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Sample records for arnica montana extract

  1. Final report on the safety assessment of Arnica montana extract and Arnica montana.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Arnica Montana Extract is an extract of dried flowerheads of the plant, Arnica montana. Arnica Montana is a generic term used to describe a plant material derived from the dried flowers, roots, or rhizomes of A. montana. Common names for A. montana include leopard's bane, mountain tobacco, mountain snuff, and wolf's bane. Two techniques for preparing Arnica Montana Extract are hydroalcoholic maceration and gentle disintegration in soybean oil. Propylene glycol and butylene glycol extractions were also reported. The composition of these extracts can include fatty acids, especially palmitic, linoleic, myristic, and linolenic acids, essential oil, triterpenic alcohols, sesquiterpene lactones, sugars, phytosterols, phenol acids, tannins, choline, inulin, phulin, arnicin, flavonoids, carotenoids, coumarins, and heavy metals. The components present in these extracts are dependent on where the plant is grown. Arnica Montana Extract was reported to be used in almost 100 cosmetic formulations across a wide range of product types, whereas Arnica Montana was reported only once. Extractions of Arnica Montana were tested and found not toxic in acute toxicity tests in rabbits, mice, and rats; they were not irritating, sensitizing, or phototoxic to mouse or guinea pig skin; and they did not produce significant ocular irritation. In an Ames test, an extract of A. montana was mutagenic, possibly related to the flavenoid content of the extract. No carcinogenicity or reproductive/developmental toxicity data were available. Clinical tests of extractions failed to elicit irritation or sensitization, yet Arnica dermatitis, a delayed type IV allergy, is reported in individuals who handle arnica flowers and may be caused by sesquiterpene lactones found in the flowers. Ingestion of A. montana-containing products has induced severe gastroenteritis, nervousness, accelerated heart rate, muscular weakness, and death. Absent any basis for concluding that data on one member of a botanical

  2. Characterization and pharmacodynamic properties of Arnica montana complex.

    PubMed

    Šutovská, M; Capek, P; Kočmalová, M; Pawlaczyk, I; Zaczyńska, E; Czarny, A; Uhliariková, I; Gancarz, R; Fraňová, S

    2014-08-01

    A dark brown polymeric complex was isolated from flowering parts of medicinal plant Arnica montana L. by hot alkaline extraction followed by neutralization and multi-step extractions with organic solvents. It was recovered in 5.7% yield, on GPC showed two peaks of molecular mass of 9 and 3.5kDa. The compositional analyses of Arnica complex revealed the presence of carbohydrates (26%), uronic acids (12%), phenolics (1.25mM or 213mg of GAE/1g), and low protein content (∼1%). The carbohydrate moiety was rich mainly in rhamnogalacturonan and arabinogalactan. The antitussive tests showed the reduction of the cough efforts by Arnica complex, however, its total antitussive effect was lower compared with that of codeine, the strongest antitussive agent. The bronchodilatory activity of Arnica complex was similar to salbutamol, a classic antiasthmatic drug, and was confirmed by significantly decreased values of specific airways resistance in vivo and by considerably attenuated the amplitude of acetylcholine and histamine-induced contractions in vitro. Arnica complex did not show any cytotoxic effect on mouse fibroblast cultures and human lung cells, up to the dose of 500μg/mL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness and Safety of Arnica montana in Post-Surgical Setting, Pain and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Morales-Medina, Julio César; Bellavite, Paolo; Rottigni, Valentina; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2016-01-01

    Arnica montana has been widely used as a homeopathic remedy for the treatment of several inflammatory conditions in pain management and postoperative settings. This review gives an overview of the therapeutic use of Arnica montana in the above-mentioned fields also focusing on its mechanisms of action learned from animal models and in vitro studies. Arnica montana is more effective than placebo when used for the treatment of several conditions including post-traumatic and postoperative pain, edema, and ecchymosis. However, its dosages and preparations used have produced substantial differences in the clinical outcome. Cumulative evidence suggests that Arnica montana may represent a valid alternative to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, at least when treating some specific conditions.

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of Arnica montana 6cH: preclinical study in animals.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, S B; Ferreira, L R; Perazzo, F F; Carvalho, J C

    2004-04-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of Arnica montana 6cH was evaluated using acute and chronic inflammation models. In the acute, model, carrageenin-induced rat paw oedema, the group treated with Arnica montana 6cH showed 30% inhibition compared to control (P < 0.05). Treatment with Arnica 6cH, 30 min prior to carrageenin, did not produce any inhibition of the inflammatory process. In the chronic model, Nystatin-induced oedema, the group treated 3 days previously with Arnica montana 6cH had reduced inflammation 6 h after the inflammatory agent was applied (P < 0.05). When treatment was given 6 h after Nystatin treatment, there was no significant inhibitory effect. In a model based on histamine-induced increase of vascular permeability, pretreatment with Arnica montana 6cH blocked the action of histamine in increasing vascular permeability.

  5. Evaluation of antioxidant and cytoprotective activities of Arnica montana L. and Artemisia absinthium L. ethanolic extracts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arnica montana L. and Artemisia absinthium L. (Asteraceae) are medicinal plants native to temperate regions of Europe, including Romania, traditionally used for treatment of skin wounds, bruises and contusions. In the present study, A. montana and A. absinthium ethanolic extracts were evaluated for their chemical composition, antioxidant activity and protective effect against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in a mouse fibroblast-like NCTC cell line. Results A. absinthium extract showed a higher antioxidant capacity than A. montana extract as Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, Oxygen radical absorbance capacity and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical-scavenging activity, in correlation with its flavonoids and phenolic acids content. Both plant extracts had significant effects on the growth of NCTC cells in the range of 10–100 mg/L A. montana and 10–500 mg/L A. absinthium. They also protected fibroblast cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage, at the same doses. The best protection was observed in cell pre-treatment with 10 mg/L A. montana and 10–300 mg/L A. absinthium, respectively, as determined by Neutral red and lactate dehydrogenase assays. In addition, cell pre-treatment with plant extracts, at these concentrations, prevented morphological changes induced by hydrogen peroxide. Flow-cytometry analysis showed that pre-treatment with A. montana and A. absinthium extracts restored the proportion of cells in each phase of the cell cycle. Conclusions A. montana and A. absinthium extracts, rich in flavonoids and phenolic acids, showed a good antioxidant activity and cytoprotective effect against oxidative damage in fibroblast-like cells. These results provide scientific support for the traditional use of A. montana and A. absinthium in treatment of skin disorders. PMID:22958433

  6. Arnica montana experimental studies: confounders and biases?

    PubMed

    Bellavite, Paolo; Marzotto, Marta; Bonafini, Clara

    2018-03-01

    Arnica montana is a popular traditional remedy widely used in complementary and alternative medicine, in part for its wound-healing properties. The authors recently showed that this plant extract and several of its homeopathic dilutions are able to modify the expression of a series of genes involved in inflammation and connective tissue regeneration. Their studies opened a debate, including criticisms to the "errors" in the methods used and the "confounders and biases". Here the authors show that the criticisms raised on methodology and statistics are not consistent and cannot be considered pertinent. The present comment also updates and reviews information concerning the action of A. montana dilutions in human macrophage cells while summarizing the major experimental advances reported on this interesting medicinal plant. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Arnica montana L. - a plant of healing: review.

    PubMed

    Kriplani, Priyanka; Guarve, Kumar; Baghael, Uttam S

    2017-08-01

    Arnica montana is a widely used therapeutic plant used traditionally to treat various ailments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the botany, phytochemistry and ethnopharmacology along with special emphasis given on pharmacological activity of plant A. montana. The plant extracts have been reported to possess antibacterial, antitumor, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antifungal and immunomodulatory activity. A wide range of chemical compounds including sesquiterpene lactones and their short-chain carbonic acid esters, flavonoids, carotenoids, essential oils, diterpenes, arnidiol, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, coumarins, phenolic acids, lignans and oligosaccharides, etc., are found in different parts of the plant. It has been scrutinized that extensive research has been carried out to explore the therapeutic potential of flowers of the plant. Therefore, investigations should be carried out to explore the therapeutic potential of other parts of the plant for better therapeutic utilization. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. Identification of HSP70-inducing activity in Arnica montana extract and purification and characterization of HSP70-inducers.

    PubMed

    Usui, Keiko; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Horibe, Yuumi; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Mizushima, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    The expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), particularly HSP70, is receiving considerable attention in the field of cosmetics, particularly given our recent report that ultraviolet-induced melanin production, skin damage and wrinkle formation were all suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. In the present study, we searched for HSP70-inducers from a library of herbal extracts that have already been approved as quasi-pharmaceutical products in Japan. We selected an ethanol extract of Arnica montana (A. montana), based on its high HSP70-inducing activity and low cytotoxicity. Cell viability was determined by MTT method and expression of HPS70 was monitored by immunoblotting analysis. From the extract, we purified and identified eight sesquiterpene lactones (AM1-8) as HSP70-inducers, among which AM-2 (helenalin 2-methylbutyrate) was selected due to its good HSP70-inducing properties and low cytotoxicity. Treatment of cultured mouse melanoma cells with AM-2 or A. montana extract up-regulated the expression of HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner. This treatment also activated heat shock factor-1, a transcription factor for hsp genes. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cells with AM-2 or A. montana extract decreased melanin production and expression and activity of tyrosinase. These results suggest that AM-2 and A. montana extract could be beneficial for use in hypopigmenting cosmetics as a consequence of their stimulatory effects on HSP70 expression. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. New sesquiterpene lactones from Arnica tincture prepared from fresh flowerheads of Arnica montana.

    PubMed

    Kos, Olha; Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Tubaro, Aurelia; Sosa, Silvio; Merfort, Irmgard

    2005-11-01

    Investigation of an ethanolic extract prepared from fresh Arnica montana flowers afforded three new 1,5- trans-guaianolides, of which 11alpha,13-dihydro-2-O-tigloylflorilenalin and the respective 2-O-isovaleryl derivative are reported for the first time. Additionally, three new and one known 2beta-ethoxy-2,3-dihydrohelenalin esters were isolated. GC/MS studies of the extract after a two year storage at 4 degrees C demonstrated that the latter were artefacts that had been formed by addition of ethanol to the cyclopentenone structure of helenalin. Formation of these adducts gave compounds possessing an inhibitory activity comparable to that of 11alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin derivatives in the NF-kappaB EMSA and the IL-8 ELISA in vitro assays as well as in the in vivo croton oil-induced mouse ear edema test for one adduct, namely 2beta-ethoxy-6-O-acetyl-2,3-dihydrohelenalin. As expected, 6-O-(2-methylbutyryl)- and 6-O-methacryloyl-helenalin exhibited a stronger activity in the NF-kappaB EMSA and IL-8 ELISA. Sesquiterpene lactones seem to be the most important NF-kappaB inhibiting compounds in the Arnica extract. Bioguided fractionation using the luciferase reporter gene assay resulted in the isolation of only moderately active compounds, such as 6-acetoxy-2,2-dimethylchroman-4-one and 10-acetoxy-8,9-epoxythymol isobutyrate.

  10. [On the effectiveness of the homeopathic remedy Arnica montana].

    PubMed

    Lüdtke, Rainer; Hacke, Daniela

    2005-11-01

    Arnica montana is a homeopathic remedy often prescribed after traumata and injuries. To assess whether Arnica is effective beyond placebo and to identify factors which support or contradict this effectiveness. All prospective, controlled trials on the effectiveness of homeopathic Arnica were included. Overall effectiveness was assessed by meta-analysis and meta-regression techniques. 68 comparisons from 49 clinical trials show a significant effectiveness of Arnica in traumatic injuries in random effects meta-analysis (odds ratio [OR], 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.55), but not in meta-regression models (OR, 0.37; CI, 0.11-1.24). We found no evidence for publication bias. Studies from Medline-listed journals and high-quality studies are less likely to report positive results (p = 0.0006 and p = 0.0167). The hypothesis that homeopathic Arnica is effective could neither be proved nor rejected. All trials were highly heterogeneous, meta-regression does not help to explain this heterogeneity substantially.

  11. Inflammatory Process Modulation by Homeopathic Arnica montana 6CH: The Role of Individual Variation

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Ana Paula; Sato, Cesar; Cardoso, Thayna Neves; Bonamin, Leoni Villano

    2011-01-01

    The effects of Arnica montana 6cH on the individual modulation of acute inflammation kinetics in rats were evaluated. Adult male Wistar rats were inoculated with 1% carrageenan into the footpad and treated with Arnica montana 6cH, dexamethasone (4.0 mg/kg; positive control) or 5% hydroalcoholic solution (negative control), per os, each 15 minutes, between 30 and 180 minutes after the irritant inoculation. Histopathological and immunohistochemistry procedures were done in order to get a panel of inflammatory positive cells for CD3 (T lymphocytes), CD45RA (B lymphocytes), CD18 (beta 2 integrin), CD163 (ED2 protein), CD54 (ICAM-1), and MAC 387 (monocytes and macrophages). The statistical treatment of data included a posteriori classification of animals from each group (N = 20) in two subgroups presenting spontaneous precocious or late oedema. Animals that presented precocious oedema were less responsible to Arnica montana 6cH in relation to hemodynamic changes. Instead, rats that exhibited late oedema presented less intense oedema (P = .01), lower percentage of mast cell degranulation (P = .0001), and increase in lymphatic vessels diameter (P = .05). The data suggest an individually qualitative adjustment of inflammatory vascular events by Arnica montana 6cH. PMID:21318109

  12. Thymol derivatives from hairy roots of Arnica montana.

    PubMed

    Weremczuk-Jezyna, I; Kisiel, W; Wysokińska, H

    2006-09-01

    Five known thymol derivatives were isolated from roots of Arnica montana transformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes LBA 9402. The compounds were characterized by spectral methods. The pattern of thymol derivatives in light-grown hairy roots was slightly different from that in dark-grown ones. This is the first report on the presence of thymol derivatives in hairy roots of the plant.

  13. Comparison of cytotoxic and anti-platelet activities of polyphenolic extracts from Arnica montana flowers and Juglans regia husks.

    PubMed

    Rywaniak, Joanna; Luzak, Boguslawa; Podsedek, Anna; Dudzinska, Dominika; Rozalski, Marcin; Watala, Cezary

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenolic compounds of plant origin are well known to be beneficial to human health: they exert protective effects on haemostasis and have a particular influence on blood platelets. However, the anti-platelet properties of polyphenolic compounds observed so far have not been weighed against their potential cytotoxic action against platelets. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that anti-platelet and cytotoxic effects on blood platelets may interfere and therefore, may often lead to confusion when evaluating the properties of plant extracts or other agents towards blood platelets. The anti-platelet and cytotoxic in vitro effects of plant extracts obtained from the husks of walnuts (J. regia) and flowers of arnica (A. montana) on platelet reactivity and viability were examined. Platelet function was assessed using standard methods (flow cytometry: P-selectin expression, activation of GPIIbIIIa complex, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, VASP index; turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry) and newly set assays (flow cytometric monitoring of platelet cytotoxicity). The results reveal that none of the studied plant extracts demonstrated cytotoxicity towards blood platelets. The phenolic acid-rich extract of A. montana (7.5 and 15 µg/ml) significantly reduced the ADP-induced aggregation in both whole blood and PRP, and decreased the platelet reactivity index (PRI; VASP phosphorylation) in whole blood, while showing excellent antioxidant capacity. The extract of J. regia husks significantly reduced ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood when applied at 7.5 µg/ml, and only slightly decreased the PRI at 15 µg/ml. Both examined extracts suppressed platelet hyper-reactivity, and such influence did not interfere with cytotoxic effects of the extracts. Thus, its high polyphenol content, excellent antioxidant capacity and distinct anti-platelet properties, in combination with its lack of toxicity, make the extract of A. montana flowers a possible

  14. Treatment of Postoperative Sore Throat With the Aid of the Homeopathic Remedy Arnica montana: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Tsintzas, Dionysis; Vithoulkas, George

    2017-10-01

    We present 2 cases of severe postoperative sore throat, hoarseness, aphonia, and dysphagia, after a laryngeal mask insertion, who were treated successfully with the homeopathic remedy Arnica montana. Three doses of Arnica montana 200CH were given to the patients over 36 hours. Although the symptoms were very intense, the remedy was very effective and cleared most of the symptoms in 48 hours.

  15. Perioperative Arnica montana for Reduction of Ecchymosis in Rhinoplasty Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chaiet, Scott R; Marcus, Benjamin C

    2016-05-01

    Studies of homeopathic therapies to decrease postrhinoplasty ecchymosis have previously used subjective measurements, limiting their clinical significance. Recently, Arnica montana was shown to decrease postoperative ecchymosis after rhytidectomy, using an objective measuring tool. We believe that oral A. montana, given perioperatively, can be objectively shown to reduce extent and intensity of postoperative ecchymosis in rhinoplasty surgery. Subjects scheduled for rhinoplasty surgery with nasal bone osteotomies by a single surgeon were prospectively randomized to receive either oral perioperative A. montana (Alpine Pharmaceuticals, San Rafael, Calif) or placebo in a double-blinded fashion. Ecchymosis was measured in digital "three-quarter"-view photographs at 3 postoperative time points. Each bruise was outlined with Adobe Photoshop (Adobe Systems Incorporated, San Jose, Calif), and the extent was scaled to a standardized reference card. Cyan, magenta, yellow, black, and luminosity were analyzed in the bruised and control areas to calculate change in intensity. P value of <0.1 was set as a meaningful difference with statistical significance. Compared with 13 subjects receiving placebo, 9 taking A. montana had 16.2%, 32.9%, and 20.4% less extent on postoperative days 2/3, 7, and 9/10, a statistically significant difference on day 7 (P = 0.097). Color change initially showed 13.1% increase in intensity with A. montana but 10.9% and 36.3% decreases on days 7 and 9/10, a statistically significant difference on day 9/10 (P = 0.074). One subject experienced mild itching and rash with the study drug that resolved during the study period. Arnica montana seems to accelerate postoperative healing, with quicker resolution of the extent and the intensity of ecchymosis after osteotomies in rhinoplasty surgery, which may dramatically affect patient satisfaction.

  16. Permeation of bioactive constituents from Arnica montana preparations through human skin in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Tekko, I A; Bonner, M C; Bowen, R D; Williams, A C

    2006-09-01

    This study investigated and characterised transdermal permeation of bioactive agents from a topically applied Arnica montana tincture. Permeation experiments conducted over 48 h used polydimethylsiloxane (silastic) and human epidermal membranes mounted in Franz-type diffusion cells with a methanol-water (50:50 v/v) receptor fluid. A commercially available tincture of A. montana L. derived from dried Spanish flower heads was a donor solution. Further donor solutions prepared from this stock tincture concentrated the tincture constituents 1, 2 and 10 fold and its sesquiterpene lactones 10 fold. Permeants were assayed using a high-performance liquid chromatography method. Five components permeated through silastic membranes providing peaks with relative retention factors to an internal standard (santonin) of 0.28, 1.18, 1.45, 1.98 and 2.76, respectively. No permeant was detected within 12 h of applying the Arnica tincture onto human epidermal membranes. However, after 12 h, the first two of these components were detected. These were shown by Zimmermann reagent reaction to be sesquiterpene lactones and liquid chromatography/diode array detection/mass spectrometry indicated that these two permeants were 11,13-dihydrohelenalin (DH) analogues (methacrylate and tiglate esters). The same two components were also detected within 3 h of topical application of the 10-fold concentrated tincture and the concentrated sesquiterpene lactone extract.

  17. Treatment of Postoperative Sore Throat With the Aid of the Homeopathic Remedy Arnica montana: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Tsintzas, Dionysis; Vithoulkas, George

    2017-01-01

    We present 2 cases of severe postoperative sore throat, hoarseness, aphonia, and dysphagia, after a laryngeal mask insertion, who were treated successfully with the homeopathic remedy Arnica montana. Three doses of Arnica montana 200CH were given to the patients over 36 hours. Although the symptoms were very intense, the remedy was very effective and cleared most of the symptoms in 48 hours. PMID:29228804

  18. Effect of the oral administration homeopathic Arnica montana on mitochondrial oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Ronaldo Antônio; da Costa, Ellen Dias; Catisti, Rosana

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the effect of homeopathic Arnica on mitochondrial oxidative stress induced by Ca(2+) plus inorganic phosphate and/or Fe(2+)-citrate-mediated lipid peroxidation through changes in oxygen consumption rates. Mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation from the livers of adult male Wistar rats which had been treated with Arnica montana 6cH, 12cH, 30cH or succussed 30% ethanol (control) for 21 days. In the presence of antimycin-A, electron transport chain inhibitor, as evidenced by antimycin-A insensitive O(2) consumption, Arnica inhibited lipid peroxidation of mitochondrial membranes. In oxidative stress conditions, in the presence of Ca(2+) and inorganic phosphate, animals receiving Arnica 30cH had a significant decrease in mitochondrial O(2) consumption compared to control animals. When administrated orally, Arnica 30cH protects against hepatic mitochondrial membrane permeabilization induced by Ca(2+) and/or Fe(2+)-citrate-mediated lipid peroxidation and fragmentation of proteins due to the attack by reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of the homeopathic remedies Arnica montana and Bellis perennis on mild postpartum bleeding--a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study--preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Oberbaum, Menachem; Galoyan, Narine; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Singer, Shepherd Roee; Grisaru, Sorina; Shashar, David; Samueloff, Arnon

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of Arnica Montana and Bellis perennis on postpartum blood loss. Double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, clinical trial. Department of Gynecology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem. Forty parturients were randomized to one of three groups: Arnica montana C6 and Bellis perennis C6 (n=14), Arnica montana C30 and Bellis perennis C30 (n=14), or double placebo (n=12). After 48 h the Arnica/placebo was halted, and patients continued the Bellis/placebo until cessation of lochia. Hemoglobin levels (Hb) at 48 and 72 h postpartum. At 72 h postpartum, mean Hb levels remained similar after treatment with homeopathic remedies (12.7 versus 12.4) as compared to a significant decrease in Hb levels in the placebo group (12.7 versus 11.6; p<0.05), in spite of less favorable initial characteristics of the treatment group. The mean difference in Hb levels at 72 h postpartum was -0.29 (95% CI -1.09; 0.52) in the treatment group and -1.18 (95% CI -1.82; -0.54) in the placebo group (p<0.05). Treatment with homeopathic Arnica montana and Bellis perennis may reduce postpartum blood loss, as compared with placebo.

  20. Optimization of culture conditions of Arnica montana L.: effects of mycorrhizal fungi and competing plants.

    PubMed

    Jurkiewicz, Anna; Ryszka, Przemyslaw; Anielska, Teresa; Waligórski, Piotr; Białońska, Dobroslawa; Góralska, Katarzyna; Tsimilli-Michael, Merope; Turnau, Katarzyna

    2010-06-01

    Arnica montana is a rare plant that needs special protection because of its intensive harvesting for medicinal purposes. The present work was aimed at finding optimal culture conditions for Arnica plants in order to enable their successful reintroduction into their natural stands. Plants were cultivated under controlled greenhouse conditions on substrata with different nitrogen (N) concentration. As Arnica is always colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in nature, a fact that has been overlooked in other similar projects, we, here, applied and tested different inocula. We found that they differed in their effectiveness, both in establishing symbiosis, assessed by the colonization parameters, and in improving the performance of Arnica, evaluated by the photosynthetic parameters derived from the fluorescence transients (JIP-test), with the inocula containing G. intraradices or composed of several Glomus strains being the most effective. The comparison was possible only on substrata with medium N, since high N did not permit the formation of mycorrhiza, while at low N, few nonmycorrhizal plants survived until the measurements and mycorrhizal plants, which were well growing, exhibited a high heterogeneity. Analysis of secondary metabolites showed clearly that mycorrhization was associated with increased concentrations of phenolic acids in roots. For some of the inocula used, a tendency for increase of the level of phenolic acids in shoots and of sesquiterpene lactones, both in roots and in shoots, was also observed. We also studied the interactions between A. montana and Dactylis glomerata, known to compete with Arnica under field conditions. When specimens from both species were cultured together, there was no effect on D. glomerata, but Arnica could retain a photosynthetic performance that permitted survivability only in the presence of AMF; without AMF, the photosynthetic performance was lower, and the plants were eventually totally outcompeted.

  1. Fourteen polymorphic microsatellite markers for the threatened Arnica montana (Asteraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Duwe, Virginia K.; Ismail, Sascha A.; Buser, Andres; Sossai, Esther; Borsch, Thomas; Muller, Ludo A. H.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed to investigate population genetic structure in the threatened species Arnica montana. • Methods and Results: Fourteen microsatellite markers with di-, tetra-, and hexanucleotide repeat motifs were developed for A. montana using 454 pyrosequencing without and with library-enrichment methods, resulting in 56,545 sequence reads and 14,467 sequence reads, respectively. All loci showed a high level of polymorphism, with allele numbers ranging from four to 11 in five individuals from five populations (25 samples) and an expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.192 to 0.648 across the loci. • Conclusions: This set of microsatellite markers is the first one described for A. montana and will facilitate conservation genetic applications as well as the understanding of phylogeographic patterns in this species. PMID:25606354

  2. Effects of phonophoresis with Arnica montana onto acute inflammatory process in rat skeletal muscles: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Alfredo, Patrícia P; Anaruma, Carlos A; Pião, Antônio C S; João, Silvia M A; Casarotto, Raquel A

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed at verifying the effects of phonophoresis associated with Arnica montana on the acute phase of an inflammatory muscle lesion. Forty Wistar male rats (300+/-50 g), of which the Tibialis Anterior muscle was surgically lesioned, were divided into four groups (n=10 each): control group received no treatment; the ultrasound group (US) was treated in pulsed mode with 1-MHz frequency, 0.5 W/cm(2) intensity (spatial and temporal average - SATA), duty cycle of 1:2 (2 ms on, 4 ms off, 50%), time of application 3 min per session, one session per day, for 3 days; the phonophoresis or ultrasound plus arnica (US+A) group was treated with arnica with the same US parameters plus arnica gel; and the arnica group (A) was submitted to massage with arnica gel, also for 3 min, once a day, for 3 days. Treatment started 24h after the surgical lesion. On the 4th day after lesion creation, animals were sacrificed and sections of the lesioned, inflamed muscle were removed for quantitative (mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cell count) and qualitative histological analysis. Collected data from the 4 groups were statistically analyzed and the significance level set at p<0.05. Results show higher mononuclear cell density in all three treated groups with no significant difference between them, but values were significantly different (p<0.0001) when compared to control group's. As to polymorphonuclear cell density, significant differences were found between control group (p=0.0134) and US, US+A and A groups; the arnica group presented lesser density of polymorphonuclear cells when compared (p=0.0134) to the other groups. No significant difference was found between US and US+A groups. While the massage with arnica gel proved to be an effective anti-inflammatory on acute muscle lesion in topic use, these results point to ineffectiveness of Arnica montana phonophoresis, US having seemingly checked or minimized its anti-inflammatory effect.

  3. The seamy side of natural medicines: contact sensitization to arnica (Arnica montana L.) and marigold (Calendula officinalis L.).

    PubMed

    Reider, N; Komericki, P; Hausen, B M; Fritsch, P; Aberer, W

    2001-11-01

    Medical remedies of plant origin have gained increasing popularity in recent years. Both anaphylactic and eczematous allergic reactions are on the rise, accordingly. Arnica and marigold, both of the Compositae family, are in widespread use, but only limited data are available on their allergenic potential. We tested 443 consecutive patients, in addition to the European standard and other series, with Compositae mix, sesquiterpene lactone mix, arnica, marigold, and propolis. 5 subjects ( approximately 1.13%) reacted to arnica, 9 ( approximately 2.03%) to marigold. The Compositae mix was positive in 18 cases ( approximately 4.06%). Among them were 3 out of 5 individuals with a sensitization to arnica, and 4 out of 9 who reacted to marigold. Sensitization to arnica and marigold was often accompanied by reactions to nickel, Myroxylon Pereirae resin, fragrance mix, propolis, and colophonium. We conclude that Compositae allergy contributes significantly to the epidemiology of contact dermatitis and that sensitization to arnica and marigold cannot be assessed by testing with the Compositae or sesquiterpene mix alone. As extracts of these plants are frequently used in occupational and cosmetic products, patch testing with additional plant extracts or adjustment of the commercial Compositae mix to regional conditions is recommended.

  4. Temperature is the key to altitudinal variation of phenolics in Arnica montana L. cv. ARBO.

    PubMed

    Albert, Andreas; Sareedenchai, Vipaporn; Heller, Werner; Seidlitz, Harald K; Zidorn, Christian

    2009-05-01

    Plants in alpine habitats are exposed to many environmental stresses, in particular temperature and radiation extremes. Recent field experiments on Arnica montana L. cv. ARBO indicated pronounced altitudinal variation in plant phenolics. Ortho-diphenolics increased with altitude compared to other phenolic compounds, resulting in an increase in antioxidative capacity of the tissues involved. Factors causing these variations were investigated by climate chamber (CC) experiments focusing on temperature and ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation. Plants of A. montana L. cv. ARBO were grown in CCs under realistic climatic and radiation regimes. Key factors temperature and UV-B radiation were altered between different groups of plants. Subsequently, flowering heads were analyzed by HPLC for their contents of flavonoids and caffeic acid derivatives. Surprisingly, increased UV-B radiation did not trigger any change in phenolic metabolites in Arnica. In contrast, a pronounced increase in the ratio of B-ring ortho-diphenolic (quercetin) compared to B-ring monophenolic (kaempferol) flavonols resulted from a decrease in temperature by 5 degrees C in the applied climate regime. In conclusion, enhanced UV-B radiation is probably not the key factor triggering shifts in the phenolic composition in Arnica grown at higher altitudes but rather temperature, which decreases with altitude.

  5. Homeopathic Arnica montana for post-tonsillectomy analgesia: a randomised placebo control trial.

    PubMed

    Robertson, A; Suryanarayanan, R; Banerjee, A

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of Homeopathic Arnica in reducing the morbidity following tonsillectomy. Randomised double blind, placebo controlled trial at a tertiary referral centre. 190 patients over the age of 18 undergoing tonsillectomy were randomised into intervention and control groups receiving either Arnica 30c or identical placebo, 2 tablets 6 times in the first post-operative day and then 2 tablets twice a day for the next 7 days. The primary outcome measure was the change in pain scores (visual analogue scale) recorded by the patient on a questionnaire over 14 days post-operatively; Secondary outcome measures were: analgesia consumption, visits to the GP or hospital, antibiotic usage, the day on which their swallowing returned to normal and the day on which they returned to work. 111 (58.4%) completed questionnaires were available for analysis. The Arnica group had a significantly larger drop in pain score from day 1 to day 14 (28.3) compared to the placebo group (23.8) with p < 0.05. The two groups did not differ significantly on analgesic consumption or any of the other secondary outcome measures (number of post-operative visits to GP, use of antibiotics and secondary haemorrhage readmissions). The results of this trial suggest that Arnica montana given after tonsillectomy provides a small, but statistically significant, decrease in pain scores compared to placebo.

  6. Sesquiterpene lactones in Arnica montana: helenalin and dihydrohelenalin chemotypes in Spain.

    PubMed

    Perry, Nigel B; Burgess, Elaine J; Rodríguez Guitián, Manuel A; Romero Franco, Rosa; López Mosquera, Elvira; Smallfield, Bruce M; Joyce, Nigel I; Littlejohn, Roger P

    2009-05-01

    An analytical RPLC method for sesquiterpene lactones in Arnica montana has been extended to include quantitative analyses of dihydrohelenalin esters. LC-ESI-MS-MS distinguished the isomeric helenalin and dihydrohelenalin esters. The dihydrohelenalin esters have lower response factors for UV detection than do helenalin esters, which must be taken into account for quantitative analyses. Analyses of flowers from 16 different wild populations of A. montana in Spain showed differing proportions of helenalin and dihydrohelenalin esters. For the first time a chemotype with high levels of helenalin esters (total helenalins 5.2-10.3 mg/g dry weight) is reported in Spanish A. montana. These samples were from heath lands at high altitude (1330-1460 m), whereas samples from meadows and peat bogs at lower altitudes were the expected chemotype with high levels of dihydrohelenalin esters (total dihydrohelenalins 10.9-18.2 mg/g). The phenolic compounds, both flavonoid glycosides and caffeoylquinic acids, in Spanish A. montana are reported for the first time. The levels of several of these compounds differed significantly between samples from heath lands and samples from peat bogs or meadows, with the heath land samples being most similar to central European A. montana in their phenolic composition. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart. New York.

  7. Chemometrics-based Approach in Analysis of Arnicae flos

    PubMed Central

    Zheleva-Dimitrova, Dimitrina Zh.; Balabanova, Vessela; Gevrenova, Reneta; Doichinova, Irini; Vitkova, Antonina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Arnica montana flowers have a long history as herbal medicines for external use on injuries and rheumatic complaints. Objective: To investigate Arnicae flos of cultivated accessions from Bulgaria, Poland, Germany, Finland, and Pharmacy store for phenolic derivatives and sesquiterpene lactones (STLs). Materials and Methods: Samples of Arnica from nine origins were prepared by ultrasound-assisted extraction with 80% methanol for phenolic compounds analysis. Subsequent reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of the analytes was performed using gradient elution and ultraviolet detection at 280 and 310 nm (phenolic acids), and 360 nm (flavonoids). Total STLs were determined in chloroform extracts by solid-phase extraction-HPLC at 225 nm. The HPLC generated chromatographic data were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering (HC). Results: The highest total amount of phenolic acids was found in the sample from Botanical Garden at Joensuu University, Finland (2.36 mg/g dw). Astragalin, isoquercitrin, and isorhamnetin 3-glucoside were the main flavonol glycosides being present up to 3.37 mg/g (astragalin). Three well-defined clusters were distinguished by PCA and HC. Cluster C1 comprised of the German and Finnish accessions characterized by the highest content of flavonols. Cluster C2 included the Bulgarian and Polish samples presenting a low content of flavonoids. Cluster C3 consisted only of one sample from a pharmacy store. Conclusion: A validated HPLC method for simultaneous determination of phenolic acids, flavonoid glycosides, and aglycones in A. montana flowers was developed. The PCA loading plot showed that quercetin, kaempferol, and isorhamnetin can be used to distinguish different Arnica accessions. SUMMARY A principal component analysis (PCA) on 13 phenolic compounds and total amount of sesquiterpene lactones in Arnicae flos collection tended to cluster the studied 9 accessions into

  8. Effect of vehicles on topical application of aloe vera and arnica montana components.

    PubMed

    Bergamante, Valentina; Ceschel, Gian Carlo; Marazzita, Sergio; Ronchi, Celestino; Fini, Adamo

    2007-10-01

    In this study two types of gels and microemulsions are investigated for their ability to dissolve, release, and induce the permeation of helenalin, a flavonoid responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of arnica montana extract, and aloin, an anthrone-C-glucosyls with antibacterial activity present in aloe vera extract. The release of these agents from each vehicle was followed by HPLC, and transcutaneous permeation was examined using a modified Franz cell and a porcine skin membrane. The study showed that a microemulsion can be a good vehicle to increase the permeation of helenalin, while the gel formulation, containing Sepigel 305, proved able to reduce the release and permeation of aloin, with a consequent activity limited to the surface of application, without any permeation. This is in accordance with the necessity to avoid this process, since human skin fibroblasts can metabolize absorbed aloin into a structurally related compound that increases the sensitivity of skin to ultraviolet light.

  9. Quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones in extract of Arnica montana L. by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Jordanka; Denkova, Pavletta; Todorova, Milka; Evstatieva, Ljuba

    2011-01-05

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used as a method for quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones present in a crude lactone fraction isolated from Arnica montana. Eight main components - tigloyl-, methacryloyl-, isobutyryl- and 2-methylbutyryl-esters of helenalin (H) and 11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DH) were identified in the studied sample. The method allows the determination of the total amount of sesquiterpene lactones and the quantity of both type helenalin and 11α,13-dihydrohelenalin esters separately. Furthermore, 6-O-tigloylhelenalin (HT, 1), 6-O-methacryloylhelenalin (HM, 2), 6-O-tigloyl-11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHT, 5), and 6-O-methacryloyl-11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHM, 6) were quantified as individual components. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Endophytic Streptomyces in the traditional medicinal plant Arnica montana L.: secondary metabolites and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Wardecki, Tina; Brötz, Elke; De Ford, Christian; von Loewenich, Friederike D; Rebets, Yuriy; Tokovenko, Bogdan; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Merfort, Irmgard

    2015-08-01

    Arnica montana L. is a medical plant of the Asteraceae family and grows preferably on nutrient poor soils in mountainous environments. Such surroundings are known to make plants dependent on symbiosis with other organisms. Up to now only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were found to act as endophytic symbiosis partners for A. montana. Here we identified five Streptomyces strains, microorganisms also known to occur as endophytes in plants and to produce a huge variety of active secondary metabolites, as inhabitants of A. montana. The secondary metabolite spectrum of these strains does not contain sesquiterpene lactones, but consists of the glutarimide antibiotics cycloheximide and actiphenol as well as the diketopiperazines cyclo-prolyl-valyl, cyclo-prolyl-isoleucyl, cyclo-prolyl-leucyl and cyclo-prolyl-phenylalanyl. Notably, genome analysis of one strain was performed and indicated a huge genome size with a high number of natural products gene clusters among which genes for cycloheximide production were detected. Only weak activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus was revealed, but the extracts showed a marked cytotoxic activity as well as an antifungal activity against Candida parapsilosis and Fusarium verticillioides. Altogether, our results provide evidence that A. montana and its endophytic Streptomyces benefit from each other by completing their protection against competitors and pathogens and by exchanging plant growth promoting signals with nutrients.

  11. Propagation and introduction of Arnica montana L. into cultivation: a step to reduce the pressure on endangered and high-valued medicinal plant species.

    PubMed

    Sugier, Danuta; Sugier, Piotr; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    Arnica montana (L.) is an endangered and endemic medicinal plant species in Europe. The pressure on natural sources of this plant is alleviated by a suitable use of arnica resources in the European region and introduction into cultivation. The objective of this study was to describe the impact of different ways of plant propagation and introduction on the growth and reproduction mode of this species. During the six consecutive years of the field experiment, the vegetative and reproductive traits were monitored, and survival time was assessed. The particular ways of arnica plant propagation and introduction determined all the intrinsic species traits and plant survival. The values of the characteristics studied indicated good acclimatization of the arnica ecotype to the climatic conditions of eastern Poland. Practical implications from the data presented here include the possibility of using the presented modes of arnica propagation and introduction in the short- and long-term perspective of arnica cultivation, which can give a possibility of better adjustment of raw material production.

  12. Cumulative therapeutic effects of phytochemicals in Arnica montana flower extract alleviated collagen-induced arthritis: inhibition of both pro-inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Arif, Mohammad; Nirala, Ranjeet Kumar; Gupta, Ritu; Thakur, Sonu Chand

    2016-03-30

    The plant Arnica montana is used in folk medicine to alleviate pain, inflammation and swelling of muscles and joints associated with rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects and mechanism of action of A. montana flower methanol extract (AMME) against both inflammation and oxidative stress in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Oral administration of AMME was found to reduce clinical signs and improve the histological and radiological status of the hind limb joints. AMME-treated rats had lower expression levels of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukins (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12) and titer of anti-type II collagen antibody compared with untreated CIA rats. Furthermore, by inhibiting these mediators, AMME also contributed towards the reversal of disturbed antioxidant levels and peroxidative damage. The alleviation of arthritis in rats was very likely due to the combined action of phenolic and flavonoid compounds, the major constituents identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The study also shed some light on mechanisms involved in diminution of inflammatory mediators and free radical-generating toxicants and enhancement of the antioxidant armory, thereby preventing further tissue damage, injury and synovial hyperproliferation in arthritis. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhiza of Arnica montana under field conditions--conventional and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Ryszka, Przemysław; Błaszkowski, Janusz; Jurkiewicz, Anna; Turnau, Katarzyna

    2010-11-01

    Two distinct populations of Arnica montana, an endangered medicinal plant, were studied under field conditions. The material was investigated using microscopic and molecular methods. The analyzed plants were always found to be mycorrhizal. Nineteen arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal DNA sequences were obtained from the roots. They were related to Glomus Group A, but most did not match any known species. Some showed a degree of similarity to fungi colonizing liverworts. Conventional analysis of spores isolated from soil samples allowed to identify different fungal taxa: Glomus macrocarpum, Glomus mosseae, Acaulospora lacunosa, and Scutellospora dipurpurescens. Their spores were also isolated from trap cultures.

  14. Propagation and Introduction of Arnica montana L. into Cultivation: A Step to Reduce the Pressure on Endangered and High-Valued Medicinal Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Arnica montana (L.) is an endangered and endemic medicinal plant species in Europe. The pressure on natural sources of this plant is alleviated by a suitable use of arnica resources in the European region and introduction into cultivation. The objective of this study was to describe the impact of different ways of plant propagation and introduction on the growth and reproduction mode of this species. During the six consecutive years of the field experiment, the vegetative and reproductive traits were monitored, and survival time was assessed. The particular ways of arnica plant propagation and introduction determined all the intrinsic species traits and plant survival. The values of the characteristics studied indicated good acclimatization of the arnica ecotype to the climatic conditions of eastern Poland. Practical implications from the data presented here include the possibility of using the presented modes of arnica propagation and introduction in the short- and long-term perspective of arnica cultivation, which can give a possibility of better adjustment of raw material production. PMID:24282381

  15. Arnica montana Stimulates Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression in a Macrophage Cell Line Differentiated to Wound-Healing Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Marzotto, Marta; Bonafini, Clara; Olioso, Debora; Baruzzi, Anna; Bettinetti, Laura; Di Leva, Francesca; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Bellavite, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Arnica montana (Arnica m.) is used for its purported anti-inflammatory and tissue healing actions after trauma, bruises, or tissue injuries, but its cellular and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. This work tested Arnica m. effects on gene expression using an in vitro model of macrophages polarized towards a "wound-healing" phenotype. The monocyte-macrophage human THP-1 cell line was cultured and differentiated with phorbol-myristate acetate and Interleukin-4, then exposed for 24h to Arnica m. centesimal (c) dilutions 2c, 3c, 5c, 9c, 15c or Control. Total RNA was isolated and cDNA libraries were sequenced with a NextSeq500 sequencer. Genes with significantly positive (up-regulated) or negative (down-regulated) fold changes were defined as differentially expressed genes (DEGs). A total of 20 DEGs were identified in Arnica m. 2c treated cells. Of these, 7 genes were up-regulated and 13 were down-regulated. The most significantly up-regulated function concerned 4 genes with a conserved site of epidermal growth factor-like region (p<0.001) and three genes of proteinaceous extracellular matrix, including heparin sulphate proteoglycan 2 (HSPG2), fibrillin 2 (FBN2), and fibronectin (FN1) (p<0.01). Protein assay confirmed a statistically significant increase of fibronectin production (p<0.05). The down-regulated transcripts derived from mitochondrial genes coding for some components of electron transport chain. The same groups of genes were also regulated by increasing dilutions of Arnica m. (3c, 5c, 9c, 15c), although with a lower effect size. We further tested the healing potential of Arnica m. 2c in a scratch model of wound closure based on the motility of bone marrow-derived macrophages and found evidence of an accelerating effect on cell migration in this system. The results of this work, taken together, provide new insights into the action of Arnica m. in tissue healing and repair, and identify extracellular matrix regulation by macrophages as a therapeutic

  16. Arnica montana Stimulates Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression in a Macrophage Cell Line Differentiated to Wound-Healing Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marzotto, Marta; Bonafini, Clara; Olioso, Debora; Baruzzi, Anna; Bettinetti, Laura; Di Leva, Francesca; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Bellavite, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Arnica montana (Arnica m.) is used for its purported anti-inflammatory and tissue healing actions after trauma, bruises, or tissue injuries, but its cellular and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. This work tested Arnica m. effects on gene expression using an in vitro model of macrophages polarized towards a “wound-healing” phenotype. The monocyte-macrophage human THP-1 cell line was cultured and differentiated with phorbol-myristate acetate and Interleukin-4, then exposed for 24h to Arnica m. centesimal (c) dilutions 2c, 3c, 5c, 9c, 15c or Control. Total RNA was isolated and cDNA libraries were sequenced with a NextSeq500 sequencer. Genes with significantly positive (up-regulated) or negative (down-regulated) fold changes were defined as differentially expressed genes (DEGs). A total of 20 DEGs were identified in Arnica m. 2c treated cells. Of these, 7 genes were up-regulated and 13 were down-regulated. The most significantly up-regulated function concerned 4 genes with a conserved site of epidermal growth factor-like region (p<0.001) and three genes of proteinaceous extracellular matrix, including heparin sulphate proteoglycan 2 (HSPG2), fibrillin 2 (FBN2), and fibronectin (FN1) (p<0.01). Protein assay confirmed a statistically significant increase of fibronectin production (p<0.05). The down-regulated transcripts derived from mitochondrial genes coding for some components of electron transport chain. The same groups of genes were also regulated by increasing dilutions of Arnica m. (3c, 5c, 9c, 15c), although with a lower effect size. We further tested the healing potential of Arnica m. 2c in a scratch model of wound closure based on the motility of bone marrow-derived macrophages and found evidence of an accelerating effect on cell migration in this system. The results of this work, taken together, provide new insights into the action of Arnica m. in tissue healing and repair, and identify extracellular matrix regulation by macrophages as a

  17. Arnica montana effects on gene expression in a human macrophage cell line. Evaluation by quantitative Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Olioso, Debora; Marzotto, Marta; Bonafini, Clara; Brizzi, Maurizio; Bellavite, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Arnica montana is a popular traditional remedy widely used in complementary medicine, also for its wound healing properties. Despite its acknowledged action in clinical settings at various doses, the molecular aspects relating to how A. montana promotes wound healing remain to be elucidated. To fill this gap, we evaluated the whole plant extract, in a wide range of dilutions, in THP-1 human cells, differentiated into mature macrophages and into an alternative IL-4-activated phenotype involved in tissue remodelling and healing. Real-time quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) analysis was used to study the changes in the expression of a customized panel of key genes, mainly cytokines, receptors and transcription factors. On macrophages differentiated towards the wound healing phenotype, A. montana affected the expression of several genes. In particular CXC chemokine ligand 1 (CXCL1), coding for an chief chemokine, exhibited the most consistent increase of expression, while also CXC chemokine ligand 2 (CXCL2), Interleukin8 (IL8) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP2) were slightly up-regulated, suggesting a positive influence of A. montana on neutrophil recruitment and on angiogenesis. MMP1, coding for a metalloproteinase capable of cleaving extracellular matrix substrates, was down-regulated. Most results showed non-linearity of the dose-effect relationship. This exploratory study provides new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of A. montana as a promoter of healing, since some of the genes it modifies are key regulators of tissue remodelling, inflammation and chemotaxis. Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Developmental and Environmental Effects on Sesquiterpene Lactones in Cultivated Arnica montana L.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Milka; Trendafilova, Antoaneta; Vitkova, Antonina; Petrova, Maria; Zayova, Ely; Antonova, Daniela

    2016-08-01

    The amount of sesquiterpene lactones and the lactone profile of Arnica montana L. in flowering and seed formation stages in vitro and in vivo propagated from seeds of German, Ukrainian, and Austrian origin and grown in two experimental fields were studied. It was found that in vitro propagated 2-year plants in full flowering stage accumulated higher amount of lactones in comparison to in vivo propagated 3-year plants and to the seed formation stage, respectively. Helenalins predominated in in vivo propagated 2-year or in vitro propagated 3-year plants. 2-Methylbutyrate (2MeBu) was the principal ester in the samples with prevalence of helenalins, while isobutyrate (iBu) was the major one in the samples with predominance of 11,13-dihydrohelenalins. The results revealed that the environmental conditions on Vitosha Mt. are more suitable for cultivation of A. montana giving higher content of lactones. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zürich.

