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Sample records for aromatase inhibitor resistance

  1. Nonhypoxic regulation and role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in aromatase inhibitor resistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although aromatase inhibitors (AIs; for example, letrozole) are highly effective in treating estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, a significant percentage of patients either do not respond to AIs or become resistant to them. Previous studies suggest that acquired resistance to AIs involves a switch from dependence on ER signaling to dependence on growth factor-mediated pathways, such as human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). However, the role of HER2, and the identity of other relevant factors that may be used as biomarkers or therapeutic targets remain unknown. This study investigated the potential role of transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in acquired AI resistance, and its regulation by HER2. Methods In vitro studies using AI (letrozole or exemestane)-resistant and AI-sensitive cells were conducted to investigate the regulation and role of HIF-1 in AI resistance. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses were conducted to compare protein and mRNA expression, respectively, of ERα, HER2, and HIF-1α (inducible HIF-1 subunit) in AI-resistant versus AI-sensitive cells. Similar expression analyses were also done, along with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), to identify previously known HIF-1 target genes, such as breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), that may also play a role in AI resistance. Letrozole-resistant cells were treated with inhibitors to HER2, kinase pathways, and ERα to elucidate the regulation of HIF-1 and BCRP. Lastly, cells were treated with inhibitors or inducers of HIF-1α to determine its importance. Results Basal HIF-1α protein and BCRP mRNA and protein are higher in AI-resistant and HER2-transfected cells than in AI-sensitive, HER2- parental cells under nonhypoxic conditions. HIF-1α expression in AI-resistant cells is likely regulated by HER2 activated-phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase/Akt-protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) pathway, as its expression was inhibited

  2. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Aromatase inhibitors and other compounds for lowering breast cancer risk Aromatase inhibitors (drugs that lower estrogen levels) ... day. Can aromatase inhibitors lower the risk of breast cancer? Aromatase inhibitors are used mainly to treat hormone ...

  3. Contribution of Estrone Sulfate to Cell Proliferation in Aromatase Inhibitor (AI) -Resistant, Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hanamura, Toru; Gohno, Tatsuyuki; Niwa, Toshifumi; Yamaguchi, Yuri; Horiguchi, Jun; Hayashi, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) effectively treat hormone receptor-positive postmenopausal breast cancer, but some patients do not respond to treatment or experience recurrence. Mechanisms of AI resistance include ligand-independent activation of the estrogen receptor (ER) and signaling via other growth factor receptors; however, these do not account for all forms of resistance. Here we present an alternative mechanism of AI resistance. We ectopically expressed aromatase in MCF-7 cells expressing green fluorescent protein as an index of ER activity. Aromatase-overexpressing MCF-7 cells were cultured in estrogen-depleted medium supplemented with testosterone and the AI, letrozole, to establish letrozole-resistant (LR) cell lines. Compared with parental cells, LR cells had higher mRNA levels of steroid sulfatase (STS), which converts estrone sulfate (E1S) to estrone, and the organic anion transporter peptides (OATPs), which mediate the uptake of E1S into cells. LR cells proliferated more in E1S-supplemented medium than did parental cells, and LR proliferation was effectively inhibited by an STS inhibitor in combination with letrozole and by ER-targeting drugs. Analysis of ER-positive primary breast cancer tissues showed a significant correlation between the increases in the mRNA levels of STS and the OATPs in the LR cell lines, which supports the validity of this AI-resistant model. This is the first study to demonstrate the contribution of STS and OATPs in E1S metabolism to the proliferation of AI-resistant breast cancer cells. We suggest that E1S metabolism represents a new target in AI-resistant breast cancer treatment. PMID:27228187

  4. Aromatase Inhibitors in the Treatment of Short Stature.

    PubMed

    Hero, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Reports published in the 1990s of men with estrogen deficiency caused by defective aromatase or estrogen resistance due to a defective estrogen receptor α confirmed the crucial role of estrogen in bone maturation, closure of the epiphyses and cessation of statural growth. Based on these findings, it became reasonable to postulate that selective inhibition of estrogen synthesis with aromatase inhibitors could increase adult height by delaying bone maturation and prolonging the period of growth in males. To date, aromatase inhibitors have been employed in rare pediatric conditions associated with sex steroid excess, and in randomized controlled trials involving boys with short stature and/or constitutional delay of puberty. Findings from these randomized trials suggest that potent aromatase inhibitors increase predicted height, but final adult height data are scarce. Moreover, several safety issues remain inadequately studied. In this paper, published findings on the use of aromatase inhibitors in growth indications are reviewed with emphasis on treatment efficacy and safety.

  5. Natural Products as Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating also the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein. PMID:18690828

  6. New cell culture model for aromatase inhibitor-resistant breast cancer shows sensitivity to fulvestrant treatment and cross-resistance between letrozole and exemestane.

    PubMed

    Hole, Stine; Pedersen, Astrid M; Hansen, Susanne K; Lundqvist, Johan; Yde, Christina W; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2015-04-01

    Aromatase inhibitor (AI) treatment is first-line systemic treatment for the majority of postmenopausal breast cancer patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive primary tumor. Although many patients benefit from treatment, some will develop resistance, and models mimicking acquired resistance will be valuable tools to unravel the resistance mechanisms and to find new treatments and biomarkers. Cell culture models for acquired resistance to the three clinically relevant AIs letrozole, anastrozole and exemestane were developed by selection and expansion of colonies of MCF-7 breast cancer cells surviving long-term AI treatment under conditions where endogenous aromatase-mediated conversion of androgen to estrogen was required for growth. Four cell lines resistant to each of the AIs were established and characterized. Maintenance of ER expression and function was a general finding, but ER loss was seen in one of twelve cell lines. HER receptor expression was increased, in particular EGFR expression in letrozole-resistant cell lines. The AI-resistant cell lines had acquired ability to grow without aromatase-mediated conversion of testosterone to estradiol, but upon withdrawal of AI treatment, testosterone induced minor growth stimulation. Letrozole, exemestane and tamoxifen were able to abrogate the testosterone stimulation but could not reduce growth to below the level in standard growth medium with AI, demonstrating cross-resistance between letrozole, exemestane and tamoxifen. In contrast, fulvestrant totally blocked growth of the AI resistant cell lines both after withdrawal of AI and with AI treatment. These data show that ER is the main driver of growth of the AI-resistant cell lines and indicate ligand-independent activation of ER. Fulvestrant is an efficient treatment option for these AI-resistant breast cancer cells, and the cell lines will be useful tools to disclose the underlying molecular mechanism for resistance to the different AIs.

  7. Aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Męczekalski, Błażej

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in which foci of endometrial tissue grow outside of the uterine cavity. Endometriosis was estimated to affect 176 million women of childbearing potential all over the world in 2010. The presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue is associated with pain and infertility. Typical symptoms of endometriosis include dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia), pelvic pain that is not related to menstrual cycles, dysuria, and chronic fatigue. Medical treatments for endometriosis include combined oral contraceptive pills, danazol, gestrinone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (aGnRHs). A new class of medications called aromatase inhibitors has been identified in recent years as potential therapeutic agents for endometriosis. This article provides general information about aromatase inhibitors, their use in gynaecology, and their adverse effects. In particular, the paper discusses the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis in postmenopausal women. Unlike oral contraceptives, gestagens, aGnRHs, and danazol, which suppress ovarian oestrogen synthesis, aromatase inhibitors inhibit mainly extra-ovarian synthesis of oestrogens. Therefore, the use of aromatase inhibitors seems to be particularly relevant in older patients, as most of the body's oestrogen is produced outside the ovaries after menopause. The paper discusses also the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of pain associated with endometriosis and infertility caused by endometriosis. PMID:27095958

  8. Aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Słopień, Radosław; Męczekalski, Błażej

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in which foci of endometrial tissue grow outside of the uterine cavity. Endometriosis was estimated to affect 176 million women of childbearing potential all over the world in 2010. The presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue is associated with pain and infertility. Typical symptoms of endometriosis include dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia), pelvic pain that is not related to menstrual cycles, dysuria, and chronic fatigue. Medical treatments for endometriosis include combined oral contraceptive pills, danazol, gestrinone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (aGnRHs). A new class of medications called aromatase inhibitors has been identified in recent years as potential therapeutic agents for endometriosis. This article provides general information about aromatase inhibitors, their use in gynaecology, and their adverse effects. In particular, the paper discusses the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis in postmenopausal women. Unlike oral contraceptives, gestagens, aGnRHs, and danazol, which suppress ovarian oestrogen synthesis, aromatase inhibitors inhibit mainly extra-ovarian synthesis of oestrogens. Therefore, the use of aromatase inhibitors seems to be particularly relevant in older patients, as most of the body's oestrogen is produced outside the ovaries after menopause. The paper discusses also the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of pain associated with endometriosis and infertility caused by endometriosis. PMID:27095958

  9. Molecular characterization of anastrozole resistance in breast cancer: pivotal role of the Akt/mTOR pathway in the emergence of de novo or acquired resistance and importance of combining the allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206 with an aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vilquin, Paul; Villedieu, Marie; Grisard, Evelyne; Ben Larbi, Sabrina; Ghayad, Sandra E; Heudel, Pierre-Etienne; Bachelot, Thomas; Corbo, Laura; Treilleux, Isabelle; Vendrell, Julie A; Cohen, Pascale A

    2013-10-01

    Acquisition of resistance to aromatase inhibitors (AIs) remains a major drawback in the treatment of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive breast cancers. The Res-Ana cells, a new model of acquired resistance to anastrozole, were established by long-term exposure of aromatase-overexpressing MCF-7 cells to this drug. These resistant cells developed ER-independent mechanisms of resistance and decreased sensitivity to the AI letrozole or to ERα antagonists. They also displayed a constitutive activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and a deregulated expression of several ErbB receptors. An observed increase in the phospho-Akt/Akt ratio between primary and matched recurrent breast tumors of patients who relapsed under anastrozole adjuvant therapy also argued for a pivotal role of the Akt pathway in acquired resistance to anastrozole. Ectopic overexpression of constitutively active Akt1 in control cells was sufficient to induce de novo resistance to anastrozole. Strikingly, combining anastrozole with the highly selective and allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206 or with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased sensitivity to this AI in the control cells and was sufficient to overcome resistance and restore sensitivity to endocrine therapy in the resistant cells. Our findings lead to us proposing a model of anastrozole-acquired resistance based on the selection of cancer-initiating-like cells possessing self-renewing properties, intrinsic resistance to anastrozole and sensitivity to MK-2206. Altogether, our work demonstrated that the Akt/mTOR pathway plays a key role in resistance to anastrozole and that combining anastrozole with Akt/mTOR pathway inhibitors represents a promising strategy in the clinical management of hormone-dependent breast cancer patients.

  10. Aromatase inhibitors in men: effects and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors effectively delay epiphysial maturation in boys and improve testosterone levels in adult men Therefore, aromatase inhibitors may be used to increase adult height in boys with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty, idiopathic short stature and constitutional delay of puberty. Long-term efficacy and safety of the use of aromatase inhibitors has not yet been established in males, however, and their routine use is therefore not yet recommended. PMID:21693046

  11. Presence of aromatase inhibitors in cycads.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M T; Itzhak, Y; Puett, D

    1995-07-28

    Cycads, the most primitive of the living gymnosperms, have been used and continue to be used for food and medicinal purposes by many cultures, although toxins must be removed before ingestion. In our quest to identify tropical plants that contain inhibitors of the cytochrome P-450 aromatase and thus may be efficacious in treating estrogen-dependent tumors, we have screened extracts from 5 species of cycad folia encompassing 3 genera: Cycas cairnsiana F. Muell., Cycas revoluta Thunb., Cycas rumphii Miq., Dioon spinulosum Dyer and Encephalartos ferox Bertol. All extracts were found to contain inhibitors of the human enzyme.

  12. Tamoxifen-resistant fibroblast growth factor-transfected MCF-7 cells are cross-resistant in vivo to the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 and two aromatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    McLeskey, S W; Zhang, L; El-Ashry, D; Trock, B J; Lopez, C A; Kharbanda, S; Tobias, C A; Lorant, L A; Hannum, R S; Dickson, R B; Kern, F G

    1998-03-01

    Although the antiestrogen tamoxifen has been the mainstay of therapy for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, successful treatment of responsive tumors is often followed by the acquisition of tamoxifen resistance. Subsequently, only 30-40% of patients have a positive response to second hormonal therapies. This lack of response might be explained by mechanisms for tamoxifen resistance that sensitize ER pathways to small amounts of estrogenic activity present in tamoxifen or that bypass ER pathways completely. To elucidate one possible mechanism of tamoxifen resistance, we treated ovariectomized tumor-bearing mice injected with fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-transfected MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells with the steroidal antiestrogen ICI 182,780 or one of two aromatase inhibitors, 4-OHA or letrozole. These treatments did not slow estrogen-independent growth or prevent metastasis of tumors produced by FGF-transfected MCF-7 cells in ovariectomized nude mice. FGF-transfected cells had diminished responses to ICI 182,780 in vitro, suggesting that autocrine activity of the transfected FGF may be replacing estrogen as a mitogenic stimulus for tumor growth. ER levels in FGF transfectants were not down-regulated, and basal levels of transcripts for estrogen-induced genes or of ER-mediated transcription of estrogen response element (ERE) luciferase reporter constructs in the FGF expressing cells were not higher than parental cells, implying that altered hormonal responses are not due to down-regulation of ER or to FGF-mediated activation of ER. These studies indicate that estrogen independence may be achieved through FGF signaling pathways independent of ER pathways. If so, therapies directed at the operative mechanism might produce a therapeutic response or allow a response to a second course of antiestrogen treatment.

  13. Aromatase Inhibitor-Mediated Down Regulation of INrf2 (Keap1) Leads to Increased Nrf2 and Resistance in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Raju; Shah, Preeti; Guha, Rupa; Rassool, Feyruz V.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Brodie, Angela; Jaiswal, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are effective drugs that reduce or eliminate hormone sensitive breast cancer. However, despite their efficacy, resistance to these drugs can occur in some patients. The INrf2 (Keap1):Nrf2 complex serves as a sensor of drug/radiation-induced oxidative/electrophilic stress. INrf2 constitutively suppresses Nrf2 by functioning as an adapter protein for the Cul3/Rbx1-mediated ubiquitination/degradation of Nrf2. Upon stress, Nrf2 dissociates from INrf2, is stabilized, translocates to the nucleus, and coordinately induces a battery of cytoprotective gene expression. Current studies investigated the role of Nrf2 in AI resistance. RT-PCR and immunoblot assays showed that AI-resistant breast cancer LTLTCa and AnaR cells express lower INrf2 and higher Nrf2 protein levels, as compared to drug sensitive MCF-7Ca and AC1 cells, respectively. The increase in Nrf2 was due to lower ubiquitination/degradation of Nrf2 in AI-resistant cells. Higher Nrf2-mediated levels of biotransformation enzymes, drug-transporters and anti-apoptotic proteins contributed to reduced efficacy of drugs and aversion to apoptosis that led to drug resistance. shRNA inhibition of Nrf2 in LTLTCa (LTLTCa-Nrf2KD) cells reduced resistance and sensitized cells to AI exemestane. Interestingly, LTLTCa-Nrf2KD cells also showed reduced levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase, a marker of Tumor-Initiating Cells and significantly decreased mammosphere formation, as compared to LTLTCa-Vector control cells. The results together suggest that persistent AI treatment down-regulated INrf2 leading to higher expression of Nrf2 and Nrf2 regulated cytoprotective proteins that resulted in increased AI drug resistance. These findings provide a rationale for the development of Nrf2 inhibitors to overcome resistance and increase efficacy of AI. PMID:25976679

  14. Committee Opinion No. 663 Summary: Aromatase Inhibitors in Gynecologic Practice.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, ovulation induction, endometriosis, and other estrogen-modulated conditions. For women with breast cancer, bone mineral density screening is recommended with long-term aromatase inhibitor use because of risk of osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency. Based on long-term adverse effects and complication safety data, when compared with tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors are associated with a reduced incidence of thrombosis, endometrial cancer, and vaginal bleeding. For women with polycystic ovary syndrome and a body mass index greater than 30, letrozole should be considered as first-line therapy for ovulation induction because of the increased live birth rate compared with clomiphene citrate. Lifestyle changes that result in weight loss should be strongly encouraged. Aromatase inhibitors are a promising therapeutic option that may be helpful for the management of endometriosis-associated pain in combination therapy with progestins. PMID:27214185

  15. Committee Opinion No. 663: Aromatase Inhibitors in Gynecologic Practice.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, ovulation induction, endometriosis, and other estrogen-modulated conditions. For women with breast cancer, bone mineral density screening is recommended with long-term aromatase inhibitor use because of risk of osteoporosis due to estrogen deficiency. Based on long-term adverse effects and complication safety data, when compared with tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors are associated with a reduced incidence of thrombosis, endometrial cancer, and vaginal bleeding. For women with polycystic ovary syndrome and a body mass index greater than 30, letrozole should be considered as first-line therapy for ovulation induction because of the increased live birth rate compared with clomiphene citrate. Lifestyle changes that result in weight loss should be strongly encouraged. Aromatase inhibitors are a promising therapeutic option that may be helpful for the management of endometriosis-associated pain in combination therapy with progestins. PMID:27214191

  16. Aromatase inhibitors in stimulated IVF cycles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been introduced as a new treatment modality that could challenge clomiphene citrate as an ovulation induction regiment in patients with PCOS. Although several randomized trials have been conducted regarding their use as ovulation induction agents, only few trials are available regarding their efficacy in IVF stimulated cycles. Current available evidence support that letrozole may have a promising role in stimulated IVF cycles, either when administered during the follicular phase for ovarian stimulation. Especially for women with poor ovarian response, letrozole appears to have the potential to increase clinical pregnancy rates when combined with gonadotropins, whereas at the same time reduces the total gonadotropin dose required for ovarian stimulation. However, given that in all of the trials letrozole has been administered in GnRH antagonist cycles, it is intriguing to test in the future how it may perform when used in GnRH agonist cycles. Finally administration of letrozole during luteal phase in IVF cycles offers another treatment modality for patients at high risk for OHSS taking into account that it drastically reduces estradiol levels PMID:21693033

  17. Novel Aromatase Inhibitors by Structure-Guided Design

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Debashis; Lo, Jessica; Morton, Daniel; Valette, Damien; Xi, Jingle; Griswold, Jennifer; Hubbell, Susan; Egbuta, Chinaza; Jiang, Wenhua; An, Jing; Davies, Huw M. L.

