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Sample records for army surgical hospital

  1. The mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH): a military and surgical legacy.

    PubMed Central

    King, Booker; Jatoi, Ismalil

    2005-01-01

    Operation Iraqi Freedom was perhaps the last military campaign that will ever utilize the services of a mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH). The Army has now essentially replaced the MASH with combat surgical hospitals (CSH) and forward surgical teams (FST). MASH units were designed as mobile, flexible, forward-deployed military hospitals, providing care for the wounded near the frontlines of the battlefield. These hospitals not only saved thousands of lives during war but also greatly influenced the delivery of trauma and critical care in civilian hospitals. The MASH was made popular by the television series of the 1970s, depicting the 4077th during the Korean War. Although a comical series, these television episodes provided viewers with a glimpse of life in a MASH during time of war. This article chronicles the history of the MASH from its inception during World War II to recent experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 p656-a PMID:15926641

  2. Policy Analysis of Surgical Utilization at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-09

    orthopedics/podiatry, eyes/ears/nose/throat (EENT), general surgery , and specialized clinics in optical refractory care and bariatric surgery . Patients that...numbers of surgeries , and the access to care. The first three courses of action show improvement with these projected outcomes, however, the... surgery , surgical, utilization, in room time, resource sharing, swing shift 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U

  3. The Falklands war: Army field surgical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D. S.; Batty, C. G.; Ryan, J. M.; McGregor, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    In the recent Falklands campaign four Army Field Surgical Teams were deployed in the two phases of the war. They functioned as Advanced Surgical Centres and operated on 233 casualties. There were 3 deaths. The patterns of wounding and the methods of casualty management are discussed and compared with other recent campaigns. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6614760

  4. A Study to Determine the Best Method of Caring for Certain Short-Stay Surgical Patients at Reynolds Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    1984, September), may soon fall by the wayside. New techniques in laparoscopic surgery, particularly utilizing new laser technologies, are allowing...and safer. This is seen in the’widespread use of laserq for Furgery. As reflected in the literature, the use of various types of lasers in surgery is...the surgery and post-surgical healing is aided. And yet, in the military, lasers are seldom-used (there are none Surgical Patients 83 at RACR), and are

  5. Training forward surgical teams for deployment: the US Army Trauma Training Center.

    PubMed

    Valdiri, Linda A; Andrews-Arce, Virginia E; Seery, Jason M

    2015-04-01

    Since the late 1980s, the US Army has been deploying forward surgical teams to the most intense areas of conflict to care for personnel injured in combat. The forward surgical team is a 20-person medical team that is highly mobile, extremely agile, and has relatively little need of outside support to perform its surgical mission. In order to perform this mission, however, team training and trauma training are required. The large majority of these teams do not routinely train together to provide patient care, and that training currently takes place at the US Army Trauma Training Center (ATTC). The training staff of the ATTC is a specially selected 10-person team made up of active duty personnel from the Army Medical Department assigned to the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital Ryder Trauma Center in Miami, Florida. The ATTC team of instructors trains as many as 11 forward surgical teams in 2-week rotations per year so that the teams are ready to perform their mission in a deployed setting. Since the first forward surgical team was trained at the ATTC in January 2002, more than 112 forward surgical teams and other similar-sized Department of Defense forward resuscitative and surgical units have rotated through trauma training at the Ryder Trauma Center in preparation for deployment overseas.

  6. [The army nurse, from hospital to overseas operations].

    PubMed

    Guérot, Françoise; Saliou, Henri; Lefort, Hugues; De Rudnickl, Stéphane

    2014-09-01

    Assigned to French army teaching hospitals, the army nurse can be deployed on overseas operations in support of the armed forces. Experience in the treatment of casualties in life-threatening emergencies is essential, as is the ability to adapt and react. Designated on a voluntary basis, after some two years of working in an army teaching hospital, the hospital nurse receives training in the specificities of the theatre of deployment.

  7. Costs of surgical procedures in Indian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite a growing volume of surgical procedures in low-income and middle-income countries, the costs of these procedures are not well understood. We estimated the costs of 12 surgical procedures commonly conducted in five different types of hospitals in India from the provider perspective, using a microcosting method. Design Cost and utilisation data were collected retrospectively from April 2010 to March 2011 to avoid seasonal variability. Setting For this study, we chose five hospitals of different types: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital and a 778-bed tertiary care teaching hospital based on their willingness to cooperate and data accessibility. The hospitals were from four states in India. The private, charitable and tertiary care hospitals serve urban populations, the district hospital serves a semiurban area and the private teaching hospital serves a rural population. Results Costs of conducting lower section caesarean section ranged from rupees 2469 to 41 087; hysterectomy rupees 4124 to 57 622 and appendectomy rupees 2421 to 3616 (US$1=rupees 52). We computed the costs of conducting lap and open cholecystectomy (rupees 27 732 and 44 142, respectively); hernia repair (rupees 13 204); external fixation (rupees 8406); intestinal obstruction (rupees 6406); amputation (rupees 5158); coronary artery bypass graft (rupees 177 141); craniotomy (rupees 75 982) and functional endoscopic sinus surgery (rupees 53 398). Conclusions Estimated costs are roughly comparable with rates of reimbursement provided by the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY)—India's government-financed health insurance scheme that covers 32.4 million poor families. Results from this type of study can be used to set and revise the reimbursement rates. PMID:23794591

  8. An Effective Outpatient Appointment System for General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-13

    Orthopedics, Pediatric , Physical Examination, xPodiatry, Surgical, Urology, Well Baby, Body Fat Evaluation, Nutrition , PFB, and Speech. 2. RESPONSIBILITIES. a...PROJECT TASK WvORK UNIT I1 I ILUE (include Securiy assicton) An Effective Outpatient Appointment System for Gen Leonard Wood Army Comunity Hospital 12...analysis. Thirty two variables were provided by the reports for the six following clinic; Internal Medicine, Pediatrics , General Outpatient, Family Practice

  9. Medical museum, 2nd surgical hospital.

    PubMed

    Hawk, Alan J

    2013-12-01

    When his unit, the 2nd Surgical Hospital (MA), was established at An Khe in January 1966, MAJ Rich began collecting retrieved foreign bodies along with documentation of the wound. A museum displaying these objects was established at one end of the operating room Quonset hut. During Rich's tour of duty, there were 324 cases where the patient was wounded by a punji stick, representing 38% wounds because of hostile action.

  10. [The organization of surgical care in Russian army during 1812 Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Gliantsev, S P

    2012-01-01

    The article considers the characteristics of surgical care to warriors of Russian army during 1812 Great Patriotic War. Such conditions are analyzed as damaging action of French weapons, types of combat wounds, organization and forces of military sanitary service of Russian troops, surgeons' support with means of supplying surgical care to the wounded and arsenal of surgical aids. On the basis of given materials analysis a preliminary conclusion is made that surgical care in Russian army in 1812 not only was on the sufficiently high level but it played a specified role in the victory of Russian weapon.

  11. Acute Surgical Unit at Auckland City Hospital: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsee, Li; Devaud, Marcelo; Middelberg, Lisa; Jones, Wayne; Civil, Ian

    2012-09-01

    Lack of timely assessment and access to acute operating rooms is a worldwide problem and also exists in New Zealand hospitals. To address these issues, an Acute Surgical Unit (ASU) was set up at Auckland City Hospital (ACH) in January 2009. This service has evolved and been modified to address the specific needs of acute surgical patients of ACH. Despite initial challenges inherent to setting up a new service, the Unit has been in steady operation and enhanced its performance over time. This paper is a descriptive analysis of the design of the ACH ASU and discusses some of the indications for streamlining acute surgical services at a large tertiary metropolitan hospital in New Zealand. Performance of the ASU has shown benefits for acute patients and the Hospital. The acute surgical rotation has also been beneficial for surgical training.

  12. An analysis of surgical cases in a Nigerian mission hospital.

    PubMed

    WARD, R V

    1963-08-24

    Approximately 315 major surgical cases were treated in one year in a one-doctor 80-bed mission hospital in Nigeria. The hospital serves a population of 137,000. One hundred and forty-three of the cases were herniorrhaphies: 19 of these cases were strangulated, of which seven required bowel resection. A case of a strangulated inguinal hernia containing uterus, Fallopian tubes and ovaries is reported. Other interesting surgical cases are also discussed.

  13. HOSPITALIZATION TIME AFTER OPEN APPENDECTOMY BY THREE DIFFERENT SURGICAL TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    XIMENES, Agláia Moreira Garcia; MELLO, Fernando Salvo Torres; de LIMA-JÚNIOR, Zailton Bezerra; FERREIRA, Cícero Faustino; CAVALCANTI, Amanda Dantas Ferreira; DIAS-FILHO, Adalberto Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Background The choice of surgical technique to approach the appendicular stump depends mostly on skill and personal preference of the surgeon or on the protocol used in the service, and the influence of this choice in hospitalization time is not evaluated. Aim To evaluate the relation between surgical technique and postoperative hospitalization time in patients presenting with acute appendicitis. Methods Retrospective analysis of 180 patients who underwent open appendectomy. These where divided into three groups according to surgical technique: conventional appendectomy (simple ligation of the stump), tobacco pouch suture and Parker-Kerr suture. Data where crossed with hospitalization time (until three days, from four to six days and over seven days). Results A hundred and eighty patients with age from 15 to 85 years where included. From these, 95 underwent conventional technique, had an average hospitalization time of 3,9 days and seven had complications (surgical site infection, seroma, suture dehiscence and evisceration). In 67 patients, tobacco pouch suture was chosen and had average hospitalization time of 3,7 days and two complications (infection and seroma). In 18 Parker-Kerr suture was made, with average hospitalization time of 2,6 days, with no complication. Contingency coefficient between the variables hospitalization time and technique was 0,255 and Cramér's V was 0,186. Conclusion There was tendency to larger hospitalization time and larger number of complications in conventional appendectomy, whereas in patients where Parker-Kerr suture was performed, hospitalization time was significantly smaller. PMID:25184769

  14. Surgical and anaesthetic capacity of hospitals in Malawi: key insights

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jaymie Ang; Frenkel, Erica; Borgstein, Eric; Mkandawire, Nyengo; Goddia, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgery is increasingly recognized as an important driver for health systems strengthening, especially in developing countries. To facilitate quality improvement initiatives, baseline knowledge of capacity for surgical, anaesthetic, emergency and obstetric care is critical. In partnership with the Malawi Ministry of Health, we quantified government hospitals’ surgical capacity through workforce, infrastructure and health service delivery components. Methods From November 2012 to January 2013, we surveyed district and mission hospital administrators and clinical staff onsite using a modified version of the Personnel, Infrastructure, Procedures, Equipment and Supplies (PIPES) tool from Surgeons OverSeas. We calculated percentage of facilities demonstrating adequacy of the assessed components, surgical case rates, operating theatre density and surgical workforce density. Results Twenty-seven government hospitals were surveyed (90% of the district hospitals, all central hospitals). Of the surgical workforce surveyed (n = 370), 92.7% were non-surgeons and 77% were clinical officers (COs). Of the 109 anaesthesia providers, 95.4% were non-physician anaesthetists (anaesthesia COs or ACOs). Non-surgeons and ACOs were the only providers of surgical services and anaesthetic services in 85% and 88.9% of hospitals, respectively. No specialists served the district hospitals. All of the hospitals experienced periods without external electricity. Most did not always have a functioning generator (78.3% district, 25% central) or running water (82.6%, 50%). None of the district hospitals had an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Cricothyroidotomy, bowel resection and cholecystectomy were not done in over two-thirds of hospitals. Every hospital provided general anaesthesia but some did not always have a functioning anaesthesia machine (52.2%, 50%). Surgical rate, operating theatre density and surgical workforce density per 100 000 population was 289.48–747.38 procedures, 0

  15. Experience and Consequences on the Deployments of the Medical Services of the German Army in Foreign Countries - Surgical Aspects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    RTO-MP-HFM-109 41 - 1 Experience and Consequences on the Deployments of the Medical Services of the German Army in Foreign Countries...army medical services lead to new experiences concerning personal, training, preparation, support, equipment and standardisation. The consequences...are not only important for the surgical work but also for anaesthesiology , intensive care, internal medicine and neurology and psychiatry. The

  16. District nursing sister attached to hospital surgical department.

    PubMed

    Hockey, L

    1970-04-18

    An experiment of attaching a district nursing sister to the surgical department of a general hospital was designed to show the use of the district nursing service for the after-care of patients discharged from hospital after surgical treatment. In a 15-week period about 590 bed days were saved, and only six out of 126 patients discharged early had to be readmitted. Most of the patients and the general practitioners who replied to questionaries about the scheme were in favour of it.

  17. Relationship between Patient Safety and Hospital Surgical Volume

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Downey, John R; McDonald, Kathryn; Morton, John M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between hospital volume and in-hospital adverse events. Data Sources Patient safety indicator (PSI) was used to identify hospital-acquired adverse events in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database in abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery bypass graft, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass from 2005 to 2008. Study Design In this observational study, volume thresholds were defined by mean year-specific terciles. PSI risk-adjusted rates were analyzed by volume tercile for each procedure. Principal Findings Overall, hospital volume was inversely related to preventable adverse events. High-volume hospitals had significantly lower risk-adjusted PSI rates compared to lower volume hospitals (p < .05). Conclusion These data support the relationship between hospital volume and quality health care delivery in select surgical cases. This study highlights differences between hospital volume and risk-adjusted PSI rates for three common surgical procedures and highlights areas of focus for future studies to identify pathways to reduce hospital-acquired events. PMID:22091561

  18. To Determine the Method of Scheduling Surgery to Optimize Utilization of Surgical Resources at Landstuhl Army Regional Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    DETERMINE THE METHOD VF SCHEDULING SURGERY TO OPTIMIZE UTILIZATION OF SURGICAL RESOURCES AT LANDSTUHL ARMY REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR...GROUP Health Care, Surgery Scheduling 19, ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) This study was conducted to determine...the optimum method of scheduling surgery to make maximum use of the surgical facilities at Landstuhl Army Regional Medical Center. Current scheduling

  19. Predicting U.S. Army suicides after hospitalizations with psychiatric diagnoses in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Warner, LTC Christopher H.; Ivany, LTC Christopher; Petukhova, Maria V.; Rose, Sherri; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Brown, LTC Millard; Cai, Tianxi; Colpe, Lisa J.; Cox, Kenneth L.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Li, Junlong; Millikan-Bell, Amy M.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Rosellini, Anthony J.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.; Wessely, Simon; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The U.S. Army experienced a sharp rise in suicides beginning in 2004. Administrative data show that among those at highest risk are soldiers in the 12 months after inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder. OBJECTIVE To develop an actuarial risk algorithm predicting suicide in the 12 months after US Army soldier inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder to target expanded post-hospital care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS There were 53,769 hospitalizations of active duty soldiers in 2004–2009 with ICD-9-CM psychiatric admission diagnoses. Administrative data available prior to hospital discharge abstracted from a wide range of data systems (socio81 demographic, Army career, criminal justice, medical/pharmacy) were used to predict suicides in the subsequent 12 months using machine learning methods (regression trees, penalized regressions) designed to evaluate cross-validated linear, nonlinear, and interactive predictive associations. MAIN OUTCOME Suicides of soldiers hospitalized with psychiatric disorders in the 12 months after hospital discharge. RESULTS 68 soldiers died by suicide within 12 months of hospital discharge (12.0% of all Army suicides), equivalent to 263.9 suicides/100,000 person-years compared to 18.5 suicides/100,000 person-years in the total Army. Strongest predictors included socio-demographics (male, late age of enlistment), criminal offenses (verbal violence, weapons possession), prior suicidality, aspects of prior psychiatric inpatient and outpatient treatment, and disorders diagnosed during the focal hospitalizations. 52.9% of post-hospital suicides occurred after the 5% of hospitalizations with highest predicted suicide risk (3,824.1 suicides/100,000 person years). These highest-risk hospitalizations also accounted for significantly elevated proportions of several other adverse post-hospital outcomes (unintentional injury deaths, suicide attempts, re-hospitalizations). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The high concentration

  20. Re-engineering surgical services in a community teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M M; Wreford, M; Barnes, M; Voight, P

    1997-04-01

    The Grace Hospital Surgical Services redesign project began in December 1995 and concluded in November 1996. It was led by the Chief of Surgery, the Surgical/Anesthesia Services Director, and the Associate Director of Critical Care/Trauma. The project was undertaken in order to radically redesign the delivery of surgical services in the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) Northwest Region. It encompassed the Grace Hospital Main Operating Room (10 operating theatres) and Post-Anesthesia Recovery Unit, and a satellite Ambulatory Surgery Center in Southfield, Michigan. The four areas of focus were materials management, case scheduling, patient flow/staffing, and business planning. The guiding objectives of the project were to improve upon the quality of surgical services for patients and physicians, to substantially reduce costs, and to increase case volume. Because the Grace Surgical Services redesign project was conducted in a markedly open communicative, and inclusive fashion and drew participation from a broad range of medical professionals, support staff, and management, it created positive ripple effects across the institution by raising staff cost-consciousness, satisfaction, and morale. Other important accomplishments of the project included: Introduction of block scheduling in the ORs, which improved room utilization and turnaround efficiencies, and greatly smoothed the boarding process for physicians. Centralization of all surgical boarding, upgrading of computer equipment to implement "one call" surgery scheduling, and enlarging the capacity for archiving, managing and retrieving OR data. Installation of a 23-hour, overnight recovery unit and provision of physician assistants at the Ambulatory Surgery Center, opening the doors to an expanded number of surgical procedures, and enabling higher quality care for patients. Reduction of FTE positions by 27 percent at the Ambulatory Surgery Center. This yielded a total cost reduction of +1.5 million per annum in the

  1. Physician-owned Surgical Hospitals Outperform Other Hospitals in the Medicare Value-based Purchasing Program

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Adriana G; Tracci, Margaret C; Stukenborg, George J; Turrentine, Florence E; Kozower, Benjamin D; Jones, R Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background The Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program measures value of care provided by participating Medicare hospitals while creating financial incentives for quality improvement and fostering increased transparency. Limited information is available comparing hospital performance across healthcare business models. Study Design 2015 hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program results were used to examine hospital performance by business model. General linear modeling assessed differences in mean total performance score, hospital case mix index, and differences after adjustment for differences in hospital case mix index. Results Of 3089 hospitals with Total Performance Scores (TPS), categories of representative healthcare business models included 104 Physician-owned Surgical Hospitals (POSH), 111 University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC), 14 US News & World Report Honor Roll (USNWR) Hospitals, 33 Kaiser Permanente, and 124 Pioneer Accountable Care Organization affiliated hospitals. Estimated mean TPS for POSH (64.4, 95% CI 61.83, 66.38) and Kaiser (60.79, 95% CI 56.56, 65.03) were significantly higher compared to all remaining hospitals while UHC members (36.8, 95% CI 34.51, 39.17) performed below the mean (p < 0.0001). Significant differences in mean hospital case mix index included POSH (mean 2.32, p<0.0001), USNWR honorees (mean 2.24, p 0.0140) and UHC members (mean =1.99, p<0.0001) while Kaiser Permanente hospitals had lower case mix value (mean =1.54, p<0.0001). Re-estimation of TPS did not change the original results after adjustment for differences in hospital case mix index. Conclusions The Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program revealed superior hospital performance associated with business model. Closer inspection of high-value hospitals may guide value improvement and policy-making decisions for all Medicare Value-Based Purchasing Program Hospitals. PMID:27502368

  2. Hazardous Waste Surveys of Two Army Installations and an Army Hospital.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    232 Nickel-63 Uranium-238 Plutonium-239 Polonium - 210 6 Army Medical Treatment Facilities: General Administration Army Regulation (AR) 40-2, 42A peren...Adhesive BN R 0x AU DOI545AO GI. 312 F 44 0,3 27)d17 N6341( 2 14,5 0 6 Adhesive 81 A XY AO D041419A0 PI 210 82140 O0 5824596 RO.34 140376139 Adhesi E ON...C010101A DR I 1b40 00 2671565 14004068342F650 Cloth. Asbestos GA N xx 60 LMS640026 no 2 6540 00 267157) h004068342F651 Cloth. Asbestos GA N Xx GO LN5640026

  3. A Study to Determine the Best Method of Delivering Nutrition Education Services at Darnall Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    University Graduate Program in Darnall, Army Comm. Hospital N/A Health Care Administration 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City...Services .................... 52 III. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS ......................... 54 APPENDIX A. NUTRITION CARE DIVISION ORGANIZATION...53 ii I. INTRODUCTION Conditions Which Prompted The Study The mission of the Army hospital Nutrition Care Division (NCD) is "to provide

  4. An Analysis of a Program to Identify and Quantify Standards of Performance for U.S. Army Hospital Food Services for the Purpose of Quality Assurance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    the wards. 3. Silas B. Hays Army Cormnunity Hospital is located at Fort Ord, California. The hospital has 169 operating beds . A number of specialties... Hospital is a 238 bed hospital located at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. The majority of patients seen are basic trainees with relatively minor injuries...home of the Army Command and General Staff College and the Army Detention Facility. The hospital is a 46 bed hospital averaging about 34 occupied beds

  5. [Management of Grave's disease in the tropics (experience at Bouffard Army Hospital Center in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Coulet, O; Kraemer, P; Leyral, G; Cloatre, G

    2004-01-01

    Based on their experience in managing Grave's disease at the Bouffard Army Hospital Center within the local health care context in Djibouti, the authors advocate surgery as the first line treatment. Medical and economical factors supporting this preference are discussed so that readers can adapt them to his own local context.

  6. A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Establishing a Wellness Center at Martin Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-06

    MTF) establish a Wellness/Health Promotion Center to provide the services needed to support the wellness concepto (Department of the Army, 1984). 2...Directive 1010.10 (Health Promotion). 6. It is recommended that a marketing plan be developed for the wellness center. The plan should include articles for...1981). Wellness programs attract new markets for hospitals. Hospitals, 55(22), 115-116, 119. Manring, S.L. (1985). Evaluating corporate wellness and

  7. A Study of Health Care Needs of the Community Served by Kimbrough Army Community Hospital, Fort Meade, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    hospital acute care capacity is measured in patient beds and utilization is measured and projected in terms of patient days or admissions times length...the Community Served by Kimbrough Army Comunity Hospital , Ft. Meade, Maryland 12. PERSONAL AUITHOR(S) Captain Donald C. Curry, Jr., 13a. TYPE OF REPORT...COMMUNITY SERVED BY KIMBROUGH ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL FORT MEADE, MARYLAND A Problem Solving Project Submitted to the Faculty of Baylor University In

  8. Energy Engineering Analysis Program. Irwin Army Community Hospital, Fort Riley, Kansas. Volume 2. Narrative. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    This report covers the Prefinal Submittal for Study of Irwin Army Community Hospital Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Fort Riley, Kansas. Generally, this project consists of conducting and analyzing a coordinated energy study, including a detailed energy survey of the entire hospital facility while integrating any available prior or on-going energy conservation studies. Included in this study are the Hospital (Building 600), the Energy Plant (Building 615), Nurses Quarters (Building 610), family housing barracks Barnes Hall (Building 620) and Kimball Hall (Building 621). Illustrated in Exhibit No. 1 is the site plan showing the general location of the five buildings in the hospital complex. Identify and analyze all possible Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECO`s) in and around the five building hospital complex. Analysis to include energy savings, dollar savings, cost of implementation, simple payback period, savings to investment ratio and life cycle cost analysis. Recommend Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECO`s) for energy programming implementation.

  9. Surgical education and training in an outer metropolitan hospital: a qualitative study of surgical trainers and trainees.

    PubMed

    Nestel, Debra; Harlim, Jennifer; Bryant, Melanie; Rampersad, Rajay; Hunter-Smith, David; Spychal, Bob

    2016-07-14

    The landscape of surgical training is changing. The anticipated increase in the numbers of surgical trainees and the shift to competency-based surgical training places pressures on an already stretched health service. With these pressures in mind, we explored trainers' and trainees' experiences of surgical training in a less traditional rotation, an outer metropolitan hospital. We considered practice-based learning theories to make meaning of surgical training in this setting, in particular Actor-network theory. We adopted a qualitative approach and purposively sampled surgical trainers and trainees to participate in individual interviews and focus groups respectively. Transcripts were made and thematically analysed. Institutional human research ethics approval was obtained. Four surgical trainers and fourteen trainees participated. Almost without exception, participants' report training needs to be well met. Emergent inter-related themes were: learning as social activity; learning and programmatic factors; learning and physical infrastructure; and, learning and organizational structure. This outer metropolitan hospital is suited to the provision of surgical training with the current rotational system for trainees. The setting offers experiences that enable consolidation of learning providing a rich and varied overall surgical training program. Although relational elements of learning were paramount they occurred within a complex environment. Actor-network theory was used to give meaning to emergent themes acknowledging that actors (both people and objects) and their interactions combine to influence training quality, shifting the focus of responsibility for learning away from individuals to the complex interactions in which they work and learn.

  10. Implementing DRGs at Silas B. Hays Army Community Hospital: Enhancement of Utilization Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    ROTC Cadet F80 USAF ROTC Cadet US Uniformed Services Personnel Permanently Retired (Length of Service or PDRL): A30 Army N30 Navy M30 Marine Corps F30...representing the Resource Management Division of Health Services Command ( HSC ). This reallocation was based on five percent of the difference between supply... HSC would allocate all supply dollars by the DRG system within two years with a potential loss to the Fort Ord hospital of over $900 thousand compared

  11. Graduate Management Project (GMP). Developing a Health Information Plan for Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    Mail ® on the new LAN which was not available on the hospital’s older system. MEDCOM, and most of the medical organizations in the Army were quickly...migrating to CC Mail ® as the primary means of communication of electronic mail (e- mail ) and required that executive staff be connected. Shortly...they could receive the deluge of information being passed along in the new application. Along with the use of CC Mail ®, other upgraded versions of

  12. [Surgical service at the Central Military Hospital of People's Commissariat of Defence shortly before the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Krainyukov, P E; Efimenko, N A; Abashin, V G

    2015-04-01

    Authors present the article historical data on the foundation and development of surgical service at the 1st Therapeutic Red Cross Hospital (Central Military Hospital of People's Commissariat. of Defense) since its organization. The structure of the hospital surgical service and organization of surgical activity during the pre-war years is presented. Provided information about outstanding surgeons who was working in the hospital.

  13. Surgical team member assessment of the safety of surgery practice in 38 South Carolina hospitals.

    PubMed

    Singer, Sara J; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Lyen C; Gibbons, Lorri; Kiang, Mathew V; Edmondson, Lizabeth; Gawande, Atul A; Berry, William R

    2015-06-01

    We assessed surgical team member perceptions of multiple dimensions of safe surgical practice in 38 South Carolina hospitals participating in a statewide initiative to implement surgical safety checklists. Primary data were collected using a novel 35-item survey. We calculated the percentage of 1,852 respondents with strongly positive, positive, and neutral/negative responses about the safety of surgical practice, compared results by hospital and professional discipline, and examined how readiness, teamwork, and adherence related to staff perception of care quality. Overall, 78% of responses were positive about surgical safety at respondent's hospitals, but in each survey dimension, from 16% to 40% of responses were neutral/negative, suggesting significant opportunity to improve surgical safety. Respondents not reporting they would feel safe being treated in their operating rooms varied from 0% to 57% among hospitals. Surgeons responded more positively than nonsurgeons. Readiness, teamwork, and practice adherence related directly to staff perceptions of patient safety (p < .001).

  14. A Resource Planning Analysis of District Hospital Surgical Services in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Sion, Melanie; Rajan, Dheepa; Kalambay, Hyppolite; Lokonga, Jean-Pierre; Bulakali, Joseph; Mossoko, Mathias; Kwete, Dieudonne; Schmets, Gerard; Kelley, Edward; Elongo, Tarcisse; Sambo, Luis; Cherian, Meena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The impact of surgical conditions on global health, particularly on vulnerable populations, is gaining recognition. However, only 3.5% of the 234.2 million cases per year of major surgery are performed in countries where the world's poorest third reside, such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Methods: Data on the availability of anesthesia and surgical services were gathered from 12 DRC district hospitals using the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Emergency and Essential Surgical Care Situation Analysis Tool. We complemented these data with an analysis of the costs of surgical services in a Congolese norms-based district hospital as well as in 2 of the 12 hospitals in which we conducted the situational analysis (Demba and Kabare District Hospitals). For the cost analysis, we used WHO's integrated Healthcare Technology Package tool. Results: Of the 32 surgical interventions surveyed, only 2 of the 12 hospitals provided all essential services. The deficits in procedures varied from no deficits to 17 services that could not be provided, with an average of 7 essential procedures unavailable. Many of the hospitals did not have basic infrastructure such as running water and electricity; 9 of 12 had no or interrupted water and 7 of 12 had no or interrupted electricity. On average, 21% of lifesaving surgical interventions were absent from the facilities, compared with the model normative hospital. According to the normative hospital, all surgical services would cost US$2.17 per inhabitant per year, representing 33.3% of the total patient caseload but only 18.3% of the total district hospital operating budget. At Demba Hospital, the operating budget required for surgical interventions was US$0.08 per inhabitant per year, and at Kabare Hospital, US$0.69 per inhabitant per year. Conclusion: A significant portion of the health problems addressed at Congolese district hospitals is surgical in nature, but there is a current inability to meet

  15. [Structural and clinical characteristics of elderly and senile patients' treatment in regional surgical hospital].

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, A O; Seĭdinov, Sh M; Iusupov, A A

    2011-01-01

    Treatment results of 1219 patients of elderly and senile age, hospitalized in surgical departments of Turkestan during 2001-2008 were analyzed. Demographic characteristics, spectrum of profile pathology as well as concurrent diseases were given. Operative activity and average hospital stay, hospital lethality and complication rates were defined.

  16. Sentinel node biopsy in the surgical management of breast cancer: experience in a general hospital with a dedicated surgical team.

    PubMed

    Merson, M; Fenaroli, P; Gianatti, A; Virotta, G; Giuliano, L G; Bonasegale, A; Bambina, S; Pericotti, S; Guerra, U; Tondini, C

    2004-06-01

    The aims of this study were to analyse the feasibility and accuracy of the sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) procedure as performed in a general hospital compared with the literature results; to report on the organizational aspects of planning surgical time with higher accuracy of pathological analysis; and to verify that there is a real advantage of SLNB in the surgical management of breast cancer. From October 1999 to September 2000, 371 consecutive patients with T1-2N0 breast lesions underwent SLNB. The immunoscintigraphic method of sentinel node identification was the main one used, the blue dye method being used only when the lymphoscintigraphic method was unsuccessful in identifying sentinel nodes. SLNB was done under either general or local anaesthesia, depending on how the surgical procedure was organized and clinically planned. SLNB was successful in 99% of these T1-2N0 breast cancer cases, and in 71% no metastases were found in the sentinel node. In 47% of cases with axillary metastasis only the sentinel node was involved. Nodal involvement was not present in any case of microinvasive or in situ carcinoma. In T1 cancers nodal involvement was present in 21%; in T2 cases the corresponding rate reached 51%. The results obtained with the SLNB procedure at Bergamo Hospital are similar to the literature data. When a dedicated surgical team, the nuclear medicine department and the pathology department work together, a general hospital can provide breast cancer patients with appropriate surgical treatment.

  17. Alternatives to Address Role Clarification at the U.S. Army Community Hospital, Fort Polk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Consultant Occ. Health GMO My role is: a. Flight Surgeon - - aviation physicals, Class I, IA, 1I, III Up and down slips 4156 (F/ S only) Waiver authority for...unlimited 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) 5. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) 87-88 •0. NAME OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 6b. OFFICE...U.S. Army Community Hospital, Ft Polk 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR( S ) CPT Robert J. He-rckert. Jr. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year

  18. [Clinical features in fatal Spanish influenza: Japanese Army Hospital medical records investigation].

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Yuji; Kawana, Akihiko; Kato, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Yasutaka; Kudo, Koichiro

    2010-03-01

    Pandemic influenza preparedness requires a thorough knowledge of past pandemics. Tokyo First Army Hospital medical records from January 1918 to December 1920 found recently included 132 consecutive records of those diagnosed with influenza. We report on the clinical features in 8 fatal cases. Inpatient mortality was found to be 6.1% (8/132). Cough was noted in 6 (75%) and thoracic rales in 8 (100%) on admission, mimicking pneumonia. Bloody sputum was noted in 5 (62.5%) and diarrhea in 4 (50%), with marked hemorrhagic and digestive symptoms, resembling highly pathogenic avian influenza. Clinical features may differ from seasonal influenza, making early detection and treatment essential especially in severe cases.

  19. Pharmaceutical services in an Army field hospital in Haiti during Operation Uphold Democracy.

    PubMed

    Frank, K J

    1996-07-15

    The pharmaceutical services provided by an Army field hospital in Haiti during Operation Uphold Democracy are described. In January 1995, 155 soldiers of the 47th Field Hospital from Ft. Sill, Oklahoma, were deployed to Haiti to provide medical care for 2400 U.S. troops and 7000 multinational troops and police officers. The pharmacy staff (one pharmacist and two technicians) provided patient counseling, drug information, staff consultation, and clinical support to the intensive and intermediate care wards and emergency medical tent of the field hospital. Other responsibilities were providing nonprescription drugs to outpatients, interpreting and evaluating drug orders, participating in drug selection, and ordering supplies. A 30- to 60-day drug supply was maintained. The formulary was designed by the pharmacist and an internist and was based on the mission requirements and conditions in Haiti. Of the 10 oral medications most commonly dispensed to outpatients, 6 were antibacterials and 1 was an antimalarial. An average of two patients were admitted to the hospital daily. Some 240 inpatients were recorded in the pharmacy computer during the hospital's six-month deployment, and more than 5000 were treated in the emergency tent. The pharmacy service of the 47th Field Hospital met the challenge of supporting U.S. and multinational troops in Haiti during Operation Uphold Democracy.

  20. How Does Degree of Rurality Impact the Provision of Surgical Services at Rural Hospitals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Brit; Zuckerman, Randall; Finlayson, Samuel; Jenkins, Paul; Rieb, Nathaniel; Heneghan, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Context: Rural residents frequently have decreased access to surgical services. Consequences of this situation include increased travel time and financial costs for patients. There are also economic implications for hospitals as they may lose revenue when patients leave the area in order to obtain surgical services. Rural communities vary in size…

  1. Perception of the nursing team of a Surgical Center regarding Hospital Accreditation at a University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Hellen Maria de Lima Graf; Peniche, Aparecida de Cássia Giani

    2015-02-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of nursing teams at a surgical center regarding the process of hospital accreditation, in the evaluative aspects of structure, process, and result. Method The study takes a quantitative and exploratory-descriptive approach, carried out at a university hospital. Result The population consisted of 69 nursing professionals, and the data collection was performed in the months of January and February 2014 by way of a questionnaire, utilizing the Likert scale. The methodology used a Cronbach's Alpha equal to 0.812. In the comparison of the three aspects, the one with the highest favorability score was "result", with an average of 47.12 (dp±7.23), and the smallest was "structure," with an average of 40.70 (dp±5.19). Conclusion This situational diagnostic can assist in the restructuring of the vulnerable areas evaluated in these three aspects, mainly in the aspect of structure, with a goal of level 2 accreditation by the ONA (Brazilian's National Organization for Accreditation) defended by the Institution.

  2. [Surgical treatment for gastric cancer in a specialized service: the Rebagliati Hospital experience].

    PubMed

    Portanova, Michel; Vargas, Fernando; Lombardi, Emilio; Carbajal, Ramiro; Palacios, Nestor; Rodriguez, Cesar; Orrego, Jorge; Ferreyra, Mario

    2005-01-01

    The results of the surgical treatment for gastric cancer within a specialized surgical service in this pathology are described in this work. This system for surgical treatment of gastric cancer is new in our country. The implementation process included prepare a team of surgeons and establish protocols and guides to surgical treatment, based on the recommendations of the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association. Additional training in the Japanese advanced surgical technique was required, as well as a strict documentation of the cases. During 2004, 139 surgical interventions were carried out on 137 patients with tumoral gastric pathology. Surgical mortality was 2.1% and morbidity was 21.8%. The average resected glands was 38.6.t 13.7 (range: 20-87) for distal gastrectomy and 46.6 +/- 16.2 (range: 24-87) for total gastrectomy. The stay in the hospital was 11.7 +/- 6.3 days (range: 5-37) for distal gastrectomy and 14.8 +/- 11.3 days (range: 7-56) for total gastrectomy. The hospital and surgeon volumes are underlined as important factors in determining the short and long term results. Implementation of specialized surgical units in general hospitals, for surgical treatment of gastric cancer, is recommended.

  3. 1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Max; Meunier, Bethann; Trottier, Vincent; Christian, Michael; Hillier, Tracey; Berger, Chris; McAlister, Vivian; Taylor, Scott

    2012-08-01

    The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.

  4. A Study to Determine Methods to Improve Patient Awareness at Moncrief Army Hospital, Fort Jackson, South Carolina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    MAVOtDS TO IMPROVE PATIENT AWARENESS AT MONCRIEF ARMY HOSPITAL, FORT JACKSON , SOUTH CAROLINA I WNfAL A~TO 1,UdPE OF REPORT 1 3b. MT VWDi l0 TT4. DAOF&PORT...MONCRIEF ARMY HOSPITAL FORT JACKSON , SOUTH CAROLINA A Problem Solving Project Submitted to the Faculty of Saylor University In Partial Fulfillment of...3Bloch, p. 54. 41bid., p. 53 5Cunningham, p. 68 6Ibid., p. 67. 7Bloch, p. 53. 8Christina Maslach , "Burned-Out," Human Behavior, September 1976, p. 17

  5. 78 FR 54842 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... -1 Genitourinary system 159 5 Integumentary system 130 8 Respiratory system 46 7 Cardiovascular... Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; Hospital Value-Based Purchasing... Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program; Organ...

  6. Recurrence of inguinal hernias repaired in a large hernia surgical specialty hospital and general hospitals in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Atiqa; Bell, Chaim M.; Stukel, Thérèse A.; Urbach, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of hospital specialization on the risk of hernia recurrence after inguinal hernia repair is not well described. Methods We studied Ontario residents who had primary elective inguinal hernia repair at an Ontario hospital between 1993 and 2007 using population-based, administrative health data. We compared patients from a large hernia specialty hospital (Shouldice Hospital) with those from general hospitals to determine the risk of recurrence. Results We studied 235 192 patients, 27.7% of whom had surgery at Shouldice hospital. The age-standardized proportion of patients who had a recurrence ranged from 5.21% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.94%–5.49%) among patients who had surgery at the lowest volume general hospitals to 4.79% (95% CI 4.54%–5.04%) who had surgery at the highest volume general hospitals. In contrast, patients who had surgery at the Shouldice Hospital had an age-standardized recurrence risk of 1.15% (95% CI 1.05%–1.25%). Compared with patients who had surgery at the lowest volume hospitals, hernia recurrence among those treated at the Shouldice Hospital was significantly lower after adjustment for the effects of age, sex, comorbidity and income level (adjusted hazard ratio 0.21, 95% CI 0.19–0.23, p < 0.001). Conclusion Inguinal hernia repair at Shouldice Hospital was associated with a significantly lower risk of subsequent surgery for recurrence than repair at a general hospital. While specialty hospitals may have better outcomes for treatment of common surgical conditions than general hospitals, these benefits must be weighed against potential negative impacts on clinical care and the financial sustainability of general hospitals. PMID:26574701

  7. Recommendations for surgical safety checklist use in Canadian children’s hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Skarsgard, Erik D.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is ample evidence that avoidable harm occurs in patients, including children, who undergo surgical procedures. Among a number of harm mitigation strategies, the use of surgical safety checklists (SSC) is now a required organizational practice for accreditation in all North American hospitals. Although much has been written about the effects of SSC on outcomes of adult surgical patients, there is a paucity of literature on the use and role of the SSC as an enabler of safe surgery for children. Methods The Pediatric Surgical Chiefs of Canada (PSCC) advocates on behalf of all Canadian children undergoing surgical procedures. We undertook a survey of the use of SSC in Canadian children’s hospitals to understand the variability of implementation of the SSC and understand its role as both a measure and driver of patient safety and to make specific recommendations (based on survey results and evidence) for standardized use of the SSC in Canadian children’s hospitals. Results Survey responses were received from all 15 children’s hospitals and demonstrated significant variability in how the checklist is executed, how compliance is measured and reported, and whether or not use of the checklist resulted in specific instances of error prevention over a 12-month observation period. There was near unanimous agreement that use of the SSC contributed positively to the safety culture of the operating room. Conclusion Based on the survey results, the PSCC have made 5 recommendations regarding the use of the SSC in Canadian children’s hospitals. PMID:27240284

  8. Reducing serious injury from falls in two veterans' hospital medical-surgical units.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Patricia A; Hahm, Bridget; Collazo, Sonia; Gibson, Wanda; Janzen, Sandra; Powell-Cope, Gail; Rice, Fanny; Sarduy, Innette; Tyndall, Kyna; White, Susan V

    2009-01-01

    A large veteran's hospital participated in a year-long collaborative project across 9 hospitals to reduce serious injury from falls in acute care, targeting medical-surgical units. The primary objective of this project was to develop and test a set of interventions (bundles) to prevent serious physical injury (fractures and hemorrhagic bleeds) from patient falls. The interventions were implemented using tests of change on 2 medical-surgical units focused on engaging unit-based staff and combining innovations for vulnerable populations at greatest risk for injury if they fall.

  9. An MRP system for surgical linen management at a large hospital.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, L; Murphy, M; Gray, D; Stoner, T

    2001-02-01

    Materials Requirements Planning (MRP) has been used extensively in manufacturing and other industries to improve on-time delivery and to reduce costs. In this paper, we illustrate how an MRP-type system was developed to monitor surgical linen at a large teaching hospital. We also describe a bar-code scanning 'tag and recapture' study to estimate total inventory. The hospital implemented several changes based upon our recommendations that resulted in time savings and a smoother flow of materials throughout the surgical linen supply chain.

  10. Patient Safety Events and Harms During Medical and Surgical Hospitalizations for Persons With Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Daumit, Gail L.; McGinty, Emma E.; Pronovost, Peter; Dixon, Lisa B.; Guallar, Eliseo; Ford, Daniel E.; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Boonyasai, Romsai T.; Thompson, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study explored the risk of patient safety events and associated nonfatal physical harms and mortality in a cohort of persons with serious mental illness. This group experiences high rates of medical comorbidity and premature mortality and may be at high risk of adverse patient safety events. Methods Medical record review was conducted for medical-surgical hospitalizations occurring during 1994–2004 in a community-based cohort of Maryland adults with serious mental illness. Individuals were eligible if they died within 30 days of a medical-surgical hospitalization and if they also had at least one prior medical-surgical hospitalization within five years of death. All admissions took place at Maryland general hospitals. A case-crossover analysis examined the relationships among patient safety events, physical harms, and elevated likelihood of death within 30 days of hospitalization. Results A total of 790 hospitalizations among 253 adults were reviewed. The mean number of patient safety events per hospitalization was 5.8, and the rate of physical harms was 142 per 100 hospitalizations. The odds of physical harm were elevated in hospitalizations in which 22 of the 34 patient safety events occurred (p<.05), including medical events (odds ratio [OR]=1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.3–1.7) and procedure-related events (OR=1.6, CI=1.2–2.0). Adjusted odds of death within 30 days of hospitalization were elevated for individuals with any patient safety event, compared with those with no event (OR=3.7, CI=1.4–10.3). Conclusions Patient safety events were positively associated with physical harm and 30-day mortality in nonpsychiatric hospitalizations for persons with serious mental illness. PMID:27181736

  11. US Army Institute of Surgical Research Annual Research Progress Report FY 1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    alcohol or drug abuse, and child neglect), to burned patients with associated injuries. to any patient with a more than ten percent preburn weight...are being investigated. pow JtVI DS OTIONG OF T1419 FORM AWEG 08DEETE. D PORN 1496A. I NOV 00 DDO&OŕNO ’A’:6 l 1 MAN O (FOR ARMY? USg~ OUDELE.TE. X

  12. A hospital cost analysis of a fibrin sealant patch in soft tissue and hepatic surgical bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Mitra; Ferko, Nicole; Hogan, Andrew; Hollmann, Sarah S; Gangoli, Gaurav; Jamous, Nadine; Batiller, Jonathan; Kocharian, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite hemostat use, uncontrolled surgical bleeding is prevalent. Drawbacks of current hemostats include limitations with efficacy on first attempt and suboptimal ease-of-use. Evarrest® is a novel fibrin sealant patch that has demonstrated high hemostatic efficacy compared with standard of care across bleeding severities. The objective of this study was to conduct a hospital cost analysis of the fibrin sealant patch versus standard of care in soft tissue and hepatic surgical bleeding. Methods The analysis quantified the 30-day costs of each comparator from a hospital perspective. Published US unit costs were applied to resource use (ie, initial treatment, retreatment, operating time, hospitalization, transfusion, and ventilator) reported in four trials. A “surgical” analysis included resources clinically related to the hemostatic benefit of the fibrin sealant patch, whereas a “hospital” analysis included all resources reported in the trials. An exploratory subgroup analysis focused solely on coagulopathic patients defined by abnormal blood test results. Results The surgical analysis predicted cost savings of $54 per patient with the fibrin sealant patch compared with standard of care (net cost impact: −$54 per patient; sensitivity range: −$1,320 to $1,213). The hospital analysis predicted further cost savings with the fibrin sealant patch (net cost impact of −$2,846 per patient; sensitivity range: −$1,483 to −$5,575). Subgroup analyses suggest that the fibrin sealant patch may provide dramatic cost savings in the coagulopathic subgroup of $3,233 (surgical) and $9,287 (hospital) per patient. Results were most sensitive to operating time and product units. Conclusion In soft tissue and hepatic problematic surgical bleeding, the fibrin sealant patch may result in important hospital cost savings. PMID:27703386

  13. 78 FR 74825 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ...This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2014 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors......