  19. Lignans from Arnica species.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas J; Stausberg, Sabine; Raison, Jeanette Von; Berner, Matthias; Willuhn, Günter

    2006-05-10

    From four Arnica species (A. angustifolia Vahl ssp. attenuata (Greene) Maguire, A. lonchophylla Greene ssp. lonchophylla Maguire (flowerheads), A. chamissonis Less. ssp. foliosa (Nutt.) Maguire, A. montana L. (roots and rhizomes)) a total of twelve lignans of the furofuran-, dibenzylbutyrolactone- and dibenzylbutyrolactol-type were isolated. No report on lignans as constituents of Arnica species exists so far. Besides the known pinoresinol, epipinoresinol, phillygenin, matairesinol, nortrachelogenin and nortracheloside, six dibenzylbutyrolactol derivatives with different stereochemistry and substitution at C-9 were isolated and their structures elucidated by NMR spectroscopic and mass spectral analysis.

  20. Evaluation of homeopathic Arnica montana for ecchymosis after upper blepharoplasty: a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Kotlus, Brett S; Heringer, Dustin M; Dryden, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    Ecchymosis is commonly encountered after upper eyelid blepharoplasty. The use of homeopathic preparations of Arnica montana, a flowering herb, has been advocated by physicians, patients, and manufacturers for reduction of postsurgical ecchymosis. The authors evaluate its efficacy after upper eyelid blepharoplasty. A prospective, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was performed in which patients were randomly assigned to the administration of homeopathic A. montana or placebo concurrent with unilateral upper eyelid blepharoplasty followed by contralateral treatment at least 1 month later. Ecchymosis was evaluated at days 3 and 7 by rank order of severity and measurement of surface area of observable ecchymosis. There was no statistically significant difference in area of ecchymosis or rank order of ecchymosis severity for days 3 and 7 after treatment with A. montana versus placebo. Additionally, there was no difference in ease of recovery per patient report, and there was no difference in the rate of ecchymosis resolution. The authors find no evidence that homeopathic A. montana, as used in this study, is beneficial in the reduction or the resolution of ecchymosis after upper eyelid blepharoplasty.

  1. The effect of topical arnica on muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Adkison, Julie D; Bauer, David W; Chang, Terence

    2010-10-01

    The herb Arnica montana, in topical formulations, has been reputed to decrease bruising and muscle pain. This claim has been inadequately and incompletely addressed. To determine whether topical A. montana cream could decrease subjective leg pain following calf raises. Secondary outcomes were effects on ankle range of motion and muscle tenderness. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 53 subjects. Active range of motion was measured in both ankles, and then a series of calf-raises were completed according to a standardized protocol. Each participant received 2 tubes of cream, 1 with active arnica and 1 with placebo. The creams were applied to the lower legs immediately after the exercise, and again at 24 and 48 hours postexercise according to the "RIGHT" or "LEFT" labels. At 48 hours postexercise, subjects had their ankle range of motion and muscle tenderness measured. Subjects used the analog scale to rate pain in each leg at baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours. No significant differences in pain scores were seen before exercise (arnica: 0.07 vs placebo: 0.09, p = 0.32). Pain scores on legs treated with arnica were higher than scores on those receiving placebo 24 hours after exercise (3.04 vs 2.36, respectively; p < 0.005). Pain scores on day 3 (arnica: 3.44 vs placebo: 3.20, p = 0.66) and day 4 (arnica: 2.36 vs placebo: 2.31, p = 0.62) were not significantly different. There was no difference in muscle tenderness (arnica: 1.05 vs placebo: 1.05, p = 1.0). Ankle range of motion did not differ significantly on either day 1 (arnica: 64.70 degrees vs placebo: 66.15, p = 0.352 or day 3 (arnica: 63.32 degrees vs placebo: 65.94, p = 0.058). Rather than decreasing leg pain, arnica was found to increase leg pain 24 hours after eccentric calf exercises. This effect did not extend to the 48-hour measurement.

  2. Altitudinal variation of phenolic contents in flowering heads of Arnica montana cv. ARBO: a 3-year comparison.

    PubMed

    Spitaler, Renate; Winkler, Andrea; Lins, Isabella; Yanar, Sema; Stuppner, Hermann; Zidorn, Christian

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of our studies of altitudinal effects on secondary metabolite profile of flowering heads from taxa of the Asteraceae, we investigated phenolic contents and radical scavenging potential from cultivated plants of Arnica montana cv. ARBO during the growing seasons 2003, 2004, and 2005. By conducting experiments on potted plants, we excluded that differences in phenolic contents from plants grown at different altitudes were related primarily to differences in soil composition at these sites. To assess altitudinal and interseasonal variation, plants of A. montana cultivar ARBO were grown in nine experimental plots at altitudes between 590 and 2,230 m at Mount Patscherkofel near Innsbruck, Austria. In all growing seasons and regardless of the soil the plants were grown in, the proportion of flavonoids with vicinal-free hydroxy groups in ring B to flavonoids lacking this feature, and the total amount of caffeic acid derivatives, significantly increased with elevation. These increases of antioxidant phenolics corresponded to an increase of the radical scavenging potential of extracts from plants grown at different altitudes. The results are discussed in regard to previous studies that suggest that enhanced UV-B radiation and decreased temperatures trigger augmented biosynthesis of UV-absorbing and antioxidant phenolics in higher plants.

  3. Identification and characterization of two new derivatives of chlorogenic acids in Arnica (Arnica montana L.) flowers by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Rakesh; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2011-04-27

    Arnica montana is a medicinally important plant due to its broad health effects, and it is used in Ayurvedic, Homeopathic, Unani, and folk medicines. We have used LC-MS(n) (n = 2-5) to detect and characterize in Arnica flowers 11 quantitatively minor fumaric and methoxyoxalic acid-containing chlorogenic acids, nine of them not previously reported in nature. These comprise 1,5-dicaffeoyl-3-methoxyoxaloylquinic acid, 1,3-dicaffeoyl-4-methoxyoxaloylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoyl-4-methoxyoxaloylquinic acid, and 1-methoxyoxaloyl-4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (M(r) 602); 3-caffeoyl-4-feruloyl-5-methoxyoxaloylquinic acid and 3-feruloyl-4-methoxyoxaloyl-5-caffeoylquinic acid (M(r) 616); 1,5-dicaffeoyl-4-fumaroyl and 1,5-dicaffeoyl-3-fumaroylquinic acid (M(r) 614); 3,5-dicaffeoyl-1,4-dimethoxyoxaloylquinic acid (M(r) 688); and 1-methoxyoxaloyl-3,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid and 1,3,4-tricaffeoyl-5-methoxyoxaloylquinic acid (M(r) 764). All of the structures have been assigned on the basis of LC-MS(n) patterns of fragmentation, relative hydrophobicity, and analogy of fragmentation patterns if compared to caffeoylquinic acids. This is the first time when fumaric acid-containing chlorogenic acids are reported in nature.

  4. Altitudinal variation of secondary metabolite profiles in flowering heads of Arnica montana cv. ARBO.

    PubMed

    Spitaler, Renate; Schlorhaufer, P Daniel; Ellmerer, Ernst P; Merfort, Irmgard; Bortenschlager, Sigmar; Stuppner, Hermann; Zidorn, Christian

    2006-02-01

    The altitudinal variation on the contents of secondary metabolites in flowering heads of Arnica montana was assessed. Plants of A. montana cultivar ARBO were grown in nine experimental plots at altitudes between 590 and 2230m at Mount Patscherkofel near Innsbruck/Austria. The total contents of sesquiterpene lactones and flavonoids were not positively correlated with the altitude of the growing site. However, the proportion of flavonoids with vicinal free hydroxy groups in ring B to flavonoids lacking this feature significantly increased with elevation. Additionally, the level of caffeic acid derivatives also positively correlated with the altitude of the growing site. In particular amounts of 1-methoxyoxaloyl-3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid significantly increased in higher sites and samples from the summit region contained 85% more of this compound than samples from valley sites. These results are discussed with regards to chemosystematic studies comparing samples collected in different altitudes as well as in the light of a UV-B protective and radical scavenging function of phenolics and their significance for plant life in environments with elevated UV-B radiation.

  5. Screening for anti-inflammatory activity of 12 Arnica (Asteraceae) species assessed by inhibition of NF-kappaB and release of human neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Ekenäs, Catarina; Zebrowska, Anna; Schuler, Barbara; Vrede, Tobias; Andreasen, Katarina; Backlund, Anders; Merfort, Irmgard; Bohlin, Lars

    2008-12-01

    Several species in the genus Arnica have been used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory-related disorders. Extracts of twelve Arnica species and two species closely related to arnica ( Layia hieracioides and Madia sativa) were investigated for inhibition of human neutrophil elastase release and inhibition of transcription factor NF-kappaB. Statistical analyses reveal significant differences in inhibitory capacities between extracts. Sesquiterpene lactones of the helenanolide type, of which some are known inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase release and NF-kappaB, are present in large amounts in the very active extracts of A. montana and A. chamissonis. Furthermore, A. longifolia, which has previously not been investigated, shows a high activity similar to that of A. montana and A. chamissonis in both bioassays. Sesquiterpene lactones of the xanthalongin type are present in large amounts in A. longifolia and other active extracts and would be interesting to evaluate further. COX-2:cyclooxygenase 2 EMSA:electrophoretic mobility shift assay fMLP: N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine HaCaT:human keratinocyte HNE:human neutrophil elastase IkappaB:inhibitory subunit of kappaB iNOS:inducible nitric oxide synthase NF-kappaB:nuclear factor kappaB PAF:platelet activating factor STL:sesquiterpene lactone TNF-alpha:tumor necrosis factor alpha.

  6. Is there a role for homeopathy in breast cancer surgery? A first randomized clinical trial on treatment with Arnica montana to reduce post-operative seroma and bleeding in patients undergoing total mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Luca; Piraneo, Salvatore; Riggio, Eliana; Basilicò, Silvia; Sartani, Alessandra; Bossi, Daniela; Corsi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the benefits of Arnica montana on post-operative blood loss and seroma production in women undergoing unilateral total mastectomy by administering Arnica Montana 1000 Korsakovian dilution (1000 K). From 2012 to 2014, 53 women were randomly assigned to A. montana or placebo and were followed up for 5 days. The main end point was the reduction in blood and serum volumes collected in drainages. Secondary end points were duration of drainage, a self-evaluation of pain, and the presence of bruising or hematomas. The per-protocol analysis revealed a lower mean volume of blood and serum collected in drainages with A. montana (-94.40 ml; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 22.48-211.28; P = 0.11). A regression model including treatment, volume collected in the drainage on the day of surgery, and patient weight showed a statistically significant difference in favor of A. montana (-106.28 ml; 95% CI: 9.45-203.11; P = 0.03). Volumes collected on the day of surgery and the following days were significantly lower with A. montana at days 2 ( P = 0.033) and 3 ( P = 0.0223). Secondary end points have not revealed significant differences. A. montana 1000 K could reduce post-operative blood and seroma collection in women undergoing unilateral total mastectomy. Larger studies are needed with different dilutions of A. montana to further validate these data.

  7. Development and stability of semisolid preparations based on a supercritical CO2 Arnica extract.

    PubMed

    Bilia, Anna Rita; Bergonzi, Maria Camilla; Mazzi, Giovanni; Vincieri, Franco Francesco

    2006-05-03

    Conventional herbal drug preparations (HDP) based on Arnica montana L. have a low content of the active principles, sesquiterpene lactones, which show poor stability and low physical compatibility in semisolid formulations. Recently, an innovative supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) extract with high sesquiterpene content has been marketed. Development of six semisolid preparations (cetomacrogol, polysorbate 60, polawax, anphyphil, natrosol and sepigel) based on this innovative CO2 extract is discussed. Stability of these preparations was investigated according to ICH guidelines. The evaluation of in vitro release of active constituents was performed using the cell method reported in the European Pharmacopoeia. Preliminary data on in vivo permeation of three selected formulations is demonstrated using the "skin stripping" test, according to the FDA, in healthy subjects. Analysis of sesquiterpene lactones within the extract and in vitro and in vivo studies was performed by RP-HPLC-DAD-MS method. The cetomacrogol showed the best release profile in the in vitro test, while in the in vivo test the best preparation resulted polysorbate 60 and polawax.

  8. Is there a role for homeopathy in breast cancer surgery? A first randomized clinical trial on treatment with Arnica montana to reduce post-operative seroma and bleeding in patients undergoing total mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Luca; Piraneo, Salvatore; Riggio, Eliana; Basilicò, Silvia; Sartani, Alessandra; Bossi, Daniela; Corsi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the benefits of Arnica montana on post-operative blood loss and seroma production in women undergoing unilateral total mastectomy by administering Arnica Montana 1000 Korsakovian dilution (1000 K). Materials and Methods: From 2012 to 2014, 53 women were randomly assigned to A. montana or placebo and were followed up for 5 days. The main end point was the reduction in blood and serum volumes collected in drainages. Secondary end points were duration of drainage, a self-evaluation of pain, and the presence of bruising or hematomas. Results: The per-protocol analysis revealed a lower mean volume of blood and serum collected in drainages with A. montana (−94.40 ml; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 22.48-211.28; P = 0.11). A regression model including treatment, volume collected in the drainage on the day of surgery, and patient weight showed a statistically significant difference in favor of A. montana (−106.28 ml; 95% CI: 9.45-203.11; P = 0.03). Volumes collected on the day of surgery and the following days were significantly lower with A. montana at days 2 (P = 0.033) and 3 (P = 0.0223). Secondary end points have not revealed significant differences. Conclusions: A. montana 1000 K could reduce post-operative blood and seroma collection in women undergoing unilateral total mastectomy. Larger studies are needed with different dilutions of A. montana to further validate these data. PMID:28163953

  9. Arnica Tincture Cures Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Golden Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Robledo, Sara M; Vélez, Ivan D; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2018-01-12

    In search for potential therapeutic alternatives to existing treatments for cutaneous Leishmaniasis, we have investigated the effect of Arnica tincture Ph. Eur. (a 70% hydroethanolic tincture prepared from flowerheads of Arnica montana L.) on the lesions caused by infection with Leishmania braziliensis in a model with golden hamsters. The animals were treated topically with a daily single dose of the preparation for 28 days. Subsequently, the healing process was monitored by recording the lesion size in intervals of 15 days up to day 90. As a result, Arnica tincture fully cured three out of five hamsters while one animal showed an improvement and another one suffered from a relapse. This result was slightly better than that obtained with the positive control, meglumine antimonate, which cured two of five hamsters while the other three showed a relapse after 90 days. This result encourages us to further investigate the potential of Arnica tincture in the treatment of cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

  10. Anti-inflammatory and immune-regulatory mechanisms prevent contact hypersensitivity to Arnica montana L.

    PubMed

    Lass, Christian; Vocanson, Marc; Wagner, Steffen; Schempp, Christoph M; Nicolas, Jean-Francois; Merfort, Irmgard; Martin, Stefan F

    2008-10-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SL), secondary plant metabolites from flowerheads of Arnica, exert anti-inflammatory effects mainly by preventing nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation because of alkylation of the p65 subunit. Despite its known immunosuppressive action, Arnica has been classified as a plant with strong potency to induce allergic contact dermatitis. Here we examined the dual role of SL as anti-inflammatory compounds and contact allergens in vitro and in vivo. We tested the anti-inflammatory and allergenic potential of SL in the mouse contact hypersensitivity model. We also used dendritic cells to study the activation of NF-kappaB and the secretion of interleukin (IL)-12 in the presence of different doses of SL in vitro. Arnica tinctures and SL potently suppressed NF-kappaB activation and IL-12 production in dendritic cells at high concentrations, but had immunostimulatory effects at low concentrations. Contact hypersensitivity could not be induced in the mouse model, even when Arnica tinctures or SL were applied undiluted to inflamed skin. In contrast, Arnica tinctures suppressed contact hypersensitivity to the strong contact sensitizer trinitrochlorobenzene and activation of dendritic cells. However, contact hypersensitivity to Arnica tincture could be induced in acutely CD4-depleted MHC II knockout mice. These results suggest that induction of contact hypersensitivity by Arnica is prevented by its anti-inflammatory effect and immunosuppression as a result of immune regulation in immunocompetent mice.

  11. Effect of homeopathic Arnica montana on bruising in face-lifts: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Brook M; Denton, Andrew B; Ahn, Min S; Maas, Corey S

    2006-01-01

    To design a model for performing reproducible, objective analyses of skin color changes and to apply this model to evaluate the efficacy of homeopathic Arnica montana as an antiecchymotic agent when taken perioperatively. Twenty-nine patients undergoing rhytidectomy at a tertiary care center were treated perioperatively with either homeopathic A. montana or placebo in a double-blind fashion. Postoperative photographs were analyzed using a novel computer model for color changes, and subjective assessments of postoperative ecchymosis were obtained. No subjective differences were noted between the treatment group and the control group, either by the patients or by the professional staff. No objective difference in the degree of color change was found. Patients receiving homeopathic A. montana were found to have a smaller area of ecchymosis on postoperative days 1, 5, 7, and 10. These differences were statistically significant (P<.05) only on postoperative days 1 (P<.005) and 7 (P<.001). This computer model provides an efficient, objective, and reproducible means with which to assess perioperative color changes, both in terms of area and degree. Patients taking perioperative homeopathic A. montana exhibited less ecchymosis, and that difference was statistically significant (P<.05) on 2 of the 4 postoperative data points evaluated.

  12. Differences in the chemical composition of Arnica montana flowers from wild populations of north Italy.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Maria; Aiello, Nicola; Scartezzini, Fabrizio; Innocenti, Gabbriella; Dall'Acqua, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The flower heads of fourteen wild Arnica montana L. populations were collected in the summer of 2010 in the provinces of Trento, Brescia and Bergamo (Italy). The dried flowers were analyzed to assess their chemical diversity. HLPC-MS analysis led to the identification of phenolic derivatives and sesquiterpene lactones in the samples, confirming literature data. Quali-quantitative analysis of the flower heads showed similar qualitative patterns both for the phenolic as well as sesquiterpene lactone derivatives, while significant variability was obtained in the amounts (HPLC-DAD) of sesquiterpene lactones (0.45-2.31%), phenolic acids (1.44-2.88%) and flavonoids (0.96-2.44%). The highest quantities of sesquiterpene lactones, flavonoids and phenolic acids were found in Malga Fregasoga (1703 m above sea level), Rifugio Camini (1608 m a.s.l.) and Malga Sass (1817 m a.s.l.) samples, respectively.

  13. Assessing the Effectiveness of Arnica montana and Rhododendron tomentosum (Ledum palustre) in the Reduction of Ecchymosis and Edema After Oculofacial Surgery: Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Kang, Julia Y; Tran, Kimberly D; Seiff, Stuart R; Mack, William P; Lee, Wendy W

    The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary data on the potential effectiveness of the combination of topical Arnica montana and Rhododendron tomentosum (Ledum palustre) in reducing postoperative ecchymosis and edema in a select population of healthy volunteers after oculofacial surgery. This retrospective review examined the postoperative course of healthy volunteers using topical Arnica and Ledum after undergoing common oculofacial procedures, including blepharoplasty, browpexy, and rhinoplasty, in the hands of 4 surgeons at tertiary referral centers from July 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 using medical records review. Each patient included had used topical hydrogel pads (OcuMend, Cearna Inc., Chicago, IL) containing Arnica 50 M (10) 50% and Ledum 50 M (10). The pads were applied bilaterally after surgery through postoperative day 6. At each postoperative visit, the patients were evaluated by their respective surgeons and assigned a subjective physician-patient rating score comparing each patient's observed healing compared with expected healing if not using Arnica/Ledum. Photographs of patients undergoing equivalent procedures, but not using Arnica/Ledum were used as controls for comparison. Physician-patient rating scores were categorical: markedly accelerated healing defined as approximately 7 days ahead of expected, accelerated healing, defined as <7 days ahead of expected, and no appreciable difference from expected. The proportion of patients with each physician-patient rating score was calculated for postoperative days 1 to 2, 3 to 5, 6 to 8, and overall. Difference of proportions was calculated with 95% confidence intervals using Newcombe unpaired difference comparison of proportions. Photographs documenting the clinical progression of selected patients are provided. A total of 27 patients (16 females, 11 males) were included in the study. Age range was 18 to 70 years. The majority of patients were white (52.9%), and underwent blepharoplasty

  14. Skin penetration studies of Arnica preparations and of their sesquiterpene lactones.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Steffen; Suter, Andreas; Merfort, Irmgard

    2004-10-01

    Alcoholic preparations of Arnica montana are widely used for the topical treatment of various inflammatory diseases. Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are mainly responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity. Here we have studied the penetration kinetics of Arnica tinctures prepared from dried Arnica flowers originating from different chemotypes as well as of their respective dominating SLs, helenalin isobutyrate and 11alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin acetate. Some alcoholic preparations of fresh Arnica flowers and an Arnica fresh plant gel were also included in the study. We used the stripping method with adhesive tape and pig skin as a model and determined the quantity of SLs in the stripped layers of the stratum corneum (SC). Thus, we observed the penetration into and permeation through this uppermost part of the skin. Whereas isolated SLs permeate through the SC only in a very small amount, permeation of SLs was much higher when they were present in the tinctures. Furthermore, differences of permeation were observed between helenalin and dihydrohelenalin derivatives. Permeation through the SC could be determined for the tested Arnica preparations of fresh Arnica flowers with two preparations showing the best penetration behaviour of all the tested substances. Moreover, the effects of incubation time as well as of repeated applications were investigated with one preparation. Altogether, this study shows that a sufficient amount of SLs might permeate the skin barrier by using Arnica preparations to exert anti-inflammatory effects and that the topical use of plant preparations may be advantageous compared to the isolated compounds.

  15. Variation of sesquiterpene lactone contents in different Arnica montana populations: influence of ecological parameters.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Andreas; Wallner, Teresa; Poschlod, Peter; Heilmann, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    In ten grassland or heathland sites along a geographic (north to south) and climatic gradient in Germany, flowerheads of Arnica montana were collected, and the total content of sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) as well as the content of the detected single compounds were determined. The ratios of helenalin (H)- and corresponding 11 alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin(DH)-type compounds were calculated. All habitats were characterised concerning the climatic and soil conditions, and the values obtained were correlated with SL contents according to univariate statistical analyses. All populations showed very similar and constant ratios of helenalin ( 1)/11 alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin ( 2) at around 1.5-2/1 irrespective of different ecological parameters. The ratio of helenalin/11 alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin esters was several fold higher in all samples, but it was nearly identical in every habitat among each other, except for the helenalin/11 alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin 2-methylbutyrate pair ( 5/ 11), which showed a constantly twofold higher H/DH ratio. However, the 6- O-isovalerylhelenalin content ( 6) showed highly significant correlations to climatic factors. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  16. Homeopathic potencies of Arnica montana L. change gene expression in a Tamm-Horsfall protein-1 cell line in vitro model: the role of ethanol as a possible confounder and statistical bias.

    PubMed

    Chirumbolo, Salvatore; Bjørklund, Geir

    2017-07-01

    Marzotto et al. showed that homeopathic preparations of Arnica montana L. acted directly on gene expression of Tamm-Horsfall protein-1 (THP-1) monocyte/macrophage cell lines activated with phorbol12-myristate13-acetate and interleukin-4 (IL-4). A. montana homeopathic dilutions are used in complementary and alternative medicine to treat inflammation disorders and post-traumatic events as well as for wound repair. The French Pharmacopoeia of these remedies uses 0.3% ethanol in each centesimal dilution. In this paper, we discuss how ethanol-containing A. montana homeopathic centesimal dilutions can change gene expression in IL-4-treated monocyte/macrophage THP-1. We assessed the role of ethanol in the Arnica homeopathic dilutions containing this alcohol by investigating its action on gene expression of THP-1 cell. Evidence would strongly suggest that the presence of ethanol in these remedies might play a fundamental role in the dilutions ability to affect gene expression, particularly for doses from 5c to 15c. Where, rather than playing a major role in the mesoscopic structure of water, the ethanol might have a chemical-physical role in the induction of THP-1 gene expression, apoptosis, and deoxyribonucleic acid function. This evidence generates a debate about the suggestion that the use of a binary-mixed solvent in homeopathic chemistry, used by Hahnemann since 1810, may be fundamental to explain the activity of homeopathy on cell models.

  17. Identification of Bioactivity, Volatile and Fatty Acid Profile in Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Mexican arnica.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, J Saúl; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P; Arévalo-Gallegos, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Parra-Saldivar, Roberto

    2016-09-12

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a sustainable technique used for the extraction of lipophilic metabolites such as pigments and fatty acids. Arnica plant is considered a potential candidate material with high antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Therefore, in this study, a locally available Heterotheca inuloides, also known as Mexican arnica, was analyzed for the extraction of high-value compounds. Based on different pressure (P), temperature (T), and co-solvent (CoS), four treatments (T) were prepared. A maximum 7.13% yield was recovered from T2 (T = 60 °C, P = 10 MPa, CoS = 8 g/min), followed by 6.69% from T4 (T = 60 °C, P = 30 MPa, CoS = 4 g/min). Some bioactive sesquiterpenoids such as 7-hydroxycadalene, caryophyllene and δ-cadinene were identified in the extracts by GC/MS. The fatty acid profile revealed that the main components were palmitic acid (C16:0), followed by linoleic acid (C18:2ω6c), α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) and stearic acid (C18:0) differing in percent yield per treatment. Antibacterial activities were determined by the agar diffusion method, indicating that all the treatments exerted strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, C. albicans, and E. coli strains. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was also measured by three in vitro assays, DPPH, TEAC and FRAP, using Trolox as a standard. Results showed high antioxidant capacity enabling pharmaceutical applications of Mexican arnica.

  18. Identification of Bioactivity, Volatile and Fatty Acid Profile in Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Mexican arnica

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, J. Saúl; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P.; Arévalo-Gallegos, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Iqbal, Hafiz M. N.; Parra-Saldivar, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a sustainable technique used for the extraction of lipophilic metabolites such as pigments and fatty acids. Arnica plant is considered a potential candidate material with high antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Therefore, in this study, a locally available Heterotheca inuloides, also known as Mexican arnica, was analyzed for the extraction of high-value compounds. Based on different pressure (P), temperature (T), and co-solvent (CoS), four treatments (T) were prepared. A maximum 7.13% yield was recovered from T2 (T = 60 °C, P = 10 MPa, CoS = 8 g/min), followed by 6.69% from T4 (T = 60 °C, P = 30 MPa, CoS = 4 g/min). Some bioactive sesquiterpenoids such as 7-hydroxycadalene, caryophyllene and δ-cadinene were identified in the extracts by GC/MS. The fatty acid profile revealed that the main components were palmitic acid (C16:0), followed by linoleic acid (C18:2ω6c), α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) and stearic acid (C18:0) differing in percent yield per treatment. Antibacterial activities were determined by the agar diffusion method, indicating that all the treatments exerted strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus, C. albicans, and E. coli strains. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was also measured by three in vitro assays, DPPH, TEAC and FRAP, using Trolox as a standard. Results showed high antioxidant capacity enabling pharmaceutical applications of Mexican arnica. PMID:27626416

  19. A novel melanin inhibitor: hydroperoxy traxastane-type triterpene from flowers of Arnica montana.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kazuhisa; Naitou, Tomoko; Umishio, Kenichi; Fukuhara, Tadao; Motoyama, Akira

    2007-05-01

    We isolated a novel inhibitor of melanin biosynthesis from the flowers of Arnica montana L. (Compositae), and identified it as a traxastane-type triterpene (3beta,16beta-dihydroxy-21alpha-hydroperoxy-20(30)-taraxastene) [1] by means of 1D or 2D-NMR and liquid chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HR-MS). Compound [1] at the concentration of 0.53 muM completely inhibited melanin accumulation in cultured B16 melanoma cells. It is one of the most potent among known plant inhibitors of melanin biosynthesis in cultured cells, being 50 times more potent than 4-methoxyphenol, which is used as an anti-pigmentation agent. Its mechanism of action is considered to involve inhibition of transcriptional factor MITF-M (melanocyte-type isoform of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), which would lead to a decrease of tyrosinase and related genes. We confirmed that compound [1] decreased the protein levels of tyrosinase and its related proteins in B16 melanoma cells. Further study revealed that a similar hydroperoxy triterpene also suppressed the melanin pigment accumulation of B16 melanoma cells. These results indicate that the hydroperoxy group may play an important role in the suppression of the melanin accumulation by compound [1].

  20. Efficacy of Arnica montana D4 for healing of wounds after Hallux valgus surgery compared to diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Karow, Jens-Hagen; Abt, Hans-Peter; Fröhling, Markus; Ackermann, Hanns

    2008-01-01

    This study was undertaken to answer the question: "Is Arnica D4 as efficacious as diclofenac in relation to symptoms and wound healing after foot surgery?" In this randomized double-blinded, parallel-group study (GCP-standard), the efficacy of Arnica D4 10 pillules (taken orally, 3 times per day) and diclofenac sodium, 50 mg (taken orally, 3 times per day) were investigated for equivalence in 88 patients 4 days after hallux valgus surgery. Outcome parameters were (1) postoperative irritation, (2) patient mobility, (3) rated pain, and (4) use of analgesics. The hierarchic equivalence test based on one-sided Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney-U confidence intervals (CIs) was used. Equivalence was perceived, when the lower margin of the 95% CI was > 0.36 corresponding to a range of equivalence of 1/2 standard deviation. Arnica D4 and diclofenac were equivalent for wound irritation (lower margin of the 95% CI on day 4: 0.4729 for rubor; 0.3674 for swelling; 0.4106 for calor) and patient mobility (0.4726). A descriptive analysis showed the superiority of Arnica D4 with respect to patient mobility (p = 0.045). With respect to pain, Arnica D4 was inferior to diclofenac (lower margin of the 95% CI 0.026). No significant differences were found regarding the use of additional analgesics during the 4 postoperative days (Dipidolor, Janssen-Cilag, Neuss, Germany; p = 0.54; Tramal, Grünenthal, Aachen, Germany; p = 0.1; and Novalgin, AVENTIS-Pharma, Bad Soden, Germany; p = 0.1). Arnica D4 was significantly better tolerated than diclofenac (p = 0.049). Nine (9) patients (20.45%) of the diclofenac group and 2 (4.5%) of the Arnica D4 group reported intolerance. There was no disturbance in wound healing in any of the patients. Arnica D4 is 60% cheaper than diclofenac. After foot operations, Arnica D4 can be used instead of diclofenac to reduce wound irritation.

  1. Arnica

    MedlinePlus

    ... climates in North America. The flowers of the plant are used in medicine. People take arnica by ... considered LIKELY UNSAFE. Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Arnica may cause an allergic reaction in people ...

  2. Effects of microcurrent application alone or in combination with topical Hypericum perforatum L. and Arnica montana L. on surgically induced wound healing in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Castro, Fabiene C B; Magre, Amanda; Cherpinski, Ricardo; Zelante, Paulo M; Neves, Lia M G; Esquisatto, Marcelo A M; Mendonça, Fernanda A S; Santos, Gláucia M T

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated the wound healing activity of microcurrent application alone or in combination with topical Hypericum perforatum L. and Arnica montana L. on skin surgical incision surgically induced on the back of Wistar rats. The animals were randomly divided into six groups: (1) no intervention (control group); (2) microcurrent application (10 μA/2 min); (3) topical application of gel containing H. perforatum; (4) topical application of H. perforatum gel and microcurrent (10 μA/2 min); (5) topical application of gel containing A. montana; (6) topical application of A. montana gel and microcurrent (10 μA/2 min). Tissue samples were obtained on the 2nd, 6th and 10th days after injury and submitted to structural and morphometric analysis. Differences in wound healing were observed between treatments when compared to the control group. Microcurrent application alone or combined with H. perforatum gel or A. montana gel exerted significant effects on wound healing in this experimental model in all of the study parameters (P<0.05) when compared to the control group with positive effects seen regarding newly formed tissue, number of newly formed blood vessels and percentage of mature collagen fibers. The morphometric data confirmed the structural findings. In conclusion, application of H. perforatum or A. montana was effective on experimental wound healing when compared to control, but significant differences in the parameters studied were only observed when these treatments were combined with microcurrent application. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Skin penetration behaviour of sesquiterpene lactones from different Arnica preparations using a validated GC-MSD method.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Steffen; Merfort, Irmgard

    2007-01-04

    Preparations of Arnica montana L. are widely used for the topical treatment of inflammatory diseases. The anti-inflammatory activity is mainly attributed to their sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) from the helenalin and 11alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin type. To study the penetration kinetics of SLs in Arnica preparations, a stripping method with adhesive tape and pig skin as a model was used. For the determination of SLs in the stripped layers of the stratum corneum (SC), a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed and validated. Thereby the amount of helenalin derivatives was calculated as helenalin isobutyrate, and 11alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin derivatives as 11alpha,13-dihydrohelenalin methacrylate. This GC-MSD method is suitable also to determine low amounts of SLs in Arnica preparations. The penetration behaviour of one gel preparation and two ointment preparations was investigated. The SLs of all preparations show a comparable penetration in and a permeation through the stratum corneum, the uppermost part of the skin. Interestingly, the gel preparation showed a decrease of the penetration rate over 4h, whereas the penetration rate of ointments kept constant over time. Moreover, we could demonstrate that the totally penetrated amount of SLs only depends on the kind of the formulation and of the SLs-content in the formulation but not on the SLs composition or on the used extraction agent.

  4. No effect of a homoeopathic combination of Arnica montana and Bryonia alba on bleeding, inflammation, and ischaemia after aortic valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Catherine; Joseph, Pierre; Gaillard, Ségolène; Bauer, Christian; Vedrinne, Catherine; Bissery, Alvine; Melot, Ghislaine; Bossard, Nadine; Belon, Philippe; Lehot, Jean-Jacques

    2010-02-01

    " Arnica montana is a popular homoeopathic treatment with potential haemostatic and anti-inflammatory properties. A homoeopathic combination of A. montana and Bryonia alba was used in aortic valve surgery to evaluate its effectiveness in reducing bleeding, inflammation, pain and myocardial ischaemia. One day before surgery, 92 adult patients were randomly assigned to a double-blind parallel trial with either homoeopathic granules or a matching placebo until 4 days after surgery. The primary outcome was the volume of blood/liquid in the drains at their removal. The secondary outcomes included postoperative blood/liquid losses at 12 and 24 h as well as C-reactive protein (CRP), pain, temperature and plasma troponin Ic. At 12 h and 24 h after surgery, then at drain removal, blood losses in homoeopathy and placebo groups were not statistically significant (362 +/- 218, 520 +/- 269 and 640 +/- 297 ml vs. 456 +/- 440, 620 +/- 477 and 796 +/- 717 ml; P= 0.19, 0.23 and 0.35, respectively). The statistical modelling did not show significantly different patterns of CRP, troponin and body temperature changes or of pain perception. The number of transfused packed red cells was not significantly different either (P= 0.58). Two patients from each group died during the study period and the number of serious adverse events was not statistically different (six in homoeopathy vs. 10 in placebo groups; Fisher's exact test P= 0.41). In the study setting, there was no evidence of effects of A. montana and B. alba combination on bleeding, inflammation, pain or myocardial ischaemia.

  5. No effect of a homoeopathic combination of Arnica montana and Bryonia alba on bleeding, inflammation, and ischaemia after aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cornu, Catherine; Joseph, Pierre; Gaillard, Ségolène; Bauer, Christian; Vedrinne, Catherine; Bissery, Alvine; Melot, Ghislaine; Bossard, Nadine; Belon, Philippe; Lehot, Jean-Jacques

    2010-01-01

    AIMS Arnica montana is a popular homoeopathic treatment with potential haemostatic and anti-inflammatory properties. A homoeopathic combination of A. montana and Bryonia alba was used in aortic valve surgery to evaluate its effectiveness in reducing bleeding, inflammation, pain and myocardial ischaemia. METHODS One day before surgery, 92 adult patients were randomly assigned to a double-blind parallel trial with either homoeopathic granules or a matching placebo until 4 days after surgery. The primary outcome was the volume of blood/liquid in the drains at their removal. The secondary outcomes included postoperative blood/liquid losses at 12 and 24 h as well as C-reactive protein (CRP), pain, temperature and plasma troponin Ic. RESULTS At 12 h and 24 h after surgery, then at drain removal, blood losses in homoeopathy and placebo groups were not statistically significant (362 ± 218, 520 ± 269 and 640 ± 297 ml vs. 456 ± 440, 620 ± 477 and 796 ± 717 ml; P= 0.19, 0.23 and 0.35, respectively). The statistical modelling did not show significantly different patterns of CRP, troponin and body temperature changes or of pain perception. The number of transfused packed red cells was not significantly different either (P= 0.58). Two patients from each group died during the study period and the number of serious adverse events was not statistically different (six in homoeopathy vs. 10 in placebo groups; Fisher's exact test P= 0.41). CONCLUSIONS In the study setting, there was no evidence of effects of A. montana and B. alba combination on bleeding, inflammation, pain or myocardial ischaemia. PMID:20233176

  6. Quantitative analysis of flavonoids and phenolic acids in Arnica montana L. by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ganzera, Markus; Egger, Christoph; Zidorn, Christian; Stuppner, Hermann

    2008-05-05

    Arnica montana preparations have been used in Europe for centuries to treat skin disorders. Among the biologically active ingredients in the flower heads of the plant are sequiterpenes, flavonoids and phenolic acids. For the simultaneous determination of compounds belonging to the latter two groups a micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEKC) method was developed and validated. By using an electrolyte solution containing 50 mM borax, 25 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate and 30% of acetonitrile the separation of seven flavonoids and four caffeic acid derivatives was feasible in less than 20 min. The optimized system was validated for repeatability (sigma(rel) < or = 4.4%), precision (inter-day sigma(rel) < or = 8.13%, intra-day sigma(rel) < or = 4.32%), accuracy (recovery rates from 96.8 to 102.4%), sensitivity (limit of detection (LOD) < or = 4.5 microg mL(-1)) and linearity (R(2) > or = 0.9996), and then successfully applied to assay several plant samples. In all of them the most dominant flavonoid was found to be quercetin 3-O-glucuronic acid, whereas 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid was the major phenolic acid; the total content of flavonoids and phenolic acids varied in the samples from 0.60 to 1.70%, and 1.03 to 2.24%, respectively.

  7. Demographic consequences of inbreeding and outbreeding in Arnica montana: A field experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luijten, S.H.; Kery, M.; Oostermeijer, J.G.B.; Den, Nijs H.J.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    1. The genetic constitution of populations may significantly affect demography. Founder populations or isolated remnants may show inbreeding depression, while established populations can be strongly adapted to the local environment. Gene exchange between populations can lead to better performance if heterozygosity levels are restored (heterosis), or to reduced performance if coadapted gene complexes are disrupted (outbreeding depression). 2. Five populations of the self-incompatible perennial Arnica montana (Asteraceae) were analysed for the demographic consequences of inbreeding and of intra- and interpopulation outcrossing, using both small and large populations as donors for the latter. We analysed seed production and seed weight and monitored growth, survival and flowering of offspring introduced as seeds and as 4-week-old seedlings in a 4-year field experiment. 3. Reduced seed set after selfing was probably due to the self-incompatibility system rather than to inbreeding depression. There was a significant increase for seed set after interpopulation crosses, which resulted from the alleviation of low mate availability in one of the small populations. 4. Significant inbreeding depression was observed for growth rates of plants introduced as seedlings. We found significant heterosis for flowering probability of plants introduced as seeds, but for plants introduced as seedlings, heterosis for seedling size and flowering probability was only marginally significant. Outbreeding depression was not observed. 5. The results of this study are important for reinforcement measures in small, remnant populations. Significant differences among populations for all measured fitness components suggest that reinforcement is best achieved using material from several populations. 6. The observed higher survival of seedlings as compared with seeds suggests that it is better to plant individuals than to sow. Sowing, however, is easier and cheaper, and was more likely to eliminate

  8. Quantification of Sesquiterpene Lactones in Asteraceae Plant Extracts: Evaluation of their Allergenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Salapovic, Helena; Geier, Johannes; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs), mainly those with an activated exocyclic methylene group, are important allergens in Asteraceae (Compositae) plants. As a screening tool, the Compositae mix, consisting of five Asteraceae plant extracts with allergenic potential (feverfew, tansy, arnica, yarrow, and German chamomile) is part of several national patch test baseline series. However, the SL content of the Compositae mix may vary due to the source material. Therefore, a simple spectrophotometric method for the quantitative measurement of SLs with the α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone moiety was developed, giving the percentage of allergenic compounds in plant extracts. The method has been validated and five Asteraceae extracts, namely feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.), tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.), arnica (Arnica montana L.), yarrow (Achillea millefolium L.), and German chamomile (Chamomilla recutita L. Rauschert) that have been used in routine patch test screening were evaluated. A good correlation could be found between the results obtained using the proposed spectrophotometric method and the corresponding clinical results. Thus, the introduced method is a valuable tool for evaluating the allergenic potential and for the simple and efficient quality control of plant extracts with allergenic potential. PMID:24106675

  9. Antimicrobial Activities of Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized by Using Water Extract of Arnicae anthodium.

    PubMed

    Dobrucka, Renata; Długaszewska, Jolanta

    2015-06-01

    Green synthesis of nanoparticles has gained significant importance in recent years and has become the one of the most preferred methods. Also, green synthesis of nanoparticles is valuable branch of nanotechnology. Plant extracts are eco-friendly and can be an economic option for synthesis of nanoparticles. This study presents method the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using water extract of Arnicae anthodium. Formation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by UV-visble spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis. The morphology of the synthesized silver nanoparticles was verified by SEM-EDS. The obtained silver nanoparticles were used to study their antimicrobial activity.

  10. A Homeopathic Arnica Patch for the Relief of Cellulitis-derived Pain and Numbness in the Hand.

    PubMed

    Barkey, Elisabeth; Kaszkin-Bettag, Marietta

    2012-05-01

    Arnica montana, belonging to the Compositae family, is a plant with a longstanding tradition of relieving pain and/or inflammation in muscles and joints and may thus represent an alternative to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, which are often ineffective or lead to a number of adverse effects. A homeopathic arnica patch (3X dilution according to the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia of the United States) was developed to alleviate pain symptoms in the back and neck muscles and joints. The present case report describes the treatment outcome after administration of the arnica patch in a 55-year-old female patient with pain in the right hand and numbness in the fourth finger after cellulitis in the palmar area. The cellulitis was treated with antibiotics, but pain symptoms remained at 7 points on a 0-to-10-point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain despite intake of oral ibuprofen and oral and topical application of an arnica-containing complex homeopathic ointment. Ten arnica patches were dispensed to the patient. She cut the patch into strips to cover all painful areas of the hand and applied them at night. After 3 days, she reported a substantial decrease in pain symptoms (VAS = 1) and a marked decrease in numbness and in the size of a tender nodule on the third metacarpal area. Moreover, the patient was able to sleep through the night without being awakened by the pain. The symptoms declined further during the next 2 days. This case demonstrates that after a relatively short period of time, the administration of the arnica patch on the hand provided a marked reduction of pain and recovery of functionality of the hand.

