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Sample records for arnold chiari malformation

  1. Prolonged expiratory apnoea with cyanosis in Arnold Chiari II malformation

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nahin

    2017-01-01

    Apnoea associated with Arnold Chiari malformation is a known entity and can be obstructive or central. Differentiating between two types is vital to deciding management pathway and prognosticating disease process. PMID:28321315

  2. Arnold-Chiari type I malformation presenting as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Unal, M; Bagdatoglu, C

    2007-03-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformations are a group of congenital hindbrain and spinal cord abnormalities characterized by herniation of the contents of the posterior cranial fossa caudally through the foramen magnum into the upper cervical spine. It is important to recognize Arnold-Chiari type I malformation in the differential diagnosis of adult vertigo cases. We present a 51-year-old patient with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation that was initially diagnosed as posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  3. Nonsurgical treatment for esotropia secondary to Arnold-Chiari I malformation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Baxstrom, Curtis R

    2009-09-01

    A 14-year-old girl with diplopia and esotropia secondary to Arnold-Chiari I malformation was surgically treated with Arnold-Chiari I malformation decompression (suboccipital craniectomy), C1 and partial C2 laminectomy, and duraplasty. The residual esotropia was treated with compensatory prisms and vision therapy more than 1 year after Arnold-Chiari malformation surgery. The esotropia was resolved after approximately 3.5 months of treatment. Five years later, the patient continued to maintain fusion without compensatory prism.

  4. Disturbances of sexual potency in patients with basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Caetano de Barros, M; Farias da Silva, W; De Azevedo Filho, H C; Spinelli, C

    1975-06-01

    Sexual impotence is common in patients with basilar impression and/or Arnold-Chiari malformation. There is no evidence of hypogonadism and testicular biopsy is usually normal. An autonomic disturbance is postulated.

  5. Arnold Chiari Malformation With Sponastrime (Spondylar and Nasal Changes, With Striations of the Metaphyses) Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, A Leum; Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong Kyu; Im, Soo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract SPOndylar and NAsal changes, with STRIations of the Metaphyses (SPONASTRIME) dysplasia (SD) is a dwarfing autosomal recessive syndrome, characterized by a variety of clinical and radiographic features, which form the basis for diagnosis. We describe the presentation of an Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of SD. The malformation was successfully treated by decompression of the foramen magnum and elevation of the cerebellum, with complete resolution of pain. We report a rare case of Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient presenting with clinical and radiographic features strongly suggestive of SD and be successfully treated. PMID:27149441

  6. [Surgical findings in 260 cases of basilar impression and/or Arnold-Chiari malformation].

    PubMed

    da Silva, J A; Brito, J C; da Nóbrega, P V; Costa, M do D; de Souza, A B

    1994-09-01

    The surgical findings observed in a series of 260 patients with craniovertebral anomaly are presented. There were 29 (11.1%) patients only with basilar impression, 18 (6.9%) cases of pure Arnold-Chiari malformation and 213 (81.9%) cases of basilar impression associated with Chiari malformation. The surgical findings on bone, dura-mater, nervous tissue and blood vessels of this region are reported.

  7. Unusual association of Arnold-Chiari malformation and vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Praharaj, Heramba Narayan

    2012-07-09

    Arnold-Chiari malformations are a group of congenital or acquired defects associated with the displacement of cerebellar tonsils into the spinal canal. First described by Chiari (1891), this has various grades of severity and involves various parts of neuraxis, for example, cerebellum and its outputs, neuro-otological system, lower cranial nerves, spinal sensory and motor pathways. The symptomatology of Arnold-Chiari malformations may mimic multiple sclerosis, primary headache syndromes, spinal tumours and benign intracranial hypertension. We highlighted a case of Chiari type I malformation, who presented with posterolateral ataxia associated with significant vitamin B(12) deficiency. The patient was supplemented with vitamin B(12) injections and showed remarkable improvement at follow-up after 3 months.

  8. Arnold Chiari I malformation with tip-toe gait: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gi Hoon; Kim, Ghi Chan; Jeong, Ho Joong; Sim, Young-Joo; Park, Yong Seok

    2013-03-01

    The Arnold-Chiari type I malformation has many symptoms such as headache, neck pain, gait impairment, abnormal movements or postures. But a few cases reported association of specific symptom including headache, neck pain, vertigo or ataxia. We report a case of 12 year-old boy presenting with tip-toe gait. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of brain and spine revealed underlying Arnold-Chiari type I malformation. This case shows that it is need for central nervous system evaluation in patients with changes of lower extremities tone.

  9. Basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation. Surgical findings in 209 cases.

    PubMed

    da Silva, J A

    1992-11-01

    The surgical findings observed in a series of 209 consecutive patients with craniovertebral anomaly are presented. The high prevalence of basilar impression in the Northeast of Brazil is noteworthy. There were 28 (13.3%) patients with basilar impression alone, 10 (4.7%) cases of pure Arnold-Chiari malformation and in 171 (81.8%) cases the basilar impression was associated with Arnold-Chiari malformation. This study reflects our surgical experience of the pathology in a 17-year period (1971-1987). It reflects also the peculiarities of neurosurgical practice in an undeveloped region of this Country. The literature is extensively reviewed.

  10. [Acute respiratory failure as the sol inaugural sign of Arnold-Chiari malformation. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Chaouch, N; Meraï, S; Cheikh Rouhou, S; Ben Romdhane, K; Ben Mrad, S; Besbes, M; Tritar, F

    2007-10-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformation is an occipitocervical malformation where the cerebellar amygdales descend below the occipital foramen. Acute respiratory failure is an exceptional inaugural sign. We report two cases disclosed by alveolar hypoventilation associated with type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The two patients age 51 and 52 years had an uneventful past history and presented with hypercapnic encephalopathy with acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory assistance. Respiratory function tests, helicoidal thoracic computed tomographic angiography, electromyogram, cardiac echography, and thyroid and immunological tests were normal. Blood gases and polysomnography were in favor of central hypoventilation without sleep apnea. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The course was complicated by recurrent respiratory failure in both patients. Surgical decompression performed for the first patient provided no improvement. This patient died two months after surgery subsequent to aspiration pneumonia. The second patient was treated with continuous positive pressure noninvasive ventilatory assistance and had a good outcome at 25 months. These two cases illustrate the absence of any neurological sign, acute respiratory failure being the only sign of Arnold-Chiari malformation.

  11. Cervical arachnoidal cyst with basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi, A; Orrico, D; Polo, A; Gerosa, M; Bricolo, A

    1992-01-01

    A case of cervical spinal arachnoidal cyst is presented. The association with basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation is a peculiarity seldom reported. The clinical aspects with remission and exacerbation are discussed. The importance of the neuroradiological findings and the usefulness of the neurophysiological examination (evoked potentials) are suggested.

  12. The Arnold-Chiari Malformation and Its Implications for Individuals with Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittler, Joel E.

    1986-01-01

    The Arnold-Chiari malformation is present in most infants born with myelomeningocele (a form of spina bifida) and hydrocephalus. The syndrome is responsible for structural abnormalities in the brain, and peripheral nervous system. Etiology, symptoms, impact on central nervous system structures, surgical treatment, and implications for education…

  13. Arnold Chiari malformation with spina bifida: a lost opportunity of folic Acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Deepa; Sagayaraj, Benjamin M; Barua, Ravi Kumar; Sharma, Nidhi; Ranga, Upasana

    2014-12-01

    In Arnold Chiari (kee-AHR-ee) II malformation elongated cerebellar tonsils are displaced inferiorly through the Foramen Magnum into the upper cervical spinal canal. It is a complex anomaly with skull, dura, brain, spine and cord manifestations. Meningomyelocele is seen in all cases. We present a case of type II Arnold Chiari Malformation diagnosed in utero in a pregnant lady .There was no periconceptional folic acid supplementation. As the role of the Methylene Tetra Hydro Folate Reductase gene polymorphism in neural tube defects is becoming evident, a simple opportunity as folic acid supplementation should not be missed. Folate supplementation as fortification of cereal grains will also prevent other conditions like congenital heart defects, urinary tract anomalies, orofacial defects, limb defects and pyloric stenosis.

  14. [Arnold-Chiari malformation and syringomyelia in primary care. A case report].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sabater, A; Sancho-Cantus, D

    2012-01-01

    Rare diseases, due to their epidemiological characteristics, and sometimes to the non-specific symptoms, are difficult to diagnose routinely at Primary Care Level. A case is presented of Arnold Chiari malformation in a young male patient with early insidious presentation (neck pain and sub-occipital headaches) consulting due to the emergence of new symptoms (paresthesias, muscular weakness, cervicobrachial and radiating lumbar pain, and headaches after mild exertion).

  15. Arnold Chiari Malformation With Sponastrime (Spondylar and Nasal Changes, With Striations of the Metaphyses) Dysplasia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Je Hoon; Lee, A Leum; Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong Kyu; Im, Soo-Bin

    2016-05-01

    SPOndylar and NAsal changes, with STRIations of the Metaphyses (SPONASTRIME) dysplasia (SD) is a dwarfing autosomal recessive syndrome, characterized by a variety of clinical and radiographic features, which form the basis for diagnosis. We describe the presentation of an Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of SD. The malformation was successfully treated by decompression of the foramen magnum and elevation of the cerebellum, with complete resolution of pain.We report a rare case of Arnold Chiari malformation in a patient presenting with clinical and radiographic features strongly suggestive of SD and be successfully treated.

  16. [Papillary oedema revealing Arnold Chiari malformation type 1: about a case].

    PubMed

    Imane, Mouhoub; Asmae, Maadane; Toufik, Ramdani; Rachid, Sekhsoukh

    2016-01-01

    Arnold Chiari malformation type 1 is defined as a herniation of the cerebellar tonsils into the foramen magnum of more than 5 mm. Symptoms are most commonly dominated by occipital headache, torticollis and sometimes swallowing disorders. Ophthalmologically abnormal convergences, oculomotor palsy and diplopia are the main clinical signs. We report the case of a 9 year old child, who presented with visual loss evolving since 6 months. Ophthalmologic examination showed visual acuity of 4/10 in both eyes, retained ocular motility and rotational nystagmus. The examination of the anterior segment of the eye showed megalocornea with no evidence of goniodysgenesis, iridodonesis associated with atrophy of the dilator muscle and microcoria with lazy photomotor reflex. Normal intraocular pressure was 14 mmHg. Ocular fundus examination, despite difficulties in performing it, objectified bilateral papilledema (stage II). General physical examination showed torticollis, scoliosis and a tetra-pyramidal syndrome. MRI showed Chiari malformation type I associated with hydrocephalus and syringomyelia. Neurosurgical intervention based on internal CSF drainage with occipitocervical osteo-dural decompression was proposed. The evolution was favorable with regression of clinical signs. Ophthalmologically, there was a regression of papilledema but visual acuity remained stationary. The occurrence of papilledema associated with Chiari malformation type 1 is rare, it has been only reported in 2% of symptomatic patients. Its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. The originality of our study consists in the association of cerebellar malformations with ocular malformations including megalocornea and microcoria which make ophthalmologic examination more difficult to perform.

  17. [Type 1 Arnold Chiari malformation, syringomielia, syringobulbia and IV ventricle entrapment].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Vázquez-Elizondo, Genaro; Gutiérrez-Delgado, Linda G; Guevara-Arnal, Luis; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2008-01-01

    Arnold-Chiari Malformation (ACM) was first described by Hans Chiari in 1890. Four types of this malformation are recognized, of those, type I is the most common among adults. It is caused by an elongation of the cerebellum into the conic projections that accompany the brain stem within the spinal channel. It is mostly congenital but "acquired" forms can be seen in the context of infections or posterior fossa tumors. Clinically, it can present as an asymptomatic finding, but it can produce brain stem compression. Syringomielia--cavitation of the brain stem central areas--is associated with MAC type I in 75 to 85% of cases. Clinical signs include pain, weakness, extremity parestesia. A shunt to the lateral ventricles can produce IV ventricle entrapment and is associated with cerebrospinal fluid blockage. We describe a case of MAC type I associated with the presence of syringomielia, syringobulbia and IV ventricle entrapment.

  18. Bilateral Vocal Cord Palsy with Arnold Chiari Malformation: A Rare Case Series.

    PubMed

    Arora, Nikhil; Juneja, Ruchika; Meher, Ravi; Bhargava, Eishaan K

    2016-09-01

    Stridor in paediatric age group is not an uncommon presentation to the ENT emergency. The range of differential diagnosis is vast. The presentation may vary from noisy breathing to severe respiratory distress and apnea. Early and meticulous diagnosis is crucial for the management as the condition may be life threatening. We report a rare case series of 3 infants with Arnold Chiari Malformation who presented to the hospital with stridor and were diagnosed with bilateral vocal cord palsy. These 3 infants had similar underlying neurological condition with hydrocephalus and raised intracranial pressure. Chiari malformation is the one of the most common congenital central nervous system anomaly associated with bilateral vocal cord paralysis. However, the presentation is rare. This article, thus, emphasizes the significance of early diagnosis and immediate management of this condition.

  19. Bilateral Vocal Cord Palsy with Arnold Chiari Malformation: A Rare Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nikhil; Meher, Ravi; Bhargava, Eishaan K.

    2016-01-01

    Stridor in paediatric age group is not an uncommon presentation to the ENT emergency. The range of differential diagnosis is vast. The presentation may vary from noisy breathing to severe respiratory distress and apnea. Early and meticulous diagnosis is crucial for the management as the condition may be life threatening. We report a rare case series of 3 infants with Arnold Chiari Malformation who presented to the hospital with stridor and were diagnosed with bilateral vocal cord palsy. These 3 infants had similar underlying neurological condition with hydrocephalus and raised intracranial pressure. Chiari malformation is the one of the most common congenital central nervous system anomaly associated with bilateral vocal cord paralysis. However, the presentation is rare. This article, thus, emphasizes the significance of early diagnosis and immediate management of this condition. PMID:27790480

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of Arnold-Chiari type I malformation with hydromyelia

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaPaz, R.L.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; New, P.F.; Kistler, J.P.; McGinnis, B.D.; Pykett, I.L.; Taveras, J.M.

    1983-02-01

    Saturation recovery nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images and metrizamide computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained in an adult patient with a clinical history suggestive of syringomyelia. Both NMR and CT studies showed low lying cerebellar tonsils. The CT study demonstrated central cavitation of the spinal cord from the midthoracic to midcervical levels but could not exclude an intramedullary soft tissue mass at the cervico-medullary junction. The NMR images in transverse, coronal, and sagittal planes demonstrated extension of an enlarged central spinal cord cerebrospinal fluid space to the cervico-medullary junction. This was felt to be strong evidence for exclusion of an intramedullary soft tissue mass and in favor of a diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari Type I malformation with hydromyelia. The noninvasive nature of spinal cord and cervico-medullary junction evaluation with NMR is emphasized.

  1. Anesthesia for a patient of acromesomelic dysplasia with associated hydrocephalus, Arnold Chiari malformation and syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Rudrashish; Gyanesh, Prakhar; Samanta, Sukhen

    2013-10-01

    Acromesomelic dysplasias are autosomal recessive osteochondrodysplasias. Acromesomelic dysplasia Maroteaux-type (AMDM), also known as St Helena dysplasia, is of two types: The classical and the mild variety. About 50 cases of AMDM have been reported till date, most of them being the classical variety. There is scarcity of literature on anesthesia for such patients. We are reporting a case of general anesthetic management of AMDM, associated with hydrocephalus, Arnold Chiari malformation type-1 and syringomyelia. The patient was a 10-year-old short-statured boy who presented with symptomatic thoracic kyphoscoliosis, gibbus deformity and back pain. On examination, there was no neurological deficit. Radiology revealed thoracic kyphoscoliosis, mild ventriculomegaly and upper cervical syringomyelia. The patient underwent posterior fossa decompression in the prone position under general anesthesia. We will discuss the anesthetic considerations for such patients and review the pertinent literature.

  2. [Basilar impression and malformation of Arnold-Chiari. Postoperative complications in 126 cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves da Silva, J A; Gonçalves da Silva, C E

    1981-09-01

    Within a period of ten years we operated on 126 cases of basilar impression and/or Arnold-Chiari malformation. Two surgical techniques were employed for decompression of the posterior fossa. In the group I (64 cases) the operation consisted of craniectomy and the dura mater was left open and was fixed to the lateral musculature. The technique of the group II (62 cases) consisted in endotracheal intubation without flexion of the head, position of the head without anterior flexion during the operation and plastic closure of the dura. The dural graft was employed to create more space at the craniocervical joint, to avoid cerebrospinal fluid fistula and to restore the integrity of the dura as a protection for the nervous structures of the posterior fossa. The frequency of postoperative complications and mortality observed in group II was definitely less than in the group I.

  3. Management of parturients in active labor with Arnold Chiari malformation, tonsillar herniation, and syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramsis F.; Tverdohleb, Tatiana; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2017-01-01

    Background: Arnold-Chiari malformation Type 1 (ACM-1) in parturients is a topic of ongoing discussion between obstetricians and anesthesiologists. The primary unanswered question remains; How should the anesthesia provider proceed with labor analgesia and anesthesia for cesarean section when confronted with an advanced, asymptomatic, or minimally symptomatic case of ACM-1 during labor? Case Description: A 24-year-old, ASA II, G1P0 full-term parturient presented to Labor and Delivery for vaginal delivery. A diagnosis of ACM-1 was made 12 years ago when a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for right-sided numbness following a rear-end motor vehicle collision. The patient had been asymptomatic since then and had been seen by an outside neurologist frequently for the past 10 years. During the anesthesia evaluation, it was noted that she had an exaggerated patellar reflex, and a questionable left-sided Babinski; subsequently, an MRI study was requested. Review of a brain MRI demonstrated an advanced form of ACM with a 1.7 cm transtonsillar herniation and a large syrinx extending from C1 down to C5. Following a discussion with the patient, family, and primary OB team, a plan for elective cesarean section was made per neurosurgical recommendations. This was conducted uneventfully under general anesthesia. The patient had no complaints in the post-anesthesia care unit. Conclusion: Unfamiliarity of health care providers with regards to ACM-1 parturients can be countered by increasing awareness of this condition throughout medical specialties involved in their care. The Ghaly Obstetric Guide to Arnold-Chiari malformation Type 1, along with proper training of anesthesia care providers regarding the specificities of ACM-1 parturients aids in better management and understanding of this complex condition. PMID:28217389

  4. Cranio-cervical growth collision: another explanation of the Arnold-Chiari malformation and of basilar impression.

    PubMed

    Roth, M

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of neuro-cranio-spinal development suggests a cranio-cervical growth conflict as the cause of the Arnold-Chiari malformation and of basilar impression. The ascending course and elongation of the upper cervical nerves associated with the Arnold-Chiari malformation reflects the abnormal, caudo-cranially proceeding growth of the cervical spine. This is the opposite of the normal cranio-caudal direction of growth (which includes the brain) with downward slanting of the cervical nerve roots. The cervical growth reversal is a compensatory event related to the impairment of distal spinal growth at the level of the coexistent myelomeningocele. With the reversal of the cerical growth, the initial descent (uncoiling) of the primordial brain curvatures is compromised owing to the growth-collision with the ascending cervical spine. Their subsequent growth proceeds into the upper cervical spinal canal. The contents of the posterior cranial fossa are actively "sucked up", "devoured" by the latter. In contrast to the adaptively enhanced growth of the early cranio-cervical nervous structures in the Arnold-Chiari malformation, as an answer to the growth-shifts of the encasing skeleton, basilar impression is a postembryonic adaptation of the cervico-cranial skeleton to the inadequate growth of the nervous structures after the latter have lost their growth adaptability. Arnold-Chiari malformation and basilar impression are just two representatives of "osteo-neural growth pathology" encompassing some "dysplastic" disorders of the axial as well as of the limb skeleton such as platyspondyly, scoliosis, Scheuermann's kyphosis, achondroplasia-like conditions, congenital dysplasia of the hip etc.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. [Cruciate hemiplegia associated with basilar impression, Arnold-Chiari malformation and syringomyelia. Case report].

    PubMed

    da Silva, J A; da Costa, M D; Leal, A B; dos Reis, F R; de Queiroz, R B

    1996-12-01

    The authors report a case of cruciate hemiplegia associated with basilar impression, Chiari malformation and syringomyelia. The neuroanatomical controversy, the surgical treatment and the good outcome of the patient are discussed.

  6. Arnold-Chiari malformation type 1 complicated by sudden onset anterior spinal artery thrombosis, tetraparesis and respiratory arrest.

    PubMed

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Zayyani, Najah R; Al Miamini, Wail; Khoujah, Amer M; Alharbi, Zeyad; Diari, Mohd S

    2011-04-15

    Chiari in 1891 described a constellation of anomalies at the base of the brain inherited congenitally, the characteristic of which are (1) extension of a tongue of cerebellar tissue posterior to the medulla and cord that extends into the cervical spinal canal; (2) caudal displacement of the medulla and the inferior part of the fourth ventricle into the cervical canal; and (3) a frequent but not invariable association with syringomyelia or a spinal developmental abnormality. Chiari recognized four types of abnormalities. Presently, the term has come to be restricted to Chiari's types I and II, that is, to cerebellomedullary descent without and with a meningomyelocele, respectively. The association of Arnold-Chairi malformation and high cervical cord infarction is unusual. The most common syndrome, anterior spinal artery syndrome (ASAS), is caused by interruption of blood flow to the anterior spinal artery, producing ischaemia in the anterior two-thirds of the cord, with resulting neurologic deficits. Causes of ASAS include aortic disease, postsurgical, sepsis, hypotension and thromboembolic disorders. The authors present an interesting case of cervical cord infarction due to anterior spinal artery thrombosis in a patient of type 1 Arnold-Chiari malformation without any of the above predisposing factors.

  7. Arnold-Chiari Malformation Type III With Meningoencephalocele: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dae Ho; Kim, Chang Hwan; Kim, Myeong Ok; Chung, Hyung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Han Young

    2014-06-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformation type III (CM III) is an extremely rare anomaly with poor prognosis. An encephalocele with brain anomalies as seen in CM II, and herniation of posterior fossa contents like the cerebellum are found in CM III. The female infant was a twin, born at 33 weeks, weighing 1.7 kg with a huge hydrocele on the craniocervical junction. After operations were performed, she was referred to the department of rehabilitation medicine for poor motor development, swallowing dysfunction, and poor eye fixation at 22 months. The child was managed with neurodevelopmental treatment, oromotor facilitation, and light perception training. After 14 months, improvement of gross motor function was observed, including more stable head control, rolling, and improvement of visual perception. CM III has been known as a condition with poor prognosis. However, with the improvement in operative techniques and intensive rehabilitations, the prognosis is more promising than ever before. Therefore, more attention must be paid to the rehabilitation issues concerning patients with CM III.

  8. Viewing condition dependence of the gaze-evoked nystagmus in Arnold Chiari type 1 malformation.

    PubMed

    Ghasia, Fatema F; Gulati, Deepak; Westbrook, Edward L; Shaikh, Aasef G

    2014-04-15

    Saccadic eye movements rapidly shift gaze to the target of interest. Once the eyes reach a given target, the brainstem ocular motor integrator utilizes feedback from various sources to assure steady gaze. One of such sources is cerebellum whose lesion can impair neural integration leading to gaze-evoked nystagmus. The gaze evoked nystagmus is characterized by drifts moving the eyes away from the target and a null position where the drifts are absent. The extent of impairment in the neural integration for two opposite eccentricities might determine the location of the null position. Eye in the orbit position might also determine the location of the null. We report this phenomenon in a patient with Arnold Chiari type 1 malformation who had intermittent esotropia and horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus with a shift in the null position. During binocular viewing, the null was shifted to the right. During monocular viewing, when the eye under cover drifted nasally (secondary to the esotropia), the null of the gaze-evoked nystagmus reorganized toward the center. We speculate that the output of the neural integrator is altered from the bilateral conflicting eye in the orbit position secondary to the strabismus. This could possibly explain the reorganization of the location of the null position.

  9. [Paget's disease of bone and basilar impression associated with an Arnold-Chiari type-1 malformation].

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Osma, C; Gómez Sánchez, J C; Suquia Múgica, B; Querol Prieto, R; de Portugal Alvarez, J

    1997-10-01

    The patient, a 78-year-old female with history of headache and progressive gait disturbance for almost one year, was admitted to our department because of dysphagia and dysphonia since three months before. Neurological examination revealed nystagmus, cerebellar ataxia, deafness, and vesical incontinence. No cerebral injuries were detected by computed tomography (CT) scan, although Paget's. Disease of Bone (PDB) was suggested, confirmed by biochemical and scintigraphic studies. The plain skull X-ray showed platybasia. As all the disarrangements were not explained by PDB complications alone, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed which demonstrated an Arnold-Chiari malformation (ACM) type I, with mild tonsillar herniation and anterior compression of the brainstem due to basilar impression, without syringomyelia. The association of PDB and ACM is a peculiarity seldom reported. The surgical approach was rejected, but the severity of symptoms and osteitis deformans biochemical activity needed a treatment; it was orientated to modify bone turnover using etidronate, a bisphosphonate, which induced clinical improvement and a decrease in serum alkaline phosphatase as well as in other bone resorption markers, without side effects. The good status and biochemical remission have been maintained a year later.

  10. Syringomyelia and Arnold-Chiari malformation associated with neck pain and left arm radiculopathy treated with spinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Tieppo Francio, Vinicius

    2014-11-09

    An 18-year-old female patient presented with left dominant neck pain after a motor vehicle collision. Her cervical spine MRI revealed syringomyelia with associated Type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. Some researchers have reported that these might be considered contraindications to spinal manipulation. Nevertheless, her benign and functional clinical examination suggested otherwise and she underwent four manipulative treatments in 2 weeks. By the end of the treatment plan and after 1-month follow-up, she was asymptomatic, no adverse effects were noted and her outcome assessment score decreased from 56% to 0%. This case illustrates that spinal manipulation may be a useful adjunctive treatment procedure for spinal pain, even in the presence of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation, which may not necessarily be a contraindication to spinal manipulation, when performed by a skilled and well-trained physician.

  11. Syringomyelia and Arnold-Chiari malformation associated with neck pain and left arm radiculopathy treated with spinal manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Tieppo Francio, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    An 18-year-old female patient presented with left dominant neck pain after a motor vehicle collision. Her cervical spine MRI revealed syringomyelia with associated Type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. Some researchers have reported that these might be considered contraindications to spinal manipulation. Nevertheless, her benign and functional clinical examination suggested otherwise and she underwent four manipulative treatments in 2 weeks. By the end of the treatment plan and after 1-month follow-up, she was asymptomatic, no adverse effects were noted and her outcome assessment score decreased from 56% to 0%. This case illustrates that spinal manipulation may be a useful adjunctive treatment procedure for spinal pain, even in the presence of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation, which may not necessarily be a contraindication to spinal manipulation, when performed by a skilled and well-trained physician. PMID:25385566

  12. [The basilar impression and the Arnold-Chiari malformation. Techno-surgical considerations apropos of 13 cases].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves da Silva, J A; Gonçalves da Silva, C E; de Farias Brito, J C; Rodrigues de Sousa, M; Gonçalves da Silva, J B

    1978-03-01

    The surgical technic for decompression of the posterior fossa in cases of basilar impression and malformation of Arnold-Chiari mainly based in (1) endotracheal intubation without any flexion of the head, (2) position of the head without anterior flexion during the surgery, (3) plastic of the posterior fossa with dura-mater of cadaver conserved in glicerina, was emploied in 13 patients. The plastic was made to create space at the craniocervical joint in order to avoid cerebrospinal fluid fistula and to restore the integrity of the dura. Infection was not observed.

  13. Successful treatment of adult Arnold-Chiari malformation associated with basilar impression and syringomyelia by the transoral anterior approach.

    PubMed

    Kohno, K; Sakaki, S; Shiraishi, T; Matsuoka, K; Okamura, H

    1990-04-01

    A case of adult type I Arnold-Chiari malformation associated with basilar impression, syringomyelia, atlantoaxial dislocation, and occipitalization of the atlas is reported. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging clearly revealed evidence of severe anterior compression of the cervicomedullary junction due to basilar impression and a sharp clivoaxial angle. Therefore, transoral anterior decompression and fusion were performed, resulting in an improvement of the patient's neurologic signs and symptoms. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed an obvious reduction of the tonsillar herniation and syringomyelia, as well as an improvement of the cervicomedullary compression.

  14. Not all cases of nyctalopia are benign: Unusual and serendipitous presentation of Arnold-Chiari Type 1 malformation at a Pediatric Tertiary Care Center.

    PubMed

    Patra, Kailash Chandra; Kirtane, Abhijeet Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The Arnold-Chiari Type 1 malformation (CM1) is a rare congenital abnormality characterized by ectopia or caudal herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum into the cervical spine, resulting in crowding at the craniocervical junction. It seldom presents in childhood with symptoms and a normal neurological examination. More typically, CM1 presents in young adult women with neurological symptoms including a headache, cervical pain, cranial nerve palsies, neurosensory deficit, and ataxia. Ocular manifestations associated with Chiari I include third and sixth cranial nerve paresis and convergence/divergence abnormalities. Papilledema is a rare manifestation of Chiari I with a clinical presentation often similar to that of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. To underscore this noteworthy complication, the authors report a case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with nyctalopia and suboccipital headaches, but was diagnosed serendipitously as a case of papilledema due to Chiari I malformation.

  15. [Arnold-Chiari malformation in Noonan syndrome and other syndromes of the RAS/MAPK pathway].

    PubMed

    Ejarque, Ismael; Millán-Salvador, José M; Oltra, Silvestre; Pesudo-Martínez, José V; Beneyto, Magdalena; Pérez-Aytés, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Introduccion. El sindrome de Noonan (SN) y otros sindromes con fenotipo similar, como LEOPARD, cardiofaciocutaneo, Costello y Legius, estan asociados a mutaciones en genes incluidos en la via RAS/MAPK (rasopatias), una importante via de señalizacion relacionada con la proliferacion celular. El descenso de las amigdalas cerebelares dentro del canal medular cervical, conocido como malformacion de Arnold-Chiari (MAC), se ha descrito en pacientes afectos de SN, lo que ha llevado a sugerir que la MAC podria formar parte del espectro fenotipico del SN. Presentamos dos casos con SN y MAC. Casos clinicos. Caso 1: mujer de 29 años con fenotipo de Noonan. Fue intervenida a los 9 años de estenosis valvular pulmonar. A los 27 años, presento MAC sintomatica que preciso descompresion quirurgica. Presentaba mutacion c.922A>G (N308D) en el gen PTPN perteneciente a la via RAS/MAPK. Caso 2: niña de 10 años con fenotipo de Noonan y MAC asintomatica detectada en resonancia magnetica cerebral. Era portadora de la mutacion c.923A>G (N308S) en el gen PTPN11. Conclusiones. Hemos encontrado en la bibliografia seis pacientes con esta asociacion, cuatro con fenotipo Noonan y dos con LEOPARD. Nuestros dos pacientes aportan evidencia suplementaria a la hipotesis de que la MAC formaria parte del espectro fenotipico del SN. El escaso numero de pacientes publicados con esta asociacion no permite extraer recomendaciones sobre el momento y la frecuencia de estudio de neuroimagen; no obstante, una exploracion neurologica cuidadosa deberia incluirse en la guia anticipatoria de salud en los sindromes de la via RAS/MAPK.

  16. Restoration of the efferent phase of the sneeze reflex after regression of an Arnold-Chiari malformation with compression of the medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Songu, Murat; Can, Nazan; Gelal, Fazil

    2013-01-01

    The precise location of the sneeze center in the human brain has not been definitively identified. The aim of this report is to contribute to the effort to detect its location. We report the case of a 13-year-old boy who presented to our outpatient clinic for evaluation of an inability to sneeze. In an attempt to trigger the afferent (nasal) phase of the sneeze reflex, we first applied a cotton swab and later a silver nitrate stick to the patient's nasal mucosa. Once that was accomplished, we observed that the patient could not complete the efferent (expiratory) phase of the sneeze reflex, and thus he did not sneeze. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that his cerebellar tonsils extended approximately 10 mm inferiorly through the foramen magnum, which represented a type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The tonsils were noted to have compressed the posterolateral portion of the medulla oblongata. At follow-up 21 months later, we noted that the patient was able to sneeze spontaneously as well as with nasal stimulation. Repeat MRI revealed that the Arnold-Chiari malformation had undergone a spontaneous partial regression, which resulted in relief of the compression of the medulla oblongata. We believe that the patient's earlier inability to sneeze might have been attributable to the compression of the medulla oblongata by the cerebellar tonsils and that the site of the compression might represent the location of his sneeze center.

  17. Transnasal endoscopic removal of malformation of the odontoid process in a patient with type I Arnold-Chiari malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grammatica, A; Bonali, M; Ruscitti, F; Marchioni, D; Pinna, G; Cunsolo, E M; Presutti, L

    2011-08-01

    The endoscopic endonasal approach is emerging as a feasible alternative to the trans-oral route for the resection of the odontoid process, when the latter produces a compression of the brainstem and cervicomedullary junction. This type of approach has some advantages, such as excellent pre-vertebral exposure of the cranio-vertebral junction in patients with small oral cavities and the possibility to avoid the use of mouth retractors. A typical case of a 24-year-old male patient with a previous diagnosis of type I Arnold-Chiari Malformation, suffering from a posterior dislocation of the odontoid process causing severe anterior compression of the brainstem, is presented to stress the potential of this technique. Trans-nasal endoscopic removal of the odontoid process was performed and resolution of the ventral compression of the brainstem was achieved. This report demonstrates that in selected cases, an endoscopic endonasal approach should now be considered an excellent alternative to the traditional trans-oral approach.

  18. Focal dermal hypoplasia: report of a case with myelomeningocele, Arnold-Chiari malformation and hydrocephalus with a review of neurologic manifestations of Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peters, Tess; Perrier, Renee; Haber, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [OMIM] 305600) is a rare X-linked dominant congenital disorder involving defects of mesodermal- and ectodermal-derived structures. It is associated with mutations in the PORCN gene, a regulator of Wnt signaling proteins. The phenotype is highly variable, although all describe characteristic skin findings as a primary diagnostic feature. To date there are few case reports of focal dermal hypoplasia associated with central nervous system abnormalities. We report the second case of focal dermal hypoplasia associated with myelomenigocele, Arnold-Chiari malformation and hydrocephalus and the first in a male. Genetic testing identified a novel mosaic three base pair deletion within the PORCN gene (c.853_855delACG). This case highlights the importance of neurological evaluation in focal dermal hypoplasia and consideration of other syndromes more commonly associated with central nervous system abnormalities. In this report we summarize the literature on neurological manifestations in Goltz syndrome.

  19. Unusual Ventilatory Response to Exercise in Patient with Arnold-Chiari Type 1 Malformation after Posterior Fossa Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Keely; Gomez-Rubio, Ana M.; Harris, Tomika S.; Brooks, Lauren E.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 17-year-old Hispanic male with Arnold-Chiari Type 1 [AC-Type 1] with syringomyelia, status post decompression, who complains of exercise intolerance, headaches, and fatigue with exertion. The patient was found to have diurnal hypercapnia and nocturnal alveolar hypoventilation. Cardiopulmonary testing revealed blunting of the ventilatory response to the rise in carbon dioxide (CO2) resulting in failure of the parallel correlation between increased CO2 levels and ventilation; the expected vertical relationship between PETCO2 and minute ventilation during exercise was replaced with an almost horizontal relationship. No new pathology of the brainstem was discovered by MRI or neurological evaluation to explain this phenomenon. The patient was placed on continuous noninvasive open ventilation (NIOV) during the day and CPAP at night for a period of 6 months. His pCO2 level decreased to normal limits and his symptoms improved; specifically, he experienced less headaches and fatigue during exercise. In this report, we describe the abnormal response to exercise that patients with AC-Type 1 could potentially experience, even after decompression, characterized by the impairment of ventilator response to hypercapnia during exertion, reflecting a complete loss of chemical influence on breathing with no evidence of abnormality in the corticospinal pathway. PMID:27418995

  20. Chiari-like Malformation.

    PubMed

    Loughin, Catherine A

    2016-03-01

    Chiari-like malformation is a condition of the craniocervical junction in which there is a mismatch of the structures of the caudal cranial fossa causing the cerebellum to herniate into the foramen magnum. This herniation can lead to fluid buildup in the spinal cord, also known as syringomyelia. Pain is the most common clinical sign followed by scratching. Other neurologic signs noted are facial nerve deficits, seizures, vestibular syndrome, ataxia, menace deficit, proprioceptive deficits, head tremor, temporal muscle atrophy, and multifocal central nervous system signs. MRI is the diagnostic of choice, but computed tomography can also be used.

  1. Posterior fossa decompression combined with resection of the cerebellomedullary fissure membrane and expansile duraplasty: a radical and rational surgical treatment for Arnold-Chiari type I malformation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chen Jian; Dong, Qiu Jian; Xing, You Heng; Shan, Ma; Wen, Lian Xiao; Qiang, Zhong Yuan; Ping, Zhang Qing; Tao, Peng Zhi; Ping, Huang Xiao

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to introduce a new surgical procedure for the treatment of Arnold-Chiari type I malformation (ACM-1) and to compare its effectiveness with the techniques described in previous studies. We performed the following procedures: foramen magnum decompression combined with the removal of both the atlanto-occipital membrane, extended resection of the cerebellomedullary fissure arachnoid membrane, and artificial duraplasty to enlarge the membranic posterior fossa without resecting the cerebellar tonsils and syringosubarachnoid shunting. There were 21 ACM-1 patients: 12 cases had osteo-compression on the cerebellar hemisphere, 18 cases had thickened adhered fabric ring that stretched from arachnoid membrane to cerebellar hemisphere, and 15 cases with syringomyelia. The patients were followed up for 6 months to 3 years after the surgery. All patients showed a remarkable recovery of syringomyelia. There were no morbidity or death related to the surgery. Most of ACM-1 patients, the osteo- and membrane compression on cerebellar hemisphere and tonsil were observed during the operation. Therefore, decompression of foramen magnum and posterior craniocervical combined with the removal of cerebellomedullary fissure arachnoid membrane and placement of an artificial dural graft should be considered as a comprehensive option of minimally invasive surgery and rational and radical treatment of ACM-1. Our experience showed that, by using our procedure, shunting becomes no longer necessary in the treatment of ACM-1-associated syringomyelia.

  2. Chiropractic Care for Headaches and Dizziness of a 34-Year-Old Woman Previously Diagnosed With Arnold-Chiari Malformation Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Sergent, Adam W.; Cofano, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the chiropractic care of a patient with headaches and dizziness. Clinical Features A 34-year-old woman with a history of headaches, dizziness, photophobia, and temporary loss of vision aggravated by postural positions while bending forward sought conservative care for her symptoms. She reported a prior diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari malformation (ACM) type 1 by magnetic resonance imaging in 2005 that revealed descending cerebellar tonsils measured at 5 mm with an impression of ACM type 1. A new magnetic resonance image taken in 2013 indicated the cerebellar tonsils measured at 3 mm and did not project through the plane of the foramen magnum. The diagnosis of ACM type 1 was no longer applicable; however, the signs and symptoms of ACM type 1 persisted. Intervention and Outcome She was treated using cervical chiropractic manipulation using diversified technique. The dizziness and headache were resolved after 3 visits. At her 3-month follow-up, she continued to be symptom-free. Conclusion A patient with headaches and dizziness and a previous diagnosis of ACM type 1 responded positively to chiropractic care. PMID:25225468

  3. [Autonomic nervous system disorders in 230 cases of basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari deformity].

    PubMed

    da Silva, J A; Brito, J C; da Nóbrega, P V

    1992-11-01

    Within the period of 1971 to 1989 we operated on 230 cases of craniocervical malformations characterised by 189 cases of basilar impression associated with Arnold-chiari malformation, 28 cases of isolated basilar impression and 13 cases of Arnold-Chiari malformation. Autonomic disturbance was observed in 136 (59.1%) cases: sexual disorders like reduced potency and impotency were observed in 86 (60.9%) out of 141 male patients, urinary symptoms in 39 (17%) patients; and other autonomic features like dyspnea, anhidrosis, hyperhidrosis, Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome and constipation in 41 (17.8%) patients.

  4. [Compression of the inferior cerebellar artery-induced compression of the medulla oblongata in Arnold-Chiari malformation as a cause of essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Makhmudov, U V; Salalykin, V I; Shimanskiĭ, V N; Taniashin, S V; Sidorkin, D V

    2001-01-01

    Cerebrovascular abnormalities (primarily looping of cerebellar arteries) are almost without exception concurrent with the Arnold-Chiari syndrome and hydrocephalus. Persistent essential hypertension may be a manifestation of pathological vessel-brain contact. Customary microvascular decompression may lead to blood pressure stabilization in the postoperative period for a long time. The paper presents a clinical case of a 52-year female patient with the Arnold-Chiari syndrome who underwent microvascular decompression of the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery at the level of the medulla oblongata. Surgical treatment regressed preoperative cerebellar, bulbar, and truncal symptoms, lowered blood pressure from 190/100 to 120/80 mm Hg, and stabilized it at this level.

  5. [Hemifacial spasm and basilar impression associated with Arnold-Chiari deformity. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Leal Filho, M B; Dias-Tosta, E; Allan, N; Said, P; Mendonça, J L; Henriques, F G

    1992-09-01

    The authors report a case of symptomatic basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation being presented as the first symptom of hemifacial spasm. The surgical treatment of the malformation resulted in improvement of the clinical manifestation with reduction of the hemifacial spasm. The need for the aetiological therapy for the hemifacial spasm is emphasized, before symptomatic treatment with botulinum toxin is tried.

  6. Chiari Malformation: Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... the tendency to ignore them by assigning their origin to Chiari. While Chiari is known to be associated in rare cases with serious heart and respiratory problems, it is not known to be associated with thyroid disease or diabetes. And, even if the Chiari patient ...

  7. Chiari Malformation: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... endorse any doctors, procedures, or products. © 2012 C&S Patient Education Foundation, ® Treatment Options Patients evaluated for Chiari-like ... when there is a significant syrinx © 2012 C&S Patient Education Foundation, ® This presentation is for informational purposes, consult ...

  8. Consensus conference on Chiari: a malformation or an anomaly? Scoliosis and others orthopaedic deformities related to Chiari 1 malformation.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Luca F; Motta, Francesco

    2011-12-01

    In this article, we analysed the orthopaedic malformation in patients affected by Chiari I malformations as well as conservative or surgical treatment. The most common deformity in these patients is scoliosis. Different studies suggest a causal relation between syringomyelia and spinal deformities that differ by the type of deformities: asymptomatic scoliosis is characterized by a higher incidence of a single curve and convexity to the left, while symptomatic scoliosis is characterized by a double thoracolumbar curve. The conservative treatment with brace in these patients is not effective and scoliosis is typically evolutive. The evidence of the international data is that in patients without myelomeningocele or congenital scoliosis, but with Arnold Chiari I malformation and syringomyelia, suboccipital craniectomy gives the best chance for syrinx reduction and scoliosis improvement, particulary in children younger than 10 years and below a Cobb angle of 30°. The orthopaedic treatment in late decompression or in progressive curve is spine arthrodesis.

  9. Atypical presentations in Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Rath, G P; Bithal, P K; Chaturvedi, A

    2006-01-01

    Myelomeningocele with Chiari II malformation and hydrocephalus is a common association seen in infants with a congenital failure of neurulation. Here we report two cases of such an association presenting with different sets of problems. The first patient presented with severe inspiratory stridor due to bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis, which was relieved completely within 24 h of definitive surgery. The second patient experienced intraoperative cardiac arrest. Definitive surgery was followed after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The cause of the perioperative sequence of events in both cases is attributed to the associated pathologies of Chiari II malformation.

  10. Chiari I Malformation in Nephropathic Cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Kavya I; Hesselink, John; Trauner, Doris A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the relative incidence of Chiari I malformations in children with cystinosis compared with those in the general population. Study design Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed on 53 patients with nephropathic cystinosis and 120 controls, age range 3-18 years. Results Ten of 53 (18.9%) cystinosis patients had Chiari I or tonsillar ectopia, and only 2 of 120 controls (1.6%) had a similar finding. At least 2 of the patients had symptoms or signs thought to be related to the malformation, and one had surgical decompression. Two had an associated cervical syrinx. Conclusions Children with cystinosis have a 12-fold higher prevalence of Chiari I malformations than the general pediatric population. Chiari I malformations should be high on the differential diagnosis when individuals with cystinosis develop neurologic signs and symptoms, and MRI scans should be performed on children with cystinosis who present with new-onset headache, ataxia, incontinence, or other unexplained neurologic symptoms. PMID:26265281

  11. Chiari Type I malformation presenting with bilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Dolgun, Habibullah; Turkoglu, Erhan; Kertmen, Hayri; Yilmaz, Erdal R; Sekerci, Zeki

    2009-09-01

    Chiari Type I malformations can present with several clinical signs and symptoms. We describe a 44-year-old female patient presenting with bilateral hearing loss with hydrocephalus coexisting with Chiari Type I malformation and a unilateral arachnoid cyst. Thus, sensorineural hearing loss may be caused by hydrocephalus with Chiari Type I malformation. The placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt without a posterior fossa decompression is an effective treatment.

  12. Pathogenesis and Cerebrospinal Fluid Hydrodynamics of the Chiari I Malformation.

    PubMed

    Buell, Thomas J; Heiss, John D; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-10-01

    This article summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the Chiari I malformation that is based on observations of the anatomy visualized by modern imaging with MRI and prospective studies of the physiology of patients before and after surgery. The pathogenesis of a Chiari I malformation of the cerebellar tonsils is grouped into 4 general mechanisms.

  13. Chiari-I malformation in two fighter pilots.

    PubMed

    Akin, Ahmet; Canakci, Zafer; Sen, Ahmet; Tore, Hasan F

    2003-07-01

    This report describes two cases of Chiari Malformation Type I (Chiari-I) in fighter pilots of the Turkish Air Force. Chiari-I is a congenital malformation characterized by herniation of cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. Patients have symptoms and signs related to dysfunction of the brainstem, spinal cord, and cerebellum. They generally are symptomatic in the earlier years of life. However, asymptomatic cases can eventually become symptomatic in later years. Symptoms can be provoked by increasing intracranial pressure (Valsalva or straining). We report on two pilots with Chiari-I malformation who had no symptoms or signs in their daily activities. Furthermore, these pilots had successfully completed physiological training, including centrifuge training, without any symptoms. However, they suffered from headache, neck spasms, and/or disequilibrium under +Gz during flight training sorties. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, possibility of acquired cases, and aeromedical disposition of Chiari malformations are discussed.

  14. [Brainstem auditory evoked potentials and somatosensory evoked potentials in Chiari malformation].

    PubMed

    Moncho, Dulce; Poca, María A; Minoves, Teresa; Ferré, Alejandro; Rahnama, Kimia; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2013-06-16

    Introduccion. La malformacion de Chiari (MC) incluye una serie de anomalias congenitas que tienen como comun denominador la ectopia de las amigdalas del cerebelo por debajo del foramen magno, lo que puede condicionar fenomenos compresivos del troncoencefalo, la medula espinal alta y los nervios craneales, alterando las respuestas de los potenciales evocados auditivos del tronco cerebral (PEATC) y de los potenciales evocados somatosensoriales (PESS). Sin embargo, las indicaciones de ambas exploraciones en las MC han sido motivo de estudio en un numero limitado de publicaciones, centradas en series cortas y heterogeneas de pacientes. Objetivo. Revisar los hallazgos de los PEATC y los PESS en los estudios publicados en pacientes con MC tipo 1 (MC-1) o tipo 2 (MC-2), y su indicacion en el diagnostico, tratamiento y seguimiento, especialmente en la MC-1. Desarrollo. Es un estudio de revision realizado mediante analisis de los estudios publicados en Medline desde 1966, localizados mediante PubMed, utilizando combinaciones de las palabras clave 'Chiari malformation', 'Arnold-Chiari malformation', 'Chiari type 1 malformation', 'Arnold-Chiari type 1 malformation', 'evoked potentials', 'brainstem auditory evoked potentials' y 'somatosensory evoked potentials', asi como informacion de pacientes con MC-1 valorados en los servicios de neurocirugia y neurofisiologia clinica del Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron. Conclusiones. Los hallazgos mas comunes de los PESS son la reduccion en la amplitud cortical para el nervio tibial posterior, la reduccion o ausencia del potencial cervical del nervio mediano y el aumento del intervalo N13-N20. En el caso de los PEATC, los hallazgos mas frecuentes descritos son el aumento del intervalo I-V y la alteracion periferica o coclear.

  15. Stenogyria - not only in Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika; Duczkowska, Agnieszka; Brągoszewska, Hanna; Duczkowski, Marek; Mierzewska, Hanna

    2014-12-15

    Stenogyria, meaning multiple small compacted gyri separated by shallow sulci, is reported in the literature in association with Chiari II malformation (CM II) which in turn is reported in association with myelomeningocele (MMC). The authors present five cases of stenogyria (and other abnormalities found in CM II, like callosal hypoplasia/dysplasia, agenesis of the anterior commissure, hypoplasia of the falx cerebri) in children without the history of MMC or any other form of open spinal dysraphism. In these cases stenogyria was associated with Chiari I malformation, rhombencephalosynapsis and spina bifida. Stenogyria, which is not a true neuronal migration disorder, should not be mistaken for polymicrogyria which is also present in CM II. It is histologically different from polymicrogyria because the cortex is normally organized. Also on MRI, the general sulcal pattern is preserved in stenogyria, while it is completely distorted in polymicrogyria. The authors conclude that features traditionally attributed to CM II, like stenogyria, occur not only in the population of patients with MMC as opposed to the widely accepted theory.

  16. [Postoperative complications in 139 cases of basilar impression and/or Arnold-Chiari deformity].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves da Silva, J A; Gonçalves da Silva, C E

    1981-09-01

    The many kinds of complication that have been observed following operations of basilar impression and/or malformation of Arnold-Chiari are analysed. Two surgical techniques were adopted in the treatment of the patients. In the first 64 cases, the operation consisted in the craniectomy of the posterior fossa and high cervical laminectomy, while the dura-mater remained opened and saturated to the lateral musculature. Concerning the other 75 cases, it was made a plastic of the dura-mater of the posterior fossa and, in most of the cases, the patients were intubated with no retroflexion of the head and operated in sitting position without anterior flexion of the head. In the second group of patients, it was observed lesser occurrence of complications and death.

  17. Type I Chiari malformation presenting central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takuro; Miyazaki, Soichiro; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Takashi; Okawa, Masako; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Komada, Ichiro; Hatano, Taketo; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Sleep apnea is a rare but a well-known clinical feature of type I Chiari malformation. It may be obstructive or central in nature. Sleep apnea in patients with type I Chiari malformation rarely presents without accompanying neurological signs or symptoms. We here report a case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with central sleep apnea without any other neurological signs but was ultimately diagnosed with type I Chiari malformation. The patient initially showed mild improvement in symptoms after administration of an acetazolamide. Finally, posterior fossa decompression dramatically improved her respiratory status during sleep, both clinically and on polysomnography. This case suggests that type I Chiari malformation should be considered in the differential diagnoses of central apneas in children, even if there are no other neurological signs and symptoms. Furthermore, sagittal craniocervical magnetic resonance imaging may be necessary for a definitive diagnosis.

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of Chiari malformation with syringomyelia in the second trimester.

    PubMed

    Iruretagoyena, Jesus Igor; Trampe, Barbara; Shah, Dinesh

    2010-02-01

    Routine anatomic ultrasound performed in the second trimester has a detection rate of approximately 70-90% for fetal congenital abnormalities (Nyberg and Souter, J Ultrasound Med 2001;6:655-674). The central nervous system abnormalities are one of the most common ones detected. Chiari malformation is among the CNS abnormalities diagnosed in the fetal period (Bianchi et al., Fetology - diagnosis and management of the fetal patient, McGraw-Hill, 2000). The Arnold-Chiari malformation was first described in 1883 by Cleland (Romero et al., Prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies, Appleton and Lange, 1988). It is characterised by the prolapse of the hindbrain structures below the level of the foramen magnum. It can be associated with skeletal abnormalities and neurological dysfunction. In type I, a lip of cerebellum is downwardly displaced with the tonsils, but the fourth ventricle remains in the posterior fossa. This condition may coexist with syringomyelia, which is a cyst formation on the cervical portion of the spinal cord (Creasy et al., Maternal fetal medicine principles and practice, 2004). We present a case where Chiari type 1 and syringomyelia detected at 18 weeks of gestation. The reason for referral to our center was an abnormal inward posturing of both upper and lower extremities (minimal gross movement and almost inexistent range of motion on fetal joints). On further fetal evaluation, an abnormal brain ultrasound was identified. Prenatal diagnosis of Chiari type 1 malformation and syringomyelia is almost nonexistent when reviewing the literature is the reason why this case is presented.

  19. Sports participation with Chiari I malformation.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Geh, Ndi; Selzer, Béla J; Bower, Regina; Himedan, Mai; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with Chiari I malformation (CM-I). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with the imaging finding of CM-I. METHODS A prospective survey was administered to 503 CM-I patients at 2 sites over a 46-month period. Data were gathered on imaging characteristics, treatment, sports participation, and any sport-related injuries. Additionally, 81 patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry and were included in a prospective group, with a mean prospective follow-up period of 11 months. RESULTS Of the 503 CM-I patients, 328 participated in sports for a cumulative duration of 4641 seasons; 205 of these patients participated in contact sports. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. One patient had temporary extremity paresthesias that resolved within hours, and this was not definitely considered to be related to the CM-I. In the prospective cohort, there were no permanent neurological injuries. CONCLUSIONS No permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries were observed in CM-I patients participating in athletic activities. The authors believe that the risk of such injuries is low and that, in most cases, sports participation by children with CM-I is safe.

  20. [Type I Chiari malformation associated with cerebellar atrophy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Calderón-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Lee-Aguirre, Ángel; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Chiari malformation is characterized by caudal displacement of the cerebellar tonsils that penetrate into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum, achieving reach the atlas or axis. trunk and any drop of the fourth ventricle is observed. Typically is seen in young adults. In some cases scoliosis and Syringomyelic cavities may occur. The authors present (as far as they know) the first case in the literature with long term follow-up, of a caucasian woman with an unusual form of cerebellar atrophy and Chiari Type I malformation, suffering from weakness in his upper and lower extremities with rapidly progression. The patient was successfully treated with suboccipital decompression and C1 laminectomy.

  1. Chiari type 1 malformation in a pseudotumour cerebri patient: is it an acquired or congenital Chiari malformation?

    PubMed

    Istek, Seref

    2014-06-04

    Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1) is a developmental abnormality of the cerebellar tonsils. Patients with CM1 commonly present with headache. Papilloedema is rarely seen in CM1. However, a 52-year-old woman presented to the hospital with a headache and her ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral papilloedema. Her cranial MRI was compatible with borderline CM1. Bilateral papilloedema and headache suggested idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) as the preliminary diagnosis. IIH is a rare case in CM1. This article argues about this association and discusses as to whether it is an acquired or congenital Chiari malformation.

  2. Familial Aggregation of Chiari Malformation: Presentation, Pedigree, and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Laszlo; Mobley, James; Ray, Coby

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the largest familial aggregation of Chiari malformation in a single family to date as reported in the literature. This study is a retrospective case series of a family of whom five individuals have a confirmed case of Chiari malformation and three additional individuals have Chiari signs and symptoms. This contribution further supports the implication of genetics in the transmission of Chiari malformation. The family reported in this study also has a significant incidence of Ehlers-Danlos. Three sisters, including a set of twins, presented with confirmed cases of Chiari malformation and four of the five children of the twin sisters presented with confirmed or suspected Chiari malformation. Of note, the non-twin sister has three children who are unaffected. This report provides further evidence for a shared loci between the Chiari malformation and Ehlers-Danlos.

  3. Craniocervical spinal instability after type 1 Arnold Chiari decompression: a case report.

    PubMed

    Camino Willhuber, Gaston O; Bosio, Santiago T; Puigdevall, Miguel H; Halliburton, Carolina; Sola, Carlos A; Maenza, Ruben A

    2017-01-01

    To present and describe an unusual case of spinal instability after craniocervical spinal decompression for a type-1 Chiari malformation. Type-1 Chiari malformation is a craniocervical disorder characterized by tonsillar displacement greater than 5 mm into the vertebral canal; posterior fossa decompression is the most common surgical treatment for this condition. Postoperative complications have been described: cerebrospinal fluid leak, pseudomeningocele, aseptic meningitis, wound infection, and neurological deficit. However, instability after decompression is unusual. A 9-year-old female presented with symptomatic torticollis after cervical decompression for a type-1 Chiari malformation. Spinal instability was diagnosed; craniocervical stabilization was performed. After a 12-month follow-up, spinal stability was achieved, with a satisfactory clinical neck alignment. We present a craniocervical instability secondary to surgical decompression; clinical and radiological symptoms, and definitive treatment were described.

  4. Chiari I malformation as part of the Floating-Harbor syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kurzbuch, Arthur R; Magdum, Shailendra

    2016-12-01

    We report the first case of a patient diagnosed with Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) and Chiari I malformation. The 3-year-old girl was of proportional short stature, had delay of language development, conductive hearing loss and a high threshold of pain. Diagnosis of Chiari I malformation may be difficult in FHS patients who present with communication problems. Clinicians following patients with FHS should be aware of a possible relation between FHS and Chiari I malformation.

  5. Autism Spectrum Disorder and Chiari 1 Malformation Co-occurring in a Child.

    PubMed

    Osuagwu, Ferdnand C; Amalraj, Benedict; Noveloso, Bernard D; Aikoye, Salisu A; Bradley, Ronald

    2016-03-20

    Very few studies have shown associations between autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and Chiari 1 malformation. Here, we report an 10-year-old male that presented after having seizures with a history of Chiari 1 malformation, autism spectrum disorder and ADHD with moderate mental retardation and speech delay. This case highlights the fact that autism spectrum disorder as biologically based neurodevelopmental disorder with altered brain growth may be associated with Chiari 1 malformation and ADHD.

  6. Headache and Chiari I Malformation in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Victorio, M Cristina; Khoury, Chaouki K

    2016-02-01

    Headache is a common problem in children and adolescents. Its recurrent and disabling nature may lead to use of neuroimaging to exclude secondary causes of headache such as Chiari I malformation (CM I). CM I has a variety of presentation with headache being the most common symptom. CM I can be asymptomatic and is also often found incidentally in neuroimaging done for conditions other than headache. This article reviews the spectrum of headache in patients with CM I.

  7. Chiari type I malformation, syncope, headache, hypoglycemia and hepatic steatosis in an 8-year old girl: a causal association?