    2012-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 aromatase catalyzes with high specificity the synthesis of estrogens from androgens. Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) such as exemestane, 6-methylideneandrosta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, are preeminent drugs for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. The crystal structure of human placental aromatase has shown an androgen-specific active site. By utilization of the structural data, novel C6-substituted androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione inhibitors have been designed. Several of the C6-substituted 2-alkynyloxy compounds inhibit purified placental aromatase with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Antiproliferation studies in a MCF-7 breast cancer cell line demonstrate that some of these compounds have EC50 values better than 1 nM, exceeding that for exemestane. X-ray structures of aromatase complexes of two potent compounds reveal that, per their design, the novel side groups protrude into the opening to the access channel unoccupied in the enzyme–substrate/exemestane complexes. The observed structure–activity relationship is borne out by the X-ray data. Structure-guided design permits utilization of the aromatase-specific interactions for the development of next generation AIs. PMID:22951074

  18. Synthesis and biological characterization of 3-(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)piperidine sulfonamides as aromatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, Mauro; Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Andreoli, Federico; Caffa, Irene; De Filippis, Barbara; Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Giampietro, Letizia; Maccallini, Cristina; Nencioni, Alessio; Parenti, Marco Daniele; Soncini, Debora; Del Rio, Alberto; Amoroso, Rosa

    2016-07-01

    The most frequently used treatment for hormone receptor positive breast cancer in post-menopausal women are aromatase inhibitors. In order to develop new aromatase inhibitors, we designed and synthesized new imidazolylmethylpiperidine sulfonamides using the structure of the previously identified aromatase inhibitor SYN 20028567 as starting lead. By this approach, three new aromatase inhibitors with IC50 values that are similar to that of letrozole and SYN 20028567 were identified. PMID:27161804

  19. Tamoxifen through GPER upregulates aromatase expression: a novel mechanism sustaining tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Stefania; Giordano, Cinzia; Panza, Salvatore; Chemi, Francesca; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Lanzino, Marilena; Rizza, Pietro; Romeo, Francesco; Fuqua, Suzanne A W; Maggiolini, Marcello; Andò, Sebastiano; Barone, Ines

    2014-07-01

    Tamoxifen resistance is a major clinical challenge in breast cancer treatment. Aromatase inhibitors are effective in women who progressed or recurred on tamoxifen, suggesting a role of local estrogen production by aromatase in driving tamoxifen-resistant phenotype. However, the link between aromatase activity and tamoxifen resistance has not yet been reported. We investigated whether long-term tamoxifen exposure may affect aromatase activity and/or expression, which may then sustain tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell growth. We employed MCF-7 breast cancer cells, tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 cells (MCF-7 TR1 and TR2), SKBR-3 breast cancer cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs1 and CAFs2). We used tritiated-water release assay, realtime-RT-PCR, and immunoblotting analysis for evaluating aromatase activity and expression; anchorage-independent assays for growth; reporter-gene, electrophoretic-mobility-shift, and chromatin-immunoprecipitation assays for promoter activity studies. We demonstrated an increased aromatase activity and expression, which supports proliferation in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells. This is mediated by the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR30/GPER, since knocking-down GPER expression or treatment with a GPER antagonist reversed the enhanced aromatase levels induced by long-term tamoxifen exposure. The molecular mechanism was investigated in ER-negative, GPER/aromatase-positive SKBR3 cells, in which tamoxifen acts as a GPER agonist. Tamoxifen treatment increased aromatase promoter activity through an enhanced recruitment of c-fos/c-jun complex to AP-1 responsive elements located within the promoter region. As tamoxifen via GPER induced aromatase expression also in CAFs, this pathway may be involved in promoting aggressive behavior of breast tumors in response to tamoxifen treatment. Blocking estrogen production and/or GPER signaling activation may represent a valid option to overcome tamoxifen-resistance in breast cancers.

  20. Conflict of interest in economic analyses of aromatase inhibitors in breast cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sekwon; Chae, Young Kwang; Haddad, Tufia; Majhail, Navneet S

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether authors conducting economic analyses of aromatase inhibitors in breast cancer are less likely to reach unfavorable conclusions if the economic study is sponsored by the manufacturer of the drug. Articles reporting the economic analyses of aromatase inhibitors in breast cancer were selected from PubMed in May 2009. Information was collected on the types of analysis, the qualitative conclusion, the quantitative results, and the funding sources. Fisher's exact test was conducted to compare the frequency of unfavorable conclusions based on study sponsorship. Thirty-two eligible articles were identified. Twenty-six were funded by pharmaceutical companies, and 4 were funded by non-pharmaceutical companies. Two studies did not report a funding source. Twenty-one studies evaluated aromatase inhibitors in the adjuvant setting, while 11 studies examined their use in advanced breast cancer. Twenty-two studies evaluated one type aromatase inhibitor, while 10 compared multiple types of aromatase inhibitors. Only one of the 26 (4%) pharmaceutical company-sponsored studies reported unfavorable cost-effectiveness of an aromatase inhibitor, which was a competitor's product, whereas two of four (50%) non-pharmaceutical company-sponsored studies concluded aromatase inhibitors are not cost-effective in certain clinical scenarios (P < 0.05). Seven pharmaceutical company-sponsored studies conducted a comparison among several aromatase inhibitors; all 7 studies reported favorable conclusions for the sponsoring company's products. The majority of economic analyses of aromatase inhibitors in breast cancer are sponsored by pharmaceuticals. Economic evaluations of aromatase inhibitors in breast cancer that are funded by a pharmaceutical company are less likely to reach unfavorable conclusions about the sponsor's product.

  1. Developing steroidal aromatase inhibitors-an effective armament to win the battle against breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mange Ram; Barmade, Mahesh A; Tamboli, Riyaj S; Murumkar, Prashant R

    2015-11-13

    Breast cancer, an emerging disease among the women population, occurs due to overexpression of estrogens. The enzyme aromatase plays a key rate limiting role in the biosynthesis of estrogens. Certain clinical advantages of the use of exemestane, a steroidal aromatase inhibitor over non-steroidal aromatase inhibitors have drawn the attention of researchers for the development of novel steroidal aromatase inhibitors.The current review is a humble attempt to compile the reports by various researchers till date on the synthesis of steroidal aromatase inhibitors. It has been tried to encompass the structural modifications carried out by various researchers in the steroid ring system by taking up the functional group modifications on rings A, B, ring A/B junction, ring-D, ring modifications, bridged derivatives and heterocyclic ring-fused derivatives in a systematic way.

  2. Mechanism-based Categorization of Aromatase Inhibitors: A Potential Discovery and Screening Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytochrome P450 aromatase is a key steroidogenic enzyme that converts androgens to estrogens in vertebrates. There is much interest in aromatase inhibitors (AIs) because a number of environmental contaminants can act as AIs, thereby disrupting endocrine function in humans and wil...

  3. Use of Network Inference to Unravel the Mechanisms of Action and Specificity of Aromatase Inhibitors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertebrate hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is controlled through various feedback mechanisms in order to maintain a dynamic homeostasis during changing environmental conditions, including exposure to chemical stressors. In this study, three aromatase inhibitors, fad...

  4. Potential role of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Abu Hashim, Hatem

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent chronic inflammatory disease affecting 5%-10% of reproductive-age women, with a prevalence of 5%-50% in infertile women and >33% of women with chronic pelvic pain. Third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are approved adjuvants for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Molecular studies have revealed the presence of aromatase P450, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ovarian estradiol, inside the endometriotic tissue, indicating local synthesis of estradiol. Thereby, AIs represent an appealing medical option for the management of different aspects of this enigmatic disease, especially pelvic pain and infertility. Accordingly, this review aims to evaluate the potential role of AIs in the treatment of endometriosis-associated symptoms, mainly pain and infertility. Notably, several studies have demonstrated that the combination of AIs with conventional therapy as oral contraceptive pills, progestins, or gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs can be used to control endometriosis-associated pain and pain recurrence in premenopausal women, particularly those with pain due to rectovaginal endometriosis refractory to other medical or surgical treatment. Some case reports have shown promising results in the treatment of postmenopausal endometriosis as first-line treatment, when surgery is contraindicated, or as second-line treatment in the case of postoperative recurrence. Third-generation AIs, especially letrozole, have challenged clomiphene citrate as an ovulation-induction agent in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and in cases of unexplained infertility. However, few studies are available regarding the use of AIs to treat endometriosis-associated infertility. Therefore, larger multicenter randomized trials using AIs for the treatment of endometriosis-associated infertility are needed to clarify its effect. The safety of AIs for ovulation induction or superovulation has generated a lively discussion

  5. 3D QSAR Studies, Pharmacophore Modeling and Virtual Screening on a Series of Steroidal Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Huiding; Qiu, Kaixiong; Xie, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors are the most important targets in treatment of estrogen-dependent cancers. In order to search for potent steroidal aromatase inhibitors (SAIs) with lower side effects and overcome cellular resistance, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) were performed on a series of SAIs to build 3D QSAR models. The reliable and predictive CoMFA and CoMSIA models were obtained with statistical results (CoMFA: q2 = 0.636, r2ncv = 0.988, r2pred = 0.658; CoMSIA: q2 = 0.843, r2ncv = 0.989, r2pred = 0.601). This 3D QSAR approach provides significant insights that can be used to develop novel and potent SAIs. In addition, Genetic algorithm with linear assignment of hypermolecular alignment of database (GALAHAD) was used to derive 3D pharmacophore models. The selected pharmacophore model contains two acceptor atoms and four hydrophobic centers, which was used as a 3D query for virtual screening against NCI2000 database. Six hit compounds were obtained and their biological activities were further predicted by the CoMFA and CoMSIA models, which are expected to design potent and novel SAIs. PMID:25405729

  6. Ocular Surface Disease in Breast Cancer Patients Using Aromatase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chatziralli, Irini; Sergentanis, Theodoros; Zagouri, Flora; Chrysikos, Dimosthenis; Ladas, Ioannis; Zografos, George C; Moschos, Marilita

    2016-09-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are widely used as adjuvant hormonal therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential impact of AIs on the anterior segment of the eye and especially the ocular surface. Participants in our study were 41 hormone receptor-positive early stage breast cancer patients (80 eyes), treated with AIs, while 80 eyes of 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls, not previously used AIs for any purpose, were also evaluated. All participants underwent a complete ophthalmological examination, including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) assessment, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and dilated fundus examination. Ocular surface disease-related symptoms and signs were also recorded. The most common symptom was found to be blurred vision, while other symptoms included foreign body sensation, tearing, redness, and photophobia. Slit-lamp examination revealed blepharitis and meibomian gland dysfunction in 75% and 42.5% of patients, respectively. Superficial punctate keratitis and conjunctival injection were also present. Our results demonstrated a high prevalence of ocular surface disease-related symptoms and signs in patients receiving AIs compared to healthy controls. This study may raise a flag regarding the use of AIs. However, further and larger prospective longitudinal studies are needed to examine the possible effect of AIs alone or in combination with chemotherapy in the eyes of breast cancer patients.

  7. Ocular Surface Disease in Breast Cancer Patients Using Aromatase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chatziralli, Irini; Sergentanis, Theodoros; Zagouri, Flora; Chrysikos, Dimosthenis; Ladas, Ioannis; Zografos, George C; Moschos, Marilita

    2016-09-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are widely used as adjuvant hormonal therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential impact of AIs on the anterior segment of the eye and especially the ocular surface. Participants in our study were 41 hormone receptor-positive early stage breast cancer patients (80 eyes), treated with AIs, while 80 eyes of 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls, not previously used AIs for any purpose, were also evaluated. All participants underwent a complete ophthalmological examination, including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) assessment, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and dilated fundus examination. Ocular surface disease-related symptoms and signs were also recorded. The most common symptom was found to be blurred vision, while other symptoms included foreign body sensation, tearing, redness, and photophobia. Slit-lamp examination revealed blepharitis and meibomian gland dysfunction in 75% and 42.5% of patients, respectively. Superficial punctate keratitis and conjunctival injection were also present. Our results demonstrated a high prevalence of ocular surface disease-related symptoms and signs in patients receiving AIs compared to healthy controls. This study may raise a flag regarding the use of AIs. However, further and larger prospective longitudinal studies are needed to examine the possible effect of AIs alone or in combination with chemotherapy in the eyes of breast cancer patients. PMID:27296769

  8. Two aromatase inhibitors inhibit the ability of a third to promote mating in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yahr, Pauline

    2015-09-01

    Aromatase, the enzyme that aromatizes androstenedione (A) to estrone and testosterone (T) to estradiol (E), affects androgen control of male sex behavior in many vertebrates. In male monkeys, rats and quail, E mimics the ability of T to promote mating, and aromatase inhibitors block mating induced by T but not E. Aromatase inhibitors include androgens with different A-rings than T and A, e.g., 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD), azoles, e.g., fadrozole, and androgens α-halogenated at carbon 6, e.g., 6α-bromoA, 6α-fluoroA and 6α-fluoroT. 6α-FluoroT is the only 6α-halogenated androgen studied in regard to mating. It promotes mating in male rats and quail and was studied, before it was known to inhibit aromatase, because it cannot be aromatized yet has the same A-ring as T. 6α-FluoroT might promote mating by binding estrogen receptors (ER) directly, i.e., unassisted, or by metabolism to an androgen that binds ER. Since neither process would require aromatase, this study tested both hypotheses by determining how mating induced in castrated male rats by 6α-fluoroT is affected by ATD and fadrozole. Both aromatase inhibitors inhibited the effects of 6α-fluoroT on mating. Thus, 6α-fluoroT does not promote mating by direct ER binding or metabolism to another androgen. Since aromatase underlies a process in which 6α-fluoroT, unlike most nonaromatizable androgens, mimics T effects on male sex behavior, the process must involve a feature that 6α-fluoroT shares with T but not other nonaromatizable androgens. A-ring structure is a candidate. A hypothesis is also offered for how aromatase may participate without aromatizing the androgen.

  9. IBIS II: a breast cancer prevention trial in postmenopausal women using the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole.

    PubMed

    Cuzick, Jack

    2008-09-01

    Tamoxifen has been shown to reduce the incidence of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer by approximately 50% in high-risk women. Similar results are seen for raloxifene, but it has a more favorable side-effect profile. Data on contralateral tumors from women in adjuvant trials treated with aromatase inhibitors suggest that new tumors can be reduced by another 50% with these drugs, suggesting a potential 75% reduction of estrogen receptor-positive tumors when used in a prophylactic manner. Side effects appear to be fewer with the aromatase inhibitors, with no excess of gynecologic (including endometrial cancer) or thromboembolic events, but an increase in fracture risk and joint symptoms does occur. IBIS II is a placebo-controlled prevention trial evaluating 5 years of the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole in high-risk postmenopausal women. The primary end point is breast cancer incidence, but major efforts are also being directed at minimizing any fracture risk.

  10. Aromatase Inhibitor-Induced Erythrocytosis in a Patient Undergoing Hormonal Treatment for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Ogbonna, Onyekachi Henry; Oneal, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are most commonly used for breast cancer patients with hormone receptor positive disease. Although the side effect profile of aromatase inhibitors is well known, including common side effects like arthralgia, bone pain, arthritis, hot flashes, and more serious problems like osteoporosis, we present a case of an uncommon side effect of these medications. We report the case of a postmenopausal woman on adjuvant hormonal therapy with anastrozole after completing definitive therapy for stage IIIB estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, who was referred to hematology service for evaluation of persistent erythrocytosis. Primary and known secondary causes of polycythemia were ruled out. On further evaluation, we found that her erythrocytosis began after initiation of anastrozole and resolved after it was discontinued. We discuss the pathophysiology of aromatase inhibitor-induced erythrocytosis and reference of similar cases reported in the literature. PMID:26137331

  11. Direct Effects, Compensation, and Recovery in Female Fathead Minnows Exposed to a Model Aromatase Inhibitor

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports on the effects of a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, on molecular and biochemical endpoints within the fathead minnow reproductive axis. Unlike previous studies, this work incorporated extensive time-course characterization over the course of an 8 d exposu...

  12. A Study to Evaluate Genetic Predictors of Aromatase Inhibitor Musculoskeletal Symptoms (AIMSS) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    E1Z11 is a study to determine whether certain genetic information can predict which breast cancer patients will discontinue treatment with AIs due to the development of musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS). Women with stage 1-111 breast cancer who are prescribed the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole as treatment may join. |

  13. Histopathologic Effects in Marine Fish Treated with Estrogens or an Aromatase Inhibitor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals, such as the estrogens estradiol (E2) and ethinylestradiol (EE2) , have been reported to affect fish reproduction. Androstatrienedione (ATD) is a known aromatase inhibitor which inhibits the conversion of testosterone to estradiol. The intent of thi...

  14. Can Exercise Ameliorate Aromatase Inhibitor-Induced Cognitive Decline in Breast Cancer Patients?

    PubMed

    Li, Cuicui; Zhou, Chenglin; Li, Rena

    2016-08-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have been commonly used as an effective adjuvant therapy in treatment of breast cancer, especially for menopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Due to the nature of aromatase, the key enzyme for endogenous estrogen synthesis, inhibitory of aromatase-induced side effects, such as cognitive impairment has been reported in both human and animal studies. While extensive evidence suggested that physical exercises can improve learning and memory activity and even prevent age-related cognitive decline, basic research revealed some common pathways between exercise and estrogen signaling that affected cognitive function. This review draws on clinical and basic studies to assess the potential impact of exercise in cognitive function from women treated with AIs for breast cancer and explore the potential mechanism and effects of exercise on estrogen-related cognition. PMID:26223800

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Aromatase Inhibitors from Brassaiopsis glomerulata (Araliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Riswan, Soedarsono; Fong, Harry H.S.; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Pezzuto, John M.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The hexane- and ethyl acetate-soluble extracts of the leaves of Brassaiopsis glomerulata (Blume) Regel (Araliaceae), collected in Indonesia, were found to inhibit aromatase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of estrogens from androgens, in both enzyme- and cell-based aromatase inhibition (AI) assays. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of six known compounds of the steroid and triterpenoid classes (1–6) from the hexane extract, of which 6β-hydroxystimasta-4-en-3-one (5), was moderately active in the cell-based AI assay. Fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract afforded seven pure isolates (7–13) of the modified peptide, fatty acid, monoterpenoid, and benzenoid types, including six known compounds and the new natural product, N-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (9). The absolute stereochemistry of 9 and the other two peptides, 7 and 8, was determined by Marfey’s analysis. Linoleic acid (10) was found to be active in the enzyme-based AI assay, while 9 and (−)-dehydrololiolide (12) showed activity in the cell-based AI assay. PMID:20161072

  16. ALTERATIONS IN THE TRANSCRIPTOME AND PROTEOME OF ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO) EXPOSED TO FADROZOLE, A MODEL AROMATASE INHIBITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fadrozole is a reversible, competitive inhibitor of aromatase activity and therefore an endocrine-disrupting compound (EDC) that disrupts steroidogenesis by inhibiting the conversion of testosterone to 172-estradiol. While fadrozole is a therapeutic drug with generally no enviro...

  17. Survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer: analysis of randomized studies comparing oral aromatase inhibitors versus megestrol.

    PubMed

    Messori, A; Cattel, F; Trippoli, S; Vaiani, M

    2000-10-01

    In patients with metastatic breast cancer, second-line therapy with aromatase inhibitors can improve survival in comparison with megestrol. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effectiveness of aromatase inhibitors versus megestrol. After a Medline search, three trials (evaluating letrozole, anastrozole or exemestane versus megestrol) were included in the survival meta-analysis. Our methodology retrieved patient-level information on survival. In comparison with megestrol, aromatase inhibitors prolonged survival at levels of statistical significance (relative death risk for oral aromatase inhibitors=0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.69-0.91; p=0.0011). A lifetime analysis of the pooled survival curves of aromatase inhibitors versus megestrol found a mean survival gain of 4.1 months per patient. Aromatase inhibitors confer a significant survival benefit to patients with metastatic breast cancer as compared with megestrol. A preliminary calculation of the cost per life year gained shows that the pharmacoeconomic profile of these drugs is favorable. PMID:11129731

  18. Drug withdrawal in women with progressive metastatic breast cancer while on aromatase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chavarri-Guerra, Y; Higgins, M J; Szymonifka, J; Cigler, T; Liedke, P; Partridge, A; Ligibel, J; Come, S E; Finkelstein, D; Ryan, P D; Goss, P E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acquiring resistance to endocrine therapy is common in metastatic hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer (MBC). These patients most often transition either to next-line endocrine therapy or to systemic chemotherapy. However, withdrawal of endocrine therapy and observation as is selectively practiced in prostate cancer is another potential strategy for breast cancer patients. Methods: A prospective, single-arm phase II trial of aromatase inhibitor (AI) withdrawal was performed in women with MBC, who had disease progression on AI therapy. The primary objective was to estimate the clinical benefit rate (defined as complete or partial response, or stable disease for at least 24 weeks, by RECIST criteria). Participants were monitored clinically and radiographically off all therapy at 8, 16 and 24 weeks after treatment and every 12 weeks thereafter until disease progression. Results: Twenty-four patients (of 40 intended) were enrolled when the study was closed due to slow accrual. Clinical benefit rate overall was 46% (95% CI 26% to 67%). Median progression-free survival from time of AI withdrawal was 4 months. Two patients have remained progression free, off all treatment, for over 60 months. Conclusions: Despite suboptimal patient accrual, our results suggest that selected patients with metastatic breast cancer progressing on AI therapy can experience disease stabilisation and a period of observation after AI withdrawal. A randomised phase II trial is planned. PMID:25233398

  19. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of resveratrol analogues as aromatase and quinone reductase 2 inhibitors for chemoprevention of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bin; Hoshino, Juma; Jermihov, Katie; Marler, Laura; Pezzuto, John M.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Cushman, Mark

    2012-07-11

    A series of new resveratrol analogues were designed and synthesized and their inhibitory activities against aromatase were evaluated. The crystal structure of human aromatase (PDB 3eqm) was used to rationalize the mechanism of action of the aromatase inhibitor 32 (IC{sub 50} 0.59 {mu}M) through docking, molecular mechanics energy minimization, and computer graphics molecular modeling, and the information was utilized to design several very potent inhibitors, including compounds 82 (IC{sub 50} 70 nM) and 84 (IC{sub 50} 36 nM). The aromatase inhibitory activities of these compounds are much more potent than that for the lead compound resveratrol, which has an IC{sub 50} of 80 {mu}M. In addition to aromatase inhibitory activity, compounds 32 and 44 also displayed potent QR2 inhibitory activity (IC{sub 50} 1.7 {mu}M and 0.27 {mu}M, respectively) and the high-resolution X-ray structures of QR2 in complex with these two compounds provide insight into their mechanism of QR2 inhibition. The aromatase and quinone reductase inhibitors resulting from these studies have potential value in the treatment and prevention of cancer.