  11. Homeopathic arnica therapy in patients receiving knee surgery: results of three randomised double-blind trials.

    PubMed

    Brinkhaus, B; Wilkens, J M; Lüdtke, R; Hunger, J; Witt, C M; Willich, S N

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of homeopathic Arnica montana on postoperative swelling and pain after arthroscopy (ART), artificial knee joint implantation (AKJ), and cruciate ligament reconstruction (CLR). Three randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, sequential clinical trials. Single primary care unit specialised in arthroscopic knee surgery. Patients suffering from a knee disease that necessitated arthroscopic surgery. Prior to surgery, patients were given 1 x 5 globules of the homeopathic dilution 30x (a homeopathic dilution of 1:10(30)) of arnica or placebo. Following surgery, 3 x 5 globules were administered daily. The primary outcome parameter was difference in knee circumference, defined as the ratio of circumference on day 1 (ART) or day 2 (CLR and AKJ) after surgery to baseline circumference. A total of 227 patients were enrolled in the ART (33% female, mean age 43.2 years;), 35 in the AKJ (71% female, 67.0 years), and 57 in the CLR trial (26% female; 33.4 years). The percentage of change in knee circumference was similar between the treatment groups for ART (group difference Delta=-0.25%, 95% CI: -0.85 to 0.41, p=0.204) and AKJ (Delta=-1.68%, -4.24 to 0.77, p=0.184) and showed homeopathic arnica to have a beneficial effect compared to placebo in CLR (Delta=-1.80%, -3.30 to -0.30, p=0.019). In all three trials, patients receiving homeopathic arnica showed a trend towards less postoperative swelling compared to patients receiving placebo. However, a significant difference in favour of homeopathic arnica was only found in the CLR trial.

  12. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plant extracts against periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Iauk, L; Lo Bue, A M; Milazzo, I; Rapisarda, A; Blandino, G

    2003-06-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antibacterial activity of Althaea officinalis L. roots, Arnica montana L. flowers, Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hamamelis virginiana L. leaves, Illicium verum Hook. fruits and Melissa officinalis L. leaves, against anaerobic and facultative aerobic periodontal bacteria: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Capnocytophaga gingivalis, Veilonella parvula, Eikenella corrodens, Peptostreptococcus micros and Actinomyces odontolyticus. The methanol extracts of H. virginiana and A. montana and, to a lesser extent, A. officinalis were shown to possess an inhibiting activity (MIC < or = 2048 mg/L) against many of the species tested. In comparison, M. officinalis and C. officinalis extracts had a lower inhibiting activity (MIC > or = 2048 mg/L) against all the tested species with the exception of Prevotella sp. Illicium verum methanol extract was not very active though it had a particular good activity against E. corrodens. The results suggest the use of the alcohol extracts of H. virginiana, A. montana and A. officinalis for topical medications in periodontal prophylactics. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. A Homeopathic Arnica Patch for the Relief of Cellulitis-derived Pain and Numbness in the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Kaszkin-Bettag, Marietta

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Arnica montana, belonging to the Compositae family, is a plant with a longstanding tradition of relieving pain and/or inflammation in muscles and joints and may thus represent an alternative to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, which are often ineffective or lead to a number of adverse effects. A homeopathic arnica patch (3X dilution according to the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia of the United States) was developed to alleviate pain symptoms in the back and neck muscles and joints. Case Presentation: The present case report describes the treatment outcome after administration of the arnica patch in a 55-year-old female patient with pain in the right hand and numbness in the fourth finger after cellulitis in the palmar area. The cellulitis was treated with antibiotics, but pain symptoms remained at 7 points on a 0-to-10–point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain despite intake of oral ibuprofen and oral and topical application of an arnica-containing complex homeopathic ointment. Ten arnica patches were dispensed to the patient. She cut the patch into strips to cover all painful areas of the hand and applied them at night. After 3 days, she reported a substantial decrease in pain symptoms (VAS = 1) and a marked decrease in numbness and in the size of a tender nodule on the third metacarpal area. Moreover, the patient was able to sleep through the night without being awakened by the pain. The symptoms declined further during the next 2 days. Conclusion: This case demonstrates that after a relatively short period of time, the administration of the arnica patch on the hand provided a marked reduction of pain and recovery of functionality of the hand. PMID:24278813

  14. The benefits of Arnica: 16 case reports.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    2003-10-01

    Following the publication of a randomised controlled trial of Arnica in hand surgery, a number of reports of apparently beneficial effects of Arnica came to the author's attention. Many of these apparent responses could have been due to other factors including the use of herbal (non-diluted) Arnica, placebo response and natural course of disease.

  15. Identification of hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids of arnica flowers and burdock roots using a standardized LC-DAD-ESI/MS profiling method.

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Ze; Harnly, James M

    2008-11-12

    A screening method using LC-DAD-ESI/MS was developed for the identification of common hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids based on direct comparison with standards. A complete standard set for mono-, di-, and tricaffeoylquinic isomers was assembled from commercially available standards, positively identified compounds in common plants (artichokes, asparagus, coffee bean, honeysuckle flowers, sweet potato, and Vernonia amygdalina leaves) and chemically modified standards. Four C18 reversed phase columns were tested using the standardized profiling method (based on LC-DAD-ESI/MS) for 30 phenolic compounds, and their elution order and retention times were evaluated. Using only two columns under standardized LC condition and the collected phenolic compound database, it was possible to separate all of the hydroxycinnamoylquinic acid conjugates and to identify 28 and 18 hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids in arnica flowers (Arnica montana L.) and burdock roots (Arctium lappa L.), respectively. Of these, 22 are reported for the first time.

  16. A homeopathic remedy from arnica, marigold, St. John's wort and comfrey accelerates in vitro wound scratch closure of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hostanska, Katarina; Rostock, Matthias; Melzer, Joerg; Baumgartner, Stephan; Saller, Reinhard

    2012-07-18

    Drugs of plant origin such as Arnica montana, Calendula officinalis or Hypericum perforatum have been frequently used to promote wound healing. While their effect on wound healing using preparations at pharmacological concentrations was supported by several in vitro and clinical studies, investigations of herbal homeopathic remedies on wound healing process are rare. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a commercial low potency homeopathic remedy Similasan® Arnica plus Spray on wound closure in a controlled, blind trial in vitro. We investigated the effect of an ethanolic preparation composed of equal parts of Arnica montana 4x, Calendula officinalis 4x, Hypericum perforatum 4x and Symphytum officinale 6x (0712-2), its succussed hydroalcoholic solvent (0712-1) and unsuccussed solvent (0712-3) on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Cell viability was determined by WST-1 assay, cell growth using BrdU uptake, cell migration by chemotaxis assay and wound closure by CytoSelect ™Wound Healing Assay Kit which generated a defined "wound field". All assays were performed in three independent controlled experiments. None of the three substances affected cell viability and none showed a stimulating effect on cell proliferation. Preparation (0712-2) exerted a stimulating effect on fibroblast migration (31.9%) vs 14.7% with succussed solvent (0712-1) at 1:100 dilutions (p < 0.001). Unsuccussed solvent (0712-3) had no influence on cell migration (6.3%; p > 0.05). Preparation (0712-2) at a dilution of 1:100 promoted in vitro wound closure by 59.5% and differed significantly (p < 0.001) from succussed solvent (0712-1), which caused 22.1% wound closure. Results of this study showed that the low potency homeopathic remedy (0712-2) exerted in vitro wound closure potential in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. This effect resulted from stimulation of fibroblasts motility rather than of their mitosis.

  17. Phytochemical profile and anticholinesterase and antimicrobial activities of supercritical versus conventional extracts of Satureja montana.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filipa V M; Martins, Alice; Salta, Joana; Neng, Nuno R; Nogueira, José M F; Mira, Delfina; Gaspar, Natália; Justino, Jorge; Grosso, Clara; Urieta, José S; Palavra, António M S; Rauter, Amélia P

    2009-12-23

    Winter savory Satureja montana is a medicinal herb used in traditional gastronomy for seasoning meats and salads. This study reports a comparison between conventional (hydrodistillation, HD, and Soxhlet extraction, SE) and alternative (supercritical fluid extraction, SFE) extraction methods to assess the best option to obtain bioactive compounds. Two different types of extracts were tested, the volatile (SFE-90 bar, second separator vs HD) and the nonvolatile fractions (SFE-250 bar, first and second separator vs SE). The inhibitory activity over acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase by S. montana extracts was assessed as a potential indicator for the control of Alzheimer's disease. The supercritical nonvolatile fractions, which showed the highest content of (+)-catechin, chlorogenic, vanillic, and protocatechuic acids, also inhibited selectively and significantly butyrylcholinesterase, whereas the nonvolatile conventional extract did not affect this enzyme. Microbial susceptibility tests revealed the great potential of S. montana volatile supercritical fluid extract for the growth control and inactivation of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus, showing some activity against Botrytis spp. and Pyricularia oryzae. Although some studies were carried out on S. montana, the phytochemical analysis together with the biological properties, namely, the anticholinesterase and antimicrobial activities of the plant nonvolatile and volatile supercritical fluid extracts, are described herein for the first time.

  18. Use of Arnica to relieve pain after carpal-tunnel release surgery.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, S L A; Belcher, H J C R

    2002-01-01

    Arnica is commonly used by the public as a treatment for bruising and swelling. To assess whether Arnica administration affects recovery from hand surgery. Double-blind, randomized comparison of Arnica administration versus placebo. Specialist hand surgery unit at the Queen Victoria NHS Trust. Thirty-seven patients undergoing bilateral endoscopic carpal-tunnel release between June 1998 and January 2000. Homeopathic Arnica tablets and herbal Arnica ointment compared to placebos. Grip strength, wrist circumference, and perceived pain measured 1 and 2 weeks after surgery. No difference in grip strength or wrist circumference was found between the 2 groups. However, there was a significant reduction in pain experienced after 2 weeks in the Arnica-treated group (P<.03). The role of homeopathic and herbal agents for recovery after surgery merits further investigation.

  19. Effects of topical arnica gel on post-laser treatment bruises.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Delilah; Lazarus, Melissa C; Baumann, Leslie

    2002-08-01

    Claims have been made suggesting that topical arnica prevents and speeds the resolution of bruises, yet there are no well-designed placebo-controlled studies to date evaluating topical arnica's effect on bruising. To compare the efficacy of topical arnica in the prevention and resolution of laser-induced bruising. Nineteen patients with facial telangiectases were enrolled in this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study and were divided into pretreatment and posttreatment groups. The pretreatment group applied arnica with vehicle to one side of the face and vehicle alone to the other side of the face twice a day for 2 weeks prior to laser treatment. The posttreatment group followed the same procedure for 2 weeks after laser treatment. On day 0, all patients were treated for facial telangiectases using a 585 nm pulsed dye laser. Bruising was assessed using a visual analog scale on days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 17 by the patient and the physician. In addition, photographs taken at each of the follow-up visits were later assessed by a second physician using the visual analog scale. There was no statistically significant difference between the mean scores of arnica and vehicle (P = 0.496) and the mean scores of arnica and vehicle (P = 0.359) in the pretreatment and posttreatment groups, respectively. No significant difference was found between topical arnica and vehicle in the prevention or resolution of bruising.

  20. A homeopathic remedy from arnica, marigold, St. John’s wort and comfrey accelerates in vitro wound scratch closure of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drugs of plant origin such as Arnica montana, Calendula officinalis or Hypericum perforatum have been frequently used to promote wound healing. While their effect on wound healing using preparations at pharmacological concentrations was supported by several in vitro and clinical studies, investigations of herbal homeopathic remedies on wound healing process are rare. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a commercial low potency homeopathic remedy Similasan® Arnica plus Spray on wound closure in a controlled, blind trial in vitro. Methods We investigated the effect of an ethanolic preparation composed of equal parts of Arnica montana 4x, Calendula officinalis 4x, Hypericum perforatum 4x and Symphytum officinale 6x (0712–2), its succussed hydroalcoholic solvent (0712–1) and unsuccussed solvent (0712–3) on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Cell viability was determined by WST-1 assay, cell growth using BrdU uptake, cell migration by chemotaxis assay and wound closure by CytoSelect ™Wound Healing Assay Kit which generated a defined “wound field”. All assays were performed in three independent controlled experiments. Results None of the three substances affected cell viability and none showed a stimulating effect on cell proliferation. Preparation (0712–2) exerted a stimulating effect on fibroblast migration (31.9%) vs 14.7% with succussed solvent (0712–1) at 1:100 dilutions (p < 0.001). Unsuccussed solvent (0712–3) had no influence on cell migration (6.3%; p > 0.05). Preparation (0712–2) at a dilution of 1:100 promoted in vitro wound closure by 59.5% and differed significantly (p < 0.001) from succussed solvent (0712–1), which caused 22.1% wound closure. Conclusion Results of this study showed that the low potency homeopathic remedy (0712–2) exerted in vitro wound closure potential in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. This effect resulted from stimulation of fibroblasts motility rather than of their mitosis. PMID:22809174

  1. Arnica Ointment 10% Does Not Improve Upper Blepharoplasty Outcome: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    van Exsel, Denise C E; Pool, Shariselle M W; van Uchelen, Jeroen H; Edens, Mireille A; van der Lei, Berend; Melenhorst, Wynand B W H

    2016-07-01

    It has been suggested that arnica can reduce postoperative edema and ecchymosis associated with cosmetic surgical procedures and improve outcome. Despite a high incidence of arnica use among upper blepharoplasty patients, evidence to support its treatment effect is lacking. The authors performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of arnica ointment after upper blepharoplasty. One hundred thirty-six bilateral upper blepharoplasty patients were randomized between arnica ointment 10% and placebo ointment. In both study arms, one periorbital area was designated as the treatment side (either arnica or placebo ointment), and the contralateral side served as an untreated (no ointment) internal control. As the primary endpoint, the overall periorbital appearance as based on light photography and judged by a medical and nonmedical panel, was assessed after 3 days, 7 days, and 6 weeks. Secondary endpoints were swelling, ecchymosis, erythema, pain, and patient satisfaction with recovery and outcome. There was no significant difference between arnica and placebo in overall judgment of periorbital appearance 3 days, 7 days, and 6 weeks after surgery. Furthermore, swelling, ecchymosis, erythema, pain, and patient satisfaction with recovery and outcome did not differ between arnica and placebo. Postoperative outcome in untreated eyelids was not different from eyelids treated with either arnica or placebo on any of the studied outcome measures. The authors' study demonstrates that topical arnica ointment after upper blepharoplasty does not improve postoperative outcome. Therapeutic, II.

  2. ARNICA, the Arcetri Near-Infrared Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisi, F.; Baffa, C.; Bilotti, V.; Bonaccini, D.; del Vecchio, C.; Gennari, S.; Hunt, L. K.; Marcucci, G.; Stanga, R.

    1996-04-01

    ARNICA (ARcetri Near-Infrared CAmera) is the imaging camera for the near-infrared bands between 1.0 and 2.5 microns that the Arcetri Observatory has designed and built for the Infrared Telescope TIRGO located at Gornergrat, Switzerland. We describe the mechanical and optical design of the camera, and report on the astronomical performance of ARNICA as measured during the commissioning runs at the TIRGO (December, 1992 to December 1993), and an observing run at the William Herschel Telescope, Canary Islands (December, 1993). System performance is defined in terms of efficiency of the camera+telescope system and camera sensitivity for extended and point-like sources. (SECTION: Astronomical Instrumentation)

  3. Assessment of Mexican Arnica (Heterotheca inuloides Cass) and Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) Extracts on Dopamine and Selected Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Stomach and Brain of Salmonella typhimurium Infected rats.

    PubMed

    Guzmàn, David Calderón; Herrera, Maribel Ortiz; Brizuela, Norma Osnaya; Mejía, Gerardo Barragàn; García, Ernestina Hernàndez; Olguín, Hugo Juàrez; Peraza, Armando Valenzuela; Ruíz, Norma Labra; Del Angel, Daniel Santamaría

    2017-01-01

    The effects of some natural products on dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) in brain of infected models are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of Mexican arnica/rosemary (MAR) water extract and oseltamivir on both biogenic amines and some oxidative biomarkers in the brain and stomach of young rats under infection condition. Female Wistar rats (weight 80 g) in the presence of MAR or absence (no-MAR) were treated as follows: group 1, buffer solution (controls); oseltamivir (100 mg/kg), group 2; culture of Salmonella typhimurium ( S.Typh ) (1 × 10 6 colony-forming units/rat) group 3; oseltamivir (100 mg/kg) + S.Typh (same dose) group 4. Drug and extracts were administered intraperitoneally every 24 h for 5 days, and S.Typh was given orally on days 1 and 3. On the fifth day, blood was collected to measure glucose and hemoglobin. The brains and stomachs were obtained to measure levels of DA, 5-HIAA, glutathione (GSH), TBARS, H 2 O 2 , and total ATPase activity using validated methods. DA levels increased in MAR group treated with oseltamivir alone but decreased in no-MAR group treated with oseltamivir plus S.Typh . 5-HIAA, GSH, and H 2 O 2 decreased in this last group, and ATPase activity increased in MAR group treated with oseltamivir plus S.Typh . TBARS (lipid peroxidation) increased in MAR group that received oseltamivir alone. Most of the biomarkers were not altered significantly in the stomach. MAR extract alters DA and metabolism of 5-HIAA in the brain of young animals infected. Antioxidant capacity may be involved in these effects. The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of Mexican arnica/rosemary water extract and oseltamivir on both biogenic amines and some oxidative biomarkers in the brain and stomach of young rats under infection condition. Results: Mexican arnica and rosemary extract alter dopamine and metabolism of 5-HIAA in the brain of young animals infected. Antioxidant capacity may be

  4. Assessment of Mexican Arnica (Heterotheca inuloides Cass) and Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) Extracts on Dopamine and Selected Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Stomach and Brain of Salmonella typhimurium Infected rats

    PubMed Central

    Guzmàn, David Calderón; Herrera, Maribel Ortiz; Brizuela, Norma Osnaya; Mejía, Gerardo Barragàn; García, Ernestina Hernàndez; Olguín, Hugo Juàrez; Peraza, Armando Valenzuela; Ruíz, Norma Labra; Del Angel, Daniel Santamaría

    2017-01-01

    Background: The effects of some natural products on dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) in brain of infected models are still unclear. Objective: The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of Mexican arnica/rosemary (MAR) water extract and oseltamivir on both biogenic amines and some oxidative biomarkers in the brain and stomach of young rats under infection condition. Methods: Female Wistar rats (weight 80 g) in the presence of MAR or absence (no-MAR) were treated as follows: group 1, buffer solution (controls); oseltamivir (100 mg/kg), group 2; culture of Salmonella typhimurium (S.Typh) (1 × 106 colony-forming units/rat) group 3; oseltamivir (100 mg/kg) + S.Typh (same dose) group 4. Drug and extracts were administered intraperitoneally every 24 h for 5 days, and S.Typh was given orally on days 1 and 3. On the fifth day, blood was collected to measure glucose and hemoglobin. The brains and stomachs were obtained to measure levels of DA, 5-HIAA, glutathione (GSH), TBARS, H2O2, and total ATPase activity using validated methods. Results: DA levels increased in MAR group treated with oseltamivir alone but decreased in no-MAR group treated with oseltamivir plus S.Typh. 5-HIAA, GSH, and H2O2 decreased in this last group, and ATPase activity increased in MAR group treated with oseltamivir plus S.Typh. TBARS (lipid peroxidation) increased in MAR group that received oseltamivir alone. Most of the biomarkers were not altered significantly in the stomach. Conclusion: MAR extract alters DA and metabolism of 5-HIAA in the brain of young animals infected. Antioxidant capacity may be involved in these effects. SUMMARY The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of Mexican arnica/rosemary water extract and oseltamivir on both biogenic amines and some oxidative biomarkers in the brain and stomach of young rats under infection condition. Results: Mexican arnica and rosemary extract alter dopamine and metabolism of 5-HIAA in the brain of young

  5. Efficacy of Arnica Echinacea powder in umbilical cord care in a large cohort study.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Serafina; Coppi, Silvia; Coviello, Caterina; Cecchi, Sara; Becucci, Elisa; Tataranno, Maria Luisa; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    Today healthy newborns are discharged after 48 h-72 h of life until umbilical cord (UC) detachment. Complications due to an inappropriate management are: erythema, edema, bleeding, omphalitis and sepsis. Hence the importance of a safe, effective, easy to do, and cheap method. This study tests the effects and the efficacy of arnica echinacea powder by evaluating the time of cord detachment and the risk of side effects in a large cohort of newborns. 6323 babies were treated with Arnica Echinacea powder twice a day until cord stump detachment. Medications started in hospital ward and continued at home until stump detachment. The UC stump detachment occurred in 89.09% of newborns during the first 4 days of life. This percentage increase to 96.13% at 6 days. Our study demonstrates the efficacy and the safety of arnica echinacea in UC separation. No infections or even bacterial colonizations were found. The use of arnica echinacea reduces hospital costs as a consequence of complications. In addition arnica use is well received by medical staff and parents. In conclusion due to its potential benefits, low cost and feasibility, we recommend the use of arnica echinacea powder as routine procedure in all nurseries.

  6. ARNICA, the Arcetri near-infrared camera: Astronomical performance assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L. K.; Lisi, F.; Testi, L.; Baffa, C.; Borelli, S.; Maiolino, R.; Moriondo, G.; Stanga, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The Arcetri near-infrared camera ARNICA was built as a users' instrument for the Infrared Telescope at Gornergrat (TIRGO), and is based on a 256x256 NICMOS 3 detector. In this paper, we discuss ARNICA's optical and astronomical performance at the TIRGO and at the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma. Optical performance is evaluated in terms of plate scale, distortion, point spread function, and ghosting. Astronomical performance is characterized by camera efficiency, sensitivity, and spatial uniformity of the photometry.

  7. Arnica (Asteraceae) phylogeny revisited using RPB2: complex patterns and multiple d-paralogues.

    PubMed

    Ekenäs, Catarina; Heidari, Nahid; Andreasen, Katarina

    2012-08-01

    The region coding for the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2) was explored for resolving interspecific relationships in Arnica and lower level taxa in general. The region between exons 17 and 23 was cloned and sequenced for 33 accessions of Arnica and four outgroup taxa. Three paralogues of the RPB2-d copy (RPB2-dA, B and C) were detected in Arnica and outgroup taxa, indicating that the duplications must have occurred before the divergence of Arnica. Parsimony and Bayesian analyses of separate alignments of the three copies reveal complex patterns in Arnica, likely reflecting a history of lineage sorting in combination with apomixis, polyploidization, and possibly hybridization. Cloned sequences of some taxa do not form monophyletic clades within paralogues, but form multiple strongly supported clades with sequences of other taxa. Some well supported groups are present in more than one paralogue and many groups are in line with earlier hypotheses regarding interspecific relationships within the genus. Low levels of homoplasy in combination with relatively high sequence variation indicates that the introns of the RPB2 region could be suitable for phylogenetic studies in low level taxonomy. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Cosmetics and herbal remedies with Compositae plant extracts - are they tolerated by Compositae-allergic patients?

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Evy; Chistensen, Lars P; Andersen, Klaus E

    2008-01-01

    Compositae-sensitive patients are routinely warned against topical use of Compositae-containing cosmetics and herbal remedies. However, the risk of elicitation of dermatitis in presensitized persons is unknown. The main aim of this study was to assess the significance of direct plant allergen contact via Compositae-derived cosmetics and herbal remedies in Compositae-allergic patients with special reference to arnica (Arnica montana) and German chamomile (Chamomilla recutita). 8 of 12 chamomile-sensitive patients tested positive to chamomile-containing preparations, including tea, creams, ointments, and oil. 5 of 6 arnica-sensitive persons tested positive to arnica-based products. When the group was patch tested with cosmetic and/or herbal product ingredients, plant allergens elicited positive reactions most frequently, but fragrances, emulsifiers, and preservatives tested positive as well. Plant allergens were mainly derived from Compositae, but avocado oil, and Hamamelis virginiana tincture were unexpectedly detected as sensitizers too. Chemical analyses indicated that the Compositae allergens were both sesquiterpene lactones and other naturally occurring compounds. In conclusion, Compositae-allergic persons should be warned against topical use of Compositae-containing products, not only because of the plant allergens, but also because of allergenic cream constituents that may cause reactions in the group of patients who have multiple contact allergies beside the Compositae allergy.

  9. Toxic optic neuropathy following ingestion of homeopathic medication Arnica-30.

    PubMed

    Venkatramani, Devendra V; Goel, Shubhra; Ratra, Vineet; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of acute, bilateral and severe vision loss after inadvertent consumption of a large quantity of the homoeopathic medication Arnica-30. Severe vomiting which required hospitalization preceded visual symptoms. In the acute stage, pupillary responses to light were absent and fundus examination was normal. Vision loss followed a fluctuating course, with profound loss noted after 6 weeks along with bilateral optic disc pallor. Neuro-ophthalmic examination and detailed investigations were performed, including magnetic resonance imaging, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potentials (VEP). Ocular coherence tomography (OCT) showed gross thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer. While a differential diagnosis of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy was kept in mind, these findings supported a diagnosis of bilateral toxic optic neuropathy. Arnica-30 is popularly used to accelerate wound healing, including after oculoplastic surgery. While homeopathic medicines are generally considered safe due to the very low concentrations involved, Arnica-30 may be neurotoxic if consumed internally in large quantities.

  10. Homeopathic arnica for prevention of pain and bruising: randomized placebo-controlled trial in hand surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stevinson, C; Devaraj, V S; Fountain-Barber, A; Hawkins, S; Ernst, E

    2003-01-01

    Homeopathic arnica is widely believed to control bruising, reduce swelling and promote recovery after local trauma; many patients therefore take it perioperatively. To determine whether this treatment has any effect, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial with three parallel arms. 64 adults undergoing elective surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome were randomized to take three tablets daily of homeopathic arnica 30C or 6C or placebo for seven days before surgery and fourteen days after surgery. Primary outcome measures were pain (short form McGill Pain Questionnaire) and bruising (colour separation analysis) at four days after surgery. Secondary outcome measures were swelling (wrist circumference) and use of analgesic medication (patient diary). 62 patients could be included in the intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences on the primary outcome measures of pain (P=0.79) and bruising (P=0.45) at day four. Swelling and use of analgesic medication also did not differ between arnica and placebo groups. Adverse events were reported by 2 patients in the arnica 6C group, 3 in the placebo group and 4 in the arnica 30C group. The results of this trial do not suggest that homeopathic arnica has an advantage over placebo in reducing postoperative pain, bruising and swelling in patients undergoing elective hand surgery. PMID:12562974

  11. Homeopathic arnica for prevention of pain and bruising: randomized placebo-controlled trial in hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Devaraj, V S; Fountain-Barber, A; Hawkins, S; Ernst, E

    2003-02-01

    Homeopathic arnica is widely believed to control bruising, reduce swelling and promote recovery after local trauma; many patients therefore take it perioperatively. To determine whether this treatment has any effect, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial with three parallel arms. 64 adults undergoing elective surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome were randomized to take three tablets daily of homeopathic arnica 30C or 6C or placebo for seven days before surgery and fourteen days after surgery. Primary outcome measures were pain (short form McGill Pain Questionnaire) and bruising (colour separation analysis) at four days after surgery. Secondary outcome measures were swelling (wrist circumference) and use of analgesic medication (patient diary). 62 patients could be included in the intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences on the primary outcome measures of pain (P=0.79) and bruising (P=0.45) at day four. Swelling and use of analgesic medication also did not differ between arnica and placebo groups. Adverse events were reported by 2 patients in the arnica 6C group, 3 in the placebo group and 4 in the arnica 30C group. The results of this trial do not suggest that homeopathic arnica has an advantage over placebo in reducing postoperative pain, bruising and swelling in patients undergoing elective hand surgery.

  12. The effects of topical Arnica on performance, pain and muscle damage after intense eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Pumpa, Kate L; Fallon, Kieran E; Bensoussan, Alan; Papalia, Shona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if topical Arnica is effective in reducing pain, indicators of inflammation and muscle damage, and in turn improve performance in well-trained males experiencing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty well-trained males matched by maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 Max) completed a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial. Topical Arnica was applied to the skin superficial to the quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles immediately after a downhill running protocol designed to induce DOMS. Topical Arnica was reapplied every 4 waking hours for the duration of the study. Performance measures (peak torque, countermovement and squat jump), pain assessments (visual analogue scale (VAS) and muscle tenderness) and blood analysis (interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, C-reactive protein, myoglobin and creatine kinase) were assessed at seven time points over five days (pre-, post-, 4, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after the downhill run). Participants in the topical Arnica group reported less pain as assessed through muscle tenderness and VAS 72 hours post-exercise. The application of topical Arnica did not affect any performance assessments or markers of muscle damage or inflammation. Topical Arnica used immediately after intense eccentric exercise and for the following 96 hours did not have an effect on performance or blood markers. It did however demonstrate the possibility of providing pain relief three days post-eccentric exercise.

  13. Effect of Arnica D30 in marathon runners. Pooled results from two double-blind placebo controlled studies.

    PubMed

    Tveiten, D; Bruset, S

    2003-10-01

    To examine whether the homeopathic medicine Arnica D30 has an effect on muscle soreness and cell damage after marathon running. The subjects were 82 marathon runners from two separate randomised double-blind placebo controlled trials participating in the Oslo Marathon in 1990 and 1995. Five pills of Arnica D30 or placebo were given morning and evening. Treatment started on the evening before the marathon and continued on day of the race and the three following days. The runners assessed muscular soreness on a visual analogue scale. Muscle enzymes, electrolytes and creatinine were measured before and after the marathon. Muscle soreness immediately after the marathon run was lower in the Arnica group than in the placebo group (P = 0.04). Cell damage measured by enzymes was similar in the Arnica and the placebo group. These pooled results suggest that Arnica D30 has a positive effect on muscle soreness after marathon running, but not on cell damage measured by enzymes.

  14. A systematic approach to the identification of common hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids in plant materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A standardized profiling method based on liquid chromatography with diode array and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometric detection (LC-DAD-ESI/MS) was used to separate and identify the phenolic components of arnica flowers (Arnica montana L.), burdock roots (Artium lappa L.), coffee beans (Cof...

  15. Is There a Role for Arnica and Bromelain in Prevention of Post-Procedure Ecchymosis or Edema? A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek; Jagdeo, Jared; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2016-04-01

    The management of postprocedure skin care is of significant interest to dermatologists and other physicians. Ecchymosis and edema are common temporary postprocedure unwanted effects. Two botanically-derived products, arnica and bromelain, are used internationally by physicians to limit ecchymosis and edema that occur secondary to cosmetic, laser, and surgical skin procedures. The authors review the published literature and provide evidence-based recommendations on arnica and bromelain for prevention and treatment of postprocedure ecchymosis and edema. A search of the computerized bibliographic databases Medline, EMBASE, Scopus, and CINAHL was performed on March 23, 2015. The key terms used were "arnica," and "bromelain." This review contains clinical trials that evaluated prevention and/or treatment of postprocedure ecchymosis or edema with oral arnica (11), topical arnica (2), and oral bromelain (7). No studies on topical bromelain were found. Clinical trials on arnica and bromelain have demonstrated mixed results. Some randomized controlled trials reported improvement postprocedure with arnica (4/13) and bromelain (5/7). Based upon published studies, there is insufficient data to support use of arnica and bromelain post procedure, and the authors recommend additional research to determine the efficacy and safety of arnica and bromelain to prevent and/or treat ecchymosis and edema in patients.

  16. 21 CFR 172.510 - Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... root and flowers Althea officinalis L Amyris (West Indian sandalwood) Amyris balsamifera L Angola weed Roccella fuciformis Ach In alcoholic beverages only Arnica flowers Arnica montana L., A. fulgens Pursh, A... Peumus boldus Mol Do. Boronia flowers Boronia megastigma Nees Bryonia root Bryonia alba L., or B. diocia...

  17. [Efficacy of Arnica in varicose vein surgery: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study].

    PubMed

    Wolf, M; Tamaschke, C; Mayer, W; Heger, M

    2003-10-01

    In homeopathy ARNICA is widely used as a woundhealing medication and for the treatment of hematomas. In this pilot study the efficacy and safety of ARNICA D12 in patients following varicose vein surgery were investigated. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial according to ICH GCP guidelines. The study was conducted by a surgeon at the Angiosurgical Clinic, Berlin- Buch. After randomized allocation, 60 patients received either ARNICA D12 or placebo. Start of medication occurred the evening before operation with 5 globules. On the operation day one preoperative and hourly postoperative dosages after awakening were given. On days 2-14 of the study 5 globules 3 times a day were given. OUTCOME CRITERIA: Surface (in cm(2) and using a three-point verbal rating scale) and intensity of hematomas induced by operation, complications of wound healing, and intensity of pain (five-point verbal rating scale) as well as efficacy and safety of the study medication were assessed. Hematoma surface was reduced (from day 7 to day 14) under ARNICA by 75.5% and under placebo by 71.5% (p = 0.4726). The comparison of hematoma surface (small, medium, large) using the verbal rating scale yielded a value of p = 0.1260. Pain score decreased by 1.0 +/- 2.2 points under ARNICA and 0.3 +/- 0.8 points under placebo (p = 0.1977). Remission or improvement of pain was observed in 43.3% of patients in the ARNICA group and in 27.6% of patients in the placebo group. Tolerability was rated as very good in all cases. The results of this pilot study showed a trend towards a beneficial effect of ARNICA D12 with regard to reduction of hematoma and pain during the postoperative course. For a statistically significant proof of efficacy of ARNICA D12 in patients following varicose vein surgery a larger sample size is necessary. Copyright 2003 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  18. Potential of the homeopathic remedy, Arnica Montana 30C, to reduce DNA damage in Escherichia coli exposed to ultraviolet irradiation through up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes.

    PubMed

    Das, Sreemanti; Saha, Santu Kumar; De, Arnab; Das, Durba; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2012-03-01

    To examine to what degree an ultra-highly diluted homeopathic remedy, Arnica Montana 30C (AM-30C), used in the treatment of shock and injury, can modulate the expression of nucleotide excision repair genes in Escherichia coli exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. E. coli were cultured to their log phase in a standard Luria-Bertani medium and then exposed to sublethal doses of UV irradiation at 25 and 50 J/m(2) for 22.5 and 45 s, respectively. The UV-exposed bacteria were then supplemented with either AM-30C (drug) or placebo (P-30C). The drug-treated and placebo-treated bacteria were subjected to assay for DNA damage and oxidative stress 90 min after UV exposure. Several protocols like comet assay, gel electrophoresis for DNA ladder and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and biomarker measurement like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were conducted. The mRNA expressions of the excision repair genes like ultraviolet repair uvrA, B and C genes (or also known as excision repair genes) were estimated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. The UV-exposed bacteria showed DNA damage and oxidative stress, as revealed by an increase in ROS generation, and a decrease in SOD, CAT and GSH activities. As compared to placebo, the AM-30C-treated bacteria showed less DNA damage and oxidative stress as manifested by a decrease in ROS generation, and an increase in SOD, CAT and GSH activities. AM-30C also up-regulated the expression of repair genes as compared to the control. AM-30C helped repair the DNA damage through up-regulation of repair genes and also ameliorated the oxidative stress through the reduction of ROS generation and suitable modulation of anti-oxidative stress enzymes.

  19. Oil Secretory System in Vegetative Organs of Three Arnica Taxa: Essential Oil Synthesis, Distribution and Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kromer, Krystyna; Kreitschitz, Agnieszka; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Szumny, Antoni

    2016-05-01

    Arnica, a genus including the medicinal species A. montana, in its Arbo variety, and A. chamissonis, is among the plants richest in essential oils used as pharmaceutical materials. Despite its extensive use, the role of anatomy and histochemistry in the internal secretory system producing the essential oil is poorly understood. Anatomical sections allowed differentiation between two forms of secretory structures which differ according to their distribution in plants. The first axial type is connected to the vascular system of all vegetative organs and forms canals lined with epithelial cells. The second cortical type is represented by elongated intercellular spaces filled with oil formed only between the cortex cells of roots and rhizomes at maturity, with canals lacking an epithelial layer.Only in A. montana rhizomes do secretory structures form huge characteristic reservoirs. Computed tomography illustrates their spatial distribution and fusiform shape. The axial type of root secretory canals is formed at the interface between the endodermis and cortex parenchyma, while, in the stem, they are located in direct contact with veinal parenchyma. The peripheral phloem parenchyma cells are arranged in strands around sieve tube elements which possess a unique ability to accumulate large amounts of oil bodies. The cells of phloem parenchyma give rise to the aforementioned secretory structures while the lipid components (triacylglycerols) stored there support the biosynthesis of essential oils by later becoming a medium in which these oils are dissolved. The results indicate the integrity of axial secretory structures forming a continuous system in vegetative plant organs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The Commissioning of the Arcetri Near-Infrared Camera ARNICA: II. Broadband Astronomical Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L.; Maioíino, R.; Moriondo, G.; Testi, L.

    1994-11-01

    This report is the second of a series that describes the data analysis and the quantitative results obtained with ARNICA. Our original intention was to limit this report to a description of ARNICA's performance during the commissioning of the camera at the TIRGO (November 1992 - June 1993). Various considerations have since induced us to also include a discussion of results obtained during an observing run in December, 1993, at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT, La Palma, Canary Islands), and during a subsequent observing run at the TIRGO (February, 1994).

  1. Effects of Arnica comp.-Heel® on reducing cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Fioranelli, Massimo; Bianchi, Maria; Roccia, Maria G; Di Nardo, Veronica

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment with one tablet a day of a low dose multicomponent medication (Arnica comp.-Heel® tablets) with anti-inflammatory properties in order to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with clinically stable coronary disease. The presence of inflammatory cells in atherosclerotic plaques of patients with stable coronary disease indicates the possibility to act by inhibiting the inflammatory phenomenon with Arnica comp.-Heel® tablets reducing the risk of instability of the plaque and, consequently, improving the clinical outcome in patients with stable coronary disease. Within this retrospective observational spontaneous clinical study 44 patients (31 males and 13 females) all presenting stable coronary artery disease were evaluated; 25 subjects were treated with only acetylsalicylic acid and/or clopidogrel in association with statins (standard therapeutic protocol) while for the other 18 subjects the standard therapeutic protocol was integrated with Arnica comp.-Heel® (one sublingual tablet/day). The primary outcome was to evaluate the incidence of acute coronary syndrome, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, or non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke. The evaluation of the primary outcome showed that in the group of patients (18) who received the standard therapeutic protocol plus Arnica comp.-Heel® only one cardiovascular event was registered (5.6%) while in the group treated only with standard therapy 4 events were recorded in 25 patients (16%). The treatment with Arnica comp.-Heel® (one tablet/day) in combination with standard therapies for secondary prevention is effective in reducing the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

  2. Accelerated resolution of laser-induced bruising with topical 20% arnica: a rater-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Leu, S; Havey, J; White, L E; Martin, N; Yoo, S S; Rademaker, A W; Alam, M

    2010-09-01

    Dermatological procedures can result in disfiguring bruises that resolve slowly. To assess the comparative utility of topical formulations in hastening the resolution of skin bruising. Healthy volunteers, age range 21-65 years, were enrolled for this double (patient and rater) blinded randomized controlled trial. For each subject, four standard bruises of 7 mm diameter each were created on the bilateral upper inner arms, 5 cm apart, two per arm, using a 595-nm pulsed-dye laser (Vbeam; Candela Corp., Wayland, MA, U.S.A.). Randomization was used to assign one topical agent (5% vitamin K, 1% vitamin K and 0·3% retinol, 20% arnica, or white petrolatum) to exactly one bruise per subject, which was then treated under occlusion twice a day for 2 weeks. A dermatologist not involved with subject assignment rated bruises [visual analogue scale, 0 (least)-10 (most)] in standardized photographs immediately after bruise creation and at week 2. There was significant difference in the change in the rater bruising score associated with the four treatments (anova, P=0·016). Pairwise comparisons indicated that the mean improvement associated with 20% arnica was greater than with white petrolatum (P=0·003), and the improvement with arnica was greater than with the mixture of 1% vitamin K and 0·3% retinol (P=0·01). Improvement with arnica was not greater than with 5% vitamin K cream, however. Topical 20% arnica ointment may be able to reduce bruising more effectively than placebo and more effectively than low-concentration vitamin K formulations, such as 1% vitamin K with 0·3% retinol. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.

  3. Choosing between NSAID and arnica for topical treatment of hand osteoarthritis in a randomised, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Widrig, Reto; Suter, Andy; Saller, Reinhard; Melzer, Jörg

    2007-04-01

    The use of topical preparations for symptom relief is common in osteoarthritis. The effects of ibuprofen (5%) and arnica (50 g tincture/100 g, DER 1:20), as gel preparations in patients with radiologically confirmed and symptomatically active osteoarthritis of interphalangeal joints of hands, were evaluated in a randomised, double-blind study in 204 patients, to ascertain differences in pain relief and hand function after 21 days' treatment. Diagnosis was according to established criteria; primary endpoints were pain intensity and hand function; statistical design was as per current regulatory guidelines for testing topical preparations. There were no differences between the two groups in pain and hand function improvements, or in any secondary end points evaluated. Adverse events were reported by six patients (6.1%) on ibuprofen and by five patients (4.8%) on arnica. Our results confirm that this preparation of arnica is not inferior to ibuprofen when treating osteoarthritis of hands.

  4. Response of Arnica dealbata to climate change, nitrogen deposition, and fire

    Treesearch

    Matthew Hurteau; Malcolm North

    2009-01-01

    Predicted changes in climate and increasing nitrogen deposition are likely to have significant impacts on species that have limited distributions or are already experiencing diminished population size. Arnica dealbata (A. Gray, Asteraceae), a listed sensitive species in Yosemite National Park, is endemic to California and has limited...

  5. Coalbed Methane Extraction and Soil Suitability Concerns in the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    The Powder River Basin is located in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana. It is an area of approximately 55,000 square kilometers. Extraction of methane gas from the coal seams that underlie the Powder River Basin began in Wyoming in the late 1980s and in Montana in the late 1990s. About 100-200 barrels of co-produced water per day are being extracted from each active well in the Powder River Basin, which comes to over 1.5 million barrels of water per day for all the active coalbed methane wells in the Basin. Lab testing indicates that Powder River Basin co-produced water is potable but is high in sodium and other salts, especially in the western and northern parts of the Powder River Basin. Common water management strategies include discharge of co-produced water into drainages, stock ponds, evaporation ponds, or infiltration ponds; treatment to remove sodium; or application of the water directly on the land surface via irrigation equipment or atomizers. Problems may arise because much of the Powder River Basin contains soils with high amounts of swelling clays. As part of the USGS Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center's hyperspectral research program, researchers are investigating whether hyperspectral remote sensing data can be beneficial in locating areas of swelling clays. Using detailed hyperspectral data collected over parts of the Powder River Basin and applying our knowledge of how the clays of interest reflect energy, we will attempt to identify and map areas of swelling clays. If successful, such information will be useful to resource and land managers.

  6. Secondary Metabolites, Glandular Trichomes and Biological Activity of Sideritis montana L. subsp. montana from Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Alessandro; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Frezza, Claudio; Serafini, Mauro; Giacomello, Ginevra; Giuliani, Claudia; Bramucci, Massimo; Quassinti, Luana; Lupidi, Giulio; Lucarini, Domenico; Papa, Fabrizio; Maggi, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    Sideritis montana subsp. montana is a small annual herb occurring in countries bordering the Mediterranean and Balkan regions. The secondary metabolism of this plant has not been fully explored so far. The aim of the present study was to understand the complex mixture of secondary metabolites and the type of secretory structures. The polar constituents were isolated by column chromatography from the ethanolic extract, and their structure was elucidated by NMR and MS. The essential oil was isolated by hydrodistillation and analysed by GC/MS. The plant indumentum was studied by light and scanning electron microscopy. To complete the work, the essential oil antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity on tumor cells were evaluated by DPPH, ABTS, FRAP, and MTT methods. Four different classes of secondary metabolites were isolated, namely flavonoids, caffeoylquinic derivatives, glycosidic hydroquinones and iridoids. The essential oil was mainly characterized by sesquiterpenene hydrocarbons. Peltate and long-capitate hairs were the main sites where terpenes and polar constituents are produced. The secondary metabolites found in S. montana subsp. montana are of chemotaxonomic interest, some of them being typical of the genus Sideritis. The trichomes types observed partially differ from those described in other members of the genus Sideritis. The essential oil showed noteworthy inhibition on tumor cells. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zürich.