    PubMed Central

    Tarani, Luigi; Del Balzo, Francesca; Costantino, Francesco; Properzi, Enrico; D’Eufemia, Patrizia; Liberati, Natascia; Spalice, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Chiari type I malformation (CMI) is a congenital hindbrain anomaly characterized by downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. Chiari type I malformation often presents with a complex clinical picture and can be sporadic or linked to a variety of genetic conditions. We report on a girl in whom Chiari type I malformation was associated with hypoglycemia, headache, vertigo, syncope and hepatic steatosis. We hypothesize that these symptoms are primarily a consequence of Chiari type I malformation. PMID:21589844

  8. Isolated unilateral trismus as a presentation of Chiari malformation: case report.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Michelle; Babington, Parker; Sood, Shawn; Keating, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The authors present a case of Chiari malformation manifesting as isolated trismus, describe the typical symptoms associated with Chiari malformation, and discuss the potential anatomical causes for this unique presentation. A 3-year-old boy presented with inability to open his jaw for 6 weeks with associated significant weight loss. The results of medical and radiological evaluation were negative except for Type I Chiari malformation with cerebellar tonsils 12 mm below the level of the foramen magnum. The patient underwent Chiari decompression surgery. Postoperatively, his ability to open his mouth was significantly improved, allowing resumption of a regular diet. Postoperative MRI revealed almost complete resolution of the syringobulbia. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of isolated trismus from Chiari malformation with syringobulbia.

  9. Definitions and Anatomic Considerations in Chiari I Malformation and Associated Syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane

    2015-10-01

    Current understanding of the hindbrain hernias known as Chiari I malformations is based on more than 100 years of pathologic and clinical experience. Over time, the definition of this finding has been analyzed and altered. The term Chiari I malformation is currently used to describe tonsillar ectopia in a wide range of patients with varying embryonic derailments. This article discusses this malformation, its various definitions, and varied anatomic traits. In addition, the morphology of the commonly associated syringomyelia is reviewed.

  10. A rare course of scoliosis associated with Chiari malformation and syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Arataki, Shinya; Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Spinal deformity is an important clinical manifestation of Chiari I malformation (CM-I) and syringomyelia. Here we report the result of an 8-year follow-up of a 13-year-old girl with severe scoliosis associated with Chiari malformation and a large syringomyelia. The patient presented at our hospital at the age of 13 with a 68° scoliosis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed Chiari malformation and a large syringomyelia. Neurosurgical treatment involved foramen magnum decompression and partial C1 laminectomy, but the scoliosis still progressed. We present the first case report of a rare course of scoliosis in a patient with CM-I and a large syringomyelia.

  11. Ethical Implications of an Incidentally Discovered Asymptomatic Chiari Malformation in a Competitive Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Illes, Judy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clinical and ethical implications of an asymptomatic 17-year-old competitive football player incidentally found to have a type 1 Chiari malformation without a syrinx on brain imaging are discussed. Considering that patients with Chiari malformations can sustain irreversible neurologic injury or death after a mild head injury, and given the lack of data describing the risk of catastrophic injury after head trauma, the ethics of clearing this athlete to return to play are reviewed. PMID:25470168

  12. Intracranial Hypertension in a Patient with a Chiari Malformation Accompanied by Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-01-01

    The Chiari malformation is an infrequently detected congenital anomaly characterized by the downward displacement of the cerebellum with a tonsillar herniation below the foramen magnum that may be accompanied by either syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. Surgery, such as foramen magnum decompression, is indicated for a symptomatic Chiari malformation, although an incidental lesion may be followed-up without further treatment. Infrequently, increased intracranial pressure emerges due to hyperthyroidism. A nineteen-year-old girl visited our outpatient clinic presented with a headache, nausea and vomiting. A brain and spinal magnetic resonance image study (MRI) indicated that the patient had a Chiari I malformation without syringomyelia or hydrocephalus. An enlarged thyroid gland was detected on a physical examination, and serum markers indicated Graves' disease. The patient started anti-hyperthyroid medical treatment. Subsequently, the headache disappeared after the medical treatment of hyperthyroidism without surgical intervention for the Chiari malformation. A symptomatic Chiari malformation is indicated for surgery, but a surgeon should investigate other potential causes of the symptoms of the Chiari malformation to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26512271

  13. The Chiari Severity Index: A Preoperative Grading System for Chiari Malformation Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jacob K; Yarbrough, Chester K; Radmanesh, Alireza; Godzik, Jakub; Yu, Megan; Jeffe, Donna B; Smyth, Matthew D; Park, Tae Sung; Piccirillo, Jay F; Limbrick, David D

    2014-01-01

    Background To develop evidence-based treatment guidelines for Chiari Malformation Type 1 (CM-1), preoperative prognostic indices capable of stratifying patients for comparative trials are needed. Objective To develop a preoperative Chiari Severity Index (CSI) integrating the clinical and neuroimaging features most predictive of long-term patient-defined improvement in quality of life (QOL) after CM-1 surgery. Methods We recorded preoperative clinical (e.g. headaches, myelopathic symptoms) and neuroimaging (e.g. syrinx size, tonsillar descent) characteristics. Brief follow-up surveys were administered to assess overall patient-defined improvement in QOL. We used sequential sequestration to develop clinical and neuroimaging grading systems and conjunctive consolidation to integrate these indices to form the CSI. We evaluated statistical significance using the Cochran-Armitage test and discrimination using the c-statistic. Results Our sample included 158 patients. Sequential sequestration identified headache characteristics and myelopathic symptoms as the most impactful clinical parameters, producing a clinical grading system with improvement rates ranging from 81% (grade 1) to 58% (grade 3) (p=0.01). Based on sequential sequestration, the neuroimaging grading system included only the presence (55% improvement) or absence (74% improvement) of a syrinx ≥ 6 mm (p=0.049). Integrating the clinical and neuroimaging indices, improvement rates for the CSI ranged from 83% (grade 1) to 45% (grade 3) (p=0.002). The combined CSI had moderately better discrimination (c=0.66) than the clinical (c=0.62) or neuroimaging (c=0.58) systems alone. Conclusion Integrating clinical and neuroimaging characteristics, the CSI is a novel tool that predicts patient-defined improvement following CM-1 surgery. The CSI may aid preoperative counseling and stratify patients in comparative effectiveness trials. PMID:25584956

  14. MRI findings and sleep apnea in children with Chiari I malformation.

    PubMed

    Khatwa, Umakanth; Ramgopal, Sriram; Mylavarapu, Alexander; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Smith, Edward; Proctor, Mark; Scott, Michael; Pai, Vidya; Zarowski, Marcin; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2013-04-01

    Chiari I malformation is characterized by downward herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. Scant data are available on the clinical course, relationship to the extent of herniation on magnetic resonance imaging in Chiari I malformation and the presence of sleep-disordered breathing on polysomnography. Retrospective analysis was performed looking at polysomnographic findings of children diagnosed with Chiari I malformation. Details on how Chiari I malformation was diagnosed, brainstem magnetic resonance imaging findings, and indications for obtaining the polysomnogram in these patients were reviewed. We also reviewed available data on children who had decompression surgery followed by postoperative polysomnography findings. Twenty-two children were identified in our study (11 males, median age 10 years, range 1 to 18). Three had central sleep apnea, five had obstructive sleep apnea, and one had both obstructive and central sleep apnea. Children with sleep-disordered breathing had excessive crowding of the brainstem structures at the foramen magnum and were more likely to have a greater length of herniation compared with those children without sleep-disordered breathing (P = 0.046). Patients with central sleep apneas received surgical decompression, and their conditions were significantly improved on follow-up polysomnography. These data suggest that imaging parameters may correlate with the presence of sleep-disordered breathing in children with Chiari I malformation.

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography in Patients with Chiari I Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Perrini, Paolo; Miccoli, Mario; Baggiani, Angelo; Nardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims. To evaluate optic nerve head with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) in patients with Chiari I malformation (CMI) compared to healthy controls. Methods. Cross-sectional study. OCT of the optic nerve head of 22 patients with CMI and 22 healthy controls was quantitatively analyzed. The healthy controls were matched for age and sex with the study population. Mean retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness was calculated for both eyes; the mean thickness value was also registered for each quadrant and for each subfield of the four quadrants. Results. CMI patients showed a reduction of the RNFL thickness in both eyes. This reduction was more statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the inferior quadrant in the right eye and in each quadrant than nasal one in the left eye. Conclusion. A distress of the retinal nerve fibers could explain the observed reduction of the RNFL thickness in patients with CMI; in our series the reduction of the RNFL thickness seems lower when CMI is associated with syringomyelia. PMID:25815335

  16. Intradiploic occipital pseudomeningocele in a patient with remote history of surgical treatment of Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Mahaney, Kelly B; Menezes, Arnold H

    2014-11-01

    An intradiploic CSF pseudocyst is a rare entity that has been described in association with trauma, as a sequela of untreated hydrocephalus, or occasionally as a congenital finding in older adults. The authors present the case of a woman with a remote history of a posterior fossa intradural procedure, in which she underwent Chiari malformation decompression, Silastic substitute-assisted duraplasty, and occipitocervical fusion; she presented 19 years later with recurrent symptoms of Chiari malformation. She was found to have an occipital intradiploic pseudomeningocele, arising within her dorsal occipitocervical fusion mass and resulting in dorsal hindbrain compression. She underwent a posterior fossa decompression and revision of her failed duraplasty, and she had a good recovery. This case demonstrates intradiploic CSF pseudomeningocele as a rare potential delayed complication of an intradural procedure for the treatment of Chiari malformation with occipitocervical fusion.

  17. The Risk of Athletes with Chiari Malformations Suffering Catastrophic Injuries during Sports Participation is Low

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, William P.; Jordaan, Marc; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Carew, Liz; Mannix, Rebekah C.; Proctor, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the risk of athletes with Chiari malformations sustaining a catastrophic injury. Design Retrospective, descriptive cohort study. Participants All patients diagnosed with Chiari malformation at our institution between June 2008 and November 2011. Assessment of Risk Factors Participants were mailed a questionnaire regarding the number of seasons they participated in organized athletics. Magnetic resonance images were reviewed to describe the characteristics of respondent’s Chiari malformations. Main Outcome Measures Whether or not the patient had sustained an injury resulting in death, coma, or paralysis. Results We had a 53% (N=147) response rate. Respondents were a mean age of 15 years (SD 2 years) at the time of diagnosis. The mean length of protrusion of the cerebellar tonsils below the foramen magnum was 11.2mm (SD 5.7mm). The majority of respondents had pointed cerebellar tonsils and some degree of crowding within the foramen magnum. During a total of 1,627 athletic seasons played by patients with Chiari malformation, 0 respondents (95% CI 0.0000, 0.0023) sustained an injury resulting in death, coma or paralysis. Likewise, during 191 collision sport athletic seasons, 0 (95% CI 0.0000, 0.0191) respondents sustained an injury resulting in death, coma or paralysis. Conclusions The risk of athletes with Chiari malformations suffering catastrophic injuries during sports participation is low. This estimate of risk should be considered when making return-to-play decisions. Given the variability of anatomical consideration for patients with Chiari malformations, however, each return-to-play decision must continue to be made on a case-by-case basis, considering all of the available information. PMID:24905537

  18. Stereological and Morphometric Analysis of MRI Chiari Malformation Type-1

    PubMed Central

    Alkoç, Ozan Alper; Songur, Ahmet; Eser, Olcay; Toktas, Muhsin; Esi, Ertap; Haktanir, Alpay

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to investigate the underlying ethiological factors in chiari malformation (CM) type-I (CMI) via performing volumetric and morphometric length-angle measurements. Methods A total of 66 individuals [33 patients (20-65 years) with CMI and 33 control subjects] were included in this study. In sagittal MR images, tonsillar herniation length and concurrent anomalies were evaluated. Supratentorial, infratentorial, and total intracranial volumes were measured using Cavalieri method. Various cranial distances and angles were used to evaluate the platybasia and posterior cranial fossa (PCF) development. Results Tonsillar herniation length was measured 9.09±3.39 mm below foramen magnum in CM group. Tonsillar herniation/concurrent syringomyelia, concavity/defect of clivus, herniation of bulbus and fourth ventricle, basilar invagination and craniovertebral junction abnormality rates were 30.3, 27, 18, 2, 3, and 3 percent, respectively. Absence of cisterna magna was encountered in 87.9% of the patients. Total, IT and ST volumes and distance between Chamberlain line and tip of dens axis, Klaus index, clivus length, distance between internal occipital protuberance and opisthion were significantly decreased in patient group. Also in patient group, it was found that Welcher basal angle/Boogard angle increased and tentorial slope angle decreased. Conclusion Mean cranial volume and length-angle measurement values significantly decreased and there was a congenital abnormality association in nearly 81.5 percent of the CM cases. As a result, it was concluded that CM ethiology can be attributed to multifactorial causes. Moreover, congenital defects can also give rise to this condition. PMID:26713146

  19. Surgical treatment of Chiari I malformation complicated with syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    BAO, CHANGSHUN; YANG, FUBING; LIU, LIANG; WANG, BING; LI, DINGJUN; GU, YINGJIANG; ZHANG, SHULING; CHEN, LIGANG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the curative effects of various surgical procedures on Chiari I malformation (CMI) complicated with syringomyelia. A total of 185 patients with CMI complicated with syringomyelia who received treatment between January 1997 and December 2011 were recruited. All patients underwent posterior fossa decompression in which the lamina of the first cervical vertebra was removed, with the removal of the second or third depending on the severity of the cerebellar tonsil herniation. Of the patients, 76 underwent large-bone-window decompression and duraplasty, while 109 underwent small-bone-window decompression, displaced cerebellar tonsil resection and duraplasty. The curative effects of the different surgical procedures were analyzed retrospectively. Clinical symptoms were eliminated or improved in 156 patients (84.3%) by the time of discharge from hospital. A total of 148 patients were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which revealed that the cisterna magna was reconstructed in 92 patients and spinal syrinx was reduced in 75. Follow-up was performed on 147 patients (79.5%) for between 3 months and 12 years. During the follow-up, symptoms were eliminated or improved in 110 patients (74.8%), not improved in 26 (17.7%) and deteriorated in 11 (7.5%). MRI was performed on 95 patients during follow-up examinations and the cisterna magna was reconstructed in 87 patients and spinal syrinx was reduced in 79. Small-bone-window decompression plus duraplasty is an effective surgical procedure for treating CMI complicated with syringomyelia and intraoperative cerebellar tonsillectomy significantly aids patient recovery. PMID:23251294

  20. Surgical Outcome of Adult Idiopathic Chiari Malformation Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Yuh, Woon Tak; Kim, Chi Heon; Kim, Hyun-Jib; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Park, Sung Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objective The pathophysiology of idiopathic Chiari malformation (CM) type 1 is disturbance of free cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow and restoration of normal CSF flow is the mainstay of treatment. Additional migration of the medulla oblongata in pediatric patients is referred to as CM type 1.5, but its significance in adult patients is unknown. This study is to compare surgical outcomes of adult idiopathic CM type 1.5 with that of type 1. Methods Thirty-eight consecutive adult patients (M : F=11 : 27; median, 33.5; range, 18–63) with syringomyelia due to idiopathic CM type 1 were reviewed. Migration of the medulla oblongata was noted in 13 patients. The modified McCormick scale (MMS) was used to evaluate functional status before and one year after surgery. All patients underwent foramen magnum decompression and duroplasty. Factors related to radiological success (≥50% decrease in the diameter of the syrinx) were investigated. The follow-up period was 72.7±55.6 months. Results Preoperative functional status were MMS I in 11 patients and MMS II in 14 of CM type 1 and MMS I in 8 and II in 5 of CM type 1.5. Of patients with MMS II, 5/14 patients in group A and 3/5 patients in group B showed improvement and there was no case of deterioration. Radiological success was achieved in 32 (84%) patients and restoration of the cisterna magna (p=0.01; OR, 46.5) was the only significant factor. Conclusion Migration of the medulla oblongata did not make a difference in the surgical outcome when the cisterna magna was restored. PMID:27651871

  1. Chiari Type I Malformations in Young Adults: Implications for the College Health Practitioner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Mary Jane; Vaughn, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe 2 cases of Chiari type I malformation (CM-I) in students presenting to a college health center within a 6-month period. A review of CM-I, including epidemiology, typical presentation, evaluation, and management, is followed by a discussion of the clinical and functional implications of the disorder in an…

  2. Acquired Chiari malformation secondary to atlantoaxial vertical subluxation in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis combined with atlanto-occipital assimilation.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuiko; Seichi, Atsushi; Gomi, Akira; Kojima, Masahiro; Inoue, Hirokazu; Kimura, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman with a history of rheumatoid arthritis presented with a rare case of acquired Chiari malformation secondary to atlantoaxial vertical subluxation, associated with congenital atlanto-occipital assimilation. Syringomyelia and tetraparesis improved immediately after posterior fossa decompression and simultaneous occipito-cervical junction fusion. The progression of acquired Chiari malformation is not well known. We concluded that coexisting assimilation accelerated crowded foramen magnum following atlantoaxial vertical subluxation and induced acquired Chiari malformation over the course of a few years.

  3. Transoral decompression evaluated by cine-mode magnetic resonance imaging: a case of basilar impression accompanied by Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, T; Koshu, K; Ogawa, A; Yoshimoto, T

    1991-06-01

    Cine-mode magnetic resonance imaging provides simultaneous images of cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics. A patient with a basilar impression accompanied by a Chiari malformation and von Recklinghausen's disease who underwent transoral decompression is reported. Preoperative cine-mode magnetic resonance imaging visualized an associated obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile flow at the level of the foramen magnum. Tonsilar herniation (Chiari I malformation) and hydrocephalus were also present. Postoperatively, the obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid flow was resolved concomitant with the correction of the cervicomedullary angulation. On the basis of observations made by magnetic resonance imaging, the surgical treatment of basilar impression accompanied by Chiari malformation is briefly discussed.

  4. Malformations of the craniocervical junction (chiari type I and syringomyelia: classification, diagnosis and treatment)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Chiari disease (or malformation) is in general a congenital condition characterized by an anatomic defect of the base of the skull, in which the cerebellum and brain stem herniate through the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal canal. The onset of Chiari syndrome symptoms usually occurs in the second or third decade (age 25 to 45 years). Symptoms may vary between periods of exacerbation and remission. The diagnosis of Chiari type I malformation in patients with or without symptoms is established with neuroimaging techniques. The most effective therapy for patients with Chiari type I malformation/syringomyelia is surgical decompression of the foramen magnum, however there are non-surgical therapy to relieve neurophatic pain: either pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Pharmacological therapy use drugs that act on different components of pain. Non-pharmacological therapies are primarly based on spinal or peripheral electrical stimulation. It is important to determine the needs of the patients in terms of health-care, social, educational, occupational, and relationship issues, in addition to those derived from information aspects, particularly at onset of symptoms. Currently, there is no consensus among the specialists regarding the etiology of the disease or how to approach, monitor, follow-up, and treat the condition. It is necessary that the physicians involved in the care of people with this condition comprehensively approach the management and follow-up of the patients, and that they organize interdisciplinary teams including all the professionals that can help to increase the quality of life of patients. PMID:20018097

  5. Chiari I malformation associated with atlanto-occipital assimilation presenting as orthopnea and cough syncope.

    PubMed

    Mangubat, Erwin Zeta; Wilson, Tom; Mitchell, Brian A; Byrne, Richard W

    2014-02-01

    Although it is not uncommon for patients with Chiari I malformations to present with respiratory complaints, cough syncope is a rare presenting symptom. We report an adult patient who had both a Chiari I malformation and atlanto-occipital assimilation, and complained of cough syncope, orthopnea, and central sleep apnea. The patient underwent decompressive craniectomy of the posterior fossa and a cervical level 2 laminectomy. However, due to an initial under-appreciation of the profound narrowing of the foramen magnum as a result of these concomitant pathologies, the patient had continued impaired cerebrospinal fluid flow, leading to a symptomatic pseudomeningocele and required a more extensive decompression that included a cervical level 3 laminectomy as well as a temporary lumbar drain. On 2 year follow-up, he remained asymptomatic.

  6. Chiari malformation, cervical disc prolapse and syringomyelia--always think twice.

    PubMed

    Ball, Jonathon R; Little, Nicholas S

    2008-04-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old man with neck pain and parasthesia of both upper limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cervical disc protrusion with spinal cord compression, a Chiari I malformation and cervical syringomyelia. On clinical grounds it was suspected that the cervical stenosis was the symptomatic pathology and an anterior cervical decompression was performed, followed by arthroplasty. Post-operative imaging demonstrated adequate canal decompression, preserved cervical mobility and near-complete resolution of the syrinx. Syringomyelia has a multitude of causes and synchronous pathology can occur. Cervical spondylosis is infrequently associated with syringomyelia. Chiari I malformations are increasingly incidentally detected and asymptomatic. This first report of arthroplasty for cervical spondylosis associated with syringomyelia adds to the growing body of experience with this new technology.

  7. Spontaneous resolution of a Chiari I malformation associated syringomyelia in one child.

    PubMed

    Guillen, A; Costa, J M

    2004-02-01

    A child with complete spontaneous resolution of a Chiari I malformation associated Syringomyelia without surgical intervention is presented. The child was followed clinically by serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and remains neurologically stable after 8-years of follow-up. To our knowledge, only 6 pediatric cases with spontaneous resolution of a spinal cord syrinx documented by MRI without surgical intervention have been reported. This case is of interest in the light of the postulated theories to explain spontaneous resolution of syringomyelia.

  8. Concomitant achondroplasia and Chiari II malformation: A double-hit at the cervicomedullary junction

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Al-Wala; Aleck, Kyrieckos A; Bhardwaj, Ratan D

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of a neonate with concurrent Chiari II malformation and achondroplasia. Although rare, both these conditions contribute to several deleterious anatomical changes at the cervicomedullary junction and thus predispose to acute hydrocephalus. Although our patient was initially asymptomatic, hydrocephalus ensued several weeks after birth and required cerebral spinal fluid diversion. We discuss the potential links between the two conditions, the pathophysiology, and the important clinical implications for the management of the increased risk of hydrocephalus. PMID:25405196

  9. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid flow assessed using intraoperative MRI during posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Bond, Aaron E; Jane, John A; Liu, Kenneth C; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The authors completed a prospective, institutional review board-approved study using intraoperative MRI (iMRI) in patients undergoing posterior fossa decompression (PFD) for Chiari I malformation. The purpose of the study was to examine the utility of iMRI in determining when an adequate decompression had been performed. METHODS Patients with symptomatic Chiari I malformations with imaging findings of obstruction of the CSF space at the foramen magnum, with or without syringomyelia, were considered candidates for surgery. All patients underwent complete T1, T2, and cine MRI studies in the supine position preoperatively as a baseline. After the patient was placed prone with the neck flexed in position for surgery, iMRI was performed. The patient then underwent a bone decompression of the foramen magnum and arch of C-1, and the MRI was repeated. If obstruction was still present, then in a stepwise fashion the patient underwent dural splitting, duraplasty, and coagulation of the tonsils, with an iMRI study performed after each step guiding the decision to proceed further. RESULTS Eighteen patients underwent PFD for Chiari I malformations between November 2011 and February 2013; 15 prone preincision iMRIs were performed. Fourteen of these patients (93%) demonstrated significant improvement of CSF flow through the foramen magnum dorsal to the tonsils with positioning only. This improvement was so notable that changes in CSF flow as a result of the bone decompression were difficult to discern. CONCLUSIONS The authors observed significant CSF flow changes when simply positioning the patient for surgery. These results put into question intraoperative flow assessments that suggest adequate decompression by PFD, whether by iMRI or intraoperative ultrasound. The use of intraoperative imaging during PFD for Chiari I malformation, whether by ultrasound or iMRI, is limited by CSF flow dynamics across the foramen magnum that change significantly when the patient is

  10. Surgical management of Chiari I malformation based on different cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns at the cranial-vertebral junction.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tao; Zhao, HaiJun; Zhao, XinGang; Liang, Cong; Wang, YinQian; Gai, QiFei

    2017-02-09

    Chiari I malformation has been shown to present different cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow patterns at the cranial-vertebral junction (CVJ). Posterior fossa decompression is the first-line treatment for symptomatic Chiari I malformation. However, there is still controversy on the indication and selection of decompression procedures. This research aims to investigate the clinical indications, outcomes, and complications of the decompression procedures as alternative treatments for Chiari I malformation, based on the different CSF flow patterns at the cranial-vertebral junction. In this study, 126 Chiari I malformation patients treated with the two decompression procedures were analyzed. According to the preoperative findings obtained by using cine phase-contrast MRI (cine PC-MRI), the abnormal CSF flow dynamics at the CVJ in Chiari I malformation was classified into three patterns. After a preoperative evaluation and an intraoperative ultrasound after craniectomy, the two procedures were alternatively selected to treat the Chiari I malformation. The indication and selection of the two surgical procedures, as well as their outcomes and complications, are reported in detail in this work. Forty-eight patients underwent subdural decompression (SDD), and 78 received subarachnoid manipulation (SAM). Ninety patients were diagnosed as having Chiari I malformation with a syrinx. Two weeks after the operation, the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (mJOA) scores increased from the preoperative value of 10.67 ± 1.61 to 12.74 ± 2.01 (P < 0.01). The mean duration of follow-up was 24.8 months; the mJOA scores increased from the postoperative value of 12.74 ± 2.01 to 12.79 ± 1.91 at the end of follow-up (P = 0.48). More complications occurred in the patients who underwent SAM than in those who received SDD (SAM 11 of 78 (9.5%) vs SDD 2 of 48 (3.5%)). The abnormal CSF flow dynamics at the CVJ in Chiari I malformation can be classified into three patterns. A SAM

  11. [Oropharyngeal dysphagia associated with Chiari I malformation and syringomyelia J].

    PubMed

    Cortés-Medina, Julio César; Cárdenas-Lara, Armando; Guerrero-Rascón, Carlos Alberto; Rodríguez-Bautista, Heber

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: la disfagia con afección neurológica constituye un dato clínico significativo en el diagnóstico de lesiones que justifiquen la compresión del tronco cerebral y los nervios craneales bajos. Objetivo: destacar la importancia del estudio de la disfagia en una paciente con malformación de Chiari tipo I y siringomielia, sin síntomas gastroenterológicos primarios. Caso clínico: se comunica el caso de una mujer de 62 años de edad con disfagia orofaríngea de seis años de evolución, cervicobraquialgia, ptosis palpebral y diplejía facial. Conclusiones: el estudio por resonancia magnética constituye un elemento fundamental para establecer el diagnóstico causal de la disfagia neurogénica.

  12. The association of Chiari type III malformation and Klippel-Feil syndrome with mirror movement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Erol, Fatih Serhat; Ucler, Necati; Yakar, Huseyin

    2011-01-01

    Basically Chiari type III malformation is a combination of encephalocele with of brain stem and cerebellar abnormality. Although Klippel-Feil syndrome may be associated with other congenital anomalies, this syndrome is mainly associated with varying degrees of cervical vertebral fusion anomalies. In this study, we reported the association of Chiari type III malformation and Klippel-Feil syndrome with the mirror movement by imaging studies. The main involvement in Chiari type III malformation and Klippel-Feil syndrome is in the craniocervical junction. In such a small area, the emergence of these complex pathologies in our case was remarkable. Our patient had reconstruction surgery of the posterior fossa and his encephalocele was excised successfully. Hydrocephaly and/or deterioration in the functions of other posterior fossa structures have not been seen in the patient's follow-up.

  13. Hidden aqueductal stenosis associated to bilateral idiopathic foramina of Monro stenosis mimicking a Chiari I malformation? Case report.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Andrea; Ghinda, Cristina Diana; Radovanovic, Ivan; Momjian, Shahan

    2012-11-01

    A 39-year old man came to our outpatient clinic with long history of unspecific symptoms and signs. Cerebral MRI showed herniation of the cerebellar tonsils of more than 1 cm below the foramen magnum and a triventricular hydrocephalus. A diagnosis of Chiari I malformation was retained. After an osteo-dural decompression of the posterior fossa, post-operative MRI revealed an aqueductal stenosis with triventricular hydrocephalus. An endoscopic-third- ventriculostomy showed an idiopathic stenosis of the right foramen of Monro. Residual symptoms and persistence of biventricular hydrocephalus justified a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Aqueductal and foramina of Monro stenosis can mimick a Chiari I malformation.

  14. Mechanisms of cerebellar tonsil herniation in patients with Chiari malformations as guide to clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Misao; Kula, Roger W.; Dlugacz, Yosef D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of Chiari malformations is incompletely understood. We tested the hypothesis that different etiologies have different mechanisms of cerebellar tonsil herniation (CTH), as revealed by posterior cranial fossa (PCF) morphology. Methods In 741 patients with Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) and 11 patients with Chiari malformation type II (CM-II), the size of the occipital enchondrium and volume of the PCF (PCFV) were measured on reconstructed 2D-CT and MR images of the skull. Measurements were compared with those in 80 age- and sex-matched healthy control individuals, and the results were correlated with clinical findings. Results Significant reductions of PCF size and volume were present in 388 patients with classical CM-I, 11 patients with CM-II, and five patients with CM-I and craniosynostosis. Occipital bone size and PCFV were normal in 225 patients with CM-I and occipitoatlantoaxial joint instability, 55 patients with CM-I and tethered cord syndrome (TCS), 30 patients with CM-I and intracranial mass lesions, and 28 patients with CM-I and lumboperitoneal shunts. Ten patients had miscellaneous etiologies. The size and area of the foramen magnum were significantly smaller in patients with classical CM-I and CM-I occurring with craniosynostosis and significantly larger in patients with CM-II and CM-I occurring with TCS. Conclusions Important clues concerning the pathogenesis of CTH were provided by morphometric measurements of the PCF. When these assessments were correlated with etiological factors, the following causal mechanisms were suggested: (1) cranial constriction; (2) cranial settling; (3) spinal cord tethering; (4) intracranial hypertension; and (5) intraspinal hypotension. PMID:20440631

  15. Yawning as a presenting symptom of Chiari malformation Type I: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Zebian, Bassel; Hogg, Florence Rosie Avila; Fu, Richard Zhiming; Sivakumaran, Ramanan; Stapleton, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Yawning is thought to be a behavior regulated by the brainstem. Although excessive yawning has been reported in brainstem strokes, demyelination, and tumors, the cases presented here are the first reports of excessive yawning in patients with Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). The authors believe that brainstem compression at the craniocervical junction and ensuing edema were implicated in this curious symptomatology. They describe excessive yawning as a presenting feature of CM-I in 2 adolescent females. The presentation was acute in the first case and more chronic in the second. Both patients underwent foramen magnum decompression, which resulted in complete cessation of the excessive yawning.

  16. Paroxysmal hemicrania-tic and Chiari I malformation: an unusual association.

    PubMed

    Monzillo, P; Nemoto, P; Costa, A; Rocha, A J

    2007-12-01

    A 54 year-old female has a clinical diagnosis of chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH) according to IHS-criteria (2004) three years ago. Six months after that, she developed symptoms compatible with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) involving the second and third trigeminal territories also at the left side. Cranial and cervical spine resonance magnetic images showed extensive cervical syringomyelia that included nucleus caudalis (C2 level) region and a posterior fossa Chiari I malformation without hydrocephalus. The association between CPH and TN is called chronic paroxysmal hemicrania-tic syndrome (CPH-tic). This is the first clinical description of a secondary cause of CPH-tic syndrome in the literature.

  17. Formative evaluation of a World Wide Web-based Chiari malformation hypermedia program.

    PubMed

    Hough, B

    1997-01-01

    The interface design of a Chiari malformation hypermedia document was tested with formative evaluation, a type of usability testing. The evaluation tested six common interactive design features essential for the design of user-friendly interfaces: image, size, label highlighting, text presentation (scrolling vs. hyperlinks), color (text, visual material, and background), and button behavior. Six neurosurgical residents answered a questionnaire focusing on these interactive design features during the development of the hypermedia document. Over a period of two months, the responses to the questions and suggestions made by the volunteers were used to improve the six interactive design features for the specific target audience of Toronto Hospital, Western Division neurosurgical residents.

  18. Evidence of familial syringomyelia in discordant association with Chiari type I malformation.

    PubMed

    Robenek, M; Kloska, S P; Husstedt, I W

    2006-07-01

    We report a sister and two half brothers who presented with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-proven syringomyelia and associated Chiari type I malformation in two cases. The individuals have the same mother but two different fathers. The mother shows no clinical signs of syringomyelia. The two fathers died through unknown causes. In a third healthy son of the mother by a relationship with a third father syringomyelia was excluded by MRI. We believe that an autosomal-dominant predisposition is the primary factor in the appearance of syringomyelia in these cases.

  19. Type I Chiari malformation presenting orthostatic syncope who treated with decompressive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong A; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chiari malformations are a congenital anomaly of the hindbrain. The most common, Chiari malformation type I (CM-I), is characterized by herniation of the cerebellar tonsils extending at least 3 mm below the plane of the foramen magnum. Consequently, CM-I is associated with hydrocephalus and symptoms involving compression of the cervicomedullary junction by ectopic tonsils. Several studies have reported the clinical symptoms associated with CM-I, including suboccipital headache, weakness in the upper extremities, facial numbness, loss of temperature sensation, ataxia, diplopia, dysarthria, dysphagia, vomiting, vertigo, nystagmus, and tinnitus. Syncope is one of the rarest presentations in patients with CM-I. There are many hypotheses regarding the causes of syncope in patients with CM-I; however, the mechanisms are not clearly understood. Although surgical decompression for CM-I in patients with syncope has yielded good clinical results in some studies, such cases are rarely reported. We report a case of orthostatic syncope in a patient with CM-I who was treated with surgical intervention. PMID:28018469

  20. Syringomyelia with irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation, basilar invagination and Chiari I malformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenglin; Wang, Chao; Yan, Ming; Zhou, Haitao; Jiang, Liang

    2010-03-01

    A 27-year-old woman presented with bilateral weakness of her all extremities for 5 years. She had a spastic gait and was unable to ambulate without assistance. Neurologic examination revealed increased deep tendon reflexes and positive pathologic reflexes. Radiographs showed occipitalization of the atlas, C2-C3 congenital fusion and fixed atlantoaxial dislocation with an atlanto-dental interval of 10 mm. MRI demonstrated cervicomedullary junction (CMJ) compression from the odontoid, a Chiari type I malformation, and syringomyelia extending from the foramen magnum to C5. The patient underwent transoral atlantoaxial release followed by posterior internal fixation from the occiput to the axis, which resulted in a significant improvement in motor function in all extremities. Post-operative images showed anatomical reduction of the atlantoaxial joint. However, an MRI performed 8 days following surgery showed a new retro-odontoid pannus had developed that was compressing the spinal cord at CMJ. A follow-up CT scan performed at 6 months post-operatively demonstrated a solid bony fusion between the occiput and C2, while an MRI at that time showed complete resolution of the retro-odontoid soft tissue mass with correction of the Chiari I malformation, and resolution of the syringomyelia. Final follow-up at 2-years revealed an excellent clinical outcome.

  1. [An autopsy case of syringomyelia associated with Chiari malformation and basilar impression].

    PubMed

    Isu, T; Iwasaki, Y; Sasaki, H; Abe, H; Tashiro, K; Nakamura, N

    1987-06-01

    The authors report one autopsy case of syringomyelia associated with Chiari malformation and basilar impression. The pathogenesis of syringomyelia in our case is discussed. This 37-year-old man complained of progressive difficulty in swallowing and walking for two years. He had noticed dysarthria for six months before admission. (Examination) Neurological examination showed dysarthria, down beat nystagmus, disturbance of IXth nerve, Xth nerve and XIth nerve, and cerebellar ataxia. Deep tendon reflexes were hyperactive in the upper and lower extremities. Babinski's sign was positive bilaterally. Neuroradiological examination demonstrated basilar impression and Chiari malformation. (Operation) Suboccipital craniectomy and laminectomy of upper cervical vertebra were performed with dural plasty. Postoperatively he acquired some improvement, but soon after he was worse. He died of respiratory disturbance. (Postmortem examination) Though the central canal was obliterated at the C4 level, the syrinx extended from the C5 to Th7 level. From the C5 to C8, the syrinx was present in the areas of central gray matter, extending into the left dorsal horn, where it communicated with subarachnoid space. Furthermore, the abnormal vessels were noticeable around the syrinx. At the Th2 level, they were also shown in central grey matter where no syrinx existed. (Conclusion) The etiology of syringomyelia in our case was not explained by Gardner's hydrodynamic theory. We suggested that intramedullary abnormal vessels played an important part for the formation of the syringomyelia.

  2. Health-related quality of life in pediatric Chiari Type I malformation: the Chiari Health Index for Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Westrick, Ashly C; Wellons, John C; Shannon, Chevis N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The purpose of this study was to design and validate a patient-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instrument for pediatric Chiari Type I malformation (CM-I), the Chiari Health Index for Pediatrics (CHIP). METHODS The CHIP has 45 items with 4 components making up 2 domain scores, physical (pain frequency, pain severity, nonpain symptoms) and psychosocial; physical and psychosocial scores are combined to create an overall HRQOL score. Increasing scores (0 to 1) represent increasing HRQOL. Fifty-five patients with CM-I (mean age 12 ± 4 years, 53% male) were enrolled and completed the CHIP and Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3). Twenty-five healthy controls (mean age 11.9 ± 4 years, 40% male) also completed the CHIP. CHIP scores were compared between these groups via the Mann-Whitney U-test. For CHIP discriminative function, subscore versus presence of CM-I was compared via receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. CHIP scores in the CM-I group were stratified by symptomatology (asymptomatic, headaches, and paresthesias) and compared via Kruskal-Wallis test with Mann-Whitney U-test with Bonferroni correction (p < 0.0167). CHIP was compared with HUI3 (Health Utilities Index Mark 3) via univariate and multivariate linear regression. RESULTS CHIP physical and psychosocial subscores were, respectively, 24% and 18% lower in CM-I patients than in controls (p < 0.001); the overall HRQOL score was 23% lower as well (p < 0.001). The area under the curve (AUC) for CHIP physical subscore versus presence of CM-I was 0.809. CHIP physical subscore varied significantly with symptomatology (p = 0.001) and HUI3 pain-related quality of life (R(2) = 0.311, p < 0.001). The AUC for CHIP psychosocial subscore versus presence of CM-I was 0.754. CHIP psychosocial subscore varied significantly with HUI3 cognitive- (R(2) = 0.324, p < 0.001) and emotion-related (R(2) = 0.155, p = 0.003) quality of life. The AUC for CHIP HRQOL versus presence of CM-I was 0

  3. A unifying hypothesis for hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, anencephaly and spina bifida

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Helen

    2008-01-01

    This work is a modified version of the Casey Holter Memorial prize essay presented to the Society for Research into Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida, June 29th 2007, Heidelberg, Germany. It describes the origin and consequences of the Chiari malformation, and proposes that hydrocephalus is caused by inadequate central nervous system (CNS) venous drainage. A new hypothesis regarding the pathogenesis, anencephaly and spina bifida is described. Any volume increase in the central nervous system can increase venous pressure. This occurs because veins are compressible and a CNS volume increase may result in reduced venous blood flow. This has the potential to cause progressive increase in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume. Venous insufficiency may be caused by any disease that reduces space for venous volume. The flow of CSF has a beneficial effect on venous drainage. In health it moderates central nervous system pressure by moving between the head and spine. Conversely, obstruction to CSF flow causes localised pressure increases, which have an adverse effect on venous drainage. The Chiari malformation is associated with hindbrain herniation, which may be caused by low spinal pressure relative to cranial pressure. In these instances, there are hindbrain-related symptoms caused by cerebellar and brainstem compression. When spinal injury occurs as a result of a Chiari malformation, the primary pathology is posterior fossa hypoplasia, resulting in raised spinal pressure. The small posterior fossa prevents the flow of CSF from the spine to the head as blood enters the central nervous system during movement. Consequently, intermittent increases in spinal pressure caused by movement, result in injury to the spinal cord. It is proposed that posterior fossa hypoplasia, which has origins in fetal life, causes syringomyelia after birth and leads to damage to the spinal cord in spina bifida. It is proposed that hydrocephalus may occur as a result of posterior fossa hypoplasia, where

  4. Chiari type 1 malformation and periventricular nodular heterotopia in a 6-year-old boy with congenital hemiplegia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Jaya Shankar; Sharma, Suvasini; Aneja, Satinder; Kumar, Atin

    2014-01-01

    A 6-year-old boy presented with weakness of the right upper and lower limbs, noted since infancy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed periventricular nodular heterotopia lining the trigone and occipital horns of bilateral lateral ventricles along with herniation of the cerebellar tonsils below the foramen magnum suggestive of Chiari type 1 malformation. The association of periventricular nodular heterotopia with Chiari type 1 malformation has not been described earlier in children.

  5. The association between Chiari-like malformation, ventriculomegaly and seizures in cavalier King Charles spaniels.

    PubMed

    Driver, C J; Chandler, K; Walmsley, G; Shihab, N; Volk, H A

    2013-02-01

    Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCSs) with Chiari-like malformation (CM) and associated seizures are frequently diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy. There could be an association between ventriculomegaly (V) or caudal fossa overcrowding (CCFP) and seizures. A retrospective case-control study was performed using MRI to investigate the possible association between these morphological abnormalities and seizures. Seizure semiology and, where possible, electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities were documented. Eighty-five CKCS with CM were included, 27 with seizures. There was no association between V or CCFP and seizures (P=0.10 and 0.71, respectively). Seizures were classified as having partial onset in 61% of individuals in the study population (95% CI 42.41-76.43%). Another cause of recurrent seizures in CKCS (such as familial epilepsy) is suspected, as previously reported.

  6. Chiari malformation and central sleep apnea syndrome: efficacy of treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation*

    PubMed Central

    do Vale, Jorge Marques; Silva, Eloísa; Pereira, Isabel Gil; Marques, Catarina; Sanchez-Serrano, Amparo; Torres, António Simões

    2014-01-01

    The Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) has been associated with sleep-disordered breathing, especially central sleep apnea syndrome. We report the case of a 44-year-old female with CM-I who was referred to our sleep laboratory for suspected sleep apnea. The patient had undergone decompressive surgery 3 years prior. An arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercapnia. Polysomnography showed a respiratory disturbance index of 108 events/h, and all were central apnea events. Treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation was initiated, and central apnea was resolved. This report demonstrates the efficacy of servo-ventilation in the treatment of central sleep apnea syndrome associated with alveolar hypoventilation in a CM-I patient with a history of decompressive surgery. PMID:25410846

  7. Sleep Disordered Breathing in Children and Adolescents with Chiari Malformation Type I

    PubMed Central

    Losurdo, Anna; Dittoni, Serena; Testani, Elisa; Di Blasi, Chiara; Scarano, Emanuele; Mariotti, Paolo; Paternoster, Giovanna; Di Rocco, Concezio; Massimi, Luca; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) has been associated with sleep disordered breathing (SDB). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of SDB in CM-I and its clinical correlates in a population of children and adolescents. Methods: Fifty-three consecutive children and adolescents affected by CM-I were enrolled (27 girls and 26 boys, mean age 10.3 ± 4.3, range: 3-18 years). All patients underwent neurological examination, MRI, and polysomnography (PSG). Otorhinolaryngologic clinical evaluation was performed in patients with polysomnographic evidence of sleep-related upper airway obstruction. Results: Mean size of the herniation was 9.5 ± 5.4 mm. Fourteen patients had syringomyelia, 5 had hydrocephalus, 31 presented neurological signs, 14 had epileptic seizures, and 7 reported poor sleep. PSG revealed SDB in 13 subjects. Patients with SDB, compared to those without SDB, had a higher prevalence hydrocephalus (p = 0.002), syringomyelia (p = 0.001), and neurological symptoms (p = 0.028). No significant difference was observed in age, gender, prevalence of epilepsy, and size of the herniation. Obstructive SDB was associated with syringomyelia (p = 0.004), whereas central SDB was associated with hydrocephalus (p = 0.034). Conclusions: In our population of CM-I patients the prevalence of SDB was 24%, lower than that reported in literature. Moreover, our findings suggest that abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in CM-I, particularly syringomyelia and hydro-cephalus, are associated with SDB. Citation: Losurdo A; Dittoni S; Testani E; Di Blasi C; Scarano E; Mariotti P; Paternoster G; Di Rocco C; Massimi L; Della Marca G. Sleep disordered breathing in children and adolescents with Chiari malformation Type I. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(4):371-377. PMID:23585753

  8. Œdème papillaire revelant une malformation d’Arnold Chiara type 1 : à propos d’un cas

    PubMed Central

    Imane, Mouhoub; Asmae, Maadane; Toufik, Ramdani; Rachid, Sekhsoukh

    2016-01-01

    La malformation d'Arnold Chiari de type 1 est définie par une hernie des tonsilles cérébelleuses dans le foramen magnum de plus de 5 mm. Les symptômes sont dominés par les céphalées surtout occipitales, les torticolis, et parfois des troubles de déglutition. Sur le plan ophtalmologique les anomalies de convergences, les paralysies oculomotrices et la diplopie sont les principaux signes cliniques retrouvés. Nous rapportons le cas d'un enfant de 9 ans, qui consulte pour une baisse d'acuité visuelle évoluant depuis 6 mois. L'examen ophtalmologique objective une acuité visuelle chiffrée à 4/10ème aux deux yeux. Une motilité oculaire conservée ainsi qu'un nystagmus rotatoire. L'examen du segment antérieur montre une mégalocornée, sans goniodysgénésie, un iridodonesis associé à une atrophie du muscle dilatateur, et une microcorie avec un reflex photo-moteur paresseux. Le tonus oculaire est correct à 14 mmHg. Le fond d'œil, malgré la difficulté de le réaliser, objective la présence d'un œdème papillaire bilatéral stade II. L'examen général retrouve un torticolis, une scoliose et un syndrome tétra-pyramidal. L'imagerie par résonance magnétique a mis en évidence une malformation de CHIARI type I, associée à une hydrocéphalie et une syringomyélie. Une intervention neurochirurgicale reposant sur une dérivation interne du LCR avec décompression ostéodurale cervico occipitale est proposée. L'évolution est favorable avec une régression des signes cliniques. Sur le plan ophtalmologique, on note une régression de l'œdème papillaire, mais l'acuité visuelle est restée stationnaire. La survenue d'un œdème papillaire est rare dans la malformation de Chiari type 1, il n'a été décrit que chez 2% des patients symptomatiques. Sa physiopathologie est encore mal élucidée. L'originalité de notre observation consiste en l'association de malformations cérébelleuses avec des malformations oculaires à type de mégalocornée et de

  9. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the brain stem (the part of the brain that controls nerves in the face, mouth, throat, neck, and spine) down through a funnel-like hole ... relieving them and stopping further damage to the brain and spinal cord. ... headaches and neck pain. They also may recommend limiting activities that ...

  10. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cerebellum and to relieve pressure on the spinal column. Surgery involves making an incision at the back ... of the skull (and sometimes part of the spinal column) to correct the irregular bony structure. The neurosurgeon ...

  11. Chiari Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... spine, and bones develop. These include hydrocephalus, scoliosis, spina bifida , and syringomyelia (a problem with the spine that ... can be caused by certain birth defects, like spina bifida, children born with these defects are usually tested ...

  12. Foramen magnum decompression for syringomyelia associated with basilar impression and Chiari I malformation--report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kohno, K; Sakaki, S; Nakamura, H; Sakoh, M; Takeda, S; Sadamoto, K

    1991-11-01

    Anterior or posterior decompression of the foramen magnum was performed in three patients with syringomyelia associated with basilar impression and Chiari I malformation. The operative results were evaluated using the pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images. Two patients with combined anterior and posterior cervicomedullary compression due to basilar impression and tonsillar descent received suboccipital craniectomy, upper cervical laminectomy, and dural plasty without any intradural manipulations via the posterior approach. One patient with prominent anterior cervicomedullary compression due to basilar impression and a sharp clivoaxial angle was operated on by the transoral anterior approach. Postoperatively, all patients showed a sustained shrinkage of the syrinx and rounding of the flattened cerebellar tonsils. Two patients showed upward movement of the herniated tonsils. All patients had improved symptoms during 2-4 years follow-up. Treatment of syringomyelia associated with basilar impression and Chiari I malformation requires more efficient decompressive procedures at the foramen magnum based on neurological and MR findings.

  13. PROGRESSIVE SYRINGOHYDROMYELIA AND DEGENERATIVE AXONOPATHY IN A BOBCAT (LYNX RUFUS) FOLLOWING SURGICAL CORRECTION OF A CHIARI-LIKE MALFORMATION.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan; Schumacher, Juergen; Ramsay, Edward; McCleery, Brynn; Baine, Katherine; Thomas, William; Nobrega-Lee, Michelle; Henry, George A; Newman, Shelley J

    2016-03-01

    A 3-yr-old male captive bobcat (Lynx rufus) presented with chronic ataxia and right-sided head tilt. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed cerebellar crowding and compression consistent with Chiari-like malformation. The clinical signs did not improve after surgical occipital craniectomy, and 2 mo postoperatively a second MRI showed hydromyelia and continued cerebellar compression. The bobcat was euthanized, and necropsy showed chronic focal cerebellar herniation and chronic multifocal atlanto-occipital joint osteophyte proliferation. Histology confirmed the presence of a thick fibrous membrane along the caudal aspect of the cerebellar vermis, suggestive of postoperative adhesions, and axonal degeneration of the cervical spinal cord, even in sections without a central canal lesion. These lesions appear to have been complications associated with surgical correction of the Chiari-like malformation.

  14. Inheritance of Chiari-Like Malformation: Can a Mixed Breeding Reduce the Risk of Syringomyelia?

    PubMed Central

    Knowler, Susan P.; v/d Berg, Henny; McFadyen, Angus; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Rusbridge, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Canine Chiari-like malformation (CM) is a complex abnormality of the skull and craniocervical junction associated with miniaturization and brachycephaly which can result in the spinal cord disease syringomyelia (SM). This study investigated the inheritance of CM in a Griffon Bruxellois (GB) family and feasibility of crossbreeding a brachycephalic CM affected GB with a mesaticephalic normal Australian terrier and then backcrossing to produce individuals free of the malformation and regain GB breed characteristics. The study family cohort (n = 27) included five founder dogs from a previous baseline study of 155 GB which defined CM as a global malformation of the cranium and craniocervical junction with a shortened skull base and increased proximity of the cervical vertebrae to the skull. T1-weighted sagittal DICOM images of the brain and craniocervical junction were analysed for five significant traits (two angles, three lines) identified from the previous study and subsequent Qualitative Trait Loci analysis. Mean measurements for mixed breed, pure-breed and baseline study groups were compared. Results indicated that mixed breed traits posed less risk for CM and SM and were useful to distinguish the phenotype. Moreover on the MR images, the filial relationships displayed by the traits exhibited segregation and those presenting the greatest risk for CM appeared additive towards the severity of the condition. The external phenotypes revealed that by outcrossing breed types and with careful selection of appropriate conformation characteristics in the first generation, it is possible to regain the GB breed standard and reduce the degree of CM. The four GB affected with SM in the study all exhibited reduced caudal skull development compared to their relatives. The craniocervical traits may be useful for quantifying CM and assessing the possibility of SM thus assisting breeders with mate selection. However, such a system requires validation to ensure appropriateness for

  15. Inheritance of Chiari-Like Malformation: Can a Mixed Breeding Reduce the Risk of Syringomyelia?

    PubMed

    Knowler, Susan P; v/d Berg, Henny; McFadyen, Angus; La Ragione, Roberto M; Rusbridge, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Canine Chiari-like malformation (CM) is a complex abnormality of the skull and craniocervical junction associated with miniaturization and brachycephaly which can result in the spinal cord disease syringomyelia (SM). This study investigated the inheritance of CM in a Griffon Bruxellois (GB) family and feasibility of crossbreeding a brachycephalic CM affected GB with a mesaticephalic normal Australian terrier and then backcrossing to produce individuals free of the malformation and regain GB breed characteristics. The study family cohort (n = 27) included five founder dogs from a previous baseline study of 155 GB which defined CM as a global malformation of the cranium and craniocervical junction with a shortened skull base and increased proximity of the cervical vertebrae to the skull. T1-weighted sagittal DICOM images of the brain and craniocervical junction were analysed for five significant traits (two angles, three lines) identified from the previous study and subsequent Qualitative Trait Loci analysis. Mean measurements for mixed breed, pure-breed and baseline study groups were compared. Results indicated that mixed breed traits posed less risk for CM and SM and were useful to distinguish the phenotype. Moreover on the MR images, the filial relationships displayed by the traits exhibited segregation and those presenting the greatest risk for CM appeared additive towards the severity of the condition. The external phenotypes revealed that by outcrossing breed types and with careful selection of appropriate conformation characteristics in the first generation, it is possible to regain the GB breed standard and reduce the degree of CM. The four GB affected with SM in the study all exhibited reduced caudal skull development compared to their relatives. The craniocervical traits may be useful for quantifying CM and assessing the possibility of SM thus assisting breeders with mate selection. However, such a system requires validation to ensure appropriateness for

  16. Not all cases of nyctalopia are benign: Unusual and serendipitous presentation of Arnold–Chiari Type 1 malformation at a Pediatric Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Kailash Chandra; Kirtane, Abhijeet Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The Arnold–Chiari Type 1 malformation (CM1) is a rare congenital abnormality characterized by ectopia or caudal herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum into the cervical spine, resulting in crowding at the craniocervical junction. It seldom presents in childhood with symptoms and a normal neurological examination. More typically, CM1 presents in young adult women with neurological symptoms including a headache, cervical pain, cranial nerve palsies, neurosensory deficit, and ataxia. Ocular manifestations associated with Chiari I include third and sixth cranial nerve paresis and convergence/divergence abnormalities. Papilledema is a rare manifestation of Chiari I with a clinical presentation often similar to that of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. To underscore this noteworthy complication, the authors report a case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with nyctalopia and suboccipital headaches, but was diagnosed serendipitously as a case of papilledema due to Chiari I malformation. PMID:27857798

  17. Results of the treatment of syringomyelia associated with Chiari malformation: analysis of 60 cases.

    PubMed

    Arruda, José Arnaldo Motta de; Costa, Carlos Maurício de Castro; Tella Jr, Oswaldo Inácio de

    2004-06-01

    We analyze the results of surgical treatment of 60 patients presenting syringomyelia (SM) associated with Chiari malformation (CM) who were operated in the period 1982-2000. For each case, analysis covered 15 signs and 16 symptoms included in a protocol that separated SM signs and symptoms from those of CM. A score system was established in parallel with the protocol to make the evaluation of treatment results easier. All cases were submitted to craniovertebral decompression by C1 and eventually C2 laminectomy and cerebellar tonsillectomy with duramater graft. To evaluate the results, statistical proportion difference tests and variance analyses were made to a reliability index of 95% (p=0.05). We conclude that the statistical improvement of CM signs and symptoms was very significant (p=0). Syringomyelia signs and symptoms also improved significantly, except for "upper limb hyporeflexia", which did not improve. No statistical difference in the improvement of SM symptoms as compared to CM symptom was found. Syringomyelia signs improved statistically more than CM signs. In half of patients, the percent improvement of signs and symptoms ranged between 40% and 60%.

  18. Retrospective study of patients with Chiari: malformation submitted to surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Taricco, Mário Augusto; Melo, Luiz Ricardo Santiago

    2008-06-01

    The Chiari malformation (CM) is characterized by variable herniation of one or both cerebellar tonsils, associated or not with displacement of the hindbrain structures into the vertebral canal. This is a retrospective study of 29 patients with CM submitted to surgical procedure between 1990 and 2003. There were 14 females and 15 males whose ages ranged from 16 to 65 years. There were seven patients with isolated CM, 12 associated with syringomyelia (SM), three associated with basilar impression (BI) and seven associated with SM and BI. The surgery was based on posterior fossa decompression. In seven patients a catheter was introduced from the subarachnoid space into the III ventricle and five were submitted to tonsillectomy. Twenty-one patients improved, one worsened, one remained unchanged, four missed follow up and two died. We conclude that the best results with CM surgery are obtained by an effective posterior fossa decompression. Those CM cases associated with other abnormalities, such as SM and BI, probably need complementary techniques which will be the theme for new prospective studies.

  19. Basilar impression, Chiari malformation and syringomyelia: a retrospective study of 53 surgically treated patients.

    PubMed

    da Silva, José Alberto Gonçalves; Holanda, Maurus Marques de Almeida

    2003-06-01

    The present study shows the results of 53 patients who have been treated surgically for basilar impression (BI), Chiari malformation (CM), and syringomyelia (SM). The patients were divided into two groups. Group I (24 patients) underwent osteodural decompression with large inferior occipital craniectomy, laminectomy from C 1 to C 3, dural opening in Y format, dissection of arachnoid adhesion between the cerebellar tonsils, medulla oblongata and spinal cord, large opening of the fourth ventricle and dural grafting with the use of bovine pericardium. Group II patients (29 patients) underwent osteodural-neural decompression with the same procedures described above plus dissection of the arachnoid adherences of the vessels of the region of the cerebellar tonsils, and tonsillectomy (amputation) in 10 cases, and as for the remainning 19 cases, intrapial aspiration of the cerebellar tonsils was performed. The residual pial sac was sutured to the dura in craniolateral position. After completion of the suture of the dural grafting, a thread was run through the graft at the level of the created cisterna magna and fixed to the cervical aponeurosis so as to move the dural graft on a posterior- caudal direction, avoiding, in this way, its adherence to the cerebellum.

  20. The Vestibulo-ocular Reflex During Active Head Motion in Chiari II Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Michael S.; Sharpe, James A.; Lillakas, Linda; Dennis, Maureen; Steinbach, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Chiari type II malformation (CII) is a developmental anomaly of the cerebellum and brainstem, which are important structures for processing the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). We investigated the effects of the deformity of CII on the angular VOR during active head motion. Methods Eye and head movements were recorded using an infrared eye tracker and magnetic head tracker in 20 participants with CII [11 males, age range 8-19 years, mean (SD) 14.4 (3.2) years]. Thirty-eight age-matched healthy children and adolescents (21 males) constituted the control group. Participants were instructed to ‘look’ in darkness at the position of their thumb, placed 25 cm away, while they made horizontal and vertical sinusoidal head rotations at frequencies of about 0.5 Hz and 2 Hz. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used to compare the two groups. Results The VOR gains, the ratio of eye to head velocities, were abnormally low in two participants with CII and abnormally high in one participant with CII. Conclusion The majority of participants with CII had normal VOR performance in this investigation. However, the deformity of CII can impair the active angular VOR in some patients with CII. Low gain is attributed to brainstem damage and high gain to cerebellar dysfunction. PMID:18973069

  1. Digenic mutations of human OCRL paralogs in Dent’s disease type 2 associated with Chiari I malformation

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Daniel; Jin, Sheng Chih; DeSpenza, Tyrone; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Cogal, Andrea G; Abrash, Elizabeth W; Harris, Peter C; Lieske, John C; Shimshak, Serena JE; Mane, Shrikant; Bilguvar, Kaya; DiLuna, Michael L; Günel, Murat; Lifton, Richard P; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2016-01-01

    OCRL1 and its paralog INPP5B encode phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphatases that localize to the primary cilium and have roles in ciliogenesis. Mutations in OCRL1 cause the X-linked Dent disease type 2 (DD2; OMIM# 300555), characterized by low-molecular weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, and the variable presence of cataracts, glaucoma and intellectual disability without structural brain anomalies. Disease-causing mutations in INPP5B have not been described in humans. Here, we report the case of an 11-year-old boy with short stature and an above-average IQ; severe proteinuria, hypercalciuria and osteopenia resulting in a vertebral compression fracture; and Chiari I malformation with cervico-thoracic syringohydromyelia requiring suboccipital decompression. Sequencing revealed a novel, de novo DD2-causing 462 bp deletion disrupting exon 3 of OCRL1 and a maternally inherited, extremely rare (ExAC allele frequency 8.4×10−6) damaging missense mutation in INPP5B (p.A51V). This mutation substitutes an evolutionarily conserved amino acid in the protein’s critical PH domain. In silico analyses of mutation impact predicted by SIFT, PolyPhen2, MetaSVM and CADD algorithms were all highly deleterious. Together, our findings report a novel association of DD2 with Chiari I malformation and syringohydromyelia, and document the effects of digenic mutation of human OCRL paralogs. These findings lend genetic support to the hypothesis that impaired ciliogenesis may contribute to the development of Chiari I malformation, and implicates OCRL-dependent PIP3 metabolism in this mechanism. PMID:28018608

  2. Sudden unexpected nocturnal death in Chiari type 1 malformation and potential role of opioid analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Roohi, Fereydoon; Gropen, Toby; Kula, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1) is a common congenital anomaly of the craniocervical junction. CM1 is reported to run a usually benign course and patients typically experience no symptoms or chronic, slowly progressive symptoms. However, recent reports indicate that a subset of patients with CM1 may present with acute deterioration and sudden unexpected death (SUD). We report a case of SUD during sleep in a young man with CM1, which we believe was related to the administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. We will clarify the pathophysiology of acute deterioration and SUD in CM1 and the possibility that the adverse effects of opiate analgesics likely were the leading cause of death in our patient. Case Description: In this review, we present a 29-year-old male with worsening headache secondary to previously diagnosed CM1. The patient died suddenly and unexpectedly after administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. Conclusion: The mechanism(s) of acute neurological deterioration and sudden death in patients with CM1 remains poorly understood. We believe the rapid fatal deterioration in our patient following administration of opioids suggests that this category of medication may cause sudden unexpected “neurogenic” cardiac death in CM1 patients by inducing sleep-related breathing difficulties and associated hypercapnia. Hypercapnia by further increasing intracranial pressure can result in a sudden pressure-induced decompensation of the cardiopulmonary control centers in the brain stem and cause instantaneous cardiorespiratory arrest. PMID:24778905

  3. Outcomes after suboccipital decompression without dural opening in children with Chiari malformation Type I

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Benjamin C.; Kelly, Kathleen M.; Phan, Michelle Q.; Bruce, Samuel S.; McDowell, Michael M.; Anderson, Richard C. E.; Feldstein, Neil A.