  14. [Early gastric cancer surgically treated at Rebagliati Hospital: study of 76 cases during 5 years].

    PubMed

    Portanova, Michel; Mena, Victor; Yábar, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the characteristics of early gastric cancer surgically treated in the Gastric Cancer Unit at Rebagliati National Hospital between January 2004 and December 2008. Mean age was 68 years; males, distal location, submucosa infiltration and intestinal histological type predominate in these patients. Lymph node involvement was 13%.

  15. 78 FR 43533 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ...This proposed rule would revise the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2014 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this proposed rule, we describe the proposed changes to the amounts and factors used to determine......

  16. Use of a Patient Portal During Hospital Admissions to Surgical Services

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jamie R.; Davis, Sharon E.; Cronin, Robert M.; Jackson, Gretchen P.

    2016-01-01

    Patient portal research has focused on medical outpatient settings, with little known about portal use during hospitalizations or by surgical patients. We measured portal adoption among patients admitted to surgical services over two years. Surgical services managed 37,025 admissions of 31,310 unique patients. One-fourth of admissions (9,362, 25.3%) involved patients registered for the portal. Registration rates were highest for admissions to laparoscopic/gastrointestinal (55%) and oncology/endocrine (50%) services. Portal use occurred during 1,486 surgical admissions, 4% of all and 16% of those registered at admission. Inpatient portal use was associated with patients who were white, male, and had longer lengths of stay (p < 0.01). Viewing health record data and secure messaging were the most commonly used functions, accessed in 4,836 (72.9%) and 1,626 (24.5%) user sessions. Without specific encouragement, hospitalized surgical patients are using our patient portal. The surgical inpatient setting may provide opportunities for patient engagement using patient portals. PMID:28269956

  17. The founding of Walter Reed General Hospital and the beginning of modern institutional army medical care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    When Walter Reed United States Army General Hospital opened its doors in 1909, the Spanish-American War had been over for a decade, World War I was in the unforeseeable future, and army hospital admission rates were steadily decreasing. The story of the founding of Walter Reed, which remained one of the flagship military health institutions in the United States until its 2011 closure, is a story about the complexities of the turn of the twentieth century. Broad historical factors-heightened imperial ambitions, a drive to modernize the army and its medical services, and a growing acceptance of hospitals as ideal places for treatment-explain why the institution was so urgently fought for and ultimately won funding at the particular moment it did. The justifications put forth for the establishment of Walter Reed indicate that the provision of publicly funded medical care for soldiers has been predicated not only on a sense of humanitarian commitment to those who serve, but on principles of military efficiency, thrift, pragmatism, and international competition. On a more general level, the story of Walter Reed's founding demonstrates a Progressive Era shift in health services for U.S. soldiers-from temporary, makeshift hospitals to permanent institutions with expansive goals.

  18. [Experience in organizing the surgical work of a garrison hospital in an armed conflict].

    PubMed

    Ulunov, A D; Tatarin, S N; Ivantsov, V A; Teslenko, Iu A; Ismailov, R M; Fokin, Iu N; Lukashov, O V

    2000-02-01

    The authors have summarized organizational experience of surgical work of garrison military hospital strengthened with specialized brigades during the period of armed conflict in Republic of Dagestan (August-September, 1999). From the start of active actions in order to render assistance specialized surgical teams from district military hospital equipped with special kits (at the rate of 7 operations/day during a week) were sent to garrison hospital. In this armed conflict there are features characterising both mine-and-explosive war in Afghanistan and sniper war in Chechen Republic resulting in increase in the number of seriously wounded (up to 46.7%) casualties during Botlikhskiĭ operation constituted 1:4, Novolakskiĭ (Kadarskiĭ)--1:5. Bullet injuries were fatal in 49.4% of the cases, fragmentation (including MET)--50.6%. During 1.5 month of hospital work there were performed 303 surgical interventions. 22.7% of slightly wounded from local garrisons were treated in garrison hospitals. Treatment results--postoperative lethality in gunshot trauma at the given stage constituted 1.1%.

  19. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  20. A Study to Identify the Optimum Method of Providing Biomedical Engineering/Maintenance Support of Radiologic Equipment at General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    This study was done to determine the optimum method of providing biomedical engineering /maintenance support of diagnostic radiologic equipment at...General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital (GLWACH). The study concluded that the optimum method of providing biomedical engineering /maintenance

  1. Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Fort McClellan, Alabama, energy audit of Noble Army Hospital. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1985-06-01

    This report is the executive summary of an Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) Study that was conducted at the Noble Army Hospital, Fort McClellan, Alabama by the firm of BENATECH, INC. Work was begun on the hospital energy audit during November, 1983. The facilities investigated in this EEAP Study include the main hospital (building 292) and certain support facilities (buildings 1789, 1929, 2290 and 3211). The study was a special EEAP Hospital Energy Audit and indentified I ECIP Project, 3 non-ECiP Projects and 13 Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs). The Scope of Work for the hospital study required the performance of a comprehensive energy audit and analysis. If all of the 17 recommended projects and measures are implemented, a 2.3 percent reduction in basewide energy consumption would be realized. A four volume report has been prepared that describes in detail the work accomplished during the study.

  2. A Study to Determine the Best Design for a Family Practice Center at Womack Army Hospital, Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    documentation of competent treatment of patients. 1 2 Since the American Board of Family Practice approval in 1969, the number of training programs has...dency training program and to contain the operations of a growing family medicine program . The area lacked suitable conference and study space...care services at Womack Army Hospital, and in July 1974, a Family Practice residency training program was initiated. The Family Practice Activity was

  3. A comparison of surgical assisting in a prepaid group practice and a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Lewit, E M; Bentkover, J D; Bentkover, S H; Watkins, R N; Hughes, E F

    1980-09-01

    Previous studies of the work loads and time utilization of general surgeons in two different practice settings suggested that paraprofessional surgical assistants (SAs) could reduce surgeon assisting time and perhaps increase productivity. In order to further assess the potential advantage of using SAs as surgical assistants, the present study examines assisting patterns in a prepaid group practice where SAs are used and in a community hospital where only physicians are available to assist. In the prepaid group practice, 87 per cent of general surgical procedures were performed with an assistant; in the c ommunity hospital, 67 per cent of general surgical procedures were performed with an assistant. General practitioners also were found to assist in the community hospital; family practice residents, medical students and "others" also assisted in prepaid group. In both settings, the propensity to use an assistant was positively correlated with operative complexity. On operations of greatest complexity, surgeons were most likely to act as first assistants. The use of SAs was not usually associated with operative sessions longer than when surgeons assisted, except on operations of high complexity. In the prepaid group, SAs also frequently assisted on orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery and obstetrics-gynecology, only occasionally on otolaryngology and plastic surgery, and never on ophthalmology. It appears that in organizations such as a prepaid group practice, where mechanisms for sharing resources exist and incentives are provided to minimize the total cost of surgery, the utilization of SAs might be associated with cost savings. At present, organizational and financial barriers exist to the introduction of paraprofessionals as surgical assistants. It is difficult to advocate the modification of these barriers to facilitate the training and large-scale introduction of this new group of paraprofessionals in the current surgical market where there may already be an

  4. Hospital Blood Transfusion Patterns During Major Noncardiac Surgery and Surgical Mortality.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alicia; Trivedi, Amal N; Jiang, Lan; Vezeridis, Michael; Henderson, William G; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-08-01

    We retrospectively examined intraoperative blood transfusion patterns at US veteran's hospitals through description of national patterns of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion in the elderly; assessment of temporal trends in the use of intraoperative blood transfusion; and relationship of institutional use of intraoperative blood transfusion to hospital 30-day risk-adjusted postoperative mortality rates.Limited data exist on the pattern of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion at the hospital level, and the relationship between intraoperative transfusion rates and institutional surgical outcomes.Using the Department of Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we assigned 424,015 major noncardiac operations among elderly patients (≥65 years) in 117 veteran's hospitals, from 1997 to 2009, into groups based on indication for intraoperative blood transfusion according to literature and clinical guidelines. We then examined institutional variations and temporal trends in surgical blood use based on these indications, and the relationship between these institutional patterns of transfusion and 30-day postoperative mortality.Intraoperative transfusion occurred in 38,056/424,015 operations (9.0%). Among the 64,390 operations with an indication for transfusion, there was wide variation (median: 49.9%, range: 8.7%-76.2%) in hospital transfusion rates, a yearly decline in transfusion rates (average 1.0%/y), and an inverse relationship between hospital intraoperative transfusion rates and hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality (adjusted mortality of 9.8 ± 2.8% vs 8.3 ± 2.1% for lowest and highest tertiles of hospital transfusion rates, respectively, P = 0.02). In contrast, for the 225,782 operations with no indication for transfusion, there was little variation in hospital transfusion rates (median 0.7%, range: 0%-3.4%), no meaningful temporal change in transfusion (average 0.0%/y), and

  5. Epidemiology of paediatric surgical admissions to a government referral hospital in the Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bickler, S. W.; Sanno-Duanda, B.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a paucity of published data on the type of conditions that require surgery among children in sub-Saharan Africa. Such information is necessary for assessing the impact of such conditions on child health and for setting priorities to improve paediatric surgical care. METHODS: Described in the article is a 29-month prospective study of all children aged < 15 years who were admitted to a government referral hospital in the Gambia from January 1996 to May 1998. RESULTS: A total of 1726 children were admitted with surgical problems. Surgical patients accounted for 11.3% of paediatric admissions and 34,625 total inpatient days. The most common admission diagnoses were injuries (46.9%), congenital anomalies (24.3%), and infections requiring surgery (14.5%). The diagnoses that accounted for the greatest number of inpatient days were burns (18.8%), osteomyelitis (15.4%), fractures (12.7%), soft tissue injuries (3.9%), and head injuries (3.4%). Gambian children were rarely admitted for appendicitis and never admitted for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. The leading causes of surgical deaths were burns, congenital anomalies, and injuries other than burns. DISCUSSION: Prevention of childhood injuries and better trauma management, especially at the primary and secondary health care levels, should be the priorities for improving paediatric surgical care in sub-Saharan Africa. Surgical care of children should be considered an essential component of child health programmes in developing countries. PMID:11143193

  6. Effectiveness in professional organizations: the impact of surgeons and surgical staff organizations on the quality of care in hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Flood, A B; Scott, W R; Ewy, W; Forrest, W H

    1982-01-01

    In this research, we examine the relative importance of different structural units in a professional organization, the hospital, as they affect organizational effectiveness. The difficulties of measuring effectiveness in a complex professional organization are discussed, and an adjusted measure of surgical outcome is developed. Data are drawn from a prospective study of over 8,000 surgical patients treated by more than 500 surgeons in 15 hospitals throughout the nation. Two different types of analyses are presented, both indicating that hospital features have more impact on surgical outcomes than do surgeon characteristics. The second analysis assesses the relative importance of specific attributes of the hospital, surgical staff organization, and surgeon characteristics on surgical outcomes. PMID:7152960

  7. Care interaction adding challenges to old patients’ well-being during surgical hospital treatment

    PubMed Central

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2015-01-01

    Today, hospitals offer surgical treatment within a short hospital admission. This brief interaction may challenge the well-being of old patients. The aim of this study was to explore how the well-being of old hospitalized patients was affected by the interaction with staff during a fast-track surgical treatment and hospital admission for colon cancer. We used an ethnographic methodology with field observations and unstructured interviews focusing on one patient at a time (n=9) during a full day; the hours ranging from 7:45 a.m. to 8 p.m. Participants were between 74 and 85 years of age and of both sexes. The study was reported to the Danish Data Protection Agency with reference number (2007-58-0010). The encounter between old patients and the staff was a main theme in our findings elucidating a number of care challenges. The identified care challenges illustrated “well-being as a matter of different perspectives,” “vulnerability in contrast to well-being,” and “staff mix influencing the care encounter.” The experience of well-being in old cancer patients during hospital admission was absent or challenged when staff did not acknowledge their individual vulnerability and needs. PMID:26499314

  8. Care interaction adding challenges to old patients' well-being during surgical hospital treatment.

    PubMed

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2015-01-01

    Today, hospitals offer surgical treatment within a short hospital admission. This brief interaction may challenge the well-being of old patients. The aim of this study was to explore how the well-being of old hospitalized patients was affected by the interaction with staff during a fast-track surgical treatment and hospital admission for colon cancer. We used an ethnographic methodology with field observations and unstructured interviews focusing on one patient at a time (n=9) during a full day; the hours ranging from 7:45 a.m. to 8 p.m. Participants were between 74 and 85 years of age and of both sexes. The study was reported to the Danish Data Protection Agency with reference number (2007-58-0010). The encounter between old patients and the staff was a main theme in our findings elucidating a number of care challenges. The identified care challenges illustrated "well-being as a matter of different perspectives," "vulnerability in contrast to well-being," and "staff mix influencing the care encounter." The experience of well-being in old cancer patients during hospital admission was absent or challenged when staff did not acknowledge their individual vulnerability and needs.

  9. Maximizing appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis for surgical patients: an update from LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City.

    PubMed

    Burke, J P

    2001-09-01

    Errors in antimicrobial prophylaxis for surgical patients remain one of the most frequent types of medication errors in hospitals. Failure to administer the first dose of antimicrobial prophylaxis within the 2-h window of time before incision is associated with 2- to 6-fold increases in rates of surgical site infection. Optimal use of antimicrobial prophylaxis includes proper case selection; use of appropriate agents; proper dosing, route of administration, timing, and duration; and intraoperative dosing when appropriate. Effective use of antimicrobial prophylaxis also requires monitoring of and feedback on patterns of use. Programs to improve antimicrobial prophylaxis should be multidisciplinary and should aim to improve use of medications, not simply to change physician practice patterns. The LDS Hospital experience demonstrates the clinical and financial benefits of such a program and also shows the pitfalls of and great difficulties associated with changing systems of care.

  10. Reducing Avoidable Deaths Among Veterans: Directing Private-Sector Surgical Care to High-Performance Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, William B.; West, Alan N.; Wallace, Amy E.; Lee, Richard E.; Goodman, David C.; Dimick, Justin B.; Bagian, James P.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. We quantified older (65 years and older) Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patients’ use of the private sector to obtain 14 surgical procedures and assessed the potential impact of directing that care to high-performance hospitals. Methods. Using a merged VHA–Medicare inpatient database for 2000 and 2001, we determined where older VHA enrollees obtained 6 cardiovascular surgeries and 8 cancer resections and whether private-sector care was obtained in high- or low-performance hospitals (based on historical performance and determined 2 years in advance of the service year). We then modeled the mortality and travel burden effect of directing private-sector care to high-performance hospitals. Results. Older veterans obtained most of their procedures in the private sector, but that care was equally distributed across high- and low-performance hospitals. Directing private-sector care to high-performance hospitals could have led to the avoidance of 376 to 584 deaths, most through improved cardiovascular care outcomes. Using historical mortality to define performance would produce better outcomes with lower travel time. Conclusions. Policy that directs older VHA enrollees’ private-sector care to high-performance hospitals promises to reduce mortality for VHA’s service population and warrants further exploration. PMID:17971543

  11. Beyond Volume: Hospital-Based Healthcare Technology for Better Outcomes in Cerebrovascular Surgical Patients Diagnosed With Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Jang, Sung-In

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We examined whether the level of hospital-based healthcare technology was related to the 30-day postoperative mortality rates, after adjusting for hospital volume, of ischemic stroke patients who underwent a cerebrovascular surgical procedure. Using the National Health Insurance Service-Cohort Sample Database, we reviewed records from 2002 to 2013 for data on patients with ischemic stroke who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard models to test our hypothesis. A total of 798 subjects were included in our study. After adjusting for hospital volume of cerebrovascular surgical procedures as well as all for other potential confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals was 2.583 (P < 0.001). We also found that, although the HR of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals with high volume as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals with high volume was the highest (10.014, P < 0.0001), cerebrovascular surgical procedure patients treated in low healthcare technology hospitals had the highest 30-day mortality rate, irrespective of hospital volume. Although results of our study provide scientific evidence for a hospital volume/30-day mortality rate relationship in ischemic stroke patients who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures, our results also suggest that the level of hospital-based healthcare technology is associated with mortality rates independent of hospital volume. Given these results, further research into what components of hospital-based healthcare technology significantly impact mortality is warranted. PMID:26986122

  12. The Mobile Modular Surgical Hospital: the Army Medical Department’s Future Unit of Action

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-17

    Quinn Patton , Qualitative Evaluation and Research Methods , (Newbury Park, NY: Sage Publications, 1990), 10. 34 CHAPTER 4...Charles Scribner’s Sons, Macmillan Publishing Company, 1994. Patton , Michael Q. Qualitative Evaluation and Research Method . Newbury Park, NY: Sage...Staff College.2 The thesis research method will be a qualitative analysis. This thesis is ideally suited for qualitative analysis

  13. A Study to Determine the Most Efficient Provision of Surgical Care at Darnall Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    24 Analys is ot Surgcal WorKload ...................... 24 Analysis of Nursing Wor~ load ........................ -5 Cost Com parison...decreased as post operative compizcations secondary to nosocomial infections decrease (Egdahl, 1984; and Pineauit, i985). The primary emphasis has been on...the advantages of decreased postoperative infection , conservation of bed days, anc the freeing of nurses and other personnel for the more critically

  14. Scheduling Operative Surgical Services to Recover CHAMPUS Surgical Procedures at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, Kentucky

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    7758 ARTHROPLASTY 3-5 DIGITS LEFT FOOT 20 29:43 1:29 7867 REMOVAL RETAINED SCREW RIGHT ANKLE 4 7:10 1:47 9999 OTHER 25 45:03 1:48 7768 EXCISION... ARTHROPLASTY 5TH DIGIT 5 13:00 2:36 7937 ORIF 5TH METATARSAL RIGHT FOOT 2 5:25 2:42 7753 RIGHT CARPAL TUNNEL RELEASE 6 16:25 2:44 8027 ARTHROSCOPY 6...TIME 9999 OTHER 25 45:03 1:48 7758 ARTHROPLASTY PIPJ 3-5 DIGITS L FOOT 20 29:43 1:29 7752 AUSTIN OSTEOTOMY WITH HERBERT SCREW 16 35:10 2:12 7768

  15. Elective surgical patients' narratives of hospitalization: the co-construction of safety.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Carole; Saunders, Mark N K

    2013-12-01

    This research explores how elective surgical patients make sense of their hospitalization experiences. We explore sensemaking using longitudinal narrative interviews (n=72) with 38 patients undergoing elective surgical procedures between June 2010 and February 2011. We consider patients' narratives, the stories they tell of their prior expectations, and subsequent post-surgery experiences of their care in a United Kingdom (UK) hospital. An emergent pre-surgery theme is that of a paradoxical position in which they choose to make themselves vulnerable by agreeing to surgery to enhance their health, this necessitating trust of clinicians (doctors and nurses). To make sense of their situation, patients draw on technical (doctors' expert knowledge and skills), bureaucratic (National Health Service as a revered institution) and ideological (hospitals as places of safety), discourses. Post-operatively, themes of 'chaos' and 'suffering' emerge from the narratives of patients whose pre-surgery expectations (and trust) have been violated. Their stories tell of unmet expectations and of inability to make shared sense of experiences with clinicians who are responsible for their care. We add to knowledge of how patients play a critical part in the co-construction of safety by demonstrating how patient-clinician intersubjectivity contributes to the type of harm that patients describe. Our results suggest that approaches to enhancing patients' safety will be limited if they fail to reflect patients' involvement in the negotiated process of healthcare. We also provide further evidence of the contribution narrative inquiry can make to patient safety.

  16. Determinants of Malnutrition and Post-operative Complications in Hospitalized Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, José Luiz Braga

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The study aimed to determine the nutritional status (NS) of hospitalized surgical patients and investigate a possible association between NS and type of disease, type of surgery and post-operative complications. The gender, age, disease, surgery, complications, length of hospital stay, number of medications, laboratory test results, and energy intake of 388 hospitalized surgical patients were recorded. NS was determined by classical anthropometry. The inclusion criteria were: nutritional status assessment done within the first 24 hours of admission, age ≥20 years, and complete medical history. Univariate and multiple Cox's regression analyses were employed to determine which variables were possible risk factors of malnutrition and complications. Malnutrition was more common in males (p=0.017), individuals aged 70 to 79 years (p=0.000), and individuals with neoplasms and digestive tract diseases (p=0.000). Malnourished individuals had longer hospital stays (p=0.013) and required more medications (p=0.001). The risk of malnutrition was associated with age and disease. Individuals aged 70 years or more had a two-fold increased risk of malnutrition (p=0.014; RR=2.207; 95% CI 1.169-4.165); those with neoplasms (p=0.008; RR=14.950; 95% CI 2.011-111.151) and those having digestive tract diseases (p=0.009; RR=14.826; 95% CI 1.939-113.362) had a 14-fold increased risk of malnutrition. Complications prevailed in older individuals (p=0.016), individuals with longer hospital stays (p=0.007), and individuals who died (p=0.002). The risk of complications was associated with age and BMI. In the present study, the risk of malnutrition was associated with age and type of disease; old age and low BMI may increase complications. PMID:25395903

  17. [Building of the surgical pavilion of the County Hospital in Bjelovar].

    PubMed

    Bagarić, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Preparations for the construction of the surgical pavilion of the County hospital in Bjelovar began in 1913 initiated by doctor Antun Gottlieb. The entire project documentation was drawn by Ignjat Fischer (1870-1948), the architect who specialized in the construction of medical buildings in the first decades of the 20th century. Fischer designed the Bjelovar Pavillion as a two-storey building with an annexe in which double operating rooms were situated. In this paper Fischer's early functionalist approach to the designing of medical buildings is dealt with and the parallels between the Bjelovar Surgical Pavilion and other Fischer's medical buildings are drawn. The Bjelovar Pavilion has only been slightly reconstructed to date, and the arrangement of the majority of facilities--compared to the Fischer's project--has remained unchanged, which bears testimony to the high quality of Fischer's designing procedure.

  18. LED Surgical Task Lighting Scoping Study: A Hospital Energy Alliance Project

    SciTech Connect

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-01-17

    Tungsten-halogen (halogen) lamps have traditionally been used to light surgical tasks in hospitals, even though they are in many respects ill-suited to the application due to the large percentage of radiant energy outside the visible spectrum and issues with color rendering/quality. Light-emitting diode (LED) technology offers potential for adjustable color and improved color rendition/quality, while simultaneously reducing side-effects from non-visible radiant energy. It also has the potential for significant energy savings, although this is a fairly narrow application in the larger commercial building energy use sector. Based on analysis of available products and Hospital Energy Alliance member interest, it is recommended that a product specification and field measurement procedure be developed for implementation in demonstration projects.

  19. Assessment of malnutrition in hip fracture patients: effects on surgical delay, hospital stay and mortality.

    PubMed

    Symeonidis, Panagiotis D; Clark, David

    2006-08-01

    The importance of malnutrition in elderly hip fracture patients has long been recognised. All patients operated upon for a hip fracture over a five-year period were assessed according to two nutritional markers : a) serum albumin levels and b) peripheral blood total lymphocyte count. Patients were subdivided into groups according to the four possible combinations of these results. Outcomes according to four clinical outcome parameters were validated: a) waiting time to operation b) length of hospitalisation, c) in-hospital mortality, and d) one-year postoperative mortality. Significant differences were found between malnourished patients and those with normal laboratory values with regard to surgical delay and one year postoperative mortality. Malnourished patients were also more likely to be hospitalised longer than a month and to die during their hospital stay, but the difference was not significant. The combination of serum albumin level and total lymphocyte count can be used as an independent prognostic factor in hip fracture patients.

  20. From Pergamon to Army Base Hospital No. 5: the history and significance of the galea aponeurotica in the evolution of neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Connor, David E; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nanda, Anil

    2014-08-01

    The authors trace the etymology and historical significance of galea or epicranial aponeurosis. In ancient Greece, galea referred to a helmet worn by soldiers, typically made of animal hide or leather. Throughout antiquity, physicians referred to all soft tissue between the skin and the skull as panniculus, a standard established by Galen of Pergamon. A manual of surgery in the Middle Ages referred to the entire scalp as a "great panicle that is called pericranium." During the early Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci famously and stylistically analogized the dissection of the cranium with the peeling of an onion. Not until 1724 would the tendinous sheath connecting the frontalis and occipitalis muscles be defined as "Galea tendinosa cranii." By 1741, the convention of referring to the galea as an aponeurosis was well established. Harvey Cushing's wartime experiences at Army Base Hospital No. 5 reinforced the surgical significance of the galea. Operative mortality was significantly diminished due to "closure of the wounds with buried sutures in the galea." This operative nuance was then passed from teacher to pupil and has now become one of the tenets of modern neurosurgical practice.

  1. Discharge after discharge: predicting surgical site infections after patients leave hospital.

    PubMed

    Daneman, N; Lu, H; Redelmeier, D A

    2010-07-01

    In this population-based retrospective cohort study, we examined the frequency, severity, and prediction of post-discharge surgical site infections (SSIs). We evaluated all patients admitted for their first elective surgical procedure in Ontario, Canada, between 1 April 2002 and 31 March 2008. Procedure and patient characteristics were derived from linked hospital, emergency room and physician claims databases within Canada's universal healthcare system. The 30 day risk of SSI was derived from the initial hospital admission, outpatient consultations, return emergency room visits and readmissions. The cohort included 622 683 patients, of whom 84 081 (13.5%) were diagnosed with SSI, and more than half (48 725) were diagnosed post-discharge. Post-discharge infections were associated with an increased risk of reoperation (odds ratio: 2.28; 95% confidence interval: 2.11-2.48), return emergency room visit (9.08; 8.89-9.27), and readmission (6.16; 5.98-6.35). The most common risk index predicted incremental increases in the risk of in-hospital SSI, but did not predict increases in the risk of post-discharge infection. Patients with post-discharge infections had baseline characteristics more akin to uninfected patients than patients with in-hospital infections. Predictors of post-discharge infection included shorter procedure duration, shorter length of stay, rural residence, alcoholism, diabetes and obesity. Post-discharge SSIs are frequent, severe, scattered over time and location, and hard to predict using common risk indices. They represent an important hidden burden in our healthcare system.

  2. Wills Eye Hospital and surgical network: successful pre-positioning strategies for payment reduction and managed care pressures.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D M

    2001-01-01

    Through strategic clinical diversification, political activism, and bold expansion, Wills Eye Hospital, a teaching specialty surgical hospital, survives ravages of sudden onslaughts of managed care payment reductions while maintaining autonomy. Slack inpatient resources were re-utilized to create unique programs attractive to regional managed care organizations. Advocacy and lobbying for short-term favorable treatment from Medicare bought the Hospital valuable time and positioning. Building out a regional network of ambulatory surgical centers assures the growth and access to market required for Wills to maintain its autonomy in a managed care contracting environment.

  3. Incidence of healthcare associated infection in the surgical ICU of a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shivinder; Chaturvedi, R.; Garg, S.M.; Datta, Rashmi; Kumar, Ambikesh

    2012-01-01

    Background Healthcare associated infections (HAI) have taken on a new dimension with outbreaks of increasingly resistant organisms becoming common. Protocol-based infection control practices in the intensive care unit (ICU) are extremely important. Moreover, baseline information of the incidence of HAI helps in planning-specific interventions at infection control. Methods This hospital-based observational study was carried out from Dec 2009 to May 2010 in the 10-bedded surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital. CDC HAI definitions were used to diagnose HAI. Results A total of 293 patients were admitted in the ICU. 204 of these were included in the study. 36 of these patients developed HAI with a frequency of 17.6%. The incidence rate (IR) of catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI) was 16/1000 Central Venous Catheter (CVC) days [95% C.I. 9–26]. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) 9/1000 urinary catheter days [95% C.I. 4–18] and ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAP) 32/1000 ventilator days [95% confidence interval 22–45]. Conclusion The HAI rates in our ICU are less than other hospitals in developing countries. The incidence of VAP is comparable to other studies. Institution of an independent formal infection control monitoring and surveillance team to monitor & undertake infection control practices is an inescapable need in service hospitals. PMID:24600084

  4. Destination Healthcare Facility of Shocked Trauma Patients in Scotland: Analysis of Transfusion and Surgical Capability of Receiving Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    of this study is to evaluate the resource provision of the destination hospital of Scottish trauma patients exhibiting evidence of pre-hospital shock...Methods: Patients who sustained a traumatic injury between November 2008 and October 2010 were retrospectively identified from the Scottish Ambulance... Scottish trauma patients are transported to a hospital with full transfusion capability, although the majority lack surgical sub-specialty

  5. Reducing Length of Hospital Stay Does Not Increase Readmission Rates in Early-Stage Gastric, Colon, and Lung Cancer Surgical Cases in Japanese Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kunisawa, Susumu; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Background The Japanese government has worked to reduce the length of hospital stay by introducing a per-diem hospital payment system that financially incentivizes the timely discharge of patients. However, there are concerns that excessively reducing length of stay may reduce healthcare quality, such as increasing readmission rates. The objective of this study was to investigate the temporal changes in length of stay and readmission rates as quality indicators in Japanese acute care hospitals. Methods We used an administrative claims database under the Diagnosis Procedure Combination Per-Diem Payment System for Japanese hospitals. Using this database, we selected hospitals that provided data continuously from July 2010 to March 2014 to enable analyses of temporal changes in length of stay and readmission rates. We selected stage I (T1N0M0) gastric, colon, and lung cancer surgical patients who had been discharged alive from the index hospitalization. The outcome measures were length of stay during the index hospitalization and unplanned emergency readmissions within 30 days after discharge. Results From among 804 hospitals, we analyzed 42,585, 15,467, and 40,156 surgical patients for gastric, colon, and lung cancer, respectively. Length of stay was reduced by approximately 0.5 days per year. In contrast, readmission rates were generally stable at approximately 2% or had decreased slightly over the 4-year period. Conclusions In early-stage gastric, colon, and lung cancer surgical patients in Japan, reductions in length of stay did not result in increased readmission rates. PMID:27832182

  6. Nutritional Status of Patients Admitted in a General Surgical Ward at a Tertiary Hospital of Punjab.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Faiza; Fazal, Muhammad Irfan; Cheema, Muhammad Arshad

    2016-04-01

    Nutritional assessment, as a method to identify malnourishment, has long been documented as an essential component of patient management which predicts adverse outcomes. The objective of the study was to find out the frequency of malnutrition and its association with the frequency of complications and deaths postoperatively. This study included all patients who were operated upon in a general surgical unit of Mayo Hospital, Lahore from June to August, 2013. Evaluation of 280 patients showed that 112 (40%) of the patients were malnourished, 90 (32%) were at risk of being malnourished and remaining 78 (28%) of the patients had normal nutritional status, according to the Subjective Global Assessment. Thirteen percent (13%) malnourished and 2 (3%) of the normally nourished patients died within 30 days of operation (p=0.001). Incidence of complications in malnourished patients was 23 (20.53%) as compared to normally nourished patients (5.12%, p=0.006). Malnutrition is very common in patients admitted to surgery wards of our hospitals. It adversely effects the outcome of surgical operations by increasing complications and mortality.

  7. Hashimoto's thyroiditis: celebrating the centennial through the lens of the Johns Hopkins hospital surgical pathology records.

    PubMed

    Caturegli, Patrizio; De Remigis, Alessandra; Chuang, Kelly; Dembele, Marieme; Iwama, Akiko; Iwama, Shintaro

    2013-02-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is now considered the most prevalent autoimmune disease, as well as the most common endocrine disorder. It was initially described in 1912, but only rarely reported until the early 1950s. To celebrate this centennial, we reviewed the surgical pathology archives of the Johns Hopkins hospital for cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, spanning the period from May 1889 to October 2012. Approximately 15,000 thyroidectomies were performed at this hospital over 124 years. The first surgical case was reported in 1942, 30 years after the original description. Then, 867 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis were seen from 1942 to 2012, representing 6% of all thyroidectomies. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was the sole pathological finding in 462 cases; it accompanied other thyroid pathologies in the remaining 405 cases. The most commonly associated pathology was papillary thyroid cancer, an association that increased significantly during the last two decades. The most common indication for thyroidectomy was a thyroid nodule that was cytologically suspicious for malignancy. Hashimoto's thyroiditis remains a widespread, intriguing, and multifaceted disease of unknown etiology one century after its description. Advances in the understanding of its pathogenesis and preoperative diagnosis will improve recognition and treatment of this disorder, and may one day lead to its prevention.

  8. Surgical periodontal therapy at Tokyo Dental College Suidobashi Hospital: a statistical profile in 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Hiroki; Ota, Kei; Ida, Atsushi; Fujinami, Koushu; Furusawa, Masahiro; Makiishi, Takemi; Nikaido, Masahiko; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Saito, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the profile of surgical periodontal therapy performed at the Suidobashi Hospital of Tokyo Dental College, during the period of April 2010 through March 2011. A total of 112 periodontal surgeries in 69 patients (mean age: 51.4 years; 28 men and 41 women) were registered for the data analysis. The surgical interventions performed by 17 dentists comprised 79 cases of open flap debridement, 27 cases of periodontal regenerative therapy with enamel matrix derivative and 6 cases of periodontal plastic surgery. Eighty percent of the surgical sites were in the molar region and 41 cases had furcation involvement. In these patients, an improvement in oral hygiene status was observed prior to surgery: the mean plaque score of 45% at initial visit was significantly reduced to 31% after initial periodontal therapy (p<0.01). At sites that subsequently received open flap debridement or periodontal regenerative therapy, the mean probing depth and clinical attachment level after initial therapy was 6.4 mm and 7.6 mm, respectively. These values were significantly lower than those at initial visit (p<0.01). Lower prevalence of sites with positive bleeding on probing was observed after initial therapy. The initial periodontal therapy performed was considered to be effective in improving the periodontal condition of the sites prior to surgery. More effort, however, is indicated in improvement of patient oral hygiene status.

  9. The Hidden Story of Innovation: Charity Hospital, Angola Prison, and the Challenging of Surgical Dogma.

    PubMed

    Greiffenstein, Patrick; Hastings, Paul R

    2017-02-01

    The late 1960s was a period of significant upheaval of social, cultural, and scientific norms. The generally accepted notion of mandatory laparotomy for all penetrating abdominal injuries was among those norms being called into question across the country and many advocated expectant management of selected patients presenting with this type of injury. Leaders of the surgical community published opinions on either side of the argument. The house staff at Charity Hospital during this period was among the busiest in the nation in treating these injuries, many of them inmates of the Louisiana State Penitentiary who used self-inflicted stab wounds to the abdomen as a means of temporary respite from the inhumane conditions in the prison. Inspired, in part, by the overabundance of negative laparotomies among this group, F. Carter Nance went on to systematically challenge the standard of care. This effort constitutes one of the major forces for change of the surgical dogma of mandatory laparotomy for all abdominal stab wounds. It is the first major study to show conclusively that delayed laparotomy for perforated viscous was not significantly detrimental and posed less of a risk than unnecessary laparotomy. The circumstances surrounding this initiative constitute a powerful and heretofore unknown chapter in the history of surgical innovation.

  10. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. Materials and Methods: One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. Results: A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Conclusions: Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26421133

  11. Flail Chest in Polytraumatized Patients: Surgical Fixation Using Stracos Reduces Ventilator Time and Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Jayle, Christophe P. M.; Allain, Géraldine; Ingrand, Pierre; Laksiri, Leila; Bonnin, Emilie; Hajj-Chahine, Jamil; Mimoz, Olivier; Corbi, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Conservative management of patients with flail chest is the treatment of choice. Rib fracture repair is technically challenging; however, with the advent of specially designed molding titanium clips, surgical management has been simplified. Surgical stabilization has been used with good outcomes. We are reporting on our institutional matched-case-control study. Methods. Between April 2010 and April 2011, ten polytraumatized patients undergoing rib stabilization for flail chest were matched 1 : 1 to 10 control patients by age ±10 years, sex, neurological or vertebral trauma, abdominal injury, and arm and leg fractures. Surgery was realized in the first 48 hours. Results. There were no significant differences between groups for matched data and prognostic scores: injury severity score, revised trauma score, and trauma injury severity score. Ventilator time (142 ± 224 versus 74 ± 125 hours, P = 0.026) and overall hospital stay (142 ± 224 versus 74 ± 125 hours, P = 0.026) were significantly lower for the surgical group after adjustment on prognostic scores. There was a trend towards shorter ICU stay for operative patients (12.3 ± 8.5 versus 9.0 ± 4.3 days, P = 0.076). Conclusions. Rib fixation with Stracos is feasible and decreases the length of ventilation and hospital stay. A multicenter randomized study is warranted so as to confirm these results and to evaluate impact on pulmonary function status, pain, and quality of life. PMID:25710011

  12. Length of hospital stay after craniotomy for tumor: a National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

    PubMed

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Liu, Kevin X; Devine, Christopher A; Chavakula, Vamsidhar; Smith, Timothy R; Gormley, William B; Dunn, Ian F

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Although the length of hospital stay is often used as a measure of quality of care, data evaluating the predictors of extended hospital stay after craniotomy for tumor are limited. The goals of this study were to use multivariate regression to examine which preoperative characteristics and postoperative complications predict a prolonged hospital stay and to assess the impact of length of stay on unplanned hospital readmission. METHODS Data were extracted from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from 2007 to 2013. Patients who underwent craniotomy for resection of a brain tumor were included. Stratification was based on length of hospital stay, which was dichotomized by the upper quartile of the interquartile range (IQR) for the entire population. Covariates included patient age, sex, race, tumor histology, comorbidities, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, functional status, preoperative laboratory values, preoperative neurological deficits, operative time, and postoperative complications. Multivariate logistic regression with forward prediction was used to evaluate independent predictors of extended hospitalization. Thereafter, hierarchical multivariate logistic regression assessed the impact of length of stay on unplanned readmission. RESULTS The study included 11,510 patients. The median hospital stay was 4 days (IQR 3-8 days), and 27.7% (n = 3185) had a hospital stay of at least 8 days. Independent predictors of extended hospital stay included age greater than 70 years (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.28%-1.83%, p < 0.001); African American (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.44%-2.14%, p < 0.001) and Hispanic (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.36%-2.08%) race or ethnicity; ASA class 3 (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.34%-1.73%) or 4-5 (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.82%-2.62%) designation; partially (OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.61%-2.35%) or totally dependent (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.95%-5.55%) functional status; insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.16%-1.84%); hematological

  13. A Study of Waste Management within the COL Florence A. Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    9. Contaminated waste may be burned using the new hospital incinerator as it is scheduled to comply with all existing air emission standards. 10...General waste may be safely disposed of using the land fill located at Fort Campbell in compliance with existing Tennessee polution abatement regulations...presence of an infectious agent on a body surface in clothing, bedding, on trays, surgical instruments, dressings, needles or syringes, air or water

  14. Misdiagnosis and Quality of Management in Paediatric Surgical Patients Referred to a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cazares-Rangel, Joel; Zalles-Vidal, Cristian; Davila-Perez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background: The literature on diagnosis and management prior to transfer paediatric surgical patients to a tertiary care center is scarce. In referral centers, it is common to receive patients previously subjected to inadequate or inappropriate health care. Aim: Analyze the prevalence of misdiagnosis and quality of management in patients before being referred and factors related to misdiagnosis and inadequate management. Design: Prospective, longitudinal, comparative study between patients with appropriate and inappropriate submission diagnosis and between patients with adequate or inadequate treatment. Setting: Third level care hospital, Mexico City. Participants: Newborn to adolescents referred to Paediatric Surgery Department. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Misdiagnosis and quality of management prior to being referred. Result: Two hundred patients were evaluated. Correlation between submission diagnosis and final diagnosis showed that 70% were correct and 30% incorrect; 48.5% were properly managed and 51.5% inappropriately managed. Incorrect diagnosis was more frequent when referred from first-or second-level hospitals and in inflammatory conditions. Patients referred by paediatricians had a higher rate of adequate management. Conclusion: We present the frequency of incorrect diagnosis and inadequate patient management in a highly selected population. Sample size should be increased as well as performing these studies in other hospital settings in order to determine whether the results are reproducible. PMID:24959495

  15. The Optimal Feasible Method of Collecting and utilizing Army Hospital Meal Accounting Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    hospital food services performe in-house are evaluated for p6 sible contracting out to commercial services. This study attempts to determine the optimal...complicates the process of military-civilian comparisons. Hospital food services are being subject to Commercial Activities requirements of potentially...hospital beds -investor-owned or not -for- profit -government or nongovernment -accredited or nonaccredited -hospital’s position in terms of the New

  16. [Problems in the diagnosis and surgical treatment in an osseous tuberculosis hospital].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, N I; Evlashkin, D V; Karzhavina, G I

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosed patients treated at an osseous tuberculosis hospital are analyzed. In the reporting period, the diagnosis of osseous tuberculosis has not been verified. Late detection of osseous tuberculosis, as its prehospital hyperdiagnosis is one of the main reasons of a grave condition in this group of patients. The paper characterizes plastic reparative versus palliative decompressive operations for tuberculous spondylitis with spinal-cord abnormalities and shows that radical surgery has a higher efficiency (89%) in the treatment of an inflammatory process and in the regression of neurological complications. In generalized forms of osteoarticular lesions if there is an indication for surgical treatment, long-term drug therapy for tuberculosis of the lung and other organs is not warranted.

