deployments. Military commanders and medical officers have different, but complementary responsibilities in achieving vector control. In this paper we define a hierarchy of evidence-based vector control guidelines. Field guidelines must be based on the best available research evidence, preferably that derived from pragmatic randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and from systematic reviews of trials. Assessing the effectiveness of different vector control measures involves a trade-off between the relative benefits and harm of different technology options. There is compelling scientific evidence that bed nets and screens treated with a pyrethroid insecticide are highly effective in protecting against nocturnally active, anthropophilic arthropods (including ectoparasites), and will reduce the incidence of malaria, leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis and Chagas' disease. Etofenprox and deltamethrin are the safest pyrethroids, and permethrin the least safe. Vector control strategies of probable effectiveness are the use of insecticide-treated clothing, the wearing of protective clothing, and the correct use of DEET-based topical insect repellents. Aerosol insecticides are of debatable effectiveness. Other effective vector control measures, of limited usefulness during deployments, include electric fans, mosquito coils/vaporising mats, and smoke. "Biological" vector control measures, and insect buzzers/electrocuters are ineffective. Practical insect avoidance measures, based on an understanding of vector biology, complete the military vector-control arsenal. We conclude that practical insect avoidance measures, combined with pyrethroid-treated nets and clothing, and DEET-based topical repellents, can achieve almost 100% protection against biting arthropods. PMID:11584666

  16. [The system of selection and training of military-medical staff for the 40th army (1979-1989)].

    PubMed

    Ryabinkin, V V

    2015-10-01

    In December 1979 in order to fulfil their internationalist duty troops and units of the 40th Army of the Armed Forces of the USSR was brought into Afghanistan. For complete and qualitative manning of the army with the military doctors it was needed in a short time to create a system capable to carry out candidates selection, their education and specialized training for work in extreme conditions of combat operations. This system was created in a short time. The article presents information about its features, advantages and problems that had to be solved during the entire period of the Soviet-Afghan war. The complex staff arrangements had allowed solving medical support problems of the 40th Army on the high level.

  17. Influence of new military athletic footwear on the kinetics and kinematics of running in relation to army boots.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries in the lower extremities are common in military recruits. Army boots have frequently been cited as a potential mechanism behind these high injury rates. In response to this, the British Army introduced new footwear models, the PT-03 (cross-trainer) and PT1000 (running shoes), which are issued to each new recruit in an attempt to reduce the incidence of these injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the kinetics and kinematic of the PT-03 and PT1000 footwear in relation to conventional army boots. Thirteen participants ran at 4.0 m·s in each footwear condition. Three-dimensional kinematics from the hip, knee, and ankle were measured using an 8-camera motion analysis system. In addition, simultaneous ground reaction forces were obtained. Kinetic parameters were obtained alongside joint kinematics and compared using repeated-measures analyses of variance. The kinetic analysis revealed that impact parameters were significantly greater when running in the army boot compared with the PT-03 and PT1000. The kinematic analysis indicated that, in comparison with the PT-03 and PT1000, running in army boots was associated with significantly greater eversion and tibial internal rotation. It was also found that when running in the PT-03 footwear, participants exhibited significantly greater hip adduction and knee abduction compared with the army boots and PT1000. The results of this study suggest that the army boots and PT-03 footwear are associated with kinetic and kinematic parameters that have been linked to the etiology of injury; thus, it is recommended that the PT1000 footwear be adopted for running exercises.

  18. Armies of east and southern Africa fighting a guerrilla war with AIDS. Special report: AIDS and the military.

    PubMed

    Yeager, R

    1995-12-01

    AIDS prevention and care programs administered by the defense forces of Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe embody information, education, and communication, condom promotion, sexually transmitted disease (STD) control, safe blood supply, pre- and post-test counseling, and support for those afflicted. Rules of the UN peacekeeping operations are also observed: training in HIV prevention, testing prior to deployment, and no deployment of troops infected. The militaries' efforts are linked with the endeavors of national AIDS programs run by civilian government agencies and nongovernmental organizations. The various policies towards HIV-infected personnel usually employ discharge provisions only when the soldier is unable to perform his duties. Health education is part of the militaries' programs. In Malawi each unit in military school is educated about HIV/STD transmission and condom use. In Tanzania HIV-positive troops are counseled and those with symptoms are given a sick leave to prepare for retirement. The Ugandan Army operates nine health education centers that offer training and counseling. AIDS widows and orphans are cared for and their property rights are protected. In Zambia the military have trained HIV/AIDS counselors and HIV-positive persons are counseled and treated for up to seven years. In Zimbabwe, HIV-infected but fit servicemen continue service and are treated until death, while their dependents are cared for. Women are also included in the armies of these seven countries, but Malawi and Kenya restrict in-service marriages. Uganda and Zimbabwe have guidelines against sexual harassment and provide better living conditions for married couples. Only the Malawian Army tests all recruits for HIV prior to officer training. Botswana, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe have voluntary testing schemes, but reassessment is underway in Zambia where 25% of recruits are infected with HIV. The impact of HIV/AIDS can be reduced

  19. Armies of east and southern Africa fighting a guerrilla war with AIDS. Special report: AIDS and the military.

    PubMed

    Yeager, R

    1995-12-01

    AIDS prevention and care programs administered by the defense forces of Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe embody information, education, and communication, condom promotion, sexually transmitted disease (STD) control, safe blood supply, pre- and post-test counseling, and support for those afflicted. Rules of the UN peacekeeping operations are also observed: training in HIV prevention, testing prior to deployment, and no deployment of troops infected. The militaries' efforts are linked with the endeavors of national AIDS programs run by civilian government agencies and nongovernmental organizations. The various policies towards HIV-infected personnel usually employ discharge provisions only when the soldier is unable to perform his duties. Health education is part of the militaries' programs. In Malawi each unit in military school is educated about HIV/STD transmission and condom use. In Tanzania HIV-positive troops are counseled and those with symptoms are given a sick leave to prepare for retirement. The Ugandan Army operates nine health education centers that offer training and counseling. AIDS widows and orphans are cared for and their property rights are protected. In Zambia the military have trained HIV/AIDS counselors and HIV-positive persons are counseled and treated for up to seven years. In Zimbabwe, HIV-infected but fit servicemen continue service and are treated until death, while their dependents are cared for. Women are also included in the armies of these seven countries, but Malawi and Kenya restrict in-service marriages. Uganda and Zimbabwe have guidelines against sexual harassment and provide better living conditions for married couples. Only the Malawian Army tests all recruits for HIV prior to officer training. Botswana, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe have voluntary testing schemes, but reassessment is underway in Zambia where 25% of recruits are infected with HIV. The impact of HIV/AIDS can be reduced

  20. Shut Out of the Military: Today's High School Education Doesn't Mean You're Ready for Today's Army. K-12 Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theokas, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Many educators comfortably embrace the myth that the military will enlist any and all high school graduates who are interested. However, a new analysis from The Education Trust reports that too many of the nation's high school graduates have not been adequately prepared to serve in the U.S. Army. In "Shut Out of the Military," the first-ever…

  1. The Roles of Women in the Army and Their Impact on Military Operations and Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batts, John H.; And Others

    Problems inherent in the expanded utilization of female soldiers in the U.S. Army are numerous. Attitudes of a wide sample of Army personnel, men and women, enlisted and officer, were surveyed pertaining to those problems. Some problems such as uniforms, billeting, assignments, and training are obvious and with proper planning can and will be…

  2. Putting the military back into the history of the military-industrial complex: the management of technological innovation in the U.S. Army, 1945-1960.

    PubMed

    Lassman, Thomas C

    2015-03-01

    In 1946 General Dwight Eisenhower, the Army Chief of Staff, established the Research and Development (R&D) Division on the War Department General Staff to expedite major technological breakthroughs in weapons technology. This goal, based on the separation of the management of R&D from procurement, captured the Army's preference for qualitative rather than quantitative superiority on the battlefield, but it threatened to upend entrenched methods of incremental product improvement under way in the Army's supply organizations, collectively called the technical services. The division's brief existence (it ceased operations in 1947) contrasted sharply with the longevity of the Ordnance Department's in-house manufacturing arsenals; for more than a century they had exploited synergies between R&D and production to turn out new weapons mass-produced in industry. The history of the R&D Division and the corresponding management of technological innovation in the technical services broadens an otherwise narrow historiographical interpretation of postwar knowledge production in the United States that is still focused heavily on the moral and political economy of military-funded academic research.

  3. Putting the military back into the history of the military-industrial complex: the management of technological innovation in the U.S. Army, 1945-1960.

    PubMed

    Lassman, Thomas C

    2015-03-01

    In 1946 General Dwight Eisenhower, the Army Chief of Staff, established the Research and Development (R&D) Division on the War Department General Staff to expedite major technological breakthroughs in weapons technology. This goal, based on the separation of the management of R&D from procurement, captured the Army's preference for qualitative rather than quantitative superiority on the battlefield, but it threatened to upend entrenched methods of incremental product improvement under way in the Army's supply organizations, collectively called the technical services. The division's brief existence (it ceased operations in 1947) contrasted sharply with the longevity of the Ordnance Department's in-house manufacturing arsenals; for more than a century they had exploited synergies between R&D and production to turn out new weapons mass-produced in industry. The history of the R&D Division and the corresponding management of technological innovation in the technical services broadens an otherwise narrow historiographical interpretation of postwar knowledge production in the United States that is still focused heavily on the moral and political economy of military-funded academic research. PMID:26027309

  4. Realizing Major William Borden's dream: military medicine, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and its wounded warriors, 1909-2009: an essay review.

    PubMed

    Connor, J T H

    2011-07-01

    This essay review examines three books dealing with the founding and subsequent activities of Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) and the evolution of military medicine from 1909 to 2009 recently published by the US Army's Borden Institute. Established by fellow army doctor William Borden to honor Walter Reed himself, WRAMC, located in Washington, DC, soon became the public and professional face of medical care for American soldiers. The discussion highlights the ongoing issue of the care and treatment of combat amputees; aspects of gender within military medicine; and WRAMC's function as an educational and research facility. Also discussed are the archival and documentary bases for these books and their utility for historians. Complimentary analysis of two of the books which are, in particular, explicitly about the history of WRAMC is contextualized within the celebration of the centennial of this army post contemporaneously with its closure, amalgamation, and relocation primarily to Maryland. PMID:21724648

  5. Suicide in the Military: Army-NIH Funded Study Points to Risk and Protective Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office 301-443-4536 NIMHpress@nih.gov More Science News about Basic Research Military Service Members Suicide ... the Field News from the Field NIMH-Funded Science on EurekAlert Lack of Sleep Increases a Child's ...

  6. The Needs of the Army: Using Compulsory Relocation in the Military to Estimate the Effect of Air Pollutants on Children's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lleras-Muney, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Recent research suggests that pollution has a large impact on asthma and other respiratory and cardiovascular conditions. But this relationship and its implications are not well understood. I use changes in location due to military transfers, which occur entirely to satisfy the needs of the army, to identify the causal impact of pollution on…

  7. A prospective investigation of injury incidence and injury risk factors among army recruits in military police training

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background United States Army military police (MP) training is a 19-week course designed to introduce new recruits to basic soldiering skills, Army values and lifestyle, and law enforcement skills and knowledge. The present investigation examined injury rates and injury risk factors in MP training. Methods At the start of training, 1,838 male and 553 female MP recruits were administered a questionnaire containing items on date of birth, height, weight, tobacco use, prior physical activity, injury history, and menstrual history. Injuries during training were obtained from electronic medical records and the training units provided data on student graduation and attrition. Results Successfully graduating from the course were 94.3% of the men and 83.7% of the women. Experiencing at least one injury during training were 34.2% of the men and 66.7% of the women (risk ratio (women/men) = 1.95, 95% confidence interval = 1.79-2.13). Recruits were at higher injury risk if they reported that they were older, had smoked in the past, or had performed less frequent exercise or sports prior to MP training. Men were at higher injury risk if they reported a prior injury and women were at higher risk if they reported missing at least six menstrual cycles in the last year or had previously been pregnant. Conclusion The present investigation was the first to identify injury rates and identify specific factors increasing injury risk during MP training. PMID:23327563

  8. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... application is not filed within prescribed time limits and when it is not in the interest of justice to excuse... application when requesting correction of another person's military records. (2) Time limits. Applicants must... should be granted) that was not in the record at the time of the ABCMR's prior consideration. If...

  9. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... application is not filed within prescribed time limits and when it is not in the interest of justice to excuse... application when requesting correction of another person's military records. (2) Time limits. Applicants must... should be granted) that was not in the record at the time of the ABCMR's prior consideration. If...

  10. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... application is not filed within prescribed time limits and when it is not in the interest of justice to excuse... application when requesting correction of another person's military records. (2) Time limits. Applicants must... should be granted) that was not in the record at the time of the ABCMR's prior consideration. If...

  11. Integration and cooperation of Army logistics simulations for multiphased military deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Richard J.; Blachowicz, Dariusz; Bragen, Mark; Braun, Mary; Burke, James, Jr.; Howard, Dawn; Macal, Charles; Van Groningen, Charles; Widing, Mary Ann

    2004-08-01

    Military deployment planners and analysts must consider the constraints, options, and available infrastructure of a network of installations and ports, from the beginning of the transportation system in the United States to the end of the deployment in the host country. Argonne National Laboratory developed a suite of models that simulate and visualize these deployments. There are discrete event simulations (the Enhanced Logistics Intra-theater Support Tool, the Transportation System Capability model, and the Port Simulation model) as well as several data editing and visualization tools. This paper presents the models, and discusses how they interact and leverage their shared data and technologies, to facilitate deployment analysis.

  12. Study of the cost-savings potential of the Military - Civilian Health Services Partnership Program in the nuclear medicine and radioimmunoassay services at Ireland Army Community Hospital, Fort Knox, Kentucky. Master's thesis, July 1987-July 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Amon, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Using workload data for Calendar Year 1987, a cost savings analysis was performed on the following three options (involving the Nuclear Medicine Department at Ireland Army Community Hospital); (1) Elimination of Radioimmunoassay Internal Service, (2) Civilian Military Health Service Partnership Program and (3) Fixed price contract for Nuclear Medicine Services. This study revealed the Civilian-Military Health Services Partnership Program would potentially generate the greatest cost savings and recommended that it be implemented in other areas throughout the Army Medical Department.

  13. Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-10-01

    The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

  14. Microhabitat and body size effects on heat tolerance: implications for responses to climate change (army ants: Formicidae, Ecitoninae).

    PubMed

    Baudier, Kaitlin M; Mudd, Abigail E; Erickson, Shayna C; O'Donnell, Sean

    2015-09-01

    1. Models that predict organismal and population responses to climate change may be improved by considering ecological factors that affect species thermal tolerance. Species differences in microhabitat use can expose animals to diverse thermal selective environments at a given site and may cause sympatric species to evolve different thermal tolerances. 2. We tested the hypothesis that species differences in body size and microhabitat use (above- vs. below-ground activity) would correspond to differences in thermal tolerance (maximum critical temperatures: CTmax ). Thermal buffering effects of soil can reduce exposure to extreme high temperatures for below-ground active species. We predicted larger-bodied individuals and species would have higher CTmax and that species mean CTmax would covary positively with degree of above-ground activity. We used Neotropical army ants (Formicidae: Ecitoninae) as models. Army ants vary in microhabitat use from largely subterranean to largely above-ground active species and are highly size polymorphic. 3. We collected data on above- and below-ground temperatures in habitats used by army ants to test for microhabitat temperature differences, and we conducted CTmax assays for army ant species with varying degrees of surface activity and with different body sizes within and between species. We then tested whether microhabitat use was associated with species differences in CTmax and whether microhabitat was a better predictor of CTmax than body size for species that overlapped in size. 4. Microhabitat use was a highly significant predictor of species' upper thermal tolerance limits, both for raw data and after accounting for the effects of phylogeny. Below-ground species were more thermally sensitive, with lower maximum critical temperatures (CTmax ). The smallest workers within each species were the least heat tolerant, but the magnitude of CTmax change with body size was greater in below-ground species. Species-typical microhabitat

  15. English Educational Policies of the U.S. Army Military Government in Korea from 1945 to 1948 and Their Effects on the Development of English Language Teaching in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Eun Gyong

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the English language teaching (ELT) policies and measures taken under the United States Army Military Government in Korea (USAMGIK) from 1945 to 1948, in an attempt to illuminate their implications on the current ELT in Korea. The study analyzes data derived from documents of the Korean and the U.S. governments, literature on…

  16. Evaluation of the utility and energy monitoring and control system installed at the US Army, Europe, 409th Base Support Battalion, Military Community at Grafenwoehr, Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Broders, M.A.; Ruppel, F.R.

    1993-05-01

    Under the provisions of Interagency Agreement DOE 1938-B090-A1 between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Army Europe (USAREUR), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., is providing technical assistance to USAREUR in the areas of computer science, information engineering, energy studies, and engineering and systems development. One of the initial projects authorized under this interagency agreement is the evaluation of utility and energy monitoring and control systems (UEMCSs) installed at selected US Army installations in Europe. This report is an evaluation of the overall energy-conservation effectiveness and use of the UEMCS at the 409th Base Support Battalion located in Grafenwoehr, Germany. The 409th Base Support Battalion is a large USAREUR military training facility that comprises a large training area, leased housing, the main post area, and the camp areas that include Camps Aachen, Algier, Normandy, Cheb, and Kasserine. All of these facilities are consumers of electrical and thermal energy. However, only buildings and facilities in the main post area and Camps Aachen, Algier, and Normandy are under the control of the UEMCS. The focus of this evaluation report is on these specific areas. Recommendations to further increase energy and cost savings and to improve operation of the UEMCS are proposed.

  17. Military Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton; Hayes, Bill

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores questions of military authority. The first article looks at the French Army mutinies in World War I and how the French Army dealt with them. The second article examines President Truman's firing of popular and powerful General Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. The final article looks at how…

  18. U.S. Army Medical Department

    MedlinePlus

    ... Excerpt-3 Building partnerships through military medicine Tripler Army Medical Center assists in medical missions. Read more ... their age, height, and weight. Healthy Living Videos Army Medicine Health Minute View More Videos

  19. Army thermophotovoltaic efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, John S.; Guazzoni, Guido; Nawrocki, Selma J.

    1999-03-01

    A presentation and description of the several efforts in Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) Energy Conversion for power generation supported/monitored by the Army is provided with their more recent technical status and results. The efforts are related to small business (SBIR, STTR) contracts, academic research grants (MURI), and contracts awarded as the result of specialized solicitations. This paper covers a number of Army potential uses of the TPV power generation and is an attempt to give a more cohesive and integrated picture of the various military interests in TPV. With the exception of low power (<10 W) units, all Army potential uses of TPV power sources will demand operation with logistically available fuels.

  20. Improving Soldier Health and Performance by Moving Army Medicine Toward a System for Health.

    PubMed

    Caravalho, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    With growing limitations on military resources, including a reduction in the overall size of our military force, the Army must make the most of every soldier in its ranks. The only way to achieve the necessary improvements in human performance with upcoming constraints will be through exploring innovative ways of thinking while implementing the best policies and doctrine that will maintain each soldier's resilience throughout their military career. Moving the Army from a traditional health care system to a system for health is expected to substantially improve and maintain soldier health and performance by focusing on 3 key areas: the Performance Triad (sleep health, physical activity, and nutrition behaviors), Delivery of Health, and Healthy Environments. The implementation of this system for health will not only improve individual soldier's resiliency/capability both throughout and beyond their military careers and benefit Army Medicine as a whole, but could also serve as a successful model for the nation if changes are adopted. PMID:26506196

  1. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy....

  2. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy....

  3. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy....

  4. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy....

  5. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy....

  6. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Steven G; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting, contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples.

  7. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Heeringa, Steven G.; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce U.S. Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples. PMID:24038395

  8. Modeling, simulation, and concept design for hybrid-electric medium-size military trucks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzoni, Giorgio; Josephson, John R.; Soliman, Ahmed; Hubert, Christopher; Cantemir, Codrin-Gruie; Dembski, Nicholas; Pisu, Pierluigi; Mikesell, David; Serrao, Lorenzo; Russell, James; Carroll, Mark

    2005-05-01

    A large scale design space exploration can provide valuable insight into vehicle design tradeoffs being considered for the U.S. Army"s FMTV (Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles). Through a grant from TACOM (Tank-automotive and Armaments Command), researchers have generated detailed road, surface, and grade conditions representative of the performance criteria of this medium-sized truck and constructed a virtual powertrain simulator for both conventional and hybrid variants. The simulator incorporates the latest technology among vehicle design options, including scalable ultracapacitor and NiMH battery packs as well as a variety of generator and traction motor configurations. An energy management control strategy has also been developed to provide efficiency and performance. A design space exploration for the family of vehicles involves running a large number of simulations with systematically varied vehicle design parameters, where each variant is paced through several different mission profiles and multiple attributes of performance are measured. The resulting designs are filtered to remove dominated designs, exposing the multi-criterial surface of optimality (Pareto optimal designs), and revealing the design tradeoffs as they impact vehicle performance and economy. The results are not yet definitive because ride and drivability measures were not included, and work is not finished on fine-tuning the modeled dynamics of some powertrain components. However, the work so far completed demonstrates the effectiveness of the approach to design space exploration, and the results to date suggest the powertrain configuration best suited to the FMTV mission.

  9. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  10. Suicide in the US Army

    PubMed Central

    Lineberry, Timothy W.; O'Connor, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

  11. Military and civilian emergency aeromedical services: common goals and different approaches.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, R A

    1997-01-01

    Military and civilian organizations in the U.S. operate separate but parallel emergency aeromedical services. Despite common origins, military and civilian approaches and methods have diverged. This article compares and contrasts the capabilities, priorities, safety, equipment, training and personnel of the largest military service, the U.S. Army, to civilian rotary wing (helicopter) emergency aeromedical programs. The different successes of military and civilian emergency aeromedical programs can be considered for use to improve the services of each. In general, Army programs operate larger aircraft and utilize two pilots per aircraft. Safety is a high priority and the Army aeromedical safety record is excellent. The Army also places a high degree of emphasis on crashworthiness and protective gear for the crew. Most civilian air Emergency Medical Service (EMS) programs operate small to moderate-sized aircraft flying with a single pilot. The recent safety record has improved dramatically. Civilian programs may add to their safety by considering two pilots and incorporating the crashworthy and protective advancements made by the military. Civilian programs fly with two highly trained medical technicians, nurses or physicians, equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment. Army helicopters fly with one lesser-trained medical crewmember and less equipment. Improved combat casualty care and battlefield survival may be possible by increasing both the number and training of the medical attendants on Army aircraft. PMID:9006884

  12. The military insanity defense.

    PubMed

    Lande, R G

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the military insanity defense. The success of the litigated insanity defense is explored through the number of insanity acquittals over a 28-month period. A questionnaire distributed to all United States Army psychiatrists provided information on the number of forensic evaluations performed, the number of not criminally responsible (NCR) opinions made, and the disposition of noncontested NCR opinions. The questionnaire also tested the Army psychiatrists' knowledge about recent changes in the military insanity defense. This pilot study raises interesting questions about the military insanity defense that further research can address.

  13. THE CHALLENGE OF MOLDS FOR THE U.S. ARMY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Army and all armies have been interested in molds since there were armies. The most obvious interest was human infections by molds like trench foot. Then there were losses of military animals and contamination of their fodder, most notably the Soviet loss of thousands o...

  14. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. 553.7 Section 553.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army...

  15. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. 553.7 Section 553.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army...

  16. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. 553.7 Section 553.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army...

  17. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. 553.7 Section 553.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army...

  18. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. 553.7 Section 553.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army...

  19. 78 FR 43796 - Indebtedness of Military Personnel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... is removed, which was established in the Federal Register, March 3, 1986 (51 FR 7268). Rules in the... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 513 Indebtedness of Military Personnel AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD... procedures for handling debt claims against soldiers. These rules in the Army Regulation have been...

  20. 76 FR 776 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution... sent by e-mail to: chad.t.privett@us.army.mil or george.alie@us.army.mil . FOR FURTHER...

  1. 75 FR 24667 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution... information may be sent by e-mail to: tony.mayo@us.army.mil or jessica.c.hamilton@us.army.mil . FOR...

  2. 75 FR 36643 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and....privett@us.army.mil or george.alie@us.army.mil . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Chad Privett,...

  3. ETL wins Army Lab Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Army Engineer Topographic Laboratories (ETL), located in Fort Belvoir, Va., was awarded the 1981 Department of the Army Most Improved Laboratory of the Year Award for ETL's scientific and technical achievements in mapping, military geographic information, and geographic intelligence systems.ETL, the largest topographic research and development organization of its kind in the world, specializes in mapping, geodesy, point positioning, and military geographic information. ETL addresses the full range of development from basic research to a final product in the topographic sciences. In addition, scientists at the laboratory have interpreted feedback from satellites, such as Landsat, to help pinpoint and improve ecological imbalance in some areas. ETL engineers are developing electronic systems to measure dams, while other ETL staff members are designing a pseudo-radar system for the Pershing II missile.

  4. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of college, only…

  5. [The military pharmocopoeias in Denmark].

    PubMed

    Kruse, P R

    2000-09-01

    In 1812, the Danish king decided to reform the medicine supply to the military on the initiative of the pharmacist Jens Peter Groth (1785-1832), the tenant of the Royal Orphanage Pharmacy in Copenhagen. Up till then, the military physicians themselves for fixed medicine money had supplied the army and the navy with the necessary medicine, but now it was decided that Groth should establish a military pharmacy to manage the future medicine supply to the army and the navy in Copenhagen and also that the medicial members of the General Direction of the Military Medical Service should compile a military pharmacopoeia for both of the fighting services. The Royal Orphanage Pharmacy was named the Royal Military & Orphanage Pharmacy and the ordered military pharmacopoeia was issued in 1813. Compared with the national pharmacopoeia, the military pharmacopoeia was characterized by a limitation of the number of medicaments and by a simplification of the compositions. These facts were caused by the economic considerations and the duty of the military physicians themselves to prepare the simple medicaments. The subsequent editions of the military pharmacopoeia were published in 1840, 1857 og 1869, but in 1874, the military pharmacopoeia was cancelled, because the medicaments in the military pharmacopoeia were less effectual and less palatable than the medicaments in the national pharmacopoeia, and because the use of the military pharmacopoeia did not result in economic savings. PMID:11640530

  6. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply.

  7. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  8. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  9. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  10. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  11. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  12. Occupations: Military--Civilian Occupational Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armed Forces Vocational Testing Group, Universal City, TX.

    Information on enlisted military occupations is offered in the source book to arrive at a comprehensive statement of job tasks in the military service and their similarities to jobs in civilian life. Basic information about five areas of the U.S. military services (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) focuses on their military…

  13. The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps: A Compromise to Overcome the Conflict of Women Serving in the Army

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Permeswaran, Yashila

    2008-01-01

    Though people now take the idea of women in the military for granted, in the 1940s it was a vigorously debated suggestion. Men protected their country; women stayed at home. Because of the conflict over whether women should serve in the army, Congress compromised by creating the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC). This article describes the…

  14. A Retrospective of Four Decades of Military Interest in Thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzoni, Guido; Matthews, Selma

    2004-11-01

    Following a short discussion on the origin of Thermophotovoltaic (TPV), this presentation offers a retrospective of the progress and results of the recurrent efforts in TPV conducted in the United States by the Military during the last 40 years. The US Army's interest in TPV, for the development of portable power sources, started a few years after the energy conversion approach was conceived. TPV technology was seen to offer a solution for the Army's need for power in the 10 to 1500 Watt range. The technology offered the means to overcome the limitation of size and weight found in existing commercial power sources, with the additional advantage of silent and multifuel operation. Hence, the Army invested research and development (R&D) funding to investigate TPV feasibility for tactical field application. After an initial decade of continuous research studies by the Army, the support for this technology has experienced cycles of significant efforts interrupted by temporary waiting periods to allow this technology to further mature. Over the last four decades, several TPV proof of concept systems were developed. The results of their testing and evaluation have demonstrated the feasibility of the technology for development of power sources with output of several watts to a few hundreds watts. To date, the results have not been found to adequately demonstrate the applicability of TPV to the development of military power generators with output above 500 watts. TPV power sources have not been developed yet for Army field use or troop testing. The development risk is still considered to be moderate-to-high since practical-size systems that go beyond the laboratory test units have not been designed, constructed, tested. The greatest need is for system development, along with concurrent continued component development and improvement. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) support for TPV R&D effort has been drastically reduced. The Army is still pursuing a 500

  15. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553.17 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17...

  16. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553.17 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons ineligible...

  17. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553.17 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons ineligible...

  18. 76 FR 59119 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution.... Request for additional information may be sent by e-mail to: chad.t.privett@us.army.mil or...

  19. Suicide in the Army National Guard: An Empirical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather,…

  20. Vaccines for military use.

    PubMed

    Artenstein, Andrew W

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have long been used by military forces in order to prevent communicable diseases and thereby preserve the fighting force. A tradition that began with the mass vaccination of the Continental Army against smallpox during the War of the American Revolution in the late 18th century continues today with routine and deployment-based vaccination of military forces against potential pathogens of nature and biological weapon threats. As their role has expanded in recent years to include humanitarian and peacekeeping missions, the military's use of vaccines against infectious diseases has concomitantly broadened to include civilian populations worldwide. The emergence of new threats and the recognition of additional global challenges will continue to compel the development and promotion of vaccines to combat infectious diseases of military significance. PMID:19837279

  1. 77 FR 73455 - Change to the Military Freight Carrier Registration Program (FCRP)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Army Change to the Military Freight Carrier Registration Program (FCRP) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ] SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command (SDDC) is..., and household goods TSPs. This update will be included in the next release of the Military...

  2. Military Career Guide: Employment and Training Opportunities in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Military Entrance Processing Command (DOD), North Chicago, IL.

    This copiously illustrated guide is a single reference source for the diverse employment and training opportunities in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. It is divided into two major sections. The first section contains descriptions of 134 enlisted military occupations and provides information regarding the aptitudes needed…

  3. Continued growth for military PAs.

    PubMed

    Salyer, Steven W

    2002-10-01

    The US military physician assistant (PA) originated from the corpsmen and medics of the army, navy, air force, and Coast Guard. PAs have been present in every military campaign since 1980 and serve in a wide variety of medical roles. Their combat role has expanded so that in many instances the PA has replaced the physician as the front-line care provider. All have moved from warrant officer into the commissioned officer ranks, a change that has enabled them to rise into command and administrative positions. Narrowing of the pay differential between military and civilian PAs has contributed to their retention.

  4. Military laser weapons: current controversies.

    PubMed

    Seet, B; Wong, T Y

    2001-09-01

    Military laser weapons systems are becoming indispensable in most modern armies. These lasers have undergone many stages of development, and have outpaced research on eye protection measures, which continue to have inherent limitations. Eye injuries caused by military lasers are increasingly reported, leading to speculation that these would become an important cause of blinding in modern conflicts. As part of the effort to ban inhumane weapons, international laws have been passed to restrict the proliferation of such blinding weapons. However, there are controversies concerning the interpretation, implementation and effectiveness of these laws. The ophthalmic community can play a greater role in highlighting ocular morbidity from military lasers, and in preventing their further proliferation.

  5. 32 CFR 538.4 - Convertibility of military payment certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Convertibility of military payment certificates. 538.4 Section 538.4 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS MILITARY PAYMENT CERTIFICATES § 538.4 Convertibility of military payment certificates....