    2015-01-01

    Object Symptomatic pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is most often treated with posterior fossa decompression (PFD), but controversy exists over whether the dura needs to be opened during PFD. While dural opening as a part of PFD has been suggested to result in a higher rate of resolution of CM symptoms, it has also been shown to lead to more frequent complications. In this paper, the authors present the largest reported series of outcomes after PFD without dural opening surgery, as well as identify risk factors for recurrence. Methods The authors performed a retrospective review of 156 consecutive pediatric patients in whom the senior authors performed PFD without dural opening from 2003 to 2013. Patient demographics, clinical symptoms and signs, radiographic findings, intraoperative ultrasound results, and neuromonitoring findings were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine risk factors for recurrence of symptoms and the need for reoperation. Results Over 90% of patients had a good clinical outcome, with improvement or resolution of their symptoms at last follow-up (mean 32 months). There were no major complications. The mean length of hospital stay was 2.0 days. In a multivariate regression model, partial C-2 laminectomy was an independent risk factor associated with reoperation (p = 0.037). Motor weakness on presentation was also associated with reoperation but only with trend-level significance (p = 0.075). No patient with < 8 mm of tonsillar herniation required reoperation. Conclusions The vast majority (> 90%) of children with symptomatic CM-I will have improvement or resolution of symptoms after a PFD without dural opening. A non–dural opening approach avoids major complications. While no patient with tonsillar herniation < 8 mm required reoperation, children with tonsillar herniation at or below C-2 have a higher risk for failure when this approach is used. PMID:25932779

  4. Trends in surgical treatment of Chiari malformation Type I in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, D Andrew; Johnson, Kyle; Garton, Hugh J L; Muraszko, Karin M; Maher, Cormac O

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this analysis was to define temporal and geographic trends in the surgical treatment of Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) in a large, privately insured health care network. METHODS The authors examined de-identified insurance claims data from a large, privately insured health care network of over 58 million beneficiaries throughout the United States for the period between 2001 and 2014 for all patients undergoing surgical treatment of CM-I. Using a combination of International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnosis codes and Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes, the authors identified CM-I and associated diagnoses and procedures over a 14-year period, highlighting temporal and geographic trends in the performance of CM-I decompression (CMD) surgery as well as commonly associated procedures. RESULTS There were 2434 surgical procedures performed for CMD among the beneficiaries during the 14-year interval; 34% were performed in patients younger than 20 years of age. The rate of CMD increased 51% from the first half to the second half of the study period among younger patients (p < 0.001) and increased 28% among adult patients between 20 and 65 years of age (p < 0.001). A large sex difference was noted among adult patients; 78% of adult patients undergoing CMD were female compared with only 53% of the children. Pediatric patients undergoing CMD were more likely to be white with a higher household net worth. Regional variability was identified among rates of CMD as well. The average annual rate of surgery ranged from 0.8 surgeries per 100,000 insured person-years in the Pacific census division to 2.0 surgeries per 100,000 insured person-years in the East South Central census division. CONCLUSIONS Analysis of a large nationwide health care network showed recently increasing rates of CMD in children and adults over the past 14 years.

  5. Chronic daily headache in the adults: differential diagnosis between symptomatic Chiari I malformation and spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Mea, Eliana; Chiapparini, Luisa; Leone, Massimo; Franzini, Angelo; Messina, Giuseppe; Bussone, Gennaro

    2011-12-01

    This article briefly reviews the spectrum of headaches associated with Chiari type I malformation (CMI) and specifically analyzes the current data on the possibility of this malformation as an etiology for some cases of chronic daily headache (CDH). CMI is definitely associated with cough headache and not with primary episodic headaches, with the rare exception of basilar migraine-like cases. With regard to CDH, there is no clear evidence supporting an association with CMI. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study would be justified only in patients showing either a Valsalva-aggravating component or cervicogenic features. Hydrocephalus and low-intracranial pressure syndrome should be ruled out in patients showing tonsillar herniation in an MRI study and consulting due to daily headache.

  6. Chiari type 1 malformation in an infant with type 2 Pfeiffer syndrome: further evidence of acquired pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ranger, Adrianna; Al-Hayek, Ali; Matic, Damir

    2010-03-01

    There seems to be an association between type 1 Chiari malformation (CM) and some congenital craniosynostosis syndromes. Type 2 Pfeiffer syndrome is a condition associated with premature fusion of multiple cranial sutures, cloverleaf skull (kleeblatschädel deformity), prominent ptosis, thumb and first toe abnormalities, variable syndactyly, and mutated genes for type 1 or 2 fibroblast growth factor receptor. These children generally do poorly because of significant often severe neurologic and cognitive defects, and many die very young. Roughly half of all patients with Pfeiffer syndrome, and virtually all with type 2 disease, also have type 1 CM. Chiari malformation may not be congenital but acquired as a consequence of the skull deformities and other associated intracranial factors in patients with craniosynostosis. We report a term male infant with type 2 Pfeiffer syndrome, who was not noted to have any CM on initial brain imaging done at 2 months but in whom repeated imaging demonstrated clear evidence of CM by 4 months, despite reconstructive craniotomies and unilateral ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion. Posterior fossa decompression yielded a good result. This patient provides further evidence to support the concept of acquired tonsillar herniation in patients with craniosynostosis syndromes. The etiology seems multifactorial and related to (1) the disproportionately slow growth of the skull relative to the brain, particularly in the posterior fossa, secondary to early fusion of skull sutures, in turn secondary to congenital deficiencies in fibroblast growth factor receptors; (2) impaired venous sinus drainage; (3) hydrocephalus; and (4) resultant elevations in intracranial pressure.

  7. Are evoked potentials clinically useful in the study of patients with Chiari malformation Type 1?

    PubMed

    Moncho, Dulce; Poca, Maria A; Minoves, Teresa; Ferré, Alejandro; Cañas, Victoria; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study, the authors describe the brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) and somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) alterations found in a large cohort of patients with Chiari malformation Type 1 (CM-1), the relationship between the BAEPs/SSEPs and the clinical findings, the abnormalities in patients with associated syringomyelia, and the clinical and neuroradiological risk factors that are associated with abnormal evoked potentials (EPs). METHODS A prospectively collected database containing 545 patients with CM-1 was queried to search for patients satisfying the following criteria: 1) an age of at least 14 years, 2) neuroradiological criteria of CM-1, 3) no prior Chiari-related surgeries, and 4) preoperative EP studies conducted at the authors' institution. The 200 patients included in this cohort were classified into CM-0, CM-1, and CM-1.5 subtypes. Linear, planimetric, and angular measurements of the posterior fossa were conducted, as well as syringomyelia measurements. Two separate multiple logistic regression models were used, one to predict the covariates associated with abnormal BAEPs, and a second model to explore the variables associated with an abnormal SSEP. In these models, the BAEPs and SSEPs were dichotomized as being normal or abnormal. RESULTS Headaches were the main symptom in 70.5% of the patients, and Valsalva-induced headaches were most frequent in patients with CM-1 and CM-1.5 compared with patients with CM-0 (p = 0.031). BAEPs were abnormal in 38.5% of patients, and abnormal SSEPs were found in 43.5% of the entire cohort. Syringomyelia was most frequent in patients with CM-0 (64.3%) and CM-1 (51.1%) compared with those with CM-1.5 (34.7%; p = 0.03). Age (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.06), the degree of tonsillar herniation (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.01-1.16), and lower cranial nerve dysfunction (OR 3.99, 95% CI 1.29-14.01) had a statistically significant correlation with abnormal BAEPs. Only age (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.10) and the degree

  8. Patient-reported Chiari malformation type I symptoms and diagnostic experiences: a report from the national Conquer Chiari Patient Registry database.

    PubMed

    Fischbein, Rebecca; Saling, Julia R; Marty, Paige; Kropp, Denise; Meeker, James; Amerine, Jenna; Chyatte, Michelle Renee

    2015-09-01

    Chiari malformation (CM) is a condition in which cerebellar tonsillar ectopia may manifest with various clinical presentations. This study reports from the only national, online patient registry available, the symptoms, comorbid neurocognitive and psychological conditions, and diagnostic experiences of patients living with CM type I (CM I). The current research is one component of a large investigation designed to collect information from individuals with CM through the online Conquer Chiari Patient Registry questionnaire. Analyses included descriptive statistics to study body system impact and patient diagnostic experiences. Participants were 768 individuals with CM I and were predominantly female (86.8 %) and Caucasian (93.8 %) with an average age of 35 years. Pain was the most frequently reported symptom (76.69 %) experienced prior to diagnosis with headaches implicated most often (73.44 %). Neurocognitive comorbidities included memory difficulties (43.88 %) and aphasia (43.75 %) and psychological disorders such as depression (31.77 %) and anxiety disorders (19.92 %) were reported. Average time to diagnosis from first physician visit to diagnosis was 3.43 years, and only 8.46 % of patients had previous awareness of CM. CM I diagnosis was found incidentally for 24.87 % of participants. Common misdiagnoses were classified as psychological (19.26 %) and neurological (19.26 %). Fear was the most frequent emotion elicited at the time of correct diagnosis (42.19 %). CM I can be a challenging condition for patients and physicians, during both the search for diagnosis and management of symptoms. Patient and physician education about CM I may permit early intervention and the prevention of further deterioration and patient suffering.

  9. The association between Chiari malformation Type I, spinal syrinx, and scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Smith, Brandon W; Martinez, Melaine; Bapuraj, J Rajiv; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is often found in patients with scoliosis. Most previous reports of CM-I and scoliosis have focused on patients with CM-I and a spinal syrinx. The relationship between CM-I and scoliosis in the absence of a syrinx has never been defined clearly. The authors sought to determine if there is an independent association between CM-I and scoliosis when controlling for syrinx status. METHODS The medical records of 14,118 consecutive patients aged ≤ 18 years who underwent brain or cervical spine MRI at a single institution in an 11-year span were reviewed to identify patients with CM-I, scoliosis, and/or syrinx. The relationship between CM-I and scoliosis was analyzed by using multivariate regression analysis and controlling for age, sex, CM-I status, and syrinx status. RESULTS In this cohort, 509 patients had CM-I, 1740 patients had scoliosis, and 243 patients had a spinal syrinx. The presence of CM-I, the presence of syrinx, older age, and female sex were each significantly associated with scoliosis in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate regression analysis, older age (OR 1.02 [95% CI 1.01-1.03]; p < 0.0001), female sex (OR 1.71 [95% CI 1.54-1.90]; p < 0.0001), and syrinx (OR 9.08 [95% CI 6.82-12.10]; p < 0.0001) were each independently associated with scoliosis. CM-I was not independently associated with scoliosis when controlling for these other variables (OR 0.99 [95% CI 0.79-1.29]; p = 0.9). CONCLUSIONS A syrinx was independently associated with scoliosis in a large pediatric population undergoing MRI. CM-I was not independently associated with scoliosis when controlling for age, sex, and syrinx status. Because CM-I is not independently associated with scoliosis, scoliosis should not necessarily be considered a symptom of low cerebellar tonsil position in patients without a syrinx.

  10. Factors associated with spinal fusion after posterior fossa decompression in pediatric patients with Chiari I malformation and scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Mackel, Charles E; Cahill, Patrick J; Roguski, Marie; Samdani, Amer F; Sugrue, Patrick A; Kawakami, Noriaki; Sturm, Peter F; Pahys, Joshua M; Betz, Randal R; El-Hawary, Ron; Hwang, Steven W

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors performed a study to identify clinical characteristics of pediatric patients diagnosed with Chiari I malformation and scoliosis associated with a need for spinal fusion after posterior fossa decompression when managing the scoliotic curve. METHODS The authors conducted a multicenter retrospective review of 44 patients, aged 18 years or younger, diagnosed with Chiari I malformation and scoliosis who underwent posterior fossa decompression from 2000 to 2010. The outcome of interest was the need for spinal fusion after decompression. RESULTS Overall, 18 patients (40%) underwent posterior fossa decompression alone, and 26 patients (60%) required a spinal fusion after the decompression. The mean Cobb angle at presentation and the proportion of patients with curves > 35° differed between the decompression-only and fusion cohorts (30.7° ± 11.8° vs 52.1° ± 26.3°, p = 0.002; 5 of 18 vs 17 of 26, p = 0.031). An odds ratio of 1.0625 favoring a need for fusion was established for each 1° of increase in Cobb angle (p = 0.012, OR 1.0625, 95% CI 1.0135-1.1138). Among the 14 patients older than 10 years of age with a primary Cobb angle exceeding 35°, 13 (93%) ultimately required fusion. Patients with at least 1 year of follow-up whose curves progressed more 10° after decompression were younger than those without curve progression (6.1 ± 3.0 years vs 13.7 ± 3.2 years, p = 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test). Left apical thoracic curves constituted a higher proportion of curves in the decompression-only group (8 of 16 vs 1 of 21, p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS The need for fusion after posterior fossa decompression reflected the curve severity at clinical presentation. Patients presenting with curves measuring > 35°, as well as those greater than 10 years of age, may be at greater risk for requiring fusion after posterior fossa decompression, while patients less than 10 years of age may require routine monitoring for curve progression. Left apical thoracic curves

  11. Neurofibromatosis type 1 and Chiari type 1 malformation: A case report and literature review of a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Pozetti, Marianne; Belsuzarri, Telmo Augusto Barba; Belsuzarri, Natalia C. B.; Seixas, Naira B.; Araujo, João F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The association between neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-I) and Chiari I malformation (CMI) is rare, and not many studies are reported in the literature. Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with NF-1 is essential because several cases of Chiari type I are completely asymptomatic. We emphasize the need for inclusion of Chiari I as diagnosis in association with NF-1. Case Description: The patient was a 51-year-old black man who presented with complaints of pain and decreased motion and sensibility of his hands, wrists, and forearms, along with progressive dysarthria. Even though the computed tomography (CT) scan of the skull did not show changes, the MRI showed hydro/syringomyelia in the cervical spine area. Midline suboccipital craniectomy with total laminectomy of c1 and partial laminectomy of c2 was performed; tonsillectomy was also performed for cistern expansion because of intense thickening and obliteration of the obex by the cerebellar tonsils. Following treatment, the patient showed remission of symptoms. Conclusion: NF-1 in association with CMI is rare, and early diagnosis and surgical treatment are essential to slow down the myelopathy; although they prevent neurological damages, patients with NF-1 must remain under doctor's attention in case of association with CMI. Our literature review showed that symptoms can vary and include headache, gait disturbance, and sensory/motor diminution, until asymptomatic patients. Moreover, the incidence of NF-1 is considerably higher in CMI patients in comparison to the global incidence (8.6–11.8% and 0.775%, respectively). The surgical technique must be evaluated case by case according to the degree of cerebrospinal fluid obstruction. PMID:27500008

  12. Posterior fossa decompression with tonsillectomy in 104 cases of basilar impression, Chiari malformation and/or syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    da Silva, José Alberto Gonçalves; dos Santos, Adailton Arcanjo; Melo, Luiz Ricardo Santiago; de Araújo, Antônio Fernandes; Regueira, Giseuda Pessoa

    2011-10-01

    The prime objective in the surgical treatment of basilar impression (BI), Chiari malformation (CM) and/or syringomyelia (SM) is based on the restoration of the normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics at the craniovertebral junction through the creation of a large artificial cisterna magna. A small suboccipital craniectomy has been emphasized to avoid caudal migration of the hindbrain structures into the vertebral canal. Nevertheless, the results showed downward migration of the hindbrain related to that type of craniectomy. The authors present, otherwise, the results of 104 cases of BI, CM and/or SM, whose surgical treatment was characterized by a large craniectomy with the patient in the sitting position, tonsillectomy, large opening of the fourth ventricle and duraplasty with creation of a large artificial cisterna magna. A significant upward migration of the posterior fossa structures was detected by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

  13. Placement of occipital condyle screws for occipitocervical fixation in a pediatric patient with occipitocervical instability after decompression for Chiari malformation.

    PubMed

    Bekelis, Kimon; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Missios, Symeon; Belden, Clifford; Simmons, Nathan

    2010-08-01

    In cadaveric studies and recently in one adult patient the occipital condyle has been studied as an option to allow bone purchase by fixation devices. In the current case the authors describe the use of occipital condyle screws in a child undergoing occipitocervical fixation. To the best of the authors' knowledge this case is the first reported instance of this technique in a pediatric patient. This girl had a history of posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I when she was 22 months of age. When she was 6 years old she presented with neck pain on flexion and extension of her head. Magnetic resonance imaging in flexion and extension revealed occipitocervical instability. She underwent an occiput to C-2 posterior arthrodesis with bilateral screw placement in the occipital condyles, C-2 lamina, and C-1 lateral masses. Postoperatively, she was neurologically intact. Computed tomography demonstrated a stable construct, and her cervical pain had resolved on follow-up.

  14. A extremely rare case of cervical intramedullary granuloma due to Brucella accompanied by Chiari Type-1 malformation.

    PubMed

    Tufan, Kadir; Aydemir, Fatih; Sarica, Feyzi Birol; Kursun, Ebru; Kardes, Özgür; Cekinmez, Melih; Caner, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Chiari Type-1 malformation is displacement of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum into the cervical spine and usually does not exceed the level of C2. It is 50-70% associated with syringomyelia. Nervous system involvement due to brucellosis is called neurobrucellosis, and neurological involvement rate has been reported an average of 3-5%, ranging between 3% and 25% at different series. Intramedullary abscess or granuloma due to Brucella is extremely rare. Hence far, six cases have been reported in the literature and only two of these cases were reported as intramedullary granuloma. This case is presented in order to remind the importance of the cervical cord granuloma which was presented once before in the literature and to emphasize the importance of evaluation of patient history, clinical and radiological findings together in the evaluation of a patient.

  15. Delayed expansion of an intracranial cyst induced by ventriculoperitoneal shunt in a patient with Chiari malformation type 2.

    PubMed

    Maki, Yoshinori; Ohta, Tsuyoshi; Onishi, Hirokazu; Fukui, Naoki; Morimoto, Masanori

    2017-02-11

    A male neonate was referred to our hospital for the treatment of myelomeningocele and hydrocephalus related to Chiari malformation type 2. After the placement of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt for hydrocephalus, an intracranial cyst, which was asymptomatic at first, expanded and caused clinical symptoms due to increased intracranial pressure. The expansion of the cyst was confirmed dominantly in the right lateral ventricle where the VP shunt was inserted. Intraoperative findings through a neuroendoscope suggested that the expanded cyst was an isolated lesion. The pressure reduction in the lateral ventricle through the shunt tube, not the malfunction of the VP shunt, might have attributed to increased intracranial pressure with the expanded cyst. The authors present this rare case, speculating the cause of the expansion of the cyst.

  16. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) Study Identifies Novel Genomic Regions Associated to Chiari-Like Malformation in Griffon Bruxellois Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lemay, Philippe; Knowler, Susan P.; Bouasker, Samir; Nédélec, Yohann; Platt, Simon; Freeman, Courtenay; Child, Georgina; Barreiro, Luis B.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Rusbridge, Clare; Kibar, Zoha

    2014-01-01

    Chiari-like malformation (CM) is a developmental abnormality of the craniocervical junction that is common in the Griffon Bruxellois (GB) breed with an estimated prevalence of 65%. This disease is characterized by overcrowding of the neural parenchyma at the craniocervical junction and disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. The most common clinical sign is pain either as a direct consequence of CM or neuropathic pain as a consequence of secondary syringomyelia. The etiology of CM remains unknown but genetic factors play an important role. To investigate the genetic complexity of the disease, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) approach was adopted. A total of 14 quantitative skull and atlas measurements were taken and were tested for association to CM. Six traits were found to be associated to CM and were subjected to a whole-genome association study using the Illumina canine high density bead chip in 74 GB dogs (50 affected and 24 controls). Linear and mixed regression analyses identified associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on 5 Canis Familiaris Autosomes (CFAs): CFA2, CFA9, CFA12, CFA14 and CFA24. A reconstructed haplotype of 0.53 Mb on CFA2 strongly associated to the height of the cranial fossa (diameter F) and an haplotype of 2.5 Mb on CFA14 associated to both the height of the rostral part of the caudal cranial fossa (AE) and the height of the brain (FG) were significantly associated to CM after 10 000 permutations strengthening their candidacy for this disease (P = 0.0421, P = 0.0094 respectively). The CFA2 QTL harbours the Sall-1 gene which is an excellent candidate since its orthologue in humans is mutated in Townes-Brocks syndrome which has previously been associated to Chiari malformation I. Our study demonstrates the implication of multiple traits in the etiology of CM and has successfully identified two new QTL associated to CM and a potential candidate gene. PMID:24740420

  17. Posterior odontoid process angulation in pediatric Chiari I malformation: an MRI morphometric external validation study.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Dewan, Michael C; Day, Matthew A; Shannon, Chevis N; Tomycz, Luke; Tulipan, Noel; Wellons, John C

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Osseous anomalies of the craniocervical junction are hypothesized to precipitate the hindbrain herniation observed in Chiari I malformation (CM-I). Previous work by Tubbs et al. showed that posterior angulation of the odontoid process is more prevalent in children with CM-I than in healthy controls. The present study is an external validation of that report. The goals of our study were 3-fold: 1) to externally validate the results of Tubbs et al. in a different patient population; 2) to compare how morphometric parameters vary with age, sex, and symptomatology; and 3) to develop a correlative model for tonsillar ectopia in CM-I based on these measurements. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of 119 patients who underwent posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt University; 78 of these patients had imaging available for review. Demographic and clinical variables were collected. A neuroradiologist retrospectively evaluated preoperative MRI examinations in these 78 patients and recorded the following measurements: McRae line length; obex displacement length; odontoid process parameters (height, angle of retroflexion, and angle of retroversion); perpendicular distance to the basion-C2 line (pB-C2 line); length of cerebellar tonsillar ectopia; caudal extent of the cerebellar tonsils; and presence, location, and size of syringomyelia. Odontoid retroflexion grade was classified as Grade 0, > 90°; Grade I,85°-89°; Grade II, 80°-84°; and Grade III, < 80°. Age groups were defined as 0-6 years, 7-12 years, and 13-17 years at the time of surgery. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses, Kruskal-Wallis 1-way ANOVA, and Fisher's exact test were performed to assess the relationship between age, sex, and symptomatology with these craniometric variables. RESULTS The prevalence of posterior odontoid angulation was 81%, which is almost identical to that in the previous report

  18. Computational Investigation of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in the Posterior Cranial Fossa and Cervical Subarachnoid Space in Patients with Chiari I Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Støverud, Karen-Helene; Langtangen, Hans Petter; Ringstad, Geir Andre; Eide, Per Kristian; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previous computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies have demonstrated that the Chiari malformation is associated with abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cervical part of the subarachnoid space (SAS), but the flow in the SAS of the posterior cranial fossa has received little attention. This study extends previous modelling efforts by including the cerebellomedullary cistern, pontine cistern, and 4th ventricle in addition to the cervical subarachnoid space. Methods The study included one healthy control, Con1, and two patients with Chiari I malformation, P1 and P2. Meshes were constructed by segmenting images obtained from T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences. CFD simulations were performed with a previously verified and validated code. Patient-specific flow conditions in the aqueduct and the cervical SAS were used. Two patients with the Chiari malformation and one control were modelled. Results The results demonstrated increased maximal flow velocities in the Chiari patients, ranging from factor 5 in P1 to 14.8 in P2, when compared to Con1 at the level of Foramen Magnum (FM). Maximal velocities in the cervical SAS varied by a factor 2.3, while the maximal flow in the aqueduct varied by a factor 3.5. The pressure drop from the pontine cistern to the cervical SAS was similar in Con1 and P1, but a factor two higher in P2. The pressure drop between the aqueduct and the cervical SAS varied by a factor 9.4 where P1 was the one with the lowest pressure jump and P2 and Con1 differed only by a factor 1.6. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates that including the posterior cranial fossa is feasible and suggests that previously found flow differences between Chiari I patients and healthy individuals in the cervical SAS may be present also in the SAS of the posterior cranial fossa. PMID:27727298

  19. Craniospinal Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia, Aneurysmal Bone Cysts, and Chiari Type 1 Malformation Coexistence in a Patient with McCune-Albright Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urgun, Kamran; Yılmaz, Baran; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakın, Akın; Konya, Deniz; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Kılıç, Türker

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are defined as benign cystic lesions of bone composed of blood-filled spaces. ABCs may be a secondary pathology superimposed on fibrous dysplasia (FD). Concomitant FD and ABC in relation with McCune-Albright syndrome is an extremely rare condition. Here, we report concomitant, double ABCs in bilateral occipital regions and FD from the skull base to the C2 vertebra with Chiari type 1 malformation. A 14-year-old female with a diagnosis of McCune-Albright syndrome presented with swellings at the back of her head. The lesions were consistent with ABCs and were totally resected with reconstruction of the calvarial defects. The coexistence of FD, bilateral occipital ABCs, and Chiari malformation type 1 in a McCune-Albright patient is an extremely rare condition and, to our knowledge, has not been reported to date. Exact diagnosis and appropriate surgical treatment usually lead to a good outcome.

  20. A minimally invasive technique for decompression of Chiari malformation type I (DECMI study): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu; Liu, Jiagang; Chen, Haifeng; Jiang, Shu; Li, Qiang; Fang, Yuan; Gong, Shuhui; Wang, Yuelong; Huang, Siqing

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) is a congenital hindbrain anomaly that requires surgical decompression in symptomatic patients. Posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty (PFDD) has been widely practiced in Chiari decompression, but dural opening carries a high risk of surgical complications. A minimally invasive technique, dural splitting decompression (DSD), preserves the inner layer of the dura without dural opening and duraplasty, potentially reducing surgical complications, length of operative time and hospital stay, and cost. If DSD is non-inferior to PFDD in terms of clinical improvement, DSD could be an alternative treatment modality for CM-I. So far, no randomised study of surgical treatment of CM-I has been reported. This study aims to evaluate if DSD is an effective, safe and cost-saving treatment modality for adult CM-I patients, and may provide evidence for using the minimally invasive procedure extensively. Methods and analysis DECMI is a randomised controlled, single-masked, non-inferiority, single centre clinical trial. Participants meeting the criteria will be randomised to the DSD group and the PFDD group in a 1:1 ratio. The primary outcome is the rate of clinical improvement, which is defined as the complete resolution or partial improvement of the presenting symptoms/signs. The secondary outcomes consist of the incidence of syrinx reduction, postoperative morbidity rates, reoperation rate, quality of life (QoL) and healthcare resource utilisation. A total of 160 patients will be included and followed up at 3 and 12 months postoperatively. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol was approved by the Biological and Medical Ethics Committee of West China Hospital. The findings of this trial will be published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal and presented at scientific conferences. Trial registration number ChiCTR-TRC-14004099. PMID:25926152

  1. The odontoid process invagination in normal subjects, Chiari malformation and Basilar invagination patients: Pathophysiologic correlations with angular craniometry

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jânio A.; Botelho, Ricardo V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniometric studies have shown that both Chiari malformation (CM) and basilar invagination (BI) belong to a spectrum of malformations. A more precise method to differentiate between these types of CVJM is desirable. The Chamberlain's line violation (CLV) is the most common method to identify BI. The authors sought to clarify the real importance of CLV in the spectrum of craniovertebral junction malformations (CVJM) and to identify possible pathophysiological relationships. Methods: We evaluated the CLV in a sample of CVJM, BI, CM patients and a control group of normal subjects and correlated their data with craniocervical angular craniometry. Results: A total of 97 subjects were studied: 32 normal subjects, 41 CM patients, 9 basilar invagination type 1 (BI1) patients, and 15 basilar invagination type 2 (BI2) patients. The mean CLV violation in the groups were: The control group, 0.16 ± 0.45 cm; the CM group, 0.32 ± 0.48 cm; the BI1 group, 1.35 ± 0.5 cm; and the BI2 group, 1.98 ± 0.18 cm. There was strong correlation between CLV and Boogard's angle (R = 0.82, P = 0.000) and the clivus canal angle (R = 0.7, P = 0.000). Conclusions: CM's CLV is discrete and similar to the normal subjects. BI1 and BI2 presented with at least of 0.95 cm CLV and these violations were strongly correlated with a primary cranial angulation (clivus horizontalization) and an acute clivus canal angle (a secondary craniocervical angle). PMID:26229733

  2. The Association of Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia with Chiari Malformation Type I: A Coincidence or a Common Link?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-month-old boy was referred for progressive weight gain. His past medical history included congenital hypothyroidism and developmental delay. Physical examination revealed characteristics of Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy, macrocephaly, and calcinosis cutis. He had hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and elevated Parathyroid Hormone levels. Genetic testing revealed a known mutation of GNAS gene, confirming the diagnosis of Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia (PHP-Ia) (c.34C>T (p.G1n12X)). He had a normal brain MRI at three months, but developmental delay prompted a repeat MRI that revealed Chiari Malformation Type I (CM-I) with hydrocephalus requiring neurosurgical intervention. This was followed by improvement in attaining developmental milestones. Recently, he was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency. This case suggests the potential association of CM-I with PHP-Ia. Larger studies are needed to assess whether CM-I with hydrocephalus are common associations with PHP-Ia and to define potential genetic links between these conditions. We propose a low threshold in performing brain MRI on PHP-1a patients, especially those with persistent developmental delay to rule out CM-I. Early intervention may improve neurodevelopmental outcomes and prevent neurosurgical emergencies. PMID:27703483

  3. Contemporary occurrence of hydrocephalus and Chiari I malformation in sagittal craniosynostosis. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sgulò, Francesco Giovanni; Spennato, Pietro; Aliberti, Ferdinando; Di Martino, Giuliana; Cascone, Daniele; Cinalli, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) and hydrocephalus are often associated with complex craniosynostosis. On the contrary, their simultaneous occurrence in monosutural synostosis is extremely rare. The pathophysiological hypothesis is that they may alter posterior fossa growth and lead to cerebellar tonsil herniation also without skull base primary involvement. Hydrocephalus is multifactorial and may be secondary to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction. The management of these cases is quite complex and not well defined. Cranial vault remodeling should be the only treatment when CM-I is asymptomatic and not related to syringomyelia. Suboccipital decompression should be reserved only in complicated CM-I, usually as a second surgical step following the correction of the supratentorial deformity. In our opinion, the associated hydrocephalus should be treated first in order to normalize intracranial hypertension before opening the cranial sutures. We report the case of a 26-month-old child that presented with sagittal craniosynostosis, hydrocephalus, and CM-I. He was managed by performing endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) first and cranial vault remodeling thereafter. Clinico-radiological outcome was very satisfying. Concerning literature is reviewed; physiopathology and surgical management are discussed.

  4. Lumbar subdural cerebrospinal fluid collection with acute cauda equina syndrome after posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I: case report.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Houssein A; Oldfield, Edward H

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the circumstances of a patient with a cauda equina syndrome due to the development of a lumbar subdural CSF collection with ventral displacement of the cauda equina shortly following posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). This unusual, but clinically significant, complication was successfully treated with percutaneous drainage of the extraarachnoid CSF collection. Although there are a few cases of intracranial subdural hygroma developing after surgery for CM-I, often attributed to a pinhole opening in the arachnoid, as far as the authors can determine, a spinal subdural hygroma associated with surgery for CM-I has not been recognized.

  5. Complications and Resource Utilization Associated With Surgery for Chiari Malformation Type 1 in Adults: A Population Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jacob K.; Ladner, Travis R.; Olsen, Margaret A.; Shannon, Chevis N.; Liu, Jingxia; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Wellons, John C.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Outcomes research on Chiari Malformation Type 1 (CM-1) is impeded by reliance on small, single-center cohorts. Objective To study complications and resource utilization associated with adult CM-1 surgery using administrative data. Methods We used a recently-validated ICD-9-CM code algorithm to retrospectively study adult CM-1 surgeries from 2004–2010 in California, Florida, and New York using State Inpatient Databases. Outcomes included complications and resource utilization within 30 and 90 days of treatment. We used multivariable-logistic regression to identify risk factors for morbidity and negative binomial models to determine risk-adjusted costs. Results We identified 1,947 CM-1 operations. Surgical complications were more common than medical at both 30 (14.3% vs 4.4%) and 90 days (18.7% vs 5.0%) postoperatively. Certain comorbidities were associated with increased morbidity; for example, hydrocephalus increased the risk for surgical (odds ratio [OR]=4.51) and medical (OR=3.98) complications. Medical but not surgical complications were also more common in older patients (OR=5.57 for oldest vs youngest age category) and males (OR=3.19). Risk-adjusted hospital costs were $22,530 at 30 days and $24,852 at 90 days postoperatively. Risk-adjusted 90-day costs were more than twice as high for patients experiencing surgical ($46,264) or medical ($65,679) complications than patients without complications ($18,880). Conclusion Complications after CM-1 surgery are common, and surgical complications are more frequent than medical. Certain comorbidities and demographic characteristics are associated with increased risk for complications. Beyond harming patients, complications are also associated with substantially higher hospital costs. These results may help guide patient management and inform decision making for patients considering surgery. PMID:25910086

  6. Rate of Chiari I malformation in children of mothers with depression with and without prenatal SSRI exposure.

    PubMed

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Woolson, Sandra; Hamer, Robert M; Smith, J Keith; Lury, Kenneth; Gilmore, John H

    2014-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are frequently prescribed to pregnant women. Therefore, research on in utero exposure to SSRIs can be helpful in informing patients and clinicians. The aim of this retrospective two-cohort study was to determine whether there is a statistically significant increase in Chiari I malformations (CIM) in children exposed to SSRIs during pregnancy. A total of 33 children whose mothers received a diagnosis of depression and took SSRIs during pregnancy (SSRI-exposed cohort) were matched to 66 children with no history of maternal depression and no SSRI exposure. In addition, 30 children whose mothers received a diagnosis of depression, but did not receive antidepressants during pregnancy (history of maternal depression cohort), were matched to 60 children with no history of maternal depression and no SSRI exposure. Main outcome was presence/absence of CIM on MRI scans at 1 and/or 2 years of age. Scans were reviewed by two independent neuroradiologists who were blind to exposure status. The SSRI-exposed children were significantly more likely to be classified as CIM than comparison children with no history of maternal depression and no SSRI exposure (18% vs 2%, p=0.003, OR estimate 10.32, 95% Wald confidence limits 2.04-102.46). Duration of SSRI exposure, SSRI exposure at conception, and family history of depression increased the risk. The history of maternal depression cohort did not differ from comparison children with no history of maternal depression and no SSRI exposure in occurrence of CIM (7% vs 5%, p=0.75, OR estimate 1.44, 95% Wald confidence limits 0.23-7.85). Replication is needed, as is additional research to clarify whether SSRIs directly impact risk for CIM or whether this relationship is mediated by severity of depressive symptoms during pregnancy. We would discourage clinicians from altering their prescribing practices until such research is available.

  7. Chiari malformation Type I surgery in pediatric patients. Part 1: validation of an ICD-9-CM code search algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Travis R.; Greenberg, Jacob K.; Guerrero, Nicole; Olsen, Margaret A.; Shannon, Chevis N.; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Anderson, Richard C. E.; Feldstein, Neil A.; Wellons, John C.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Administrative billing data may facilitate large-scale assessments of treatment outcomes for pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). Validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code algorithms for identifying CM-I surgery are critical prerequisites for such studies but are currently only available for adults. The objective of this study was to validate two ICD-9-CM code algorithms using hospital billing data to identify pediatric patients undergoing CM-I decompression surgery. Methods The authors retrospectively analyzed the validity of two ICD-9-CM code algorithms for identifying pediatric CM-I decompression surgery performed at 3 academic medical centers between 2001 and 2013. Algorithm 1 included any discharge diagnosis code of 348.4 (CM-I), as well as a procedure code of 01.24 (cranial decompression) or 03.09 (spinal decompression or laminectomy). Algorithm 2 restricted this group to the subset of patients with a primary discharge diagnosis of 348.4. The positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of each algorithm were calculated. Results Among 625 first-time admissions identified by Algorithm 1, the overall PPV for CM-I decompression was 92%. Among the 581 admissions identified by Algorithm 2, the PPV was 97%. The PPV for Algorithm 1 was lower in one center (84%) compared with the other centers (93%–94%), whereas the PPV of Algorithm 2 remained high (96%–98%) across all subgroups. The sensitivity of Algorithms 1 (91%) and 2 (89%) was very good and remained so across subgroups (82%–97%). Conclusions An ICD-9-CM algorithm requiring a primary diagnosis of CM-I has excellent PPV and very good sensitivity for identifying CM-I decompression surgery in pediatric patients. These results establish a basis for utilizing administrative billing data to assess pediatric CM-I treatment outcomes. PMID:26799412

  8. Chiari malformation Type I surgery in pediatric patients. Part 1: validation of an ICD-9-CM code search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Greenberg, Jacob K; Guerrero, Nicole; Olsen, Margaret A; Shannon, Chevis N; Yarbrough, Chester K; Piccirillo, Jay F; Anderson, Richard C E; Feldstein, Neil A; Wellons, John C; Smyth, Matthew D; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Administrative billing data may facilitate large-scale assessments of treatment outcomes for pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). Validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code algorithms for identifying CM-I surgery are critical prerequisites for such studies but are currently only available for adults. The objective of this study was to validate two ICD-9-CM code algorithms using hospital billing data to identify pediatric patients undergoing CM-I decompression surgery. METHODS The authors retrospectively analyzed the validity of two ICD-9-CM code algorithms for identifying pediatric CM-I decompression surgery performed at 3 academic medical centers between 2001 and 2013. Algorithm 1 included any discharge diagnosis code of 348.4 (CM-I), as well as a procedure code of 01.24 (cranial decompression) or 03.09 (spinal decompression or laminectomy). Algorithm 2 restricted this group to the subset of patients with a primary discharge diagnosis of 348.4. The positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of each algorithm were calculated. RESULTS Among 625 first-time admissions identified by Algorithm 1, the overall PPV for CM-I decompression was 92%. Among the 581 admissions identified by Algorithm 2, the PPV was 97%. The PPV for Algorithm 1 was lower in one center (84%) compared with the other centers (93%-94%), whereas the PPV of Algorithm 2 remained high (96%-98%) across all subgroups. The sensitivity of Algorithms 1 (91%) and 2 (89%) was very good and remained so across subgroups (82%-97%). CONCLUSIONS An ICD-9-CM algorithm requiring a primary diagnosis of CM-I has excellent PPV and very good sensitivity for identifying CM-I decompression surgery in pediatric patients. These results establish a basis for utilizing administrative billing data to assess pediatric CM-I treatment outcomes.

  9. Intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential recovery following opening of the fourth ventricle during posterior fossa decompression in Chiari malformation: case report.

    PubMed

    Grossauer, Stefan; Koeck, Katharina; Vince, Giles H

    2015-03-01

    The most appropriate surgical technique for posterior fossa decompression in Chiari malformation (CM) remains a matter of debate. Intraoperative electrophysiological studies during posterior fossa decompression of Type I CM (CM-I) aim to shed light on the entity's pathomechanism as well as on the ideal extent of decompression. The existing reports on this issue state that significant improvement in conduction occurs after craniotomy in all cases, but additional durotomy contributes a further improvement in only a minority of cases. This implies that craniotomy alone might suffice for clinical improvement without the need of duraplasty or even subarachnoid manipulation at the level of the craniocervical junction. In contrast to published data, the authors describe the case of a 32-year-old woman who underwent surgery for CM associated with extensive cervicothoracic syringomyelia and whose intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) did not notably improve after craniotomy or following durotomy; rather, they only improved after opening of the fourth ventricle and restoration of CSF flow through the foramen of Magendie. Postoperatively, the patient recovered completely from her preoperative neurological deficits. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of significant SSEP recovery after opening the fourth ventricle in the decompression of a CM-I. The electrophysiological and operative techniques are described in detail and the findings are discussed in the light of available literature. The authors conclude that there might be a subset of CM-I patients who require subarachnoid dissection at the level of the craniocervical junction to benefit clinically. Prospective studies with detailed electrophysiological analyses seem warranted to answer the question regarding the best surgical approach in CM-I decompression.

  10. Contiguous triple spinal dysraphism associated with Chiari malformation Type II and hydrocephalus: an embryological conundrum between the unified theory of Pang and the unified theory of McLone.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Srinivasan, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Triple spinal dysraphism is extremely rare. There are published reports of multiple discrete neural tube defects with intervening normal segments that are explained by the multisite closure theory of primary neurulation, having an association with Chiari malformation Type II consistent with the unified theory of McLone. The authors report on a 1-year-old child with contiguous myelomeningocele and lipomyelomeningocele centered on Type I split cord malformation with Chiari malformation Type II and hydrocephalus. This composite anomaly is probably due to select abnormalities of the neurenteric canal during gastrulation, with a contiguous cascading impact on both dysjunction of the neural tube and closure of the neuropore, resulting in a small posterior fossa, probably bringing the unified theory of McLone closer to the unified theory of Pang.

  11. Clinical significance of changes in pB-C2 distance in Chiari I malformation patients following posterior fossa decompression: a single-institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Adrian J.; Duong, Ngoc Quyen; Bonney, Phillip A.; Cheema, Ahmed A.; Glenn, Chad A.; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Stoner, Julie B.; Mapstone, Timothy B.

    2016-01-01

    Object The coexistence of Chiari I malformations and ventral brainstem compression (VBSC) has been well-documented, but the change in VBSC after posterior fossa decompression (PFD) has had little investigation. In this study we evaluate the incidence and degree of VBSC in patients with Chiari I malformations and determine the change in VBSC after PFD, correlating changes in VBSC with clinical status and the need for further intervention. Methods Patients who underwent PFD for Chiari I malformations by the senior author from November 2005 – January 2013 with complete radiographic records were included in the analysis. The following data were obtained: subjective and objective measures of ventral brainstem compression; relationship of odontoid to Chamberlain’s, McGregor’s, McRae’s, and Wackenheim’s lines; clival length; foramen magnum diameter; and basal angle. The objective evaluation of VBSC was performed with the senior author’s previously described method using pB-C2 distance. Statistical analyses were performed using paired t-tests and a mixed effects ANOVA model. Results Thirty-one patients were included in the analysis. The mean age of the cohort was 10.0 years. There was a small but statistically significant increase in pB-C2 postoperatively (0.5 mm, p < 0.0001 via mixed effects ANOVA). Eleven patients had postoperative pB-C2 values greater than 9 mm. The mean distance from the odontoid tip to Wackenheim’s line did not change after PFD, signifying postoperative occipitocervical stability. No patients underwent transoral odontoidectomy or occipitocervical fusion. No patients experienced clinical deterioration after PFD. Conclusions The increase in pB-C2 in patients undergoing posterior fossa decompression is likely a result of releasing the posterior vector on the ventral dura, allowing it to relax posteriorly. This increase is well-tolerated, and a postoperative pB-C2 measurement of greater than 9 mm in light of stable craniocervical metrics and

  12. Conquer Chiari

    MedlinePlus

    ... Efforts ABOUT US C&S Patient Education Foundation Mission History & Accomplishments Team Financial Disclosure Forms (990's) Get Involved Contact Us Conquer Chiari Home Pediatric Chiari Research Center Walk Across America New! CCRC finds Chiari Clues in Skull and ...

  13. Case Report: Acute obstructive hydrocephalus associated with infratentorial extra-axial fluid collection following foramen magnum decompression and durotomy for Chiari malformation type I

    PubMed Central

    Munakomi, Sunil; Bhattarai, Binod; Chaudhary, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to infratentorial extra-axial fluid collection (EAFC) is an extremely rare complication of foramen magnum decompression (FMD) and durotomy for Chiari malformation type I. Presence of infratentorial  EAFC invariably causes obstruction at the level of the fourth ventricle or aqueduct of Silvius, thereby indicating its definitive role in hydrocephalus. Pathogenesis of EAFC is said to be a local arachnoid tear as a result of durotomy, as this complication is not described in FMD without durotomy. Controversy exists in management. Usually EAFC is said to resolve with conservative management; so hydrocephalus doesn’t require treatment. However, in this case EAFC was progressive and ventriculo-peritoneal shunting (VPS) was needed for managing progressive and symptomatic hydrocephalus. PMID:27303624

  14. Chiari Malformation: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is measured by a patients ability to resist force. Motor Strength Assessment Scale Score 0 1 2 3 4 5 Description No muscle movement Some visible movement Full range of motion, not against gravity Movement against gravity, but not ...

  15. [Treatment of syringomyelia in patients with Chiari malformation and craniosynostosis. A case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Aransay-Garcia, A; Villarejo-Ortega, F J

    2016-11-16

    Introduccion. Los pacientes con craneosinostosis complejas o unisuturales presentan frecuentemente malformacion de Chiari y siringomielia. El tratamiento quirurgico de la siringomielia en estos pacientes es controvertido. Caso clinico. Niña de 3 años con craneosinostosis compleja no corregida quirurgicamente. Permanecio asintomatica a pesar de que en la resonancia magnetica craneal se evidencio una malformacion de Chiari y un año despues desarrollo una siringomielia cervicodorsolumbar. Se le realizo una craniectomia suboccipital descompresiva, pero posteriormente sufrio un empeoramiento de la siringomielia. El registro de presion intracraneal resulto patologico, por lo que se decidio realizar una craneotomia descompresiva frontoparietotemporal bilateral y remodelacion de la boveda craneal, con lo que se consiguio una disminucion significativa de la siringomielia. Conclusiones. Tras la revision de la bibliografia, se observa que actualmente no existe un consenso sobre el tratamiento de la siringomielia en los pacientes con craneosinostosis y malformacion de Chiari. Algunos autores recomiendan la simultanea descompresion quirurgica suboccipital y de la boveda craneal, otros solo la descompresion de la boveda craneal, y otros la ampliacion de la fosa posterior con distractores. En los casos en los que se realizo primero la descompresion suboccipital no se consiguio resolver ni estabilizar la siringomielia. Concluimos que el tratamiento mas eficaz para los pacientes con siringomielia y craneosinostosis es la remodelacion descompresiva de la boveda craneal, ya que el principal factor causante de la siringomielia es la hipertension intracraneal y la falta de distensibilidad del craneo.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging-based measures predictive of short-term surgical outcome in patients with Chiari malformation Type I: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Alperin, Noam; Loftus, James Ryan; Bagci, Ahmet M; Lee, Sang H; Oliu, Carlos J; Shah, Ashish H; Green, Barth A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study identifies quantitative imaging-based measures in patients with Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) that are associated with positive outcomes after suboccipital decompression with duraplasty. METHODS Fifteen patients in whom CM-I was newly diagnosed underwent MRI preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. More than 20 previously described morphological and physiological parameters were derived to assess quantitatively the impact of surgery. Postsurgical clinical outcomes were assessed in 2 ways, based on resolution of the patient's chief complaint and using a modified Chicago Chiari Outcome Scale (CCOS). Statistical analyses were performed to identify measures that were different between the unfavorable- and favorable-outcome cohorts. Multivariate analysis was used to identify the strongest predictors of outcome. RESULTS The strongest physiological parameter predictive of outcome was the preoperative maximal cord displacement in the upper cervical region during the cardiac cycle, which was significantly larger in the favorable-outcome subcohorts for both outcome types (p < 0.05). Several hydrodynamic measures revealed significantly larger preoperative-to-postoperative changes in the favorable-outcome subcohort. Predictor sets for the chief-complaint classification included the cord displacement, percent venous drainage through the jugular veins, and normalized cerebral blood flow with 93.3% accuracy. Maximal cord displacement combined with intracranial volume change predicted outcome based on the modified CCOS classification with similar accuracy. CONCLUSIONS Tested physiological measures were stronger predictors of outcome than the morphological measures in patients with CM-I. Maximal cord displacement and intracranial volume change during the cardiac cycle together with a measure that reflects the cerebral venous drainage pathway emerged as likely predictors of decompression outcome in patients with CM-I.

  17. Cranial malformations in related white lions (Panthera leo krugeri).

    PubMed

    Scaglione, F E; Schröder, C; Degiorgi, G; Zeira, O; Bollo, E

    2010-11-01

    White lions (Panthera leo krugeri) have never been common in the wild, and at present, the greatest population is kept in zoos where they are bred for biological and biodiversity conservation. During the years 2003 to 2008 in a zoological garden in northern Italy, 19 white lions were born to the same parents, who were in turn paternally consanguineous. Out of the 19 lions, 4 (21%) were stillborn, 13 (69%) died within 1 month, and 1 (5%) was euthanatized after 6 months because of difficulty with prehension of food. Six lions (32%) showed malformations involving the head (jaw, tongue, throat, teeth, and cranial bones). One lion (5%) still alive at 30 months revealed an Arnold-Chiari malformation upon submission for neurological evaluation of postural and gait abnormalities. Paternal consanguinity of the parents, along with inbreeding among white lions in general, could account for the high incidence of congenital malformations of the head in this pride of white lions.

  18. [Monitoring of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials during Foramen Magnum Decompression of Chiari Malformation Type I Complicated with Syringomyelia: A Report of Two Cases].

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Tatsuo; Takenaka, Ichiro; Kinoshita, Yuki; Shiraishi, Munehiro; Uehara, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Joyashiki, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    Few reports exist on anesthetic management for foramen magnum decompression (FMD) of Chiari malformation type I (CM I) complicated with syringomyelia. In two such cases we monitored somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP). Case 1 : A 40-year-old woman presented with occipital headache and nuchal pain for 2 months; numbness and muscular weakness of bilateral upper limbs for a month. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed CM I complicated with syringomyelia. Case 2 : A 32-year-old man presented with numbness and muscular weakness of bilateral upper limbs for 5 months; numbness and muscular weakness of lower limbs for 2 months. MRI scan showed CM I complicated with syringomyelia. They underwent FMD. In both cases, general anesthesia was induced with remifentanil, propofol and rocuronium, and was maintained with oxygen, air, remifentanil and propofol. Moreover, we monitored SEP. Their operative courses were uneventful. In case 1, SEP latency became shorter after FMD. Her preoperative neurologic symptoms disappeared on first postoperative day. In contrast there was no change of SEP latency after FMD in case 2. His preoperative neurologic symptoms showed no change on fifth postoperative day. SEP monitoring may be a useful index for prediction of early recovery of neurologic symptoms after FMD.

  19. Foramen Magnum Decompression and Duraplasty is Superior to Only Foramen Magnum Decompression in Chiari Malformation Type 1 Associated with Syringomyelia in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Berkman, Mehmet Zafer; Ünal, Emre; Akpınar, Elif; Gök, Şevki; Orakdöğen, Metin; Aydın, Salih

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Purpose To compare surgical results of foramen magnum decompression with and without duraplasty in Chiari malformation type 1 (CM-1) associated syringomyelia (SM). Overview of Literature The optimal surgical treatment of CM-1 associated with SM is unclear. Methods Twenty-five cases of CM-1 with SM were included. There were 12 patients (48%) in the non-duraplasty group and 13 patients (52%) in the duraplasty group. The rate of improvement, state of postoperative SM size, amount of tonsillar herniation, preoperative symptom duration, complications and reoperation rates were analysed. Results The rate of clinical improvement was significantly higher with duraplasty (84.6%) than without (33.3%, p <0.05). The rate of postoperative syrinx regression was significantly higher in the duraplasty group (84.6%) than in the non-duraplasty group (33.3%, p <0.05). One case in the duraplasty group needed a reoperation compared with five cases in the non-duraplasty group (p =0.059). Conclusions Duraplasty is superior to non-duraplasty in CM-1 associated with SM despite a slightly higher complication rate. PMID:26435790

  20. Use of Morphometric Mapping to Characterise Symptomatic Chiari-Like Malformation, Secondary Syringomyelia and Associated Brachycephaly in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Chloe; Griffiths, Sandra; McFadyen, Angus K.; Jovanovik, Jelena; Tauro, Anna; Kibar, Zoha; Driver, Colin J.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Rusbridge, Clare

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To characterise the symptomatic phenotype of Chiari-like malformation (CM), secondary syringomyelia (SM) and brachycephaly in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel using morphometric measurements on mid-sagittal Magnetic Resonance images (MRI) of the brain and craniocervical junction. Methods This retrospective study, based on a previous quantitative analysis in the Griffon Bruxellois (GB), used 24 measurements taken on 130 T1-weighted MRI of hindbrain and cervical region. Associated brachycephaly was estimated using 26 measurements, including rostral forebrain flattening and olfactory lobe rotation, on 72 T2-weighted MRI of the whole brain. Both study cohorts were divided into three groups; Control, CM pain and SM and their morphometries compared with each other. Results Fourteen significant traits were identified in the hindbrain study and nine traits in the whole brain study, six of which were similar to the GB and suggest a common aetiology. The Control cohort had the most elliptical brain (p = 0.010), least olfactory bulb rotation (p = 0.003) and a protective angle (p = 0.004) compared to the other groups. The CM pain cohort had the greatest rostral forebrain flattening (p = 0.007), shortest basioccipital (p = 0.019), but a greater distance between the atlas and basioccipital (p = 0.002) which was protective for SM. The SM cohort had two conformation anomalies depending on the severity of craniocervical junction incongruities; i) the proximity of the dens (p <0.001) ii) increased airorhynchy with a smaller, more ventrally rotated olfactory bulb (p <0.001). Both generated ‘concertina’ flexures of the brain and craniocervical junction. Conclusion Morphometric mapping provides a diagnostic tool for quantifying symptomatic CM, secondary SM and their relationship with brachycephaly. It is hypothesized that CM pain is associated with increased brachycephaly and SM can result from different combinations of abnormalities of the forebrain, caudal fossa and

  1. Comparison of posterior fossa decompression with and without duraplasty for the surgical treatment of Chiari malformation type I in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junchen; Li, Yongning; Wang, Tianyu; Gao, Jun; Xu, Jincheng; Lai, Runlong; Tan, Dianhui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) is a congenital neurosurgical disease about the herniation of cerebellar tonsil through the foramen magnum. A variety of surgical techniques for CM-I have been used, and there is a controversy whether to use posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty (PFDD) or posterior fossa decompression without duraplasty (PFD) in CM-I patients. Here, we compared the clinical results and effectiveness of PFDD and PFD in adult patients with CM-I. The cases of 103 adult CM-I patients who underwent posterior fossa decompression with or without duraplasty from 2008 to 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the surgical techniques: PFDD group (n = 70) and PFD group (n = 33). We compared the demographics, preoperative symptoms, radiographic characteristics, postoperative complications, and clinical outcomes between the PFD and PFDD patients. No statistically significant differences were found between the PFDD and PFD groups with regard to demographics, preoperative symptoms, radiographic characteristics, and clinical outcomes(P > 0.05); however, the postoperative complication aseptic meningitis occurred more frequently in the PFDD group than in the PFD group (P = 0.027). We also performed a literature review about the PFDD and PFD and made a summary of these preview studies. Our study suggests that both PFDD and PFD could achieve similar clinical outcomes for adult CM-I patients. The choice of surgical procedure should be based on the patient's condition. PFDD may lead to a higher complication rate and autologous grafts seemed to perform better than nonautologous grafts for duraplasty. PMID:28121938

  2. Chiari malformation Type I surgery in pediatric patients. Part 2: complications and the influence of comorbid disease in California, Florida, and New York.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jacob K; Olsen, Margaret A; Yarbrough, Chester K; Ladner, Travis R; Shannon, Chevis N; Piccirillo, Jay F; Anderson, Richard C E; Wellons, John C; Smyth, Matthew D; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is a common and often debilitating pediatric neurological disease. However, efforts to guide preoperative counseling and improve outcomes research are impeded by reliance on small, single-center studies. Consequently, the objective of this study was to investigate CM-I surgical outcomes using population-level administrative billing data. METHODS The authors used Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases (SID) to study pediatric patients undergoing surgical decompression for CM-I from 2004 to 2010 in California, Florida, and New York. They assessed the prevalence and influence of preoperative complex chronic conditions (CCC) among included patients. Outcomes included medical and surgical complications within 90 days of treatment. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for surgical complications. RESULTS A total of 936 pediatric CM-I surgeries were identified for the study period. Overall, 29.2% of patients were diagnosed with syringomyelia and 13.7% were diagnosed with scoliosis. Aside from syringomyelia and scoliosis, 30.3% of patients had at least 1 CCC, most commonly neuromuscular (15.2%) or congenital or genetic (8.4%) disease. Medical complications were uncommon, occurring in 2.6% of patients. By comparison, surgical complications were diagnosed in 12.7% of patients and typically included shunt-related complications (4.0%), meningitis (3.7%), and other neurosurgery-specific complications (7.4%). Major complications (e.g., stroke or myocardial infarction) occurred in 1.4% of patients. Among children with CCCs, only comorbid hydrocephalus was associated with a significantly increased risk of surgical complications (OR 4.5, 95% CI 2.5-8.1). CONCLUSIONS Approximately 1 in 8 pediatric CM-I patients experienced a surgical complication, whereas medical complications were rare. Although CCCs were common in pediatric CM-I patients, only hydrocephalus was independently

  3. Clinical significance of changes in pB-C2 distance in patients with Chiari Type I malformations following posterior fossa decompression: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Bonney, Phillip A; Maurer, Adrian J; Cheema, Ahmed A; Duong, Quyen; Glenn, Chad A; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Stoner, Julie A; Mapstone, Timothy B

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT The coexistence of Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) and ventral brainstem compression (VBSC) has been well documented, but the change in VBSC after posterior fossa decompression (PFD) has undergone little investigation. In this study the authors evaluated VBSC in patients with CM-I and determined the change in VBSC after PFD, correlating changes in VBSC with clinical status and the need for further intervention. METHODS Patients who underwent PFD for CM-I by the senior author from November 2005 to January 2013 with complete radiological records were included in the analysis. The following data were obtained: objective measure of VBSC (pB-C2 distance); relationship of odontoid to Chamberlain's, McGregor's, McRae's, and Wackenheim's lines; clival length; foramen magnum diameter; and basal angle. Statistical analyses were performed using paired t-tests and a mixed-effects ANOVA model. RESULTS Thirty-one patients were included in the analysis. The mean age of the cohort was 10.0 years. There was a small but statistically significant increase in pB-C2 postoperatively (0.5 mm, p < 0.0001, mixed-effects ANOVA). Eleven patients had postoperative pB-C2 values greater than 9 mm. The mean distance from the odontoid tip to Wackenheim's line did not change after PFD, signifying postoperative occipitocervical stability. No patients underwent transoral odontoidectomy or occipitocervical fusion. No patients experienced clinical deterioration after PFD. CONCLUSIONS The increase in pB-C2 in patients undergoing PFD may occur as a result of releasing the posterior vector on the ventral dura, allowing it to relax posteriorly. This increase appears to be well-tolerated, and a postoperative pB-C2 measurement of more than 9 mm in light of stable craniocervical metrics and a nonworsened clinical examination does not warrant further intervention.