  17. Quality of Surgical Case Notes at Dow University Hospital according to modified ANKLe score

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Masood; Bakhtiar, Nighat; Khalique, Abdul; Masood, Zubia

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find out quality of surgical case notes according to modified Adjusted Note keeping and Legibility (ANKLe) score in Dow University Hospital. Methods: For this audit, medical records of all the patients admitted in Dow University Hospital surgery department were reviewed from February 2012 to April 2012. The modified ANKLe score (total 24) is formed by the combination of, the content (out of 20) and legibility (out of 4) to give an overall score out of 24. A score of at least 20 (content score 17/20; legibility score 3/4) is considered as acceptable. It means that a surgical record is legible and the majority of the essential content is recorded. Results: A total of 236 records were evaluated. Overall mean ± standard deviation (SD) of ANKLe score was 18.4± 2.1 out of maximum score of 24. Content and legibility has overall mean scores of 14.4 out of 20 and 3.9 out of 4 respectively. Only two variables, patient’s name and consultant on call were documented in 100% of records while the least documented variable were social history 2 (0.2%). Legibility scoring system provides that 218notes out of total set of 236 notes (that is 92.4% of overall notes) have achieved a score of 4. The benchmark of 80% was achieved in 26.1% for total ANKLe score, 6.8% for contents and 99.1% for legibility. Conclusion: Overall, quality of records is not good but legibility part scores exceptionally high. PMID:24353683

  18. Surgical Indications and Clinical Results of Patients with Exchanged Intraocular Lenses in a Tertiary Eye Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kavuncu, Sevim; Omay, Aslıhan Esra; Tırhış, Mehmet Hakan; Yılmazbaş, Pelin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the demographics, surgical indications and clinical results of patients with repositioned or explanted intraocular lens (IOL) in a tertiary referral eye hospital. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight eyes of 48 patients that underwent surgery to exchange or reposition the IOL at Ulucanlar Eye Training and Research Hospital between 2009 and 2013 were included in the study. Medical records of patients were evaluated for surgical indications, time elapsed since initial operation, preoperative and postoperative best corrected distance visual acuity and the presence of ocular disease. Results: The mean age of the 31 male and 17 female patients was 64.91±14.26 years. Median time between the initial and final operations was 36.0 months. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PEX) was present in 25% of the patients. There was history of previous vitreoretinal surgery in 18.8% of patients, ocular trauma in 6.3%, high myopia and refractive surgery in 4% of patients. In the first operation the IOL was implanted in the sulcus in 50%, in the bag in 27.1%, and in the anterior chamber in 20.8%; following the final surgery the IOL was in the sulcus in 27.1%, in the anterior chamber in 22.9%, and fixated to the sclera in 10.4% of the patients, while the remaining 29.1% remained aphakic. Indication for the secondary surgery was IOL dislocation in 58%, corneal decompensation in 20.8% and IOL degeneration in 6.3%. In the final surgery, IOL was exchanged in 54.2% of the cases, removed in 31.3% of cases, and repositioned in 14.6%. Visual acuity improved by 1-3 lines in 52.3% and remained stable in 13.6% of the patients postoperatively. Conclusion: IOL exchange may be necessary at any time following cataract surgery due to surgical complications, IOL dislocation, biometric measurement errors and corneal decompensation. Factors such as vitreoretinal surgery and the existence of PEX increase the risk of IOL exchange surgery. PMID:28058149

  19. A Study to Determine the Impact of the PRIMUS Clinic on Patient Workload in the General Outpatient Clinic, the Emergency Room, the GYN Clinic, the Pediatric Clinic, and the Family Practice Clinic at Martin Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-07

    as obstetrics and pediatrics will be honed to a fine edge. Cherkov further suggests that construction of medical facilities outside of the hospital...ROOM, m THE OB GYN CLINIC, THE PEDIATRIC CLINIC, AND THE FAMILY o 0c C PRACTICE CLINIC AT MARTIN ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 0 0 m M xz z Baylor...Clinic on patien workload in the Outpatient, Family Practice, and Pediatrics Clinics and The Emergency Room at Martin Army Commnity Hospital. 12. PERSONAL

  20. A Study to Determine the Practicability and Impact of Recovering Champus Patients at Evans U.S. Army Community Hospital, Fort Carson, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-15

    EVANS U.S. ARMY COMMUNITY (If applicable) U.S. ARMY-BAYLOR UNIVERSITY GRADUATE HOSPITAL PROGRAM IN HEALT H CARE ADMIN. k.ADOMfrS (y, State. and ZIP...determining the bed occupancy in a particular service. It can also be determined by • 18 comparing the computed cost per admission for MTF care with known...seem to indicate that by increasing the occupancy rate from 46 percent to 57 percent, without a likely increase in overall length of stay, a

  1. 42 CFR 413.118 - Payment for facility services related to covered ASC surgical procedures performed in hospitals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for facility services related to covered... PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.118 Payment for facility services related to covered ASC surgical procedures performed in hospitals on...

  2. Early post-surgical cognitive dysfunction is a risk factor for mortality among hip fracture hospitalized older persons.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, C; Bonamassa, L; Pelini, L; Prioletta, I; Cianferotti, L; Metozzi, A; Benvenuti, E; Brandi, G; Guazzini, A; Santoro, G C; Mecocci, P; Black, D; Brandi, M L

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the relationship between cognitive dysfunction or delirium detected in the early post-surgical phase and the 1-year mortality among 514 hip fracture hospitalized older persons. Patients with early cognitive dysfunction or delirium experienced a 2-fold increased mortality risk. Early post-operative cognitive dysfunction and delirium are negative prognostic factors for mortality.

  3. A Marketing Analysis to Determine the Consumer Demand for Ambulatory Surgery at Darnall Army Community Hospital, Fort Hood, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    should be utilized as a guide to the development of the ambulatory surgical program. FOOTNOTES iMacStravic, Robin E ., Marketing Health Care, Germantown...March/ April 1982, pp. 59-64. MacStravic, Robin E ., " Marketing : Changing Prospective Patient’s Behavior," Hospital Progress, 60, June 1979, pp. 47-49...Recent Literature is Teling Urn,, Hosmtal and Health Services Administrator, VoL 26, Special II 1981, pp. 68. 191bid, pp. 69. 2 0 MacStravic, Robin E

  4. US Army Two-Surgeon Teams Operating in Remote Afghanistan - An Evaluation of Split-Based Forward Surgical Team Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    rotator) Orthopedic surgeon (6-mo rotator) Nurse anesthetist Nurse anesthetist (6-mo rotator) Critical care registered nurse Emergency medicine... nurse anesthetist , the detachment ser- geants, and the critical care nurse all had previous experience in combat medical care. These key personnel...registered nurse Licensed practical nurse Operating room registered nurse Surgical technician Licensed practical nurse Surgical technician Licensed

  5. Nursing burnout: cross-sectional study at a large Army hospital.

    PubMed

    Lang, Gary Morris; Pfister, Elizabeth A; Siemens, Michelle J

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the levels of burnout among U.S. Army and civilian nursing personnel assigned to a large military treatment facility. Using a cross-sectional design, a convenience sample of eligible participants (n = 364) completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory. T-test and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze data. Findings suggest that both groups were experiencing a moderate level of burnout. However, civilian nursing personnel demonstrated statistical lower levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Findings suggest that nursing personnel who worked the day shift, no more than 8 hours a day and had fewer patient care contacts with military personnel injured in Iraq or Afghanistan reported lower levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. This study provides ideas for policy changes at medical treatment facilities that are experiencing similar challenges.

  6. A Study of Perinatal Services at Walson Army Hospital, Fort Dix, New Jersey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    patients would also be hospitalized on the ward. With an estimated gynecological surgery workload of sixty cases per month and an average length of stay of...1/1/77-12/31/77 Number of Admissions 1,224 717 Total Hospital Days 5,396 3,124 Average Length of Stay 4.4 4.4 Average Daily Patient Load 14.8 8.6

  7. Standardizing Management of Adults with Delirium Hospitalized on Medical-Surgical Units

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Clay; Brooks, Kristen; Fourie, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Context Delirium is common among inpatients aged 65 years and older and is associated with multiple adverse consequences, including increased length of stay (LOS). However, delirium is frequently unrecognized and poorly understood. At one hospital, baseline management of delirium on medical-surgical units varied greatly, and psychiatric consultations focused exclusively on crisis management. Objective To implement a multidisciplinary program for rapid identification and proactive management of patients with delirium on medical-surgical units. Design A pilot from September 2010 to July 2012 included 920 unique patients, of whom 470 were seen by the delirium management team. A delirium management team included a redesigned role for consulting psychiatrists and a new clinical nurse specialist role; the team provided assistance with diagnosis and recommendations for nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic management of delirium. Multidisciplinary education focused on delirium identification and management and nurses’ use of appropriate assessment tools. Electronic health record functions supported accurate problem list coding, referrals to the team, and standardized documentation. Main Outcome Measure Length of stay. Results During the study period, average LOS in the target population decreased from 8.5 days to 6.5 days (p = 0.001); average LOS for the Medical Center remained stable. Compared with patients whose delirium was diagnosed during the baseline period, patients who received a delirium diagnosis during the pilot period had a higher illness burden and were likelier to have a history of delirium and diagnosed dementia. Conclusion Program implementation was associated with reduced LOS among older inpatients with delirium. The delirium team is an effective model that can be quickly implemented with few additional resources. PMID:27644045

  8. Factors Affecting Length of Hospital Stay and Mortality in Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers Undergoing Surgical Drainage without Major Amputation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Gyun; Moon, Sang Young; Park, Moon Seok; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Jung, Ki Jin; Lee, Taeseung; Kim, Baek Kyu; Yoon, Chan; Lee, Kyoung Min

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate factors affecting length of hospital stay and mortality of a specific group of patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage without major amputation, which is frequently encountered by orthopedic surgeons. Data on length of hospital stay, mortality, demographics, and other medical information were collected for 79 consecutive patients (60 men, 19 women; mean age, 66.1 [SD, 12.3] yr) with infected diabetic foot ulcer who underwent surgical drainage while retaining the heel between October 2003 and May 2013. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine factors affecting length of hospital stay, while multiple Cox regression analysis was conducted to assess factors contributing to mortality. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, P=0.034), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (P=0.021), body mass index (BMI, P=0.001), and major vascular disease (cerebrovascular accident or coronary artery disease, P=0.004) were significant factors affecting length of hospital stay, whereas age (P=0.005) and serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level (P=0.024) were significant factors contributing to mortality. In conclusion, as prognostic factors, the length of hospital stay was affected by the severity of inflammation, the recent control of blood glucose level, BMI, and major vascular disease, whereas patient mortality was affected by age and renal function in patients with infected diabetic foot ulcer undergoing surgical drainage and antibiotic treatment.

  9. Outcome of pyometra in female dogs and predictors of peritonitis and prolonged postoperative hospitalization in surgically treated cases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the most common diseases in intact bitches is pyometra– a potentially life-threatening disease associated with a variety of clinical and laboratory findings. The aims of the present study were to describe complications of the disease and to investigate clinically useful indicators associated with peritonitis and/or prolonged postoperative hospitalization. Results A retrospective study was performed using records from 356 bitches diagnosed with pyometra during the years 2006–2007 at the University Animal Hospital, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. Of the 356 bitches, 315 were surgically treated by ovariohysterectomy, 9 were medically treated and 32 were euthanized without treatment. In the surgically treated bitches, univariable associations between clinical and laboratory data, risk for prolonged hospitalization (≥ 3 days) and/or signs of peritonitis, were analyzed by Chi-square and Fisher’s exact test. Logistic regression models were used to assess multivariable associations. The most common complication observed in surgically treated bitches was peritonitis (40 bitches), followed by urinary tract infection (19 bitches), wound infection (8 bitches), uveitis (6 bitches), and cardiac arrhythmia (5 bitches). Leucopenia and fever/hypothermia were associated with increased risk for peritonitis (18-fold and three-fold, respectively). Moderate to severe depression of the general condition, pale mucous membranes and leucopenia were associated with increased risk (seven-fold, three-fold, and over three-point-five-fold, respectively) for prolonged postoperative hospitalization. Conclusions Several clinically useful indicators were identified. Leucopenia was the most important marker, associated with 18-fold increased risk for peritonitis and an over three-point-five increased risk for prolonged hospitalization. Fever/hypothermia, depression and pale mucous membranes were associated with increased risk for peritonitis and

  10. Improvement of teamwork and safety climate following implementation of the WHO surgical safety checklist at a university hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takashi; Taniwaki, Miki; Ogata, Kimiyo; Sakamoto, Miwa; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2014-06-01

    With the aim to optimize surgical safety, the World Health Organization (WHO) introduced the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSCL) in 2008. The SSCL has been piloted in many countries worldwide and shown to improve both safety attitudes within surgical teams and patient outcomes. In the study reported here we investigated whether implementation of the SSCL improved the teamwork and safety climate at a single university hospital in Japan. All surgical teams at the hospital implemented the SSCL in all surgical procedures with strict adherence to the SSCL implementation manual developed by WHO. Changes in safety attitudes were evaluated using the modified operating-room version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). A before and after design was used, with the questionnaire administered before and 3 months after SSCL implementation. Our analysis revealed that the mean scores on the SAQ had significantly improved 3 months after implementation of the SSCL compared to those before implementation. This finding implies that effective implementation of the SSCL could improve patient outcomes in Japan, similar to the findings of the WHO pilot study.

  11. Characterisation of metabolic acidosis in Kenyan children admitted to hospital for acute non-surgical conditions.

    PubMed

    Sasi, P; English, M; Berkley, J; Lowe, B; Shebe, M; Mwakesi, R; Kokwaro, G

    2006-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with most severe malaria deaths in African children, and most deaths occur before maximum antimalarial action is achieved. Thus, specific acidosis treatment may reduce mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood and no specific interventions have been developed. A detailed characterisation of this acidosis is critical in treatment development. We used the traditional and Stewart's approach to characterise acidosis in consecutive paediatric admissions for malaria and other acute non-surgical conditions to Kilifi District Hospital in Kenya. The overall acidosis prevalence was 21%. Gastroenteritis had the highest prevalence (61%). Both the mean albumin-corrected anion gap and the strong ion gap were high (>13 mmol/l and >0 mmol/l, respectively) in malaria, gastroenteritis, lower respiratory tract infection and malnutrition. Presence of salicylate in plasma was not associated with acidosis but was associated with signs of severe illness (odds ratio 2.11, 95% CI 1.1-4.2). In malaria, mean (95% CI) strong ion gap was 15 (14-7) mmol/l, and lactate, creatinine and inorganic phosphorous explained only approximately 40% of the variability in base excess (adjusted R2 = 0.397). Acidosis may be more common than previously recognised amongst paediatric admissions in Africa and is characterised by the presence of currently unidentified strong anions. In malaria, lactate and ketones, but not salicylate, are associated with acidosis. However, unidentified anions may be more important.

  12. Surgical Outcomes Associated with Operable Gastric Cancer in a Tertiary Care Indian Hospital

    PubMed Central

    George, Sam V.; Yacob, Myla; Abraham, Vijay; Chandran, Sudhakar; Sebastian, Tunny; Samarasam, Inian

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Data on operable gastric cancer from India is sparse. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical details, histopathological demographics, and 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) associated with operable, non-metastatic gastric cancer in a dedicated upper gastrointestinal (GI) surgical unit in India. Materials and Methods Data for patients diagnosed with operable gastric cancer between January 2006 and December 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Data were collected from electronic hospital records in addition to mail and telephonic interviews when possible. Results A total of 427 patients were included. The tumor was located in the pyloro-antral region in 263 patients (61.7%). Subtotal gastrectomy was performed in 291 patients and total gastrectomy in 136 patients. Tumor stage classification revealed 43 patients (10.0%) with stage I, 40 patients (9.4%) with stage IIA, 59 patients (13.9%) with stage IIB, 76 patients (17.8%) with stage IIIA, 96 patients (22.5%) with stage IIIB, and 113 patients (26.4%) with stage IIIC disease. Follow-up data were available for 71.6% of the patients with a mean duration of 32.4 months. Five-year DFS and OS were 39% and 59%, respectively. Conclusions Despite presenting at an advanced stage, the 5-year DFS and OS of patients with operable gastric cancer treated at a dedicated upper GI unit of a tertiary care center in India was good. PMID:28337364

  13. [Implementation strategy of the HAS French surgical check-list in a university hospital].

    PubMed

    Cunat, C; Flatin, V; Viale, J-P

    2011-06-01

    The check-list (CL) "Safety in Operating Room" has been introduced in our teaching hospital since 2009, associated to a "Quality and Prevention of Risks" program. This introduction was carried out over two distinct phases. The first one was a pilot start including five OR, allowing us to draw firm recommendations on the best way to perform the introduction, followed by a generalization to the other operating room (OR). The recommendations were the followings: a pilot committee including all the professionals should be constituted before the onset of introduction, a dedicated communication should focus on the actual concerns and benefits, and finally, the person questioning other care givers and filling the form should be clearly identified and supported in the OR. Meanwhile a guide on the utilization of the CL in each surgical speciality was written, and a dedicated manager was in charge of the whole procedure. This experience raised several remarks. This implementation of the CL proved to be a cause of self-interrogation on our medical practices, and the opportunity to improve communication among the professionals of the OR. Indeed, the 10 items of the OR should be thought as the last check before the no-return point, which should be shared by anyone in the OR. If these conditions were fulfilled, the CL could be viewed as an actual improvement of safety in the OR. Otherwise, CL is just a supplementary form.

  14. Multidisciplinary management of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus - Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgical Hospital consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuqun; Yang, Jiamei; Shen, Feng; Zhou, Weiping; Wang, Yi; Cong, Wenming; Yang, Guang Shun; Cheng, Hongyan; Hu, Heping; Gao, Chunfang; Guo, Jia; Li, Aijun; Meng, Yan; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Yefa; Qian, Guojun; Luo, Ming; Hu, Bing; Man, Xiaobo; Zhang, Baohua; Su, Changqing; Zhou, Feiguo; Li, Nan; Shi, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zheng, Yaxin; Guo, Weixing; Sun, Juxian; Wang, Hongyang; Lau, Wan-Yee; Wu, Meng-Chao

    2016-06-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) complicated by portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) is associated with poor prognosis, early recurrence of HCC, and limited treatment options. Current guidelines do not have standardized diagnostic and treatment modalities, thus creating a need for a multidisciplinary treatment model for standardization of the treatment. Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgical Hospital (China) convened two working parties of experts from all the departments, to consolidate the current evidence, prevailing vision for the future, and experience of the practicing clinicians engaged in HCC management, so as to develop a consensus for PVTT diagnosis and treatment according to the GRADE system. Based on the quality of the existing evidence and the strength of recommendations, the consensus statements were categorized into 3 evidence levels (A/B/C) and 5 classes (I/II/IIa/IIb/III).The panel discussed and provided clarity on the management and research options in the field of HCC with PVTT. In addition, the panel also assessed the quality of the cited studies and assigned grades to the recommendation statements. Among the group of experts, there was excellent agreement with regard to effective diagnosis and treatment of HCC with PVTT. The recommendations of this consensus will provide guidance to physicians and clinical researchers on the effective management of HCC with PVTT.

  15. Inpatient Obstetric Care at Irwin Army Community Hospital: A Study to Determine the Most Efficient Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    Reese’s new birthing suites may curb maternity malpractice suits. Modern Healthcare, 16 (11), 48. Clark, L., & Stewart, R. (1982). Nurse- midwifery ...practice in an in-hospital birthing center: 2050 births. Journal of Nurse- Midwifery , 27 (3), 21-26. Cooper, R. & Schindler, P. (1998a). Design Strategies. In

  16. Demand Management: The Primary Care Role at Ireland Army Community Hospital (IACH)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-29

    internal medicine, and pediatrics (Kongstvedt, 2001). The principal role of primary care physicians is an inevitable evolution of managed care (Fox... Moron , Bacchetti, Baker & Bindman, 2001; Zhan, Miller, Wong, & Myer, 2004). A study examining the correlation of preventable hospitalizations and...effectiveness of primary care (Gill & Mainous, 1998; Backus, Moron , Bacchetti, Baker & Bindman, 2001; Bindman, et al., 1995; Zhan, Miller, Wong, & Myer, 2004

  17. A Cost Analysis Comparing CHAMPUS to Treatment Provided within Ireland Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    care programs. At one 562 bed hospital. high-cost DRGs were examined prior and after the initiation of managed care. Average length of stay dropped...that an average bed day cost the government $660.45. By identifying all patients who received a cholelithasis, their average length - of - stay could be

  18. A Study to Identify the Causes of Decreasing Surgical Suite Productivity and Recommend Methods Which May Restore Surgical Output to Previous Levels at the United States Air Force Academy Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-16

    residency in his hospital. The experience has been invaluable to me, and I hope the Air Force. The Air Force has been especially generous to me and I...boasts an unusually large array of specialties for a 0 0 small hospital. This range of services includes General Surgery, OB/GYN, m z Orthopedics...Patients requiring specialty care not available at the USAFAH are generally referred to Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center in Aurora CO, 60 miles away

  19. [The surgically treated gunshot injury. Securing evidence in hospitals without primary participation of police or legal medicine].

    PubMed

    Zack, F; Manhart, J; Rummel, J; Büttner, A

    2015-05-01

    Against the background of a problematic reconstruction of a hunting accident, the question arises how such cases can be handled in hospitals and how exhibits can be adequately dealt with. After evaluating a questionnaire on current conditions of securing evidence in cases of surgically treated gunshot wounds from 26 surgical institutions in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and in consideration of the certified advanced training in the field of legal medicine, recommendations are given regarding the securing of evidence within the clinical setting without primary involvement of police or legal medicine.

  20. A Systems Analysis to Determine the Optimal Organizational Design for the Coordinated Care Division at Moncrief Army Community Hospital, Fort Jackson, South Carolina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Community Hospital. Coker, D. E. (1992). TDA alignment under consolidation of the Clinical Support Division and the Coordinated Care Division -- Change 1...report. Fort Jackson, SC: Author. Coordinated Care Division 121 U. S. Army Medical Department Activity, Fort Jackson. (1991). On-line TDA system (Document...ýPATENT 4. -- iReceive appointment ,-DER . ................. eq~ s •• s st m . . LI request sse -. f ot appt/ referral PPN I " er*f,(- FT--F P- ATENT i4

  1. A Study of Veterans Administration/Department of Defense Health Care Resources Sharing at Keller Army Community Hospital West Point, New York 10996

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    potential to reduce the excess capacity of participating facilities. 6. Provide a mechanism for notifying participating facilities that the purchase...imminent. 7. Provide a mechanism for addressing joint acquisition of major equipment/services. 8. Demonstrate a potential cost savings for resources...VA) first expressed a desire to share medical resources with Keller Army Community Hospital (KACH), West Point, New York.1 The mechanics of Federal

  2. Assessment of Health Behaviors, Health Education Interests, and Injuries among Employees at the General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital, October 2014 - December 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-06

    Behaviors , Health Education Interests, and Injuries among Employees at the General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital, October 2014 – December 2014...2016 2. REPORT TYPE FINAL 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) October 2014-December 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Assessment of Health Behaviors , Health...military as well as civilian populations. Purpose: To assess health behaviors , health education interests, perceived barriers to participation in health

  3. A Study of the Committee Structure of Ireland Army Hospital, Fort Knox, Kentucky

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    committee is medical records review. This function is required on a 6 quarterly basis and yet is accomplished by the Medical Care Evaluation Committee...Services Committee (EMCSC) would submit its minutes through the Ambulatory Patient Care Committee (APCC) to the Medical Care Evaluation Committee 14...solution. Through QAPC Alternative Five the existing Medical Care Evaluation Committee (MCEC) would become the hospital’s Quality Assurance Program

  4. A Study of the Committee Structure of Ireland Army Hospital, Fort Knox, Kentucky.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    on a 6 quarterly basis and yet is accomplished by the Medical Care Evaluation Committee (MCEC) each month. It is not proposed that productive...Committee (APCC) to the Medical Care Evaluation Committee 14 (MCEC). The review of the actions of the EMCSC and submission of its own minutes to the MCEC...solution. . Through QAPC Alternative Five the existing Medical Care Evaluation Committee (MCEC) would become the hospital’s Quality Assurance Program

  5. Etiology and severity of various forms of ocular war injuries in patients presenting at an Army Hospital in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Hassan Naqvi, Syed Abid; Malik, Sidra; Zulfiqaruddin, Syed; Anwar, Syeda Birjees; Nayyar, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the etiology and severity of various forms of ocular war injuries in patients presenting at an Army Hospital in Pakistan. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted at the Department of Ophthalmology, Combined Military Hospital, Peshawar over four years period from June 2012 through March 2016, Two hundred ten consecutive soldiers who presented with ocular war injuries were included for analysis after taking written informed consent. A predesigned proforma was used to record patient’s demographic details along with the cause, side, type and severity of injury, ocular trauma score was also recorded at presentation. Results: The mean age of the patients was 29.34±5.35 years. All of them were males. Left side was more frequently involved (n=126, 60.0%) and the most frequent underlying cause was IED blast injury (n=114, 54.3%). Closed globe injuries were more frequent and were recorded in 120 (57.1%) patients. Upon assigning Ocular Trauma Score, Grade-V (28.6%) injuries were the most frequent followed by Grade-I (25.7%), Grade III (25.7%), Grade II (11.4%) and Grade IV (8.6%). When stratified for the type of injury, OTS Grade I injuries were highest (60.0%) among patients with open globe injuries, hence poorer prognosis, while OTS Grade V injuries were highest (50.0%) among patients with closed globe injuries (p=0.000). Conclusion: IED blast injuries are most frequently encountered ocular war injuries often involving soldiers in the age group 20-30 years. These open globe injuries had worst clinical presentation to begin with and poorer prognosis than closed globe injuries. PMID:28083061

  6. Surgical management of pneumothorax: significance of effective admission or communication strategies between the district general hospitals and specialized unit.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Muhammad I; Martin-Ucar, Antonio E; Nakas, Apostolos; Waller, David A

    2011-11-01

    A preoperative delay in emergency surgery for spontaneous pneumothorax is associated with a poor outcome after surgery and a prolonged hospital stay. To reduce preoperative delays, all tertiary referrals from district general hospitals to our thoracic surgery unit were processed through a 'clinical decisions unit' (CDU). Prior to the establishment of the CDU, these patients were added to a waiting list for a surgical bed. This study has reviewed the effect of this change in admission policy on the efficiency of treatment for non-elective spontaneous pneumothorax. An intergroup comparison (pre-CDU group vs. post-CDU group) was made of the following parameters: referral to transfer time, transfer to surgery time and length of inpatient stay in the referring and tertiary hospitals. There were no significant differences in gender, diagnosis, treatment in the referring hospitals, postoperative clinical outcome, or indications for or type of surgery. The total length of inpatient stay in the referring and tertiary hospitals was significantly reduced for the post-CDU group (12 vs. 15 days; P<0.001), which was attributed to the earlier transfer of patients (18 vs. 78 hours; P<0.001) hours. Allowing surgical access to a traditional medical admission unit is therefore, cost-effective and significantly improves the efficiency of non-elective pneumothorax surgery.

  7. Nutritional screening in surgical patients of a teaching hospital from Southern Brazil: the impact of nutritional risk in clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rosane Scussel; Tavares, Léa Regina da Cunha; Pastore, Carla Alberici

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the prevalence of nutritional risk in surgical patients of a teaching hospital and its associated factors. Methods: A cross-sectional study with secondary data of surgical ward patients of the Hospital Escola da Universidade Federal de Pelotas, from April to October, 2010. Patients were evaluated up to 36 hours after admission using the Malnutrition Screening Tool. Results: The study included 565 patients, with a mean age of 52.8±15.6 years, and the majority (51%) was female. More than 30% of the patients presented with an average or high nutritional risk, and 7% of them were at high risk. Associated with the greater risk were aging, cancer surgery, and mortality. The length of hospital stay showed a linear increase according to nutritional risk. Conclusion: The Malnutrition Screening Tool is a simple and effective tool for nutritional screening that does not require anthropometric measurements. In this study, average or high nutritional risk was prevalent in one third of the sample, and was related to increased mortality, hospital stay, cancer, and aging. Nutritional care outpatients’ protocols could be used prior to elective surgery to reduce the nutritional risk of these patients, improving clinical outcomes and reducing length and costs of hospital stay. PMID:23843052

  8. Fucntional and Radiological Outcome of Surgical Management of Acetabular Fractures in Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Taufiq, Intikhab; Najjad, Muhammad Kazim Raheem; Khan, Naveed; Zia, Osama Bin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acetabular fractures are mainly caused by trauma and the incidence is rising in developing countries. Initially these fractures were managed conservatively, due to lack of specialized and dedicated acetabulum surgery centres. Our aim is to study the radiological and functional outcomes of surgical management of acetabular fractures in tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods Total 50 patients were enrolled. The patients with acetabular fractures were enrolled between the years 2012 to 2014. Patients were evaluated clinically with Harris hip score (HHS) and radiologically with Matta outcome grading. The factors examined include age, gender, fracture pattern, time between injury and surgery, initial displacement and quality of reduction on the final outcome. Results There were 34 males and 16 females. Mean age was 44.20±11.65 years while mean duration of stay was 9.28±2.36 days. Duration of follow-up was 24 months. Most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accident (n=37, 74.0%). Open reduction and internal fixation of fractures were performed using reconstruction plates. Mean HHS at 24 months was 82.36±8.55. The clinical outcome was acceptable (excellent or good) in 35 (70.0%) cases and not acceptable (fair or poor) in 15 (30.0%) cases. The radiological outcome was anatomical in 39 (78.0%) cases, congruent in 5 (10.0%) cases, incongruent in 6 (12.0%) cases. Conclusion Study results indicated that mechanism of injury, time between injury and surgery, initial degree of displacement and quality of reduction had significant effect on functional as well as radiological outcome. PMID:28097111

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury Hospitalizations of U.S. Army Soldiers Deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    TBI igure 1. Tramatic brain injury ( TBI ) hospitalization episo ote: All rates were expressed as per 10,000 soldier-years.BI and Type 3 categories...Catherine R. Stein, MS, Karen Bagg, MS, Rebecca J. Humphrey, MA, Jason Orosco, BS Background: Traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) is a life-altering...Journal of Preventive MedicineA t m A p D o 1 f t w i e r T ntroduction raumatic brain injury ( TBI ) is a blunt or penetrat- ing injury

  10. Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chun-Ru; Pan, I-Wen; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Tsai, Teressa; Liang, Ji-An; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997-2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non-medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

  11. Mobile emergency (surgical) hospital: Development and application in medical relief of "4.20" Lushan earthquake in Sichuan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bin; Shi, Ruo-Fei; Du, Ding-Yuan; Hu, Ping; Feng, Jun; Huang, Guang-Bin; Cai, An-Ning; Yin, Wei; Yang, Rong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    In the 21st century, natural disasters and emergencies occur frequently worldwide, which leads to the loss of hundreds of thousands of lives as well as the direct and indirect economic losses. China has a vast territory frequently struck by natural disasters. However, the reality is not optimistic. Poor organization and management during the rescue actions, the lack of large-scale, systematic medical rescue equipment were all great barriers to the outcomes. Mobile hospitals are expected to provide better health care. We were inspired by the concept of mobile hospital. Chongqing Emergency Medical Center, has set up trauma care system since 1988, in which prehospital care, intensive care, and in-hospital treatment is fully integrated. As a major advantage, such a system provided assurance of "golden hour" rescue treatment. Providing mobile intensive care and prehospital surgical service for severe trauma patients could reduce mortality significantly. Based on the civilian experiences in Chongqing Emergency Medical Center, the mobile emergency (surgical) hospital was developed.

  12. Pattern of Bacterial Pathogens and Their Susceptibility Isolated from Surgical Site Infections at Selected Referral Hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mulugeta, Gebru; Fentaw, Surafael; Mihret, Amete; Hassen, Mulu; Abebe, Engida

    2016-01-01

    Background. The emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens in hospitals is becoming a challenge for surgeons to treat hospital acquired infections. Objective. To determine bacterial pathogens and drug susceptibility isolated from surgical site infections at St. Paul Specialized Hospital Millennium Medical College and Yekatit 12 Referral Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2013 and March 2014 on 107 surgical site infected patients. Wound specimens were collected using sterile cotton swab and processed as per standard operative procedures in appropriate culture media; and susceptibility testing was done using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. The data were analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Result. From a total of 107 swabs collected, 90 (84.1%) were culture positive and 104 organisms were isolated. E. coli (24 (23.1%)) was the most common organism isolated followed by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species (23 (22.1%)). More than 58 (75%) of the Gram negative isolates showed multiple antibiotic resistance (resistance ≥ 5 drugs). Pan-antibiotic resistance was noted among 8 (34.8%) Acinetobacter species and 3 (12.5%) E. coli. This calls for abstinence from antibiotic abuse. Conclusion. Gram negative bacteria were the most important isolates accounting for 76 (73.1%). Ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, cephazoline, and tetracycline showed resistance while gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were relatively effective antimicrobials. PMID:27446213

  13. A Quality Improvement Approach to Reducing the Caesarean section Surgical Site Infection Rate in a Regional Hospital.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlon, M; McKenna, C; Carton, E; Diviney, D; Costello, M R; O'Sullivan, L; Fitzsimons, J; Toland, L; Dornikova, G; Curran, R; McCann, C; O'Sullivan, L; Doherty, T; Crowley, C; O'Coigligh, S

    2016-09-09

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are used extensively by hospitals as a basis for quality improvement. A 30-day post-discharge SSI programme for Caesarean section operations has been implemented in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital since 2011. It has been shown that skin antisepsis and antibiotic prophylaxis are key factors in the prevention of SSI. Using quality improvement methodology, an infection prevention bundle was introduced to address these two factors. Skin antisepsis was changed from povidone-iodine to chlorhexidine-alcohol. Compliance with choice of antibiotic prophylaxis increased from 89.6% in 2014 to 98.5% in 2015. Compliance with timing also improved. The SSI rate of 7.5% was the lowest recorded to date, with the majority of SSIs (64%) diagnosed after hospital discharge. The level of variation was also reduced. However, the continued presence of variation and possibility of lower infection rates from the literature imply that further improvements are required.

  14. Minor Postoperative Increases of Creatinine Are Associated with Higher Mortality and Longer Hospital Length of Stay in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kork, Felix; Balzer, Felix; Spies, Claudia D.; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Ginde, Adit A.; Jankowski, Joachim; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical patients frequently experience postoperative increases in creatinine levels. The authors hypothesized that even small increases in postoperative creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Methods The authors examined the association of postoperative changes from preoperative baseline creatinine with all-cause in-hospital mortality and hospital length of stay (HLOS) in a retrospective analysis of surgical patients at a single tertiary care center between January 2006 and June 2012. Results The data of 39,369 surgical patients (noncardiac surgery n = 37,345; cardiac surgery n = 2,024) were analyzed. Acute kidney injury (AKI)—by definition of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome group—was associated with a five-fold higher mortality (odds ratio [OR], 4.8; 95% CI, 4.1 to 5.7; P < 0.001) and a longer HLOS of 5 days (P < 0.001) after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities, congestive heart failure, preoperative hemoglobin, preoperative creatinine, exposure to radiocontrast agent, type of surgery, and surgical AKI risk factors. Importantly, even minor creatinine increases (Δcreatinine 25 to 49% above baseline but < 0.3 mg/dl) not meeting AKI criteria were associated with a two-fold increased risk of death (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.4; P < 0.001) and 2 days longer HLOS (P < 0.001). This was more pronounced in noncardiac surgery patients. Patients with minor creatinine increases had a five-fold risk of death (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 1.5 to 20.3; P < 0.05) and a 3-day longer HLOS (P < 0.01) when undergoing noncardiac surgery. Conclusions Even minor postoperative increases in creatinine levels are associated with adverse outcomes. These results emphasize the importance to find effective therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat even mild forms of postoperative kidney dysfunction to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26492475

  15. A Retrospective Case Series of Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) Placement at the Afghan National Police Hospital, Kabul, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Christian W; Royal, David; Arzoiey, Humayoon Abdul; Shefa, Azizullah; Sultani, Salim; Mosafa, Mohammed Omar; Sadat, Safiullah; Zirkle, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    In Afghanistan, adequate and cost-effective medical care for even routine conditions is lacking; especially for complex injuries like long-bone fractures. The Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) intramedullary nail is used for treatment of long-bone fractures from blunt injuries and does not require imaging. We are reporting for the first time results of the SIGN intramedullary nail at the Afghan National Police Hospital, a tertiary care facility in Kabul. 71 records from the SIGN Online Surgical Database were reviewed for gender, age, date of injury, implant date, patient's home of record, and type/ mechanism of injury. Mean age was 26.7 years, all but one being male; time from injury to implant ranged 1 to 401 days, with mean of 40.6 days. Long-bone fractures from motor vehicle accidents remained constant, and war injuries peaked in summer. Follow-up is limited because of security and financial burdens of travel. However, personal communication with Afghan National Police Hospital surgeons suggests that patients included in the current study have not experienced any adverse outcomes. While it remains to be seen if the SIGN Online Surgical Database will facilitate more comprehensive outcome studies, our results provide support for the efficacy of SIGN nails in treating long-bone fractures from war injuries.

  16. Para-oesophageal and parahiatal hernias in an Asian acute care tertiary hospital: an underappreciated surgical condition

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ye Xin; Ong, Lester Wei Lin; Lee, June; Wong, Andrew Siang Yih

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The prevalence of hiatal hernias and para-oesophageal hernias (PEHs) is lower in Asian populations than in Western populations. Progressive herniation can result in giant PEHs, which are associated with significant morbidity. This article presents the experience of an Asian acute care tertiary hospital in the management of giant PEH and parahiatal hernia. METHODS Surgical records dated between January 2003 and January 2013 from the Department of Surgery, Changi General Hospital, Singapore, were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Ten patients underwent surgical repair for giant PEH or parahiatal hernia during the study period. Open surgery was performed for four patients with giant PEH who presented emergently, while elective laparoscopic repair was performed for six patients with either giant PEH or parahiatal hernia (which were preoperatively diagnosed as PEH). Anterior 180° partial fundoplication was performed in eight patients, and mesh reinforcement was used in six patients. The electively repaired patients had minimal or no symptoms during presentation. Gastric volvulus was observed in five patients. There were no cases of mortality. The median follow-up duration was 16.3 months. There were no cases of mesh erosion, complaints of dysphagia or recurrence of PEH in all patients. CONCLUSION Giant PEH and parahiatal hernia are underdiagnosed in Asia. Most patients with giant PEH or parahiatal hernia are asymptomatic; they often present emergently or are incidentally diagnosed. Although surgical outcomes are favourable even with a delayed diagnosis, there should be greater emphasis on early diagnosis and elective repair of these hernias. PMID:26778633

  17. Critical values in pediatric surgical pathology: definition, implementation, and reporting in a children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Cheryl M; Spilker, Krista; Lowichik, Amy; Zhou, Holly; Nielson, Kim; Erickson, Lance; Pysher, Theodore J

    2007-12-01

    Timely communication of significant or unexpected findings in surgical pathology can significantly improve patient care. Although surgical pathology critical values have been published, no systematic assessment in pediatric surgical pathology has been published. We surveyed pediatric pathologists and pediatric subspecialists to develop pediatric surgical pathology critical values for verbal reporting before the final pathology report. A policy and process for reporting and documentation was implemented, with retrospective and prospective quality review. Critical values cases constituted 9.4% of surgical pathology accessions. Retrospective analysis revealed that 80% (73/91) had been reported and documented before policy implementation. Following implementation, 97.3% (402/413) were verbally reported and documented. A multidisciplinary group provided valuable information about critical values that might not have been obvious to pediatric pathologists but are important for patient care. Although the term critical values has become embedded in the surgical pathology literature, we would propose an alternative term for significant or unexpected findings that require timely communication and documentation.

  18. Incidence and Etiology of Surgical Site Infections among Emergency Postoperative Patients in Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital, South Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Joel, Bazira; Justina Lucy, Najjuka

    2017-01-01

    Background. This prospective hospital based study was conducted to determine the incidence, risk factors, and causative agents of surgical site infection their susceptibility to among 114 emergency postoperative patients at the Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital between September 2014 and January 2015. Methods. Consented patients were consecutively enrolled and their preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were collected. Follow-ups were done in the surgical outpatient clinics. Wound specimens were collected and processed as per Sops; susceptibility testing was done using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. Data was analyzed using STATA 11.0. Results. Overall SSI incidence was 16.4%: 5.9% superficial and 47.1% deep and organ space SSIs each. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most predominant organism (50%) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (27.8%). E. coli and P. aeruginosa both accounted for 11.1%. Wound class (p = 0.009), anaemia (p = 0.024), low serum albumin (p = 0.046), and property of suture material used (p = 0.006) were significantly associated with SSIs. All organisms had 100% resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, septrin, and erythromycin. Ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone are highly sensitive to all organisms. Conclusion. The incidence of SSI in this hospital is very high. Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant cause. Ciprofloxacin are very potent antibiotics against organisms that cause SSI. PMID:28168215

  19. Incidence and Etiology of Surgical Site Infections among Emergency Postoperative Patients in Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital, South Western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Lubega, Abubaker; Joel, Bazira; Justina Lucy, Najjuka

    2017-01-01

    Background. This prospective hospital based study was conducted to determine the incidence, risk factors, and causative agents of surgical site infection their susceptibility to among 114 emergency postoperative patients at the Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital between September 2014 and January 2015. Methods. Consented patients were consecutively enrolled and their preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were collected. Follow-ups were done in the surgical outpatient clinics. Wound specimens were collected and processed as per Sops; susceptibility testing was done using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. Data was analyzed using STATA 11.0. Results. Overall SSI incidence was 16.4%: 5.9% superficial and 47.1% deep and organ space SSIs each. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most predominant organism (50%) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (27.8%). E. coli and P. aeruginosa both accounted for 11.1%. Wound class (p = 0.009), anaemia (p = 0.024), low serum albumin (p = 0.046), and property of suture material used (p = 0.006) were significantly associated with SSIs. All organisms had 100% resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, septrin, and erythromycin. Ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone are highly sensitive to all organisms. Conclusion. The incidence of SSI in this hospital is very high. Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant cause. Ciprofloxacin are very potent antibiotics against organisms that cause SSI.

  20. A Study to Identify the Determinants of Patient Satisfaction at Martin Army Community Hospital Using Quantitative and Qualitative Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    OF THIS PAGE DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT ACTIVITY FORT SENNING, GEORGIA 31905-6100 • t y TO...due to a lack of documentation in the medical records (i.e., misssing lab tests and consults). The best predictor of inpatient satisfaction was the...types of attitudinal variables (e.g., continuity of care, confidence in the medical care system, and ability to access the system) that may predispose

  1. Base Closure and Health Coverage; the Case of Silas B. Hays Army Community Hospital and Fort Ord

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Natividad Medical Center, Salinas Valley Memorial Hospital and Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula) and compare their services to that of...remaining personnel was determined. The utilization statistics of three local hospitals (Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula, Natividad ...Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula (CHOMP), Salinas Valley Memorial Hospital and Natividad Medical Center. Each were evaluated as a potential source of

  2. Forward surgery and combat hospitals: the origins of the MASH.

    PubMed

    Marble, Sanders

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Army adopted forward surgical hospitals (SHs) during World War I on the advice of the British and French armies. The purposes were not just to save lives, but to benefit the military by returning more patients to duty and reducing the size of the hospital system through fewer infections and shorter hospital stays. The Army examined the utility of the units at the end of the war and retained them for any future conflicts, but opposition also survived. The question was the utility for the Army: was it worth making a substantial investment, and reducing care for other wounded soldiers, for the most grievously wounded, perhaps 1 percent of the total? Devising an effective way to organize forward SHs was a problem in the interwar years and early in World War II (WWII). But from the late 1930s, the Army never reexamined whether it should provide forward surgery, only how to do so, including pushing surgeons even further forward on the battlefield. At the end of WWII, the Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH) was created to perform the mission, although the MASH was only the latest format.

  3. 76 FR 74121 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-30

    ...This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) for CY 2012 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital......

  4. 76 FR 42169 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ...This proposed rule would revise the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system. In this proposed rule, we describe the proposed changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital outpatient services paid under the OPPS.......

  5. Cost Determinants of Percutaneous and Surgical Interventions for Treatment of Intermittent Claudication from the Perspective of the Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Janne d'Othee, Bertrand Morris, Michael F.; Powell, Richard J.; Bettmann, Michael A.

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To identify pretreatment predictors of procedural costs in percutaneous and surgical interventions for intermittent claudication due to aortoiliac and/or femoropopliteal disease. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted in 97 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous or surgical interventions over 15 months at a tertiary care center. Nineteen clinical predictive variables were collected at baseline. Procedural costs (outcome) were assessed from the perspective of the hospital by direct calculation, not based on ratios of costs-to-charges. A multivariable regression model was built to identify significant cost predictors. Follow-up information was obtained to provide multidimensional assessment of clinical outcome, including technical success (arteriographic score) and clinical result (changes in ankle-brachial pressure index; cumulative patency, mortality, and complication rates). Results. The linear regression model shows that procedural costs per patient are 25% lower in percutaneous patients (versus surgical), 42% lower for patients without rest pain than for those with, 28% lower if treated lesions are unilateral (versus bilateral), 12% lower if the treated lesion is stenotic rather than occlusive, 34% higher in sedentary patients, and 11% higher in patients with a history of cardiac disease. After a mean clinical follow-up >2 years, between-group differences between percutaneous and surgical patients were small and of limited significance in all dimensions of clinical outcome. Conclusion. Predictors of clinical outcome are different from predictors of costs, and one should include both types of variables in the decision-making process. The choice of percutaneous versus surgical strategy, the presence of rest pain, and the bilaterality of the culprit lesions were the main pretreatment determinants of procedural costs. When possible choices of treatment strategy overlap, percutaneous treatment should provide an acceptable result that is less

  6. Quantifying the Diversity and Similarity of Surgical Procedures Among Hospitals and Anesthesia Providers.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Franklin; Ledolter, Johannes; Hindman, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    In this Statistical Grand Rounds, we review methods for the analysis of the diversity of procedures among hospitals, the activities among anesthesia providers, etc. We apply multiple methods and consider their relative reliability and usefulness for perioperative applications, including calculations of SEs. We also review methods for comparing the similarity of procedures among hospitals, activities among anesthesia providers, etc. We again apply multiple methods and consider their relative reliability and usefulness for perioperative applications. The applications include strategic analyses (e.g., hospital marketing) and human resource analytics (e.g., comparisons among providers). Measures of diversity of procedures and activities (e.g., Herfindahl and Gini-Simpson index) are used for quantification of each facility (hospital) or anesthesia provider, one at a time. Diversity can be thought of as a summary measure. Thus, if the diversity of procedures for 48 hospitals is studied, the diversity (and its SE) is being calculated for each hospital. Likewise, the effective numbers of common procedures at each hospital can be calculated (e.g., by using the exponential of the Shannon index). Measures of similarity are pairwise assessments. Thus, if quantifying the similarity of procedures among cases with a break or handoff versus cases without a break or handoff, a similarity index represents a correlation coefficient. There are several different measures of similarity, and we compare their features and applicability for perioperative data. We rely extensively on sensitivity analyses to interpret observed values of the similarity index.