  20. Synthesis of Triphenylethylene Bisphenols as Aromatase Inhibitors That Also Modulate Estrogen Receptors.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Liu, Jinzhong; Skaar, Todd C; O'Neill, Elizaveta; Yu, Ge; Flockhart, David A; Cushman, Mark

    2016-01-14

    A series of triphenylethylene bisphenol analogues of the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) tamoxifen were synthesized and evaluated for their abilities to inhibit aromatase, bind to estrogen receptor α (ER-α) and estrogen receptor β (ER-β), and antagonize the activity of β-estradiol in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The long-range goal has been to create dual aromatase inhibitor (AI)/selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). The hypothesis is that in normal tissue the estrogenic SERM activity of a dual AI/SERM could attenuate the undesired effects stemming from global estrogen depletion caused by the AI activity of a dual AI/SERM, while in breast cancer tissue the antiestrogenic SERM activity of a dual AI/SERM could act synergistically with AI activity to enhance the antiproliferative effect. The potent aromatase inhibitory activities and high ER-α and ER-β binding affinities of several of the resulting analogues, together with the facts that they antagonize β-estradiol in a functional assay in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and they have no E/Z isomers, support their further development in order to obtain dual AI/SERM agents for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26704594

  1. Aromatase Inhibitors for Endometriosis-Associated Infertility; Do We Have Sufficient Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Abu Hashim, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Orally active aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have gained attention for treatment of infertile women with endometriosis in whom aromatase p450 is aberrantly expressed. This review aimed to critically appraise and summarize the available evidence concerning the use of AIs for management of endometriosis-associated infertility. PubMed was searched to May 2015 with the following key words: endometriosis, infertility and aromatase. Priority was given for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) followed by other study designs. Main outcome measures were as follows: rates of clinical pregnancy, miscarriage and live birth as well as endocrine outcomes. Eighty-two abstracts were screened and six original articles were included. A RCT demonstrated that post-operative letrozole treatment did not improve spontaneous pregnancy rate. Another RCT reported no superiority of letrozole superovulation over clomiphene citrate (each combined with intrauterine insemination) in minimalmild endometriosis and previous laparoscopic treatment. Anastrozole significantly inhibited the growth of endometriotic cells and their estrogen production in culture. In assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles, dual suppression (Agonist/anastrozole) was tested in a pilot study with a pregnancy rate of 45% however, high pregnancy loss (30%) occurred. A retrospective study showed that letrozole may improve endometrial receptivity in endometriotic patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). An opposite view from an in vitro study showed lower estradiol production and aromatase expression in cultured granulosa cells from endometriotic women undergoing IVF and marked reduction under letrozole. In conclusion, current evidence is limited. More trials are warranted to enhance our knowledge and provide a clear and unequivocal evidence to guide our clinical management of infertile women with endometriosis using AIs. PMID:27695608

  2. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico screening for new P450 19 (aromatase) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Daniela; Laggner, Christian; Steindl, Theodora M; Palusczak, Anja; Hartmann, Rolf W; Langer, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 19 (P450 19, aromatase) constitutes a successful target for the treatment of breast cancer. This study analyzes chemical features common to P450 19 inhibitors to develop ligand-based, selective pharmacophore models for this enzyme. The HipHop and HypoRefine algorithms implemented in the Catalyst software package were employed to create both common feature and quantitative models. The common feature model for P450 19 includes two ring aromatic features in its core and two hydrogen bond acceptors at the ends. The models were used as database search queries to identify active compounds from the NCI database. PMID:16711749

  3. Prevention of spontaneous tumours in female rats by fadrozole hydrochloride, an aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Gunson, D. E.; Steele, R. E.; Chau, R. Y.

    1995-01-01

    Mammary tumours are oestrogen dependent in female Sprague-Dawley rats and in a significant proportion of women, so pharmacological treatment to inhibit oestrogen production is a valuable therapeutic measure to prevent or slow the progression of disease. Here we show that a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor, which competitively inhibits the conversion of androstenedione to oestrone, prevents the development of both benign and malignant spontaneous mammary neoplasms in female Sprague-Dawley ats. It also slows the spontaneous development of pituitary pars distalis adenomas in female rats, and reduces the incidence of spontaneous hepatocellular tumours in male and female rats. PMID:7639848

  4. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico screening for new P450 19 (aromatase) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Daniela; Laggner, Christian; Steindl, Theodora M; Palusczak, Anja; Hartmann, Rolf W; Langer, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 19 (P450 19, aromatase) constitutes a successful target for the treatment of breast cancer. This study analyzes chemical features common to P450 19 inhibitors to develop ligand-based, selective pharmacophore models for this enzyme. The HipHop and HypoRefine algorithms implemented in the Catalyst software package were employed to create both common feature and quantitative models. The common feature model for P450 19 includes two ring aromatic features in its core and two hydrogen bond acceptors at the ends. The models were used as database search queries to identify active compounds from the NCI database.

  5. Antihormonal activities of 5 alpha-reductase and aromatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zoppi, S; Cocconi, M; Lechuga, M J; Messi, E; Zanisi, M; Motta, M

    1988-10-01

    The problem of developing androgen antagonists has been tackled so far only by synthesizing steroids able to displace testosterone and other androgens from their specific receptor sites. The observation that testosterone has to be converted intracellularly either to 5 alpha-reduced metabolites (DHT, 3 alpha-diol, etc.) or to estrogens, in order to become fully active on androgen-dependent structures (both central and peripheral), has opened the possibility of creating molecules which prevent these conversions, and which could then block the actions of testosterone. The availability of these new compounds has allowed a better understanding of the selective physiological role of each of the metabolites of testosterone, and to provide the basis for the development of new hormone antagonists to be used in those clinical conditions for which an inhibition of the actions of testosterone is foreseen. The usefulness of these enzyme inhibitors is underlined by some examples described in this paper. The results obtained may permit the formulation of the following conclusions: (1) The conversion of testosterone to its 5 alpha-reduced metabolites occurring in the neuroendocrine structures may represent an essential step for the appearance of the inhibitory feedback effect testosterone exerts on LH secretion; (2) Testosterone exhibits its negative feedback effect on FSH secretion as such and not following the local aromatization to estrogens; (3) Testosterone exerts its effect on the intrahypothalamic stores of LHRH acting as such and not following its local conversion either to 5 alpha-reduced metabolites or to estrogenic molecules; (4) Some of the new enzyme inhibitors (e.g. 4-OH-A) may represent an interesting tool for the treatment and/or the prevention of BPH and possibly of other androgen-dependent diseases (prostate carcinoma, acne etc.), as shown by their ability to prevent the in vitro conversion of testosterone to its 5 alpha-reduced metabolites both in the normal

  6. Synthesis and PET studies of [11C-cyano]letrozole (Femara), an aromatase inhibitor drug

    SciTech Connect

    kil K. E.; Biegon A.; Kil, K.-E.; Biegon, A.; Ding, Y.-S.; Fischer, A.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Kim, S.-W.; Pareto, D.; Schueller, M.J.; Fowler, J.S.

    2008-11-10

    Aromatase, a member of the cytochrome P450 family, converts androgens such as androstenedione and testosterone to estrone and estradiol respectively. Letrozole (1-[bis-(4-cyanophenyl)methyl]-1H-1,2,4-triazole, Femara{reg_sign}) is a high affinity aromatase inhibitor (K{sub i}=11.5 nM) which has FDA approval for breast cancer treatment. Here we report the synthesis of carbon-11 labeled letrozole and its assessment as a radiotracer for brain aromatase in the baboon. Letrozole and its precursor (4-[(4-bromophenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl]benzonitrile, 3) were prepared in two-step syntheses from 4-cyanobenzyl bromide and 4-bromobenzyl bromide, respectively. The [{sup 11}C]cyano group was introduced via the tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0) catalyzed coupling of [{sup 11}C]cyanide with the bromo-precursor (3). PET studies in the baboon brain were carried out to assess regional distribution and kinetics, reproducibility of repeated measures and saturability. The free fraction of letrozole in the plasma, log D, and the [{sup 11}C-cyano]letrozole fraction in the arterial plasma were also measured. [{sup 11}C-cyano]Letrozole was synthesized in 60 min with a radiochemical yield of 79-80%, with a radiochemical purity greater than 98% and a specific activity of 4.16 {+-} 2.21 Ci/{micro}mol at the end of bombardment (n=4). PET studies in the baboon revealed initial rapid and high uptake and initial rapid clearance followed by slow clearance of carbon-11 from the brain with no difference between brain regions. The brain kinetics was not affected by co-injection of unlabeled letrozole (0.1 mg/kg). The free fraction of letrozole in plasma was 48.9% and log D was 1.84. [{sup 11}C-cyano]Letrozole is readily synthesized via a palladium catalyzed coupling reaction with [{sup 11}C]cyanide. Although it is unsuitable as a PET radiotracer for brain aromatase as revealed by the absence of regional specificity and saturability in brain regions, such as amygdala, which are known

  7. Direct Effects, Compensation, and Recovery in Female Fathead Minnows Exposed to a Model Aromatase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Mueller, Nathaniel D.; Martinović, Dalma; Makynen, Elizabeth A.; Kahl, Michael D.; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Durhan, Elizabeth J.; Cavallin, Jenna E.; Bencic, David; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Several chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. Objectives The objective of this study was to provide a detailed characterization of molecular and biochemical responses of female fathead minnows to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole (FAD). Methods Fish were exposed via water to 0, 3, or 30 μg FAD/L for 8 days and then held in clean water for 8 days, with samples collected at four time points during each 8-day period. We quantified ex vivo steroid production, plasma steroids, and plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) concentrations and analyzed relative transcript abundance of 10 key regulatory genes in ovaries and 3 in pituitary tissue by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Ex vivo 17β-estradiol (E2) production and plasma E2 and Vtg concentrations were significantly reduced after a single day of exposure to 3 μg or 30 μg FAD/L. However, plasma E2 concentrations recovered by the eighth day of exposure in the 3-μg/L group and within 1 day of cessation of exposure in the 30-μg/L group, indicating concentration- and time-dependent physiologic compensation and recovery. Concentration-dependent increases in transcripts coding for aromatase (A isoform), cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and follicle-stimulating hormone receptor all coincided with increased E2 production and recovery of plasma E2 concentrations. Conclusions Results of this research highlight the need to consider compensation/adaptation and recovery when developing and interpreting short-term bioassays or biomarkers or when trying to predict the effects of chemical exposures based on mode of action. PMID:19440503

  8. EVALUATION OF THE AROMATASE INHIBITOR FADROZOLE IN A SHORT-TERM REPRODUCTION ASSAY WITH THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytochrome P450 aromatase is a key enzyme in vertebrate steroidogenesis, catalyzing the conversion of C19 androgens to C18 estrogens such a B-estradiol (E2). The objective of this study was to assess effects of the CYP inhibitor fadrozole on fathead minnow reproductive endocrinol...

  9. Management of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal breast cancer patients taking adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Derzko, C.; Elliott, S.; Lam, W.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment with aromatase inhibitors for postmenopausal women with breast cancer has been shown to reduce or obviate invasive procedures such as hysteroscopy or curettage associated with tamoxifen-induced endometrial abnormalities. The side effect of upfront aromatase inhibitors, diminished estrogen synthesis, is similar to that seen with the natural events of aging. The consequences often include vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes) and vaginal dryness and atrophy, which in turn may result in cystitis and vaginitis. Not surprisingly, painful intercourse (dyspareunia) and loss of sexual interest (decreased libido) frequently occur as well. Various interventions, both non-hormonal and hormonal, are currently available to manage these problems. The purpose of the present review is to provide the practitioner with a wide array of management options to assist in treating the sexual consequences of aromatase inhibitors. The suggestions in this review are based on recent literature and on the recommendations set forth both by the North American Menopause Association and in the clinical practice guidelines of the Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Canada. The complexity of female sexual dysfunction necessitates a biopsychosocial approach to assessment and management alike, with interventions ranging from education and lifestyle changes to sexual counselling, pelvic floor therapies, sexual aids, medications, and dietary supplements—all of which have been reported to have a variable, but often successful, effect on symptom amelioration. Although the use of specific hormone replacement—most commonly local estrogen, and less commonly, systemic estrogen with or without an androgen, progesterone, or the additional of an androgen in an estrogenized woman (or a combination)—may be highly effective, the concern remains that in patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer, including those receiving anti-estrogenic adjuvant therapies, the use of these hormones may be

  10. Effects of a short-term exposure to the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole on steroid production and gene expression in the ovary of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytochrome P450 aromatase is a steriodogenic enzyme that converts C19 androgens to C18 estrogens and is critical for normal reproduction in females. Fadrozole is a well-studied aromatase inhibitor that has been shown to suppress estrogen production in the ovaries of fish. Howev...

  11. Induction of Female-to-Male Sex Change in Adult Zebrafish by Aromatase Inhibitor Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, Kanae; Miyaoku, Kaori; Roy, Shimi Rani; Murono, Yuki; Sago, Tomohiro; Itagaki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaru; Tokumoto, Toshinobu

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated whether undifferentiated germ and/or somatic stem cells remain in the differentiated ovary of a species that does not undergo sex changes under natural conditions and retain their sexual plasticity. The effect of aromatase inhibitor (AI)-treatment on sexually mature female zebrafish was examined. A 5-month AI treatment caused retraction of the ovaries after which testes-like organs appeared, and cyst structures filled with spermatozoa-like cells were observed in sections of these tissues. Electron microscopic observations revealed that these cells appeared as large sperm heads without tails. Sperm formation was re-examined after changing the diet to an AI-free food. A large number of normal sperm were obtained after eight weeks, and no formation of ovarian tissue was observed. Artificial fertilization using sperm from the sex-changed females was successful. These results demonstrated that sex plasticity remains in the mature ovaries of this species.

  12. Induction of Female-to-Male Sex Change in Adult Zebrafish by Aromatase Inhibitor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Takatsu, Kanae; Miyaoku, Kaori; Roy, Shimi Rani; Murono, Yuki; Sago, Tomohiro; Itagaki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaru; Tokumoto, Toshinobu

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether undifferentiated germ and/or somatic stem cells remain in the differentiated ovary of a species that does not undergo sex changes under natural conditions and retain their sexual plasticity. The effect of aromatase inhibitor (AI)-treatment on sexually mature female zebrafish was examined. A 5-month AI treatment caused retraction of the ovaries after which testes-like organs appeared, and cyst structures filled with spermatozoa-like cells were observed in sections of these tissues. Electron microscopic observations revealed that these cells appeared as large sperm heads without tails. Sperm formation was re-examined after changing the diet to an AI-free food. A large number of normal sperm were obtained after eight weeks, and no formation of ovarian tissue was observed. Artificial fertilization using sperm from the sex-changed females was successful. These results demonstrated that sex plasticity remains in the mature ovaries of this species. PMID:24292399

  13. Management of bone loss in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cepa, M; Vaz, C

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, but despite survival rates improvement, it is still the second major cause of cancer related death. In postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER) dependent breast cancer, hormone therapy is an option, either by direct inhibition of ER using tamoxifen or by aromatase inhibition, resulting in decreased estrogen production. In this paper these two endocrine therapy approaches are compared in terms of their impact on bone health. Guidance for the prevention of bone loss and occurrence of fractures in postmenopausal women receiving AIs is also proposed. Despite intervention strategies to maintain bone health in AI-treated patients are not well established, recommendations by international societies to identify women with high risk of fracture and advice on the preventive anti-fracture therapy are exposed. Finally, available therapeutic options for management of bone loss in patients receiving AIs are presented. The search strategy for this literature review was conducted by using the key words "aromatase inhibitor*" and "bone loss" OR "aromatase inhibitor*" and "osteoporosis" in the MEDLINE/PubMed database. Nowadays, hormone-responsive breast cancer in postmenopausal women is preferably being treated with AIs instead of tamoxifen, due to clear benefits in disease-free survival and reduced recurrence. AIs have an advantageous side effect profile compared to tamoxifen, however all AIs have detrimental long-term effects on bone, due to nearly complete depletion of estrogens, resulting in increased bone loss and increased risk of fracture. Current recommendations state that all women treated with AIs should be evaluated for their fracture risk prior to initiation of AI-treatment, taking in consideration individual bone mineral density and several risk factors. The thresholds to introduce preventive therapy and drugs proposed differ among the available recommendations. Lifestyle modifications and adequate

  14. Nuclear receptor co-activators and HER-2/neu are upregulated in breast cancer patients during neo-adjuvant treatment with aromatase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Flågeng, M Hauglid; Haugan Moi, L L; Dixon, J M; Geisler, J; Lien, E A; Miller, W R; Lønning, P E; Mellgren, G

    2009-01-01

    Background: Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer is poorly understood. Characterisation of the molecular response to aromatase inhibitors in breast cancer tissue may provide important information regarding development of oestrogen hypersensitivity. Methods: We examined the expression levels of nuclear receptor co-regulators, the orphan nuclear receptor liver receptor homologue-1 and HER-2/neu growth factor receptor using real-time RT-PCR before and after 13–16 weeks of primary medical treatment with the aromatase inhibitors anastrozole or letrozole. Results: mRNA expression of the steroid receptor co-activator 1 (SRC-1) and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1α (PGC-1α) was correlated (P=0.002), and both co-activators increased during treatment in the patient group as a whole (P=0.008 and P=0.032, respectively), as well as in the subgroup of patients achieving an objective treatment response (P=0.002 and P=0.006). Although we recorded no significant change in SRC-3/amplified in breast cancer 1 level, the expression correlated positively to the change of SRC-1 (P=0.002). Notably, we recorded an increase in HER-2/neu levels during therapy in the total patient group (18 out of 26; P=0.016), but in particular among responders (15 out of 21; P=0.008). Conclusion: Our results show an upregulation of co-activator mRNA and HER-2/neu during treatment with aromatase inhibitors. These mechanisms may represent an early adaption of the breast cancer cells to oestrogen deprivation in vivo. PMID:19755984

  15. CYP11A1 expression in bone is associated with aromatase inhibitor-related bone loss.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanz, M; García-Giralt, N; Prieto-Alhambra, D; Servitja, S; Balcells, S; Pecorelli, R; Díez-Pérez, A; Grinberg, D; Tusquets, I; Nogués, X

    2015-08-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) used as adjuvant therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer cause diverse musculoskeletal side effects that include bone loss and its associated fracture. About half of the 391 patients treated with AIs in the Barcelona-Aromatase induced bone loss in early breast cancer cohort suffered a significant bone loss at lumbar spine (LS) and/or femoral neck (FN) after 2 years on AI-treatment. In contrast, up to one-third (19.6% LS, 38.6% FN) showed no decline or even increased bone density. The present study aimed to determine the genetic basis for this variability. SNPs in candidate genes involved in vitamin D and estrogen hormone-response pathways (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, HSD3B2, HSD17B3, CYP19A1, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, ESR1, DHCR7, GC, CYP2R1, CYP27B1, VDR and CYP24A1) were genotyped for association analysis with AI-related bone loss (AIBL). After multiple testing correction, 3 tag-SNPs (rs4077581, s11632698 and rs900798) located in the CYP11A1 gene were significantly associated (P<0.005) with FN AIBL at 2 years of treatment. Next, CYP11A1 expression in human fresh bone tissue and primary osteoblasts was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Both common isoforms of human cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (encoded by CYP11A1 gene) were detected in osteoblasts by western blot. In conclusion, the genetic association of CYP11A1 gene with AIBL and its expression in bone tissue reveals a potential local function of this enzyme in bone metabolism regulation, offering a new vision of the steroidogenic ability of this tissue and new understanding of AI-induced bone loss. PMID:26108486

  16. CYP11A1 expression in bone is associated with aromatase inhibitor-related bone loss.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanz, M; García-Giralt, N; Prieto-Alhambra, D; Servitja, S; Balcells, S; Pecorelli, R; Díez-Pérez, A; Grinberg, D; Tusquets, I; Nogués, X

    2015-08-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) used as adjuvant therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer cause diverse musculoskeletal side effects that include bone loss and its associated fracture. About half of the 391 patients treated with AIs in the Barcelona-Aromatase induced bone loss in early breast cancer cohort suffered a significant bone loss at lumbar spine (LS) and/or femoral neck (FN) after 2 years on AI-treatment. In contrast, up to one-third (19.6% LS, 38.6% FN) showed no decline or even increased bone density. The present study aimed to determine the genetic basis for this variability. SNPs in candidate genes involved in vitamin D and estrogen hormone-response pathways (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, HSD3B2, HSD17B3, CYP19A1, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, ESR1, DHCR7, GC, CYP2R1, CYP27B1, VDR and CYP24A1) were genotyped for association analysis with AI-related bone loss (AIBL). After multiple testing correction, 3 tag-SNPs (rs4077581, s11632698 and rs900798) located in the CYP11A1 gene were significantly associated (P<0.005) with FN AIBL at 2 years of treatment. Next, CYP11A1 expression in human fresh bone tissue and primary osteoblasts was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Both common isoforms of human cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (encoded by CYP11A1 gene) were detected in osteoblasts by western blot. In conclusion, the genetic association of CYP11A1 gene with AIBL and its expression in bone tissue reveals a potential local function of this enzyme in bone metabolism regulation, offering a new vision of the steroidogenic ability of this tissue and new understanding of AI-induced bone loss.