  4. Stratified whole genome linkage analysis of Chiari type I malformation implicates known Klippel-Feil syndrome genes as putative disease candidates.

    PubMed

    Markunas, Christina A; Soldano, Karen; Dunlap, Kaitlyn; Cope, Heidi; Asiimwe, Edgar; Stajich, Jeffrey; Enterline, David; Grant, Gerald; Fuchs, Herbert; Gregory, Simon G; Ashley-Koch, Allison E

    2013-01-01

    Chiari Type I Malformation (CMI) is characterized by displacement of the cerebellar tonsils below the base of the skull, resulting in significant neurologic morbidity. Although multiple lines of evidence support a genetic contribution to disease, no genes have been identified. We therefore conducted the largest whole genome linkage screen to date using 367 individuals from 66 families with at least two individuals presenting with nonsyndromic CMI with or without syringomyelia. Initial findings across all 66 families showed minimal evidence for linkage due to suspected genetic heterogeneity. In order to improve power to localize susceptibility genes, stratified linkage analyses were performed using clinical criteria to differentiate families based on etiologic factors. Families were stratified on the presence or absence of clinical features associated with connective tissue disorders (CTDs) since CMI and CTDs frequently co-occur and it has been proposed that CMI patients with CTDs represent a distinct class of patients with a different underlying disease mechanism. Stratified linkage analyses resulted in a marked increase in evidence of linkage to multiple genomic regions consistent with reduced genetic heterogeneity. Of particular interest were two regions (Chr8, Max LOD = 3.04; Chr12, Max LOD = 2.09) identified within the subset of "CTD-negative" families, both of which harbor growth differentiation factors (GDF6, GDF3) implicated in the development of Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS). Interestingly, roughly 3-5% of CMI patients are diagnosed with KFS. In order to investigate the possibility that CMI and KFS are allelic, GDF3 and GDF6 were sequenced leading to the identification of a previously known KFS missense mutation and potential regulatory variants in GDF6. This study has demonstrated the value of reducing genetic heterogeneity by clinical stratification implicating several convincing biological candidates and further supporting the hypothesis that

  5. Posterior fossa decompression with and without duraplasty for the treatment of Chiari malformation type I-a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Chu, LinYang; He, Rui; Ge, Chang; Lei, Ting

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of Chiari malformation type 1 (CM-I) with posterior fossa decompression without (PFD) or with duraplasty (PFDD) is controversial. Our aim is to compare the clinical outcome between the two methods for the treatment of CM-I. In this paper, the authors report a systematic review and meta-analysis of operation time, clinical improvement, and complications of PFD compared with PFDD for the treatment of CM-I. Randomized or non-randomized controlled trials of PFD and PFDD were considered for inclusion. Twelve published reports of eligible studies involving 841participants meet the inclusion criteria. There is significant difference in the operative time [mean difference = -74.63, 95 % CI (-83.02, -66.25), p < 0.05] in favor of PFD compared with PFDD. There is significant difference in overall complication rates [mean difference = 0.34, 95 % CI (0.19, 0.60), p < 0.05] and rates of CSF leak [mean difference = 0.24, 95 % CI (0.07, 0.78), p < 0.05] in favor of PFD groups. However, there is significant difference in the clinical improvement rate in favor of the PFDD group [mean difference = 0.85, 95 % CI (0.73, 0.99), p < 0.05]. Although PFDD is related with longer operation time and higher CSF leak rate, it can still be considered as a preferable treatment option for most CM-I patients for its higher improvement rate. More evidence from advanced multi-center studies are needed to provide illumination for the surgical decision making of CM-I.

  6. Chiari malformation Type I surgery in pediatric patients. Part 2: complications and the influence of comorbid disease in California, Florida, and New York

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jacob K.; Olsen, Margaret A.; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Ladner, Travis R.; Shannon, Chevis N.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Anderson, Richard C. E.; Wellons, John C.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is a common and often debilitating pediatric neurological disease. However, efforts to guide preoperative counseling and improve outcomes research are impeded by reliance on small, singlecenter studies. Consequently, the objective of this study was to investigate CM-I surgical outcomes using population-level administrative billing data. Methods The authors used Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases (SID) to study pediatric patients undergoing surgical decompression for CM-I from 2004 to 2010 in California, Florida, and New York. They assessed the prevalence and influence of preoperative complex chronic conditions (CCC) among included patients. Outcomes included medical and surgical complications within 90 days of treatment. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for surgical complications. Results A total of 936 pediatric CM-I surgeries were identified for the study period. Overall, 29.2% of patients were diagnosed with syringomyelia and 13.7% were diagnosed with scoliosis. Aside from syringomyelia and scoliosis, 30.3% of patients had at least 1 CCC, most commonly neuromuscular (15.2%) or congenital or genetic (8.4%) disease. Medical complications were uncommon, occurring in 2.6% of patients. By comparison, surgical complications were diagnosed in 12.7% of patients and typically included shunt-related complications (4.0%), meningitis (3.7%), and other neurosurgery-specific complications (7.4%). Major complications (e.g., stroke or myocardial infarction) occurred in 1.4% of patients. Among children with CCCs, only comorbid hydrocephalus was associated with a significantly increased risk of surgical complications (OR 4.5, 95% CI 2.5–8.1). Conclusions Approximately 1 in 8 pediatric CM-I patients experienced a surgical complication, whereas medical complications were rare. Although CCCs were common in pediatric CM-I patients, only hydrocephalus was independently

  7. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Presenting as a "Pseudo-Chiari 1

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Ali S; Sulhan, Suraj; Watson, Ian T; Leonard, Dean; Arrey, Eliel N; Nguyen, Phu; Layton, Kennith F

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is classified as a decrease in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure secondary to a CSF leakage and consequent descent of the brain into the foramen magnum. Diagnosing SIH can be difficult due to its overlapping findings with Arnold-Chiari type 1 Malformation (CM1) where the cerebellar tonsils herniate into the foramen magnum. The similarity of both conditions calls for a more reliable imaging technique to localize the CSF leak which could narrow the differential diagnosis and aid in choosing the correct treatment. Here, we present a case of a 28-year-old female, ten weeks post-partum with symptoms similar to SIH. MRI of the brain was remarkable for tonsillar herniation below the foramen magnum. Literature was reviewed for additional neuroradiology techniques that would aid in narrowing our differential diagnosis. Interestingly, computed tomography-, digital subtraction-, and magnetic resonance myelography with intrathecal gadolinium are the preferred techniques for diagnosis of high flow and low flow CSF leaks, respectively. These modalities further aid in choosing the correct treatment while avoiding complications. Literature suggests that treatment for CM1 involves posterior fossa decompression, whereas the mainstay of treatment for SIH involves an epidural blood patch (EBP). Thus, our patient was treated with an EBP and recovered without complication. PMID:28357166

  8. Dexmedetomidine for an awake fiber-optic intubation of a parturient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, Type I Arnold Chiari malformation and status post released tethered spinal cord presenting for repeat cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tanmay H; Badve, Manasi S; Olajide, Kowe O; Skorupan, Havyn M; Waters, Jonathan H; Vallejo, Manuel C

    2011-07-01

    Patients with Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS) have congenital fusion of their cervical vertebrae due to a failure in the normal segmentation of the cervical vertebrae during the early weeks of gestation and also have myriad of other associated anomalies. Because of limited neck mobility, airway management in these patients can be a challenge for the anesthesiologist. We describe a unique case in which a dexmedetomidine infusion was used as sedation for an awake fiber-optic intubation in a parturient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome, who presented for elective cesarean delivery. A 36-year-old female, G2P1A0 with KFS (fusion of cervical vertebrae) who had prior cesarean section for breech presentation with difficult airway management was scheduled for repeat cesarean delivery. After obtaining an informed consent, patient was taken in the operating room and non-invasive monitors were applied. Dexmedetomidine infusion was started and after adequate sedation, an awake fiber-optic intubation was performed. General anesthetic was administered after intubation and dexmedetomidine infusion was continued on maintenance dose until extubation. Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS) is a rare congenital disorder for which the true incidence is unknown, which makes it even rare to see a parturient with this disease. Patients with KFS usually have other congenital abnormalities as well, sometimes including the whole thoraco-lumbar spine (Type III) precluding the use of neuraxial anesthesia for these patients. Obstetric patients with KFS can present unique challenges in administering anesthesia and analgesia, primarily as it relates to the airway and dexmedetomidine infusion has shown promising result to manage the airway through awake fiberoptic intubation without any adverse effects on mother and fetus.

  9. Basilar invagination, Chiari malformation, syringomyelia: a review.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul

    2009-01-01

    Institute and personal experience (over 25 years) of basilar invagination was reviewed. The database of the department included 3300 patients with craniovertebral junction pathology from the year 1951 till date. Patients with basilar invagination were categorized into two groups based on the presence (Group A) or absence (Group B) of clinical and radiological evidence of instability of the craniovertebral junction. Standard radiological parameters described by Chamberlain were used to assess the instability of the craniovertebral junction. The pathogenesis and clinical features in patients with Group A basilar invagination appeared to be related to mechanical instability, whereas it appeared to be secondary to embryonic dysgenesis in patients with Group B basilar invagination. Treatment by facetal distraction and direct lateral mass fixation can result in restoration of craniovertebral and cervical alignment in patients with Group A basilar invagination. Such a treatment can circumvent the need for transoral or posterior fossa decompression surgery. Foramen magnum bone decompression appears to be a rational surgical treatment for patients having Group B basilar invagination. The division of patients with basilar invagination on the basis of presence or absence of instability provides insight into the pathogenesis of the anomaly and a basis for rational surgical treatment.

  10. Klippel-Feil syndrome and Dandy-Walker malformation.

    PubMed

    Karaman, A; Kahveci, H

    2011-01-01

    The Klippel-Feil deformity is a complex of osseous and visceral anomalies, which include low hairline, platybasia, fused cervical vertebrae with a short neck, and deafness. Associated central nervous system abnormalities include occipital cephalocele, Chiari I malformation, syrinx, microcephaly, and hydrocephalus. Herein, we report a case with Klippel-Feil syndrome and Dandy-Walker malformation.

  11. Angular craniometry in craniocervical junction malformation.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Ricardo Vieira; Ferreira, Edson Dener Zandonadi

    2013-10-01

    The craniometric linear dimensions of the posterior fossa have been relatively well studied, but angular craniometry has been poorly studied and may reveal differences in the several types of craniocervical junction malformation. The objectives of this study were to evaluate craniometric angles compared with normal subjects and elucidate the main angular differences among the types of craniocervical junction malformation and the correlation between craniocervical and cervical angles. Angular craniometries were studied using primary cranial angles (basal and Boogard's) and secondary craniocervical angles (clivus canal and cervical spine lordosis). Patients with basilar invagination had significantly wider basal angles, sharper clivus canal angles, larger Boogard's angles, and greater cervical lordosis than the Chiari malformation and control groups. The Chiari malformation group does not show significant differences when compared with normal controls. Platybasia occurred only in basilar invagination and is suggested to be more prevalent in type II than in type I. Platybasic patients have a more acute clivus canal angle and show greater cervical lordosis than non-platybasics. The Chiari group does not show significant differences when compared with the control, but the basilar invagination groups had craniometric variables significantly different from normal controls. Hyperlordosis observed in the basilar inavagination group was associated with craniocervical kyphosis conditioned by acute clivus canal angles.

  12. 75 FR 17169 - Nextera Energy Duane Arnold, LLC, Duane Arnold Energy Center; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... COMMISSION Nextera Energy Duane Arnold, LLC, Duane Arnold Energy Center; Exemption 1.0 Background NextEra Energy Duane Arnold, LLC, formerly FPL Energy Duane Arnold, LLC (the licensee) is the holder of Facility Operating License No. DPR- 49, which authorizes operation of the Duane Arnold Energy Center (Duane...

  13. A Tribute to Arnold Reichenberger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebold, Russell P.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Special issue as a tribute to Dr. Arnold Reichenberger, a well-known Hispanist, who has served as chairman of the Department of Romance Languages at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania. (DS)

  14. 09-NIF Dedication: Arnold Schwarzenegger

    ScienceCinema

    Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger

    2016-07-12

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

  15. 09-NIF Dedication: Arnold Schwarzenegger

    SciTech Connect

    Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger

    2009-07-02

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

  16. Cognitive profiles of neurofibromatosis type 1 patients with minor brain malformations.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Maria T; Walsh, Karin S; Kardel, Peter G; Kutteruf, Rachel E; Bhatt, Rujuta R; Bouton, Tara C; Vezina, Louis-Gilbert; Packer, Roger J

    2012-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic condition associated with increased risk of abnormal brain development. The relationship between a specific type of brain malformation and a distinct cognitive sign/deficiency remains unknown. This study investigated the frequency of brain malformations in children with neurofibromatosis type 1, and the impact of those brain malformations on cognitive performance. A retrospective examination was performed of cranial magnetic resonance imaging and clinical records in 604 neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. Eighteen patients with brain malformations and intellectual evaluations were available and compared to a subset of neurofibromatosis type 1 patients (n = 20) without brain malformations. The most common brain malformations included hypothalamic hamartomas and Chiari I malformation. More complex migration disorders were also observed. Comparisons of cognitive profiles between groups revealed differences in patients with hamartomas compared with those manifesting Chiari I malformations or control subjects. As a group, those with hamartomas demonstrated below-average global intellect, whereas patients with Chiari I or no malformations performed in the average range. Disorders in cell organization, expressed as brain malformations (hamartomas or more complex defects), may comprise part of the expression of organizational and developmental defects in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 and possibly other rat sarcoma gene-mitogen activated protein kinase pathway disorders.

  17. American Syringomyelia & Chiari Alliance Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Conditions Support & Resources Professional Center Research Great Expectations Patients, Family & Friends: For those living with Chiari ... Grant Guidelines Marcy Speer Research Memorial Fund Great Expectations Fundraise ASAP’s L.E.A.R.N! Points ...

  18. [Chronic Budd-Chiari syndrome can cause liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Stine; Nielsen, Dennis Tønner; Grønbæk, Henning

    2012-06-11

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is a rare disease defined by congestive hepatopathy with obstruction of the hepatic venous outflow tract. Classical symptoms and signs include ascites, hepatomegaly, abdominal pain and various degrees of liver dysfunction. BCS is predominantly caused by thrombosis, malformations and venous compression. We present a case, in which BCS was the cause of liver cirrhosis complicated with refractory ascites and which can be misinterpreted as hepatocellular carcinoma nodules. The diagnosis was confirmed during the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedure with successful vascular stenting resolving the ascites formation.

  19. Sutures - separated

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be caused by: Arnold-Chiari malformation Battered child syndrome Bleeding inside the brain (intraventricular hemorrhage) Brain tumor Certain vitamin deficiencies Dandy-Walker malformation Down syndrome Hydrocephalus Infections that are present at birth ( ...

  20. Arnold Tongues in Cell Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Mogens

    In a recent work with Leo Kadanoff we studied the synchronization between an internal and an external frequency. One obtains a highly structured diagram with details that in essence are related to the difference between rational and irrational number. The synchronized regions appear as Arnold tongues that widen as the coupling between the frequencies increases. Such tongues have been observed in many physical systems, like in the Libchaber convective cell in the basement of the University of Chicago. In biological systems, where oscillators appear in in a broad variety, very little research on Arnold tongues has been performed. We discuss single cell oscillating dynamics triggered by an external cytokine signal. When this signal is overlaid by an oscillating variation, the two oscillators might couple leading to Arnold tongue diagram. When the tongues overlap, the cell dynamics can shift between the tongues eventually leading to a chaotic response. We quantify such switching in single cell experiments and in model systems based on Gillespie simulations. Kadanoff session.

  1. NREM sleep parasomnia associated with Chiari I malformation.

    PubMed

    Daftary, Ameet S; Walker, James M; Farney, Robert J

    2011-10-15

    Parasomnias are common sleep disorders in children, and most cases resolve naturally by adolescence.(1) They represent arousal disorders beginning in NREM sleep and are generally non-concerning in children. The diagnosis can usually be made by clinical assessment, and testing with polysomnography is not routinely indicated.(2) However, in certain cases with atypical features, polysomnography and more extensive neurologic evaluation are medically indicated.

  2. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  3. The speed of Arnold diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, C.; Harsoula, M.

    2013-05-01

    A detailed numerical study is presented of the slow diffusion (Arnold diffusion) taking place around resonance crossings in nearly integrable Hamiltonian systems of three degrees of freedom in the so-called ‘Nekhoroshev regime’. The aim is to construct estimates regarding the speed of diffusion based on the numerical values of a truncated form of the so-called remainder of a normalized Hamiltonian function, and to compare them with the outcomes of direct numerical experiments using ensembles of orbits. In this comparison we examine, one by one, the main steps of the so-called analytic and geometric parts of the Nekhoroshev theorem. Thus: (i) we review and implement an algorithm Efthymiopoulos (2008) [45] for Hamiltonian normalization in multiply resonant domains which is implemented as a computer program making calculations up to a high normalization order. (ii) We compute the dependence of the optimal normalization order on the small parameter ɛ in a specific model and compare the result with theoretical estimates on this dependence. (iii) We examine in detail the consequences of assuming simple convexity conditions for the unperturbed Hamiltonian on the geometry of the resonances and on the phase space structure around resonance crossings. (iv) We discuss the dynamical mechanisms by which the remainder of the optimal Hamiltonian normal form drives the diffusion process. Through these steps, we are led to two main results: (i) We construct in our concrete example a convenient set of variables, proposed first by Benettin and Gallavotti (1986) [12], in which the phenomenon of Arnold diffusion in doubly resonant domains can be clearly visualized. (ii) We determine, by numerical fitting of our data, the dependence of the local diffusion coefficient D on the size ‖R‖ of the optimal remainder function, and we compare this with a heuristic argument based on the assumption of normal diffusion. We find a power law D∝‖, where the constant b has a small positive

  4. Atlas Assimilation Patterns in Different Types of Adult Craniocervical Junction Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Edson Dener Zandonadi; Botelho, Ricardo Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. This is a cross-sectional analysis of resonance magnetic images of 111 patients with craniocervical malformations and those of normal subjects. Objective. To test the hypothesis that atlas assimilation is associated with basilar invagination (BI) and atlas's anterior arch assimilation is associated with craniocervical instability and type I BI. Summary of Background Data. Atlas assimilation is the most common malformation in the craniocervical junction. This condition has been associated with craniocervical instability and BI in isolated cases. Methods. We evaluated midline Magnetic Resonance Images (MRIs) (and/or CT scans) from patients with craniocervical junction malformation and normal subjects. The patients were separated into 3 groups: Chiari type I malformation, BI type I, and type II. The atlas assimilations were classified according to their embryological origins as follows: posterior, anterior, and both arches assimilation. Results. We studied the craniometric values of 111 subjects, 78 with craniocervical junction malformation and 33 without malformations. Of the 78 malformations, 51 patients had Chiari type I and 27 had BI, of whom 10 presented with type I and 17 with type II BI. In the Chiari group, 41 showed no assimilation of the atlas. In the type I BI group, all patients presented with anterior arch assimilation, either in isolation or associated with assimilation of the posterior arch. 63% of the patients with type II BI presented with posterior arch assimilation, either in isolation or associated with anterior arch assimilation. In the control group, no patients had atlas assimilation. Conclusion. Anterior atlas assimilation leads to type I BI. Posterior atlas assimilation more frequently leads to type II BI. Separation in terms of anterior versus posterior atlas assimilation reflects a more accurate understanding of the clinical and embryological differences in craniocervical junction malformations. Level of Evidence: N/A PMID

  5. Severe holocord syrinx in a child with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Segal, Devorah; Heary, Robert F; Sabharwal, Sanjeev; Barry, Maureen T; Ming, Xue

    2016-07-01

    The authors present the case of a child with megalencephaly-capillary malformation syndrome who developed a rapidly progressive holocord syringomyelia that was treated surgically. A 3-year-old boy with megalencephaly-capillary malformation-polymicrogyria (MCAP) syndrome presented with several months of right leg weakness, worsening scoliosis, and increased seizures. An MRI study of the brain demonstrated a Chiari I malformation and massively dilated syringomyelia extending from C-2 to the conus medullaris. The patient underwent an urgent suboccipital craniectomy with C1-3 laminectomies to relieve the CSF outflow obstruction with significant clinical improvement. Surgery was complicated by bleeding from intracranial vascular malformations. This report describes a very rapidly developing, massive holocord syringomyelia related to CSF obstruction due to an unusual congenital brain malformation and associated vascular overgrowth at the site. Serial, premorbid MRI studies demonstrated the very rapid progression from no Chiari malformation, to progressively greater cerebellar tonsillar herniation, to holocord syrinx. This complication has never been reported in MCAP syndrome and should be considered in any affected MCAP patient with a progressive neurological decline, even if previous spine imaging findings were normal. Surgical complications due to hemorrhage also need to be considered in this vascular brain malformation.

  6. Glomuvenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Henning, J Scott; Kovich, Olympia I; Schaffer, Julie V

    2007-01-27

    A 9-year-old girl presented with a congenital, blue-purple, partially compressible plaque with a cobblestone surface on the left lateral foot and ankle. Similar, solitary, blue nodules later appeared elsewhere on the extremities. The lesions were tender to palpation and were associated with spontaneous paroxysms of pain and paresthesias. Histopathologic evaluation of a skin biopsy specimen showed rows of glomus cells that surrounded thin-walled vascular channels, which confirmed the diagnosis of glomuvenous malformations. This autosomal dominant condition, which is due to mutations in the GLMN gene, presents with clinical findings that are distinct from those of familial, multiple, cutaneous and mucosal venous malformations. Treatment options include excision, sclerotherapy, and laser therapy (ablative or pulsed dye).

  7. Chiari-associated exertional, cough, and sneeze headache responsive to medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M Gabriella; Formisano, Rita; Colonnese, Claudio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2003-04-01

    Benign exertional headache is coded as a separate entity within the International Headache Society's classification system, but the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this clinical headache subtype are unknown and possibly are similar to those generating migraine. Coexistence of migraine and benign exertional headache in the same patient is not unusual, and antimigraine pharmacologic treatments are often effective in both headache types. Regardless, optimal management mandates that the clinician exclude any intracranial or systemic disease that could mimic "primary" exertional headache. The same holds for primary headaches induced by coughing or sneezing; congenital malformations or neoplasms, particularly within the posterior fossa, are not rare in these patients. The neurologic examination may not be sufficiently sensitive to detect the offending lesion. We describe a patient with migraine without aura and exertional secondary headache due to Chiari malformation type I whose headaches responded to treatment with propranolol and indomethacin.

  8. INTERIOR OF BARN HAYLOFT, LOOKING WEST (Charles Arnold added a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF BARN HAYLOFT, LOOKING WEST (Charles Arnold added a Cleaning Mill to the barn's hayloft c. 1960. This photograph shows the elevator, chaff shoot, and metal funnel that still remain. The barn's gambrel roof is supported by a three-hinged arch truss system) - Arnold Farm, Barn, 1948 Arnold Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  9. The Function of Matthew Arnold at the Present Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltason, Timothy

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the career and achievement of the British writer Matthew Arnold. Focuses on Arnold's status as a symbol of conservatism in the current culture wars. Argues for a recuperation of a true representation of Arnold's achievement. Illustrates the dangers of misrepresenting major literary figures invoked in cultural disputes. (HB)

  10. Congenital malformations of the brain and spine.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Prashant; Zamora, Carlos; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we briefly address the most common congenital brain and spinal anomalies as well as their most salient imaging, especially magnetic resonance, findings. Some of them, such as Chiari II, and open spinal defects, have become relatively rare due to their detection in utero and repair of the spinal malformation. Regardless of the type of brain anomaly, the most common clinical symptoms are mental retardation, hydrocephalus, and seizure; the latter two may need to be surgically and medically addressed. The most commonly found spinal congenital anomalies include the filum terminale lipoma which is generally asymptomatic and incidental and the caudal regression syndrome for which no primary treatment exists. Any spinal congenital anomaly may present in adulthood as a consequence of spinal cord tethering and/or development of syringomyelia.

  11. 75 FR 64748 - Nextera Energy Duane Arnold, LLC; Duane Arnold Energy Center; Notice of Availability of the Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... renewal) include no action and reasonable alternative energy sources. As discussed in Section 9.4 of the... COMMISSION Nextera Energy Duane Arnold, LLC; Duane Arnold Energy Center; Notice of Availability of the Final... operation for the Duane Arnold Energy Center (DAEC). The DAEC is located in Linn County, Iowa,...

  12. Small hepatic veins Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Oliviero; Marzano, Chiara; Papa, Alessia; Pasquale, Chiara; Gasperini, Maria Ludovica; Gigante, Antonietta; Valla, Dominique Charles; Plessier, Aurélie; Amoroso, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by hepatic venous outflow obstruction at any level from the small hepatic veins to the atrio-caval junction, in the absence of heart failure or constrictive pericarditis. Various imaging modalities are available for investigating the gross hepatic vascular anatomy but there are rare forms of this disease where the obstruction is limited to the small intrahepatic veins, with normal appearance of the large hepatic veins at imaging. In this cases only a liver biopsy can demonstrate the presence of a small vessels outflow block. We report two cases of small hepatic veins Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  13. Arnold Goldstein: From Counselor to Psychoeducator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Alan D.

    1998-01-01

    A proponent of the scientist-practitioner model, Arnold Goldstein has devoted his career to the study and practice of helping people change. In this interview he discusses the origins of his interest in aggression and violence, the development of models for enhancing prosocial skills, and he reflects on the current and future status of counselor…

  14. Congratulations to Vladimir Igorevich Arnol'd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    12 June 2007 was the seventieth birthday of a member of the editorial board of this journal, Academician Vladimir Igorevich Arnol'd. We warmly congratulate Vladimir Igorevich on his birthday and wish him good health, happiness and continuing success in his scientific activities.

  15. Benedict Arnold: A Question of Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolosi, Annie; O'Connell, Libby Haight; Rust, Mead

    2003-01-01

    The spring 2003 The Idea Book for Educators highlights television programming from the Arts and Entertainment Network (A&E), the History Channel, and the Biography Channel, with a focus on an A&E original movie premiere, "Benedict Arnold: A Question of Honor." The booklet contains the following materials: "A&E Study…

  16. Prosocial Youth: The Legacy of Arnold Goldstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amendola, Mark; Oliver, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Arnold P. Goldstein served for over 30 years at Syracuse University where he directed the Center for Research on Aggression. His model of Aggression Replacement Training (ART) was enriched by diverse perspectives of many colleagues. This article highlights the ideas of three persons who strongly influenced Goldstein's work, namely, Jerome Frank,…

  17. Hepatic vein obstruction (Budd-Chiari)

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider if: You have symptoms of hepatic vein obstruction You are being treated for this condition and you develop new symptoms Alternative Names Budd-Chiari syndrome; Hepatic veno-occlusive disease Images Digestive system Digestive system organs Blood clot formation ...

  18. Anorectal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Marc A; Peña, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Anorectal malformations comprise a wide spectrum of diseases, which can affect boys and girls, and involve the distal anus and rectum as well as the urinary and genital tracts. They occur in approximately 1 in 5000 live births. Defects range from the very minor and easily treated with an excellent functional prognosis, to those that are complex, difficult to manage, are often associated with other anomalies, and have a poor functional prognosis. The surgical approach to repairing these defects changed dramatically in 1980 with the introduction of the posterior sagittal approach, which allowed surgeons to view the anatomy of these defects clearly, to repair them under direct vision, and to learn about the complex anatomic arrangement of the junction of rectum and genitourinary tract. Better imaging techniques, and a better knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the pelvic structures at birth have refined diagnosis and initial management, and the analysis of large series of patients allows better prediction of associated anomalies and functional prognosis. The main concerns for the surgeon in correcting these anomalies are bowel control, urinary control, and sexual function. With early diagnosis, management of associated anomalies and efficient meticulous surgical repair, patients have the best chance for a good functional outcome. Fecal and urinary incontinence can occur even with an excellent anatomic repair, due mainly to associated problems such as a poorly developed sacrum, deficient nerve supply, and spinal cord anomalies. For these patients, an effective bowel management program, including enema and dietary restrictions has been devised to improve their quality of life. PMID:17651510

  19. A Single-Center Experience of CNS Anomalies or Neural Tube Defects in Patients With Jarcho-Levin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nihat; Peker, Erdal; Gülşen, İsmail; Ağengin, Kemal; Kaba, Sultan; Tuncer, Oğuz

    2016-03-01

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome (JLS) is a genetic disorder characterized by distinct malformations of the ribs and vertebrae, and/or other associated abnormalities such as neural tube defect, Arnold-Chiari malformation, renal and urinary abnormalities, hydrocephalus, congenital cardiac abnormalities, and extremity malformations. The study included 12 cases at 37-42 weeks of gestation and diagnosed to have had Jarcho-Levin syndrome, Arnold-Chiari malformation, and meningmyelocele. All cases of Jarcho-Levin syndrome had Arnold-Chiari type 2 malformation; there was corpus callosum dysgenesis in 6, lumbosacral meningmyelocele in 6, lumbal meningmyelocele in 3, thoracal meningmyelocele in 3, and holoprosencephaly in 1 of the cases. With this article, the authors underline the neurologic abnormalities accompanying Jarcho-Levin syndrome and that each of these abnormalities is a component of Jarcho-Levin syndrome.

  20. Author! Author! Creator of Frog and Toad: Arnold Lobel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a brief biography of author Arnold Lobel, perhaps best known for giving the world Frog and Toad. Arnold Lobel was born in Los Angeles, California, on May 22, 1933, and was raised by his grandparents in New York. He loved checking out books from the library when he was a little boy and sharing with his classmates the stories…

  1. Arnold Gesell and the maturation controversy.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Thomas C

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the work of Arnold Lucius Gesell and argues that he not only paved the way for contemporary research in motor development, but that he and colleagues anticipated fundamental issues about growth that must be addressed by psychologists and neuroscientists who are committed to the advancement of developmental science. Arnold Lucius Gesell was a pioneer in developmental psychology when the field was in its infancy. He worked diligently for the rights of physically and mentally handicapped children to receive special education that would enable them to find gainful employment. Gesell's writings in books and popular magazines increased public awareness of and support for preschool education and better foster care for orphans. Despite these achievements, many of his successors have questioned his views about infant development. Developmental psychologists have criticized Gesell for proposing a stage theory of infant growth that has fallen into disfavor among contemporary researchers. His conception of development as a maturational process has been challenged for allegedly reducing complex behavioral, perceptual, and learning processes to genetic factors. The author rejects this overly simplistic interpretation and contends that Gesell's work continues to stand the test of time.

  2. Arnold B. Arons (1916-2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Bruce A.

    Arnold B. Arons died of a heart attack at his home in Seattle on February 28, 2001, aged 84. He was a long-time member of the American Geophysical Union (1950; Ocean Sciences) and of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT), of which he was president in 1961. He was a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.Arnold Arons was a teacher of physics. He taught it to the freshmen at Amherst College from 1952 to 1968, and then, at the University of Washington, he taught prospective teachers of physics how to teach it. He stressed meaning in physical concepts: how it is derived from shared experience, is founded on operational definitions, and is deepened and broadened with growing sophistication, individual and historical. He derided glib chatter about complex ideas (“Gibberish!”), or mere manipulation of symbols and formulas, and insisted—fiercely—that students know what they were talking about. His presence in the lecture hall at Amherst was sometimes terrifying; that technique might not be readily accepted in present, more tender times, but it was effective in shaking high school hotshots loose from some of their delusions. Despite perceived indignities, they usually gave him a standing ovation at the end of the spring semester.

  3. Final Environmental Assessment: Construction of New Arnold Village Sewage Treatment Plant Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    Vulpes vulpes ATL/P:\\ARNOLDAFB\\315331DO34\\SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT EA\\CD\\FINAL STP EA 05_05.DOC 3-11 TABLE 3-2 Common Wildlife Species Occurring in Arnold...frog is disjunct, separated from the nearest other population by several hundred miles and may represent a distinct, as yet undescribed, subspecies ...The three subspecies of the gopher frog recognized in the scientific literature are considered species of concern by the USFWS. Many of the rare

  4. 32. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arnold Moses, Photographer February 23, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arnold Moses, Photographer February 23, 1937, DETAIL OF CARVED SWAG ON PULPIT, CLERK'S DESK. - St. Paul's Chapel, Broadway & Fulton Streets, New York County, NY

  5. An Interview with Arnold Bank: Designer, Letterer, and Master Calligrapher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Anne

    1985-01-01

    Arnold Bank, emeritus professor of design at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, has been one of the most inspiring teachers of calligraphy, paleography, and typography in the United States. His life and work are discussed. (RM)

  6. Pediatric neuroanesthesia. Arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Newfield, P; Hamid, R K

    2001-06-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations can occur singly, multiply, and in conjunction with aneurysms and denovo, family, or in conjunction with connective-tissue disorders. Intracranial hemorrhage is the most common presentation, occurring in 20% to 50% of cases. In children, seizures are the second most common presentation occurring in 15% to 20% of cases. The modalities available treatment of arteriovenous malformations are microsurgery, embolization, and stereotactic radiosurgery with heavy particles, alpha knife, or linear accelerator. Induction, maintenance, and emergence from anesthesia are designed to prevent rupture of arteriovenous malformation and aneurysm and to improve intracranial compliance in the presence of an intracranial hematoma, during both diagnostic (CT, MR scanning) and therapeutic procedures.

  7. Chiari-related hydrocephalus: assessment of clinical risk factors in a cohort of 297 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Brockmeyer, Douglas L

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients treated for Chiari I malformation (CM-I) with posterior fossa decompression (PFD) may occasionally and unpredictably develop postoperative hydrocephalus. The clinical risk factors predictive of this type of Chiari-related hydrocephalus (CRH) are unknown. The authors' objective was to evaluate their experience to identify risk factors that may predict which of these patients undergoing PFD will develop CRH after surgery. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective clinical chart review of all patients who underwent PFD surgery and duraplasty for CM-I at the Primary Children's Hospital in Utah from June 1, 2005, through May 31, 2015. Patients were dichotomized based on the need for long-term CSF diversion after PFD. Analysis included both univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses. RESULTS The authors identified 297 decompressive surgeries over the period of the study, 22 of which required long-term postoperative CSF diversion. On multivariable analysis, age < 6 years old (OR 3.342, 95% CI 1.282-8.713), higher intraoperative blood loss (OR 1.003, 95% CI 1.001-1.006), and the presence of a fourth ventricular web (OR 3.752, 95% CI 1.306-10.783) were significantly associated with the need for long-term CSF diversion after decompressive surgery. CONCLUSIONS Younger patients, those with extensive intraoperative blood loss, and those found during surgery to have a fourth ventricular web were at higher risk for the development of CRH. Clinicians should be alert to evidence of CRH in this patient population after PFD surgery.

  8. Pregnancy in Budd-Chiari Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Waltraut M.; Rüland, Anna M.; Hippe, Valeria; Poetzsch, Bernd; Meyer, Carsten; Pollok, Joerg M.; Gembruch, Ulrich; Trebicka, Jonel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Due to its rarity, experience with pregnancy in Budd–Chiari syndrome (BCS) is limited. With the advent of new treatment modalities, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in particular, numbers of affected women seeking pregnancy with BCS are expected to rise. Here, we use a case that ended lethal within 2 years after delivery to discuss the effect of pregnancy on BCS and vice versa, and to highlight the necessity of a multidisciplinary teamwork. Additionally, a risk classification is proposed which may serve as a framework for preconception counseling and assist in the establishment and evaluation of treatment algorithms; its criteria need to be defined and assessed for their applicability in further studies. PMID:27258526

  9. Pelvic Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Brian M.; Gipson, Matthew G.; Smith, Mitchell T.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular malformations (VMs) comprise a wide spectrum of lesions that are classified by content and flow characteristics. These lesions, occurring in both focal and diffuse forms, can involve any organ and tissue plane and can cause significant morbidity in both children and adults. Since treatment strategy depends on the type of malformation, correct diagnosis and classification of a vascular lesion are crucial. Slow-flow VMs (venous and lymphatic malformations) are often treated by sclerotherapy, whereas fast-flow lesions (arteriovenous malformations) are generally managed with embolization. In addition, some cases of VMs are best treated surgically. This review will present an overview of VMs in the female pelvis as well as a discussion of endovascular therapeutic techniques. PMID:24436563

  10. Myelomeningocele associated with split cord malformation type I -three case reports-.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Sasano, Mari; Sato, Hironobu; Sekido, Ken'ichi; Ito, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Three neonates presented with split cord malformation (SCM) associated with myelomeningocele (MMC), complicated with various coexisting anomalies. All patients were female and classified as SCM type I. All patients had a syrinx located rostral to the SCM. One patient had hydrocephalus and Chiari malformation causing serious respiratory problems. Two patients had partial hypertrichosis located close to the MMC, suggesting association with SCM. One patient had sacral hypoplasty and right kidney agenesis, suggesting that some embryologic errors may affect not only neural but also mesodermal development. All patients underwent surgical treatment for SCM after detailed evaluation and management of concomitant anomalies, and developed no new neurological deficits. Delayed surgery is an alternative treatment strategy for SCM in patients with both SCM and MMC with similar complications.

  11. Large plaque-like glomuvenous malformation (glomangioma) simulating venous malformation.

    PubMed

    Vercellino, N; Nozza, P; Oddone, M; Bava, G L

    2006-07-01

    Glomuvenous malformations and venous malformations are vascular lesions that can be distinguished on the basis of clinical and pathological features. A vascular lesion of the skin and superficial and deep soft tissues of a lower limb in a 5-year-old child is described. The clinical and radiological features, including skeletal muscle involvement, were typical of venous malformation, whereas the histopathological features were those of a glomuvenous malformation. The clinical and histopathological features are briefly discussed.

  12. [Multiple intracranial arteriovenous malformation].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, Miguel; Santin-Amo, José María; Román-Pena, Paula; Vázquez Herrero, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are thought to be exceedingly rare lesions and have usually been reported as single cases. The incidence of multiple cerebral AVMs in major series ranges from 0.3% to 9% and, in the majority of cases, these malformations are associated with other vascular anomalies of the brain or soft tissues. We report a 62-year-old woman that presented with a left temporal haemorrhage. Angiography showed 3 AVMs located in the left temporal lobe, left cerebellar hemisphere and right temporal lobe. The lesions were treated with radiosurgery.

  13. Rare malformation of glans penis: arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Akin, Y; Sarac, M; Yucel, S

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric glans penis malformations, especially arteriovenous malformations (AVM), are very rare. Herein, we report two rare cases. A 14-year-old boy attended our outpatient clinic with chief complaints of purple swelling and rapidly growing lesion on the glans penis. The lesion was excised surgically after physical and radiological evaluations. Pathology reported AVM and the patient is being followed up. The second case is a 2-year-old boy who was admitted with a big lesion involving glans penis and genital area that has been present since birth. In physical and radiological evaluations, lesion on the glans penis was pulsatile. Parents of the patient did not want any surgery and patient has been in follow-up. Diagnosis of the vascular lesions on glans penis is very easy by physical and radiological examinations today. Long-term follow-up is very important for AVM. Clinicians must make a careful effort to document new glans lesions in the pediatric population and decrease anxiety in the parents of affected children.

  14. A unifying hypothesis for hydrocephalus and the Chiari malformations part two: The hydrocephalus filling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Williams, Helen

    2016-09-01

    It is proposed that negative central nervous system (CNS) pressure is one of the filling mechanisms of the fluid spaces of the CNS. Negative CNS pressure is caused by the combination of gravitational force and body movement. The venous system imposes pressure fluctuations on the CNS due to changes in posture and body cavity pressure. It is proposed here that filling of veins, arteries and cerebrospinal (CSF) spaces are all assisted by negative CNS pressure. Hyperemia in the CNS in response to pressure changes with movement was described in the first part of this hypothesis. By this means parenchyma water levels may increase (Williams, 2008). In the developmental forms of hydrocephalus expansion of CSF spaces is a more prominent feature than parenchyma water changes. This feature is explained by this second part of the hypothesis where the negative pulsatility of pressure that can accompany positive pressure pulsatility, which occurs with body movement, is described as the pathological force that leads to cavity filling. When CNS compliance is lost there is overrepresentation of low and well as high pressure pulsations in response to body movements. Pressure that leads to the development of hydrocephalus can be described as being abnormally labile. Negative CNS pressure causes cavity filling in an analogous way to pleural cavity filling, with water passing from parenchyma tissue. Positive pressure within the pressure profile may cause expansion of regions of the CNS skeletal system that are able to grow such as the cranial vault so that large head size is a frequent accompaniment to hydrocephalus that is caused by this mechanism. Hydrocephalic disorders that are characterised by negative pressure filling mechanism often have a skeletal anatomical abnormality that causes reduced CNS compliance and adversely affect neural development. This is often in the form of obstruction to CSF flow around the base of the brain that then leads to vault expansion by means of high pressure pulsation and ventricle enlargement by means of low pressure pulsation. In health pressure pulsatility does not lead to enduring changes in water distribution within the CNS compartments but it assists physiological water balance.

  15. [Cerebrovenous orthostatic reactivity in pathology of the craniovertebral junction (Chiari malformation)].

    PubMed

    Shakhnovich, V A; Mitrofanova, E V; Shimanskiy, V N; Konovalov, N A; Shkarubo, A N

    2015-01-01

    Мальформация Киари характеризуется вклинением миндалин мозжечка в большое затылочное отверстие, что приводит к нарушению циркуляции ликвора через краниовертебральный переход. Адекватным методом для выявления этих нарушений являются ортостатические нагрузки, которые приводят к перемещению ликвора через краниовертебральный переход. Возникающие при этом изменения внутричерепного давления оказывают влияние на церебровенозную ортостатическую реактивность (ЦВОР), которая оценивается неинвазивно при мальформации Киари. Материал и методы. Исследование проведено у 35 больных с мальформацией Киари (Киари I — 26 больных, Киари II — 9) в возрасте от 4 до 58 лет. Среди обследованных больных у 4 была выявлена гидроцефалия, у 6 — сирингомиелия. Методом транскраниальной допплерографии регистрировали венозный кровоток в прямом синусе мозга при изменении положения тела на ортостоле от +90° до –30°. Результаты. У больных с мальформацией Киари ЦВОР существенно отличается от нормы (более чем в 90% случаев) как ее увеличением (иногда в 5—6 раз по сравнению с верхней границей нормы — значительная гиперреактивность), так и полным отсутствием каких-либо изменений при ортостатической нагрузке (ареактивность). У больных c мальформацией Киари до хирургического лечения ЦВОР чаще всего характеризуется ареактивностью, а также умеренной или значительной гиперреактивностью. После хирургического лечения (декомпрессия большого затылочного отверстия) у больных с мальформацией Киари отмечается существенная нормализация краниовертебральных объемных соотношений, а ЦВОР чаще всего характеризуется нормореактивностью (63%), реже — умеренной гиперреактивностью. Скорость венозного кровотока в прямом синусе мозга при мальформации Киари до операции бывает повышена, а после хирургического лечения нормализуется. Выводы. Выявлена высокая частота нарушений ЦВОР (более 90% случаев) у больных с мальформацией Киари. После хирургического лечения этих больных больше чем в половине наблюдений (63%) отмечается полная нормализация ЦВОР.

  16. [Posterior decompression of the craniovertebral junction in children with Chiari malformation: a surgery extent issue].

    PubMed

    Korshunov, A E; Kushel', Yu V

    Цель исследования — выработать рациональный подход к выбору объема задней декомпрессии при аномалии Киари-1 у детей. Материал и методы. С 2001 по 2015 г. задняя декомпрессия выполнена 76 детям в возрасте до 18 лет с аномалией Киари-1. У 52 (68%) детей имелась сирингомиелия. В 14 (18%) случаях выполнена экстрадуральная декомпрессия (ЭДД); в 21 (28%) случае — экстраарахноидальная дуропластика (ЭАД); в 21 (28%) — интраарахноидальная диссекция и дуропластика; в 20 (26%) — стентирование отверстия Мажанди и дуропластика. Результаты. Осложнения возникли у 15 (20%) больных, одно из них с летальным исходом (летальность 1,3%). Частота осложнений была выше после (1) интраарахноидальной диссекции (p=0,0009) и стентирования (p=0,02). Реоперации потребовались у 8 (11%) больных. Суммарная частота осложнений и реопераций была наименьшей после ЭАД (10%). Заключение. ЭАД — метод выбора при аномалии Киари-1 у детей. ЭДД может быть принята как первичная опция, но требует отбора подходящих пациентов. Интраарахноидальная диссекция, в том числе со стентированием, не оправдана при первичных вмешательствах, но может быть неизбежной при ревизии.

  17. [Results of surgical treatment of syringomyelia associated with Chiari 1 malformation. An analysis of 125 cases].

    PubMed

    Zuev, A A; Pedyash, N V; Epifanov, D S; Kostenko, G V

    2016-01-01

    Частота аномалии Киари (АК) в популяции составляет от 3 до 8 на 100 000 населения. В 62—80% наблюдений она сопровождается развитием сирингомиелии (СМ) на разных уровнях. Клиническая картина у этих пациентов складывается из проявлений АК и СМ, однако нередко на первый план выходят симптомы СМ, что создает определенные трудности в диагностике патологии и определении оптимальных методов лечения. Цель исследования — уточнить показания к хирургическому лечению СМ, ассоциированной с АК, определить оптимальный объем операции и критерии оценки ее результатов на основании собственного опыта хирургических вмешательств. Материал и методы. За период с 2011г. по февраль 2015 г. проведено обследование 225 пациентов с сочетанием СМ и АК 1-го типа, из них прооперированы 125 человек. Средний возраст оперированных составил 56±8 лет, средний срок от появления первых признаков заболевания до операции — 75±82 мес. Все операции выполнены одним хирургом. Операции проводились в положении пациента полусидя (89,6%) и лежа на животе (10,4%), заключались в экономной субокципитальной краниоэктомии, резекции дужки СI позвонка, восстановлении ликвородинамики по задней поверхности мозжечка, пластике твердой мозговой оболочки (ТМО) в области краниовертебрального перехода. Результаты. При ревизии арахноидальной оболочки большой затылочной цистерны после вскрытия ТМО у 78 (62,4%) больных арахнопатия отсутствовала (0-й тип, по Klekamp). Арахнопатия 1-го типа по Klekamp выявлена у 31 (24,8%) пациента, арахнопатия 2-го типа — у 16 (12,8%). Через 1 год после операции произведена оценка состояния 109 (88%) пациентов. У 61 (56%) пациента отмечен частичный или полный регресс предоперационной неврологической симптоматики, у 44 (40%) — заболевание перестало прогрессировать. У 4 (3,7%) пациентов заболевание обострилось. За время наблюдения рецидива нарушений ликвородинамики на краниовертебральном уровне не выявлено. Ранние послеоперационные осложнения развились у 4 (3,2%) пациентов: у 1 (0,8%) — раневая ликворея, у 1 (0,8%) — острая эпидуральная гематома, у 2 (1,6%) — асептический менингит. Преходящие ухудшения состояния (усиление головной боли, метеочувствительность) были выявлены у 11 (8,9%) пациентов. К концу 1-го месяца после операции данная симптоматика регрессировала. Летальных исходов не было. Выводы. Показанием к операции у больных с сочетанием АК и СМ служит наличие неврологической симптоматики, связанной с СМ, и ее прогрессирование, а также головная боль, обусловленная вклинением миндаликов мозжечка и существенно нарушающая качество жизни пациента. Основными критериями оценки эффективности проведенного лечения признаются стабилизация клинических симптомов и/или улучшение состояния больного. Субокципитальная краниоэктомия с последующей пластикой ТМО и восстановлением ликвородинамики в краниовертебральной области является эффективным методом лечения СМ, ассоциированной с АК 1-го типа.

  18. Horseshoes and Arnold Diffusion for Hamiltonian Systems on Lie Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-28

    478. V. I. Arnold [1964]. Inst"ility of dynamical systenms with several degrees of freedom, Dokl . Akad . Riuk. SSSR 156,9-12. V. I. Ar’nold [1966...a rigid body, Trans, oscow Math. Soc. 41, 287. S.L. Ziglin [1981]. Branching of solutions and nonexistence of integrals in Hamiltonian systems. Doklady Akad . Nauk . SSSR 257, 26-29. - J. I

  19. Arnold L. Gesell: The Paradox of Nature and Nurture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelen, Esther; Adolph, Karen E.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the impact of Arnold L. Gesell on developmental psychology. Gesell is best remembered for his developmental norms, acquired from observations of infants and children. Gesell's ideas about maturation have lost favor, but his belief in infants' native abilities is still a dominant theme in theories. (BC)

  20. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arnold Moses, Photographer December 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arnold Moses, Photographer December 1, 1936, VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM THIRD FLOOR OF 29 1/2 CHERRY STREET SHOWING ROOF LINE OF BRICK FILLED TIMBER HOUSE RECENTLY DEMOLISHED. - John Beekman House, 29-29 1/2 Cherry Street, New York County, NY

  1. Proteus Syndrome with Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Asilian, Ali; Kamali, Atefeh Sadat; Riahi, Nabet Tajmir; Adibi, Neda; Mokhtari, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare sporadic disorder that appears with localized macrosomia, congenital lipomatosis, and slow flow vascular malformations, connective tissue nevus, and epidermal nevus. There are usually some manifestations at birth. The vascular abnormalities that have been reported in Proteus syndrome are capillary and slow flow venous malformation. We report a case of a 10-year-old boy with confirmed Proteus syndrome characterized by high flow vascular malformation (arteriovenous [AV] malformation) unlike the usual vascular malformations seen in this syndrome. This case adds a new perspective to the established clinical findings of the Proteus syndrome.

  2. Factor V Leiden related Budd-Chiari syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Deltenre, P; Denninger, M; Hillaire, S; Guillin, M; Casadevall, N; Briere, J; Erlinger, S; Valla, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The role of factor V Leiden as a cause of Budd-Chiari syndrome has only recently been described.
AIMS—To assess the specific features of factor V Leiden related Budd-Chiari syndrome.
PATIENTS—Sixty three consecutive patients with hepatic vein or terminal inferior vena cava thrombosis.
METHODS—Standardised chart review.
RESULTS—Factor V Leiden was found in 20 patients (31% (95% CI 20-43)). In the subgroup of patients with, compared with the subgroup without, factor V Leiden, a combination of prothrombotic states was more common (70% (95% CI 50-90) v 14% (95% CI 3-24)); inferior vena cava thrombosis was more frequent (40% (95% CI 19-61) v 7% (95% CI 0-14)); and distribution of initial alanine aminotransferase values was bimodal (almost normal or extremely increased) versus unimodal (p=0.003). Factor V Leiden accounted for four of five cases of massive ischaemic necrosis (transaminases >50-fold the upper limit of normal values) (p=0.014), and also for all three cases developing during pregnancy. Patients with and without factor V Leiden did not differ with regard to mortality, portosytemic shunting, or listing for liver transplantation. Hepatocellular carcinoma developed in two patients; both had factor V Leiden and indolent obstruction of the inferior vena cava.
CONCLUSIONS—In patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome, factor V Leiden (a) is common; (b) precipitates thrombosis mostly when combined with another risk factor; (c) is associated with one of two contrasting clinical pictures: indolent thrombosis—particularly of the inferior vena cava—or massive ischaemic necrosis; and (d) is a major cofactor of Budd-Chiari syndrome developing during pregnancy.


Keywords: thrombophilia; Budd-Chiari syndrome; inferior vena cava obstruction; myeloproliferative disorders; ischaemic necrosis PMID:11156651

  3. Pilot-scale in situ vitrification at Arnold Engineering Development Center, Arnold AFB, TN

    SciTech Connect

    Lominac, J.K.; Edwards, R.C. ); Timmerman, C.L. )

    1989-11-01

    The Department of Defense has the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) to identify and permanently remediate hazardous material disposal sites at its military bases across the United States. Pursuant to this guidance, Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) selected In Situ Vitrification (ISV) to remediate an old fire training area, Fire Protection Training Area (FPTA) No. 2. The ISV technology was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA, for the US Department of Energy (DOE) and will allow for the destruction and encapsulation of the petroleum-oil-lubricants (POL) and heavy metal-constituents found at the FPTA and adjacent overflow pond. ISV operates by passing a measured current of electricity into the ground through a set of electrodes. The resulting heat causes the soil to melt and form a solid vitreous (glass) mass similar to naturally occurring obsidian or basalt. In the process, organic constituents will be pyrolyzed (changed by heat) by the ensuing heat whereas the non-organic material will be incorporated into the glass matrix. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Color image encryption based on gyrator transform and Arnold transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Liansheng; Gao, Bo

    2013-06-01

    A color image encryption scheme using gyrator transform and Arnold transform is proposed, which has two security levels. In the first level, the color image is separated into three components: red, green and blue, which are normalized and scrambled using the Arnold transform. The green component is combined with the first random phase mask and transformed to an interim using the gyrator transform. The first random phase mask is generated with the sum of the blue component and a logistic map. Similarly, the red component is combined with the second random phase mask and transformed to three-channel-related data. The second random phase mask is generated with the sum of the phase of the interim and an asymmetrical tent map. In the second level, the three-channel-related data are scrambled again and combined with the third random phase mask generated with the sum of the previous chaotic maps, and then encrypted into a gray scale ciphertext. The encryption result has stationary white noise distribution and camouflage property to some extent. In the process of encryption and decryption, the rotation angle of gyrator transform, the iterative numbers of Arnold transform, the parameters of the chaotic map and generated accompanied phase function serve as encryption keys, and hence enhance the security of the system. Simulation results and security analysis are presented to confirm the security, validity and feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  5. Difusión de Arnold en un modelo simple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cincotta, P. M.; Nuñez, J. A.; Miloni, O.

    Investigadores como Merritt, Valluri, Pfenniger o Contopoulos (por citar los más relevantes) consideran seriamente la hipótesis que la difusión de Arnold juega un rol importante en la evolución dinámica de los sistemas estelares y planetarios. Sin embargo no existe ninguna evidencia. El mayor problema para investigar fenómenos como éste es que uno debe estudiar numéricamente sistemas multidimensionales (más de dos grados de libertad) y visualizar de alguna manera el espacio de fases (más de cuatro dimensiones). Más complicado aún es el caso de difusión de Arnold, donde deben considerarse tiempos de movimiento extremadamente largos y tratar con parámetros exponencialmente pequeños. El propósito de este trabajo es estudiar, en un modelo simple 3D, la existencia o no de difusión de Arnold mediante experimentos numéricos y estimaciones analíticas. Siguiendo los trabajos de Cincotta (2000) y Cincotta, Nuñez y Simo (2000), aquí se pretende ``visualizar" la difusión y, a la vez, determinar la escala de tiempo en la que ésta se podría manifestar. Este trabajo es el escalón inicial para luego abordar este problema en modelos.

  6. Arteriovenous Malformation Management

    SciTech Connect

    Yakes, Wayne F.; Rossi, Plinio; Odink, Henk

    1996-11-15

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare vascular lesions that can present with a myriad of clinical presentations. In our institutions, initial workup consists of a clinical exam, color Doppler imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging. After the initial noninvasive workup, arteriography, at times closed system venography, and ethanol endovascular repair of the AVM is performed under general anesthesia. Depending on the size of the lesion, additional Swan-Ganz line and arterial line monitoring are performed. Patients are usually observed overnight and uneventfully discharged the following day if no complication occurs. Patients are followed at periodic intervals despite cure of their lesion. Long-term follow-up is essential in AVM management.

  7. [Hepatic retransplant and acute Budd Chiari syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Savio-López, Andrés M; Lara-Molina, Evelin E; Soliva-Domínguez, Ramón; Capo-Jorge, José A; Gala-López, Boris; González-Castillo, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Hepatic retransplant constitutes 10-20% of all orthotopic hepatic transplants. The piggy-back technique was used in hepatectomy with conservation of the retrohepatic vena cava. A side-to-side cavo-cavostomy technique is described in the case of hepatic congestion or acute Budd Chiari syndrome post-transplant. This is an extremely serious condition and can result in death. We present the first case of hepatic retransplant performed in Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras in a patient who received who received his first transplant due to non-resectable hepatocarcinoma and who required retransplant due to acute rejection and graft dysfunction. During retransplant, the Belghiti side-to-side anastomosis technique was used to resolve the acute Budd Chiari syndrome that presented itself. Post-surgical evolution at 18 months was satisfactory without evidence of complications of the graft. Acute Budd Chiari syndrome post-transplant can satisfactorily be resolved with the Belghiti technique, although it is preferable to take prophylactic measures to avoid it.

  8. Cystic Mass on Right Atrium of Unusual Form of Chiari's Network: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bae, Chi-Hoon; Kwon, Oh-Choon; Lee, Sub; Lee, Chul Ho; Cho, Jun Woo

    2012-08-01

    Chiari's networks are present in 1.5% to 4% of the population. They are a congenital disease characterized by a remnant of the right valve of sinus venosus and rarely have clinical significance. Chiari's network, as the name implies, has network-like shape, but there are other forms of appearance. We have experienced a case of a 60-year-old woman who had a cystic mass on the right atrium. Surgical treatment was performed forthe mass removal and differential diagnosis of the mass. There was no evidence of other tumor, but Chiari's network. As cystic form of Chiari's network have not been reported before, it is the first report of cystic form of Chiari's network.

  9. Classification of Arnold-Beltrami flows and their hidden symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fré, P.; Sorin, A. S.