  7. What Does a Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Reveal About Patient Safety Culture of Surgical Units Compared With That of Other Units?

    PubMed

    Shu, Qin; Cai, Miao; Tao, Hong-Bing; Cheng, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Jing; Hu, Yin-Huan; Li, Gang

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the strengths and weaknesses of surgical units as compared with other units, and to provide an opportunity to improve patient safety culture in surgical settings by suggesting targeted actions using Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) investigation.A Hospital Survey on Patient Safety questionnaire was conducted to physicians and nurses in a tertiary hospital in Shandong China. 12 patient safety culture dimensions and 2 outcome variables were measured.A total of 23.5% of respondents came from surgical units, and 76.5% worked in other units. The "overall perceptions of safety" (48.1% vs 40.4%, P < 0.001) and "frequency of events reported" (63.7% vs 60.7%, P = 0.001) of surgical units were higher than those of other units. However, the communication openness (38.7% vs 42.5%, P < 0.001) of surgical units was lower than in other units. Medical workers in surgical units reported more events than those in other units, and more respondents in the surgical units assess "patient safety grade" to be good/excellent. Three dimensions were considered as strengths, whereas 5 other dimensions were considered to be weaknesses in surgical units. Six dimensions have potential to aid in improving events reporting and patient safety grade. Appropriate working times will also contribute to ensuring patient safety. Medical staff with longer years of experience reported more events.Surgical units outperform the nonsurgical ones in overall perception of safety and the number of events reported but underperform in the openness of communication. Four strategies, namely deepening the understanding about patient safety of supervisors, narrowing the communication gap within and across clinical units, recruiting more workers, and employing the event reporting system and building a nonpunitive culture, are recommended to improve patient safety in surgical units in the context of 1 hospital.

  8. Analysis of in hospital mortality and long-term survival excluding in hospital mortality after open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Jun Gyo; Cho, Yong-Pil; Han, Young Jin; Noh, Min Su

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to confirm the factors that affect the mortality associated with the open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) and to analyze the long-term survival rates. Methods A retrospective review was performed on a prospectively collected database that included 455 consecutive patients who underwent open surgical repair for AAA between January 2001 and December 2012. We divided our analysis into in-hospital and postdischarge periods and analyzed the risk factors that affected the long-term survival of rAAA patients. Results Of the 455 patients who were initially screened, 103 were rAAA patients, and 352 were non-rAAA (nAAA) patients. In the rAAA group, 25 patients (24.2%) died in the hospital and 78 were discharged. Long-term survival was significantly better in the nAAA group (P = 0.001). The 2-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates of the rAAA patients were 87%, 73.4%, and 54.1%, respectively. Age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–.08; P < 0.001) and aneurysm rupture (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.12–.44; P = 0.01) significantly affected long-term survival. Conclusion Preoperative circulatory failure is the most common cause of death for in-hospital mortality of rAAA patients. After excluding patients who have died during the perioperative period, age is the only factor that affects the survival of rAAA patients. PMID:27904852

  9. Informed consent practices for surgical care at university teaching hospitals: a case in a low resource setting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Informed consent in medical practice is essential and a global standard that should be sought at all the times doctors interact with patients. Its intensity would vary depending on the invasiveness and risks associated with the anticipated treatment. To our knowledge there has not been any systematic review of consent practices to document best practices and identify areas that need improvement in our setting. The objective of the study was to evaluate the informed consent practices of surgeons at University teaching Hospitals in a low resource setting. Methods A cross-sectional study conducted at three university teaching hospitals in Uganda. Self-guided questionnaires were left at a central location in each of the surgical departments after verbally communicating to the surgeons of the intention of the study. Filled questionnaires were returned at the same location by the respondents for collection by the research team. In addition, 20 in-depth interviews were held with surgeons and a review of 384 patients’ record files for informed consent documentation was done. Results A total of 132 (62.1%) out of 214 questionnaires were completed and returned. Respondents were intern doctors, residents and specialists from General surgery, Orthopedic surgery, Ear, Nose and Throat, Ophthalmology, Dentistry, Obstetrics and Gynaecology departments. The average working experience of respondents was 4.8 years (SD 4.454, range 0–39 years). 48.8% of the respondents said they obtained consent all the time surgery is done while 51.2% did not obtain consent all the time. Many of the respondents indicated that informed consent was not obtained by the surgeon who operated the patient but was obtained either at admission or by nurses in the surgical units. The consent forms used in the hospitals were found to be inadequate and many times signed at admission before diagnosing the patient’s disease. Conclusions Informed consent administration and documentation for

  10. Impact of a major hurricane on surgical services in a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Norcross, E D; Elliott, B M; Adams, D B; Crawford, F A

    1993-01-01

    Hurricane Hugo struck Charleston, South Carolina, on September 21, 1989. This report analyzes the impact this storm had upon surgical care at a university medical center. Although disaster planning began on September 17, hurricane damage by high winds and an 8.7-foot tidal surge led to loss of emergency power and water. Consequently, system failures occurred in air conditioning, vacuum suction, steam and ethylene oxide sterilization, plumbing, central paging, lighting, and refrigeration. The following surgical support services were affected. In the blood bank, lack of refrigeration meant no platelet packs for 2 days. In radiology, loss of electrical power damaged CT/MRI scanners and flooding ruined patient files, resulting in lost information. In the intensive care unit, loss of electricity meant no monitors and hand ventilation was used for 4 hours. In the operating room, lack of temperature and humidity control (steam, water, and suction supply) halted elective surgery until October 2. Ground and air transportation were limited by unsafe landing sites, impassable roads, and personnel exhaustion. Surgical planning for a major hurricane should include: 1) a fail-safe source of electrical power, 2) evacuation of as many critically ill patients as possible before the storm, 3) cancellation of all elective surgery, and 4) augmented ancillary service staffing with some, although limited, physician support.

  11. The effect of hospital infection control policy on the prevalence of surgical site infection in a tertiary hospital in South-South Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Brisibe, Seiyefa Fun-Akpa; Ordinioha, Best; Gbeneolol, Precious K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a significant cause of morbidity, emotional stress and financial cost to the affected patients and health care institutions; and infection control policy has been shown to reduce the burden of SSIs in several health care institutions. This study assessed the effects of the implementation of the policy on the prevalence of SSI in the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Patients and Methods: A review of the records of all Caesarean sections carried out in the hospital, before and 2 years after the implementation of the infection control policy was conducted. Data collected include the number and characteristics of the patients that had Caesarean section in the hospital during the period and those that developed SSI while on admission. Results: The proportion of patients with SSI decreased from 13.33% to 10.34%, 2 years after the implementation of the policy (P-value = 0.18). The implementation of the policy did not also result in any statistically significant change in the nature of the wound infection (P-value = 0.230), in the schedule of the operations (P-value = 0.93) and in the other predisposing factors of the infections (P-value = 0.72); except for the significant decrease in the infection rate among the un-booked patients (P-value = 0.032). Conclusion: The implementation of the policy led to a small decrease in SSI, due to the non-implementation of some important aspects of the WHO policy. The introduction of surveillance activities, continuous practice reinforcing communications and environmental sanitation are recommended to further decrease the prevalence of SSI in the hospital. PMID:26229228

  12. Emergency Preparedness: An Analysis of Staff Knowledge and Training at Darnall Army Community Hospital, Fort Hood, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    of Contents DISCLOSURE AS CALLED FOR BY ARMY REGULATION 360-1 .................................... 2 STATEMENT OF ETHICAL CONDUCT IN RESERACH ...these two factors the apathy factor and the paper plan syndrome. Apathy is a social reality to be faced in disaster planning. Public apathy towards...Medication Management (MM), Surveillance, Prevention and Control of Infection (IC), Improving Organization Performance (PI), Leadership (LD), Management

  13. Influence of atmospheric states in semi-arid areas on hospital admission in cardio-surgical department.

    PubMed

    Yackerson, Naomy S; Zilberman, Arkadi; Aizenberg, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The influence of the changes in atmospheric state, typical for areas close to big deserts, on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was analyzed. Under test was the group of 3256 patients (77 % males, 23 % females), hospitalized in the Cardio-Surgical Department of Soroka Medical Center at Ben-Gurion University (BGU, Israel) during 2000-2008. To explore the relationship between atmospheric parameters and AMI, multivariate regression analysis has been performed. AMI was most frequent in winter to spring and least in summer. The highest number of cases was recorded in December and the lowest in September. Hospital admissions showed a higher prevalence in men than in women; the ratio is 3.3/1.0. About 60 % of males were aged between 45 and 65 years old with maximum ∼55 (21 %), whereas 60 % of women hospital admissions were aged between 65 and 80 years old with maximum ∼72 (24 %). The result suggested that the monthly mean relative humidity at daytime and its overall daily differences, wind speed, and respirable fraction of particulate concentration are associated with the admission for AMI. The results of the study confirm the importance of atmospheric state variability for cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Influence of atmospheric states in semi-arid areas on hospital admission in cardio-surgical department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yackerson, Naomy S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Aizenberg, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    The influence of the changes in atmospheric state, typical for areas close to big deserts, on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was analyzed. Under test was the group of 3256 patients (77 % males, 23 % females), hospitalized in the Cardio-Surgical Department of Soroka Medical Center at Ben-Gurion University (BGU, Israel) during 2000-2008. To explore the relationship between atmospheric parameters and AMI, multivariate regression analysis has been performed. AMI was most frequent in winter to spring and least in summer. The highest number of cases was recorded in December and the lowest in September. Hospital admissions showed a higher prevalence in men than in women; the ratio is 3.3/1.0. About 60 % of males were aged between 45 and 65 years old with maximum ˜55 (21 %), whereas 60 % of women hospital admissions were aged between 65 and 80 years old with maximum ˜72 (24 %). The result suggested that the monthly mean relative humidity at daytime and its overall daily differences, wind speed, and respirable fraction of particulate concentration are associated with the admission for AMI. The results of the study confirm the importance of atmospheric state variability for cardiovascular diseases.

  15. 77 FR 217 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ..., Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program Issues. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-28612 of November 30, 2011 (76 FR 74122), (hereinafter referred to as the CY 2012 OPPS/ASC final... they had been included in the CY 2012 OPPS/ASC final rule with comment period (76 FR 74122)...

  16. [Surgical treatment of wounds of the neck in practice of the emergency hospital during peacetime].

    PubMed

    Mosiagin, V B; Ryl'kov, V F; Moiseev, A A

    2013-01-01

    The data of the follow-up study of 60 patients with wounds of the neck are presented in this article. The authors describe the volume and severity of injuries of the neck and at the same time examine the difficulties of diagnostics and treatment. The scope of investigations, the necessity of consultation of "narrow" specialist, the volume of surgical handbook and the conservative therapy are determined. The significance of the up-to-date methods of instrumental researches, such as computed tomography, Doppler tomography, are emphasized particularly for evaluation of the injury volume.

  17. A Comparative Study of the Lengths of Stay of Matched Groups of Inpatients Treated in Civilian, United States Army, Navy, and Air Force Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-03-01

    average length of stay for surgical, medical, and orthopedic service patients, in addition to...the 3 average length of stay for all patients. The lengths of stay for the two hospital categories were then compared by 3 using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov...Naval hospi- 4D tals were experiencing an average length of stay which?, • was, in most diagnostic categories, two to three times greater than that

  18. Surgical Audit of Patients with Ileal Perforations Requiring Ileostomy in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Hemkant; Pandey, Siddharth; Sheoran, Kapil Dev; Marwah, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Ileal perforation peritonitis is a frequently encountered surgical emergency in the developing countries. The choice of a procedure for source control depends on the patient condition as well as the surgeon preference. Material and Methods. This was a prospective observational study including 41 patients presenting with perforation peritonitis due to ileal perforation and managed with ileostomy. Demographic profile and operative findings in terms of number of perforations, site, and size of perforation along with histopathological findings of all the cases were recorded. Results. The majority of patients were male. Pain abdomen and fever were the most common presenting complaints. Body mass index of the patients was in the range of 15.4–25.3 while comorbidities were present in 43% cases. Mean duration of preoperative resuscitation was 14.73 + 13.77 hours. Operative findings showed that 78% patients had a single perforation; most perforations were 0.6–1 cm in size and within 15 cm proximal to ileocecal junction. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was seen in 29.2% patients. On histopathological examination, nonspecific perforations followed by typhoid and tubercular perforations respectively were the most common. Conclusion. Patients with ileal perforations are routinely seen in surgical emergencies and their demography, clinical profile, and intraoperative findings may guide the choice of procedure to be performed. PMID:26247059

  19. Surgical pathology in the 20th century at the Mount Sinai Hospital, New York.

    PubMed

    Geller, Stephen A

    2008-08-01

    How did the education of surgical pathology, and pathology in general, differ at Mount Sinai? Passing the examination of the American Board of Pathology was never the focus of the department. Learning criteria or quoting references was de-emphasized, but mastery of macroscopic pathology was required, supported in both word and action by two brilliant surgical pathologists, Otani and Kaneko, and by two extraordinary medical pathologists, Klemperer and Popper. Meticulous microscopy emphasized pattern rather than reliance on lists of discrete features. Otani developed a regular "problem case" meeting for a community of pathologists, made up of alumni and other interested pathologists, as well as active department members. These monthly sessions provided the highest level of "continuing medical education." Otani and Kaneko unequivocally believed in learning from cases, and Mount Sinai residents were fortunate both in the one-to-one teaching and in the wealth of material, in all systems, that came to surgical pathology. Outstanding pathologists who came from Mount Sinai settled throughout the country and provided the highest level of diagnoses, but, with the exception of Bernard Wagner, Emanuel Rubin, Fiorenzo Paronetto, Richard Horowitz, Michael Gerber, Marc Rosenblum, Bruce Wenig, Jaishree Jagirdar, Swan Thung, Cesar Moran, Hideko Kamino, Philip LeBoit, Alberto Marchevsky, and others, there were relatively few academic leaders. Otani and Kaneko did not have national reputations. Klemperer, although world renowned, was relatively unassuming, and his disciples numbered almost as many nonpathologists as pathologists. Popper did establish a major center for liver pathology, with students coming from around the world, but did not particularly promote general surgical pathology. Can the Mount Sinai approach still be applied? The decline in the numbers of autopsies performed, the demands for rapid turnaround time, the de-emphasis of gross pathology as newer technologies (eg

  20. A Study to Determine the Extent of Social Support and Burnout among Nurses at Womack Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    Maslach and Jackson followed closely their definition of burnout and designed the Maslach Burnout Inventory to assess the three aspects of the syndrome...compared to a previous similar study conducted by Constable at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center and studies conducted by Maslach and Jackson , and House...D. Kafry, Burnout, New York: The Free Press, 1981, pp 4-6. 1 5Cherniss, Staff Burnout, pp 18-19. 16 C. Maslach and S. Jackson , Maslach Burnout

  1. The Development and Analysis of a Strategic Planning Process at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop and analyze a strategic planning process which culminated in a strategic plan for Blanchfield Army...identifying key stakeholders, and selecting committee members. Phase two was an educational phase in which committee members were oriented to strategic planning and...The final phase focused on the revision of the strategic planning document A review and analysis of the planning process revealed three areas for

  2. A Study of the Ambulatory Care Quality Assurance Program at DeWitt Army Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Practice Inpatient Services. These will include medical , pediatric , obstetrical and gynecologic patient categories. Audits will be conducted once monthly...CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Development of the Problem "The impetus for the study of the ambulatory care Quality Assurance Program at the US Army Medical ...regarding the quality of ambulatory care. Repeatedly, the outcome of quality assurance( QA) related committee meetings, e.g., the Medical Care

  3. Out-of-Hospital Surgical Airway Management: Does Scope of Practice Equal Actual Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Molly; Kohn, Melissa; Overberger, Ryan; Jaslow, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pennsylvania, among other states, includes surgical airway management, or cricothyrotomy, within the paramedic scope of practice. However, there is scant literature that evaluates paramedic perception of clinical competency in cricothyrotomy. The goal of this project is to assess clinical exposure, education and self-perceived competency of ground paramedics in cricothyrotomy. Methods Eighty-six paramedics employed by four ground emergency medical services agencies completed a 22-question written survey that assessed surgical airway attempts, training, skills verification, and perceptions about procedural competency. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate responses. Results Only 20% (17/86, 95% CI [11–28%]) of paramedics had attempted cricothyrotomy, most (13/17 or 76%, 95% CI [53–90%]) of whom had greater than 10 years experience. Most subjects (63/86 or 73%, 95% CI [64–82%]) did not reply that they are well-trained to perform cricothyrotomy and less than half (34/86 or 40%, 95% CI [30–50%]) felt they could correctly perform cricothyrotomy on their first attempt. Among subjects with five or more years of experience, 39/70 (56%, 95% CI [44–68%]) reported 0–1 hours per year of practical cricothyrotomy training within the last five years. Half of the subjects who were able to recall (40/80, 50% 95% CI [39–61%]) reported having proficiency verification for cricothyrotomy within the past five years. Conclusion Paramedics surveyed indicated that cricothyrotomy is rarely performed, even among those with years of experience. Many paramedics felt that their training in this area is inadequate and did not feel confident to perform the procedure. Further study to determine whether to modify paramedic scope of practice and/or to develop improved educational and testing methods is warranted. PMID:27330674

  4. Data Accuracy of the Bubble Sheet Ambulatory Data System and the KG-Ambulatory Data System in the Internal Medicine Clinic, Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital, Fort Polk, Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    in the Ambulatory Data System (ADS) for the Internal Medicine Clinic at Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital, Fort Polk, Louisiana. A secondary purpose...Analysis of the financial data indicated that the hospital was minimally at risk for either fraudulent billing or loss of revenue. However, as the Internal ... Medicine Clinic only accounts for 6.3% of outpatient workload, coding behaviors similar to those observed practiced in other high volume clinics would

  5. Surgical services and transformation of civil hospital during "August War 2008" in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kiladze, M A; Lominadze, N G; Goderdzishvili, V T; Kcherodinashvili, G I; Mgeliashvili, T I; Abuladze, V I

    2011-01-01

    Structural transformation of a civil hospital into a military one during "August War 2008" (August 8-12) in Georgia is presented. Damage-control principles, such as hemorrhage control, liver-packing and abdominal tamponade, gastrointestinal tract resection without formation of anastomoses, and other temporary interventions were prioritized. This provided a chance to empty the hospital in a short period to provide the admission of an increased number of combat casualties. There were soldiers from Georgian troops, civilians, and captives of war. The number of total admitted patients was 739. Fifty-two patients were operated on in the surgery department. The following operations were carried out: removal of foreign bodies from the neck region, 6 cases; isolated thoracotomy, pulmorrhaphy, and drainage, 2 cases; laparotomy, hepatorrhaphy, gastrorrhaphy, splenectomy, resection of small intestine, and colostomy, 18 cases; combined operations (thoracotomy plus laparotomy), 9 cases; extended debridement and dressing of wounds, 11 cases; angiosurgical operations, 4 cases; and coloplasty, 2 cases. There were 2 cases of mortality, 1 case of rethoracotomy, and 3 cases of relaparotomy: 2 because of intracavital bleeding and 1 because of sanation.

  6. Analysis of wounds incurred by U.S. Army Seventh Corps personnel treated in Corps hospitals during Operation Desert Storm, February 20 to March 10, 1991.

    PubMed

    Carey, M E

    1996-03-01

    One hundred and forty-three soldiers who received ballistic injury were actively treated at U.S. Army Seventh Corps hospitals during Operation Desert Storm. Ninety-five percent were wounded by fragments, 5% by bullets. Many had wounds of several body parts, including 17.3% who received a head wound; 4.3% a neck wound; 5.8% a chest wound; 9.3% an abdominal wound; and 90% who had extremity wounds. Three hospital deaths occurred--a 2.1% mortality rate. Only two soldiers sustained a brain wound; in both, the missile entered below the skull area protected by the Kevlar helmet. One brainwounded individual was treated and lived; the other died from hemorrhage and shock from concomitant traumatic lower-extremity amputations. The current U.S. helmet appears to provide significant protection from fragmenting ordnance as does the armored vest. Hemorrhage from proximal extremity wounds caused hospital deaths. Treatment of such wounds will have to be improved to reduce future combat mortality.

  7. Surgical travellers: tapestry to Bayeux.

    PubMed

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2014-09-01

    The planning for surgery in war was revisited in 1937 when Ian Fraser was elected a member of the Surgical Travellers. At their 1938 Surgical Travellers meeting in Vienna, Ian and Eleanor Fraser were evicted from their hotel room by the Nazis. The 1939 meeting in Belfast discussed the organization of surgery and the conduct of Emergency Medical Service Hospitals in the United Kingdom; the vast majority were to be under civilian government and military control. From 1943 lengthy and informative organizational meetings were held at least monthly under the chairmanship of Sir Alexander Hood, KBE, Head of the RAMC. Surgical Consultants, now Major Generals, Brigadiers or Full Colonels in the British and U.S. Armies stationed in the UK, prepared for the invasion of Europe. The allocation of medical, surgical, nursing and auxiliary responsibilities was delineated. Liaison with the RAF and US Army Air Force was close as it was with the proposed leaders, Ulstermen Brooke and Montgomery. Montgomery chose Arthur Porritt as Surgeon in Chief to Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF), and Eisenhower, General Albert W. Kenner. Just after D-Day, Porritt met Ian Fraser, who had waded in on Arromanches Beach. The triage and evacuation plans for Allied casualties had been controversial, particularly as regards Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs). The dispute with the Hood-selected surgeons on one side, against medical and surgical deployment of LSTs, and Admiral Ernest King and Winston Churchill on the other, favouring LST use for surgery and evacuation. King and Churchill were correct but total Allied air superiority allowed wide use of many of the Allies' Dakotas; 10,000 DC-3s were eventually in service. Supported by forty Allied combat planes to each Luftwaffe, the dispute about Landing Ship Tank use in about a fortnight became moot. The multifaceted role of the Princess Royal in the Emergency Medical Services of the United Kingdom and her close liaison with the Consultant

  8. Surgical Travellers: Tapestry to Bayeux

    PubMed Central

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2014-01-01

    The planning for surgery in war was revisited in 1937 when Ian Fraser was elected a member of the Surgical Travellers. At their 1938 Surgical Travellers meeting in Vienna, Ian and Eleanor Fraser were evicted from their hotel room by the Nazis. The 1939 meeting in Belfast discussed the organization of surgery and the conduct of Emergency Medical Service Hospitals in the United Kingdom; the vast majority were to be under civilian government and military control. From 1943 lengthy and informative organizational meetings were held at least monthly under the chairmanship of Sir Alexander Hood, KBE, Head of the RAMC. Surgical Consultants, now Major Generals, Brigadiers or Full Colonels in the British and U.S. Armies stationed in the UK, prepared for the invasion of Europe. The allocation of medical, surgical, nursing and auxiliary responsibilities was delineated. Liaison with the RAF and US Army Air Force was close as it was with the proposed leaders, Ulstermen Brooke and Montgomery. Montgomery chose Arthur Porritt as Surgeon in Chief to Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF), and Eisenhower, General Albert W. Kenner. Just after D-Day, Porritt met Ian Fraser, who had waded in on Arromanches Beach. The triage and evacuation plans for Allied casualties had been controversial, particularly as regards Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs). The dispute with the Hood-selected surgeons on one side, against medical and surgical deployment of LSTs, and Admiral Ernest King and Winston Churchill on the other, favouring LST use for surgery and evacuation. King and Churchill were correct but total Allied air superiority allowed wide use of many of the Allies' Dakotas; 10,000 DC-3s were eventually in service. Supported by forty Allied combat planes to each Luftwaffe, the dispute about Landing Ship Tank use in about a fortnight became moot. The multifaceted role of the Princess Royal in the Emergency Medical Services of the United Kingdom and her close liaison with the Consultant

  9. Effect of glycemic state on hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Chi, Albert; Lissauer, Matthew E; Kirchoffner, Jill; Scalea, Thomas M; Johnson, Steven B

    2011-11-01

    Intensive insulin therapy can reduce mortality. Hypoglycemia related to intensive therapy may worsen outcomes. This study compared risk adjusted mortality for different glycemic states. A retrospective review of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit over 4 years was performed. Patients were divided into glycemic groups: HYPER (≥1 episode > 180 mg/dL, any <60), HYPO (≥1 episode < 60 mg/dL, any >180), BOTH (≥1 episode < 60 and ≥1 episode > 180 mg/dL), NORMO (all episodes 60-180 mg/dL), HYPER-Only (≥1 episode > 180, none <60 mg/dL), and HYPO-Only (≥1 episode < 60, none >180 mg/dL). Observed to expected Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III mortality ratios (O/E) were studied. Number of adverse glycemic events was compared with mortality. Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia occurred in 18 per cent and 50 per cent of patients. Mortality was 12.4 per cent (O/E = 0.88). BOTH had the highest O/E ratio (1.43) with HYPO the second highest (1.30). Groups excluding hypoglycemia (NORMO and HYPER-only) had the lowest O/E ratios: 0.56 and 0.88. Increasing number of hypoglycemic events were associated with increasing O/E ratio: 0.69 O/E for no events, 1.19 for 1-3 events, 1.35 for 4-6 events, 1.9 for 7-9 events, and 3.13 for ≥ 10 events. Ten or more hyperglycemic events were needed to significantly associate with worse mortality (O/E 1.53). Hyper- and hypoglycemia increase mortality compared with APACHE III expected mortality, with highest mortality risk if both are present. Hypoglycemia is associated with worse risk. Glucose control may need to be loosened to prevent hypoglycemia and reduce glucose variability.

  10. The burden of second hip fractures: provincial surgical hospitalizations over 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Pierre; Sobolev, Boris; Sheehan, Katie Jane; Kuramoto, Lisa; Lefaivre, Kelly Ann

    2017-01-01

    Background Second hip fractures account for up to 15% of all hip fractures. We sought to determine if the proportion of hip fracture surgeries for second hip fracture changed over time in terms of patient and fracture characteristics. Methods We reviewed the records of patients older than 60 years hospitalized for hip fracture surgery between 1990 and 2005 in British Columbia. We studied the proportion of surgeries for second hip fracture among all hip fracture surgeries. Linear regression tested for trends across fiscal years for women and men. Results We obtained 46 341 patient records. Second hip fracture accounted for 8.3% of hip fracture surgeries. For women the proportion of second hip fracture surgeries increased linearly from 4% to 13% with each age decade (p = 0.001) and across fiscal years (p = 0.002). In men the proportion of second hip fracture surgeries was 5% for each age decade between the ages of 60 and 90 years across fiscal years, increasing to 8% for men older than 90 years across fiscal years (p = 0.20). These sex-specific trends were similar for both pertrochanteric and transcervical fracture types. Conclusion Second hip fracture surgeries account for an increasing proportion of hip fracture surgeries and may require more health care resources to minimize poorer reported outcomes. Future research should determine whether more health care resources are required to manage these patients and optimize their outcomes. PMID:28234218

  11. A comparison of the surgical mortality due to colorectal perforation at different hospitals with data from 10,090 cases in the Japanese National Clinical Database

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Miyata, Hiroaki; Sato, Yasuto; Saida, Yoshihisa; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki; Seto, Yasuyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal perforation has a high rate of mortality. We compared the incidence and fatality rates of colorectal perforation among different hospitals in Japan using data from the nationwide surgical database. Patients were registered in the National Clinical Database (NCD) between January 1st, 2011 and December 31st, 2013. Patients with colorectal perforation were identified from surgery records by examining if acute diffuse peritonitis (ADP) and diseases associated with a high probability of colorectal perforation were noted. The primary outcome measures included the 30-day postsurgery mortality and surgical mortality of colorectal perforation. We analyzed differences in the observed-to-expected mortality (O/E) ratio between the two groups of hospitals, that is, specialized and non-specialized, using the logistic regression analysis forward selection method. There were 10,090 cases of disease-induced colorectal perforation during the study period. The annual average postoperative fatality rate was 11.36%. There were 3884 patients in the specialized hospital group and 6206 in the non-specialized hospital group. The O/E ratio (0.9106) was significantly lower in the specialized hospital group than in the non-specialized hospital group (1.0704). The experience level of hospitals in treating cases of colorectal perforation negatively correlated with the O/E ratio. We conducted the first study investigating differences among hospitals with respect to their fatality rate of colorectal perforation on the basis of data from a nationwide database. Our data suggest that patients with colorectal perforation should choose to be treated at a specialized hospital or a hospital that treats five or more cases of colorectal perforation per year. The results of this study indicate that specialized hospitals may provide higher quality medical care, which in turn proves that government policy on healthcare is effective at improving the medical system in Japan. PMID:28079809

  12. [Adherence to oral nutrition supplements in hospitalized patients with clinical pathology-surgical].

    PubMed

    Villagra, Anabel; Merkel, María Cecilia; Rodriguez Bugueiro, Julia; Lacquaniti, Natalia; Remoli, Rosario

    2014-09-12

    Introducción: Los trabajos cientificos realizados respecto al uso de los suplementos nutricionales sugieren que su aceptacion es en general buena, por lo que su utilizacion es ampliamente aceptada por los profesionales. Sin embargo en la practica diaria hospitalaria se observa que dicha aceptacion es variable. El objetivo de nuestro estudio es conocer el nivel de adherencia a los suplementos nutricionales orales y los principales motivos de no adherencia en pacientes internados por patologia clinica o quirurgica. Métodos: Estudio observacional y prospectivo, unicentrico. Se incluyeron pacientes consecutivos internados en un hospital de alta complejidad, con evaluacion global subjetiva categoria B, entre agosto 2012 y mayo 2013. Se indico un suplemento diario, se evaluo la adherencia y se determinaron los motivos de no adherencia. Se considero paciente adherente cuando el consumo fue ≥75% de los suplementos indicados. Resultados: Sobre un total de 807 pacientes con evaluacion global subjetiva, 73 pacientes tuvieron indicacion de suplemento nutricional oral. La mediana de edad fue 52 anos (IIC 35-62), hombres 58,9%, mediana de indice de masa corporal 24,5 (IIC 22,5-27,3). Se indicaron un total de 489 suplementos y fueron consumidos un total de 371. La mediana de tiempo de indicacion de suplemento por paciente fue de 5 dias (IIC 4-10) y la mediana de dias consumidos fue de 4 por paciente (IIC 1-8). La adherencia fue de 58,9% (43 pacientes). Los motivos de no adherencia fueron: causas digestivas propias del paciente 5 pacientes (16,7%), intolerancia al suplemento nutricional oral 18 pacientes (60%), negativa del paciente no justificada 7 pacientes (23,3%). Conclusiones:En pacientes internados por patologia clinica o quirurgica con evaluacion global subjetiva B, la adherencia a los suplementos nutricionales orales fue insuficiente. La intolerancia al suplemento fue la causa mas frecuente de no adherencia.

  13. An Analysis of the Need for a Whole-Body CT Scanner at US Darnall Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    offract Initial detection; whether liver is primary organ -Posttraumatio slenosis: detection of fracture frag- o neelo xmnda ato Teauto ments or hematoma ...subdural hematoma can be transferred to hospital A, where the neuroradiologist and neurosurgeon will be located for definitive therapy.’ ’Fine,’ I said...8217That makes a perfect organizational sense. But it means that the physicians in hospital B have made the diagnosis of subdural hematoma without the

  14. Identification and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in surgical wards in a Chinese university hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dalin; Ma, Linlin; Wu, Zhenyu; Li, Mingcheng; Li, Xiaohan; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Kun

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumanni isolated from surgical wards in a university hospital, China. A total of 143 non-duplicate A. baumannii were isolated from 517 inpatients in surgery intensive care units (ICUs), burn wards, and general surgery wards. Of these, 102 isolates of A. baumannii (71.3%) were resistant to imipenem. Among imipenem-resistant isolates, all isolates were resistant to almost all antimicrobial agents except polymyxin E, all isolates were positive for blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-51 in addition to ISAba1, 52 (51%) were positive for blaOXA-58, 8 (7.8%) contained blaVIM-2, which co-harbored with blaOXA-58. Molecular typing revealed the presence of three clones among imipenem-resistant isolates. This study confirmed that A. baumannii strains harboring OXA or VIM type β-lactamases are widely distributed throughout the surgery wards. The data demonstrate that there was a high prevalence of imipenem-resistant A. baumannii infection in the region.

  15. Validation of a whole slide imaging system for primary diagnosis in surgical pathology: A community hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Thomas P.; Dilorio, Rebecca; Havrilla, Lauren; O’Neill, Dennis G.

    2014-01-01

    Guidelines for validating whole slide imaging (WSI) for primary diagnosis in surgical pathology have been recommended by an expert panel commissioned by the College of American Pathologists. The implementation of such a system using these validation guidelines has not been reported from the community hospital setting. The objective was to implement a WSI system, validate each pathologist using the system and run the system in parallel with routine glass slide interpretation. Six pathologists re-reviewed approximately 300 previously diagnosed specimens each, divided equally between glass slides and digital images (scanned at ×20). Baseline intraobserver discordance rates (glass to glass) were calculated and compared to discordance rates between the original glass slide interpretation and the reviewed digital slide interpretation. A minimum of 3 months was used as the washout period. After validation, a subset of daily cases was diagnosed in parallel using traditional microscopy (TM) and WSI over an 8-month period. The TM and WSI discordance rates ranged from 3.3% to 13.3% and 2.1% to 10.1%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among the pathologists. The parallel study yielded similar rates of discordances. In our laboratory, after appropriate implementation and training, there was no difference between the WSI and TM methods. PMID:25535591

  16. [Surgical treatment in severe acute pancreatitis. Last 15 years of experience in Emergency County Hospital of Baia Mare].

    PubMed

    Leşe, Mihaela; Tămăşan, Anca; Stoicescu, B; Brânduşe, M; Puia, Ioana; Mare, C; Lazăr, C

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the particular course of the patients operated for severe acute pancreatitis in a period of 15 years in surgical department of Emergency County Hospital of Baia Mare. Medical records of 202 patients admitted and operated for severe acute pancreatitis, were studied. Follow-up parameters were: age, gender, etiology, moment of operation, the type of operations and postoperative evolution of this patients. In the group of deceased patients alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis was prevailing. Almost a half of patients were operated in the first day of admission. A high number of patients were operated for diagnosis of acute abdomen with intention of exploratory laparotomy. In the last years, besides the usual closed drainage, open drainage and planning drainage were performed. Postoperative mortality is still high. The diagnose of severe acute pancreatitis is difficult in emergency. Global mortality in pancreatitis remains high, especially in the period of enzymatic shock, and is correlated with masculine gender, alcoholic etiology and somewhat with precocity of operation.

  17. The burden of surgical diseases on critical care services at a tertiary hospital in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Jared; Haac, Bryce; Kadyaudzu, Clement; Samuel, Jonathan C; Campbell, Emilia L P; Lee, Clara N; Charles, Anthony G

    2013-01-01

    In many developing countries, including those of sub-Saharan Africa, care of the critically ill is poorly developed. We sought to elucidate the characteristics and outcomes of critically ill patients in order to better define the burden of disease and identify strategies for improving care. We conducted a cross sectional observation study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit at Kamuzu Central Hospital in 2010. Demographics, patient characteristics, clinical specialty and outcome data was collected for the 234 patients admitted during the study period. Older age and admission from trauma, general surgery or medical services were associated with increased mortality. The lowest mortality was among obstetrical and gynaecology patients. Use of the ventilator and transfusions were not associated with increased mortality. Patients with head injuries had the highest mortality rate. Rationing of critical care resources, using admitting diagnosis or scoring tools, can maximize access to critical care services in resource-limited settings. Furthermore, improvements of critical care services will be central to future efforts to reduce surgical morbidity and mortality and improving outcomes in all critically ill patients.

  18. Validation of a whole slide imaging system for primary diagnosis in surgical pathology: A community hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Buck, Thomas P; Dilorio, Rebecca; Havrilla, Lauren; O'Neill, Dennis G

    2014-01-01

    Guidelines for validating whole slide imaging (WSI) for primary diagnosis in surgical pathology have been recommended by an expert panel commissioned by the College of American Pathologists. The implementation of such a system using these validation guidelines has not been reported from the community hospital setting. The objective was to implement a WSI system, validate each pathologist using the system and run the system in parallel with routine glass slide interpretation. Six pathologists re-reviewed approximately 300 previously diagnosed specimens each, divided equally between glass slides and digital images (scanned at ×20). Baseline intraobserver discordance rates (glass to glass) were calculated and compared to discordance rates between the original glass slide interpretation and the reviewed digital slide interpretation. A minimum of 3 months was used as the washout period. After validation, a subset of daily cases was diagnosed in parallel using traditional microscopy (TM) and WSI over an 8-month period. The TM and WSI discordance rates ranged from 3.3% to 13.3% and 2.1% to 10.1%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among the pathologists. The parallel study yielded similar rates of discordances. In our laboratory, after appropriate implementation and training, there was no difference between the WSI and TM methods.

  19. Multidisciplinary management of hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus – Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgical Hospital consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shuqun; Yang, Jiamei; Shen, Feng; Zhou, Weiping; Wang, Yi; Cong, Wenming; Yang, Guang shun; Cheng, Hongyan; Hu, Heping; Gao, Chunfang; Guo, Jia; Li, Aijun; Meng, Yan; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Yefa; Qian, Guojun; Luo, Ming; Hu, Bing; Man, Xiaobo; Zhang, Baohua; Su, Changqing; Zhou, Feiguo; Li, Nan; Shi, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zheng, Yaxin; Guo, Weixing; Sun, Juxian; Wang, Hongyang; Lau, Wan-yee; Wu, Meng-chao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) complicated by portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) is associated with poor prognosis, early recurrence of HCC, and limited treatment options. Current guidelines do not have standardized diagnostic and treatment modalities, thus creating a need for a multidisciplinary treatment model for standardization of the treatment. Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgical Hospital (China) convened two working parties of experts from all the departments, to consolidate the current evidence, prevailing vision for the future, and experience of the practicing clinicians engaged in HCC management, so as to develop a consensus for PVTT diagnosis and treatment according to the GRADE system. Based on the quality of the existing evidence and the strength of recommendations, the consensus statements were categorized into 3 evidence levels (A/B/C) and 5 classes (I/II/IIa/IIb/III). The panel discussed and provided clarity on the management and research options in the field of HCC with PVTT. In addition, the panel also assessed the quality of the cited studies and assigned grades to the recommendation statements. Among the group of experts, there was excellent agreement with regard to effective diagnosis and treatment of HCC with PVTT. The recommendations of this consensus will provide guidance to physicians and clinical researchers on the effective management of HCC with PVTT. PMID:27027235

  20. The Optimal Utilization Management Model for Martin Army Community Hospital Under the Next Generation of TRICARE Contracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    the business operation of our military health care delivery system. The largest area of change is in utilization managemlent (UM). Under the new...contract, the government will be responsible for all aspects of health care management of prime enrolled beneficiaries to include underwriting the cost of...process to include medical necessity review, continued stay review and coding of all medical, surgical and behavioral health episodes of care . The

  1. Role of Surgical Services in Profitability of Hospitals in California: An Analysis of Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Annual Financial Data.

    PubMed

    Moazzez, Ashkan; de Virgilio, Christian

    2016-10-01

    With constant changes in health-care laws and payment methods, profitability, and financial sustainability of hospitals are of utmost importance. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between surgical services and hospital profitability. The Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development annual financial databases for the years 2009 to 2011 were used for this study. The hospitals' characteristics and income statement elements were extracted for statistical analysis using bivariate and multivariate linear regression. A total of 989 financial records of 339 hospitals were included. On bivariate analysis, the number of inpatient and ambulatory operating rooms (ORs), the number of cases done both as inpatient and outpatient in each OR, and the average minutes used in inpatient ORs were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. On multivariate regression analysis, when controlling for hospitals' payer mix and the study year, only the number of inpatient cases done in the inpatient ORs (β = 832, P = 0.037), and the number of ambulatory ORs (β = 1,485, 466, P = 0.001) were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. These findings suggest that hospitals can maximize their profitability by diverting and allocating outpatient surgeries to ambulatory ORs, to allow for more inpatient surgeries.

  2. Assessing the Need for an Organization Structure for Quality Assurance, Womack Army Community Hospital, Fort Bragg, North Carolina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    quality assurance program at WACH is managed by the committee process. The hospital quality assurance committee is titled the Medical Care Evaluation Committee...provided in Table 1. Table I Members of the WACH Medical Care Evaluation Committee Chief, Professional Services, Chief, General Surgery Service (Chairman

  3. In-Hospital and 4-Year Clinical Outcomes Following Transcatheter Versus Surgical Closure for Secundum Atrial Septal Defect in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tien-Hsing; Hsiao, Yuan-Chuan; Cheng, Chia-Chi; Mao, Chun-Tai; Chen, Dong-Yi; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Yang, Teng-Yao; Lin, Yu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Atrial septal defect (ASD) closure is major therapy for patients with secundum ASD. Although surgical closure (SC) and transcatheter closure (TC) are usually performed in such patients, data on the long-term outcomes comparing TC and SC in adults are limited. Data on the participants of this cohort study were retrieved from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database from 2004 to 2011. Secundum ASD patients > 18 years of age who underwent TC or SC were initially enrolled, and those with associated comorbidities were excluded. After propensity score matching, the clinical outcomes between the TC and SC groups were analyzed. There were 595 patients recruited in the TC group and 308 patients in the SC group. The SC group had a higher incidence of systemic thromboembolism (P < 0.001), ischemic stroke (P = 0.002), and all-cause mortality (P = 0.013) when compared with those of the TC group at the index hospitalization, and similar phenomena could also be seen in a around 4-year follow-up period after the procedures (systemic thromboembolism (P < 0.001, HR = 11.48, 95% CI: 3.29–40.05), ischemic stroke (P = 0.005, HR = 9.28, 95% CI: 1.94–44.39), and all-cause mortality (P = 0.035, HR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.06–4.89). In addition, atrial fibrillation (P = 0.005) and atrial flutter (P = 0.049) more frequently developed in the SC group than in the TC group at the index hospitalization. The adult secundum ASD patients had lower incidence rates of systemic thromboembolism, ischemic stroke, and all-cause mortality after TC than those after SC in the 4-year follow-up after procedures. Transcatheter ASD closure should therefore be given priority PMID:26402807

  4. A Study to Determine the Most Cost Effective Method for Delivery of a Selected Inpatient Medical Service to Champus Eligible Beneficiaries in the Silas B. Hays Army Community Hospital Catchment Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Procedures 526 141 151 CMIS 0ECA Dollar Value 39 91 02 49 Occupational Therapy DHBA Weighted Proced 7,431 3,892 9,289 11.614 Physical Therapy DHDA Visit 41...for delivery of the selected service within the Silas B. Hays Army Community Hospital physical plant was limited to those for which sufficient space...Specifics concerning the operation of the service such as physical location of its delivery, the hours of operation, and the price are also

  5. A Study to Determine the Success of Implementing the Workload Management System for Nurses at Moncrief Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-18

    nursing care hours, census, and changes in census. The study supported the contention that staff were being moved, in part, as a function of the elements of the WMSN. The availability of staff to be moved to meet nursing care needs was found to be a significant limiting factor. The need for follow-up studies and the routine use of the actual staffing Utilization Ratio as a means of communicating staffing needs to the hospital leadership were

  6. An Implementation Plan for a Hospital-Wide Recycling Program at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, El Paso, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    enrgy costs. Establishing a hospital recycling program involves three steps: (1) forming a team that assists with the plans, iu.eenation, and on-going...was finding a market for materials and corivining recyclers that clean medical trash was safe if separated and handled correctly. Another challenge was...collection of mi par because In- .a’ate mterials and trash wmrs being placed in the containers. Wiite cUmP*ter paper turned cut to be the easiest and

  7. A Study of the Ambulatory Care Quality Assurance Program at DeWitt Army Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    laboratory test, an 47 administrative procedure, or the patient’s food . After the subject is selected the next decision is what is to be measured...procedures telateid to the selec!on, intrahospilta distribution more T’eio-.!ently l~iii also Pharmacb’Jsitial and handling, and safe administration of drugs...FOCUS CONENTS 4.’ Functi•oal Continuous . Comprehensive hospital- * Produce safe character- Safety and program wide program Istics and practices

  8. Improving Surgical and Anaesthesia Practice: Review of the Use of the WHO Safe Surgery Checklist in Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Ryan; Izzuddin Mohamad Nor, Ahmad; Pimentil, Iona; Bitew, Zebenaye; Moore, Jolene

    2017-01-01

    Development of surgical and anaesthetic care globally has been consistently reported as being inadequate. The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery highlights the need for action to address this deficit. One such action to improve global surgical safety is the introduction of the WHO Surgical Checklist to Operating Rooms (OR) around the world. The checklist has a growing body of evidence supporting its ability to assist in the delivery of safe anaesthesia and surgical care. Here we report the introduction of the Checklist to a major Ethiopian referral hospital and low-resource setting and highlight the success and challenges of its implementation over a one year period. This project was conducted between July 2015 and August 2016, within a wider partnership between Felege Hiwot Hospital and The University of Aberdeen. The WHO Surgical Checklist was modified for appropriate and locally specific use within the OR of Felege Hiwot. The modified Checklist was introduced to all OR's and staff instructed on its use by local surgical leaders. Assessment of use of the Checklist was performed for General Surgical OR in three phases and Obstetric OR in two phases via observational study and case note review. Training was conduct between each phase to address challenges and promote use. Checklist utilisation in the general OR increased between Phase I and 2 from 50% to 97% and remained high at 94% in Phase 3. Between Phase I and 2 partial completion rose from 27% to 77%, whereas full completion remained unchanged (23% to 20%). Phase 3 resulted in an increase in full completion from 20% to 60%. After 1 year the least completed section was “Sign In” (53%) and “Time Out” was most completed (87%). The most poorly checked item was “Site Marked” (60%). Use of the checklist in Obstetrics OR increased between Phase I and Phase II from 50% to 100% with some improvement in partial completion (50% to 60%) and a notable increase in full completion (0% to 40%). The least

  9. Taking Specialist Surgical Services to the Rural District Hospitals at One Forth Cost: A Sustainable 'Return on Investment' Public Health Initiative of Patan Hospital, Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shah, J N

    2015-01-01

    The inequitable distribution and centralization of resources and services in urban area persists around the world, more so in developing countries. The challenge to meet the health needs of rural population requires health policy makers, government and concerned organization to put extra efforts. Such efforts require innovative, feasible and sustainable strategies to address the social justice of people living in districts away from capital and urban cities. At Patan Academy of Health Sciences, the medial school curriculum is designed to address these issues. Together with health professionals from Patan Hospital, the main teaching hospital on which the academy evolved, have initiated strategies to bring specialist services, starting with surgical services to remote district hospitals to serve the need of rural population. This initiative is 'desirable, doable and feasible'. Further more, this can be modified for replication and promotion by other academic institutions, central hospitals and government health system.