  6. 32 CFR 538.4 - Convertibility of military payment certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Convertibility of military payment certificates. 538.4 Section 538.4 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS MILITARY PAYMENT CERTIFICATES § 538.4 Convertibility of military payment certificates....

  7. 75 FR 60436 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Reference: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publications (MFTURP) No....

  8. 75 FR 15420 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: References: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publications (MFTURP) No....

  9. Ditching Tests of a 1/9-Size Model of the Army P-38 Airplane in Langley Tank No. 2 and at the Outdoor Catapult

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarvis, George A.; Cederborg, Gibson A.

    1946-01-01

    A dynamically similar model of the Army P-38 airplane was tested to determine the best way to land this airplane on the water and to determine its probable ditching performance. The tests consisted of ditching the model at various landing attitudes, flap settings, speeds, weights, and conditions of simulated damage. The model was ditched in calm water from the tank towing carriage and a few ditching were made in both calm and rough water at the outdoor catapult. The performance of the model was determined by making visual observations, by recording lengths of run and time histories of decelerations, and by taking motion pictures of the ditchings.

  10. Unattended ground sensor related technologies: an Army perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotts, Larry B.; Bryski, Daniel D.

    2002-08-01

    The United States Army has embarked on a revolutionary transformation path towards a future, general purpose Objective Force that is strategically responsive and dominant across the entire spectrum of military operations. Key to the success of the Objective Force will be the ability to generate unprecedented battlespace understanding and situational awareness. A layered surveillance approach, one that relies on a full range of sensor assets from all echelons, is required to paint a battlespace piocture of sufficient fidelity. The Army's science and technology program continues to research and develop promising unattended ground sensor technologies that support Army transformation objectives.

  11. Radiography in the United States Army during World War II: Part I.

    PubMed

    Lauer, O G

    1986-01-01

    This is the first of two articles highlighting Army radiography through World War II. Topics concentrate on a few important military and civilian events between wars (1918-1941), such as the Army's contributions in (classifying) radiographic knowledge and escalating x-ray commercialization. Peacetime objectives, the mobilization effort, personnel and training, and how WACs and civilians contributed are discussed also.

  12. The Army Spouse: Perceptions of Educational Needs during Deployment and Nondeployment Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Alicia G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare educational needs and goals during deployment and nondeployment of spouses of active-duty Army service members. The sample consisted of spouses of active-duty military service members from the Army brigades who had recently returned from a deployment or who were experiencing a deployment…

  13. Suicide in the U.S. Army: Epidemiological and Periodic Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothberg, Joseph M.; Jones, Franklin D.

    1987-01-01

    Presents overview of suicide in the United States Army, including epidemiology of army suicides and temporal aspects of those suicides compared with the data for the United States as a whole. Documents some of the changes in contemporary military suicide rates compared to those of the past century. Examined cycles in the number of suicides by day…

  14. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  15. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  16. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations §...

  17. Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command Hawaii, Wheeler Army Air Base, Hawaii) Photographer unknown, Circa 1990 AERIAL VIEW SHOWING MAIN SECTION OF BASE, BETWEEN KUNIA ROAD, WILIKINA DRIVE, AND McMAHON ROAD, AS WELL AS ADJACENT PINEAPPLE FIELDS, AND LAKE WILSON. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Wilikina Drive & Kunia Road, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  18. Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command Hawaii, Wheeler Army Air Base, Hawaii) Photographer unknown, Circa 1990 OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW SHOWING MAIN SECTION OF BASE WITH LAKE WILSON IN THE FOREGROUND AND WAIANAE MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Wilikina Drive & Kunia Road, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Educating the U.S. Army: Arthur L. Wagner and Reform, 1875-1905.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brereton, T. R.

    Arthur Lockwood Wagner, who graduated from West Point in 1876, was one of the best known and most influential U.S. Army officers of his day. An intellectual and educator, Wagner was instrumental in some of the most critical reforms in U.S. Army history. He advocated enhanced military education, adopting modern combat techniques, holding…

  20. From Swift to Swiss: Tactical Decision Games and Their Place in Military Education and Performance Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandergriff, Donald E.

    2006-01-01

    In today's arena of military transformation, the newest bandwagon everyone is jumping on is "reform military education." This comes about in light of the complex problems faced by Army leaders in Afghanistan and Iraq. The Army's education and training doctrine was developed to deal with second-generation or industrial war. The existing system did…

  1. 76 FR 60816 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: Ms. Joy A. Pasquazi, (845) 938-5078, Joy.Pasquazi@us.army.mil . ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  2. Reinforcement Management; An Approach to Motivating Army Trainees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassileth, Barrie

    To study the effectiveness of reinforcement management (contigency management) as applied to a military program of instruction already in operation, 335 students in an Army clerk-typist course in which self-paced instruction is used were given points for successive approximations to desired learning behavior. The points were exchangeable later for…

  3. Soldier to Civilian: Army Education and Postwar New Zealand Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickell, Chris

    2010-01-01

    New Zealand's army education schemes were established in 1943, following overseas practice, with several objectives in mind. Those on active service often suffered from boredom, and the schemes' libraries, movies and study courses offered one means of boosting flagging spirits. At the same time, military personnel needed to be prepared for an…

  4. Effectiveness of Interactive Videodisc in Army Communications Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, John D.; Polich, J. Michael

    This report presents the results of RAND research conducted at the U.S. Army Signal Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia, to evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive videodisc (IVD) system used to facilitate training in a variety of military occupational specialities. The objectives of the study were to: (1) develop a methodology for assessing the…

  5. Commentary on "The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)": Army STARRS: a Framingham-like study of psychological health risk factors in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Ressler, Kerry J; Schoomaker, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    Although historically the Army suicide rate has been significantly lower than the civilian rate, in 2004, the suicide and accidental death rates began trending upward. By 2008, the Army suicide rate had risen above the national average (20.2 per 100,000). In 2009, 160 active duty Soldiers took their lives, making suicide the third leading cause of death among the Army population. If accidental death, frequently the result of high-risk behavior, is included, then more Soldiers died by their own actions than in combat in 2009. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) was thus created in 2009 to begin to address these problems. The Army STARRS project is a large consortium of seven different studies to develop data-driven methods for mitigating or preventing suicide behaviors and improving the overall mental health and behavioral functioning of Army Soldiers during and after their Army service. The first research articles from the Army STARRS project were published in late 2013 and early 2014. This work has already begun to outline important facets of risk in the military, and it is helping to drive an empirically derived approach to improvements in understanding mental disorders and risk behavior and to improve prevention and support of mental health and resilience. The Framingham Heart Study, started in the 1940s, marked a watershed event in utilizing large cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal collaborative research to identify and understand risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The Army STARRS project, through its collaborative, prospective, and robust innovative design and implementation, may provide the beginning of a similar scientific cohort in mental disorders. The work of this project will help understand biological and psychological aspects of military service, including those leading to suicide. When coupled with timely feedback to Army leadership, it permits near real-time steps to diagnose, mitigate, and

  6. Decision-Making Considerations for Mid-Career Army Officers to Pursue Master's Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding why military students pursue a master's degree has become more important as the number of military students taking advantage of education benefits through the Post-911 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008 has increased. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how U.S. Army officers attending the Command and…

  7. Exploring Collaboration System Effectiveness at the United States Army Brigade Echelon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Terry W.

    2012-01-01

    Since the attacks on September 11, 2001, a major transformation of the United States Army began to create a modular, scalable, and modernized military force. This effort was the most significant restructuring of military forces in the last 80 years. However, after 6 years of sustained combat operations in the Middle East many of the collaboration…

  8. Officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Hermann Oberth (forefront) with officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Huntsville, Alabama in 1956. Left to right: Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger (seated); Major General H.N. Toftoy, Commanding Officer and person responsible for 'Project Paperclip,' which took scientists and engineers out of Germany after World War II to design rockets for American military use. Many of the scientists later helped to design the Saturn V rocket that took the Apollo 11 astronauts to the Moon. Dr. Eberhard Rees, Deputy Director, Development Operations Division Wernher von Braun, Director, Development Operations Division.

  9. 32 CFR 538.2 - Use of military payment certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 538.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND... used. Military payment certificates are to be used only in the Department of Defense by authorized... to individuals in and under the Department of Defense. (c) Facilities in which used. Military...

  10. Israeli Adolescents and Military Service: Encounters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Amihay; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Asserts that inadequate attention has been paid to the problems of the young soldier entering army life in Israel. Delineates some areas of friction and vulnerability between the worlds of the youth and the military. Describes the systematization of these encounters into groups, creating the "Binary Model," which helps in locating and treating…

  11. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  12. 76 FR 5143 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2011 Organizational Meeting of the USMA Board of... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Wednesday, February 16, 2011. ] 3. Time: 12...

  13. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  14. 32 CFR 538.5 - Conversion of invalidated military payment certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conversion of invalidated military payment certificates. 538.5 Section 538.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS MILITARY PAYMENT CERTIFICATES § 538.5 Conversion of invalidated military...

  15. 32 CFR 538.5 - Conversion of invalidated military payment certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Conversion of invalidated military payment certificates. 538.5 Section 538.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS MILITARY PAYMENT CERTIFICATES § 538.5 Conversion of invalidated military...

  16. Army ground robotics technology development and experimentation program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.; Brendle, Bruce E., Jr.; Shoemaker, Chuck M.

    2001-09-01

    In the past year, the U.S. Army has committed to a paradigm shift in the way future ground military operations will be conducted. Increased emphasis upon the deployability of future forces has focused efforts towards reducing the weight, volume, and logistics requirements for proposed tactical systems. Extensive use of unmanned systems offer a potential means to achieve these goals, without reducing the lethality or survivability of this future ground combat force. To support this vision, the U.S. Army has embarked upon a concerted effort to develop required technology and demonstrate its maturity with the goal of incorporating this technology into the Future Combat Systems and the Objective Force.

  17. 78 FR 70024 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Modernization and Repair of Piers 2 and 3, Military...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... Department of the Army Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Modernization and Repair of Piers 2 and 3, Military Ocean Terminal Concord, CA AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Availability. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army announces the availability of the Draft Environmental Impact...

  18. Military Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Janet L. S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Includes "Forging Partnerships into the Twenty-First Century" (Brown); "Uncle Sam Wants You to Go to School!" (Perez); "Maintaining Educational Access" (Kelly); "College on Military Bases" (Anderson); "Air Force Members Set High Goals for Continuing Education" (Hoban); "Post-Secondary Education for Military Students through Contracting" (Erdman);…

  19. Army ants: an evolutionary bestseller?

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Stefanie M

    2003-09-01

    Army ants are characterized by a complex combination of behavioral and morphological traits. Molecular data now indicate that army ant behavior has a unique evolutionary origin and has been conserved for over more than 100 million years.

  20. [History of the management of medical supply system of the Soviet army during the World War II 1941-1945].

    PubMed

    Radysh, Ia F

    2004-01-01

    The article considers the management of medical care in the soviet army during the World War II 1941-1945. One of the main reasons of an ineffective management of medical care in the soviet army, after the author's opinion, was heavy tolls among medical care staff as well as medical military personnel hadn't any protection from the International Genevan Convention.

  1. "You're Always First a Girl": Emerging Adult Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Israeli Army

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Dana S.

    2011-01-01

    The Israeli army drafts both men and women, and most Israelis complete their military service during their emerging adulthood years. This study examined Israeli women's experiences as soldiers in the army. Twenty-three women (18 emerging adults, 5 young adults) were recruited using purposive sampling and interviewed about how they experienced…

  2. Nostalgia in the Army (17th-19th Centuries).

    PubMed

    Battesti, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    People died from nostalgia in the army in the 17th-19th centuries. The term 'nostalgia', created by the doctor Johannes Hofer (1669-1752), from Mulhouse, came from the Germanic Heimweh, or 'homesickness'. It affected the young people enrolled in the army, such as Swiss mercenaries. Longing for their native land, they were consumed by an ongoing desire to return home. If it was impossible to do so, they sank into 'a sadness accompanied with insomnia, anorexia and other unpleasant symptoms' that could lead to death. Nostalgia became classified as a disease during the last quarter of the 18th century and ravaged the French army during the Revolution and the Napoleonic wars. However, as soon as the wars ended, it ceased to exist in the army (except the colonial army). It was removed from the nosology in the first half of the 19th century. Rapidly explained as an example of a misdiagnosis or a confusion between 'connection and cause', nostalgia needs to be assessed in regard to the medical debate between 'alienists' and 'organicists'. Creating much concern, nostalgia needs to be considered in the historical context of a society destabilized by modernity, with some individuals uprooted by the sudden transition from civil society to military life. It raises questions about the role that the army played in the creation of the French national union. Nostalgia may have also covered psychic traumatisms later designated as combat fatigue, war neurosis, or post-traumatic stress disorder.

  3. Nostalgia in the Army (17th-19th Centuries).

    PubMed

    Battesti, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    People died from nostalgia in the army in the 17th-19th centuries. The term 'nostalgia', created by the doctor Johannes Hofer (1669-1752), from Mulhouse, came from the Germanic Heimweh, or 'homesickness'. It affected the young people enrolled in the army, such as Swiss mercenaries. Longing for their native land, they were consumed by an ongoing desire to return home. If it was impossible to do so, they sank into 'a sadness accompanied with insomnia, anorexia and other unpleasant symptoms' that could lead to death. Nostalgia became classified as a disease during the last quarter of the 18th century and ravaged the French army during the Revolution and the Napoleonic wars. However, as soon as the wars ended, it ceased to exist in the army (except the colonial army). It was removed from the nosology in the first half of the 19th century. Rapidly explained as an example of a misdiagnosis or a confusion between 'connection and cause', nostalgia needs to be assessed in regard to the medical debate between 'alienists' and 'organicists'. Creating much concern, nostalgia needs to be considered in the historical context of a society destabilized by modernity, with some individuals uprooted by the sudden transition from civil society to military life. It raises questions about the role that the army played in the creation of the French national union. Nostalgia may have also covered psychic traumatisms later designated as combat fatigue, war neurosis, or post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:27035922

  4. Body composition and military performance--many things to many people.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Karl E

    2012-07-01

    Soldiers are expected to maintain the highest possible level of physical readiness because they must be ready to mobilize and perform their duties anywhere in the world at any time. The objective of Army body composition standards is to motivate physical training and good nutrition habits to ensure a high state of readiness. Establishment of enforceable and rational standards to support this objective has been challenging even at extremes of body size. Morbidly obese individuals are clearly not suited to military service, but very large muscular individuals may be superbly qualified for soldier performance demands. For this reason, large individuals are measured for body fat using a waist circumference-based equation (female soldiers are also measured for hip circumference). The main challenge comes in setting appropriate fat standards to support the full range of Army requirements. Military appearance ideals dictate the most stringent body fat standards, whereas health risk thresholds anchor the most liberal standards, and physical performance associations fall on a spectrum between these 2 poles. Standards should not exclude or penalize specialized performance capabilities such as endurance running or power lifting across a spectrum of body sizes and fat. The full integration of women into the military further complicates the issue because of sexually dimorphic characteristics that make gender-appropriate standards essential and where inappropriately stringent standards can compromise both health and performance of this segment of the force. Other associations with body composition such as stress effects on intraabdominal fat distribution patterns and metabolic implications of a fat reserve for survival in extreme environments are also relevant considerations. This is a review of the science that underpins the U.S. Army body composition standards.

  5. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata toward a new mission:…

  6. Population trends of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.

    1992-10-01

    Population trends of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1989 through August 1991. Six semiannual livetrapping sessions and eight scent-station survey sessions were conducted. Livetrapping results and radiotelemetry data were used to calculate minimum population size, density, and distribution. A total of 175 individual foxes were trapped 463 times. The number of individuals trapped and minimum population size calculations showed a decline over time. The highest minimum population (109) was observed in winter 1988. Summer 1991 had the lowest minimum population size (45). No evidence was found to indicate that the apparent population decline was a result of military-authorized activities.

  7. Nuclear Medical Science Officers: Army Health Physicists Serving and Defending Their Country Around the Globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, Mark; Bosley, William; Santiago, Jodi; Hamilton, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Tracing their distinguished history back to the Manhattan Project that developed the world's first atomic bomb, the Nuclear Medical Science Officers are the Army's experts on radiation and its health effects. Serving around the globe, these commissioned Army officers serve as military health physicists that ensure the protection of Soldiers and those they defend against all sources of radiation, military and civilian. This poster will highlight the various roles and responsibilities that Nuclear Medical Science Officers fill in defense of the Nation. Areas where these officers serve include medical health physics, deployment health physics, homeland defense, emergency response, radiation dosimetry, radiation research and training, along with support to the Army's corporate radiation safety program and international collaborations. The poster will also share some of the unique military sources of radiation such as depleted uranium, which is used as an anti-armor munition and in armor plating because of its unique metallurgic properties. )

  8. Distance Education: A University's Pioneering Master of Social Work Program Partnership with the U.S. Army

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Terri Moore; Freeman, Dexter

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the relevance of an army-university partnership in view of the cultures of both public higher education and the military graduate education system. The article also outlines the planning model used to navigate through the various issues that should be considered when a university partners with a federal or military agency to…

  9. Development of a model of moral distress in military nursing.

    PubMed

    Fry, Sara T; Harvey, Rose M; Hurley, Ann C; Foley, Barbara Jo

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a model of moral distress in military nursing. The model evolved through an analysis of the moral distress and military nursing literature, and the analysis of interview data obtained from US Army Nurse Corps officers (n = 13). Stories of moral distress (n = 10) given by the interview participants identified the process of the moral distress experience among military nurses and the dimensions of the military nursing moral distress phenomenon. Models of both the process of military nursing moral distress and the phenomenon itself are proposed. Recommendations are made for the use of the military nursing moral distress models in future research studies and in interventions to ameliorate the experience of moral distress in crisis military deployments.

  10. Guidelines for chemical warfare agents in military field drinking water. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    CW agents are generally designed to be used on opposing military forces to produce death or incapacitation. When they are used in military attacks, they are potential contaminants of field drinking-water supplies. CW agents that could appear in military field water and that are of particular concern to the Army are 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (BZ), organophosphorus nerve agents (GA, GB, GD, and VX), sulfur mustard agents (HD, THD, and HT), T-2 toxin (a fungal metabolite), lewisite (an arsenical vesicant), and cyanide. The Army requested that the National Research Council (NRC) review the toxicity of selected CW agents and assess the adequacy of its proposed field drinking-water standards. The report presents the subcommittee`s evaluations of the Army`s proposed standards. The report also presents the subcommittee`s recommendations for preventing adverse health effects in military personnel exposed to CW agents in field drinking water and for improving the toxicity data base for these CW agents.

  11. [Theory and practice at the army's clinical schools in the Napoleonic kingdom of Italy].

    PubMed

    Messina, Annalucia Forti

    2011-01-01

    One of the problems the newly founded Army of the Kingdom of Italy in Napoleonic times had to face was to endow itself with a sanitary service. This implied the recruitment of physicians and surgeons to incorporate in the army corps and in the military hospitals. In order to provide the best qualification of those health officers, clinical schools were founded at the military hospital St. Ambrogio in Milano. This paper discusses their aims, rules, personages, programs and eventually tries to evaluate their accomplishments in the few years of their life. PMID:23057198

  12. The Army Selected Reserve Dental Readiness System: overview, assessment, and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Honey, James R

    2013-06-01

    The Army Selected Reserve Dental Readiness System (ASDRS) is a key dental program directed by the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower & Reserve Affairs) starting in fiscal year 09. The Army National Guard and Army Reserve have steadily implemented ASDRS over the past 3 years as a means to improve the historically abysmal dental readiness of the Army Reserve Component (RC). Dental readiness is essential for sustaining an Army RC Operational Force. ASDRS is a tool for RC commanders to provide contract dental readiness care in support of over 558 thousand nonmobilized Selected Reserve Citizen-Soldiers dispersed throughout the 54 states and U.S. territories, at home station before alert, and if necessary after alert (throughout the Army force generation cycle). This article examines the status of ASDRS implementation, assesses its effectiveness in improving Army RC Dental Readiness, and provides Army leadership recommendations regarding the following focus areas: (1) command emphasis, (2) program execution, and (3) synergy with the Military Health System and Department of Veterans Affairs.

  13. [The physician in the Roman Army in the early period and at the height of the empire].

    PubMed

    Wilmanns, J C

    1995-01-01

    This article deals with the organization of health care in the Roman army, especially in the garrisons stationed in the more remote provinces of the Roman empire. A system of military healthcare was first created during the reign of Augustus. It consisted of various ranks of military physicians (milites medici) and assistants (capsarii and marsi) as well as military hospitals (valetudinaria). These played a major part in the spread of rational medicine over the less civilized parts of the Roman empire.

  14. Raising the clinical standard of care for suicidal soldiers: an army process improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Archuleta, Debra; Jobes, David A; Pujol, Lynette; Jennings, Keith; Crumlish, Jennifer; Lento, Rene M; Brazaitis, Katherine; Moore, Bret A; Crow, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    From 2004 to 2008, the suicide rate among US Army Soldiers increased 80%, reaching a record high in 2008 and surpassing the civilian rate for the first time in recorded history. In recent years, the rate of Army suicides rose again; the year 2012 reflects the highest rate of military suicides on record. There is a need to assess current behavioral health practices to identify both effective and ineffective practices, and to adapt services to meet the needs of the Army behavioral health patient population. This paper discusses a process improvement initiative developed in an effort to improve clinical processes for suicide risk mitigation in an Army behavioral health clinic located in the catchment area of the US Army Southern Regional Medical Command.

  15. Raising the clinical standard of care for suicidal soldiers: an army process improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Archuleta, Debra; Jobes, David A; Pujol, Lynette; Jennings, Keith; Crumlish, Jennifer; Lento, Rene M; Brazaitis, Katherine; Moore, Bret A; Crow, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    From 2004 to 2008, the suicide rate among US Army Soldiers increased 80%, reaching a record high in 2008 and surpassing the civilian rate for the first time in recorded history. In recent years, the rate of Army suicides rose again; the year 2012 reflects the highest rate of military suicides on record. There is a need to assess current behavioral health practices to identify both effective and ineffective practices, and to adapt services to meet the needs of the Army behavioral health patient population. This paper discusses a process improvement initiative developed in an effort to improve clinical processes for suicide risk mitigation in an Army behavioral health clinic located in the catchment area of the US Army Southern Regional Medical Command. PMID:25830799

  16. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  17. 78 FR 18473 - Army Privacy Act Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Register (71 FR 46052), the Department of the Army issued a final rule. This final rule corrects the... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 505 Army Privacy Act Program AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army is amending its rule on notification of the...

  18. 76 FR 12087 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Department of the Army Army Educational Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: March 24, 2011. Place of Meeting:...

  19. 76 FR 72914 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Department of the Army Army Educational Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: December 14, 2011. Place of Meeting:...

  20. 75 FR 7255 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... Department of the Army Army Educational Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... CFR 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Date of Meeting: March 11, 2010. Place of Meeting:...

  1. 76 FR 66282 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Educational Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... CFR 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: November 15, 2011. Place of Meeting:...

  2. MELIOS: Status report of the U.S. Army's eyesafe laser rangefinder program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renairi, Richard C.; Johnson, Anthony M.

    1990-07-01

    In 1980 the Army fielded the AN/GVS-5 Nd:YAG hand held laser rangefinder. The use and widespread deployment of the AN/GVS-5 was limited due to concerns for eyesafe operation in training and forceonforce battlefield simulation scenarios. In 1983 the Arniy awarded contracts to develop 1. 54 nticron laser rangefinders to provide eyesafe operation for both training and tactical use. Following the early developmental efforts the Army awarded in 1988 a Development Production Prove Out (DPPO) contract to finalize the design and establish the system to produce thousands of these devices. The product is designated as the AN/PVS-6 Mini Eyesafe Laser Infrared Observation Set (MELIOS) . This paper summarizes the system''s history projected performance and the present status of the program. 1. THE NEED FOR A LASER RANGEFINDER There has always been a need for accurate range information in military operations. Until the advent of the laser the ability to satisfy this need was at best extremely limited. Manual rangefinding techniques include the use of maps and compasses and the estimation of distance to a target by its relative size in sighting optics. These techniques are slow difficult to master and the skills quickly erode unless constantly practiced. Studies have shown that manual range estimation techniques typically have an error of 27. Personal experience indicates that this error is usually an underestimation of the actual range to a target. It is desirable to

  3. 78 FR 60266 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Michael McClendon, a former tactical non- commissioned officer in the US Corps of Cadets; the...

  4. 78 FR 13030 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Designated Federal Officer or Point of Contact: Ms. Deadra Ghostlaw, (845) 938-4200,...

  5. Knowledge of infectious disease reporting amongst military and civilian medical officers.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, S F

    1994-10-01

    Anecdotally expressed concern over the military/civilian interface regarding infectious disease notification, and the current review of procedures in both civilian and military settings prompted this study. Its aim was to quantify knowledge of doctors involved in the provision of care to Army personnel and their dependants in the United Kingdom regarding infectious disease reporting and make recommendations to improve the process. A questionnaire was sent to all such military and civilian doctors in the Southern Military District of England. The group was no less knowledgeable than others studied previously. Differences were found in the knowledge of reporting procedures between civilian and military doctors, with military hospital doctors demonstrating particularly poor knowledge. It is recommended that specific instruction on all aspects of infectious disease reporting be given to doctors joining the Army and to civilian GPs involved in care of the Military.

  6. Annihilating time and space: The electrification of the United States Army, 1875--1920

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Shannon Allen

    2000-10-01

    The United States Army embraced electrical technology in the 1870s as part of a wider initiative to meet the challenge of the coastal defense mission. As commercial power storage, generation, and transmission technology improved and the army came to recognize the value of the energy source as a means and method of improving command and control, localized electrical networks were integrated into the active service of the military. New vulnerabilities emerged as the army became ever more reliant upon electric power, however, and electrification---the institutional adoption and adaptation of electrical technologies---emerged as a very expensive and contentious process guided by technical, political, and economic pressures, and influenced by conflicting personalities within the service. This study considers the institutional evolution of the U.S. Army before and during World War I with respect to the adoption and application of electrical technology. The changing relationships between the military and electrical manufacturing and utilities industries during the period 1875--1920 are also explored. Using a combination of military archival sources and published primary materials, this study traces the effects of electrification on the army. In the end, this study proves that electrification was, at first, a symptom of, and later, a partial solution to the army's struggle to modernize and centralize during the period under consideration. Electrification produced a set of conditions that encouraged a new maturity within the ranks of the army, in technical, doctrinal, and administrative terms. This growth eventually led to the development of new capabilities, new forms of military organization, new missions, and new approaches to warfare.

  7. Challenges in sending large radiology images over military communications channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kevin R.; Levine, Betty A.; Norton, Gary S.; Mundur, Padmavathi V.

    1997-05-01

    In cooperation with the US Army, Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) deployed a teleradiology network to sites in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Hungary, and Germany in early 1996. This deployment was part of Operation Primetime III, a military project to provide state-of-the-art medical care to the 20,000 US troops stationed in Bosnia-Herzegovina.In a three-month time frame from January to April 1996, the Imaging Sciences and Information Systems (ISIS) Center at GUMC worked with the Army to design, develop, and deploy a teleradiology network for the digital storage and transmission of radiology images. This paper will discuss some of the problems associated with sending large files over communications networks with significant delays such as those introduced by satellite transmissions.Radiology images of up to 10 megabytes are acquired, stored, and transmitted over the wide area network (WAN). The WAN included leased lines from Germany to Hungary and a satellite link form Germany to Bosnia-Herzegovina. The communications links provided at least a T-1 bandwidth. The satellite link introduces a round-trip delay of approximately 500 milliseconds. This type of high bandwidth, high delay network is called a long fat network. The images are transferred across this network using the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP). By modifying the TCP/IP software to increase the window size, the throughput of the satellite link can be greatly improved.

  8. Occupational differences in US Army suicide rates

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, R. C.; Stein, M. B.; Bliese, P. D.; Bromet, E. J.; Chiu, W. T.; Cox, K. L.; Colpe, L. J.; Fullerton, C. S.; Gilman, S. E.; Gruber, M. J.; Heeringa, S. G.; Lewandowski-Romps, L.; Millikan-Bell, A.; Naifeh, J. A.; Nock, M. K.; Petukhova, M. V.; Rosellini, A. J.; Sampson, N. A.; Schoenbaum, M.; Zaslavsky, A. M.; Ursano, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Civilian suicide rates vary by occupation in ways related to occupational stress exposure. Comparable military research finds suicide rates elevated in combat arms occupations. However, no research has evaluated variation in this pattern by deployment history, the indicator of occupation stress widely considered responsible for the recent rise in the military suicide rate. Method The joint associations of Army occupation and deployment history in predicting suicides were analysed in an administrative dataset for the 729 337 male enlisted Regular Army soldiers in the US Army between 2004 and 2009. Results There were 496 suicides over the study period (22.4/100 000 person-years). Only two occupational categories, both in combat arms, had significantly elevated suicide rates: infantrymen (37.2/100 000 person-years) and combat engineers (38.2/100 000 person-years). However, the suicide rates in these two categories were significantly lower when currently deployed (30.6/100 000 person-years) than never deployed or previously deployed (41.2–39.1/100 000 person-years), whereas the suicide rate of other soldiers was significantly higher when currently deployed and previously deployed (20.2–22.4/100 000 person-years) than never deployed (14.5/100 000 person-years), resulting in the adjusted suicide rate of infantrymen and combat engineers being most elevated when never deployed [odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–4.1], less so when previously deployed (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.1), and not at all when currently deployed (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8–1.8). Adjustment for a differential ‘healthy warrior effect’ cannot explain this variation in the relative suicide rates of never-deployed infantrymen and combat engineers by deployment status. Conclusions Efforts are needed to elucidate the causal mechanisms underlying this interaction to guide preventive interventions for soldiers at high suicide risk. PMID:26190760

  9. Perspectives on history: Army dietitians in the European, North African, and Mediterranean theaters of operation in World War II.

    PubMed

    Hodges, P A

    1996-06-01

    World War II necessitated the mobilization of hundreds of dietitians to serve in military hospitals in the United States and in theaters of war all over the globe. Although initially military dietitians had civilian status, on December 22, 1942, Congress passed Public Law 828, which authorized military status for Army dietitians with relative rank in the Medical Department for the duration of the war and 6 months thereafter. This article chronicles the role of Army dietitians who supported the allied troops in military hospitals in England, Europe, and North Africa during World War II. Recollections of military dietitians who served in the war are included to illustrate the circumstances under which these professionals lived and the dedication with which they worked. PMID:8655909

  10. US Army lithium cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legath, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    The how, why and where the Army is applying lithium batteries are addressed. The Army is committing its efforts to the utilization of lithium batteries in new equipment that will be going into the field possibly from FY-80 and thereafter. The Army's philosophy is to guide their users and the equipment designers, to use battery packs are opposed to singel cells. After a detailed description of the battery types that are being considered, a discussion is presented in which questions and comments are exchanged among the Workshop participants.