  17. Expression of Estrogen-Related Gene Markers in Breast Cancer Tissue Predicts Aromatase Inhibitor Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Irene; Lin, Zhihong; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Reierstad, Scott; Khan, Seema A.; Bulun, Serdar E.

    2013-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the most effective class of drugs in the endocrine treatment of breast cancer, with an approximate 50% treatment response rate. Our objective was to determine whether intratumoral expression levels of estrogen-related genes are predictive of AI responsiveness in postmenopausal women with breast cancer. Primary breast carcinomas were obtained from 112 women who received AI therapy after failing adjuvant tamoxifen therapy and developing recurrent breast cancer. Tumor ERα and PR protein expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of 5 estrogen-related genes–AKR1C3, aromatase, ERα, and 2 estradiol/ERα target genes, BRCA1 and PR–were measured by real-time PCR. Tumor protein and mRNA levels were compared with breast cancer progression rates to determine predictive accuracy. Responsiveness to AI therapy–defined as the combined complete response, partial response, and stable disease rates for at least 6 months–was 51%; rates were 56% in ERα-IHC-positive and 14% in ERα-IHC-negative tumors. Levels of ERα, PR, or BRCA1 mRNA were independently predictive for responsiveness to AI. In cross-validated analyses, a combined measurement of tumor ERα and PR mRNA levels yielded a more superior specificity (36%) and identical sensitivity (96%) to the current clinical practice (ERα/PR-IHC). In patients with ERα/PR-IHC-negative tumors, analysis of mRNA expression revealed either non-significant trends or statistically significant positive predictive values for AI responsiveness. In conclusion, expression levels of estrogen-related mRNAs are predictive for AI responsiveness in postmenopausal women with breast cancer, and mRNA expression analysis may improve patient selection. PMID:24223121

  18. The role of aromatase inhibitors in ameliorating deleterious effects of ovarian stimulation on outcome of infertility treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mitwally, Mohamed FM; Casper, Robert F; Diamond, Michael P

    2005-01-01

    Clinical utilization of ovulation stimulation to facilitate the ability of a couple to conceive has not only provided a valuable therapeutic approach, but has also yielded extensive information on the physiology of ovarian follicular recruitment, endometrial receptivity and early embryo competency. One of the consequences of the use of fertility enhancing agents for ovarian stimulation has been the creation of a hyperestrogenic state, which may influence each of these parameters. Use of aromatase inhibitors reduces hyperestrogenism inevitably attained during ovarian stimulation. In addition, the adjunct use of aromatase inhibitors during ovarian stimulation reduces amount of gonadotropins required for optimum stimulation. The unique approach of reducing hyperestrogenism, as well as lowering amount of gonadotropins without affecting the number of mature ovarian follicles is an exciting strategy that could result in improvement in the treatment outcome by ameliorating the deleterious effects of the ovarian stimulation on follicular development, endometrial receptivity, as well as oocyte and embryo quality. PMID:16202169

  19. Improving compliance and persistence to adjuvant tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Hadji, Peyman

    2010-02-01

    Better compliance and persistence with therapy are associated with improved patient outcomes. As more and more patients survive breast cancer, compliance with adjuvant therapy becomes increasingly important. In clinical trials, compliance with adjuvant endocrine therapy among women with breast cancer is usually high. Retrospective analyses of databases and medical records from clinical practice, insurance databases of prescription refills, and survey data show a significant decrease in persistence after 12 months of therapy. With ongoing therapy, a further decline in persistence of up to 50% has been reported. A consistent methodology is needed to measure patient behavior and identify patients who are not adhering to therapy. Promising strategies for enhancing adherence to treatment in clinical practice include improving access to health care, increasing patient satisfaction, managing side effects, patient education, and better communication between the patient and health care provider. Positive relationships between patients and their health care providers, and frequent monitoring and feedback, may be most effective. While the lack of conformity across studies in measuring makes cross-study comparisons difficult, this review evaluates the available data regarding compliance and persistence with adjuvant endocrine therapies for breast cancer (tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors) and presents strategies for improving adherence.

  20. Vaginal estrogen products in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sulaica, Elisabeth; Han, Tiffany; Wang, Weiqun; Bhat, Raksha; Trivedi, Meghana V; Niravath, Polly

    2016-06-01

    Atrophic vaginitis represents a major barrier to compliance with aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in breast cancer (BC) survivors. While local estrogen therapy is effective for postmenopausal vaginal dryness, the efficacy of such therapies has not been evaluated systematically in hormone receptor-positive (HR+) BC patients on AI therapy. Furthermore, the potential risk of breast cancer recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy represents a long-term safety concern for the patients with HR + BC. Unfortunately, there is no standardized assay to measure very low concentrations of estradiol (E2) in these women being treated with AI therapy. This makes it difficult to evaluate even indirectly the potential risk of BC recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In this review, we describe available assays to measure very low concentrations of E2, discuss the Food and Drug Administration-approved vaginal estrogen products on the market, and summarize published and ongoing clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of vaginal estrogen in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In the absence of any randomized controlled clinical trials, this review serves as a summary of available clinical data and ongoing studies to aid clinicians in selecting the best available option for their patients.

  1. Genetic Associations With Toxicity-related Discontinuation of Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Henry, N. Lynn; Skaar, Todd C.; Dantzer, Jessica; Li, Lang; Kidwell, Kelley; Gersch, Christina; Nguyen, Anne T.; Rae, James M.; Desta, Zeruesenay; Oesterreich, Steffi; Philips, Santosh; Carpenter, Janet S.; Storniolo, Anna M.; Stearns, Vered; Hayes, Daniel F.; Flockhart, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Up to 25% of patients discontinue adjuvant aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy due to intolerable symptoms. Predictors of which patients will be unable to tolerate these medications have not been defined. We hypothesized that inherited variants in candidate genes are associated with treatment discontinuation because of AI-associated toxicity. Methods We prospectively evaluated reasons for treatment discontinuation in women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer initiating adjuvant AI through a multicenter, prospective, randomized clinical trial of exemestane versus letrozole. Using multiple genetic models, we evaluated potential associations between discontinuation of AI therapy because of toxicity and 138 variants in 24 candidate genes, selected a priori, primarily with roles in estrogen metabolism and signaling. To account for multiple comparisons, statistical significance was defined as p<0.00036. Results Of the 467 enrolled patients with available germline DNA, 152 (33%) discontinued AI therapy because of toxicity. Using a recessive statistical model, an intronic variant in ESR1 (rs9322336) was associated with increased risk of musculoskeletal toxicity-related exemestane discontinuation (HR 5.0 (95% CI 2.1–11.8), p<0.0002). Conclusion An inherited variant potentially affecting estrogen signaling may be associated with exemestane-associated toxicity, which could partially account for intra-patient differences in AI tolerability. Validation of this finding is required. PMID:23546553

  2. Genetic associations with toxicity-related discontinuation of aromatase inhibitor therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Henry, N Lynn; Skaar, Todd C; Dantzer, Jessica; Li, Lang; Kidwell, Kelley; Gersch, Christina; Nguyen, Anne T; Rae, James M; Desta, Zeruesenay; Oesterreich, Steffi; Philips, Santosh; Carpenter, Janet S; Storniolo, Anna M; Stearns, Vered; Hayes, Daniel F; Flockhart, David A

    2013-04-01

    Up to 25 % of patients discontinue adjuvant aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy due to intolerable symptoms. Predictors of which patients will be unable to tolerate these medications have not been defined. We hypothesized that inherited variants in candidate genes are associated with treatment discontinuation because of AI-associated toxicity. We prospectively evaluated reasons for treatment discontinuation in women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer initiating adjuvant AI through a multicenter, prospective, randomized clinical trial of exemestane versus letrozole. Using multiple genetic models, we evaluated potential associations between discontinuation of AI therapy because of toxicity and 138 variants in 24 candidate genes, selected a priori, primarily with roles in estrogen metabolism and signaling. To account for multiple comparisons, statistical significance was defined as p < 0.00036. Of the 467 enrolled patients with available germline DNA, 152 (33 %) discontinued AI therapy because of toxicity. Using a recessive statistical model, an intronic variant in ESR1 (rs9322336) was associated with increased risk of musculoskeletal toxicity-related exemestane discontinuation [HR 5.0 (95 % CI 2.1-11.8), p < 0.0002]. An inherited variant potentially affecting estrogen signaling may be associated with exemestane-associated toxicity, which could partially account for intra-patient differences in AI tolerability. Validation of this finding is required. PMID:23546553

  3. Comparative study on individual aromatase inhibitors on cardiovascular safety profile: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xihe; Liu, Lei; Li, Kai; Li, Wusheng; Zhao, Li; Zou, Huawei

    2015-01-01

    The third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs: anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane) have now become standard adjuvant endocrine treatment for postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer complementing chemotherapy and surgery. Because of the absence of direct head-to-head comparisons of these AIs, an indirect comparison is needed for individual treatment choice. In this network systemic assessment, the cardiovascular (CV) side effects in using anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane based on original studies on AIs vs placebo or tamoxifen were compared. We integrated all available direct and indirect evidences. The odds ratio (OR) of severe CV events for indirect comparisons between exemestane and anastrozole was 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI] =0.49–2.78), letrozole and anastrozole was 1.80 (95% CI =0.40–3.92), and letrozole and exemestane was 1.46 (95% CI =0.34–3.4). OR of subgroup risk for AIs and tamoxifen were all >1 except for thrombolism risk subgroup. The results showed that the total and severe CV risk ranking is letrozole, exemestane, and anastrozole in descending order. None of the AIs showed advantages in CV events than tamoxifen except for thromboembolism event incidence. PMID:26491345

  4. Postmenopausal Breast Cancer, Aromatase Inhibitors, and Bone Health: What the Surgeon Should Know.

    PubMed

    Baatjes, K J; Apffelstaedt, J P; Kotze, M J; Conradie, M

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer, as the most common malignancy in women, remains a major public health issue despite countless advances across decades. Endocrine therapy is the cornerstone of treatment of the hormone-sensitive subtype of breast cancer. The use of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the postmenopausal women has extended the survival beyond that of Tamoxifen, but harbors a subset of side effects, most notably accelerated bone loss. This, however, does not occur in all women undergoing treatment. It is vital to identify susceptible patients early, to limit such events, employ early treatment thereof, or alter drug therapy. International trials on AIs, predominantly performed in North American and European females, provide little information on what to expect in women in developing countries. Here, surgeons often prescribe and manage endocrine therapy. The prescribing surgeon should be aware of the adverse effect of the endocrine therapy and be able to attend to side effects. This review highlights clinical and biochemical factors associated with decrease in bone mineral density in an, as yet, unidentified subgroup of postmenopausal women. In the era of personalized medical care, appropriate management of bone health by surgeons based on these factors becomes increasingly important. PMID:27189076

  5. Masculinization of female golden rabbitfish Siganus guttatus using an aromatase inhibitor treatment during sex differentiation.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Toru; Nakamura, Shigeo; Nakamura, Masaru

    2006-08-01

    To elucidate the involvement of endogenous estrogen (estradiol-17beta; E2) and the decisive factor (somatic or germinal element) in the ovarian differentiation of tropical marine teleosts, the effect of the aromatase inhibitor (AI) fadrozole on gonadal sex differentiation in the golden rabbitfish Siganus guttatus (Bloch) was examined for different dosages and periods of treatment. Fadrozole interrupted ovarian cavity formation at a dose of 500 microg g(-1) diet, while there was little effect at 10 or 100 microg g(-1). The gonads from both the 30-day and 90-day administration (500 microg g(-1) diet) groups were significantly biased toward testes (P=0.002 and <0.0001, respectively), which suggests strongly that E2 is involved in early ovarian differentiation and that its suppression is an indispensable condition for testicular differentiation in S. guttatus. The results from the two different AI treatment periods imply that the initial feminization of somatic gonadal elements determines subsequent ovarian differentiation, including oogenesis: a conclusion supported by the considerable time lag between ovarian cavity formation and subsequent oogenesis during normal ovarian differentiation in S. guttatus.

  6. Sensitivity of New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray) to a specific aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gust, M; Garric, J; Giamberini, L; Mons, R; Abbaci, K; Garnier, F; Buronfosse, T

    2010-03-01

    The freshwater prosobranch Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Molluska, Hydrobiidea, Smith 1889) has been proposed as a suitable species to assess the impact of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC) in aquatic ecosystems. Steroid hormone biosynthesis pathway is potentially an important target for EDC, and vertebrate-like sex steroids seem to play a functional role in the control of mollusk reproduction. To assess the response and the sensitivity of P. antipodarum to disrupters of the steroid hormone biosynthesis pathway, we have experienced the action of a specific vertebrate aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, acting on 17beta-estradiol synthesis in two separate 28 and 42d exposures. Fadrozole had effects consistent with the expected mechanism of action. A decrease of the reproduction parameters (such as on the number of neonates and number of embryos in the brood pouch) in a dose-dependant manner was observed. The steroids levels were also impaired with the ratio 17beta-estradiol/testosterone decreased by half in exposed snails. This shift of the steroids balance was accompanied by some alteration in the gonads histology and immunohistochemistry in fadrozole-exposed snails. This study highlights the value role of P. antipodarum as a test species for assessing EDC effects in aquatic wildlife.

  7. Skeletal adverse effects with aromatase inhibitors in early breast cancer: evidence to date and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Servitja, Sonia; Martos, Tamara; Rodriguez Sanz, Maria; Garcia-Giralt, Natalia; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Garrigos, Laia; Nogues, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are routinely used in the adjuvant treatment of women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer. Patients who receive AIs have an increased risk of bone loss and arthralgia compared with those treated with tamoxifen. In addition to the effects of AIs, the population of women with early breast cancer has a high prevalence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) insufficiency. In our experience 88% of patients had concentrations lower than 30 ng/ml. Vitamin D supplementation should be adapted to the baseline concentration. Another relevant finding in our research program was the close relationship between 25(OH)D levels and intensity of AI-related arthralgia (AIrA). A target concentration of 40 ng/ml 25(OH)D may prevent development of AIrA. We also demonstrate that AIrA is genetically determined: single nucleotide polymorphisms located in genes encoding key factors for the metabolism of estrogens and vitamin D (CYP17A1, VDR, and CYP27B1) are associated with self-reported arthralgia during AI therapy. We recommend establishing an individualized protocol of bone-health surveillance based on baseline and evolutionary clinical variables. PMID:26327926

  8. Aromatase and comparative response to its inhibitors in two types of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Berstein, L; Kovalevskij, A; Zimarina, T; Maximov, S; Gershfeld, E; Vasilyev, D; Baisheva, S; Baymakhasheva, A; Thijssen, J H H

    2005-05-01

    aromatase inhibitors in EC can be of importance too. PMID:15939586

  9. The Introduction of Generic Aromatase Inhibitors and Treatment Adherence Among Medicare D Enrollees

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraju, Sailaja; Charlson, John A.; Wozniak, Erica M.; Smith, Elizabeth C.; Biggers, Alana; Smallwood, Alicia J.; Laud, Purushottam W.; Pezzin, Liliana E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) substantially reduce breast cancer mortality in clinical trials, but high rates of nonadherence to these long-term oral therapies have reduced their impact outside of trials. We examined the association of generic AI availability with AI adherence among a large national breast cancer cohort. Methods: Using a quasi-experimental prepost design, we examined the effect of generic AI introductions (7/2010 and 4/2011) on adherence among a national cohort of women with incident breast cancer in 2006 and 2007 who were enrolled in the Medicare D pharmaceutical coverage program. Medicare D claims were used to calculate AI adherence, defined as a medication possession ratio of 80% or more of eligible days, over 36 months. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated with generalized estimating equations were applied to longitudinal adherence data to control for possible confounders, including receipt of a Medicare D low-income subsidy, and to account for repeated measures. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Sixteen thousand four hundred sixty-two Medicare D enrollees were eligible. Adherence declined throughout the study. However, among women without a subsidy, the median quarterly out-of-pocket cost of anastrozole fell from $183 in the fourth quarter of 2009 to $15 in 2011, and declines in adherence were attenuated with generic AI introductions. Regression-adjusted adherence probabilities were estimated to be 5.4% higher after generic anastrozole was introduced in 2010 and 11% higher after generic letrozole/exemestane was introduced in 2011. Subsidy recipients had higher adherence rates throughout the study. Conclusions: The introduction of generic medications attenuated the decline in adherence to AIs over three years of treatment among breast cancer survivors not receiving low-income subsidies for Medicare D coverage. PMID:25971298

  10. Patient-Reported Symptoms and Discontinuation of Adjuvant Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kidwell, Kelley M.; Harte, Steven E.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Carpenter, Janet; Flockhart, David A.; Stearns, Vered; Clauw, Daniel J.; Williams, David A.; Henry, N. Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background Aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy results in substantial survival benefits in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Poor adherence and discontinuation rates of AI therapy are high, primarily due to treatment-related toxicities such as musculoskeletal pain. While pain-related symptoms may worsen during AI therapy, we hypothesized that non-persistence with AI therapy was associated with symptoms which were present prior to treatment initiation. Methods Postmenopausal women initiating AI therapy who were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial completed questionnaires at baseline to assess sleep, fatigue, mood, and pain. Reasons for treatment discontinuation during the first year of treatment were recorded. Associations between baseline patient-reported symptoms and treatment discontinuation due to toxicity were identified using logistic regression. Results Four hundred forty-nine patients were evaluable. Odds of treatment discontinuation were higher in patients who reported a greater number of symptoms prior to AI initiation. Baseline poor sleep quality was associated with early treatment discontinuation, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.91 (95% CI 1.26–2.89; p=0.002). Baseline presence of tired feeling and forgetfulness had similar odds ratios for discontinuation (OR 1.76 (95% CI 1.15–2.67, p=0.009) and OR 1.66 (95% CI 1.11–2.48, p=0.015), respectively). Increasing total number of baseline symptoms was associated with increased likelihood of treatment discontinuation, with an OR 1.89 (95% CI 1.20–2.96; p=0.006) for 3–5 symptoms versus 0–2 symptoms. Conclusions Symptom clusters in breast cancer survivors present prior to initiation of adjuvant AI therapy may negatively impact persistence with therapy. Interventions to manage these symptoms may improve breast cancer outcomes and quality of life. PMID:24802413