  7. Antiproliferative and antimicrobial activity of traditional Kombucha and Satureja montana L. Kombucha.

    PubMed

    Cetojevic-Simin, D D; Bogdanovic, G M; Cvetkovic, D D; Velicanski, A S

    2008-01-01

    To carry out a preliminary investigation of the biological activity of Kombucha beverages from Camellia sinensis L. (black tea) and Satureja montana L. (winter savory tea), that have consuming acidity. Cell growth effect was measured by sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay on HeLa (cervix epithelioid carcinoma), HT-29 (colon adenocarcinoma), and MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma). Antimicrobial activity to bacteria, yeasts and moulds was determined by agar-well diffusion method. Consuming Kombuchas had the most expressive antimicrobial activity against all investigated bacteria, except Sarcina lutea, while unfermented tea samples had no activity. Traditional Kombucha showed higher activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli than acetic acid, while both neutralized Kombuchas had bacteriostatic activity on Salmonella enteritidis. Examined Kombuchas did not stimulate cell proliferation of the investigated cell lines. Antiproliferative activity of winter savory tea Kombucha was comparable to that of traditional Kombucha made from black tea. Furthermore, in HeLa cell line Satureja montana L. Kombucha induced cell growth inhibition by 20% (IC20) at lower concentration compared to the activity of water extract of Satureja montana L. obtained in our previous research. Presence of more active antiproliferative component(s) in Satureja montana L. Kombucha compared to Satureja montana L. water extract and antimicrobial component(s) other than acetic acid in both Kombuchas is suggested.

  8. A randomized, controlled comparison between arnica and steroids in the management of postrhinoplasty ecchymosis and edema.

    PubMed

    Totonchi, Ali; Guyuron, Bahman

    2007-07-01

    Both arnica and corticosteroids have been suggested for reducing the postoperative edema and bruising associated with rhinoplasty. This study compared the efficacy of these products following rhinoplasty. Forty-eight primary rhinoplasty patients were randomized into three groups: group P received 10 mg of dexamethasone (intravenously) intraoperatively followed by a 6-day oral tapering dose of methyl-prednisone; group A received arnica three times a day for 4 days; and group C received neither agent and served as the control. Three blinded panelists rated the extent of ecchymosis, the intensity of the ecchymosis, and the severity of the edema. On postoperative day 2, there were no significant differences in the ratings of extent and intensity of ecchymosis among the groups. There was a significant difference for the edema rating (p < 0.0001), with group C demonstrating more swelling compared with groups A and P. In addition, on postoperative day 8, group P demonstrated a significantly larger extent of ecchymosis (p < 0.05) and higher intensity of ecchymosis (p < 0.01) compared with groups A and C. There were no differences in the magnitude of edema by postoperative day 8 among the three groups. When the differences between day 2 and day 8 ratings were considered, groups A and C exhibited significantly more resolution of ecchymosis by day 8 compared with group P (p < 0.05). This study suggests that both arnica and corticosteroids may be effective in reducing edema during the early postoperative period. Arnica does not appear to provide any benefit with regard to extent and intensity of ecchymosis. The delay in resolution of ecchymosis for patients receiving corticosteroids may outweigh the benefit of reducing edema during the early postoperative period.

  9. Montana StreamStats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2016-04-05

    About this volumeMontana StreamStats is a Web-based geographic information system (http://water.usgs.gov/osw/streamstats/) application that provides users with access to basin and streamflow characteristics for gaged and ungaged streams in Montana. Montana StreamStats was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Montana Departments of Transportation, Environmental Quality, and Natural Resources and Conservation. The USGS Scientific Investigations Report consists of seven independent but complementary chapters dealing with various aspects of this effort.Chapter A describes the Montana StreamStats application, the basin and streamflow datasets, and provides a brief overview of the streamflow characteristics and regression equations used in the study. Chapters B through E document the datasets, methods, and results of analyses to determine streamflow characteristics, such as peak-flow frequencies, low-flow frequencies, and monthly and annual characteristics, for USGS streamflow-gaging stations in and near Montana. The StreamStats analytical toolsets that allow users to delineate drainage basins and solve regression equations to estimate streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites in Montana are described in Chapters F and G.

  10. Phytomedicines prepared from Arnica flowers inhibit the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappaB and modulate the activity of MMP1 and MMP13 in human and bovine chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Christoph; Hrenn, Andrea; Zwingmann, Jörn; Suter, Andreas; Merfort, Irmgard

    2009-10-01

    Arnica preparations have long been used for the symptomatic treatment of rheumatic complaints and recent clinical trials have demonstrated the beneficial effects of Arnica preparations in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). The efficacy of Arnica is presumed to be mainly due to its anti-inflammatory properties and inhibition of the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Here we provide further insights into its molecular mode of action. Arnica preparations suppress MMP1 and MMP13 mRNA levels in bovine and human articular chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner and in a low concentration range. This suppression may be due to inhibition of DNA binding of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappaB. Interestingly, sesquiterpene lactones present in the preparations were always more active than the pure compounds, demonstrating the advantage of using plant preparations. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  11. 21 CFR 172.510 - Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... africana Mill. and A. spicata Baker Althea root and flowers Althea officinalis L Amyris (West Indian... flowers Arnica montana L., A. fulgens Pursh, A. sororia Greene, or A. cordifolia Hooker Do. Artemisia..., Section Eubatus Boldus (boldo) leaves Peumus boldus Mol Do. Boronia flowers Boronia megastigma Nees...

  12. 21 CFR 172.510 - Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... africana Mill. and A. spicata Baker Althea root and flowers Althea officinalis L Amyris (West Indian... flowers Arnica montana L., A. fulgens Pursh, A. sororia Greene, or A. cordifolia Hooker Do. Artemisia..., Section Eubatus Boldus (boldo) leaves Peumus boldus Mol Do. Boronia flowers Boronia megastigma Nees...

  13. Social Organization in Montana. Montana Economic Study-Staff Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigart, Robert J.

    The four papers in this publication discusses Montana's social structure as it relates to culture, income, urbanism, and communal religious communities. "Montana Social Structure and Culture" includes rural and suburban life styles; the history of rural community organization; rural-small town communities; urban physical conditions;…

  14. Altitudinal gradients of generalist and specialist herbivory on three montane Asteraceae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidel, U.; Röhl, S.; Bruelheide, H.

    Different functional types of herbivory on three montane Asteraceae were investigated in natural populations in central Germany to test the hypothesis that herbivory is decreasing with altitude. Generalist herbivory was assessed as leaf area loss, mainly caused by slugs, and, in Petasites albus, as rhizome mining by oligophagous insect larvae. Capitules were found to be parasitized by oligophagous insects in Centaurea pseudophrygia and by the specialist fly Tephritis arnicae in Arnica montana. Only the damage to leaves of P. albus showed the hypothesized decrease with increasing altitude. No altitudinal gradient could be found in the leaf and capitule damage to C. pseudophrygia. In A. montana, capitule damage increased with increasing elevation. The data suggest that abundance and activity of generalist herbivores are more affected by climatic conditions along altitudinal gradients than specialist herbivores. In all probability, specialist herbivores depend less on abiotic conditions than on their host's population characteristics, such as host population size.

  15. ARNICA and LonGSp: the refurbishment of two near infrared instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshida, Shintaro; Vanzi, Leonardo; Guzman, Dani; Leiva, Rodrigo; Bonati, Marco A.; Avilés, Roberto L.; Baffa, Carlo; Palla, Francesco; Mannucci, Filippo; Shen, Tzu Chiang; Suc, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    ARNICA and LonGSp are two NICMOS based near infrared instruments developed in the 90's by the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri. After more than 10 years from decommissioning we refurbished the two instruments with a new read-out electronics and control software. We present the performances of the refurbished systems and compare them with the historic behavior. Both instruments are currently used for testing purposes in the Lab and at the telescope, we present some example applications.

  16. Synergetic analgesic effect of the combination of arnica and hydroxyethyl salicylate in ethanolic solution following cutaneous application by transcutaneous electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Miroslav; Horácek, Ondrej; Kálal, Jan; Kolár, Pavel; Korbelar, Peter; Polesná, Zora

    2003-01-01

    A combination of the active agents arnica and hydroxyethyl salicylate (HES) in ethanolic solution (Sportino Acute Spray) is cutaneously applied for the treatment of sports injuries and diseases of the locomotor apparatus. The aim was to examine the efficacy and synergism of the single substances and the combination with regard to the analgesic effect after cutaneous application as well as to validate the method of transcutaneous electronic stimulation as a method of measuring the analgesic effect. In the present article, the method of transcutaneous electrostimulation was used in a randomized, controlled, single-blind trial on healthy volunteers to provide objective evidence that the combination of active agents displays a significantly greater analgesic effect than the individual active agents. Thus there is synergy between the active agents arnica and hydroxyethyl salicylate in the combination preparation. In addition, the effect of the vehicle ethanol and the reference substance water could be determined within the framework of these comparative experiments and the difference between the combination preparation and the individual substances arnica and HES could be shown. The method of transcutaneous electrostimulation used for the objective measurement of the analgesic effect was validated.

  17. Effects of the homeopathic remedy arnica on attenuating symptoms of exercise-induced muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Plezbert, Julie A.; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency (200c), on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Methods Twenty subjects completed a maximal eccentric exercise protocol with the non-dominate elbow flexors to induce delayed onset muscle soreness. Either Arnica or placebo tablets were administered in a random, double- blinded fashion immediately after exercise and at 24 hours and 72 hours after exercise. Before exercise, immediately post-exercise, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post-exercise, assessments of delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle function included: 1) muscle soreness and functional impairment; 2) maximum voluntary contraction torque; 3) muscle swelling; and 4) range of motion tests to document spontaneous muscle shortening and muscle shortening ability. Blood samples drawn before exercise and at 24, 48, and 96 hours after exercise were used to measure muscle enzymes as indirect indices of muscle damage. Results Regardless of the intervention, the extent of delayed onset muscle soreness and elevations in muscle enzymes were similar on the days following the eccentric exercise protocol. The post-exercise time profiles of decreases in maximum voluntary contraction torque and muscle shortening ability and increases in muscle swelling and spontaneous muscle shortening were similar for each treatment intervention. Conclusions The results of this study did not substantiate the clinical efficacy of Arnica at a high potency on moderating delayed onset muscle soreness and accompanying symptoms of muscle dysfunction. Despite the findings of this study, future investigations on the clinical efficacy of homeopathic interventions should consider incorporating research strategies that emphasize differential therapeutics for each patient rather than treating a specific disease or symptom complex, such as DOMS, with a single homeopathic remedy. PMID:19674657

  18. Montana Logging Utilization, 2002

    Treesearch

    Todd A. Morgan; Timothy P. Spoelma; Charles E. Keegan; Alfred L. Chase; Michael T. Thompson

    2005-01-01

    A study of logging utilization in Montana during 2002 provided logging and product utilization data for sawlog and veneer log harvests in Montana. Results of the study indicate a shift toward greater utilization of smaller diameter material, as 78 percent of the harvested volume in Montana during 2002 came from trees less than 17 inches diameter at breast height. The...

  19. A combination of tryptophan, Satureja montana, Tribulus terrestris, Phyllanthus emblica extracts is able to improve sexual quality of life in patient with premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Salvatore; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Mondaini, Nicola; Cantiello, Francesco; Antonini, Gabriele; Cai, Tommaso

    2016-10-05

    The management of patient affected by premature ejaculation (PE) is nowadays not highly satisfactory. Here, we aimed to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of a combination of tryptophan, Satureja montana, Tribulus terrestris, Phyllanthus emblica extracts in order to improve sexual quality of life in patients with premature ejaculation. All patients attending to 5 urological centers from January 2015 to March 2015, due to premature ejaculation were enrolled in this study. At the enrolment visit, all subjects underwent self-administered IIEF-5, Male Sexual Health Questionnaire-Ejaculation Disorder (MSHQEjD), PEDT and IELTS (calculated as mean from that perceived by partner and that perceived by patient) and underwent urological visit and laboratory examinations. All patients received one tablet per day of a combination of tryptophan, Satureja montana, Tribulus terrestris, Phyllanthus emblica extracts for 3 months (Group A). After 3 months all patients underwent follow-up visit with the same investigations that have been carried out in the enrolment visit. The results were compared with a cohort of patients enrolled in the same period in another urological center and considered as a control group (Group B). All patients in the control group underwent counseling and sexual behavioral treatment without any pharmacological compound. At the follow-up analysis, significant changes in terms of IELT in the Group A (mean difference: 31.90; p < 0.05) at 3 months and versus Group B at the intergroup analysis (mean difference: 30.30; p < 0.05) were reported. In the group A, significant differences from baseline to last follow- up were observed relative to IIEF-5 (mean difference: 1.04; p < 0.05), PEDT (mean difference: -2.57; p < 0.05) and FSH (mean difference: -16.46; p < 0.05). In conclusion, patients affected by PE may significantly benefit from oral therapy with a combination of tryptophan, Satureja montana, Tribulus terrestris, Phyllanthus emblica

  20. Arnica/Hydroxyethyl Salicylate Combination Spray for Ankle Distortion: A Four-Arm Randomised Double-Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Kučera, Miroslav; Kolar, Pavel; Barna, Milos; Kučera, Alexander; Hladiková, Marie

    2011-01-01

    570 patients with acute ankle joint distortion were randomized to four treatment groups: a combination spray of arnica tincture and hydroxyethyl salicylate (HES; group A, n = 228), arnica (B, n = 57), HES (C, n = 228), and placebo (D, n = 57). The medication was applied 4-5 times daily for 10 days. Efficacy was assessed on day 3-4 by evaluating pain on motion on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Pain improvement in group A was significantly superior over groups B–D (t-test with unadjusted baseline values, P < 4 × 10−7 and ANCOVA after adjustment, P < 5 × 10−11) and approximately corresponded to the cumulative effect of the single constituents (12.1, 7.5, and 18.7 mm VAS for A versus B, A versus C, and A versus D; 95% CI 8.0–16.2, 4.7–10.4, and 14.8–22.5 mm). The combination is justified by the additive effects of the single active constituents. PMID:22110924

  1. Arnica and stinging nettle for treating burns - a self-experiment.

    PubMed

    Huber, Roman; Bross, Felix; Schempp, Christoph; Gründemann, Carsten

    2011-10-01

    Combudoron, composed of extracts from arnica and stinging nettle, is used for the treatment of partial thickness burns and insect bites in Europe. Because clinical investigations are lacking we wanted to investigate its efficacy in partial thickness burns. Two individuals performed a self experiment: 4 experimental grade 2 burns (each 1 cm(2)) on the back were induced respectively with an erbium YAG-laser. Wounds were treated with Combudoron gel, Combudoron liquid, placebo gel or placebo liquid in each of the subjects in a standardized, single blind manner. Outcome parameters were the photo documented duration of wound healing and visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores. All 8 experimental burns were similar from size and depth at baseline. Eschars of the verum-treated burns fell off earlier than the placebo-treated burns (verum liquid: after 14 and 19 days compared to 17 and 27 days with placebo liquid. Verum gel: after 16 and 22 days compared to 18 and 28 days with placebo gel). Eschars of the liquid treated burns fell off earlier than of the gel treated burns. Pain scores were not applicable because they were low and differences between the lesions could not be discriminated on the back. Combudoron seems to have positive effects on healing of grade 2 laser induced burns which deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel bisabolane derivative from "arnica-da-serra" (Vernonieae: Asteraceae) reduces pro-nociceptive cytokines levels in LPS-stimulated rat macrophages.

    PubMed

    Petinatti Pavarini, Daniel; Nogueira, Elídia Fernandes; Callejon, Daniel Roberto; Soares, Denis Melo; de Souza, Glória Emilia Petto; Cunha, Fernando de Queiroz; Lopes, João L C; Lopes, Norberto Peporine

    2013-07-30

    Hydro alcoholic leaves extracts (HALE) of Lychnophora ericoides Mart. ("false arnica" or "arnica-da-serra") had been popularly used against pain and inflammatory process. The present work aimed to look for possible active volatile compounds that could be found in HALE of Lychnophora ericoides among the non volatile anti-inflammatory and analgesic compounds previously reported. Harvests were performed during the end of the wet summer season (April) when scented branches were instantly collected and frozen. HALE's were simulated at the lab by following the procedures lectured by the locals. Mass Spectrometry experiments suggested structural information when using both EI-MS and ESI-MS/MS. After isolation through classical thin layer chromatography (TLC) procedures, the NMR experiments and signals assignments were carried out. The effects on the cytokines or nitric oxide (NO) production were assessed at in vitro assays that had monitored the levels of these substances on the supernatant of LPS-stimulated macrophage primary cell culture. The major metabolite from HALE was isolated from the essential oil and the major compound had its molecular formulae established by Mass Spectrometry (High Resolution) and its structure by NMR. Literature-based investigation enables us to define the structure of the new metabolite as 6-methyl-2-(4-methylcyclohex-4-enyl-2-acetyloxy) hept-5-en-2-ol and its name as orto-acetoxy-bisabolol. In vitro assay of interleukins release inhibition was carried out using rat peritoneal macrophages cultures. IL-1β and TNF-α levels were significantly reduced when cells were previously treated with low doses of orto-acetoxy-bisabolol, but neither IL-6 nor NO levels have their levels reduced. Results suggest that ethnical knowledge of anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the "arnica-da-serra" HALE may be associated to the orto-acetoxy-bisabolol ability on synthesis inhibition of the key inflammatory/hypernociceptive mediators. Phytochemical

  3. LC-PDA-ESI/MS Identification of the Phenolic Components of Three Compositae Spices: Chamomile, Tarragon, and Mexican Arnica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.), tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.) and Mexican arnica (Heterotheca inuoides) are common compositae spices and herbs found in the US market. They contain flavonoids and hydroxycinnamates that are potentially beneficial to human health. A standardized LC-PDA-ESI...

  4. Montana StreamStats—A method for retrieving basin and streamflow characteristics in Montana: Chapter A in Montana StreamStats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.; Sando, Steven K.; Sando, Roy

    2016-04-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides streamflow characteristics and other related information needed by water-resource managers to protect people and property from floods, plan and manage water-resource activities, and protect water quality. Streamflow characteristics provided by the USGS, such as peak-flow and low-flow frequencies for streamflow-gaging stations, are frequently used by engineers, flood forecasters, land managers, biologists, and others to guide their everyday decisions. In addition to providing streamflow characteristics at streamflow-gaging stations, the USGS also develops regional regression equations and drainage area-adjustment methods for estimating streamflow characteristics at locations on ungaged streams. Regional regression equations can be complex and often require users to determine several basin characteristics, which are physical and climatic characteristics of the stream and its drainage basin. Obtaining these basin characteristics for streamflow-gaging stations and ungaged sites traditionally has been time consuming and subjective, and led to inconsistent results.StreamStats is a Web-based geographic information system application that was created by the USGS to provide users with access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resource planning and management. StreamStats allows users to easily obtain streamflow and basin characteristics for USGS streamflow-gaging stations and user-selected locations on ungaged streams. The USGS, in cooperation with Montana Department of Transportation, Montana Department of Environmental Quality, and Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, completed a study to develop a StreamStats application for Montana, compute streamflow characteristics at streamflow-gaging stations, and develop regional regression equations to estimate streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites. Chapter A of this Scientific Investigations Report describes the Montana Stream

  5. First experiences with ARNICA, the ARCETRI observatory imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisi, F.; Baffa, C.; Hunt, L.; Maiolino, R.; Moriondo, G.; Stanga, R.

    1994-03-01

    ARNICA (ARcetri Near Infrared CAmera) is the imaging camera for the near infrared bands between 1.0 and 2.5 micrometer that Arcetri Observatory has designed and built as a common use instrument for the TIRGO telescope (1.5 m diameter, f/20) located at Gornergrat (Switzerland). The scale is 1 sec per pixel, with sky coverage of more than 4 min x 4 min on the NICMOS 3 (256 x 256 pixels, 40 micrometer side) detector array. The optical path is compact enough to be enclosed in a 25.4 cm diameter dewar; the working temperature of detector and optics is 76 K. We give an estimate of performance, in terms of sensitivity with an assigned observing time, along with some preliminary considerations on photometric accuracy.

  6. Livability for Montana transportation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-03-01

    The concept of livability is not new to Montana or the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT). Helping build great places in great environments has long been embedded in the departments mission, and even the state constitution. In light of the...

  7. Montana rest area plan

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-12-01

    Montana first developed a rest area plan in 1985; however, that plan no longer adequately sported decisions related to longe-range policy issues. Hence this docment represents a comprehensive effort to update rest area planning for Montana. A three p...

  8. Montana Institute for Effective Teaching of American Indian Children (Missoula, Montana, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Helena.

    This guide presents 11 American Indian study units developed by Montana teachers. Nine units are intended for intermediate or middle-school grades; two are suitable for prekindergarten through primary grades. The units contain information about various American Indian tribes, but focus on tribes of Montana. Many lessons include writing and…

  9. Topical Application of Arnica and Mucopolysaccharide Polysulfate Attenuates Periorbital Edema and Ecchymosis in Open Rhinoplasty: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Gokce; Sari, Elif; Kilic, Rahmi; Bayar Muluk, Nuray

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of local arnica and mucopolysaccharide polysulfate treatment on the regression of postoperative edema and ecchymosis in patients who have undergone open technique rhinoplasty. One hundred eight patients were included in the study. Participants were randomized into three groups, all of whom had undergone rhinoplasty. Group 1 (n = 36) received postoperative arnica cream treatment, and group 2 (n = 36) received postoperative mucopolysaccharide polysulfate cream treatment. Group 3 (n = 36, control group) consisted of patients who received no postoperative local treatments. Patients were evaluated for 24 hours on days 2, 5, 7, and 10 after the operation. For the evaluation of postoperative edema and ecchymosis, a scale ranging from 0 to 4 was used, and the groups were compared. In groups 1 and 2, postoperative ecchymosis was significantly less than in the control group during postoperative days 1, 5, and 7 (p < 0.005). The regression of the edema was also more rapid in groups 1 and 2 than in the control group during evaluations on postoperative days 1, 5, and 7 (p < 0.005). Neither edema nor ecchymosis was significantly different between groups 1 and 2 (p > 0.005). The authors' results suggest that a rapid regression of edema and ecchymosis may be achieved by local treatments of arnica and mucopolysaccharide polysulfate cream. In addition, there are no significant differences between these two treatment regimens. Therapeutic, II.

  10. 2009 Montana Summer Transportation Institute.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-09-01

    The Western Transportation Institute hosted a two-week residential Summer Transportation : Institute for sixteen high school students on the Montana State University campus from June : 14 to June 26, 2009. Participants included Montana residents, one...

  11. Case Study of a Service-Learning Partnership: Montana Tech and the Montana State Prison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amtmann, John; Evans, Roberta; Powers, Jack

    2002-01-01

    As a service learning project, Montana Tech students deliver a wellness program for older inmates in Montana State Prison. Outcomes identified in student interviews included improved interpersonal skills (tact, diplomacy, communication, assertiveness) and opportunities to apply knowledge. Students recognized the value of the program for…

  12. ARNICA, the NICMOS 3 imaging camera of TIRGO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisi, F.; Baffa, C.; Hunt, L.; Stanga, R.

    ARNICA (ARcetri Near Infrared CAmera) is the imaging camera for the near infrared bands between 1.0 and 2.5 μm that Arcetri Observatory has designed and built as a general facility for the TIRGO telescope (1.5 m diameter, f/20) located at Gornergrat (Switzerland). The scale is 1″per pixel, with sky coverage of more than 4 min×4 min on the NICMOS 3 (256×256 pixels, 40 μm side) detector array. The camera is remotely controlled by a PC 486, connected to the array control electronics via a fiber-optics link. A C-language package, running under MS-DOS on the PC 486, acquires and stores the frames, and controls the timing of the array. The camera is intended for imaging of large extra-galactic and Galactic fields; a large effort has been dedicated to explore the possibility of achieving precise photometric measurements in the J, H, K astronomical bands, with very promising results.

  13. JACK CREEK BASIN, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Van Noy, Ronald M.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Jack Creek basin area in Montana revealed that phosphate rock underlies the basin. The phosphate rock is in thin beds that dip steeply and are broken and offset by faults. These features plus the rugged topography of the region would make mining difficult; however, this study finds the area to have a probable mineral-resource potential for phosphate. Sedimentary rock formations favorable for oil and gas also underlie the basin. No oil or gas has been produced from the basin or from nearby areas in southwestern Montana, but oil and gas have been produced from the same favorable formations elsewhere in Montana. The possibility of oil and gas being produced from the basin is slight but it cannot be ignored.

  14. A Report on Traffic Safety and Montana's Children. 1999 Montana Special Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies--The Montana Coalition, Helena.

    This brief Kids Count report looks at major problems, available data, and some solutions for Montana's children as passengers in and drivers of vehicles on Montana's roads and highways. The report also presents information about adults' roles and responsibilities for preventing traffic accidents and protecting children. Facts presented in the…

  15. Coal-bed methane potential in Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Campen, E.

    1991-06-01

    Montana's coal resources are the second largest of the US, with coal underlying approximately 35% of the state. These resources are estimated at 478 billion tons. Associated coal-bed methane resources are estimated to be 14 tcf. The coals of Montana range from Jurassic to early Tertiary in age and from lignite to low-volatile bituminous in rank. Thickness, rank, maceral composition, and proximate and ultimate analyses all vary vertically and laterally. The state contains eight major coal resource areas. A large percentage of Montana's coal consists of the Paleocene Fort Union lignites of eastern Montana, generally considered of too low amore » rank to contain significant methane resources. Most of the state's other coal deposits are higher in rank and contain many recorded methane shows. During Cretaceous and Tertiary times, regressive-transgressive cycles resulted in numerous coal-bearing sequences. Major marine regressions allowed the formation of large peat swamps followed by transgressions which covered the swamps with impervious marine shales, preventing the already forming methane from escaping. About 75% of Montana's coal is less than 1,000 ft below the ground's surface, making it ideal for methane production. Associated water appears to be fresh, eliminating environmental problems. Pipelines are near to most of the major coal deposits. Exploration for coal-bed methane in Montana is still in its infancy but at this time shows commercial promise.« less

  16. A Report on Teen Pregnancy in Montana. 1996/97 Montana Special Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies--The Montana Coalition, Helena.

    This brief "Kids Count" report explores the impact of and factors that bear on teen pregnancy in Montana and ways to prevent teen pregnancy. Statistics and summaries are provided in the following areas: (1) live births to women under age 20, 1990-95; (2) Montana's unmarried teen births as compared to neighboring states; (3) number of…

  17. 76 FR 64047 - Montana Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 926... Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; public comment period and... amendment to the Montana regulatory program (hereinafter, the ``Montana program'') under the Surface Mining...

  18. 76 FR 64045 - Montana Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 926... Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; public comment period and... amendment to the Montana regulatory program (hereinafter, the ``Montana program'') under the Surface Mining...

  19. 76 FR 76111 - Montana Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 926... Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; public comment period and... amendment to the Montana regulatory program (hereinafter, the ``Montana program'') under the Surface Mining...

  20. ARNICA: the Arcetri Observatory NICMOS3 imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisi, Franco; Baffa, Carlo; Hunt, Leslie K.

    1993-10-01

    ARNICA (ARcetri Near Infrared CAmera) is the imaging camera for the near infrared bands between 1.0 and 2.5 micrometers that Arcetri Observatory has designed and built as a general facility for the TIRGO telescope (1.5 m diameter, f/20) located at Gornergrat (Switzerland). The scale is 1' per pixel, with sky coverage of more than 4' X 4' on the NICMOS 3 (256 X 256 pixels, 40 micrometers side) detector array. The optical path is compact enough to be enclosed in a 25.4 cm diameter dewar; the working temperature is 76 K. The camera is remotely controlled by a 486 PC, connected to the array control electronics via a fiber-optics link. A C-language package, running under MS-DOS on the 486 PC, acquires and stores the frames, and controls the timing of the array. We give an estimate of performance, in terms of sensitivity with an assigned observing time, along with some details on the main parameters of the NICMOS 3 detector.

  1. PubMed Central

    Baillargeon, L.; Drouin, J.; Desjardins, L.; Leroux, D.; Audet, D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study, which took the form of a two-period cross-over clinical trial, was to determine whether a homeopathic substance, Arnica Montana, significantly decreased bleeding time (Simplate II) and to describe its impact on various blood coagulation tests. It was not shown that this substance had a significant impact on various parameters of blood coagulation in healthy volunteers in the period immediately following administration [corrected]. PMID:7903572

  2. The influence of seasonality on the content of goyazensolide and on anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperuricemic effects of the ethanolic extract of Lychnophora passerina (Brazilian arnica).

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque Ugoline, Bruno César; de Souza, Jacqueline; Ferrari, Fernanda Cristina; Ferraz-Filha, Zilma Schimith; Coelho, Grazielle Brandão; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes

    2017-02-23

    Lychnophora passerina (Mart ex DC) Gardn (Asteraceae), popularly known as Brazilian arnica, is used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat pain, rheumatism, bruises, inflammatory diseases and insect bites. Investigate the influence of the seasons on the anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperuricemic activities of ethanolic extract of L. passerina and the ratio of the goyazensolide content, main chemical constituent of the ethanolic extract, with these activities. Ethanolic extracts of aerial parts of L. passerina were obtained from seasons: summer (ES), autumn (EA), winter (EW) and spring (EP). The sesquiterpene lactone goyazensolide, major metabolite, was quantified in ES, EA, EW and EP by a developed and validated HPLC-DAD method. The in vivo anti-hyperuricemic and anti-inflammatory effects of the ethanolic extracts from L. passerina and goyazensolide were assayed on experimental model of oxonate-induced hyperuricemia in mice, liver xanthine oxidase (XOD) inhibition and on carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. HPLC method using aqueous solution of acetic acid 0.01% (v/v) and acetonitrile with acetic acid 0.01% (v/v) as a mobile phase in a gradient system, with coumarin as an internal standard and DAD detection at 270nm was developed. The validation parameters showed linearity in a range within 10.0-150.0µg/ml, with intraday and interday precisions a range of 0.61-3.82. The accuracy values of intraday and interday analysis within 87.58-100.95%. EA showed the highest goyazensolide content. From the third to the sixth hour after injection of carrageenan, treatments with all extracts at the dose of 125mg/kg were able to reduce edema. Goyazensolide (10mg/kg) showed significant reduction of paw swelling from the second hour assay. This sesquiterpene lactone was more active than extracts and presented similar effect to indomethacin. Treatments with ES, EA and EP (125mg/kg) and goyazensolide (10mg/kg) reduced serum urate levels compared to hyperuricemic control group and were

  3. Montana rest area usage : data acquisition and usage estimation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-02-01

    The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) has initiated research to refine the figures employed in the : estimation of Montana rest area use. This work seeks to obtain Montana-specific data related to rest area usage, : including water flow, eff...

  4. Observations on a Montana water quality proposal.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.

    2006-01-12

    In May 2005, a group of petitioners led by the Northern Plains Resource Council (NPRC) submitted a petition to revise water quality requirements to the Montana Board of Environmental Review (BER). Under Montana law, the BER had to consider the petition and either reject it or propose it as a new regulation. In September 2005, the BER announced proposed changes to the Montana water quality regulations. The proposal, which included almost the exact language found in the petition, was directed toward discharges of water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production. The key elements of the proposal included: (1) Nomore » discharges of CBNG water are allowed to Montana surface waters unless operators can demonstrate that injection to aquifers with the potential for later recovery of the water is not feasible. (2) When operators can demonstrate the injection is not feasible, the CBNG water to be discharged must meet very strict technology-based limits for multiple parameters. (3) The Montana water quality standards for the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and electrical conductivity (EC) would be evaluated using the 7Q10 flow (lowest 7-consecutive-day flow in a 10-year period) rather than a monthly flow that is currently used. (4) SAR and EC would be reclassified as ''harmful parameters'', thereby greatly restricting the ability for CBNG discharges to be allowed under Montana's nondegradation regulations. The proposed regulations, if adopted in their current form, are likely to substantially reduce the amount of CBNG production in Montana. The impact also extends to Wyoming CBNG production through much greater restrictions on water quality that must be met at the interstate border.« less

  5. Reflections on Tribal Governance in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Kenneth L., Ed.

    This document discusses tribal governance as part of the "Native American Week" on Montana State University's Bozeman campus. The document contains a commissioned paper, a panel discussion, a speech, and a list of legal documents of tribal governments in Montana. The commissioned paper, "Federal Indian Policy: A Summary," by…

  6. Animal-vehicle collisions and habitat connectivity along Montana Highway 83 in the Seeley-Swan Valley, Montana: a reconnaissance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-02-01

    "Montana Highway 83 in northwestern Montana, USA, is known for its great number of animal-vehicle collisions, : mostly with white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). This document reports on the first phase of an effort to produce : an effective im...

  7. 78 FR 63911 - Montana Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 926...; S2D2SSS08011000 SX066A00033 F13XS501520] Montana Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation... regulatory program (hereinafter, the ``Montana program'') under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation...

  8. Fast ultrasound-assisted extraction of polar (phenols) and nonpolar (lipids) fractions in Heterotheca inuloides Cass.

    PubMed

    Ricárdez, O F Mijangos; Ruiz-Jiménez, J; Lagunez-Rivera, L; de Castro, M D Luque

    2011-01-01

    Heterotheca inuloides Cass., also known as "arnica", is used in traditional medicine in Mexico. Development of fast methods for the extraction of lipidic and phenolic fractions from arnica plants and their subsequent characterization. Ultrasound was applied to accelerate extraction of the target compounds from this plant and reduce the use of organic solvents as compared with conventional methods. Gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with diode-array detection were used for the characterization of the lipidic and phenolic fractions, respectively. Under optimal extraction conditions, 9 and 55 min were necessary to complete extraction of the lipidic and phenolic fractions, respectively. The fatty acids present at the highest concentrations in H. inuloides were eicosatetraenoic n3 (24.6 μg/g), cis-9-hexadecenoic n7 (23.1 μg/g), exacosanoic (22.7 μg/g) and cis-9-octadecenoic acid (21.3 μg/g), while the rest were in the range 7.6-1.3 μg/g. The most concentrated phenols were guaiacol (41.5 μg/g), catechin (38.7 μg/g), ellagic acid (35.9 μg/g), carbolic acid (24.2 μg/g) and p-coumaric acid (19.5 μg/g), while the rest were in the range 5.1-0.4 μg/g. Ultrasound reduces the time necessary to complete the extraction 160 and 26 times, the extraction volume 2.5 and 4 times, and increases the extraction efficiency 5 and 3 times for lipidic and phenolic fractions, respectively, in comparison with conventional extraction methods. In addition, the characterization of the lipidic and phenolic fractions constitutes a first approach to the H. inuloides metabolome. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Dillon cutoff-Basement-involved tectonic link between the disturbed belt of west-central Montana and the overthrust belt of extreme southwestern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, J. Michael; Schmidt, Christopher J.; Genovese, Paul W.

    1990-11-01

    The front of the Cordilleran fold and thrust belt in western Montana follows the disturbed belt in the north, merges with the southwest Montana transverse zone in the west-central part of the region, and in southwestern Montana is marked by a broad zone characterized by complex interaction between thrust belt structures and basement uplifts. The front margin of the thrust belt in Montana reflects mainly thin-skinned tectonic features in the north, an east-trending lateral ramp that curves southwest in the central part into the Dillon cutoff, an oblique-slip, thick-skinned displacement transfer zone that cuts through basement rocks of the Lima recess, and a zone of overlap between thin- and thick-skinned thrusts in extreme southwestern Montana. The transverse ramp and basement-involved thrust faults are controlled by Proterozoic structures.

  10. Re-evaluation of Montana's air quality program.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-08-01

    This project examined the Montana DOTs current methods for determining projects for the Montana Air and Congestion Initiative (MACI) program, and made recommendations to improve and implement this program. A major project objective was to keep the...

  11. Plan for the Development of Library Service in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warncke, Ruth

    This plan for the development of Montana library service is based on the experiences of other states, opinions of library experts, written information on Montana libraries, visits to several libraries, and attendance at meetings of the Montana Library Association and its committees. Specific recommendations include: moving the State Library…

  12. Estimated water use in Montana in 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, M.R.; Johnson, Dave R.

    2004-01-01

    The future health and economic welfare of Montana's population is dependent on a continuing supply of fresh water. Montana's finite water resources are being stressed by increasing water withdrawals and instream-flow requirements. Various water managers in Montana need comprehensive, current, and detailed water-use data to quantify current stresses and estimate and plan for future water needs. This report summarizes selected water-use data for all of Montana's counties and stream basins to help meet those needs. In 2000, the citizens of Montana withdrew and used about 10,749 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water from Montana's streams and aquifers. Withdrawals from surface water were about 10,477 Mgal/d and withdrawals from ground water were about 272 Mgal/d. Agricultural irrigation accounted for about 10,378 Mgal/d or about 96.5 percent of total withdrawals for all uses. Withdrawals for public supply were about 136 Mgal/d, self-supplied domestic withdrawals were about 23 Mgal/d, self-supplied industrial withdrawals were about 61 Mgal/d, withdrawals for thermoelectric power generation were about 110 Mgal/d, and withdrawals for livestock were about 41 Mgal/d. Total consumptive use of water in 2000 was about 2,370 Mgal/d, of which about 2,220 Mgal/d (93.6 percent) was for agricultural irrigation. Instream uses of water included hydroelectric power generation and maintenance of instream flows for conservation of wildlife and aquatic life, and for public recreational purposes. In 2000, about 74,486 Mgal/d was used at hydroelectric plants for generation of about 11,591 gigawatt-hours of electricity. Evaporation from large water bodies, although not a classified water use, accounts for a large loss of water in some parts of the State. Net evaporation from Montana's 60 largest reservoirs and regulated lakes averaged about 891 Mgal/d.

  13. Montana Wildfires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Montana Wildfires     View larger image ... in the early summer of 2012 has been on the destructive wildfires in Colorado, as of July 3, 2012, dozens of major wildfires were burning across the western United States, including six in ...

  14. Idaho-Montana Logging

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-16

    Logging operations have left a striking checkerboard pattern in the landscape along the Idaho-Montana border, sandwiched between Clearwater and Bitterroot National Forests as seen in this image acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  15. Methods for estimating streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites in western Montana based on data through water year 2009: Chapter G in Montana StreamStats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Peter M.; Sando, Roy; Sando, Steven K.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    All of the data used to calculate basin characteristics were derived from publicly available data sources and are available through the U.S. Geological Survey Streamstats program (http://water.usgs.gov/osw/streamstats/) for Montana. The primary purpose of the Montana StreamStats application is to provide estimates of basin characteristics and streamflow characteristics for user-selected ungaged sites on Montana streams. The regional regression equations presented in this report have been loaded to the Montana StreamStats application and can be used to derive streamflow characteristics for ungaged sites.

  16. Precambrian basement geologic map of Montana; an interpretation of aeromagnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sims, P.K.; O'Neill, J. M.; Bankey, Viki; Anderson, E.

    2004-01-01

    Newly compiled aeromagnetic anomaly data of Montana, in conjunction with the known geologic framework of basement rocks, have been combined to produce a new interpretive geologic basement map of Montana. Crystalline basement rocks compose the basement, but are exposed only in the cores of mountain ranges in southwestern Montana. Principal features deduced from the map are: (1) A prominent northeast-trending, 200-km-wide zone of spaced negative anomalies, which extends more than 700 km from southwestern Montana's Beaverhead Mountains to the Canadian border and reflects suturing of the Archean Mexican Hat Block against the Archean Wyoming Province along the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Montana Orogen (new name) at about 1.9-1.8 Ga; (2) North-northwest-trending magnetic lows in northeastern Montana, which reflect the 1.9-1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogen and truncate the older Trans-Montana Zone; and (3) Subtle northwest- and west-trending negative anomalies in central and western Montana, which represent the northernmost segment of brittle-ductile transcurrent faults of the newly recognized Mesoproterozoic Trans-Rocky Mountain fault system. Structures developed in the Proterozoic provided zones of crustal weakness reactivated during younger Proterozoic and Phanerozoic igneous and tectonic activity. For example, the Trans-Montana Zone guided basement involved thrust faulting in southwestern Montana during the Sevier Orogeny. The Boulder Batholith and associated ore deposits and the linear belt of alkaline intrusions to the northeast were localized along a zone of weakness between the Missouri River suture and the Dillon shear zone of the Trans-Montana Orogen. The northwest-trending faults of Trans-Rocky Mountain system outline depocenters for sedimentary rocks in the Belt Basin. This fault system provided zones of weakness that guided Laramide uplifts during basement crustal shortening. Northwest-trending zones have been locally reactivated during Neogene basin-range extension.

  17. Board of Regents' Montana University System (MUS) Strategic Plan 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana University System, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Montana University System Strategic Plan is the primary planning document of the Board of Regents. The Plan sets forth an agenda for higher education in Montana by delineating the strategic directions, goals, and objectives that guide the Montana University System (MUS). In July 2006, after several years of study, public dialogue, and internal…

  18. Measured and Estimated Sodium-Adsorption Ratios for Tongue River and its Tributaries, Montana and Wyoming, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, M.R.; Nimick, David A.; Cleasby, Thomas E.; Kinsey, Stacy M.; Lambing, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The Tongue River drains an area of about 5,400 square miles and flows northward from its headwaters in the Bighorn National Forest of northeastern Wyoming to join the Yellowstone River at Miles City, Montana. Water from the Tongue River and its tributaries is extensively used for irrigation in both Wyoming and Montana. The Tongue River watershed contains vast coal deposits that are extracted at several surface mines. In some areas of the watershed, the coal beds also contain methane gas (coal-bed methane or natural gas), which has become the focus of intense exploration and development. Production of coal-bed methane requires the pumping of large volumes of ground water from the coal beds to reduce water pressure within the formation and release the stored gas. Water from the coal beds typically is high in sodium and low in calcium and magnesium, resulting in a high sodium-adsorption ratio (SAR). Disposal of ground water with high sodium concentrations into the Tongue River has the potential to increase salinity and SAR of water in the river, and potentially reduce the quality of water for irrigation purposes. This report documents SAR values measured in water samples collected at 12 monitoring sites in the Tongue River watershed and presents regression relations between specific conductance (SC) and SAR at each site for the years 2004-06. SAR in water samples was determined from laboratory-measured concentrations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium. The results of regression analysis indicated that SC and SAR were significantly related (p-values < 0.05) at most sites. The regression relations developed for most monitoring sites in the Tongue River watershed were used with continuous SC data to estimate daily SAR during the 2004 and 2005 irrigation seasons and to estimate 2006 provisional SAR values, which were displayed on the Web in real-time. Water samples were collected and analyzed from seven sites on the main stem of the Tongue River located at: (1) Monarch

  19. Corrections in Montana: A Consultation on Corrections in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Helena.

    The findings and recommendations of a two-day conference on the civil and human rights of inmates of Montana's correctional institutions are contained in this report. The views of private citizens and experts from local, state, and federal organizations are presented in edited form under seven subject headings: existing prison reform legislation,…

  20. Faculty Handbook -- 1974-1976. Montana State University, Bozeman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Univ., Bozeman.

    The Montana State University's 1974 faculty handbook outlines the history and scope of the university within the Montana state higher education system. The document details the administrative organization; the faculty organization and operation; personnel policies including appointments, tenure, rank and titles, faculty review, promotions,…

  1. Stratigraphy and geologic history of the Montana group and equivalent rocks, Montana, Wyoming, and North and South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, James R.; Cobban, William Aubrey

    1973-01-01

    During Late Cretaceous time a broad north-trending epicontinental sea covered much of the western interior of North America and extended from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Ocean. The sea was bounded on the west by a narrow, unstable, and constantly rising cordillera which extended from Central America to Alaska and which separated the sea from Pacific oceanic waters. The east margin of the sea was bounded by the low-lying stable platform of the central part of the United States.Rocks of the type Montana Group in Montana and equivalent rocks in adjacent States, which consist of eastward-pointing wedges of shallow-water marine and nonmarine strata that enclose westward-pointing wedges of fine-grained marine strata, were deposited in and marginal to this sea. These rocks range in age from middle Santonian to early Maestrichtian and represent a time span of about 14 million years. Twenty-nine distinctive ammonite zones, each with a time span of about half a million years, characterize the marine strata.Persistent beds of bentonite in the transgressive part of the Claggett and Bearpaw Shales of Montana and equivalent rocks elsewhere represent periods of explosive volcanism and perhaps concurrent subsidence along the west shore in the vicinity of the Elkhorn Mountains and the Deer Creek volcanic fields in Montana. Seaward retreat of st randlines, marked by deposition of the Telegraph Creek, Eagle, Judith River, and Fox Hills Formations in Montana and the Mesaverde Formation in Wyoming, may be attributed to uplift in near-coastal areas and to an increase in volcaniclastic rocks delivered to the sea.Rates of transgression and regression determined for the Montana Group in central Montana reveal that the strandline movement was more rapid during times of transgression. The regression of the Telegraph Creek and Eagle strandlines averaged about 50 miles per million years compared with a rate of about 95 miles per million years for the advance of the strand-line during

  2. Compilation of Water-Resources Data for Montana, Water Year 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ladd, P. B.; Berkas, W.R.; White, M.K.; Dodge, K.A.; Bailey, F.A.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Montana Water Science Center, in cooperation with other Federal, State, and local agencies, and Tribal governments, collects a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Montana each water year. This report is a compilation of Montana site-data sheets for the 2006 water year, which consists of records of stage and discharge of streams; water quality of streams and ground water; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; water levels in wells; and precipitation data. Site-data sheets for selected stations in Canada and Wyoming also are included in this report. The data for Montana, along with data from various parts of the Nation, are included in 'Water-Resources Data for the United States, Water Year 2006', which is published as U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data Report WDR-US-2006 and is available at http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/wdr2006. Additional water year 2006 data collected at crest-stage gage and miscellaneous-measurement stations were collected but were not published. These data are stored in files of the U.S. Geological Survey Montana Water Science Center in Helena, Montana, and are available on request.