  11. Teaching at the United States Army War College: Philosophy, Practice, and Resources. AY [Academic Year] 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, John R., III

    This manual is intended for use as part of a 3-day orientation training for new faculty at the U.S. Army War College (USAWC) in Pennsylvania, a facility which trains tactical and operational leaders for policy and strategy roles in the military and related agencies. The orientation focuses on five factors which determine the value of an…

  12. Integrating Learning, Leadership, and Crisis in Management Education: Lessons from Army Officers in Iraq and Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayes, D. Christopher; Allen, Nate; Self, Nate

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model and case study used to teach crisis leadership as a management education topic. The materials emerge from studies of U.S. Army leaders (company commanders and platoon leaders) working in Iraq and Afghanistan. The authors explain how examples and cases from military combat provide tools to teach about crisis…

  13. The 1980 Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services. [Volume] 2: Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Eugene J.; And Others

    For more than 35 years, this Guide has been the standard reference work for recognizing learning acquired in military life. All the courses offered by the Army are listed and briefly described. Each course description includes the course title and number: the length of the course, and where and when it was offered; the course objectives; the type…

  14. Assessment for the U.S. Army Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Program: The Global Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher; Park, Nansook; Castro, Carl A.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology and the U.S. military have a long history of collaboration. The U.S. Army Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program aims to measure the psychosocial strengths and assets of soldiers as well as their problems, to identify those in need of basic training in a given domain as well as those who would benefit from advanced training, and…

  15. [Organization of stomatological care in Russian army during first World War 1914-1917 y].

    PubMed

    Pavlovskiĭ, L N

    2006-01-01

    The article presents issues on organization of stomatological care in Russian army during First World War. The author showed reasons of low efficiency of the treatment of soldiers with maxillofacial region. Injuries beginning of a new stage in the treatment of maxillofacial region fire wounds and origin of a new specialty developed a military maxillofacial surgery.

  16. The U.S. Army's Impact on the History of Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Steve

    2005-01-01

    One of the most significant events that heralded the Department of Defense's commitment to distance education was the Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) Initiative, which held its kickoff meeting in Washington, DC in 1997. This meeting provided the army and other military services the endorsement that had been lacking relative to implementing…

  17. U.S. Army Female Soldiers' Career and Racial Attitudes and Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehring, Dwight J.; Thomas, James A.

    Racial perceptions and attitudes as well as career orientations of 158 black and 187 white females from 27 U.S. Army installations were measured by questionnaire. Demographic characteristics between female groups, and with a larger sample of males, are compared. Specific areas of satisfaction with military life and general career orientation are…

  18. United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine: Warfighter Research Focusing on the Past 25 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandolf, Kent B.; Francesconi, Ralph; Sawka, Michael N.; Cymerman, Allen; Hoyt, Reed W.; Young, Andrew J.; Zambraski, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    The United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) celebrated its 50th anniversary on July 1, 2011. This article reviews its history, evolution, and transition of its research programs as well as its scientific and military accomplishments, emphasizing the past 25 yr. During the 1990s, USARIEM published a series of…

  19. A Case Study of the Army ROTC Core Curriculum and Its Implementation in the '70's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyasaki, Shuichi

    This essay examines the development of the Army ROTC core curriculum program and its implementation at the University of Hawaii, a school that has experienced anti-military sentiments. Data were principally obtained from search of laws, governmental regulations, publications and reports, newspapers, periodicals, and personal interviews. The…

  20. 77 FR 14006 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... attend the meeting will need to show photo identification in order to gain access to the meeting...

  1. The Long War and Parental Combat Deployment: Effects on Military Children and At-Home Spouses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Patricia; Peterson, Kris; Reeves, James; Knauss, Larry; Glover, Dorie; Mogil, Catherine; Duan, Naihua; Saltzman, William; Pynoos, Robert; Wilt, Katherine; Beardslee, William

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Given the growing number of military service members with families and the multiple combat deployments characterizing current war time duties, the impact of deployments on military children requires clarification. Behavioral and emotional adjustment problems were examined in children (aged 6 through 12) of an active duty Army or Marine…

  2. 75 FR 60436 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No... INFORMATION: Reference: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publications (MFTURP) No. 1. Background:...

  3. 32 CFR 536.75 - Claims payable under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Claims payable under the Military Claims Act. 536.75 Section 536.75 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act §...

  4. 32 CFR 536.73 - Statutory authority for the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Statutory authority for the Military Claims Act. 536.73 Section 536.73 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act §...

  5. 32 CFR 536.74 - Scope for claims under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope for claims under the Military Claims Act. 536.74 Section 536.74 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act §...

  6. The Success of a National Dialogue on Sustainable Military Range Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Lenny

    2003-01-01

    Military munitions are the silent giant of hazardous waste management and cleanup in the United States. Toward the end of the first Clinton administration, the Navy and Air Force prevailed upon the Army--the armed service with the biggest ordnance problem--to consider co-sponsoring a formal dialogue on military munitions facilitated by the…

  7. 78 FR 20299 - Meeting of the Department of Defense Military Family Readiness Council (MFRC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Council meeting is to review the military family programs which will be the focus for the Council for next year, and address selected concerns of military family organizations. DATES: Wednesday, May 1, 2013... the Secretary of Defense. This meeting will focus on Army and Office of the Secretary of...

  8. 76 FR 70710 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries... first-come basis. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lieutenant Colonel Renea Yates;...

  9. Health Potential of Female Candidates to the Professional Military Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Alicja; Sokolowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess health and social characteristics of female candidates for professional officers and non-commissioned officers of Polish Army. Material and methods: All female students of officer and non-commissioned officer Military Academies (16 each) were studied in 2009. Two questionnaires were applied in the study: IPAQ (short) for…

  10. Survey of Speech Articulation Disorders Among Military Dependent Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Don E.

    Reported was a study involving 20,000 (army) military dependent children (MDC) attending 75 schools in seven school systems throughout the continental United States during 1971. Testing of 412 randomly selected MDC using the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation revealed a significant correlation and associative factor between MDC speech…

  11. Educating the Military Work Force: A Worldwide Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Donald W.; Saltman, Lenore E.

    1989-01-01

    The Department of Defense, in cooperation with a number of colleges and universities, offers a variety of higher education opportunities to military personnel: the Community College of the Air Force, the Army and Navy's Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges, and Defense Activity for Nontraditional Education Support (DANTES). (SK)

  12. Free Speech in the Military: A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Richard A.

    Two recent decisions of the United States Supreme Court have emasculated First Amendment guarantees for military personnel. In the first case, Parker v. Levy, an Army captain urged enlisted Special Forces personnel at his post to refuse to go to Viet Nam, claiming that "Special Forces personnel are liars and thieves and killers of peasants and…

  13. 77 FR 50090 - Update to the 26 September 2011 Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    .... Request for additional information may be sent by email to: chad.t.privett@us.army.mil . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Chad Privett, (618) 220-6901. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Reference: Military...

  14. Surgeons reconsidered: military medical men of the American revolution.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Tabitha

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the reputation of British military medical staff in the 18th century, focusing on the character and professionalism of regimental surgeons and mates who served at the time of the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783). Examining the careers and contributions of men such as Thomas Dickson Reide, Robert Jackson, and Robert Hamilton reveals that--in contrast to charges of ineptitude, laziness and dishonesty among military surgeons--the British army could count on a cadre of military medical men who were devoted both to their patients and to the advancement of their profession.

  15. [French military nurses during the First World War (1914-1918)].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Julien; Lefort, Hugues; Lamache, Christophe; Tabbagh, Xavier; Olier, François

    2014-06-01

    In 1914, beingthe heirs of the ambulance soldiers who had been created during the time of the Empire, the military males-nurses were overwhelmed by the armies huge needs in paramedics. Facing both the callings of commandment which demanded the recruitment of soldiers and the necessity--which had been set up as a duty by the health service--to attend the doctors, the military male-nurse gave way, in 1918 to a new comer: the female military nurse.

  16. Documented suicides within the British Army during the Crimean War 1854-1856.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey Allen; Masuhara, Kristi L; Frueh, B Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We have little understanding of the increased active duty military suicide rates found in the United States, and little understanding of what is historically normative for combatants. Therefore, we examined historical records on suicides among the British Army during the Crimean War for the years 1854-1856. There were 18 documented suicides in the British Army during this period. Calculating an accurate annual suicide rate per 100,000 is impossible because it is unclear how many of the 111,313 military personnel were in country for each of the 2 years of the war. However, the range is conservatively estimated between 8 and 16 per 100,000, with the likely answer somewhere near the middle. This suggests the possibility that increasing suicide rates among active duty military may be a modern U.S. phenomenon.

  17. Radiation exposure of U.S. military individuals.

    PubMed

    Blake, Paul K; Komp, Gregory R

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. military consists of five armed services: the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. It directly employs 1.4 million active duty military, 1.3 million National Guard and reserve military, and 700,000 civilian individuals. This paper describes the military guidance used to preserve and maintain the health of military personnel while they accomplish necessary and purposeful work in areas where they are exposed to radiation. It also discusses military exposure cohorts and associated radiogenic disease compensation programs administered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the U.S. Department of Labor. With a few exceptions, the U.S. military has effectively employed ionizing radiation since it was first introduced during the Spanish-American War in 1898. The U.S military annually monitors 70,000 individuals for occupational radiation exposure: ~2% of its workforce. In recent years, the Departments of the Navy (including the Marine Corps), the Army, and the Air Force all have a low collective dose that remains close to 1 person-Sv annually. Only a few Coast Guard individuals are now routinely monitored for radiation exposure. As with the nuclear industry as a whole, the Naval Reactors program has a higher collective dose than the remainder of the U.S. military. The U.S. military maintains occupational radiation exposure records on over two million individuals from 1945 through the present. These records are controlled in accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974 but are available to affected individuals or their designees and other groups performing sanctioned epidemiology studies.Introduction of Radiation Exposure of U.S. Military Individuals (Video 2:19, http://links.lww.com/HP/A30).

  18. Radiation exposure of U.S. military individuals.

    PubMed

    Blake, Paul K; Komp, Gregory R

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. military consists of five armed services: the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. It directly employs 1.4 million active duty military, 1.3 million National Guard and reserve military, and 700,000 civilian individuals. This paper describes the military guidance used to preserve and maintain the health of military personnel while they accomplish necessary and purposeful work in areas where they are exposed to radiation. It also discusses military exposure cohorts and associated radiogenic disease compensation programs administered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the U.S. Department of Labor. With a few exceptions, the U.S. military has effectively employed ionizing radiation since it was first introduced during the Spanish-American War in 1898. The U.S military annually monitors 70,000 individuals for occupational radiation exposure: ~2% of its workforce. In recent years, the Departments of the Navy (including the Marine Corps), the Army, and the Air Force all have a low collective dose that remains close to 1 person-Sv annually. Only a few Coast Guard individuals are now routinely monitored for radiation exposure. As with the nuclear industry as a whole, the Naval Reactors program has a higher collective dose than the remainder of the U.S. military. The U.S. military maintains occupational radiation exposure records on over two million individuals from 1945 through the present. These records are controlled in accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974 but are available to affected individuals or their designees and other groups performing sanctioned epidemiology studies.Introduction of Radiation Exposure of U.S. Military Individuals (Video 2:19, http://links.lww.com/HP/A30). PMID:24378502

  19. Comparison of occupational hearing losses among military engineers and their civilian counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.L.; Chandler, D.W.

    1983-10-01

    A previous study examined group hearing loss of 209 U.S.Army engineers by comparing current with reference audiograms. The sample was categorized by military occupation specialty, age, and time on job. The present study reports comparable data for 187 civilian engineers on the same Army post exposed to essentially the same noise. These had less hearing loss than their military counterparts. Some reasons are suggested, such as attrition of the civilian workforce because of hearing problems, and a likely greater exposure of the military engineers to noises not job-related. Age was less important than time on the job. Both groups, however, exhibited significantly lower hearing levels than the industrial population of Glorig et al at the 1954 Wisconsin State Fair, possibly because both military and civilian personnel at this Army post had been for some years in an aggressive hearing conservation program.

  20. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  1. Military specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The current situation relative to the military specification is that there is not one specific model of turbulence which people are using. Particular disagreement exists on how turbulence levels will vary with qualitative analysis. It does not tie one down to specifics. When it comes to flying quality specifications, many feel that one should stay with the definitions of the Cooper-Harper rating scale but allow the levels to shift depending on the level of turbulence. There is a ride quality specification in the MIL-SPEC having to do with flight control systems design that is related to a turbulence model. This spec (MIL-F8785C) and others are discussed.

  2. Perspectives on Aerobic and Strength Influences on Military Physical Readiness: Report of an International Military Physiology Roundtable.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Karl E; Knapik, Joseph J; Häkkinen, Keijo; Baumgartner, Neal; Groeller, Herbert; Taylor, Nigel A S; Duarte, Antonio F A; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Jones, Bruce H; Kraemer, William J; Nindl, Bradley C

    2015-11-01

    Physical fitness training of military recruits is an enduring focus of armies. This is important for safe and effective performance of general tasks that anyone may have to perform in a military setting as well as preparation for more specialized training in specific job specialties. Decades of studies on occupationally specific physical requirements have characterized the dual aerobic and strength demands of typical military tasks; however, scientifically founded strategies to prepare recruits with a good mix of these 2 physiologically opposing capabilities have not been well established. High levels of aerobic training can compromise resistance training gains and increase injury rates. Resistance training requires a greater commitment of time and resources as well as a greater understanding of the science to produce true strength gains that may be beneficial to military performance. These are critical issues for modern armies with increased demands for well-prepared soldiers and fewer injury losses. The actual physical requirements tied to metrics of success in military jobs are also under renewed examination as women are increasingly integrated into military jobs previously performed only by men. At the third International Congress on Soldiers' Physical Performance, a roundtable of 10 physiologists with military expertise presented comparative perspectives on aerobic and strength training. These topics included the physiological basis of training benefits, how to train effectively, how to measure training effectiveness, considerations for the integration of women, and the big perspective. Key discussion points centered on (a) the significance of findings from research on integrated training, (b) strategies for effective strength development, and

  3. Precipitating circumstances of suicide among active duty U.S. Army personnel versus U.S. civilians, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents' military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  4. Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide among Active Duty U.S. Army Personnel Versus U.S. Civilians, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents’ military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  5. Posttraumatic stress disorder post Iraq and Afghanistan: prevalence among military subgroups.

    PubMed

    Hines, Lindsey A; Sundin, Josefin; Rona, Roberto J; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T

    2014-09-01

    A large body of research has been produced in recent years investigating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among military personnel following deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, resulting in apparent differences in PTSD prevalence. We compare prevalence estimates for current PTSD between military subgroups, providing insight into how groups may be differentially affected by deployment. Systematic literature searches using the terms PTSD, stress disorder, and acute stress, combined with terms relating to military personnel, identified 49 relevant papers. Studies with a sample size of less than 100 and studies based on data for treatment seeking or injured populations were excluded. Studies were categorized according to theatre of deployment (Iraq or Afghanistan), combat and noncombat deployed samples, sex, enlistment type (regular or reserve and [or] National Guard), and service branch (for example, army, navy, and air force). Meta-analysis was used to assess PTSD prevalence across subgroups. There was large variability in PTSD prevalence between studies, but, regardless of heterogeneity, prevalence rates of PTSD were higher among studies of Iraq-deployed personnel (12.9%; 95% CI 11.3% to 14.4%), compared with personnel deployed to Afghanistan (7.1%; 95% CI 4.6% to 9.6%), combat deployed personnel, and personnel serving in the Canadian, US, or UK army or the navy or marines (12.4%; 95% CI 10.9% to 13.4%), compared with the other services (4.9%; 95% CI 1.4% to 8.4%). Contrary to findings from within-study comparisons, we did not find a difference in PTSD prevalence for regular active-duty and reserve or National Guard personnel. Categorizing studies according to deployment location and branch of service identified differences among subgroups that provide further support for factors underlying the development of PTSD.

  6. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Post Iraq and Afghanistan: Prevalence Among Military Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Lindsey A; Sundin, Josefin; Rona, Roberto J; FFPH; Wessely, Simon; FMedSci; Fear, Nicola T

    2014-01-01

    A large body of research has been produced in recent years investigating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among military personnel following deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, resulting in apparent differences in PTSD prevalence. We compare prevalence estimates for current PTSD between military subgroups, providing insight into how groups may be differentially affected by deployment. Systematic literature searches using the terms PTSD, stress disorder, and acute stress, combined with terms relating to military personnel, identified 49 relevant papers. Studies with a sample size of less than 100 and studies based on data for treatment seeking or injured populations were excluded. Studies were categorized according to theatre of deployment (Iraq or Afghanistan), combat and noncombat deployed samples, sex, enlistment type (regular or reserve and [or] National Guard), and service branch (for example, army, navy, and air force). Meta-analysis was used to assess PTSD prevalence across subgroups. There was large variability in PTSD prevalence between studies, but, regardless of heterogeneity, prevalence rates of PTSD were higher among studies of Iraq-deployed personnel (12.9%; 95% CI 11.3% to 14.4%), compared with personnel deployed to Afghanistan (7.1%; 95% CI 4.6% to 9.6%), combat deployed personnel, and personnel serving in the Canadian, US, or UK army or the navy or marines (12.4%; 95% CI 10.9% to 13.4%), compared with the other services (4.9%; 95% CI 1.4% to 8.4%). Contrary to findings from within-study comparisons, we did not find a difference in PTSD prevalence for regular active-duty and reserve or National Guard personnel. Categorizing studies according to deployment location and branch of service identified differences among subgroups that provide further support for factors underlying the development of PTSD. PMID:25569079

  7. [Disease control in the Red Army during the final stages of the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Butakov, S S; Berskii, O V; Zetkin, A Yu; Zobov, A E

    2015-05-01

    Forms and methods of disease, control in troops were fully developed during the Great Patriotic War 1941-1945 years. An improvement of anti-epidemic organization in the Red Army was based on military medical doctrine, which demanded united views on methods of disease prevention and in accordance with the 'main tasks of medical support of the army, including prevention of epidemic outbreaks in the army. Disease control system in the Red Army during the war was a series of targeted, science-based and proved by military practice measures .aimed at both the prevention and the immediate elimination of epidemic diseases. when they occur. The questions of disease control forces in the final stage of the Great Patriotic War (January 1944 - May 1945). Depending on the progress of the war and the conditions of the fighting, given the period laid down in the principles of disease control of military operations, discussed aspects of the organization of sanitary-epidemiological (preventive) measures in the armed forces.

  8. Meaningfulness of service and marital satisfaction in Army couples.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jeffrey S; Renshaw, Keith D; Allen, Elizabeth S; Markman, Howard J; Stanley, Scott M

    2014-10-01

    The vast numbers of military service members who have been deployed since 2001 highlights the need to better understand relationships of military couples. A unique consideration in military couples is the concept of meaningfulness of service, or the value service members and their partners place on military service in spite of the sacrifices it requires. In a sample of 606 Army couples, the authors used path analysis to examine how male service members' and female spouses' perceived meaningfulness of service added to the prediction of marital satisfaction in both members of the couple, when accounting for service members' PTSD symptoms. Spouses' perceived meaningfulness of service was linked with higher marital satisfaction in spouses, regardless of service member's perceived meaningfulness of service. Service members' perceived meaningfulness of service was also associated with increased marital satisfaction in service members, but only when their spouses also perceived higher meaningfulness. There were no significant interactions between service members' PTSD and either partner's perceived meaningfulness. Implications for enhanced attention to spousal perceptions of meaningfulness of service are discussed. PMID:25046347

  9. Opportunities and challenges for MEMS technology in Army missile systems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.

    1999-07-01

    The military market drives the thrust for the development of robust, high performance MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) devices with applications such as: competent and smart munitions, aircraft and missile autopilots, tactical missile guidance, fire control systems, platform stabilization, smart structures with embedded inertial sensors, missile system health monitoring, aerodynamic flow control, and multiple intelligent small projectiles. Army missile applications will be a fertile market for MEMS products, such as MEMS-based inertial sensors. MEMS technology should significantly enhance performance and provide more robust mission capability in applications where arrays of MEMS devices are required. The Army Aviation and Missile Command Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center is working diligently with other government agencies, academia, and industry to develop high performing MEMS devices to withstand shock, vibration, temperature, humidity, and long-term storage conditions often encountered by Army missile systems. The goals of the ongoing DARPA MEMS technology programs will meet a significant portion of the Army missile systems requirements. In lieu of presenting an all-inclusive review of Army MEMS applications, this paper addresses a number of opportunities and associated challenges for MEMS systems operating in military environments. Near term applications and the less mature, high-risk applications of MEMS devices are addressed.

  10. Biomarker characteristics of alcohol use in the U.S. Army.

    PubMed

    Lande, R Gregory; Marin, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to collect data providing information about the biomarker characteristics of alcohol use among a sample of military personnel in the U.S. Army. Military personnel enrolled in the Army Substance Abuse Program at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC, received a comprehensive assessment that included a panel of direct and indirect biomarkers. A total of 80 records were reviewed to assess biomarker results. Higher Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores correlated with higher gamma glutamyltransferase levels. All subjects tested negative on the initial breathalyzer. All subjects completed an initial ethyl glucuronide and approximately one-third received a positive report. A second positive ethyl glucuronide did correlate with a positive third and fourth result. Military personnel deployed to an area of combat operations reported tobacco use more frequently than military personnel not assigned to an area of combat operations. A broad range of assessment tools, including traditional interviews, standardized questionnaires, indirect, and direct biomarkers, provide clinicians the techniques to screen alcohol use disorders. Direct biomarkers are a valuable assessment tool but must be integrated with the other components of the diagnostic evaluation. PMID:19340678

  11. Ingredients of military genius. Student essay

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J.M.

    1986-04-07

    This article deals with military genius from an historical and a classical theory perspective. The author modifies an approach developed by Carl von Clausewitz that makes use of theory as a framework for the study of history. Clausewitz used theory to study campaigns of Napoleon. This article uses Clausewitz's theory of military genius to study some of the great captains of the American Civil War and World War II. Using seven qualities of military genius that Clausewitz lists in his ON WAR, a study was made to ascertain commonalities of behavior displayed by great battlefield generals. Historical examples are given which reflect the qualities of military genius. The basic hypothesis of the article is that successful generals command their armies with their total being and not just one predominate aspect of their person. The underlying theme is that body, emotions, mind, and spirit must work in a relatively balanced manner which results in military genius being displayed. Historical example urges each senior officer to continually train and discipline his being in preparation for his possible future destiny.

  12. The great disease enemy, Kak'ke (beriberi) and the Imperial Japanese Army.

    PubMed

    Hawk, Alan

    2006-04-01

    Although Japanese military officials had discovered that an improved diet could prevent beriberi by the late 19th century, their soldiers in the army suffered from beriberi during the Russo-Japanese War and World War II. A change in diet at the end of the Russo-Japanese War solved the problem and the army applied the lesson learned, along with postwar scientific discoveries about nutrition, toward the diet used during World War II. However, beriberi again plagued Japanese soldiers, this time due to poor logistics and unpalatable dietary supplements. PMID:16673750

  13. Crucible of fire: the Boer War and the birth of the Canadian Army Medical Corps.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, I

    1995-11-15

    Although Canada's military physicians didn't come to prominence until WW I and WW II, the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC), the forerunner of the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps and the current Canadian Forces Medical Service, actually had its origins in the Boer War. During that turn-of-the-century conflict, field hospitals accompanied Canadian troops to South Africa. Ian McCulloch discusses that early type of medical service and the steps that led to the creation of the CAMC.

  14. Exploiting social media for Army operations: Syrian crisis use case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Sue E.; Bowman, Elizabeth K.; Al Amin, Tanvir; Abdelzaher, Tarek

    2014-05-01

    Millions of people exchange user-generated information through online social media (SM) services. The prevalence of SM use globally and its growing significance to the evolution of events has attracted the attention of the Army and other agencies charged with protecting national security interests. The information exchanged in SM sites and the networks of people who interact with these online communities can provide value to Army intelligence efforts. SM could facilitate the Military Decision Making Process by providing ongoing assessment of military actions from a local citizen perspective. Despite potential value, there are significant technological barriers to leveraging SM. SM collection and analysis are difficult in the dynamic SM environment and deception is a real concern. This paper introduces a credibility analysis approach and prototype fact-finding technology called the "Apollo Fact-finder" that mitigates the problem of inaccurate or falsified SM data. Apollo groups data into sets (or claims), corroborating specific observations, then iteratively assesses both claim and source credibility resulting in a ranking of claims by likelihood of occurrence. These credibility analysis approaches are discussed in the context of a conflict event, the Syrian civil war, and applied to tweets collected in the aftermath of the Syrian chemical weapons crisis.

  15. The Army word recognition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  16. [Preparing army nurses for deployment].

    PubMed

    Ringeval, Jean-François; Bellard, Valérie; Melaine, Régis; Lefort, Hugues

    2014-09-01

    When on overseas operations, the nurses and doctors of the French army health service are confronted with exceptional situations, with a specific tactical and geographical environment and complex pathologies to treat. Initial and continuing training based on immersion Simulation is essential in order to be able to treat a war casualty in these conditions. PMID:25464632

  17. [Preparing army nurses for deployment].

    PubMed

    Ringeval, Jean-François; Bellard, Valérie; Melaine, Régis; Lefort, Hugues

    2014-09-01

    When on overseas operations, the nurses and doctors of the French army health service are confronted with exceptional situations, with a specific tactical and geographical environment and complex pathologies to treat. Initial and continuing training based on immersion Simulation is essential in order to be able to treat a war casualty in these conditions. PMID:25508263

  18. Battles: Intelligent Army versus Insurgency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Linda; Sen, Surajit

    2009-03-01

    A ``simple'' battle can be thought of as a conflict between two parties, each with finite reserves, and typically fought on one side’s territory. Modern battles are often strategic, based largely on the speed of information processing and decision making and are mission oriented rather than to annex new territory. Here, we analyze such battles using a simple model in which the ``blue'' army fights a strategic battle against a ``red'' army that is well matched in combat power and in red’s territory. We assume that the blue army attacks strategically while the red army attempts to neutralize the enemy when in close enough proximity, implemented here as ``on- site,'' with randomly varying force levels to potentially confuse and drive the blue's strategies. The temporal evolution of the model battles incorporate randomness in the deployment of the reds and hence possess attendant history dependence. We show that minimizing risk exposure and making strategic moves based on local intelligence are often the deciding factors that determine the outcome of battles among well matched adversaries.

  19. Leader development transformation in the Army Nurse Corps.

    PubMed

    Funari, Tamara S; Ford, Kathleen; Schoneboom, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    The Army Nurse (AN) Corps is undergoing a historic transformation. Under the leadership of its Chief, MG Patricia Horoho, the Corps developed and implemented the AN Campaign Plan to insure that the Corps has the right capability and capacity to meet the current and future needs of the US Army. This article describes the work conducted by the AN Corps Leadership Imperative Action Team (Leader IAT) to develop full-spectrum leaders for the future. The mission of the Leader IAT is derived from both the AN Campaign plan as well as the operational objectives defined in the AN balanced scorecard. As a result of the analysis conducted during preparation of the AN Campaign Plan, several key gaps were identified regarding the Army Nurse Corps' ability to match leadership talents with the diverse demands of current missions, as well as its adaptability and flexibility to be prepared for unknown future missions. This article also introduces the Leadership Capability Map and other initiatives implemented to ensure the development of full-spectrum leaders who will be effective in the future military healthcare environment. PMID:22124868

  20. ENLISTED MEN SEPARATING FROM THE MILITARY SERVICE AS A POTENTIAL SOURCE OF TEACHERS FOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HENSEL, JAMES W.; AND OTHERS

    THE PRIMARY PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO DETERMINE WHETHER THE MILITARY SERVICES OFFERED A POTENTIAL SOURCE FOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL TEACHERS. MILITARY OFFICIALS DESIGNATED ONE ARMY, ONE NAVY, AND ONE AIR FORCE BASE WHICH REPRESENTED A TYPICAL SEPARATION CENTER FOR EACH PARTICULAR SERVICE. A QUESTIONNAIRE, ADMINISTERED BY DESIGNATED BASE…

  1. 48 CFR 225.7702-2 - Acquisition of uniform components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police. 225.7702-2 Section 225.7702-2 Federal Acquisition... components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police. Any textile components supplied by DoD to the Afghan National Army or the Afghan National Police for purpose of production of uniforms shall be produced in...

  2. 48 CFR 225.7702-2 - Acquisition of uniform components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police. 225.7702-2 Section 225.7702-2 Federal Acquisition... components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police. Any textile components supplied by DoD to the Afghan National Army or the Afghan National Police for purpose of production of uniforms shall be produced in...

  3. The priming effect of military service on creativity performance.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Fa-Chung; Tu, Priscilla L P

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the service priming effect on creativity performance. In three experiments, the service priming was manipulated in three ways (Army priming, Air Force priming, and a Neutral condition). Participants' performances on the Chinese Remote Associates Test (CRAT), insight problems, and critical thinking problems were accordingly measured in each experiment. Results showed that the Air Force priming improved creativity and the Army priming enhanced critical thinking. The results suggest that the constructions and processes of these two manipulations are different. In addition, results also suggested that the branch of military service moderates the relationship between the service priming and the performance of creativity. PMID:24897904

  4. The unsilencing of military wives: wartime deployment experiences and citizen responsibility.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Ward, David B; Storm, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    One of therapists' contemporary moral imperatives is to support American service members and their families regardless of personal position on the Global War on Terrorism. One way therapists can respond to this imperative is by seeking to understand Army wives' experiences during their husbands' wartime deployments. Therefore, this study utilized a combination of individual interviews with Army wives and a reflecting team of military wives and civilians to explore military wives' experiences. Two main themes were identified: the wives' experience was an emotional roller coaster and they felt silenced--and could be unsilenced--in their interactions with civilians. Therapists working with Army wives should (a) normalize the roller-coaster experience; (b) encourage wives to recognize negative and positive influencers and explore their idiosyncratic coping skills; (c) support positive civilian-military connections; and (d) as a civilian and as a therapist, seek to be a positive civilian connection by proactively showing support. PMID:21198688

  5. 77 FR 9633 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries Advisory...: Lieutenant Colonel Renea Yates; renea-yates@us.army.mil or 571.256.4325. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  6. Nursing advocacy during a military operation.

    PubMed

    Foley, B J; Minick, P; Kee, C

    2000-06-01

    Advocacy is an essential component of the registered nurse's professional role, yet experts provide no consistent definition of advocacy. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of military nurses as they engage in advocating practices and to describe their shared practices and common meanings. Heideggerian hermeneutic phenomenology, provided the framework and method for this study. Twenty-four U.S. Army nurses were individually interviewed and the researcher kept interview observational notes. The constant comparative method of analysis was used. The stories of these nurses revealed one constitutive pattern--safeguarding--and four related themes. The themes were advocating as protecting, advocating as attending the whole person, advocating as being the patient's voice, and advocating as preserving personhood. One conclusion was that military nurses must be prepared for the important safe-guarding role. They must be coached in how to deal with other members of the health team on the patient's behalf. PMID:10826256

  7. Dermatology in the military field: What physicians should know?

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Wei-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In the civilian dermatological setting, the top 5 skin diseases usually seen are eczema/dermatitis, acne, benign skin tumors, viral infections and pigmentary disorders. In comparison, the top 5 skin conditions encountered in the military sector are usually fungal infections, eczema/dermatitis, insect bite reactions, bacterial infections and acne. This is not surprising as military personnel, due to the special environment and vocations they are in, are prone to getting eczema as heat, sweating and wearing of the military uniform aggravate the condition. Fungal infections are common in those who wear the army boots. Insect bite reactions are not an uncommon sight among those who have to go to the jungle regularly for outfield training. Grass allergy or intolerance, contact dermatitis or acneiform eruption due to the application of military camouflage cream on the face, contact dermatitis to insect repellents, and military uniform allergy and intolerance are amongst the commonest dermatological problems encountered in the military field, and physicians should recognize them, investigate and manage these problems accordingly. Lastly, a diagnosis not to be missed in the military field is cutaneous melioidosis, especially when a military personnel presents with a non-healing ulcer. PMID:24340268

  8. [Military medical service and international humanitarian law (literature review)].