  11. Cell-Based High-Throughput Screening for Aromatase Inhibitors in the Tox21 10K Library

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shiuan; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Huang, Ruili; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Hsin, Li-Yu; Xia, Menghang; Shockley, Keith R.; Auerbach, Scott; Kanaya, Noriko; Lu, Hannah; Svoboda, Daniel; Witt, Kristine L.; Merrick, B. Alex; Teng, Christina T.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms exist for endocrine disruption; one nonreceptor-mediated mechanism is via effects on aromatase, an enzyme critical for maintaining the normal in vivo balance of androgens and estrogens. We adapted the AroER tri-screen 96-well assay to 1536-well format to identify potential aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the U.S. Tox21 10K compound library. In this assay, screening with compound alone identifies estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) agonists, screening in the presence of testosterone (T) identifies AIs and/or ERα antagonists, and screening in the presence of 17β-estradiol (E2) identifies ERα antagonists. Screening the Tox-21 library in the presence of T resulted in finding 302 potential AIs. These compounds, along with 31 known AI actives and inactives, were rescreened using all 3 assay formats. Of the 333 compounds tested, 113 (34%; 63 actives, 50 marginal actives) were considered to be potential AIs independent of cytotoxicity and ER antagonism activity. Structure-activity analysis suggested the presence of both conventional (eg, 1, 2, 4, - triazole class) and novel AI structures. Due to their novel structures, 14 of the 63 potential AI actives, including both drugs and fungicides, were selected for confirmation in the biochemical tritiated water-release aromatase assay. Ten compounds were active in the assay; the remaining 4 were only active in high-throughput screen assay, but with low efficacy. To further characterize these 10 novel AIs, we investigated their binding characteristics. The AroER tri-screen, in high-throughput format, accurately and efficiently identified chemicals in a large and diverse chemical library that selectively interact with aromatase. PMID:26141389

  12. Reduced estradiol synthesis by letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, is protective against development of pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling in mice.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Davood; Panda, B P; Vohora, Divya

    2015-11-01

    Neurosteroids, such as testosterone and their metabolites, are known to modulate neuronal excitability. The enzymes regulating the metabolism of these neurosteroids, thus, may be targeted as a noval strategy for the development of new antiepileptic drugs. The present work targeted two such enzymes i,e aromatase and 5α-reductase in order to explore the potential of letrozole (an aromatase inhibitor) on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling in mice and the ability of finasteride (a 5α-reductase inhibitor) to modulate any such effects. PTZ (30 mg/kg, i.p.), when administered once every two days (for a total of 24 doses) induced kindling in Swiss albino mice. Letrozole (1 mg/kg, p.o.), administered prior to PTZ, significantly reduced the % incidence of kindling, delayed mean onset time of seizures and reduced seizure severity score. Letrozole reduced the levels of plasma 17β-estradiol after induction of kindling. The concurrent administration of finasteride and letrozole produced effects similar to letrozole on PTZ-kindling and on estradiol levels. This implies that the ability of letrozole to redirect the synthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5α-androstanediol from testosterone doesn't appear to play a significant role in the protective effects of letrozole against PTZ kindling. Letrozole, however, increased the levels of 5α-DHT in mice plasma. The aromatase inhibitors, thus, may be exploited for inhibiting the synthesis of proconvulsant (17β-estradiol) and/or redirecting the synthesis of anticonvulsant (DHT and 5α-androstanediol) neurosteroids.

  13. Gene expression alterations associated with outcome in aromatase inhibitor-treated ER+ early-stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Karina G; Lyng, Maria B; Elias, Daniel; Vever, Henriette; Knoop, Ann S; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-12-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI), either alone or together with chemotherapy, have become the standard adjuvant treatment for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Although AIs improve overall survival, resistance is still a major clinical problem, thus additional biomarkers predictive of outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with AIs are needed. Global gene expression analysis was performed on ER+ primary breast cancers from patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy; half experienced recurrence (median follow-up 6.7 years). Gene expression alterations were validated by qRT-PCR, and functional studies evaluating the effect of siRNA-mediated gene knockdown on cell growth were performed. Twenty-six genes, including TFF3, DACH1, RGS5, and GHR, were shown to exhibit altered expression in tumors from patients with recurrence versus non-recurrent (fold change ≥1.5, p < 0.05), and the gene expression alterations were confirmed using qRT-PCR. Ten of these 26 genes could be linked in a network associated with cellular proliferation, growth, and development. TFF3, which encodes for trefoil factor 3 and is an estrogen-responsive oncogene shown to play a functional role in tamoxifen resistance and metastasis of ER+ breast cancer, was also shown to be upregulated in an AI-resistant cell line model, and reduction of TFF3 levels using TFF3-specific siRNAs decreased the growth of both the AI-resistant and -sensitive parental cell lines. Moreover, overexpression of TFF3 in parental AI-sensitive MCF-7/S0.5 cells resulted in reduced sensitivity to the AI exemestane, whereas TFF3 overexpression had no effect on growth in the absence of exemestane, indicating that TFF3 mediates growth and survival signals that abrogate the growth inhibitory effect of exemestane. We identified a panel of 26 genes exhibiting altered expression associated with disease recurrence in patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy, including TFF3, which was shown to

  14. Gene expression alterations associated with outcome in aromatase inhibitor-treated ER+ early-stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Karina G; Lyng, Maria B; Elias, Daniel; Vever, Henriette; Knoop, Ann S; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-12-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI), either alone or together with chemotherapy, have become the standard adjuvant treatment for postmenopausal, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Although AIs improve overall survival, resistance is still a major clinical problem, thus additional biomarkers predictive of outcome of ER+ breast cancer patients treated with AIs are needed. Global gene expression analysis was performed on ER+ primary breast cancers from patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy; half experienced recurrence (median follow-up 6.7 years). Gene expression alterations were validated by qRT-PCR, and functional studies evaluating the effect of siRNA-mediated gene knockdown on cell growth were performed. Twenty-six genes, including TFF3, DACH1, RGS5, and GHR, were shown to exhibit altered expression in tumors from patients with recurrence versus non-recurrent (fold change ≥1.5, p < 0.05), and the gene expression alterations were confirmed using qRT-PCR. Ten of these 26 genes could be linked in a network associated with cellular proliferation, growth, and development. TFF3, which encodes for trefoil factor 3 and is an estrogen-responsive oncogene shown to play a functional role in tamoxifen resistance and metastasis of ER+ breast cancer, was also shown to be upregulated in an AI-resistant cell line model, and reduction of TFF3 levels using TFF3-specific siRNAs decreased the growth of both the AI-resistant and -sensitive parental cell lines. Moreover, overexpression of TFF3 in parental AI-sensitive MCF-7/S0.5 cells resulted in reduced sensitivity to the AI exemestane, whereas TFF3 overexpression had no effect on growth in the absence of exemestane, indicating that TFF3 mediates growth and survival signals that abrogate the growth inhibitory effect of exemestane. We identified a panel of 26 genes exhibiting altered expression associated with disease recurrence in patients treated with adjuvant AI monotherapy, including TFF3, which was shown to

  15. Synthesis and PET studies of [11C-cyano]letrozole (Femara®), an aromatase inhibitor drug

    PubMed Central

    Kil, Kun-Eek; Biegon, Anat; Ding, Yu-Shin; Fischer, Andre; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Kim, Sung Won; Pareto, Deborah; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Aromatase, a member of the cytochrome P450 family, converts androgens such as androstenedione and testosterone to estrone and estradiol respectively. Letrozole (1-[bis-(4-cyanophenyl)methyl]-1H-1,2,4-triazole, Femara®) is a high affinity aromatase inhibitor (Ki=11.5 nM) which has FDA approval for breast cancer treatment. Here we report the synthesis of carbon-11 labeled letrozole and its assessment as a radiotracer for brain aromatase in the baboon. Methods Letrozole and its precursor (4-[(4-bromophenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl]benzonitrile, 3) were prepared in two-step syntheses from 4-cyanobenzyl bromide and 4-bromobenzyl bromide, respectively. The [11C]cyano group was introduced via the tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0) catalyzed coupling of [11C]cyanide with the bromo-precursor (3). PET studies in the baboon brain were carried out to assess regional distribution and kinetics, reproducibility of repeated measures and saturability. The free fraction of letrozole in the plasma, log D, and the [11C-cyano]letrozole fraction in the arterial plasma were also measured. Results [11C-cyano]Letrozole was synthesized in 60 min with a radiochemical yield of 79–80%, with a radiochemical purity greater than 98% and a specific activity of 4.16±2.21 Ci/μmol at the end of bombardment (n=4). PET studies in the baboon revealed initial rapid and high uptake and initial rapid clearance followed by slow clearance of carbon-11 from the brain with no difference between brain regions. The brain kinetics was not affected by co-injection of unlabeled letrozole (0.1 mg/kg). The free fraction of letrozole in plasma was 48.9% and log D was 1.84. Conclusion [11C-cyano]Letrozole is readily synthesized via a palladium catalyzed coupling reaction with [11C]cyanide. Although it is unsuitable as a PET radiotracer for brain aromatase as revealed by the absence of regional specificity and saturability in brain regions, such as amygdala, which are known to contain

  16. Direct Effects, Compensation, and Recovery in Female Fathead Minnows Exposed to the Aromatase Inhibitor Fadrozole

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals present in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. The objective of this study was to provide a detailed characterization of the molecular and biochemical responses of female fathead minnows to a m...

  17. Sex Amphibian, Xenopus tropicalis, following Larval Exposure to an Aromatase Inhibitor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aromatase is a steroidogenic enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens in vertebrates. Modulation of this enzyme’s activity by xenobiotic exposure has been shown to adversely affect gonadal differentiation in a number of diverse species. We hypothesized tha...

  18. Randomized, blinded trial of vitamin D3 for treating aromatase inhibitor-associated musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS).

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Alice C; Adlis, Susan A; Robien, Kim; Kirstein, Mark N; Liang, Shuang; Richter, Sara A; Lerner, Rachel E

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of vitamin D3 at 4000 IU/day as a treatment option for aromatase inhibitor-associated musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS) when compared with the usual care dose of 600 IU D3. We conducted a single site randomized, double-blind, phase 3 clinical trial in women with AIMSS comparing change in symptoms, reproductive hormones and AI pharmacokinetics. Postmenopausal women ≥18 years with stages I-IIIA breast cancer, taking AI and experiencing AIMSS [breast cancer prevention trial symptom scale-musculoskeletal (BCPT-MS) subscale ≥1.5] were admitted. Following randomization, 116 patients had a run-in period of 1 month on 600 IU D3, then began the randomized assignment to either 600 IU D3 (n = 56) or 4000 IU D3 (n = 57) daily for 6 months. The primary endpoint was a change in AIMSS from baseline (after 1 month run-in) on the BCPT-MS (general MS pain, joint pain, muscle stiffness, range for each question: 0 = not at all to 4 = extremely). Groups had no statistically significant differences demographically or clinically. There were no discernable differences between the randomly allocated treatment groups at 6 months in measures of AIMSS, pharmacokinetics of anastrozole and letrozole, serum levels of reproductive hormones, or adverse events. We found no significant changes in AIMSS measures between women who took 4000 IU D3 daily compared with 600 IU D3. The 4000 IU D3 did not adversely affect reproductive hormone levels or the steady state pharmacokinetics of anastrozole or letrozole. In both groups, serum 25(OH)D remained in the recommended range for bone health (≥30 ng/mL) and safety (<50 ng/mL). PMID:26868123

  19. Randomized, blinded trial of vitamin D3 for treating aromatase inhibitor-associated musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS).

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Alice C; Adlis, Susan A; Robien, Kim; Kirstein, Mark N; Liang, Shuang; Richter, Sara A; Lerner, Rachel E

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of vitamin D3 at 4000 IU/day as a treatment option for aromatase inhibitor-associated musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS) when compared with the usual care dose of 600 IU D3. We conducted a single site randomized, double-blind, phase 3 clinical trial in women with AIMSS comparing change in symptoms, reproductive hormones and AI pharmacokinetics. Postmenopausal women ≥18 years with stages I-IIIA breast cancer, taking AI and experiencing AIMSS [breast cancer prevention trial symptom scale-musculoskeletal (BCPT-MS) subscale ≥1.5] were admitted. Following randomization, 116 patients had a run-in period of 1 month on 600 IU D3, then began the randomized assignment to either 600 IU D3 (n = 56) or 4000 IU D3 (n = 57) daily for 6 months. The primary endpoint was a change in AIMSS from baseline (after 1 month run-in) on the BCPT-MS (general MS pain, joint pain, muscle stiffness, range for each question: 0 = not at all to 4 = extremely). Groups had no statistically significant differences demographically or clinically. There were no discernable differences between the randomly allocated treatment groups at 6 months in measures of AIMSS, pharmacokinetics of anastrozole and letrozole, serum levels of reproductive hormones, or adverse events. We found no significant changes in AIMSS measures between women who took 4000 IU D3 daily compared with 600 IU D3. The 4000 IU D3 did not adversely affect reproductive hormone levels or the steady state pharmacokinetics of anastrozole or letrozole. In both groups, serum 25(OH)D remained in the recommended range for bone health (≥30 ng/mL) and safety (<50 ng/mL).

  20. Aromatase inhibitors with or without gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue in metastatic male breast cancer: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Zagouri, F; Sergentanis, T N; Koutoulidis, V; Sparber, C; Steger, G G; Dubsky, P; Zografos, G C; Psaltopoulou, T; Gnant, M; Dimopoulos, M-A; Bartsch, R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Data regarding the safety and effectiveness of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) as monotherapy or combined with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue in male breast cancer are scarce. Methods: In this retrospective chart review, cases of male breast cancer patients treated with AIs with or without a GnRH analogue were evaluated. Results: Twenty-three men were included into this case series. Aromatase inhibitors in combination with or without a GnRH analogue were given as first-line therapy in 60.9% and as second-line therapy in 39.1% of patients, respectively. All patients had visceral metastases, whereas in five of them bone lesions coexisted. In all cases AIs were tolerated well, and no case of grade 3 and 4 adverse events was reported. A partial response was observed in 26.1% of patients and stable disease in 56.5%. Median overall survival (OS) was 39 months and median progression-free survival (PFS) was 13 months. Regarding OS and PFS, no significant effects of GnRH analogue co-administration or type of AI were noted. Conclusion: Our study shows that AIs with or without GnRH analogues may represent an effective and safe treatment option for hormone-receptor positive, pretreated, metastatic, male breast cancer patients. PMID:23722469

  1. Altered Gene Expression in the Brain and Ovaries of Zebrafish Exposed to the Aromatase Inhibitor Fadrozole: Microarray analysis and Hypothesis Generation

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a research effort examining system-wide responses of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in fish to endocrine active chemicals (EACs) with different modes of action, we exposed zebrafish (Danio rerio) to 25 or 100 ìg/L of the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole for...

  2. Altered Gene Expression in the Brain and Ovaries of Zebrafish Exposed to the Aromatase Inhibitor Fadrosole: Microarray Analysis for Hypothesis Generation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A part of an overall program of research aimed at examining system-wide responses of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in fish to endocrine active chemicals acting through a variety of modes of action, we exposed zebrafish (Danio rerio) to the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole ...

  3. The impact of educational materials on compliance and persistence rates with adjuvant aromatase inhibitor treatment: first-year results from the compliance of aromatase inhibitors assessment in daily practice through educational approach (CARIATIDE) study.

    PubMed

    Neven, Patrick; Markopoulos, Christos; Tanner, Minna; Marty, Michel; Kreienberg, Rolf; Atkins, Louise; Franquet, Ann; Gnant, Michael; Neciosup, Silvia; Tesarova, Petra; Barni, Sandro; Deschamp, Veronique

    2014-08-01

    The CARIATIDE study was designed to assess the impact of educational materials (EMs) on compliance and persistence rates with aromatase inhibitor (AI) treatment in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer. Patients were randomized to standard AI treatment (Group A; N = 1379) or standard AI treatment plus EMs containing information on a range of breast-cancer-related topics (Group B; N = 1379). Standardized questionnaires assessed investigator-perceived levels of care and evaluated patient compliance and behavior. At 1 year, there was no significant difference in compliance between Group A and Group B (81% vs. 82%, p = 0.4524). However, higher compliance in patients receiving EMs was observed in Sweden/Finland (p = 0.0246). Compliance with initial AI and persistence rate were not significantly altered by EM. Other factors associated with improved compliance, irrespective of EMs, e.g. administration of chemotherapy were identified.

  4. Insight into the binding interactions of CYP450 aromatase inhibitors with their target enzyme: a combined molecular docking and molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, Roberta; Massaccesi, Luca

    2012-03-01

    CYP450 aromatase catalyzes the terminal and rate-determining step in estrogen synthesis, the aromatization of androgens, and its inhibition is an efficient approach to treating estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Insight into the molecular basis of the interaction at the catalytic site between CYP450 aromatase inhibitors and the enzyme itself is required in order to design new and more active compounds. Hence, a combined molecular docking-molecular dynamics study was carried out to obtain the structure of the lowest energy association complexes of aromatase with some third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs) and with other novel synthesized letrozole-derived compounds which showed high in vitro activity. The results obtained clearly demonstrate the role of the pharmacophore groups present in the azaheterocyclic inhibitors (NSAIs)-namely the triazolic ring and highly functionalized aromatic moieties carrying H-bond donor or acceptor groups. In particular, it was pointed out that all of them can contribute to inhibition activity by interacting with residues of the catalytic cleft, but the amino acids involved are different for each compound, even if they belong to the same class. Furthermore, the azaheterocyclic group strongly coordinates with the Fe(II) of heme cysteinate in the most active NSAI complexes, while it prefers to adopt another orientation in less active ones.

  5. Clinical Significance of Female-hormones and Cytokines in Breast Cancer Patients Complicated with Aromatase Inhibitor-related Osteoarthropathy - Efficacy of Vitamin E

    PubMed Central

    Kiyomi, Anna; Makita, Masujiro; Iwase, Takuji; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Hironori; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Aromatase inhibitor use for postmenopausal hormone-sensitive breast cancer patients often results in drug-induced osteoarthropathy, while its accurate mechanism has not been clarified. We investigated the implication of female hormones and several cytokines in osteoarthropathy complicated with aromatase inhibitor treatment, and the efficacy of vitamin E on the severity of osteoarthropathy, in breast cancer patients. Methods: Sixty two breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitor for average of 1.77 years were included. These patients were orally administered vitamin E (150mg/day) for 29.8 days to alleviate aromatase inhibitor-related osteoarthropathy. Severity of osteoarthropathy was scored, and the patients were grouped based on the severity or vitamin E efficacy. Serum estradiol, progesterone, vitamin E, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-17A concentrations were measured by ELISA or beads array procedures followed by flow cytometry. Results: There was no significant difference in serum concentrations of the biomarkers between the severe and the mild osteoarthropathy groups before vitamin E administration. The osteoarthropathy scores significantly decreased after vitamin E administration (p=0.0243), while serum-estradiol concentrations did not change. The serum-estradiol concentrations before vitamin E administration in the group sensitive to the vitamin E efficacy were significantly lower, as compared with those in the insensitive group (p=0.0005). The rate of the highly sensitive patients to the vitamin E efficacy in those exhibiting low serum-estradiol concentrations was significantly higher than that in the high serum-estradiol group (p=0.0004). In the sensitive group, serum-estradiol concentrations after taking vitamin E were significantly higher than those before taking vitamin E (p=0.0124). Conclusions: Vitamin E administration seemed to be a potential way for

  6. The impact of an aromatase inhibitor on body composition and gonadal hormone levels in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    van Londen, G J; Perera, S; Vujevich, K; Rastogi, P; Lembersky, B; Brufsky, A; Vogel, V; Greenspan, S L

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have become the standard adjuvant therapy of postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. AIs induce a reduction of bioavailable estrogens by inhibiting aromatase, which would be expected to induce alterations in body composition, more extensive than induced by menopause. The objectives are to examine the impact of AIs on (1) DXA-scan derived body composition and (2) gonadal hormone levels. This is a sub-analysis of a 2-year double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of 82 women with nonmetastatic breast cancer, newly menopausal following chemotherapy, who were randomized to risedronate (35 mg once weekly) versus placebo, and stratified for their usage of AI versus no AI. Outcomes included DXA-scan derived body composition and gonadal hormone levels. As a group, total body mass increased in women over 24 months. Women on AIs gained a significant amount of lean body mass compared to baseline as well as to no-AI users (P < 0.05). Women not on an AI gained total body fat compared to baseline and AI users (P < 0.05). Free testosterone significantly increased and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) significantly decreased in women on AIs compared to no AIs at 24 months (P < 0.01) while total estradiol and testosterone levels remained stable. Independent of AI usage, chemotherapy-induced postmenopausal breast cancer patients demonstrated an increase of total body mass. AI users demonstrated maintenance of total body fat, an increase in lean body mass and free testosterone levels, and a decrease in SHBG levels compared to no-AI users. The mechanisms and implications of these changes need to be studied further.