  3. 76 FR 20624 - Central Montana Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... will meet in Stanford, Montana. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools... Ranger District, located at 109 Central Avenue, Stanford, MT. Written comments should be sent to Ron Wiseman, Lewis and Clark National Forest, 109 Central Avenue, Stanford, Montana 59479. Comments may also...

  4. 76 FR 49433 - Central Montana Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... will meet in Stanford, Montana. The committee is meeting as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools... Ranger District, located at 109 Central Avenue, Stanford, MT. Written comments should be sent to Ron Wiseman, Lewis and Clark National Forest, 109 Central Avenue, Stanford, Montana 59479. Comments may also...

  5. Workforce: Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Employment in Montana (including hourly and salaried jobs and self-employment) is projected to grow by 17 percent from 2002 to 2012, adding over 96,000 new jobs to the state's economy and growing the workforce from 554,456 to 651,135. The rate of growth is higher than the 15 percent increase projected for the nation as a whole. Growth will occur…

  6. Role and Scope of the Montana University System. Adopted June 25, 1979 by the Board of Regents, Montana University System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education, Helena.

    The role and scope of the Montana University and postsecondary education system are described. It is explained that the primary goal of the Montana University System is to use as effectively as possible the resources available to it in providing high quality educational opportunities and service to the people of the state, encompassing the three…

  7. Collective Bargaining Agreement between Montana University System and the Northern Montana College Federation of Teachers, July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Univ. System, Helena.

    The collective bargaining agreement between Montana University System and the Northern Montana College Federation of Teachers, an affiliate of the National Education Association, covering the period July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987, is presented. Items covered in the agreement include: unit recognition, dues deduction, access to information, use of…

  8. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: Alternative Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior alternative school student frequency distributions. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 274 alternative school students in Montana during February of 2011. Frequency distributions may not total 274 due to nonresponse and percents may not total 100 percent due to…

  9. Montana's forest products industry and timber harvest, 2004

    Treesearch

    Timothy P. Spoelma; Todd A. Morgan; Thale Dillon; Alfred L. Chase; Charles E. Keegan; Larry T. DeBlander

    2008-01-01

    This report traces the flow of Montana's 2004 timber harvest through the primary wood-using industries; provides a description of the structure, capacity, and condition of Montana's primary forest products industry; and quantifies volumes and uses of wood fiber. Historical wood products industry changes are discussed, as well as changes in harvest, production...

  10. 2008 Montana transportation facts

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-12-01

    This publication provides an overview of the Department's responsibilities as well as facts and figures related to Montana's highway system, public transportation, rail system, and air service. The publication also includes information on funding sou...

  11. Montana Highway Reconfiguration Study

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-02-01

    "The 2001 Montana State legislature and Governors Office directed the Department (MDT) to conduct a study : examining the economic impact of reconfiguring the States major two-lane highways. To achieve this overall goal, : the Governor created ...

  12. A Response to "A Description of Merger Applied to the Montana State University Context."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Ronald P.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Contains three responses to Stephen L. Coffman's article appearing in the same issue, "A Description of Merger Applied to the Montana State University Context": one from the chancellor of Montana State University-Billings, one from the president of Montana State University-Bozeman, and one from the commissioner of the Montana State University…

  13. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Mendon, Vrushali V.; Zhao, Mingjie; Taylor, Zachary T.

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Montana. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2014 Montana State Code base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Montana.

  14. 2015 Graduation and Dropout Report. Graduation Matters Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2016

    2016-01-01

    In today's economy, a quality public education is the key to economic prosperity for young people. When Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau took office in 2009, there were 2,272 public school students who dropped out of school, and Montana had a dropout rate of five percent. For a state with a school population as small as Montana,…

  15. Montana's forest products industry and timber harvest, 2009

    Treesearch

    Chelsea P. McIver; Colin B. Sorenson; Charles E. Keegan; Todd A. Morgan; Jim Menlove

    2013-01-01

    This report traces the flow of Montana’s 2009 timber harvest through the primary wood-using industries; provides a description of the structure, capacity, and condition of Montana’s primary forest products industry; and quantifies volumes and uses of wood fiber. Historical wood products industry changes are discussed, as well as changes in harvest, production,...

  16. LC-PDA-ESI/MS identification of the phenolic components of three compositae spices: chamomile, tarragon, and Mexican arnica.

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Ze; Harnly, James M

    2012-06-01

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.), tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.) and Mexican arnica (Heterotheca inuoides) are common compositae spices and herbs found in the US market. They contain flavonoids and hydroxycinnamates that are potentially beneficial to human health. A standardized LC-PDA-ESI/MS profiling method was used to identify 51 flavonoids and 17 hydroxycinnamates. Many of the identifications were confirmed with authentic standards or through references in the literature or the laboratory's database. More than half of the phenol compounds for each spice had not been previously reported. The phenolic profile can be used for plant authentication and to correlate with biological activities.

  17. Collective Bargaining Agreement between American Association of University Professors, Eastern Montana College, and the Montana University System, July 1, 1981-June 30, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Univ. System, Helena.

    The collective bargaining agreement between the Montana University System and the Eastern Montana College Chapter (140 members) of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) covering the period July 1, 1981-June 30, 1985 is presented. Items covered are: definitions, nondiscrimination and affirmative action, unit recognition and…

  18. Baxter v. Montana, libertarianism, and end-of-life: the ripe time for a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Ruble, James H

    2010-09-01

    Baxter v. Montana (2009 WL 5155363 [Mont. 2009]) is a recent decision from the Montana Supreme Court that provides new legal insight into the societal issue of aid in dying. This case involves interests of persons with terminal illness, medical practitioners, law enforcement, legislative and judicial bodies, as well as the citizens of Montana. A summary judgment ruling at the Montana district court level was based almost entirely on a constitutional fundamental rights analysis. In contrast, the Montana Supreme Court affirming decision was based almost entirely on a statutory rights analysis. Both rulings from the Montana courts support the position that licensed prescribers in Montana who provide aid in dying assistance to terminally ill patients have some immunity from criminal prosecution. Each side in the case argued what they believed to be the intents and purposes of the people of Montana. Baxter v. Montana illustrates different methods to determine the will of the people concerning aid in dying and public policy. This case very subtly suggests a paradigm shift may be occurring in aid in dying policy.

  19. 77 FR 42509 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of Montana, Missoula, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... Thompson, Department of Anthropology, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, telephone (406) 243-5525... over to the University of Montana, Department of Anthropology. The remains were discovered in the... White, contacted Carling Malouf of the University of Montana, Department of Anthropology, and the...

  20. Developing a Climate Change Boundary Organization: the Montana Adaptation Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, C. L.; Brooks, S.; Armstrong, T.; Bryan, B.

    2016-12-01

    Small-population large-area states like Montana are often challenged by a need to offer timely and relevant climate-change information that addresses diverse and widely dispersed stakeholder groups. In Montana, filling the gap between science and various types of decision-makers has motivated development of the first Montana Climate Assessment (MCA1), to be released in 2017 with a focus on climate-change impacts for agricultural, water and forestry sectors. To sustain and build on the MCA1 effort, we are also in the process of creating a Boundary Organization (defined by the National Academy of Sciences) called the Montana Adaptation Exchange (the Exchange); this entity will facilitate the flow of information across the boundaries between science, knowledge and implementation. In Montana, the Exchange brings scientists and practitioners together to seek solutions related to climate-change adaptation and other pressing environmental and social-economic challenges. The Montana Adaptation Exchange (1) is a collaborative partnership of members from the science and practitioner communities under a shared governance and participatory model; (2) presents research that has been vetted by the scientific community at large and represents the current state of knowledge; (3) allows for revision and expansion of assessments like the MCA; (4) communicates relevant, often technical, research and findings to a wide variety of resource managers and other stakeholders; (5) develops and maintains an extensive online database that organizes, regularly updates, and makes research data products readily available; and (6) offers an online portal and expert network of affiliated researchers and climate adaptation specialists to provide effective customer support. Boundary organizations, such as the Montana Adaptation Exchange, offer a scalable path to effectively move from "science to knowledge to action" while also allowing stakeholder needs to help inform research agendas.

  1. [The advantages and disadvantages of Artemisia princeps and A. montana].

    PubMed

    Oda, R

    2000-01-01

    In Japan, Moxa is made from Artemisia princeps and A. montana P. which are plants of the composiae family. Evaluations of the superiority or inferiority of these raw materials for Moxa have been confusing. The judgement of superiority or inferiority is roughly based on the strenght of the fragrance and somewhat of down. When I investigated 14 kinds of documents from the Edo period to the Showa period, 10 of the documents gave good evaluations for Artemisia princeps. On the other hand the remaining four gave good evaluations for A. montana P. But there is quite an opposite opinion, because the four deemed good for Artemisia princeps were misunderstood regarding the discrimination of Artemisia princeps and A. montana P. Since correcting them, each material has seven good evaluations, tying the score. Therefore, I researched the contents of the principal ingredient, Cineole, using an important evaluation index and the fragrances were compared measuring both materials, which were collected from different places. The results to examining six kinds of Artemisia princeps, and eight kinds of A. montana P. (14 kinds in total) are as follows: The A. montana P. contents Cineole was more abundant than the other on average. However, it is from three to five times the change by the growing both ground, and superiority or inferiority cannot be decided indiscriminately. When quality is evaluated, it is necessary to clarify the materials orgin. Generally speaking, the fragrance of A. montana P. is stronger than the other.

  2. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for students with disabilities. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 1,672 high school students with disabilities in Montana during February of 2011. Frequency distributions may not total 1,672 due to nonresponse and…

  3. Occurrences of the western skink (Eumeces skiltonianus) in grasslands of western Montana

    Treesearch

    Yvette K. Ortega; Dean E. Pearson

    2001-01-01

    The western skink (Eumeces skiltonianus) was recently classified as a Montana Species of Special Concern due to its restricted range in the state (D. P. Hendricks, Montana Natural Heritage Program, Helena, MT, pers. comm.). Records of the western skink in Montana are limited to a few, scattered locations on the western edge of the state (Tanner 1988; Reichel...

  4. Impacts of invasive nonnative plant species on the rare forest herb Scutellaria montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikkema, Jordan J.; Boyd, Jennifer N.

    2015-11-01

    Invasive plant species and overabundant herbivore populations have the potential to significantly impact rare plant species given their increased risk for local extirpation and extinction. We used interacting invasive species removal and grazer exclusion treatments replicated across two locations in an occurrence of rare Scutellaria montana (large-flowered skullcap) in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA, to assess: 1) competition by invasive Ligustrum sinense (Chinese privet) and Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle) and 2) the role of invasive species in mediating Oedocoilus virginianus (white-tailed deer) grazing of S. montana. Contrary to our hypothesis that invasive species presence would suppress S. montana directly via competition, S. montana individuals experienced a seasonal increase in stem height when invasive species were intact but not when invasive species were removed. Marginally significant results indicated that invasive species may afford S. montana protection from grazers, and we suggest that invasive species also could protect S. montana from smaller herbivores and/or positively influence abiotic conditions. In contrast to growth responses, S. montana individuals protected from O. virginianus exhibited a decrease in flowering between seasons relative to unprotected plants, but invasive species did not affect this variable. Although it has been suggested that invasive plant species may negatively influence S. montana growth and fecundity, our findings do not support related concerns. As such, we suggest that invasive species eradication efforts in S. montana habitat could be more detrimental than positive due to associated disturbance. However, the low level of invasion of our study site may not be representative of potential interference in more heavily infested habitat.

  5. Smokers Report: A Health Risk Behavior Comparison of Montana High School Students Based on Current Smoking. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is administered by the Montana Office of Public Instruction every two years to students in grades 7 through 12. The purpose of the survey is to help monitor the prevalence of behaviors that not only influence youth health, but also put youth at risk for the most significant health and social problems…

  6. 75 FR 42125 - Notice of Public Meeting, Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... Public Meeting, Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet as indicated below. DATES: The next regular meeting of the Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council will be...

  7. 2008 Montana Summer Transportation Institute.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-09-01

    The Western Transportation Institute hosted a two-week residential Summer Transportation Institute for eleven high school students on the Montana State University campus from June 15 to June 27, 2008.

  8. Montana SIP: Table c, (viii) Administrative Rules of Montana, Subchapter 10, Preconstruction Permit Requirements for Major Stationary Sources or Major Modifications Locating Within Attainment or Unclassified Areas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Montana SIP: Table c, (viii) Administrative Rules of Montana, Subchapter 10, Preconstruction Permit Requirements for Major Stationary Sources or Major Modifications Locating Within Attainment or Unclassified Areas

  9. Karyomorphometric analysis of Fritillaria montana group in Greece.

    PubMed

    Samaropoulou, Sofia; Bareka, Pepy; Kamari, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Fritillaria Linnaeus, 1753 (Liliaceae) is a genus of geophytes, represented in Greece by 29 taxa. Most of the Greek species are endemic to the country and/or threatened. Although their classical cytotaxonomic studies have already been presented, no karyomorphometric analysis has ever been given. In the present study, the cytological results of Fritillaria montana Hoppe ex W.D.J. Koch, 1832 group, which includes Fritillaria epirotica Turrill ex Rix, 1975 and Fritillaria montana are statistically evaluated for the first time. Further indices about interchromosomal and intrachromosomal asymmetry are given. A new population of Fritillaria epirotica is also investigated, while for Fritillaria montana , a diploid individual was found in a known as triploid population. Paired t-tests and PCoA analysis have been applied to compare the two species.

  10. Resources for Teaching HERO: Food Service Occupations in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Angelina O.; Harris, Pamela R.

    This resource guide is designed to help home economics teachers in Montana to develop occupational programs for food service. It provides resources that can be used with the "Food Service Occupations in Montana: Scope and Sequence in Wage-Earning Home Economics." The guide contains 13 sections. The first section explains the core…

  11. A Sensitive Sensor Cell Line for the Detection of Oxidative Stress Responses in Cultured Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Ute; Priem, Melanie; Bartzsch, Christine; Winckler, Thomas; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    In the progress of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, chemicals that cause the generation of reactive oxygen species trigger a heat shock response in keratinocytes. In this study, an optical sensor cell line based on cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the stress-inducible HSP70B' promoter were constructed. Exposure of HaCaT sensor cells to 25 μM cadmium, a model substance for oxidative stress induction, provoked a 1.7-fold increase in total glutathione and a ∼300-fold induction of transcript level of the gene coding for heat shock protein HSP70B'. An extract of Arnica montana flowers resulted in a strong induction of the HSP70B' gene and a pronounced decrease of total glutathione in keratinocytes. The HSP70B' promoter-based sensor cells conveniently detected cadmium-induced stress using GFP fluorescence as read-out with a limit of detection of 6 μM cadmium. In addition the sensor cells responded to exposure of cells to A. montana extract with induction of GFP fluorescence. Thus, the HaCaT sensor cells provide a means for the automated detection of the compromised redox status of keratinocytes as an early indicator of the development of human skin disorders and could be applied for the prediction of skin irritation in more complex in vitro 3D human skin models and in the development of micro-total analysis systems (μTAS) that may be utilized in dermatology, toxicology, pharmacology and drug screenings. PMID:24967604

  12. Montana Standards and Guidelines for Career and Vocational/Technical Education. Summer 2002 Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Office of Public Instruction, Helena.

    This document presents Montana's standards and guidelines for career and vocational/technical education (CVTE). The guide begins with a directory of Montana's key CVTE personnel and specialists. Part 1 presents the federal and state definitions of CVTE and provides an overview of Montana's system for delivering CVTE and its philosophy regarding…

  13. The Montana experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dundas, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    The development and capabilities of the Montana geodata system are discussed. The system is entirely dependent on the state's central data processing facility which serves all agencies and is therefore restricted to batch mode processing. The computer graphics equipment is briefly described along with its application to state lands and township mapping and the production of water quality interval maps.

  14. 2010 Montana Summer Transportation Institute.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-09-01

    The Summer Transportation Institute (STI) hosted by the Western Transportation Institute at Montana : State University serves to attract high school students to participate in an innovative summer : educational program in transportation. The STI aims...

  15. LC-PDA-ESI/MS Identification of the Phenolic Components of Three Compositae Spices: Chamomile, Tarragon, and Mexican Arnica

    PubMed Central

    Harnly, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.), tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.) and Mexican arnica (Heterotheca inuoides) are common compositae spices and herbs found in the US market. They contain flavonoids and hydroxycinnamates that are potentially beneficial to human health. A standardized LC-PDA-ESI/MS profiling method was used to identify 51 flavonoids and 17 hydroxycinnamates. Many of the identifications were confirmed with authentic standards or through references in the literature or the laboratory’s database. More than half of the phenol compounds for each spice had not been previously reported. The phenolic profile can be used for plant authentication and to correlate with biological activities. PMID:22816299

  16. 2013 Montana Summer Transportation Institute.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-10-01

    The Summer Transportation Institute (STI) hosted by the Western Transportation Institute (WTI) at : Montana State University (MSU) aims to heighten student interest in transportation careers at the pre-college level. The program recruits high school ...

  17. 2014 Montana Summer Transportation Institute.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-10-01

    The Summer Transportation Institute (STI) hosted by the Western Transportation Institute (WTI) at : Montana State University (MSU) aims to heighten student interest in transportation careers at the pre-college level. The program recruits high school ...

  18. 2011 Montana Summer Transportation Institute.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-09-01

    The Summer Transportation Institute (STI) hosted by the Western Transportation Institute at Montana State University serves to attract high school students to participate in an innovative summer educational program in transportation. The STI aims to ...

  19. Montana Schools of Promise: Addressing Equity in American Indian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishbaugh, Mary Susan E.; Dugi, Rosemarie; Schmitz, Stevie

    2016-01-01

    The American Indian presence in Montana enriches the state's culture. Educationally, however, there are gross disparities between academic performance of American Indian students when compared with the student population as a whole and with various ethnic/cultural subgroups. Montana's educational data mirror the Bureau of Indian Education national…

  20. 2012 Montana Summer Transportation Institute

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-10-01

    The Summer Transportation Institute (STI) hosted by the Western Transportation Institute (WTI) at Montana State University (MSU) aims to heighten student interest in transportation careers at the pre-college level. The program recruits high school st...

  1. Streamflow characteristics based on data through water year 2009 for selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana: Chapter E in Montana StreamStats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Peter M.

    2016-04-05

    Chapter E of this Scientific Investigations Report documents results from a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality and the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, to provide an update of statewide streamflow characteristics based on data through water year 2009 for streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana. Streamflow characteristics are presented for 408 streamflow-gaging stations in Montana and adjacent areas having 10 or more years of record. Data include the magnitude and probability of annual low and high streamflow, the magnitude and probability of low streamflow for three seasons (March–June, July–October, and November–February), streamflow duration statistics for monthly and annual periods, and mean streamflows for monthly and annual periods. Streamflow is considered to be regulated at streamflow-gaging stations where dams or other large-scale human modifications affect 20 percent or more of the contributing drainage basin. Separate streamflow characteristics are presented for the unregulated and regulated periods of record for streamflow-gaging stations with sufficient data.

  2. Montana Certification Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Library, Helena.

    The Montana Certification Program offers librarians, library staff members, and trustees a systematic and progressive method by which to track their continuing education (CE) efforts; the program also offers library boards and managers an opportunity to recognize staff efforts to improve their skills, ability, and knowledge. This first section of…

  3. 2015 Montana Summer Transportation Institute.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-10-01

    The Western Transportation Institute (WTI) at Montana State University (MSU) hosted a Summer : Transportation Institute (STI) from June 14 to June 26, 2015. The aim of the program is to introduce : high school participants to career opportunities in ...

  4. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Eric J

    Energy used by Montana single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  5. Forest regions of Montana

    Treesearch

    Stephen F. Arno

    1979-01-01

    In this paper, Montana is divided into eight geographic subdivisions called "forest regions," based on distributions of tree and undergrowth species and the relationship of these patterns to climate and topography. The regions serve as a geographic reference for describing patterns of forest vegetation across the State. Data on the distributions of plant...

  6. Sources and patterns of wolverine mortality in western Montana

    Treesearch

    John R. Squires; Jeffrey P. Copeland; Todd J. Ulizio; Michael K. Schwartz; Leonard F. Ruggiero

    2007-01-01

    We instrumented 36 wolverines (Gulo gulo) on 2 study areas in western Montana and one study area on the Idaho-Montana (USA) border: 14 (9 M, 5 F) on the Pioneer study area, 19 (11 M, 8 F) on the Glacier study area, and 3 (2M, 1 F) on the Clearwater study area. During 2002-2005, harvest from licensed trapping accounted for 9 (6 M, 3 F) of 14 mortalities,...

  7. NPDES Permit for Town of Hot Springs Wastewater Treatment Facility in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT0020591, the Town of Hot Springs, Montana, is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located in Sanders County, Montana, to a ditch discharging to Hot Springs Creek.

  8. Methods for estimating peak-flow frequencies at ungaged sites in Montana based on data through water year 2011: Chapter F in Montana StreamStats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Roy; Sando, Steven K.; McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, completed a study to update methods for estimating peak-flow frequencies at ungaged sites in Montana based on peak-flow data at streamflow-gaging stations through water year 2011. The methods allow estimation of peak-flow frequencies (that is, peak-flow magnitudes, in cubic feet per second, associated with annual exceedance probabilities of 66.7, 50, 42.9, 20, 10, 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.2 percent) at ungaged sites. The annual exceedance probabilities correspond to 1.5-, 2-, 2.33-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals, respectively.Regional regression analysis is a primary focus of Chapter F of this Scientific Investigations Report, and regression equations for estimating peak-flow frequencies at ungaged sites in eight hydrologic regions in Montana are presented. The regression equations are based on analysis of peak-flow frequencies and basin characteristics at 537 streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana and were developed using generalized least squares regression or weighted least squares regression.All of the data used in calculating basin characteristics that were included as explanatory variables in the regression equations were developed for and are available through the USGS StreamStats application (http://water.usgs.gov/osw/streamstats/) for Montana. StreamStats is a Web-based geographic information system application that was created by the USGS to provide users with access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resource planning and management. The primary purpose of the Montana StreamStats application is to provide estimates of basin characteristics and streamflow characteristics for user-selected ungaged sites on Montana streams. The regional regression equations presented in this report chapter can be conveniently solved using the Montana StreamStats application.Selected results from

  9. Indian Education for All: Essential Understandings Regarding Montana Indians. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the year 1999, OPI [Montana Office of Public Instruction] brought together representatives from all the tribes in Montana and created 7 Essential Understandings. These are some of the major issues all tribes have in common. They form the basis for all of our curriculum efforts and initiatives. There is great diversity among the 12 tribal…

  10. 77 FR 74873 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Montana, Missoula, MT; Museum of the Rockies at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... Inventory Completion: University of Montana, Missoula, MT; Museum of the Rockies at Montana State University... Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Montana, the Museum of the Rockies at... contact the University of Montana, which is acting on its own behalf and for the Museum of the Rockies and...

  11. Smoke over Montana and Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    California was not the only western state affected by fire during the last weekend of July. Parts of Montana and Wyoming were covered by a thick pall of smoke on July 30, 2000. This true-color image was captured by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). It is much easier to distinguish smoke from cloud in the color SeaWiFS imagery than the black and white Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imagery. However, GOES provides almost continuous coverage (animation of Sequoia National Forest fire) and has thermal infrared bands (Extensive Fires in the Western U.S.) which detect the heat from fires. On Monday July 31, 2000, eight fires covering 105,000 acres were burning in Montana, and three fires covering 12,000 acres were burning in Wyoming. Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  12. Students with Special Needs: A Health Risk Behavior Comparison of Montana High School Students Based on Special Education Assistance. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is administered by the Montana Office of Public Instruction every two years to students in grades 7 through 12. The purpose of the survey is to help monitor the prevalence of behaviors that not only influence youth health, but also put youth at risk for the most significant health and social problems…

  13. Annual Report to the Board of Regents of the Montana University System, 1973-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Univ. System, Helena.

    This is the first annual report to the Board of Regents from the Commissioner of Higher Education. The purpose of the report is to provide the Board of Regents with comprehensive information on programs and policies of the six institutions of the Montana University System: University of Montana at Missoula, Montana State University at Bozeman,…

  14. Northwestern Montana next frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Stremel, K.

    1983-08-01

    Many contractors are proposing nonexclusive surveys, anticipating more activity in shallow, oil-producing basins. Excluding the Powder River Basin, a majority of geophysical activity in the northern Rockies is focusing on several areas in Montana. Some believe this virtually unexplored area may hold reserves equal to approximately 15-20% of the total known reserves in the U.S.

  15. "Just Following the Buffalo": Origins of a Montana Metis Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Martha Harroun

    2006-01-01

    By 1879 the vast buffalo herds were all but gone from the Great Plains. Many of the remaining animals had moved south from the Milk River of northern Montana and Alberta into the Judith Basin of central Montana. In these rich grasslands, for a few more years, life went on as it had for centuries. Following the buffalo came many Indian bands, as…

  16. Environmental Impact Statement. Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Program. Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Study for Sun River Electr’: Cooperative, Inc. Fairfield, Montana. Butler, G.C., C. Hyslop , and 0. Huntzinger (editors) 1980 Anthroposenic Compounds...Counties, Montana, 1980 -1984 3.1.3-2 Actual and Projected Population of Selected Montana ................ 3-7 Counties and Cities, the State of...by Grade Level 3.1.3-4 City of Great Falls Revenues and Expenditures, All Governmental .... 3-18 Governmental Funds, FY 1980 -2000 3.1.3-5 Cascade

  17. Identifying priority chronic wasting disease surveillance areas for mule deer in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, Robin E.; Gude, Justin; Anderson, N.J.; Ramsey, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal prion disease that affects a variety of ungulate species including mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). As of 2014, no CWD cases had been reported in free-ranging ungulates in Montana. However, nearby cases in Canada, Wyoming, and the Dakotas indicated that the disease was encroaching on Montana's borders. Mule deer are native and common throughout Montana, and they represent a significant portion of the total hunter-harvested cervids in the state. The arrival of CWD in Montana may have significant ecosystem and socioeconomic impacts as well as potential consequences for wildlife management. We used 18,879 mule deer locations from 892 individual deer collected during 1975–2011 and modeled habitat selection for 7 herds in 5 of the 7 wildlife management regions in Montana. We estimated resource selection functions (RSF) in a Bayesian framework to predict summer and winter habitat preferences for mule deer. We estimated deer abundance from flyover counts for each region, and used the RSF predictions as weights to distribute the deer across the region. We then calculated the distance to the nearest known infected herds. We predicted areas of high risk of CWD infection in mule deer as areas with densities above the median density estimate and within the lowest quartile of distances to known infected herds. We identified these areas, the southeast corner of Montana and the north-central border near Alberta and Saskatchewan, as priority areas for CWD surveillance and management efforts. 

  18. Montana Faxnet Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brander, Linda L.

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Montana Faxnet Project, which was created to design and demonstrate a statewide document delivery network utilizing telefacsimile equipment that would create equitable access for all Montanans accessing and retrieving information, and reduce the waiting time for requested materials…

  19. Water Resources Data, Montana, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkas, Wayne R.; White, Melvin K.; Ladd, Patricia B.; Bailey, Fred A.; Dodge, Kent A.

    2003-01-01

    Water resources data for Montana for the 2002 water year consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report contains discharge records for 244 streamflow-gaging stations; stage or content records for 9 lakes and large reservoirs and content for 31 smaller reservoirs; water-quality records for 142 streamflow stations (42 ungaged), 9 ground-water wells, and 3 lakes; precipitation records for 2 atmospheric-deposition stations; and water-level records for 53 observation wells. Additional water year 2002 data collected at crest-stage gage and miscellaneous-measurement sites were collected but are not published in this report. These data are stored within the District office files in Helena and available on request. These data represent part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Montana.

  20. Peak-flow frequency analyses and results based on data through water year 2011 for selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana: Chapter C in Montana StreamStats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    Chapter C of this Scientific Investigations Report documents results from a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Transportation and the Montana Department of Natural Resources, to provide an update of statewide peak-flow frequency analyses and results for Montana. The purpose of this report chapter is to present peak-flow frequency analyses and results for 725 streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana based on data through water year 2011. The 725 streamflow-gaging stations included in this study represent nearly all streamflowgaging stations in Montana (plus some from adjacent states or Canadian Provinces) that have at least 10 years of peak-flow records through water year 2011. For 29 of the 725 streamflow-gaging stations, peak-flow frequency analyses and results are reported for both unregulated and regulated conditions. Thus, peak-flow frequency analyses and results are reported for a total of 754 analyses. Estimates of peak-flow magnitudes for 66.7-, 50-, 42.9-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities are reported. These annual exceedance probabilities correspond to 1.5-, 2-, 2.33-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals.

  1. Forest resources of Montana

    Treesearch

    S. Blair Hutchinson; Paul D. Kemp

    1952-01-01

    In 1928 Congress passed the McSweeney-McNary Forest Research Act authorizing a comprehensive survey of the timber supplies in the United States. Responsibility for this survey was assigned to the Forest Service of the Department of Agriculture. The work in Montana has been under the direction of the Northern Rockv Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. This is a...

  2. Montana air service : opportunities and challenges.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-02-01

    "This report analyzes the challenges facing Montanas commercial service airports and outlines the opportunities : for air service and air cargo development. There are 15 commercial service airports in the state. Before : opportunities could be rec...

  3. Frontier Schools in Montana: Challenges and Sustainability Practices. A Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Hobart L.; Morton, Claudette

    2010-01-01

    This study reveals the challenges confronting small, rural "frontier" schools in Montana and the practices that contribute to their sustainability. A Montana frontier school is defined as a school district with 200 or fewer students and its attendant community in a county with five or fewer people per square mile. The researcher…

  4. Preliminary geologic map of the Townsend 30' x 60' quadrangle, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Mitchell W.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2006-01-01

    The geologic map of the Townsend quadrangle, scale 1:100,000, was made as part of the Montana Investigations Project to provide new information on the stratigraphy, structure, and geologic history of this geologically complex area in west-central Montana. The quadrangle encompasses about 4,200 square km (1,640 square mi).

  5. Equal Educational Opportunity for Native American Students in Montana Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Helena.

    The Montana Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights examined the extent of equal educational opportunity and educational quality offered to Native American children in Montana public schools. Fact-finding meetings were held in Billings (December 10, 1996) and Missoula (April 24, 1997). Chapter 1 of this report outlines the…

  6. 76 FR 46320 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... survey of the lands described below in the BLM Montana State Office, Billings, Montana, on September 1... telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339..., in front of section 30, and certain division of accretion and partition lines, the subdivision of...

  7. 75 FR 58430 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Montana, Missoula, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of... University of Montana, Missoula, MT. The human remains and associated funerary object were removed from a... made by University of Montana, Department of Anthropology, professional staff in consultation with...

  8. 77 FR 47907 - Montana Disaster #MT-00067

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... the disaster: Primary Counties: Rosebud. Contiguous Counties: Montana: Big Horn, Custer, Garfield....938 Businesses With Credit Available Elsewhere 6.000 Businesses Without Credit Available Elsewhere 4...

  9. Who Will Teach Montana's Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielson, Dori Burns

    Montana is experiencing three types of teacher shortages, each requiring different intervention strategies. These situations include shortages in specific subject areas, most notably in music, special education, and foreign languages, followed closely by guidance and library; many job openings, caused by rapid enrollment growth, a large number of…

  10. Supreme Court strikes down Montana's sodomy law.

    PubMed

    1997-08-08

    The Montana Supreme Court struck down the State's sodomy law and ruled that the law violates the State constitutional right to privacy. Until this ruling, all homosexual relations were labeled deviate sexual conduct, punishable by a $50,000 fine and 10 years in prison. No one had been prosecuted under the law since it was enacted in 1973, but its existence placed gay men and lesbians at risk of prosecution. The high court was not persuaded by the State's argument that the sodomy law was permissible because it prevented HIV infection and preserved public morality, largely because the law was enacted a decade before the first case of AIDS was reported in Montana.

  11. 77 FR 42760 - Notice of Public Meeting, Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... management in Montana. At these meetings, topics will include: Miles City and Billings Field Office manager.... Diane Friez, Eastern Montana -- Dakotas District Manager. [FR Doc. 2012-17712 Filed 7-19-12; 8:45 am...

  12. 77 FR 42507 - Notice of Public Meeting, Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... management in Montana. At these meetings, topics will include: Miles City and Billings Field Office manager.... Diane Friez, Eastern Montana--Dakotas District Manager. [FR Doc. 2012-17567 Filed 7-18-12; 8:45 am...

  13. Applicability of ERTS-1 to Montana geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, R. M. (Principal Investigator); Alt, D. D.; Berg, R. A.; Johns, W. M.; Flood, R. E.; Hawley, K. T.; Wackwitz, L. K.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A detailed band 7 ERTS-1 lineament map covering western Montana and northern Idaho has been prepared and is being evaluated by direct comparison with geologic maps, by statistical plots of lineaments and known faults, and by field checking. Lineament patterns apparent in the Idaho and Boulder batholiths do not correspond to any known geologic structures. A band 5 mosaic of Montana and adjacent areas has been laid and a lineament annotation prepared for comparison with the band 7 map. All work to date indicates that ERTS-1 imagery is very useful for revealing patterns of high-angle faults, though much less useful for mapping rock units and patterns of low-angle faults. Large-scale mosaics of U-2 photographs of three test sites have been prepared for annotation and comparison with ERTS-1 maps. Mapping of Quaternary deposits in the Glacial Lake Missoula basin using U-2 color infrared transparencies has been successful resulting in the discovery of some deposits not previously mapped. Detailed work has been done for Test Site 354 D using ERTS-1 imagery; criteria for recognition of several rock types have been found. Photogeologic mapping for southeastern Montana suggest Wasatch deposits where none shown of geologic map.

  14. Echinococcus granulosus in gray wolves and ungulates in Idaho and Montana, USA.

    PubMed

    Foreyt, William J; Drew, Mark L; Atkinson, Mark; McCauley, Deborah

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated the small intestines of 123 gray wolves (Canis lupus) that were collected from Idaho, USA (n=63), and Montana, USA (n=60), between 2006 and 2008 for the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. The tapeworm was detected in 39 of 63 wolves (62%) in Idaho, USA, and 38 of 60 wolves (63%) in Montana, USA. The detection of thousands of tapeworms per wolf was a common finding. In Idaho, USA, hydatid cysts, the intermediate form of E. granulosus, were detected in elk (Cervus elaphus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and a mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus). In Montana, USA, hydatid cysts were detected in elk. To our knowledge, this is the first report of adult E. granulosus in Idaho, USA, or Montana, USA. It is unknown whether the parasite was introduced into Idaho, USA, and southwestern Montana, USA, with the importation of wolves from Alberta, Canada, or British Columbia, Canada, into Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA, and central Idaho, USA, in 1995 and 1996, or whether the parasite has always been present in other carnivore hosts, and wolves became a new definitive host. Based on our results, the parasite is now well established in wolves in these states and is documented in elk, mule deer, and a mountain goat as intermediate hosts.

  15. State of Montana ITS/CVO business plan : intelligent transportation system commercial vehicle operations

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-01-01

    This plans purpose is to encourage coordinated, efficient and safe commercial vehicle operations throughout Montana, and to promote inter-agency and regional cooperation as ITS/CVO projects are developed and deployed. The Plan discusses Montana...

  16. Scheduling Recess before Lunch: Exploring the Benefits and Challenges in Montana Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bark, Katie; Stenberg, Molly; Sutherland, Shelly; Hayes, Dayle

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the "Montana Recess Before Lunch Survey" was to explore benefits, challenges, and factors associated with successful implementation of Recess Before Lunch (RBL), from the perspective of school principals. Methods: An online written questionnaire was distributed to all (N = 661) Montana elementary and…

  17. 76 FR 53940 - Notice of Public Meeting; Western Montana Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... management in Montana. During these meetings the council will participate in/discuss/act upon several topics... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMTB07900 09 L10100000.PH0000 LXAMANMS0000] Notice of Public Meeting; Western Montana Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...

  18. Deer Lodge Valley investigations, western Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Wideman, C.J.; Sonderegger, J.; Crase, E.

    1982-07-01

    A review of the geothermal investigations conducted in the Deer Lodge Valley of Western Montana is briefly presented. Maps of the generalized geology and Bouguer gravity and graphs of selected geothermal gradients and resistivity sounding profiles are presented. (MJF)

  19. Rodent-vegetation relationships in southeastern Montana

    Treesearch

    James G. MacCracken; Daniel W. Uresk; Hansen; Richard M.

    1985-01-01

    Plant communities of southeastern Montana were surveyed for rodents over a two year period. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were the most abundant rodent species found on the study area. Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster), meadow voles (M. pennsylvanicus), sagebrush voles (Lagurus curtatus...

  20. Montana Advanced Biofuels Great Falls Approval

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This November 20, 2015 letter from EPA approves the petition from Montana Advanced Biofuels, LLC, Great Falls facility, regarding ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for advanced biofuel (D-code 5) and renewable

  1. 2000 Montana state rail plan update

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-01-01

    This 2000 Montana Rail Plan Update is a comprehensive update of the State Rail Plan. The purpose of this update is to review the State's role in rail planning, retain eligibility for Local Rail Freight Assistance (LRFA) funding, update the descriptio...

  2. Montana University System Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Univ. System, Helena. Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education.

    This report contains numerous figures and tables providing data about the Montana University System. The report is divided into 11 sections, with some preceded by a brief text summary, followed by data tables and figures. Sections cover: (1) total funds, (2) state appropriated funds, (3) funding sources, (4) enrollment, (5) employment, (6) state…

  3. Chemical composition and antifungal activity of Arnica longifolia, Aster hesperius, and Chrysothamnus nauseosus essential oils.

    PubMed

    Tabanca, Nurhayat; Demirci, Betul; Crockett, Sara L; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can; Wedge, David E

    2007-10-17

    Essential oils from three different Asteraceae obtained by hydrodistillation of aerial parts were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Main compounds obtained from each taxon were found as follows: Arnica longifolia carvacrol 37.3%, alpha-bisabolol 8.2%; Aster hesperius hexadecanoic acid 29.6%, carvacrol 15.2%; and Chrysothamnus nauseosus var. nauseosus beta-phellandrene 22.8% and beta-pinene 19.8%. Essential oils were also evaluated for their antimalarial and antimicrobial activity against human pathogens, and antifungal activities against plant pathogens. No antimalarial and antimicrobial activities against human pathogens were observed. Direct bioautography demonstrated antifungal activity of the essential oils obtained from three Asteraceae taxa and two pure compounds, carvacrol and beta-bisabolol, to the plant pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae and C. gloeosporioides. Subsequent evaluation of antifungal compounds using a 96-well micro-dilution broth assay indicated that alpha-bisabolol showed weak growth inhibition of the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea after 72 h.

  4. Annual peak discharges from small drainage areas in Montana through September 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.V.; Omang, R.J.; Hull, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Annual peak discharge from small drainage areas is tabulated for 336 sites in Montana. The 1976 additions included data collected at 206 sites. The program which investigates the magnitude and frequency of floods from small drainage areas in Montana, was begun July 1, 1955. Originally 45 crest-stage gaging stations were established. The purpose of the program is to collect sufficient peak-flow data, which through analysis could provide methods for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods at any point in Montana. The ultimate objective is to provide methods for estimating the 100-year flood with the reliability needed for road design. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Highway mitigation for wildlife in northwest Montana.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-08-01

    In this report, the Center for Large Landscape : Conservation (CLLC), Future West, the : Sonoran Institute, and Montana State : Universitys Western Transportation : Institute (WTI) investigated the potential impacts : of future housing development...

  6. Floods of May 1981 in west-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Omang, R.J.; Hull, J.A.; Fassler, John W.

    1982-01-01

    Extensive flooding occurred in west-central Montana during May 22-23, 1981, as a result of a series of rainstorms. Flooding was particularly severe in the communities of East Helena, Belt, and Deer Lodge. Although no lives were lost, total flood damages were estimated by the Montana Disaster Emergency Services Division to be in excess of $30 million. Peak discharges were determined at 75 sites in the flooded area. At 25 sites the May 1981 peak discharge exceeded the computed 100-year frequency flood, and at 29 sites, where previous flow records are available, the May 1981 peak discharge exceeded the previous peak of record. (USGS)

  7. Montana's forest resources, 2003-2009

    Treesearch

    Jim Menlove; John D. Shaw; Michael T. Thompson; Chris Witt; Michael C. Amacher; Todd A. Morgan; Colin Sorenson; Chelsea McIver; Charles Werstak

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the most recent inventory information for Montana's forest lands. The report includes descriptive highlights and tables of area, number of trees, biomass, volume, growth, mortality, and removals. Most of the tables are organized by forest type group, species group, diameter class, or owner group. The report also describes...

  8. Indian Child Welfare in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dull Knife Memorial Coll., Lame Deer, MT.

    This report is based upon a 1985-86 survey conducted by the Dull Knife Memorial College Indian Child Welfare Project. A series of workshops were conducted throughout Montana to acquaint providers of services for abused and neglected Indian children with the requirements of and issues associated with the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978.…

  9. 75 FR 81112 - Montana Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... Supplemental Planting of Tree and Shrub Seedlings (III.A.); Mechanical Practices, Supplemental Mulching... Shrub Seedlings. Montana proposes to add the following language regarding Interseeding and Supplemental.... Interseeding may also be used to improve or alter the compositional balance between forage species and shrubs...

  10. 77 FR 18149 - Montana Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 926... Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; reopening and extension of public... receipt of Montana's response to the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement's (OSM) November...

  11. 76 FR 12857 - Montana Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 926... of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Final rule; approval of amendment... the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (``SMCRA'' or ``the Act''). Montana proposed...

  12. Fires in Idaho and Montana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    2000 continues to be the worst fire season in the United States in decades. By August 8, 2000, fires in Montana and Idaho had burned more than 250,000 acres. Resources were stretched so thin that Army and Marine soldiers were recruited to help fight the fires. President Clinton visited Payette National Forest to lend moral support to the firefighters. Dense smoke from Idaho and western Montana is visible stretching all the way to North and South Dakota in this image from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). The image was taken on August 7, 2000. Although the primary mission of SeaWiFS is to measure the biology of the ocean, it also provides stunning color imagery of the Earth's surface. For more information about fires in the U.S., visit the National Interagency Fire Center. To learn more about using satellites to monitor fires, visit Global Fire Monitoring and New Technology for Monitoring Fires from Space in the Earth Observatory. Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  13. Idaho and Montana non-fuel exploration database 1980-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckingham, David A.; DiFrancesco, Carl A.; Porter, Kenneth E.; Bleiwas, Donald I.; Causey, J. Douglas; Ferguson, William B.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes a relational database containing information about mineral exploration projects in the States of Idaho and Montana for the years 1980 through 1997 and a spatial (geographic) database constructed using data from the relational database. The focus of this project was to collect information on exploration for mineral commodities with the exception of sand, gravel, coal, geothermal, oil, and gas. The associate databases supplied with this report are prototypes that can be used or modified as needed. The following sources were used to create the databases-serial mining periodicals; annual mineral publications; mining company reports; U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications; an Idaho mineral property data base developed by Dave Boleneus, USGS, Spokane, Washington; Montana state publications; and discussions with representatives of Montana, principally the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology and the Department of Environmental Quality. Fifty commodity groups were reported between the 596 exploration projects identified in this study. Precious metals (gold, silver, or platinum group elements) were the primary targets for about 67 percent of the exploration projects. Information on 17 of the projects did not include commodities. No location could be determined for 51 projects, all in Idaho. During the time period evaluated, some mineral properties were developed into large mining operations (for example Beal Mountain Mine, Stillwater Mine, Troy Mine, Montana Tunnels Mine) and six properties were reclaimed. Environmental Impact Statements were done on four properties. Some operating mines either closed or went through one or more shutdowns and re-openings. Other properties, where significant resources were delineated by recent exploration during this time frame, await the outcome of important factors for development such as defining additional reserves, higher metal prices, and the permitting process. Many of these

  14. Montana TranPlan 21 annual report : system characteristics overview policy goals and actions status

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-07-01

    TranPlan 21 was Montana's first statewide multimodal transportation plan. The plan, published in : February of 1995, identified the most pressing transportation issues facing Montana, evaluated future : transportation concerns, and established the po...

  15. Green Algae from Coal Bed Methane Ponds as a Source of Fertilizer for Economically Important Plants of Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunsakin, O. R.; Apple, M. E.; Zhou, X.; Peyton, B.

    2016-12-01

    The Tongue River Basin of northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana is the location of natural gas reserves and coal bed methane (CBM) acreage. Although the water that emanates from CBM extraction varies with site, it is generally of higher quality than the waters produced by conventional oil and gas wells, in part because it is low in volatile organic compounds. However, since CBM water contains dissolved solids, including sodium (Na), bicarbonate (HCO3) and chloride (Cl) ions, the water must be treated before it can be discharged into the river or wetlands, or used for stock ponds or irrigation. Several ponds have been constructed to serve as a holding facility for CBM water. Algae from the CBM ponds of the Tongue River Basin have the potential to be utilized as fertilizer on economically important plants of Montana. Two very important crop plants of Montana are wheat, Triticum aestivum, and potatoes, Solanum tuberosum. To explore this potential, isolates of unicellular green algae (Chlorella sp.) from the CBM ponds were cultured in aerated vessels with Bold's Basic Growth Medium and natural and/or supplemental light. Algal biomass was condensed in and collected from a valved funnel, after which cell density was determined via light microscopy and a hemacytometer. Algal/water slurries with known nutrient contents were added to seedlings of hard winter wheat, T.aestivum, grown in a greenhouse for three months before harves. When compared to wheat provided with just water, or with water and a commercially available fertilizer, the wheat fertilized with algae had a higher chlorophyll content, more tillers (side shoots), and a higher ratio of influorescences (groups of flowers) per stem. In a related experiment, Ranger Russet seed potatoes, S. tuberosum were given just water, water and Hoagland's nutrient solution, or water with algae in order to compare aboveground growth and potato production among the treatments. The results of this study suggest that

  16. Developing a Climate Change Boundary Organization: the Montana Adaptation Knowledge Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, C. L.; Brooks, S.; Armstrong, T.; Bryan, B.