    PubMed

    Radysh, Ia F; Mehed', V P; Badiuk, M I; Mel'nyk, O M; Andriienko, O Ia

    2004-12-01

    Three periods of the development of military medical service management in Ukraine can be outlined according to the findings of the conducted study, they are the following: formation (1992-1994), consolidation and development (the end of 1994-2003), functional and structural transformation (2004). Leading tendencies of the formation of the management of medical military service in the period are shown in the article to be democratization and structural order of units of the system of the management of military service, integration of efforts and resources of medical military service in one medically covered area of the state, introduction and intensive expansion in army prophylactic and treatment institutions of wide spectrum of requiring payment medical service, rendering out-patient medical service to armed forces personnel and pensioner of Ministry of Defense by family physicians, orientation toward effective management. PMID:15771081

  9. [Military medical service and international humanitarian law (literature review)].

    PubMed

    Radysh, Ia F; Mehed', V P; Badiuk, M I; Mel'nyk, O M; Andriienko, O Ia

    2004-12-01

    Three periods of the development of military medical service management in Ukraine can be outlined according to the findings of the conducted study, they are the following: formation (1992-1994), consolidation and development (the end of 1994-2003), functional and structural transformation (2004). Leading tendencies of the formation of the management of medical military service in the period are shown in the article to be democratization and structural order of units of the system of the management of military service, integration of efforts and resources of medical military service in one medically covered area of the state, introduction and intensive expansion in army prophylactic and treatment institutions of wide spectrum of requiring payment medical service, rendering out-patient medical service to armed forces personnel and pensioner of Ministry of Defense by family physicians, orientation toward effective management.

  10. 'We did the best we could'--the United States Army nurses of Ie Shima.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Francie

    2013-01-01

    During World War II, Army Nurses of the 156th Army Evacuation Hospital delivered care while under attack, demonstrated incredible bravery, endured extreme hardships, and unknowingly defined advanced nursing practice as we know it today. First Lieutenant Edythe (Goldstein) Pallin, BS, RN, was a 23-year old registered nurse who served in the Pacific and was stationed near the front lines on the remote island of Ie Shima in the Ryukyu Island Chain near Okinawa. This article, as told to Edythe's daughter, draws heavily on her memories and her military photo album stored in the attic of her home for over 50 years. Edythe only acknowledges her military experience by saying, "We did the best we could." Yes, these nurses not only did the best they could, they also changed nursing from a subservient position to an independent practice long before nurses even understood their professional possibilities. Edythe passed away October 26, 2012. PMID:23734553

  11. Challenges in biodefense research and the role of US Army veterinary pathologists.

    PubMed

    Steele, Keith E; Alves, Derron A; Chapman, Jennifer L

    2007-01-01

    For years the nation's development of medical countermeasures to biowarfare agents has primarily existed as the domain of the United States military, but it has taken on increased urgency in the last few years. The realization that the civilian population is also at risk from biological agents has resulted in the institution of new biodefense programs at a variety of nonmilitary organizations. USAMRIID, a long-time leader in the nation's biodefense effort, will soon be joined by other US government agencies as part of a planned National Interagency Biodefense Campus at Fort Detrick Maryland. US Army veterinary pathologists at USAMRIID have played an important role in the nation's biodefense effort, along with our veterinary colleagues representing other specialties, our military colleagues in other Army Medical Department corps, and our civilian colleagues. Together, we will continue to strive to develop the diagnostics, vaccines, therapeutic agents, and operational practices that are required to meet the great demands posed by the threat of biowarfare agents.

  12. Joseph Lovell, MD (1788-1836): First US army surgeon general.

    PubMed

    Craig, Stephen C

    2016-08-01

    Joseph Lovell, trained in medicine at Harvard and in military medicine/surgery by the War of 1812, became the first Surgeon General to sit on the reorganised army staff at the tender age of 29 in 1818. With a keen intellect, medical acumen, and wartime experiences for his tools and a close supporting relationship with Commanding General Jacob Jennings Brown and Secretary of War John C Calhoun (1728-1850), Lovell constructed an efficient and effective organisational and administrative framework for the new Medical Department of the US Army. Moreover, he not only redefined the role of the American military physician but also established the professional dignity, respectability and value of the medical officer among line officers and staff. Lovell's 18-year tenure came to an abrupt end, but the operational framework he created became both foundation and legacy for his successors.

  13. [Health conditions and physical development of soldiers during enrollment in the Armed Forces of Ukraine and military service in 2001-2010].

    PubMed

    Didenko, L V; Ustinova, L A; Khyzhniak, M I

    2012-01-01

    Fitness of soldiers in military reserve for military service at the stage in the Armed Forces of Ukraine has been studied in the article. It has been established that the growing number of soldiers in military reserve with changes in health and physical condition indicates insufficient level of their health which has a negative impact on their capability and gradually on their fitness for military service. Priorities of changes in organization of the process of completion by human resources of the soldiers' military reserve in the Armed Forces of Ukraine during their transition towards professional army have been defined, to include optimization of criteria of fitness for military service.

  14. British military forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Turner, Mark A; Neal, Leigh A

    2004-04-01

    Military psychiatry has recently generated a lot of interest. In contrast there is virtually no literature on military forensic psychiatry. The first section of the paper is a brief review of British military psychiatric services and recent data on the prevalence of mental illness in British armed forces personnel. The second section summarizes the relevant aspects of the British military judicial and penal systems including the practice of summary justice, the court martial system, and sentencing and corrective training. The third section of the paper addresses issues which are particular to forensic psychiatry, including mental defences in relation to the military, the military offences of malingering and impersonation, risk assessment in military contexts and the notion of 'temperamental unsuitability' to military service. PMID:15176622

  15. Military Education in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haussman, Fay

    1974-01-01

    A large share of the credit for Brazil's recent progress must go to Brazil's highly structured military education, including the colegios militares (high schools), the military colleges, and the general staff schools. (Author/PG)

  16. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... EFMP + Special Needs Health Care Leaving the Military Marriage + Divorce Survivors Wounded + Caregivers Spouses + Scholarships NMFA Scholarships ... EFMP + Special Needs Health Care Leaving the Military Marriage + Divorce Survivors Wounded + Caregivers Spouses + Scholarships NMFA Scholarships ...

  17. [Petechial typhus. History of men, armies and pedicula].

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, Sergio

    2006-09-01

    Since the Classical age, humankind has had to cope with petechial typhus, especially during wars and famine. Epidemics chiefly occurred during sieges and followed the paths of armies, when infected soldiers transmitted the infection to populations with whom they came into contact. Winter exacerbated the disease due to the use of unhygienic woollen clothes that allowed the spread of pediculosis. It was only in the early 18th century that petechial typhus outbreaks diminished thanks to the use of Marseille soap and to the new custom of changing clothing at bedtime. In many military campaigns, deaths from typhus were higher than those due to war wounds: recent studies established that the French defeat during the Napoleonic Russian military campaign has to be attributed more to typhus than to the military superiority of the enemy. Indeed, the contagion is estimated to have affected 80% of the 600,000 troops involved. The role of Pediculus as a vehicle of infection established in 1909 by Charles Nicolle, microbiological isolation performed by Howard Ricketts and Stanislaus von Prowazck, and finally the advent of antibiotic therapy, all laid the basis for controlling the disease in the 20th century.

  18. Validity of the Military Applicant Profile (MAP) for Predicting Early Attrition in Different Educational, Age, and Racial Groups. Technical Report 567.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Newell K.; And Others

    The Military Applicant Profile (MAP) was developed to serve as an applicant screening instrument to reduce attrition in the all-volunteer Army. Since 1979, it has been used operationally to screen 17-year-old non-high school graduate males. The Army Research Institute was asked to explore the extension of MAP to older (above 17) nongraduate males,…

  19. Army Reserve 63d RSC Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lot Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes how the Army Reserve 63d Regional Support Command (RSC) achieved 85% energy savings and $4,000 per year in cost savings by replacing 12 old light fixtures with light-emitting diode fixtures in the military equipment parking area. This project was part of a camp-wide parking lighting retrofit which, on average, delivered 78% energy savings and a simple payback of 4.4 years.

  20. Nursing in the Sardinian-Piedmontese Army during the Crimean War.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Anna; Lusignani, Maura

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary history considers the Crimean War one of the most important European military campaign between the Napoleonic Wars and World War I. For the history of nursing this is an historical landmark, where, thanks to Florence Nightingale, the professional nursing was born. At the moment, the organization of health care and nursing of the Sardinian Piedmontese Army has not been the subject of extensive study. This report is meant to start the analysis of their commitment. Through analysis of primary historical sources, we would like to highlight the role of healthcare and nursing in the Sardinian-Piedmontese Army starting from 1855, during the Crimean War. We have analyzed the records stored in the archive of the Ispettorato Generale (part of the Ministry of War) in Turin and the reports by Army chief physician Dr. Comissetti, as well as the surveys in the archive of the Sisters of Charity at the convent of San Salvato in Turin, the letters of Florence Nightingale and the French doctors' testimonies. So we were able to shed light on the people involved in assistance and healthcare in the Sardinian -Piedmontese Army. A new, unprecedented historical research has shown the dedication and the daily work of male military personnel and religious during the Crimean War, a new aspect during this war that of what would later become the basis of the profession nursing.

  1. [Viktor Borisovich von Gyubbenet--a military physician, a surgeon and a social activist].

    PubMed

    Ishutin, O S

    2015-02-01

    The current article is dedicated to a talented surgeon, an organizer of military health care, an extraordinary personality and a public figure--Doctor of Medicine, a privy councilor Victor Borisovich von Guebbenet. A talent of von Gyubbenea as a doctor-surgeon and an organizer of the surgical help on theater of war was especially brightly shown during two big military conflicts of the beginning of the XX century--the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905) and the First World War I (1914-1918). In the first case doctor von Gyubbenet, being a surgeon of the 3rd Siberian corps successfully manage the activity of military-medical divisions and establishments of Port Arthur garrison. In the second military conflict Victor Borisovich as a doctor and an organizer headed sanitary part of armies of the Western front and successfully directed a medical support of armies of the front since 1915 and until the end of war. PMID:25920178

  2. Military personnel recognition system using texture, colour, and SURF features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irhebhude, Martins E.; Edirisinghe, Eran A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an automatic, machine vision based, military personnel identification and classification system. Classification is done using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) on sets of Army, Air Force and Navy camouflage uniform personnel datasets. In the proposed system, the arm of service of personnel is recognised by the camouflage of a persons uniform, type of cap and the type of badge/logo. The detailed analysis done include; camouflage cap and plain cap differentiation using gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture feature; classification on Army, Air Force and Navy camouflaged uniforms using GLCM texture and colour histogram bin features; plain cap badge classification into Army, Air Force and Navy using Speed Up Robust Feature (SURF). The proposed method recognised camouflage personnel arm of service on sets of data retrieved from google images and selected military websites. Correlation-based Feature Selection (CFS) was used to improve recognition and reduce dimensionality, thereby speeding the classification process. With this method success rates recorded during the analysis include 93.8% for camouflage appearance category, 100%, 90% and 100% rates of plain cap and camouflage cap categories for Army, Air Force and Navy categories, respectively. Accurate recognition was recorded using SURF for the plain cap badge category. Substantial analysis has been carried out and results prove that the proposed method can correctly classify military personnel into various arms of service. We show that the proposed method can be integrated into a face recognition system, which will recognise personnel in addition to determining the arm of service which the personnel belong. Such a system can be used to enhance the security of a military base or facility.

  3. Thermal signature training for military observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFollette, Robert; Horger, John D.

    1991-09-01

    The U.S. Army's CECOM Center for Night Vision and Electro-Optics, C2NVEO, has been conducting a series of human perception tests. These tests score military observers on their ability to identify and recognize thermal images. The results of these tests are used to develop and refine the Night Vision FLIR Performance Model (FLIR90/ACQUIRE). The Thermal Image Training Package is a useful by-product of these tests. It was originally developed to train military observers for perception tests, but the soldiers tested pointed out its value for general training. Since that time, the package has been used by several Army units and has been found to be a valuable asset for training. The Thermal Image Training Package consists of software and imagery designed to quickly teach an observer how to recognize and identify thermal images. It runs on an IBM PC/AT compatible computer with VGA graphics and a hard disk. It loads into a computer in about 15 minutes and a complete training session is self- paced and usually takes less than two hours. It is effective, inexpensive, and simple to use. The package uses actual thermal images, simulated ranges, allows contrast and brightness adjustments, black or white hot polarity, red, green, or gray screen coloring and provides output files of scores for progress checking and analysis. The training package is a useful tool in its present form, but with continued interest and the development of better, cheaper PCs possible future versions have even greater potential.

  4. Military Education: Student and Faculty Perceptions of Student Life at the Military Academies. Report to the Subcommittee on Defense, Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Derek B.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) surveyed students and faculty at the academies operated by the Army, Navy, and Air Force to educate and train young men and women to become leaders and effective junior officers in the military services. A web-based survey of 12,264 students and 2,065 faculty members at the 3 service academies on questions…

  5. Military Education: DOD Needs To Enhance Performance Goals and Measures To Improve Oversight of Military Academies. Report to the Subcommittee on Defense, Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart; Derek B.

    Graduates of the service academies operated by the Army, Navy, and Air Force currently make up approximately 18 percent of the officer corps for the nation's armed services. The academies represent the military's most expensive source of new officers. The Department of Defense (DOD) pays the full cost of a student's 4-year education at the…

  6. [The military role in a flu pandemic].

    PubMed

    Molina Hazan, Vered; Balicer, Ran D; Groto, Itamar; Zarka, Salman; Ankol, Omer E; Bar-Zeev, Yael; Levine, Hagai; Ash, Nachman

    2010-01-01

    Pandemic influenza is a major challenge to emergency preparedness agencies and health systems throughout the world. It requires preparation for a situation of widespread morbidity due to flu and its complications which will lead to a huge burden on the health system in the community and in hospitals, and work absenteeism, also among health care personnel. This may require major involvement of the army in both preparedness and measures to be taken to tackle such an event. This article reviews the different roles armies could take in such a crisis, and presents the Israeli test case. Defense systems are characterized by a number of attributes that may be major advantages during pandemic influenza: crisis management capacities, ability to deal with varied tasks in sub-optimal conditions, logistic resources (fuel, food and water), widespread deployment in the country and sometimes in the world, and the ability to activate people in risky situations, even against their will. The army roles during pandemic outbreaks could include: taking national and regional command of the event, assigning workforce for essential civilian missions, use of logistic and military resources, maintaining public order and implementing public health measures such as isolation and quarantine. In addition, the army must continue its primary role of maintaining the security and guarding the borders of the state, especially in times of global geopolitical changes due to pandemic. Since March 2009, the influenza A/H1N1 2009 virus spread throughout the world, leading the WHO to declare a state of pandemic influenza. According to Israeli preparedness plans, the management of the event was supposed to pass to the defense system. However, due to the moderate severity of the illness, it was decided to leave the management of the event to the health system. In view of the necessity of maintaining military combat capabilities, and the possibility of outbreaks in combat units, which actually occurred, the

  7. Bearing the burden: deployment stress among army national guard chaplains.

    PubMed

    Besterman-Dahan, Karen; Barnett, Scott; Hickling, Edward; Elnitsky, Christine; Lind, Jason; Skvoretz, John; Antinori, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Military Chaplains are a critical component of behavioral health and spiritual support in combat operations. Support of combat operations has taken a toll on these caregivers. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of deployment on the psychosocial and health characteristics and reintegration of Army National Guard (ARNG) chaplains. Seventy-four ARNG chaplains participated in an anonymous, online survey. Results were categorized into two mutually exclusive groups, combat deployed and non-combat deployed. Although both groups tended to present similar results, Combat deployed group chaplains were significantly more likely to be of higher rank, have served in a pastoral role in the ARNG longer, and present with higher scores for combat exposure, resilience, and alcohol use. Further, five and seven participants, respectively, the majority of whom were from the combat deployed group, endorsed "frequently" or "a great deal" to negative religious coping. These endorsements of abandonment may relate back to Reserve component specific deployment concerns.

  8. The Army's Use of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilse, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    Tactical operations require military commanders to be mobile and have a high level of independence in their actions. Communications capabilities providing intelligence and command orders in these tactical situations have been limited to simple voice communications or low-rate narrow bandwidth communications because of the need for immediate reliable connectivity. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) has brought an improved communications tool to the tactical commander giving the ability to gain access to a global communications system using high data rates and wide bandwidths. The Army has successfully tested this new capability of bandwidth-on-demand and high data rates for commanders in real-world conditions during Operation UPHOLD DEMOCRACY in Haiti during the fall and winter of 1994. This paper examines ACTS use by field commanders and details the success of the ACTS system in support of a wide variety of field condition command functions.

  9. A content analysis of military commander messages about tobacco and other health issues in military installation newspapers: what do military commanders say about tobacco?

    PubMed

    Poston, Walker S C; Haddock, Christopher K; Jahnke, Sara A; Hyder, Melissa L; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2015-06-01

    Military installation newspapers are a primary means used by military commanders to communicate information about topics important to military personnel including leadership, training issues, installation events, safety concerns, and vital health issues. We conducted a content analysis of military commanders' messages about health issues that were published in online military installation newspapers/newsfeeds. We identified a total of 75 publicly accessible installation newspapers/newsfeeds with commanders' messages (n = 39 Air Force, n = 19 Army, n = 7 Navy, n = 1 Marine, and n = 9 Joint Bases). Commander messages published from January 2012 to December 2012 were collected, screened, and coded. Coder inter-rater reliability was 98.9%. Among the 2,479 coded commanders' messages, 132 (5.3%) addressed a health topic as the primary focus. There were no significant differences between service branches in the percentage of health-oriented messages (χ(2) = 5.019, p = 0.285). The most commonly addressed health topics were exercise/fitness (23.5%), other mental health concerns (19.7%), alcohol/driving under the influence (13.6%), and suicide (12.1%). Tobacco use was directly addressed as a primary health aim in only two commanders' messages (1.5%). Health topics, and particularly tobacco-related content, are rarely written about by military commanders. The absence of tobacco-related health messages from line leadership contributes to the perception that tobacco control is a low priority. PMID:26032388

  10. A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF MILITARY COMMANDER MESSAGES ABOUT TOBACCO AND OTHER HEALTH ISSUES IN MILITARY INSTALLATION NEWSPAPERS: WHAT DO MILITARY COMMANDERS SAY ABOUT TOBACCO?

    PubMed Central

    Poston, Walker S.C.; Haddock, Christopher K.; Jahnke, Sara A.; Hyder, Melissa L.; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2014-01-01

    Military installation newspapers are a primary means used by military commanders to communicate information about topics important to military personnel including leadership, training issues, installation events, safety concerns, and vital health issues. We conducted a content analysis of military commanders’ messages about health issues that were published in online military installation newspapers/newsfeeds. We identified a total of 75 publicly accessible installation newspapers/newsfeeds with commanders’ messages (n=39 Air Force, n=19 Army, n=7 Navy, n=1 Marine, and n=9 Joint Bases). Commander messages published between January 2012–December 2012 were collected, screened, and coded. Coder inter-rater reliability was 98.9%. Among the 2,479 coded commanders’ messages, 132 (5.3%) addressed a health topic as the primary focus. There were no significant differences between service branches in the percentage of health-oriented messages (χ2=5.019, p=0.285). The most commonly addressed health topics were exercise/fitness (23.5%), other mental health concerns (19.7%), alcohol/DUI (13.6%), and suicide (12.1%). Tobacco use was directly addressed as a primary health aim in only two commanders’ messages (1.5%). Health topics, and particularly tobacco-related content, are rarely written about by military commanders. The absence of tobacco-related health messages from line leadership contributes to the perception that tobacco control is a low priority. PMID:26032388

  11. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    .... SUMMARY: On March 7, 2011 (76 FR 12508-12548), DoD published notice of approval of a personnel management... the Army; Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Tank Automotive Research, Development... 9, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: TARDEC: Mr. Gregory Berry, U. S. Army Tank...

  12. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... ] Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: May 31, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122...

  13. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: February 23, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  14. 78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Session AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: 1. Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). 2. Date: Wednesday, July...

  15. 77 FR 50089 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of...

  16. 78 FR 69077 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open-meeting rules...@us.army.mil , (831) 242-5828. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to 41 CFR 102-3.105(j) and 102-...

  17. 77 FR 40030 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (41 CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: July 26,...

  18. 76 FR 43993 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department ] of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: August...

  19. 78 FR 24735 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3.140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting:...

  20. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of...

  1. 78 FR 38956 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open- meeting rules. FOR... Designated Federal Officer: ATFL- APO, Monterey, CA, 93944, Robert.Savukinas@us.army.mil , (831)...

  2. 77 FR 66823 - Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD... the Federal Regulations (41 CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date(s) of...

  3. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Dates of Meeting: May 16, 2013. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  4. 78 FR 73852 - Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3.140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB) Winter Plenary Session. Date: January...

  5. 78 FR 60864 - Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB) Fall Plenary Session....

  6. 77 FR 21977 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3.140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: May 3, 2012. Time(s)...

  7. 75 FR 38504 - Army Science Board Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice... Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: July 21, 2010....

  8. Perspectives on Aerobic and Strength Influences on Military Physical Readiness: Report of an International Military Physiology Roundtable.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Karl E; Knapik, Joseph J; Häkkinen, Keijo; Baumgartner, Neal; Groeller, Herbert; Taylor, Nigel A S; Duarte, Antonio F A; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Jones, Bruce H; Kraemer, William J; Nindl, Bradley C

    2015-11-01

    Physical fitness training of military recruits is an enduring focus of armies. This is important for safe and effective performance of general tasks that anyone may have to perform in a military setting as well as preparation for more specialized training in specific job specialties. Decades of studies on occupationally specific physical requirements have characterized the dual aerobic and strength demands of typical military tasks; however, scientifically founded strategies to prepare recruits with a good mix of these 2 physiologically opposing capabilities have not been well established. High levels of aerobic training can compromise resistance training gains and increase injury rates. Resistance training requires a greater commitment of time and resources as well as a greater understanding of the science to produce true strength gains that may be beneficial to military performance. These are critical issues for modern armies with increased demands for well-prepared soldiers and fewer injury losses. The actual physical requirements tied to metrics of success in military jobs are also under renewed examination as women are increasingly integrated into military jobs previously performed only by men. At the third International Congress on Soldiers' Physical Performance, a roundtable of 10 physiologists with military expertise presented comparative perspectives on aerobic and strength training. These topics included the physiological basis of training benefits, how to train effectively, how to measure training effectiveness, considerations for the integration of women, and the big perspective. Key discussion points centered on (a) the significance of findings from research on integrated training, (b) strategies for effective strength development, and PMID:26506170

  9. Suicide Attempts in the United States Army

    PubMed Central

    Ursano, Robert J.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Stein, Murray B.; Naifeh, James A.; Aliaga, Pablo A.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Colpe, Lisa J.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Cox, Kenneth L.; Heeringa, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The U.S. Army suicide attempt rate increased sharply during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Comprehensive research on this important health outcome has been hampered by a lack of integration among Army administrative data systems. Objective To identify risk factors for Regular Army suicide attempts during the years 2004–2009 using data from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS). Design, Setting, and Participants There were 9,791 medically documented suicide attempts among Regular Army soldiers during the study period. Individual-level person-month records from Army and Department of Defense administrative data systems were analyzed to identify socio-demographic, service-related, and mental health risk factors distinguishing suicide attempt cases from an equal-probability control sample of 183,826 person-months. Main Outcome and Measures Suicide attempts were identified using Department of Defense Suicide Event Report records and ICD-9 E95x diagnostic codes. Predictor variables were constructed from Army personnel and medical records. Results Enlisted soldiers accounted for 98.6% of all suicide attempts, with an overall rate of 377/100,000 person-years, versus 27.9/100,000 person-years for officers. Significant multivariate predictors among enlisted soldiers included socio-demographic characteristics (female gender, older age at Army entry, younger current age, low education, non-hispanic white), short length of service, never or previously deployed, and the presence and recency of mental health diagnoses. Among officers, only socio-demographic characteristics (female gender, older age at Army entry, younger current age, and low education) and the presence and recency of mental health diagnoses were significant. Conclusions and Relevance Results represent the most comprehensive accounting of U.S. Army suicide attempts to date and reveal unique risk profiles for enlisted soldiers and officers, and highlighting the

  10. Maggot debridement therapy in modern army medicine: perceptions and prevalence.

    PubMed

    Heitkamp, Rae A; Peck, George W; Kirkup, Benjamin C

    2012-11-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT), despite its long history and safety profile, finds limited use in the military health care system. Although new methods are continually being investigated to debride wounds more quickly and effectively, MDT remains largely a therapy of last resort. We evaluated the frequency of MDT in the Army sector of the MHS and the decision-making process surrounding its use. A 22 question survey of Army physicians was prepared and distributed through select Medical Corps Consultants in specialties likely to practice debridement. 83% of respondents were familiar with MDT, and of those familiar, 63% were aware of FDA approval for the product and 10% had used the product themselves. The three most frequently cited reasons for not using the therapy were no need (52%), no access (23%), and insufficient experience (19%). Informing the 37% of physicians who are not aware of FDA approval is an obvious target for program improvement. However, as many do not find a need for MDT, targeted improvements to MDT access and education for those physicians who encounter indications for MDT would permit them to apply MDT where there is an unmet need.

  11. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army...) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel....

  12. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army...) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel....

  13. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army...) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel....

  14. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army...) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel....

  15. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army...) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel....

  16. Portable fuel cell systems for America's army: technology transition to the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ashok S.; Dubois, Terry G.; Sifer, Nicholas; Bostic, Elizabeth; Gardner, Kristopher; Quah, Michael; Bolton, Christopher

    The US Army Communications, Electronics Research Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) envisions three thrust areas for portable fuel cell systems for military applications. These areas include soldier power (<500 W), sensor power (0-100 W), and auxiliary power units or APUs (0.5-10 kW). Soldier and sensor fuel cell systems may be man-portable/backpackable while APUs could be employed as squad battery chargers or as 'Silent Watch' APUs where low signature (acoustic, thermal, etc.) operation is a requirement. The Army's research and development efforts are focusing on methods of either storing or generating hydrogen on the battlefield. Hydrogen storage technology is considered critical to small military and/or commercial fuel cell systems, and is being pursued in a host of commercial and government programs. CERDEC, in a joint effort with the Army Research Office (ARO) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), is developing several promising hydrogen generating technologies. The goal of this program is a safe, reliable hydrogen source that can provide rates up to 100 W with an energy density of greater than 1000 Wh/kg. For larger fuel cell units (>500 W), it is imperative that the fuel cell power units be able to operate on fuels within the military logistics chain [DOD 4140.25-M, DOD Directive 4140.25 (1993)]. CERDEC is currently conducting research on catalysts and microchannel fuel reformers that offer great promise for the reforming of diesel and JP-8 fuels into hydrogen. In addition to research work on PEM fuel cells and enabling technologies, the Army is also conducting research on direct methanol and solid oxide fuel cells, and combined heat and power applications utilizing new high temperature fuel cells.

  17. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army policies. 651.5 Section 651.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL...

  18. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army policies. 651.5 Section 651.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL...

  19. Army industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use

    SciTech Connect

    Stoughton, Kate McMordie; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  20. Supplement use by UK-based British Army soldiers in training.

    PubMed

    Casey, Anna; Hughes, Jason; Izard, Rachel M; Greeves, Julie P

    2014-10-14

    The use of supplements is widespread at all levels of civilian sport and a prevalence of 60-90 % is reported among high-performance UK athletes, including juniors. The prevalence of supplement use among UK-based British Army personnel is not known. The aim of the present study was to establish the point prevalence of supplement use in UK-based British Army soldiers under training (SuTs) and associated staff. A cross-sectional anonymous survey was carried out in 3168 British Army SuTs and soldiers, equating to 3·1 % of regular Army strength, based at eleven Phase 1, 2 and 3 UK Army training sites. Overall, 38 % of the respondents reported current use of supplements, but prevalence varied according to the course attended by the respondents. The number of different supplements used was 4·7 (sd 2·9). Supplements most commonly used were protein bars, powders and drinks (66 %), isotonic carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drinks (49 %), creatine (38 %), recovery sports drinks (35 %), multivitamins (31 %) and vitamin C (25 %). A small proportion of respondents reported the use of amphetamines and similar compounds (1·6 %), cocaine (0·8 %), anabolic androgenic steroids (1·1 %), growth hormone (2·0 %), and other anabolic agents, e.g. testosterone (4·2 %). Logistic regression modelling indicated that, for current users, younger age, being female, smoking and undergoing Officer Cadet training were associated with greater supplement use. This is the first study to investigate the prevalence of dietary and training supplement use in UK-based British military personnel. Self-administration of a wide range of supplements is reported by British military personnel in training, which is at least as great as that reported by those on deployment, and has implications for Defence policy and educational needs.

  1. OLED study for military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barre, F.; Chiquard, A.; Faure, S.; Landais, L.; Patry, P.

    2005-07-01

    The presentation deals with some applications of OLED displays in military optronic systems, which are scheduled by SAGEM DS (Defence and Security). SAGEM DS, one of the largest group in the defence and security market, is currently investigating OLED Technologies for military programs. This technology is close from being chosen for optronic equipment such as future infantry night vision goggles, rifle-sight, or, more generally, vision enhancement systems. Most of those applications requires micro-display with an active matrix size below 1". Some others, such as, for instance, ruggedized flat displays do have a need for higher active matrix size (1,5" to 15"). SAGEM DS takes advantages of this flat, high luminance and emissive technology in highly integrated systems. In any case, many requirements have to be fulfilled: ultra-low power consumption, wide viewing angle, good pixel to pixel uniformity, and satisfactory behaviour in extreme environmental conditions.... Accurate measurements have been achieved at SAGEM DS on some micro display OLEDs and will be detailed: luminance (over 2000 cd/m2 achieved), area uniformity and pixel to pixel uniformity, robustness at low and high temperature (-40°C to +60°C), lifetime. These results, which refer to military requirements, provide a valuable feedback representative of the state of the art OLED performances.

  2. Advancing botnet modeling techniques for military and security simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

    2011-06-01

    Simulation environments serve many purposes, but they are only as good as their content. One of the most challenging and pressing areas that call for improved content is the simulation of bot armies (botnets) and their effects upon networks and computer systems. Botnets are a new type of malware, a type that is more powerful and potentially dangerous than any other type of malware. A botnet's power derives from several capabilities including the following: 1) the botnet's capability to be controlled and directed throughout all phases of its activity, 2) a command and control structure that grows increasingly sophisticated, and 3) the ability of a bot's software to be updated at any time by the owner of the bot (a person commonly called a bot master or bot herder.) Not only is a bot army powerful and agile in its technical capabilities, a bot army can be extremely large, can be comprised of tens of thousands, if not millions, of compromised computers or it can be as small as a few thousand targeted systems. In all botnets, their members can surreptitiously communicate with each other and their command and control centers. In sum, these capabilities allow a bot army to execute attacks that are technically sophisticated, difficult to trace, tactically agile, massive, and coordinated. To improve our understanding of their operation and potential, we believe that it is necessary to develop computer security simulations that accurately portray bot army activities, with the goal of including bot army simulations within military simulation environments. In this paper, we investigate issues that arise when simulating bot armies and propose a combination of the biologically inspired MSEIR infection spread model coupled with the jump-diffusion infection spread model to portray botnet propagation.