  7. Use of Aromatase Inhibitors in Large Cell Calcifying Sertoli Cell Tumors: Effects on Gynecomastia, Growth Velocity, and Bone Age

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Melissa K.; Gourgari, Evgenia; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LCCSCT) present in isolation or, especially in children, in association with Carney Complex (CNC) or Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS). These tumors overexpress aromatase (CYP19A1), which leads to increased conversion of delta-4-androstenedione to estrone and testosterone to estradiol. Prepubertal boys may present with growth acceleration, advanced bone age, and gynecomastia. Objective: To investigate the outcomes of aromatase inhibitor therapy (AIT) in prepubertal boys with LCCSCTs. Design: Case series of a very rare tumor and chart review of cases treated at other institutions. Setting: Tertiary care and referral center. Patients: Six boys, five with PJS and one with CNC, were referred to the National Institutes of Health for treatment of LCCSCT. All patients had gynecomastia, testicular enlargement, and advanced bone ages, and were being treated by their referring physicians with AIT. Interventions: Patients were treated for a total of 6–60 months on AIT. Main Outcome Measures: Height, breast tissue mass, and testicular size were all followed; physical examination, scrotal ultrasounds, and bone ages were obtained, and hormonal concentrations and tumor markers were measured. Results: Tumor markers were negative. All patients had decreases in breast tissue while on therapy. Height percentiles declined, and predicted adult height moved closer to midparental height as bone age advancement slowed. Testicular enlargement stabilized until entry into central puberty. Only one patient required unilateral orchiectomy. Conclusions: Patients with LCCSCT benefit from AIT with reduction and/or elimination of gynecomastia and slowing of linear growth and bone age advancement. Further study of long-term outcomes and safety monitoring are needed but these preliminary data suggest that mammoplasty and/or orchiectomy may be foregone in light of the availability of medical therapy. PMID:25226294

  8. The impact of an aromatase inhibitor on body composition and gonadal hormone levels in women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Perera, S.; Vujevich, K.; Rastogi, P.; Lembersky, B.; Brufsky, A.; Vogel, V.; Greenspan, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have become the standard adjuvant therapy of postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. AIs induce a reduction of bioavailable estrogens by inhibiting aromatase, which would be expected to induce alterations in body composition, more extensive than induced by menopause. The objectives are to examine the impact of AIs on (1) DXA-scan derived body composition and (2) gonadal hormone levels. This is a sub-analysis of a 2-year double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of 82 women with nonmetastatic breast cancer, newly menopausal following chemotherapy, who were randomized to risedronate (35 mg once weekly) versus placebo, and stratified for their usage of AI versus no AI. Outcomes included DXA-scan derived body composition and gonadal hormone levels. As a group, total body mass increased in women over 24 months. Women on AIs gained a significant amount of lean body mass compared to baseline as well as to no-AI users (P < 0.05). Women not on an AI gained total body fat compared to baseline and AI users (P < 0.05). Free testosterone significantly increased and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) significantly decreased in women on AIs compared to no AIs at 24 months (P < 0.01) while total estradiol and testosterone levels remained stable. Independent of AI usage, chemotherapy-induced postmenopausal breast cancer patients demonstrated an increase of total body mass. AI users demonstrated maintenance of total body fat, an increase in lean body mass and free testosterone levels, and a decrease in SHBG levels compared to no-AI users. The mechanisms and implications of these changes need to be studied further. PMID:21046232

  9. The impact of an aromatase inhibitor on body composition and gonadal hormone levels in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    van Londen, G J; Perera, S; Vujevich, K; Rastogi, P; Lembersky, B; Brufsky, A; Vogel, V; Greenspan, S L

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have become the standard adjuvant therapy of postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. AIs induce a reduction of bioavailable estrogens by inhibiting aromatase, which would be expected to induce alterations in body composition, more extensive than induced by menopause. The objectives are to examine the impact of AIs on (1) DXA-scan derived body composition and (2) gonadal hormone levels. This is a sub-analysis of a 2-year double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of 82 women with nonmetastatic breast cancer, newly menopausal following chemotherapy, who were randomized to risedronate (35 mg once weekly) versus placebo, and stratified for their usage of AI versus no AI. Outcomes included DXA-scan derived body composition and gonadal hormone levels. As a group, total body mass increased in women over 24 months. Women on AIs gained a significant amount of lean body mass compared to baseline as well as to no-AI users (P < 0.05). Women not on an AI gained total body fat compared to baseline and AI users (P < 0.05). Free testosterone significantly increased and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) significantly decreased in women on AIs compared to no AIs at 24 months (P < 0.01) while total estradiol and testosterone levels remained stable. Independent of AI usage, chemotherapy-induced postmenopausal breast cancer patients demonstrated an increase of total body mass. AI users demonstrated maintenance of total body fat, an increase in lean body mass and free testosterone levels, and a decrease in SHBG levels compared to no-AI users. The mechanisms and implications of these changes need to be studied further. PMID:21046232

  10. miR-155 Drives Metabolic Reprogramming of ER+ Breast Cancer Cells Following Long-Term Estrogen Deprivation and Predicts Clinical Response to Aromatase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Marina; Giannoni, Elisa; Fearns, Antony; Ribas, Ricardo; Gao, Qiong; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Pintus, Gianfranco; Dowsett, Mitch; Isacke, Clare M; Martin, Lesley-Ann; Chiarugi, Paola; Morandi, Andrea

    2016-03-15

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI) have become the first-line endocrine treatment of choice for postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer patients, but resistance remains a major challenge. Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer and may contribute to drug resistance. Here, we investigated the link between altered breast cancer metabolism and AI resistance using AI-resistant and sensitive breast cancer cells, patient tumor samples, and AI-sensitive human xenografts. We found that long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED), a model of AI resistance, was associated with increased glycolysis dependency. Targeting the glycolysis-priming enzyme hexokinase-2 (HK2) in combination with the AI, letrozole, synergistically reduced cell viability in AI-sensitive models. Conversely, MCF7-LTED cells, which displayed a high degree of metabolic plasticity, switched to oxidative phosphorylation when glycolysis was impaired. This effect was ER dependent as breast cancer cells with undetectable levels of ER failed to exhibit metabolic plasticity. MCF7-LTED cells were also more motile than their parental counterparts and assumed amoeboid-like invasive abilities upon glycolysis inhibition with 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). Mechanistic investigations further revealed an important role for miR-155 in metabolic reprogramming. Suppression of miR-155 resulted in sensitization of MCF7-LTED cells to metformin treatment and impairment of 2-DG-induced motility. Notably, high baseline miR-155 expression correlated with poor response to AI therapy in a cohort of ER(+) breast cancers treated with neoadjuvant anastrozole. These findings suggest that miR-155 represents a biomarker potentially capable of identifying the subset of breast cancers most likely to adapt to and relapse on AI therapy. PMID:26795347

  11. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on three sex steroids in two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and in the H295R cell assay.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Nellemann, Christine; Styrishave, Bjarne; Halling-Sørensen, Bent

    2015-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are known to have a range of disorders that are often linked to the endocrine system e.g. hormonal imbalances, breast enlargement, sexual dysfunction, and menstrual cycle disorders. The mechanisms behind most of these disorders are not known in details. In this study we investigated whether the endocrine effect due to SSRI exposure could be detected in well adopted in vitro steroidogenesis assays, two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and the H295R cell assay. The five drugs citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline, were shown to inhibit the aromatase enzyme in both types of aromatase assays. The IC50 values ranged from 3 to 600 μM. All five SSRIs, were further investigated in the H295R cell line. All compounds altered the steroid secretion from the cells, the lowest observed effect levels were 0.9 μM and 3.1 μM for sertraline and fluvoxamine, respectively. In general the H295R cell assay was more sensitive to SSRI exposure than the two aromatase assays, up to 20 times more sensitive. This indicates that the H295R cell line is a better tool for screening endocrine disrupting effects. Our findings show that the endocrine effects of SSRIs may, at least in part, be due to interference with the steroidogenesis. PMID:26162595

  12. Manipulation of broiler chickens sex differentiation by in ovo injection of aromatase inhibitors, and garlic and tomato extracts.

    PubMed

    Fazli, Nahid; Hassanabadi, Ahmad; Mottaghitalab, Majid; Hajati, Hosna

    2015-11-01

    The influence of in ovo administration of aromatase inhibitors, clomiphen citrate, tomoxifen, and garlic and tomato extracts on sex differentiation in broiler chickens were investigated in 2 experiments. Five hundred, and 1,000 fertile eggs from Ross 308 strain were used in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. In both experiments, eggs were divided into 5 groups: control group (DW, 0.1 mL/egg), tomoxifen (0.05 mg/egg), clomiphene citrate (0.05 mg/egg), garlic and tomato extracts (0.1 mL/egg). Eggs were sanitized and prepared for incubation in a regular automatic hatchery. Experimental preparations were injected into eggs at day 5 of the incubation period. Injection sites on the eggs were cleaned with 70% ethylic alcohol, bored by a needle, and aromatase inhibitors were injected into the white from the thin end of the eggs by insulin syringe and then sealed by melted paraffin. In experiment 1, hatched one-day-old chicks (mixed-sex) were raised till 42 days of age in 25 floor pens with a completely randomized design. Experiment 2 was designed to investigate the effects of sex and treatments on the feed-to-gain ratio of broiler chicks. In experiment 2, hatched one-day-old chicks were feather sexed and raised till 42 days of age in 50 floor pens. A completely randomized design with a 2 × 5 factorial arrangement of treatments (sex×treatment) was used. Gonads of the chicks were checked to determine their sex on day 42 by optic microscope to make sure feather sexing was correct. At the end of both experiments, on day 42, one bird from each pen was slaughtered for carcass analysis. In experiment 1, hatchability and the one-day-old weight of chicks showed no significant differences among treatments (P > 0.05). However, in ovo administration of garlic and tomato extracts caused the highest percentage of male chicks (P < 0.05). Also, the percentage of thighs and wings of the males were significantly higher than those of females (P < 0.05). In experiment 2, feed-to-gain ratio

  13. Methods to Standardize a Multicenter Acupuncture Trial Protocol to Reduce Aromatase Inhibitor-related Joint Symptoms in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Heather; Crew, Katherine D.; Capodice, Jillian; Awad, Danielle; Jeffres, Anne; Unger, Joseph M.; Lew, Danika L.; Hansen, Lisa K.; Meyskens, Frank L.; Wade, James L.; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2015-01-01

    Robust methods are needed to efficiently conduct large, multi-site, randomized controlled clinical trials of acupuncture protocols. SWOG S1200 is a randomized, controlled sham- and waitlist-controlled trial of a standardized acupuncture protocol treating aromatase inhibitor (AI)-associated arthralgias in early stage breast cancer patients (n=228). The primary objective is to determine whether true acupuncture administered twice weekly for 6 weeks compared to sham acupuncture or a waitlist control causes a reduction in AI-associated joint pain at 6 weeks as assessed by patient report. The study is conducted at 11 institutions across the US. The true acupuncture protocol was developed using a consensus-based process. Both the true acupuncture and sham acupuncture protocols consist of 12 sessions administered over 6 weeks, followed by 1 session per week for the remaining 6 weeks. The true acupuncture protocol uses standardized protocol points in addition to standardized acupoints tailored to a patient’s joint symptoms. The similarly standardized sham acupuncture protocol utilizes superficial needling of non-acupoints. Standardized methods were developed to train and monitor acupuncturists, including online and in-person training, study manuals, monthly phone calls, and remote quality assurance monitoring throughout the study period. Research staff was similarly trained using online and in-person training, and monthly phone calls. PMID:26100070

  14. Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Arthritis Program for Breast Cancer Survivors on Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy Who Experience Joint Pain.

    PubMed

    Nyrop, Kirsten A; Callahan, Leigh F; Rini, Christine; Altpeter, Mary; Hackney, Betsy; Schecher, Arielle; Wilson, Anne; Muss, Hyman B

    2015-01-01

    Adding aromatase inhibitors (AIs) to adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer significantly reduces cancer recurrence. A common side effect of AIs is noninflammatory joint pain and stiffness (arthralgia) similar to arthritis symptoms. An evidence-based walking program developed by the Arthritis Foundation - Walk With Ease (WWE) - reduces arthritis-related joint symptoms. We hypothesized that WWE may also reduce AI-associated arthralgia. However, the potential for different barriers and facilitators to physical activity for these 2 patient populations suggested a need to adapt WWE before testing it with breast cancer survivors. We conducted qualitative research with 46 breast cancer survivors to explore program modification and inform the development of materials for an adapted program (Walk With Ease-Breast Cancer). Our process parallels the National Cancer Institute's Research-Tested Intervention Programs (RTIPs) guidelines for adapting evidence-based programs for cancer populations. Findings resulted in a customized 8-page brochure to supplement existing WWE materials. PMID:26068412

  15. Regulation of aromatase expression in breast cancer treated with anastrozole neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghimenti, Chiara; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Grosso, Enrico; Scatolini, Maria; Regolo, Lea; Zambelli, Alberto; Chiorino, Giovanna

    2013-03-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs), such as anastrozole, are established in the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer. However, ∼20% of patients with hormone receptor-positive breast tumors treated with anastrozole do not respond and it remains impossible to accurately predict sensitivity. Since polymorphisms in the aromatase gene may influence the response to inhibitory drugs, we evaluated the presence of rs6493497 and rs7176005 polymorphisms (mapping in the 5'-flanking region of the CYP19A1 gene coding for the aromatase protein) in a cohort of 37 patients with postmenopausal breast cancer who received three-month neoadjuvant treatment with anastrozole. We then investigated any association of the polymorphisms with changes in aromatase mRNA expression change and/or response to treatment. We also analyzed five miRNAs computationally predicted to target aromatase, to observe any association between their expression and sensitivity to anastrozole. Three samples carried the two polymorphisms and the remaining samples were wild-type for both, however, no association with response or with aromatase mRNA basal expression level or expression difference after therapy was observed. Polymorphic samples that were resistant to anastrozole showed no change or decrease in aromatase expression following AI treatment, whereas an increase in expression was observed for the polymorphic responsive samples. No statistically significant correlation was observed between miRNA and aromatase mRNA expression, or with response to anastrozole neoadjuvant treatment. These data indicate that the polymorphisms analyzed are not involved in aromatase activity and that other epigenetic mechanisms may regulate aromatase protein expression.

  16. Targeted Metabolomics Approach To Detect the Misuse of Steroidal Aromatase Inhibitors in Equine Sports by Biomarker Profiling.

    PubMed

    Chan, George Ho Man; Ho, Emmie Ngai Man; Leung, David Kwan Kon; Wong, Kin Sing; Wan, Terence See Ming

    2016-01-01

    The use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is prohibited in both human and equine sports. The conventional approach in doping control testing for AAS (as well as other prohibited substances) is accomplished by the direct detection of target AAS or their characteristic metabolites in biological samples using hyphenated techniques such as gas chromatography or liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Such an approach, however, falls short when dealing with unknown designer steroids where reference materials and their pharmacokinetics are not available. In addition, AASs with fast elimination times render the direct detection approach ineffective as the detection window is short. A targeted metabolomics approach is a plausible alternative to the conventional direct detection approach for controlling the misuse of AAS in sports. Because the administration of AAS of the same class may trigger similar physiological responses or effects in the body, it may be possible to detect such administrations by monitoring changes in the endogenous steroidal expression profile. This study attempts to evaluate the viability of using the targeted metabolomics approach to detect the administration of steroidal aromatase inhibitors, namely androst-4-ene-3,6,17-trione (6-OXO) and androsta-1,4,6-triene-3,17-dione (ATD), in horses. Total (free and conjugated) urinary concentrations of 31 endogenous steroids were determined by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for a group of 2 resting and 2 in-training thoroughbred geldings treated with either 6-OXO or ATD. Similar data were also obtained from a control (untreated) group of in-training thoroughbred geldings (n = 28). Statistical processing and chemometric procedures using principle component analysis and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) have highlighted 7 potential biomarkers that could be used to differentiate urine samples obtained from the control and the treated groups

  17. Effect of Estrogen Depletion on Pain Sensitivity in Aromatase Inhibitor-Treated Women with Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Henry, N. Lynn; Conlon, Anna; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Griffith, Kent; Smerage, Jeffrey B.; Schott, Anne F.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Williams, David A.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Harte, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI), which are used to treat breast cancer, inhibit estrogen production in postmenopausal women. AI-associated musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS) occur in approximately half of treated women, and lead to treatment discontinuation in 20–30%. The etiology may be due in part to estrogen deprivation. In premenopausal women, lower estrogen levels have been associated with increased pain, as well as with impairment of descending pain inhibitory pathways, which may be a risk factor for developing chronic pain. We prospectively tested whether AI-induced estrogen deprivation alters pain sensitivity, thereby increasing the risk of developing AIMSS. Fifty postmenopausal breast cancer patients underwent pressure pain testing and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) assessment prior to AI initiation and after 3 and 6 months. At baseline, 26 of 40 (65%) assessed patients demonstrated impaired CPM, which was greater in those who had previously received chemotherapy (p=0.006). No statistically significant change in pressure pain threshold or CPM was identified following estrogen deprivation. In addition, there was no association with either measure of pain sensitivity and change in patient-reported pain with AI therapy. AIMSS are not likely due to decreased pain threshold or impaired CPM prior to treatment initiation, or to effects of estrogen depletion on pain sensitivity. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01814397. Perspective This article presents our findings of the effect of estrogen deprivation on objective measures of pain sensitivity. In postmenopausal women, medication-induced estrogen depletion did not result in an identifiable change in pressure pain threshold or conditioned pain modulation. Impaired conditioned pain modulation may be associated with chemotherapy. PMID:24462504

  18. Aromatase inhibitors associated musculoskeletal disorders and bone fractures in postmenopausal breast cancer patients: a result from Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Wang, Jue; Xue, Dan-Dan; He, Wei

    2014-09-01

    As the prognosis of early breast cancer patients improves, the long-term safety of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) is increasingly important. In the present study, we retrospectively investigated the incidences of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and bone fractures in a cohort of Chinese postmenopausal patients with breast cancer. Data of postmenopausal patients with breast cancer were collected. Among which, 70 patients received AIs therapy (median follow-up of 32.5 months), 52 patients received tamoxifen (TAM), and 89 patients received no endocrine therapy (NE). Baseline characteristics, incidence of MSDs and bone fractures were analyzed and compared. When compared with NE group (40.4 %, 36/89), more patients in AIs group developed MSDs (72.9 %, 51/70, adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.30, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.59-6.88, P = 0.001). But no difference was found between TAM group (36.5 %, 19/52, AOR = 0.70, 95 % CI = 0.32-1.52, P = 0.372) and NE group. About 39.7 months after initial AIs therapy, nine patients in AI group developed bone fractures in different sites, and the bone fracture rate was significantly increased (12.9 %, 9/70, adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) = 20.08, 95 % CI = 1.72-234.08, P = 0.017) in comparison with NE group (1.1 %, 1/89). Moreover, the bone fracture rate of TAM group was not different from NE group (1.9 %, 1/52, AHR = 2.64, 95 % CI = 0.14-48.73, P = 0.513). AIs therapy may induce increased rates of MSDs and bone fractures in Chinese population of postmenopausal breast cancer patients, whereas TAM therapy did not help reduce the incidences of MSDs and bone fractures.