    2015-07-01

    In the context of mathematical hydrodynamics, we consider the group theory structure which underlies the so named ABC flows introduced by Beltrami, Arnold and Childress. Main reference points are Arnold's theorem stating that, for flows taking place on compact three manifolds ℳ3, the only velocity fields able to produce chaotic streamlines are those satisfying Beltrami equation and the modern topological conception of contact structures, each of which admits a representative contact one-form also satisfying Beltrami equation. We advocate that Beltrami equation is nothing else but the eigenstate equation for the first order Laplace-Beltrami operator ★ g d, which can be solved by using time-honored harmonic analysis. Taking for ℳ3, a torus T 3 constructed as ℝ3/Λ, where Λ is a crystallographic lattice, we present a general algorithm to construct solutions of the Beltrami equation which utilizes as main ingredient the orbits under the action of the point group B A of three-vectors in the momentum lattice *Λ. Inspired by the crystallographic construction of space groups, we introduce the new notion of a Universal Classifying Group which contains all space groups as proper subgroups. We show that the ★ g d eigenfunctions are naturally arranged into irreducible representations of and by means of a systematic use of the branching rules with respect to various possible subgroups we search and find Beltrami fields with non trivial hidden symmetries. In the case of the cubic lattice the point group is the proper octahedral group O24 and the Universal Classifying Group is a finite group G1536 of order |G1536| = 1536 which we study in full detail deriving all of its 37 irreducible representations and the associated character table. We show that the O24 orbits in the cubic lattice are arranged into 48 equivalence classes, the parameters of the corresponding Beltrami vector fields filling all the 37 irreducible representations of G1536. In this way we obtain an

  10. An Awkward Echo: Matthew Arnold and John Dewey. Research in Curriculum and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Mark David

    2010-01-01

    Matthew Arnold, 19th century English poet, literary critic and school inspector, felt that each age had to determine that philosophy that was most adequate to its own concerns and contexts. This study looks at the influence that Matthew Arnold had on John Dewey and attempts to fashion a philosophy of education that is adequate for our own…

  11. Final Environmental Assessment, Conversion of Forest Land to Road Right-of-Way, Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    DECHERD ESTILL SPRINGS WINCHESTER SEWANEE Figure 1-1 Legend Road Centerline County Boundaries Arnold AFB Boundary 0 2.51.25 Miles Arnold Air Force Base...to 890 feet above sea level in the valleys. In the areas north and northeast of Arnold AFB, there are many swamps and internally drained depressions...rivers, streams, and springs ) and groundwater. Arnold AFB lies within the Duck River and the Elk River basins. The drainage divide between these two

  12. [Diagnostics of genetic malformations in small ruminants].

    PubMed

    Ganter, M

    2013-01-01

    The epidemic occurrence of the Schmallenberg virus has induced numerous congenital malformations in small ruminants. Because of this high incidence of malformed lambs, an overview of the different causes of congenital malformations is provided. The most frequent infectious and physical causes as well as mineral and vitamin deficiencies and toxic agents which can induce congenital malformations are indicated. This list is supplemented by advice on sampling and laboratory diagnosis for an etiological diagnosis of the malformations.

  13. Research status of Budd-Chiari syndrome in China

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Xiaowei; Li, Luhao; Xu, Peiqin

    2014-01-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (B-CS) is a disease with a low incidence and has obvious geographical difference in subtype and clinical characteristics. The pathogenesis of B-CS in China is significantly different from that in western countries and is a complex process involving multiple factors. However, the specific cause of this disease is not yet clear. In-depth understanding of B-CS pathogenesis will be of great importance in preventing and treating the disease and improving the quality of life of the patients. PMID:25663961

  14. Budd-Chiari syndrome: illustrated review of current management.

    PubMed

    Horton, John D; San Miguel, Francisco L; Membreno, Fernando; Wright, Francis; Paima, Juan; Foster, Preston; Ortiz, Jorge A

    2008-04-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is characterized by hepatic venous outflow obstruction at any level from the small hepatic veins to the atriocaval junction. BCS is a complex disease with a wide spectrum of aetiologies and presentations. This article reviews the current literature with respect to presentation, management and prognosis of the disease. Medical, interventional and surgical management of BCS is discussed. Particular attention is paid to interventional and surgical aspects of management. The review is augmented by images, which provide a clinical corollary to the text.

  15. Diagnosis and Management of Budd Chiari Syndrome: An Update

    SciTech Connect

    Copelan, Alexander; Remer, Erick M. Sands, Mark; Nghiem, Hanh; Kapoor, Baljendra

    2015-02-15

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the early detection and assessment of the extent of disease in Budd Chiari syndrome (BCS). Early diagnosis and intervention to mitigate hepatic congestion is vital to restoring hepatic function and alleviating portal hypertension. Interventional radiology serves a key role in the management of these patients. The interventionist should be knowledgeable of the clinical presentation as well as key imaging findings, which often dictate the approach to treatment. This article concisely reviews the etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of BCS and provides a detailed description of imaging and treatment options, particularly interventional management.

  16. Embolization of Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, H.; Hongo, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Takamae, T.; Okudera, H.; Koyama, J.I.; Oya, F.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Summary Treatment options for cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) are still controversial due to the recent result of stereotactic radiosurgery and the improved result of microsurgical resection. We investigated previously treated AVM cases and discussed the efficacy and safety of preoperative embolization especially for microsurgical resection of high-grade AVM in the Spetzler-Martin grading. Efficacy of preoperative embolization was evaluated based on 126 previously treated AVM cases at Shinshu University Hospital during the last 25 years. The safety of embolization was evaluated based on our previously-embolized 58 AVM cases (91 procedures) in the last 11 years after introduction of preoperative embolization for AVM. In all 126 cases, 82 were treated before introduction of embolization and 44 were treated after introduction of embolization. In 82 cases of the pre-embolization era, 63 lesions were removed totally in 63 AVMs (77%), partially resected in 11 (13%) and untreated in eight (10%). In 74 surgically removed cases, 11 (15%) cases showed severe intra/postoperative bleeding. In 44 cases of the embolization era, lesions were removed totally in 29 AVMs (66%), disappeared only with embolization in one (2%), disappeared with radiosurgery in seven (16%) and were untreated in five (11%). In 32 surgically removed cases, only one (2%) case showed severe intra/postoperative bleeding. In all 58 embolized cases, 44 were surgically removed, six were treated with radiosurgery, one was eliminated with embolization alone and six were partially obliterated and followed up for their location. In 91 procedures for 58 cases, two haemorrhagic and three ischemic complications occurred, three were transient and two remained having neurological deficits. The introduction of preoperative embolization improved the total removal rate and reduced the intra/postoperative bleeding rate in surgical removal of AVM. The total risk of embolization is low and well-designed preoperative

  17. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ∼1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  18. "Tangible as tissue": Arnold Gesell, infant behavior, and film analysis.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Scott

    2011-09-01

    From 1924 to 1948, developmental psychologist Arnold Gesell regularly used photographic and motion picture technologies to collect data on infant behavior. The film camera, he said, records behavior "in such coherent, authentic and measurable detail that ... the reaction patterns of infant and child become almost as tangible as tissue." This essay places his faith in the fidelity and tangibility of film, as well as his use of film as evidence, in the context of developmental psychology's professed need for legitimately scientific observational techniques. It also examines his use of these same films as educational material to promote his brand of scientific child rearing. But his analytic techniques - his methods of extracting data from the film frames - are the key to understanding the complex relationship between his theories of development and his chosen research technology.

  19. Optical image encryption using multilevel Arnold transform and noninterferometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-11-01

    Information security has attracted much current attention due to the rapid development of modern technologies, such as computer and internet. We propose a novel method for optical image encryption using multilevel Arnold transform and rotatable-phase-mask noninterferometric imaging. An optical image encryption scheme is developed in the gyrator transform domain, and one phase-only mask (i.e., phase grating) is rotated and updated during image encryption. For the decryption, an iterative retrieval algorithm is proposed to extract high-quality plaintexts. Conventional encoding methods (such as digital holography) have been proven vulnerably to the attacks, and the proposed optical encoding scheme can effectively eliminate security deficiency and significantly enhance cryptosystem security. The proposed strategy based on the rotatable phase-only mask can provide a new alternative for data/image encryption in the noninterferometric imaging.

  20. Arnold Gesell's progressive vision: child hygiene, socialism and eugenics.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ben

    2011-08-01

    In October 1913, The American Magazine published an article by Arnold Gesell that portrayed Alma, Wisconsin (his hometown) as overflowing with the mentally and morally unfit. In "The Village of a Thousand Souls", Gesell called for the observation and segregation of the unfit as a eugenic measure. This article explores the reasons behind this infamous article by someone who became a famous developmental psychologist and pediatrician. Gesell's papers at the Library of Congress reveal his socialist views of poverty, injustice, and human development. The archives of his father's photography studio at the Wisconsin Historical Society reveal his manipulation of the photographic record to fit his negative view of Alma. Typical of the era, Gesell's Progressive vision combined social control and negative eugenics with egalitarianism and the benevolent engineering of the environment.

  1. Quantum image encryption based on generalized Arnold transform and double random-phase encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan Run; Hua, Tian Xiang; Gong, Li Hua; Pei, Dong Ju; Liao, Qing Hong

    2015-04-01

    A quantum realization of the generalized Arnold transform is designed. A novel quantum image encryption algorithm based on generalized Arnold transform and double random-phase encoding is proposed. The pixels are scrambled by the generalized Arnold transform, and the gray-level information of images is encoded by the double random-phase operations. The keys of the encryption algorithm include the independent parameters of coefficients matrix, iterative times and classical binary sequences, and thus, the key space is extremely large. Numerical simulations and theoretical analyses demonstrate that the proposed algorithm with good feasibility and effectiveness has lower computational complexity than its classical counterpart.

  2. Acute Liver Failure Due to Budd-Chiari Syndrome in the Setting of Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Stine, Jonathan G; Newton, Kelly; Vinayak, Ajeet G

    2015-04-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the heart, specifically cardiac sarcomas, are rare and mainly diagnosed at autopsy. Acute Budd-Chiari syndrome is a recognized cause of acute liver failure and has been associated with several rare cardiac tumors: atrial myxoma, caval rhabdomyosarcoma, and primary cardiac adenocarcinoma. We present the first case of a fatal, highly differentiated cardiac synovial sarcoma that presented as acute liver failure from Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  3. Potentiometric surfaces of the Arnold Engineering Development Complex Area, Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee, May and September 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugh, Connor J.; Robinson, John A.

    2016-01-29

    During May 2011, when water levels were near seasonal highs, water-level data were collected from 374 monitoring wells; and during September 2011, when water levels were near seasonal lows, water-level data were collected from 376 monitoring wells. Potentiometric surfaces were mapped by contouring altitudes of water levels measured in wells completed in the shallow aquifer, the upper and lower parts of the Manchester aquifer, and the Fort Payne aquifer. Water levels are generally 2 to 14 feet lower in September compared to May. The potentiometric-surface maps for all aquifers indicate a groundwater depression at the J4 test cell. Similar groundwater depressions in the shallow and upper parts of the Manchester aquifer are within the main testing area at the Arnold Engineering Development Complex at dewatering facilities.

  4. Cardiac arteriovenous malformation causing sudden death.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Beatriz; Suárez-Mier, M Paz; Argente, Trinidad

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac vascular malformations are rare. We report a subendocardial arteriovenous malformation (AVM), associated with extensive myocardial fibrosis, causing sudden death in a 25-year-old woman. To our knowledge, this is the first autopsy case reported.

  5. In utero Repair of Myelomeningocele: Rationale, Initial Clinical Experience and a Randomized Controlled Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Enrico; Flake, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    Myelomeningocele (MMC), one of the most common congenital malformations, can result in severe lifelong disabilities, including paraplegia, hydrocephalus, Arnold-Chiari II malformation, incontinence, sexual dysfunction, skeletal deformations, and mental impairment. MMC was the first nonlethal anomaly to be treated by fetal surgery. Studies in animals provide compelling evidence that the primary cause of the neurological deficit associated with MMC is not simply incomplete neurulation but rather chronic mechanical injury and amniotic-fluid-induced chemical trauma that progressively damage the exposed neural tissue during gestation. Initial results suggest that the surgical repair of MMC before 25 weeks of gestation may preserve neurological function, reverse the hindbrain herniation of the Arnold-Chiari II malformation, and obviate the need for postnatal placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. As it is currently unknown whether fetal surgery for MMC is truly beneficial compared to standard postnatal care, a randomized, controlled clinical trial has been initiated within the United States. PMID:22479081

  6. Origins of Airpower. Hap Arnold’s Early Career in Aviation Technology, 1903-1935

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    Origins of Airpower Hap Arnold’s Early Career in Aviation Technology, 1903–1935 HENRY HARLEY (“Hap”) Arnold was not supposed to enter the Army.1...War for Inde­ pendence. Henry Harley , Hap’s namesake and great-great-grandfather, had been a private in the MAJ DIK DASO, USAF Pennsylvania...admission tests, Thomas rejected his parents’ persistent urging to attend West Point. So Henry Arnold, then called Harley , inherited the oppor­ tunity to

  7. Air Sampling of Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxins, Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans, and Polychlorinated Biphenyls Arnold AFS, Tennessee.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    DIBENZOFURANS, AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS ARNOLD AFS TN ISAAC ATKINS, JR., CAPTAIN, USAF, BSC January 1987 D I ~ELECTE FINAL REPORT 0Wfl D LU...NO 11. TITLE (Include Security ClassificatiOtl) Air Sampling of Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxins, Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans, and Polychlorinated ... Biphenyls at Arnold AFS TN (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Captaiq Isaac Atkins, Jr. 13a. TYP OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month

  8. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE FACE CAPILLARY MALFORMATION].

    PubMed

    Galich, S P; Gindich, O A; Dabizha, A Yu; Ogorodnik, Ya P

    2015-08-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 37 patients for the head and neck capillary malformations were analyzed. Optimal surgical tactics, depending on the malformation form and localization, was proposed. Restitution of the tissues defect after excision of malformation, using the flaps transposition, have permitted to achieve good esthetic results.

  9. Reconstruction of middle ear malformations

    PubMed Central

    Schwager, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    Malformations of the middle ear are classified as minor and major malformations. Minor malformations appear with regular external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and aerated middle ear space. The conducting hearing loss is due to fixation or interruption of the ossicular chain. The treatment is surgical, following the rules of ossiculoplasty and stapes surgery. In major malformations (congenital aural atresia) there is no external auditory canal and a deformed or missing pinna. The mastoid and the middle ear space may be underdevelopped, the ossicular chain is dysplastic. Surgical therapy is possible in patients with good aeration of the temporal bone, existing windows, a near normal positioned facial nerve and a mobile ossicular chain. Plastic and reconstructive surgery of the pinna should proceed the reconstruction of the external auditory canal and middle ear. In cases of good prognosis unilateral aural atresia can be approached already in childhood. In patients with high risk of surgical failure, bone anchored hearing aids are the treatment of choice. Recent reports of implantable hearing devices may be discussed as an alternative treatment for selected patients. PMID:22073077

  10. Genetic causes of vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Brouillard, Pascal; Vikkula, Miikka

    2007-10-15

    Vascular malformations are localized defects of vascular development. They usually affect a limited number of vessels in a restricted area of the body. Although most malformations are sporadic, inheritance is observed, enabling genetic analysis. Usually, sporadic forms present with a single lesion whereas multiple lesions are observed in familial cases. The last decade has seen unraveling of several causative genes and beginning of elucidation of the pathophysiological pathways involved in the inherited forms. In parallel, definition of the clinical phenotypes has improved and disorders such as Parkes-Weber syndrome (PKWS), first thought to be sporadic, is now known to be part of a more common inheritable phenotype. In addition, the concept of double-hit mechanism that we proposed earlier to explain the incomplete penetrance, variable expressivity and multifocality of lesions in inherited venous anomalies is now becoming confirmed, as some somatic mutations have been identified in venous, glomuvenous and cerebral cavernous malformations. It is thus tempting to suggest that familial forms of vascular malformations follow paradominant inheritance and that sporadic forms, the etiopathogenic causes of which are still unelucidated, are caused by somatic mutations in the same genes.

  11. Polysplenia with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Papagiannis, J; Kanter, R J; Effman, E L; Pratt, P C; Marcille, R; Browning, I B; Armstrong, B E

    1993-03-01

    A patient with polysplenia syndrome, dextrocardia, left atrial isomerism, normal great vessel relationships, and no intracardiac shunts developed progressive cyanosis and clubbing. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) were diagnosed by angiography and confirmed by lung biopsy. Superior mesenteric arteriogram revealed hypoplasia of the intrahepatic portal vein branches and a portosystemic shunt. The possible etiologies of PAVMs are discussed.

  12. Arteriovenous malformation of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Dodia, Nazera; George, Suku

    2015-09-17

    We present the case of a 54-year-old woman with intermittent right-sided abdominal pain. Ultrasound scans showed an unusual vascular appearance of the uterus with a thinned endometrium. Contrast CT led to a strong suspicion of an arteriovenous malformation of the uterus. The patient was successfully treated with a hysterectomy with salpingo-oophorectomy.

  13. Budd-Chiari syndrome: Etiology, pathogenesis and diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Aydinli, Musa; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is a congestive hepatopathy caused by blockage of hepatic veins. This syndrome occurs in 1/100 000 in the general population. Hypercoagulable state could be identified in 75% of the patients; more than one etiologic factor may play a role in 25% of the patients. Primary myeloproliferative diseases are the leading cause of the disease. Two of the hepatic veins must be blocked for clinically evident disease. Liver congestion and hypoxic damage of hepatocytes eventually result in predominantly centrilobular fibrosis. Doppler ultrasonography of the liver should be the initial diagnostic procedure. Hepatic venography is the reference procedure if required. Additionally liver biopsy may be helpful for differential diagnosis. The prognosis of the chronic form is acceptable compared to other chronic liver diseases. PMID:17569137

  14. Suboccipital craniectomy with opening of the fourth ventricle and duraplasty: study of 192 cases of craniovertebral malformations.

    PubMed

    Silva, José Alberto Gonçalves da; Santos Jr, Adailton Arcanjo dos; Costa, Maria do Desterro Leiros da; Almeida, Everardo Bandeira de

    2013-09-01

    The prime objective in the surgical treatment of basilar impression (BI), Chiari malformation (CM), and/or syringomyelia (SM) is based on restoration of the normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics at the craniovertebral junction and creation of a large artificial cisterna magna, avoiding the caudal migration of the hindbrain. It is observed that a large craniectomy might facilitate an upward migration of the posterior fossa structures. There are many surgical techniques to decompress the posterior fossa; however, a gold standard approach remains unclear. The authors present the results of 192 cases of BI, CM, and SM treated between 1975 and 2008 and whose surgical treatment was characterized by a large craniectomy without tonsillectomy with the patient in the sitting position, large opening of the fourth ventricle, and duraplasty.

  15. Evaluation and prevalence of major central nervous system malformations: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tutus, Sadan; Ozyurt, Sezin; Yilmaz, Ebru; Acmaz, Gokhan; Akin, Mustafa Ali

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Central nervous system (CNS) anomalies are the most common abnormalities of all malformations and can be diagnosed on routine prenatal ultrasonography (US). We aimed to find out fetal CNS anomaly rate in our clinic which is the referral center in the region. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of 15000 pregnant women who were scanned for routine obstetric follow-up from January 2012 to July 2013 in our referral center. We diagnosed CNS anomalies in 41 fetuses by using high resolution ultrasound unit with 3.5 MHz transabdominal and 6 MHz transvaginal transducers. RESULTS: CNS anomalies included 12 Chiari malformations, 2 Dandy-Walker malformations (DWM), 1 variant of Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS), 3 iniencephalies, 15 anencephalies, 1 alobar holoprosencephaly, 2 isolated hydrocephalies, 3 hydrocephalies with cerebellar hypoplasia, 1 occipital encephalocele, 1 lumbosacral myelomeningocele accompanied with microcephaly. There were some associated anomalies in the groups that included club-foot deformities in 6 cases, ventricular septal defect (VSD) in 2 cases, polycystic kidney in 2 cases, scoliosis in 1 case, hypoplasic left ventricle in 1 case; alone atrium, single umbilical artery, echogenic focus, hydronephrosis and cleft lip and palate in the same case, and omphalocele in one. CONCLUSION: Prognosis and early detection of CNS abnormalities have become an important issue because the most serious complications of major CNS anomalies are disability and getting bedridden and this situation is inevitably related to health economy. On the other hand prognosis of the fetus and family counseling is another important issue. Parents should decide whether to continue their pregnancies or not. PMID:28058307

  16. The quantum realization of Arnold and Fibonacci image scrambling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Wu, Wen-Ya; Wang, Luo

    2014-05-01

    The quantum Fourier transform, the quantum wavelet transform, etc., have been shown to be a powerful tool in developing quantum algorithms. However, in classical computing, there is another kind of transforms, image scrambling, which are as useful as Fourier transform, wavelet transform, etc. The main aim of image scrambling, which is generally used as the preprocessing or postprocessing in the confidentiality storage and transmission, and image information hiding, was to transform a meaningful image into a meaningless or disordered image in order to enhance the image security. In classical image processing, Arnold and Fibonacci image scrambling are often used. In order to realize these two image scrambling in quantum computers, this paper proposes the scrambling quantum circuits based on the flexible representation for quantum images. The circuits take advantage of the plain adder and adder modulo to factor the classical transformations into basic unitary operators such as Control-NOT gates and Toffoli gates. Theoretical analysis indicates that the network complexity grows linearly with the size of the number to be operated.

  17. Plasma Propulsion Testing Capabilities at Arnold Engineering Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Dawbarn, Albert; Moeller, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a series of experiments aimed at quantifying the plasma propulsion testing capabilities of a 12-ft diameter vacuum facility (12V) at USAF-Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC). Vacuum is maintained in the 12V facility by cryogenic panels lining the interior of the chamber. The pumping capability of these panels was shown to be great enough to support plasma thrusters operating at input electrical power >20 kW. In addition, a series of plasma diagnostics inside the chamber allowed for measurement of plasma parameters at different spatial locations, providing information regarding the chamber's effect on the global plasma thruster flowfield. The plasma source used in this experiment was Hall thruster manufactured by Busek Co. The thruster was operated at up to 20 kW steady-state power in both a lower current and higher current mode. The vacuum level in the chamber never rose above 9 x 10(exp -6) torr during the course of testing. Langmuir probes, ion flux probes, and Faraday cups were used to quantify the plasma parameters in the chamber. We present the results of these measurements and estimates of pumping speed based on the background pressure level and thruster propellant mass flow rate.

  18. Arnold diffusion for a complete family of perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delshams, Amadeu; Schaefer, Rodrigo G.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we illustrate the Arnold diffusion in a concrete example — the a priori unstable Hamiltonian system of 2 + 1/2 degrees of freedom H( p, q, I, φ, s) = p 2/2+ cos q - 1 + I 2/2 + h( q, φ, s; ɛ) — proving that for any small periodic perturbation of the form h( q, φ, s; ɛ) = ɛ cos q ( a 00 + a 10 cos φ + a 01 cos s) ( a 10 a 01 ≠ 0) there is global instability for the action. For the proof we apply a geometrical mechanism based on the so-called scattering map. This work has the following structure: In the first stage, for a more restricted case ( I* π/2 μ, μ = a 10/ a 01), we use only one scattering map, with a special property: the existence of simple paths of diffusion called highways. Later, in the general case we combine a scattering map with the inner map (inner dynamics) to prove the more general result (the existence of instability for any μ). The bifurcations of the scattering map are also studied as a function of μ. Finally, we give an estimate for the time of diffusion, and we show that this time is primarily the time spent under the scattering map.

  19. [Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with chronic myeloproliferative syndromes: analysis of 6 cases].

    PubMed

    Cobo, F; Cervantes, F; García-Pagán, J C; Bosch, J; Rozman, C; Montserrat, E

    1996-11-16

    The chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD) are considered the main etiology of Budd-Chiari syndrome in Western countries. Moreover, an occult CMPD has been recently identified in most patients with idiopathic hepatic vein thrombosis. In order to determine the frequency of the association between the above entities and to analyze the clinical and hematologic features of such patients, fourteen cases of Budd-Chiari syndrome diagnosed at a single institution over a five year period were reviewed. In 6 patients a CMPD was identified, with this being the first cause of the syndrome. Median age of the later six patients was 32 years (range: 14-54), and 4 were females. In all cases the CMPD was suspected due to the presence of hematological abnormalities, including a high hematocrit (5 cases), leucocytosis (4 cases) and thrombocytosis (3 cases). Five patients had polycythemia vera (PV) and one idiopathic myelofibrosis. In an additional Budd-Chiari patient with polycythemia, PV was ruled out on the basis of high serum erythropoietin and the absence of endogenous growth of erythroid colonies in the hematopoietic progenitor culture. The CMPD treatment included phlebotomies and hydroxiurea, whereas the Budd-Chiari syndrome was treated in most patients with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent-shunt. One patient died from a gastrointestinal hemorrhage at 48 months from Budd-Chiari diagnosis, and the remaining five are alive after a median follow-up of 28 months.

  20. Budd-Chiari syndrome in a young patient with anticardiolipin antibodies: need for prolonged anticoagulant treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Ouwendijk, R J; Koster, J C; Wilson, J H; Stibbe, J; Lameris, J S; Visser, W; Benhamou, J P

    1994-01-01

    The case of a 20 year old woman is reported with Budd-Chiari syndrome in whom lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies were shown; treatment with oral anticoagulants induced a considerable improvement. This treatment was interrupted after one year; interruption was followed by redevelopment of ascites. Further treatment with anticoagulants was continued for five years with noticeable improvement. When treatment with oral anticoagulants was stopped because of pregnancy, the patient redeveloped ascites and had a spontaneous miscarriage. Subsequently, treatment with oral anticoagulants was reintroduced and again resulted in noticeable improvement. In conclusion patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome should be tested for lupus anticoagulants and anticardiolipin antibodies, Budd-Chiari syndrome resulting from this cause may have a good response to treatment with oral anticoagulants; this treatment should be maintained permanently, and pregnancy in such patients may initiate serious difficulties. Images p1004-a PMID:8063206

  1. Cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A.; Enzmann, D.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients with angiographically cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem were examined with computed tomography (CT). The clinical and CT findings of cryptic vascular malformations of the brainstem are described and distinguished from those of brainstem glioma and multiple sclerosis. Calcification within a brainstem lesion that displays relatively little mass effect and shows little contrast enhancement, particularly when associated with a long history of waxing and waning brainstem symptoms, should suggest a vascular malformation.

  2. Multiple cavernous malformations with supravermian arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Unalp, Aycan; Uran, Nedret

    2007-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation are congenital vascular abnormalities that have been reported in 0.4% of the population; they represent 5-13% of all cerebrovascular malformations. Onset of cerebral cavernous malformations may be associated with seizures, intracranial hemorrhages, focal neurological deficit or migraine-type headaches. Some patients may require surgical intervention due to hemorrhage. Multiple cavernomas in childhood have been reported in the literature, but they are rare. This manuscript presents a 12-year-old girl with multiple cavernomas accompanied by supravermian arachnoid cyst detected by neuroimaging techniques. This is the first report that demonstrates a case of pediatric multiple cavernous malformation coexisting with arachnoid cyst of the supravermian cistern.

  3. 75 FR 6737 - FPL Energy Duane Arnold, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplement 42 to the Generic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... alternative energy sources. The draft Supplement 42 to the GEIS is publicly available at the NRC Public... COMMISSION FPL Energy Duane Arnold, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplement 42 to the Generic... of Duane Arnold Energy Center Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

  4. Interventional therapeutic techniques in Budd-Chiari syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Bilbao, Jose Ignacio; Pueyo, Jesus Ciro; Longo, Jesus Maria; Arias, Mercedes; Herrero, Jose Ignacio; Benito, Alberto; Barettino, Maria Dolores; Perotti, Juan Pablo; Pardo, Fernando

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. To analyze the results obtained with percutaneous therapeutic procedures in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCHS). Methods. Between August 1991 and April 1993, seven patients with BCHS were treated in our hospital. Three presented with a congenital web; in another three cases the hepatic veins and/or the inferior vena cava (IVC) were compromised after major hepatic surgery; one patient presented with a severe stenosis of the intrahepatic IVC due to hepatomegaly. Results. One of the patients with congenital web has required several new dilatations due to restenosis; one patient required a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedure while awaiting a liver transplantation. The two postsurgical patients with stenosed hepatic veins did not require any new procedure after the placement of metallic endoprostheses. However, the patient with liver transplantation presented IVC restenosis after balloon angioplasty that required the deployment of metallic endoprostheses. In the patient with hepatomegaly a self-expandable prosthesis was placed in the intrahepatic portion of the IVC before (4 months) a liver transplantation. Conclusion. Interventional therapeutic techniques offer a wide variety of possibilities for the treatment of patients with BCHS. For IVC stenoses, the results obtained with balloon angioplasty are at least as good as those obtained with surgery.

  5. Budd-Chiari Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation of Multisystemic Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bacha, Dhouha; Romdhane, Hayfa; Cheikh, Myriam; Nejma, Houda Ben; BelHadj, Najet

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown origin. All organs may be affected. Liver involvement is common but it is rarely symptomatic. Only a few cases of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) secondary to a hepatic sarcoidosis have been described so far. We describe a case of multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with BCS. A 42-year old female was referred to our department for chronic and anicteric cholestasis. Laboratory and imaging investigations disclosed features of chronic BCS associated with multisystemic sarcoidosis. The positive diagnosis was based on microscopic features, which showed hepatic, gastric and cutaneous non-caseating granulomas. Screening for an underlying thrombophilic disorder was negative. The diagnosis of BCS complicating hepatic sarcoidosis was the most likely. She was put on corticosteroids and anticoagulation therapy. To our knowledge, few cases of sarcoidosis-related BCS have been reported in the literature. In addition to being an uncommon presentation of sarcoidosis, this case illustrates the importance of recognizing an unusual cause of BCS and its therapeutic difficulties. PMID:26900444

  6. Phase image encryption in the fractional Hartley domain using Arnold transform and singular value decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Phool; Yadav, A. K.; Singh, Kehar

    2017-04-01

    A novel scheme for image encryption of phase images is proposed, using fractional Hartley transform followed by Arnold transform and singular value decomposition in the frequency domain. Since the plaintext is a phase image, the mask used in the spatial domain is a random amplitude mask. The proposed scheme has been validated for grayscale images and is sensitive to the encryption parameters such as the order of the Arnold transform and the fractional orders of the Hartley transform. We have also evaluated the scheme's resistance to the well-known noise and occlusion attacks.

  7. Stent Angioplasty of Closed Mesocaval Shunt in a Patient with Budd-Chiari Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sancak, Tanzer; Karagulle, Ayse Tuba; Bilgic, Sadik; Sanlidilek, Umman; Yerdel, Mehmet Ali

    2002-08-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is an uncommon disorder caused by hepatic venous outflow obstruction. It is characterized by ascites, hepatomegaly and abdominal pain. Percutaneous intervention shave recently been used for the treatment of BCS. We present a case of BCS with a closed mesocaval shunt which was reopened with a self-expandable metallic stent.

  8. Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicating Hydatid Cyst of the Liver Managed by Venoplasty and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Sarawagi, Radha Keshava, Shyamkumar N. Surendrababu, Narayanam R. S.; Zachariah, Uday G. Eapen, Eapen C.

    2011-02-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal hypertension is an uncommon complication of hydatid cyst of the liver. Previous reports describe cyst excision or portosystemic shunt surgery for such patients. Here we present a case of hydatid cyst of the liver with BCS that was treated successfully with hepatic venoplasty and transjugular stent placement.

  9. [Basilar impression as a cause of trigeminal neuralgia: report of a case].

    PubMed

    da Silva, J A; da Silva, E B

    1982-06-01

    A case of basilar impression associated with Arnold-Chiari malformation and with trigeminal neuralgia is reported. The radiological examination of the skull showed marked asymmetry of the petrous bone with the tip of the odontoid apophysis located 30 mm above the McGregor line. Treatment consisted of craiectomy of the posterior fossa and cervical laminetomy (C1 to C3). The postoperative course was uneventful with total disappearance of the trigeminal neuralgia.

  10. [Familial occurrence of basilar impression].

    PubMed

    Da Silva, J A; Da Silva, E B; de Souza, M B

    1978-09-01

    The authors studied nine members of the same family; two among them received surgical treatment for basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation. In the other members of the family, several signs and symptoms of central nervous disease were observed. All patients had the apex of the odontoid apophysis above McGregor's line, 4 mm in the case 9, and 10 mm or more in the others.

  11. Boston's Arnold Arboretum: A Place for Study and Recreation. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Alan

    This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places registration file for the Arnold Arboretum (Massachusetts) and other source material about the Arboretum and Frederick Law Olmstead. The lesson focuses on the first arboretum in the United States, which was part of Olmstead's plan for Boston's park system, known as the "Emerald…

  12. Arnold's Advantages: How Governor Schwarzenegger Acquired English through De Facto Bilingual Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Francisco; Krashen, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has repeatedly mentioned that immigrants to the United States should do what he did to acquire English: Avoid using their first languages and speak, listen to, and read a vast amount of materials in English--a combination he referred to as "immersion." Yet, Schwarzenegger's real path to successful English…

  13. Internal Evaluation a Quarter-Century Later: A Conversation with Arnold J. Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkov, Boris B.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter features a recent conversation with Dr. Arnold J. Love, a long-time proponent of internal evaluation and one of the most cited internal evaluation authors. In 1983, Love edited the first issue of "New Directions for Program Evaluation" on the topic of internal evaluation. He is the author of the book "Internal…

  14. What Rural Education Research is of Most Worth? A Reply to Arnold, Newman, Gaddy, and Dean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Craig B.; Theobald, Paul; Howley, Aimee

    2005-01-01

    Offering a response to the question, "What rural education research is of most worth?", the authors recommend an approach very different from the one taken by Arnold, Newman, Gaddy, and Dean (2005) in their consideration of the rural education research literature. They remind readers that about 150 years ago, Herbert Spencer put a similar…

  15. Seedbed of Reform: Arnold Guyot and School Geography in Massachusetts, 1849-1855

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koelsch, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Swiss-born Arnold Henri Guyot (1807-1884) was the first professionally trained geographer to hold an academic position in the United States. After his migration to this country in 1848 he lived for several years in Massachusetts. During this period he introduced contemporary German-Swiss ideas of geography to key opinion leaders in an important…

  16. Living donor liver transplantation for Budd–Chiari syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Cengiz; Akbulut, Sami; Ince, Volkan; Karakas, Serdar; Baskiran, Adil; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of the study was to report the detailed surgical techniques of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in patients with Budd–Chiari syndrome (BCS). Methods: Demographic and surgical techniques characteristics of 39 patients with BCS who underwent LDLT were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-two of them had native vena cava inferior (VCI) preservation and 6 had retrohepatic VCI resection with venous continuity established by cryopreserved VCI (n = 4) or aortic graft (n = 2). In 1 patient, the anastomosis was established between the graft hepatic vein (HV) and the suprahepatic VCI. For preservation of the native VCI, immediately before the graft implantation, the thickened anterior, and right/left lateral walls of the recipient VCI were resected caudally and cranially until the intact vein wall was reached, and then an anastomosis was created between the (HV) of the graft reconstructed as a circumferential fence and the reconstructed recipient VCI. For resection of the retrohepatic VCI, the anastomosis was created with the same technique in all 6 patients in whom VCI was reformed by using a vascular graft. Results: Post-LT complications developed in 19 of the patients. Complications related to the biliary anastomosis accounted for 12 of these cases, with 11 treated by PTC and/or ERCP, and 1 by hepaticojejunostomy. Two of the 39 patients developed recurrent BCS and were treated by interventional radiological methods. Thirteen patients died and none were related to the BCS recurrence. Conclusion: Favorable outcomes are achievable with LDLT treatment of patients with BCS, which carries important implications for countries with inadequate cadaveric donor pools. PMID:27787368

  17. Radiosurgery for brainstem arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Koga, Tomoyuki; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C; Lunsford, L Dade

    2013-01-01

    The authors outlined the treatment result of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) inside the brainstem by reviewing the 4 existing studies in detail. The majority of patients with brainstem AVMs had a history of hemorrhage, leading to neurological deficits at the time of treatment in 72-73% of patients. The most frequent location was the midbrain or the pons depending on studies, while the medulla oblongata was the least common location throughout the series. The obliteration rate after radiosurgery was 44-73%, which was generally lower than in other locations, while the complication rate was 5-14%, which was expectedly higher than in other locations. No objective evidence for size is known, and therefore, patient selection and treatment planning should be carefully performed after judicious assessment of treatment risks and benefits among limited treatment options.

  18. Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    KOMIYAMA, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) represent a high risk of intracranial hemorrhages, which are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality of bAVMs, especially in children and young adults. Although a variety of factors leading to hemorrhages of bAVMs are investigated extensively, their pathogenesis is still not well elucidated. The author has reviewed the updated data of genetic aspects of bAVMs, especially focusing on clinical and experimental knowledge from hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which is the representative genetic disease presenting with bAVMs caused by loss-of-function in one of the two genes: endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1. This knowledge may allow us to infer the pathogensis of sporadic bAVMs and in the development of new medical therapies for them. PMID:27076383

  19. New insights into craniofacial malformations

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2015-01-01

    Development of the human skull and face is a highly orchestrated and complex three-dimensional morphogenetic process, involving hundreds of genes controlling the coordinated patterning, proliferation and differentiation of tissues having multiple embryological origins. Craniofacial malformations that occur because of abnormal development (including cleft lip and/or palate, craniosynostosis and facial dysostoses), comprise over one-third of all congenital birth defects. High-throughput sequencing has recently led to the identification of many new causative disease genes and functional studies have clarified their mechanisms of action. We present recent findings in craniofacial genetics and discuss how this information together with developmental studies in animal models is helping to increase understanding of normal craniofacial development. PMID:26085576

  20. Genetic Basis of Brain Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Parrini, Elena; Conti, Valerio; Dobyns, William B.; Guerrini, Renzo

    2016-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) represent a major cause of developmental disabilities, severe epilepsy, and reproductive disadvantage. Genes that have been associated to MCD are mainly involved in cell proliferation and specification, neuronal migration, and late cortical organization. Lissencephaly-pachygyria-severe band heterotopia are diffuse neuronal migration disorders causing severe global neurological impairment. Abnormalities of the LIS1, DCX, ARX, RELN, VLDLR, ACTB, ACTG1, TUBG1, KIF5C, KIF2A, and CDK5 genes have been associated with these malformations. More recent studies have also established a relationship between lissencephaly, with or without associated microcephaly, corpus callosum dysgenesis as well as cerebellar hypoplasia, and at times, a morphological pattern consistent with polymicrogyria with mutations of several genes (TUBA1A, TUBA8, TUBB, TUBB2B, TUBB3, and DYNC1H1), regulating the synthesis and function of microtubule and centrosome key components and hence defined as tubulinopathies. MCD only affecting subsets of neurons, such as mild subcortical band heterotopia and periventricular heterotopia, have been associated with abnormalities of the DCX, FLN1A, and ARFGEF2 genes and cause neurological and cognitive impairment that vary from severe to mild deficits. Polymicrogyria results from abnormal late cortical organization and is inconstantly associated with abnormal neuronal migration. Localized polymicrogyria has been associated with anatomo-specific deficits, including disorders of language and higher cognition. Polymicrogyria is genetically heterogeneous, and only in a small minority of patients, a definite genetic cause has been identified. Megalencephaly with normal cortex or polymicrogyria by MRI imaging, hemimegalencephaly and focal cortical dysplasia can all result from mutations in genes of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway. Postzygotic mutations have been described for most MCD and can be limited to the dysplastic tissue in the

  1. Renal tract malformations: perspectives for nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Kerecuk, Larissa; Schreuder, Michiel F; Woolf, Adrian S

    2008-06-01

    Renal tract malformations are congenital anomalies of the kidneys and/or lower urinary tract. One challenging feature of these conditions is that they can present not only prenatally but also in childhood or adulthood. The most severe types of malformations, such as bilateral renal agenesis or dysplasia, although rare, lead to renal failure. With advances in dialysis and transplantation for young children, it is now possible to prevent the early death of at least some individuals with severe malformations. Other renal tract malformations, such as congenital pelviureteric junction obstruction and primary vesicoureteric reflux, are relatively common. Renal tract malformations are, collectively, the major cause of childhood end-stage renal disease. Their contribution to the number of adults on renal replacement therapy is less clear and has possibly been underestimated. Renal tract malformations can be familial, and specific mutations of genes involved in renal tract development can sometimes be found in affected individuals. These features provide information about the causes of malformations but also raise questions about whether to screen relatives. Whether prenatal decompression of obstructed renal tracts, or postnatal initiation of therapies such as prophylactic antibiotics or angiotensin blockade, improve long-term renal outcomes remains unclear.

  2. Vascular Malformations: Approach by an Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalwar, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Children with vascular malformations are best managed with a multidisciplinary team of specialists. Interventional radiology may deliver primary treatment such as staged sclerotherapy and embolization for malformations that are poor candidates for primary surgical resection or play a supportive role such as preoperative or intraoperative embolization. A thorough understanding of vascular morphology and flow dynamics is imperative to choosing the best treatment tool and technique. In this review, the author discusses the selection of techniques and tools used to treat vascular malformations based on their angiographic morphology. PMID:25045335

  3. Split cord malformations: A two years experience at AIIMS

    PubMed Central

    Borkar, Sachin A.; Mahapatra, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Over a 2-year period, 2008-2009, a total of 53 cases of split cord malformation (SCM) were treated at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS). This study is a retrospective analysis of clinical features, radiological findings, and surgical outcome of these patients. Materials and Methods: During this period, 53 cases of SCM were treated at AIIMS. They constitute around 27% of all spinal dysraphism surgeries performed at the department of Neurosurgery, AIIMS; as 200 cases of spinal dysraphism were operated during the study period. The data was obtained from case files, operation notes, discharge summaries, and follow-up files. Observations: There were 30 cases of SCM type I and 23 cases of type II SCM. Seven patients were adult above 18 years of age. Except 7 patients, remaining 46 were symptomatic. Bony deformity of spine was recorded in 24 patients; of them, 19 had scoliosis and 4 had kyphosis. Deformity of foot was recorded in 10 patients. Thirteen patients had hypertrichosis, while four had dermal sinus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in all patients. MRI revealed syringomyelia in 14 patients; however, only one patient had associated Chiari malformation. Six patients had meningomyelocele. Intra-operative; thick filum was noticed in 10 cases and in another 9 cases, there was filum lipoma. Dermoid was encountered in 4 patients, one patient had epidermoid tumor. Site of split was thoracic in 22, followed by lumbar region in 21 patients. Only 3 patients had split in cervical spinal cord. Seven patients had two separate splits at two different levels. Two patients had posteriorly located bony spur. All patients underwent surgery. Seven patients, those who had no neurological deficits pre-op, remained unchanged post-op. Amongst the 46 patients who had preoperative neurological deficits, eight had neurological deterioration post-op; five had deterioration in motor power and three had urinary problem. Five of these patients had

  4. Anterior commissure absence without callosal agenesis: a new brain malformation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, T N; Stevens, J M; Free, S L; Sander, J W; Shorvon, S D; Sisodiya, S M

    2002-04-23

    The authors report a novel human brain malformation characterized by the absence of the anterior commissure without callosal agenesis, but associated with gross unilateral panhemispheric malformation incorporating subependymal heterotopia, subcortical heterotopia, and gyral abnormalities including temporal malformation and polymicrogyria. In contrast, a normal anterior commissure was found in 125 control subjects and in 113 other subjects with a range of brain malformations.

  5. Aetiological factors of Budd-Chiari syndrome in Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Afredj, Nawel; Guessab, Nawal; Nani, Abdelbasset; Faraoun, Sid Ahmed; Ouled Cheikh, Ibtissem; Kerbouche, Rafik; Hannoun, Djouhar; Amir, Zine Charef; Ait Kaci, Hayet; Bentabak, Kamel; Plessier, Aurélie; Valla, Dominique-Charles; Cazals-Hatem, Valerie; Denninger, Marie-Hélène; Boucekkine, Tadjeddine; Debzi, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the clinical presentation of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and identify the aetiologies of this disease in Algeria. METHODS: Patients with BCS, hospitalised in our unit from January 2004 until June 2010 were included and the aetiological factors were assessed. Patients presenting a BCS in the setting of advanced-stage cirrhosis or a liver transplantation were excluded from the study. The diagnosis was established when an obstruction of hepatic venous outflow (thrombosis, stenosis or compression) was demonstrated. We diagnosed myeloproliferative disease (MPD) by bone marrow biopsy and V617F JAK2 mutation. Anti-phospholipid syndrome (APLS) was detected by the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies, anti-β2 glycoprotein antibodies and Lupus anticoagulant. We also detected paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) by flow cytometry. Celiac disease and Behçet disease were systematically investigated in our patients. Hereditary anticoagulant protein deficiencies were also assessed. We tested our patients for the G20210A mutation at Beaujon Hospital. Imaging procedures were performed to determine a local cause of BCS, such as a hydatid cyst or a liver tumour. RESULTS: One hundred and fifteen patients were included. Mean follow up: 32.12 mo. Mean age: 34.41 years, M/F = 0.64. Chronic presentation was frequent: 63.5%. The revealing symptoms for the BCS were ascites (74.8%) and abdominal pain (42.6%). The most common site of thrombosis was the hepatic veins (72.2%). Involvement of the inferior vena cava alone was observed in 3 patients. According to the radiological investigations, BCS was primary in 94.7% of the cases (n = 109) and secondary in 5.2% (n = 6). An aetiology was identified in 77.4% of the patients (n = 89); it was multifactorial in 27% (n = 31). The predominant aetiology of BCS in our patients was a myeloproliferative disease, observed in 34.6% of cases. APLS was found in 21.7% and celiac disease in 11.4%. Other acquired conditions were: PNH (n

  6. Fibrinolysis status in the Budd-Chiari syndrome in China.

    PubMed

    Ke, Zhang; Hao, Xu; Ning, Wei; Zu, Mao-heng; Fun, Yu-fei

    2015-10-01

    Pathogenesis and clinical characteristics of the Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) in Asia are somewhat different from the ones observed in Western countries. Obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC) or of the hepatic veins is caused to a greater extent by membranous webs than by thrombosis. Impaired fibrinolysis has been found in European patients with BCS, but its status in Chinese patients with this condition is still unknown. To explore the characteristics of fibrinolysis in BCS patients in this country, we measured the euglobulin lysis time (ELT) for overall fibrinolysis and the plasma levels of five fibrinolytic components in 65 Chinese patients with BCS and 43 healthy controls. In patients, ELTs were slightly shorter than in controls (mean, 293 vs. 357 min, P < 0.02), tissue type plasminogen activator levels were higher than in controls (mean, 239 vs. 185 pg/ml, P < 0.01), and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 levels were lower than in controls (mean, 1.43 vs. 1.73 ng/ml, P < 0.001). To explore BCS in more detail, we subgrouped the cases according to age, type of venous occlusion, Child-Pugh score, and thrombosis. As a result of this analysis, we found that young patients (age <30 years) had a longer ELT (mean, 440 min) than the older patient groups (30 ≤ age ≤ 44, 45 ≤ age ≤ 54, age>54 years; mean ELT = 242, 198, and 289 min, respectively, all P < 0.05). The independent hepatic vein occlusion subgroup showed a longer ELT (mean, 367 min) than the combined hepatic vein and IVC or the independent IVC occlusion subgroup (mean ELT = 233 and 260 min, both P < 0.05). ELT did not show significant differences between Child-Pugh class A and B subgroups (mean, 267 vs. 333 min, P > 0.05). ELT in the subgroup without thrombosis was shorter than in controls (mean, 288 vs. 358 min, P < 0.05), and in the subgroup with thrombosis, it was also slightly shorter than in controls, without reaching statistical significance (mean, 306 vs. 358 min, P > 0.05). By and large

  7. Jupiter's winds and Arnol'd's second stability theorem: Slowly moving waves and neutral stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamp, Andrew P.; Dowling, Timothy E.

    1993-01-01

    Since the Voyager encounters in 1979, it has been known that Jupiter's cloud-top zonal winds violate the barotropic stability criterion. A vortex-tube stretching analysis of the Voyager wind data indicates that the more general Charney-Stern stability criterion is also violated. On the other hand, the zonal winds determined by tracking cloud features in Hubble Space Telescope images taken in 1991 precisely match the zonal winds determined by tracking cloud features in Voyager images, and it is hard to understand how a complicated zonal wind profile like Jupiter's could be unstable and yet not change at all in 12 years. In fact, there are at least two unknown ways to violate the Charney-Stern stability criterion and still have a stable flow. The better known of these is called Fjortoft's theorem, or Arnol'd's 1st theorem for the case of large-amplitude perturbations. Although the Fjortoft-Arnol'd theorem has been extended from the quasi-geostrophic equations to the primitive equations, the basic requirement that the potential vorticity be an increasing function of streamfunction is opposite to the case found in Jupiter, where the Voyager data indicate that the potential vorticity is a decreasing function of streamfunction. But this second case is precisely that which is covered by Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem. In fact, the Voyager data suggest that Jupiter's zonal winds are neutrally stable with respect to Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem. Here, we analyze the linear stability problem of a one-parameter family of sinusoidal zonal wind profiles that are close to neutral stability with respect to Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem. We find numerically that the most unstable mode is always stationary, which may help to explain the slowly moving mode 10 waves observed on Jupiter. We find that violation of Arnol'd's 2nd stability theorem is both necessary and sufficient for instability of sinusoidal profiles. However, there appears to be no simple extension of Arnol'd's 2

  8. Glomuvenous malformation: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Flors, Lucia; Norton, Patrick T; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of a glomuvenous malformation involving the dorsal aspect of the right hand and distal forearm in an 11-year-old boy. He had a history of multiple vascular anomalies since birth and presented with increasing right hand pain. MRI played an important role in characterizing and determining the extent of the lesion. In particular, dynamic time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography precisely defined its vascularity. The diagnosis was made histopathologically after partial resection of the lesion. Glomuvenous malformation is a rare developmental hamartoma that originates from the glomus body. Clinically they usually resemble a venous malformation but they are a different entity. In the appropriate clinical setting this rare condition must be included in the differential diagnosis of a vascular malformation, especially when subtle arterial enhancement, early venous shunting and progressive filling of dilated venous spaces are depicted on MRA.

  9. [Central nervous system malformations: neurosurgery correlates].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-León, Juan C; Betancourt-Fursow, Yaline M; Jiménez-Betancourt, Cristina S

    2013-09-06

    Congenital malformations of the central nervous system are related to alterations in neural tube formation, including most of the neurosurgical management entities, dysraphism and craniosynostosis; alterations of neuronal proliferation; megalencefaly and microcephaly; abnormal neuronal migration, lissencephaly, pachygyria, schizencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, heterotopia and cortical dysplasia, spinal malformations and spinal dysraphism. We expose the classification of different central nervous system malformations that can be corrected by surgery in the shortest possible time and involving genesis mechanisms of these injuries getting better studied from neurogenic and neuroembryological fields, this involves connecting innovative knowledge areas where alteration mechanisms in dorsal induction (neural tube) and ventral induction (telencephalization) with the current way of correction, as well as the anomalies of cell proliferation and differentiation of neuronal migration and finally the complex malformations affecting the posterior fossa and current possibilities of correcting them.

  10. Inner ear malformations: a practical diagnostic approach.

    PubMed

    Mazón, M; Pont, E; Montoya-Filardi, A; Carreres-Polo, J; Más-Estellés, F

    2016-12-29

    Pediatric sensorineural hearing loss is a major cause of disability; although inner ear malformations account for only 20-40% of all cases, recognition and characterization will be vital for the proper management of these patients. In this article relevant anatomy and development of inner ear are surveyed. The role of neuroimaging in pediatric sensorineural hearing loss and cochlear preimplantation study are assessed. The need for a universal system of classification of inner ear malformations with therapeutic and prognostic implications is highlighted. And finally, the radiological findings of each type of malformation are concisely described and depicted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play a crucial role in the characterization of inner ear malformations and allow the assessment of the anatomical structures that enable the selection of appropriate treatment and surgical approach.

  11. Venous malformations: clinical diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Behravesh, Sasan; Yakes, Wayne; Gupta, Nikhil; Naidu, Sailendra; Chong, Brian W.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformation (VM) is the most common type of congenital vascular malformation (CVM). They are present at birth and are often symptomatic, causing morbidity and pain. VMs can be challenging to diagnose and are often confused with hemangioma in terminology as well as with imaging. An accurate clinical history and cross-sectional imaging are critical for diagnosis and for devising management. This manuscript will review imaging approaches to diagnosing VMs and current treatment strategies. PMID:28123976

  12. Malformation and plastic surgery in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Ralf; Magritz, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Malformations of the head and neck show a huge variety of clinical symptoms with functional and esthetic consequences. Often times its rehabilitation requires multi-staged and multi-disciplinary procedures and concepts. These must consider eating, speech, mimic expression, hearing and “esthetics” or at least “normality”. A survey of the most common head and neck malformations and their treatment options are presented here. PMID:25587361

  13. Spontaneous thrombosis of vein of Galen malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kariyappa, Kalpana Devi; Krishnaswami, Murali; Gnanaprakasam, Francis; Ramachandran, Madan; Krishnaswamy, Visvanathan

    2016-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare intracranial vascular malformation. Before the advent and advancement of various endovascular techniques, there was dismal prognosis. Rarely, this condition may spontaneously thrombose without the need for surgical or endovascular treatment with good prognosis. We report a case of an 8-month-old infant who had serial imaging, suggestive of VOGM and presented to us for further management, wherein the imaging revealed spontaneous thrombosis. PMID:27857804

  14. The Microcephaly-Capillary Malformation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Paciorkowski, Alex R.; Smyser, Christopher D.; Willing, Marcia C.; Lind, Anne C.; Dobyns, William B.

    2012-01-01

    We report on three children from two families with a new pattern recognition malformation syndrome consisting of severe congenital microcephaly (MIC), intractable epilepsy including infantile spasms, and generalized capillary malformations that was first reported recently in this journal [Carter et al. (2011); Am J Med Genet A 155: 301–306]. Two of our reported patients are an affected brother and sister, suggesting this is an autosomal recessive severe congenital MIC syndrome. PMID:21815250

  15. Final Environmental Assessment: Construction of SWMU 74 Groundwater Extraction and Convenience System Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    member of the task force, Dr. Franklin County Coffee County TULLAHOMA MANCHESTER DECHERD SEWANEE ESTILL SPRINGS WINCHESTER Figure 1-1 Arnold Air Force...migrated from multiple sources at Arnold AFB and is discharging to springs and wells located on private property approximately 3 miles from the Base...Samples from private water-supply wells and springs located along the Plume’s path have contained trichloroethene (TCE) at concentrations exceeding the

  16. Venous Malformation: update on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis & management

    PubMed Central

    Dompmartin, Anne; Vikkula, Miikka; Boon, Laurence M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to discuss the current knowledge on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapeutic management of venous malformations. Venous malformations (VMs) are slow-flow vascular anomalies. They are simple, sporadic or familial (cutaneo-mucosal venous malformation or glomuvenous malformations), combined (e.g. capillaro-venous, capillaro-lymphaticovenous malformations) or syndromic (Klippel-Trenaunay, Blue Rubber Bleb Naevus and Maffucci). Genetic studies have identified causes of familial forms and of 40% of sporadic VMs. Another diagnostic advancement is the identification of elevated D-dimer level as the first biomarker of venous malformations within vascular anomalies. Those associated with pain are often responsive to Low Molecular Weight Heparin which should also be used to avoid disseminated intravascular coagulopathy secondary to intervention, especially if fibrinogen level is low. Finally, development of a modified sclerosing agent, ethylcellulose–ethanol, has improved therapy. It is efficient and safe, and widens indications for sclerotherapy to sensitive and dangerous areas such as hands, feet and periocular area. PMID:20870869

  17. [Intracranial arteriovenous malformations in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Lin, L S; Shih, C J

    1993-12-01

    This paper analyzes the available literature on intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in Taiwan. The incidence and symptoms of the disease are studied with a view to assisting practitioners in its recognition. The incidence of intracranial AVM in patients who have suffered hemorrhagic stroke in Taiwan is 2.5% to 4.8%, with the male to female ratio being 1.5:1. The peak age at which bleeding from intracranial AVM occurred ranged from 10 to 40 years; bleeding showed no seasonal variation. Sudden headaches, vomiting, and disturbance of consciousness were the commonest presenting symptoms of AVM, similar to the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. However, the possibility of focal neurological deficit among patients with intracranial AVM was higher than in patients with intracranial aneurysms. Risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, smoking and alcohol intake showed no close relationship to bleeding in intracranial AVM. Pregnancy is not a risk factor in female patients with intracranial AVM with no history of hemorrhage. Small intracranial AVM are more likely to bleed. Since 1961 the majority of Taiwan's intracranial AVM patients have been treated surgically, while before that date general medicine was the treatment of choice. In recent years, several developments such as operation microscope, microsurgical instruments and microsurgical techniques have enhanced the efficacy of surgical intervention in the treatment of AVM. When the mortality and morbidity rates resulting from the two forms of treatment are compared, surgical treatment shows a better prognosis for the treatment of intracranial AVM.

  18. Budd-chiari syndrome and renal arterial neurysms due to Behcet disease: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Batur, Abdussamet; Dorum, Meltem; Yüksekkaya, Hasan Ali; Koc, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis of unknown etiology with a chronic relapsing course. Vasculitis in Behcet's disease with predominant vascular involvement is the only vasculitis that affects both arteries and veins of any size. Involvement of the renal artery and inferior vena cava is rare among the arteries and veins, respectively. When disease affect the veins, it is in the form of thrombosis. Arterial complications include aneurysms, stenosis and occlusions. Both rupture of arterial aneurysm and occlusion of suprahepatic veins, causing Budd-Chiari syndrome, are associated with a high mortality rate. Vascular involvement is more common in male patients than in female patients. Men and patients with a younger age of onset present with a more severe prognosis. In this case report, we describe a very rare cause of intrarenal arterial aneurysm's rupture with previous Budd-Chiari syndrome due to Behcet's disease and successful angiographic embolization of actively bleeding aneurysm.

  19. Accidental Entrapment of Electrical Mapping Catheter by Chiari's Network in Right Atrium during Catheter Ablation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Sakakibara, Tomoaki; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to frequent palpitation. His electrocardiogram (ECG) presented regular narrow QRS tachycardia with 170 bpm, and catheter ablation was planned. During electroanatomical mapping of the right atrium (RA) with a multiloop mapping catheter, the catheter head was entrapped nearby the ostium of inferior vena cava. Rotation and traction of the catheter failed to detach the catheter head from the RA wall. Exfoliation of connective tissue twined around catheter tip by forceps, which were designed for endomyocardial biopsy, succeeded to retract and remove the catheter. Postprocedural echocardiography and pathologic examination proved the existence of Chiari's network. The handling of complex catheters in the RA has a potential risk of entrapment with Chiari's network. PMID:27366332

  20. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 1: Records Search, Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), Tennessee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee, midway between Chattanooga and Nashville.3 The entire AEDC reservation encompasses some 39,000 acres, of which...Geological Survey, Water Resources Division o University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) (AEDC Site) o Coffee Co. - Manchester - Tullahoma Landfill...INSTALLATION DESCRIPTION LOCATION, SIZE, AND BOUNDARIES Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is located in southern-middle Tennessee ( Coffee and

  1. Tennessee Army National Guard (TNARNG) Range Expansion at Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee. Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    world, with 58 aerodynamic and propulsion wind tunnels, rocket and turbine engine test cells, space environmental chambers, arc heaters, ballistic...U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service UXO unexploded ordnance VOC volatile organic compound VTS Volunteer Training Site VTS-T Volunteer Training Site...rare species. Arnold AFB contains 1,894 acres of jurisdictional wetlands. The remaining 4,683 acres are occupied by wildlife food plots, buildings

  2. Translation of the V. I. Arnold paper "From Superpositions to KAM Theory" (Vladimir Igorevich Arnold. Selected — 60, Moscow: PHASIS, 1997, pp. 727-740)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevryuk, Mikhail B.