  10. Trends in hospital admissions and surgical procedures for degenerative lumbar spine disease in England: a 15-year time-series study

    PubMed Central

    Sivasubramaniam, Vinothan; Patel, Hitesh C; Ozdemir, Baris A; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Low back pain (LBP), from degenerative lumbar spine disease, represents a significant burden on healthcare resources. Studies worldwide report trends attributable to their country's specific demographics and healthcare system. Considering England's specific medico-socioeconomic conditions, we investigate recent trends in hospital admissions and procedures for LBP, and discuss the implications for the allocation of healthcare resources. Design Retrospective cohort study using Hospital Episode Statistics data relating to degenerative lumbar spine disease in England, between 1999 and 2013. Regression models were used to analyse trends. Outcome measures Trends in the number of admissions and procedures for LBP, mean patient age, gender and length of stay. Results Hospital admissions and procedures have increased significantly over the study period, from 127.09 to 216.16 and from 24.5 to 48.83 per 100 000, respectively, (p<0.001). The increase was most marked in the oldest age groups with a 1.9 and 2.33-fold increase in admissions for patients aged 60–74 and ≥75 years, respectively, and a 2.8-fold increase in procedures for those aged ≥60 years. Trends in hospital admissions were characterised by a widening gender gap, increasing mean patient age, and decreasing mean hospital stay (p<0.001). Trends in procedures were characterised by a narrowing gender gap, increasing mean patient age (p=0.014) and decreasing mean hospital stay (p<0.001). Linear regression models estimate that each hospital admission translates to 0.27 procedures, per 100 000 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.30, r 0.99, p<0.001; r, Pearson's correlation coefficient). Hospital admissions are increasing at 3.5 times the rate of surgical procedures (regression gradient 7.63 vs 2.18 per 100 000/year). Conclusions LBP represents a significant and increasing workload for hospitals in England. These trends demonstrate an increasing demand for specialists involved in the surgical and non-surgical

  11. Deployment Surveillance Report: Traumatic Brain Injury Identified from Hospitalization and Air Evacuation Records - Army, 2004-2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-17

    TBIs (n=2,055), 667 cases were categorized as a fracture (32.5 percent), 1,279 cases were internal injuries (62.2 percent), 98 cases had an...displayed in this matrix.  There were 2,738 fractures represented in the matrix (TBI and non-TBI injuries), accounting for 30.2 percent of all injuries...Among the non-TBI hospitalizations (n=7,018), 29.5 percent (n=2,071) had a fracture . Fracture was the injury type for 667 TBIs (32.5 percent of TBIs

  12. Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Irwin Army Community Hospital, Fort Riley, Kansas. Volume 3: Project documentation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    There are existing single pane windows in the 1955 portion of Building 600 with no thermal break. They are located in the following areas: 1. Second floor connecting corridor to Mechanical Equipment Room. 2. Second floor Chapel windows. 3. Dining Rooms. 4. Bakery. Replacement windows for these areas would be 1 tinted insulating glass set in bronze aluminum window units containing thermal breaks. The existing single pane clear window units with storms in Building 610 are also being replaced as part of this project. Tinted 1 insulated glass will be installed in 101 windows and 2 insulated wall panels will be installed in the remaining 230 units. Hospital entry vestibules at the main entry and the emergency/ outpatient entrance would be revised to create effective entry vestibules. The main entry vestibule was visited and field measured. An approximate 9`-O wide curved hospital entry vestibule 6`-0 long on one side and 8`-0 long on the opposite side was added as part of the 1975 expansion and renovation project. The doors are medium styled, bronze anode, set in the original anodized window wall frame system. The vestibule does not provide adequate depth to ensure exterior doors are closed before interior doors are open and vice versa, especially when wheelchair bound persons use the entrance.

  13. [A surgical safety checklist implementation: experience of a start-up phase of a collaborative project in hospitals of Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    Secanell, Mariona; Orrego, Carola; Vila, Miquel; Vallverdú, Helena; Mora, Núria; Oller, Anna; Bañeres, Joaquim

    2014-07-01

    Surgical patient safety is a priority in the national and international quality healthcare improvement strategies. The objective of the study was to implement a collaborative intervention with multiple components and to evaluate the impact of the patient surgical safety checklist (SSC) application. This is a prospective, longitudinal multicenter study with a 7-month follow-up period in 2009 based on a collaborative intervention for the implementation of a 24 item-SSC distributed in 3 different stages (sign in, time out, sign out) for its application to the surgical patient. A total number of 27 hospitals participated in the strategy. The global implementation rate was 48% (95%CI, 47.6%-48.4%) during the evaluation period. The overall compliance with all the items of the SSC included in each stage (sign in, time out, sign out) was 75,1% (95%CI, 73.5%-76.7%) for the sign in, 77.1% (95%CI, 75.5%-78.6%) for the time out and 88.3% (95%CI, 87.2%-89.5%) for the sign out respectively. The individual compliance with each item of the SSC has remained above 85%, except for the surgical site marking with an adherence of 67.4% (95%CI, 65.7%-69.1%)] and 71.2% (95%CI, 69.6%-72.9%)] in the sign in and time out respectively. The SSC was successfully implemented to 48% of the surgeries performed to the participating hospitals. The global compliance with the SSC was elevated and the intervention trend was stable during the evaluation period. Strategies were identified to allow of a higher number of surgeries with application of the SSC and more professional involvement in measures compliance such as surgical site marking.

  14. Beyond Volume: Hospital-Based Healthcare Technology for Better Outcomes in Cerebrovascular Surgical Patients Diagnosed With Ischemic Stroke: A Population-Based Nationwide Cohort Study From 2002 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Jang, Sung-In

    2016-03-01

    We examined whether the level of hospital-based healthcare technology was related to the 30-day postoperative mortality rates, after adjusting for hospital volume, of ischemic stroke patients who underwent a cerebrovascular surgical procedure. Using the National Health Insurance Service-Cohort Sample Database, we reviewed records from 2002 to 2013 for data on patients with ischemic stroke who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazard models to test our hypothesis. A total of 798 subjects were included in our study. After adjusting for hospital volume of cerebrovascular surgical procedures as well as all for other potential confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals was 2.583 (P < 0.001). We also found that, although the HR of 30-day mortality in low healthcare technology hospitals with high volume as compared to high healthcare technology hospitals with high volume was the highest (10.014, P < 0.0001), cerebrovascular surgical procedure patients treated in low healthcare technology hospitals had the highest 30-day mortality rate, irrespective of hospital volume. Although results of our study provide scientific evidence for a hospital volume/30-day mortality rate relationship in ischemic stroke patients who underwent cerebrovascular surgical procedures, our results also suggest that the level of hospital-based healthcare technology is associated with mortality rates independent of hospital volume. Given these results, further research into what components of hospital-based healthcare technology significantly impact mortality is warranted.

  15. Evaluation of current practices in surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in primary total hip prosthesis--a multicentre survey in private and public French hospitals.

    PubMed

    Quenon, J-L; Eveillard, M; Vivien, A; Bourderont, D; Lepape, A; Lathelize, M; Jestin, C

    2004-03-01

    Deep wound infection is a rare but dreaded postoperative complication after total hip prosthesis (THP) procedures but its incidence can be reduced by systemic antimicrobial prophylaxis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether antimicrobial prophylaxis for elective primary THP in patients without any history of hip infection, in orthopaedic wards, participating on a voluntary basis, in French public hospitals and private institutions, complies with published guidelines. Three types of data were collected from anaesthetic and surgical records (November 2000-January 2001) in participating hospitals: (1) administrative data on the hospitals and orthopaedic wards, (2) data on patients, (3) data on compliance of practices with five critical criteria derived from published French guidelines. These criteria concerned administration of prophylaxis, choice of antimicrobial agent, dose of first injection, timing of administration and total length of prophylaxis. Thirty institutions sent data files on 1257 THPs to the coordination centre. Compliance exceeded 80% for all criteria except one (interval between first and second injection). Cumulative compliance with the five criteria was 66.9%. Major compliance failures were an inappropriate interval between the first injection and incision, and total antimicrobial prophylaxis exceeding 48 h. Cumulative compliance was 87.9% in teaching hospitals, 61.8% in general hospitals and 67.7% in private institutions (P<1 x 10(-6)). It was slightly higher when the annual number of interventions was > or =100 (69.4 versus 62.3%; P<0.02). Although the protocol for antimicrobial prophylaxis in THP was clear and easy, one-third of practices did not conform with all five standards. Knowledge of the results by the participating institutions should encourage them to set up working groups to draft care protocols for THP and other surgical interventions, in order to improve practice and perhaps reduce costs.

  16. Larger Units: Theater Army, Army Group, Field Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    LARGER UNITS: Theater Army, Army Group , Field Army St Fort LeawiivfoW, Kansas /A ’j>’" /\\(7 ’"VX <\\,» •«:-•$-(••’•.•->’-:-j Report...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1984 to 00-00-1984 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Larger Units: Theater Army, Army Group , Field Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Bibliography No. 4 LARGER UNITS: THEATER ARMY—ARMY GROUP —FIELD ARMY by LTC Gary L. Bounds Combat Studies Institute U.S. Army Command and General Staff

  17. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2013 rates; hospitals' resident caps for graduate medical education payment purposes; quality reporting requirements for specific providers and for ambulatory surgical centers. final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-08-31

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2012. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes made by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are implementing changes relating to determining a hospital's full-time equivalent (FTE) resident cap for the purpose of graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We also are establishing new administrative, data completeness, and extraordinary circumstance waivers or extension requests requirements, as well as a reconsideration process, for quality reporting by ambulatory surgical centers

  18. Variability in Deposition Rates and Mean Days of Hospitalization for the 100 Most Common Diagnostic Codes in U.S. Army Health Services Command Facilities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-02

    by each facility is not entirely clear. Army facilities treat not only Army active duty and retired personnel and their dependents, but also often... treat U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force active duty and retired personnel and their dependents. The reported population in each facility’s catchment area does...the variability in 0449 HTLV- III/LAV is clearly related to other considerations. Patients infected with HIV are usually treated in the limited number

  19. [Thrombectomy and plication of veins as a method of preventing pulmonary artery thromboembolism at a multidisciplinary surgical hospital].

    PubMed

    Galkin, S V; Pashin, N V; Dedyukhin, I G; Aleksandrov, A G; Lebedeva, M V

    2016-01-01

    The authors assessed efficacy and safety of the operation of plication of deep veins of lower extremities, pelvic veins, and the inferior vena cava as a method of preventing fatal pulmonary artery thromboembolism. A total of 48 patients were operated on. Of these, 23 patients belonged to traumatological-and-orthopaedical cohort, 3 to general surgical cohort, 4 to gynaecological, and 18 to vascular cohort (isolated deep vein thrombosis). The length of the floating head of the thrombus varied from 2 to 10 cm. The presence of a floating thrombus in traumatological, surgical and gynaecological patients, regardless of the length of the floating part was an absolute indication for thrombectomy and venous plication. Vascular patients were operated on in accordance with the National Guidelines (with the length of the thrombus floating portion of not less than 4 cm). In all cases, surgical management envisaged direct and indirect thrombectomy. Plication was always performed above the level of venotomy. It was shown that thrombectomy combined with plication of major veins is a reliable and safe method of prophylaxis, being in some cases the only possible method of preventing fatal pulmonary artery thromboembolism. The operation of plication makes it possible not to cancel a scheduled surgical intervention in patients with a detected floating thrombus of major veins. The operation of thrombectomy and plication above the level of the floating head of the thrombus may be considered an operation of choice in the conditions where there is no possibility to use endovascular methods of treatment (implantation of a cava filter, endovascular catheter thrombectomy), as well as in pregnant women. Restoration of the venous lumen occurs at safe terms spontaneously, not requiring repeat surgical intervention. Simultaneous plication of the vein does not complicate the course of the postoperative period of the main surgical intervention. Thrombectomy and plication do not lead to the

  20. Peer-to-peer nursing rounds and hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence in a surgical intensive care unit: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Alyson Dare; Moorer, Amanda; Makic, MaryBeth Flynn

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a quality improvement project in order to evaluate the effect of nurse-to-nurse bedside "rounding" as a strategy to decrease hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) in a surgical intensive care unit. We instituted weekly peer-to-peer bedside skin rounds in a 17-bed surgical intensive care unit. Two nurses were identified as skin champions and trained by the hospital's certified WOC nurse to conduct skin rounds. The skin champion nurses conducted weekly peer-to-peer rounds that included discussions about key elements of our patients' skin status including current Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk score, and implementation of specific interventions related to subscale risk assessment. If a pressure ulcer was present, the current action plan was reevaluated for effectiveness. Quarterly HAPU prevalence studies were conducted from January 2008 to December 2010. Nineteen patients experienced a HAPU: 17 were located on the coccyx and 2 on the heel. Ten ulcers were classified as stage II, 3 PU were stage IV, 5 were deemed unstageable, and 1 was classified as a deep tissue injury. The frequency of preventive interventions rose during our quality improvement project. Specifically, the use of prevention surfaces increased 92%, repositioning increased 30%, nutrition interventions increased 77%, and moisture management increased 100%. Prior to focused nursing rounds, the highest HAPU prevalence rate was 27%. After implementing focused nursing rounds, HAPU rates trended down and were 0% for 3 consecutive quarters.

  1. Knowledge about complementary, alternative and integrative medicine (CAM) among registered health care providers in Swedish surgical care: a national survey among university hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies show an increased interest and usage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the general population and among health care workers both internationally and nationally. CAM usage is also reported to be common among surgical patients. Earlier international studies have reported that a large amount of surgical patients use it prior to and after surgery. Recent publications indicate a weak knowledge about CAM among health care workers. However the current situation in Sweden is unknown. The aim of this study was therefore to explore perceived knowledge about CAM among registered healthcare professions in surgical departments at Swedish university hospitals. Method A questionnaire was distributed to 1757 registered physicians, nurses and physiotherapists in surgical wards at the seven university hospitals in Sweden from spring 2010 to spring 2011. The questionnaire included classification of 21 therapies into conventional, complementary, alternative and integrative, and whether patients were recommended these therapies. Questions concerning knowledge, research, and patient communication about CAM were also included. Result A total of 737 (42.0%) questionnaires were returned. Therapies classified as complementary; were massage, manual therapies, yoga and acupuncture. Alternative therapies; were herbal medicine, dietary supplements, homeopathy and healing. Classification to integrative therapy was low, and unfamiliar therapies were Bowen therapy, iridology and Rosen method. Therapies recommended by > 40% off the participants were massage and acupuncture. Knowledge and research about CAM was valued as minor or none at all by 95.7% respectively 99.2%. Importance of possessing knowledge about it was valued as important by 80.9%. It was believed by 61.2% that more research funding should be addressed to CAM research, 72.8% were interested in reading CAM-research results, and 27.8% would consider taking part in such research. Half of the

  2. Army Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    intelligent. BY MATT DECEMBER, TARDEC PUBLIC AFFAIRS 7 OWN THE WEATHER Army aviators fly in degraded visual environments with help from sensor...JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2015 Army researchers are going after solutions to help aircraft crews navigate in degraded visual environments, where weather ...DVE as a tactical advantage and to enable safe operations in all conditions, Dellert said. The team’s mantra is “Own the Weather ,” which aims to

  3. Effects of Resident Duty Hour Reform on Surgical and Procedural Patient Safety Indicators Among Hospitalized VA and Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Amy K.; Loveland, Susan A.; Romano, Patrick S.; Itani, Kamal MF; Silber, Jeffrey H.; Even-Shoshan, Orit O.; Halenar, Michael J.; Teng, Yun; Zhu, Jingsan; Volpp, Kevin G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Improving patient safety was a strong motivation behind duty hour regulations implemented by ACGME on July 1, 2003. We investigated whether rates of Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) changed following these reforms. Research Design Observational study of patients admitted to VA (N=826,047) and Medicare (N=13,367,273) acute-care hospitals from 7/1/2000–6/30/2005. We examined changes in patient safety events in more vs. less teaching-intensive hospitals before (2000–2003) and after (2003–2005) duty hour reform, using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for patient age, gender, comorbidities, secular trends, baseline severity, and hospital site. Measures Ten PSIs were aggregated into 3 composite measures based on factor analyses: “Continuity of Care,” “Technical Care,” and “Other” composites. Results “Continuity of Care” composite rates showed no significant changes post-reform in hospitals of different teaching intensity in either VA or Medicare. In the VA, there were no significant changes post-reform for the “Technical Care” composite. In Medicare, the odds of a Technical Care PSI event in more vs. less teaching-intensive hospitals in post-reform year 1 were 1.12 (95% CI; 1.01–1.25); there were no significant relative changes in post-reform year 2. “Other” composite rates increased in VA in post-reform year 2 in more vs. less teaching-intensive hospitals (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.10–2.41), but not in Medicare in either post-reform year. Conclusions Duty hour reform had no systematic impact on PSI rates. In the few cases where there were statistically significant increases in the relative odds of developing a PSI, the magnitude of the absolute increases were too small to be clinically meaningful. PMID:19536029

  4. [The chief surgeon Claude Louis Sommé (1772-1855) French military physician, surgeon of Antwerp hospital].

    PubMed

    Tricot, Jean-pierre

    2015-01-01

    Claude Louis Sommé was born in Paris in 1772. After surgical studies between 1790 and 1792, he successfully embraced a military career in the armies of Napoleon at different fronts and in several hospitals. In 1806 he submitted his doctoral thesis at the Special Medical School of Strasburg, Dissertation upon Pain. The same year he presented his dismissal from he imperial armies and became chief-surgeon at the St Elisabeth hospital of Antwerp where he stayed on duty until his death in 1855. Sommé wrote a lot of medical books: surgical, anatomical and physiological. After the battle of Waterloo one third of the injured soldiers were transferred to Antwerp and were attended in his department. He also played an important role as a professor at the Primary Medical School of Antwerp. Sommé also created the botanical garden of Antwerp, close to the hospital.

  5. The Prevalence of HIV in Cancer Patients at the Surgical Oncology Unit of Donka University Hospital of Conakry (Guinea)

    PubMed Central

    Traore, Bangaly; Bah, Thierno Souleymane; Traore, Fode Amara; Sow, Mamadou Saliou; Diane, Solomana; Keita, Mamady; Cisse, Mohamed; Koulibaly, Moussa; Camara, Naby Daouda

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To determine the prevalence of HIV infection among patients seen at the surgical oncology unit of Donka (Conakry, Guinea). Method. We conducted a retrospective and descriptive study of HIV infection in cancer patients from May 2007 to December 2012. Social characteristics (age, gender, marital status, and education) and immune status (HIV type, CD4 count) were reviewed. Results. Out of 2598 cancer patients, 54 (2.1%) tested positive for HIV. There were 11 (20.4%) defining AIDS and 43 (79.6%) nondefining AIDS cancers. The most frequent cancers were breast (14) (26.0%), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (6) (11.1%), liver (6) (11.1%), eye and annexes (6) (11.1%), and cervical cancer (5) (9.3%). These patients were female in 34 (63.0%) and had a median age of 39 years and body mass index was 20,3 Kg/m2. They were unschooled in 40 (74.1%) and married in 35 (64.8%). CD4 count showed a median of 317 cells/mL. Antiretroviral treatment was performed in 40 (74.1%). Conclusion. HIV prevalence is higher in patients in our unit of surgical oncology. Breast cancer was the most common in this association. A national survey of a large sample is needed to determine the true prevalence and impact of HIV on cancer prognosis. PMID:26770197

  6. [Medical support of the 65th Army during the East Prussian offensive operation performed by the 2nd Belorussian Front].

    PubMed

    Shelepov, A M; Leonik, S I; Lemeshkin, R N

    2015-02-01

    Prussian offensive operation performed by the 2nd Belorussian Front. An activity of the medical An activity of the medical service of the 65th Army during the East Prussian offensive operation performed by the 2nd Belorussian Front is a typical example of the medical support of troops during the final stages of World War II. Forms and methods of medical support management, which were developed during the war, haven't lost their importance in modern conditions. These methods include the establishment of specialized surgical and therapeutic field hospital, establishment of medical institutions in the Army, which worked on the evacuation directions and reserve of mobile hospitals and transport, timely extension of the first echelons of the hospital base front to change institutions hospital deployed the army base. A research of experience in organizing medical support of the offensive operations performed during the last year of World War II provides the material for the development of the theory of modern medical support operations and ability to provide on this basis, the continuity of the hospitals, the continuity of qualified and specialized medical care, improve the performance of diagnostic and treatment work.

  7. Surgical management of stress urinary incontinence: Burch colposuspension, modified Pereyra and Stamey bladder neck suspension, and collagen injection--Toa Payoh Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Tay, K P; Lim, P H; Chng, H C

    1995-12-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 34 female patients who underwent corrective surgery for stress urinary incontinence over a 4-year period at the Toa Payoh Hospital. These patients were offered surgery only after an adequate trial of medical therapy, pelvic floor exercises and weight reduction. Bladder neck suspension operations were performed via the Burch, Stamey and modified Pereyra techniques. Towards the later part of this study, endoscopic injection of Collagen was performed as a salvage procedure in 2 patients. The Burch colposuspension gave uniformly good results, with all patients being completely dry. Seventy percent and sixty percent complete continence were achieved via the modified Pereyra and Stamey techniques respectively. Three patients required additional surgical procedures. Using these techniques, the overall results showed that 27 patients (79.4%) had complete urinary continence following surgery, while the remaining 7 patients (20.6%) experienced significant improvement of symptoms.

  8. [Delayed autologous transfusion: about 70 surgical patients at the Saint-Jean-de-Dieu Hospital in Afagnan, Togo].

    PubMed

    Ouédraogo, N; Tomta, K; Agbetra, N; Ouro-Bang'Na Maman, A F

    2006-10-01

    This prospective study was conducted from 2000, September the 1st to October the 31st, at the Saint-Jean-de-Dieu Hospital in Afagnan (Togo). All the 75 patients who received indication of autologous blood transfusion (ABT) accepted the protocol; 70 out of them, among whom 63% were female, benefited an ABT The age of the patients varies between 13 and 80 years old (average 33.2). Initial rate of haemoglobin was on average of 11.7 g/dl; 14% of these patients had a haemoglobin diseases. The most frequent interventions were hysterectomies (21%), bone surgery (16%), prostatectomies (11). Only one blood unit was taken from 63 patients and two units from the 7 others inducing giddiness (5) and headaches (1). During intra and postoperative periods, 41 patients were given 45 units of blood (use rate: 58%). The percentage of patients who received transfusion was 56% in gynaecological surgery 79% in orthopaedics and 88% in urology. Only one patient received an additional homologous unit of blood. The rate of haemoglobin was on average 10.2 g/dl the day after surgery. No incident in connection with the ABT was recorded. The ABT is a feasible, effective and secure method in the context of a small African hospital. It may be a solution to the problems of shortage of blood products and transfusion safety. Training and motivation are necessary for its successful implementation.

  9. Serial pHi measurement as a predictor of mortality, organ failure, and hospital stay in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, M R; Smith, R S; Helmer, S D

    1999-08-01

    Intestinal ischemia is a common condition in critically ill patients and has been postulated to play a role in the development of organ failure and death. This has resulted in the recent interest in monitoring gastric intramucosal pH (pHi) in critically ill patients to provide earlier evidence of inadequate resuscitation, cardiogenic dysfunction, or sepsis. Several reports have indicated that low pHi values obtained during the initial 24 to 48 hours of intensive care unit (ICU) admission were associated with the development of organ failure and death. The purpose of this study was to assess the predictive value of serial pHi measurements obtained throughout the entire ICU admission. A retrospective analysis of critically ill trauma, burn, and surgical patients who had frequent pHi determinations during ICU treatment was performed. When stratified by pHi values, there were no significant differences in length of stay, organ dysfunction, or mortality. Our findings suggest that serial pHi determinations obtained beyond the early critical care period are less reliable predictors of poor outcome.

  10. Hospitals with briefer than average lengths of stays for common surgical procedures do not have greater odds of either re-admission or use of short-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Dexter, F; Epstein, R H; Dexter, E U; Lubarsky, D A; Sun, E C

    2017-03-01

    We considered whether senior hospital managers and department chairs need to be concerned that small reductions in average hospital length of stay (LOS) may be associated with greater rates of re-admission, use of home health care, and/or transfers to short-term care facilities. The 2013 United States Nationwide Readmissions Database was used to study surgical Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) with 1) national median LOS ≥3 days and 2) ≥10 hospitals in the database that each had ≥100 discharges for the DRG. Dependent variables were considered individually: 1) re-admission within 30 days of discharge, 2) discharge disposition to home health care, and/or 3) discharge disposition of transfer to short-term care facility (i.e., inpatient rehabilitation hospital or skilled nursing facility). While controlling for DRG, each one-day decrease in hospital median LOS was associated with an odds of re-admission nationwide of 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.92-0.99; P=0.012), odds of disposition upon discharge being home care of 0.95 (95% CI 0.83-1.10; P=0.64), and odds of transfer to short-term care facility of 0.68 (95% CI 0.54-0.85; P=0.0008). Results were insensitive to the addition of patient-specific data. In the USA, patients at hospitals with briefer median LOS across multiple common surgical procedures did not have a greater risk for either hospital re-admission within 30 days of discharge or transfer to an inpatient rehabilitation hospital or a skilled nursing facility. The generalisable implication is that, across many surgical procedures, DRG-based financial incentives to shorten hospital stays seem not to influence post-acute care decisions.

  11. Local-regional anesthesia in the management of stingray stings: Experience of the Bouffard medical-surgical hospital in Djibouti.

    PubMed

    Vanoye, C; Lacroix, G; Le Gonidec, E; Couret, A; Benois, A; Peigne, V

    2017-01-27

    Stingray injuries are very painful. Systemic analgesics are ineffective, and the use of local-regional anesthesia has been reported. This retrospective descriptive study reviewed all cases of stingray injuries seen at the emergency department of the Bouffard Hospital (Djbouti, Africa) between 2011 and 2014. The study included 35 patients. Most of the injuries (n= 31, 89%) concerned the lower limbs. Median pain intensity was 6 [5-8] on a visual analog scale of 0 (no pain) to 10. The following systemic medications were administered: acetaminophen to 13 (27%) patients, morphine to 8 (23%), and tramadol to 6 (17%). In all, 25 (71%) patients received local-regional anesthesia, 15 (60%) by injections at the ankle. All procedures were successful, and no adverse event was reported. This study reports clinical data about stingray injuries in the Red Sea area and highlights the interest of local-regional anesthesia in their management. Most of the procedures were distal and could be performed by trained emergency physicians.

  12. Using multiple sources of data for surveillance of postoperative venous thromboembolism among surgical patients treated in Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Richard E.; Grosse, Scott D.; Waitzman, Norman J.; Lin, Junji; DuVall, Scott L.; Patterson, Olga; Tsai, James; Reyes, Nimia

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limitations to using administrative data to identify postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE). We used a novel approach to quantify postoperative VTE events among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) surgical patients during 2005–2010. Methods We used VA administrative data to exclude patients with VTE during 12 months prior to surgery. We identified probable postoperative VTE events within 30 and 90 days post-surgery in three settings: 1) pre-discharge inpatient, using a VTE diagnosis code and a pharmacy record for anticoagulation; 2) post-discharge inpatient, using a VTE diagnosis code followed by a pharmacy record for anticoagulation within 7 days; and 3) outpatient, using a VTE diagnosis code and either anticoagulation or a therapeutic procedure code with natural language processing (NLP) to confirm acute VTE in clinical notes. Results Among 468,515 surgeries without prior VTE, probable VTEs were documented within 30 and 90 days in 3,931 (0.8%) and 5,904 (1.3%), respectively. Of probable VTEs within 30 or 90 days post-surgery, 47.8% and 62.9%, respectively, were diagnosed post-discharge. Among post-discharge VTE diagnoses, 86% resulted in a VA hospital readmission. Fewer than 25% of outpatient records with both VTE diagnoses and anticoagulation prescriptions were confirmed by NLP as acute VTE events. Conclusion More than half of postoperative VTE events were diagnosed post-discharge; analyses of surgical discharge records are inadequate to identify postoperative VTE. The NLP results demonstrate that the combination of VTE diagnoses and anticoagulation prescriptions in outpatient administrative records cannot be used to validly identify postoperative VTE events. PMID:25666908

  13. Comparison of two alcohol-based surgical scrub solutions with an iodine-based scrub brush for presurgical antiseptic effectiveness in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Gupta, C; Czubatyj, A M; Briski, L E; Malani, A K

    2007-01-01

    The antiseptic effectiveness and acceptability of a commercial alcohol-based waterless (ABWL) and an alcohol-based water-aided (ABWA) scrub solution were compared with a brush-based iodine solution (BBIS) under conditions encountered in community hospital operating rooms. This randomized partially blinded study was based on guidelines from the American Society for Testing and Methods. The three scrub solutions were compared for antimicrobial efficacy, using criteria within the Food and Drug Administration's Tentative Final Monograph for Healthcare Antiseptic Products (FDA-TFM), and for participants' acceptance of the products. Volunteer surgical staff that worked daily in the same operating room for the entire duration of the study were enrolled. In total, 1126 surgical scrub procedures were performed over the duration of the study. Only the ABWL met all of the FDA-TFM criteria. The BBIS performed better than both of the alcohol-based solutions at the end of Day 1 (P=0.03), but the ABWL was more efficacious than the ABWA and the BBIS at the end of Days 2 and 5 (P=0.02 and 0.01, respectively). When colony-count reductions were compared over the entire duration of the study, there was no significant difference between the three solutions (P=0.2). The participants found the ABWL easiest to use (P<0.001), with the fewest adverse effects on skin (P=0.007), and it was their preferred product (P<0.001). Although both of the commercially available alcohol-based solutions may be considered as acceptable alternatives to the BBIS for presurgical antisepsis, the ABWL was found to have significantly higher user acceptability.

  14. Simple interventions can greatly improve clinical documentation: a quality improvement project of record keeping on the surgical wards at a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Glen, Peter; Earl, Naomi; Gooding, Felix; Lucas, Emily; Sangha, Nicole; Ramcharitar, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Clinical documentation is an integral part of the healthcare professional's job. Good record keeping is essential for patient care, accurate recording of consultations and for effective communication within the multidisciplinary team. Within the surgical department at the Great Western Hospital, Swindon, the case notes were deemed to be bulky and cumbersome, inhibiting effective record keeping, potentially putting patients' at risk. The aim of this quality improvement project was therefore to improve the standard of documentation, the labelling of notes and the overall filing. A baseline audit was firstly undertaken assessing the notes within the busiest surgical ward. A number of variables were assessed, but notably, only 12% (4/33) of the case notes were found to be without loose pages. Furthermore, less than half of the pages with entries written within the last 72 hours contained adequate patient identifiers on them. When assessing these entries further, the designation of the writer was only recorded in one third (11/33) of the cases, whilst the printed name of the writer was only recorded in 65% (21/33) of the entries. This project ran over a 10 month period, using a plan, do study, act methodology. Initial focus was on simple education. Afterwards, single admission folders were introduced, to contain only information required for that admission, in an attempt to streamline the notes and ease the filing. This saw a global improvement across all data subsets, with a sustained improvement of over 80% compliance seen. An educational poster was also created and displayed in clinical areas, to remind users to label their notes with patient identifying stickers. This saw a 4-fold increase (16%-68%) in the labelling of notes. In conclusion, simple, cost effective measures in streamlining medical notes, improves the quality of documentation, facilitates the filing and ultimately improves patient care. PMID:26734440

  15. To Determine the Best Means of Providing a Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine Capability at U.S. Darnall Army Hospital, Fort Hood, Texas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    accuracy. 1 The scintillation camera, which detects radioactive tracers, became readily available comercially in 1964, and significantly im- pacted on the...Hospital to accommodate a nuclear medi- cine service. The hospital was about to start an extensive renovation and new construction program and the...September 1, 1970), p. 55. 6N. Jeanne Harris and Leslie R. Bennett, "Planning a Nuclear Medi- cine Service," Hospitals 47 (October 1, 1973), p. 90. 7

  16. A Study to Establish Baseline Data on the Retiree Population’s Perceptions of Access and Health Care Delivered through Outpatient Services at Ireland Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    dissatisfied patients before they could begin to fill unused hospital beds and cut the costs of CHAMPUS, the civilian health care alternative for...organizations’ programs to be utilized and their hospitals ’ beds to be filled. Instead, the proponents of health care marketing contend that it is the...its tax-funded programs is emphasized by estimates that the United States has some 130,000 excess hospital beds , costing 2 billion dollars a 16 year

  17. [Rethinking the surgical approach to intestinal obstruction surgery in neonates. Experience of a third-level hospital].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda-Vildósola, Ana Carolina; Piedra Buena-Muñoz, Esmeralda; Partida-Justo, Irving; Campos-Lozada, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: la elección de una incisión para laparotomía depende del área que necesite ser expuesta, la urgencia del procedimiento y las preferencias del cirujano. En el Hospital de Pediatría del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI del IMSS, tradicionalmente se realiza abordaje por línea media en estos pacientes. Nuestro objetivo fue determinar si el abordaje por línea media es seguro para el manejo de neonatos sometidos a laparotomía por oclusión intestinal. Métodos: estudio retrospectivo que incluyó a todos los neonatos sometidos a laparotomía por oclusión intestinal mediante abordaje por línea media, en un período comprendido entre enero 2010 a enero 2012. Resultados: se estudiaron 34 pacientes. El 88.2 % de los procedimientos fueron de urgencia. Se encontraron complicaciones en 44 % de los pacientes, de las cuales la más frecuentes fueron: infección y dehiscencia de herida. Dentro de las complicaciones respiratorias, el 32.4 % presentó atelectasia y el 14.7 %, neumonía. Tuvieron hernia postincisional al año el 14.7 %. Ninguna de las variables del paciente o la cirugía fueron estadísticamente significativas para el desarrollo de complicaciones. Se presentaron más complicaciones en los procedimientos de urgencia, en pacientes menores a 2000 gramos y con tiempos quirúrgicos mayores a 120 minutos. Conclusiones: la frecuencia de complicaciones inmediatas y mediatas posteriores al evento quirúrgico son mayores a las reportadas en la literatura con abordaje transverso. La frecuencia de hernia postincisional al año es similar a lo reportado con éste último abordaje.

  18. Army Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-07

    Army Robotics 07 October 2009 Dr. Grant Gerhart, Senior Research Scientist Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A... Robots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Grant Gerhart; Bernard Theisen 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...CBRNE • IED Defeat Systems • Disarm / Disrupt • Reconnaissance • Investigation • Explosive Sniffer • Common Robotic Kit • EOD • Convoy • Log

  19. In-Hospital and 4-Year Clinical Outcomes Following Transcatheter Versus Surgical Closure for Secundum Atrial Septal Defect in Adults: A National Cohort Propensity Score Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tien-Hsing; Hsiao, Yuan-Chuan; Cheng, Chia-Chi; Mao, Chun-Tai; Chen, Dong-Yi; Tsai, Ming-Lung; Yang, Teng-Yao; Lin, Yu-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    Atrial septal defect (ASD) closure is major therapy for patients with secundum ASD. Although surgical closure (SC) and transcatheter closure (TC) are usually performed in such patients, data on the long-term outcomes comparing TC and SC in adults are limited. Data on the participants of this cohort study were retrieved from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database from 2004 to 2011. Secundum ASD patients > 18 years of age who underwent TC or SC were initially enrolled, and those with associated comorbidities were excluded. After propensity score matching, the clinical outcomes between the TC and SC groups were analyzed. There were 595 patients recruited in the TC group and 308 patients in the SC group. The SC group had a higher incidence of systemic thromboembolism (P < 0.001), ischemic stroke (P = 0.002), and all-cause mortality (P = 0.013) when compared with those of the TC group at the index hospitalization, and similar phenomena could also be seen in a around 4-year follow-up period after the procedures (systemic thromboembolism (P < 0.001, HR = 11.48, 95% CI: 3.29-40.05), ischemic stroke (P = 0.005, HR = 9.28, 95% CI: 1.94-44.39), and all-cause mortality (P = 0.035, HR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.06-4.89). In addition, atrial fibrillation (P = 0.005) and atrial flutter (P = 0.049) more frequently developed in the SC group than in the TC group at the index hospitalization. The adult secundum ASD patients had lower incidence rates of systemic thromboembolism, ischemic stroke, and all-cause mortality after TC than those after SC in the 4-year follow-up after procedures. Transcatheter ASD closure should therefore be given priority.

  20. Abortion - surgical

    MedlinePlus

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  1. Major Harvey Cushing's difficulties with the British and American armies during World War I.

    PubMed

    Carey, Michael E

    2014-08-01

    This historical review explores Harvey Cushing's difficulties with both the British and American armies during his World War I service to definitively examine the rumor of his possible court martial. It also provides a further understanding of Cushing the man. While in France during World War I, Cushing was initially assigned to British hospital units. This service began in May 1917 and ended abruptly in May 1918 when the British cashiered him for repeated censorship violations. Returning to American command, he feared court martial. The army file on this matter (retrieved from the United States National Archives) indicates that US Army authorities recommended that Cushing be reprimanded and returned to the US for his violations. The army carried out neither recommendation, and no evidence exists that a court martial was considered. Cushing's army career and possible future academic life were protected by the actions of his surgical peers and Merritte Ireland, Chief Surgeon of the US Army in France. After this censorship episode, Cushing was made a neurosurgical consultant but was also sternly warned that further rule violations would not be tolerated by the US Army. Thereafter, despite the onset of a severe peripheral neuropathy, probably Guillian Barré's syndrome, Cushing was indefatigable in ministering to neurosurgical needs in the US sector in France. Cushing's repeated defying of censorship regulations reveals poor judgment plus an initial inability to be a "team player." The explanations he offered for his censorship violations showed an ability to bend the truth. Cushing's war journal is unclear as to exactly what transpired between him and the British and US armies. It also shows no recognition of the help he received from others who were instrumental in preventing his ignominious removal from service in France. Had that happened, his academic future and ability to train future neurosurgical leaders may have been seriously threatened. Cushing's foibles

  2. Army Personnel System Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-12-01

    Allen Mr. Mike Redgrave PAMSIM Applied Research, Inc. OPXAA LTC Delyle Redmond Army Aviation OPAR LTC William Rousse Aviator Assignment OPXAA LTC Billy...Rutherford Army Aviation OPEN MAJ Thomas Sands Army Aviation OPAT LTC John Schnibben Army Aviation OPIN LTC Daniel Sharp Officer Assignment- DATCOM

  3. [The development of bariatric surgery and the role of the First Surgical Clinic of the General Medical School Hospital and the First Medical School of Charles University in Prague in this specialty].

    PubMed

    Fried, M; Kasalický, M; Gürlich, R

    2001-10-01

    The authors discuss the development of bariatric surgery in Europe and the USA from its beginnings at the onset of the fifties. More detailed attention is paid in particular to the development of the method of gastric bandings and the role at the First Surgical Department in this field in "classical" as well as miniinvasive surgery. Results of gastric banding are summarized in 683 patients operated since 1983, in particular the numbers of early and late complications after laparotomies and laparoscopic operations, similarly as complications which are directly associated with gastric banding itself. In the conclusion it is stated that the First Surgical Department of the General Faculty Hospital and First Medical Faculty Charles University in Prague belong as regards their results in surgical treatment of obese subjects and the position in the field of bariatric surgery on an international scale to the foremost departments in this field worldwide.

  4. A Prospective Study on Malnutrition and Duration of Hospitalisation among Hospitalised Geriatric Patients Admitted to Surgical and Medical Wards of Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Suzana; Wong, Sunfun; Wan, Chakpa'wanchik

    2002-03-01

    Elderly people are known to be at a greater risk of malnutrition, particularly those having diseases or illnesses. A prospective study was undertaken on 92 hospitalised geriatric patients (45.6% males), aged 60 to 89 years old, admitted to surgical and medical wards at Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM). The study aimed to assess malnutrition at admission, day 3 and day 7 of hospitalisation, and its relation with length of stay in the wards. Malnutrition was assessed using anthropometrics and biochemical indicators. Although the majority of subjects had a normal Body Mass Index (BMI), 10.9% had Chronic Energy Deficiency (CED) and 38% were overweight. A total of 10% subjects had muscle wasting as assessed by Mid-upper Arm Circumference (MUAC). Biochemical tests indicated that women subjects were more likely to have hypoalbuminaemia (p <0.05) whilst, men were at risk of anaemia (p < 0.05). Throughout hospitalisation, there was a significant reduction in body weight, biceps skinfold thickness, calf circumference, MUAC, percentage of body fat and body mass index (BMI) in both males and females (p < 0.05 for all parameters). Biochemical tests on a sub sample of subjects indicated that 71.4% had hypoalbuminaemia and 39.6% were anaemic. Subjects diagnosed with cancer, had loss of appetite or had poor nutritional status as assessed by BMI or MUAC on admission were more likely to be hospitalised longer than or equal to 7 days (p < 0.05 for all parameters). Serum albumin levels at admission correlated positively with MUAC values both on admission (r = 0.608, p <0.01) and at clay seven of hospitalisation (r = 0.906, p < 0.05). There is a need to screen elderly patients at high risk of malnutrition at admission in order to reduce the length of stay and increase their health and nutritional status.

  5. Highlights in the History of the Army Nurse Corps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    functions, personnel administration, psychology of leadership, and orientation to all departments of an Army hospital. 2 Feb 1951 The 50th Anniversary of...at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center Chapel. A brunch and reception followed at the WRAMC Officers’ Club. The honored guests present and their

  6. A Strategic Marketing Plan for Women and Infant Services, DeWitt Army Community Hospital and the DeWitt Health Care System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    Manual of the American Psychological Association (4th ed.). (1996). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Reid, A. (1996). Marketing...personal communication, September 4, 1998) Potomac Hospital. [On-line]. Available: http://www.pcweb.com/potomachospital/ s_wome.html Publication

  7. Referral Process Improvement: A Study of the Efficiency and Tracking Processes for In-house Referrals at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    emerged in the 1920s and 1930s when the advances and costs in medicine and hospital care, along with the Great Depression , eroded the public’s ability...57 McPhee, SJ., Lo, B., Saika, GY., and Meltzer , R. (1984). How good is communication between primary care physicians and subspecialty consultants

  8. Audibility of patient clinical alarms to hospital nursing personnel.

    PubMed

    Sobieraj, Josef; Ortega, Claudia; West, Iris; Voepel, Leo; Battle, Steven; Robinson, DaShawn

    2006-04-01

    The audibility of patient clinical alarms to nursing personnel was tested during the first shift on a medical/surgical in-patient ward at William Beaumont Army Medical Center. This study was conducted during normal hospital operations, and we tested the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations 2004 National Patient Safety Goal, Section 6b to determine whether patient alarms could sufficiently compete against environmental background noises. Patient clinical alarms were audible at distances of > or = 95 feet with room doors open but were not sufficiently audible to hospital staff members when room doors were closed or during floor-buffing activities. This study suggests that, under these circumstances, hospitals may not meet Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations 2004 National Patient Safety Goal, Section 6b. Because the audibility of patient clinical alarms directly affects patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of care, we provide recommendations for engineering controls and modifications to work routines.