  3. The evolution of extreme polyandry in social insects: insights from army ants.

    PubMed

    Barth, Matthias Benjamin; Moritz, Robin Frederik Alexander; Kraus, Frank Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The unique nomadic life-history pattern of army ants (army ant adaptive syndrome), including obligate colony fission and strongly male-biased sex-ratios, makes army ants prone to heavily reduced effective population sizes (Ne). Excessive multiple mating by queens (polyandry) has been suggested to compensate these negative effects by increasing genetic variance in colonies and populations. However, the combined effects and evolutionary consequences of polyandry and army ant life history on genetic colony and population structure have only been studied in a few selected species. Here we provide new genetic data on paternity frequencies, colony structure and paternity skew for the five Neotropical army ants Eciton mexicanum, E. vagans, Labidus coecus, L. praedator and Nomamyrmex esenbeckii; and compare those data among a total of nine army ant species (including literature data). The number of effective matings per queen ranged from about 6 up to 25 in our tested species, and we show that such extreme polyandry is in two ways highly adaptive. First, given the detected low intracolonial relatedness and population differentiation extreme polyandry may counteract inbreeding and low Ne. Second, as indicated by a negative correlation of paternity frequency and paternity skew, queens maximize intracolonial genotypic variance by increasingly equalizing paternity shares with higher numbers of sires. Thus, extreme polyandry is not only an integral part of the army ant syndrome, but generally adaptive in social insects by improving genetic variance, even at the high end spectrum of mating frequencies.

  4. Technology complementing military psychology programs and services in the Pacific Regional Medical Command.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Melba C; Folen, Raymond A; Van Horn, Sandra; Ruseborn, Daniel; Samuel, Kevin M

    2013-08-01

    The Tripler Army Medical Center is the only federal tertiary care hospital serving the Pacific Regional Medical Command. Due to Tripler's large area of responsibility, many behavioral health professionals are starting to employ more technology during their sessions. As explained in this article, virtual reality and telepsychology efforts are proving to benefit military service members and their families in the Pacific Rim. PMID:22984878

  5. Bite Protection Performance of New Factory-Level Permethrin-Treated Military Uniforms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permethrin-treatment of field-worn U.S. Military uniforms has been standard practice since 1991. The uniform fabric composition has changed significantly from 100% cotton to 50:50 nylon:cotton Battle Dress Uniforms (BDUs), to 50:50 nylon:cotton Army Combat Uniforms (ACUs) with wrinkle-free finish, ...

  6. Research Training Fellowship Program (Formerly Military Medicine and Allied Sciences Course).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter Reed Army Hospital, Washington, DC.

    This document provides an outline of the Research Training Fellowship Program at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Emphasizing the scientific foundations of military medicine, the course aims at preparing medical corps officers for careers in laboratory research or clinical investigation and teaching. The intent is to give officers who…

  7. Talking about War: Reflections on Doing Oral History and Military History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    Reflects on the use of oral history in the author's scholarship on World War I and the peacetime U.S. army. Discusses the availability of accounts with veterans through oral history and provides a list of oral history sources of the military services. (CMK)

  8. Distance Education for Corporate and Military Training. Readings in Distance Education, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Michael G., Ed.

    This publication, which consists of selected readings from volumes 1-5 of The American Journal of Distance Education, is designed for corporate and military trainers who want research-grounded materials that can be used in programs that train trainers. The 12 articles, whose authors come from the army, navy, and airforce, from universities and…

  9. 32 CFR 536.77 - Applicable law for claims under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) The United States will only be liable for the portion of loss or damage attributable to the fault of the United States or its employees. Joint and several liability is inapplicable. (v) No allowance will... ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military...

  10. Description, Evaluation, and Validation of a Pilot Developmental Assessment Center in a Military-Educational Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Richard P.; And Others

    The purpose of this report is to describe, evaluate, and validate a pilot assessment center (AC) established in the Center for Leadership and Personal Development at the U.S. Military Academy to develop cadets on job skills needed by newly commissioned officers in the U.S. Army. The AC programs employ a leadership evaluation development method…

  11. Suicides and Suicide Attempts in the U.S. Military, 2008-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Nigel E.; Reger, Mark A.; Luxton, David D.; Skopp, Nancy A.; Kinn, Julie; Smolenski, Derek; Gahm, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Defense Suicide Event Report Program collects extensive information on suicides and suicide attempts from the U.S. Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. Data are compiled on demographics, suicide event details, behavioral health treatment history, military history, and information about other potential risk factors such as…

  12. Teaching Mental Skills for Self-Esteem Enhancement in a Military Healthcare Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammermeister, Jon; Pickering, Michael A.; Ohlson, Carl J.

    2009-01-01

    The need exists for educational methods which can positively influence self-esteem, especially in demanding military healthcare settings. Warrior Transition Units (WTU's) are tasked with the challenging mission of caring for seriously injured or ill U.S. Army Soldiers. This paper explored the hypothesis that an educationally-based Mental Skills…

  13. 32 CFR 536.78 - Settlement authority for claims under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Settlement authority for claims under the Military Claims Act. 536.78 Section 536.78 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the...

  14. SUNY Colleges in the North Country: A Successful Partnership with the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsica, Joanne Y.; Johnson, Donald R.; Lancaster, Wanda Rushing

    2002-01-01

    Describes the SUNY Colleges in the North Country Consortium, which comprises nine higher education institutions committed to working collaboratively and in concert with an Army Education Center at Fort Drum. The consortium provides educational services to active-duty military and their spouses. (EV)

  15. 75 FR 3901 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... leadership will provide the Board updates on the following: Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM... Army, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board...

  16. 75 FR 34989 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ..., Preparatory School Program, Cadet Quality of Life, Honor Code System and Resources. 7. Public's Accessibility... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Agency: Department...

  17. Baron Dominique-Jean Larrey (1766-1842): founder of military surgery and trauma care.

    PubMed

    Karamanou, M; Rosenberg, T; Liakakos, T; Androutsos, G

    2011-01-01

    Dominique-Jean Larrey was a distinguished surgeon in chief of Napoleon's army and a faithful servant of the Empire. His surgical skills and inventions, his absolute attachment and devotion to his profession, his humanitarian spirit and courage entitled him as one of history's greatest military surgeons. PMID:21520773

  18. Dengue fever among U.S. military personnel--Haiti, September-November, 1994.

    PubMed

    1994-11-25

    Since September 19, 1994, approximately 20,000 U. S. military personnel have been deployed to Haiti as part of Operation Uphold Democracy. To monitor the occurrence of mosquitoborne illnesses (including dengue fever [DF] and malaria) among deployed military personnel, on September 19 the U. S. Army established a surveillance system for febrile illness. Before deployment, all military personnel were instructed to take antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, either chloroquine phosphate (500 mg weekly) or doxycycline (100 mg daily). This report summarizes surveillance findings for September 19-November 4.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Occupational back disability in U.S. Army personnel.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, S M; Feuerstein, M; Lopez, M S; Peck, C A

    1999-06-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders represent a prevalent source of outpatient visits, lost work time, hospitalization, and disability in the military. Recent research has identified patterns among military occupations, gender, and musculoskeletal disability. Although back disorders accounted for a high percentage of all cases, little is known about the relationship between job type and disability in soldiers. The present study analyzed 41,750 disability cases to determine (1) prevalence of work-related back disability diagnoses, (2) specific jobs associated with greater risk of back disability, and (3) association among gender, job type, and disability. The results indicate that (1) lumbosacral strain and intervertebral disc syndrome represent the most prevalent diagnoses for back disability, (2) certain occupations were associated with higher back disability risk, and (3) specific jobs were identified in which females experienced higher rates of back disability than males. The nature of these high-risk jobs, and recent research on work disability factors in U.S. Army soldiers, suggest that a combination of ergonomic and individual/organizational psychosocial factors may play a role in the development, exacerbation, and maintenance of work disability. Future research that identifies specific job factors contributing to increased back disability risk should assist in the development of empirically based work site prevention programs to improve musculoskeletal health and readiness. PMID:10377710

  20. [Sanitary service of West Special Military District on the eve and in the first days of the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945].

    PubMed

    Shelepov, A M; Ishutin, O S; Leonik, S I

    2011-06-01

    This article evaluates military and political situation in the world and operational-strategic environment on the West Theater of operations on the eve of the Great Patriotic War (1941-1945). We analyze structure and overall condition of sanitary service of West Special Military District of the Workers and Peasants Red Army and causes of failure of mobilization, organization and deployment of military units and establishments from the beginning of aggression of Fascist Germany to the Soviet Union.

  1. [Sanitary service of West Special Military District on the eve and in the first days of the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945].

    PubMed

    Shelepov, A M; Ishutin, O S; Leonik, S I

    2011-06-01

    This article evaluates military and political situation in the world and operational-strategic environment on the West Theater of operations on the eve of the Great Patriotic War (1941-1945). We analyze structure and overall condition of sanitary service of West Special Military District of the Workers and Peasants Red Army and causes of failure of mobilization, organization and deployment of military units and establishments from the beginning of aggression of Fascist Germany to the Soviet Union. PMID:21899072

  2. Risky business: challenges and successes in military radiation risk communication.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Mark A; Geckle, Lori S; Davidson, Bethney A

    2012-01-01

    Given the general public's overall lack of knowledge about radiation and their heightened fear of its harmful effects, effective communication of radiation risks is often difficult. This is especially true when it comes to communicating the radiation risks stemming from military operations. Part of this difficulty stems from a lingering distrust of the military that harkens back to the controversy surrounding Veteran exposures to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War along with the often classified nature of many military operations. Additionally, there are unique military exposure scenarios, such as the use of nuclear weapons and combat use of depleted uranium as antiarmor munitions that are not found in the civilian sector. Also, the large, diverse nature of the military makes consistent risk communication across the vast and widespread organization very difficult. This manuscript highlights and discusses both the common and the distinctive challenges of effectively communicating military radiation risks, to include communicating through the media. The paper also introduces the Army's Health Risk Communication Program and its role in assisting in effective risk communication efforts. The authors draw on their extensive collective experience to share 3 risk communication success stories that were accomplished through the innovative use of a matrixed, team approach that combines both health physics and risk communication expertise.

  3. Risky business: challenges and successes in military radiation risk communication.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Mark A; Geckle, Lori S; Davidson, Bethney A

    2012-01-01

    Given the general public's overall lack of knowledge about radiation and their heightened fear of its harmful effects, effective communication of radiation risks is often difficult. This is especially true when it comes to communicating the radiation risks stemming from military operations. Part of this difficulty stems from a lingering distrust of the military that harkens back to the controversy surrounding Veteran exposures to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War along with the often classified nature of many military operations. Additionally, there are unique military exposure scenarios, such as the use of nuclear weapons and combat use of depleted uranium as antiarmor munitions that are not found in the civilian sector. Also, the large, diverse nature of the military makes consistent risk communication across the vast and widespread organization very difficult. This manuscript highlights and discusses both the common and the distinctive challenges of effectively communicating military radiation risks, to include communicating through the media. The paper also introduces the Army's Health Risk Communication Program and its role in assisting in effective risk communication efforts. The authors draw on their extensive collective experience to share 3 risk communication success stories that were accomplished through the innovative use of a matrixed, team approach that combines both health physics and risk communication expertise. PMID:22815169

  4. Ambulatory physical activity in Swiss Army recruits.

    PubMed

    Wyss, T; Scheffler, J; Mäder, U

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively assess and compare the type, duration and intensity of physical activity during the basic training provided by each of 5 selected Swiss Army occupational specialties. The first objective was to develop and validate a method to assess distance covered on foot. The second objective was to describe and compare physical activity levels among occupational specialties. In the first part of the study, 30 male volunteers completed 6 laps of 290 m at different gait velocities. Data from 15 volunteers were used to develop linear regression equations for the relationship between step frequency and gait velocity, and data from the other 15 volunteers were used to verify the accuracy of these equations. In the second part of the study, 250 volunteers from 5 military schools (each training school for a different occupational specialty) wore heart-rate, acceleration and step-count monitors during workdays of weeks 2, 4, 8 and 10 of their basic training. Sensor data were used to identify physically demanding activities, estimate energy expenditure (based on already published algorithms) and estimate distance covered on foot (based on the algorithm developed in the first part of this study). A branched model using 2 regression equations (gait velocity=0.705∙step frequency for walking speeds below 1 m/s and gait velocity=1.675∙step frequency - 1.464 for faster gait velocities) was shown to be accurate for estimating distance covered on foot. In the training schools investigated, average physical activity energy expenditure was 10.5 ± 2.4 MJ per day, and trainees covered 12.9 ± 3.3 km per day on foot. Recruits spent 61.0 ± 23.3 min per day marching and 33.1 ± 19.5 min per day performing physically demanding materials-handling activities. Average physical activity energy expenditure decreased significantly from week 2 to week 8. The measurement system utilised in the present study yielded data comparable to those of prior studies that

  5. Intimate partner violence among female service members and veterans: information and resources available through military and non-military websites.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy; Joshi, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of women's roles in the military, the number of female service members and veterans has increased. Considerable knowledge about intimate partner violence (IPV) in civilian couples exists but little is known about IPV among female service members and veterans. Prevalence rates of IPV range from 17% to 39% for female service members, and 21.9% to 74% for veterans. Most service members and veterans indicated using the Internet at least occasionally and expressed willingness to seek information about services via the Internet. Informed by data, we conducted a systematic review of military (Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps) and non-military (Veterans Affairs and Google) websites to explore the availability and presentation of information and resources related to IPV. The websites search revealed a variety of resources and information available, and important differences between sites with regard to what and how information is presented. Implications for practice and further research are discussed.

  6. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  7. Advising Transfer Military Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Today's students can come from a larger area than just high school. With the entire world's conflicts and today's society, more and more of our present day students may have come from the military ranks. Though we have not come to an actual draft system, more and more modern day students have served their time in the military, to keep America…

  8. Sensors, nano-electronics and photonics for the Army of 2030 and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perconti, Philip; Alberts, W. C. K.; Bajaj, Jagmohan; Schuster, Jonathan; Reed, Meredith

    2016-02-01

    The US Army's future operating concept will rely heavily on sensors, nano-electronics and photonics technologies to rapidly develop situational understanding in challenging and complex environments. Recent technology breakthroughs in integrated 3D multiscale semiconductor modeling (from atoms-to-sensors), combined with ARL's Open Campus business model for collaborative research provide a unique opportunity to accelerate the adoption of new technology for reduced size, weight, power, and cost of Army equipment. This paper presents recent research efforts on multi-scale modeling at the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and proposes the establishment of a modeling consortium or center for semiconductor materials modeling. ARL's proposed Center for Semiconductor Materials Modeling brings together government, academia, and industry in a collaborative fashion to continuously push semiconductor research forward for the mutual benefit of all Army partners.

  9. Injuries to deployed U.S. Army soldiers involved in HMMWV crashes, 2002-2006.

    PubMed

    Peik, Samuel M; Pollack, Keshia M; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Hauret, Keith G; Baker, Susan P

    2012-08-01

    Highly mobile multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV or Humvee) crashes present an important issue for the U.S. military. The aim of this study was to provide a descriptive analysis of occupants of military motor vehicle (MMV) crashes involving HMMWVs that occurred among deployed U.S. Army Soldiers. Crash-related data were collected from the U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center on MMV crashes among active duty Army personnel between 1999 and 2006. Records for 964 occupants with injuries from HMMWV crashes were analyzed, which represented 52% of the total occupants of MMV crashes. A significant association was observed between injury and engagement in combat, odds ratio 1.49 (1.03, 2.16). The risk of injury was greatest for gunners, odds ratio 2.37 (1.43, 3.92), and injury cost related to the crash was significantly related to prior deployment status (p < 0.001) and role of Soldier in the vehicle (Operator p = 0.005, Gunner p = 0.003). There was also a decrease over time in the number of crashes resulting in injury (p < 0.001). These data support the development of interventions that address the specific risks detailed, including the use of combat simulation training, increased protection for vulnerable positions, and enforcement of safety regulations. PMID:22934378

  10. [Health situation of the armies in the Crimean war and a document related to this].

    PubMed

    Dağlar, Oya

    2004-01-01

    Although the Crimean War seems to be a war between the Ottoman and Russian with the support of England an France, in reality, it was a power struggle between the biggest European countries. The cooperation between England - Ottoman Empire and France in the Crimean War meanly determined the result of the war. The Crimean War should not only be evaluated in militarian and political aspect, but also from other perspectives. One of the most important problems for the allied armies in Istanbul and Crimea was related to the health concepts. During the two years long war, problems were the freezing cold and contagious diseases before the Russian soldiers. And thypus, scorbut, cholera and malaria prepears the dead of a large number of soldiers. Although the allied armies won the battle but all the sides fighting in the was lost many people due to contagious diseases. According to the resources, the contagious diseases such as, thypus, cholera and malaria led to the deads of more than ten times of the people who were in the battle field. Thats why, The European armies understood the importance of the treatment diseases in the war and gave importance to the development of military medical services and form this point, the Crimean War became the begining of an important development in military health concept.

  11. Tuberculosis and the military.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Matthew K; Wilson, D

    2013-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity and mortality among the global civilian population. Historically, TB has also been responsible for a considerable burden of disease among military populations during periods of both peace and conflict. TB will continue to be of importance to the military for several reasons. Military units live and work in confined environments, personnel may deploy to areas highly endemic for TB where there is the potential to be exposed to infected local communities, and they undertake physiologically stressful activities during training and operations. These are just a few of the factors that may increase the risk of acquiring, developing and transmitting TB among military personnel. This review examines the military relevance of TB in the modern era within the context of epidemiological, pathological and clinical considerations of this ancient disease.

  12. US army land condition-trend analysis (LCTA) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diersing, Victor E.; Shaw, Robert B.; Tazik, David J.

    1992-05-01

    The US Army Land Condition-Trend Analysis (LCTA) program is a standardized method of data collection, analysis, and reporting designed to meet multiple goals and objectives. The method utilizes vascular plant inventories, permanent field plot data, and wildlife inventories. Vascular plant inventories are used for environmental documentation, training of personnel, species identification during LCTA implementation, and as a survey for state and federal endangered or threatened species. The permanent field plot data documents the vegetational, edaphic, topographic, and disturbance characteristics of the installation. Inventory plots are allocated in a stratified random fashion across the installation utilizing a geographic information system that integrates satellite imagery and soil survey information. Ground cover, canopy cover, woody plant density, slope length, slope gradient, soil information, and disturbance data are collected at each plot. Plot data are used to: (1) describe plant communities, (2) characterize wildlife and threatened and endangered species habitat, (3) document amount and kind of military and nonmilitary disturbance, (4) determine the impact of military training on vegetation and soil resources, (5) estimate soil erosion potential, (6) classify land as to the kind and amount of use it can support, (7) determine allowable use estimates for tracked vehicle training, (8) document concealment resources, (9) identify lands that require restoration and evaluate the effectiveness of restorative techniques, and (10) evaluate potential acquisition property. Wildlife inventories survey small and midsize mammals, birds, bats, amphibians, and reptiles. Data from these surveys can be used for environmental documentation, to identify state and federal endangered and threatened species, and to evaluate the impact of military activities on wildlife populations. Short- and long-term monitoring of permanent field plots is used to evaluate and adjust land

  13. Modeling of Army Research Laboratory EMP simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Miletta, J.R.; Chase, R.J.; Luu, B.B. ); Williams, J.W.; Viverito, V.J. )

    1993-12-01

    Models are required that permit the estimation of emitted field signatures from EMP simulators to design the simulator antenna structure, to establish the usable test volumes, and to estimate human exposure risk. This paper presents the capabilities and limitations of a variety of EMP simulator models useful to the Army's EMP survivability programs. Comparisons among frequency and time-domain models are provided for two powerful US Army Research Laboratory EMP simulators: AESOP (Army EMP Simulator Operations) and VEMPS II (Vertical EMP Simulator II).

  14. Lessons learned from producing health information booklets for deploying U.S. military personnel.

    PubMed

    Huycke, K A; Gambel, J M; Petruccelli, B P; Wasserman, G M

    1997-03-01

    Health information booklets deliver information to large groups quickly and economically. Rapidly deploying soldiers are a group that needs such information. Military personnel responsible for the health of troops should know of the materials produced to meet this need so that they can facilitate booklet distribution. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research within the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command has produced health information booklets in support of deployments to Southwest Asia, Somalia, Rwanda, Haiti, and the former Republics of Yugoslavia. This article describes these booklets' content, use during military operations, distribution, costs, and benefits. A discussion of lessons learned includes steps to develop and evaluate health information and is followed by an explanation of the current situation. We offer suggestions to improve the booklet development process; our experience may be helpful to others developing health information materials for military personnel or civilians. PMID:9121670

  15. Predictors of Army National Guard and Reserve members' use of Veteran Health Administration health care after demobilizing from OEF/OIF deployment.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alex H S; Chen, Cheng; Mohr, Beth A; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

    2014-10-01

    This study described rates and predictors of Army National Guard and Army Reserve members' enrollment in and utilization of Veteran Health Administration (VHA) services in the 365 days following demobilization from an index deployment. We also explored regional and VHA facility variation in serving eligible members in their catchment areas. The sample included 125,434 Army National Guard and 48,423 Army Reserve members who demobilized after a deployment ending between FY 2008 and FY 2011. Demographic, geographic, deployment, and Military Health System eligibility were derived from Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System and "Contingency Tracking System" data. The VHA National Patient Care Databases were used to ascertain VHA utilization and status (e.g., enrollee, TRICARE). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate predictors of VHA utilization as an enrollee in the year following demobilization. Of the study members demobilizing during the observation period, 56.9% of Army National Guard members and 45.7% of Army Reserve members utilized VHA as an enrollee within 12 months. Demographic, regional, health coverage, and deployment-related factors were associated with VHA enrollment and utilization, and significant variation by VHA facility was found. These findings can be useful in the design of specific outreach efforts to improve linkage from the Military Health System to the VHA.

  16. Surveillance of Disease and Nonbattle Injuries During US Army Operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    PubMed

    Hauret, Keith G; Pacha, Laura; Taylor, Bonnie J; Jones, Bruce H

    2016-01-01

    Disease and nonbattle injury (DNBI) are the leading causes of morbidity during wars and military operations. However, adequate medical data were never before available to service public health centers to conduct DNBI surveillance during deployments. This article describes the process, results and lessons learned from centralized DNBI surveillance by the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, predecessor of the US Army Public Health Command, during operations in Afghanistan and Iraq (2001-2013).The surveillance relied primarily on medical evacuation records and in-theater hospitalization records. Medical evacuation rates (per 1,000 person-years) for DNBI were higher (Afghanistan: 56.7; Iraq: 40.2) than battle injury rates (Afghanistan: 12.0; Iraq: 7.7). In Afghanistan and Iraq, respectively, the leading diagnostic categories for medical evacuations were nonbattle injury (31% and 34%), battle injury (20% and 16%), and behavioral health (12% and 10%). Leading causes of medically evacuated nonbattle injuries were sports/physical training (22% and 24%), falls (23% and 26%) and military vehicle accidents (8% and 11%). This surveillance demonstrated the feasibility, utility, and benefits of centralized DNBI surveillance during military operations. PMID:27215861

  17. Prevalence of childhood trauma among U.S. Army soldiers with suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Perales, Rossybelle; Gallaway, M Shayne; Forys-Donahue, Kelly L; Spiess, Anita; Millikan, Amy M

    2012-09-01

    In 2009, suicide was reported to be the third leading cause of death among U.S. Army personnel. The increase of suicides in the Army indicates the need for additional research to better understand the problem. Research in civilian populations found that experiencing childhood trauma increases the risk for various negative health outcomes, including suicide and suicide attempts, during adulthood. To date, there has been very little focus on pre-existing mental health before joining the service because of a lack of existing data. Participants were active duty Army Soldiers who attempted or completed suicide as identified by the Department of Defense Suicide Event Report. Among Soldiers exhibiting suicidal behavior, analyses were completed to identify significant associations with specific types of childhood trauma experienced before joining the Army. The prevalence of childhood trauma in this population was 43.3% among the suicide cases and 64.7% among the attempt cases. The most common types of childhood trauma among Soldiers were family problems and abuse. The need for further research among military populations is clear given the high prevalence of childhood trauma found among these Soldiers with suicidal behavior and the lack of complete data for this population.

  18. [Spotted fever and the invention of its serodiagnosis and vaccination in the Austro-Hungarian army in World War I].

    PubMed

    Flamm, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    After description of the medical institutions and epidemiological situations of the Austro-Hungarian army in World War I the provisions against spotted fever focused on louse control are discussed. The letter specified for the army had to be adjusted for the local populations. 1915 in the k.u.k. military service in Galicia Edmund Weil and Arthur Felix cultivated Proteus strains from urine of soldiers with spotted fever. As sera of such patients agglutinated these bacteria in considerable titers the investigators developed the reliable diagnostic "Weil-Felix-Test" used still today. In the same military area and time Rudolf Weigl invented the anal infection of lice. This enabled him to harvest a great amount of louse intestines containing the spotted fever Rickettsiae in their epithelial cells. Lots with defined numbers of intestines were homogenized, sterilized and used with success as vaccine for medical staff. This sort of vaccine still was used in World War II.

  19. Serving the army as secretaries: intersectionality, multi-level contract and subjective experience of citizenship.

    PubMed

    Lomsky-Feder, Edna; Sasson-Levy, Orna

    2015-03-01

    With the growing elusiveness of the state apparatus in late modernity, military service is one of the last institutions to be clearly identified with the state, its ideologies and its policies. Therefore, negotiations between the military and its recruits produce acting subjects of citizenship with long-lasting consequences. Arguing that these negotiations are regulated by multi-level (civic, group, and individual) contracts, we explore the various meanings that these contracts obtain at the intersectionality of gender, class, and ethnicity; and examine how they shape the subjective experience of soldierhood and citizenship. More particularly, we analyse the meaning of military service in the retrospective life stories of Israeli Jewish women from various ethno-class backgrounds who served as army secretaries - a low-status, feminine gender-typed occupation within a hyper-masculine organization. Findings reveal that for women of the lower class, the organizing cultural schema of the multi-level contract is that of achieving respectability through military service, which means being included in the national collective. Conversely, for middle-class women, it is the sense of entitlement that shapes their contract with the military, which they expect to signify and maintain their privileged status. Thus, while for the lower class, the multi-level contract is about inclusion within the boundaries of the national collective, for the dominant groups, this contract is about reproducing social class hierarchies within national boundaries.

  20. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) , Ordnance Dept. U.S. Army, proposed addition to dock at Sandy Hook, 1918 Ordnance wharf and boathouse - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  1. Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

    2008-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NREL are developing target energy budgets and design guides to achieve 30% energy savings. This paper focuses the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing.

  2. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to NEPA analysis and documentation. (10) Environmental analysis of strategic plans based on: (i... the public; and (v) Adaptive management of Army operations to stay on course with the strategic plan's... balance environmental concerns with mission requirements, technical requirements, economic...

  3. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to NEPA analysis and documentation. (10) Environmental analysis of strategic plans based on: (i... the public; and (v) Adaptive management of Army operations to stay on course with the strategic plan's... balance environmental concerns with mission requirements, technical requirements, economic...

  4. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to NEPA analysis and documentation. (10) Environmental analysis of strategic plans based on: (i... the public; and (v) Adaptive management of Army operations to stay on course with the strategic plan's... balance environmental concerns with mission requirements, technical requirements, economic...

  5. Physics in Aerospace and Military Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tat, Hong

    2006-12-01

    Aerospace, which includes both commercial and military applications, provides a wide variety of challenging opportunities in physics. I have worked primarily in the area of sensors with projects including airport baggage scanners and defect detection for the Space Shuttle. In my current role on the Army's Future Combat Systems, we use physical models to predict battlefield sensor performance. This talk will focus on the physical principles involved in modeling electro-optical sensor performance, including the fundamental concept of minimum resolvable contrast and minimum resolvable temperature curves. I will also touch upon my experiences at Boeing and give an overview of the range of physics-related projects at Boeing. Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited, TACOM 15 SEP 2006, case 06-188

  6. Army dependents: childhood illness and health provision.

    PubMed

    Giles, Sarah

    2005-06-01

    This small qualitative study explored attitudes of a group of Army wives to childhood illness and their expectations of health provision. The author's practice serves a population mainly comprising of Army dependents where GP attendance rates are double the national average. Two focus groups were organised using health visitor groups attached to the practice. Transcripts were examined to produce a framework for semi-structured interviews with nine mothers, who were selected by purposive sampling. Mothers were asked about symptoms, coping, social problems, decisions to take action, health provision and support. Data were analysed and sorted, using the principles of grounded theory, into four main themes: attitude to child's illness, coping, Army culture and accessibility to health services. Many Army wives appear to suffer from high levels of stress. It seemed that the coping ability of the mother was affected by the constant turbulence and isolation of Army life. While mothers displayed a knowledge of common illnesses, they had fears of the unknown and of life threatening illnesses. They sometimes managed childhood illness at home owing to lack of transport. The author concluded that some Army wives suffer from stress and lack confidence in their mothering skills when their children are ill, which may be due, in part, to the constant cycle of postings and isolation from family and services. They need easily accessible health facilities and information regarding these services. Communication should be encouraged between civilian services and the Army. It appears that Army dependents require more support from their GP practice than the average civilian family, offering opportunity for nurses and health visitors to provide alternative and proactive services.

  7. Assuring structural integrity in Army systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The object of this study was to recommend possible improvements in the manner in which structural integrity of Army systems is assured. The elements of a structural integrity program are described, and relevant practices used in various industries and government organizations are reviewed. Some case histories of Army weapon systems are examined. The mandatory imposition of a structural integrity program patterned after the Air Force Aircraft Structural Integrity Program is recommended and the benefits of such an action are identified.

  8. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army...

  9. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    .... Background In the April 14, 2010, issue of the Federal Register (75 FR 19302), the Army issued a proposed..., 2007 (72 FR 55864) that became effective on November 30, 2007. The Army received no comments on its... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of...

  10. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army...

  11. 78 FR 64205 - Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... published in the Federal Register on October 2, 2013 (78 FR 60864) has been cancelled due to the Government... Department of the Army Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... Defense cancelled the meeting of the U.S. Army Science Board on October 16, 2013. As a result,...

  12. Army Recruiters: "Counseling" High-Schoolers to Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrow, John

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with Army recruitment in high schools. Students get to ask questions and hear stories about life In the Army from a soldier of the year, officers, and recruiters. Some brave students will even get a physical taste of life in the Army. According to an Army officer, the primary reason why recruiters go on high school campuses is…

  13. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army claims mission. (a) Promptly...

  14. Army Basic Skills Provision: Whole Organisation Approach/Lessons Learnt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basic Skills Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Army began working in partnership with the Basic Skills Agency in 2000. This was formalised with the establishment of the Basic Skills Agency's National Support Project for the Army (2001) that contributes to the raising of basic skills standards in the Army by advising on, and assisting with, the development of the Army's basic skills policy…

  15. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army claims mission. (a) Promptly...