    2014-11-01

    V. I. Arnold (12 June 1937-3 June 2010) published several papers where he described, in the form of recollections, his two earliest research problems (superpositions of continuous functions and quasi-periodic motions in dynamical systems), the main results and their interrelations: [A1], then [A2] (reprinted as [A4, A6]), and [A3] (translated into English by the author as [A5]). The first exposition [A1] has never been translated into English; however, it contains many details absent in the subsequent articles. It seems therefore that publishing the English translation of the paper [A1] would not be superfluous. What follows is this translation. In many cases, the translator gives complete bibliographic descriptions of various papers mentioned briefly in the original Russian text. The English translations of papers in Russian are also pointed out where possible. A related material is contained also in Arnold's recollections "On A.N. Kolmogorov". Slightly different versions of these reminiscences were published several times in Russian and English [A7-A12]. The early history of KAM theory is also discussed in detail in the recent brilliant semi-popular book [A13].

  3. Acute Budd-Chiari syndrome: Treatment with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    SciTech Connect

    Strunk, Holger M.; Textor, Jochen; Brensing, Karl-August; Schild, Hans H.

    1997-07-15

    The case of a 28-year-old man with acute Budd-Chiari syndrome due to veno-occlusive disease is reported. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed after upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, duplex sonographic and abdominal computed tomographic examination, inferior cavogram with hepatic venous catheterization, and transvenous biopsy. A 10-mm parenchymal tract was created. The patient did well after the procedure; ascites resolved and liver function improved markedly. The shunt has remained patent up to now for 6 months.

  4. Virus-induced congenital malformations in cattle.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Peperkamp, Klaas; Windsor, Peter A

    2015-09-24

    Diagnosing the cause of bovine congenital malformations (BCMs) is challenging for bovine veterinary practitioners and laboratory diagnosticians as many known as well as a large number of not-yet reported syndromes exist. Foetal infection with certain viruses, including bovine virus diarrhea virus (BVDV), Schmallenberg virus (SBV), blue tongue virus (BTV), Akabane virus (AKAV), or Aino virus (AV), is associated with a range of congenital malformations. It is tempting for veterinary practitioners to diagnose such infections based only on the morphology of the defective offspring. However, diagnosing a virus as a cause of BCMs usually requires laboratory examination and even in such cases, interpretation of findings may be challenging due to lack of experience regarding genetic defects causing similar lesions, even in cases where virus or congenital antibodies are present. Intrauterine infection of the foetus during the susceptible periods of development, i.e. around gestation days 60-180, by BVDV, SBV, BTV, AKAV and AV may cause malformations in the central nervous system, especially in the brain. Brain lesions typically consist of hydranencephaly, porencephaly, hydrocephalus and cerebellar hypoplasia, which in case of SBV, AKAV and AV infections may be associated by malformation of the axial and appendicular skeleton, e.g. arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Doming of the calvarium is present in some, but not all, cases. None of these lesions are pathognomonic so diagnosing a viral cause based on gross lesions is uncertain. Several genetic defects share morphology with virus induced congenital malformations, so expert advice should be sought when BCMs are encountered.

  5. [Venous malformations: clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Casanova, D; Boon, L-M; Vikkula, M

    2006-01-01

    Venous malformations (VM) are localized defects of blood vessels that are due to vascular dysmorphogenesis. These slow-flow lesions can affect any tissue or organ. Clinically, a cutaneous VM is characterized by a bluish mass that is compressible on palpation. Phleboliths are commonly present. Symptoms depend on location and size. VM are often sporadic and isolated, however, they can be associated with other malformations and be part of a syndrome; Klippel-Trenaunay (capillary-lymphatico-venous malformation with limb hypertrophy) is the most common. Glomuvenous malformation (GVM) is another type of venous anomaly. In contrast to VM, GVM is often painful on palpation and not compressible. Clinical diagnosis of VM is often made in the presence of a bluish cutaneous lesion: however, other lesions can mimick VM. The most frequent anomalies are a blue naevus, a hemorrhagic lymphatic malformation, a sub-cutaneous hemangioma or even the presence of dilated superficial normal veins due to underlying venous stenoses. This chapter will detail the clinical characteristics of venous anomalies and their differential diagnosis.

  6. Ovine craniofacial malformation: a morphometrical study.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, T; Kuiper, H; Pielmeier, R; Ganter, M; Distl, O; Staszyk, C

    2012-12-01

    Craniofacial malformation in 64 sheep was phenotypically described as mandibular distoclusion. Digital radiographs were examined in order to determine the degree of morphological changes in certain bones of the skull. Therefore, laterolateral standardised digital radiographs were used to determine anatomic reference points. Subsequently, five reference lines were defined and 16 linear and seven angular measurements were determined to describe malformations in the bones of the skull. Statistical analysis revealed a significant shortening of the rostral part of the corpus mandibulae and of the ramus mandibulae. However, the molar part of the mandible remained unchanged. These morphological changes caused premolar and molar malocclusion. No further craniofacial abnormalities, such as an elongation of the maxilla or of the incisive bone, were identified. In conclusion, the phenotypically observed mandibular distoclusion is caused by a shortening of specific parts of the mandible. This form of ovine craniofacial malformation is therefore best described as brachygnathia inferior.

  7. Debendox in early pregnancy and fetal malformation.

    PubMed

    Fleming, D M; Knox, J D; Crombie, D L

    1981-07-11

    During the mid-1960s, 22 977 pregnant women in Scotland and England were followed up prospectively for the incidence of malformations in their infants evident at birth or within six weeks. During the first 13 weeks of gestation 620 of these women had been prescribed Debendox (dicyclomine-doxylamine-pyridoxine) and 743 other women agents other than Debendox containing pyridoxine. Of the 620 women given Debendox, 589 (95%) had a normal outcome of pregnancy, 8 (13%) delivered a malformed infant, and 23 (3.7%) had other outcomes. Of the 22 357 women who were given Debendox, 445 (2.0%) produced infants with malformation; and the rates for all abnormal outcomes among women given Debendox and those not given the drug were 5.0% and 5.4% respectively. These results support the hypothesis that Debendox is not teratogenic.

  8. Debendox in early pregnancy and fetal malformation.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, D M; Knox, J D; Crombie, D L

    1981-01-01

    During the mid-1960s, 22 977 pregnant women in Scotland and England were followed up prospectively for the incidence of malformations in their infants evident at birth or within six weeks. During the first 13 weeks of gestation 620 of these women had been prescribed Debendox (dicyclomine-doxylamine-pyridoxine) and 743 other women agents other than Debendox containing pyridoxine. Of the 620 women given Debendox, 589 (95%) had a normal outcome of pregnancy, 8 (13%) delivered a malformed infant, and 23 (3.7%) had other outcomes. Of the 22 357 women who were given Debendox, 445 (2.0%) produced infants with malformation; and the rates for all abnormal outcomes among women given Debendox and those not given the drug were 5.0% and 5.4% respectively. These results support the hypothesis that Debendox is not teratogenic. PMID:6789952

  9. [Diagnosis and management of Mondini malformation].

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Fang, Y; Yang, S

    1997-02-01

    Owing to the development of imaging technology and audiology, some of the sensorineural hearing loss cases that were previcusly considered to be of unknown cause have been found to be inner ear malformation. Five cases of Mondini malformation are reviewed in this paper. CSF otorhinorrhea occurred in four cases, Klippel-Feil syndrome in three, and concurrent otosclerosis in one patient. In discussion, the authors point out that: 1) CT scanning is an supplement to audiologic tests for such patients; 2) perilymph fistula in Mondini malformation is often found at the oval window and its vicinity, the foot plate and the round window; 3) the fistula can be treated by plugging with fascial tissue via tympanoplastic approach with endaural incision. The mucosa around the fistula should be stripped away and the plugging tissue should be of dumb-bell shape.

  10. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    PubMed

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth.

  11. Total knee arthroplasty in vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Bhende, Harish; Laud, Nanadkishore; Deore, Sandeep; Shashidhar, V

    2015-01-01

    In Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome, vascular malformations are not only in skin and superficial soft tissues but also in deep tissues like muscles bones and joints. It is well documemted that these recurrent intraarticular bleeds can cause early arthritis and joint pain. Performing arthroplasty in such patients is difficult and fraught with complications. We describe such a case where navigated total knee arthroplasty was performed with success to avoid the problems of intra medullary alignment used in the presence of intra medullary vascular malformations. We also suggest certain measures when knee arthroplasty is considered in such patients. PMID:26538765

  12. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labreze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussiere, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  13. Cochlear Implantation in Children with Cochlear Malformation.

    PubMed

    Saikawa, Etsuko; Takano, Kenichi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Tsubomatsu, Chieko; Takahashi, Nozomi; Shirasaki, Hideaki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) has proven to be an effective treatment for severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Inner ear malformation is a rare anomaly and occurs in approximately 20% of cases with congenital SNHL. In cases with cochlear malformation, CI can be successfully performed in nearly all patients, the exceptions being those with complete labyrinthine and cochlear aplasia. It is important to evaluate the severity of inner ear deformity and other associated anomalies during the preimplantation radiological assessment in order to identify any complication that may potentially occur during the surgery and subsequent patient management.

  14. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  15. Genetic basis of congenital cardiovascular malformations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the la...

  16. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Albarella, Sara; Ciotola, Francesca; D'Anza, Emanuele; Coletta, Angelo; Zicarelli, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo

    2017-02-10

    The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital malformations most frequently reported in literature or signaled by breeders to the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production of the University Federico II (Naples, Italy) in river buffalo are: musculoskeletal defects (transverse hemimelia, arthrogryposis, umbilical hernia) and disorders of sexual development. In conclusion this review put in evidence that river buffalo have a great variety of malformations due to genetic causes, and TH and omphalocele are the most frequent and that several cases are still not reported, leading to an underestimation of the real weight of genetic diseases in this species.

  17. Differential Gene Expression in Human Cerebrovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Elliott, J. Paul; Diener, Katrina; Gault, Judith; Hu, Ling-Jia; Cohrs, Randall J.; Phang, Tzulip; Hunter, Lawrence; Breeze, Robert E.; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to identify genes with differential expression in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and control superficial temporal arteries (STAs) and to confirm differential expression of genes previously implicated in the pathobiology of these lesions. METHODS Total ribonucleic acid was isolated from four CCM, four AVM, and three STA surgical specimens and used to quantify lesion-specific messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels on human gene arrays. Data were analyzed with the use of two separate methodologies: gene discovery and confirmation analysis. RESULTS The gene discovery method identified 42 genes that were significantly up-regulated and 36 genes that were significantly down-regulated in CCMs as compared with AVMs and STAs (P = 0.006). Similarly, 48 genes were significantly up-regulated and 59 genes were significantly down-regulated in AVMs as compared with CCMs and STAs (P = 0.006). The confirmation analysis showed significant differential expression (P < 0.05) in 11 of 15 genes (angiogenesis factors, receptors, and structural proteins) that previously had been reported to be expressed differentially in CCMs and AVMs in immunohistochemical analysis. CONCLUSION We identify numerous genes that are differentially expressed in CCMs and AVMs and correlate expression with the immunohistochemistry of genes implicated in cerebrovascular malformations. In future efforts, we will aim to confirm candidate genes specifically related to the pathobiology of cerebrovascular malformations and determine their biological systems and mechanistic relevance. PMID:12535382

  18. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Albarella, Sara; Ciotola, Francesca; D’Anza, Emanuele; Coletta, Angelo; Zicarelli, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Congenital malformations (due to genetic causes) represent a hidden danger for animal production, above all when genetic selection is undertaken for production improvements. These malformations are responsible for economic losses either because they reduce the productivity of the farm, or because their spread in the population would decrease the total productivity of that species/breed. River buffalo is a species of increasing interest all over the world for its production abilities, as proved by the buffalo genome project and the genetic selection plans that are currently performed in different countries. The aim of this review is to provide a general view of different models of congenital malformations in buffalo and their world distribution. This would be useful either for those who performed buffalo genetic selection or for researchers in genetic diseases, which would be an advantage to their studies with respect to the knowledge of gene mutations and interactions in this species. Abstract The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital

  19. A chaotic cryptosystem for images based on Henon and Arnold cat map.

    PubMed

    Soleymani, Ali; Nordin, Md Jan; Sundararajan, Elankovan

    2014-01-01

    The rapid evolution of imaging and communication technologies has transformed images into a widespread data type. Different types of data, such as personal medical information, official correspondence, or governmental and military documents, are saved and transmitted in the form of images over public networks. Hence, a fast and secure cryptosystem is needed for high-resolution images. In this paper, a novel encryption scheme is presented for securing images based on Arnold cat and Henon chaotic maps. The scheme uses Arnold cat map for bit- and pixel-level permutations on plain and secret images, while Henon map creates secret images and specific parameters for the permutations. Both the encryption and decryption processes are explained, formulated, and graphically presented. The results of security analysis of five different images demonstrate the strength of the proposed cryptosystem against statistical, brute force and differential attacks. The evaluated running time for both encryption and decryption processes guarantee that the cryptosystem can work effectively in real-time applications.

  20. A Chaotic Cryptosystem for Images Based on Henon and Arnold Cat Map

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Elankovan

    2014-01-01

    The rapid evolution of imaging and communication technologies has transformed images into a widespread data type. Different types of data, such as personal medical information, official correspondence, or governmental and military documents, are saved and transmitted in the form of images over public networks. Hence, a fast and secure cryptosystem is needed for high-resolution images. In this paper, a novel encryption scheme is presented for securing images based on Arnold cat and Henon chaotic maps. The scheme uses Arnold cat map for bit- and pixel-level permutations on plain and secret images, while Henon map creates secret images and specific parameters for the permutations. Both the encryption and decryption processes are explained, formulated, and graphically presented. The results of security analysis of five different images demonstrate the strength of the proposed cryptosystem against statistical, brute force and differential attacks. The evaluated running time for both encryption and decryption processes guarantee that the cryptosystem can work effectively in real-time applications. PMID:25258724

  1. Behçet’s disease presenting with Budd–Chiari syndrome and intracardial thrombus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minji Jennifer; Jo, Yong Suk; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Eun Bong; Song, Yeong Wook; Lee, Eun Young

    2011-01-01

    Budd–Chiari syndrome has been described as a late complication of Behçet’s disease. Although the mortality rate associated with Behçet’s disease is low, it can escalate in the presence of Budd–Chiari syndrome and may be further complicated by intracardial thrombus formation. It is therefore important to detect and initiate management early in the disease course. The imaging modalities of choice should be minimally invasive as certain procedures may aggravate Behçet’s disease by initiating a thrombosis or aggravating an existing one. In Behçet’s disease-induced Budd–Chiari syndrome, cardiac investigation is crucial in the work-up in order to identify any cardiac involvement and determine the etiology of intracardial thrombus. Furthermore, the treatment should ultimately focus on controlling the activity of Behçet’s disease. We report an unusual case of Behçet’s disease presenting with Budd–Chiari syndrome complicated by intracardial thrombus in a young Korean man. PMID:23754909

  2. Cytogenomic Aberrations in Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Azamian, Mahshid; Lalani, Seema R.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cardiovascular malformations are the most common birth defects, with a complex multifactorial etiology. Genetic factors play an important role, illuminated by numerous cytogenetically visible abnormalities, as well as submicroscopic genomic imbalances affecting critical genomic regions in the affected individuals. Study of rare families with Mendelian forms, as well as emerging next-generation sequencing technologies have uncovered a multitude of genes relevant for human congenital cardiac diseases. It is clear that the complex embryology of human cardiac development, with an orchestrated interplay of transcription factors, chromatin regulators, and signal transduction pathway molecules can be easily perturbed by genomic imbalances affecting dosage-sensitive regions. This review focuses on chromosomal abnormalities contributing to congenital heart diseases and underscores several genomic disorders linked to human cardiac malformations in the last few decades. PMID:27385961

  3. Occipitoatlantoaxial malformation in an adult goat.

    PubMed

    Seva, Juan I; Gómez, Serafin; Pallarés, Francisco J; Sánchez, Pedro; Bernabé, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    An occipitoatlantoaxial malformation was diagnosed in a 1-year-old Murciano-Granadina goat. At clinical examination, the head and cranial part of the neck were deviated to the right. Clinical signs of spinal cord or brain disease were not observed. At necropsy, morphological abnormalities were seen in the craniovertebral junction and cervical vertebrae, characterized by a firm attachment and incomplete articulation between the occipital bone and the atlas, and scoliosis in the cervical regions. The definitive diagnosis was bilateral asymmetrical occipitoatlantoaxial fusion with rotation of the atlas and atlantoaxial subluxation. To the authors' knowledge, this case report is the second occipitoatlantoaxial malformation described in a goat and the first description in an adult goat.

  4. Arteriovenous malformation in chronic gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Cavett, C M; Selby, J H; Hamilton, J L; Williamson, J W

    1977-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon and treatment is problematic because routine barium contrast studies and endoscopy fail to demonstrate the lesion. Diagnosis is by selective mesenteric arteriography, demonstrating a characteristic vascular tuft and very early venous phase. Two cases of arteriovenous malformation are presented and 47 other reported cases are reviewed. Forty-five per cent were found in the cecum; 37, or 80%, involved the distal ileum, cecum ascending colon, or hepatic flexure. Seventy-five per cent of all patients fall into the 50--80 year age range. The literature reveals a recurring pattern of chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, anemia, and delay (even negative abdominal explorations) before the diagnosis is finally made. A more aggressive approach to chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is suggested through the use of selective mesenteric arteriography. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:299801

  5. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term "arteriovenous malformation," limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected.

  6. Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an important cause of hemorrhagic stroke. The etiology is largely unknown and the therapeutics are controversial. A review of AVM-associated animal models may be helpful in order to understand the up-to-date knowledge and promote further research about the disease. We searched PubMed till December 31, 2014, with the term “arteriovenous malformation,” limiting results to animals and English language. Publications that described creations of AVM animal models or investigated AVM-related mechanisms and treatments using these models were reviewed. More than 100 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were identified, and from them eight different types of the original models were summarized. The backgrounds and procedures of these models, their applications, and research findings were demonstrated. Animal models are useful in studying the pathogenesis of AVM formation, growth, and rupture, as well as in developing and testing new treatments. Creations of preferable models are expected. PMID:26649296

  7. FTO variant associated with malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Luis; Lawson, Michelle; Guzman, Edwin; Ganapathi, Mythily; Cho, Megan T; Haverfield, Eden; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame

    2016-04-01

    Common FTO variants are associated with obesity. However, it has recently been shown that homozygous FTO c.947G>A variant, which predicts p.R316Q, and c.956C>T, which predicts p.S319F, are associated with a malformation syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We present a similar homozygous FTO c.965G>A variant that predicts p.R322Q, associated with a lethal malformation syndrome in a consanguineous Yemeni family. Functional studies showed that the p.R316Q, p.S219F, and p.R322Q variants render the FTO protein inactive. We further expand on the phenotype of homozygous FTO loss-of-function mutations to include eye abnormalities, gingival overgrowth, craniosynostosis, and cutaneous photosensitivity.

  8. Embolization and radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Plasencia, Andres R.; Santillan, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) requires a multidisciplinary management including microsurgery, endovascular embolization, and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). This article reviews the recent advancements in the multimodality treatment of patients with AVMs using endovascular neurosurgery and SRS. We describe the natural history of AVMs and the role of endovascular and radiosurgical treatment as well as their interplay in the management of these complex vascular lesions. Also, we present some representative cases treated at our institution. PMID:22826821

  9. Arteriovenous malformations: epidemiology and clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Aki; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2012-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain are relatively rare congenital developmental vascular lesions. They may cause hemorrhagic stroke, epilepsy, chronic headache, or focal neurologic deficits, and the incidence of asymptomatic AVMs is increasing due to widespread availability of noninvasive imaging methods. Since the most severe complication of an AVM is hemorrhagic stroke, most epidemiologic studies have concentrated on the hemorrhage risk and its risk factors. In this article, the authors discuss the epidemiology, presenting symptoms, and hemorrhage risk associated with brain AVMs.

  10. Debendox and congenital malformations in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed Central

    Harron, D W; Griffiths, K; Shanks, R G

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was carried out in Northern Ireland into the alleged association between fetal abnormalities and Debendox, an antiemetic drug used in pregnancy. During the period 1966-78 the total number of births each year and the overall incidence of congenital malformations per 10 000 births fell. The incidences of cleft lip, cleft palate, reduction deformities, and defects of the heart and great vessels fell from 1966 to 1976 but increased in 1977 and 1978. During the same period (1966-78) the number of prescriptions for Debendox issued by general practitioners increased more than fourfold. These observations suggest that there is no relation between congenital malformations and the use of Debendox. This conclusion, however, does not take into account other drug- or environmental-related factors that may have resulted in a reduction in the number of congenital malformations and would hence have masked an increase associated with greater usage of Debendox. In particular, the amount of Debendox sold direct to the public without a prescription and the use of the drug by patients who were not pregnant could not be established. The amount of drug used in these ways is probably small, and it is difficult to see how it might influence the conclusions reached. PMID:7437804

  11. Debendox and congenital malformations in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Harron, D W; Griffiths, K; Shanks, R G

    1980-11-22

    An investigation was carried out in Northern Ireland into the alleged association between fetal abnormalities and Debendox, an antiemetic drug used in pregnancy. During the period 1966-78 the total number of births each year and the overall incidence of congenital malformations per 10 000 births fell. The incidences of cleft lip, cleft palate, reduction deformities, and defects of the heart and great vessels fell from 1966 to 1976 but increased in 1977 and 1978. During the same period (1966-78) the number of prescriptions for Debendox issued by general practitioners increased more than fourfold. These observations suggest that there is no relation between congenital malformations and the use of Debendox. This conclusion, however, does not take into account other drug- or environmental-related factors that may have resulted in a reduction in the number of congenital malformations and would hence have masked an increase associated with greater usage of Debendox. In particular, the amount of Debendox sold direct to the public without a prescription and the use of the drug by patients who were not pregnant could not be established. The amount of drug used in these ways is probably small, and it is difficult to see how it might influence the conclusions reached.

  12. Confessions of a Would-Be Non-Provincial--Or, the English Teacher and Matthew Arnold's Ghost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, W.

    Although Matthew Arnold may appear to be the representative of an increasingly irrelevant elitist vision by advocating a culture ultimately dependent on the exclusion of all but the very best in thought and expression, in fact he remains the writer who reminds us of the necessity for a social vision of ourselves superior to any mere provincialism.…

  13. Malformations in neotropical viperids: qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, S S; Grego, K F; Lorigados, C A B; Fonseca-Pinto, A C B C; Fernandes, W; Sá-Rocha, L C; Catão-Dias, J L

    2013-11-01

    Malformations can occur in all living species, but there is little information about anomalies that occur in snakes and their frequency. This study assessed malformations in newborn South American pit vipers (Bothrops jararaca) and South American rattlesnakes (Crotalus durissus) from wild captured pregnant females (240 and 35 litters, respectively). Newborn snakes were measured, weighed, sexed and studied grossly and by radiography for the presence of malformations. Ninety-five malformed pit vipers were identified from 4,087 births (2.3%), while 36 malformed rattlesnakes were found from 324 births (11.1%). Spinal abnormalities were the most common in both species, followed by fusion of ventral scales. Pit vipers showed a greater range of malformations including schistosomia (22.1%), kinked tail (13.7%), bicephaly (3.1%) and hydrocephaly (2.1%).

  14. Extracranial vascular malformations (hemangiomas and vascular malformations) in children and adolescents – diagnosis, clinic, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eivazi, Behfar; Werner, Jochen A.

    2014-01-01

    The field of extracranial vascular anomalies is considered as special focus of pediatric otolaryngology and it has shown a rapid development during the last years. The reason for this interest is finally also due to the global acceptance of the classification introduced by the ISSVA (International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies). Hemangiomas are the most frequently observed vascular tumors. Today the systemic propranolol therapy is mostly used for therapy of hemangiomas requiring treatment. Increasingly, the topical application of beta blocker is discussed while the benefit in the head and neck seems to be limited. Vascular malformations are classified according to the morphology of the affected part of the vascular system in arterial, venous, arterio-venous, lymphatic, capillary, and combined vascular malformations. Conventional surgery, sclerosing therapy, and laser treatment are invasive options for the treatment of lymphatic malformations. The options for the treatment of venous malformations could be significantly improved during the last years. In this context, the use of Nd:YAG laser, the conservative treatment of the localized disseminated intravascular coagulation with low-molecular weight heparin, the re-discovery of bleomycin as effective sclerosing agent, and the improvement of alcohol-based embolization agents must be mentioned. Today the treatment with dye laser is the preferred therapy for capillary malformations and it is superior to other therapeutic options as for example photodynamic therapy. Arterio-venous malformations as representatives for high-flow lesions are the high-risk lesions. Frequently they are compared to malignant head and neck tumors, in particular when a curative treatment can no longer be assured because of diffuse or multifocal extent and when the disease shows a progressive course. The combined treatment of embolization and surgical resection and if necessary consecutive defect reconstruction have turned out to be

  15. Families made by science. Arnold Gesell and the technologies of modern child adoption.

    PubMed

    Herman, E

    2001-12-01

    This essay considers the effort to transform child adoption into a modern scientific enterprise during the first half of the twentieth century via a case study of Arnold Gesell (1880-1961), a Yale developmentalist well known for his studies of child growth and the applied technologies that emerged from them: normative scales promising to measure and predict development. Scientific adoption was a central aspiration for many human scientists, helping professionals, and state regulators. They aimed to reduce the numerous hazards presumed to be inherent in adopting children, especially infants, who were not one's "own." By importing insights and techniques drawn from the world of science into the practical world of family formation, scientific adoption stood for kinship by design. This case study explores one point of intersection between the history of science and the history of social welfare and social policy, simultaneously illustrating the cultural progress and power of scientific authority and the numerous obstacles to its practical realization.

  16. Weak chaos in the disordered nonlinear Schroedinger chain: Destruction of Anderson localization by Arnold diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Basko, D.M.

    2011-07-15

    Research Highlights: > In a one-dimensional disordered chain of oscillators all normal modes are localized. > Nonlinearity leads to chaotic dynamics. > Chaos is concentrated on rare chaotic spots. > Chaotic spots drive energy exchange between oscillators. > Macroscopic transport coefficients are obtained. - Abstract: The subject of this study is the long-time equilibration dynamics of a strongly disordered one-dimensional chain of coupled weakly anharmonic classical oscillators. It is shown that chaos in this system has a very particular spatial structure: it can be viewed as a dilute gas of chaotic spots. Each chaotic spot corresponds to a stochastic pump which drives the Arnold diffusion of the oscillators surrounding it, thus leading to their relaxation and thermalization. The most important mechanism of equilibration at long distances is provided by random migration of the chaotic spots along the chain, which bears analogy with variable-range hopping of electrons in strongly disordered solids. The corresponding macroscopic transport equations are obtained.

  17. Heat conduction in systems with Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser phase space structure.

    PubMed

    Herrera-González, I F; Pérez-Aguilar, H I; Mendoza-Suárez, A; Tututi, E S

    2012-09-01

    We study heat conduction in a billiard channel formed by two sinusoidal walls and the diffusion of particles in the corresponding channel of infinite length; the latter system has an infinite horizon, i.e., a particle can travel an arbitrary distance without colliding with the rippled walls. For small ripple amplitudes, the dynamics of the heat carriers is regular and analytical results for the temperature profile and heat flux are obtained using an effective potential. The study also proposes a formula for the temperature profile that is valid for any ripple amplitude. When the dynamics is regular, ballistic conductance and ballistic diffusion are present. The Poincaré plots of the associated dynamical system (the infinitely long channel) exhibit the generic transition to chaos as ripple amplitude is increased. When no Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) curves are present to forbid the connection of all chaotic regions, the mean square displacement grows asymptotically with time t as tln(t).

  18. Aeromagnetic map of the Arnold Mesa Roadless Area, Yavapai County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Willard E.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    1983-01-01

    The Arnold Mesa Roadless Area is within the transition zone between the Colorado Plateaus to the northeast and the Basin and Range province to the southwest. The transition zone is a belt about 701 miles (120 km) wide that extends diagonally from northwest to south east across central Arizona and parallels the topographic margin of the plateaus. The study area is underlain by Precambrian rocks and gently dipping Paleozoic strata that are largely covered by basaltic lavas and pyroclastic deposits of Miocene age ( McKee and Anderson, 1971). Dacite breccia and tuff are locally interbedded with the basaltic rocks. Sedimentary deposits of late Cenozoic age are dominant in the Verde Valley from about Chasm Creek north; they accumulated in a depositional basin bounded on the west by the Verde fault.

  19. Case study of hydrogen water chemistry implementation at the Duane Arnold Energy Center

    SciTech Connect

    Leibel, T.A.; Turley, D.S. ); Steen, A. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) program implemented at Duane Arnold Energy Center (DAEC). In 1985 various reactor recirculation system piping weld repairs and safe end replacements were performed at the DAEC. These weld repairs and safe-end replacements were required as a result of inter-granular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In 1986, the utility decided to implement a hydrogen water chemistry program as a means of suppressing IGSCC. The paper includes a discussion of the system design basis, a brief system description, and a discussion of plant system interactions. A description of methodology developed to verify and monitor the effectiveness of the HWC system is also included.

  20. Future aerospace ground test facility requirements for the Arnold Engineering Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, Mark E.; Baron, Judson R.; Bogdonoff, Seymour M.; Carter, Donald I.; Couch, Lana M.; Fanning, Arthur E.; Heiser, William H.; Koff, Bernard L.; Melnik, Robert E.; Mercer, Stephen C.

    1992-01-01

    Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was conceived at the close of World War II, when major new developments in flight technology were presaged by new aerodynamic and propulsion concepts. During the past 40 years, AEDC has played a significant part in the development of many aerospace systems. The original plans were extended through the years by some additional facilities, particularly in the area of propulsion testing. AEDC now has undertaken development of a master plan in an attempt to project requirements and to plan for ground test and computational facilities over the coming 20 to 30 years. This report was prepared in response to an AEDC request that the National Research Council (NRC) assemble a committee to prepare guidance for planning and modernizing AEDC facilities for the development and testing of future classes of aerospace systems as envisaged by the U.S. Air Force.

  1. Stochastic dynamics and control of a driven nonlinear spin chain: the role of Arnold diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotorlishvili, L.; Toklikishvili, Z.; Berakdar, J.

    2009-09-01

    We study a chain of nonlinear interacting spins driven by a static and a time-dependent magnetic field. The aim is to identify the conditions for the locally and temporally controlled spin switching. Analytical and full numerical calculations show the possibility of stochastic control if the underlying semiclassical dynamics is chaotic. This is achievable by tuning the external field parameters according to the method described in this paper. We show analytically for a finite spin chain that Arnold diffusion is the underlying mechanism for the present stochastic control. Quantum mechanically we consider the regime where the classical dynamics is regular or chaotic. For the latter we utilize the random matrix theory. The efficiency and the stability of the non-equilibrium quantum spin states are quantified by the time dependence of the Bargmann angle related to the geometric phases of the states.

  2. Hemangiomas and Vascular Malformations: Current Theory and Management

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Gresham T.; Friedman, Adva B.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of congenital blood vessel disorders more typically referred to as birthmarks. Subcategorized into vascular tumors and malformations, each anomaly is characterized by specific morphology, pathophysiology, clinical behavior, and management approach. Hemangiomas are the most common vascular tumor. Lymphatic, capillary, venous, and arteriovenous malformations make up the majority of vascular malformations. This paper reviews current theory and practice in the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of these more common vascular anomalies. PMID:22611412

  3. [Diagnosis of fetal malformations with ultrasound--state of development].

    PubMed

    Fendel, M; Fendel, H

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonography is of great importance for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal malformations and abnormalities. An early diagnosis in the second trimester is of great interest for an intrauterine or an extrauterine therapy planning (the choice of the time and mode of delivery). Defects of the neural tube including hydrocephalus, malformations of the extremities, the gastrointestinal tract, omphaloceles, the urogenital and cardiac system are described. Four cases of fetal malformations are presented: fetal myelomeningocele, hydrocephalus, bilateral hydronephrosis and lymphangioma with fetal ascites.

  4. Notch receptor expression in human brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hill-Felberg, Sandra; Wu, Hope Hueizhi; Toms, Steven A; Dehdashti, Amir R

    2015-08-01

    The roles of the Notch pathway proteins in normal adult vascular physiology and the pathogenesis of brain arteriovenous malformations are not well-understood. Notch 1 and 4 have been detected in human and mutant mice vascular malformations respectively. Although mutations in the human Notch 3 gene caused a genetic form of vascular stroke and dementia, its role in arteriovenous malformations development has been unknown. In this study, we performed immunohistochemistry screening on tissue microarrays containing eight surgically resected human brain arteriovenous malformations and 10 control surgical epilepsy samples. The tissue microarrays were evaluated for Notch 1-4 expression. We have found that compared to normal brain vascular tissue Notch-3 was dramatically increased in brain arteriovenous malformations. Similarly, Notch 4 labelling was also increased in vascular malformations and was confirmed by western blot analysis. Notch 2 was not detectable in any of the human vessels analysed. Using both immunohistochemistry on microarrays and western blot analysis, we have found that Notch-1 expression was detectable in control vessels, and discovered a significant decrease of Notch 1 expression in vascular malformations. We have demonstrated that Notch 3 and 4, and not Notch 1, were highly increased in human arteriovenous malformations. Our findings suggested that Notch 4, and more importantly, Notch 3, may play a role in the development and pathobiology of human arteriovenous malformations.

  5. A case report: Pulmonary venous malformation complicated with pulmonary hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Supakul, Nucharin; Fan, Rong; Karmazyn, Boaz

    2012-12-01

    Pulmonary venous malformation is extremely rare. We present imaging and clinical findings of a 17-year-old male with multifocal subcutaneous venous malformations and multiple cystic lesions in the liver and spleen, suggestive of slow flow vascular malformation. In the right lung, chest radiography followed by chest CT demonstrated large tortuous pulmonary veins and cystic emphysematous changes. Tc99m-MAA (pertechnetate-labeled macroaggregated albumin) lung perfusion scan demonstrated only 3% of normal perfusion to the right lung, with no evidence of arteriovenous shunting. The child had diffuse intraparenchymal hemorrhage throughout the right lower and middle lobes and underwent resection. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of venous malformation complicated with bleeding.

  6. Craniometric Analysis of the Hindbrain and Craniocervical Junction of Chihuahua, Affenpinscher and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Dogs With and Without Syringomyelia Secondary to Chiari-Like Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kiviranta, Anna-Mariam; McFadyen, Angus K.; Jokinen, Tarja S.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Rusbridge, Clare

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To characterize and compare the phenotypic variables of the hindbrain and craniocervical junction associated with syringomyelia (SM) in the Chihuahua, Affenpinscher and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (CKCS). Method Analysis of 273 T1-weighted mid-sagittal DICOM sequences of the hindbrain and craniocervical junction from 99 Chihuahuas, 42 Affenpinschers and 132 CKCSs. The study compared 22 morphometric features (11 lines, eight angles and three ratios) of dogs with and without SM using refined techniques based on previous studies of the Griffon Bruxellois (GB) using Discriminant Function Analysis and ANOVA with post-hoc corrections. Results The analysis identified 14/22 significant traits for SM in the three dog breeds, five of which were identical to those reported for the GB and suggest inclusion of a common aetiology. One ratio, caudal fossa height to the length of the skull base extended to an imaginary point of alignment between the atlas and supraoccipital bones, was common to all three breeds (p values 0.029 to <0.001). Associated with SM were a reduced occipital crest and two acute changes in angulation i) ‘sphenoid flexure’ at the spheno-occipital synchondrosis ii) ‘cervical flexure’ at the foramen magnum allied with medulla oblongata elevation. Comparing dogs with and without SM, each breed had a unique trait: Chihuahua had a smaller angle between the dens, atlas and basioccipital bone (p value < 0.001); Affenpinschers had a smaller distance from atlas to dens (p value 0.009); CKCS had a shorter distance between the spheno-occipital synchondrosis and atlas (p value 0.007). Conclusion The selected morphometries successfully characterised conformational changes in the brain and craniocervical junction that might form the basis of a diagnostic tool for all breeds. The severity of SM involved a spectrum of abnormalities, incurred by changes in both angulation and size that could alter neural parenchyma compliance and/or impede cerebrospinal fluid channels. PMID:28121988

  7. EGFR mutation of adenocarcinoma in congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mizue; Sakai, Fumikazu; Arimura, Ken; Katsura, Hideki; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-03-01

    An 80-year-old man underwent right upper lobectomy for the resection of multiple cysts accompanied by a nodule. The pathological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma with surrounding atypical epithelial cell proliferation in a Type 1 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation. There was epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in the adenocarcinoma and surrounding atypical epithelial cells that had proliferated. Malignant transformation of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation may be related to the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in this case, with atypical epithelial cell proliferation as a precursor. We emphasize the importance of complete resection of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation and the possibility of treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated cases.

  8. Somatic Mutations in Cerebral Cortical Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Jamuar, Saumya S.; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Kircher, Martin; D'Gama, Alissa M.; Wang, Jian; Barry, Brenda J.; Zhang, Xiaochang; Hill, Robert Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Rozzo, Aldo; Servattalab, Sarah; Mehta, Bhaven K.; Topcu, Meral; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Dan, Bernard; Parrini, Elena; Guerrini, Renzo; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Leventer, Richard J.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai Lin; Barkovich, A. James; Sahin, Mustafa; Chang, Bernard S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Poduri, Annapurna; Yu, Timothy W.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although there is increasing recognition of the role of somatic mutations in genetic disorders, the prevalence of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disease and the optimal techniques to detect somatic mosaicism have not been systematically evaluated. METHODS Using a customized panel of known and candidate genes associated with brain malformations, we applied targeted high-coverage sequencing (depth, ≥200×) to leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 158 persons with brain malformations, including the double-cortex syndrome (subcortical band heterotopia, 30 persons), polymicrogyria with megalencephaly (20), periventricular nodular heterotopia (61), and pachygyria (47). We validated candidate mutations with the use of Sanger sequencing and, for variants present at unequal read depths, subcloning followed by colony sequencing. RESULTS Validated, causal mutations were found in 27 persons (17%; range, 10 to 30% for each phenotype). Mutations were somatic in 8 of the 27 (30%), predominantly in persons with the double-cortex syndrome (in whom we found mutations in DCX and LIS1), persons with periventricular nodular heterotopia (FLNA), and persons with pachygyria (TUBB2B). Of the somatic mutations we detected, 5 (63%) were undetectable with the use of traditional Sanger sequencing but were validated through subcloning and subsequent sequencing of the subcloned DNA. We found potentially causal mutations in the candidate genes DYNC1H1, KIF5C, and other kinesin genes in persons with pachygyria. CONCLUSIONS Targeted sequencing was found to be useful for detecting somatic mutations in patients with brain malformations. High-coverage sequencing panels provide an important complement to whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing in the evaluation of somatic mutations in neuropsychiatric disease. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others.) PMID:25140959

  9. Laser treatment of oral vascular malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Gaimari, G.; Mohsen, M.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral Vascular Malformations (OVM) are congenital anomalies characterized by morph-structural and/or functional changes of nature in severity and extension. OVM can affect any type of vessels arterial, venous or lymphatic and any capillary or anatomical. They are divided into two categories: low and high flow. In this study were treated 40 patients with OVM with a range size from 2 mm to 44 mm; they were subjected to clinical examination supported by Colour-Doppler Ultrasound instrumental examination and only for doubt cases the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was prescribed. Only low flow venous and capillary malformations were treated by GaAlAs laser (Wiser®, Lambda, Brindole,Italy, 980nm) and KTP laser (SmartLite®, DEKA, Florence, Italy, 532nm) with two different techniques: the Transmucosal Thermophotocoagulation (TMT) and the Intralesional Photocoagulation (ILP). These techniques permitted a good control of haemostasis, avoiding bleeding both during surgery and in the postoperative. It is obtained an excellent and good healing respectively in 10% and 60% of cases, a moderate and poor resolution respectively in 22.5% and 7.5% of cases. A clear diagnosis allowed the management of Venous malformations (VM) by laser devices with wavelengths highly absorbed in haemoglobin in safety and efficacy and according to the principles of minimal invasive surgery. The aim of this study was to verify if the laser is effective in the treatment of OVM for the purpose of the clinical findings and the postoperative course. The Authors concluded that the laser can be considered the "gold standard" for treating OVM.

  10. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    PubMed Central

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  11. BIOLOGY OF VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS OF THE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Gabrielle G.; Golanov, Eugene; Awad, Issam A.; Young, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose This review discusses recent research on the genetic, molecular, cellular, and developmental mechanisms underlying the etiology of vascular malformations of the brain (VMBs), including cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), sporadic brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and the AVMs of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Summary of Review The identification of gene mutations and genetic risk factors associated with CCM, HHT, and sporadic AVM has enabled the development of animal models for these diseases and provided new insights into their etiology. All of the genes associated with VMBs to date have known or plausible roles in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. Recent work suggests that the angiogenic process most severely disrupted by VMB gene mutation is that of vascular stabilization, the process whereby vascular endothelial cells form capillary tubes, strengthen their intercellular junctions, and recruit smooth muscle cells to the vessel wall. In addition, there is now good evidence that in some cases CCM lesion formation involves a genetic two-hit mechanism, in which a germline mutation in one copy of a CCM gene is followed by a somatic mutation in the other copy. There is also increasing evidence that environmental second hits can produce lesions when there is a mutation to a single allele of a VMB gene. Conclusions Recent findings begin to explain how mutations in VMB genes render vessels vulnerable to rupture when challenged with other inauspicious genetic or environmental factors, and have suggested candidate therapeutics. Understanding of the cellular mechanisms of VMB formation and progression in humans has lagged behind that in animal models. New knowledge of lesion biology will spur new translational work. Several well-established clinical and genetic database efforts are already in place, and further progress will be facilitated by collaborative expansion and standardization of these. PMID:19834013

  12. Oral vascular malformations: laser treatment and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, U.; Rocchetti, F.; Gaimari, G.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.; Lo Giudice, G.

    2016-03-01

    Vascular malformations are a very heterogeneous group of circulatory system's diseases that can involve different kind of vessels: arterial, venous or lymphatic ones. Many treatments, such as conventional surgery, embolization, steroid therapy and laser therapy, are available for vascular lesions. The laser approach relies more therapeutic techniques: the transmucosal thermophotocoagulation, intralesional photocoagulation, the excisional biopsy. Today laser is demonstrated to be the gold standard technique to treat vascular lesions that allows a safe and efficient treatment and a lower post-operative healing time. The only disadvantage is the risk of carbonization that could be avoided by using the multiple-spot single pulsed wave technique.

  13. [Recurrent meningitis in inner ear malformations].

    PubMed

    Claros, Pedro; Matusialk, Monika

    2008-01-01

    Authors present two cases of children with reccurent meningitis and unilateral deafness. Implemented diagnostics (CT, NMR, ABR) revealed one side inner ear congenital malformation in one case and anterior fossa bony defect accompanied by labirynthine deformation in the other case. The presence of perilymphatic fistulae in oval and round windows and cerebrospinal fluid leakage has been confirmed in both cases during surgery. Carefull obliteration of the Eustachian tube and both windows has been performed. Non- complicated postoperative course (2 months and 6 years - respectively) has prooved the effectiveness of applied treatment.

  14. Congenital malformations of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Shraddha S; Parmar, Hemant A; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Mukherji, Suresh K

    2011-08-01

    Congenital ear or temporal bone malformations are a diagnostic challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Newer imaging techniques can detect subtle changes in middle ear and cochlear anatomy. This information is invaluable with increasing use of hearing restoration surgeries and/or cochlear implants in such patients. This article discusses the embryogenesis, classification system, and salient imaging findings of congenital outer, middle ear, and inner ear anomalies in children. Both high-resolution computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the temporal bones are described.

  15. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous malformation causing recurrent strokes

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Kareem; Premachandra, Lalith; Vankawala, Viren; Sun, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This case reveals a left pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) as a cause of recurrent cerebral and cerebellar emboli. Extensive workup excluded other etiologies of emboli formation, and the patient was transferred to a tertiary care center for percutaneous embolotherapy. In the absence of a clear etiology, PAVM should be considered as a potential cause of recurrent cerebral emboli, especially in the absence of carotid disease, intracardiac thrombus, atrial septal defect, and patent foramen ovale. Diagnostic work-up for the PAVM can be cost effective and expedited by utilization of agitated saline contrast echocardiography, as noted in our case. PMID:26486114

  16. Refractory hypoxemia in a 23-year-old patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bunge, Jeroen J H; Wiersema, Ubbo S; Moelker, Adriaan; van Bommel, Jasper; Tjwa, Eric T T L

    2014-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by a hypercoagulable state, leading to arterial and venous thrombosis. We present a 23-year-old patient, suspected of having Budd-Chiari syndrome due to antiphospholipid syndrome, who developed severe and progressive hypoxemia, requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. After a detailed but unsuccessful workup, a contrast CT scan revealed an occluded superior vena cava and azygos vein-superior vena cava junction and massive right-to-left shunting through a network of systemic to pulmonary venous collaterals. Restoring normal blood flow from the azygos vein into the right atrium by stenting the azygos-superior vena cava junction resolved the hypoxemia immediately. Within the same procedure, the hepatic outflow obstruction was successfully treated by stenting a severe stenosis of the suprahepatic inferior vena cava caused by calcified thrombus.

  17. Liver transplantation in a patient with primary antiphospholipid syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reshetnyak, Tatiana M; Seredavkina, Natalia V; Satybaldyeva, Maria A; Nasonov, Evgeniy L; Reshetnyak, Vasiliy I

    2015-09-08

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired thrombophilic disorder in which autoantibodies are produced to a variety of phospholipids determinants of cell membranes or phospholipid binding proteins. There are few reports about association between antiphospholipid antibodies and development of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). We report the case of BCS development in young Russian male with primary APS. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation on August 26, 2012. At present time his state is good, the blood flow in the liver restored and its function is not impaired. We report about the first time the successful use of dabigatran etexilate for prolonged anticoagulation therapy in APS patient with BCS. In addition patient is managed with immunosuppressive drugs.

  18. Air embolism after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a patient with budd Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wills-Sanin, Beatriz; Cárdenas, Yenny R; Polanco, Lucas; Rivero, Oscar; Suarez, Sebastian; Buitrago, Andrés F

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a procedure commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of various pancreatic and biliary diseases. Air embolism is a rare complication, which may be associated with this procedure. This condition can be manifested as cardiopulmonary instability and/or neurological symptoms. Known risk factors include: sphincterotomy; application of air with high intramural pressure; anatomic abnormalities; and chronic hepatobiliary inflammation. It is important for the health-care staff, including anesthesiologists, interventional gastroenterologists, and critical care specialists, amongst others, to promptly recognize air embolism and to initiate therapy in a timely fashion, thus preventing potentially fatal outcomes. We submit a brief review of the literature and a case report of air embolism which occurred in the immediate postoperative stage of an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, performed in a woman with a history of liver transplantation due to Budd Chiari syndrome and biliary stricture.

  19. Air Embolism after Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in a Patient with Budd Chiari Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wills-Sanin, Beatriz; Cárdenas, Yenny R.; Polanco, Lucas; Rivero, Oscar; Suarez, Sebastian; Buitrago, Andrés F.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is a procedure commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of various pancreatic and biliary diseases. Air embolism is a rare complication, which may be associated with this procedure. This condition can be manifested as cardiopulmonary instability and/or neurological symptoms. Known risk factors include: sphincterotomy; application of air with high intramural pressure; anatomic abnormalities; and chronic hepatobiliary inflammation. It is important for the health-care staff, including anesthesiologists, interventional gastroenterologists, and critical care specialists, amongst others, to promptly recognize air embolism and to initiate therapy in a timely fashion, thus preventing potentially fatal outcomes. We submit a brief review of the literature and a case report of air embolism which occurred in the immediate postoperative stage of an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, performed in a woman with a history of liver transplantation due to Budd Chiari syndrome and biliary stricture. PMID:25478242

  20. Liver transplantation in a patient with primary antiphospholipid syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Tatiana M; Seredavkina, Natalia V; Satybaldyeva, Maria A; Nasonov, Evgeniy L; Reshetnyak, Vasiliy I

    2015-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired thrombophilic disorder in which autoantibodies are produced to a variety of phospholipids determinants of cell membranes or phospholipid binding proteins. There are few reports about association between antiphospholipid antibodies and development of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). We report the case of BCS development in young Russian male with primary APS. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation on August 26, 2012. At present time his state is good, the blood flow in the liver restored and its function is not impaired. We report about the first time the successful use of dabigatran etexilate for prolonged anticoagulation therapy in APS patient with BCS. In addition patient is managed with immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:26380049

  1. Endomyocardial fibrosis as a cause of Budd-Chiari syndrome and fatal pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Silva, Carolina M P D C; Ardito, Sabrina Q; Theodoropoulos, Tatiana A D; Cury, Patrícia M; Corbucci, Hélio A R

    2010-01-01

    A 24-year-old-man had right-sided heart failure of 3 months' duration. A Doppler echocardiogram revealed atrium and right ventricular enlargement, obliteration of the right ventricular apex, and a mass with an echolucent center measuring 20x21 mm in the right ventricular outlet. He died of pulmonary embolism. At autopsy, a huge organized thrombus obliterating the right ventricular apex passing through the tricuspid valve to the right atrium and then extending to the inferior vena cava up to the suprahepatic veins was seen. Histologically, an intense fibrotic thickening of the endomyocardium extending into the myocardium was observed. Cardiac thrombosis associated with endomyocardial fibrosis should be added to the list of causes of Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  2. Validation of prognostic indices in Egyptian Budd-Chiari syndrome patients: A single-center study

    PubMed Central

    Sakr, Mohammad; Abdelhakam, Sara M; Elsayed, Soheir A; Allam, Enas H; Farid, Amir M; Abdelmoaty, Waleed; Hassan, Azza M; Shaker, Mohamed; El-Gharib, Mohamed; Eldorry, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare predictive ability of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) prognostic indices (PIs) for one-year survival and Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) patency. METHODS This retrospective study enrolled 194 Egyptian patients with primary BCS who presented to the Budd-Chiari Study Group of Ain Shams University Hospital. Calculation of the available PIs was performed using Child-Pugh and model for end-stage liver disease scores, BCS-specific PIs (Clichy, New Clichy and Rotterdam) for all patients, and BCS-TIPS PI only for patients who underwent TIPS. The overall one-year survival rate and the one-year shunt patency rate for TIPS were reported. RESULTS The overall one-year survival rate was 69.6%, and the New Clichy PI revealed the best validity for its prediction at a cut-off value of 3.75, with sensitivity and specificity of 78% and 73.3%, respectively [area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.806]. The one-year survival rate post-TIPS was 89.7%, and the BCS-TIPS score demonstrated validity for its prediction at a cut-off value of 3.92 (sensitivity and specificity were 71.4% and 64.5%, respectively) (AUC = 0.715). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the New Clichy PI (P = 0.030), high serum total bilirubin (P = 0.047) and low albumin (P < 0.001) were independent factors for predicting mortality within one year. The one-year shunt patency rate in TIPS was 80.2%, and none of the PIs exhibited significant validity for its prediction. CONCLUSION The New Clichy score could independently predict the one-year survival in Egyptian BCS patients. PMID:28216969

  3. Suboccipital craniotomy for Chiari I results in evoked potential conduction changes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jason A.; Coutin-Churchman, Pedro E.; Nuwer, Marc R.; Lazareff, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Management of Chiari I is controversial, in part because there is no widely used quantitative measurement of decompression. It has been demonstrated that brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) have decreased conduction latencies after wide craniectomy. We analyzed these parameters in a suboccipital craniectomy/craniotomy procedure. Methods: Thirteen consecutive patients underwent suboccipital decompression for treatment of symptomatic Chiari I. Craniectomy was restricted to the inferior aspect of the nuchal line, and in most cases the bone flap was replaced. Neuronal conduction was monitored continuously with median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (M-SEP), posterior tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (T-SEP), BAER, or a combination. The M-SEP N20, T-SEP P37, and BAER V latencies were recorded at four milestones – preoperatively, following craniotomy, following durotomy, and following closure. Results: Five males and eight females, with average age of 9 years, were studied. Clinical improvement was noted in all 13 patients. M-SEP N20 latency decreased from a mean of 18.55 at baseline to 17.75 ms after craniotomy (P = 0.01); to 17.06 ms after durotomy (P = 0.01); and to 16.68 ms after closing (P = 0.02). T-SEP P37 latency did not change significantly. BAER V latency decreased from a mean of 6.25 ms at baseline to 6.14 ms after craniotomy (P = 0.04); to 5.98 ms after durotomy (P = 0.01); and to 5.95 ms after closing (P = 0.45). Conclusion: Significant improvements in conduction followed both craniectomy and durotomy. Bone replacement did not affect these results. PMID:23372981

  4. Genetic Basis of Congenital Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Belmont, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are a singularly important class of birth defects and, due to dramatic improvements in medical and surgical care, there are now large numbers of adult survivors. The etiologies are complex, but there is strong evidence that genetic factors play a crucial role. Over the last 15 years there has been enormous progress in the discovery of causative genes for syndromic heart malformations and in rare families with Mendelian forms. The rapid characterization of genomic disorders as major contributors to congenital heart defects is also notable. The genes identified encode many transcription factors, chromatin regulators, growth factors and signal transduction pathways– all unified by their required roles in normal cardiac development. Genome-wide sequencing of the coding regions promises to elucidate genetic causation in several disorders affecting cardiac development. Such comprehensive studies evaluating both common and rare variants would be essential in characterizing gene-gene interactions, as well as in understanding the gene-environment interactions that increase the susceptibility to congenital heart defects. PMID:24793338

  5. Twin pregnancy in the congenital malformed uterus.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Pentti K

    2016-07-01

    The frequency and outcome of twin pregnancies in women with uterine malformation were studied. The cohort comprised 13 (4.9%) women with twin pregnancy found among 263 women. They had 483 deliveries, 13 of them twins (2.7%; 95% CI 1.6-4.6%). Among 38 patients with unicornuate uterus 5 (6.8%) out of 74 deliveries were twins, 39 women with didelphic uterus 2 (3.2%) out of 62 deliveries and 147 women with septate or subseptate uterus 6 (2.3%) out of 264 deliveries were twins. The mean duration of gestation was 249 days (range 190-268 days), 5 (38%) out of 13 deliveries were premature, 25 out of 26 newborns were alive. Mean durations of gestation and mean weights of newborns did not differ when 7 cases with unicornuate or didelphic uterus were compared to 6 cases with complete or partial uterine septum. A congenital malformed uterus can bear twin pregnancy without severe complications apart from prematurity.

  6. Sirenomelia and caudal malformations in two families.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Marion; Layet, Valérie; Costa, Teresa; Roumazeilles, Yves; Chenal, Pierre; Cailliez, Daniel; Gerard, Bénédicte

    2012-07-01

    We report on two families with co-occurrence of sirenomelia and caudal malformations. In the first family, the mother had undergone surgery for a short form of imperforate anus. Her first pregnancy was terminated because of bilateral renal agenesis with oligohydramnios. Her second pregnancy was interrupted because of sirenomelia. The second family was referred to us because of caudal malformation in their two children. The parents' spinal radiographs were normal. The first pregnancy resulted in a girl with imperforate anus, absence of S3-S5 and coccyx, abnormal pelvic floor, and an almost bifid anteriorly located bladder. The second pregnancy resulted in a baby girl with sirenomelia. No diabetes was present during the pregnancies in either of these two families. These families confirm the hypothesis that major genes are responsible for the embryogenesis of the caudal part of the embryo, with variable expression, as has been already described in sirenomelia mouse models (CYP26A1, BMP7/tsg). Molecular studies are underway in these families and in sporadic cases in our laboratory to explore the genetic basis of sirenomelia in humans.

  7. Glomuvenous Malformation: A Rare Periorbital Lesion of the Thermoregulatory Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Whipple, Katherine M; Godfrey, Kyle J; Solomon, James P; Lin, Jonathan H; Korn, Bobby S; Kikkawa, Don O

    Glomuvenous malformations (GVMs), previously referred to as glomus tumors or glomangiomas, are benign, mesenchymal venous malformations arising from glomus bodies. Glomus bodies are modified smooth muscle neuromyoarterial structures involved in temperature regulation via blood shunting. These classically occur in the digits but can occur in other locations. The authors present a case of a periorbital GVM presented following blunt trauma to the area.

  8. Congenital plaque-type glomuvenous malformation associated with chylous ascites.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, Maria; Martín-Santiago, Ana; Gómez, Cristina; Fiol, Miquel; Benítez-Segura, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Congenital plaque-type glomuvenous malformation (GVM) is caused by loss of function mutations in glomulin gene. We report a newborn with this rare vascular disorder associated with chylous ascites. The common mesenchymal origin of GVM and lymphatic vessels as well as the glomulin expression in vascular smooth muscle cells in utero could help explain this unusual prenatal complication of glomuvenous malformations.

  9. [The progress of inner ear malformation in radiological research].

    PubMed

    Kong, Dehua; Fu, Kuang; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear malformations are anomalies linking to development insults at different periods of embryogenesis,which are common causes of congenital sensorineural hearing loss. The evaluation of pediatric sensorineural hearing loss mostly depends on high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, which can excellently depict the temporal bones and inner ear malformations.

  10. Variations of some elements in cadmium-induced malformed fish

    SciTech Connect

    Muramoto, S.

    1981-08-01

    Reports of malformation induced by cadmium such as the appearance of vertebral anomalies in carp have been described by the present author. In this paper, the appearance of such malformed fish by exposure to cadmium was confirmed in a repeat experiment. Decalcification of the fish was studied from spinal x-ray photographs and the results of some elements analysis.

  11. Resection of a cardiac tumor extending into the inferior vena cava presenting as Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Naruto; Saiki, Munehiro; Kamihira, Satoshi; Kanaoka, Yasushi; Ishiguro, Shingo; Ohgi, Shigetsugu

    2006-07-01

    This report describes the successful treatment of a case of cardiac adenocarcinoma with the clinical presentation as Budd-Chiari syndrome. Complete surgical excision of the atriocaval mass was successfully achieved under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Histopathological diagnosis of this tumor was tubular adenocarcinoma with positive immunostaining by carcinoembrionic antigen. Subsequent systemic search could not detect any evidence of extra-cardiac primary site and distant metastatic lesion. A 2-year follow-up without any adjuvant therapy revealed no sign of recurrence.

  12. [Cochlear implant for malformations of the inner ear].

    PubMed

    Aschendorff, A; Laszig, R; Maier, W; Beck, R; Schild, C; Birkenhäger, R; Wesarg, T; Kröger, S; Arndt, S

    2009-06-01

    The radiologic evaluation of the temporal bone in cochlear implant candidates can detect malformations of the inner ear in up to 20% of cases. The aim of our study was to analyze and classify malformations of the inner ear in patients with cochlear implants carried out from 2001 to 2009. Malformations of the inner ear, including malformations of the internal auditory canal were detected in 12.7% of children and 3.4% of adults. Mondini dysplasia was most common and occurred in 45% of cases. The surgical procedure had to be adapted according to the individual malformation. Modification of surgical access, management of intraoperative CSF gusher, choice of electrode array, intraoperative imaging and the use of navigation were the most important factors. Rehabilitation results were generally very positive and corresponded to the expectation depending on the duration of deafness, if no additional handicaps were present.