  9. Determining the Most Appropriate Organizational Structure and Alignment for a Managed Care Office at Keller Army Community Hospital, West Point, NY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-15

    Hospital. This reference provided me with an excellent knowledge base in organization design that greatly facilitated my conduct of this management...Department Technologies.. 66 0 MAPPENDIX m -- zA. DEFINITIONS M B. ACRONYMS Z C. SURVEY QUESTIONAIRE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL m COMPLEXITY AND CHANGE M D...Daft, 1989; Duncan, 1979). Technology. Technology is the transformation process in which the knowledge , tools, techniques, and actions are used to

  10. Analysis of the Impact of the Armed Forces Health Longitudinal Technology Application (AHLTA) on Ambulatory Data Module and Coding Compliance and Provider Productivity at Moncrief Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    quality in several key areas. The results from this project could potentially lessen the impact of the AHLTA transition to the inpatient clinics in the...using the Hospital Commander’s data Impact of AHLTA 18 quality statement. PASBA compares the submitted data to its collected data and if there is a...from CHCS and converted to percentages by the Data Quality Manager. The impact will then be measured using the following information obtained from the

  11. A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Implementing the Joint Health Benefits Delivery Program in Obstetrics or Psychiatry at Kenner Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    Average Length of Stay (Days...286,954 111,653 Average Length of Stay (Days) 30.23 25.29 Total Occupied Bed Days 3,325 + 1,062 - 4387 Total Inpatient Professional Services Cost 93,754...412 Inpatient Hospi- tal Services Government Cost 907,279 941,168 Inpatient Hospital Services Patient C ost 50,963 73,364 Average Length of Stay

  12. The Design and Implementation of a Public Relations Program in Support of the Composite Health Care System at Ireland Army Community Hospital, Fort Knox, Kentucky

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    operation. The Education/Training Project Officer was Sergeant First Class Bowman, the Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge of the Nursing Education and Staff... Education and Staff Development Service. The Nursing Education and Staff Development Service training area on the ninth floor was upgraded with the...the data communication lines terminal located on the 9th tloor in being strung throughout the hospital. Nursing Education and Staff There are

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster Store House, Northwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Greenhouse, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 139, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Turbercular Ward, Northwest Corner of Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing southwest corner of building 732. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tool House, West Pennington Avenue, North of Building No. 140, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), looking east. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tennis Courts, Northeast Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouse, East Harlow Avenue, immediately South of Building 201, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ambulent Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), west and north sides of the southern wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, North Eighth Street, North of Building No. 143, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers Quarters, Northeast Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 216, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Recreation Building, West Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building 118, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Workshop Building, East Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building No. 529, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 217, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tubercular Ward, Southwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses Quarters No. 3, Northwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Salvage Building, Northeast Corner of East I Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storage Sheds, Northeast Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Wagon Shed with Office, Southeast Corner of East J Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably southwest side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Operating Pavilion, West McAfee Avenue, East of Building No. 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Infirmary, Northwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Administration Building, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ice Plant, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Utilities Storeroom, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 145, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover) south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Garage, East of Building No. 121, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Office Building, Northwest Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Female Dormitory, Southeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers' Garage, West Pennington Avenue, West of Building 129, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laboratory Annex, Northwest Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Fire Equipment House, North Page Street, North of Building No. 228, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Power House, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth clover), west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Dispatcher's Office, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Gymnasium, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Shops Building, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Pharmacy & Prophylactic Station, Northwest Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue, & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Artesian Well, East McCloskey Avenue, East of Building No. 231, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. 21. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital. EKG Cardiology Clinic, Building 1049. December 1955. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. 42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital, X-Ray Department and Second Floor Plan, X-Ray Department Plan, Building 1006. no date. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. [Surgical site infections].

    PubMed

    Sganga, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are recognized as a common surgical complication, occurring in about 2-5% of all surgical procedures. SSIs represent the third most frequent nosocomial infection, accounting for 14-16% of all infections observed in hospitalized patients and up to 38% of those observed among surgical patients. Knowledge of incidence, epidemiology, classification, process of wound healing, and pathogenesis of surgical site infection is of great importance. Given the high economic burden that infections provoke, beyond the increased morbidity and mortality, it appears mandatory to improve our tools in order to reduce their incidence, as a reduction of only 0.1% can result in a considerable saving of economic resources to be allocated to other activities, such as screening and prevention programs.

  17. Robert R. Shaw, MD: thoracic surgical hero, Afghanistan medical pioneer, champion for the patient, never a surgical society president.

    PubMed

    Urschel, Harold C; Urschel, Betsey Bradley

    2012-06-01

    Dr Robert R. Shaw arrived in Dallas to practice Thoracic Surgery in 1937, as John Alexander's 7th Thoracic Surgical Resident from Michigan University Medical Center. Dr Shaw's modus operandi was, "You can accomplish almost anything, if you don't care who gets the credit." He was a remarkable individual who cared the most about the patient and very little about getting credit for himself. From 1937 to 1970, Dr Shaw established one of the largest lung cancer surgical centers in the world in Dallas, Texas. It was larger than M.D. Anderson and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Hospitals put together regarding the surgical treatment of lung cancer patients. To accomplish this, he had the help of Dr Donald L. Paulson, who trained at the Mayo Clinic and served as Chief of Thoracic Surgery at Brook Army Hospital during the Second World War. Following the War, because of his love for Texas, he ended up as a partner of Dr Shaw in Dallas. Together, they pursued the development of this very large surgical lung cancer center. Dr Shaw and his wife Ruth went to Afghanistan with Medico multiple times to teach men modern cardiac and thoracic surgery. They also served as consultants on Medico's Ship of Hope in Africa. Dr Shaw initiated multiple new operations including: 1) resection of Pancoast's cancer of the lung after preoperative irradiation; 2) upper lobe of the lung bronchoplasty, reattaching (and saving) the lower lobe to prevent the "disabling" pneumonectomy; and 3) resections of pulmonary mucoid impaction of the lung in asthmatics. Because of his humility and giving "the credit to others," Dr Shaw was never President of a major medical or surgical association.

  18. Detailed Requirements Analysis for a Management Information System for the Department of Family Practice and Community Medicine at Silas B. Hays Army Community Hospital, Fort Ord, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    U.S. Govcrnnct. i -- I - Cosati Codes IS Subct [ erms rco,,thv on rrti erse f neessarv and ide,t’v bl. Ho..k zeuto , r Hospital Administratio.h i...lume riaw, Jr. Approved By: Q/W 7L’),? fk ’L _ "Thomas P. Moore, Thesis Advisor T e7g Reader David R . Whipple, Jr., Chairman, Department of...Lnsh //ew C.n onliution.upen o Opiion SolutriReues Trainingfo I Proposals NCWDsg Proposals System SpecficationsL 1 r 8 -7Vendors Deliver Computer

  19. Army Posture Statement 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-14

    and overhead. We are now well underway in deploying the Lean Six Sigma methodology as a vehicle to seek continuous process improvement, eliminate...and morale. • Implemented Lean Six Sigma methodology within all Army Commands, Direct Reporting Units, Army Service Components of Joint Commands...between 2007 and 2013. • Implemented Lean Six Sigma methodology within all Army Commands, Direct Reporting Units, Army Service Components of Joint

  20. A Study to Develop a Decision Support Model for the Assessment of Needs and Prioritization of Recruitment/Selection Activities Under the Military- Civilian Health Services Partnership Program at Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    physicians within military medical treatment facilities. The model is designed to aid the commander and his supporting staff in the objective...OF THE ARMY US ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT ACTIVITY FORT POLK. LOUISIANA 71459-6000 REPLY TO ATTENTION OF: HSXV-CSD 27 September 1989 MEMORANDUM THRU COL...Relevant Factors . . . . . . . . . . 39 Conduct a Comparative Analysis of Competing Medical Service Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Prioritize

  1. Time-Dependent Effect of Chlorhexidine Surgical Prep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-15

    Time-dependent effect of chlorhexidine surgical prep D.J. Stinner*, C.A. Krueger, B.D. Masini, J.C. Wenke United States Army Institute of Surgical ...2011 by J.A. Child Available online 15 October 2011 Keywords: Chlorhexidine Surgical site infection s u m m a r y Despite continued advances in...preoperative preventive measures and aseptic technique, surgical site infections remain a problem. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time

  2. Decision Support for Installations of the United States Army: The Installation Status Report Part 1- Infrastructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    implementing instructions satisfy the need to~ (1) Apply common Army-wide standards for assessing the condition of facilities. (2) Identify installation... satisfy the need to~ (1) Apply common Army-wide standards for assessing the condition of the overall environmental program. (2) Measure...Retail Restaurant/ Cafe Commissary (**) 74021 Commissary Dental Clinic 54010 Dental Clinic Hospitals 51010 Hospital Troop Medical Clinics 55010 Health

  3. Army Programs: The Army Respiratory Protection Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    leak testing • 3–5, page 4 Maintenance and care of respirators • 3–6, page 4 Procedures for routine worksite inspections • 3–7, page 4 Air quality • 3–8...training provided the DA safety policy for training in smoke is observed. (b) When training and field operations require entrance into con- fined spaces...the Army Respiratory Protection Program as required by law and AR 385–10. 2–3. Commanders of major Army commands Commanders of major Army commands

  4. Diffusion and transmission of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in the medical and surgical wards of a university hospital in Milan, Italy.

    PubMed

    Ridolfo, Anna L; Rimoldi, Sara G; Pagani, Cristina; Marino, Andrea F; Piol, Anna; Rimoldi, Matteo; Olivieri, Pietro; Galli, Massimo; Dolcetti, Lucia; Gismondo, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) is emerging as a public health problem worldwide. In Italy, a remarkable increase in CRKP cases has been reported since 2010. In this study, CRKP diffusion, distribution and in-hospital transmission trends were evaluated in a university hospital in Milan, Italy, from January 2012 to December 2013. Isolates from 63 newly detected CRKP-positive patients were genotyped, and possible transmission was determined by combining the molecular results with data concerning the patients' admission and in-hospital transfers. Most of the cases (90.4%) were from general medical and surgery wards, and the remaining 9.6% were from the intensive care unit. Fifteen of the 46 hospital-associated cases (32.6%) were attributable to in-hospital transmission. After the introduction of targeted and hospital-wide control measures, the transmission index significantly decreased from 0.65 to 0.13 (p=0.01). There was also a decrease in the overall nosocomial case incidence, from 0.37 to 0.17 per 1000 person-days (p=0.07). Our findings indicate that the spread of CRKP in Northern Italy hospitals may go far beyond high-risk settings (i.e., intensive care units) and that strict surveillance should be extended to general areas of care.

  5. The Impact of Socioeconomic Status, Surgical Resection and Type of Hospital on Survival in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer. A Population-Based Study in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van der Geest, Lydia G. M.; de Jong, Koert P.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of socioeconomic inequalities in pancreatic cancer patients and especially its effect in patients who had a resection is not known. Hospital type in which resection is performed might also influence outcome. Patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer from 1989 to 2011 (n = 34,757) were selected from the population-based Netherlands Cancer Registry. Postal code was used to determine SES. Multivariable survival analyses using Cox regression were conducted to discriminate independent risk factors for death. Patients living in a high SES neighborhood more often underwent resection and more often were operated in a university hospital. After adjustment for clinicopathological factors, risk of dying was increased independently for patients with intermediate and low SES compared to patients with high SES. After resection, no survival difference was found among patients in the three SES groups. However, survival was better for patients treated in university hospitals compared to patients treated in non-university hospitals. Low SES was an independent risk factor for poor survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. SES was not an adverse risk factor after resection. Resection in non-university hospitals was associated with a worse prognosis. PMID:27832174

  6. Medicare program; hospital outpatient prospective payment system and CY 2007 payment rates; CY 2007 update to the ambulatory surgical center covered procedures list; Medicare administrative contractors; and reporting hospital quality data for FY 2008 inpatient prospective payment system annual payment update program--HCAHPS survey, SCIP, and mortality. Final rule with comment period and final rule.

    PubMed

    2006-11-24

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system, and to implement certain related provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) of 2003 and the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) of 2005. In this final rule with comment period, we describe changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital outpatient services paid under the prospective payment system. These changes are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2007. In addition, this final rule with comment period implements future CY 2009 required reporting on quality measures for hospital outpatient services paid under the prospective payment system. This final rule with comment period revises the current list of procedures that are covered when furnished in a Medicare-approved ambulatory surgical center (ASC), which are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2007. This final rule with comment period revises the emergency medical screening requirements for critical access hospitals (CAHs). This final rule with comment period supports implementation of a restructuring of the contracting entities responsibilities and functions that support the adjudication of Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) claims. This restructuring is directed by section 1874A of the Act, as added by section 911 of the MMA. The prior separate Medicare intermediary and Medicare carrier contracting authorities under Title XVIII of the Act have been replaced with the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) authority. This final rule continues to implement the requirements of the DRA that require that we expand the "starter set" of 10 quality measures that we used in FY 2005 and FY 2006 for the hospital inpatient prospective payment system (IPPS) Reporting Hospital Quality Data

  7. Distribution of methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci (MRCoPS) in a surgical unit and cystotomy operation sites in a veterinary teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    FUNGWITHAYA, Punpichaya; BRIKSHAVANA, Pasakorn; CHANCHAITHONG, Pattrarat; PRAPASARAKUL, Nuvee

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the spread of methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci (MRCoPS) among veterinary staff, hand-touch sites and surgical tissue during cystotomy operations on cats and dogs that were patients, and to analyze the genetic relatedness and antimicrobial resistance profiles of the isolates. Human and environmental samples were obtained from the nasal passageways of 12 surgeons and veterinary assistants and from 29 hand-touch sites of instruments in operative units and subjected to bacterial isolation and enumeration. Swab samples were collected in triplicate from 29 dogs and three cats at the site of incision, from the incision area, from the peritoneum during surgery and from the peritoneum before suture. MRCoPS were identified by mecA gene detection and characterized by their antibiogram profile, SCCmec type and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Twenty-four staphylococci were isolated, derived from one veterinary assistant, 12 operating room floor areas and hand-touch sites, three dogs and one cat. Methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) was found on an electric clipper and rebreathing circuits in the operating room. Three dogs were positive for MRSP during surgery, and one methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was detected in a cat. All MRCoPS were resistant to doxycycline, erythromycin, clindamycin and enrofloxacin, but no patients developed surgical site infections. According to their genotypic patterns, the clones obtained from the environment and human sources differed from the animal clones. Despite intensive hygienic management, a variety of MRCoPS clones were present within the surgical unit and during surgery. PMID:27990009

  8. Distribution of methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci (MRCoPS) in a surgical unit and cystotomy operation sites in a veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Fungwithaya, Punpichaya; Brikshavana, Pasakorn; Chanchaithong, Pattrarat; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2017-02-28

    This study aimed to investigate the spread of methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci (MRCoPS) among veterinary staff, hand-touch sites and surgical tissue during cystotomy operations on cats and dogs that were patients, and to analyze the genetic relatedness and antimicrobial resistance profiles of the isolates. Human and environmental samples were obtained from the nasal passageways of 12 surgeons and veterinary assistants and from 29 hand-touch sites of instruments in operative units and subjected to bacterial isolation and enumeration. Swab samples were collected in triplicate from 29 dogs and three cats at the site of incision, from the incision area, from the peritoneum during surgery and from the peritoneum before suture. MRCoPS were identified by mecA gene detection and characterized by their antibiogram profile, SCCmec type and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Twenty-four staphylococci were isolated, derived from one veterinary assistant, 12 operating room floor areas and hand-touch sites, three dogs and one cat. Methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) was found on an electric clipper and rebreathing circuits in the operating room. Three dogs were positive for MRSP during surgery, and one methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was detected in a cat. All MRCoPS were resistant to doxycycline, erythromycin, clindamycin and enrofloxacin, but no patients developed surgical site infections. According to their genotypic patterns, the clones obtained from the environment and human sources differed from the animal clones. Despite intensive hygienic management, a variety of MRCoPS clones were present within the surgical unit and during surgery.

  9. Poststernotomy mediastinitis: a review of conventional surgical treatments, vacuum-assisted closure therapy and presentation of the Lund University Hospital mediastinitis algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Johan; Malmsjö, Malin; Gustafsson, Ronny; Ingemansson, Richard

    2006-12-01

    Poststernotomy mediastinitis, also commonly called deep sternal wound infection, is one of the most feared complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The overall incidence of poststernotomy mediastinitis is relatively low, between 1% and 3%, however, this complication is associated with a significant mortality, usually reported to vary between 10% and 25%. At the present time, there is no general consensus regarding the appropriate surgical approach to mediastinitis following open-heart surgery and a wide range of wound-healing strategies have been established for the treatment of poststernotomy mediastinitis during the era of modern cardiac surgery. Conventional forms of treatment usually involve surgical revision with open dressings or closed irrigation, or reconstruction with vascularized soft tissue flaps such as omentum or pectoral muscle. Unfortunately, procedure-related morbidity is relatively frequent when using conventional treatments and the long-term clinical outcome has been unsatisfying. Vacuum-assisted closure is a novel treatment with an ingenious mechanism. This wound-healing technique is based on the application of local negative pressure to a wound. During the application of negative pressure to a sternal wound several advantageous features from conventional surgical treatment are combined. Recent publications have demonstrated encouraging clinical results, however, observations are still rather limited and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This review provides an overview of the etiology and common risk factors for deep sternal wound infections and presents the historical development of conventional therapies. We also discuss the current experiences with VAC therapy in poststernotomy mediastinitis and summarize the current knowledge on the mechanisms by which VAC therapy promotes wound healing. Finally, we suggest a structured algorithm for using VAC therapy for treatment of poststernotomy mediastinitis in clinical

  10. Army Energy Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-08

    achievement will be measured against these goals. Total Army commitment to sound energy policies will reduce our vulnerability to limited external...and strategies ........... 3-2 3.1.2 DOD energy organization ......................... 3-4 3.2 ARMY GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND POLICIES ...Objectives .............. . . . ........ . ... 3-9 3.2.4 Policies ..................................... 3-10 3.3 ORGANIZATION

  11. Multistage Deployment of the Army Theater Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    organic to the supported unit typically provide role-1 and role-2 care with capabilities for immediate lifesaving measures and stabilization for...conform to the tactical plans of the combat forces, and are located close to the forward line of troops to allow rapid acquisition , stabilization...deployment, mobility, and logistical strain are not a key measure of combat service support performance. Recently however, as the battlefield morphs

  12. Medicare program: hospital outpatient prospective payment system and CY 2011 payment rates; ambulatory surgical center payment system and CY 2011 payment rates; payments to hospitals for graduate medical education costs; physician self-referral rules and related changes to provider agreement regulations; payment for certified registered nurse anesthetist services furnished in rural hospitals and critical access hospitals. Final rule with comment period; final rules; and interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2010-11-24

    The final rule with comment period in this document revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system and to implement certain provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Affordable Care Act). In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital outpatient services paid under the prospective payment system. These changes are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2011. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates the revised Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act. In this final rule with comment period, we set forth the applicable relative payment weights and amounts for services furnished in ASCs, specific HCPCS codes to which these changes apply, and other pertinent ratesetting information for the CY 2011 ASC payment system. These changes are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2011. In this document, we also are including two final rules that implement provisions of the Affordable Care Act relating to payments to hospitals for direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) costs; and new limitations on certain physician referrals to hospitals in which they have an ownership or investment interest. In the interim final rule with comment period that is included in this document, we are changing the effective date for otherwise eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals that have been reclassified from urban to rural under section 1886(d)(8)(E) of the Social Security

  13. Improving Army Operational Contract Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Dr. Richard M. Meinhart U.S. Army War...Austin Project Adviser Dr. Richard M. Meinhart U.S. Army War College Faculty Mentor This manuscript is submitted in partial...Improving Army Operational Contract Support by Colonel Daryl P. Harger United States Army United

  14. Index to Army Times 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    1991; 51(26): p. 6. ARMY--REORGANIZATION Investigators chaLLenge cadre concept. Army Times; Sept. 30, 1991; 52(9): p. 6. ARROW (MISSILE)-- ISRAEL ...p. 10. NUTRITION--RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Tickling palates with pizza, pouch bread. Army Times; Nov. 18, 1991; 52(16): p. 10. OBESITY Poor...Aviators awarded. Army Times; June 24, 1991; 51(48): p. 15. Honoring Patriot crews in Israel . Army Times; Apr. 1, 1991; 51(35): p. 17. House passes

  15. Nutritional screening in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J S; Burrough, C A; Green, J L; Brown, G L

    1984-03-01

    Routine nutritional screening of patients admitted to the surgical services confirms a substantial prevalence of malnutrition. Identification of the malnourished patient and the patient who is likely to become malnourished should be done as early as possible in the hospital stay and usually requires only simple, readily available parameters. Nutritional screening is only the first step in the optimal nutritional management of surgical patients. This information should be used to determine the need for further nutritional assessment, the appropriate consultation, and nutritional therapy.

  16. [Problems in the admission to in-hospital oral surgical care from the patient's viewpoint--results of patient interviews in the hospital for dental and maxillo-facial surgery of the Karl Marx University, Leipzig].

    PubMed

    Erpenbeck, F; Birnbaum, K; Langanke, B; Niemand, B; Thomzyk, I

    1979-06-01

    The author deals with the results from the interviewing of oral surgery patients on their problems concerning the sending and the admission to the hospital, with special attention to the problems of waiting for admission, the familiarization with the clinical environment and the improvement suggestions of the patients. The conclusions concern tasks arising from the medical and dental care for inpatients as well as for outpatients.

  17. Medicare and Medicaid programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; electronic reporting pilot; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities Quality Reporting Program; revision to Quality Improvement Organization regulations. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2012-11-15

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2013 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program, the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program, and the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility (IRF) Quality Reporting Program. We are continuing the electronic reporting pilot for the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program, and revising the various regulations governing Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs), including the secure transmittal of electronic medical information, beneficiary complaint resolution and notification processes, and technical changes. The technical changes to the QIO regulations reflect CMS' commitment to the general principles of the President's Executive Order on Regulatory Reform, Executive Order 13563 (January 18, 2011).

  18. Army Equipment Modernization Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    transition , we must continue to provide the Nation with the best equipped, most modernized, and highly capable Army to prevail in any operational...interoperability. • Conducted the Initial Operational Test and Evaluation (IOTE) for WIN-T Inc 2 provid- ing an initial on-the-move capability to BCTs and...the Joint Air to Ground Missile (JAGM) which supports the transition of Army Hellfire missile to a joint missile system and replaces the Marine

  19. The Total Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    headquarters, but the acknowledged limitations reflect otherwise. This is even more concerning given “the Army strategy for global mission command of Army...above resembles a global security market , yet decisions are based on subjective estimates of risks, threats, and opportunities rather than objective...enthusiasm for new investments in blood and treasure. Yet the global security environment is one of growing complexity and danger, and the demand for an

  20. 2010 Army Modernization Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    details outlined in Chapter 4 will describe the following modernization objectives: With night vision goggles our Soldiers “own the night .” 10 2010 ARMY...modern armor-capable truck versus a non-armor capable truck? What percentage of our Night Vision Devices must be the most modern variant? The Army...Soldier weapons sight and sensors so they operate within the GSS framework. Systems such as the Digital Enhanced Night Vision Goggle could allow

  1. Assessing the Army Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Initial Planning Conference, 15 December 2010. 24. John Winthrop Hackett, The Profession of Arms (Officers’ Call), CMH Pub 70-18 (Washington D.C...unacceptable conditions. In 1986, General John Wickham wrote Values, the Bedrock of the Profession in an attempt to establish a moral touchstone for...Profession Following the methodology of former Army Chiefs of Staff when faced with times of change and turbulence, Secretary of the Army John M

  2. Army Sustainability Report 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    30 Army Campaign Plan for Health Promotion, Risk Reduction and Suicide Prevention...FY09, Camp Bullis created a 3,000-acre ACUB buffer, which complements the joint economic and nuisance measures of their JLUS with the City of San...under the Fact Sheets section of the ACUB website, aec.army. mil/usaec/acub. Including Camp Bullis , expansions at other buffers, and new buffers at

  3. Army Medical Robotics Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Army Medical Robotics Research Gary Gilbert, Ph.D., U.S. Army TATRC, Ph: (301) 619-4043, Fax: (301) 619-2518 gilbert@tatrc.org, www.tatrc.org...politically sensitive low intensity combat in urban terrain. Research progress has been made in the areas of robotics ; artificial intelligence...institutions have demonstrated intelligent robots that execute functions ranging from performing mechanical repairs to playing soccer. The military has

  4. The Army Ethic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    14. ABSTRACT This thesis examined the CAPE Army Ethic. It uses a three-phased approach, first conducting a survey to determine perceptions of...Army Ethic. It uses a three-phased approach, first conducting a survey to determine perceptions of relevancy among CGSS officers. Second, it uses a...Professionals15 The proposed Ethic then discusses each one of those principles, adding depth and breadth to them in an attempt to show how those

  5. Index to Army Times 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    services, role in drug war. Army Times; Jun. 13, 1988; 48(44): p. 10. Watch out below. Army Tir.:7; May 23, 1988; 48(41): p. 25. DRUGS AND EMPLOYMENT ...CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES Most civilians working abroad may avoid AIDS tests. Army Times; Sep. 19, 1988; 49(6): p. 30. Plans to screen civilians for AIDS... EMPLOYMENT In the cockpit as a civilian. Army Times; Jul. 4, 1988; 48(47): p. 20. AKHRCMEYEV, SERGEI Army special agents guarding Soviet Chief. Army

  6. A Study to Determine the Ambulatory Quality Assurance Impact of a Computer-Stored Medical Records System Upon the Family Practice Clinic, Silas B. Hays Army Community Hospital, Fort Ord, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) S. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) 89-88 6a. NAME OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION I 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7a. NAME OF...MONITORING ORGANIZATION U.S. Army-Baylor University (If applicable) Graduate Program in Health Care rdmin/HSHA-IHC 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP...IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION I (/f applicable) ft ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 10. SOURCE OF FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM I PROJECT TASK IWORK

  7. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants.

  8. [Analysis of non-confraternity sports accidents in the surgical department of a former district hospital during the period of 2 years].

    PubMed

    Raschka, Ch; Raschka, S; Peikert, T

    2009-12-01

    This epidemiological study analyses all n = 1,659 outpatient and inpatient non-confraternity sports accidents treated during a 2-year period in a former district hospital. The largest share with 40.6% is soccer, followed by cycling (15%), general fitness sports (7.6%), outdoor sports (6.5%), winter sports (5.5%), and riding (5.2%). Soccer injuries rise steadily until the age of 30. Of 86 horse riding accidents a total of 68 involved women, but only 18 men (ratio 8 : 2). 53% of the horse riding accidents among women concern the age group between 10 and 20 years. 70.6% (79%) of the athletes under (over) 20 years were male, 29.4% (21%) female (p < 0.05). Topographically the lower extremities represent the most affected body region in all sports (runners 84.4%, soccer players 60.2%). Most accidents occur on a Sunday. The most common diagnosis is contusion, most commonly in martial arts (60.8%), followed by horse riding (51%). There is an astonishing dominance of soccer accidents given the fact that this study records all athletes, not just club athletes, unlike insurance studies. Important preventive measures would be a comprehensive biological training prophylaxis and the provision of communication of age-specific accident prevention proposals for the mainly affected sports.

  9. U.S. Army Medical Command Injury Summary, Active Duty Personnel, 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    can conduct surveys of their staff, as was done at the General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital, to quantify injury incidence among both...softball bases (Pollack et al., 2005) • Mouthguards for football, basketball (Knapik et al., 2007) • Protective eyewear (Cass, 2012; Goldstein and Wee...training, including running and road marching (Kaufman et al., 2000). A survey of employees at the General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital found

  10. The evolution of casualty evacuation in the British Army in the 20th century (Part 2)--1918 to 1945.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C M

    2002-09-01

    This is the second in a series of papers that examine the evolution of the military casualty evacuation chain during the 20th century. The Spanish Civil War demonstrated to the world the revolutionary tactic of 'Blitzkrieg' developed by the Germans. This and the experience of the British Expeditionary Force in 1940 emphasised the need for mobility in forward medical units. The campaign in the Western Desert led to the creation of a number of new units such as the Field Surgical Unit and the Field Transfusion Unit which were introduced across the British Army as a result of the findings of the Hartgill Committee. The aeroplane transformed the evacuation chain from CCSs to base hospitals and beyond.

  11. Comparison of Three Surgical Methods in Treatment of Patients with Pilonidal Sinus: Modified Excision and Repair/Wide Excision/Wide Excision and Flap in RASOUL, OMID and SADR Hospitals( 2004-2007).

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Heidari, Afshin; Jafarnejad, Babak

    2013-10-01

    This study is a comparison between three methods that are frequently used for the surgical treatment of pilonidal disease all over the world: modified excision and repair, wide excision and secondary repair, and wide excision and flap. The first technique is done by our group for the first time, and has not been described previously in the literature. This is an interventional study performed at Omid, Sadr, and Rasoul Akram hospitals on patients who had undergone operation because of pilonidal sinus disease and met the inclusion criteria between 2004 and 2007. Exclusion criteria were (1) acute pilonidal sinus diseases, (2) history of pilonidal sinus surgery, (3) history of systemic diseases (DM, malignancy, etc.), and (4) pilonidal abscess. Essential information was extracted from complete medical archives. Any data not available in files or during follow-up visits (all patients supposed to be followed at least for 1 year) were gathered by a telephone interview. A total of 194 patients met the criteria and had complete archived files. Longer duration of hospital stay was found in the "wide excision and closing with flap" method comparing with two other methods (P < 0.05). Length of incapacity for work was not different between the "wide excision and modified repair" and "wide excision" (P > 0.5) methods, but longer for "wide excision and flap" in comparison with two others (P < 0.05). Healing time was significantly longer in the "wide excision" method in comparison with two other methods (P < 0.05). However, "wide excision and modified repair" method had the least healing time between all above techniques, except for length of leaving the office. All the three recurrences (1.5 %) occurred in the wide excision and flap method (P < 0.05). The frequency of postoperative complications was 2 (3.3 %) in wide excision and modified repair, 15 (18.5 %) in wide excision, and 17 (32.7 %) in wide excision and flap closure; these differences in

  12. Army ants: an evolutionary bestseller?

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Stefanie M

    2003-09-02

    Army ants are characterized by a complex combination of behavioral and morphological traits. Molecular data now indicate that army ant behavior has a unique evolutionary origin and has been conserved for over more than 100 million years.

  13. Surgical mortality score: risk management tool for auditing surgical performance.

    PubMed

    Hadjianastassiou, Vassilis G; Tekkis, Paris P; Poloniecki, Jan D; Gavalas, Manolis C; Goldhill, David R

    2004-02-01

    Existing methods of risk adjustment in surgical audit are complex and costly. The present study aimed to develop a simple risk stratification score for mortality and a robust audit tool using the existing resources of the hospital Patient Administration System (PAS) database. This was an observational study for all patients undergoing surgical procedures over a two-year period, at a London university hospital. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine predictive factors of in-hospital mortality, the study outcome. Odds ratios were used as weights in the derivation of a simple risk-stratification model-the Surgical Mortality Score (SMS). Observed-to-expected mortality risk ratios were calculated for application of the SMS model in surgical audit. There were 11,089 eligible cases, under five surgical specialties (maxillofacial, orthopedic, renal transplant/dialysis, general, and neurosurgery). Incomplete data were 3.7% of the total, with no evidence of systematic underreporting. The SMS model was well calibrated [Hosmer-Lemeshow C-statistic: development set (3.432, p = 0.33), validation set (6.359, p = 0.10) with a high discriminant ability (ROC areas: development set [0.837, S.E.=0.013] validation set [0.816, S.E. = 0.016]). Subgroup analyses confirmed that the model can be used by the individual specialties for both elective and emergency cases. The SMS is an accurate risk- stratification model derived from existing database resources. It is simple to apply as a risk-management, screening tool to detect aberrations from expected surgical outcomes and to assist in surgical audit.

  14. Index to Army Times 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    32. ADVANCED FIELD ARTILLERY TACTICAL DATA SYSTEM (AFTADS) Artillery fire control system gets green light. Army Times; Oct. 9, 1989; 50(9): p. 37...COMMAND Special Operations to gain control of its own budget. Army Times; Feb. 20, 1989; 49(28): p. 27. Special operations units face funding crisis...VEHICLES--TESTING Armor breakthrough near. Army Times; July 3, 1989; 49(47): p. 25. I 17 ARMS CONTROL Soviets run into Hilt skepticism. Army Times; May 2

  15. Index to Army Times 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    CHAMPUS to revise health-care rules. Army Times; Mar. 26, 1990; 50(33): p. 9. CHAMPUS- - CHIROPRACTIC TREATMENT Chiropractic coverage tested. Army Times...FORCES--PANAMA--AMERICAN INVASION, 1989-1990 Women’s action investigated. Army Times; Feb. 5, 1990; 50(26): p. 10. WOMEN IN THE ARMED FORCES-- PREGNANCY ... Pregnancy a growing problem in early outs. Army Times; Sept. 3, 1990; 51(4): p. 10. WOMEN IN THE ARMED FORCES--RECRUITING, ENLISTMENT, ETC. No special

  16. Surgical Site Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Ken; Huang, Susan S.; Murphy, Michael V.; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Platt, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background: Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are publicly reported as quality metrics and increasingly used to determine financial reimbursement. Objective: To evaluate the volume-outcome relationship as well as the year-to-year stability of performance rankings following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and hip arthroplasty. Research Design: We performed a retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries who underwent CABG surgery or hip arthroplasty at US hospitals from 2005 to 2011, with outcomes analyzed through March 2012. Nationally validated claims-based surveillance methods were used to assess for SSI within 90 days of surgery. The relationship between procedure volume and SSI rate was assessed using logistic regression and generalized additive modeling. Year-to-year stability of SSI rates was evaluated using logistic regression to assess hospitals’ movement in and out of performance rankings linked to financial penalties. Results: Case-mix adjusted SSI risk based on claims was highest in hospitals performing <50 CABG/year and <200 hip arthroplasty/year compared with hospitals performing ≥200 procedures/year. At that same time, hospitals in the worst quartile in a given year based on claims had a low probability of remaining in that quartile the following year. This probability increased with volume, and when using 2 years’ experience, but the highest probabilities were only 0.59 for CABG (95% confidence interval, 0.52–0.66) and 0.48 for hip arthroplasty (95% confidence interval, 0.42–0.55). Conclusions: Aggregate SSI risk is highest in hospitals with low annual procedure volumes, yet these hospitals are currently excluded from quality reporting. Even for higher volume hospitals, year-to-year random variation makes past experience an unreliable estimator of current performance. PMID:27517331

  17. Mobile surgical skills education unit: a new concept in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Faisal M; Hseino, Hazem; Hill, Arnold D K; Kavanagh, Eamon; Traynor, Oscar

    2011-08-01

    Basic surgical skills are an integral part of surgical training. Simulation-based surgical training offers an opportunity both to trainees and trainers to learn and teach surgical skills outside the operating room in a nonpatient, nonstressed environment. However, widespread adoption of simulation technology especially in medical education is prohibited by its inherent higher cost, limited space, and interruptions to clinical duties. Mobile skills laboratory has been proposed as a means to address some of these limitations. A new program is designed by the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), in an approach to teach its postgraduate basic surgical trainees the necessary surgical skills, by making the use of mobile innovative simulation technology in their own hospital settings. In this article, authors describe the program and students response to the mobile surgical skills being delivered in the region of their training hospitals and by their own regional consultant trainers.

  18. Aeroacoustic research: An Army perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, H. A.; Schmitz, F. H.

    1978-01-01

    A short perspective of the Army aeroacoustic research program is presented that emphasizes rotary wing, aerodynamically generated noise. Exciting breakthroughs in experimental techniques and facilities are reviewed which are helping build a detailed understanding of helicopter external noise. Army and joint Army/NASA supported research programs in acoustics which promise to reduce the noise of future helicopters without severe performance penalties are included.

  19. Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office, building 120. Photograph by Rocky Mountain photo. CO was no copyrighted and is , therefore, in the public domain. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Memorial Tablet, West McAfee, South of Building No. 524, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph of south side before perpendicular wing added. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Carpenter Shop Building, Southwest Corner of West I Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north and east sides of the east/west wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, General Mess & Kitchen, Southwest Corner of East McAfee Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 257 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 257, North side of East O'Neill Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides of buildings no. 719, now the north wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Red Cross Building, South Eighth Street Bounded by West McAfee Avenue on South & West Harlow Avenue on North, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property book (green cloth cover), showing east and most of south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Assembly Hall School, Northeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably west and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Patient's Mess & Kitchen, Northeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 256 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 256, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing part of east side and most of north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster's Storehouse, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides of building no. 715, now the south wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing building 225's west and a north sides. This photograph is included because it shows how the west side of building 221 looked before the corridor between buildings 220 and 221 was added and because building 225 was built to the same plan as building 221. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Hospital Corps Barracks, East Harlow Street, East of Building No. 220, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Factors Influencing Army Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    ARI Research Note 89-11 (N 00 Factors Influencing Army Maintenance LOloD Debra C. Evans and J. Thomas Roth Applied Science Associates, Inc. for...1.2.7 .2.7.C.1 11. TITLE (Include Security ClassifIcarIon) Factors Influencing Army Maintenance i2. FERSONAL AuTtiOR(S) Evans, Debra C., and Roth, J...y • ’ Factors and variables that influence maintenance for systems and related manpower, per- sonnel, and training (MPT) characteristics were

  13. Index to Army Times 1992.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    ACUTE CARE SUPPORT FACILITIES Gift of homes helps patients, families. Army Times; Oct. 12, 1992; 53(11): p. 28. ADDS SEE ARMY DATA DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM...reinstated. Army Times; May 11, 1992; 52(41): p. 23. Wanted: A baby (Life in the Times). Army Times; Nov. 23, 1992; 53(17): p. 45. 3 ADOPTION AND...Times; Aug. 17, 1992; 53(3): p. 24. AUSTRALIAN EXERCISE KANGAROO 92 (MANEUVgRS) Exercise K92: Show the flag in the outback. Army Times; Nov. 2, 1992; 53

  14. The Surgical Treatment of Mycetoma

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, Suleiman Hussein; Wadaella, EL Sammani; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Surgical intervention is an integral component in the diagnosis and management of mycetoma. Surgical treatment is indicated for small, localised lesions and massive lesions to reduce the mycetoma load and to enable better response to medical therapy. It is also a life-saving procedure in patients with massive disease and sepsis. Surgical options for mycetoma treatment range from a wide local surgical excision to repetitive debridement excisions to amputation of the affected part. Adequate anaesthesia, a bloodless field, wide local excision with adequate safety margins in a suitable surgical facility, and expert surgeons are mandatory to achieve the best surgical outcome. Surgical intervention in mycetoma is associated with considerable morbidity, deformities, and disabilities, particularly in advanced disease. These complications can be reduced by educating patients to seek medical advice earlier when the lesion is small, localised, and amenable to surgery. There is no evidence for mycetoma hospital cross infection. This communication is based on the authors’ experience in managing over 7,200 mycetoma patients treated at the Mycetoma Research Centre, University of Khartoum, Sudan. PMID:27336736

  15. [The seven wounds Ernst Jünger at the time of the Great War. Reflection of the health service of the imperial army].

    PubMed

    Ségal, Alain; Ferrandis, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to Ernt Junger's amazing career--and despite his many injuries--we have a great view of the German Imperial Army's sanitary corps. This can be observed from the actions of the stretcher-bearers to German hospitals in general, and with the organization of their sanitary transport, as well as their medico-surgical concerns. We can see, therefore, that very few differences existed with the French medico-surgical structures except for the fact that,from the very beginning, Imperial medical warfare was able to adjust to the changes from field to trench situations. Thanks to its adaptable system of triage, and its ability to offer the most coherent medico-surgical choices and options, it was possible to save time. It enabled surgical actions in places that were close to the battlefield. Furthermore, we have been able to find out about the personal experience of an exceptional 20th century writer who later became a great European citizen.

  16. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata…

  17. Army Leader Transitions Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Initiate Organizational Communication (STRATCOM) Plan Step 3: Build and Sustain Knowledge Management Systems Step 4: Build Coalitions Internally and...Externally Step 5: Eliminate Needless Constraints PHASE VI: SUSTAINING (D+91+) Step 1: Manage Organizational Systems and Operations Step 2...field manuals and Army regulations and system -oriented technical manuals. Review Organizational Results Conduct a review of results oriented

  18. Specialty hospitals: can general hospitals compete?

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2005-07-13

    The rapid increase in specialty cardiac, surgical, and orthopedic hospitals has captured the attention of general hospitals and policymakers. Although the number of specialty hospitals remains small in absolute terms, their entry into certain health care markets has fueled arguments about the rules of "fair" competition among health care providers. To allow the smoke to clear, Congress effectively stalled the growth in new specialty hospitals by temporarily prohibiting physicians from referring Medicare or Medicaid patients to specialty hospitals in which they had an ownership interest. During this 18-month moratorium, which expired June 8, 2005, two mandated studies of specialty hospitals provided information to help assess their potential effect on health care delivery. This issue brief discusses the research on specialty hospitals, including their payments under Medicare's hospital inpatient payment system, the quality and cost of care they deliver, their effect on general hospitals and on overall health care delivery, and the regulatory and legal environment in which they have proliferated. It concludes with open issues concerning physician self-referral and the role of general hospitals in providing a range of health care services.

  19. [Financing and control of surgical training].

    PubMed

    Schröder, W; Welcker, K

    2010-01-01

    The present analyses of different surgical training systems show that training of surgical residents significantly contributes to hospital costs. These are predominantly caused by prolonged operation times of residents with increased work load for other staff members in the operating room. In addition, the productivity of surgical residents is less compared to experienced surgeons. On the other hand, hospital managements save money by the lower standard wages paid to the residents. The amount of educational costs is difficult to determine because surgical training takes place as on the job training. Therefore, from an economic point of view, the two products patient care and surgical training are difficult to separate. There are no reliable cost analyses available for the German training system. At present surgical training is indirectly financed by the DRG (diagnosis-related groups) flat rates of the health insurance. Possible options of financing the surgical training are additional funding from the health department or redistribution with supplemental payment for those surgical departments which contribute significantly more to the residents' training. Statements of medical associations, health departments and health insurances demonstrate the difficulty to come to an agreement concerning the finances of the training system. Despite this controversial discussion it should be taken into consideration that there is no alternative to a high quality surgical training as this is the basis for an effective health system.