  16. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army claims mission. (a) Promptly...

  17. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army claims mission. (a) Promptly...

  18. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army...

  19. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army claims mission. (a) Promptly...

  20. Perspectives on history: army dietetics in southwest Asia during Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm.

    PubMed

    Hodges, P A; Lyon, J M

    1996-06-01

    The Army dietitians deployed during Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm exemplified the commitment, dedication, patriotism, and professionalism of their predecessors. Although some were continuously on the move and all dealt with the extremes of a desert environment, were frequently handicapped with equipment shortages, and coped constantly with the monotony of limited ration variety, throughout their experiences these professionals expressed pride in participating in this national undertaking. The purposes of this article are to familiarize members of The American Dietetic Association with the responses of their colleagues in the US military to another of their nation's calls, to relate some aspects of Army dietetics experienced in Southwest Asia, and to identify the lessons learned in that engagement. PMID:8655908

  1. Directions and opportunities for immunoprophylaxis development among Polish Army soldiers sent to foreign missions

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Radosław

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Polish Army is engaged in stabilization activities and peace missions in countries often characterized by completely different customs, culture and religion, as well as different bacterial and viral flora. It might be expected that foreign military operations will be more and more important, as the number of local conflicts is escalating. The safety and health of our citizens in these circumstances is the absolute priority. This article is dedicated to the safety of soldiers in the context of the risks associated with infectious diseases that can be prevented by vaccination. The main goal of this study is to verify the model and condition of immunization in the Polish Army in the context of foreign contingents, as well as presentation of the possibilities to optimize solutions in this field. PMID:22143031

  2. The Role of Army Nurse Practitioners Supporting Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul C; Yackel, Edward; Prior, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Family nurse practitioners are an essential member of the military medical team. They were incorporated into the Army medical system almost as soon as there was an academic program to develop the role in primary care settings. The role for nurse practitioners during deployment has not been as clear. Even though they have been around for 50 years, the specific role nurse practitioners provide is still evolving. This article explores the incorporation of nurse practitioners into Army medicine with a focus on deployed medicine. Nurse practitioners have been shown to be very versatile providers with the requisite skill sets to meet the demands of the combat environment and are able to substitute for other medical assets that are critically short due to sustained conflict. Clarifying the value a nurse practitioner brings to medical care in the combat environment is essential to insure all assets are being employed to provide the best medical care to the US fighting force. PMID:27215868

  3. The U.S. Army Telemedicine and m-Health Program: making a difference at home and abroad.

    PubMed

    Poropatich, Ronald; Lai, Eva; McVeigh, Francis; Bashshur, Rashid

    2013-05-01

    This article highlights the deployment of telemedicine by the U.S. Army through the various echelons of care and in overseas locations, including range and scope of health services provided by telemedicine in a challenging environment. This is followed by a discussion of technological developments advances in mobile communications likely to change the practice of telemedicine in the military from limited fixed-point access to a highly mobile individual with handheld communication devices.

  4. Proposed draft military handbook presenting requirements for an Electronic Display System (EDS) for Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals (IETMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Eric L.; Fuller, Joseph J.; Rainey, Samuel C.

    1990-07-01

    The report summarizes recent activities in the Department of Defense and in the U.S. Navy, Army, and Air Force to establish Service use of Interactive Electronic Manuals (IETMs) as replacements for paper Technical Manuals for logistic support of military equipment. the IETM concept is described, and an overview is provided of five IETM acquisition Specifications and Military Handbooks developed by the Tri-Service Interactive Electronic Technical Manual Working Group established in 1989 by the Defense Quality and Standardization Office.

  5. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 1: Army fault tolerant architecture overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Digital computing systems needed for Army programs such as the Computer-Aided Low Altitude Helicopter Flight Program and the Armored Systems Modernization (ASM) vehicles may be characterized by high computational throughput and input/output bandwidth, hard real-time response, high reliability and availability, and maintainability, testability, and producibility requirements. In addition, such a system should be affordable to produce, procure, maintain, and upgrade. To address these needs, the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) is being designed and constructed under a three-year program comprised of a conceptual study, detailed design and fabrication, and demonstration and validation phases. Described here are the results of the conceptual study phase of the AFTA development. Given here is an introduction to the AFTA program, its objectives, and key elements of its technical approach. A format is designed for representing mission requirements in a manner suitable for first order AFTA sizing and analysis, followed by a discussion of the current state of mission requirements acquisition for the targeted Army missions. An overview is given of AFTA's architectural theory of operation.

  6. Families in the Military

    MedlinePlus

    ... have led to deployment of large numbers of military personnel (active duty, Reserves, National Guard). As a result ... worries and plans for the future. Let your child know that the family member is making a ...

  7. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the prevalence of dietary supplement use by military personnel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although a number of studies have been conducted on the prevalence of dietary supplement (DS) use in military personnel, these investigations have not been previously summarized. This article provides a systematic literature review of this topic. Methods Literature databases, reference lists, and other sources were searched to find studies that quantitatively examined the prevalence of DS use in uniformed military groups. Prevalence data were summarized by gender and military service. Where there were at least two investigations, meta-analysis was performed using a random model and homogeneity of the prevalence values was assessed. Results The prevalence of any DS use for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps men was 55%, 60%, 60%, and 61%, respectively; for women corresponding values were 65%, 71%, 76%, and 71%, respectively. Prevalence of multivitamin and/or multimineral (MVM) use for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps men was 32%, 46%, 47%, and 41%, respectively; for women corresponding values were 40%, 55%, 63%, and 53%, respectively. Use prevalence of any individual vitamin or mineral supplement for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps men was 18%, 27%, 25%, and 24%, respectively; for women corresponding values were 29%, 36%, 40%, and 33%, respectively. Men in elite military groups (Navy Special Operations, Army Rangers, and Army Special Forces) had a use prevalence of 76% for any DS and 37% for MVM, although individual studies were not homogenous. Among Army men, Army women, and elite military men, use prevalence of Vitamin C was 15% for all three groups; for Vitamin E, use prevalence was 8%, 7%, and 9%, respectively; for sport drinks, use prevalence was 22%, 25% and 39%, respectively. Use prevalence of herbal supplements was generally low compared to vitamins, minerals, and sport drinks, ≤5% in most investigations. Conclusions Compared to men, military women had a higher use prevalence of any DS and MVM. Army men and women tended to

  8. MECHANIZATION STUDY OF THE ARMY DOCUMENTATION AND INFORMATION RETRIEVAL SYSTEM, U.S. ARMY LIBRARY, WASHINGTON, D.C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KERSHAW, G.A.; AND OTHERS

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THE ARMY STUDY DOCUMENTATION AND INFORMATION RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (ASDIRS) ARE TO PROVIDE A CENTRAL LIBRARY OF ARMY STUDIES READILY ACCESSIBLE IN THE PENTAGON. AT THE PRESENT TIME, A BIBLIOGRAPHIC QUARTERLY CATALOG OF ARMY STUDIES AND A PERMUTED DESCRIPTOR/TITLE INDEX ARE PROVIDED. THE CATALOG OF ARMY STUDIES IS PRODUCED USING AN IBM…

  9. Radiometry in military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof

    2001-08-01

    Missiles guided using optoelectronic methods, optoelectronic imaging systems (thermal imaging systems, night vision devices, LLLTV cameras, TV cameras), and optoelectronic countermeasures (smoke screens, camouflage paints and nets, IR flares, decoys, jamming systems, warning systems) are one of the most important components of modern military armament. There are numerous military standards, some of them secret, that precise radiometric parameters to be measured and the testing methods to be used. There is also much literature on the subject of testing of the systems mentioned above, although mostly on subject of testing of the thermal imaging systems. In spite of this apparently numerous literature, there still significant confusion in this area due to secrecy of some parameters and testing methods, differences in recommendations of different military standards, fast progress in military optoelectronics, and also due to enormous number of different types of optoelectronics systems used in the military armament. A review of testing methods of the three basic groups of optoelectronics systems used in modern military armament: the missiles guided using optoelectronics methods, the optoelectronic imaging systems, and the optoelectronic countermeasures is presented in this paper. Trends in the measuring sets.

  10. Creating and sustaining a military women's Health Research Interest Group.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Candy; Trego, Lori; Rychnovsky, Jacqueline; Steele, Nancy; Foradori, Megan

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, four doctorate military nurse scientists representing the triservices (Army, Navy, and Air Force) identified a common interest in the health and care of all women in the armed forces. For 7 years, the team's shared vision to improve servicewomen's health inspired them to commit to a rigorous schedule of planning, developing, and implementing an innovative program that has the capability of advancing scientific knowledge and influencing health policy and practice through research. The ultimate goal of the Military Women's Health Research Interest Group (MWHRIG) is to support military clinicians and leaders in making evidence-based practice and policy decisions. They developed a 4-pronged approach to cultivate the science of military women's healthcare: evaluate the existing evidence, develop a research agenda that addresses gaps in knowledge, facilitate the collaboration of multidisciplinary research, and build the bench of future researchers. The MWHRIG has been a resource to key leaders; its value has been validated by multiservice and multidisciplinary consultations. However, the journey to goal attainment has only been achieved by the enduring commitment of these MWHRIG leaders and their passion to ensure the health and wellbeing of the many women who serve in the United States military. This article describes their journey of dedication.

  11. Creating and sustaining a military women's Health Research Interest Group.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Candy; Trego, Lori; Rychnovsky, Jacqueline; Steele, Nancy; Foradori, Megan

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, four doctorate military nurse scientists representing the triservices (Army, Navy, and Air Force) identified a common interest in the health and care of all women in the armed forces. For 7 years, the team's shared vision to improve servicewomen's health inspired them to commit to a rigorous schedule of planning, developing, and implementing an innovative program that has the capability of advancing scientific knowledge and influencing health policy and practice through research. The ultimate goal of the Military Women's Health Research Interest Group (MWHRIG) is to support military clinicians and leaders in making evidence-based practice and policy decisions. They developed a 4-pronged approach to cultivate the science of military women's healthcare: evaluate the existing evidence, develop a research agenda that addresses gaps in knowledge, facilitate the collaboration of multidisciplinary research, and build the bench of future researchers. The MWHRIG has been a resource to key leaders; its value has been validated by multiservice and multidisciplinary consultations. However, the journey to goal attainment has only been achieved by the enduring commitment of these MWHRIG leaders and their passion to ensure the health and wellbeing of the many women who serve in the United States military. This article describes their journey of dedication. PMID:26101911

  12. Health, Information, and Migration: Geographic Mobility of Union Army Veterans, 1860–1880

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chulhee

    2009-01-01

    This article explores how injuries, sickness, and the geographic mobility of Union Army veterans while in service affected their postservice migrations. Wartime wounds and illnesses significantly diminished the geographic mobility of veterans after the war. Geographic moves while carrying out military missions had strong positive effects on their postservice geographic mobility. Geographic moves while in service also influenced the choice of destination among the migrants. I discuss some implications of the results for the elements of self-selection in migration, the roles of different types of information in migration decisions, and the overall impact of the Civil War on geographic mobility. PMID:20234796

  13. The evolution of a school behavioral health model in the US Army.

    PubMed

    Faran, Michael E; Johnson, Patti L; Ban, Paul; Shue, Tracy; Weist, Mark D

    2015-04-01

    The US Army has developed an innovative School Behavioral Health (SBH) program, part of the Child and Family Behavioral Health System, a collaborative, consultative behavioral health care model that includes SBH, standardized training of primary care providers in treatment of common behavioral health problems, use of tele-consultation/tele-behavioral health, optimizing community outreach services, and integration with other related behavioral health services. In this article, the needs of military children, adolescents, and families are reviewed, a history of this initiative is presented, key themes are discussed, and next steps in advancing this evolving, innovative system of health care featuring SBH are described. PMID:25773333

  14. Military Careers: A Guide to Military Occupations and Selected Military Career Paths, 1992-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This book was developed to help educators and youth learn about career opportunities in the military. It is a compendium of military occupational, training, and career information and is designed for use by students interested in the military. The first section, military occupations, contains descriptions of 197 enlisted and officer occupations.…

  15. The development of bacteriology, sanitation science and allied research in the British Army 1850-1918: equipping the RAMC for war.

    PubMed

    Atenstaedt, R L

    2010-09-01

    The recent 90 year anniversary of the end of the First World War is an opportune time to reconsider the important role of the Royal Army Medical Corps in this conflict. One area which has been neglected is the role of the Royal Army Medical Corps in responding to infectious diseases and to understand this properly it is important to consider the development of bacteriology, sanitation science and allied research in the British Army up to the Great War. The context of the home front is also central, with the British population from 1880-1914 increasingly benefiting from improved public sanitation and the new science of bacteriology. Historians acknowledge that the British campaign in the Crimea in the 1850s was pursued with inadequate medical provision and as a result, the Army suffered severely from infectious diseases. Limited changes were introduced after the Crimean War, such as the establishment of the Army Medical School, with its high quality instruction in military hygiene and later bacteriology. Army medics also led the way in various branches of scientific research, through research in the colonies. As compared with the continental powers, however, the application of bacteriology and sanitation to field craft in the British Army was delayed. It took the experiences of the South African and Russo-Japanese Wars for the importance of these sciences to be recognised by the Army as a whole. These subjects began to form part of the education of army Medical Officers, but training was basic and few trainees had specialised in bacteriology by 1914. In spite of these limitations, the Royal Army Medical Corps responded well to the demands placed upon it by World War One, recruiting civilian bacteriologists to its ranks, developing technological innovations such as mobile bacteriological laboratories for them to work in, forming a sanitation service and fostering medical research.

  16. The development of bacteriology, sanitation science and allied research in the British Army 1850-1918: equipping the RAMC for war.

    PubMed

    Atenstaedt, R L

    2010-09-01

    The recent 90 year anniversary of the end of the First World War is an opportune time to reconsider the important role of the Royal Army Medical Corps in this conflict. One area which has been neglected is the role of the Royal Army Medical Corps in responding to infectious diseases and to understand this properly it is important to consider the development of bacteriology, sanitation science and allied research in the British Army up to the Great War. The context of the home front is also central, with the British population from 1880-1914 increasingly benefiting from improved public sanitation and the new science of bacteriology. Historians acknowledge that the British campaign in the Crimea in the 1850s was pursued with inadequate medical provision and as a result, the Army suffered severely from infectious diseases. Limited changes were introduced after the Crimean War, such as the establishment of the Army Medical School, with its high quality instruction in military hygiene and later bacteriology. Army medics also led the way in various branches of scientific research, through research in the colonies. As compared with the continental powers, however, the application of bacteriology and sanitation to field craft in the British Army was delayed. It took the experiences of the South African and Russo-Japanese Wars for the importance of these sciences to be recognised by the Army as a whole. These subjects began to form part of the education of army Medical Officers, but training was basic and few trainees had specialised in bacteriology by 1914. In spite of these limitations, the Royal Army Medical Corps responded well to the demands placed upon it by World War One, recruiting civilian bacteriologists to its ranks, developing technological innovations such as mobile bacteriological laboratories for them to work in, forming a sanitation service and fostering medical research. PMID:20919615

  17. Army Distance Learning: Potential for Reducing Shortages in Army Enlisted Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Michael G.; Leonard, Henry A.; Winkler, John D.

    The potential of distance learning (DL) to expedite the U.S. Army's efforts to redress personnel shortages in Army enlisted occupations was studied by evaluating how DL-based training strategies might affect skill shortages in the following occupations: helicopter repairer; electronic switching system operator; microwave systems…

  18. Early Roman military fortifications and the origin of Trieste, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Federico; Vinci, Giacomo; Horvat, Jana; De Min, Angelo; Forte, Emanuele; Furlani, Stefano; Lenaz, Davide; Pipan, Michele; Zhao, Wenke; Sgambati, Alessandro; Potleca, Michele; Micheli, Roberto; Fragiacomo, Andrea; Tuniz, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    An interdisciplinary study of the archaeological landscape of the Trieste area (northeastern Italy), mainly based on airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and archaeological surveys, has led to the discovery of an early Roman fortification system, composed of a big central camp (San Rocco) flanked by two minor forts. The most ancient archaeological findings, including a Greco–Italic amphora rim produced in Latium or Campania, provide a relative chronology for the first installation of the structures between the end of the third century B.C. and the first decades of the second century B.C. whereas other materials, such as Lamboglia 2 amphorae and a military footwear hobnail (type D of Alesia), indicate that they maintained a strategic role at least up to the mid first century B.C. According to archaeological data and literary sources, the sites were probably established in connection with the Roman conquest of the Istria peninsula in 178–177 B.C. They were in use, perhaps not continuously, at least until the foundation of Tergeste, the ancestor of Trieste, in the mid first century B.C. The San Rocco site, with its exceptional size and imposing fortifications, is the main known Roman evidence of the Trieste area during this phase and could correspond to the location of the first settlement of Tergeste preceding the colony foundation. This hypothesis would also be supported by literary sources that describe it as a phrourion (Strabo, V, 1, 9, C 215), a term used by ancient writers to designate the fortifications of the Roman army. PMID:25775558

  19. Early Roman military fortifications and the origin of Trieste, Italy.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Federico; Vinci, Giacomo; Horvat, Jana; De Min, Angelo; Forte, Emanuele; Furlani, Stefano; Lenaz, Davide; Pipan, Michele; Zhao, Wenke; Sgambati, Alessandro; Potleca, Michele; Micheli, Roberto; Fragiacomo, Andrea; Tuniz, Claudio

    2015-03-31

    An interdisciplinary study of the archaeological landscape of the Trieste area (northeastern Italy), mainly based on airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and archaeological surveys, has led to the discovery of an early Roman fortification system, composed of a big central camp (San Rocco) flanked by two minor forts. The most ancient archaeological findings, including a Greco-Italic amphora rim produced in Latium or Campania, provide a relative chronology for the first installation of the structures between the end of the third century B.C. and the first decades of the second century B.C. whereas other materials, such as Lamboglia 2 amphorae and a military footwear hobnail (type D of Alesia), indicate that they maintained a strategic role at least up to the mid first century B.C. According to archaeological data and literary sources, the sites were probably established in connection with the Roman conquest of the Istria peninsula in 178-177 B.C. They were in use, perhaps not continuously, at least until the foundation of Tergeste, the ancestor of Trieste, in the mid first century B.C. The San Rocco site, with its exceptional size and imposing fortifications, is the main known Roman evidence of the Trieste area during this phase and could correspond to the location of the first settlement of Tergeste preceding the colony foundation. This hypothesis would also be supported by literary sources that describe it as a phrourion (Strabo, V, 1, 9, C 215), a term used by ancient writers to designate the fortifications of the Roman army.

  20. Edgar Allan Poe: The Army Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, J. Thomas

    This issue of the United States Military Academy Library Bulletin reviews the reported facts of Poe's biography from his enlistment at the age of 15 to the termination of his military sojourn. The 1831 and the 1966 Corps of Cadets' subscriptions for Poe's "Poems" are also discussed, and a long-term inaccuracy regarding the poet's West Point…

  1. Wars and sexually transmitted diseases in the Indian Army.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, V D; Talwar, S; Panvelkar, V V; Tutakne, M A

    1992-01-01

    A large majority of the world's soldiers are young, away from home, of low rank, and of low educational level. Many consume large quantities of alcohol and other drugs to cope. This combination of factors leads many soldiers to have sex with prostitutes and other casual partners, placing them at high risk of contracting and transmitting STDs. The worldwide incidence of STD for the US Army in 1978 was 98 per 1000 soldiers. The authors reviewed the records of STD cases treated in the Indian armed forces during the period 1938-78 to find that there was a decline in STDs in the Indian Army from 5.22 per 1000 in 1895 to 2.12 per 1000 in 1978. There was, however, an increase in the incidence of STD during war in the Indian Army, albeit marginal compared to global figures. The incidence of STD in the Indian Armed Forces has been much lower than in any other country. Chancroid was the most common STD, affecting most commonly soldiers aged 21-30 years. Prostitutes remained the most common source of infection. Better education appears to decrease the incidence of infection, there was no homosexuality recorded, marital status had little impact upon the risk of contracting STD, prophylactic measures were taken by only 6% of individuals, and 5% of infected soldiers in 1965 and 7% in 1971 were repeat patients. 60% of the men contracted their STD while on leave just prior to entering the theater of war. The rapid expansion of armed forces which results in relaxed recruiting standards, individual separation from sources of moral influence, the lack of disciplinary and moral control by superiors, the uncertainty of survival, emotional strains, illiteracy, and the lack of adequate recreational facilities support the increased incidence of STD during war. Reasons for the comparatively low incidence of STD among Indian soldiers include good management and discipline, religious faith, social customs, fear of social stigmatization upon contracting STD, close surveillance by military

  2. Evaluating the Impact of Hospital Efficiency on Wellness in the Military Health System.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Nathaniel D; Kang, Hyojung; Swenson, Eric R; Fulton, Lawrence V; Griffin, Paul M

    2016-08-01

    Like all health care delivery systems, the U.S. Department of Defense Military Health System (MHS) strives to achieve top preventative care and population health outcomes for its members while operating at an efficient level and containing costs. The objective of this study is to understand the overall efficiency performance of military hospitals and investigate the relationship between efficiency and wellness. This study uses data envelopment analysis and stochastic frontier analysis to compare the efficiency of 128 military treatment facilities from the Army, Navy, and Air Force during the period of 2011 to 2013. Fixed effects panel regression is used to determine the association between the hospital efficiency and wellness scores. The results indicate that data envelopment analysis and stochastic frontier analysis efficiency scores are congruent in direction. Both results indicate that the majority of the MHS hospitals and clinics can potentially improve their productive efficiency by managing their input resources better. When comparing the performance of the three military branches of service, Army hospitals as a group outperformed their Navy and Air Force counterparts; thus, best practices from the Army should be shared across service components. The findings also suggest no statistically significant, positive association between efficiency and wellness over time in the MHS.

  3. Evaluating the Impact of Hospital Efficiency on Wellness in the Military Health System.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Nathaniel D; Kang, Hyojung; Swenson, Eric R; Fulton, Lawrence V; Griffin, Paul M

    2016-08-01

    Like all health care delivery systems, the U.S. Department of Defense Military Health System (MHS) strives to achieve top preventative care and population health outcomes for its members while operating at an efficient level and containing costs. The objective of this study is to understand the overall efficiency performance of military hospitals and investigate the relationship between efficiency and wellness. This study uses data envelopment analysis and stochastic frontier analysis to compare the efficiency of 128 military treatment facilities from the Army, Navy, and Air Force during the period of 2011 to 2013. Fixed effects panel regression is used to determine the association between the hospital efficiency and wellness scores. The results indicate that data envelopment analysis and stochastic frontier analysis efficiency scores are congruent in direction. Both results indicate that the majority of the MHS hospitals and clinics can potentially improve their productive efficiency by managing their input resources better. When comparing the performance of the three military branches of service, Army hospitals as a group outperformed their Navy and Air Force counterparts; thus, best practices from the Army should be shared across service components. The findings also suggest no statistically significant, positive association between efficiency and wellness over time in the MHS. PMID:27483520

  4. Bot armies as threats to network security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

    2007-04-01

    "Botnets", or "bot armies", are large groups of remotely controlled malicious software. Bot armies pose one of the most serious security threats to all networks. Botnets, remotely controlled and operated by botmasters or botherders, can launch massive denial of service attacks, multiple penetration attacks, or any other malicious network activity on a massive scale. While bot army activity has, in the past, been limited to fraud, blackmail, and other forms of criminal activity, their potential for causing large-scale damage to the entire internet; for launching large-scale, coordinated attacks on government computers and networks; and for large-scale, coordinated data gathering from thousands of users and computers on any network has been underestimated. This paper will not discuss how to build bots but the threats they pose. In a "botnet" or "bot army", computers can be used to spread spam, launch denial-of-service attacks against Web sites, conduct fraudulent activities, and prevent authorized network traffic from traversing the network. In this paper we discuss botnets and the technologies that underlie this threat to network and computer security. The first section motivates the need for improved protection against botnets, their technologies, and for further research about botnets. The second contains background information about bot armies and their key underlying technologies. The third section presents a discussion of the types of attacks that botnets can conduct and potential defenses against them. The fourth section contains a summary and suggestions for future research and development.

  5. Risk Factors for Accident Death in the U.S. Army, 2004–2009

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Peterson, Christopher; Berglund, Patricia A.; Collins, Stacey; Cox, Kenneth; Hauret, Keith; Jones, Bruce; Kessler, Ronald C.; Mitchell, Colter; Park, Nansook; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Heeringa, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Accidents are one of the leading causes of death among U.S. active duty Army soldiers. Evidence-based approaches to injury prevention could be strengthened by adding person-level characteristics (e.g., demographics) to risk models tested on diverse soldier samples studied over time. Purpose To identify person-level risk indicators of accident deaths in Regular Army soldiers during a time frame of intense military operations, and to discriminate risk of not-line-of-duty (NLOD) from line-of-duty (LOD) accident deaths. Methods Administrative data acquired from multiple Army/Department of Defense sources for active duty Army soldiers during 2004–2009 were analyzed in 2013. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify person-level sociodemographic, service-related, occupational, and mental health predictors of accident deaths. Results Delayed rank progression or demotion and being male, unmarried, in a combat arms specialty, and of low rank/service length increased odds of accident death for enlisted soldiers. Unique to officers was high risk associated with aviation specialties. Accident death risk decreased over time for currently deployed, enlisted soldiers while increasing for those never deployed. Mental health diagnosis was associated with risk only for previous and never-deployed, enlisted soldiers. Models did not discriminate NLOD from LOD accident deaths. Conclusions Adding more refined person-level and situational risk indicators to current models could enhance understanding of accident death risk specific to soldier rank and deployment status. Stable predictors could help identify high risk of accident deaths in future cohorts of Regular Army soldiers. PMID:25441238

  6. Estimated effects of ionizing radiation upon military task performance: individual combat crewmember assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Anno, G.H.; Wilson, D.B.

    1984-04-01

    Quantitative estimates are developed of the performance levels for selected individual Army combat crewmembers exposed to prompt ionizing radiation from nuclear weapons. The performance levels, expressed in percent of normal (baseline) task performance, provide information for military operations planning, combat training, and computer simulation modeling of combat crew and unit effectiveness. The methodology is described where data from two separate bodies of information: acute radiation sickness symptomatology, and judgment of task performance time from Army combat crew questionnaires - are integrated to compute performance levels as a function of dose (free-in-air) and post-exposure time.

  7. Military audiological aspects in noise-induced hearing losses.

    PubMed

    Salmivalli, A

    1979-01-01

    The sound pressure of a single shot ranges from about 165 up to 190 dB, depending on the type of weapon. In general, most shooting practice is carried out from a sheltered shooting gallery. Groupshooting and multiple reverberations from sheltered galleries maximize the acoustic strain. Clinically the acoustic trauma can be considered to be a combination of both acute and chronic noise injury, because very intense impulse noise, such as gunfire, can injure the inner ear both mechanically and by mean of disturbances in metabolism. When the ears are not protected, acoustic trauma develops in about 10% of military conscripts and 60% of regular army personnel.

  8. Questionnaire assessment of estimated radiation effects upon military task performance

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, A.S.; Winne, P.S.; Morgan, B.B. Jr.; Moe, R.B.

    1984-04-01

    One hundred twenty-five supervisors in four types of U.S. Army combat systems estimated the degree of degradation of military tasks for 30 descriptive symptom complexes associated with various radiation exposures. Results indicated that (a) the relative order of symptom effects were highly consistent across positions and the types of systems, (b) performances were expected to be deleteriously affected under most illness conditions, even mild ones, but incapacitation was not anticipated until illness conditions became quite severe, and (c) the most important factors in estimating performances were fluid loss and fatigability/weakness.

  9. Influence of Military Training and Standardized Nutrition in Military Unit on Soldiers' Nutritional Status and Physical Fitness.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, Andrzej; Bertrandt, Jerzy; Kłos, Anna; Kłos, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    Tomczak, A, Bertrandt, J, Kłos, A, and Kłos, K. Influence of military training and standardized nutrition in military unit on soldiers' nutritional status and physical fitness. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2774-2780, 2016-Despite suspension of conscription in Polish Army, trainings of soldiers are still carried out. It is expected that they will be effective and will contribute to obtaining optimum level of psychophysical efficiency that enables fulfillment of military tasks. Total of 60 soldiers took part in the study. During the 9-month military service, soldiers had 200 hours of physical training and basic military training (shooting, drill, anti-chemical training, topography, general tactics, and military equipment operation). The training lasted 8 hours everyday. To assess fitness level, 4 trials were done: long jump, pull-ups, sit-ups, and 1,000 m run. Evaluation of food was based on the analysis of full board menus using the "Tables of composition and nutritional value of food products." Energy value was assessed, and content of basic nutrients was calculated. Assessment of nutritional status was based on anthropometric measurements, such as body height, body mass, and thickness of 4 selected skinfolds. Body height and body mass were the basis for the body mass index calculation. Soldiers serving in the mechanized infantry unit, after completing the training, got better results only in 1,000 m run (from 250.3 to 233.61 seconds). During the research, an average energy value of a daily food ration planned for consumption was 4,504 kcal. This value consisted of 13.2% of energy from protein, 31.9% of energy from fat, and 54.9% from carbohydrates. In the course of military service, percentage of subjects indicating overweight increased from 10.2 to 25.4%.

  10. Net Zero Fort Carson: Integrating Energy, Water, and Waste Strategies to Lower the Environmental Impact of a Military Base

    EPA Science Inventory

    Military bases resemble small cities and face similar sustainability challenges. As pilot studies in the U.S. Army Net Zero program, 17 locations are moving to 100% renewable energy, zero depletion of water resources, and/or zero waste to landfill by 2020. Some bases target net z...

  11. 78 FR 20623 - Environmental Impact Statement for Modernization and Repair of Piers 2 and 3, Military Ocean...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... Ocean Terminal Concord, CA AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Intent. SUMMARY: The...-needed modernization and repairs of Piers 2 and 3, Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO) due to... order to maintain ammunition out load capabilities at this ocean terminal. Pier 2 is the westernmost...

  12. Edward D. Churchill as a combat consultant: lessons for the senior visiting surgeons and today's military medical corps.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jeremy W; Fischer, Josef E

    2010-03-01

    In World War II, Edward D. Churchill volunteered as a combat consultant. In this role, he mentored many junior surgeons and challenged the Army leadership to treat hemorrhagic shock with blood rather than plasma. These lessons have continued relevance for today's Senior Visiting Surgeons and our military medical corps.

  13. Army Reserve Comprehensive Water Efficiency Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Kearney, Jaime

    2015-04-14

    The Army Reserve has partnered with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop comprehensive water assessments for numerous Army Reserve Centers in all five regions including the Pacific islands and Puerto Rico, and at Fort Buchanan and Fort Hunter Liggett. The objective of these assessments is to quantify water use at the site, and identify innovative water efficiency projects that can be implemented to help reduce water demand and increase efficiency. Several of these assessments have focused on a strategic plan for achieving net zero water to help meet the Army’s Net Zero Directive . The Army Reserve has also leveraged this approach as part of the energy conservation investment program (ECIP), energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs), and utility energy service contracts (UESCs). This article documents the process involved.