  13. Malformations of cortical development: genetic mechanisms and diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development are rare congenital anomalies of the cerebral cortex, wherein patients present with intractable epilepsy and various degrees of developmental delay. Cases show a spectrum of anomalous cortical formations with diverse anatomic and morphological abnormalities, a variety of genetic causes, and different clinical presentations. Brain magnetic resonance imaging has been of great help in determining the exact morphologies of cortical malformations. The hypothetical mechanisms of malformation include interruptions during the formation of cerebral cortex in the form of viral infection, genetic causes, and vascular events. Recent remarkable developments in genetic analysis methods have improved our understanding of these pathological mechanisms. The present review will discuss normal cortical development, the current proposed malformation classifications, and the diagnostic approach for malformations of cortical development. PMID:28203254

  14. Venous malformations: classification, development, diagnosis, and interventional radiologic management.

    PubMed

    Legiehn, Gerald M; Heran, Manraj K S

    2008-05-01

    Venous malformations are categorized as low-flow vascular malformations within the domain of vascular anomalies and are the most common vascular malformation encountered clinically. Venous malformations are by definition present at birth, undergo pari passu growth, and present clinically because of symptoms related to mass effect or stasis. Although diagnosis can usually be made by clinical history and examination, differentiation from other vascular and nonvascular entities often requires an imaging work-up that includes ultrasound, CT, MR imaging, and diagnostic phlebography. All decisions regarding imaging work-up and decision to treat must be coordinated though referral and discussions with a multidisciplinary team and be based on clearly defined clinical indications. Percutaneous image-guided sclerotherapy has become the mainstay of treatment for venous malformations and involves the introduction of any one of a number of endothelial-cidal sclerosants into the vascular spaces of the lesion, with each sclerosant possessing its own unique spectrum of advantages and disadvantages.

  15. Establishment of an Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Program at Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee Final Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    intensive recreational activities such as sports , campgrounds, picnic areas, paved walking/ jogging/ cycl ing trails, marinas, designated swimming...beaches, and other water sports areas. Class I Areas at Arnold AFB that are open to the general public include the Morris Ferry Recreation Area, the...Sources: U.S. Atr Force, 2006; TDEC Dtvts ton of Natural Areas (DNA), 2008; TDEC DNA, 2009 . T =Threatened; D = Deemed in Need of Management; DM

  16. Stories and photographs of William A. Arnold (1904-2001), a pioneer of photosynthesis and a wonderful friend.

    PubMed

    Choules, Lucinda; Govindjee

    2014-10-01

    William A. Arnold discovered many phenomena in photosynthesis. In 1932, together with Robert Emerson, he provided the first experimental data that led to the concept of a large antenna and a few reaction centers (photosynthetic unit); in 1935, he obtained the minimum quantum requirement of 8-10 for the evolution of one O2 molecule; in 1951, together with Bernard L. Strehler, he discovered delayed fluorescence (also known as delayed light emission) in photosynthetic systems; and in 1956, together with Helen Sherwood, he discovered thermoluminescence in plants. He is also known for providing a solid-state picture of photosynthesis. Much has been written about him and his research, including many articles in a special issue of Photosynthesis Research (Govindjee et al. (eds.) 1996); and a biography of Arnold, by Govindjee and Srivastava (William Archibald Arnold (1904-2001), 2014), in the Biographical Memoirs of the US National Academy of Sciences, (Washington, DC). Our article here offers a glimpse into the everyday life, through stories and photographs, of this remarkable scientist.

  17. Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chiari malformation, Dandy-Walker syndrome, schizencephaly (clefts or deep divisions in brain tissue), and holoprosencephaly (failure of ... Chiari malformation, Dandy-Walker syndrome, schizencephaly (clefts or deep divisions in brain tissue), and holoprosencephaly (failure of ...

  18. Diagnosis and management of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannis, J; Apostolopoulou, S; Sarris, GE; Rammos, S

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation is a rare anomaly that presents in several different ways. It can present as an isolated finding, or more often in the context of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. It can also complicate palliative surgery such as the Glenn operation for complex congenital heart disease with single ventricle physiology. Its management includes transcatheter embolization, which is the preferred mode of therapy, surgery (including resection of the affected lobe, segment, or the fistula itself), or rarely, medical therapy. Complications of the disease itself and of various modes of treatment are relatively common, and patients require close surveillance for possible recurrence, or development of new fistulas. In cases related to the Glenn operation, redirection of hepatic venous flow or heart transplantation may cure the problem. PMID:22368610

  19. Congenital cardiovascular malformations and the fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, A M

    2010-03-01

    After birth, gas exchange is achieved in the lung, whereas prenatally it occurs in the placenta. This is associated with differences in blood flow patterns in the fetus as compared with the postnatal circulation. Congenital cardiovascular malformations are associated with haemodynamic changes in the fetus, which differ from those occurring postnatally. Obstruction to cardiac outflow may alter myocardial development, resulting in progressive ventricular hypoplasia. Alteration of oxygen content may profoundly influence pulmonary vascular and ductus arteriosus responses. Interference in blood flow and oxygen content may affect cerebral development as a result of inadequate oxygen or energy substrate supply. The circulatory effects may be gestational dependent, related to maturation of vascular responses in different organs. These prenatal influences of congenital cardiac defects may severely affect immediate, as well as longterm, postnatal prognosis and survival. This has stimulated the development of techniques for palliation of disturbed circulation during fetal life.

  20. Small Rho-GTPases and cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rho-GTPases have been found to be crucial for cytoskeleton remodelling and cell polarity, as well as key players in directed cell migration in various tissues and organs, therefore becoming good candidates for involvement in neuronal migration disorders. We recently found that genetic deletion of the small GTPase RhoA in the developing mouse cerebral cortex results in three distinct cortical malformations: a defect in the proliferation of progenitor cells during development that leads to a bigger cerebral cortex in the adult mouse, a change in the morphology of radial glial cells that results in the formation of a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH, also called Double Cortex) and an increase in the speed of migrating newborn neurons. The latter, together with the aberrant radial glial shape, is likely to be the cause of cobblestone lissencephaly, where neurons protrude beyond layer I at the pial surface of the brain. PMID:23524873

  1. Multimodal device for assessment of skin malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekina, A.; Garancis, V.; Rubins, U.; Spigulis, J.; Valeine, L.; Berzina, A.

    2013-11-01

    A variety of multi-spectral imaging devices is commercially available and used for skin diagnostics and monitoring; however, an alternative cost-efficient device can provide an advanced spectral analysis of skin. A compact multimodal device for diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions was developed and tested. A polarized LED light source illuminates the skin surface at four different wavelengths - blue (450 nm), green (545 nm), red (660 nm) and infrared (940 nm). Spectra of reflected light from the 25 mm wide skin spot are imaged by a CMOS sensor. Four spectral images are obtained for mapping of the main skin chromophores. The specific chromophore distribution differences between different skin malformations were analyzed and information of subcutaneous structures was consecutively extracted.

  2. Malformations and the Manx Syndrome in Cats

    PubMed Central

    DeForest, M. E.; Basrur, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    Breeding experiments were conducted on cats with congenital taillessness, to test the dissemination pattern of taillessness in their offspring. Clinical evaluation, radiographic analysis of the vertebral column and histological studies of the digestive tract and central nervous tissue were conducted to determine the association of malformations of these systems in cats born with different degrees of taillessness noted in the rumpy and stumpy cats. The mode of transmission of the tailless (Manx) condition assumed to be through an autosomal dominant factor (M) was confirmed by this investigation. It is hypothesized that the problems associated with the tailless condition such as spina bifida, urinary and faecal incontinence and locomotor disturbances of the pelvic limbs may all be related to a disturbance affecting the development of the central nervous system in the early embryonic life. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:393376

  3. Cerebral cavernous malformation proteins at a glance.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Kyle M; Fisher, Oriana S; Boggon, Titus J; Calderwood, David A

    2014-02-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 (also known as OSM and malcavernin) or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3) cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormalities are characterized by dilated leaky blood vessels, especially in the neurovasculature, that result in increased risk of stroke, focal neurological defects and seizures. The three CCM proteins can exist in a trimeric complex, and each of these essential multi-domain adaptor proteins also interacts with a range of signaling, cytoskeletal and adaptor proteins, presumably accounting for their roles in a range of basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, migration, polarity and apoptosis. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of current models of CCM protein function focusing on how known protein-protein interactions might contribute to cellular phenotypes and highlighting gaps in our current understanding.

  4. Temporary umbilical loop colostomy for anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshinori; Takada, Kohei; Nakamura, Yusuke; Sato, Masahito; Kwon, A-Hon

    2012-11-01

    Transumbilical surgical procedures have been reported to be a feasible, safe, and cosmetically excellent procedure for various pediatric surgical diseases. Umbilical loop colostomies have previously been created in patients with Hirschsprung's disease, but not in patients with anorectal malformations (ARMs). We assessed the feasibility and cosmetic results of temporal umbilical loop colostomy (TULC) in patients with ARMs. A circumferential skin incision was made at the base of the umbilical cord under general anesthesia. The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and fascia were cored out vertically, and the umbilical vessels and urachal remnant were individually ligated apart from the opening in the fascia. A loop colostomy was created in double-barreled fashion with a high chimney more than 2 cm above the level of the skin. The final size of the opening in the skin and fascia was modified according to the size of the bowel. The bowel wall was fixed separately to the peritoneum and fascia with interrupted 5-0 absorbable sutures. The bowel was opened longitudinally and everted without suturing to the skin. The loop was divided 7 days postoperatively, and diversion of the oral bowel was completed. The colostomy was closed 2-3 months after posterior saggital anorectoplasty through a peristomal skin incision followed by end-to-end anastomosis. Final wound closure was performed in a semi-opened fashion to create a deep umbilicus. TULCs were successfully created in seven infants with rectourethral bulbar fistula or rectovestibular fistula. Postoperative complications included mucosal prolapse in one case. No wound infection or spontaneous umbilical ring narrowing was observed. Skin problems were minimal, and stoma care could easily be performed by attaching stoma bag. Healing of umbilical wounds after TULC closure was excellent. The umbilicus may be an alternative stoma site for temporary loop colostomy in infants with intermediate-type anorectal malformations, who undergo radical

  5. Genetic Screening of Pediatric Cavernous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Merello, Elisa; Pavanello, Marco; Consales, Alessandro; Mascelli, Samantha; Raso, Alessandro; Accogli, Andrea; Cama, Armando; Valeria, Capra; De Marco, Patrizia

    2016-10-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations mostly located within the central nervous system. Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607, and CCM3/PDCD10 genes are identified in about 90 % of familial cases of CCMs and two thirds of sporadic cases with multiple lesions. In this study, we performed genetic screening of a cohort of 31 patients, mainly pediatric. We analyzed the CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3 genes by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and direct sequencing of exons and intronic boundaries. A total of 9 typical pathogenic loss-of-function mutations were identified in 10 out 31 patients (32 %). The 75 % of familial cases were mutated and the percentage reached to 85 % when we consider only pediatric cases. Detection rate in sporadic cases with multiple lesions was considerably lower (16 %). We identified a novel variant of CCM3, the c.130-131insT (p.R45Efs*8), in 1 pediatric sporadic case with multiple lesions that introduced a premature termination codon into the messenger RNA (mRNA), most likely leading to mRNA decay. Similar to other CCM pediatric series, the main symptoms associated to clinical debut consisted of cerebral hemorrhage. In conclusion, the penetrance of CCM mutations in familial pediatric cases is high (85 %). The genetic workup could improve clinical and genetic counseling in CCM patients. Moreover, we confirmed the high risk of hemorrhage in children with CCMs.

  6. Detecting somatic mutations in genomic sequences by means of Kolmogorov–Arnold analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gurzadyan, V. G.; Yan, H.; Vlahovic, G.; Kashin, A.; Killela, P.; Reitman, Z.; Sargsyan, S.; Yegorian, G.; Milledge, G.; Vlahovic, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Kolmogorov–Arnold stochasticity parameter technique is applied for the first time to the study of cancer genome sequencing, to reveal mutations. Using data generated by next-generation sequencing technologies, we have analysed the exome sequences of brain tumour patients with matched tumour and normal blood. We show that mutations contained in sequencing data can be revealed using this technique, thus providing a new methodology for determining subsequences of given length containing mutations, i.e. its value differs from those of subsequences without mutations. A potential application for this technique involves simplifying the procedure of finding segments with mutations, speeding up genomic research and accelerating its implementation in clinical diagnostics. Moreover, the prediction of a mutation associated with a family of frequent mutations in numerous types of cancers based purely on the value of the Kolmogorov function indicates that this applied marker may recognize genomic sequences that are in extremely low abundance and can be used in revealing new types of mutations. PMID:26361546

  7. Determining role of Krein signature for three-dimensional Arnold tongues of oscillatory dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, Oleg N.; Günther, Uwe; Stefani, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Using a homotopic family of boundary eigenvalue problems for the mean-field α2 dynamo with helical turbulence parameter α(r)=α0+γΔα(r) and homotopy parameter βɛ[0,1] , we show that the underlying network of diabolical points for Dirichlet (idealized, β=0 ) boundary conditions substantially determines the choreography of eigenvalues and thus the character of the dynamo instability for Robin (physically realistic, β=1 ) boundary conditions. In the (α0,β,γ) space the Arnold tongues of oscillatory solutions at β=1 end up at the diabolical points for β=0 . In the vicinity of the diabolical points the space orientation of the three-dimensional tongues, which are cones in first-order approximation, is determined by the Krein signature of the modes involved in the diabolical crossings at the apexes of the cones. The Krein space-induced geometry of the resonance zones explains the subtleties in finding α profiles leading to spectral exceptional points, which are important ingredients in recent theories of polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field.

  8. Arnold diffusion for smooth convex systems of two and a half degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloshin, V.; Zhang, K.

    2015-08-01

    In the present note we announce a proof of a strong form of Arnold diffusion for smooth convex Hamiltonian systems. Let { T}2 be a 2-dimensional torus and B2 be the unit ball around the origin in { R}2 . Fix ρ > 0. Our main result says that for a ‘generic’ time-periodic perturbation of an integrable system of two degrees of freedom H_0(p)+\\varepsilon H_1(θ,p,t),\\quad θ\\in { T}^2, p\\in B^2, t\\in { T}={ R}/{ Z} , with a strictly convex H0, there exists a ρ-dense orbit (θε, pε, t)(t) in { T}2 × B2 × { T} , namely, a ρ-neighborhood of the orbit contains { T}2 × B2 × { T} . Our proof is a combination of geometric and variational methods. The fundamental elements of the construction are the usage of crumpled normally hyperbolic invariant cylinders from [9], flower and simple normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds from [36] as well as their kissing property at a strong double resonance. This allows us to build a ‘connected’ net of three-dimensional normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds. To construct diffusing orbits along this net we employ a version of the Mather variational method [41] equipped with weak KAM theory [28], proposed by Bernard in [7].

  9. Who will save the tokamak - Harry Potter, Arnold Schwarzenegger, or Shaquille O'Neil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, J.; Mangiarotti, F.; Minervini, J.

    2014-10-01

    The tokamak is the current leading contender for a fusion power reactor. The reason for the preeminence of the tokamak is its high quality plasma physics performance relative to other concepts. Even so, it is well known that the tokamak must still overcome two basic physics challenges before becoming viable as a DEMO and ultimately a reactor: (1) the achievement of non-inductive steady state operation, and (2) the achievement of robust disruption free operation. These are in addition to the PMI problems faced by all concepts. The work presented here demonstrates by means of a simple but highly credible analytic calculation that a ``standard'' tokamak cannot lead to a reactor - it is just not possible to simultaneously satisfy all the plasma physics plus engineering constraints. Three possible solutions, some more well-known than others, to the problem are analyzed. These visual image generating solutions are defined as (1) the Harry Potter solution, (2) the Arnold Schwarzenegger solution, and (3) the Shaquille O'Neil solution. Each solution will be described both qualitatively and quantitatively at the meeting.

  10. Outcome of cochlear implantation in children with cochlear malformations.

    PubMed

    Bille, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke; Ovesen, Therese

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was the evaluation of outcomes of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with cochlear malformations. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary referral centre. The patients were children with inner ear malformation judged by high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging treated with uni- or bilateral CI and a follow-up period of at least 3 years. They were matched with a control group of children operated for other reasons. The patients were operated by one of two surgeons using similar techniques including a standard perimodiolar electrode in all cases. The intervention was therapeutic and rehabilitative. The main outcome measures were category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). Eighteen children were diagnosed with cochlear malformations (12 % of children receiving CI). No statistical differences regarding CAP and SIR scores were found between the two groups. Only one child was diagnosed with a common cavity and performed below average. Children with auditory neuropathy performed beyond average. Children with cochlear malformations performed equally to children without malformation in the long term. Standard perimodiolar electrodes can be used despite cochlear malformations. The most important factors determining the outcome is the age of the child at the time of implantation and duration of hearing loss before CI. Awareness towards an increased risk of complications in case of inner ear malformations is recommended.

  11. A developmental and genetic classification for midbrain-hindbrain malformations

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Kathleen J.; Dobyns, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging, developmental biology and molecular genetics have increased the understanding of developmental disorders affecting the midbrain and hindbrain, both as isolated anomalies and as part of larger malformation syndromes. However, the understanding of these malformations and their relationships with other malformations, within the central nervous system and in the rest of the body, remains limited. A new classification system is proposed, based wherever possible, upon embryology and genetics. Proposed categories include: (i) malformations secondary to early anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning defects, or to misspecification of mid-hindbrain germinal zones; (ii) malformations associated with later generalized developmental disorders that significantly affect the brainstem and cerebellum (and have a pathogenesis that is at least partly understood); (iii) localized brain malformations that significantly affect the brain stem and cerebellum (pathogenesis partly or largely understood, includes local proliferation, cell specification, migration and axonal guidance); and (iv) combined hypoplasia and atrophy of putative prenatal onset degenerative disorders. Pertinent embryology is discussed and the classification is justified. This classification will prove useful for both physicians who diagnose and treat patients with these disorders and for clinical scientists who wish to understand better the perturbations of developmental processes that produce them. Importantly, both the classification and its framework remain flexible enough to be easily modified when new embryologic processes are described or new malformations discovered. PMID:19933510

  12. Anthelmintic induced congenital malformations in sheep embryos using netobimin.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M; Cristofol, C; Carretero, A; Arboix, M; Ruberte, J

    1998-01-24

    Benzimidazole compounds have teratogenic effects in domestic and experimental animals. In this study, 14 Manchega ewes were treated orally, under controlled conditions, with 20 mg netobimin (a prodrug of a benzimidazole compound) per/kg bodyweight on the 17th day of pregnancy. Congenital malformations and abortions affected 60 per cent of the lambs. The main malformations were skeletal and renal, but vascular malformations were observed for the first time. The abnormalities were investigated using radiological, dissection and vascular injection techniques, and associations among them were recorded. The anomalies are discussed in terms of embryological considerations.

  13. Congenital malformations of the spinal cord without early symptoms.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D; Stefanko, S Z; Makkink, B

    1986-01-01

    Description of 11 patients with congenital malformations of the spinal cord. Six of them were males, five females and the age varied from 7 to 70 years. Most of these cases produced clinical neurological signs indicating spinal cord disease in later life during an intercurrent disease. It was thought that changes in the bloodvessels and/or perfusion of the area of the spinal cord malformation was the ultimate cause of the neurological symptoms. An exact explanation of the origin of these developmental disturbances of the spinal cord remains unknown. Different hypotheses proposed in the literature, concerning these malformations, are not satisfactory.

  14. Congenital inner ear malformations without sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Michio; Kato, Zenichiro; Sasai, Hideo; Kubota, Kazuo; Funato, Michinori; Orii, Kenji; Kaneko, Hideo; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2009-10-01

    Inner ear malformations are frequently found in patients with congenital hearing loss. It has been reported that normal hearing is rare in patients with severe inner ear vestibular malformations. A 9-year-old boy had had complained of recurrent dizziness and disequilibrium for 2 months. Clinical and neuro-otological examinations showed peripheral involvement of the vestibular system, while audiological investigation was normal. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, with three-dimensional reconstruction, showed dysplasia of the bilateral lateral semicircular canals (LSCCs). Isolated vestibular malformation might not be as rare as previously thought, and should be examined by imaging of the temporal bone.

  15. Otosclerosis associated with type B-1 inner ear malformation.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, A; Dispenza, F; Aggarwal, N; Russo, A

    2010-06-01

    Malformations of bony inner ear are rare anomalies occurring in approximately 20% of patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Conductive hearing loss is usually associated with abnormalities of the external and middle ear. Recent reports of patients with lateral semicircular canal malformations indicate inner ear malformations to be associated with sensorineural or conductive hearing loss. Differential diagnosis of conductive hearing loss should include otosclerosis, isolated ossicular deformities, inner ear anomalies or a combination of these. In this report, a case is described with right vestibule-lateral semicircular canal dysplasia presenting at our centre with bilateral otosclerosis.

  16. [Arteriovenous malformation-glioma association: study of four cases].

    PubMed

    Borges, Lia Raquel R; Malheiros, Suzana M F; Pelaez, Maria Paula; Stávale, João Norberto; Santos, Adrialdo J; Carrete, Henrique; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes; Ferraz, Fernando A P; Gabbai, Alberto A

    2003-06-01

    We reviewed the clinical presentation, imaging and histopathologic findings in 4 patients with the diagnosis of arteriovenous malformation associated with glioma that were operated on from 1991 to 2000 in our institution. Four patients (2 males; age between 15 and 52 years) presented with progressive headache with clinical evidence of intracranial hypertension (in 3) and partial seizures (in 1). CT scan showed a brain tumor without any detectable pathologic vessels. Histologic examination revealed astrocytic tumors associated with arteriovenous malformation. No patient presented the vascular component intermixed with the tumor. The arteriovenous-glioma association is rare and must be identified by a clear demarcation between the malformation and the tumor.

  17. Total alleviation of downbeat nystagmus in basilar impression by transoral removal of the odontoid process.

    PubMed

    Senelick, R C

    1981-12-01

    The presence of primary position downbeat nystagmus indicates disease at the cervicomedullary junction where craniovertebral anomalies are commonly encountered. This paper reports a patient whose only symptom was disabling oscillopsia and downbeat nystagmus secondary to basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation. He experienced total resolution of his symptoms following transoral removal of the odontoid process. In the past it was felt that ocular signs and symptoms did not improve with surgery for craniovertebral anomalies. In light of this report, the ocular symptoms of craniovertebral anomalies may be considered indications in themselves for surgical intervention.

  18. Le syndrome de Budd-Chiari: une complication rare de la sarcoïdose hépatique (à propos d'un cas)

    PubMed Central

    Sghier, Ismael Ait; Billah, Nabil Moatassim

    2016-01-01

    L'atteinte hépatique au cours de la sarcoïdose est une localisation fréquente, habituellement asymptomatique. La cholestase anictérique et l'hypertension portale représentent ses principales complications. Le syndrome de Budd-Chiari est une complication peu connue qui demeure exceptionnelle. Nous rapportons un nouveau cas de syndrome de Budd-Chiari compliquant une sarcoïdose hépatique chez une jeune femme de 45 ans. PMID:27200114

  19. Dural arteriovenous malformation: a rare cause of epilepsy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Caksen, H; Unal, O; Tombul, T; Cesur, Y; Abuhandan, M

    2001-09-01

    A 3 year and 6 month old girl with epilepsy associated with dural arteriovenous malformation (DAVM), diagnosed on the MRI, is presented to emphasise the importance of DAVM in the aetiology of childhood epilepsy.

  20. [Cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung. Importance of prenatal diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Beatriz; Oñoro, Gonzalo; Cantarín Extremera, Verónica; Sanz Santiago, Verónica; Sequeiros, Adolfo

    2011-04-01

    Cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung is a rare malformation of the lung airway which often performed diagnosed in the prenatal period by ultrasound. Ultrasound monitoring should be performed during pregnancy to assess lung development. We report the case of a 4-year-old patient with prenatal diagnosis of cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung, not confirmed by chest radiograph at birth. The patient underwent surgery at 4 years of age after diagnosis was made for presenting recurrent pneumonia. A normal chest radiograph at birth does not exclude this malformation and a computerized tomography at 4 weeks of birth must be done to confirm or rule out this anomaly. Once the diagnosis is made, surgical treatment should be prompted to avoid complications.

  1. Glioma coexisting with angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junhui; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Chunlei; He, Jianqing; Li, Peipei; Zhou, Jingxu; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Yuhai

    2016-01-01

    Angiographically occult cerebrovascular malformation (AOVM) is a type of complex cerebrovascular malformation that is not visible on digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Vascular malformation coexisting with glioma is clinically rare, and glioma coexisting with AOVM is even more rare. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report glioma coexisting with AOVM in the literature. The present study reports a rare case of glioma coexisting with AOVM in a 30-year-old male patient. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed calcification, hemorrhage and edema in the right frontal lobe. CT angiography revealed a vascular malformation in the right frontal lobe, which was not observed on DSA. Finally, glioma coexisting with AOVM was confirmed by 2.0T magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative pathological examination. The present patient had a positive outcome and no neurological dysfunctions during the 6-month follow-up subsequent to surgery. PMID:27698825

  2. Optic chiasmal cavernous angioma: A rare suprasellar vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Bahatheq, Ayman; Takroni, Radwan; Al-Thubaiti, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suprasellar cavernous malformation in the optic pathway is not commonly encountered. To date, there are only few reports present in the literature. Case Description: The authors report a rare case of suprasellar optic pathway cavernous malformation in a 33-year-old female who presented with progressive visual loss. Her imaging revealed a large heterogeneous, hyperintense, hemorrhagic right suprasellar extra-axial complex cystic structure, causing mass effect on the adjacent hypothalamus and third ventricle displacing these structures. Gross total resection of the lesion was achieved utilizing a right frontal craniotomy approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of suprasellar chiasmal cavernous malformation. Conclusion: Although visual pathway cavernous malformation is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions occurring suprasellarly in the visual pathway and hypothalamus. PMID:27583178

  3. Variants in CUL4B are Associated with Cerebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A.; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K.; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M.; Yntema, Helger G.; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F. Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A.A.P.; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A. James; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B. PMID:25385192

  4. Variants in CUL4B are associated with cerebral malformations.

    PubMed

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M; Yntema, Helger G; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B A; Brunner, Han G; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A A P; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A James; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P M

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B.

  5. The numerical detection of the Arnold web and its use for long-term diffusion studies in conservative and weakly dissipative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Massimiliano; Lega, Elena

    2013-06-01

    The celebrated KAM and Nekhoroshev theorems provide essential informations about the long term dynamics of quasi-integrable Hamiltonian systems. In particular, long-term instability of the action variables can be observed only in the so-called Arnold web, which is the complement in the phase-space of all KAM invariant tori, and only on the very long times which depend exponentially on an inverse power of the perturbation parameter. Though the structure of the Arnold's web was clearly explained already on Arnold's 1963 article, its numerical detection with a precision sufficient to reveal exponentially slow diffusion of the actions through the web itself has become possible only in the last decade with the extensive computation of dynamical indicators. In this paper, we first review the detection method that allowed us to compute the Arnold web, and then we discuss its use to study the long-term diffusion through the web itself. We also show that the Arnold web of a quasi-integrable Hamiltonian system is useful to track the diffusion of orbits of weakly dissipative perturbations of the same Hamiltonian system.

  6. The numerical detection of the Arnold web and its use for long-term diffusion studies in conservative and weakly dissipative systems.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, Massimiliano; Lega, Elena

    2013-06-01

    The celebrated KAM and Nekhoroshev theorems provide essential informations about the long term dynamics of quasi-integrable Hamiltonian systems. In particular, long-term instability of the action variables can be observed only in the so-called Arnold web, which is the complement in the phase-space of all KAM invariant tori, and only on the very long times which depend exponentially on an inverse power of the perturbation parameter. Though the structure of the Arnold's web was clearly explained already on Arnold's 1963 article, its numerical detection with a precision sufficient to reveal exponentially slow diffusion of the actions through the web itself has become possible only in the last decade with the extensive computation of dynamical indicators. In this paper, we first review the detection method that allowed us to compute the Arnold web, and then we discuss its use to study the long-term diffusion through the web itself. We also show that the Arnold web of a quasi-integrable Hamiltonian system is useful to track the diffusion of orbits of weakly dissipative perturbations of the same Hamiltonian system.

  7. Base-flow data in the Arnold Air Force Base area, Tennessee, June and October 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, John A.; Haugh, Connor J.

    2004-01-01

    Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB) occupies about 40,000 acres in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee. The primary mission of AAFB is to support the development of aerospace systems. This mission is accomplished through test facilities at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), which occupies about 4,000 acres in the center of AAFB. Base-flow data including discharge, temperature, and specific conductance were collected for basins in and near AAFB during high base-flow and low base-flow conditions. Data representing high base-flow conditions from 109 sites were collected on June 3 through 5, 2002, when discharge measurements at sites with flow ranged from 0.005 to 46.4 ft3/s. Data representing low base-flow conditions from 109 sites were collected on October 22 and 23, 2002, when discharge measurements at sites with flow ranged from 0.02 to 44.6 ft3/s. Discharge from the basin was greater during high base-flow conditions than during low base-flow conditions. In general, major tributaries on the north side and southeastern side of the study area (Duck River and Bradley Creek, respectively) had the highest flows during the study. Discharge data were used to categorize stream reaches and sub-basins. Stream reaches were categorized as gaining, losing, wet, dry, or unobserved for each base-flow measurement period. Gaining stream reaches were more common during the high base-flow period than during the low base-flow period. Dry stream reaches were more common during the low base-flow period than during the high base-flow period. Losing reaches were more predominant in Bradley Creek and Crumpton Creek. Values of flow per square mile for the study area of 0.55 and 0.37 (ft3/s)/mi2 were calculated using discharge data collected on June 3 through 5, 2002, and October 22 and 23, 2002, respectively. Sub-basin areas with surplus or deficient flow were defined within the basin. Drainage areas for each stream measurement site were delineated and measured from topographic maps

  8. Glomuvenous Malformation: A Rare Periorbital Lesion of the Thermoregulatory Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Whipple, Katherine M.; Godfrey, Kyle J; Solomon, James P.; Lin, Jonathan H.; Korn, Bobby S.; Kikkawa, Don O.

    2016-01-01

    Glomuvenous malformations (GVMs), previously referred to as glomus tumors or glomangiomas, are benign, mesenchymal venous malformations arising from glomus bodies. Glomus bodies are modified smooth muscle neuromyoarterial structures involved in temperature regulation via blood shunting. These classically occur in the digits but can occur in other locations. The authors present a case of a periorbital GVM presented following blunt trauma to the area. PMID:27065433

  9. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  10. Supernumerary nipples and renal malformations: a family study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin; Schwartz, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    We describe a family with supernumerary nipples and kidney and urinary tract malformations. The proband is a 59-year-old man with a supernumerary nipple and recently identified hypoplastic kidney, bladder diverticulum, and hypotonic bladder. His mother also has a supernumerary nipple and a recently identified hypoplastic kidney. Of his three children, all male, one has a supernumerary nipple but has not been evaluated for a kidney or urinary tract malformation. This familial disorder is discussed.

  11. Diffuse pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in a child with polysplenia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kapur, S; Rome, J; Chandra, R S

    1995-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) is usually seen as a well-circumscribed cystic mass. In this communication we describe a diffuse arteriovenous malformation in a 5-month-old infant. The lesion was seen only at the microscopic level and was associated with abdominal heterotaxy, atrial situs solitus, polysplenia, interrupted inferior vena cava, atrial septal defect, and atrioventricular canal. This uncommon association may be within the spectrum of polysplenia syndrome.

  12. Split cord malformation type I distal to segmental myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Addas, Bassam M.

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of myelomeningocele (MMC) and split cord malformation (SCM) is a well-known phenomenon. The SCM is usually above or at the level of the MMC. Split cord malformation distal to the MMC is considered to be the rarest form of such a combination. We report a case of SCM (type I) distal to the MMC diagnosed pre-operatively. Repair of the MMC and the SCM were carried out in the same setting. PMID:25551117

  13. Contemporary Themes: Congenital Malformations and the Problem of their Control*

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility of preventing or reducing the prevalence of human congenital malformations is discussed in the light of current knowledge about their aetiology. The original data presented are derived from an epidemiological study of all the infants (92,982) born in the three years 1964-6 to women resident in a defined area of South Wales and all the congenital malformations (3,242) discovered in those infants by the second anniversary of their birth. PMID:4262651

  14. Limb malformations and abnormal sex hormone concentrations in frogs.

    PubMed Central

    Sower, S A; Reed, K L; Babbitt, K J

    2000-01-01

    Declines in amphibian populations, and amphibians with gross malformations, have prompted concern regarding the biological status of many anuran species. A survey of bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana, and green frogs, Rana clamitans, conducted in central and southern New Hampshire showed malformed frogs at 81% of the sites sampled (13 of 16 sites). Brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the synthesis of androgens and estradiol, hormones essential to reproductive processes, were measured from limb-malformed and normal (no limb malformation) frogs. Normal frogs had significantly higher concentrations (nearly 3-fold) of in vitro produced androgens and of brain GnRH than malformed frogs. Because most malformations are thought to occur during development, we propose that environmental factors or endocrine-disrupting chemicals that may cause developmental abnormalities also act during early development to ultimately cause abnormally reduced GnRH and androgen production in adult frogs. The consequences of reduced GnRH and androgens on anuran reproductive behavior and population dynamics are unknown but certainly may be profound and warrant further research. PMID:11102301

  15. Pseudomeningocele formation following chiari decompression: 19-year retrospective review of predisposing and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Menger, R.; Connor, D.E.; Hefner, M.; Caldito, G.; Nanda, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomeningocele is a known operative complication of Chiari decompression with significant morbidity. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 150 consecutive patients from November 1991 to June 2011 was conducted. Symptomatic pseudomeningocele was defined clinically; to meet definition it must have required operative intervention. Variables evaluated included sex, age, use of graft, and use of operative sealant. The Chi-square, Fisher test, and the two-sample t-test were used as appropriate to determine significance. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine independent risk factors for complication. Results: A total of 67.3% of patients were female, with average age being 39.7 years. A total of 67.3% of patients had a graft placed with the most common being fascia lata. Only nine patients (6%) presented with pseudomeningocele. Factors observed to be significantly associated with pseudomeningocele development were age and use of sealant. Age and sealant use were also independent risk factors for complication. Adjusted for the significant effect of age, odds for complication among patients with sealant usage were 6.67 times those for patients without sealant. Adjusted for the significance of sealant usage, there is a 6% increase in odds for complication for every year increase in patient's age. Conclusions: A statistically significant relationship exists between age and sealant use and the risk of developing a postoperative pseudomeningocele. Emphasis and attention must be placed on meticulous closure technique. This information can aide in preoperative planning and patient selection. PMID:25984384

  16. Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver: percutaneous stent therapy in Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, J; Görich, J; Kramme, E; Merkle, E; Sokiranski, R; Kern, P; Brambs, H J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Infiltration of the hepatic veins in the alveolar echinococcosis can lead to the development of the Budd-Chiari syndrome. The medical and surgical treatment of this condition is generally unsatisfactory. The results of successful interventional treatment with percutaneous stent implantation in the hepatic veins are reported. METHODS: Using a transjugular approach, metal mesh stents (Boston Scientific, Medi-Tech Accuflex 8/60 mm) were placed in the median and left hepatic veins of a 53 year old woman. After the intervention, oral chemotherapy with albendazole (2 x 400 mg/day) was continued, but no anticoagulants were given. RESULTS: Stent placement was performed without complications. The clinical picture improved rapidly: normalisation of portal blood flow was confirmed by Doppler ultrasound and there was improvement of liver function, reduction of oesophageal varices, and disappearance of ascites. A follow-up examination at 15 months showed no evidence of stent occlusion. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of portal hypertension in alveolar echinococcosis of the liver is problematic. In selected patients with portal hypertension secondary to hepatic vein stenoses but no cirrhosis, percutaneous stent placement in the hepatic veins represents a promising treatment alternative. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9026484

  17. Association between JAK2 rs4495487 Polymorphism and Risk of Budd-Chiari Syndrome in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peijin; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Hui; Ma, He; Wang, Wei; Gao, Xiuyin; Xu, Hao; Lu, Zhaojun

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are the leading cause of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), and the C allele of JAK2 rs4495487 was reported to be an additional candidate locus that contributed to MPNs. In the present study, we examined the role of JAK2 rs4495487 in the etiology and clinical presentation of Chinese BCS patients. 300 primary BCS patients and 311 healthy controls were enrolled to evaluate the association between JAK2 rs4495487 polymorphism and risk of BCS. All subjects were detected for JAK2 rs4495487 by real-time PCR. Results. The JAK2 rs4495487 polymorphism was associated with JAK2 V617F-positive BCS patients compared with controls (P < 0.01). The CC genotype increased the risk of BCS in patients with JAK2 V617F mutation compared with individuals presenting TT genotype (OR = 13.60, 95% CI = 2.04–90.79) and non-CC genotype (OR = 12.00, 95% CI = 2.07–69.52). We also observed a significantly elevated risk of combined-type BCS associated with CC genotype in the recessive model (OR = 4.44, 95% CI = 1.31–15.12). This study provides statistical evidence that the JAK2 rs4495487 polymorphism is susceptibility factor JAK2 V617F positive BCS and combined BCS in China. Further larger studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:26557140

  18. Elevated serum erythropoietin in a patient with polycythaemia vera presenting with Budd-Chiari syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Catherine; Levy, Yair; Tong, Alex W

    2014-01-01

    Polycythaemia vera (PV) is a clonal disorder of bone marrow stem cells characterised by erythrocytosis. Diagnosis of PV requires exclusion of secondary causes of polycythaemia. It has been held that an elevated erythropoietin (Epo) level strongly indicates secondary erythrocytosis and excludes PV diagnosis, to the extent that the reduced serum Epo level is currently listed as a minor criterion in the WHO classification scheme for PV. However, patients with PV who co-present with Budd-Chiari syndrome have been documented with elevated serum Epo levels. For these patients, identification of the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) V617F point mutation along with the transient nature of the Epo elevation provides certainty of PV diagnosis, as illustrated by the proband. In this case report, the patient's positive response to cytoreductive therapy (hydroxyurea 500 mg daily) and phlebotomy (750 mL over three phlebotomies) further supports validity of PV diagnosis with elevated Epo. The patient remains on rivaroxaban (Xarelto) for treatment of her portal vein thrombosis. PMID:25452296

  19. Ultrasonographic Visualization of Accessory Hepatic Veins and Their Lesions in Budd-Chiari Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shi-Feng; Gai, Yong-Hao; Ma, Shuang; Liang, Bo; Wang, Guang-Chuan; Liu, Qing-Wei

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ultrasonographic features of accessory hepatic veins (AHVs) and their lesions in Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). Three hundred patients with BCS were examined by ultrasonography with multifrequency (3-6 MHz) convex transducers. Sonography was performed 1 to 2 wk before digital subtraction angiography and computed tomography angiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Using sonograms, we evaluated the number, course, diameter, orifice, lesions and hemodynamics of patent and obstructed AHVs. Ultrasonography was superior to digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance imaging in revealing AHV lesions and hemodynamics. Dilated AHVs were detected in 227 patients. There were 239 caudate lobe veins in 167 patients and 168 inferior right hepatic veins in 151 patients. Both caudate lobe veins and inferior right hepatic veins were found in 91 of the 227 patients. The inlets to AHVs were located mainly on the right lateral or right anterior wall of the inferior vena cava, and the remnant, on the left lateral wall. AHV lesions comprised mainly septal obstruction and segmental stenosis. The hemodynamics of AHVs varied with the condition of inferior vena cava and AHVs. Ultrasonic examination can reveal AHVs and their lesions in patients with BCS and is helpful in choosing and planning therapeutic approaches.

  20. Acute Budd-Chiari syndrome due to a simple liver cyst.

    PubMed

    Long, J; Vaughan-Williams, H; Moorhouse, J; Sethi, H; Kumar, N

    2014-01-01

    Simple liver cysts are common, rarely causing significant morbidity or mortality. Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is caused by obstruction of hepatic venous outflow and is the leading cause of postsinusoidal liver failure. We present a rare case of BCS caused by a simple hepatic cyst. A 16 cm × 16 cm liver cyst was found on computed tomography of a 66-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain. The cyst had become infected, thus enlarged, exerting mass effect with almost complete compression of the inferior vena cava. Shortly after admission, the patient developed acute liver failure, with deranged clotting and hepatic encephalopathy requiring full organ support on the intensive care unit. Cardiac output studies showed a low cardiac index of 1.4 l/min/m(2). An emergency laparotomy with fenestration of the cyst and drainage of 2l of purulent material led to a full recovery. Intraoperative cystic fluid aspirates later confirmed no evidence of Echinococcus. Histology confirmed a simple cyst. Liver biopsies showed severe, confluent, bridging necrosis, without background parenchymal liver disease. Acute BCS due to rapid compression of all major hepatic veins leading to fulminant hepatic failure is rare. Our case highlights a clinically significant complication of a simple liver cyst of which clinicians should be aware when managing these 'innocent' lesions.

  1. Prevention and avoidance of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Nevin, N C

    1988-06-15

    Many congenital abnormalities do not have either a Mendelian pattern of inheritance or an identifiable chromosome abnormality and are described as 'multifactorial' as it is assumed they are determined by several genes, each with added effects and modified to a greater or lesser extent by environmental factors. They include spina bifida and anencephaly, cleft lip or cleft palate or both, congenital heart defect and congenital dislocation of the hip, and they constitute a major community health problem. Developments in genetics, biochemistry and cytogenetics have presented new approaches to the prevention and avoidance of congenital abnormalities. The approaches available for the avoidance of congenital malformations include the avoidance of harmful environmental factors, the screening of the newborn and early treatment, genetic counselling and antenatal monitoring with selective termination. The prevention of neural-tube defects in 'high risk' mothers can be achieved by periconceptional vitamin supplementation. In Northern Ireland, of 438 fully supplemented women, only 4 (0.98%) infants or fetuses among 407 infants and fetuses examined had a neural-tube defect, whereas of 356 unsupplemented women, 16 (4.7%) infants or fetuses among 337 infants or fetuses examined had a neural-tube defect.

  2. Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation Associated with Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung-Hoon; Yeon, Je Young; Park, Jae-Han

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of moyamoya disease (MMD) with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is exceedingly rare. We report two cases of AVM associated with MMD. The first case was an incidental AVM diagnosed simultaneously with MMD. This AVM was managed expectantly after encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) as the main feeders stemmed from the internal carotid artery, which we believed would be obliterated with the progression of MMD. However, the AVM persisted with replacement of the internal carotid artery feeders by new external carotid artery feeders from the EDAS site. The AVM was eventually treated with gamma knife radiosurgery considering an increasing steal effect. The second case was a de novo AVM case. The patient was initially diagnosed with MMD, and acquired an AVM eight years later that was slowly fed by the reconstituted anterior cerebral artery. Because the patient remained asymptomatic, the AVM is currently being closely followed for more than 2 years without further surgical intervention. Possible differences in the pathogenesis and the radiologic presentation of these AVMs are discussed with a literature review. No solid consensus exists on the optimal treatment of MMD-associated AVMs. Gamma knife radiosurgery appears to be an effective treatment option for an incidental AVM. However, a de novo AVM may be managed expectantly considering the possible risks of damaging established collaterals, low flow characteristics, and probably low risks of rupture. PMID:25371789

  3. Cerebral arteriovenous malformation associated with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jung-Hoon; Yeon, Je Young; Park, Jae-Han; Shin, Hyung Jin

    2014-10-01

    The coexistence of moyamoya disease (MMD) with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is exceedingly rare. We report two cases of AVM associated with MMD. The first case was an incidental AVM diagnosed simultaneously with MMD. This AVM was managed expectantly after encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis (EDAS) as the main feeders stemmed from the internal carotid artery, which we believed would be obliterated with the progression of MMD. However, the AVM persisted with replacement of the internal carotid artery feeders by new external carotid artery feeders from the EDAS site. The AVM was eventually treated with gamma knife radiosurgery considering an increasing steal effect. The second case was a de novo AVM case. The patient was initially diagnosed with MMD, and acquired an AVM eight years later that was slowly fed by the reconstituted anterior cerebral artery. Because the patient remained asymptomatic, the AVM is currently being closely followed for more than 2 years without further surgical intervention. Possible differences in the pathogenesis and the radiologic presentation of these AVMs are discussed with a literature review. No solid consensus exists on the optimal treatment of MMD-associated AVMs. Gamma knife radiosurgery appears to be an effective treatment option for an incidental AVM. However, a de novo AVM may be managed expectantly considering the possible risks of damaging established collaterals, low flow characteristics, and probably low risks of rupture.

  4. [Intracranial arteriovenous malformations in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Perquin, D A; Kloet, A; Tans, J T; Witte, G N; Dörr, P J

    1999-03-06

    Three women, aged 27, 32 and 30 years, respectively, suffered from headache, nausea and neurological abnormalities and were found to have an intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM). One of them after diagnosis had two pregnancies, both ended by caesarean section with good results. Another woman was 32 weeks pregnant when the AVM manifested itself with a haemorrhage; she recovered well and was delivered by caesarean section. After the AVM proved radiologically to have been obliterated, she delivered after her subsequent pregnancy by the vaginal route with vacuum extraction. The third woman was 15 weeks pregnant when major abnormalities developed. There was a large intracerebral haematoma with break-through to the ventricular system; this patient died. Intracranial haemorrhage during pregnancy is rate. It can result in maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. It appears that pregnancy does not increase the rate of first cerebral haemorrhage from an AVM. The management of AVM rupture during pregnancy should be based primarily on neurosurgical rather than on obstetric considerations. Close collaboration with a team of neurologists, neurosurgeons, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists is mandatory.

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux and congenital gastrointestinal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo; Centorrino, Antonio; Scalfari, Gianfranco; Santoro, Giuseppe; Impellizzeri, Pietro; Romeo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Although the outcome of newborns with surgical congenital diseases (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia; esophageal atresia; omphalocele; gastroschisis) has improved rapidly with recent advances in perinatal intensive care and surgery, infant survivors often require intensive treatment after birth, have prolonged hospitalizations, and, after discharge, may have long-term sequelae including gastro-intestinal comorbidities, above all, gastroesophageal reflux (GER). This condition involves the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a well-recognized condition, typical of infants, with an incidence of 85%, which usually resolves after physiological maturation of the lower esophageal sphincter and lengthening of the intra-abdominal esophagus, in the first few months after birth. Although the exact cause of abnormal esophageal function in congenital defects is not clearly understood, it has been hypothesized that common (increased intra-abdominal pressure after closure of the abdominal defect) and/or specific (e.g., motility disturbance of the upper gastrointestinal tract, damage of esophageal peristaltic pump) pathological mechanisms may play a role in the etiology of GER in patients with birth defects. Improvement of knowledge could positively impact the long-term prognosis of patients with surgical congenital diseases. The present manuscript provides a literature review focused on pathological and clinical characteristics of GER in patients who have undergone surgical treatment for congenital abdominal malformations. PMID:26229394

  6. Genetic and Developmental Basis of Cardiovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Mohamad; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) are the most common birth defect, occurring in 1–5% of all live births. Genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors all influence the development of CVMs, and an improved understanding of causation of CVMs is a prerequisite for prevention. Cardiac development is a complex, multi-step process of morphogenesis that is under genetic regulation. Multiple developmental pathways act independently or in combination to effect proper cardiac lineage specification, differentiation, and structure. Because of this complexity, there are numerous potential mechanisms by which genetic variation can impact both fetal cardiac development and latent cardiac disease. Although the genetic contribution to CVMs is well recognized, the genetic causes of human CVMs are still identified relatively infrequently. Mouse models are important tools to investigate the molecular mechanisms underpinning cardiac development as well as the complex genetics that characterize human CVMs. In this review we provide an overview of the key genetic concepts characterizing human CVMs, review their developmental basis, and provide examples to illustrate the critical developmental and genetic concepts underlying the pathogenesis of CVMs. PMID:26876120

  7. Carotid ultrasound for pulmonary arteriovenous malformation screening

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Günther; Maßmann, Alexander; Gräber, Stefan; Geisthoff, Urban W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) can cause serious neurological complications. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of contrast-enhanced Doppler ultrasound (CE-US) of the common carotid artery as a screening test for detection of PAVMs. Methods A total of 124 consecutive patients with HHT or a positive family history underwent screening for PAVMs with CE-US and thoracic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA). CE-US was performed after receiving (D)-galactose microparticulate, and CE-MRA with gadobenate dimeglumine. Twenty-five patients with confirmed PAVMs were referred to conventional pulmonary catheter angiography (PA). Findings on CE-US and CE-MRA were evaluated using contingency tables and McNemar’s test. Results Using CE-MRA as the reference test, CE-US had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 87%, and a negative predictive value of 100%. In 25 patients who underwent PA, PAVMs that had been diagnosed on CE-US and CE-MRA were confirmed. Of the PAVMs detected by CE-MRA, 24% were not identified on PA. Conclusion CE-US is a simple, minimally invasive screening method that can easily be performed in different settings. CE-US can predict PAVMs with high probability of success. CE-US may be a simple alternative to transthoracic echocardiography in the assessment of PAVMs in certain HHT-patients. PMID:28352707

  8. Psychosocial adjustment and craniofacial malformations in childhood.

    PubMed

    Pertschuk, M J; Whitaker, L A

    1985-02-01

    Forty-three children between the ages of 6 and 13 years with congenital facial anomalies underwent psychosocial evaluation prior to surgery. Also evaluated were healthy children matched to the craniofacial subjects by sex, age, intelligence, and economic background. Relative to this comparison group, the craniofacial children were found to have poorer self-concept, greater anxiety at the time of evaluation, and more introversion. Parents of the craniofacial children noted more frequent negative social encounters for their children and more hyperactive behavior at home. Teachers reported more problematic classroom behavior. Examination of these results revealed craniofacial malformations to be associated with psychosocial limitations rather than marked deficits. These children tended to function less well than the comparison children, but with few exceptions, they were not functioning in a psychosocially deviant range. Explanations for the observed circumscribed impact of facial deformity include the use of denial as a coping mechanism, possible diminished significance of appearance for younger children, and the restricted environment experienced by most of the subjects. It can be predicted that time would render these protective influences ineffective, so that adolescent and young adult patients could be at far greater psychosocial risk.

  9. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy.

  10. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik BW; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  11. Budd-Chiari Syndrome in a Patient with JAK-2 V617F and Factor V G1691A Mutations.

    PubMed

    Velarde-Félix, J S; Sanchez-Zazueta, J; Gonzalez-Ibarra, F P; González-Valdez, J A; Salcido-Gómez, B; Gallardo-Angulo, E; Murillo-Llanes, J

    2014-09-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are considered a risk factor for Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). The current classification of MPN by the World Health Organization is based on the presence of JAK-2 V617F somatic mutation, which is present in 40 to 60% of patients with BCS. Factor V Leiden mutation is found in around 53% of patients with BCS, representing the most common prothrombotic disease associated with the disorder. We describe a 48-year old woman with a past medical history of deep venous thrombosis in the left upper extremity and one episode in both lower extremities, one episode of transient ischaemic attack and essential thrombocythemia, who presented with jaundice, ascites and hepatomegaly. Budd-Chiari syndrome was diagnosed based on findings on Doppler ultrasound and liver biopsy. Doppler ultrasound showed narrowness of hepatic veins and inferior vena cava in its hepatic portion, diffuse echotexture and portal hypertension. Liver biopsy showed congestion of sinusoids and portal fibrosis. The patient was found to be a heterozygous carrier of Factor V and homozygous wild type G20210A prothrombin mutations. The JAK-2 V617F mutation was detected by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR). The association of these mutations is rare, with only a few cases reported in the literature. The patient was treated with oral anticoagulation and antiplatelets with good results and proper follow-up. In conclusion, due to the possible coexistence of multiple prothrombotic factors in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome, the approach to these patients must be focussed on searching for multiple factors and should include the JAK-2 V617F mutation.

  12. Budd-Chiari Syndrome in a Patient with JAK-2 V617F and Factor V G1691A Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Velarde-Félix, JS; Sanchez-Zazueta, J; Gonzalez-Ibarra, FP; González-Valdez, JA; Salcido-Gómez, B; Gallardo-Angulo, E; Murillo-Llanes, J

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are considered a risk factor for Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). The current classification of MPN by the World Health Organization is based on the presence of JAK-2 V617F somatic mutation, which is present in 40 to 60% of patients with BCS. Factor V Leiden mutation is found in around 53% of patients with BCS, representing the most common prothrombotic disease associated with the disorder. We describe a 48-year old woman with a past medical history of deep venous thrombosis in the left upper extremity and one episode in both lower extremities, one episode of transient ischaemic attack and essential thrombocythemia, who presented with jaundice, ascites and hepatomegaly. Budd-Chiari syndrome was diagnosed based on findings on Doppler ultrasound and liver biopsy. Doppler ultrasound showed narrowness of hepatic veins and inferior vena cava in its hepatic portion, diffuse echotexture and portal hypertension. Liver biopsy showed congestion of sinusoids and portal fibrosis. The patient was found to be a heterozygous carrier of Factor V and homozygous wild type G20210A prothrombin mutations. The JAK-2 V617F mutation was detected by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR). The association of these mutations is rare, with only a few cases reported in the literature. The patient was treated with oral anticoagulation and antiplatelets with good results and proper follow-up. In conclusion, due to the possible coexistence of multiple prothrombotic factors in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome, the approach to these patients must be focussed on searching for multiple factors and should include the JAK-2 V617F mutation PMID:25781296

  13. From the 'Village of a Thousand Souls' to 'Race Crossing in Jamaica': Arnold Gesell, eugenics and child development.

    PubMed

    Weizmann, Fredric

    2010-01-01

    Perhaps best known for providing age-related norms in early development, norms that are still used as a basis for measures of developmental maturity, Arnold Gesell was a key figure in developmental psychology from the 1920s through the 1950s. After examining Gesell's reputation and status in the field, we explore Gesell's changing relationship to eugenics, both in terms of Gesell's often contradictory attitudes about the role of hereditary and environmental influences in development, and in terms of the broader relationship between the eugenics movement and science.

  14. Detecting congenital malformations - Lessons learned from the Mpepu study, Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Zash, Rebecca; Shapiro, Roger L.; Batlang, Oganne; Botebele, Kerapetse; Bennett, Kara; Chilisa, Florence; von Widenfelt, Erik; Makhema, Joseph; Lockman, Shahin; Holmes, Lewis B.; Powis, Kathleen M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A large and increasing number of HIV-infected women are conceiving on antiretroviral treatment (ART). While most antiretrovirals are considered safe in pregnancy, monitoring for rare pregnancy and infant adverse outcomes is warranted. Methods We conducted a retrospective secondary analysis nested within a clinical trial of infant cotrimoxazole vs. placebo prophylaxis in Botswana (the Mpepu Study). Infants were examined at birth, and at least every 3 months through 18 months of age. Abnormal physical findings and diagnostic testing revealing malformations were documented. Post hoc, a geneticist classified all reported malformations based on available documentation. Structural malformations with surgical, medical or cosmetic importance were classified as major malformations. We present a descriptive analysis of identified malformations. Results Between 2011 and 2014, 2,933 HIV-infected women who enrolled in the Mpepu study delivered 2,971 live-born infants. Study staff conducted 2,944 (99%) newborn exams. One thousand eighty-eight (38%) women were taking ART at conception; 1,147 (40%) started ART during pregnancy; 442 (15%) received zidovudine monotherapy; and 223 (7%) received no antiretroviral during pregnancy. Of 33 reported anomalies, 25 (76%) met congenital malformations criteria, 10 (30%) were classified as major malformations, 4 (40%) of which were identified after the birth exam. Discussion Our results highlight the importance of staff training on identification of congenital malformations, programmatic monitoring beyond the birth examination and the value of geneticist involvement in the malformations classification process in resource-limited settings. These elements will be important to fully define antiretroviral drug safety in pregnancy. Significance Surveillance systems for monitoring the safety of antiretroviral use during pregnancy among HIV-infected women in resource-limited setting are lacking. The World Health Organization

  15. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Christopher J.; Ding, Dale; Leed, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S.

    2015-01-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeated radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeated radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3 years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42 Gy and 19.06 Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9–71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80 months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8 months. The most common complications of repeated radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at three years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  16. Immune Response in Human Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Du, Hongyan; Duckworth, Edward; Raja, Harish; Batjer, H. Hunt; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Preliminary observations suggesting the presence of B and plasma cells and oligoclonality of immunoglobulin (Ig) G in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) have motivated a systematic study correlating the infiltration of the immune cells with clinical activity and antigen-triggered immune response in surgically excised lesions. Methods Infiltration of plasma, B, T and HLA-DR expressing cells and macrophages within 23 excised CCMs was related to clinical activity. Relative amounts of Ig isotypes were determined. IgG clonality of mRNA from CCMs was assessed by spectratyping, cloning and sequencing. Results Infiltration of the immune cells ranged widely within CCM lesions and cells were generally co-expressed with each other. Immune cell infiltration did not associate with recent bleeding and lesion growth. Significantly more B lymphocytes in CCM lesions were associated with venous anomaly. More T cells were present in solitary lesions. More T cells and less macrophages were present in CCMs from younger subjects. IgG isotype was present in all CCM lesions. Most lesions also expressed IgM and IgA, with IgM predominance over IgA correlating with recent CCM growth. Oligoclonality was shown in IgG mRNA from CCMs, but not from peripheral blood lymphocytes, with only eight CDR3 sequences observed among 134 clones from two CCM lesions. Conclusions An antigen-directed oligoclonal IgG immune response is present within CCM lesions regardless of recent clinical activity. Apparent differences in immune response in younger patients and in lesions with recent growth will need confirmation in other series. The pathogenicity of oligoclonal immune response will require systematic hypothesis testing in recently available CCM murine models. PMID:19286587

  17. Hydrology and tree-distribution patterns of karst wetlands at Arnold Engineering Development Center, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Flooding regimes, ground-water interactions, and tree distribution patterns were determined in seasonally flooded sinkhole wetlands at Arnold Engineering Development Center near Manchester, Tennessee. The wetlands are ecologically significant because they support coastal-plain plants and animals far from their typical ranges. Surface-water stage, ground-water levels, rainfall, and streamflow were monitored at or near five wetland sites. Sinking Pond, Willow Oak Swamp, and Westall Swamp are compound sinks with depths greater than 2.5 meters, visible internal drains, and complex bottom topography dominated by coalesced sinkholes and connecting channels. Tupelo Swamp and Goose Pond are karst pans with depths less than 1.5 meters, flat bottoms, and without visible internal drains. Stage rose and fell abruptly in the compound sinks. Maximum water depths ranged from 2.6 meters in Westall Swamp to 3.5 meters in Sinking Pond. Water levels in wells adjacent to Sinking Pond and Westall Swamp rose and fell abruptly, corresponding closely to surface-water stage throughout periods of high water. The two karst pans filled and drained more gradually, but remained flooded longer than the compound sinks. The maximum recorded water depths were 1.1 meters in Tupelo Swamp and 0.7 meter in Goose Pond. Water levels in nearby wells remained lower than the stage in the pans throughout the study period. Tree species were identified and the elevations and diameters of individual trees were measured along 10 transects. Two transects crossed Sinking Pond, two crossed Tupelo Swamp, and one crossed Willow Oak Swamp. The remaining five transects crossed intermittent drainageways that carry flow into or out of Sinking Pond. Transects through ponds had fewer trees but more basal area per unit area of land surface than did transects through channels. Water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica L.) dominated the interior of Tupelo Swamp and had minimal overlap in terms of elevation and flooding duration with other

  18. Local Model of Arteriovenous Malformation of the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhda Telegina, Ms; Aleksandr Chupakhin, Mr; Aleksandr Cherevko, Mr

    2013-02-01

    Vascular diseases of the human brain are one of the reasons of deaths and people's incapacitation not only in Russia, but also in the world. The danger of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is in premature rupture of pathological vessels of an AVM which may cause haemorrhage. Long-term prognosis without surgical treatment is unfavorable. The reduced impact method of AVM treatment is embolization of a malformation which often results in complete obliteration of an AVM. Pre-surgical mathematical modeling of an arteriovenous malformation can help surgeons with an optimal sequence of the operation. During investigations, the simple mathematical model of arteriovenous malformation is developed and calculated, and stationary and non-stationary processes of its embolization are considered. Various sequences of embolization of a malformation are also considered. Calculations were done with approximate steady flow on the basis of balanced equations derived from conservation laws. Depending on pressure difference, a fistula-type AVM should be embolized at first, and then small racemose AVMs are embolized. Obtained results are in good correspondence with neurosurgical AVM practice.