    2017-12-01

    States, like Montana, with small populations and large areas, are challenged by a need to offer timely and relevant climate-science information that addresses diverse and widely dispersed stakeholder groups. In Montana, filling the gap between science and practice has motivated the first Montana Climate Assessment (MCA), released September 2017 with a focus on climate impacts on the agriculture, water and forestry sectors. The MCA is an outcome of a science-stakeholder partnership that has identified critical climate-change information and knowledge gaps for the state through listening sessions and questionnaires. From the initial feedback, it became clear that stakeholder groups were deeply concerned about the challenges posed by rising temperatures and wanted to know how recent and projected warming will affect Montana's natural and managed resources. As part of the next phase of the MCA project, we are now creating the Montana Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (MAKE), a "boundary organization" as described by the National Academy of Sciences. MAKE moves beyond information sharing by bringing scientists and practitioners together to seek solutions related to climate-change adaptation and other pressing environmental and socio-economic concerns. Through a collaborative partnership that involves Montana universities, state and federal agencies, businesses and non-governmental organizations, MAKE is designed to communicate current research findings and support revision and expansion of state-of-the-knowledge assessments like the MCA. Stakeholder partners will provide guidance to the science community to help prioritize research directions and activities of high importance. Significant, but often technical, scientific results will be translated and delivered to stakeholder groups through a variety of print, web, and mobile products. MAKE will support an extensive online database, host an online portal, gather a network of experts in respective fields, and maintain a

  17. 75 FR 43476 - Montana Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 926... Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; reopening and extension of public...'') under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (``SMCRA'' or ``the Act''). Montana revised...

  18. 75 FR 67393 - Notice of Public Meeting, Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... Field Office manager updates, subcommittee briefings, work sessions and other issues that the council..., Interior, Montana, Billings and Miles City Field Offices. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In.... Dated: October 25, 2010. M. Elaine Raper, Manager, Eastern Montana--Dakotas District. [FR Doc. 2010...

  19. 76 FR 9049 - Notice of Public Meeting, Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Billings Field Office manager updates, subcommittee briefings, work sessions and other issues that the..., Interior, Montana, Billings and Miles City Field Offices. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In.... Dated: February 8, 2011. M. Elaine Raper, Manager, Eastern Montana--Dakotas District. [FR Doc. 2011-3545...

  20. 76 FR 43705 - Notice of Public Meeting, Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Field Office manager updates, subcommittee briefings, work sessions and other issues that the council..., Interior, Montana, Billings and Miles City Field Offices. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: In.... Dated: July 8, 2011. M. Elaine Raper, Manager, Eastern Montana--Dakotas District. [FR Doc. 2011-18382...

  1. Evaluation of the Montana Department of Transportation's research project solicitation, prioritization, and selection process

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-05-01

    The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) contracted the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the University of Montana Missoula to conduct research to determine how other states solicit, prioritize, and select research problem statem...

  2. Made in Montana: Entrepreneurial Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetting, Marsha A.; Muggli, Gayle Y.

    1988-01-01

    Reports results from a survey of 13 Montana home economists who each started a small business. Information is included on types of businesses the women had started, income, personal characteristics, reasons for starting a business, its impact on family concerns, marketing, obstacles to success, and resources. (CH)

  3. NASA Education Activity Training (NEAT): Professional Development for Montana K-12 Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Kathryn; McKenzie, D.; Des Jardins, A.; Key, J.; Kanode, C.; Willoughby, S.

    2012-05-01

    Piloted during the 2011-2012 academic year, the NASA Education Activity Training (NEAT) teacher workshop program has introduced five solar astronomy and space weather activities to over forty Montana K-12 teachers. Because many Montana schools are geographically isolated (40% of Montana students live more than 50 miles from a city) and/or serve traditionally underrepresented groups (primarily Native Americans), professional development for teachers can be costly and time consuming. However, with funding shared by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly EPO team and the Montana Space Grant Consortium, graduate student specialists are able to host the two-hour NEAT workshops on-site at the schools free of charge, and participating teachers earn two continuing education credits. Leveraging the existing catalogue of research-based NASA activities, the featured NEAT activities were chosen for their ease-of-use and applicability to Montana science standards. These include three advanced activities for older students, such as a paper plate activity for the June 5th, 2012 Transit of Venus, Kinesthetic Astronomy, and the Herschel Infrared experiment, along with two simpler activities for the younger students, such as Solar Cookies and the Electromagnetic War card game. Feedback surveys show that NEAT workshop participants were interested and engaged in the activities and planned on using the activities in their classrooms. With such positive responses, the NEAT program has been a huge success and can serve as a model for other institutions looking to increase their space public outreach and education.

  4. Montana Rural Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroon, Ralph, Comp.

    The material in this K-8 curriculum guide is designed to provide classroom professionals in rural Montana schools with some guidance as to when to introduce and develop concepts in each subject area. It is intended to be a guide, not a rule book or complete course of study. For each subject area and for each grade level, topics are coded as I…

  5. Forest habitat types of Montana

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Pfister; Bernard L. Kovalchik; Stephen F. Arno; Richard C. Presby

    1977-01-01

    A land-classification system based upon potential natural vegetation is presented for the forests of Montana. It is based on an intensive 4-year study and reconnaissance sampling of about 1,500 stands. A hierarchical classification of forest sites was developed using the habitat type concept. A total of 9 climax series, 64 habitat types, and 37 additional phases of...

  6. Resource Sharing in Montana: A Study of Interlibrary Loan and Alternatives for a Montana Union Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Joseph R.

    This study recommends a variety of actions to create and maintain a Montana union catalog (MONCAT) for more effective usage of in-state resources and library funds. Specifically, it advocates (1) merger of existing COM, machine readable bibliographic records, and OCLC tapes into a single microform catalog; (2) acceptance of only machine readable…

  7. Public Education Policy Issues in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitz, Randy, Ed.; Chambers, Keith, Ed.

    This document contains articles that address six major issues affecting Montana public education. The issues were selected by an advisory group comprised of representatives from professional education organizations, state agencies, the legislature, and business. Each of the articles, written by members of the advisory group, contains an executive…

  8. 78 FR 8102 - Kootenai National Forest; Buckhorn Planning Subunit; Lincoln County, Montana; Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... National Forest, Lincoln County, Montana, and north of Troy, Montana. DATES: Comments concerning the scope... Hwy 2, Troy, MT 59935. Comments may also be sent via email to comments-northern-kootenai-three-rivers..., Project Team Leader, Three Rivers Ranger District, 12858 US Hwy 2, Troy, MT 59935. Phone: (406) 295-4693...

  9. Coach Education Online: The Montana Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig

    2006-01-01

    Coach education is important, but expensive--both in cost and time to public and private athletic programs. To provide basic coach education to coaches, new, innovative, inexpensive approaches must be developed. Joint efforts between state high school associations and colleges and universities can meet those needs. The "Montana approach"…

  10. Montana geoenvironmental explorer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Greg K.

    2001-01-01

    This report is the result of a multidisciplinary effort to assess relative potential for acidic, metal-rich drainage in the State of Montana; evaluate alternative GIS-based modeling strategies; and provide the statewide digital spatial data produced and compiled for the project. The CD is usable on various computer systems (Windows 95, 98, NT, and 2000; MacOS 7.1 or later; many versions of UNIX and Linux; and OS/2). This report and maps are in PDF format, and the data have been provided in various GIS formats. Software for viewing the report and data is included.

  11. Beginning of foreland subsidence in the Columbian-Sevier belts, southern Canada and northwest Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Janice M.; Heller, Paul L.

    1995-08-01

    Subsidence analysis and geometry of Jurassic-Cretaceous foreland strata in northwestern Montana and southern Alberta and British Columbia suggest that loading by the fold-thrust belt in Canada began as much as 40 m.y. earlier than in Montana. In Canada, early foreland basin deposits are Late Jurassic age, thicken rapidly westward, and are restricted to a narrow belt within 30 km of the thrust belt. In western Montana, contemporaneous deposits are widespread and do not increase markedly in thickness toward the thrust belt. The unconformity overlying these deposits also changes from Canada, where it is angular, to a disconformity in western Montana near Great Falls. Between these two areas, foreland geometry is transitional over a distance of <250 km. Beyond the transition zone, early foreland basin geometries are broadly consistent, showing Late Jurassic foreland subsidence in southern Canada and Early Cretaceous initial subsidence in the United States.

  12. CHARACTER AND REGIONAL SIGNIFICANCE OF GREAT FALLS TECTONIC ZONE, EAST-CENTRAL IDAHO AND WEST-CENTRAL MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, J. Michael; Lopez, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The Great Falls tectonic zone, here named, is a belt of diverse northeast-trending geologic features that can be traced from the Idaho batholith in the Cordilleran miogeocline, across thrust-belt structures and basement rocks of west-central and southwestern Montana, through cratonic rocks of central Montana, and into southwestern-most Saskatchewan, Canada. Geologic mapping in east-central Idaho and west-central Montana has outlined a continuous zone of high-angle faults and shear zones. Recurrent fault movement in this zone and strong structural control over igneous intrusion suggest a fundamental tectonic feature that has influenced the tectonic development of the Idaho-Montana area from a least middle Proterozoic time to the present. Refs.

  13. 77 FR 43116 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of Montana, Missoula, MT; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... and associated funerary objects in the possession of The University of Montana, Missoula, MT. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from various locations in western Montana... objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice...

  14. Copper-silver deposits of the Revett Formation, Montana and Idaho: origin and resource potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frost, Thomas P.; Zientek, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    The Revett Formation of northern Idaho and western Montana contains major stratabound copper-silver deposits near Troy, Rock Creek, and Rock Lake, Montana. To help the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) meet its goal of integrating geoscience information into the land-planning process, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists recently completed a compilation of regional stratigraphy and mineralogy of the Revett Formation and a mineral resource assessment of Revett-type copper-silver deposits. The USGS assessment indicates that a large area of USFS-administered land in northwestern Montana and northern Idaho may contain significant undiscovered Revett-type copper-silver deposits.

  15. Montana Department of Transportation Research Peer Exchange : Implementation, Performance Measures, and the Value of Research

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2018-01-01

    The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) Research Program hosted a peer exchange in Helena, Montana, from September 12-14, 2017. The objective for the peer exchange was to explore best practices on implementation, performance measures, and the ...

  16. 77 FR 15038 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Montana Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Montana Advisory Committee... Civil Rights (Commission) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) that a planning meeting of the Montana Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights will convene via teleconference on...

  17. Uses, funding, and availability of continuous streamflow data in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shields, R.R.; White, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    This report documents the results of a study of the uses, funding, and availability of continuous streamflow data collected and published by the U.S. Geological Survey in Montana. Data uses and funding sources are identified for the 218 continuous streamflow gages currently (1984) being operated. These stations are supported by 18 different funding sources at a budget for the 1984 water year of $1,065,000. The streamflow-gaging program in Montana has evolved through the years as Federal, State, and local needs for surface-water data have increased. Continuous streamflow records for periods ranging from less than 1 year to more than 90 years have been collected. This report describes phase 1 of a cost-effectiveness study of the streamflow-gaging program in Montana. Evaluation of the program indicates that numerous agencies use the data for studies involving regional hydrology, hydrologic systems, and planning and design. They also use the data for operations of existing hydroelectric and irrigation dams, forecasting flood and seasonal flows, water-quality monitoring, research studies for fish habitat, and other uses such as recreational management. (USGS)

  18. Montana Kids Count 1996 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies--The Montana Coalition, Helena.

    This 1996 KIDS COUNT data book presents comparative data on child well-being for each county in Montana and for the state as a whole. Data in the county profiles, which comprise the bulk of the report, are grouped into: background facts (demographic, mental health, education, security, and income support information); charts showing changes in…

  19. Helminth parasites of spotted sandpipers, Actitis macularius (Charadriiformes), from Belize, Texas, and Montana.

    PubMed

    Canaris, Albert G; Kinsella, John M; Didyk, Andy S

    2009-12-01

    In total, 70 spotted sandpipers, Actitis macularius, were examined for helminth parasites; 47 from Belize, 18 from Texas, and 5 from Montana. The compound communities consisted of 10 species of helminths for Belize, 5 for Texas, and 6 for Montana, for a total of 17 different species. The most prevalent and abundant helminths for Belize were 3 microphallid trematodes, Paramaritremopsis solielangi, Levinseniella carteretensis, and Microphallus kinsellai; for Texas, the cestodes Kowalewskiella cingulifera and Choanotaenia cayennensis; and for Montana, the cestodes Anomotaenia hypoleuci and K. cingulifera. The cestode K. cingulifera was the only species recorded from all 3 localities. The cestode A. hypoleuci was the only specialist. Characteristics for helminth compound communities from the 3 localities were similar in terms of low mean species richness, medium diversity, and in uneven parasite distribution. Infracommunities were species poor for all 3 localities. For the Belize sample, only 6 of the 47 hosts harbored as many as 3 helminth species, and only 1 harbored more, at 5 species. Only 1 host harbored as many as 3 species in the sample from Texas, and a single host harbored a high of 4 species for Montana. There were no significant differences for mean species richness or mean abundance among the 3 localities. There were no significant differences for species richness or mean abundance between the combined freshwater sample from Texas and Montana and the marine sample from Belize. There were no significant positive or negative associations between pairs of helminth species.

  20. Cenozoic pull-apart basins in southwest Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, E.T.

    1991-06-01

    Faults and fault zones bounding the mountain ranges of southwest Montana commonly have been described as normal faults, and the region has been considered to be a northern extension of the Basin and Range. New geologic mapping suggests, however, that Cenozoic movements along most of the zones of steep faults in southwest Montana and in east-central Idaho have been strike-slip, and the intermontane basins appear to be pull-aparts. The principal fault zones trend about north, northwest, east, and north-northeast; the north-trending zones are Cenozoic in age, but the others are of Archean ancestry and are rooted in basement rocks. Thesemore » faults break the region into rhomboidal mountain blocks separated by broad basins with parallel sides. The basins are as much as 5,000 m deep, and their floors are deeply indented by centers of subsidence wherre they are crossed by major fault zones. The basins are floored by Archean or Proterozoic rocks and are filled with tuffaceous sedimentary rocks of late Oligocene to late Miocene age. The Big Hole basin and the smaller basins in upper Grasshopper Creek and Horse Prairie are interpreted to be pull-aparts between zones of east-trending right-lateral faults. The cratonic basins farther east in southwest Montana are interpreted to be basement-floored openings between mountain blocks that have been separated by subcrustal flow to the northwest. The interpretations suggest that significant accumulations of oil or gas are not likely to be found in this region.« less

  1. Differences in Perception of Classroom Teaching Experience for School Counselor Certification Requirements in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowlin, James; Yazak, Daniel L.

    Counselor educators and practitioners have debated the necessity of classroom teaching prior to becoming a school counselor. This research seeks to add to the discussion by presenting the perspective of practicing school counselors and administrators in Montana. Additionally, the study was conducted following a Montana Office of Public Instruction…

  2. Stroke Knowledge among Urban and Frontier First Responders and Emergency Medical Technicians in Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Michael J.; Oser, Carrie; Gohdes, Dorothy; Fogle, Crystelle C.; Dietrich, Dennis W.; Burnett, Anne; Okon, Nicholas; Russell, Joseph A.; DeTienne, James; Harwell, Todd S.; Helgerson, Steven D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess stroke knowledge and practice among frontier and urban emergency medical services (EMS) providers and to evaluate the need for additional prehospital stroke training opportunities in Montana. Methods: In 2006, a telephone survey of a representative sample of EMS providers was conducted in Montana. Respondents were stratified…

  3. When reintroductions are augmentations: the genetic legacy of the fisher (Martes pennanti) in Montana

    Treesearch

    Ray S. Vinkey; Michael K. Schwartz; Kevin S. McKelvey; Kerry R. Foresman; Kristine L. Pilgrim; Brian J. Giddings; Eric C. Lofroth

    2006-01-01

    Fishers (Martes pennanti) were purportedly extirpated from Montana by 1930 and extant populations are assumed to be descended from translocated fishers. To determine the lineage of fisher populations, we sequenced 2 regions of the mitochondrial DNA genome from 207 tissue samples from British Columbia, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Montana. In...

  4. Origins and Widespread Distribution of Co-existing Polyploids in Arnica cordifolia (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Rebecca Hufft

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Polyploidy is a central force structuring genetic diversity in angiosperms, but its ecological significance and modes of origin are not fully understood. This work investigated the patterns of coexistence and molecular relatedness of polyploids in the perennial herb, Arnica cordifolia. Methods The local- and broad-scale distributions of cytotypes were analysed using flow cytometry. Samples were collected from both roadside and understorey habitats to test the hypothesis of niche separation between triploids and tetraploids. The nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and plastid rpl16 spacer, trnL intron plus trnL-trnF spacer and trnK 3' intron regions were sequenced. Key Results Broad-scale sampling established that both triploids and tetraploids were common throughout the range of the species, pentaploids were rare, and diploids were not found. Local-scale sampling revealed coexistence of both triploids and tetraploids within the majority of sites. Triploids and tetraploids were equally represented in the understorey and roadside habitat. Triploids were more variable than tetraploids, but both cytotypes shared polymorphisms in ITS. Conclusions Coexistence of cytotypes appears to be the norm in A. cordifolia, but habitat differentiation (roadside vs. understorey) is not supported as a coexistence mechanism. Molecular analyses supported multiple events creating triploids but revealed a lack of variation in the tetraploids. Additionally, sequence polymorphisms in ITS suggested a hybridization event prior to polyploidization. PMID:17993653

  5. Origins and widespread distribution of co-existing Polyploids in Arnica cordifolia (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Kao, Rebecca Hufft

    2008-01-01

    Polyploidy is a central force structuring genetic diversity in angiosperms, but its ecological significance and modes of origin are not fully understood. This work investigated the patterns of coexistence and molecular relatedness of polyploids in the perennial herb, Arnica cordifolia. The local- and broad-scale distributions of cytotypes were analysed using flow cytometry. Samples were collected from both roadside and understorey habitats to test the hypothesis of niche separation between triploids and tetraploids. The nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and plastid rpl16 spacer, trnL intron plus trnL-trnF spacer and trnK 3' intron regions were sequenced. Broad-scale sampling established that both triploids and tetraploids were common throughout the range of the species, pentaploids were rare, and diploids were not found. Local-scale sampling revealed coexistence of both triploids and tetraploids within the majority of sites. Triploids and tetraploids were equally represented in the understorey and roadside habitat. Triploids were more variable than tetraploids, but both cytotypes shared polymorphisms in ITS. Coexistence of cytotypes appears to be the norm in A. cordifolia, but habitat differentiation (roadside vs. understorey) is not supported as a coexistence mechanism. Molecular analyses supported multiple events creating triploids but revealed a lack of variation in the tetraploids. Additionally, sequence polymorphisms in ITS suggested a hybridization event prior to polyploidization.

  6. DOLUS LAKES ROADLESS AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, James E.; Avery, Dale W.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Dolus Lakes Roadless Area in southwestern Montana, was conducted. Much of the roadless area has probable and substantiated potential for resources of gold, silver, molybdenum, and tungsten. The nature of the geologic terrain indicates that there is little promise for the occurrence of coal, oil, gas, or geothermal resources. Detailed geologic and geochemical studies are suggested to delineate exploration targets that could be tested by drilling.

  7. Montana Curriculum Guidelines for Distributive Education. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Ron, Ed.

    These distributive education curriculum guidelines are intended to provide Montana teachers with teaching information for 11 units. Units cover introduction to marketing and distributive education, human relations and communications, operations and control, processes involved in buying for resale, merchandise handling, sales promotion, sales and…

  8. Montana's courting of physician aid in dying. Could Des Moines follow suit?

    PubMed

    Svenson, Arthur G

    2010-09-01

    Montana recently joined Oregon and Washington as the only states in the nation to legalize the choice among terminally ill adults to hasten death by self-administering a lethal dose of drugs prescribed by a physician. Unlike Oregon and Washington, however, Montana's legalization of physician aid in dying (PAID) resulted not from public consideration of a statewide initiative, but from the judicial resolution of a lawsuit, Baxter v. Montana. As originally conceived, a trial judge reasoned that the unenumerated right to PAID is embraced by enumerated state constitutional rights to privacy and dignity. On appeal, Montana's supreme court jettisoned this construct, and, in its place, fashioned a legal home for PAID out of state homicide, consent defense, and end-of-life statutes. Central to this court's statutory rendering is the finding that state law, allowing terminally ill Montanans sustained by life support to withdraw such treatment and die, discriminates against terminally ill Montanans not sustained by life support who seek death; these classes are similar, the justices reckoned, entitling both to choose death. This analysis examines Montana's courting of PAID, offering textual examination of state trial and appellate court opinions, an accounting of legal strategies advanced in amici curiae briefs, and commentary about the problems and prospects with Baxter's holding. I argue, ultimately, that the equality principles statutorily conceived in Baxter (1) could be parroted in the vast majority of states that both criminalize assisted suicide and enumerate constitutional equal protection guarantees, and (2) could replace sub silentio the equal protection paradigm applied to "physician-assisted suicide" by the United States Supreme Court in its landmark Vacco v. Quill ruling.

  9. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: American Indian Students on or near a Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for American Indian students on or near a reservation. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 720 high school American Indian students on or near a reservation in Montana during February of 2011. Frequency distributions…

  10. Sandstone: secular trends in lithology in southwestern montana.

    PubMed

    McLane, M

    1972-11-03

    Long-term secular trends in the composition and texture of sandstones in southwestern Montana reflect changing provenance and depositional environment, which in turn reflect changing tectonic patterns in the Cordilleran mobile belt just to the west.

  11. Habitat used by shrews in southeastern Montana

    Treesearch

    James G. MacCracken; Daniel W. Uresk; Richard M. Hansen

    1985-01-01

    Dwarf shrews (Sorex nanus), masked shrews (Sorex cinereus), and Merriam shrews (Sorex merriami) were most abundant in riparian and sagebrush-grass habitat types in southeastern Montana. Litter cover was greater in areas occupied by shrews than in areas without shrews. Microhabitat humidity, as related to litter...

  12. Applicability of ERTS-1 to Montana geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, R. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Rapid construction of a lineament map for western Montana, drawn as an overlay to a late August band 7 mosaic at a scale of 1:1,000,000 indicates ERTS-1 imagery to be very suitable for quick compilation of topographically expressed lineaments representing scarps and straight canyons. Over 100 such lineaments were detected, ranging in length from 80 down to 5 miles. Most of the major high angle faults of the area are represented, but low angle faults such as the Lewis overthrust are not apparent. Short and medium length lineaments of northeast trend are abundant southeast of a line connecting Missoula and Great Falls. Only about half of the lineaments are shown on the state geologic map, and limited comparisons with more detailed maps suggest that many will merit investigation as possible faults. It is already apparent that ERTS-1 imagery will be useful in construction of a needed tectonic map of Montana.

  13. Microsatellites indicate minimal barriers to mule deer Odocoileus hemionus dispersal across Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, John H.; Kalinowski, Steven T.; Higgs, Megan D.; Ebinger, Michael R.; Vu, Ninh V.; Cross, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the future spread of chronic wasting disease, we conducted a genetic assessment of mule deer Odocoileus hemionus population structure across the state of Montana, USA. Individual based analyses were used to test for population structure in the absence of a priori designations of population membership across the sampling area. Samples from the states of Wyoming, Colorado and Utah were also included in the analysis to provide a geographic context to the levels of population structure observed within Montana. Results showed that mule deer across our entire study region were characterized by weak isolation by distance and a lack of spatial autocorrelation at distances > 10 km. We found evidence for contemporary male bias in dispersal, with female mule deer exhibiting higher mean individual pairwise genetic distance than males. We tested for potential homogenizing effects of past translocations within Montana, but were unable to detect a genetic signature of these events. Our results indicate high levels of connectivity among mule deer populations in Montana and suggest few, if any, detectable barriers to mule deer gene flow or chronic wasting disease transmission.

  14. Checklist of bees (Apoidea) from a private conservation property in west-central Montana

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Skyler

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Here we present preliminary results from the first three years of a long-term bee survey conducted at a 3,840-ha private conservation property in the northern Sapphire Mountains and Bitterroot River Valley, and a pilot study at an associated 80-ha property in the Swan River Valley, Missoula County, Montana, USA. The survey includes hand-net, bowl-trap, and blue-vane trap collections. The resulting checklist comprises 229 bee species and morphospecies within 5 families, 38 genera and 91 subgenera. Of the total species in the list, 34 of them represent first state records Montana. This survey expands the number of bee species recorded in Montana to 366. Included in these species is Megachile (Eutricharaea) apicalis Spinola, showing a range expansion for this introduced bee. New information We present new distributional records for 34 bee species, including Megachile (Eutricharaea) apicalis Spinola, an introduced bee that was discovered to be resident in North America in 1984 in Santa Barbara County, California. This species has since expanded its range in the across the west, but had not been previously recorded in Montana. PMID:28765718

  15. 78 FR 45869 - Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans; State of Montana; Interstate Transport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... of Montana's submission because the submission did not include any technical analysis to support its..., EPA disagrees with that concern. Our technical analysis confirmed that emissions from Montana in total... irrelevant factors and lacks any technical analysis to support the State's conclusion with respect to...

  16. Inducing Cold-Sensitivity in the Frigophilic Fly Drosophila montana by RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Nicola; Tournière, Océane; Sneddon, Tanya; Ritchie, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Cold acclimation is a critical physiological adaptation for coping with seasonal cold. By increasing their cold tolerance individuals can remain active for longer at the onset of winter and can recover more quickly from a cold shock. In insects, despite many physiological studies, little is known about the genetic basis of cold acclimation. Recently, transcriptomic analyses in Drosophila virilis and D. montana revealed candidate genes for cold acclimation by identifying genes upregulated during exposure to cold. Here, we test the role of myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (Inos), in cold tolerance in D. montana using an RNAi approach. D. montana has a circumpolar distribution and overwinters as an adult in northern latitudes with extreme cold. We assessed cold tolerance of dsRNA knock-down flies using two metrics: chill-coma recovery time (CCRT) and mortality rate after cold acclimation. Injection of dsRNAInos did not alter CCRT, either overall or in interaction with the cold treatment, however it did induced cold-specific mortality, with high levels of mortality observed in injected flies acclimated at 5°C but not at 19°C. Overall, injection with dsRNAInos induced a temperature-sensitive mortality rate of over 60% in this normally cold-tolerant species. qPCR analysis confirmed that dsRNA injection successfully reduced gene expression of Inos. Thus, our results demonstrate the involvement of Inos in increasing cold tolerance in D. montana. The potential mechanisms involved by which Inos increases cold tolerance are also discussed. PMID:27832122

  17. Fire ecology of western Montana forest habitat types

    Treesearch

    William C. Fischer; Anne F. Bradley

    1987-01-01

    Provides information on fire as an ecological factor for forest habitat types in western Montana. Identifies Fire Groups of habitat types based on fire's role in forest succession. Describes forest fuels and suggests considerations for fire management.

  18. 77 FR 23987 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Montana; State Implementation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing a Federal Implementation Plan (FIP) to address regional haze in the State of Montana. EPA developed this proposal in response to the State's decision in 2006 to not submit a regional haze State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision. EPA is proposing to determine that the FIP satisfies requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA or ``the Act'') that require states, or EPA in promulgating a FIP, to assure reasonable progress towards the national goal of preventing any future and remedying any existing man-made impairment of visibility in mandatory Class I areas. In addition, EPA is also proposing to approve a revision to the Montana SIP submitted by the State of Montana through the Montana Department of Environmental Quality on February 17, 2012. The State's submittal contains revisions to the Montana Visibility Plan that includes amendments to the ``Smoke Management'' section, which adds a reference to Best Available Control Technology (BACT) as the visibility control measure for open burning as currently administered through the State's air quality permit program. This change was made to meet the requirements of the Regional Haze Rule. EPA will act on the remaining revisions in the State's submittal in a future action.

  19. Montana Statewide Outdoor Recreation Plan: Action Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Fish and Game Commission, Helena.

    The current revision of Montana's Statewide Outdoor Recreation Plan allows for utilizing the state's outdoor recreational resources to the best advantage of present and future generations. In developing the action program, consideration has been given to preservation, protection, and enhancement of the natural environment. The plan has also been…

  20. Extraction and speciation of arsenic in lacustrine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ficklin, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    Arsenic was partially extracted with 4.OM hydrochloric acid, from samples collected at 25-cm intervals in a 350-cm column of sediment at Milltown Reservoir, Montana and from a 60-cm core of sediment collected at the Cheyenne River Embayment of Lake Oahe, South Dakota. The sediment in both reservoirs is highly contaminated with arsenic. The extracted arsenic was separated into As(III) and As(V) on acetate form Dowex 1-X8 ion-exchange resin with 0.12M HCl eluent. Residual arsenic was sequentially extracted with KClO3 and HCl. Arsenic was determined by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry. The analytical results define oxidized and reduced zones in the sediment columns. ?? 1990.

  1. Caring, Sharing in the Big Sky--Writer, Photographer Explore Five of Montana's Tribal Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worley, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    The author travels across Montana with a former student and photographer, Anders Andersson, and says that visiting tribal colleges is the best way to really understand them. In this article, he writes about five tribal colleges in Montana: (1) Little Big Horn College (LBHC); (2) Chief Dull Knife College (CDKC); (3) Stone Child College (SCC); (4)…

  2. 77 FR 67596 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Montana; Revisions to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Proposed Action on SIP Revisions V. Summary of EPA's Proposed Action VI. Statutory and Executive Order... Program, unless the context indicates otherwise. (xi) The initials SIP mean or refer to State... September 23, 2011 the State of Montana submitted new rules and revisions to revise the Montana SIP. The...

  3. Map showing areas with potential for talc deposits in the Gravelly, Greenhorn, and Ruby ranges and the Henrys Lake Mountains of southwestern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Berg, Richard B.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.

    1998-01-01

    For the last several years, Montana has been the leading talc producing state in the United States (U.S. Geological Survey, 1996). For example, in 1992 Montana supplied about 40 percent of the U.S. mine production of talc (Virta, 1992). All of this production has come from the large deposits of high purity talc in the southwestern part of the state. All Montana talc is currently (1997) extracted from four mines, each within the study area of this map—the open pit operations of the Treasure State, Regal, and Yellowstone mines and the underground operation of the Beaverhead mine (see map numbers 1-4 on list and map to the left). The related mineral chlorite is mined at the Antler mine, located nearby, but outside of the study area in the Highland Mountains. Montana talc has at least two market advantages: (1) some deposits are very large and near surface, allowing economic mining by open pit methods; and (2) the deposits are of high purity and lack tremolite or other amphibole mineral contaminants (such as absestos) that occur in some other talc-rich deposits. Talc from southwest Montana is used in ceramics, paint, paper, plastics, cosmetics, rubber, roofing, flooring, caulking, and agricultural applications. The talc is also used in the processes of recycling paper and plastics. Talc was first discovered in the early 1900's at the present site of the Yellowstone mine (Perry, 1948, p. 9). Modest production began in 1942 from shallow pits and adits, supplying steatite (massive, compact, high-purity) talc that was used to make ceramic insulators. The southwest Montana talc industry grew to become a significant part of the region's economy; this history is described by Perry (1948), Olson (1976), and Berg (1997). Exploration and development are likely to continue for the foreseeable future for several reasons: (1) mines are active in the area at present and an infrastructure for talc processing exists; (2) large changes in domestic and export talc markets are not

  4. 76 FR 54521 - Montana Disaster Number MT-00062

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: (Physical Damage and Economic Injury Loans): Blaine..., Rosebud, Toole, Wibaux, and the Fort Peck Reservation. Contiguous Counties: (Economic Injury Loans Only): Montana: Beaverhead, Dawson, Glacier, Lincoln, Richland, Sheridan. Idaho: Fremont. North Dakota: Bowman...

  5. 76 FR 59479 - Montana Disaster Number MT-00062

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12714 and 12715] Montana Disaster Number MT-00062 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of... information in the original declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers...

  6. SPANISH PEAKS PRIMITIVE AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calkins, James A.; Pattee, Eldon C.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Spanish Peaks Primitive Area, Montana, disclosed a small low-grade deposit of demonstrated chromite and asbestos resources. The chances for discovery of additional chrome resources are uncertain and the area has little promise for the occurrence of other mineral or energy resources. A reevaluation, sampling at depth, and testing for possible extensions of the Table Mountain asbestos and chromium deposit should be undertaken in the light of recent interpretations regarding its geologic setting.

  7. Montana Integrated Carbon to Liquids (ICTL) Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fiato, Rocco A.; Sharma, Ramesh; Allen, Mark

    Integrated carbon-to-liquids technology (ICTL) incorporates three basic processes for the conversion of a wide range of feedstocks to distillate liquid fuels: (1) Direct Microcatalytic Coal Liquefaction (MCL) is coupled with biomass liquefaction via (2) Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation and Isomerization (CHI) of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) or trigylceride fatty acids (TGFA) to produce liquid fuels, with process derived (3) CO 2 Capture and Utilization (CCU) via algae production and use in BioFertilizer for added terrestrial sequestration of CO 2, or as a feedstock for MCL and/or CHI. This novel approach enables synthetic fuels production while simultaneously meeting EISA 2007 Section 526more » targets, minimizing land use and water consumption, and providing cost competitive fuels at current day petroleum prices. ICTL was demonstrated with Montana Crow sub-bituminous coal in MCL pilot scale operations at the Energy and Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota (EERC), with related pilot scale CHI studies conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center (PARC). Coal-Biomass to Liquid (CBTL) Fuel samples were evaluated at the US Air Force Research Labs (AFRL) in Dayton and greenhouse tests of algae based BioFertilizer conducted at Montana State University (MSU). Econometric modeling studies were also conducted on the use of algae based BioFertilizer in a wheat-camelina crop rotation cycle. We find that the combined operation is not only able to help boost crop yields, but also to provide added crop yields and associated profits from TGFA (from crop production) for use an ICTL plant feedstock. This program demonstrated the overall viability of ICTL in pilot scale operations. Related work on the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of a Montana project indicated that CCU could be employed very effectively to reduce the overall carbon footprint of the MCL/CHI process. Plans are currently being made to conduct larger-scale process

  8. Montana: Filling A Gap In The GeoSwath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, B.; Keller, G. R.

    2010-12-01

    The proposed Geoswath transect crosses southern Montana, and the swath of MT stations deployed as part of EarthScope cover all but a small portion of eastern Montana. USArray broadband stations of course cover the entire region. However, modern controlled-source seismic data are very sparse in this large state, and most of it dates from the 1960’s. In this study, we have taken an integrated approach to analyzing lithospheric structure by compiling and analyzing all the public domain geophysical results and data we could locate and combining them with industry seismic reflection data that were released for our study. This information was employed to interpret a suite of filtered regional maps gravity and magnetic data and to construct integrated gravity models of long profiles that reflect crustal structure and deeper features within the upper mantle of the region. Our analysis included previous seismic refraction/reflection results, EarthScope Automated Array receiver functions, new 2D seismic reflection data, seismic tomography, potential field data, and previous geological studies in order to investigate structural and compositional variations within the crust and upper mantle. Our targets included Precambrian structure and tectonics, Sevier and Laramide features, and Late Cenozoic extension. Our main conclusions are: 1) Receiver function and seismic refraction/reflection crustal thickness estimates show a W-E crustal thickening with thicknesses greater than 50 km in the central and eastern Montana; 2) Seismic reflection data reveal Laramide basement-involved structures as far east as central Montana. These structures also show that the western edge of the North American craton was affected by late Mesozoic to Cenozoic deformation and has thus been decratonized; 3) Potential field filtering methods revealed regional trends and tectonic province outlines. The tilt derivative of the reduced-to-pole magnetic data enhances crystalline basement patterns that reflect

  9. Evaluating Montana's ITEEM : successes and lessons for Eco-logical

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    Up until the late 1990s, the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) performed environmental mitigation for transportation projects on an individual-project basis. Similar experiences at State Departments of Transportation (DOTs) nationwide have s...

  10. The Marysville, Montana Geothermal Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcspadden, W. R.; Stewart, D. H.; Kuwada, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Drilling the first geothermal well in Montana presented many challenges, not only in securing materials and planning strategies for drilling the wildcat well but also in addressing the environmental, legal, and institutional issues raised by the request for permission to explore a resource which lacked legal definition. The Marysville Geothermal Project was to investigate a dry hot rock heat anomaly. The well was drilled to a total depth of 6790 feet and many fractured water bearing zones were encountered below 1800 feet.

  11. The University of Montana's Blue Mountain Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, D. B.

    2004-12-01

    The University of Montana's Department of Physics and Astronomy runs the state of Montana's only professional astronomical observatory. The Observatory, located on nearby Blue Mountain, houses a 16 inch Boller and Chivens Cassegrain reflector (purchased in 1970), in an Ash dome. The Observatory sits just below the summit ridge, at an elevation of approximately 6300 feet. Our instrumentation includes an Op-Tec SSP-5A photoelectric photometer and an SBIG ST-9E CCD camera. We have the only undergraduate astronomy major in the state (technically a physics major with an astronomy option), so our Observatory is an important component of our students' education. Students have recently carried out observing projects on the photometry of variable stars and color photometry of open clusters and OB associations. In my poster I will show some of the data collected by students in their observing projects. The Observatory is also used for public open houses during the summer months, and these have become very popular: at times we have had 300 visitors in a single night.

  12. Monitoring biological control agents and leafy spurge populations along the Smith River in Montana, USA

    Treesearch

    J. Birdsall; G. Markin; T. Kalaris; J. Runyon

    2013-01-01

    The Smith River originates in west central Montana and flows north approximately 100 miles before joining the Missouri River. The central 60 miles of the river flows through a relatively inaccessible, forested, scenic limestone canyon famous for its trout fishing. Because of its popularity, the area was designated Montana's first and only controlled river, with...

  13. NPDES Permit for Northern Border Pipeline Company in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0030791, the Northern Border Pipeline Company is authorized to discharge from locations along the Northern Border Gas Transmission Pipeline located within the exterior boundaries of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana.

  14. Assessing the effectiveness of Montana's vehicle occupant protection program.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to quantitatively evaluate the relationships between MDT's occupant protection program : activities and seat restraint usage throughout Montana, in an effort to clarify how MDT's occupant protection programs may : affe...

  15. Ride specification review for the Montana Department of Transportation

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-08-01

    This report covers the activities that were performed to enhance the current Montana Department of Transportation (MDT)ride specification for flexible pavements. The project team reviewed the MDT ride specification for flexible pavements and compared...

  16. Revitalizing Indigenous Languages, Cultures, and Histories in Montana, across the United States and around the Globe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carjuzaa, Jioanna

    2017-01-01

    Many educators have sung the praises of Indian Education for All, Montana's constitutional mandate, and heard the successes of Montana's Indigenous language revitalization efforts which reverberate around the globe. Teaching Indigenous languages is especially, challenging since there are limited numbers of fluent speakers and scarce resources…

  17. NPDES Permit for Charlo Wastewater Treatment Facility in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0022551, the Consolidated Charlo-Lake County Water & Sewer District is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located in Lake County, Montana to an unnamed swale that runs to Dublin Gulch.

  18. Success of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Education & Public Outreach (E/PO) in Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, M. S.; Lowder, S. C.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2013-03-01

    The Space Public Outreach Team (SPOT) program at Montana State University (MSU) is the main component of SDO E/PO efforts in Montana. SPOT brings energetic presentations of recent science & NASA missions to students in primary & secondary schools. Presenters are university undergraduates that visit a diverse group of K-12 students from both rural & urban areas of Montana. This program is extremely cost effective, a valuable service-learning experience for undergraduates at MSU and has repeatedly received praise from both teachers and students. A complementary effort for training schoolteachers entitled NASA Education Activity Training (NEAT) is also employed. NEAT illustrates to teachers inexpensive and highly effective methods for demonstrating difficult science concepts to their students. We will highlight the successes and lessons learned from SPOT & NEAT, so that other E/PO programs can use it as a template to further science literacy in our nation's schools.

  19. 76 FR 38604 - Southern Montana Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Big Timber, Montana. The committee is meeting as authorized under... be held at the Carnegie Public Library, 34 McLeod Street, Big Timber, MT. Written comments should be...-16557 Filed 6-30-11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410-11-P ...

  20. Race, Hunger, and Poverty on Montana Indian Reservations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brod, Rodney L.; Miller, Paul E.

    1998-01-01

    Uses a quantitative analytic procedure, logistic regression, to search for and identify critical attributes of race, highlighting the characteristics of American Indians that underlie poverty on Montana's seven reservations, with their varied tribal affiliations. Implications are drawn for the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations,…

  1. NORTH ABSAROKA STUDY AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, J.E.; Stotelmeyer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the North Absaroka study area in Montana was conducted. The results of this survey indicate that parts of the area are extensively mineralized and that the area has potential for resources of gold, silver, copper, molybdenum, nickel, lead, zinc, platinum-group metals, uranium, iron, manganese, chromium, tungsten, and arsenic. Six areas of probable and substantiated mineral-resource potential were identified. The nature of the geologic terrain indicates that there is little likelihood for occurrence of oil, gas, coal, or geothermal resources.

  2. Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Marilyn A.

    1993-02-01

    This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

  3. Flies in the north: locomotor behavior and clock neuron organization of Drosophila montana.

    PubMed

    Kauranen, Hannele; Menegazzi, Pamela; Costa, Rodolfo; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Kankainen, Annaliisa; Hoikkala, Anneli

    2012-10-01

    The circadian clock plays an important role in adaptation in time and space by synchronizing changes in physiological, developmental, and behavioral traits of organisms with daily and seasonal changes in their environment. We have studied some features of the circadian activity and clock organization in a northern Drosophila species, Drosophila montana, at both the phenotypic and the neuronal levels. In the first part of the study, we monitored the entrained and free-running locomotor activity rhythms of females in different light-dark and temperature regimes. These studies showed that D. montana flies completely lack the morning activity component typical to more southern Drosophila species in an entrained environment and that they are able to maintain their free-running locomotor activity rhythm better in constant light than in constant darkness. In the second part of the study, we traced the expression of the PDF neuropeptide and the CRY protein in the neurons of the brain in D. montana adults and found differences in the number and location of PDF- and CRY-expressing neurons compared with those described in Drosophila melanogaster. These differences could account, at least in part, for the lack of morning activity and the reduced circadian rhythmicity of D. montana flies in constant darkness, both of which are likely to be adaptive features during the long and dark winters occurring in nature.

  4. 75 FR 63855 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease MTM 98742, Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT922200-10-L13100000-FI0000-P;MTM 98742] Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease MTM 98742, Montana AGENCY: Bureau of... lease MTM 98742, for land in Fergus County, Montana. The lessee paid the required rental accruing from...

  5. 75 FR 43553 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease MTM 97827, Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT922200-10-L13100000-FI0000-P;MTM 97827] Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease MTM 97827, Montana AGENCY: Bureau of... and gas lease MTM 97827, Carbon County, Montana. The lessee paid the required rental accruing from the...

  6. School Restructuring Options/Alternatives: Synthesis on Attitudes Expressed by Participants of the Montana Rural Education Conference (16th, Dillon, Montana, June 22-24, 1994). Follow-up Report to the Montana Rural Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ley, Joyce

    This report synthesizes the experience-based ideas that emerged from small group interaction at the 16th annual Montana Rural Education Conference, which focused on the pros and cons of school district consolidation. Conferees first heard from panelists and speakers expressing a spectrum of positive and negative positions on the consolidation…

  7. Montana Highway Safety Improvement Program : an RSPCB Peer Excahnge

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-05-01

    This report provides a summary of a peer-to-peer (P2P) videoconference sponsored by the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Office of Safety. The videoconference format provided a low-cost opportun...