  14. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  15. Aerospace and military

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.A.; Esch, K

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews military and aerospace developments of 1989. The Voyager spacecraft returned astounding imagery from Neptune, sophisticated sensors were launched to explore Venus and Jupiter, and another craft went into earth orbit to explore cosmic rays, while a huge telescope is to be launched early in 1990. The U.S. space shuttle redesign was completed and access to space has become no longer purely a governmental enterprise. In the military realm, events within the Soviet bloc, such as the Berlin Wall's destruction, have popularized arms control. Several big treaties could be signed within the year. Massive troop, equipment, and budget reductions are being considered, along with a halt or delay of major new weapons systems. For new missions, the U.S. military is retreating to its role of a century ago - patrolling the nation's borders, this time against narcotics traffickers.

  16. Nuclear plants - military hostages

    SciTech Connect

    Ramberg, B.

    1986-03-01

    Recent events suggest that nuclear reactors could make tempting military or terrorist targets. Despite the care with which most reactors are built, studies document their vulnerability to willful destruction through disruption of coolant mechanisms both inside and outside the containment building. In addition to reactors, such nuclear support facilities as fuel fabrication, reprocessing, and waste storage installations may be attractive military targets. A nuclear bomb which exploded in the vicinity of a reactor could increase its lethal effects by one-third. The implications of this is vulnerability for Middle East stability as well as to other volatile regions. The author suggests several avenues for controlling the dangers: international law, military and civil defense, facility siting, increasing plant safety, and the international management of nuclear energy. 21 references.

  17. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.C.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated.

  18. [János Bolyai's health according to his military files].

    PubMed

    Acs, Tibor

    2002-01-01

    János Bolyai (1802-1860) one of the greatest mathematicians of the 19th century, the founder and inventor of non-Euclidean geometry, was born in Transylvania, as son of a Hungarian nobleman and scientist, Farkas Bolyai. Having finished his studies at the Academy for Engineering Corps in Vienna, he joined the army. From 1823 to 1833 he served at different places all over the the Empire. Being however physically and mentally unbalanced, he underwent several medical examinations during his military service. Based on archival documents and files of medical examinations and on those of the following resolutions, the author of the present article gives a comprehensive and very detailed account of the young genius's military career and on the circumstances determining his mental activities while creating the most admirable mathematical theory of the age.

  19. 32 CFR 623.3 - Submission of requests for loan of Army materiel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... procedures—(1) DOD activities. DOD activities will borrow Army materiel as follows: (i) Requests will be made... materiel as follows: (i) Non-DOD activities, and agencies, will send routine requests by letter 45 days... available, identify the items needed by type, model, size, capacity, caliber, etc. (I) Geographic...

  20. 32 CFR 623.3 - Submission of requests for loan of Army materiel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... procedures—(1) DOD activities. DOD activities will borrow Army materiel as follows: (i) Requests will be made... materiel as follows: (i) Non-DOD activities, and agencies, will send routine requests by letter 45 days... available, identify the items needed by type, model, size, capacity, caliber, etc. (I) Geographic...

  1. 32 CFR 623.3 - Submission of requests for loan of Army materiel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... procedures—(1) DOD activities. DOD activities will borrow Army materiel as follows: (i) Requests will be made... materiel as follows: (i) Non-DOD activities, and agencies, will send routine requests by letter 45 days... available, identify the items needed by type, model, size, capacity, caliber, etc. (I) Geographic...

  2. Substance Abuse in the Military

    MedlinePlus

    ... Although illicit drug use is lower among U.S. military personnel than among civilians, heavy alcohol and tobacco use, ... in identifying and treating substance use problems in military personnel, as does lack of confidentiality that deters many ...

  3. Strong army couples: a case study of rekindling marriage after combat deployment.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Kristal C; Wenzel, Jennifer; Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), occurring in 15% of combat-exposed military personnel, are associated with a decrease in couples' relationship quality. The purpose of this analysis was to describe reintegration in Army couples with high couple functioning, despite PTSS in one or both partners. Reintegration refers to readjustment after deployment; returning to previous role(s). In a mixed-methods case study of Army couples with a history of combat deployment, we used existing quantitative data to define sampling boundaries, select cases, and guide interviews. Couples scoring high on couple functioning, resilience, and couple satisfaction were interviewed (N = 5 couples, 10 participants). "Rekindling marriage" required strategies to overcome challenges during couple reintegration. For participants as individuals, those strategies were allowing negative emotions, giving each other time and space to do the work of rediscovery and accepting a changed reality, and recognizing and addressing individual needs of the other. As couples, strategies were to go with the flow, open your heart, become best friends, maintain trust, and communicate effectively. As families, strategies were to normalize schedules and protect family time. Findings offer a preliminary basis for interventions to promote strong relationships for military couples with PTSS.

  4. United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine: Warfighter research focusing on the past 25 years.

    PubMed

    Pandolf, Kent B; Francesconi, Ralph; Sawka, Michael N; Cymerman, Allen; Hoyt, Reed W; Young, Andrew J; Zambraski, Edward J

    2011-12-01

    The United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) celebrated its 50th anniversary on July 1, 2011. This article reviews its history, evolution, and transition of its research programs as well as its scientific and military accomplishments, emphasizing the past 25 yr. During the 1990s, USARIEM published a series of pocket guides providing guidance for sustaining Warfighter health and performance in Southwest Asia, Somalia, the former Republic of Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and Haiti. Issues identified during Operation Desert Storm elicited research that improved nutritional guidelines for protracted desert operations; safer use of nuclear, chemical, and biological protective clothing; equipment, development, and fielding of efficient microclimate cooling systems; and effective evaluation of pharmaceuticals to protect soldiers from chemical and biological threats. During the first decade of the 21st century, USARIEM and the Department of the Army published official medical/performance doctrines for operations in the heat and cold and at high altitude. The current Global War on Terrorism focused research to improve doctrines for hot, cold, and high-altitude operations, reduce musculoskeletal training injuries, provide improved field nutrition, more efficient planning for operational water requirements, and improve both military clothing and materiel. This article also describes the critically important interactions and communications between USARIEM and deployed units and the benefits to Warfighters from this association. This report presents USARIEM's unique and world-class facilities, organizational changes, scientific and support personnel, and major research accomplishments, including the publication of 2,200 scientific papers over the past 25 yr. PMID:22139770

  5. United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine: Warfighter research focusing on the past 25 years.

    PubMed

    Pandolf, Kent B; Francesconi, Ralph; Sawka, Michael N; Cymerman, Allen; Hoyt, Reed W; Young, Andrew J; Zambraski, Edward J

    2011-12-01

    The United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) celebrated its 50th anniversary on July 1, 2011. This article reviews its history, evolution, and transition of its research programs as well as its scientific and military accomplishments, emphasizing the past 25 yr. During the 1990s, USARIEM published a series of pocket guides providing guidance for sustaining Warfighter health and performance in Southwest Asia, Somalia, the former Republic of Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and Haiti. Issues identified during Operation Desert Storm elicited research that improved nutritional guidelines for protracted desert operations; safer use of nuclear, chemical, and biological protective clothing; equipment, development, and fielding of efficient microclimate cooling systems; and effective evaluation of pharmaceuticals to protect soldiers from chemical and biological threats. During the first decade of the 21st century, USARIEM and the Department of the Army published official medical/performance doctrines for operations in the heat and cold and at high altitude. The current Global War on Terrorism focused research to improve doctrines for hot, cold, and high-altitude operations, reduce musculoskeletal training injuries, provide improved field nutrition, more efficient planning for operational water requirements, and improve both military clothing and materiel. This article also describes the critically important interactions and communications between USARIEM and deployed units and the benefits to Warfighters from this association. This report presents USARIEM's unique and world-class facilities, organizational changes, scientific and support personnel, and major research accomplishments, including the publication of 2,200 scientific papers over the past 25 yr.

  6. Gifted Military Dependents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tittle, Bess M.; Walters, Debbie

    1985-01-01

    Two articles address problems and issues in serving gifted military dependents. The first offers suggestions for parents, including handcarrying records, involving themselves in schools, and maintaining a positive attitude toward service life. The second article describes TAG (talented and gifted) programs at the Department of Defense Dependents…

  7. HIV ban in military.

    PubMed

    1995-06-16

    The Defense Department has written into its budget a proposal to discharge all HIV-positive members of the armed services. The House Committee on National Security has approved the fiscal 1996 defense budget with the ban included. Rep. Robert K. Dornan, R- Calif., contends that having HIV-positive service members in the military compromises the nation's readiness because, under Defense Department policy, they cannot be stationed abroad. However, only one-fifth of all service members on limited assignment have HIV, the others have diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. This shows the military's readiness to discriminate against HIV-positive individuals, according to William J. Freeman of the National Association of People with AIDS. Currently all recruits are tested for HIV; if they test positive, they are denied entry to the armed services. All service members are tested annually for HIV antibodies. In anticipation of cutbacks in military-related AIDS research due to the Republican control of Congress, the military has begun to eliminate most of the AIDS research it conducts. PMID:11362530

  8. HIV ban in military.

    PubMed

    1995-06-16

    The Defense Department has written into its budget a proposal to discharge all HIV-positive members of the armed services. The House Committee on National Security has approved the fiscal 1996 defense budget with the ban included. Rep. Robert K. Dornan, R- Calif., contends that having HIV-positive service members in the military compromises the nation's readiness because, under Defense Department policy, they cannot be stationed abroad. However, only one-fifth of all service members on limited assignment have HIV, the others have diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. This shows the military's readiness to discriminate against HIV-positive individuals, according to William J. Freeman of the National Association of People with AIDS. Currently all recruits are tested for HIV; if they test positive, they are denied entry to the armed services. All service members are tested annually for HIV antibodies. In anticipation of cutbacks in military-related AIDS research due to the Republican control of Congress, the military has begun to eliminate most of the AIDS research it conducts.

  9. Why Military History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Josiah, III

    2008-01-01

    Interest in military history is as strong as it has ever been--except on American college campuses. Lt. Gen. Josiah Bunting III examines why today's undergraduates need to study the facts of war, and why knowing its causes and consequences remain a vital part of our common knowledge.

  10. Resilience among Military Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors present their approach to understanding resilience among military connected young people, and they discuss some of the gaps in their knowledge. They begin by defining resilience, and then present a theoretical model of how young people demonstrate resilient functioning. Next they consider some of the research on…

  11. Nutrition research in the military.

    PubMed

    Hill, Neil E; Fallowfield, J L; Delves, S K; Wilson, D R

    2014-06-01

    Military research performed in an operational environment involves mission-specific considerations. The Institute of Naval Medicine was tasked in 2008 by the Surgeon General to investigate the nutritional status of deployed British military personnel, and how this might affect body composition, physical fitness and operational capability. This paper briefly describes the logistic and technical issues specific to military research that were encountered by the study team, how these issues were overcome and how this research has influenced military practice.

  12. Army health care operations in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Young, Richard S K; Gillan, Eileen; Dingmann, Philip; Casinelli, Paul; Taylor, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    Four years of warfare in the urban environment of Iraq have produced fundamental changes in the Army's health-care system. First, improved communications and air evacuation have streamlined the transport of the wounded soldierfrom the battlefield to stateside medical centers. Second, individual ballistic armor has decreased the number of U.S. troops killed while the number of wounded soldiers has increased. Third, battling an unseen enemy has produced a marked increase in acute stress disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. Deployment of soldiers with chronic mental health disorders such as anxiety, attention deficit disorder, and depression is problematic. The stress of long combat tours has doubled the incidence of abuse and neglect in children of deployed service members. Comparedto active-componentsoldiers, the prevalence ofmental health disorders is twice as great in soldiers of the Army Reserve and Army National Guard. Finally, the difficulty in determining friend vs. foe in Iraq results in the incarceration of thousands of Iraqis creating both medical and ethical challenges for Army physicians.

  13. Dental Therapy Assistant: Attitudes of Army Dentists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heid, Theodore H.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    The U. S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a formal program based on the concept that dental care can be more efficiently and effectively provided with treatment teams composed of one dental officer, two dental therapy assistants, one basic assistant, and the shared support of other auxiliary personnel. Such a team will use three dental treatment…

  14. The Falklands war: Army field surgical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D. S.; Batty, C. G.; Ryan, J. M.; McGregor, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    In the recent Falklands campaign four Army Field Surgical Teams were deployed in the two phases of the war. They functioned as Advanced Surgical Centres and operated on 233 casualties. There were 3 deaths. The patterns of wounding and the methods of casualty management are discussed and compared with other recent campaigns. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6614760

  15. Army Physicians' Attitudes Towards Physicians' Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Richard B.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    In February 1972 the U. S. Army Medical Field Service School will commence training a new category of health personnel, to be known as the physicians' assistant. This type of allied health personnel will be an assistant to the physician, trained to do many of the traditional tasks usually performed by a physician, but requiring less education.…

  16. The Army's High Priority Physical Fitness Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drews, Fred R.

    1984-01-01

    This article explores the importance of physical fitness in the United States Army. The development of expanded fitness assessment and programs is related to health and the prevention of coronary heart disease. Improved physical training programs, improved nutrition, and fundamental research are necessary for maintaining a highly fit and healthy…

  17. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army commands... claims personnel in obtaining qualified expert and technical advice from command units and...

  18. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army commands... claims personnel in obtaining qualified expert and technical advice from command units and...

  19. Review of mobile health technology for military mental health.

    PubMed

    Shore, Jay H; Aldag, Matt; McVeigh, Francis L; Hoover, Ronald L; Ciulla, Robert; Fisher, Ashley

    2014-08-01

    Mental health problems pose challenges for military veterans, returning service members, and military family members including spouses and children. Challenges to meeting mental health needs include improving access to care and improving quality of care. Mobile Health, or "mHealth," can help meet these needs in the garrison and civilian environments. mHealth brings unique capabilities to health care provision through the use of mobile device technologies. This report identifies high-priority mHealth technology development considerations in two categories. First, priority considerations specific to mental health care provision include safety, privacy, evidence-based practice, efficacy studies, and temperament. Second, priority considerations broadly applicable to mHealth include security, outcomes, ease of use, carrier compliance, hardware, provider perspectives, data volume, population, regulation, command policy, and reimbursement. Strategic planning for the advancement of these priority considerations should be coordinated with stated Department of Defense capability needs to maximize likelihood of adoption. This report also summarizes three leading, military programs focused on mHealth projects in mental health, The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, The Military Operational Medicine Research Program, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, and The National Center for Telehealth and Technology.

  20. [Prospects of IT usage in the field of military psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Kuvshinov, K E; Trishkin, D V; Goncharenko, A Yu; Shamrei, V K; Borisov, D N; Lobachev, A V

    2015-03-01

    Development of effective information support for monitoring of internal health, based on the principles of complex diagnostics, provides the necessary tools objektive evaluation and prediction of mental health in servicemen. Effectiveness of psychiatric prophylaxys technologies depends on compliance with a number of fundamental principles, the main of which should be considered as a multidimensional assessment of mental health in servicemen and real cooperation of different specialists (commanders, specialists of medical and psychological service) for its implementation. In this case, an introduction of information and communication technologies on the basis of the district (fleet) and the Central Military Hospital, as well as other bodies of military control will be almost justified only when creating a full-fledged "information field of military psychiatry" that implements the basic principles of the monitoring system of mental health and includes necessary infrastructure. The practical implementation of this system will allow to personjfyfy medical and psychological assistance to military personnel, to improve early diagnosis of mental disorders, addictive .and suicidal behaviour, and thus increase the effectiveness throughout psychiatric prophylaxis in the army.

  1. Guidelines for reliability testing of microelectromechanical systems in military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Robert; Gintert, Larry; Rippen, Marc; Skelton, Don; Zunino, James; Gutmanis, Ivars

    2006-01-01

    Micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) and microsystems technologies are seeing increased consideration for use in military applications. Assets ranging from aircraft and communications to munitions may soon employ MEMS. In all cases, MEMS devices must perform their required functions for the duration of the equipment's mission profile. Long-term performance in a given scenario can be assured through an understanding of the predominant MEMS failure modes. Once the failure modes have been identified, standardized tests will be developed and conducted on representative devices to detect the potential for these failures. Failure mechanisms for MEMS devices in severe environments may include wear and stiction. While corrosion is not usually a concern for commercial MEMS devices, as they are made primarily of silicon, other materials, including metallics, are being considered for MEMS to provide enhanced robustness in military applications. When these materials are exposed to aggressive military environments, corrosion may become a concern. Corrosion of metallic packaging and interconnect materials may also present issues for overall performance. Considering these corrosion and degradation issues, there is a need to implement standardized tests and requirements to ensure adequate long-term performance of MEMS devices in fielded and emerging military systems. To this end, Concurrent Technologies Corporation has been tasked by the U.S. Army to initiate efforts to standardize test methods that have been developed under previous activities. This paper presents an overview of the MEMS activities under the standardization effort and the MEMS reliability test guidelines that have been drafted as a first phase of this effort.

  2. Review of mobile health technology for military mental health.

    PubMed

    Shore, Jay H; Aldag, Matt; McVeigh, Francis L; Hoover, Ronald L; Ciulla, Robert; Fisher, Ashley

    2014-08-01

    Mental health problems pose challenges for military veterans, returning service members, and military family members including spouses and children. Challenges to meeting mental health needs include improving access to care and improving quality of care. Mobile Health, or "mHealth," can help meet these needs in the garrison and civilian environments. mHealth brings unique capabilities to health care provision through the use of mobile device technologies. This report identifies high-priority mHealth technology development considerations in two categories. First, priority considerations specific to mental health care provision include safety, privacy, evidence-based practice, efficacy studies, and temperament. Second, priority considerations broadly applicable to mHealth include security, outcomes, ease of use, carrier compliance, hardware, provider perspectives, data volume, population, regulation, command policy, and reimbursement. Strategic planning for the advancement of these priority considerations should be coordinated with stated Department of Defense capability needs to maximize likelihood of adoption. This report also summarizes three leading, military programs focused on mHealth projects in mental health, The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, The Military Operational Medicine Research Program, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, and The National Center for Telehealth and Technology. PMID:25102529

  3. Unfit for service: the implications of rising obesity for US military recruitment.

    PubMed

    Cawley, John; Maclean, Johanna Catherine

    2012-11-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on the labor market consequences of unhealthy behaviors and poor health by examining a previously underappreciated consequence of the rise in obesity in the USA: challenges for military recruitment. Specifically, this paper estimates the percentage of the US military-age population that exceeds the US Army's current active duty enlistment standards for weight-for-height and percent body fat, using data from the series of National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys that spans 1959-2008. We calculate that the percentage of military-age adults ineligible for enlistment because they are overweight and overfat more than doubled for men and tripled for women during that time. As of 2007-2008, 5.7 million men and 16.5 million women exceeded the Army's enlistment standards for weight and body fat. We document disparities across race and education in exceeding the standards and estimate that a further rise of just 1% in weight and body fat would further reduce eligibility for military service by over 850 000 men and 1.3 million women. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings for military recruitment and defense policy.

  4. Recent Advances in Forward Surgical Team Training at the U.S. Army Trauma Training Department.

    PubMed

    Allen, Casey J; Straker, Richard J; Murray, Clark R; Hannay, William M; Hanna, Mena M; Meizoso, Jonathan P; Manning, Ronald J; Schulman, Carl I; Seery, Jason M; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2016-06-01

    U.S. Army Forward Surgical Teams (FSTs) are elite, multidisciplinary units that are highly mobile, and rapidly deployable. The mission of the FST is to provide resuscitative and damage control surgery for stabilization of life-threatening injuries in austere environments. The Army Trauma Training Center began in 2001 at the University of Miami Ryder Trauma Center under the direction of COL T. E. Knuth, MC USA (Ret.), as a multimodality combination of lectures, laboratory exercises, and clinical experiences that provided the only predeployment mass casualty and clinical trauma training center for all FSTs. Each of the subsequent five directors has restructured the training based on dynamic feedback from trainees, current military needs, and on the rapid advances in combat casualty care. We have highlighted these evolutionary changes at the Army Trauma Training Center in previous reviews. Under the current director, LTC J. M. Seery, MC USA, there are new team-building exercises, mobile learning modules and simulators, and other alternative methods in the mass casualty exercise. This report summarizes the latest updates to the state of the art training since the last review.

  5. Brief Report: Sexual Risk Behaviors of HIV Seroconverters in the US Army, 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    Scoville, Stephanie L.; Pacha, Laura A.; Peel, Sheila A.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Cersovsky, Steven B.; Scott, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The United States (US) Army implemented a comprehensive HIV characterization program in 2012 following repeal of the Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy banning openly homosexual individuals from serving in the US military. Program staff administered a standardized case report form to soldiers newly diagnosed with HIV from 2012 to 2014 in compliance with new program requirements. The case report form documented sociodemographic, sexual, and other risk behavior information elicited from US Army regulation-mandated epidemiologic interviews at initial HIV notification. A majority of HIV-infected soldiers were male and of black/African American racial origin. In the HIV risk period, male soldiers commonly reported male–male sexual contact, civilian partners, online partner-seeking, unprotected anal sex, and expressed surprise at having a positive HIV result. Don't Ask, Don't Tell repeal allows for risk screening and reduction interventions targeting a newly identifiable risk category in the US Army. At-risk populations need to be identified and assessed for possible unmet health needs. PMID:26247893

  6. Brief Report: Sexual Risk Behaviors of HIV Seroconverters in the US Army, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Hakre, Shilpa; Scoville, Stephanie L; Pacha, Laura A; Peel, Sheila A; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Cersovsky, Steven B; Scott, Paul T

    2015-12-01

    The United States (US) Army implemented a comprehensive HIV characterization program in 2012 following repeal of the Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy banning openly homosexual individuals from serving in the US military. Program staff administered a standardized case report form to soldiers newly diagnosed with HIV from 2012 to 2014 in compliance with new program requirements. The case report form documented sociodemographic, sexual, and other risk behavior information elicited from US Army regulation-mandated epidemiologic interviews at initial HIV notification. A majority of HIV-infected soldiers were male and of black/African American racial origin. In the HIV risk period, male soldiers commonly reported male-male sexual contact, civilian partners, online partner-seeking, unprotected anal sex, and expressed surprise at having a positive HIV result. Don't Ask, Don't Tell repeal allows for risk screening and reduction interventions targeting a newly identifiable risk category in the US Army. At-risk populations need to be identified and assessed for possible unmet health needs.

  7. Recent Advances in Forward Surgical Team Training at the U.S. Army Trauma Training Department.

    PubMed

    Allen, Casey J; Straker, Richard J; Murray, Clark R; Hannay, William M; Hanna, Mena M; Meizoso, Jonathan P; Manning, Ronald J; Schulman, Carl I; Seery, Jason M; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2016-06-01

    U.S. Army Forward Surgical Teams (FSTs) are elite, multidisciplinary units that are highly mobile, and rapidly deployable. The mission of the FST is to provide resuscitative and damage control surgery for stabilization of life-threatening injuries in austere environments. The Army Trauma Training Center began in 2001 at the University of Miami Ryder Trauma Center under the direction of COL T. E. Knuth, MC USA (Ret.), as a multimodality combination of lectures, laboratory exercises, and clinical experiences that provided the only predeployment mass casualty and clinical trauma training center for all FSTs. Each of the subsequent five directors has restructured the training based on dynamic feedback from trainees, current military needs, and on the rapid advances in combat casualty care. We have highlighted these evolutionary changes at the Army Trauma Training Center in previous reviews. Under the current director, LTC J. M. Seery, MC USA, there are new team-building exercises, mobile learning modules and simulators, and other alternative methods in the mass casualty exercise. This report summarizes the latest updates to the state of the art training since the last review. PMID:27244065

  8. Academic and Military Instructional Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Robert K.

    This paper examines the practices and accomplishments of the military in the area of instructional technology. An examination of historical background is used to increase the precision of the definition of instructional technology. Specific contributions of the military are described and then uses of instructional technology in the military and…

  9. [Typhus fever morbidity among the military personnel and civilians in the regions around Volga river during World War I].

    PubMed

    Raĭkova, S V; Zav'ialov, A I

    2013-07-01

    The article is concerned to the materials about epidemiologic situation of typhus fever in the regions around Volga river (Saratovsky, Samarsky and others) during World War I (1914-1918) among the military personnel of the Russian army and among the civilians. The main reasons for spread of infection, ways of the transmission, and also measures for decreasing of level of morbidity on the different stages of evacuation of patients with typhus fever in the safer hospitals are shown. The most important methods of fighting against epidemic of typhus fever were: isolation of patients in separate special hospitals, desincection and disinfection measures in the foci of infection and organization appropriate sanitary conditions for military man in the army and among civilians. Acquired valuable experience of territorial and military doctors during the period of epidemic of typhus fever allowed receiving complex effective antiepidemic measures of fighting and prevention from this disease.

  10. Promoting Health During the American Occupation of Japan The Public Health Section, Kyoto Military Government Team, 1945-1949

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Sey

    2008-01-01

    During the American occupation of Japan (1945–1952), young public health officers from the US Army Medical Corps were posted in local US Army military government teams. These young doctors (aged 25 to 27 years), who had not absorbed the strong anti-Japanese tradition of the US military during World War II, seem to have alleviated the initial resentment felt by the Japanese toward the new governors of their homeland. The case of the Kyoto Military Government Team illustrates the Kyoto citizenry’s positive view of some American-directed public health measures. The team’s services helped to counter widely held negative views on colonialism, occupation, and public health; lessened resentment toward the unilateral command structure of the occupation forces; and contributed to improved relations between the United States and Japan at the local level. PMID:18235076

  11. Variable Mortality From the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic During Military Training.

    PubMed

    Shanks, G Dennis; Burroughs, Steven; Sohn, Joshua D; Waters, Norman C; Smith, Virginia F; Waller, Michael; Brundage, John F

    2016-08-01

    During the 1918-1919 pandemic, influenza mortality widely varied across populations and locations. Records of U.S. military members in mobilization camps (n = 40), military academies, and officer training schools were examined to document differences in influenza experiences during the fall 1918. During the fall-winter 1918-1919, mortality percentages were higher among soldiers in U.S. Army mobilization camps (0.34-4.3%) than among officer trainees (0-1.0%). Susceptibility to infection and clinical expressions of 1918 pandemic influenza varied largely based on host epidemiological characteristics rather than the inherent virulence of the virus. PMID:27483527

  12. Strategies for optimizing military physical readiness and preventing musculoskeletal injuries in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Williams, Thomas J; Deuster, Patricia A; Butler, Nikki L; Jones, Bruce H

    2013-01-01

    With downsizing of the military services and significant budget cuts, it will be more important than ever to optimize the health and performance of individual service members. Musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs) represent a major threat to the health and fitness of Soldiers and other service members that degrade our nation's ability to project military power. This affects both financial (such as the economic burden from medical, healthcare, and disability costs) and human manpower resources (Soldiers medically unable to optimally perform their duties and to deploy). For example, in 2012, MSIs represented the leading cause of medical care visits across the military services resulting in almost 2,200,000 medical encounters. They also result in more disability discharges than any other health condition. Nonbattle injuries (NBIs) have caused more medical evacuations (34%) from recent theaters of operation than any other cause including combat injuries. Physical training and sports are the main cause of these NBIs. The majority (56%) of these injuries are the direct result of physical training. Higher levels of physical fitness protect against such injuries; however, more physical training to improve fitness also causes higher injury rates. Thus, military physical training programs must balance the need for fitness with the risks of injuries. The Army has launched several initiatives that may potentially improve military physical readiness and reduce injuries. These include the US Army Training and Doctrine Command's Baseline Soldier Physical Readiness Requirements and Gender Neutral Physical Performance Standards studies, as well as the reimplementation of the Master Fitness Trainer program and the Army Medical Command's Soldier Medical Readiness and Performance Triad Campaigns. It is imperative for military leaders to understand that military physical readiness can be enhanced at the same time that MSIs are prevented. A strategic paradigm shift in the military's approach

  13. Strategies for optimizing military physical readiness and preventing musculoskeletal injuries in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Williams, Thomas J; Deuster, Patricia A; Butler, Nikki L; Jones, Bruce H

    2013-01-01

    With downsizing of the military services and significant budget cuts, it will be more important than ever to optimize the health and performance of individual service members. Musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs) represent a major threat to the health and fitness of Soldiers and other service members that degrade our nation's ability to project military power. This affects both financial (such as the economic burden from medical, healthcare, and disability costs) and human manpower resources (Soldiers medically unable to optimally perform their duties and to deploy). For example, in 2012, MSIs represented the leading cause of medical care visits across the military services resulting in almost 2,200,000 medical encounters. They also result in more disability discharges than any other health condition. Nonbattle injuries (NBIs) have caused more medical evacuations (34%) from recent theaters of operation than any other cause including combat injuries. Physical training and sports are the main cause of these NBIs. The majority (56%) of these injuries are the direct result of physical training. Higher levels of physical fitness protect against such injuries; however, more physical training to improve fitness also causes higher injury rates. Thus, military physical training programs must balance the need for fitness with the risks of injuries. The Army has launched several initiatives that may potentially improve military physical readiness and reduce injuries. These include the US Army Training and Doctrine Command's Baseline Soldier Physical Readiness Requirements and Gender Neutral Physical Performance Standards studies, as well as the reimplementation of the Master Fitness Trainer program and the Army Medical Command's Soldier Medical Readiness and Performance Triad Campaigns. It is imperative for military leaders to understand that military physical readiness can be enhanced at the same time that MSIs are prevented. A strategic paradigm shift in the military's approach

  14. Acquired capability for suicide among individuals with American Indian/Alaska Native backgrounds within the military.

    PubMed

    Chiurliza, Bruno; Michaels, Matthew S; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    The present study observes a military sample across race to better understand suicide risk among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) individuals utilizing the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide. In a sample of 3,387 Army recruiters, multivariate analysis of variance was used to compare the means across race on acquired capability and pain tolerance. AI/AN individuals demonstrated higher levels of acquired capability for suicide (p = .056) and pain tolerance (p = .028). These findings indicate that acquired capability and pain tolerance are key elements involved in suicide risk among AI/AN individuals within the military. PMID:27536895

  15. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC), cartographer unknown, title unknown, March 28, 1892 1890 lifesaving station shown near fort and beach, no boathouse near engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  16. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) from Talcott, T.M.R., plot of a survey of site, Fort at Sandy Hook, NJ, 1859-1860 Detail of engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  17. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Heeringa, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce U.S. Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six component Army STARRS studies. These include: an integrated study of historical administrative data systems (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004–2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e., those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQ] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. DoD/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination. PMID:24318217

  18. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Kessler, Ronald C; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Heeringa, Steven G

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six components of the Army STARRS. These include: an integrated analysis of the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004-2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e. those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQs] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. Department of Defense/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination.

  19. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Discharge Review Board. 581.2 Section 581.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.2 Army Discharge Review Board. (a) Purpose. This regulation implements 10 U.S.C. 1553, Pub. L....

  20. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Army Discharge Review Board. 581.2 Section 581.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.2 Army Discharge Review Board. (a) Purpose. This regulation implements 10 U.S.C. 1553, Pub. L....

  1. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section 643.112 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of space and...

  2. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.416 Army...

  3. 32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Utilization of Army bands. 508.1 Section 508.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPETITION WITH CIVILIAN BANDS § 508.1 Utilization of Army bands. (a)...

  4. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and...

  5. 77 FR 20331 - Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... Part 334 Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers Felgates Creek and Indian Field Creek along the York River in Yorktown, VA; Restricted Area AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Department of Defense... submitting comments. Email: david.b.olson@usace.army.mil . Include the docket number, COE-2011-0038, in...

  6. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section 643.112 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of...