  19. Comparison of the effect of the aromatase inhibitor, anastrazole, to the antioestrogen, tamoxifen citrate, on canine prostate and semen.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, G; Guendulain, C; Maffrand, C; Gobello, C

    2009-07-01

    This study compared the efficiency of the aromatase inhibitor, anastrazole, with the antioestrogenic receptor blocker, tamoxifen, on normal (NRL) and hyperplastic prostate glands. Forty healthy dogs were classified as NRL (n = 18) or abnormal (ABN) with benign prostate hyperplasia (n = 22). The dogs were randomly assigned to one of the following six groups, treated for 60 days; oral placebo for normal (NRL-PLC; n = 6) and abnormal (ABN-PLC; n = 6), oral anastrazole 0.25-1 mg/day, for normal (NRL-ANZ, n = 6) and abnormal (ABN-ANZ, n = 8) and oral tamoxifen citrate 2.5-10 mg/day for normal (NRL-TMX; n = 6) and abnormal (ABN-TMX; n = 8) dogs. The dogs were evaluated before treatment and then monthly for 4 months. At the end of the treatment, the prostatic volume decreased by 28.5 +/- 4.3%, 21.6 +/- 6.3% and 0.7 +/- 1.0% in the ABN-TMX, ABN-ANZ and ABN-PLC (p < 0.01), respectively. From then on, prostatic volume began to increase without reaching pre-treatment values at the end of the study. In the ABN animals, there were no differences for this parameter between ANZ and TMX treatment (p > 0.1), whereas in the NRL animals ANZ produced a less pronounced decrease (p < 0.05), libido, testicular consistency and scrotal diameter decreased during treatment in the TMX group (p > 0.05). These parameters and sperm volume, count, motility and morphological abnormalities remained unaltered throughout the study in the ANZ and PLC groups (p > 0.05). There were no haematological nor biochemical side effects. Anastrazole might offer a safe and effective alternative for the medical management of dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  20. Periodontal Health in Women with Early Stage Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Newly on Aromatase Inhibitors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, LS; Inglehart, MR; Giannobile, W; Braun, T; Kolenic, G; Van Poznak, C

    2015-01-01

    Background Aromatase inhibitor (AI) use results in low estrogen levels which in turn affect bone mineral density (BMD). Periodontitis, alveolar bone loss, and tooth loss are associated with low BMD. The goal of this study was to assess the prevalence of periodontitis, perceived oral health, and evaluate salivary biomarkers in postmenopausal women who are early stage (I-IIIA) breast cancer (BCa) survivors and receive adjuvant AI therapy. Methods Participants included 58 postmenopausal women; 29 with BCa on AIs and 29 controls without BCa diagnoses. Baseline periodontal status was assessed with: (1) periodontal pocket depth (PD); (2) bleeding on probing (BOP); and (3) attachment loss (AL). Demographic and dental utilization information was gathered by questionnaire. Linear regression modeling was used to analyze the outcomes. Results No differences in mean PD or the number of teeth were found. The AI group had significantly more sites with BOP (27.8 vs. 16.7; p = 0.02), higher worst-site AL (5.2 mm vs. 4.0 mm; p < 0.01) and more sites with dental calculus than did controls (18.2 vs. 6.4; p < 0.001). Linear regression adjusted for income, tobacco use, and dental insurance, and previous radiation and chemotherapy exposure demonstrated AI use increased CAL over 2 mm (95% CI: 0.46 -3.92). Median salivary osteocalcin and Tumor Necrosis Factor levels were significantly higher in the BCa group than the control group. Conclusions This first investigation of the periodontal status of women initiating adjuvant AI therapy identifies this population as having an increased risk for periodontitis (NCT1272570). PMID:25672657

  1. Modulation of Aromatase by Phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lephart, Edwin D.

    2015-01-01

    The aromatase enzyme catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens in many human tissues. Estrogens are known to stimulate cellular proliferation associated with certain cancers and protect against adverse symptoms during the peri- and postmenopausal intervals. Phytoestrogens are a group of plant derived naturally occurring compounds that have chemical structures similar to estrogen. Since phytoestrogens are known to be constituents of animal/human food sources, these compounds have received increased research attention. Phytoestrogens may contribute to decreased cancer risk by the inhibition of aromatase enzyme activity and CYP19 gene expression in human tissues. This review covers (a) the aromatase enzyme (historical descriptions on function, activity, and gene characteristics), (b) phytoestrogens in their classifications and applications to human health, and (c) a chronological coverage of aromatase activity modulated by phytoestrogens from the early 1980s to 2015. In general, phytoestrogens act as aromatase inhibitors by (a) decreasing aromatase gene expression, (b) inhibiting the aromatase enzyme itself, or (c) in some cases acting at both levels of regulation. The findings presented herein are consistent with estrogen's impact on health and phytoestrogen's potential as anticancer treatments, but well-controlled, large-scale studies are warranted to determine the effectiveness of phytoestrogens on breast cancer and age-related diseases. PMID:26798508

  2. Anti-aromatase chemicals in red wine.

    PubMed

    Eng, E T; Williams, D; Mandava, U; Kirma, N; Tekmal, R R; Chen, S

    2002-06-01

    Estrogen synthesized in situ plays a more important role in breast cancer cell proliferation than does circulating estrogen. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen and is expressed at a higher level in breast cancer tissue than in surrounding noncancer tissue. A promising route of chemoprevention against breast cancer may be through the suppression of in situ estrogen formation using aromatase inhibitors. A diet high in fruits and vegetables may reduce the incidence of breast cancer, because they contain phytochemicals that can act as aromatase inhibitors. In our previous studies, we found that grapes and wine contain potent phytochemicals that can inhibit aromatase. We show that red wine was more effective than white wine in suppressing aromatase activity. Interestingly, our results from white wine studies suggest a weak inductive effect of alcohol on aromatase activity. On the other hand, the potent effect of anti-aromatase chemicals in red wine overcomes the weak inductive effect of alcohol in wine. Several purification procedures were performed on whole red wine to separate active aromatase inhibitors from non-active compounds. These techniques included liquid-liquid extraction, silica gel chromatography, various solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, and high performance liquid chromatography. An active Pinot Noir red wine SPE C18 column fraction (20% acetonitrile:water) was more effective than complete Pinot Noir wine in suppressing aromatase assay. This red wine extract was further analyzed in a transgenic mouse model in which aromatase was over-expressed in mammary tissue. Our gavaged red wine extract completely abrogated aromatase-induced hyperplasia and other neoplastic changes in mammary tissue. These results suggest that red wine or red wine extract may be a chemopreventive diet supplement for postmenopausal women who have a high risk of breast cancer. Further research is underway to purify and characterize the active compounds in red

  3. The immunoexpression of androgen receptor, estrogen receptors alpha and beta, vanilloid type 1 receptor and cytochrome p450 aromatase in rats testis chronically treated with letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Pilutin, Anna; Misiakiewicz-Has, Kamila; Kolasa, Agnieszka; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Marchlewicz, Mariola; Wiszniewska, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The function of testis is under hormonal control and any disturbance of hormonal homeostasis can lead to morphological and physiological changes. Therefore the aim of the study was to investigate the expression of androgen and estrogen receptors (AR, ERs), vanilloid receptor (TRPV1), cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom), as well as apoptosis of cells in testis of adult rats chronically treated with letrozole (LT), a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor, for 6 months. The testicular tissues were fixed in Bouin's fixative and embedded in paraffin. Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies (abs) against AR, ERa, P450arom, and polyclonalabs against ERβ, TRPV1, caspase-3 was applied. Long-lasting estradiol deficiency, as an effect of LT treatment, produced changes in the morphology of testis and altered the expression of the studied receptors in cells of the seminiferous tubules and rate of cell apoptosis. The immunostaining for AR was found in the nuclei of Sertoli cells and the cytoplasm of spermatogonia and spermatocytes in III-IV stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle. The intensity of staining for P450arom was lower in the testis of LT-treated rats as compared to control animals. The immunofluorescence of ERα and ERβ was observed exclusively in the nuclei of Leydig cells of LT-treated rats. There were no changes in localization of TRPV1, however, the intensity of reaction was stronger in germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium after LT treatment. The apoptosis in both groups of animals was observed within the population of spermatocytes and spermatids in II and III stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle. In testis of LT-treated rats the immunoexpression of caspase-3 was additionally found in the germ cells in I and IV stages, and Sertoli, myoid and Leydig cells. In conclusion, our results underline the important role of letrozole treatment in the proper function of male reproductive system, and additionally demonstrate that hormonal imbalance can

  4. Aromatase Inhibition in a Transcriptional Network Context

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnow ovaries (FHM, Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using a transcriptional ne...

  5. Inhibition of peripheral aromatization in baboons by an enzyme-activated aromatase inhibitor (MDL 18,962)

    SciTech Connect

    Longcope, C.; Femino, A.; Johnston, J.O.

    1988-05-01

    The peripheral aromatization ((rho)BM) of androstenedione (A) and testosterone (T) was measured before and after administration of the aromatase inhibitor 10-(2 propynyl)estr-4-ene-3,17-dione (MDL-18,962) to five mature female baboons, Papio annubis. The measurements were made by infusing (3H)androstenedione/(14C)estrone or (3H)testosterone/(14C)estradiol for 3.5 h and collecting blood samples during the infusions and all urine for 96 h from the start of the infusion. Blood samples were analyzed for radioactivity as infused and product steroids, and the data were used to calculate MCRs. An aliquot of the pooled urine was analyzed for the glucuronides of estrone and estradiol and used to calculate the (rho)BM. MDL-18,962 was administered as a pulse in polyethylene glycol-400 (1-5 ml) either iv or via gastric tube 30 min before administration of the radiolabeled steroids. Control studies were done with and without polyethylene glycol-400 administration. When MDL-18,962 was given iv at 4 mg/kg, the aromatization of A was decreased 91.8 +/- 0.9% from the control value of 1.23 +/- 0.13% to 0.11 +/- 0.01%. At the same dose, aromatization of T was decreased 82.0 +/- 7.1%, from a control value of 0.20 +/- 0.03% to 0.037 +/- 0.018%. When MDL-18,962 was given iv at doses of 0.4, 0.1, 0.04, and 0.01 mg/kg, the values for aromatization of A were 0.16 +/- 0.03%, 0.18 +/- 0.06%, 0.37 +/- 11%, and 0.65 +/- 0.09%, respectively. The administration of MDL-18,962 via gastric tube at 4 mg/kg as a pulse decreased the aromatization of A from 1.35 +/- 0.06% to 0.43 +/- 0.12%, an inhibition of 67.2 +/- 10.7%. When administered via gastric tube daily for 5 days at 4 mg/kg, the aromatization of A fell from 1.35 +/- 0.06% to 0.063 +/- 0.003%, an inhibition of 84.4 +/- 0.5%.

  6. Preventive effect of zoledronic acid on aromatase inhibitor-associated bone loss for postmenopausal breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant letrozole

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shengliang; Wang, Fuchao; Dou, Honglei; Zhang, Longqiang; Li, Jiwen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to compare the efficacy and safety between zoledronic acid combined with calcium and calcium alone to prevent aromatase inhibitor-associated bone loss for postmenopausal breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant letrozole. Methods One hundred twenty patients were randomly divided into two groups, A and B. Patients in group A (n=60) received modified radical mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery + four cycles of AC followed by T regimen (optional) + radiotherapy (optional) + letrozole 2.5 mg daily + calcium 500 mg twice daily + vitamin D 400 international units daily +4 mg of zoledronic acid every 6 months, while patients in group B (n=60) were not given zoledronic acid and the rest of the treatments of group B were the same as group A. All the patients were followed up for 1 year. The primary endpoint was the intrapatient percentage change in lumbar spine (LS) bone mineral density (BMD) from baseline to month 12. Secondary endpoints included the percentage change in total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN) BMD, the incidence of osteoporosis, the incidence of a clinically meaningful 5% decline in BMD at 1 year, change of serum N-telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTX) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) concentrations. Results Patients in group A had a statistically significant higher average change and average percent change in LS, FN, and TH than group B. Group A had a statistically significant lower incidence of a clinically meaningful loss of bone density at the LS, FN, or TH than Group B. The incidence of osteoporosis in group A was significantly lower than group B. The decreases in NTX and BSAP concentrations from baseline to month 12 in patients of group A were significant; in contrast, patients in group B were found to have increases in NTX and BSAP concentrations from baseline. The most common adverse reactions in patients are flu-like symptoms (38%), bone pain (28%), and joint pain (20%). Conclusion AI-associated bone loss

  7. Targeted Metabolomics Approach To Detect the Misuse of Steroidal Aromatase Inhibitors in Equine Sports by Biomarker Profiling.

    PubMed

    Chan, George Ho Man; Ho, Emmie Ngai Man; Leung, David Kwan Kon; Wong, Kin Sing; Wan, Terence See Ming

    2016-01-01

    The use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is prohibited in both human and equine sports. The conventional approach in doping control testing for AAS (as well as other prohibited substances) is accomplished by the direct detection of target AAS or their characteristic metabolites in biological samples using hyphenated techniques such as gas chromatography or liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Such an approach, however, falls short when dealing with unknown designer steroids where reference materials and their pharmacokinetics are not available. In addition, AASs with fast elimination times render the direct detection approach ineffective as the detection window is short. A targeted metabolomics approach is a plausible alternative to the conventional direct detection approach for controlling the misuse of AAS in sports. Because the administration of AAS of the same class may trigger similar physiological responses or effects in the body, it may be possible to detect such administrations by monitoring changes in the endogenous steroidal expression profile. This study attempts to evaluate the viability of using the targeted metabolomics approach to detect the administration of steroidal aromatase inhibitors, namely androst-4-ene-3,6,17-trione (6-OXO) and androsta-1,4,6-triene-3,17-dione (ATD), in horses. Total (free and conjugated) urinary concentrations of 31 endogenous steroids were determined by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for a group of 2 resting and 2 in-training thoroughbred geldings treated with either 6-OXO or ATD. Similar data were also obtained from a control (untreated) group of in-training thoroughbred geldings (n = 28). Statistical processing and chemometric procedures using principle component analysis and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) have highlighted 7 potential biomarkers that could be used to differentiate urine samples obtained from the control and the treated groups

  8. Resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitor herbicides currently comprise the largest site-of-action group (with 54 active ingredients across five chemical groups) and have been widely used in world agriculture since they were first introduced in 1982. Resistance evolution in weeds to AHAS inhibitors has been rapid and identified in populations of many weed species. Often, evolved resistance is associated with point mutations in the target AHAS gene; however non-target-site enhanced herbicide metabolism occurs as well. Many AHAS gene resistance mutations can occur and be rapidly enriched owing to a high initial resistance gene frequency, simple and dominant genetic inheritance and lack of major fitness cost of the resistance alleles. Major advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the AHAS (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalytic subunit in complex with various AHAS inhibitor herbicides have greatly improved current understanding of the detailed molecular interactions between AHAS, cofactors and herbicides. Compared with target-site resistance, non-target-site resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides is less studied and hence less understood. In a few well-studied cases, non-target-site resistance is due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism (metabolic resistance), mimicking that occurring in tolerant crop species and often involving cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. However, the specific herbicide-metabolising, resistance-endowing genes are yet to be identified in resistant weed species. The current state of mechanistic understanding of AHAS inhibitor herbicide resistance is reviewed, and outstanding research issues are outlined.

  9. Germline variants in the CYP19A1 gene are related to specific adverse events in aromatase inhibitor users: a substudy of Dutch patients in the TEAM trial.

    PubMed

    Fontein, Duveken B Y; Houtsma, Daniel; Nortier, Johan W R; Baak-Pablo, Renee F; Kranenbarg, Elma Meershoek-Klein; van der Straaten, Tahar R J H M; Putter, Hein; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gelderblom, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2014-04-01

    Musculoskeletal adverse events (MSAEs) and vasomotor symptoms (VMSs) are known side-effects of aromatase inhibitors, and may be related to genetic variations of the aromatase gene (CYP19A1). We investigated the relationship between these specific AEs and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CYP19A1 gene in postmenopausal, hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer (BC) patients treated with adjuvant exemestane for 5 years. Dutch patients who were randomized to receive 5 years of exemestane in the Tamoxifen Exemestane Adjuvant Multinational (TEAM) trial were included. A tagging-SNP approach was performed, covering 80 % of variations of the CYP19A1 gene with 30 SNPs. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the risk of reporting VMSs or MSAEs in relation to genotypes within selected SNPs. Of 737 included patients, 281 patients reported at least one MSAE (n = 210) or VMS (n = 163). Homozygous AA genotype of rs934635 was associated with a significantly higher odds of MSAEs (multivariate odds ratio (OR) 4.66, p = 0.008) and VMSs (multivariate OR 2.78, p = 0.044). Regarding both rs1694189 and rs7176005, the homozygous variant genotypes (TT) were associated with a higher odds of VMSs, but not MSAEs (OR 1.758, p = 0.025 and OR 6.361, p = 0.021, respectively). Our exploratory analysis demonstrated that some CYP19A1 gene variations may be associated with MSAEs and/or VMSs. Specifically, patients with the homozygous variant rs934635 genotype reported more MSAEs and VMSs. Although further confirmatory studies are warranted, genomic profiling can help identify patients at an increased risk of reporting these specific AEs, potentiating further personalized BC treatment. PMID:24590773

  10. Successful detection of (anti-)androgenic and aromatase inhibitors in pre-spawning adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) using easily measured endpoints of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Panter, G H; Hutchinson, T H; Hurd, K S; Sherren, A; Stanley, R D; Tyler, C R

    2004-10-18

    Screening assays have been successfully developed for the detection of (anti-)oestrogenic substances in several fish species, including the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Previous work suggested that pre-spawning adult fathead minnows might be an appropriate life-stage for developing a screen to detect endocrine active substances (EASs). Pre-spawning adult fathead minnows, in which their phenotypic sex could be determined, were exposed in flow-through systems to three reference substances for 21 days, at 25 degrees C. Male and female fish, held in separate tanks, were exposed to dihydrotestosterone (DHT, androgen), flutamide (anti-androgen) and fadrozole (aromatase inhibitor). Nominal (mean measured) concentrations for DHT were 10 (6.0), 32 (6.1) and 100 (8.6) microg l(-1), for flutamide, 100 (95.3), 320 (320.4) and 1000 (938.6) microg l(-1) and for fadrozole, 25 (24.8), 50 (51.7) and 100 (95.5) microg l(-1). After 14 and 21 days exposure, fish were evaluated for growth, secondary sexual characteristics (SSCs, number and prominence of nuptial tubercles), gonadosomatic index (GSI) and plasma vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations. Development of nuptial tubercles was sensitive to both DHT and flutamide exposure. Exposure to DHT significantly increased the number of nuptial tubercles (male characteristic) in both males (more abundant) and females, after 14 days. Flutamide (938.6 microg l(-1), day 21) significantly reduced nuptial tubercle number in male fish. Fadrozole significantly inhibited ovarian growth (lower GSI) and significantly induced testis growth (51.7 and 95.5 microg l(-1)), after 21 days. Plasma VTG concentrations were significantly elevated in male fish (6.1 and 8.6 microg l(-1)), but inhibited in female fish (6.0 microg l(-1)), exposed to DHT. Flutamide had no effect on plasma VTG in male fish, but significantly induced VTG in female fish, after 21 days. Fadrozole significantly inhibited VTG in females and induced VTG synthesis in males, at day 21

  11. Natural Product Compounds with Aromatase Inhibitory Activity: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Several synthetic aromatase inhibitors are currently in clinical use for the treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer. However, these treatments may lead to untoward side effects and so a search for new aromatase inhibitors continues, especially those for which the activity is promoter-specific, targeting the breast-specific promoters I.3 and II. Recently, numerous natural product compounds have been found to inhibit aromatase in non-cellular, cellular, and in vivo studies. These investigations, covering the last two years, as well as additional studies that have focused on the evaluation of natural product compounds as promoter-specific aromatase inhibitors or as aromatase inducers, are described in this review. PMID:20635310

  12. Involvement of pituitary gonadotropins, gonadal steroids and breeding season in sex change of protogynous dusky grouper, Epinephelus marginatus (Teleostei: Serranidae), induced by a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Carlos Eduardo de O; Araújo, Bruno C; Mello, Paulo H; Narcizo, Amanda de M; Rodrigues-Filho, Jandyr A; Medrado, Andreone T; Zampieri, Ricardo A; Floeter-Winter, Lucile M; Moreira, Renata Guimarães

    2013-10-01

    Two experiments were performed using the aromatase inhibitor (AI) letrozole (100mg/kg) to promote sex change, from female-to-male, in protogynous dusky grouper. One experiment was performed during the breeding season (spring) and the other at the end of the breeding season (summer). During the spring, AI promoted sex change after 9 weeks and the sperm produced was able to fertilize grouper oocytes. During the summer, the sex change was incomplete; intersex individuals were present and sperm was not released by any of the animals. Sex changed gonads had a lamellar architecture; cysts of spermatocytes and spermatozoa in the lumen of the germinal compartment. In the spring, after 4 weeks, 11ketotestosterone (11KT) levels were higher in the AI than in control fish, and after 9 weeks, coincident with semen release, testosterone levels increased in the AI group, while 11KT returned to the initial levels. Estradiol (E2) levels remained unchanged during the experimental period. Instead of decreasing throughout the period, as in control group, 17 α-OH progesterone levels did not change in the AI-treated fish, resulting in higher values after 9 weeks when compared with control fish. fshβ and lhβ gene expression in the AI animals were lower compared with control fish after 9 weeks. The use of AI was effective to obtain functional males during the breeding season. The increase in androgens, modulated by gonadotropins, triggered the sex change, enabling the development of male germ cells, whereas a decrease in E2 levels was not required to change sex in dusky grouper.