  19. Sporadic Multifocal Venous Malformations of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Michael V.; Patel, Neha A.; Hu, Shirley; Pantelides, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report a case of unusually widespread sporadic venous malformations of the head and neck associated with normal D-dimer levels and, due to the protean clinical manifestations and increased risk of coagulopathy of these lesions, to review their diagnosis and clinical management. Case Report. A 25-year-old man presented with a one-year history of intermittent right-sided neck swelling and tongue swelling. Physical exam revealed additional lesions present throughout the head and neck. There was no family history suggestive of heritable vascular malformations. Radiographic imaging demonstrated 15 lesions located in various tissue layers consistent with venous malformations. A coagulation screen showed a normal prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio, D-dimer level, and fibrinogen level. It was determined that the patient was not at increased risk for intraoperative coagulopathy and preoperative heparin administration would not be necessary. The patient's buccal and tongue lesions were subsequently excised with no complications. The patient also underwent sclerotherapy evaluation for his neck mass. Conclusion. This case describes a unique presentation of sporadic multifocal venous malformations. It also emphasizes the importance of prompt diagnosis and workup when multiple venous malformations are present to prevent morbidity during surgical excision secondary to intravascular coagulopathy. PMID:26483982

  20. Neurodevelopmental Malformations of the Cerebellar Vermis in Genetically Engineered Rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Raddy L; Van Dine, Sarah E; Gilbert, Mary E; Leheste, Joerg R; Torres, German

    2015-12-01

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformations are almost exclusively found along the primary fissure and are indicative of deficits of neuronal migration during cerebellar development. In the present report, we test the prediction that genetically engineered rats on Sprague-Dawley or Long-Evans backgrounds will also exhibit the same cerebellar malformations. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that three different transgenic lines on two different backgrounds had cerebellar malformations. Heterotopia in transgenic rats had identical cytoarchitecture as that observed in wild-type rats including altered morphology of Bergmann glia. In light of the possibility that heterotopia could affect results from behavioral studies, these data suggest that histological analyses be performed in studies of cerebellar function or development when using genetically engineered rats on these backgrounds in order to have more careful interpretation of experimental findings.

  1. Defining anural malformations in the context of a developmental problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Cole, R.A.; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.; Wolcott, M.; Helgen, J.C.; Levey, R.; Eaton-Poole, L.; Burkhart, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes terminology and general concepts involved in animal development for the purpose of providing background for the study and understanding of frog malformations. The results of our radiographic investigation of rear limb malformations in Rana pipiens provide evidence that frog malformations are the product of early developmental errors. Although bacteria, parasites and viruses were identified in these metamorphosed frogs, the relevant window to look for the teratogenic effect of these agents is in the early tadpole stage during limb development. As a result, our microbiological findings must be regarded as inconclusive relative to determining their contribution to malformations because we conducted our examinations on metamorphosed frogs not tadpoles. Future studies need to look at teratogenic agents (chemical, microbial, physical or mechanical) that are present in the embryo, tadpole, and their environments at the stages of development that are relevant for the malformation type. The impact of these teratogenic agents then needs to be assessed in appropriate animal models using studies that are designed to mimic field conditions. The results of these laboratory tests should then be analyzed in such a way that will allow comparison with the findings in the wild-caught tadpoles and frogs.

  2. Pathobiology of human cerebrovascular malformations: basic mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gault, Judith; Sarin, Hemant; Awadallah, Nabil A; Shenkar, Robert; Awad, Issam A

    2004-07-01

    Cerebrovascular malformations affect more than 3% of the population, exposing them to a lifetime risk of hemorrhagic stroke, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) exhibit an immature vessel wall, a brittle hemorrhagic tendency, and epileptogenesis, whereas arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) lack capillary beds and manifest apoplectic bleeding under high-flow conditions. There are also more benign venous anomalies, capillary malformations, and lesions with mixed and transitional features. Advances have been made toward understanding the natural history, radiological and pathological correlates, and clinical management. Yet, mechanisms of lesion genesis and clinical manifestations remain largely unknown, and the clinical behavior in individual patients is highly unpredictable. Lesion pathogenesis likely involves abnormal assembly or maintenance of blood vessels, resulting in dysmorphic vessel phenotypes. Familial CCM disease is in part caused by mutations in a cytoskeletal-related protein that is likely integral to interendothelial cell connectivity and maturation of the vascular wall. Rare familial forms of AVM disease have been correlated with two different transforming growth factor-beta receptor components, possibly causing disturbance in signaling during vascular assembly. Relevance of these mechanisms to the more common and otherwise identical sporadic CCM and AVM lesions is being explored. In this report, basic mechanisms of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and how they possibly relate to the common cerebrovascular malformation lesions are reviewed. Novel concepts are discussed related to the cellular, molecular, and genetic substrates in CCM and AVM as well as to how this knowledge can be applied to predict, explain, and possibly modify clinical disease manifestations.

  3. Budd-chiari syndrome causing acute liver failure: A multicenter case series.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Justin; Matei, Vlad M; Canas-Coto, Alejandro; Friedman, Daniel; Lee, William M

    2017-02-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is a rare disease resulting from obstruction of the hepatic venous outflow tract that typically presents with abdominal pain, jaundice, and ascites without frank liver failure. However, BCS may also evolve more rapidly to acute liver failure (ALF). In this study, we describe the clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of ALF due to BCS and compare our results with those in the published literature. Twenty of the 2344 patients enrolled in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group (ALFSG) registry since 1998 presented with a clinical diagnosis of BCS. An additional 19 patients of ALF-BCS in the English language literature were reviewed and compared with the ALFSG cases. Most ALF-BCS patients were white (84%) and female (84%) in their fourth decade. A hypercoagulable state was noted in 63% of patients. BCS was diagnosed by Doppler ultrasonography or abdominal computed tomography in all patients. Liver biopsies (n = 6) all had evidence of severe pericentral necrosis. Treatments used included most commonly anticoagulation (71%), but also transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS; 37%) and orthotopic liver transplantation (37%). In-hospital mortality was approximately 60%. In conclusion, BCS is a rare cause of ALF and mandates prompt diagnosis and management for successful outcomes. Once the diagnosis is confirmed, prompt anticoagulation is recommended in conjunction with evaluation for malignancy or thrombophilic disorder. Mortality may have improved in recent years with use of TIPS and/or orthotopic liver transplantation compared with prior published reports. Liver Transplantation 23 135-142 2017 AASLD.

  4. The Budd-Chiari syndrome. Treatment by mesenteric-systemic venous shunts.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J L; Herlong, H F; Sanfey, H; Boitnott, J; Kaufman, S L; Gott, V L; Maddrey, W C

    1983-01-01

    Twelve patients with the Budd-Chiari syndrome have been managed surgically. Ten of the patients were female, two were male, with a mean age of 40 years. Three of the patients had polycythemia vera, two had pre-existing cirrhosis, one had ingested estrogens, one had an occult tumor, and in four there were no associated factors. Ten patients presented with ascites and two with bleeding esophageal varices. The diagnosis was confirmed in all 12 patients by liver biopsy and hepatic vein catheterization. Inferior vena cavography revealed the abdominal vena cava to be thrombosed in six patients. The superior mesenteric vein was used to decompress the congested liver in all 12 patients. In five patients, a mesocaval shunt (MCS) was performed and in seven patients, a mesoatrial shunt (MAS) was carried out. There were four hospital deaths (two MCS, two MAS). One late death (MAS) occurred from liver failure following shunt thrombosis. Two additional patients (one MCS, one MAS) re-developed ascites immediately following surgery and angiography revealed a thrombosed shunt. Ascites has been controlled with a LeVeen shunt in these two patients, but liver biopsies showed progression to cirrhosis. The remaining five patients (three MAS, two MCS) did well, and angiography revealed patent shunts. Two of these patients, however, re-developed ascites at 4 and 10 months following MAS and required a second MAS. Follow-up ranges from 6 to 68 months. In three of the patients (two MCS, one MAS) with patent shunts, liver biopsy shows a remarkable return toward normal liver architecture and histology. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:6615056

  5. Topographic anatomy of the fetal inferior vena cava, coronary sinus, and pulmonary veins: Variations in Chiari's network.

    PubMed

    Naito, Michiko; Yu, Hee Chul; Kim, Ji Hyun; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2015-07-01

    To understand anomalies in Chiari's network better, we assessed the topographical anatomy of the fetal inferior vena cava (IVC), coronary sinus, and atria. We examined sagittal serial paraffin sections of 15 human fetuses of crown-rump length 24-36 mm, corresponding to a gestational age of 8 weeks. Although their outflow tract morphologies were similar, these 15 specimens could be classified into two groups. In eight specimens, the left common cardinal vein reached the body wall, whereas in the other seven the vein was obliterated near the left pulmonary vein. Irrespective of the group in which the specimen was included, the anteroposterior arrangement of the coronary sinus, the sinus septum (septum), and the right sinus valve (right valve) could be classified into three types: the right valve-septum-coronary sinus arrangement in seven specimens; the right valve-coronary sinus-septum arrangement in five; and the coronary sinus-right valve-septum arrangement in three. Depending on differences in topographical anatomy, the sinus septum separated the coronary sinus opening from either the right or the left atrium. Likewise, the coronary sinus opening was either adjacent to or distant from the IVC terminal. Rather than the counter-side position of the right valve being at the IVC terminal, the left sinus valve protruded leftward, forming an incomplete interatrial septum. Fetal variations seemed to be closely connected with individual variations and a high frequency of Chiari's network anomalies in adults.

  6. Management of patients with brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Söderman, Michael; Andersson, Tommy; Karlsson, Bengt; Wallace, M Christopher; Edner, Göran

    2003-06-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain, which are probably genetically determined, are errors in the development of the vasculature that, together with the effects of blood flow, may lead to a focal arteriovenous shunt. Clinically, the adult patient may present with acute or chronic neurological symptoms-fixed or unstable-such as deficits, seizures or headache. Sometimes the lesion is an incidental finding. In about half of the patients, the revealing event is an intracranial haemorrhage. The prevalence of AVM in the western world is probably <0.01% and the detection rate is about one per 100,000 person-years. Most AVMs are revealed in patients 20-40 years of age. Therefore, the risk of developing neurological symptoms from an AVM, usually because of haemorrhage, increases with patient age. In the young adult population, AVMs are significant risk factors for hemorrhagic stroke. This risk increases with AVM volume and is higher in centrally located AVMs. Almost all patients with AVM are subjected to treatment, either by surgery, radiosurgery or embolisation, with the functional aim of reducing the risk of haemorrhage or to alleviate neurological symptoms with an acceptable treatment risk. Few neurocentres have physicians highly skilled in all treatment modalities. Therefore, the prescribed treatment may not be defined from an objective assessment of what is optimal for each individual patient, but rather from local expertise. In this context, more and better data about the natural history and the outcome of different treatments, as well as predictive models, would be valuable to help to optimise the management. Management strategies obviously differ according to local preferences, but results presented in the literature suggest the following strategy: (I) cortically located AVMs with a nidus volume <10 ml could be operated, with or without presurgical embolisation, unless there is a single feeder that can easily be catheterised and embolised for

  7. Baller-Gerold syndrome associated with congenital portal venous malformation.

    PubMed Central

    Savarirayan, R; Tomlinson, P; Thompson, E

    1998-01-01

    We report a 4 year old boy in whom the clinical features of craniosynostosis and bilateral absent radii led to a diagnosis of Baller-Gerold syndrome. Additional congenital abnormalities included midface hypoplasia, atrial and ventricular septal defects, right hydronephrosis, partial sacral agenesis, and anterior ectopic anus. Evidence of portal venous hypertension was present from 8 months and a congenital portal venous malformation was discovered at 2 years. This is the first reported case of Baller-Gerold syndrome associated with a congenital portal venous malformation. We discuss the diagnostic confusion between this syndrome and other overlapping malformation syndromes and propose optimal evaluation strategies aimed at clarifying the nosology of these syndromes. Images PMID:9733037

  8. Venous malformations: Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Jin-Suck; Shin, Kyoo-Ho; Na, Jae-Bum; Won, Jong-Yun; Hahn, Soo-Bong

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the usefulness of a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol in the management of venous malformations. Methods. Percutaneous sclerotherapy was performed with a mixture of absolute ethanol and lipiodol (9:1) in 17 patients with venous malformations, once in 12 patients, twice in 5. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by pain reduction. Conventional radiographs (n=15) and posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging (n=5) were obtained for the follow-up evaluation. Results. Sclerotherapy was successful in all but two patients. The therapeutic effect was excellent in two patients, good in seven, fair in five, and poor in one. Radiopacity of lipiodol was beneficial for monitoring the procedure rather than for follow-up evaluations. Areas with low signal-intensity strands were increased on T2-weighted images obtained after the sclerotherapy. Conclusion. Sclerotherapy with a mixture of ethanol and lipiodol is effective in treating venous malformations.

  9. Genes and brain malformations associated with abnormal neuron positioning.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jeffrey J; Ka, Minhan; Jung, Eui-Man; Kim, Woo-Yang

    2015-11-05

    Neuronal positioning is a fundamental process during brain development. Abnormalities in this process cause several types of brain malformations and are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Little is known about the pathogenesis of developmental brain malformations associated with abnormal neuron positioning, which has hindered research into potential treatments. However, recent advances in neurogenetics provide clues to the pathogenesis of aberrant neuronal positioning by identifying causative genes. This may help us form a foundation upon which therapeutic tools can be developed. In this review, we first provide a brief overview of neural development and migration, as they relate to defects in neuronal positioning. We then discuss recent progress in identifying genes and brain malformations associated with aberrant neuronal positioning during human brain development.

  10. Revision Stapedectomy in a Female Patient with Inner Ear Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Tirth R.; Moberly, Aaron C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We describe an unusual case of surgical management of congenital mixed hearing loss in a female patient with inner ear malformation. This report outlines the role of temporal bone imaging and previous surgical history in evaluating a patient's risk of perilymph gusher during stapes surgery. Methods. A 68-year-old female patient with a history of profound bilateral mixed hearing loss due to ossicular and cochlear malformation presented to our otology clinic. She had undergone multiple unsuccessful previous ear surgeries. Computed tomography revealed bilateral inner ear malformations. She elected to proceed with revision stapedectomy. Results. The patient received modest benefit to hearing, and no operative complications occurred. Conclusions. Although stapedectomy has been shown to improve hearing in patients with stapes fixation, there is risk of perilymph gusher in patients with inner ear abnormalities. Evaluation and counseling of the risk of gusher during stapes surgery should be done on a case-by-case basis. PMID:27144044

  11. Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Malformations Associated with Heterotaxy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parinda H; Anderson, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as an investigation during fetal life, particularly for assessment of intracranial masses, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, myelomeningocele, and abdominal masses. As the number of scans increases, so is the variety of congenital malformations being recognized. It is axiomatic that interpretation of the findings is enhanced when attention is paid to the likely findings in the setting of known syndromes, this information then dictating the need for additional acquisition of images. One such syndrome is so-called “visceral heterotaxy”, in which there is typically an isomeric, rather than a lateralized, arrangement of the thoracic and abdominal organs. Typically associated with complex congenital cardiac malformations, heterotaxy can also involve the central nervous system, and produce pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immunologic, and genitourinary malformations. In this review, we discuss how these findings can be demonstrated using fetal MRI.  PMID:26180693

  12. Arteriovenous Malformation Underlying a Plexiform Neurofibroma: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zaheer; Khani, Sepideh; Zare, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 are well described in the literature, however, arteriovenous malformation is a very rare finding in neurofibromatosis type 1. We report the case of an 11-year-old girl who presented with a soft mass on the right flank. Provisional diagnosis of plexiform neurofibroma was made on the basis of clinical and histological observations. Because the lesion was warm on palpation, imaging studies were performed to evaluate further and arteriovenous malformation was detected underlying the plexiform neurofibroma. This report emphasizes the importance of careful examination and proper investigations of the plexiform neurofibroma prior to treatment strategies to avoid future complications. The rarity of plexiform neurofibroma in association with arteriovenous malformation at the same site was also highlighted in this report.

  13. Endovascular embolization of life threatening intracranial arterio-venous malformation.

    PubMed

    Khan, S U; Rahman, K M; Siddiqui, M R; Hoque, M A; Mondol, B A; Hussain, S; Mohammad, Q D

    2010-07-01

    Haemorrhagic stroke from cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) represents 2% of all hemorrhagic strokes. A clear understanding of the diagnostic and treatment algorithms of cerebral AVM management is very important, because AVMs are a cause of hemorrhage in young adults. Surgery, endovascular therapy, and radiosurgery can be used alone or in combination to treat an AVM. We reported a 40 years old man of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM), complicated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Digital subtraction angiogram was done for diagnosis and endovascular embolization for treatment of the case. This is the first successful cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) embolization in any government hospital of Bangladesh. The aim of this case report is to inform about this new technologies and emerging treatment strategies in these areas.

  14. Brainstem cavernous malformations: Natural history versus surgical management.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Choudhri, Omar; Lawton, Michael T

    2016-10-01

    While brainstem cavernous malformations were once considered inoperable, improvements in patient selection, surgical exposures, intraoperative MRI-guidance, MR tractography, and neurophysiologic monitoring have resulted in good outcomes in the majority of operated patients. In a consecutive series of 104 patients with brainstem cavernous malformations, only 14% of patients experienced cranial nerve or motor dysfunction that was worse at late follow-up, relative to their preoperative condition. Outcomes were predicted by several factors, including larger lesion size, lesions that crossed the midline, the presence of a developmental venous anomaly, older age, and greater time interval from lesion hemorrhage to surgery. The 14% of patients who experienced a persistent neurological deficit as a result of surgery, while substantial from any perspective, compares favorably with the risks of observation based on a recent meta-analysis. Curative resection is a safe and effective treatment for brainstem cavernous malformations that will prevent re-hemorrhage in symptomatic patients.

  15. Commentary: RCT of Optimal Dose Methylphenidate in Children and Adolescents with Severe ADHD and ID--A Reply to Arnold (2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonoff, Emily; Taylor, Eric; Baird, Gillian; Bernard, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The commentary by Arnold (2013) raises a number of interesting issues and speculations about the action of methylphenidate in children with intellectual disability (ID) and associated neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders. In our article (Simonoff et al., 2013), we were careful to stick closely to the statistical analysis…

  16. Constructing Masculinities under Thomas Arnold of Rugby (1828-1842): Gender, Educational Policy and School Life in an Early-Victorian Public School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neddam, Fabrice

    2004-01-01

    Thomas Arnold has been a controversial figure for historians of the English public schools. He has been depicted either as the great reformer of these famous institutions or as an ordinary head master who did not do better than his contemporary colleagues. This article seeks to continue the debate about the assessment of his head master-ship by…

  17. [Urinary tract abnormalities with anorrectal malformations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nogués, A; Ceres, M L; Olagüe, R; Andrés, V; Lanuza, A

    1978-01-01

    Thirty five patients with anorrectal malformations are reviewed. These are divided in high and low anomalies according to some simple clinical data, better than the drawing of reference lines to determinate the height of puborrectalis muscle. Malformations were associated in 13 cases with urinary tract estructural anomalies and in four cases with isolated vesico-ureteral reflux. Diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made in 14 patients, 12 of them with recto-urinary fistula. A point is made about the complete and early exploration of all these patients to prevent irreparable renal damage that could be developed.

  18. Antenatal diagnosis of congenital renal malformations using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, K P; Merchant, R H; Gondhalekar, A; Lulla, C P; Mehta, A A; Mehta, K P

    1998-08-01

    Our objectives were to determine the accuracy of antenatal sonography for the detection of congenital renal malformations and to characterize the type of malformations, seen in a 3-year prospective study at a university-affiliated maternity hospital. Participants were 31,217 pregnant women, during the study period, and subjects were 65 fetuses in whom renal malformations were detected on antenatal ultrasound. Pelvic ultrasound scans were performed at least once between 20 and 37 weeks' gestation on all pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of the hospital for the detection of renal malformations. Fetal urinary sampling, diversion procedures, or termination of pregnancy were carried out as required in those detected to have renal anomalies. Postnatal diagnosis was confirmed by sonography or autopsy. Diagnostic procedures and renal surgery were performed postnatally if indicated. Sixty-five fetuses (0.2 per cent) were diagnosed to have congenital renal malformation antenatally at a mean gestational age of 28.4 weeks. A dilated urinary system was seen in 39, cystic renal disease in 15, agenesis/hypoplasia in six, combined lesions in four, and a horseshoe kidney in one. Oligohydramnios was noted in 20 (31 per cent) pregnancies. Multiple congenital malformations associated with renal anomalies were detected in 12 pregnancies. Termination was carried out at 20 weeks in two pregnancies for lethal malformations; fetal urinary sampling was done in two fetuses with obstructed uropathy, and a vesicoamniotic shunt inserted in one. Postnatal ultrasound confirmed a dilated urinary system in 32, cystic renal dysplasia in 15, renal aplasia/hypoplasia in five, combined lesions in six, and a horseshoe and an ectopic kidney in one each. Five infants were found to be normal. There were seven stillbirths and seven neonatal deaths. Radionuclide scans showed obstruction in nine, decreased renal function in six, and absent renal functions in 10 infants. Micturating

  19. Influence of maternal distress during pregnancy on fetal malformations.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, S

    1980-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether emotional stress in a pregnant woman might have an adverse effect in the form of malformations on fetal development. The children of 1,263 women whose applications for legal abortion in 1960 had been refused were compared with the next children born in the same delivery wards and paired matched controls were thereby obtained. Results. 1) The incidence of malformations according to the criteria established by the Swedish Register of Malformations was 1.8% in the proband series as against 1.1% in the control series. 2) The incidence of malformation increased with higher age and lower social class in the proband series, whereas no such connection was found in the control series. 3) The incidence of malformations for children of abortion applicants 25 years of age and above from social class III was 3% in the proband series as against 0.6% in the control series (P = 0.017). 4) One malformation, cleft palate, occurred at a significantly (P less than 0.01) higher incidence than in the country as a whole, four cases against the expected value of 0.69. 5) Etiological analysis showed that three of the cases were chromosomal aberrations, all of them Down's syndrome, in two cases there was a genetic background and two cases were thalidomide-induced phocomelia. In three proband children there may have been a connection with the abuse of alcohol by the mother. 6) When the chromosomal, genetic and thalidomide cases are excluded, the preponderance of malformations in the proband children of mothers 25 years of age and above belonging to social class III still remains (2.2% vs. 0.3%, P = 0.017). Conclusion. The results may be seen as support for the hypothesis that emotional stress in a pregnant woman, operationally defined by the factor unwanted pregnancy, may interfere with fetal development and result in a higher incidence of malformations. The interference may occur directly via psycho-endocrinal or autonomous mechanisms or

  20. Split cervical spinal cord malformation and vertebral dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Andro, C; Pecquery, R; De Vries, P; Forlodou, P; Fenoll, B

    2009-11-01

    We report a case of vertebral malformation associated with diplomyelia believed to be a type II split cord malformation. Cervicothoracic level cases are exceptional. This article reports the case of an 11-year-old boy with no neurological symptoms who had not undergone surgery. The diagnosis was made during pregnancy by prenatal screening with ultrasound and MRI. Several embryological theories have been offered to provide an explanation for this syndrome. Close follow-up is mandatory. Surgery must only be considered if neurological deterioration occurs.

  1. Vascular malformations: an update on imaging and management.

    PubMed

    Sierre, Sergio; Teplisky, Darío; Lipsich, José

    2016-04-01

    Vascular malformations comprise a broad and heterogeneous range of lesions that often represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for the pediatrician. For a long time, the use of an inaccurate nomenclature has led to confusion. Since management depends on the specific vascular malformation, a proper classification and identification is critical. The objective of this article is to provide the necessary information about the current classification and terminology of vascular anomalies, including basic concepts about available imaging diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the management of such complex condition.

  2. Diffusion imaging and tractography of congenital brain malformations.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael; Barkovich, A James; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion imaging is an MRI modality that measures the microscopic molecular motion of water in order to investigate white matter microstructure. The modality has been used extensively in recent years to investigate the neuroanatomical basis of congenital brain malformations. We review the basic principles of diffusion imaging and of specific techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). We show how DTI and HARDI, and their application to fiber tractography, has elucidated the aberrant connectivity underlying a number of congenital brain malformations. Finally, we discuss potential uses for diffusion imaging of developmental disorders in the clinical and research realms.

  3. Nursery care of the newborn with malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pluchinotta, Francesca Romana; Memo, Luigi

    2009-10-01

    Congenital malformations are not so rare, and represent a relevant challenge to health care providers. We delineate a methodology for the clinical approach to the malformed newborn, that takes into account the needs of the patient as single person and as part of a familiar and social context. We consider first the medical problem that the neonatologists face in the nursery and neonatal intensive care unit regarding clinical assistance, diagnosis, parent counselling and hospital discharge. Then we focus on the periodic follow-up, and the role of the primary care physician and the specialist in the assistance of this patients.

  4. Multiple Complex Congenital Malformations in a Rabbit Kit (Oryctolagus cuniculi)

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Peng, Xuwen; Baccon, Jennifer; Cooper, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    Congenital malformations may occur during early embryogenesis in cases of genetic abnormalities or various environmental factors. Affected subjects most often have only one or 2 abnormalities; subjects rarely have several unrelated congenital defects. Here we describe a case of a stillborn New Zealand white rabbit with multiple complex congenital malformations, including synophthalmia, holoprosencephaly, gastroschisis, and a supernumerary hindlimb, among other anomalies. There was no historical exposure to teratogens or other known environmental causes. Although not confirmed, this case was most likely a rare spontaneous genetic event. PMID:24209970

  5. Diagnosis and management of extensive vascular malformations of the lower limb: part I. Clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Pedro; Aguado, Leyre; Martínez-Cuesta, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    There is significant confusion in the literature when describing vascular anomalies, and vascular malformations are often misnamed or incorrectly classified. Part I of this two-part series on the diagnosis and management of extensive vascular malformations of the lower limbs will discuss the dermatologist's role in the diagnosis of these lesions. At least nine types of vascular malformations with specific clinical and radiologic characteristics must be distinguished in the lower limbs: Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome, port-wine stain with or without hypertrophy, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, macrocephaly-capillary malformation, Parkes Weber syndrome, Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome, venous malformation, glomuvenous malformation, and lymphatic malformation. This article highlights the differences in clinical appearance and discusses the differential diagnosis of extensive vascular malformations in an attempt to ensure earlier diagnosis and better outcomes for these patients.

  6. Diffusion-weighted imaging in fetuses with unilateral cortical malformations and callosal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Glenn, O A; Quiroz, E M; Berman, J I; Studholme, C; Xu, D

    2010-06-01

    DWI was performed in fetuses with callosal agenesis and unilateral cortical malformations. ADC values were retrospectively measured in the developing white matter underlying the cortical malformation and compared with the corresponding contralateral white matter. In all 3 patients, ADC values were lower under the areas of cortical malformation compared with the normal contralateral side. Our findings suggest that there are structural differences in the developing white matter underlying areas of cortical malformation.

  7. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS): do concomitant esophageal malformations indicate a poor prognosis?

    PubMed

    Küker, W; Friese, S; Riethmüller, J; Krägeloh-Mann, I

    2000-12-01

    Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS) is a syndrome of cortical malformation characterized by faciopharyngoglossomasticatory diplegia. We report on two cases of CBPS with associated esophageal malformations and a poor mental and motor development. The association of CBPS and esophageal malformations may indicate a subgroup of patients with a very early prenatal injury, characterised by a bad prognosis due to severe cortical disorganization. However, it can not be excluded that the association of CBPS and esophageal malformation is purely coincidental.

  8. Notch-1 Signalling Is Activated in Brain Arteriovenous Malformations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZhuGe, Qichuan; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, WeiMing; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Mao, XiaoOu; Xie, Lin; Chen, Gourong; Chen, Yongmei; Lawton, Michael T.; Young, William L.; Greenberg, David A.; Jin, Kunlin

    2009-01-01

    A role for the Notch signalling pathway in the formation of arteriovenous malformations during development has been suggested. However, whether Notch signalling is involved in brain arteriovenous malformations in humans remains unclear. Here, we performed immunohistochemistry on surgically resected brain arteriovenous malformations and found that,…

  9. Mimosa tenuiflora as a Cause of Malformations in Ruminants in the Northeastern Brazilian Semiarid Rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Craniofacial anomalies, eye malformations, and permanent flexures of the forelimbs are common malformations seen in ruminants grazing semiarid rangelands of Northeastern Brazil. To investigate the cause of these malformations, we fed 2 suspected plants, Mimosa tenuiflora or Prosopis juliflora, to gr...

  10. Degeneration of the Arnold's prefrontopontocerebellar tract in a case of locked-in syndrome over a 23-year period.

    PubMed

    Cotton, François; Ciancia, Sophie; Tell, Laurence; Lachaise, Laurence; Braun, Marc; Rode, Gilles

    2011-05-01

    A 52-year-old woman has been under observation for a complete locked-in syndrome of vascular origin, since 1984. Her cognitive functions today are still normal. When first diagnosed, a CT-scan was made and 23 years later performed, a cerebral MRI was performed. A focal, bilateral and symmetric atrophy of the dorsomedial prefrontal gyri was clearly shown, contrasting with the non-atrophy of the precentral gyri (motor area), others prefrontal areas, frontopolar gyri and temporal cortices. Degeneration of the corticopontine projection, the first step in the corticopontocerebellar circuit, could explain this selective atrophy. This unique observation leads to the precise in vivo anatomical location of the Arnold tract.

  11. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the…

  12. Congenital subclavian arteriovenous malformation causing cardiac failure in an adult.

    PubMed

    Anoop, T M; Sreejith, P; Thomas, Joby K; Gailin, B; Jabbar, P K; Ittycheria, Cherian C; George, Raju

    2009-07-01

    Congenital arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the thoracic region are rarely reported in adults. The authors report an unusual case of a 30-year-old man who presented with a large congenital AVM and heart failure. The diagnosis was made using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography and computed tomography. Embolization followed by surgical resection of the AVM resulted in the prompt relief of heart failure.

  13. Spitz nevus arising upon a congenital glomuvenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Arica, Deniz A; Arica, Ibrahim E; Yayli, Savas; Cobanoglu, Umit; Akay, Bengu N; Anadolu, Rana; Bahadir, Sevgi

    2013-01-01

    There are several reports of the collision of vascular and pigmentary anomalies (e.g., phakomatosis pigmentovascularis) and the association between congenital melanocytic nevi and infantile hemangiomas. We report a case of Spitz nevus arising in skin overlying a congenital plaque-like glomuvenous malformation (GVM). This is the first report of a Spitz nevus arising in direct contiguity to a GVM.

  14. Diagnosis and Nonsurgical Management of Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, R. D.; Moloney, J. C.; Anderson, H. J.

    2007-11-15

    Uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an uncommon problem and traditional treatment by hysterectomy excludes the possibility of future pregnancy. Developments in interventional techniques make transcatheter embolization of the feeding vessel(s) a therapeutic alternative, potentially preserving the patient's fertility. We present a case of successful endovascular treatment of uterine AVM.

  15. Congenital Auricular Malformations: Description of Anomalies and Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bartel-Friedrich, Sylva

    2015-12-01

    Half of the malformations in the ear, nose, and throat region affect the ear. Malformations of the external ear (pinna or auricle with external auditory canal [EAC]) are collectively termed microtia. Microtia is a congenital anomaly that ranges in severity from mild structural abnormalities to complete absence of the external ear (anotia). Microtia occurs more frequently in males (∼2 or 3:1), is predominantly unilateral (∼70-90%), and more often involves the right ear (∼60%). The reported prevalence varies geographically from 0.83 to 17.4 per 10,000 births. Microtia may be genetic (with family history, spontaneous mutations) or acquired. Malformations of the external ear can also involve the middle ear and/or inner ear. Microtia may be an isolated birth defect, but associated anomalies or syndromes are described in 20 to 60% of cases, depending on study design. These generally fit within the oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum; defects are located most frequently in the facial skeleton, facial soft tissues, heart, and vertebral column, or comprise a syndrome (e.g., Treacher Collins syndrome). Diagnostic investigation of microtia includes clinical examination, audiologic testing, genetic analysis and, especially in higher grade malformations with EAC deformities, computed tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT for the planning of surgery and rehabilitation procedures, including implantation of hearing aids.

  16. Cochlear implantation in inner ear malformations--a review article.

    PubMed

    Sennaroglu, Levent

    2010-03-01

    Inner ear malformations constitute about 20% of congenital sensorineural hearing loss. In this review article an updated classification of cochlear malformations is provided. Incomplete partition and cochlear hypoplasia cases are each divided further into three groups. There are two main difficulties in the surgery of inner ear malformations; gusher and facial nerve abnormalities. Radiological features of malformations necessary to identify these problems preoperatively are discussed. Facial nerve abnormalities that may occur are described. Two different types of cerebrospinal fluid leakage are defined and necessary measures to prevent leakage are described. Standard and modified surgical approaches to overcome the described problems are described with literature findings. Finally meningitis which may occur with and without cochlear implantation in this special group of patients is emphasized. This is common in incomplete partition type I patients and is usually due to a fistula in one of the windows (usually oval window) which occurs as a result of cerebrospinal fluid pressure. This is a medical emergency leading to potential meningitis and measures that should be taken to stop the leak as soon as possible are described.

  17. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Cerebellar Malformations: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations are increasingly diagnosed in the fetal period. Consequently, their consideration requires stressful and often critical decisions from both clinicians and families. This has resulted in an emergent need to understand better the impact of these early life lesions on child development. We performed a comprehensive literature…

  18. Surgical and Technical Modalities for Hearing Restoration in Ear Malformations.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Stefan; Thomas, Jan Peter; Volkenstein, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Malformations of the external and middle ear often go along with an aesthetic and functional handicap. Independent of additional aesthetic procedures, a successful functional hearing restoration leads to a tremendous gain in quality of life for affected patients. The introduction of implantable hearing systems (bone conduction and middle ear devices) offers new therapeutic options in this field. We focus on functional rehabilitation of patients with malformations, either by surgical reconstruction or the use of different implantable hearing devices, depending on the disease itself and the severity of malformation as well as hearing impairment. Patients with an open ear canal and minor malformations are good candidates for surgical hearing restoration of middle ear structures with passive titanium or autologous implants. In cases with complete fibrous or bony atresia of the ear canal, the most promising functional outcome and gain in quality of life can be expected with an active middle ear implant or a bone conduction device combined with a surgical aesthetic rehabilitation in a single or multi-step procedure. Although the surgical procedure for bone conduction devices is straightforward and safe, more sophisticated operations for active middle ear implants (e.g., Vibrant Soundbridge, MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) provide an improved speech discrimination in noise and the ability of sound localization compared with bone conduction devices where the stimulation reaches both cochleae.

  19. Arnold's mechanism of diffusion in the spatial circular restricted three-body problem: A semi-analytical argument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delshams, Amadeu; Gidea, Marian; Roldan, Pablo

    2016-11-01

    We consider the spatial circular restricted three-body problem, on the motion of an infinitesimal body under the gravity of Sun and Earth. This can be described by a 3-degree of freedom Hamiltonian system. We fix an energy level close to that of the collinear libration point L1, located between Sun and Earth. Near L1 there exists a normally hyperbolic invariant manifold, diffeomorphic to a 3-sphere. For an orbit confined to this 3-sphere, the amplitude of the motion relative to the ecliptic (the plane of the orbits of Sun and Earth) can vary only slightly. We show that we can obtain new orbits whose amplitude of motion relative to the ecliptic changes significantly, by following orbits of the flow restricted to the 3-sphere alternatively with homoclinic orbits that turn around the Earth. We provide an abstract theorem for the existence of such 'diffusing' orbits, and numerical evidence that the premises of the theorem are satisfied in the three-body problem considered here. We provide an explicit construction of diffusing orbits. The geometric mechanism underlying this construction is reminiscent of the Arnold diffusion problem for Hamiltonian systems. Our argument, however, does not involve transition chains of tori as in the classical example of Arnold. We exploit mostly the 'outer dynamics' along homoclinic orbits, and use very little information on the 'inner dynamics' restricted to the 3-sphere. As a possible application to astrodynamics, diffusing orbits as above can be used to design low cost maneuvers to change the inclination of an orbit of a satellite near L1 from a nearly-planar orbit to a tilted orbit with respect to the ecliptic. We explore different energy levels, and estimate the largest orbital inclination that can be achieved through our construction.

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Patients Who Underwent Surgery for Genital Tract Malformations at Peking Union Medical College Hospital across 31 Years

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guang-Han; Zhu, Lan; Liu, Ai-Ming; Xu, Tao; Lang, Jing-He

    2016-01-01

    Background: Female genital malformations represent miscellaneous deviations from normal anatomy. This study aimed to explore the clinical characteristics of patients who underwent surgery for genital tract malformations at Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH) during a 31-year period. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed surgical cases of congenital malformation of the female genital tract at PUMCH for a 31-year period, analyzed the clinical characteristics of 1634 hospitalized patients, and investigated their general condition, diagnosis, and treatment process. Results: The average patient age was 27.6 ± 9.9 years. The average ages of patients who underwent surgery for uterine malformation and vaginal malformation were 31.9 ± 8.8 years and 24.7 ± 9.0 years, respectively; these ages differed significantly (P < 0.01). Among patients with genital tract malformation, the percentages of vaginal malformation, uterine malformation, vulva malformation, cervical malformation, and other malformations were 43.9%, 43.5%, 7.4%, 2.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among patients with uterine malformation, 34.5% underwent surgery for the genital tract malformation, whereas in patients with vaginal malformation, the proportion is 70.6%; the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The percentage of complications of the urinary system in patients with vaginal malformations was 10.2%, which was statistically significantly higher than that (5.3%) in patients with uterine malformations (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Compared to patients with uterine malformations, patients with vaginal malformations displayed more severe clinical symptoms, a younger surgical age, and a greater need for attention, early diagnosis, and treatment. Patients with genital tract malformations, particularly vaginal malformations, tend to have more complications of the urinary system and other malformations than patients with uterine malformations. PMID:27748336

  1. Abernethy malformation: one of the etiologies of hepatopulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Alfonso E; Ribeiro, Antônio F; Hessel, Gabriel; Baracat, Jamal; Ribeiro, José D

    2002-11-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is the clinical relationship between hepatic disease and the existence of pulmonary vascular dilatations, which can result in a range of arterial oxygenation abnormalities. It is probably caused by an alteration in the synthesis or metabolism of vasoactive pulmonary substances at a hepatic level, leading to vasodilatation of pulmonary vessels and diffusion perfusion defects. The Abernethy malformation is characterized by the congenital diversion of portal blood away from the liver, by either end-to-side or side-to-side shunt. Here, we report on a 5-year-and-11-month-old-boy who had started cyanosis at age 4 years and 11 months, and did not have any other pulmonary or cardiac signs or symptoms. In the investigation, arterial blood gases revealed a PaO(2) of 41.4 mm Hg. The chest x-ray film and echo Doppler cardiography were normal. Nuclear scanning with Technetium 99m-labeled macroaggregated albumin showed the presence of arteriovenous shunt, at 47%. Abdominal echography revealed Abernethy malformation with an absence of portal vein. We concluded that the patient had HPS caused by Abernethy malformation. The possible mechanism is that in this malformation, there is a deviation in the blood that comes from the spleen to the vena cava without passing through the liver, so there is no metabolism of some substances which can be responsible for the imbalance between the vasodilatation and the vasoconstriction of the pulmonary circulation. Abernethy malformation must be included as one of the etiologies of hepatopulmonary syndrome. This is the first case described in the literature with this form of presentation.

  2. Stereotactic radiosurgery for deep intracranial arteriovenous malformations, part 1: Brainstem arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Ding, Dale; Chen, Ching-Jen; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    The management of brainstem arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are one of the greatest challenges encountered by neurosurgeons. Brainstem AVM have a higher risk of hemorrhage compared to AVM in other locations, and rupture of these lesions commonly results in devastating neurological morbidity and mortality. The potential morbidity associated with currently available treatment modalities further compounds the complexity of decision making for affected patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has an important role in the management of brainstem AVM. SRS offers acceptable obliteration rates with lower risks of hemorrhage occurring during the latency period. Complex nidal architecture requires a multi-disciplinary treatment approach. Nidi partly involving subpial/epipial regions of the dorsal midbrain or cerebellopontine angle should be considered for a combination of endovascular embolization, micro-surgical resection and SRS. Considering the fact that incompletely obliterated lesions (even when reduced in size) could still cause lethal hemorrhages, additional treatment, including repeat SRS and surgical resection should be considered when complete obliteration is not achieved by first SRS. Patients with brainstem AVM require continued clinical and radiological observation and follow-up after SRS, well after angiographic obliteration has been confirmed.

  3. Is a Swine Model of Arteriovenous Malformation Suitable for Human Extracranial Arteriovenous Malformation? A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Ming-ming; Fan, Xin-dong; Su, Li-xin

    2013-10-15

    Objective: A chronic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) model using the swine retia mirabilia (RMB) was developed and compared with the human extracranial AVM (EAVM) both in hemodynamics and pathology, to see if this brain AVM model can be used as an EAVM model. Methods: We created an arteriovenous fistula between the common carotid artery and the external jugular vein in eight animals by using end-to-end anastomosis. All animals were sacrificed 1 month after surgery, and the bilateral retia were obtained at autopsy and performed hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Pre- and postsurgical hemodynamic evaluations also were conducted. Then, the blood flow and histological changes of the animal model were compared with human EAVM. Results: The angiography after operation showed that the blood flow, like human EAVM, flowed from the feeding artery, via the nidus, drained to the draining vein. Microscopic examination showed dilated lumina and disrupted internal elastic lamina in both RMB of model and nidus of human EAVM, but the thickness of vessel wall had significant difference. Immunohistochemical reactivity for smooth muscle actin, angiopoietin 1, and angiopoietin 2 were similar in chronic model nidus microvessels and human EAVM, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor was significant difference between human EAVM and RMB of model. Conclusions: The AVM model described here is similar to human EAVM in hemodynamics and immunohistochemical features, but there are still some differences in anatomy and pathogenetic mechanism. Further study is needed to evaluate the applicability and efficacy of this model.

  4. [Proteus syndrome: Case report of bladder vascular malformation causing massive hematuria].

    PubMed

    Abbo, O; Bouali, O; Galinier, P; Moscovici, J

    2012-02-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare, sporadic disorder consisting of disproportionate overgrowth of multiple tissues, vascular malformations, and connective tissue or epidermal nevi. Due to mosaic pattern of distribution, the phenotypes are variable and diverse. Vascular malformations are part of the major criteria used to define and diagnose this syndrome. It can involve the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, or the urinary tract but bladder malformations are rare. We report here a case of bladder vascular malformation in a 12-year-old boy known to have Proteus syndrome and review the literature on bladder malformations or tumors in this syndrome.

  5. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  6. Iliac-mesenteric-atrial shunt procedure for Budd-Chiari syndrome complicated by inferior vena caval thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J E; Ochsner, J L

    1978-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman had a diagnosis of idiopathic Budd-Chiari syndrome complicated by inferior vena caval occlusion. Conservative medical therapy failed to control the symptoms of both portal hypertension and vena caval stasis. Therefore, a prosthetic shunt was placed from the right common iliac vein to the right atrium with a side-arm to the superior mesenteric vein. She exhibited almost complete relief of symptoms and the graft was documented to be patent two weeks postoperatively. In many instances aggressive surgical therapy may help these patients who, in the past, would have been relegated to symptomatic therapy. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Figs. 6A., 6B. PMID:718289

  7. Hydrogeology of the area near the J4 test cell, Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugh, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force operates a major aerospace systems testing facility at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) in Coffee County, Tennessee. Dewatering operations at one of the test facilities, the J4 test cell, has affected the local ground-water hydrology. The J4 test cell is approximately 100 feet in diameter, extends approximately 250 feet below land surface, and penetrates several aquifers. Ground water is pumped continuously from around the test cell to keep the cell structurally intact. Because of the test cell's depth, dewatering has depressed water levels in the aquifers surrounding the site. The depressions that have developed exhibit anisotropy that is controlled by zones of high permeability in the aquifers. Additionally, contaminants - predominately volatile organic compounds - are present in the ground-water discharge from the test cell and in ground water at several other Installation Restoration Program (IRP) sites within the AEDC facility. The dewatering activities at J4 are drawing these contaminants from the nearby sites. The effects of dewatering at the J4 test cell were investigated by studying the lithologic and hydraulic characteristics of the aquifers, investigating the anisotropy and zones of secondary permeability using geophysical techniques, mapping the potentiometric surfaces of the underlying aquifers, and developing a conceptual model of the ground-water-flow system local to the test cell. Contour maps of the potentiometric surfaces in the shallow, Manchester, and Fort Payne aquifers (collectively, part of the Highland Rim aquifer system) show anisotropic water-level depressions centered on the J4 test cell. This anisotropy is the result of features of high permeability such as chert-gravel zones in the regolith and fractures, joints, and bedding planes in the bedrock. The presence of these features of high permeability in the Manchester aquifer results in complex flow patterns in the Highland Rim aquifers near the J4 test cell

  8. Positive Impact of Eculizumab Therapy on Surgery for Budd-Chiari Syndrome in a Patient with Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria and a Long-Term History of Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    De-la-Iglesia, Silvia; Luzardo, Hugo; Lemes, Angelina; Torres, Melissa; Gómez-Casares, Maria Teresa; Cruz, Naylen; Molero, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is associated with severe end-organ damage and a high risk of thrombosis. Budd-Chiari syndrome, which develops after thrombotic occlusion of major hepatic blood vessels, is relatively common in PNH and has been associated with increased mortality. We report the case of a 46-year-old male with PNH who presented with Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with portal cavernoma, portal hypertension and hypersplenism. In September 2010, the patient suffered gastrointestinal bleeding, hematuria, and elevated plasma lactate dehydrogenase; he started eculizumab therapy with a good response. In October 2012, he developed upper gastrointestinal variceal bleeding and a splenorenal shunt was placed. At the time of writing, the patient remains stable and eculizumab continues to be effective. There is limited data on the use of eculizumab for prevention of hemolysis and its consequences in PNH patients undergoing surgery. Our findings provide evidence for the efficacy and safety of eculizumab in this setting. PMID:27757214

  9. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a young patient with Budd Chiari syndrome due to a mutation of factor V Leiden: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dina, Ion; Iacobescu, Claudia; Goldis, Adrian

    2013-06-01

    Budd Chiari syndrome or hepatic venous outflow obstruction is a complex entity with multiple etiologies and various clinical manifestations. It is often difficult to establish the diagnosis. The most common cause is a hypercoagulable state due to either genetic disorders of blood coagulation or several acquired conditions such as hematological diseases, tumors, infections, chronic inflammatory diseases, pregnancy. The most common clinical presentation is hepatomegaly, abdominal pain and ascites, but the onset can also be dramatical and life threatening with upper digestive bleeding due to portal hypertension through postsinusoidal blockage. We report the case of a young patient with a coagulation disorder secondary to a mutation of factor V Leiden, who presented with upper digestive bleeding as the first manifestation of Budd Chiari syndrome and who also was associated with myocardial infarction in his past medical history.

  10. Epizootic of ovine congenital malformations associated with Schmallenberg virus infection.

    PubMed

    van den Brom, R; Luttikholt, S J M; Lievaart-Peterson, K; Peperkamp, N H M T; Mars, M H; van der Poel, W H M; Vellema, P

    2012-02-01

    Epizootic outbreaks of congenital malformations in sheep are rare and have, to the best of our knowledge, never been reported before in Europe. This paper describes relevant preliminary findings from the first epizootic outbreak of ovine congenital malformations in the Netherlands. Between 25 November and 20 December 2011, congenital malformations in newborn lambs on sheep farms throughout the country were reported to the Animal Health Service in Deventer. Subsequently, small ruminant veterinary specialists visited these farms and collected relevant information from farmers by means of questionnaires. The deformities varied from mild to severe, and ewes were reported to have given birth to both normal and deformed lambs; both male and female lambs were affected. Most of the affected lambs were delivered at term. Besides malformed and normal lambs, dummy lambs, unable to suckle, were born also on these farms. None of the ewes had shown clinical signs during gestation or at parturition. Dystocia was common, because of the lambs' deformities. Lambs were submitted for post-mortem examination, and samples of brain tissue were collected for virus detection. The main macroscopic findings included arthrogryposis, torticollis, scoliosis and kyphosis, brachygnathia inferior, and mild-to-marked hypoplasia of the cerebrum, cerebellum and spinal cord. Preliminary data from the first ten affected farms suggest that nutritional deficiencies, intoxication, and genetic factors are not likely to have caused the malformations. Preliminary diagnostic analyses of precolostral serum samples excluded border disease virus, bovine viral diarrhoea virus, and bluetongue virus. In December 2011, samples of brain tissue from 54 lambs were sent to the Central Veterinary Institute of Wageningen University Research, Lelystad. Real-time PCR detected the presence of a virus, provisionally named the Schmallenberg virus, in brain tissue from 22 of the 54 lambs, which originated from seven of eight

  11. A Case of Acute Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicating Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome Presenting as Acute Abdomen and Responding to Tight Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yasushi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman with primary antiphospholipid syndrome was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department of our hospital with fever, acute abdomen, watery diarrhea, and extremely high levels of inflammatory parameters. She had a history of left lower limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and was taking warfarin potassium. Acute gastroenteritis was suspected and an antibiotic was administered, but symptoms progressed. Abdominal ultrasonography showed occlusion of the left hepatic vein and the middle hepatic vein and her D-dimer level was high. Accordingly, Budd-Chiari syndrome was diagnosed and high-dose intravenous infusion of heparin was initiated. Her abdominal symptoms improved and the levels of inflammatory parameters and D-dimer decreased rapidly. It is known that antiphospholipid syndrome can be complicated by Budd-Chiari syndrome that usually occurs as subacute or chronic onset, but acute onset is rare. It is difficult to diagnose acute Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating antiphospholipid syndrome and this complication generally has a poor outcome. However, the present case can get early diagnosis and successful treatment with tight anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27672472

  12. Multiple disseminated glomuvenous malformations: do we know enough?

    PubMed

    Solovan, C; Chiticariu, Elena; Beinsan, Doina; Zurac, Sabina; Baderca, Flavia

    2012-01-01

    Multiple glomuvenous malformations (GVMs), also known as glomangiomas, are uncommon entities with histological features of both glomus cells proliferation and venous malformation. A 14-year-old boy was admitted to our clinic with multiple dermal blue nodules, disseminated in different segments of the body. The patient's family history was positive for similar lesions; his mother and maternal grandmother had some asymptomatic blue nodules on their body. Histological examination showed a tumor composed of multiple caveronous vessels surrounded by glomus cells, positive for alpha smooth muscle actin, HHF35 (pan-actin), and h-caldesmon. This is a case of multiple GVMs, a rare disease caused by mutations in glomulin gene, with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The clinical and histopathological features are briefly discussed.

  13. Stereotactic radiosurgery with the linear accelerator: treatment of arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Betti, O O; Munari, C; Rosler, R

    1989-03-01

    An original stereotactic radiosurgical approach coupling a) Talairach's stereotactic methodology, b) a specially devised mechanical system, and c) a linear accelerator is detailed. The authors present their preliminary results on 66 patients with nonsurgical intracranial arteriovenous malformations. The doses delivered for treatment varied from 20 to 70 Gy. Doses of no more than 40 Gy were used in 80% of patients. An angiographic study was performed when the computed tomographic scan controls showed relevant modifications of the lesion volume. Total obliteration was obtained in 27 of the 41 patients (65.8%) who were followed up for at least 24 months. The percentage of the cured patients is significantly higher when a) the entire malformation is included in the 75% isodose (96%) and b) the maximum diameter of the lesion is less than 12 mm (81%). Two patients died of rebleeding at 18 and 29 months after treatment.

  14. Linear accelerator radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations: Updated literature review.

    PubMed

    Yahya, S; Heyes, G; Nightingale, P; Lamin, S; Chavda, S; Geh, I; Spooner, D; Cruickshank, G; Sanghera, P

    2017-04-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are the leading causing of intra-cerebral haemorrhage. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established treatment for arteriovenous malformations (AVM) and commonly delivered using Gamma Knife within dedicated radiosurgery units. Linear accelerator (LINAC) SRS is increasingly available however debate remains over whether it offers an equivalent outcome. The aim of this project is to evaluate the outcomes using LINAC SRS for AVMs used within a UK neurosciences unit and review the literature to aid decision making across various SRS platforms. Results have shown comparability across platforms and strongly supports that an adapted LINAC based SRS facility within a dynamic regional neuro-oncology department delivers similar outcomes (in terms of obliteration and toxicity) to any other dedicated radio-surgical platform. Locally available facilities can facilitate discussion between options however throughput will inevitably be lower than centrally based dedicated national radiosurgery units.

  15. Congenital pulmonary airway malformation: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Bolde, Saroj; Pudale, Smita; Pandit, Gopal; Ruikar, Kirti; Ingle, Sachin B

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM), previously known as congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is a congenital disorder of the lung similar to bronchopulmonary sequestration. In CPAM, usually an entire lobe of lung is replaced by a non-working cystic piece of abnormal lung tissue. This abnormal tissue will never function as normal lung tissue. The underlying cause for CPAM is not known. It occurs in approximately 1 in every 30000 pregnancies. The association between CPAM and malignancy has been well documented. There is a small risk (0.7%) of malignant transformation within the cyst. So early diagnosis and surgical resection is important to prevent the grave complications. Herein, we are reporting two interesting cases of CPAM and one belonged to Type II and other belonged to Type III of Stocker’s classification. PMID:25984523

  16. Use of tramadol in early pregnancy and congenital malformation risk.

    PubMed

    Källén, Bengt; Reis, Margareta

    2015-12-01

    Only few studies exist regarding the risk of a teratogenic effect of tramadol when used in early pregnancy. Using the Swedish Medical Birth Register, women (deliveries in 1997-2013) who had reported the use of tramadol in early pregnancy were identified. Maternal characteristics and concomitant drug use were analyzed. Among 1,682,846 women (1,797,678 infants), 1751 (1776 infants) had used tramadol, 96 of the infants had a congenital malformation and 70 of them were relatively severe. The adjusted odds ratio for a relatively severe malformation was 1.33 (95% CI 1.05-1.70). The odds ratios for cardiovascular defects (1.56, 95% CI 1.04-2.29) and for pes equinovarus (3.63, 95% CI 1.61-6.89) were significantly increased. The study suggests a teratogenic effect of tramadol but the risk increase is moderate.

  17. Congenital malformations of the vertebral column in ancient amphibians.

    PubMed

    Witzmann, F; Rothschild, B M; Hampe, O; Sobral, G; Gubin, Y M; Asbach, P

    2014-04-01

    Temnospondyls, the largest group of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic amphibians, primitively possess rhachitomous vertebrae with multipartite centra (consisting of one horse-shoe-shaped inter- and paired pleurocentra). In a group of temnospondyls, the stereospondyls, the intercentra became pronounced and disc-like, whereas the pleurocentra were reduced. We report the presence of congenital vertebral malformations (hemi, wedge and block vertebrae) in Permian and Triassic temnospondyls, showing that defects of formation and segmentation in the tetrapod vertebral column represent a fundamental failure of somitogenesis that can be followed throughout tetrapod evolution. This is irrespective of the type of affected vertebra, that is, rhachitomous or stereospondylous, and all components of the vertebra can be involved (intercentrum, pleurocentrum and neural arch), either together or independently on their own. This is the oldest known occurrence of wedge vertebra and congenital block vertebra described in fossil tetrapods. The frequency of vertebral congenital malformations in amphibians appears unchanged from the Holocene.

  18. Pediatric lymphatic malformations: evolving understanding and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Defnet, Ann M; Bagrodia, Naina; Hernandez, Sonia L; Gwilliam, Natalie; Kandel, Jessica J

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal treatment of lymphatic malformations continues to expand as new information about the biology and genetics of these lesions is discovered, along with knowledge gained from clinical practice. A patient-centered approach, ideally provided by a multidisciplinary medical and surgical team, should guide timing and modality of treatment. Current treatment options include observation, surgery, sclerotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, and laser therapy. New medical and surgical therapies are emerging, and include sildenafil, propranolol, sirolimus, and vascularized lymph node transfer. The primary focus of management is to support and optimize these patients' quality of life. Researchers continue to study lymphatic malformations with the goal of increasing therapeutic options and developing effective clinical pathways for these complicated lesions.

  19. [The newborn infant with a suspected malformation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Memo, L

    2010-06-01

    Congenital malformations occur in 2-3% of live births, and often represent a special diagnostic and management challenge. Few clinical guidelines exist to assist the neonatologist in the approach to diagnosis and initial management of the malformed newborn. To provide optimal care for these children, one must employ a systematic approach to identify the likely pathogenic mechanism leading to the birth defects present. Determining how distinct anomalies relate to one another may lead to elucidation of a specific genetic etiology for the patient's condition. Genetic testing is increasingly available to allow for diagnostic confirmation. Using this systematic approach to a child with congenital anomalies permits accurate prognostic and recurrence risk counseling, informed management decisions, and the appropriate allocation of social support and medical resources.

  20. Behavioral effects of congenital ventromedial prefrontal cortex malformation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A detailed behavioral profile associated with focal congenital malformation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) has not been reported previously. Here we describe a 14 year-old boy, B.W., with neurological and psychiatric sequelae stemming from focal cortical malformation of the left vmPFC. Case Presentation B.W.'s behavior has been characterized through extensive review Patience of clinical and personal records along with behavioral and neuropsychological testing. A central feature of the behavioral profile is severe antisocial behavior. He is aggressive, manipulative, and callous; features consistent with psychopathy. Other problems include: egocentricity, impulsivity, hyperactivity, lack of empathy, lack of respect for authority, impaired moral judgment, an inability to plan ahead, and poor frustration tolerance. Conclusions The vmPFC has a profound contribution to the development of human prosocial behavior. B.W. demonstrates how a congenital lesion to this cortical region severely disrupts this process. PMID:22136635