  7. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army Discharge Review Board. 581.2 Section 581.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.2 Army Discharge Review Board. (a) Purpose. This regulation implements 10 U.S.C. 1553, Pub. L....

  8. 32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Utilization of Army bands. 508.1 Section 508.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPETITION WITH CIVILIAN BANDS § 508.1 Utilization of Army bands. (a)...

  9. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and...

  10. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.416 Army...

  11. 32 CFR 644.517 - Clearance of Army lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Clearance of Army lands. 644.517 Section 644.517 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... and Improvements § 644.517 Clearance of Army lands. The responsibility for performing clearance...

  12. 32 CFR 644.517 - Clearance of Army lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clearance of Army lands. 644.517 Section 644.517 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... and Improvements § 644.517 Clearance of Army lands. The responsibility for performing clearance...

  13. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Discharge Review Board. 581.2 Section 581.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.2 Army Discharge Review Board. (a) Purpose. This regulation implements 10 U.S.C. 1553, Pub. L....

  14. 32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... participation by Army bands (except the U.S. Army Band and the U.S. Army Field Band) in their official capacties... Forces, veterans, and patriotic organizations. (3) At public rallies and parades intended to stimulate national interest in the Armed Forces and/or to further the community relation program. (4) For fund...

  15. 32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... participation by Army bands (except the U.S. Army Band and the U.S. Army Field Band) in their official capacties... Forces, veterans, and patriotic organizations. (3) At public rallies and parades intended to stimulate national interest in the Armed Forces and/or to further the community relation program. (4) For fund...

  16. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor...

  17. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor...

  18. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor...

  19. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army Discharge Review Board. 581.2 Section 581.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.2 Army Discharge Review Board. (a) Purpose. This regulation implements 10 U.S.C. 1553, Pub. L....

  20. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section 643.112 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of space and...

  1. 32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Utilization of Army bands. 508.1 Section 508.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPETITION WITH CIVILIAN BANDS § 508.1 Utilization of Army bands. (a)...

  2. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section 643.112 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of...

  3. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section 643.112 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of space and...

  4. A Study of the Army's Advanced Civilian Schooling Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Joseph S.

    The purpose of the study is to review the official and unofficial U.S. Army policy toward graduate level education at civilian institutions. Particular attention is paid to: (1) the Army's advanced civilian schooling programs; (2) whether the Army receives a reasonable return on its financial and manpower expenditures on these programs; (3) what…

  5. [The Central Military Hospital of the People's Commissariat for Defence during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Simonenko, V B; Abashin, V G; Polovinka, V S

    2014-05-01

    The article is devoted to activity of the Central Military Hospital of the People's Commissariat for Defence during the Great Patriotic War. The research is based on declassified orders of PCD and orders of the chef of hospital. Authors presented the role of the hospital in organization of medical aid for officers of PCD, members of their families, Red Army soldiers, junior and senior Red Army commanders; the role of the hospital in organization of medical facilities for combat army; medical supply for evacuation of family members of PCD's officers ( en route and in evacuation places); delivery of child health care to children of officers of PCD in the hospital and education in kindergartens of PCD. PMID:25286563

  6. Introduction: military neurosurgery, past and present.

    PubMed

    Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T

    2010-05-01

    For a physician has the worth of many other warriors, both for the excision of arrows and for the administration of soothing drugs. Homer, Iliad XI.514-515 Ever since armed conflict has been used as a means to settle disputes among men, there have been those who have been tasked to mend the wounds that ravage a soldier's body from the weapons of war. The Iliad portrays the pivotal 10th year of the legendary Trojan War, during which a schism in the Greek leadership prolongs the extended siege of the city of Troy. In the midst of this martial epic come the lines quoted above, quietly attesting to the value of the military physician, even under the crude conditions of the Greek Dark Age. They are uttered by Idomeneus, one of the foremost Greeks, when he is enjoining one of his comrades, Nestor, to rescue the injured Greek physician Machaon and take him back from the line to treat his wounds. He is afraid that Machaon will be captured by the Trojans, a loss far greater than that of any other single warrior. Duty to country has helped shape the careers of many neurosurgeons, including iconic US figures such as Harvey Cushing and Donald Matson. This issue of Neurosurgical Focus celebrates the rich history of military neurosurgery from the wars of yesterday to the conflicts of today. We have been humbled by the tremendous response to this topic. The 25 articles within this issue will provide the reader with both a broad and an in-depth look at the many facets of military neurosurgery. We have attempted to group articles based on their predominant topic. We also encourage our audience to read other recently published articles. The first 8 articles relate to the current conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The lead article, written by Randy Bell and colleagues from the National Naval Medical Center and Walter Reed Army Medical Center, discusses what is arguably one of the most important contributions by military neurosurgeons from these 2 conflicts: the rapid and aggressive

  7. The adaptability rating for military aeronautics: an historical perspective of a continuing problem.

    PubMed

    Mills, J G; Jones, D R

    1984-06-01

    Healthy candidates for military flying training may vary considerably in their ability and in their motivation to fly. A variety of tests are used to predict flying ability, but motivation may be assessed only through such subjective measures as a semi-structured interview. This paper reviews the historical background of such interviews in the U.S. Army and the U.S. Air Force, and suggests some possible improvements.

  8. The founding of Walter Reed General Hospital and the beginning of modern institutional army medical care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    When Walter Reed United States Army General Hospital opened its doors in 1909, the Spanish-American War had been over for a decade, World War I was in the unforeseeable future, and army hospital admission rates were steadily decreasing. The story of the founding of Walter Reed, which remained one of the flagship military health institutions in the United States until its 2011 closure, is a story about the complexities of the turn of the twentieth century. Broad historical factors-heightened imperial ambitions, a drive to modernize the army and its medical services, and a growing acceptance of hospitals as ideal places for treatment-explain why the institution was so urgently fought for and ultimately won funding at the particular moment it did. The justifications put forth for the establishment of Walter Reed indicate that the provision of publicly funded medical care for soldiers has been predicated not only on a sense of humanitarian commitment to those who serve, but on principles of military efficiency, thrift, pragmatism, and international competition. On a more general level, the story of Walter Reed's founding demonstrates a Progressive Era shift in health services for U.S. soldiers-from temporary, makeshift hospitals to permanent institutions with expansive goals.

  9. Conformal load-bearing antenna structures (CLAS): initiative for multiple military and commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockyer, Allen J.; Alt, Kevin H.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Kinslow, Robert W.; Goetz, Allan C.

    1997-06-01

    The Structures Division of the Air Force's Wright Laboratory is sponsoring the development and demonstration of a new high pay-off technology termed CLAS--Conformal Load Bearing Antenna Structures. Northrop Grumman Corporation and TRW/ASD are developing the technology under the `Smart-Skin Structure Technology Demonstration (S3D)' program, contract, No. F33615-93-C-3200. The program goal is to design, develop, fabricate, and test a CLAS component and lay the foundation for future work where potential benefits from structurally integrated antennas may be realized. Key issues will focus but are not limited to the design, structures, and manufacturing aspects of antenna embedment into load bearing aircraft structures. Results from Phase 1 of the program have been previously reported, where initial pay-offs in reducing overall airframe acquisition and support cost, weight, signature, and drag were quantitatively and qualitatively identified. A full-sized CLAS component, featuring a broadband multi-arm spiral embedded in sandwich stiffened structure, will be fabricated and tested for static strength, durability, and damage tolerance. Basic electrical performance, (e.g., radiation patterns, gain, and impedance) will also be verified; however, extensive electrical validation will be the subject of further work. Key aspects of the work and progress to date are detailed below. Also covered are future projections of CLAS technology expansion beyond tactical aircraft into other military products highlighting ships, army vehicles, and `spin-off' commercial applications to civil aircraft and the automotive industry.

  10. Active coatings technologies for tailorable military coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of the U.S. Army's Active Coatings Technologies Program is to develop technologies that can be used in combination to tailor coatings for utilization on Army Materiel. The Active Coatings Technologies Program, ACT, is divided into several thrusts, including the Smart Coatings Materiel Program, Munitions Coatings Technologies, Active Sensor packages, Systems Health Monitoring, Novel Technology Development, as well as other advanced technologies. The goal of the ACT Program is to conduct research leading to the development of multiple coatings systems for use on various military platforms, incorporating unique properties such as self repair, selective removal, corrosion resistance, sensing, ability to modify coatings' physical properties, colorizing, and alerting logistics staff when tanks or weaponry require more extensive repair. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corrosion Office at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, Clemson University, SC, University of New Hampshire, NH, and University of Massachusetts (Lowell), MA, are developing the next generation of Smart Coatings Materiel via novel technologies such as nanotechnology, Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), meta-materials, flexible electronics, electrochromics, electroluminescence, etc. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Active Coatings Technologies Program, including an update of the on-going Smart Coatings Materiel Program, its progress thus far, description of the prototype Smart Coatings Systems and research tasks as well as future nanotechnology concepts, and applications for the Department of Defense.

  11. An Assessment of Drug Education-Prevention Programs in the U. S. Army. Army Research Institute Technical Paper 261.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Royer F.; Morton, Anton S.

    In recent years the Army has been concerned about the widespread use of psychoactive drugs by all classes of young people and the effects of this use on the Army. In order to curb this use among soldiers the Army initiated a comprehensive program to prevent and control the abuse of alcohol and drugs. Prevention was considered to include education,…

  12. Influence of oral health on combat readiness in the Croatian army.

    PubMed

    Skec, Vjekoslav; Macan, Darko; Spicek, Jasna; Susac, Marija; Luksić, Ivica

    2002-12-01

    The impact of the acute stomatological conditions on the reducing of the combat readiness is an important responsibility for the military planners. Classification of dental health is the primary condition for research and assessment of the army dental readiness for combat. Clinical examination of teeth and mouth included 912 soldiers, 650 of whom were recruits and 262 active duty military personnel. According to their oral status, the examinees were divided into three classes. Class 1 included all those examinees that did not require any dental treatment or reevaluation within 12 months. Class 2 included all of the examinees whose oral health was such that if regularly controlled or followed up, they were not expected to have a dental emergency within 12 months. Class 3 included all of the examinees that required dental treatment to correct both their dental and oral health because the present condition was likely to cause acute stomatological conditions during the 12-month period. This survey designated 130 (14.3%) of the examinees to class 1,178 (19.5%) to class 2, and 604 (66.2%) to class 3. The combat readiness of the 604 (66.2%) examinees in the third class was reduced because a dental emergency can cause the need for dental treatment. The recruits do not have satisfactory dental status even at the beginning of their army service. Unfortunately, active duty military personnel do not have satisfactory dental status either, although they have access to cost-free dental care (prosthetics and orthodontics are not included). This increases the possibility for development of dental emergencies that would have a negative impact on combat readiness. PMID:12502177

  13. The Clinton military budget

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, J. )

    1993-05-01

    In February, the Clinton administration presented the overall contours, if not the details, of its military budget plans for the next five years. $263.5 billion was requested in new budget authority for fiscal 1994. By fiscal 1995, according to the administration blueprint, the budget would be reduced to about $250 billion annually. The three points that stand out, apart from the modest nature of the reductions from the previous administration's five-year Pentagon plan, are discussed in this article. First, the Clinton team downplayed the magnitude of the cutbacks. Second, the Clinton reductions generated great confusion, as an extraordinary range of numbers was banded about. Third, the pro-military members of Congress were remarkably quiet about the Clinton defense plan. Explanations and implications of these points are explained.

  14. Training Methods and Training Instructors' Qualification Are Related to Recruits' Fitness Development During Basic Military Training.

    PubMed

    Roos, Lilian; Hofstetter, Marie-Claire; Mäder, Urs; Wyss, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Adequate physical fitness is essential for successful military service. Military organizations worldwide therefore make continuous efforts to improve their army's physical training (PT) programs. To investigate the effect of the training methods and the qualification of PT instructors on the development of recruits' physical fitness, the present study compared the outcomes of 2 training groups. Both study groups participated in approximately 145 minutes per week of PT. The control group executed the standard army PT prepared and supervised by army PT instructors. Content of the PT in the intervention group was similar to that of the control group, but their training sessions' methods were different. Their training sessions were organized, prepared, and delivered by more and better-qualified supervisors (tertiary-educated physical education teachers). After 10 weeks of training, the participants of the intervention group experienced a significantly greater physical fitness improvement than those of the control group (positive change in endurance 32 and 17%, balance 30 and 21%, and core strength 74 and 45%, respectively). In both groups, the recruits with the lowest initial fitness levels significantly increased their performance. In the intervention group, but not the control, one-third of the recruits with the highest initial fitness levels were able to further improve their general fitness performance. This study demonstrates that the training methods and quality of instruction during PT sessions are relevant for recruits' fitness development in basic military training.

  15. [The technique of army nursing in the Meiji period].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Y

    1994-06-01

    It was in the nineteenth year of Meiji that Japan introduced the modern nursing system from Europe on the nation-wide level. But the Japanese army introduced the new nursing system from the sixth year of Meiji. For that reason, I studied whether the technique of the army nursing system was modern or not. Since the technical level of the nursing system is represented by the teaching methods and text books, I studied these aspects of the Japanese army nursing system. As the result, I confirmed that the army nursing system was modern. The Japanese army was the first to introduce the modern nursing system from Europe in Japan. PMID:11639784

  16. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  17. Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J C

    2012-12-01

    The combatant soldier on the battlefield remains protected from any claim in negligence by the doctrine of combat immunity for any negligent act or omission they may make when fighting. In other words, the combatant soldier does not owe a fellow soldier a duty of care on the battlefield, as the duty of care is non-justiciable. However, the non-combatant Military Healthcare Professional, although sometimes operating in the same hostile circumstances as the fighting soldier, is unlikely to benefit from combat immunity for any clinical negligence on the battlefield. This is because they continue to owe their patient a duty of care, although this has not been tested in the courts. This paper considers if any military healthcare professional could ever benefit from combat immunity, which is unlikely due to their non-combatant status. Instead, this paper suggests that a modified form of immunity; namely, Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity could be a new, unique and viable doctrine, however, this could only be granted in rare circumstances and to a much lesser degree than combat immunity.

  18. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    SciTech Connect

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs.

  19. "More fatal than powder and shot": dysentery in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War, 1846-48.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Vincent J

    2009-01-01

    In terms of deaths due to disease, the Mexican War (1846-48) was the deadliest of all American wars. Nearly 13% of the entire U.S. force perished from disease. Of the total 12,535 war deaths, 10,986 (88%) were due to infectious diseases (overwhelmingly dysentery, both bacterial and amoebic); seven men died from disease for every man killed by Mexican musket balls. Camp pollution was the greatest error committed by U.S. troops in the Mexican War. The indifference of line officers and recruits to the need for proper sanitation and military hygiene fueled the dysentery outbreaks, and the poor conditions in military hospitals contributed further to the spread of disease. This defect in military culture undermined the health of the army and led to medical disaster. Disease caused an enormous drain on the U.S. Army's resources, eroded troop morale, and influenced strategy and tactics. As we enter the 21st century, dysentery is still a major public health threat, killing hundreds of thousands of people annually-primarily children in developing countries where personal hygiene is poor and disposal of human and animal wastes is indiscriminate.

  20. The Central Simulation Committee (CSC): a model for centralization and standardization of simulation-based medical education in the U.S. Army healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Deering, Shad; Sawyer, Taylor; Mikita, Jeffrey; Maurer, Douglas; Roth, Bernard J

    2012-07-01

    In this report, we describe the organizational framework, operations and current status of the Central Simulation Committee (CSC). The CSC was established in 2007 with the goals of standardizing simulation-based training in Army graduate medical education programs, assisting in redeployment training of physicians returning from war, and improving patient safety within the Army Medical Department. Presently, the CSC oversees 10 Simulation Centers, controls over 21,000 sq ft of simulation center space, and provides specialty-specific training in 14 medical specialties. In the past 2 years, CSC Simulation Centers have trained over 50,000 Army medical students, residents, physician assistants, nurses, Soldiers and DoD civilian medical personnel. We hope this report provides simulation educators within the military, and our civilian simulation colleagues, with insight into the workings of our organization and provides an example of centralized support and oversight of simulation-based medical education. PMID:22808890

  1. The Central Simulation Committee (CSC): a model for centralization and standardization of simulation-based medical education in the U.S. Army healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Deering, Shad; Sawyer, Taylor; Mikita, Jeffrey; Maurer, Douglas; Roth, Bernard J

    2012-07-01

    In this report, we describe the organizational framework, operations and current status of the Central Simulation Committee (CSC). The CSC was established in 2007 with the goals of standardizing simulation-based training in Army graduate medical education programs, assisting in redeployment training of physicians returning from war, and improving patient safety within the Army Medical Department. Presently, the CSC oversees 10 Simulation Centers, controls over 21,000 sq ft of simulation center space, and provides specialty-specific training in 14 medical specialties. In the past 2 years, CSC Simulation Centers have trained over 50,000 Army medical students, residents, physician assistants, nurses, Soldiers and DoD civilian medical personnel. We hope this report provides simulation educators within the military, and our civilian simulation colleagues, with insight into the workings of our organization and provides an example of centralized support and oversight of simulation-based medical education.

  2. [Epidemiologic surveillance of dengue fever in the French army from 1996 to 1999].

    PubMed

    Meynard, J B; Ollivier-Gay, L; Deparis, X; Durand, J P; Michel, R; Pages, F; Matton, T; Boutin, J P; Tolou, H; Merouze, F; Baudon, D

    2001-01-01

    Dengue fever is a widespread disease that can occur outside tropical areas. Several thousand French military personnel are exposed to this infectious risk each year and exposure is expected to rise with the creation of a professional army and the increasing number of foreign missions. As a result, dengue fever has become a major priority for the Armed Services Health Corps (ASHC). A system of epidemiological surveillance based on the active participation of all military physicians has been designed by the ASHC to collect and analyze all data relevant to cases of dengue fever involving French military personnel stationed overseas or at home. The purpose of this study is to present data compiled for the period from 1996 to 1999. Analysis of these data demonstrated that the incidence of dengue fever peaked in 1997 due to epidemic outbreaks occurring in French Polynesia and Martinique. In response to these outbreaks control measures were adapted especially in regard to vector control. This study shows that the system of surveillance implemented by the ASHC is an effective but still perfectible tool.

  3. Search and detection modeling of military imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Tana; Wilson, David L.; Driggers, Ronald G.

    2013-04-01

    For more than 50 years, the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) has been studying the science behind the human processes of searching and detecting, and using that knowledge to develop and refine its models for military imaging systems. Modeling how human observers perform military tasks while using imaging systems in the field and linking that model with the physics of the systems has resulted in the comprehensive sensor models we have today. These models are used by the government, military, industry, and academia for sensor development, sensor system acquisition, military tactics development, and war-gaming. From the original hypothesis put forth by John Johnson in 1958, to modeling time-limited search, to modeling the impact of motion on target detection, to modeling target acquisition performance in different spectral bands, the concept of search has a wide-ranging history. Our purpose is to present a snapshot of that history; as such, it will begin with a description of the search-modeling task, followed by a summary of highlights from the early years, and concluding with a discussion of search and detection modeling today and the changing battlefield. Some of the topics to be discussed will be classic search, clutter, computational vision models and the ACQUIRE model with its variants. We do not claim to present a complete history here, but rather a look at some of the work that has been done, and this is meant to be an introduction to an extensive amount of work on a complex topic. That said, it is hoped that this overview of the history of search and detection modeling of military imaging systems pursued by NVESD directly, or in association with other government agencies or contractors, will provide both the novice and experienced search modeler with a useful historical summary and an introduction to current issues and future challenges.

  4. Battles between an insurgent army and an advanced army - focus on strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Surajit; Shanahan, Linda

    2008-03-01

    Detailed and aggregate analyses of the outcome of past battles focusing on rates of troop losses or on the ratios of forces on each side is at the heart of present knowledge about battles. Here we present non-equilibrium statistical mechanics based studies of possible outcomes of well matched strategic battles by a ``blue'' army against insurgency based attacks by well matched opponents in a ``red'' army in red territory. We assume that the red army attacks with randomly varying force levels to potentially confuse and drive the blue's strategies. The temporal evolution of the model battles incorporate randomness in the deployment of the reds and hence possess attendant history dependence. Our results reveal that while unpredictable events play a major role in battles, a balance between risk of exposure in a battlefield and the use of short range intelligence is needed in determining whether one side can decimate the other, and hence force a battle to end.

  5. Join the Army and See the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galgano, Francis A., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This article maintains that nobody has a bigger stake in successful global cultural education than the United States Military Academy (USMA) in West Point, New York. Since the early 1990s, a bipolar world dominated by two superpowers has evolved into a world with a far less certain strategic outlook. This has spawned an increase in nontraditional…

  6. Institutional Guidance of Affective Bonding: Moral Values Development in Brazilian Military Education.

    PubMed

    Wortmeyer, Daniela Schmitz; Branco, Angela Uchoa

    2016-09-01

    In this article, our aim is to analyze institutional practices guided to promote the development of moral values within the context of military education of Brazilian Army combatant commissioned officers. From a cultural psychological approach, we discuss how social guidance within military culture operates at different levels of the affective-semiotic regulation of individuals, structuring complex experiences that give rise to hypergeneralized meaning fields regarding morality and military values. For this goal, we first introduce some theoretical topics related to values development, emphasizing their affective roots and role in the emergence, maintenance, amplification and attenuation of all relations between the person and the environment. Following a brief discussion on how social institutions try to promote changes in personal values, we provide an overview of values present in the military culture and socialization. Finally, the text focuses on the education of Brazilian Army combatant commissioned officers, describing how practices related to different levels of affective-semiotic experience combine in order to promote the internalization and externalization of specific moral values. We conclude suggesting issues for future investigation. PMID:26960934

  7. Institutional Guidance of Affective Bonding: Moral Values Development in Brazilian Military Education.

    PubMed

    Wortmeyer, Daniela Schmitz; Branco, Angela Uchoa

    2016-09-01

    In this article, our aim is to analyze institutional practices guided to promote the development of moral values within the context of military education of Brazilian Army combatant commissioned officers. From a cultural psychological approach, we discuss how social guidance within military culture operates at different levels of the affective-semiotic regulation of individuals, structuring complex experiences that give rise to hypergeneralized meaning fields regarding morality and military values. For this goal, we first introduce some theoretical topics related to values development, emphasizing their affective roots and role in the emergence, maintenance, amplification and attenuation of all relations between the person and the environment. Following a brief discussion on how social institutions try to promote changes in personal values, we provide an overview of values present in the military culture and socialization. Finally, the text focuses on the education of Brazilian Army combatant commissioned officers, describing how practices related to different levels of affective-semiotic experience combine in order to promote the internalization and externalization of specific moral values. We conclude suggesting issues for future investigation.

  8. Burns and military clothing.

    PubMed

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  9. Respiratory infections in the military.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Matthew K; Wilson, D

    2013-09-01

    Military training facilities and operational theatres, and the stressful activities undertaken in such settings, are unique. Military personnel living and working in these environments are at considerable risk of the acquisition and onward transmission of a variety of respiratory infections. While these generally cause mild illness, severe disease may occur with significant associated morbidity and, occasionally, mortality. Epidemic outbreaks among military personnel may have a significant detrimental impact on training schedules and operational effectiveness. The recognition of the burden of such illness among British military personnel, and the development of strategies required to prevent or limit negative impacts, can only be achieved through the use of comprehensive laboratory-based surveillance programmes.

  10. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC), U.S. Engineer Office, New York District, Harbor Defenses of New York Mine Boathouse, location plan and elevations, Fort Hancock, New Jersey, July 1943 Detail of western docking structure - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  11. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) Gillespie, G.L., map of a portion of Sandy Hook, NJ showing condition of beach in vicinity of dynamite gun emplacements, 1894 Engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  12. Evolution of Military Combat Eye Protection.

    PubMed

    Auvil, James R

    2016-01-01

    Appreciation for combat eye protection steadily increased following World War II. Products derived from experiences in World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and the Iran/Iraq war drove technical improvements throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Dismal wear compliance prior to 2004 indicates Soldiers and their leaders did not appreciate these improvements and found little value in the bulky, ugly, and uncomfortable products. In 2003, the 10th Mountain Division requested enhanced eye protection. Program Executive Office Soldier, the optometry consultant to the Army Surgeon General, members of the Tri-Service Vision Conservation and Readiness Program, and other subject matter experts selected and tested commercial off-the-shelf eye protection against military ballistic impact standards. Optical devices that met ballistic standards formed the first Authorized Protective Eyewear List and were fielded beginning in 2004. Wear compliance rose dramatically for the stylish protective eyewear, reaching 85% to 95% and eye injuries decreased across the Department of Defense even as the incidence of attacks in Iraq increased. Researchers continue to evaluate new materials and designs to increase the capabilities, features and level of protection of future ballistic eyewear. PMID:27215881

  13. Military nutrition: maintaining health and rebuilding injured tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Neil; Fallowfield, Joanne; Price, Susan; Wilson, Duncan

    2011-01-01

    Food and nutrition are fundamental to military capability. Historical examples demonstrate that a failure to supply adequate nutrition to armies inevitably leads to disaster; however, innovative measures to overcome difficulties in feeding reap benefits, and save lives. In barracks, UK Armed Forces are currently fed according to the relatively new Pay As You Dine policy, which has attracted criticism from some quarters. The recently introduced Multi-Climate Ration has been developed specifically to deal with issues arising from Iraq and the current conflict in Afghanistan. Severely wounded military personnel are likely to lose a significant amount of their muscle mass, in spite of the best medical care. Nutritional support is unable to prevent this, but can ameliorate the effects of the catabolic process. Measuring and quantifying nutritional status during critical illness is difficult. A consensus is beginning to emerge from studies investigating the effects of nutritional interventions on how, what and when to feed patients with critical illness. The Ministry of Defence is currently undertaking research to address specific concerns related to nutrition as well as seeking to promote healthy eating in military personnel. PMID:21149358

  14. Physical Training, Fitness, and Injuries: Lessons Learned From Military Studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bruce H; Hauschild, Veronique D

    2015-11-01

    Injuries are the leading cause of medical encounters across the U.S. military services resulting in more than 2.0 million clinic visits per year. Almost 50% of military service members experience an injury each year and half of those injuries are caused by physical training (PT), exercise, or sports. To prevent a problem as large and complex as injuries in the military requires a systematic approach. Several key questions must be answered to effectively address a problem such as injuries: (1) how big is the problem? (2) what are the causes and risk factors for the problem? (3) do modifiable risk factors for the problem exist? and (4) what works to prevent the problem? The article discusses leading causes of injuries for U.S. Army populations. It then explores key risk factors for exercise and training-related injuries: (1) the amounts of training, (2) types of training activities, (3) participants level of fitness, and (4) personal health risk behaviors. The article concludes with a review of prevention strategies illustrating interventions that have been shown to be effective, and others that are not effective. The data presented suggest that PT and exercise cause injuries and that modifications of training are most likely to prevent the problem. PMID:26506200

  15. [Military-medical academy celebrates the 60th anniversary].

    PubMed

    Khalimov, Ya Sh; Vasenko, A N; Matveev, S Yu; Agafonov, P V

    2016-01-01

    The first field therapy department in our country was established in the S.M.Kirov Military Medical Academy in November, 1955. The new department was established by merging of academical Department's of military toxicology, nuclear weapon and field therapy course, taught in Hospital Therapy Department. The new department was imposed as teaching and research center of organizational issues of field therapy, pathology and clinic of radiation injuries and injuries due to chemical agents. Scientific researches were also conducted on the same direction. Department was headed by outstanding field therapist such as Ivanosvky B.D., Zakrzhevsky E.B., Gembitsky E.V., Alexeev G.I., Shishmarev Yu.N, Sosukin A.E. Since 2010 the head of department is Khalimov Yu.Sh. Over the last 60 years of its activity department has became a scientific and academic center on field therapy, alma mater of specialists on clinical radiology, clinical toxicology, military professional pathology, and organization of therapeutic medicine for the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation and other foreign countries. Department became famous as in our country as outside. Today department answers neccessary requirements for scientific-and-research work and successful training and professional improvement of the army and navy physicians. PMID:27120956

  16. Physical Training, Fitness, and Injuries: Lessons Learned From Military Studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bruce H; Hauschild, Veronique D

    2015-11-01

    Injuries are the leading cause of medical encounters across the U.S. military services resulting in more than 2.0 million clinic visits per year. Almost 50% of military service members experience an injury each year and half of those injuries are caused by physical training (PT), exercise, or sports. To prevent a problem as large and complex as injuries in the military requires a systematic approach. Several key questions must be answered to effectively address a problem such as injuries: (1) how big is the problem? (2) what are the causes and risk factors for the problem? (3) do modifiable risk factors for the problem exist? and (4) what works to prevent the problem? The article discusses leading causes of injuries for U.S. Army populations. It then explores key risk factors for exercise and training-related injuries: (1) the amounts of training, (2) types of training activities, (3) participants level of fitness, and (4) personal health risk behaviors. The article concludes with a review of prevention strategies illustrating interventions that have been shown to be effective, and others that are not effective. The data presented suggest that PT and exercise cause injuries and that modifications of training are most likely to prevent the problem.

  17. Recruits' Military Preferences and Their Accommodation by the Military Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoehn, Arthur J.; And Others

    The research report provides information on recruits' military occupational preferences, match of military assignments to recruits' preferences, and changes that occur in these preferences between service entry and completion of basic training. Questionnaires were administered to recruits from four services just before classification interviewing…

  18. Labors of love: the transformation of care in the Non-Medical Attendant program at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Wool, Zoë H; Messinger, Seth D

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the Non-Medical Attendant program at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC, which subsidizes the presence of war-injured soldiers' family members as they live for months or even years at Walter Reed during treatment and rehabilitation. We elaborate the ambiguities of the program and draw on ethnographic research to demonstrate how the program's vagaries combine with the context of an overburdened military medical system and the more familiar strains of family caregiving to place family members in a gray zone of care where the line between labors of love and institutionally compensated work is blurred. PMID:22574390

  19. Senior military officers' educational concerns, motivators and barriers for healthful eating and regular exercise.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Lori D; Anderson, Jennifer E; Auld, Garry W

    2005-10-01

    The increasing trend of overweight in the military, the high cost of health care associated with overweight, and the failure to meet some Healthy People 2000 objectives related to diet identify the need for more appropriate nutrition and fitness education for military personnel. The purpose of this study was to assess senior military officers' concerns on various health topics, educational preferences for nutrition and health topics, eating habits, and barriers and motivators for eating healthfully and exercising regularly. The survey was completed by 52 resident students at the U.S. Army War College. Fitness, weight, and blood cholesterol were top health concerns, and respondents wanted to know more about eating healthfully on the run. The primary barrier to eating healthfully and exercising regularly was lack of time, whereas health and appearance were top motivators. Health interventions for this population should include their topics of concern and should address perceived barriers and motivators.

  20. The NASA/Army Autonomous Rotorcraft Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalley, M.; Freed, M.; Takahashi, M.; Christian, D.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Schulein, G.; Harris, R.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Ames Research Center Autonomous Rotorcraft Project (ARP) is presented. The project brings together several technologies to address NASA and US Army autonomous vehicle needs, including a reactive planner for mission planning and execution, control system design incorporating a detailed understanding of the platform dynamics, and health monitoring and diagnostics. A candidate reconnaissance and surveillance mission is described. The autonomous agent architecture and its application to the candidate mission are presented. Details of the vehicle hardware and software development are provided.