  8. New exploration approach: Pennsylvanian Lower Tyler central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, W.

    Modern exploration methods utilizing a plate tectonics structural model and a recent alluvial valley analog, the Brazos from the Texas Gulf Coast, have helped revive interest in Pennsylvanian Lower Tyler exploration in the central Montana petroleum province. The central Montana trough is now visualized as an aulacogen, reaching from the Rocky Mountain trench near Butte, Montana, eastward to the Williston basin. It is 60 mi wide by about 400 mi long. Pennsylvanian Lower Tyler sediments occur in this narrow east-west-trending rift system. The regional setting is an aulacogen, or intracratonic rift, that connected the Williston basin to the Cordilleran geosynclinemore » during much of geologic time, beginning in late Precambrian. The Lower Tyler is a westward-draining Pennsylvanian (Morrowan) alluvial valley-fill system consisting of a number of river valleys that funneled into the topographic low of the aulacogen. Rift-controlled, estuarine, euxinic limestones and shales above and below the Lower Tyler provide petroleum-rich source rocks. These source rocks are mature and have generated oil, probably in the Paleocene and early Eocene. The modern Brazos River Valley of southeastern Texas is a near mirror-image analog for Lower Tyler alluvial valley fill. The Brazos valleys are 6 mi wide, 150 to 300 ft thick, and contain 60 to 70% backswamp shales and silts. Point-bar sands constitute a relatively small portion of the valley fill; the sands are 60 to 70 ft thick and about 3000 ft wide. Diagenesis has decreased net porosity distribution in the Lower Tyler to less than that of the Brazos, yet porosity parameters may still be applied to exploration in the Tyler sandstones.« less

  9. 75 FR 8322 - Tatanka Wind Power, LLC, Complainant, v. Montana-Dakota Utilities Company, a Division of MDU...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Wind Power, LLC (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Montana-Dakota Utilities Company, a... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL10-41-000] Tatanka Wind Power, LLC, Complainant, v. Montana-Dakota Utilities Company, a Division of MDU Resources Group, Inc...

  10. A dolichopodid hotspot: Montana's Milligan Creek Canyon

    Treesearch

    Justin B. Runyon

    2016-01-01

    In southwest Montana, near the town of Three Forks, Milligan Creek cuts a small and seemingly mundane notch through dry limestone hills. Milligan Creek is unassuming and small enough to be effortlessly stepped over in most places. In fact, it flows underground for much of its 4-5 mile journey to the Jefferson River. Incredibly, forty-nine species of long-legged flies (...

  11. Community Education in Montana. The Broadview Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ray

    Four counties and five adjacent towns are served by the Broadview, Montana (population 100), community education program begun in 1978. A one mill tax levy and a 3-year Mott fund seed grant allowed for tuition courses in 1979-80; in 1981, a $5 per course fee will be charged. The majority of courses are taught in the school and are designed to…

  12. Bat use of highway bridges in south-central Montana.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-06-01

    "We studied use of highway structures by bats in the Billings, Montana area during 2003 and 2004. We found : evidence of bat use at 78 of 130 highway structures examined during summer 2003 in Carbon, Stillwater, and Yellowstone : counties; 66 structu...

  13. 75 FR 15411 - Southwest Montana Resource Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Southwest Montana Resource Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the authorities in the... meeting include discussion about (1) Orientation to the reauthorized legislation; (2) Purpose of the...

  14. 75 FR 55713 - Air Quality Implementation Plans; Montana; Attainment Plan for Libby, MT PM2.5

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... proposing to find on-road directly emitted PM 2.5 and oxides of nitrogen (NO X ) in the Libby, Montana... contribute to fine particle concentrations: direct PM 2.5 , sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen oxides (NO X... balance study (CMB) was conducted during the winter of 2003-2004 by the University of Montana, Center for...

  15. Using the Rural-Urban Continuum to Explore Adolescent Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use in Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Carl L.; Novilla, M. Lelinneth L. B.; Barnes, Michael D.; Eggett, Dennis; McKell, Chelsea; Reichman, Peter; Havens, Mike

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare 30-day prevalence of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use among twelfth-grade students in Montana across a rural-urban continuum during 2000, 2002, and 2004. The methods include an analysis of the Montana Prevention Needs Assessment (N = 15,372) using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for risk…

  16. Final Finding of No Significant Impact for Military Housing Privatization Initiative at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-15

    boundaries. Adjacent to the northern boundary of Jupiter Village lays Site 24CA264, which is an old section of the Chicago , Milwaukee, St. Paul...Ecological Services Montana Field Office 585 Shepard Way Heletla, Montana 59601 -6287 Phone: (406) 449-5225 Fax: (406) 449-5339 July 2, 2009

  17. Grassland and shrubland habitat types of western Montana

    Treesearch

    W. F. Mueggler; W. L. Stewart

    1978-01-01

    A classification system based upon potential natural vegetation is presented for the grasslands and shrublands of the mountainous western third of Montana. The classification was developed by analyzing data from 580 stands. Twenty-nine habitat types in 13 climax series are defined and a diagnostic key provided for field identification. Environment, vegetative...

  18. Vascular plants of west-central Montana-identification guidebook

    Treesearch

    Klaus Lackschewitz

    1991-01-01

    This comprehensive guidebook provides keys, illustrations, and descriptions that aid identification of the 1,600+ species and varieties of vascular plants growing in west-central Montana. The area covered encompasses Ravalli County and southern Missoula County, and it includes the Bitterroot National Forest and portions of the Lolo National Forest. This guidebook uses...

  19. Montana State Plan for Federal Depository Library Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Dennis L.; And Others

    This report begins by explaining the purpose of and legal basis for the state depository library program as part of the national program operated by the U.S. Government Printing Office. Montana's selective federal depository libraries are then listed together with the regional depository library and several depository vacancies. Goals for both…

  20. Predicting disease risk, identifying stakeholders, and informing control strategies: A case study of anthrax in Montana

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Lillian R.; Blackburn, Jason K.

    2018-01-01

    Infectious diseases that affect wildlife and livestock are challenging to manage, and can lead to large scale die offs, economic losses, and threats to human health. The management of infectious diseases in wildlife and livestock is made easier with knowledge of disease risk across space and identifying stakeholders associated with high risk landscapes. This study focuses on anthrax, caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, risk to wildlife and livestock in Montana. There is a history of anthrax in Montana, but the spatial extent of disease risk and subsequent wildlife species at risk are not known. Our objective was to predict the potential geographic distribution of anthrax risk across Montana, identify wildlife species at risk and their distributions, and define stakeholders. We used an ecological niche model to predict the potential distribution of anthrax risk. We overlaid susceptible wildlife species distributions and land ownership delineations on our risk map. We found that there was an extensive region across Montana predicted as potential anthrax risk. These potentially risky landscapes overlapped the ranges of all 6 ungulate species considered in the analysis and livestock grazing allotments, and this overlap was on public and private land for all species. Our findings suggest that there is the potential for a multi species anthrax outbreak on multiple landscapes across Montana. Our potential anthrax risk map can be used to prioritize landscapes for surveillance and for implementing livestock vaccination programs. PMID:27169560

  1. Predicting Disease Risk, Identifying Stakeholders, and Informing Control Strategies: A Case Study of Anthrax in Montana.

    PubMed

    Morris, Lillian R; Blackburn, Jason K

    2016-06-01

    Infectious diseases that affect wildlife and livestock are challenging to manage and can lead to large-scale die-offs, economic losses, and threats to human health. The management of infectious diseases in wildlife and livestock is made easier with knowledge of disease risk across space and identifying stakeholders associated with high-risk landscapes. This study focuses on anthrax, caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, risk to wildlife and livestock in Montana. There is a history of anthrax in Montana, but the spatial extent of disease risk and subsequent wildlife species at risk are not known. Our objective was to predict the potential geographic distribution of anthrax risk across Montana, identify wildlife species at risk and their distributions, and define stakeholders. We used an ecological niche model to predict the potential distribution of anthrax risk. We overlaid susceptible wildlife species distributions and land ownership delineations on our risk map. We found that there was an extensive region across Montana predicted as potential anthrax risk. These potentially risky landscapes overlapped the ranges of all 6 ungulate species considered in the analysis and livestock grazing allotments, and this overlap was on public and private land for all species. Our findings suggest that there is the potential for a multi-species anthrax outbreak on multiple landscapes across Montana. Our potential anthrax risk map can be used to prioritize landscapes for surveillance and for implementing livestock vaccination programs.

  2. Montana Health Enhancement...An Expanded Concept: Assessment and Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Helena.

    Comprehensive health enhancement programs (CHEPs) are a curricular area required by new Montana accreditation standards. The curriculum combines the disciplines of health and physical education into an integrated, holistic, health-oriented program. A CHEP incorporates an expanded concept of health services--healthy school environment, employee…

  3. Campsite conditions in the Bob Marshall Wilderness, Montana

    Treesearch

    David N. Cole

    1983-01-01

    The condition of campsites was examined in the Bob Marshall Wilderness, Montana. The amount of change that has occurred on these sites was inferred by comparing campsites with comparable control sites. Trampling disturbance - loss of vegetation, exposure of mineral soil, and compaction of the soil - was generally comparable to that found in other backcountry areas....

  4. Cultural Resources Investigations for Libby Reservoir, Lincoln County, Northwest, Montana. Volume 1. Environment, Archaeology, and Land Use Patterns in the Middle Kootenai River Valley.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    by rams and ewes to late winter/spring ranges (late March), movement of females to lambing areas and males to salt licks (late May), and finally the...1981:212 of California 10-15 mule Foothills of Montana Wallmo 1981:212 3.5-11 mule Badlands of Montana Wallmo 1981:212 1-5 mule Open prairies of Montana...area compare poorly with many settings of North America. North Dakota and eastern Montana prairies , for example, approximate most closely the summer

  5. Prevalence of antibodies to bluetongue virus and Anaplasma marginale in Montana yearling in Montana yearling cattle entering Alberta feedlots: Fall 2001

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract A serologic survey was conducted in yearling cattle imported into Alberta feedlots from Montana during October 2001 to estimate the prevalence of antibodies to bluetongue virus (BTV) and Anaplasma marginale in Montana yearling cattle. The apparent prevalence of antibodies to BTV when the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was used was 0.37% (21/5608). Test positive cELISA samples were also all positive when tested by virus neutralization (VN) and they reacted to 1 or more BTV serotypes, including 2, 10, 11, 13, and 17. The apparent prevalence of antibodies to A. marginale when a recombinant cELISA (rcELISA) was used with a positive cutoff at 30% inhibition was 1.93% (108/5608). When the rcELISA positive cutoff was at 42% inhibition, the apparent prevalence was 0.73% (41/5608). After the reported sensitivity and specificity of the test had been accounted for, the A. marginale antibody results were consistent with a population that was either free of exposure or had a very low prevalence for A. marginale. PMID:15283518

  6. Forest succession on four habitat types in western Montana

    Treesearch

    Stephen F. Arno; Dennis G. Simmerman; Robert E. Keane

    1985-01-01

    Presents classifications of successional community types on four major forest habitat types in western Montana. Classifications show the sequences of seral community types developing after stand-replacing wildfire and clearcutting with broadcast burning, mechanical scarification, or no followup treatment. Information is provided for associating vegetational response to...

  7. Montana's Indian Education for All: Applying Multicultural Education Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carjuzaa, Jioanna; Jetty, Mike; Munson, Michael; Veltkamp, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Montana's constitutional commitment to the cultural heritages of American Indians exemplifies the practical application of multicultural education. In this article, the authors explore the goals and evolution of Indian Education for All within a multicultural education framework, and discuss how educators are best prepared to implement this…

  8. Native American Transfer Students from Tribal Institutions in Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lindsey

    2017-01-01

    Nationally, and within Montana, Native American college student retention and graduation rates are significantly lower than those of their majority counterparts. Native American high school students have the highest dropout rates, lowest college enrollment rates, and lowest percentage distribution of degrees conferred of any minority population in…

  9. Estimators and characteristics of logging residue in Montana.

    Treesearch

    James. O Howard; Carl E. Fiedler

    1984-01-01

    Ratios are presented for estimating volume and characteristics of logging residue in Montana. They relate cubic-foot volume of residue to thousand board feet of timber harvested and to acres harvested. Tables show gross and net volume of residue, with and without bark, by diameter and length classes; by number of pieces per acre; by percent soundness; by product...

  10. Montana Partnerships for Rural Resource Teams Project Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Office of Public Instruction, Helena.

    This project manual from the Partnerships for Rural Resource Teams Project, a project designed to build upon the foundation of services for children and youth with deaf-blindness in Montana, opens with guiding principles of the project and a description of the types of available services. Grounded in a framework that draws upon the principles of…

  11. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the Montana Powder River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haacke, Jon E.; Scott, David C.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.; Gunderson, Jay A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize geology, coal resources, and coal reserves in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area in southeastern Montana. This report represents the fourth assessment area within the Powder River Basin to be evaluated in the continuing U.S. Geological Survey regional coal assessment program. There are four active coal mines in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area: the Spring Creek and Decker Mines, both near Decker; the Rosebud Mine, near Colstrip; and the Absaloka Mine, west of Colstrip. During 2011, coal production from these four mines totaled approximately 36 million short tons. A fifth mine, the Big Sky, had significant production from 1969-2003; however, it is no longer in production and has since been reclaimed. Total coal production from all five mines in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area from 1968 to 2011 was approximately 1.4 billion short tons. The Rosebud/Knobloch coal bed near Colstrip and the Anderson, Dietz 2, and Dietz 3 coal beds near Decker contain the largest deposits of surface minable, low-sulfur, subbituminous coal currently being mined in the assessment area. A total of 26 coal beds were identified during this assessment, 18 of which were modeled and evaluated to determine in-place coal resources. The total original coal resource in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area for the 18 coal beds assessed was calculated to be 215 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original coal resource remaining after subtracting restrictions and areas of burned coal, are about 162 billion short tons. Restrictions included railroads, Federal interstate highways, urban areas, alluvial valley floors, state parks, national forests, and mined-out areas. It was determined that 10 of the 18 coal beds had sufficient areal extent and thickness to be evaluated for recoverable surface resources ([Roland (Baker), Smith, Anderson, Dietz 2, Dietz 3, Canyon, Werner

  12. A quantitative approach to assessing the efficacy of occupant protection programs: A case study from Montana.

    PubMed

    Manlove, Kezia; Stanley, Laura; Peck, Alyssa

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative evaluation of vehicle occupant protection programs is critical for ensuring efficient government resource allocation, but few methods exist for conducting evaluation across multiple programs simultaneously. Here we present an analysis of occupant protection efficacy in the state of Montana. This approach relies on seat belt compliance rates as measured by the National Occupant Protection Usage Survey (NOPUS). A hierarchical logistic regression model is used to estimate the impacts of four Montana Department of Transportation (MDT)-funded occupant protection programs used in the state of Montana, following adjustment for a suite of potential confounders. Activity from two programs, Buckle Up coalitions and media campaigns, are associated with increased seat belt use in Montana, whereas the impact of another program, Selective Traffic Enforcement, is potentially masked by other program activity. A final program, Driver's Education, is not associated with any shift in seat belt use. This method allows for a preliminary quantitative estimation of program impacts without requiring states to obtain any new seat belt use data. This approach provides states a preliminary look at program impacts, and a means for carefully planning future program allocation and investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. NPDES Permit for Yellowtail Visitor Center Wastewater Treatment Facility in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    NPDES permit MT-0029106 for United States Bureau of Reclamation discharge from its Yellowtail Visitor Center wastewater treatment facility into the Bighorn Lake/Bighorn River in Big Horn County, Montana.

  14. Comparisons of hydrology, geology, and physical characteristics between Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (east side) Montana, and Coram Experimental Forest (west side) Montana

    Treesearch

    Phillip E. Farnes; Raymond C. Shearer; Ward W. McCaughey; Katherine J. Hansen

    1995-01-01

    There are two experimental forests in Montana established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station (INT). Both experimental forests are administered by INT's Research work Unit, RWU-4151, Silviculture of Subalpine Forest Ecosystems. Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (TCEF) is east of the continental Divide and is...

  15. Petrography and petrology of Smoky Butte intrusives, Garfield County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matson, Robert E.

    1960-01-01

    The Smoky Butte intrusives are located in T. 18 N., R. 36 E. Garfield County, Montana on the extreme eastern edge of the petrographic province of Central Montana. They consist of dikes and plugs arranged in linear, en-echelon pattern with a northeast trend and intrude the Tullock member (Paleocene age) of the Fort Union formation. Extrusive rocks are absent. The rocks are potassium-rich volcanic types showing a disequilibrium mineral assemblage consisting of sanidine, leucite, biotite, olivine, pyroxene, magnetite plus. ilmenite, apatite, calcite, quartz, and a yellowish to dark greenish glassy groundmass. Two chemical analyses of Smoky Butte rocks show high magnesium, potassium, titanium, and phosphorous and low aluminum and sodium content. The two norm calculations show that the rocks are oversaturated with 1.3 and 3.1 per-cent excess silica. Because of the peculiar nature of the Smoky Butte rocks, descriptive names have been applied to them. They are divided into six different types. Three periods of intrusion are proposed for Smoky Butte quarry where three rock types crop out. Other evidence for multiple injection occurs in several multiple dikes. The upper contact of the intrusion is visible on a few plugs and dikes. Smoky Butte rocks show some similarities to the undersaturated potassium-rich rocks of the Highwood and Bearpaw Mountains of Montana, the rocks of the Leucite Hills of Wyoming, and the oversaturated rocks of the West Kimberly District of Australia.

  16. Seismic reflection study of Flathead Lake, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wold, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    A seismic reflection survey of Flathead Lake, Montana, was carried out in 1970 to study the geologic structure underlying the lake. Approximately 200 km of track lines were surveyed resulting in about 140 km of useable data (Fig. 1). A one cu. in. air gun was used as the energy source. Navigation was by a series of theodolite sitings of the boat from pairs of shore-based control points. 

  17. NPDES Permit for Crow Nation Water Treatment Plants in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0030538, the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs is authorized to discharge from the Crow Agency water treatment plants via the wastewater treatment facility located in Bighorn County, Montana to the Little Bighorn River.

  18. Assessing the effectiveness of Montana's vehicle occupant protection program : [summary].

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-03-01

    States invest extensively in : occupant protection programs, : yet the impact these programs : have on improving seat belt : compliance rates remains : unclear. Although seat belt use : was on the rise in Montana : prior to 2002, it has stagnated : a...

  19. NPDES Permit for Yellowtail Dam Wastewater Treatment Facility in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0022993, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located at the Yellowtail Dam Field Office in Big Horn County, Montana, to the Yellowtail Afterbay Reservoir/Bighorn River.

  20. Dual enrollment as a factor for women transitioning into STEM majors in Montana two-year colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakes, Penny Jane

    The purpose of this non-experimental, descriptive, quantitative study was to describe the impact high school dual enrollment coursework has had on initial enrollment of women with STEM majors in Montana two-year colleges. The study was designed to find whether or not differences existed for access (initial enrollment), persistence (to third semester), and success (associate's degree, certificate, or transfer to a four-year institution within 150% of program length). The literature review highlighted the need for studies to address the issue of few women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) occupations. One goal of dual enrollment in Montana is to ease transitions from high school to college, including underrepresented populations such as women in STEM fields. The scope of this study was to collect, organize, and interpret data to describe the effect of that effort for women enrolling in STEM majors at two-year colleges in Montana. Baseline information established the demographics of young women who participated in dual enrollment in Montana high schools during 2007-2009. Data analysis described results using attributes of gender, dual enrollment, access, persistence, and success for those enrolled in STEM fields. Results indicated more young women than young men take advantage of dual enrollment in high school and more women than men with dual-enrollment credit initially enroll in college. More men than women major in a STEM field and more men persist and graduate within the STEM fields. Data indicated that 221 students enrolled in a Montana two-year college with DE/DC credit during 2007-2009. Of those, eight women chose STEM majors, six persisted to the third semester, and two completed. It is recommended that a mixed-methods study be conducted to give a deeper level of understanding for enrollment trends and career choice. Longitudinal studies should also be conducted as dual enrollment grows within the state of Montana. Further studies

  1. NPDES Permit for Soap Creek Associates Wastewater Treatment Facility in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit number MT-0023183, Soap Creek Associates, Inc. is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located in West, Bighorn County, Montana, to Soap Creek.

  2. NPDES Permit for Lame Deer Lagoon Wastewater Treatment Facility in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Final permit authorizes the Northern Cheyenne Utilities Commission to discharge from its Lame Deer Lagoon wastewater treatment facility located in Rosebud County, Montana to Lame Deer Creek, a tributary to Rosebud Creek.

  3. NPDES Permit for City of Polson Wastewater Treatment Facility in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit number MT-0020559, the City of Polson is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located in Lake County, Montana to the Flathead River.

  4. 77 FR 46109 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000- L19100000-BJ0000-LRCS42800800] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. [[Page 46110

  5. Montana K-12 & School Choice Survey: What Do Voters Say about K-12 Education? Polling Paper Number 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPerna, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The "Montana K-12 & School Choice Survey" project, commissioned by the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice and conducted by Braun Research, Inc. (BRI), measures Montana registered voters' familiarity and views on a range of K-12 education topics and school choice reforms. The author and his colleagues report response levels…

  6. MADISON ROADLESS AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Frank S.; Lambeth, Robert H.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Madison Roadless Area in the Madison Range of southwestern Montana was made. The Madison Roadless Area has demonstrated resources of about 93,000 tons of sillimanite rock at the Placer Creek deposit and of about 83,000 tons of asbestos rock at the Karst deposit. The roadless area also has areas of substantiated phosphate resource potential; much of the phosphate is in thin deeply buried beds. An area near the south edge of the roadless area has a probable resource potential for copper and silver. The concentration of uranium-rich stream-sediment samples in the southwest part of the roadless area suggests that a further attempt to identify the source rocks might be justified.

  7. Geology and mineral resources of the North-Central Montana Sagebrush Focal Area: Chapter D in Mineral resources of the Sagebrush Focal Areas of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Zientek, Michael L.; Hearn, B. Carter; Parks, Heather L.; Jenkins, M. Christopher; Anderson, Eric D.; Benson, Mary Ellen; Bleiwas, Donald I.; DeAngelo, Jacob; Denning, Paul; Dicken, Connie L.; Drake, Ronald M.; Fernette, Gregory L.; Folger, Helen W.; Giles, Stuart A.; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Granitto, Matthew; Haacke, Jon E.; Horton, John D.; Kelley, Karen D.; Ober, Joyce A.; Rockwell, Barnaby W.; San Juan, Carma A.; Sangine, Elizabeth S.; Schweitzer, Peter N.; Shaffer, Brian N.; Smith, Steven M.; Williams, Colin F.; Yager, Douglas B.

    2016-10-04

    SummaryThe U.S. Department of the Interior has proposed to withdraw approximately 10 million acres of Federal lands from mineral entry (subject to valid existing rights) from 12 million acres of lands defined as Sagebrush Focal Areas (SFAs) in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming (for further discussion on the lands involved see Scientific Investigations Report 2016–5089–A). The purpose of the proposed action is to protect the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and its habitat from potential adverse effects of locatable mineral exploration and mining. The U.S. Geological Survey Sagebrush Mineral-Resource Assessment (SaMiRA) project was initiated in November 2015 and supported by the Bureau of Land Management to (1) assess locatable mineral-resource potential and (2) to describe leasable and salable mineral resources for the seven SFAs and Nevada additions.This chapter summarizes the current status of locatable, leasable, and salable mineral commodities and assesses the potential of locatable minerals in the North-Central Montana SFA. The proposed withdrawal area that is evaluated in this report is located in north-central Montana, and includes parts of Fergus, Petroleum, Phillips, and Valley Counties.

  8. Lumber recovery from ponderosa pine in western Montana.

    Treesearch

    Marlin E. Plank

    1982-01-01

    Lumber grade yields and recovery ratios are shown for a sample of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) in western Montana. About 9 percent of the lumber produced was in Select grades, 48 percent in Shop grades, and 43 percent in Common grades. Information on log scale and yield is presented in tables by log grade and diameter class....

  9. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: Nonpublic Accredited Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for nonpublic accredited schools. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 349 high school students in Nonpublic Region during February of 2011. Frequency distributions may not total 349 due to nonresponse and percents may…

  10. Ecological adaptations in Douglas-fir populations. II. Western Montana

    Treesearch

    Gerald E. Rehfeldt

    1982-01-01

    Populations of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) from Montana west of the Continental Divide were compared in common environments. Differentiation was observed for six variables reflecting growth potential, phenology and cold hardiness. Adaptation of populations for numerous traits is viewed as a balance between selection of high growth potential in...

  11. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Montana. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  12. Environmental Assessment for a Gravel Road Training Course Extension Malmstrom Air Force Base, Great Falls, Montana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    3,271 acres in Cascade County in west-central Montana (Figure 1-1). The Base lies approximately 0.3 miles east of the city of Great Falls and 75...for future planning. MAFB has defined several land use categories, including Administration, Aircraft Operations, Airfield, Community, Housing ...greenhouse gases during construction. These emissions would be small compared to human-induced releases within the region and the State of Montana. No

  13. Prevalence and reasons for initiating use of electronic cigarettes among adults in Montana, 2013.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lisa; Reidmohr, Alison; Harwell, Todd S; Helgerson, Steven D

    2014-11-20

    We used data from the 2013 Montana Adult Tobacco Survey to estimate the prevalence of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use and reasons for initiation among Montana adults. More than 1 in 10 (11.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.1%-13.2%) adults reported ever using e-cigarettes, and 1.3% (95% CI, 0.7%-1.9%) reported current use. Most respondents reported "trying something new" (64%) or "trying to quit or reduce cigarette use" (56%) as a reason for initiating use. Ongoing surveillance of these addictive products is needed.

  14. The thrust belt in Southwest Montana and east-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppel, Edward T.; Lopez, David A.

    1984-01-01

    The leading edge of the Cordilleran fold and thrust in southwest Montana appears to be a continuation of the edge of the Wyoming thrust belt, projected northward beneath the Snake River Plain. Trces of the thrust faults that form the leading edge of the thrust belts are mostly concealed, but stratigraphic and structural evidence suggests that the belt enters Montana near the middle of the Centennial Mountains, continues west along the Red Rock River valley, and swings north into the Highland Mountains near Butte. The thrust belt in southwest Montana and east-central Idaho includes at least two major plates -- the Medicine Lodge and Grasshopper thrust plates -- each of which contains a distinctive sequence of rocks, different in facies and structural style from those of the cratonic region east of the thrust belt. The thrust plates are characterized by persuasive, open to tight and locally overturned folds, and imbricate thrust faults, structural styles unusual in Phanerozoic cratonic rocks. The basal decollement zones of the plates are composed of intensely sheared, crushed, brecciated, and mylonitized rocks, the decollement at the base of the Medicine Lodge plate is as much as 300 meters thick. The Medicine Lodge and Grasshopper thrust plates are fringed on the east by a 10- to 50-kilometer-wide zone of tightly folded rocks cut by imbricate thrust fauls, a zone that forms the eastern margin of the thrust belt in southwest Montana. The frontal fold and thrust zone includes rocks that are similar to those of the craton, even though they differ in details of thickness, composition, or stratigraphic sequence. The zone is interpreted to be one of terminal folding and thrusting in cratonic rocks overridden by the major thrust plates from farther west. The cratonic rocks were drape-folded over rising basement blocks that formed a foreland bulge in front of the thrust belt. The basement blocks are bounded by steep faults of Proterozoic ancestry, which also moved as tear

  15. Predicting the impacts of a high-voltage transmission line on big game hunting opportunities in Western Montana

    Treesearch

    Stewart Allen

    1985-01-01

    The State of Montana, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service and Bonneville Power Administration, is conducting a five-vear study on the impacts of a 500-kV transmission line on elk habitat and hunter opportunity. In fall 1983, baseline data on hunting patterns and quality were collected from over 600 hunters interviewed in three western Montana study areas. A...

  16. Potential effects of climate change on streamflow for seven watersheds in eastern and central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, Katherine J.; Haj, Adel E.; Regan, R. Steven; Viger, Roland J.

    2016-01-01

    Study regionEastern and central Montana.Study focusFish in Northern Great Plains streams tolerate extreme conditions including heat, cold, floods, and drought; however changes in streamflow associated with long-term climate change may render some prairie streams uninhabitable for current fish species. To better understand future hydrology of these prairie streams, the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System model and output from the RegCM3 Regional Climate model were used to simulate streamflow for seven watersheds in eastern and central Montana, for a baseline period (water years 1982–1999) and three future periods: water years 2021–2038 (2030 period), 2046–2063 (2055 period), and 2071–2088 (2080 period).New hydrological insights for the regionProjected changes in mean annual and mean monthly streamflow vary by the RegCM3 model selected, by watershed, and by future period. Mean annual streamflows for all future periods are projected to increase (11–21%) for two of the four central Montana watersheds: Middle Musselshell River and Cottonwood Creek. Mean annual streamflows for all future periods are projected to decrease (changes of −24 to −75%) for Redwater River watershed in eastern Montana. Mean annual streamflows are projected to increase slightly (2–15%) for the 2030 period and decrease (changes of −16 to −44%) for the 2080 period for the four remaining watersheds.

  17. NPDES Permit for the Blackfeet Community Water Treatment Plant in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0030643, the Blackfeet Tribe is authorized to discharge from its Blackfoot Community Water Treatment Plant in Glacier County, Montana, to an unnamed intermittent stream which flows to Two Medicine River.

  18. 40 CFR 272.1351 - Montana State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Montana § 272.1351... its hazardous waste management program. However, EPA retains the authority to exercise its inspection... this section are incorporated by reference as part of the hazardous waste management program under...

  19. Assessment of undiscovered continuous oil and gas resources in the Heath Formation, central Montana and western North Dakota, 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, Ronald M.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Le, Phuong A.; Leathers, Heidi M.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Finn, Thomas M.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2017-06-07

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated undiscovered, technically recoverable mean resources of 884 million barrels of oil and 106 billion cubic feet of gas in the North-Central Montana and Williston Basin Provinces of central Montana and western North Dakota.

  20. Cultural Resource Survey, Government Townsites Study, Fort Peck, Montana, Pickstown, South Dakota, Riverdale, North Dakota,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    3 7Michael P. Malone, "Montana Politics and the New Deal," Montana, 21 (January, 1971 ), 5. 38Rorty, "Fort Peck: An American Siberia," 300-301...J. Kappler (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904, reprint. New York: Ams Press Inc., 1971 ), p. 1055. 7 7Kappler, vol. 2, p. 1052; vol. 1, p...Stabilized," Minot Daily News, June 19, 1971 , 12; "Salute to Riverdale," Mandan Pioneer Weekender Magazine, May 31, 1970, 2-9; Mary Ann Barnes Williams

  1. Off-Farm Agricultural Occupations in Montana: Employment and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaney, Donald S.

    Data were obtained by interview with managers in a random sample of 161 businesses in 10 selected Montana trade and service centers to (1) identify present and emerging off-farm agricultural occupations, (2) estimate present and anticipated numbers of employees, (3) estimate annual entry opportunities, (4) determine needed competencies, and (5)…

  2. NPDES Permit for Woodcock Home Addition Wastewater Treatment Facility in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0030554, the Salish and Kootenai Housing Authority is authorized to discharge from its Woodcock Home Addition Wastewater Treatment Facility in Lake County, Montana, to a swale draining to Middle Crow Creek.

  3. Arnica compositum, Hekla lava and Acidum Nitricum Together are Superior to Arnica compositum Alone in the Local Treatment of Symptomatic Calcific Periarthritis of the Shoulder: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Simone; Buccelletti, Francesco; Franceschi, Francesco; Ramponi, Claudio; Spagnolli, Federica; Sacchetti, Gianpaolo; Oliva, Giovanna; Lumachi, Franco

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of Arnica compositum (AC) + Acidum nitricum (AN) + Hekla lava (HL) ointment in Emergency Medicine Department (EMD) as alternative nonpharmacological local treatment of patients with symptomatic calcific periarthritis of the shoulder (CPS) and to compare the effectiveness of this mixture against AC ointment alone. A series of 41 consecutive patients (20 women, 19 men, median age 49 years, range 25-80 years) with non-traumatic painful unilateral CPS were randomly assigned to receive local treatment with AC+AN+HL ointment mixture (Group A, cases, N=21) or AC ointment alone (Group B, controls, N=20). The radiological Gartner classification of the CPS, and the quantification of pre- and post-treatment pain intensity using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were obtained. The orthopedic evaluation of Shoulder Motion (SM) was also performed. The use of painkillers was reported as a number of doses needed. Age, gender distribution, Gartner type, main calcification size, baseline VAS (VAS-0) and degree of SM did not differ (p=NS) between Groups. After 3-day therapy, the reduction of pain in Group A (4.5±2.5) was superior to that observed in Group B (2.7±2.6) (p =0.03). The same result was observed in the improvement of SM in Group A (69.4±24.9) than in Group B (51.1±21.1) (p =0.015). No local or general adverse effects were noted. The number of doses of paracetamol was similar, but Group A patients used less ibuprofen (p =0.007). Local administration of the AC+AN+HL ointment mixture, which in our pilot study was superior to AC alone, could be safely suggested as an alternative uneventful treatment of patients with CPS. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Libraries across the Education Continuum: Relationships between Library Services at the University of Montana and Regional High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoellner, Kate; Potter, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the library instructional programming and resources of high school library media centers in western Montana with the intent of documenting and understanding both the services provided to and the experiences of first-year college students at the University of Montana. Results from the survey (n = 22) and site visits (n = 10)…

  5. Final Environmental Assessment for Wide Area Coverage Construct Land Mobile Network Communications Infrastructure Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT February 2008 Malmstrom ® AFB WIDE AREA COVERAGE CONSTRUCT LAND MOBILE NETWORK COMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE...Wide Area Coverage Construct Land Mobile Network Communications Infrastructure Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...SIGNIFICANT IMPACT WIDE AREA COVERAGE CONSTRUCT LAND MOBILE NETWORK COMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE MALMSTROM AIR FORCE BASE, MONTANA The

  6. The economic cost of noxious weeds on Montana grazing lands

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We distributed a 16-question survey concerning noxious weed abundances, impacts and management to livestock producers grazing on privately-owned or leased grazing lands in Montana. The noxious weeds most commonly reported as being present on respondents’ grazing units were Canada thistle (64% of gra...

  7. Effectiveness of Written Materials in a Rehabilitative Program for Female Offenders: A Case Study at the Montana Women's Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Laura; Colling, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    This case study of the Therapeutic Community Program at Montana Women's Prison investigates the relationship between inmate reading levels and the self-help materials used for rehabilitative purposes within prison settings. The Therapeutic Community Handbook, published by the Montana Department of Corrections, is used as the primary method of…

  8. 76 FR 38416 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... S., R. 10 E. The plat, in three sheets, representing the dependent resurvey of a portion of the... Township 6 South, Range 10 East, Principal Meridian, Montana, was accepted June 21, 2011. We will place a...

  9. Testing transferability of willingness to pay for forest fire prevention among three states of California, Florida and Montana

    Treesearch

    John B. Loomis; Hung Trong Le; Armando Gonzalez-Caban

    2005-01-01

    The equivalency of willingness to pay between the states of California, Florida and Montana is tested. Residents in California, Florida and Montana have an average willingness to pay of $417, $305, and $382 for prescribed burning program, and $403, $230, and $208 for mechanical fire fuel reduction program, respectively. Due to wide confidence intervals, household WTP...

  10. MONTANA PALLADIUM RESEARCH INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, John; McCloskey, Jay; Douglas, Trevor

    2012-05-09

    Project Objective: The overarching objective of the Montana Palladium Research Initiative is to perform scientific research on the properties and uses of palladium in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The purpose of the research will be to explore possible palladium as an alternative to platinum in hydrogen-economy applications. To achieve this objective, the Initiatives activities will focus on several cutting-edge research approaches across a range of disciplines, including metallurgy, biomimetics, instrumentation development, and systems analysis. Background: Platinum-group elements (PGEs) play significant roles in processing hydrogen, an element that shows highmore » potential to address this need in the U.S. and the world for inexpensive, reliable, clean energy. Platinum, however, is a very expensive component of current and planned systems, so less-expensive alternatives that have similar physical properties are being sought. To this end, several tasks have been defined under the rubric of the Montana Palladium Research Iniative. This broad swath of activities will allow progress on several fronts. The membrane-related activities of Task 1 employs state-of-the-art and leading-edge technologies to develop new, ceramic-substrate metallic membranes for the production of high-purity hydrogen, and develop techniques for the production of thin, defect-free platinum group element catalytic membranes for energy production and pollution control. The biomimetic work in Task 2 explores the use of substrate-attached hydrogen-producing enzymes and the encapsulation of palladium in virion-based protein coats to determine their utility for distributed hydrogen production. Task 3 work involves developing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a real-time, in situ diagnostic technique to characterize PGEs nanoparticles for process monitoring and control. The systems engineering work in task 4

  11. The Bitterroot Valley of western Montana: Area economic profile

    Treesearch

    Larry Swanson

    2001-01-01

    This profile provides a description and assessment of the area economy of the Bitterroot Valley of southwestern Montana. Changing conditions and trends in the area economy over the course of the last twenty to twenty- five years are examined, including trends in population and employment growth and associated income changes and economic restructuring. Changing...

  12. NPDES Permit for Keller Transport, Inc. Groundwater Remediation Treatment Facility in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit number MT0030805, Keller Transport, Inc. is authorized to discharge from its groundwater remediation treatment facility in Lake County, Montana, to Flathead Lake.

  13. 77 FR 2316 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ...] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the coal reserves in the lands described below in... Peak Energy LLC. The Federal coal resource to be offered consists of all reserves recoverable by...

  14. 76 FR 63323 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ...] Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale, Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the coal reserves in the lands described below in...) filed by Signal Peak Energy LLC. The Federal coal resource to be offered consists of all reserves...

  15. Learning Lodge Institute: Montana Colleges Empower Cultures To Save Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Learning Lodge Institute, a collaboration of seven Montana tribal colleges that utilizes language courses to promote and strengthen knowledge of traditional culture. Also discusses documenting the loss of language and building support for tribal languages. The institute supports existing language instruction programs to make them…

  16. Regional assemblages of Lygus (Heteroptera: Miridae) in Montana canola fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sweep net sampling of canola (Brassica napus L.) was conducted in 2002 and 2003 to determine Lygus (Heteroptera: Miridae) species composition and parasitism levels in four regions of Montana. Regardless of region or seasonal change, Lygus elisus (Van Duzee) was the dominant species in all canola fi...

  17. 76 FR 71355 - United States et al. v. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Montana, Inc. et al.; Proposed Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... Montana residents a high-quality option for their health insurance, routinely pressuring Blue Cross to... reputation for high-quality customer service. 36. Since the Agreement was announced in August 2011, many... offered Montana residents a high-quality option for their health insurance, routinely pressuring Blue...

  18. Floods of May 1978 in southeastern Montana and northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Carlson, D.D.; Craig, G.S.; Chin, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    Heavy rain and some snow fell on previously saturated ground over southeastern Montana and northeastern Wyoming during May 16-19, 1978. The maximum amount of 7.60 inches within a 72-hour period observed at Lame Deer, Montana, set a record for the month of May in that region. Heavy flooding occurred in the drainages of the Yellowstone River and its tributaries as well as the Belle Fourche, Cheyenne, and North Platte Rivers. The previous maximum flood of record was exceeded at 48 gaged sites, and the 1-percent chance flood was equaled or exceeded at 24 sites. Flood damage was extensive, exceeding $33 million. Nineteen counties in the two States were declared major disaster areas. Mean daily suspended-sediment discharges exceeded previously recorded maximum mean daily values at four sites on the Powder River. The maximum daily suspended-sediment discharge of 2,810,000 tons per day occurred on May 20 at the Site Powder River near Arvada, Wyoming. (USGS)

  19. On-site energy consumption at softwood sawmills in Montana

    Treesearch

    Dan Loeffler; Nathaniel Anderson; Todd A. Morgan; Colin B. Sorenson

    2016-01-01

    Total on-site energy requirements for wood product manufacturing are generally not well understood or publicly available, particularly at subregional scales, such as the state level. This article uses a mail survey of softwood sawmills in Montana to develop a profile of all on-site energy consumption. Energy use is delineated by fuel type on a production basis...

  20. The effect of disturbance history on hawkweed invasion (Montana)

    Treesearch

    Alexis Jones; Elizabeth Crone

    2009-01-01

    Orange hawkweed (Hieracium aurantiacum) is listed as a noxious weed in five states (USDA 2007), including Montana, where it is still in the early - and possibly controllable - stages of invasion. The species forms dense clonal mats that exclude natives from the area; moreover, the wind-borne seeds are viable in the soil for seven years and have a...

  1. Abundance and characteristics of snags in western Montana forests

    Treesearch

    Richard B. Harris

    1999-01-01

    Plot data from the U.S. Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis program was used to characterize the abundance and selected characteristics of snags from forests in western Montana. Plots were grouped by whether they had a history of timber harvest, and the U.S. Forest Service classifications of forest type, habitat type, and potential vegetation group were...

  2. Hierarchical den selection of Canada lynx in western Montana

    Treesearch

    John R. Squires; Nicholas J. Decesare; Jay A. Kolbe; Leonard F. Ruggiero

    2008-01-01

    We studied den selection of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis; hereafter lynx) at multiple ecological scales based on 57 dens from 19 females located in western Montana, USA, between 1999 and 2006. We considered 3 spatial scales in this analysis, including den site (11-m-radius circle surrounding dens), den area (100-m-radius circle), and den environ (1-...

  3. Montana Kids Count Data Book and County Profiles, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies--The Montana Coalition, Helena.

    This Kids Count report is the second to examine statewide trends in the well-being of Montana's children. The statistical portrait is based on 16 indicators of well-being: (1) low birthweight; (2) infant mortality; (3) child death; (4) teen violent death; (5) Medicaid participation; (6) school enrollment; (7) public school enrollment in Chapter 1…

  4. Montana Kids Count Data Book and County Profiles, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies--The Montana Coalition, Helena.

    This Kids Count publication is the first to examine statewide trends in the well-being of Montana's children. The statistical portrait is based on 13 indicators of well-being: (1) low birthweight rate; (2) infant mortality rate; (3) child death rate; (4) teen violent death rate; (5) percent of public school enrollment in Chapter 1 programs; (6)…

  5. Montana American Indian Student Achievement Data Report, Fall 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The well-being and accomplishment of all Montana students is vital to the future success of the state. More specifically, increasing academic achievement and providing all students with a quality education will result in the opportunity for students to have more choices beyond their K-12 experience. This is what the business of education is all…

  6. Invasive Species Biology, Control, and Research. Part 1: Kudzu (Pueraria montana)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    Synonymy: Pueraria lobata (Willd.), P. tunbergiana (Sieb. & Zucc.) Benth. Family: Fabaceae (Leguminosae)/Pea Family. U.S. Department of...Virginia. Biology Description Kudzu (Pueraria montana) is in the Family Fabaceae (Pea Family, leg- ume). Kudzu is a perennial, high-climbing

  7. FFY 2007 annual report for the Montana Department of Transportation Research Programs

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-01-01

    The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) conducts research to discover, develop, or extend knowledge needed to operate, maintain, and improve the statewide multimodal transportation system. Specific goals include: evaluation and advancement of ...

  8. Optimization Review: Lockwood Operable Unit 1 - Beall Source Area, Billings, Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Lockwood Solvent Groundwater Plume Site (LSGPS) consists of two operable units (OUs) and is located on the outskirts of Billings, Montana in EPA Region 8. OU1 consists of contaminated soils and a chlorinated solvent groundwater plume associated with...

  9. 76 FR 55643 - Helena National Forest; Montana; Divide Travel Plan EIS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Helena National Forest; Montana; Divide Travel Plan EIS... Divide travel planning area for wheeled and over-snow motorized vehicles. Consistent with Forest Service travel planning regulations, the designated wheeled motorized routes within the Divide Travel Planning...

  10. NPDES Permit for Sunlight Ranch Company, Little Horn Unit in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Draft permit and statement of basis MT0029424 for a beef cattle feedlot located on the Crow Reservation at the SW ¼ of Section 3, NW 1/4 of Section 10, Township 9 South Range 34 East, Montana Principal Meridian.

  11. SELWAY-BITTERROOT WILDERNESS, IDAHO AND MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toth, Margo I.; Zilka, Nicholas T.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral-resource studies of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness in Idaho County, Idaho, and Missoula and Ravalli Counties, Montana, were carried out. Four areas with probable and one small area of substantiated mineral-resource potential were recognized. The areas of the Running Creek, Painted Rocks, and Whistling Pig plutons of Tertiary age have probable resource potential for molybdenum, although detailed geochemical sampling and surface investigations failed to recognize mineralized systems at the surface. Randomly distributed breccia zones along a fault in the vicinity of the Cliff mine have a substantiated potential for small silver-copper-lead resources.