  20. Maximizing Patient Thermoregulation in US Army Forward Surgical Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Zelenock GB. Hypothermia is an independent predictor of mortality in ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms . Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2004;38(1):37-42. 8...Factors affecting mortality rates in patients with abdominal vascular injuries. J Trauma. 2001;50 (6):1020-1026. 5. Cushman JG, Feliciano DV, Renz BM...Ann Surg. 1997;226(4):439-447. 12. Johnson JW, Gracias VH, Schwab CW, et al. Evolution in damage control for exsanguinating penetrating abdominal

  1. Army Power and Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    2011 GreenGov Symposium Oct. 31 ‐ Nov. 2, 2011 Washington Hilton  Washington, DC Clean   Energy  – Session 5 Increasing the DoD Renewable Energy...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Clean   Energy  – Session 5 Increasing the DoD Renewable Energy Portfolio November 1, 2011 Army Energy in... Clean   Energy  – Session 5 Increasing the DoD Renewable Energy Portfolio November 1, 2011 3 Army Energy Consumption, 2010 Facilities Vehicles

  2. Achieving Efficiencies in Army Installations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    34" ’■■"■" 1 USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT Achieving Efficiencies in Army Installations by Richard Fliss Col. Richard M. Meinhart Project...government agency. STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT ACHIEVING EFFICIENCIES IN ARMY INSTALLATIONS BY RICHARD FLISS DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved...for public release. Distribution is unlimited. DTIC QUALITY INSPECTED & USAWC CLASS OF 1998 U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE, CARLISLE BARRACKS, PA 17013-5050

  3. Army Families and Soldier Readiness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    self-sufficiency while they are away on deployments. According to the measures in this study, Army personnel have a high level of individual...could improve soldiers’ levels of emotional well-being and yield potentially high payoffs by reducing needs for other ser- vices. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We...military member • Commitment to the ArmyArmy career intention • Adequacy of child care during deployment These seven dimensions of individual

  4. Index to Army Times, 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    10. DEPMEDS ff& DEPLOYABLE MEDICAL SYSTEM (DEPMEDS) S DESERT TORTOISE --NATIONAL TRAINING CENTER (NTC), FORT IRM.N, CA Tortoise vs. tank: No contest...Times; Sep. 13, 1993; 54(7): p. 8. Rangers in Somalia: Anatomy of a firefight (After-Action Review). Army Times; Nov. 15, 1993; 54(16): p. 14...TELEPHONE SERVICE International toLl-free numbers mushroom. Army Times; Oct. 11, 1993; 54(11): p. 18. TORTOISE SEE DESERT TORTOISE TOTAL ARMY

  5. Army Public Service Advertising.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    34 Marketing and Media Decisions, January 1982, p. 63. 6U.S., General Accounting Office, " Advertising for Military Recruiting," p. 10. 7Dean L. Yarwood...talent and necessary training, they said. 4 8 An article in Marketing and Media Decisions 4 9 offered a brief synopsis of military recruitment advertising ...support, public relations, marketing research, and analysis. The N. W. Ayer field representative’s Army counterpart is the Advertising and Sales

  6. Army Physical Readiness Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Soldiers to meet the changing physical demands that are placed upon them without undue fatigue or risk of injury is woven into the fabric of the PRT...tasks and within large- scale training event METL tasks.  They habitually train at least two echelons simultaneously on selected METL tasks and require...Chapter 6, Special Conditioning Programs, provides more information on reconditioning. PREGNANCY AND POSTPARTUM TRAINING 4-18. The US Army

  7. Army Strategic Energy Goals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-09

    3 Cells Modules Packs UNCLASSIFIED TARDEC’s End-to-End Energy Business: From Generation to Application 4UNCLASSIFIED Smart-Charging Micro-Grid...Installation of microgrid at Schofield Barracks, tied to critical infrastructure • Photovolatic array • Dedicated electric vehicle charging • Grid...Installation Forward Base / Camp Vehicle Battery-Fuel Cell Hybrid Battery-Battery Hybrid Soldier Soldier Army Advanced Energy Initiative: Concept for

  8. Returning to Army Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    Matthews and Dale E. Brown (Washington, DC: Pergamon- Brassey ‟ s , 1989), 3. 36 Ibid. 37 Ibid. 22 38 Ibid., 8. 39 Mary Blake French, ed., “Do We Need... S ) Colonel John M. Riley 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND...MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM( S ) U.S. Army War College 122 Forbes Avenue 122 Forbes Avenue

  9. Army Aviation Simulation Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    Air-Vehicle Concept Evaluation Performance Specification * Product Engineering and Development I • Air-Vehicle Testing and Certification * Aircrew...specification development 12. Helicopter stability for NOE 13. Tiltrotor certification 14. Terrain following/terrain avoidance 15. Wide angle sensor...CAPABILITY/FUNCTIONALITY R & D COST CONSIDERATIONS Speed in Low Unit Low Total HighDevetl. m’t CostA ielt E. Army Research Lab Node 5 2 3 3 F. Realistic

  10. Army Efficiency Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-28

    Service College Fellows. The views expressed in this student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy...this student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army...products, a large scale company managed to obtain significant results. Total cycle time was reduced by 60%; inventory was cut 43% from $6.3 million to

  11. The Army Lawyer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    Fired at Fleeing Cars, Soldiers Say, WASH. POST, Oct. 12, 2007, at A1 (quoting Major General (MG) Joseph Fil , Commander of 1st Cavalry Division, as...saying, “It’s yet another challenge, another setback.”). 32 See generally id. (quoting MG Joseph Fil as saying in reference to the incidents of PSC...Prosecutors Research Institute 99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510 Alexandria, VA 22313 (703) 549-9222 JULY 2008 • THE ARMY LAWYER

  12. The Army Lawyer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    81 Overall, the new 68 Id. CBS reporter Bob Simon and several camera crew members were captured...and combat camera . Id. The related capabilities of PA, civil-military operations (CMO), and defense support to public diplomacy must always be...JULY 2009 • THE ARMY LAWYER • DA PAM 27-50-434 25 affairs are the most logical IO capabilities where a war correspondent’s skill set can be used by

  13. The Army Study Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-31

    LEADERSHIP A Total Army whose leadters at all levels possess the highest ethical and professional standards committed ito mission accomplishment and the...wWIIOW WWW"I w Li- w0w iWWW WI 0 do-ccw Upt I.-0 U3 *4..00 =- 0 0 M ) Mc c VU K 0-c gmo g a0-2222we -22222 -2222w 22222W a422 .32 1-00000 ~ ~ ~ ~ 3 0-0 0 S

  14. Revolutionizing Army Leader Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    historical perspective . While it is relatively common knowledge that education and the military profession have been inherently intertwined since the...17013-5050 USAWC CLASS OF 2011 The U.S. Army War College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle State Association of...Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (215) 662-5606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting

  15. The American Armies: 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    implications of these changes for national sovereignty, identity, and security. Additionally, the study considers how proposed military reductions will...funded research and development center (FFRDC) for studies and analysis operated by RAND. The Arroyo Center provides the Army with objective, independent...chaired by the Vice Chief of Staff and by the Assistant Secretary for Research, Development, and Acquisition. Arroyo Center work is performed under

  16. Integration of Female Army Apprentices,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARMY TRAINING, *APPRENTICESHIP, * FEMALES , MILITARY TRAINING, MALES, AUSTRALIA, STRESS(PSYCHOLOGY), ATTITUDES(PSYCHOLOGY), ROLES(BEHAVIOR), ASSIMILATION, SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE, COMMERCE, INSTRUCTORS, WORK

  17. Army Occupational Health Program, 1978.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    AD A072 913 ARMY ENVIRONMENTAL HYGIENE AGENCY ABERDEEN PROVING SR—ETC Fit 6/5 ARMY OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH PROGRAM, 1978.CU) UNCLASSIFIED 1978 C A CROC...irC ~ ~~5 ~ ¶5 “u UNITE D STATES ARMY ENVIRONMENTAL HYGIENE AGENCY U ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MO 21010 ARMY OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH PROGRAM...M.D. COL , MC Di rector, Occupati onal and Environmental Health _ _ _/ Acccs3ion For NTL, ~~ i&1 Un~~~~~~ ced J~~.t~.C1 c~ t io n___________ — J A

  18. [Surgical treatment of duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Lese, M; Naghi, I; Pop, C

    2001-01-01

    The medical and endoscopic treatment of duodenal ulcer are decreasing the frequency of surgical treatment in this disease. The authors study the operations performed for duodenal ulcer within the period 1989-1999 in the County Hospital Baia Mare. The decrease of the rate of surgical interventions is the pure effect of the medical treatment, as long as the endoscopic treatment is not yet available in our service. The rate of ulcer--induced perforations remained, however, unmodified (48% of total operatory indications), as well as the postoperative morbidity and--mortality (18% respectively 9%). The last category seems not to be influenced by the type of chosen surgical procedure, but by the patient's age, duration of the disease, and associated pathology.

  19. Army Training Study: Concepts of the Army Training System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-08

    Combat Units. 1 March 1971. Harher, Robert A. and Coleman, Charlie C. Application of Simulation Training Exercises to Crisis Relocation Planning...product or outpit of the Army’s helth -. Ssinn. 0 ro)gram qM is a go example of hw pr hugra-. udgetinc’ is intro-. to work. The Army’s health care

  20. Army Force Generation: Balancing Missions in the Army National Guard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-23

    National Guard input for Chief, National Guard Bureau Update brief for 30 January 2007, available from https://gkoportal.ngb.army.mil/sites/ JOP ...January 2007; available from https://gkoportal.ngb.army.mil/sites/ JOP /cngbbrief/default.aspx; Internet; accessed 28 January 2007. 55 U.S. General

  1. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  2. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (NSQIP) and the Quality of Surgical Care in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the safety, quality, and value of surgical care have become increasingly important to surgeons and hospitals. Quality improvement in surgical care requires the ability to collect, measure, and act upon reliable and clinically relevant data. One example of a large-scale quality effort is the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-Pediatric), the only nationwide, risk-adjusted, outcomes-based program evaluating pediatric surgical care.

  3. Surgical education in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Surgical education in Mexico basically follows the same model as in the United States, with a selection process resembling the matching program. There is a 4-year training period during which residents in their third year spend 4 months as the sole surgeon in a rural community. During the senior year they are entitled to an elective period in a place of their choosing. After completion of the 4 years, residents have to present a thesis and undergo an oral examination before getting a university diploma. They are then encouraged to pass the written and oral examination of the Mexican Board of Surgery before they are fully certified to enter practice in a public or private hospital.

  4. Risk Factors for Discharge from the Army with a Permanent Disability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    as deaths, and treatment for alcohol or drug-related problems. STATEMENT OF WORK OBJECTIVES Table 1 displays the annual statement of work...in hospitalizations or outpatient visits. It is also not clear how the VASRD codes will relate to clinical diagnoses and treatment in...costs for disabled Army Soldiers are unknown, Veterans Affairs (VA) facility treatment costs for Army Soldiers with a medical discharge between 1986

  5. [Stomata--surgical standards].

    PubMed

    Wagner, M; Malayeri, V; Seiler, C A; Candinas, D

    2003-01-01

    The placement of an intestinal stoma is still a common procedure despite the recent advantages in intestinal surgery. It is mandatory to apply meticulously sound surgical principles in order to achieve good results. Nevertheless, intestinal stomas are envisioned with a high perioperative morbidity which is mostly caused by surgical inadequacy. This can lead to considerable problems in management of the stoma in the long term and ultimately will affect quality of life of the patient. The cumulative morbidity can be given by 50% with prolaps, hernia, stenosis and necrosis as well as stoma retraction being the most relevant. In contrast, an adequate intestinal stoma will positively affect the quality of life of the patient. The availability of devices developed by the industry and the inauguration of a professional service in certain hospitals simplified the management of patients with a stoma. This significantly improved the standards of care especially regarding preoperative preparation and postoperative management. Thus, most patients are able to maintain an active and socially integrated life with minimal physical and psychical limitations.

  6. Army Transformation to Expeditionary Formations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    potatoes " of the United States Army. This is what our nation depends on and expects a land based anned force to be. No formation currently on this...is something to be said about form and functionality. Briefly this, kudos to Army leadership by reducing the level of maintenance ( starching , sewing

  7. Army Recruiting Resourcing System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Sheridan, Illinois 60037-6090 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMO No. 070虨 I.& Mrw ung U btOfl tOf thti (CM .; 9 Of nOMToMt,0* Mt e,,tiSO w &rIK" 1 OUr...are those of the author and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army policy or position, unless so designated by other...changes in policies , regulations, or statutes that affect recruiting. Those interviewed within the DA staff (DCSPER, PA&E, and DAB personnel) believe there

  8. Surgical Risks Associated with Winter Sport Tourism

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Stéphane; Payet, Cécile; Lifante, Jean-Christophe; Polazzi, Stéphanie; Chollet, François; Carty, Matthew J; Duclos, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Background Mass tourism during winter in mountain areas may cause significant clustering of body injuries leading to increasing emergency admissions at hospital. We aimed at assessing if surgical safety and efficiency was maintained in this particular context. Methods We selected all emergency admissions of open surgery performed in French hospitals between 2010 and 2012. After identifying mountain areas with increasing volume of surgical stays during winter, we considered seasonal variations in surgical outcomes using a difference-in-differences study design. We computed multilevel regressions to evaluate whether significant increase in emergency cases had an effect on surgical mortality, complications and length of stay. Clustering effect of patients within hospitals was integrated in analysis and surgical outcomes were adjusted for both patient and hospital characteristics. Results A total of 381 hospitals had 559,052 inpatient stays related to emergency open surgery over 3 years. Compared to other geographical areas, a significant peak of activity was noted during winter in mountainous hospitals (Alps, Pyrenees, Vosges), ranging 6-77% volume increase. Peak was mainly explained by tourists’ influx (+124.5%, 4,351/3,496) and increased need for orthopaedic procedures (+36.8%, 4,731/12,873). After controlling for potential confounders, patients did not experience increased risk for postoperative death (ratio of OR 1.01, 95%CI 0.89-1.14, p = 0.891), thromboembolism (0.95, 0.77-1.17, p = 0.621) or sepsis (0.98, 0.85-1.12, p = 0.748). Length of stay was unaltered (1.00, 0.99-1.02, p = 0.716). Conclusion Surgical outcomes are not compromised during winter in French mountain areas despite a substantial influx of major emergencies. PMID:25970625

  9. Army Aviation -- Back to Its Roots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-03

    2 Ibid., 5 – 11, and Richard P. Weinert , Jr., A History of Army Aviation – 1950-1962 (Fort Monroe, VA: U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, 1991...Doctrine, 75 – 76. 9 Richard P. Weinert , Jr., A History of Army Aviation – 1950-1962 (Fort Monroe, VA: U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, 1991

  10. 78 FR 18473 - Army Privacy Act Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 505 Army Privacy Act Program AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... Litigation Division when complaints citing the Privacy Act are filed in order to correct the mailing address in Sec. 505.12. The address for notifying the Army Litigation Division of cases citing the...

  11. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), apparently showing west side of building 732. In 1921, buildings 732 and 733 were combined and it is assumed that this photograph, which was taken after 1921, shows the section added to make buildings 732 and 733 once continuous building. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Radiology in World War II (Medical Department, United States Army)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-01-01

    Improvised serialograph for gastric radiography ------------------------- 388 141 Army field unit adapted for examination of paranasal sinuses ...paranasal sinuses . 7. A cradle (fig. 32), to suspend the head of the patient beneath a cassette, so that roentgenography could be accomplished with the X-ray...was regarded as conservative. At many hospitals, it was the practice to make multiple exposures on single films, particularly in X-raying the sinuses

  13. [SURGICAL HAND WASHING: HANDSCRUBBING OR HANDRUBBING].

    PubMed

    Santacatalina Mas, Roser; Peix Sagues, Ma Teresa; Miranda Salmerón, Josep; Claramunt Jofre, Marta; López López, Alba; Salas Marco, Elena

    2016-02-01

    The importance of protocols for preoperative antisepsis of the hands is given by the risk of transferring bacteria from the hands of the surgical team to the patient during surgery and it is relationship with infection of surgical wound site (SSI). Careful surgical scrub reduces the number of bacteria on the skin, but does not eliminate them completely, remaining transient microorganisms on hands after the surgical scrub. There fore if micropuncture in surgical gloves occurs, the correct preoperative preparation of hands and double gloving will be essential to reduce the risk of bacterial transmission to patients. The protocols for surgical hand antisepsis are two: Surgical scrub with antiseptic soap (hand scrubbing). Surgical scrub by rubbing alcohol (handrubbing). The hand antisepsis by rubbing with an alcohol solution has proved to be significantly more effective compared to soap solutions. We must also see that in surgical hand antisepsis with soap, you must rinse them with water. And often hospitals' taps and keys are contaminated by Pseudomonas spp., including P. aeuinosa.

  14. Medicare Program: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; Organ Procurement Organization Reporting and Communication; Transplant Outcome Measures and Documentation Requirements; Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs; Payment to Nonexcepted Off-Campus Provider-Based Department of a Hospital; Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program; Establishment of Payment Rates Under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule for Nonexcepted Items and Services Furnished by an Off-Campus Provider-Based Department of a Hospital. Final rule with comment period and interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2016-11-14

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2017 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program and the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program. Further, in this final rule with comment period, we are making changes to tolerance thresholds for clinical outcomes for solid organ transplant programs; to Organ Procurement Organizations (OPOs) definitions, outcome measures, and organ transport documentation; and to the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record Incentive Programs. We also are removing the HCAHPS Pain Management dimension from the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program. In addition, we are implementing section 603 of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 relating to payment for certain items and services furnished by certain off-campus provider-based departments of a provider. In this document, we also are issuing an interim final rule with comment period to establish the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule payment rates for the nonexcepted items and services billed by a nonexcepted off-campus provider-based department of a hospital in accordance with the provisions of section 603.

  15. Infection prevention: the surgical care continuum.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Sue

    2015-05-01

    Lack of careful attention to the increasing complexity of surgical procedures, instrument cleaning and processing, and the transition of surgical and other invasive procedures from the OR to areas outside the traditional hospital OR can contribute to surgical site infection (SSI) risk. Regardless of the location of an intervention, when basic infection prevention measures are applied reliably, even low infection rates can be reduced. To address infection prevention challenges, infection preventionists (IPs) must be well informed regarding infection risk and prevention during surgical and other invasive procedures and the effect a facility type may have on patients' infection risk. The IP must have a solid understanding of surgical asepsis, instrument disinfection, and sterilization to educate and support clinical teams in identifying opportunities for improvement relative to infection prevention.

  16. Retained Surgical Foreign Bodies after Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zejnullahu, Valon A.; Bicaj, Besnik X.; Zejnullahu, Vjosa A.; Hamza, Astrit R.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of retained surgical bodies (RSB) after surgery is an issue for surgeons, hospitals and the entire medical team. They have potentially harmful consequences for the patient as they can be life threatening and usually, a further operation is necessary. The incidence of RSB is between 0.3 to 1.0 per 1,000 abdominal operations, and they occur due to a lack of organisation and communication between surgical staff during the process. Typically, the RSB are surgical sponges and instruments located in the abdomen, retroperitoneum and pelvis. PMID:28293325

  17. Transformation of the Army Depot Maintenance System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-28

    three, Internet accessed 18 January 2007. 21 Colonel Fred L. Hart, Jr., USA (Ret.), “ Lean Manufacturing and the Army Industrial Base,” Army Logistician...Six Sigma Available at http://www.amc.army.mil/lean/index.aspx, Internet accessed 18 January 2007. 24 Colonel Fred L. Hart, Jr., USA (Ret.), “ Lean ... Manufacturing and the Army Industrial Base”, 6. 25 Institute of Land Warfare, Association of the United States Army, Torchbearer, National Security

  18. Personnel Service Support (PSS) in Army Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-20

    UNCLASSIFIED N ACN 73765 PERSONNEL SERVICE SUPPORT (PSS) IN ARMY MODELS FINAL REPORT DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY TRAINING...Analysis 4-7 A-6 10 Theater Strategic Operational (TSO) Depths B-3 11 Constructing Interval Scales from Ordinal Data E-4 vii GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS ACN Army...Control Number AI Artificial Intelligence AIDS Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome ALB Airland Battle AMSAA Army Materiel Systems Analysis Agency ANSI

  19. Uncommon surgical emergencies in neonatology.

    PubMed

    Angotti, R; Bulotta, A L; Ferrara, F; Molinaro, F; Cerchia, E; Meucci, D; Messina, M

    2014-12-30

    Objective. Over the past decade, multiple factors have changed the pattern of neonatal surgical emergencies. An increase in prenatal screenings and the development of neonatal tertiary care centres have changed the clinical approach to these kids. Materials and methods. Between 1995 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed 34 patients with diagnosis of uncommon rare neonatal surgical emergencies at our institute. We analyzed: sex, gestational age, weight at birth, primary pathology, prenatal diagnosis, associated anomalies, age and weight at surgery, clinical presentation, start of oral feeding and hospitalization. The follow-up was performed at 6,12, 24 and 36 months. Results. There were 21 male and 13 female. The gestational age ranged between 28 and 36 weeks. The weight at birth ranged between 700 and 1400 grams. Oral feeding was started between 4th and 10th postoperative day. The average hospitalization was about 70.47 days. To date, all patients have finished the followup. They are healthy. Conclusion. The outcome of the patients with uncommon surgical emergencies is different based on the etiology. Overall survival is generally good but is influenced by the associated anomalies.

  20. Transforming the Army Service Component Command to a Theater Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department...Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (215) 662-5606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional...2013 2. REPORT TYPE STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT .33 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Transforming the Army Service

  1. Micro-surgical endodontics.

    PubMed

    Eliyas, S; Vere, J; Ali, Z; Harris, I

    2014-02-01

    Non-surgical endodontic retreatment is the treatment of choice for endodontically treated teeth with recurrent or residual disease in the majority of cases. In some cases, surgical endodontic treatment is indicated. Successful micro-surgical endodontic treatment depends on the accuracy of diagnosis, appropriate case selection, the quality of the surgical skills, and the application of the most appropriate haemostatic agents and biomaterials. This article describes the armamentarium and technical procedures involved in performing micro-surgical endodontics to a high standard.

  2. Surgical innovation as sui generis surgical research.

    PubMed

    Lotz, Mianna

    2013-12-01

    Successful innovative 'leaps' in surgical technique have the potential to contribute exponentially to surgical advancement, and thereby to improved health outcomes for patients. Such innovative leaps often occur relatively spontaneously, without substantial forethought, planning, or preparation. This feature of surgical innovation raises special challenges for ensuring sufficient evaluation and regulatory oversight of new interventions that have not been the subject of controlled investigatory exploration and review. It is this feature in particular that makes early-stage surgical innovation especially resistant to classification as 'research', with all of the attendant methodological and ethical obligations--of planning, regulation, monitoring, reporting, and publication--associated with such a classification. This paper proposes conceptual and ethical grounds for a restricted definition according to which innovation in surgical technique is classified as a form of sui generis surgical 'research', where the explicit goal of adopting such a definition is to bring about needed improvements in knowledge transfer and thereby benefit current and future patients.

  3. Army Occupational Health and AEHA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    of the complex environmental and occupational health problems facing the Army today. As new areas of concern are surfaced, I am sure we will be tasked...Army concern for general control of occupational health hazards occurred in August of 1938 when the Chief of Ordnance requested medical care for its...radiation protection programs beyond the traditional concern for x-ray protection., The Health Physics Division was established and presently exists to

  4. US Army TARDEC: Robotics Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-25

    unclassified US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics 25 March 2010 Reference herein to any specific commercial...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Bernard... Robotics Industry Partnerships Academia PartnershipsGovernment Partnerships TRADOC Community Outreach • S&T Support to the RS-JPO • Develops and Fosters

  5. Immunity to Diphtheria and Tetanus in Army Personnel and Adult Civilians in Mashhad, Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Shokouh, Seyyed Javad; Mohammadi, Babak; Rajabi, Jalil; Mohammadian Roshan, Ghasem

    2017-03-24

    This study aimed to investigate serologic immunity to diphtheria and tetanus in army personnel and a sample population of adult civilians in Mashhad, Iran. Army personnel (n = 180) and civilians (n = 83) who presented at Mashhad army hospital participated in this study. Diphtheria and tetanus antitoxin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Approximately 77% and 94% of army personnel aged 18-34 years had at least basic protection against diphtheria (antitoxin level ≥0.1 IU/mL) and tetanus (antitoxin level >0.1 IU/mL), respectively. For civilians in this age group, the proportions were 76% for both diseases. Antitoxin levels waned with age. Thus, participants older than 50 years had lower immunity; this decrease in immunity was more pronounced for tetanus than for diphtheria in both army personnel and civilians. For both diseases, geometric mean antitoxin titers and the proportion of participants with at least basic protection were higher in subjects with a history of vaccination in the last 10 years (P < 0.001), higher in men than women, and in army personnel than civilians in each age group. Young army personnel and civilians (18-34 years old) had adequate immunity to diphtheria and tetanus. However, the large number of susceptible older adults (>50 years old) calls for improved booster vaccination protocols.

  6. Robotics In Manufacturing: Army View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, F. J.

    1983-05-01

    (Figure 1) This is an outline of my presentation today. The U. S. Army has a dual interest in the use of robots, namely: 1. As a substitute for or an extension of the soldier in the battlefield, and 2. in the factories that make Army materiel, or - as we call it -the the production base. The Production Base can again be divided into three separate segments, i.e., the Army owned and operated facilities or GOG6s, such as Rock Island and Watervliet arsenals, and not to be overlooked, the depot operations. There the Army manufactures gun tubes and other related parts for artillery weapons and repairs and overhauls them. A second category is the Army owned and contractor operated facilities or GOCOs,such as the ammunition plants, the tank plants at Lima, Ohio and Warren, Michigan and the Stratford Engine Plant in Connecticut where gas turbines for helicopter and the Abrams tank are manufactured. The last category covers the industrial base, that is those factories which are not only operated but also owned by the contractor himself also referred to as COCOs. You can see from this description that the Army is supported by a base which produces a diversified line of products. Therefore, the task of technology development and technology insertion is considerably more complex than what one encounters in the average U. S. Manufacturing organization.

  7. The use of artificial neural networks methodology in the assessment of "vulnerability" to heroin use among army corps soldiers: a preliminary study of 170 cases inside the Military Hospital of Legal Medicine of Verona.

    PubMed

    Speri, L; Schilirò, G; Bezzetto, A; Cifelli, G; De Battisti, L; Marchi, S; Modenese, M; Varalta, F; Consigliere, F

    1998-02-01

    This article describes a preliminary study of screening/diagnostic instruments for prediction for large-scale application in the military field at the Neuropsychiatric Department of the Military Hospital of Legal Medicine of Verona and for the prevention of self-destructive behaviors, particularly through the use of drugs. 170 subjects divided into three subsamples were examined. The first subsample was characterized by a strong tendency towards normalcy, the second by a strong tendency towards pathology, and the third by a great variety of expressions of psychological and social problems, which were not necessarily related to drug use. These subjects were administered a questionnaire designed according to Squashing Theory principles (Buscema, 1994a). Answers were processed by an Artificial Neural Network created by Semeion in Rome (Buscema, 1996) and were compared with a standard clinical psychiatric assessment report and with the results of psychodiagnostic tests. Results document ANNs' remarkable ability to recognize subjects with declared, in exordium and "at risk" pathological behaviors. Blind results on learning and trial samples show a very high predictive capacity (over 90%). A comparison with the examined subjects' clinical report and the results of the first follow-up also document very high agreements. The broad variation of answers obtained in the third subsample allows further methodological reflections on the contribution of Artificial Neural Networks and Squashing Theory to the study of deviance, for both sociologists and clinicians, and not only for those in the field of drug addiction.

  8. Guidelines for surgical procedures after liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Testa, G; Goldstein, R M; Toughanipour, A; Abbasoglu, O; Jeyarajah, R; Levy, M F; Husberg, B S; Gonwa, T A; Klintmalm, G B

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The first purpose of this study is to identify the types and incidences of surgical procedures in patients who have previously undergone liver transplantation, with particular focus on the complication rates and the lengths of hospital stay. The second purpose is to present the management guidelines for patients with liver transplants at the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative stages of surgical procedure. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The surgical literature on this issue is scant, and with the growing liver transplant patient population it is not unlikey for any surgery specialist to have to operate on a patient who has undergone liver transplantation. METHODS: A sample of 409 patients with available hospital records, with a minimum of a 2-year follow-up, and with telephone access for interviews was chosen. Type of surgery, time from the liver transplant, hospital stay, immunosuppressive regimen, and complications were recorded. RESULTS: A large proportion of patients (24.2%) underwent some type of surgical procedure 2 to 10 years after liver transplantation. The authors demonstrate that most of the elective procedures can be safely carried out without an increased incidence of complication and without longer hospital stay than the general population. Conversely, emergent procedures are plagued by a greater incidence of complications that not only affect the function of the liver graft but may risk the life of the patient. PMID:9563551

  9. 2013 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    half (53%) indicate they have been effective or very effective in helping to plan career development. Sixteen percent of civilian leaders...the Army Training Network (ATN), which they rate as effective at providing resources for planning and executing self-development (61%), unit...that responded to the 2013 CASAL approximated the Army civilian workforce with regard to gender and ethnic origin ( Office of the Assistant G-1 for

  10. Perfecting patient flow in the surgical setting.

    PubMed

    Amato-Vealey, Elaine J; Fountain, Patricia; Coppola, Deborah

    2012-07-01

    Reduced surgical efficiency and productivity, delayed patient discharges, and prolonged use of hospital resources are the results of an OR that is unable to move patients to the postanesthesia care unit or other patient units. A primary reason for perioperative patient flow delay is the lack of hospital beds to accommodate surgical patients, which consequently causes backups of patients currently in the surgical suite. In one facility, implementing Six Sigma methodology helped to improve OR patient flow by identifying ways that frontline staff members could work more intelligently and more efficiently, and with less stress to streamline workflow and eliminate redundancy and waste in ways that did not necessitate reducing the number of employees. The results were improved employee morale, job satisfaction and safety, and an enhanced patient experience.

  11. [The Main Military Hospital during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, I B; Kozakov, S P; Ovchinnikova, M B

    2010-04-01

    Was characterized activity of the Central Military Clinical Hospital by Burdenko N.N. during the Great Patriotic War. From the first days work of the hospital was reorganized in dependence of needs of war time. More then 50% of physicians went in army, leading specialists were established main surgeons and therapeutics of fronts and armies. During the war efforts of collective were aimed on the main purpose--return life and health to the biggest number of patients, and the hospital pulled off this mission. During the war were treated more then 74 000 of ill and wounded persons, 82% of them were returned in troops.

  12. Nutritional assessment of surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, C S; Stegman, M R

    1988-10-01

    In order to test the sensitivity and specificity of the East Orange Nutritional Screening Form (EONSF), nutritional assessments were performed on a random sample of 10% of general medical/surgical admissions at a large midwestern veteran's administration hospital. Patients were followed until discharge to determine if they met the standard criteria of additional nutritional support. The tool correctly identified patients at nutritional risk (sensitivity) 95% of the time and patients not at nutritional risk (specificity) 89% of the time. It proved to be an effective, low-cost tool for identifying patients at risk and for planning appropriate nutritional strategies.

  13. Surgical fusion in childhood spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Stanton, R P; Meehan, P; Lovell, W W

    1985-01-01

    Twenty cases of surgical fusion for spondylolisthesis were reviewed at the Scottish Rite Hospital (Atlanta, GA, U.S.A.) to determine whether a procedure other than a simple posterolateral fusion is necessary for most patients. The patients were treated postoperatively with pantaloon spica cast immobilization. The fusion rate was high (90%), and patient satisfaction was high. One patient developed neurologic loss postoperatively. Two patients' slips progressed greater than 10% before solid fusion occurred. Thus, bilateral posterolateral fusion, followed by pantaloon spica cast immobilization, is effective for patients with symptomatic spondylolisthesis or asymptomatic children with grade 3 or greater slips. Reduction was not performed in this series.

  14. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... organization, would require a specific Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license or Army Radiation... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the... revise its regulations concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires Non-Army...

  15. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... a specific Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license or Army Radiation Authorization (ARA). The... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the... regulation concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires non-Army agencies (including...

  16. Abortion - surgical - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000658.htm Abortion - surgical - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. You have had a surgical abortion. This is a procedure that ends pregnancy by ...

  17. British surgical aid to Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, N. A.; Barry, N. A.; Davies, A. K.

    1971-01-01

    The surgical commitment of No. 2 Field Hospital, R.A.M.C., during its stay in Jordan is presented. The majority of patients that were admitted had sustained war wounds, many of which were infected due to the delay in treatment. The difficulties encountered in their subsequent management are discussed. Special reference is made to the use of ketamine (Ketalar) and mafenide acetate (Sulphamylon) in the treatment of those burns cases under our care. It is the first time for many years that a British field hospital has been employed in an active rôle. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 8Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 2Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:5114910

  18. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  19. Surgical hand rubbing compared with surgical hand scrubbing: comparison of efficacy and costs.

    PubMed

    Tavolacci, M P; Pitrou, I; Merle, V; Haghighat, S; Thillard, D; Czernichow, P

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of surgical hand rubbing (SHR) with the efficacy of surgical hand scrubbing (SHS), and to determine the costs of both techniques for surgical hand disinfection. A review of studies reported in the literature that compared the efficacy of SHS and SHR was performed using MEDLINE. The costs of SHR and SHS were estimated based on standard hospital costs. The literature showed that SHR had immediate efficacy that was similar to that of SHS, but SHR had a more lasting effect. SHR reduced costs by 67%. In conclusion, SHR is a cost-effective alternative to SHS.

  20. [Hospital schools during the Russian-Turkish War 1735-1739].

    PubMed

    Karpenko, I V

    2012-09-01

    In 1733 besides the school before the Moscow hospital also three hospital schools were open before Saint-Petersburg terrestrial and admiralty hospitals and before the hospital in Kronshtadt. The process of transfer of students from schools to army was the most intensive during the military conflicts with that is rich Russian history in XVIII century. According to documents, presented in the article, during the Russian-Turkish War in 1735-1739 hospital schools worked active and discharged a task of recruiting of medical service of the Russian Army. The most important precondition was basis of military-medical education grounded by Peter at the beginning of XVIII century.

  1. Role of Gymnastics in the Army School of Physical Training

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, DE; Hargrove, R; Clasper, J

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION As a result of a single spinal injury seen at Frimley Park Hospital, we reviewed the injuries recorded at the Army School of Physical Training since December 1996. PATIENTS AND METHODS This was a retrospective review of all acute accidents and injuries recorded in the Accident Book since its inception. RESULTS Over 75% of the injuries that were serious enough to result in soldiers having their training terminated were as a direct result of gymnastic events such as vaulting, trampolining and somersaults. These events were also responsible for most of the small number of career-threatening injuries. CONCLUSIONS This raises questions about the inclusion of gymnastic events in course training programmes, especially when considering its relevance to army training in general. PMID:17002850

  2. Army Water Reuse Policy - A Decision Document

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    US Army Corps of Engineers® Engineer Research and Development Center Army Water Reuse Policy – A Decision Document Environment, Energy...AND SUBTITLE Army Water Reuse Policy - A Decision Document 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...regional requirements • Reuse /Recycling to play bigger component US Army Corps of Engineers® Engineer Research and Development Center Tasking • Are

  3. Reducing Hazardous Emissions at Anniston Army Depot

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    Emissions at Anniston Army Depot Mr. Jack Kelley, ARL Mr. Wayne Ziegler, ARL Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reducing Hazardous Emissions at Anniston Army Depot 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Anniston Army Depot  Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) performs depot level maintenance for combat tanks

  4. Army Aviation’s Role in USAFRICOM and United States Army Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-16

    Excellence (USAACE) to work with the Department of the Army (DA) on developing an aviation force structure that can meet the needs of USAFRICOM and...Army (DA) on developing an aviation force structure that can meet the needs of USAFRICOM and USARAF. ARMY AVIATION’S ROLE IN USAFRICOM AND...UNITED STATES ARMY AFRICA This paper examines the Army Aviation force structure necessary for supporting USAFRICOM and USARAF. The examination

  5. The Army National Guard Division Headquarters in the Army of 2020

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-26

    the RC to meet combatant commanders’ objectives. In response to the President’s refined national security strategy, the Army issued the 2013 Army...the nation’s ability to maintain a force structure at a lower cost capable of rapidly mobilizing to meet national security interests. World War I...THE ARMY NATIONAL GUARD DIVISION HEADQUARTERS IN THE ARMY OF 2020 A Monograph by Major Chris M. Mabis Army National

  6. Systemic Army Environmental Issues: Perspectives and Interpretations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    satisfy today’s RCRA or HSWA [ Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 19841 based information needs" (Butts, 1991). Another observer noted that the Army...Headquarters HQDA Headquarters. Department of the Army HSWA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 MACOM Major Command MCA Military Construction. Army MS

  7. Enhancing Army Joint Force Headquarters Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Ad hoc (Army) 2004–2005 MNSTC-I SSTR CENTCOM Ad hoc (Army) 2004-2005 JTF-G8/ DNC /RNC HD/CS NORTHCOM Ad hoc (Army) x 3 2004 JTF-515 SSTR PACOM 2004...AFIC = Armed Forces Inaugural Committee; CENTCOM = Central Command; DNC = Democratic National Committee; EUCOM = European Command; FSSG = Fleet

  8. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes broad... productive, meaningful way from the standpoint of environmental quality. (b) The Army will actively... involvement of the proponent in the NEPA process. (2) NEPA technical and awareness training, as...

  9. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes broad... productive, meaningful way from the standpoint of environmental quality. (b) The Army will actively... involvement of the proponent in the NEPA process. (2) NEPA technical and awareness training, as...

  10. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes broad... productive, meaningful way from the standpoint of environmental quality. (b) The Army will actively... involvement of the proponent in the NEPA process. (2) NEPA technical and awareness training, as...

  11. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes broad... productive, meaningful way from the standpoint of environmental quality. (b) The Army will actively... involvement of the proponent in the NEPA process. (2) NEPA technical and awareness training, as...

  12. The Evolution of Army Leader Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Developing Talent, (Carlisle Barracks, PA: U.S. Army War College, March 2010), 4-6...16 Casey Wardynski, David S. Lyle, Michael J. Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Employing Talent, (Carlisle

  13. Army Cyber Mission Force - Ambitions and Realities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    6 Recruiting Market ...Reference Publication AFSC Air Force Specialty Code AMRG Army Marketing Research Group AR Army Regulation ARCYBER U.S. Army Cyber Command BEAR Bonus...JAMRS Joint Advertising and Marketing Research Studies v JP Joint Publication MOS Military Occupation Specialty NCOES

  14. 76 FR 66282 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... CFR 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College....S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle... continued growth and development of the United States Army War College. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  15. U.S. Army Role in Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-12

    with space activities with the surrender of Dr. Wernher von Braun to the Seventh Army in 1945. Wernher von Braun and German rocket scientists and...technicians formed the nucleus of the Army team to build the first US rocket in 1953.22 Wernher von Braun led the Army’s development of the nation’s first

  16. The Army Ethic-Inchoate but Sufficient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    AE Army Ethic AEWP Army Ethic White Paper CAPE Center for the Army Profession and Ethic UCMJ Uniform Code of Military Justice U.S. United States...... justice and mercy (Kem 2006, 26). An ethical decisionmaking model helps differentiate between actual and apparent ethical dilemmas. Kem proposes a

  17. Trust: Implications for the Army Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    soldiers to get out,” Army Times (23 May 2011), 16-17; Michelle Tan and John Gould . Toxic Leadership: Army wants to rid top ranks of toxic leaders. Army...US Federal News Service (Wash- ington, DC: HT Media Ltd, 2011). 44. Poppo and Schepker, 132. 45. See intro, in Charles D. Allen and Stephen J. Gerras

  18. Surgical Lasers In Gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellhas, Helmut F.; Barnes, Alfonso E.

    1982-12-01

    Multipurpose surgical CO2 lasers marketed in the USA have been developed to be applicable to a variety of surgical procedures in many surgical fields. They are all suited for endoscopic surgical procedures and can be fitted to all standard surgical microscopes. They all can adjust the focal length of the laser beam to the different standard focal lengths of the surgical microscope which for instance in laryngoscopy is 400 mm and in colposcopy 300 mm. One laser instrument can even change the spot size in a given focal distance which is very advantageous for some microsurgical procedures (Merrimack Laboratories 820). All multipurpose surgical CO2 laser systems provide a multi-articulated surgical arm for free-hand surgery. The surgical arms are cumbersome to use but they are adapted to the surgeons needs with ingenuity. The practicality of the multi-articulated surgical arms depends mostly on the distance of the handpiece from the surgical console which now is also overbridged by the laser tube in most surgical laser system. The spot size of the beam is variable in most handpieces by interchangeable lenses which modify the focal distance of the beam and the power density. Another common feature in all systems is a coaxial He-Ne pilot light which provides a red spot which unfortunately becomes invisible in a bleeding surgical field. Most surgical laser systems have a spacial mode of TEM 00 which is essential for incisional surgery. The continuous mode of beam delivery is used for incisional surgery and also for most endoscopic procedures.

  19. Systems Thinking in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    September 2011) Systems Thinking in the Army Presented by: MG. Nick Justice Commanding General RDECOM Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Systems Thinking in the Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...18 Why do  Systems   Thinking ?  Systems   Thinking : Outside the Box  Desired Capability: Space explora?on will require a wri?ng  implement that is

  20. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  1. [Surgical management of animal bites in children].

    PubMed

    Touzet-Roumazeille, S; Jayyosi, L; Plenier, Y; Guyot, E; Guillard, T; François, C

    2016-10-01

    Children represent a population at risk, because of their short size, their naivety and their attraction to animals. The face and hands are the most specific locations in young children. Wounds are often multiple. In more than half the cases, the child knows the animal, which are dogs and cats by frequency argument. The bite episode occurs mostly when the child is alone with the pet without direct supervision, while playing or stroking the animal. As in all bites, pediatric lesions are infectious, functional and aesthetic emergencies, but the goal of this work was primarily to make a point on principles of surgical management of animal bites in children, highlighting pediatric specificities. Animal bites require psychological, anesthetic and surgical treatment, adapted to the child, in a specialized structure. Hospitalization and general anesthesia are more frequent in children. Any suspicion of mistreatment (and/or abuse) should lead to the child's hospitalization, even if wounds do not justify monitoring in a surgical environment. Emergency surgery is essential to limit functional and aesthetic consequences. The healing capacities of the child and the frequent lack of co-morbidity allow a conservative surgical treatment with suture, repositioning skin flaps and controlled healing in the first place. Immobilization, drainage, and antibiotics will complete the surgery. The healing process, however, leads to a specific management during scar remodeling phase and growth. Psychological care of the child and parents should not be forgotten, and has to start at the same time as surgical treatment at in acute phase.

  2. Management: Army Management of the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    M 3. IRAC a. FAS b. SPS c. TSC d. ING M M M M M —- —- M M M 4. US BR National Committee M —- 5. US BR Study Groups (US BR SGs) a. SG-1 (Spectrum...management requirements in Army Sys- tems Acquisition Review Councils per AR 15-14. r. Provide the Army member to the IRAC and direct Army par...ticipation in IRAC activities. s. Provide the Army member to the Radio Communications Bu- reau (BR) and direct Army participation in BR study groups. t

  3. Total Quality Management in Health Care - A Study on TQM Implementation and its Application to the Army Health Care System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    Quality Management in a 300- Bed Community Hospital : The Quality Improvement Process Translated to Health Care." QMB, September 1992, pp. 293-300. Hume...get a irnzmogram. She called the Army Community Hospital for assistance. After several telephone calls, she was directed to the Radiology Department...assisted her in having her marmogram done under an external partnership agreement in the local civilian hospital . Within two weeks, Mrs. Smith was

  4. Prevalence and Characteristics of Surgical Site Infections Caused by Gram-negative Rod-shaped Bacteria from the Family Enterobacteriacae and Gram-positive Cocci from the Genus Staphylococcus in Patients who Underwent Surgical Procedures on Selected Surgical Wards.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska-Kowalska, Małgorzata; Kołomecki, Krzysztof; Wieloch-Torzecka, Maria

    2016-10-01

    Surgical site infections on surgical wards are the most common cause of postoperative complications. Prevalence of surgical site infections depends on the surgical specialization. Analysis of the causes of surgical site infections allows to conclude that microorganisms from the patient's own microbiota - Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria from the family Enterobacteriacae and from the patient's skin microbiota - Gram-positive cocci - Staphylococcus are the most common agents inducing surgical site infections. The aim of the study was to assess prevalence and characteristics of surgical site infections caused by Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria from the family Eneterobacteriacae and Gram-positive cocci from the genus Staphylococcus in patients who underwent surgical procedures at the Regional Specialist Hospital named after M. Copernika in Łódź on selected surgical wards.

  5. [The army of the East and health services].

    PubMed

    Guivarc'h, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    A medical disaster due to the failure of a plan intended to free Belfort by an army of 90 000 men, formed by Bourbaki in Nevers, joined in Besancon by 40 000 men from Lyon and from Dijon. Envisaged in three days, the regrouping lasts three weeks. A gigantic railway blocking, by an icy cold, leaves in the trains of the soldiers without food, of the horses without irons nor fodder. A third of manpower is from the start inapt for the fights. The utter exhaustion of the men don't make possible to exploit the success of Villersexel's battle (January 9), nor to cross Lizaine. The medical army officers joined those of the civil ambulances formed in South-east, and that of Pamard. The care given with delay on the covered with snow ground, in precarious shelters or encumbered hospitals, is summary. Cold, gelures, walk feet, infection, associated variola, are the cause of a high mortality: 8 500 died, and much of casualties. Ordered by Bourbaki, the dramatic routed to Switzerland by Pontarlier and the Cluse collar, under the Prussian shells will add 15 000 killed. The Swiss ones collect sick and wounded in 200 ambulances along the border, and on 87 000 men to be disarmed in 9 000 hospitalize. Pamard will remain until March 18 at the Pontarlier' hospital.