  12. Cretaceous rocks from southwestern Montana to southwestern Minnesota, northern Rocky Mountains, and Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Cobban, W.A.; Fox, J.E.; Hammond, R.H.; Nichols, D.J.; Perry, W.J.; Porter, K.W.; Rice, D.D.; Setterholm, D.R.; Shurr, G.W.; Tysdal, R.G.; Haley, J.C.; Campen, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    In Montana, Wyoming, North and South Dakota, and Minnesota, Cretaceous strata are preserved in the asymmetric Western Interior foreland basin. More than 5,200 m (17,000 ft) of Cretaceous strata are present in southwestern Montana, less than 300 m (1,000 ft) in eastern South Dakota. The asymmetry resulted from varying rates of subsidence due to tectonic and sediment loading. The strata consist primarily of sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, and shale. Conglomerate is locally abundant along the western margin, whereas carbonate is present in most areas of the eastern shelf. Sediment was deposited in both marine and nonmarine environments as the shoreline fluctuated during major tectonic and eustatic cycles.A discussion of Cretaceous strata from southwestern to east-central Montana, the Black Hills, eastern South Dakota, and southwestern Minnesota shows regional stratigraphy and facies relations, sequence, boundaries, and biostratigraphic and radiometric correlations. The thick Cretaceous strata in southwestern Montana typify nonmarine facies of the rapidly subsiding westernmost part of the basin. These strata include more than 3,000 m (10,000 ft) of synorogenic conglomerate of the Upper Cretaceous part of the Beaverhead Group. West of the Madison Range, sequence boundaries bracket the Kootenai (Aptian and Albian), the Blackleaf (Albian and Cenomanian), and the Frontier Formations (Cenomanian and Turonian); sequence boundaries are difficult to recognize because the rocks are dominantly non-marine. Cretaceous strata in east-central Montana (about 1,371 m; 4,500 ft thick) lie at the approximate depositional axis of the basin and are mostly marine terrigenous rocks. Chert-pebble zones in these rocks reflect stratigraphic breaks that may correlate with sequence boundaries to the east and west. Cretaceous rocks of the Black Hills region consist of a predominantly marine clastic sequence averaging approximately 1,524 m (5,000 ft) thick. The Cretaceous System in eastern South

  13. Agricultural land use mapping. [Pennsylvania, Montana, and Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Wilson, A. D.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Agricultural areas were selected or analysis in southeastern Pennsylvania, north central Montana, and southern Texas. These three sites represent a broad range of soils, soil parent materials, climate, modes of agricultural operation, crops, and field sizes. In each of these three sites, ERTS-1 digital data were processed to determine the feasibility of automatically mapping agricultural land use. In Pennsylvania, forest land, cultivated land, and water were separable within a 25,000 acre area. Four classes of water were also classified and identified, using ground truth. A less complex land use pattern was analyzed in Hill County, Montana. A land use map was prepared shown alternating patterns of summer fallow and stubble fields. The location of farmsteads could be inferred, along with that of a railroad line. A river and a creek flowing into the river were discernible. Six categories of water, related to sediment content and depth, were defined in the reservoir held by the Fresno dam. These classifications were completed on a 150 square mile area. Analysis of the data from Texas is in its formative stages. A test site has been selected and a brightness map has been produced.

  14. 75 FR 66718 - Helena National Forest; Montana; Blackfoot Travel Plan EIS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Helena National Forest; Montana; Blackfoot Travel Plan... within the Blackfoot travel planning area. Consistent with the Forest Service travel planning regulations.... Please indicate the name ``Blackfoot Travel Plan'' in the subject line of your e-mail. FOR FURTHER...

  15. REU program in Solar Physics at Montana State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, P. C.; Canfield, R. C.; McKenzie, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    I will present an overview of the REU program in Solar Physics and Space Weather that has existed since 1999 at Montana State University, since 2003 with NSF support. I will briefly describe the goals, organization, scientific contents and results, and present statistics on applications, participants, gender balance, and diversity. This will be concluded by an overview of our plans for the future,

  16. Winter prey selection of Canada lynx in northwestern Montana

    Treesearch

    John R. Squires; Leonard F. Ruggiero

    2007-01-01

    The roles that diet and prey abundance play in habitat selection of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) in the contiguous United States is poorly understood. From 1998-2002, we back-tracked radiocollared lynx (6 F, 9 M) for a distance of 582 km and we located 86 kills in northwestern Montana, USA. Lynx preyed on 7 species that included blue grouse (Dendragapus...

  17. Growing media trials at the Montana Conservation Seedling Nursery

    Treesearch

    John Justin

    2009-01-01

    The Montana Conservation Seedling Nursery (MCSN) in Missoula produces 750,000 container seedlings annually in containers ranging in size from 66 cm3 (4 in3) up to 61 L (16 gal) pots. The MCSN is a production facility with no research funding. When we encounter a promising idea for improving our seedlings or the efficiency of nursery operations, we rarely perform...

  18. 75 FR 54386 - Notice of Public Meeting, Western Montana Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... variety of planning and management issues associated with public land management in western Montana. At the September meeting, agenda items include an informational briefing on the Landscape Conservation...

  19. Relational Database for the Geology of the Northern Rocky Mountains - Idaho, Montana, and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causey, J. Douglas; Zientek, Michael L.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Frost, Thomas P.; Evans, Karl V.; Wilson, Anna B.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Boleneus, David E.; Pitts, Rebecca A.

    2008-01-01

    A relational database was created to prepare and organize geologic map-unit and lithologic descriptions for input into a spatial database for the geology of the northern Rocky Mountains, a compilation of forty-three geologic maps for parts of Idaho, Montana, and Washington in U.S. Geological Survey Open File Report 2005-1235. Not all of the information was transferred to and incorporated in the spatial database due to physical file limitations. This report releases that part of the relational database that was completed for that earlier product. In addition to descriptive geologic information for the northern Rocky Mountains region, the relational database contains a substantial bibliography of geologic literature for the area. The relational database nrgeo.mdb (linked below) is available in Microsoft Access version 2000, a proprietary database program. The relational database contains data tables and other tables used to define terms, relationships between the data tables, and hierarchical relationships in the data; forms used to enter data; and queries used to extract data.

  20. An evaluation of wilderness and aquatic biointegrity in western Montana

    Treesearch

    Nathaniel P. Hitt; Christopher A. Frissell

    2000-01-01

    Although the Wilderness Act of 1964 was justified in part by the importance of aquatic conservation, implementation of the Act has primarily focused on protecting terrestrial ecosystems. In this paper, we investigated the role of Congressionally-designated wilderness towards conservation of aquatic biointegrity in western Montana. To evaluate trends between 6th code...

  1. Plant community variability on a small area in southeastern Montana

    Treesearch

    James G. MacCracken; Daniel W. Uresk; Richard M. Hansen

    1984-01-01

    Plant communities are inherently variable due to a number of environmental and biological forces. Canopy cover and aboveground biomass were determined for understory vegetation in plant communities of a prairie grassland-forest ecotone in southeastern Montana. Vegetation units were described using polar ordination and stepwise discriminant analysis. Nine of a total of...

  2. Creating Educational Pathways: A Montana University Teams Up with Tribal Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trinity, Annette

    1990-01-01

    Describes programs at Montana State University, Bozeman, that cooperate with tribally controlled community colleges to provide opportunities for American Indian transfer students. Focuses on training in health sciences, engineering, public service, and educational administration and on efforts to ease students' transition to university life. (SV)

  3. 77 FR 61570 - Helena National Forest; Montana; Blackfoot Travel Plan EIS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Helena National Forest; Montana; Blackfoot Travel Plan... impact statement for the Blackfoot Travel Plan. The original notice was published in the Federal Register... submitting a corrected Notice of Intent (NOI) in regard to the Blackfoot Travel Plan Environmental Impact...

  4. Chemical characteristics of the major thermal springs of Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

    1976-07-01

    Twenty-one thermal springs in western Montana were sampled for chemical, isotope, and gas compositions. Most of the springs issue dilute to slightly saline sodium-bicarbonate waters of neutral to slightly alkaline pH. A few of the springs issue sodium-mixed anion waters of near neutral pH. Fluoride concentrations are high in most of the thermal waters, up to 18 miligrams per litre, while F/Cl ratios range from 3/1 in the dilute waters to 1/10 in the slightly saline waters. Most of the springs are theoretically in thermodynamic equilibrium with respect to calcite and fluorite. Nitrogen is the major gas escaping from mostmore » of the hot springs; however, Hunters Hot Springs issue principally methane. The deuterium content of the hot spring waters is typical of meteoric water in western Montana. Geothermal calculations based on silica concentrations and Na-K-Ca ratios indicate that most of the springs are associated with low temperature aquifers (less than 100/sup 0/C). Chalcedony may be controlling the silica concentrations in these low temperature aquifers even in ''granitic'' terranes.« less

  5. Records on floral biology and visitors of Jacquemontia montana (Moric.) Meisn. (Convolvulaceae) in Mucugê, Bahia.

    PubMed

    Silva, F O; Kevan, S D; Roque, N; Viana, B F; Kevan, P G

    2010-08-01

    We present the first records on pollination biology of Jacquemontia montana (Moric.) Meisn. (Convolvulaceae), a widespread climber in the Chapada Diamantina. Our objectives were to (1) characterise flower morphology and biology of J. montana; (2) sample flower visitors and (3) make inferences about potential pollinators, based on foraging behaviour. Observations and sampling were performed on two patches from 8:00 AM to 3:30 PM, May 15th to 16th, 2007. The corolla is bowl shaped, pentamerous, gamopetalous, actinomorphic, and yellow, with a mean diameter of 22.43 +/- 1.81 mm, the depth being variable during flower phases. Stigma receptivity lasted from 8:00 AM-3:30 PM and pollen viability from 9:00 AM-3:30 PM Pollen. showed great decline in number but not in viability during anthesis. Nectarivorous (Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera) and herbivorous (Orthoptera) insects were found on the flowers. Both male and female bees (Dialictus spp., Robertson 1902) were the most frequent flower visitor. The bees' behaviour, and time spent on flowers, varied according to the resource gathered (i.e., pollen or nectar). The Dialictus species are likely to be the main pollinator of J. montana, considering the frequency, contact with reproductive parts, and carrying only J. montana pollen spread over the ventral part of the thorax, abdomen and legs. Although not quantified, nectar may still be available in the afternoon, considering the behaviour of bees on flowers during this time. Pollen:ovule ration that was1.200:4, suggests facultative xenogamy.

  6. US Supreme Court set to hear oral arguments in Montana coal tax case

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Montana defends it 30% coal severance tax as proper compensation for exporting an exhaustible resource, but 11 utilities and four coal companies are suing on constitutional grounds. The suit charges that the tax does not balance costs and benefits and that it represents an effort to export tax burdens. Montana contends that the tax passed in 1975 recognizes the state's long-term needs by requiring that 50% of the revenue be placed in a permanent trust fund for future social and environmental adjustments and questions whether the courts can put a monetary value on these impacts. The plaintiffs see the trustmore » fund as an admission that the tax is excessive and the state's failure to comply with national energy policy. (DCK)« less

  7. Update on coal in Big Horn basin, Montana and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.W.

    1983-08-01

    The Big Horn Coal basin is located within the topographic and structural basin of the same name and is defined by the limits of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Formation in northwestern Wyoming and the Eagle Sandstone in south-central Montana. The coal in this basin ranges in rank from high volatile C bituminous (based primarily on resistance to weathering) to subbituminous B coal. In general, the Mesaverde and Eagle coals are highest in heat content, averaging over 10,500 Btu/lb; the Fort Union coals in the Red Lodge-Bear Creek and Grass Creek fields average about 10,200 Btu/lb and are second highest inmore » heating value. The Meeteetse Formation contains coals that average 9,800 Btu/lb, the lowest heating values in the basin. An average heating value for all coal in the basin is slightly less than 10,000 But/lb. The average sulfur content of all coals in this basin is less than 1%, with a range of 0.4 to 2.2%. Coal mining in the Big Horn Coal basin began in the late 1880s in the Red Lodge field and has continued to the present. Almost 53 million tons of coal have been mined in the basin; nearly 78% of this production (41 million tons) is from bituminous Fort Union coal beds in the Red Lodge-Bear Creek and Bridger coal fields, Montana. Original in-place resources for the Big Horn Coal basin are given by rank of coal: 1,265.12 million tons of bituminous coal resources have been calculated for the Silvertip field, Wyoming, and the Red Lodge-Bear Creek and Bridger fields, Montana; 563.78 million tons of subbituminous resources have been calculated for the remaining Wyoming coal fields.« less

  8. NPDES Permit for the St. Ignatius-Southside Wastewater Treatment Facility in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0029017, the Salish and Kootenai Housing Authority of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility in Lake County, Montana to an unnamed tributary of Sabine Creek.

  9. Hydrogeologic data for the northern Rocky Mountains intermontane basins, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, DeAnn M.; Lawlor, Sean M.; Briar, D.W.; Tresch, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began a Regional Aquifer- System Analysis of the Northern Rocky Mountains Intermontane Basins of western Montana and central and central and northern Idaho in 1990 to establish a regional framework of information for aquifers in 54 intermontane basins in an area of about 77,500 square miles. Selected hydrogeologic data have been used as part of this analysis to define the hydro- logic systems. Records of 1,376 wells completed in 31 of the 34 intermontane basins in the Montana part of the study area are tabulated in this report. Data consist of location, alttiude of land surface, date well constructed, geologic unit, depth of well, diameter of casing, type of finish, top of open interval, primary use of water, water level, date water level measured, discharge, specific capacity, source of discharge data, type of log available, date water-quality parameters measured, specific conductance, pH, and temperature. Hydrographs for selected wells also are included. Locations of wells and basins are shown on the accompanying plate.

  10. 75 FR 72784 - Helena National Forest; Montana; Blackfoot Travel Plan EIS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Helena National Forest; Montana; Blackfoot Travel Plan... Impact Statement for the Blackfoot Travel Plan. SUMMARY: This notice extends the comment period for the Blackfoot Travel Plan from November 30, 2010 to January 7, 2011. This extension is a result of several...

  11. Community Background Reports: Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Browning, Montana. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 7, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, Theodore R.

    A 4-man field team from the University of Colorado, under the auspices of the National Study of American Indian Education, spent 6 weeks in the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Montana, in the fall of 1968. The team studied the public school system of Browning, Montana, the major town on the reservation and reported on educational facilities,…

  12. The Story of Story Mill-A Montana Community Working to Restore Wetlands

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Story Mill, a 55-acre site on the outskirts of Bozeman, Montana, has undergone several transformations in recent history. The place is virtually a “mill of stories” with respect to land use, but originally it was a wetland.

  13. Eustatic and tectonic controls on development and demise of Waulsortian carbonate buildups, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Precht, W.F.; Shepard, W.

    1989-03-01

    Deeper water Waulsortian carbonate buildups of Kinderhookian age are known from four localities in Montana. These buildups are situated within rhythmically bedded carbonate mudstones in the Paine Member of the Lodgepole formation. These buildups are mud-rich, byrozoan-crinoid mounds which contain abundant stromatactoid-like spar-filled cavities. The buildups are located along downdropped blocks on bounding faults of the Central Montana trough related to reactivation of a middle Proterozoic intracratonic rift margin (aulacogen). Sequence stratigraphic analyses of the Lodgepole throughout central Montana forms the basis for interpretation of buildup development and demise. Opening of the trough coupled with sea level rise formed threemore » distinct members of the Lodgepole, including (1) a transgressive surface marked by shallow-water deposits of the Cottonwood Canyon Member, (2) a transgressive systems tract of the Paine Member which can be separated into two distinct facies - a condensed section of deeper water carbonate mudstones to wackestones and the Waulsortian buildup facies which are encased within these rhythmically bedded deposits, and (3) a high-stand systems tract characterized by high-energy, cyclic, shoaling-upward crinoidal grainstones and oolites of the Woodhurst Member. Rapid eustatic rise and syntectonic subsidence during the transgressive systems tract outpassed buildup development and led to subsequent drowning. The lack of rapid reef building metazoans during the Mississippian is also suspect in explaining Waulsortian buildup demise.« less

  14. Montana's High School Dropouts: Examining the Fiscal Consequences. State Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuit, David A.; Springer, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    This report analyzes the economic and social costs of the high school dropout problem in Montana from the perspective of a state taxpayer. The majority of the authors' analysis considers the consequences of this problem in terms of labor market, tax revenue, and public service costs. In quantifying these costs, the authors seek to inform public…

  15. Montana Consolidated State Application Accountability Workbook. Further Amended and Resubmitted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This workbook, submitted by the State of Montana to the U.S. Department of Education, is for State Grants under Title IX, Part C, Section 9302 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (Public Law 107-110). By January 31, 2003, States must complete and submit to the Department this Consolidated State Application Accountability Workbook. The…

  16. [Litter decomposition and lignocellulose enzyme activities of Actinothuidium hookeri and Cys- topteris montana in alpine timberline ecotone of western Sichuan, China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-mei; He, Run-lian; Deng, Chang-chun; Yang, Wan-qin; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Lin; Liu, Yang

    2015-11-01

    The mass loss and lignocellulose enzyme activities of Actinothuidium hookeri residues and Cystopteris montana leaf litter in coniferous forest and timberline of western Sichuan, China were investigated. The results showed that both the mass loss rates of A. hookeri and C. Montana in timberline were higher than those in coniferous forest, while enzyme activities in timberline were lower than those in coniferous forest which was contrast with the hypothesis. The mass loss of two ground covers had significant differences in different seasons. The mass loss rate of A. hookeri in snow-covered season accounted for 69.8% and 83.0% of the whole year' s in timberline and coniferous forest, while that of C. montana in the growing season accounted for 82.6% and 83.4% of the whole year' s in timberline and coniferous forest, respectively. C. montana leaf litter decayed faster in the growing season, which was consistent with its higher cellulase activity in the growing season. The result illustrated that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose might be the main driving force for the early stage of litter decomposition. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that environmental factors and initial litter quality could explain 45.8%-85.1% variation of enzyme activity. The enzyme activities of A. hookeri and C. montana in the process of decomposition were mainly affected by the freeze-thaw cycle in snow-covered season.

  17. NPDES Permit for Crow Municipal Rural & Industrial Pilot Water Treatment Plant in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0031827, the Crow Indian Tribe is authorized to discharge from the Crow Municipal Rural & Industrial (MR&I) Pilot Water Treatment Plant in Bighorn County, Montana to the Bighorn River.

  18. 77 FR 70807 - Notice of Public Meeting, Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... Office manager updates, subcommittee briefings, work sessions and other issues that the council may raise..., 2012. Diane Friez, Eastern Montana--Dakotas District Manager. [FR Doc. 2012-28644 Filed 11-26-12; 8:45...

  19. Cadmium, copper, iron, and zinc concentrations in kidneys of grey wolves, Canis lupus, from Alaska, Idaho, Montana (USA) and the Northwest Territories (Canada).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S R; Blunck, S A; Petersen, K N; Jones, E M; Koval, J C; Misek, R; Frick, J A; Cluff, H D; Sime, C A; McNay, M; Beckman, K B; Atkinson, M W; Drew, M; Collinge, M D; Bangs, E E; Harper, R G

    2010-11-01

    Cadmium, copper, iron, and zinc levels were measured in the kidneys of 115 grey wolves (Canis lupus) from Idaho, Montana and Alaska (United States), and from the Northwest Territories (Canada). No significant differences in the levels of iron or copper were observed between locations, but wolf kidneys from more northern locations had significantly higher cadmium levels (Alaska > Northwest Territories > Montana ≈ Idaho), and wolves from Alaska showed significantly higher zinc than other locations. Additionally, female wolves in Alaska had higher iron levels than males, and adult wolves in Montana had higher copper levels than subadults.

  20. 77 FR 13621 - Notice of Public Meeting, Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Office manager updates, subcommittee briefings, work sessions and other issues that the council may raise..., 2012. M. Elaine Raper, Eastern Montana--Dakotas District Manager. [FR Doc. 2012-5492 Filed 3-6-12; 8:45...

  1. Fire ecology of Montana forest habitat types east of the Continental Divide

    Treesearch

    William C. Fischer; Bruce D. Clayton

    1983-01-01

    Provides information on fire as an ecological factor for forest habitat types occurring east of the Continental Divide in Montana. Identifies "Fire Groups" of habitat types based on fire's role in forest succession. Describes forest fuels and suggests considerations for fire management.

  2. Strategic Enterprise Architecture Design and Implementation Plan for the Montana Department of Transportation

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this research report is to develop a Strategic Enterprise Architecture (EA) Design and Implementation Plan for the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT). Information management systems are vital to maintaining the States transp...

  3. 78 FR 66379 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMTL07000-L1420000-BJ0000-LXSIHRRB0000] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  4. 77 FR 13620 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L14200000-BJ0000] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of survey of the...

  5. 77 FR 13621 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L14200000-BJ0000] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of survey of the...

  6. 76 FR 72970 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L98200000-BJ0000-LXCSMT010000] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  7. 76 FR 70163 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L14200000-BJ0000] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of survey of the...

  8. 77 FR 12075 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L19100000-BJ0000-LRCS42800800] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  9. 77 FR 35423 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L19100000-BJ0000-LRCS42800800] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  10. 77 FR 34402 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L14200000-BJ0000] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of survey of the...

  11. 76 FR 2919 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-10-L98200000-BJ0000-LXCSMT010000] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  12. 78 FR 64531 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L14200000-BJ0000] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of survey of the...

  13. The mosquitoes and chaoborids of Glacier and Yellowstone National Parks with new records and Ochlerotatus nevadensis, a new state record for Montana.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lewis T

    2012-03-01

    The known mosquito fauna of Glacier National Park, Montana, and Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, is reported with new records, including a list of the species of Chaoboridae known from both parks. Ochlerotatus nevadensis (= Aedes nevadensis) from Glacier National Park is a new record for the state of Montana.

  14. Montana Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) and Automatic Traffic Recorder (ATR) Strategy Final Report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this project was to review the Montana Department of Transportations (MDTs) permanent Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) and Automated Traffic Recorder (ATR) data collection programs to ensure they are efficiently providing the best possibl...

  15. Hydrologic and geologic characterization of Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, Montana

    Treesearch

    Phillip E. Farnes; Ward W. McCaughey; Katherine J. Hansen

    1994-01-01

    Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (TCEF) is located in Central Montana 24 miles north of White Sulphur Springs and 9 miles northwest of Highway 89 from Kings Hill via Forest Road #839. The experimental forest can also be accessed by Forest Road #586 via Sheep Creek. A general view of TCEF showing roads and drainages is shown in figure 2. The road down Tenderfoot...

  16. Family Forest Ownerships with 10+ Acres in Montana, 2011-2013

    Treesearch

    Brett J. Butler; Sarah M. Butler

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis program conducts the National Woodland Owner Survey in order to better understand: who owns America's forests, why they own it, what they have done with it in the past, and what they intend to do with it in the future. This document summarizes data on family forest ownerships with 10+ acres in Montana. These...

  17. A new fauna from the Colorado group of southern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeside, John B.

    1925-01-01

    This paper describes a small but interesting fauna collected in 1921 by W. T. Thorn, Jr., Gail F. Moulton, T. W. Stanton, and K. C. Heald in the Crow Indian Reservation in southern Montana. The locality is in sec. 36, T. 6 S., R. 32 E., Big Horn County, and is 2 miles east of the Soap Creek oil field.

  18. Stratigraphy and depositional environment of upper Cambrian Red Lion Formation, southwestern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, L.L.; Bush, J.H.

    1987-08-01

    The Red Lion Formation was examined along a northwest-southeast transect from Missoula to Bozeman, Montana. Lateral equivalents are the Snowy Range Formation east of Bozeman and the upper Fishtrap Dolomite in northwest Montana. The basal Dry Creek Member (0-5 m) consists of shale interbedded with quartz siltstones and sandstones. The overlying Sage Member, up to 115 meters in thickness, is characterized by ribbon carbonate beds containing lime mudstone and quartzose calcisiltite couplets arranged in fining-upward sequences 1-5 cm thick. Couplets are interlayered in places with thin (1-5 cm) to medium bedded (6-70 cm) units of laminated and non-laminated calcareous siltstones,more » flat-pebble conglomerates, trilobite packstones, cryptalgal boundstones, bioturbated lime mudstones and shales. In places, the upper Sage contains columnar and domal algal features. The Red Lion Formation is considered to be one Grand Cycle with the Dry Creek representing a lower inner detrital half-cycle and the Sage an upper carbonate half-cycle. The Dry Creek formed as the result of a westward clastic pulse from the inner detrital belt across an intrashelf basin onto outer middle carbonate peritidal complexes of the underlying Pilgrim Formation. Lower Sage ribbon rocks were deposited in storm-crossed, below wave-base areas. During deposition of the upper Sage, shallowing formed discontinuous algal-peritidal complexes over much of western and central Montana. These complexes were less extensive than earlier Cambrian buildups owing to slower rates of basin subsidence and clastic input suppressing carbonate production.« less

  19. Entrepreneurship in Montana. A Handbook for Integrating Entrepreneurship into All Vocational Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Ronald R.

    This handbook was developed to provide vocational education teachers in Montana with information about entreprenuership so that they can integrate the concepts into their vocational courses. The guide provides a definition of entrepreneurship and describes the syllabus for entrepreneurship (ownership, location, financing, personnel, promotion,…

  20. 78 FR 20354 - Notice of Public Meeting; Central Montana Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMTL00000.L10200000.PG0000] Notice of Public Meeting; Central Montana Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act...

  1. Breeding chronology and reproductive success of Richardson's merlins in southeastern Montana

    Treesearch

    Dale M. Becker; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    1985-01-01

    Breeding chronology and reproductive success of the Merlin (Falco columbarius richarsonii) were studied in southeastern Montana from 1978 - 1981. Breeding activity spanned 5 mo from the earliest observation of adults to the latest dispersal of adults and young from nesting areas. Clutch size, brood size and fledging success at active nests were...

  2. 76 FR 5397 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-11-L19100000-BJ0000-LRCME0R04758] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  3. 75 FR 57287 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-10-L19100000-BJ0000-LRCM08RS4649] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  4. 75 FR 31812 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-10-L19100000-BJ0000-LRCM07RE4030] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  5. 76 FR 29006 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-11-L19100000-BJ0000-LRCME0R04043] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plat of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  6. 78 FR 64531 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L1430000-EU0000] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of survey of the lands...

  7. 77 FR 12075 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L19100000-BJ0000-LRCME1R02060] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  8. 76 FR 41821 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-11-L19100000-BJ0000-LRCME0G03219] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  9. 77 FR 46109 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L19100000-BJ0000-LRCME1R05173] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  10. 76 FR 63952 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L19100000-BJ0000-LRCME0R04772] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  11. 77 FR 38320 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-L19100000-BJ0000-LRCME1R05174] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of...

  12. 76 FR 9049 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMT926000-11-L14200000-BJ0000] Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of survey of the...

  13. NPDES Permit for Westmoreland Resources, Inc.'s Absaloka Mine South Extension in Montana

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0030783, Westmoreland Resources, Inc. is authorized to discharge mine drainage from outfalls associated with the Absaloka Mine South Extension on the Crow Indian reservation near Hardin, Montana to Middle Fork of Sarpy Creek.

  14. A century of climate and ecosystem change in Western Montana: What do temperature trends portend?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pederson, G.T.; Graumlich, L.J.; Fagre, D.B.; Kipfer, T.; Muhlfeld, C.C.

    2010-01-01

    The physical science linking human-induced increases in greenhouse gasses to the warming of the global climate system is well established, but the implications of this warming for ecosystem processes and services at regional scales is still poorly understood. Thus, the objectives of this work were to: (1) describe rates of change in temperature averages and extremes for western Montana, a region containing sensitive resources and ecosystems, (2) investigate associations between Montana temperature change to hemispheric and global temperature change, (3) provide climate analysis tools for land and resource managers responsible for researching and maintaining renewable resources, habitat, and threatened/endangered species and (4) integrate our findings into a more general assessment of climate impacts on ecosystem processes and services over the past century. Over 100 years of daily and monthly temperature data collected in western Montana, USA are analyzed for long-term changes in seasonal averages and daily extremes. In particular, variability and trends in temperature above or below ecologically and socially meaningful thresholds within this region (e.g., -17.8??C (0??F), 0??C (32??F), and 32.2??C (90??F)) are assessed. The daily temperature time series reveal extremely cold days (??? -17.8??C) terminate on average 20 days earlier and decline in number, whereas extremely hot days (???32??C) show a three-fold increase in number and a 24-day increase in seasonal window during which they occur. Results show that regionally important thresholds have been exceeded, the most recent of which include the timing and number of the 0??C freeze/thaw temperatures during spring and fall. Finally, we close with a discussion on the implications for Montana's ecosystems. Special attention is given to critical processes that respond non-linearly as temperatures exceed critical thresholds, and have positive feedbacks that amplify the changes. ?? Springer Science + Business Media B

  15. Human Influences on Geomorphic Dynamics in Western Montana Gravel-Bed Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Management of river ecosystems, river restoration, climate-change vulnerability assessments, and other applications require understanding of how current channel conditions and processes compare to historical ranges of variability. This is particularly true with respect to evaluation of sediment balances, including of whether and how current sediment supply compares to background conditions. In western Montana, management and restoration efforts are in some cases driven by the perception that anthropogenic activities have elevated sediment yields above background levels; human-induced erosional increases have been documented in certain environments, but empirical supporting evidence is lacking for western Montana rivers. Here, human-induced changes in channel form and in sediment balances, including flow, sediment supply, and erosion rates, are evaluated for rivers in western Montana, with a particular focus on the Clark Fork and Bitterroot Rivers. These rivers are characteristic of systems in the northern Rocky Mountains with gravel beds, historically wandering channel patterns, modest bed-material loads, and land uses including logging, mining, and agriculture. The Clark Fork is influenced by legacy mining-related sediments and associated contaminants, remediation efforts, and the 2008 removal of Milltown Dam. These influences have caused temporary shifts in sediment balances, but overall, sediment fluxes are modest (e.g., suspended sediment fluxes of 6 tonnes km-2 yr-1 at the USGS Turah gage). The Bitterroot River is influenced by a mix of glaciated and unglaciated landscapes with fire-dominated erosional regimes and larger sand supply than the Clark Fork, reflecting lithologic differences; erosion rates, and the imprint of anthropogenic activities on sediment dynamics, are being investigated. This work has implications for river restoration, including whether measures are needed to impose channel stability, and for evaluating how climate-change-induced changes

  16. 76 FR 27661 - Notice of Public Meeting; Western Montana Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... several topics, including reports from the Bureau of Land Management's Butte, Missoula and Dillon field... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMTB07900 09 L10100000.PH0000 LXAMANMS0000] Notice of Public Meeting; Western Montana Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...

  17. 77 FR 31873 - Notice of Public Meeting; Central Montana Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... Main, Lewistown, Montana 59457, (406) 538-1900, [email protected] . Persons who use a... to contact the above individual during normal business hours. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7... normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This 15-member council advises the Secretary of the...

  18. Natural radioactivity in geothermal waters, Alhambra Hot Springs and nearby areas, Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, Robert B.; Janzer, Victor J.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactive hot springs issue from a fault zone in crystalline rock of the Boulder batholith at Alhambra, Jefferson County, in southwestern Montana. The discharge contains high concentrations of radon, and the gross alpha activity and the concentration of adium-226 exceed maximum levels recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Part of the discharge is diverted for space heating, bathing, and domestic use. The radioactive thermal waters at measured temperatures of about 60°C are of the sodium bicarbonate type and saturated with respect to calcium carbonate. Radium-226 in the rock and on fractured surfaces or coprecipitated with calcium carbonate probably is the principal source of radon that is dissolved in the thermal water and discharged with other gases from some wells and springs. Local surface water and shallow ground water are of the calcium bicarbonate type and exhibit low background activity. The temperature, percent sodium, and radioactivity of mixed waters adjacent to the fault zone increase with depth. Samples from most of the major hot springs in southwestern Montana have been analyzed for gross alpha and beta activity. The high level of radioactivity at Alhambra appears to be related to leaching of radioactive material from siliceous veins by ascending thermal waters and is not a normal characteristic of hot springs issuing from fractured crystalline rock in Montana.

  19. Seismic structure and lithospheric rheology from deep crustal xenoliths, central Montana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, K. H.; Schulte-Pelkum, V.; Blackburn, T. J.; Bowring, S. A.; Dudas, F. O.

    2012-10-01

    Improved resolution of lower crustal structure, composition, and physical properties enhances our understanding and ability to model tectonic processes. The cratonic core of Montana and Wyoming, USA, contains some of the most enigmatic lower crust known in North America, with a high seismic velocity layer contributing to as much as half of the crustal column. Petrological and physical property data for xenoliths in Eocene volcanic rocks from central Montana provide new insight into the nature of the lower crust in this region. Inherent heterogeneity in xenoliths derived from depths below ˜30 km support a composite origin for the deep layer. Possible intralayer velocity steps may complicate the seismic definition of the crust/mantle boundary and interpretations of crustal thickness, particularly when metasomatized upper mantle is considered. Mafic mineral-dominant crustal xenoliths and published descriptions of mica-bearing peridotite and pyroxenite xenoliths suggest a strong lower crust overlying a potentially weaker upper mantle.

  20. Methods for estimating magnitude and frequency of floods in Montana based on data through 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Omang, R.J.; Parrett, Charles; Hull, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Equations are presented for estimating flood magnitudes for ungaged sites in Montana based on data through 1983. The State was divided into eight regions based on hydrologic conditions, and separate multiple regression equations were developed for each region. These equations relate annual flood magnitudes and frequencies to basin characteristics and are applicable only to natural flow streams. In three of the regions, equations also were developed relating flood magnitudes and frequencies to basin characteristics and channel geometry measurements. The standard errors of estimate for an exceedance probability of 1% ranged from 39% to 87%. Techniques are described for estimating annual flood magnitude and flood frequency information at ungaged sites based on data from gaged sites on the same stream. Included are curves relating flood frequency information to drainage area for eight major streams in the State. Maximum known flood magnitudes in Montana are compared with estimated 1 %-chance flood magnitudes and with maximum known floods in the United States. Values of flood magnitudes for selected exceedance probabilities and values of significant basin characteristics and channel geometry measurements for all gaging stations used in the analysis are tabulated. Included are 375 stations in Montana and 28 nearby stations in Canada and adjoining States. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Temporal trends and stationarity in annual peak flow and peak-flow timing for selected long-term streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana through water year 2011: Chapter B in Montana StreamStats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; McCarthy, Peter M.; Sando, Roy; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    The two low-elevation gaging stations in eastern Montana (Poplar River at international boundary [gaging station 06178000] and Powder River at Moorhead, Montana [gaging station 06324500]) had considerable changes in annual-peakflow characteristics after the mid-1970s, which might provide evidence of potential nonstationarity in the peak-flow records. The two low-elevation gaging stations that have potential nonstationarity are located in drainage basins that are strongly affected by agricultural activities that potentially affect the hydrologic regimes. Primary agricultural activities that might alter natural hydrologic conditions include construction of small impoundments (primarily for stock-watering purposes) and irrigation diversions. Temporal variability in these activities might contribute to the potential nonstationarity issues. Changes in climatic characteristics after the mid-1970s also possibly contribute to the potential nonstationarity issues. Lack of considerable indication of potential nonstationarity in annual peak flow for the other long-term gaging stations in this study might indicate that climatic changes have been more pronounced with respect to effects on peak flows in low elevation areas in eastern Montana than in areas represented by the other long-term gaging stations. Another possibility is that climatic changes after the mid-1970s are exacerbated in low-elevation areas where small-impoundment development and potential effects of irrigation diversions might be more extensive.

  2. Quantifying social preferences toward woody biomass energy generation in Montana, USA

    Treesearch

    Robert Campbell; Tyron Venn; Nathaniel Anderson

    2015-01-01

    A significant amount of the forestland in Montana is in need of mechanical forest restoration treatments, which can improve forest health and reduce wildfire risk, but can be expensive to implement and produce little merchantable timber. One option for disposal of the small diameter material produced by these treatments is to utilize it to produce energy,...

  3. Cost, performance, and esthetic impacts of an experimental forest road in Montana

    Treesearch

    Rulon B. Gardner

    1978-01-01

    An experimental logging road designed to minimize environmental and esthetic impact was constructed in northwest Montana. The road was single-lane (14-foot finished surface, 3-foot ditch), constructed along the contour. Esthetically, the single-lane experimental road was judged far superior to existing roads on the forest.

  4. 78 FR 53158 - Notice of Public Meeting; Central Montana Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ..., Central Montana District Manager, Lewistown Field Office, 920 NE Main, Lewistown, MT 59457, (406) 538-1900... Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-677-8339 to contact the above individual during normal business... individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This 15-member...

  5. Plant community classification for alpine vegetation on the Beaverhead National Forest, Montana

    Treesearch

    Stephen V. Cooper; Peter Lesica; Deborah Page-Dumroese

    1997-01-01

    Vegetation of the alpine zone of eight mountain ranges in southwestern Montana was classified using IWINSPAN, DECORAN, and STRATA-algorithms embedded within the U.S. Forest Service Northern Region's ECADS (ecological classification and description system) program. Quantitative estimates of vegetation and soil attributes were sampled from 138 plots. Vegetation...

  6. Ethnobotanical and phytomedical knowledge in the North-Western Ligurian Alps.

    PubMed

    Cornara, Laura; La Rocca, Arianna; Terrizzano, Luca; Dente, Fulvio; Mariotti, Mauro Giorgio

    2014-08-08

    The ethnobotany of European alpine regions is much diversified and scarcely investigated. These regions retain a well-developed heritage culture and botanical traditional knowledge, favored by the isolated montane location. We carried out a study of therapeutic and traditional uses of native plants of a poorly explored area of the Western Italian Alps in the Ligurian region (NW Italy). The area has been the object of human activities since prehistoric ages, and an obliged crossroad for people moving across Provence, Liguria and Piemonte. The investigation was conducted in the upper Tanarello and Arroscia Valleys by using semi-structured, open interviews. Data were summarized by different indices--Relative Frequency of Citation (RFC), Cultural Value Index (CV), Ethnobotanicity Index (EI) and Informant Consensus Factor (Fic). A group of 65 informants were interviewed, yielding an inventory of 199 botanical taxa from 64 families, and a total of 2661 citations. A total of 13 categories of use were found, of which the most frequent ones were medicinal and food. In addition, 12 main medicinal subcategories were recorded. Botanicals were mainly used to treat digestive system, respiratory system, and the skin. A relevant role was played by plants with digestive and remineralizing properties. On the basis of quantitative analysis (RFC and CV indices) among the 30 most relevant plants are included rare and/or protected species, such as Achillea ligustica, Arnica montana, Gentiana ligustica, Gentiana lutea, and Achillea erba-rotta. An exhaustive prospect of the ethnobotanical knowledge in North-Western Ligurian Alps has been achieved through the recording of a large number of data. About 50% of the recorded uses have survived in the area. A great traditional importance is retained by species such as Artemisia absinthium, Lavandula angustifolia and Arnica montana which were formerly cultivated and marketed for their therapeutic virtues. A substantial role is also attributable

  7. Effect of homeopathy on analgesic intake following knee ligament reconstruction: a phase III monocentre randomized placebo controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Paris, A; Gonnet, N; Chaussard, C; Belon, P; Rocourt, F; Saragaglia, D; Cracowski, J L

    2008-01-01

    Aims The efficacy of homeopathy is still under debate. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of homeopathic treatment (Arnica montana 5 CH, Bryonia alba 5 CH, Hypericum perforatum 5 CH and Ruta graveolens 3 DH) on cumulated morphine intake delivered by PCA over 24 h after knee ligament reconstruction. Methods This was an add-on randomized controlled study with three parallel groups: a double-blind homeopathic or placebo arm and an open-label noninterventional control arm. Eligible patients were 18–60 years old candidates for surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament. Treatment was administered the evening before surgery and continued for 3 days. The primary end-point was cumulated morphine intake delivered by PCA during the first 24 h inferior or superior/equal to 10 mg day−1. Results One hundred and fifty-eight patients were randomized (66 in the placebo arm, 67 in the homeopathic arm and 25 in the noninterventional group). There was no difference between the treated and the placebo group for primary end-point (mean (95% CI) 48% (35.8, 56.3), and 56% (43.7, 68.3), required less than 10 mg day−1 of morphine in each group, respectively). The homeopathy treatment had no effect on morphine intake between 24 and 72 h or on the visual analogue pain scale, or on quality of life assessed by the SF-36 questionnaire. In addition, these parameters were not different in patients enrolled in the open-label noninterventional control arm. Conclusions The complex of homeopathy tested in this study was not superior to placebo in reducing 24 h morphine consumption after knee ligament reconstruction. What is already known about this subject The efficacy of homeopathy is still under debate and a recent meta-analysis recommended further randomized double-blind clinical trials to identify any clinical situation in which homeopathy might be effective. What this study adds The complex of homeopathy tested in this study (Arnica montana 5 CH, Bryonia alba 5 CH

  8. Thematic mapper-derived mineral distribution maps of Idaho, Nevada, and western Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, Gary L.

    2006-01-01

    This report provides mineral distribution maps based on TM spectral information of minerals commonly associated with hydrothermal alteration in Nevada, Idaho, and western Montana. The product of the processing is provided as four ESRI GRID files with 30 m resolution by state. UTM Zone 11 projection is used for Nevada (grid clsnv) and western Idaho (grid clsid), UTM Zone 12 is used for eastern Idaho and western Montana (grid clsid_mt). A fourth grid with a special Albers projection is used for the Headwaters project covering Idaho and western Montana (grid crccls_hs). Symbolization for all four grids is stored in the ESRI layer or LYR files and color or CLR files. Objectives of the analyses were to cover a large area very quickly and to provide data that could be used at a scale of 1:100,000 or smaller. Thus, the image processing was standardized for speed while still achieving the desired 1:100,000-scale level of detail. Consequently, some subtle features of mineralogy may be missed. The hydrothermal alteration data were not field checked to separate mineral occurrences due to hydrothermal alteration from those due to other natural occurrences. The data were evaluated by overlaying the results with 1:100,000 scale topographic maps to confirm correlation with known mineralized areas. The data were also tested in the Battle Mountain area of north-central Nevada by a weights-of-evidence correlation analysis with metallic mineral sites from the USGS Mineral Resources Data System and were found to have significant spatial correlation. On the basis of on these analyses, the data are considered useful for regional studies at scales of 1:100,000.

  9. Lower Cretaceous bentonitic strata in southwestern Montana assigned to Vaughn Member of Mowry Shale (East) and of Blackleaf Formation (West)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tysdal, R.G.; Dyman, T.S.; Nichols, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Vaughn Member, newly assigned to the Mowry Shale in this report, comprises strata that crop out in the Greenhorn, Gravelly, Madison, and Gallatin ranges, and the Centennial and Beartooth mountains of southwestern Montana. Herein the member is correlated with the Vaughn Member of the Blackleaf Formation, which crops out to the west in the Lima Peaks area, Snowcrest Range, and Pioneer Mountains. Strata assigned to the Vaughn Member of the Blackleaf Formation in southwestern Montana exhibit the same contrasting relationships that exist in northwestern Montana. The Vaughn Member of the Mowry is late Albian in age, determined by bracketing with shallow water marine bivalves in the Muddy Sandstone below and palynomorphs in Mowry strata above. Palynomorphs from the Vaughn Member itself are typically mid-Cretaceous, but do not permit a more exact determination of age. -from Authors

  10. Determining the current rates of motor fuel tax evasion for the State of Montana.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-11-01

    "The report uses data collected through interviews with neighboring states and provincial tax administrators as well as : audit, enforcement and collections data provided by the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) to determine : the extent and...

  11. 76 FR 31932 - Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, Pintler Ranger District; Montana; Flint Foothills...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... District; Montana; Flint Foothills Vegetation Management Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION... Management Project proposes to use clearcut salvage logging, commercial and pre-commercial thinning, and... beetle infestation within the 44,522-acre project area. DATES: Comments concerning the scope of the...

  12. Montana Proficiency Events Handbook. FHA HERO: Future Homemakers of America toward New Horizons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Linda, Ed.; Quickenden, Sandy, Ed.

    This handbook contains directions for FHA/HERO (Future Homemakers of America/Home Economics Related Occupations) participation activities in Montana. Participation activities are local, state, and national level competitions involving students in vocational home economics programs. The handbook provides a general overview of participation…

  13. 77 FR 27450 - PPL Montana, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL12-62-000] PPL Montana... Articles 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 70, 71, 72, 73 and 76 of the License, to the extent (i) properly accounted... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE., Washington, DC 20426. This filing is...

  14. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: American Indian Students in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for American Indian students in urban schools. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 808 high school American Indian students in urban schools during February of 2011. Frequency distributions may not total 808 due to…

  15. 78 FR 3446 - Notice of Public Meeting; Western Montana Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMTB07900 09 L10100000 PH0000 LXAMANMS0000] Notice of Public Meeting; Western Montana Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... Management Act and the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972, the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of...

  16. 77 FR 30550 - Notice of Public Meeting; Western Montana Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMTB07900 09 L10100000 PH0000 LXAMANMS0000] Notice of Public Meeting; Western Montana Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... Management Act and the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972, the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of...

  17. 78 FR 45955 - Notice of Public Meeting; Western Montana Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMTB07900 09 L10100000 PH0000 LXAMANMS0000] Notice of Public Meeting; Western Montana Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... Management Act and the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972, the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of...

  18. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the North-Central Montana Province, 2017

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Woodall, Cheryl A.; Le, Phuong A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Finn, Thomas M.; Pitman, Janet K.; Marra, Kristen R.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2018-02-12

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered, technically recoverable resources of 55 million barrels of oil and 846 billion cubic feet of gas in the North-Central Montana Province.

  19. CORE-Hom: a powerful and exhaustive database of clinical trials in homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Jürgen; Moss, Sian; Tournier, Alexander; Lüdtke, Rainer; Albrecht, Henning

    2014-10-01

    The CORE-Hom database was created to answer the need for a reliable and publicly available source of information in the field of clinical research in homeopathy. As of May 2014 it held 1048 entries of clinical trials, observational studies and surveys in the field of homeopathy, including second publications and re-analyses. 352 of the trials referenced in the database were published in peer reviewed journals, 198 of which were randomised controlled trials. The most often used remedies were Arnica montana (n = 103) and Traumeel(®) (n = 40). The most studied medical conditions were respiratory tract infections (n = 126) and traumatic injuries (n = 110). The aim of this article is to introduce the database to the public, describing and explaining the interface, features and content of the CORE-Hom database. Copyright © 2014 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 75 FR 59741 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLMTB072000-L14300000-ET0000; MTM 98499] Notice of Proposed Withdrawal and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land.... [FR Doc. 2010-24281 Filed 9-27-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310-$$-P ...