  6. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of…

  7. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-18

    agreements throughout DoD DARPA, JIEDDO, DHS, FAA, DoE, NSA , NASA, SMDC, etc. Strategic Partnerships Benefit the Army Materiel Enterprise External... Neuroscience Network Sciences Hierarchical Computing Extreme Energy Science Autonomous Systems Technology Emerging Sciences Meso-scale (grain...scales • Improvements in Soldier-system overall performance → operational neuroscience and advanced simulation and training technologies

  8. Army Environmental Cleanup Strategic Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Serves an enduring document to guide future strategic plans – Establishes ISO 14001 framework for cleanup; complies w/GPRA  Army Environmental...follow ISO 14001 – Plan - Complete the FY10-11 Strategic Plan – Do - Implement Activities According to the Plan – Check - Evaluate Progress Against the

  9. The Army Learning Organisation Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge Management DALO DSTO Army Learning Organisation DASS Defence Assisted Study Scheme DLOQ Dimensions of a Learning Organisation Questionnaire...realised. Facilitation was provided through external (academic/subject matter expert) and internal (DALO Research Team) providers. The external...being an organisational archetype characterised by the existence of certain internal conditions and proclivities which facilitate learning at

  10. Army Forces for Homeland Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Overview,” slide presentation at the RAND Corporation, Arlington, Va., June 19, 2002. Feiler , Jeremy, “National Guard Association: Governors Should...Challenge,” Carlisle, Pa.: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, 2001. Pirnie, Bruce R., and Corazon M. Francisco, Assessing Requirements for

  11. The Army Profession: A Narrative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-23

    improving or reinforcing discipline within the Army. Organizational theorist, Valerie Fournier described a theory of professionalization in which an...Valerie Fournier described a theory of professionalization in which an organization’s leaders could use the concept of a profession to inculcate...Anthropology 25, no. 1 (1996): 22. 5 organizational culture. Valerie Fournier documented business

  12. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Curricula Membership + Members Join APSA Careers Surgical Practice Management In Memoriam About APSA + APSA Mission Awards APSA Leadership Committees Alliances APSA Foundation Third-Party Advertising Disclaimer ...

  13. Incontinence Treatment: Surgical Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms of Incontinence Diarrhea Treatment Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel Management Biofeedback Surgical Treatments Newer Treatment Options Tips on Finding a Doctor ...

  14. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). In that book, this photograph appears for building 706 was renumbered 353 and subsequently 202. The building in the photograph resembles building 204 more than it does building 202, but all Fitzsimons Real Property records indicate that the building in the photograph, showing west side, is early photograph of building 202. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Garage, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue, & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. A Cost Analysis of Recapturing Selected CHAMPUS Workload at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    remote military posts . The language of this act was quite vague and came to be considered as authorization for care of both dependents and retirees on a...chart on the following page graphically indicates the occupancy rate differences. 44 BED OCUPANCY RATE AT FITZSIMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER ILLUSTRATING...overcome additional nursing staff would be needed on the wards to care for the increased number of post -surgical patients. The following chart indicates

  16. Quality of surgical care and readmission in elderly glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Nuño, Miriam; Ly, Diana; Mukherjee, Debraj; Ortega, Alicia; Black, Keith L.; Patil, Chirag G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Thirty-day readmissions post medical or surgical discharge have been analyzed extensively. Studies have shown that complex interactions of multiple factors are responsible for these hospitalizations. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Medicare database of newly diagnosed elderly glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients who underwent surgical resection between 1991 and 2007. Hospitals were classified into high- or low-readmission rate cohorts using a risk-adjusted methodology. Bivariate comparisons of outcomes were conducted. Multivariate analysis evaluated differences in quality of care according to hospital readmission rates. Results A total of 1,273 patients underwent surgery in 338 hospitals; 523 patients were treated in 228 high-readmission hospitals and 750 in 110 low-readmission hospitals. Patient characteristics for high-versus low-readmission hospitals were compared. In a confounder-adjusted model, patients treated in high- versus low-readmission hospitals had similar outcomes. The hazard of mortality for patients treated at high- compared to low-readmission hospitals was 1.06 (95% CI, 0.095%–1.19%). While overall complications were comparable between high- and low-readmission hospitals (16.3% vs 14.3%; P = .33), more postoperative pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis complications were documented in patients treated at high-readmission hospitals (7.5% vs 4.1%; P = .01). Adverse events and levels of resection achieved during surgery were comparable at high- and low-readmission hospitals. Conclusions For patients undergoing GBM resection, quality of care provided by hospitals with the highest adjusted readmission rates was similar to the care delivered by hospitals with the lowest rates. These findings provide evidence against the preconceived notion that 30-day readmissions can be used as a metric for quality of surgical and postsurgical care. PMID:26034614

  17. Antidepressants in the general hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Gelenberg, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    An approach to the use of antidepressant medication in the general hospital is presented. The type of depression most likely to respond to chemotherapy is described, categories of available antidepressant agents are discussed, and relevant pharmacologic aspects are outlined. This paper suggests clinical guidelines for the use of these drugs, particularly in medical and surgical patients. PMID:455184

  18. Thematic Analysis of Spouse Comments: Annual Survey of Army Families, 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    don’t care about you" (0130) "Prices are too high at the commissary" (0710) "We need more programs for teenagers at this post" (1420) "The Army should...very difficult is leaving what has been our home for 3 or 4 years to start all over again. (E5’s spouse) "I enjoy the Army way of lif!. The most...22+ years ’ experience working in hospitals myself and I know whereof I speak." (04’s spouse) Military as an Organization (805) 96/ 4 % This category

  19. 78 FR 24735 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting: Thursday... standards so the Army can provide credible, rigorous, and relevant training and education for its force...

  20. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting... following address: Army Education Advisory Committee, Designated Federal Officer, Attn: ATTG-OPS-EI...

  1. A Marketing Assessment of Beneficiaries at Kimbrough Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    L8(2), 58-66. Kotler , P ., & Clarke, R. N. (1987). Marketing for Health Care Organizations. Englewood-Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall. McDevitt, P . K...environment, organizational goal formulation, strategy formulation, Marketing Assessment 10 organization and systems design ( Kotler , 1987). Second...environmental analysis itself is concerned with identifying marketing opportunities, threats, environmental trends and their implications ( Kotler , 1987

  2. A Visitor Control Policy for Martin Army Hospital,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-05

    o:,en back safety pin Cost: $130.00 per thousand $130.00 3.50 per background :dolor 31.50 change x 9 Total: $161.50 Badge Number 2 = ID card type...Plastic pouch safety pin back Cost: 17¢ per 1,000 $ 170.00 Card Insert = 3 x 5 card x 1,000 8.50 :otal: $ 178.50 35 5

  3. A Menu Planning Guide for Large Army Hospitals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-01-01

    enced by "the physiologic, psychologic , biochemical, social, educational, and sensory reactions of individuals who move in a framework of race, religion...liked the idea. In general the five-meal plai, consists of a continental breakfast, brunch , dinner, and an afternoon and bedtime snack. Advantages...food because of additional preparation time available between the two main meals ( brunch and dinner), and more than 20 per cent reduction in

  4. Optimize the Patient Appointment System: At Dewitt Army Community Hospital.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-15

    endometriosus, ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids, pelvic relaxation, consultation for any gynecologic surgery (to include bilateral tubal ligation ) and infertility...education classes meet the 2nd Monday of each month (alternate Mondays will be posted in advance). This is on a consult basis and is scheduled by the...be accommodated. Patients may receive counseling on contraception,preconceptual counseling, health promotion, premenstrual syndrome , menopause, STD

  5. 2009 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Behavioral Trust Inventory ( BTI ; Gillespie, 2003) were used to assess superior, peer, and subordinate trust among Army civilians:  23% of civilians...of senior leaders (GO and SES level) in the ATLDP study reported that from their vantage point supervisors and managers resist supporting leader

  6. Surgical ethics and the challenge of surgical innovation.

    PubMed

    Angelos, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Surgical ethics as a specific discipline is relatively new to many. Surgical ethics focuses on the ethical issues that are particularly important to the care of surgical patients. Informed consent for surgical procedures, the level of responsibility that surgeons feel for their patients' outcomes, and the management of surgical innovation are specific issues that are important in surgical ethics and are different from other areas of medicine. The future of surgical progress is dependent on surgical innovation, yet the nature of surgical innovation raises specific concerns that challenge the professionalism of surgeons. These concerns will be considered in the following pages.

  7. Use of a Surgical Safety Checklist to Improve Team Communication.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Richard A; Eggenberger, Terry; Keller, Kathryn; Gallison, Barry S; Newman, David

    2016-09-01

    To improve surgical team communication, a team at Broward Health Imperial Point Hospital, Ft Lauderdale, Florida, implemented a program for process improvement using a locally adapted World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist. This program included a standardized, comprehensive time out and a briefing/debriefing process. Postimplementation responses to the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire revealed a significant increase in the surgical team's perception of communication compared with that reported on the pretest (6% improvement resulting in t79 = -1.72, P < .05, d = 0.39). Perceptions of communication increased significantly for nurses (12% increase, P = .002), although the increase for surgeons and surgical technologists was lower (4% for surgeons, P = .15 and 2.3% for surgical technologists, P = .06). As a result of this program, we have observed improved surgical teamwork behaviors and an enhanced culture of safety in the OR.

  8. Surgical Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This surgical technology program guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a surgical technology program. The program guide is designed to relate primarily to the development of those skills needed by individuals in the field to provide services in the…

  9. Utilization Management of Orthopedic Services by Fitzsimons Army Medical Center and Evans Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    Nerve & Other Nerve System Proc w CC 1 2.72 2.0 -10.0 -10 209 Major Joint & Limb reattachment Procedures, lower Extremity 18 2.37 13.6 3.6 65 216...106 3.0 1.0 108 209 Major Joint & Limb Reattachment Procedures Lower Extremity 101 20.9 10.9 1105 243 Medica. Back Problems 65 9.0 4.0 261 231 Local...231 Local Excision & Removal of Int. Fix Devices exc Hip & Femur 74 4.6 0.6 41 209 Major Joint & Limb Reattachment Procedures Lower Extremity 70 22.3

  10. [Surgical site infection: clinical and microbiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Sikora, Agnieszka; Kozioł-Montewska, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is one of the most common and serious postoperative complication of modern surgery. It contributes to an increase of morbidity, mortality, prolonged hospitalization and costs of treatment. The optimal strategy in order to reduce wound infections in surgery is SSI knowledge of risk factors associated with a patient, surgery and postoperative care as well as the caution of fundamental recommendations concerning prevention, which include: preparation of patient for surgery, preparation of antiseptic principles for hand skin of the operation team, the proceedings in the case of allegation of infection or colonization within the operation team members, preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis, procedures and aspects of aseptic surgical technique, postoperative care and the rules for monitoring infections in the surgical ward.

  11. The Role of the US Army Reserve in Support of the US Army Force 2025 and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    37 United States Army Reserve 2020 Vision and Strategy...States Army Reserve Vision and Strategy 2020 , Future Force Structure Guidance, Army F2025B Concept-Strategy submission, The US Army Operating Concept...2015 National Security Strategy, (NSS) published by the President of the United States, The United States Army Reserve Vision and Strategy 2020

  12. Utilization of Facilities of a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    McCorkle, Lois P.

    1966-01-01

    The lengths of hospital stay among adult inpatients discharged during 1962 from the medical and surgical specialty departments of a large urban university-affiliated general hospital have been examined. Data are shown comparing the durations of hospitalization of patients who had a private physician directly responsible for their hospital care (private patients) and of those who did not (staff patients). The relation between the lengths of stay of private patients and those of staff patients varied considerably from one hospital department to another. On the medical services, staff patients had longer hospital stays than did private patients, a discrepancy that could not be accounted for by differences between the two groups in age, race, sex, or source of payment for hospitalization and it is being studied further. A major cause of the apparent difference in lengths of hospitalization between private and staff surgical patients proved to be inconsistencies in the criteria used to define the terms “hospital admission” and “inpatient” among various patient groups. Some of the possible effects of variations in the definition of these terms and of the terms “medical patients” and “surgical patients” in hospital-use studies are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:5915337

  13. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Appendectomy by Surgical Trainees

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Sang Gyun; Sohn, Hee Joo; Kim, Beom Gyu; Park, Joong-Min; Choi, Yoo-Shin; Park, Yong Keum

    2016-01-01

    Background: Single-incision laparoscopic appendectomy (SILA) is one of the most commonly performed single port surgeries in the world. However, there are few publications documenting a young resident’s experience. The purpose of this study is to investigate clinical outcomes of SILA performed by a surgical trainee and to evaluate its feasibility and safety compared with conventional three-port laparoscopic appendectomy (TPLA) when performed by a surgical trainee and SILA by surgical staff. Methods: Between September 2014 and August 2015, clinical data were retrospectively collected for SILA and TPLA cases performed at Chung-Ang University Hospital. Three surgical residents who have assisted at least 50 cases of TPLA and 30 cases of SILA performed by gastrointestinal surgery specialists performed the surgeries. The indication of SILA by surgical trainees was noncomplicated appendicitis with no comorbidity. Results: In total, 47 patients underwent SILA by surgical residents, 98 patients underwent TPLA by surgical residents and 137 patients underwent SILA by surgical staff. In comparing SILA and TPLA performed by surgical residents, the mean age was younger (26 vs. 41 y, P<0.005) in the SILA group, the operative time (47.2 vs. 61.5 min, P<0.010) and hospital stay (2.3 vs. 2.7 d, P=0.003) were shorter in SILA group. In the SILA group, 2 cases of postoperative fluid collection (5.7%) occurred, necessitating antibiotic treatment. In TPLA group, 1 postoperative abscess occurred, requiring drainage. When comparing SILA performed by surgical residents and SILA performed by surgical staff, there were no significant differences in operation time, and postoperative complications. Conclusion: Surgical residents safely performed SILA with good postoperative outcomes after short learning curve. PMID:27846185

  14. Standardised metrics for global surgical surveillance.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Thomas G; Makary, Martin A; Haynes, Alex B; Dziekan, Gerald; Berry, William R; Gawande, Atul A

    2009-09-26

    Public health surveillance relies on standardised metrics to evaluate disease burden and health system performance. Such metrics have not been developed for surgical services despite increasing volume, substantial cost, and high rates of death and disability associated with surgery. The Safe Surgery Saves Lives initiative of WHO's Patient Safety Programme has developed standardised public health metrics for surgical care that are applicable worldwide. We assembled an international panel of experts to develop and define metrics for measuring the magnitude and effect of surgical care in a population, while taking into account economic feasibility and practicability. This panel recommended six measures for assessing surgical services at a national level: number of operating rooms, number of operations, number of accredited surgeons, number of accredited anaesthesia professionals, day-of-surgery death ratio, and postoperative in-hospital death ratio. We assessed the feasibility of gathering such statistics at eight diverse hospitals in eight countries and incorporated them into the WHO Guidelines for Safe Surgery, in which methods for data collection, analysis, and reporting are outlined.

  15. Energy Surveys of Army Hospitals, Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Darnall Army Community Hospital, Fort Hood, Texas. Executive Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    det4tied laytecigact@o of thet fee1lricea~ opr.agcira, its thlrotment and its eqsipsebt.- Tht analysis $Nall us,* *o0eputet Wd41148. Ci.. poter ...I U I I I I 0 I I I I I I I. ’..- . U I MOM\\lE "b" Darnall US Arry A \\sptta! Fo•rt Nood, TX 1. Central IDettp~tio": 3na. The work to be &ccospli.shd

  16. Strategic Mobility, The Force Proejction Army, and the Ottawa Landmine Treaty: Can the Army Get There?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Accessed 27 October 2000. This theme was reiterated in the fiscal year 2001 Army Posture Statement. 70 Louis Caldera and Eric K. Shinseki, A Statement on the...Operations, III-21. 87 Ibid., III-4. 88 Louis Caldera and Eric K. Shinseki, A Statement on the Posture of the United States Army Fiscal Year 2001...October 2000. 50 Caldera , Louis and Eric K. Shinseki. A Statement on the Posture of the United States Army Fiscal Year 2001, (http://www.army.mil/aps

  17. Inventory management of reusable surgical supplies.

    PubMed

    Diamant, Adam; Milner, Joseph; Quereshy, Fayez; Xu, Bo

    2017-03-08

    We investigate the inventory management practices for reusable surgical instruments that must be sterilized between uses. We study a hospital that outsources their sterilization services and model the inventory process as a discrete-time Markov chain. We present two base-stock inventory models, one that considers stockout-based substitution and one that does not. We derive the optimal base-stock level for the number of reusable instruments to hold in inventory, the expected service level, and investigate the implied cost of a stockout. We apply our theoretical results to a dataset collected from a surgical unit at a large tertiary care hospital specializing in colorectal operations. We demonstrate how to implement our model when determining base-stock levels for future capacity expansion and when considering alternative stockout protocols. Our analysis suggests that the hospital can reduce the number of reusable instrument sets held in inventory if on-site sterilization techniques (e.g., flash sterilization) are employed. Our results will guide future procurement decisions for surgical units based on costs and desired service levels.

  18. Incidence, etiology, and antibiotic resistance patterns of gram-negative microorganisms isolated from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia in a medical-surgical intensive care unit of a teaching hospital in istanbul, Turkey (2004-2006).

    PubMed

    Erdem, Ilknur; Ozgultekin, Asu; Inan, Asuman Sengoz; Dincer, Emine; Turan, Guldem; Ceran, Nurgul; Ozturk Engin, Derya; Senbayrak Akcay, Seniha; Akgun, Nur; Goktas, Pasa

    2008-09-01

    The identification of microorganisms causing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is important for formulating appropriate therapies. In this study, we report the incidence, etiology, and antibiotic resistance patterns of Gram-negative microorganisms isolated from patients diagnosed with VAP in our medical-surgical intensive care unit (ICU) during the years 2004-2006. VAP was diagnosed by using the clinical criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated microorganisms were defined by standard methods. The VAP incidence rate was 22.6/1,000 ventilator days. The most frequently isolated pathogens were Acinetobacter spp., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ninety percent of Acinetobacter spp. isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, 64% to imipenem, and 80% to ciprofloxacin. Fifty-nine percent of P. aeruginosa isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, 32% to imipenem, and 62% to ciprofloxacin. Cefoperazone-sulbactam was the most active agent against Acinetobacter spp. In conclusion, the incidence of VAP and the prevalence of multidrug-resistant microorganisms are quite high in our ICU. Comparison of the resistance rates of isolates demonstrates that certain antibiotic agents are more effective than others.

  19. ETL wins Army Lab Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Army Engineer Topographic Laboratories (ETL), located in Fort Belvoir, Va., was awarded the 1981 Department of the Army Most Improved Laboratory of the Year Award for ETL's scientific and technical achievements in mapping, military geographic information, and geographic intelligence systems.ETL, the largest topographic research and development organization of its kind in the world, specializes in mapping, geodesy, point positioning, and military geographic information. ETL addresses the full range of development from basic research to a final product in the topographic sciences. In addition, scientists at the laboratory have interpreted feedback from satellites, such as Landsat, to help pinpoint and improve ecological imbalance in some areas. ETL engineers are developing electronic systems to measure dams, while other ETL staff members are designing a pseudo-radar system for the Pershing II missile.

  20. [The Central Military Hospital of the People's Commissariat for Defence during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Simonenko, V B; Abashin, V G; Polovinka, V S

    2014-05-01

    The article is devoted to activity of the Central Military Hospital of the People's Commissariat for Defence during the Great Patriotic War. The research is based on declassified orders of PCD and orders of the chef of hospital. Authors presented the role of the hospital in organization of medical aid for officers of PCD, members of their families, Red Army soldiers, junior and senior Red Army commanders; the role of the hospital in organization of medical facilities for combat army; medical supply for evacuation of family members of PCD's officers ( en route and in evacuation places); delivery of child health care to children of officers of PCD in the hospital and education in kindergartens of PCD.

  1. U.S. Army Social Media Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    The Army recognizes that social media has the ability to communicate with larger audiences faster and in new ways. It has become an important tool...for Army messaging and outreach. The Army uses a variety of social media platforms designed to support a range of media from text, audio, pictures and... social media and has worked hard to develop training to help Soldiers and family members use social media responsibly.

  2. Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction among Army Chaplains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-20

    or 20 MAY 1976 STUDY ’ PROJECT FACTORS INFLUENCING JOB SATISFACTION AMONG ARMY CHAPLAINS BY CHAPLAIN(COLONEL) KERMIT D. JOHNSON US ARMY WAR...job •atUfaction among US kxmy chaplain« it b«aad CO • mail aurvay raaponao of 998 chap Ulna out of 1411 in tha Army chaplaincy. Factors which...chaplaincy, and cosseand. Certain professional Irritants were singled out. By means of demographic information, comparisons were made as to how

  3. Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-28

    Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) AWCF Army Working Capital Fund CIP Construction-in-Progress DCD/ DCW DFAS...Warehouse (DCD/ DCW ). The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) (ASA[FM&C]) is responsible for the policies, procedures...entity’s information to automatically populate that indicator. As a result, IFS did not send DCD/ DCW correct information for determining the

  4. Army Engineers at Pearl Harbor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    the Honolulu Engi- neer District, then part of the South Pacific Division. Colonel Albert K.B. Lyman , a native Hawaiian who later attained the rank...aircraft dis- persal at Wheeler Field. On the civil side, Lieutenant Colonel Theodore Wyman, the Honolulu District Engineer, had offices employing 10...Army Engineers at Pearl Harbor Past in Review Native Hawaiian Colonel Albert K.B. Lyman , the Army’s Ha- waiian Department engineer during the attack

  5. Future of Army Water Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Energy/ water nexus  Balancing supply with demand  Aging infrastructure  Complex water rights issues  Cost vs. price imbalance  Quality degradation...Energy/ Water Nexus • Thermoelectric power • Geothermal • Biofuels • Solar-hot water • Hydropower • Carbon Capture • “ Fracking ” Regional Water Balance...with Broad Applicability  Assess 30-year water supply and demand for sample of Army installations Method developed in 2009 at two pilot studies

  6. Social Media and the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    net. (U.S. Navy, Mass Communication Specialist 2d Class Edwin L. Wriston) Chondra Perry REMEMBER WHEN BEING SOCIAL meant sharing your favorite...team? Those days are in the past. Communication has grown globally over the years; today’s technology opens a completely new way of sharing ideas...thoughts, and the latest on dit. Our Army has embraced the world of social media as the power of communication has taken a new turn. Typewriters

  7. 2011 Army Strategic Planning Guidance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-25

    TESI ) of 22,000 Soldiers, the Army’s total force by the end of the mid-term period is programmed to be 520K (AC). We will achieve a more...dwell ratios, extending TESI authority to adequately man deploying units and sustain the All-Volunteer Force, right-sizing the generating force, and... TESI Temporary End-Strength Increase WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction 2011 ARMY STRATEGIC PLANNING GUIDANCE Page 19 2011

  8. Army PCMH Initiative: Current Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-25

    Increasing accessibility and quality of healthcare • Improving Soldier and Family housing • Ensuring excellence in schools, youth services, and child ...2010 Enrollment vs. Capacity Care Continuity Appointment Availability Patient Satisfaction RMC TRICARE Operation Center ( TOC ) 04 OCT 10...2011 MHS Conference  35 Parent Sites  114 Child Sites  11 MTFs with 66 PCMH Teams  Level II NCQA Recognized PCMH: “0” PCMH in Army Inventory 10 of

  9. Army PM UAS Spectrum Update

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Spectrum Requirements 24 System Component Frequencies Used Manufacturer Quantity Location J/F-12 Number Electro-Optical / Infra-red / Laser Range...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED David Milburn Sigmatech Contractor Spectrum Manager Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project Office PACOM...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Sigmatech Inc,U.S. Army Unmanned Aircraft Systems

  10. Recruiting Effects of Army Advertising

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    large amount of newspaper advertising was bought through "groups," or aggregates of related newspapers whose space is marketed together. For example, ads ...im rm’ r .. . 2 advertising on private sector markets when firms attempt to influence consumers’ purchasing decisions. When it comes to research on... adding unique data describing the patterns and distribu- tion of Army advertising expenditures between 1981 and 1984. 3 The specific aims of the

  11. Lack of extended venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in high-risk patients undergoing major orthopaedic or major cancer surgery. Electronic Assessment of VTE Prophylaxis in High-Risk Surgical Patients at Discharge from Swiss Hospitals (ESSENTIAL).

    PubMed

    Kalka, Christoph; Spirk, David; Siebenrock, Klaus-Arno; Metzger, Urs; Tuor, Philipp; Sterzing, Daniel; Oehy, Kurt; Wondberg, Daniela; Mouhsine, El Yazid; Gautier, Emanuel; Kucher, Nils

    2009-07-01

    Extended pharmacological venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis beyond discharge is recommended for patients undergoing high-risk surgery. We prospectively investigated prophylaxis in 1,046 consecutive patients undergoing major orthopaedic (70%) or major cancer surgery (30%) in 14 Swiss hospitals. Appropriate in-hospital prophylaxis was used in 1,003 (96%) patients. At discharge, 638 (61%) patients received prescription for extended pharmacological prophylaxis: 564 (77%) after orthopaedic surgery, and 74 (23%) after cancer surgery (p < 0.001). Patients with knee replacement (94%), hip replacement (81%), major trauma (80%), and curative arthroscopy (73%) had the highest prescription rates for extended VTE prophylaxis; the lowest rates were found in patients undergoing major surgery for thoracic (7%), gastrointestinal (19%), and hepatobiliary (33%) cancer. The median duration of prescribed extended prophylaxis was longer in patients with orthopaedic surgery (32 days, interquartile range 14-40 days) than in patients with cancer surgery (23 days, interquartile range 11-30 days; p<0.001). Among the 278 patients with an extended prophylaxis order after hip replacement, knee replacement, or hip fracture surgery, 120 (43%) received a prescription for at least 35 days, and among the 74 patients with an extended prophylaxis order after major cancer surgery, 20 (27%) received a prescription for at least 28 days. In conclusion, approximately one quarter of the patients with major orthopaedic surgery and more than three quarters of the patients with major cancer surgery did not receive prescription for extended VTE prophylaxis. Future effort should focus on the improvement of extended VTE prophylaxis, particularly in patients undergoing major cancer surgery.

  12. [Amebiasis. Surgical treatment in 1989].

    PubMed

    Sigler Morales, L; Mier y Díaz, J; Melgoza Ortiz, C; Blanco Benavides, R; Medina González, E

    1989-01-01

    Even when the number of patients with invasive amebiasis has decreased, the internist and surgeon must be alert in case that the patient requires an operation. Amebic liver abscess is treated medically; percutaneous evacuation is rarely used and surgical drainage is made when there is not response to medical treatment or there is high risk of abscess rupture. Operation is mandatory when the abscess has ruptured to the abdominal cavity or through the pericardial sac. In fulminant colitis it is necessary to resect the diseased portion of the colon without primary anastomoses. Amebic apendicitis is difficult to diagnosis before an operation. It may be suspected in cases of apendicitis if the cecal wall is inflammed. Colon ameboma requires medical treatment except if it is associated with necrosis or perforation. In a four year period (1985-1988) 294 patients with diagnosis of invasive amebiasis were admitted to three hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Mexico City. 218 had hepatic abscess, 45 required surgical drainage with four deaths (9%) and four not operated patients died. In this series only four patients had their abscess drained percutaneously. 31 patients with amebic colitis were treated; three required colonic resection with one death. Ameboma was seen in five patients and there were 11 cases of amebic apendicitis. No deaths occurred in these last two groups.

  13. Understanding hospitality.

    PubMed

    Patten, C S

    1994-03-01

    Bridging patient/"customer" issues and business aspects can be aided through developing a specific nursing basis for hospitality. The ancient practice of hospitality has evolved into three distinct levels: public, personal and therapeutic. Understanding these levels is helpful in integrating various dimensions of guest relations programs in hospitals into a more comprehensive vision. Hospitality issues must become a greater part of today's nursing management.

  14. Review of Electrocution Deaths in Iraq: Part 2 - Seventeen Incidents Apart From Staff Sergeant Ryan D. Maseth, U.S. Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-24

    investigation into the death of Hospital Corpsman Third Class David A. Cedergren , and we are reviewing the final investigative results in that case...United States Army ................................................ 14 Hospital Corpsman Third Class David A. Cedergren , United States Navy...of Petty Officer David A. Cedergren -- after Armed Forces Institute of Pathology revised its initial autopsy findings to state the cause of death

  15. A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Army Advertising Attributes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    that identifies the needs and characteristics of individuals in the Armys’ prime market , as well as their exposure to Army advertising . One way the Army...U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences N Research Report 1578 A Cross-Sectional Comparison I of Army Advertising ...62785A 791 2105 H01 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Army Advertising Attributes 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S

  16. Caring for burn patients at the United States Institute of Surgical Research: the nurses' multifaceted roles.

    PubMed

    Serio-Melvin, Maria; Yoder, Linda H; Gaylord, Kathryn M

    2010-06-01

    Nursing plays a critical role in the comprehensive burn care delivered at the US Army Institute of Surgical Research, otherwise known as the US Army's Burn Center serving the Department of Defense. This center serves as a model for burn units nationally and internationally. It also provides a challenging and innovative work environment for military and civilian nurses. Nurses in the Burn Center contribute to innovations in acute, rehabilitative, and psychological care for patients with burns. This article provides an overview of the complex nursing care provided to burn patients treated at the Burn Center.

  17. Accelerating surgical training and reducing the burden of surgical disease in Haiti before and after the earthquake.

    PubMed

    DeGennaro, Vincent A; DeGennaro, Vincent A; Kochhar, Amit; Nathan, Nirmal; Low, Christopher; Avashia, Yash J; Thaller, Seth R

    2012-11-01

    In general, university-based global health initiatives have tended to focus on expanding access to primary care. In the past, surgical programs may have been characterized by sporadic participation with little educational focus. However, there have been some notable exceptions with plastic surgery volunteer missions. We offer another model of regularly scheduled surgical trips to rural Haiti in plastic and general surgery. The goal of these trips is to reduce the burden of surgical disease and ultimately repair every cleft lip/palate in Haiti. Another principal objective is to accelerate the training of American residents through increased case load and personal interaction with attending surgeons in a concentrated period. Diversity of the case load and the overall number of surgeries performed by residents in a typical surgical trip outpaces the experiences available during a typical week in an American hospital setting. More importantly, we continue to provide ongoing training to Haitian nurses and surgeons in surgical techniques and postoperative care. Our postoperative complication rate has been relatively low. Our follow-up rates have been lower than 70% despite intensive attempts to maintain continued communication with our patients. Through our experiences in surgical care in rural Haiti, we were able to quickly ramp up our trauma and orthopedic surgical care immediately after the earthquake. Project Medishare and the University of Miami continue to operate a trauma and acute care hospital in Port au Prince. The hospital provides ongoing orthopedic, trauma, and neurosurgical expertise from the rotating teams of American surgeons and training of Haitian surgeons in modern surgical techniques. We believe that surgical residencies in the United States can improve their training programs and reduce global surgical burden of disease through consistent trips and working closely with country partners.

  18. Training Strategies for Newly Designed Army Headquarters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    M 3.2 M 1.61 M 5.8 M (less Air Force) ~110 divs.; Service Troops; 3 Army Grps; 9 Field Armies (allies and USMC. 7 French armies, 2 corps, 8...Defense Command (AAMDC), A r m y M o d u l a r C a p a b i l i t i e s 8 Mark Gerner 9/18/2008 2:03 PM Secretary of the Army Functions USC...Agency authorities over contracts, programs, other mechanisms P O L I C Y P R O G R A M M A T I C Headquarters of International

  19. Anticipating Climate Change Impacts on Army Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    0.220 –5.6 Sharpe General Depot (Field Annex) 0.185 4.7 Anniston Army Depot –0.181 –4.6 It is interesting that those installations in the Canadian...Fort Gordon –15.84 –8.8 Anniston Army Depot –15.48 –8.6 Figure 29. In the globalized rapid economic growth scenario for the Canadian Model, the...Reservation -10.80 -6.0 Hunter Army Airfield -9.36 -5.2 Fort Gordon -8.82 -4.9 Anniston Army Depot -7.92 -4.4 The southeastern installations still indicate

  20. After the Spring: Reforming Arab Armies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    UNITED STATES : • l i A~\\fYWAPRESS ’ Carli!<lc lh..fl".lcb, PA STItt: NGTII_.WI S OOM AFTER THE SPRING: REFORMING ARAB ARMIES Florence Gaub U.S...SUBTITLE After the Spring: Reforming Arab Armies 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Studies Institute and U.S. Army War College Press AFTER THE SPRING: REFORMING ARAB ARMIES Florence Gaub September 2014 The views expressed in this report

  1. Surgical hand antisepsis: the evidence.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Judith

    2008-08-01

    For 150 years members of the surgical team have been washing their hands with solutions designed to remove micro-organisms and therefore reduce surgical site infections in patients. This article discusses the evidence surrounding aspects of surgical hand antisepsis.

  2. Multiscale Surgical Telerobots

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, R R; Seward, K P; Benett, W J; Tendick, F; Bentley, L; Stephan, P L

    2002-01-23

    A project was undertaken to improve robotic surgical tools for telerobotic minimally invasive surgery. The major objectives were to reduce the size of the tools to permit new surgical procedures in confined spaces such as the heart and to improve control of surgical tools by locating positional sensors and actuators at the end effector rather than external to the patient as is currently the state of the technology. A new compact end-effector with wrist-like flexibility was designed. Positional sensors based on MEMS microfabrication techniques were designed.

  3. Systems Approaches to Surgical Quality and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Charles; Moorthy, Krishna; Sarker, Sudip K.; Chang, Avril; Darzi, Ara W.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This approach provides the basis of our research program, which aims to expand operative assessment beyond patient factors and the technical skills of the surgeon; to extend assessment of surgical skills beyond bench models to the operating theater; to provide a basis for assessing interventions; and to provide a deeper understanding of surgical outcomes. Summary Background Data: Research into surgical outcomes has primarily focused on the role of patient pathophysiological risk factors and on the skills of the individual surgeon. However, this approach neglects a wide range of factors that have been found to be of important in achieving safe, high-quality performance in other high-risk environments. The outcome of surgery is also dependent on the quality of care received throughout the patient's stay in hospital and the performance of a considerable number of health professionals, all of whom are influenced by the environment in which they work. Methods: Drawing on the wider literature on safety and quality in healthcare, and recent papers on surgery, this article argues for a much wider assessment of factors that may be relevant to surgical outcome. In particular, we suggest the development of an “operation profile” to capture all the salient features of a surgical operation, including such factors as equipment design and use, communication, team coordination, factors affecting individual performance, and the working environment. Methods of assessing such factors are outlined, and ethical issues and other potential concerns are discussed. PMID:15024308

  4. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K.; Turner, R.S.

    1994-07-01

    In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

  5. Medicare Payment: Surgical Dressings and Topical Wound Care Products.

    PubMed

    Schaum, Kathleen D

    2014-08-01

    Medicare patients' access to surgical dressings and topical wound care products is greatly influenced by the Medicare payment system that exists in each site of care. Qualified healthcare professionals should consider these payment systems, as well as the medical necessity for surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Scientists and manufacturers should also consider these payment systems, in addition to the Food and Drug Administration requirements for clearance or approval, when they are developing new surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Due to the importance of the Medicare payment systems, this article reviews the Medicare payment systems in acute care hospitals, long-term acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, durable medical equipment suppliers, hospital-based outpatient wound care departments, and qualified healthcare professional offices.

  6. Medicare Payment: Surgical Dressings and Topical Wound Care Products

    PubMed Central

    Schaum, Kathleen D.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare patients' access to surgical dressings and topical wound care products is greatly influenced by the Medicare payment system that exists in each site of care. Qualified healthcare professionals should consider these payment systems, as well as the medical necessity for surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Scientists and manufacturers should also consider these payment systems, in addition to the Food and Drug Administration requirements for clearance or approval, when they are developing new surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Due to the importance of the Medicare payment systems, this article reviews the Medicare payment systems in acute care hospitals, long-term acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, durable medical equipment suppliers, hospital-based outpatient wound care departments, and qualified healthcare professional offices. PMID:25126477

  7. Surgical management of hemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Agbo, S P

    2011-07-01

    Hemorrhoids are common human afflictions known since the dawn of history. Surgical management of this condition has made tremendous progress from complex ligation and excision procedures in the past to simpler techniques that allow the patient to return to normal life within a short period. Newer techniques try to improve on the post-operative complications of older ones. The surgical options for the management of hemorrhoids today are many. Capturing all in a single article may be difficult if not impossible. The aim of this study therefore is to present in a concise form some of the common surgical options in current literature, highlighting some important post operative complications. Current literature is searched using MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane library. The conclusion is that even though there are many surgical options in the management of hemorrhoids today, most employ the ligature and excision technique with newer ones having reduced post operative pain and bleeding.

  8. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  9. Development and Implementation of a Comprehensive Risk Management Program at the USAF Academy Hospital.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    31, 1979. USAFA Hospital Regulation 161-7, Hospital Employee Health Program, Jul 14, 1978. USAFA Hospital Regulation 168-1, Patient Questionaires , Oct...Al87 344 DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE RISK 1 MANAGEMENT PROGRAM AT THE USAF ACADEMY HOSPITAL(U) ARMY HEALTH CARE STUDIES AND...Baylor University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Health Administration By Captain Charles W. Boone, USAF, MSC

  10. Pancreatic tumor of mesenchymal origin--an unusual surgical finding.

    PubMed

    Peskova, M; Fried, M

    1994-04-01

    Recently, a patient with an unusual pancreatic tumor of smooth muscle origin, presented at the First Surgical Clinic, Charles University Hospital, Prague. Leiomyosarcoma, a malignant smooth muscle tumor, may arise almost anywhere in the body. Pancreatic localization is very unusual. A number of authors have surveyed the literature on pancreatic tumors of mesenchymal origin. As many as fifty cases have been reported in autopsy studies since 1882. Only six operated cases of pancreatic sarcomas were found in surgical series.

  11. Smart surgical tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) guided smart surgical tool using a femtosecond fiber laser is developed. This system provides real-time material identification by processing and analyzing the peak intensity and ratio of atomic emissions of LIBS signals. Algorithms to identify emissions of different tissues and metals are developed and implemented into the real-time control system. This system provides a powerful smart surgical tool for precise robotic microsurgery applications with real-time feedback and control.

  12. Smart surgical tool.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) guided smart surgical tool using a femtosecond fiber laser is developed. This system provides real-time material identification by processing and analyzing the peak intensity and ratio of atomic emissions of LIBS signals. Algorithms to identify emissions of different tissues and metals are developed and implemented into the real-time control system. This system provides a powerful smart surgical tool for precise robotic microsurgery applications with real-time feedback and control.

  13. Augmented reality in surgical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, E.; Schmalstieg, D.; Vander Sloten, J.; Freudenthal, A.; Declerck, J.; Casciaro, S.; Rideng, Ø.; Gersak, B.

    2008-02-01

    Minimally invasive therapy (MIT) is one of the most important trends in modern medicine. It includes a wide range of therapies in videoscopic surgery and interventional radiology and is performed through small incisions. It reduces hospital stay-time by allowing faster recovery and offers substantially improved cost-effectiveness for the hospital and the society. However, the introduction of MIT has also led to new problems. The manipulation of structures within the body through small incisions reduces dexterity and tactile feedback. It requires a different approach than conventional surgical procedures, since eye-hand co-ordination is not based on direct vision, but more predominantly on image guidance via endoscopes or radiological imaging modalities. ARIS*ER is a multidisciplinary consortium developing a new generation of decision support tools for MIT by augmenting visual and sensorial feedback. We will present tools based on novel concepts in visualization, robotics and haptics providing tailored solutions for a range of clinical applications. Examples from radio-frequency ablation of liver-tumors, laparoscopic liver surgery and minimally invasive cardiac surgery will be presented. Demonstrators were developed with the aim to provide a seamless workflow for the clinical user conducting image-guided therapy.

  14. United States Army, Sixth Army Field Order 74

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-01-01

    Sixth Amy Reserve; _!. llth Airborne Division: a.. Commander: -Major General Joseph M. Swing,’U.S.A. b_. Units and Staging: Annex 3h_« (i) Army...HEADQUARTERS SIXTH AMY . APO-442 - 19301 28 July 1945 ANNEX 3f to FO 74 , Troop List, 40th Infantry Division, reinforced (tentative) COMBAT UNITS Unit 40th’ inf...route SHIBUSHI - KA3DYA - TAKASU. • (4) The 281st signal Pigeon Compan;,’- will: (a) provide I, IX, and XI Corps-with, one combat section each prior to

  15. The Surgical Safety Checklist: Results of Implementation in Otorhinolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of implementing the surgical safety checklist (SSCL) on the outcome of patient safety in otorhinolaryngology (ENT) surgical procedures in two hospitals in Saudi Arabia: Aseer Central and Abha Private Hospitals. Methods This retrospective study conducted over seven years (1 July 2008 to 30 June 2015) followed a staff educational and training program for the implementation of the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist (WHO SSCL). The program included the use of audiovisual aids and practical demonstrations. Incidents of non-compliance were treated as sentinel events and were audited by the process of root cause analysis. Results There were 5 144 elective ENT surgical cases in both hospitals in which the SSCL was utilized over the seven-year study period. The average compliance rate was 96.5%. Reasons for non-compliance included staff shortage, fast staff turnover, excessive workload, communication problems, and presence of existing processes. Conclusions The implementation of the SSCL was a substantial leap in efforts towards ensuring surgical patients’ safety. It is compulsory in the healthcare system in many countries. Such progress in healthcare improvement can be accomplished with the commitment of the operating suite staff by spending few moments checking facts and establishing an environment of teamwork for the benefit of the surgical patient. PMID:28042399

  16. Field-improvised war surgery in Kosovo: use of kitchen utensils as surgical instruments.

    PubMed

    Hoxha, Besim; Singh, Karan P; Muzina, Rubina; Lu, Yan; Flaherty, Devin

    2008-06-01

    After years of conflict between Serbia and neighboring Kosovo, a full-blown war started in March 1999 when the Serbian and Yugoslav armies began a statewide military crackdown against ethnic Albanians and the Kosovo Liberation Army. Most ethnic Albanians were displaced to Macedonia or Albania. Some, however, found refuge in the Molopolce mountain region of Kosovo among military personnel, thus necessitating the creation of a field medical facility. Patient treatment at the field-improvised Nerodime Military Hospital, and the management of work took place under very difficult conditions including a chronic lack of appropriate medical equipment. Improvised lifesaving surgeries were performed with kitchen utensils serving as retractors at the field hospital. This article compares the treatment of patients between the two hospitals, and is the first article to date describing the war experience in general at the field hospitals in Kosovo.

  17. A Study of the Medical Support of the Union and Confederate Armies during the Battle of Chickamauga: Lessons and Implications for Today’s US Army Medical Department Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    established at Murfreesboro, Tullahoma, Manchester, McMinnville , and Winchester. In anticipation of the Army’s move, Perin had half of the 2000-bed...hospitals in Manchester, McMinnville , and Nashville. 31 This would allow each of the corps to move unencumbered with ineffective soldiers and to bring

  18. Surgical consultation and intervention during pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Madenci, Arin L; Lehmann, Leslie E; Weldon, Christopher B

    2014-12-01

    Children undergoing HSCT are at risk for complications due to immune system impairment, toxicity from prior therapies and conditioning regimens, and long-term use of indwelling catheters. These problems may require assessment by the surgical team. We sought to characterize the role of surgical consultation during primary hospital stay for HSCT. We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive patients undergoing HSCT between September 2010 and September 2012. One hundred and seventy-three patients underwent 189 HSCTs. General surgery consultations occurred during 33% (n = 62) of primary hospitalizations for HSCT, with a total of 85 consults. Sixty-three (73%) consults resulted in an intervention in the operating room or at the bedside. The majority of consults were for CVL issues (59%, n = 50), followed by abdominal complaints (16%, n = 14). Patients requiring surgical consultation had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (16% vs. 2%, p < 0.01) and 100-day TRM (10% vs. 2%, p < 0.01), compared with those not requiring consultation. Patients undergoing HSCT often require surgical consultation, most commonly for line-related issues. Surgical consultation heralded an increased risk of in-hospital and 100-day TRM. Issues among this high-risk cohort of children who have undergone HSCT must be familiar to the general surgeon and oncologist alike.

  19. General Surgery Programs in Small Rural New York State Hospitals: A Pilot Survey of Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Randall; Doty, Brit; Gold, Michael; Bordley, James; Dietz, Patrick; Jenkins, Paul; Heneghan, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitals play a central role in small rural communities and are frequently one of the major contributors to the local economy. Surgical services often account for a substantial proportion of hospital revenues. The current shortage of general surgeons practicing in rural communities may further threaten the financial viability of rural…

  20. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…