  13. Effects of 17α-Methyltestosterone and Aromatase Inhibitor Letrozole on Sex Reversal, Gonadal Structure, and Growth in Yellow Catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhi-Gang; Fan, Qi-Xue; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Yun-Long; Wang, Han-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Monosex populations are in demand in many fish species with sexual dimorphism, e.g., better growth performance, higher gonad value, superior ornamental value. From the point of view of research, a monosex population is one of the best materials for investigating sex-determining mechanisms, sex differentiation, and sex-linked markers. Sex reversal of females (phenotypic reversal from XX female to XX male) is the first step in all-female production in species with an XX/XY system for sex determination. In the present study, masculinization of yellow catfish, a species with XX/XY sex determination, was investigated by oral administration of various doses of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) or an aromatase inhibitor (AI) letrozole (LZ); effects on survival, growth performance, sex ratio, and changes in gonadal structure were evaluated. Three doses (20, 50, and 100 mg kg(-1) diet) of oral MT or LZ were administered to fry from 10 days post-hatching (DPH) to 59 DPH. Oral administration of MT at all doses did not significantly change the ratio of males (45.8%, 33.3%, and 50.0% respectively) compared to the control group (37.5%), while yielding intersex fish at all doses (4.2% to 8.3%). Oral administration of LZ produced a significantly higher proportion of males in all doses (75.5%, 83.3%, and 75.0%, respectively). Additionally, the lowest dose of LZ improved the growth of treated fish compared to the control, and all doses of LZ enhanced spermatogenesis in treated males.

  14. Altered gene expression in the brain and ovaries of zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole: microarray analysis and hypothesis generation.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, L; Wang, Rong-Lin; Bencic, David C; Biales, Adam D; Martinović, Dalma; Lazorchak, James M; Toth, Gregory; Ankley, Gerald T

    2009-08-01

    As part of a research effort examining system-wide responses of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in fish to endocrine-active chemicals (EACs) with different modes of action, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 25 or 100 microg/L of the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole for 24, 48, or 96 h. Global transcriptional response in brain and ovarian tissue of fish exposed to 25 microg/L of fadrozole was compared to that in control fish using a commercially available, 22,000-gene oligonucleotide microarray. Transcripts altered in brain were functionally linked to differentiation, development, DNA replication, and cell cycle. Additionally, multiple genes associated with the one-carbon pool by folate pathway (KEGG 00670) were significantly up-regulated. Transcripts altered in ovary were functionally linked to cell-cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, vasculogenesis, and development. Promoter motif analysis identified GATA-binding factor 2, Ikaros 2, alcohol dehydrogenase gene regulator 1, myoblast-determining factor, and several heat shock factors as being associated with coexpressed gene clusters that were differentially expressed following exposure to fadrozole. Based on the transcriptional changes observed, it was hypothesized that fadrozole elicits neurodegenerative stress in brain tissue and that fish cope with this stress through proliferation of radial glial cells. Additionally, it was hypothesized that changes of gene expression in the ovary of fadrozole-exposed zebrafish reflect disruption of oocyte maturation and ovulation because of impaired vitellogenesis. These hypotheses and others derived from the microarray results provide a foundation for future studies aimed at understanding responses of the HPG axis to EACs and other chemical stressors.

  15. Treatment-Associated Musculoskeletal and Vasomotor Symptoms and Relapse-Free Survival in the NCIC CTG MA.27 Adjuvant Breast Cancer Aromatase Inhibitor Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stearns, Vered; Chapman, Judith-Anne W.; Ma, Cynthia X.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Ingle, James N.; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; Budd, G. Thomas; Rabaglio, Manuela; Sledge, George W.; Le Maitre, Aurélie; Kundapur, Jessica; Liedke, Pedro E.R.; Shepherd, Lois E.; Goss, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Treatment-emergent symptoms with adjuvant tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have been associated with superior recurrence-free survival (RFS). We hypothesized that MA.27 anastrozole- or exemestane-treated patients with new or worsening vasomotor and/or joint symptoms would have improved RFS. Patients and Methods MA.27 randomly assigned 7,576 postmenopausal women with breast cancer to 5 years of anastrozole or exemestane. Patient-reported symptoms were collected using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 at protocol-specified baseline and 6- and 12-month clinical visits. Symptoms were considered present with either vasomotor and/or joint complaints. Associations between symptoms and baseline patient characteristics were examined with χ2 and Fisher's exact tests. Subsequent effects of new or worsening symptoms on RFS were examined with landmark analyses and stratified univariable and multivariable Cox models. We examined the effects of 3-month symptoms arising from unplanned clinic visits as a result of severe toxicity. Results Patients were assessable if eligible for the MA.27 trial, received some trial therapy, and had no disease recurrence at the end of a symptom assessment period; 96% of patients (n = 7,306 patients) were included at 6 months, and 96% (n = 7,246) were included at 12 months. Thirty-four percent of patients had baseline symptoms. For patients without baseline symptoms, 25% and 52% had new symptoms by 6 and 12 months, respectively. Neither treatment-emergent nor baseline symptoms significantly impacted RFS (P > .10) in patients with or without baseline symptoms. Conclusion In MA.27, anastrozole or exemestane treatment-emergent symptoms were not associated with improved RFS. Women should be supported through treatment and encouraged to remain on their AI regardless of their symptoms. PMID:25512454

  16. Outcome analysis of aromatase inhibitor therapy to increase adult height in males with predicted short adult stature and/or rapid pubertal progress: a retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Kim; Cameo, Tamara; Fennoy, Ilene; Hassoun, Abeer A.; Lerner, Shulamit E.; Aranoff, Gaya S.; Sopher, Aviva B.; Yang, Christine; McMahon, Donald J.; Oberfield, Sharon E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have been used off-label to increase adult height in short adolescent males. Studies have shown that AIs increase the predicted adult height (PAH) while delaying bone age (BA) maturation. We sought to determine whether AI therapy increases PAH in boys with short stature or rapid pubertal progression, and to evaluate any untoward effects. Methods The charts of 27 boys with BA ≥ 13 and short stature [height ≥ 2 standard deviation (SD) below the mean or ≥ 2 SD below mid-parental target height (MPTH)] or rapid pubertal progress, treated with anastrozole were reviewed. Outcome measures included anthropomorphic, hormonal, and metabolic data. Results The AI therapy averaged 21 months (range 14–30 months) for all, with Rx group 1 receiving < 18 months therapy (n = 7) and Rx group 2 receiving 18–30 months therapy (n = 20). Post-therapy, in Rx group 1 and all subjects, there was no significant change in the PAH, height SDS, or BA/chronological age (CA). In Rx group 2, there was a small, nonsignificant increase in PAH, no change in height SDS, and a small decrease in BA/CA. Post-therapy PAH was different from MPTH in all and in both Rx groups 1 and 2, p < 0.02. Eight of them achieved near-final height, averaging 6.73 ± 1.40 cm less than MPTH and 1.91 ± 0.86 cm less than the pre-therapy PAH. Post-therapy, the initially decreased estradiol did not persist but mildly increased testosterone and decreased high-density lipoprotein were noted, as was an increase in hematocrit, and decrease in growth velocity. Conclusions We suggest that although bone age progression may be slightly delayed with longer duration of therapy, an overall short-term AI therapy does not lead to a final height that is greater than the predicted pre-therapy height. PMID:24756052

  17. Effects of 17α-Methyltestosterone and Aromatase Inhibitor Letrozole on Sex Reversal, Gonadal Structure, and Growth in Yellow Catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhi-Gang; Fan, Qi-Xue; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Yun-Long; Wang, Han-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Monosex populations are in demand in many fish species with sexual dimorphism, e.g., better growth performance, higher gonad value, superior ornamental value. From the point of view of research, a monosex population is one of the best materials for investigating sex-determining mechanisms, sex differentiation, and sex-linked markers. Sex reversal of females (phenotypic reversal from XX female to XX male) is the first step in all-female production in species with an XX/XY system for sex determination. In the present study, masculinization of yellow catfish, a species with XX/XY sex determination, was investigated by oral administration of various doses of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) or an aromatase inhibitor (AI) letrozole (LZ); effects on survival, growth performance, sex ratio, and changes in gonadal structure were evaluated. Three doses (20, 50, and 100 mg kg(-1) diet) of oral MT or LZ were administered to fry from 10 days post-hatching (DPH) to 59 DPH. Oral administration of MT at all doses did not significantly change the ratio of males (45.8%, 33.3%, and 50.0% respectively) compared to the control group (37.5%), while yielding intersex fish at all doses (4.2% to 8.3%). Oral administration of LZ produced a significantly higher proportion of males in all doses (75.5%, 83.3%, and 75.0%, respectively). Additionally, the lowest dose of LZ improved the growth of treated fish compared to the control, and all doses of LZ enhanced spermatogenesis in treated males. PMID:25920714

  18. Resistant mechanisms to BRAF inhibitors in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; de los Llanos Gil, María; Vila, Laia; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva; Martínez-Cardús, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced melanoma have traditionally had very poor prognosis. However, since 2011 better understanding of the biology and epidemiology of this disease has revolutionized its treatment, with newer therapies becoming available. These newer therapies can be classified into immunotherapy and targeted therapy. The immunotherapy arsenal includes inhibitors of CTLA4, PD-1 and PDL-1, while targeted therapy focuses on BRAF and MEK. BRAF inhibitors (vemurafenib, dabrafenib) have shown benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) compared to chemotherapy, and their combination with MEK inhibitors has recently been shown to improve progression-free survival (PFS), compared with monotherapy with BRAF inhibitors. However, almost 20% of patients initially do not respond, due to intrinsic resistance to therapy and, of those who do, most eventually develop mechanisms of acquired resistance, including reactivation of the MAP kinase pathway, persistent activation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTKS) receptor, activation of phosphatidyinositol-3OH kinase, overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and interactions with the tumor microenvironment. Herein we comment in detail on mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy and discuss the strategies to overcome them. PMID:27429963

  19. Comparison of tamoxifen and letrozole response in mammary preneoplasia of ER and aromatase overexpressing mice defines an immune-associated gene signature linked to tamoxifen resistance.

    PubMed

    Dabydeen, Sarah A; Kang, Keunsoo; Díaz-Cruz, Edgar S; Alamri, Ahmad; Axelrod, Margaret L; Bouker, Kerrie B; Al-Kharboosh, Rawan; Clarke, Robert; Hennighausen, Lothar; Furth, Priscilla A

    2015-01-01

    Response to breast cancer chemoprevention can depend upon host genetic makeup and initiating events leading up to preneoplasia. Increased expression of aromatase and estrogen receptor (ER) is found in conjunction with breast cancer. To investigate response or resistance to endocrine therapy, mice with targeted overexpression of Esr1 or CYP19A1 to mammary epithelial cells were employed, representing two direct pathophysiological interventions in estrogen pathway signaling. Both Esr1 and CYP19A1 overexpressing mice responded to letrozole with reduced hyperplastic alveolar nodule prevalence and decreased mammary epithelial cell proliferation. CYP19A1 overexpressing mice were tamoxifen sensitive but Esr1 overexpressing mice were tamoxifen resistant. Increased ER expression occurred with tamoxifen resistance but no consistent changes in progesterone receptor, pSTAT3, pSTAT5, cyclin D1 or cyclin E levels in association with response or resistance were found. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was employed to seek a transcriptome predictive of tamoxifen resistance using these models and a second tamoxifen-resistant model, BRCA1 deficient/Trp53 haploinsufficient mice. Sixty-eight genes associated with immune system processing were upregulated in tamoxifen-resistant Esr1- and Brca1-deficient mice, whereas genes related to aromatic compound metabolic process were upregulated in tamoxifen-sensitive CYP19A1 mice. Interferon regulatory factor 7 was identified as a key transcription factor regulating these 68 immune processing genes. Two loci encoding novel transcripts with high homology to human immunoglobulin lambda-like polypeptide 1 were uniquely upregulated in the tamoxifen-resistant models. Letrozole proved to be a successful alternative to tamoxifen. Further study of transcriptional changes associated with tamoxifen resistance including immune-related genes could expand our mechanistic understanding and lead to biomarkers predictive of escape or response to endocrine therapies

  20. The impact of treatment compliance on fracture risk in women with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Schimdt, Nina; Jacob, Louis; Coleman, Robert; Kostev, Karel; Hadji, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    No study has yet analyzed the impact of compliance with aromatase inhibitor(AI) treatments on fracture risk in a real-world setting in women with breast cancer. In this study, 8732 women with BC treated with AI, 8732 treated with tamoxifen (TAM), and 8732 age-matched women without BC selected from the Disease Analyzer database (IMS Health) were included. The main outcome measure was the impact of compliance with AI treatment on fracture risk. Demographic data included age, body mass index (BMI), and smoking status. Alcohol dependency, dementia, bone density, visual disturbances, diabetes, and use of corticosteroids were also assessed. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to analyze the proportion of patients with fracture over time, and multivariate Cox regression models were performed to assess the adjusted fracture risk. Mean age was 67.3 years. 17.6, 8.7, and 8.8 % of AI, TAM, and non-cancer patients, respectively, were diagnosed with fracture within 5 years after the index date (p < 0.001). The proportion of women receiving AI with fracture increased with treatment compliance, rising from 8.6 % when treatment persisted for less than a year to 18.0 % when it persisted for between 4 and 5 years (p < 0.001). By contrast, the proportion of fractures in women with BC receiving TAM for the same time periods decreased from 13.0 to 7.9 % (p < 0.001). The risk of fracture was higher in women with BC using AI than in the non-cancer group (HR = 3.00; p < 0.0001). Finally, current smoking status, BMI, dementia, and prescription of corticosteroids had significant impacts on fracture risk. Compliance with AI treatment in women with BC is associated with a clear increase in the risk of fracture, which is much higher than previously reported.

  1. Changes in bone biomarker concentrations and musculoskeletal symptoms among breast cancer patients initiating aromatase inhibitor therapy and women without a history of cancer.

    PubMed

    Gallicchio, Lisa; MacDonald, Ryan; Wood, Bethany; Rushovich, Errol; Fedarko, Neal S; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine: (1) changes in bone formation (osteocalcin) and bone resorption (cross-linked N-telopeptides of bone type I collagen [NTXs]) markers, as well as calcium, phosphorus, and intact parathyroid hormone, over the first 6 months of aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy among a cohort of breast cancer patients compared with a group of unexposed women without a history of cancer; and (2) whether bone marker changes were associated with musculoskeletal pain. Eligible breast cancer patients (n = 49) and postmenopausal women without a history of cancer (n = 117) were recruited and followed for 6 months. At baseline, 3 months, and 6 months, a questionnaire was administered to assess pain and medication use, and a blood sample was drawn. Results showed that, among the breast cancer patients, calcium concentrations decreased significantly (-7.8% change; p = 0.013) and concentrations of NTXs increased significantly from baseline to 6 months (9.6% change; p = 0.012). Changes were not observed for women in the comparison group. Statistically significant differences in percent change between the breast cancer patients and the women in the comparison group were observed for calcium at 6 months (-7.8% versus 0.0%; p = 0.025), phosphorus at 6 months (-5.1% versus 16.7%; p = 0.003), NTXs at 6 months (9.6% versus -0.7%; p = 0.017), and osteocalcin at 6 months (11.5% versus -3.6%; p = 0.016). No statistically significant associations were observed between bone turnover marker changes and musculoskeletal pain among the breast cancer patients, although baseline NTXs were higher among women with onset or increase in pain compared with those reporting no pain (p = 0.08). Findings from this study suggest that AIs cause changes in bone turnover during the first 6 months of treatment; however, these changes are not associated with musculoskeletal pain. Breast cancer patients initiating AI therapy should be assessed and

  2. Effect of baseline serum vitamin D levels on aromatase inhibitors induced musculoskeletal symptoms: results from the IBIS-II, chemoprevention study using anastrozole.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Cuzick, Jack; Mesher, David; Richmond, Bill; Howell, Anthony

    2012-04-01

    Severe deficiency of vitamin D in adults can cause musculoskeletal pain, stiffness, and joint discomfort. Musculoskeletal symptoms similar to those associated with vitamin D deficiency are frequently seen in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitors (AIs). This is presumably due to oestrogen deficiency caused by AIs. However, no data are available on serum levels of vitamin D and their relation to developing musculoskeletal symptoms/arthralgia in women receiving an AI. IBIS-II is a multicentre randomized placebo controlled trial of the AI, anastrozole, in postmenopausal women aged 40-70 years, who are at increased risk of breast cancer. Serum vitamin D levels were measured for 416 participants. The samples were sent for assays in three batches: the first two batches (n = 250) included paired serum samples and the third batch (n = 166) included paired samples and samples from women who had arthralgia within the first year of follow-up. At entry, 56 (13%) women had adequate (≥ 30 ng/ml), 173 (41%) had inadequate (≥ 20-< 30 ng/mL), 167 (40%) were deficient (> 10-< 20 ng/mL), and 24 (6%) were severely deficient (< 10 ng/mL). At the time of analysis, 225 out of 834 (27%) women had reported arthralgia within the first year of follow-up. Baseline serum vitamin D levels did not significantly predict arthralgia within the first year of follow-up either in the overall group (OR 0.87 (95% CI: 0.67, 1.13; P = 0.30) or separately in the anastrozole (P = 0.60) or placebo groups (P = 0.38). Absolute serum levels of vitamin D increased significantly at one year in the anastrozole group (2.88 ng/ml, [1.71, 4.06; P < 0.0001]) but not in the placebo group (0.75 ng/ml [-0.35, 1.85; P = 0.18]). Only a small and a nonsignificant effect of baseline vitamin D levels were seen on the risk of musculoskeletal symptoms. This does not appear to be a major determinant of risk for these symptoms.

  3. Evolution of resistance to quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Vipin C.; Wood, Thomas K.; Kumar, Prasun

    2013-01-01

    The major cause of mortality and morbidity in human beings is bacterial infection. Bacteria have developed resistance to most of the antibiotics primarily due to large scale and “indiscriminate” usage. The need is to develop novel mechanisms to treat bacterial infections. The expression of pathogenicity during bacterial infections is mediated by a cell density dependent phenomenon known as quorum sensing (QS). A wide array of QS systems (QSS) is operative in expressing the virulent behavior of bacterial pathogens. Each QSS may be mediated largely by a few major signals along with others produced in minuscule quantities. Efforts to target signal molecules and their receptors have proved effective in alleviating the virulent behavior of such pathogenic bacteria. These QS inhibitors (QSIs) have been reported to be effective in influencing the pathogenicity without affecting bacterial growth. However, evidence is accumulating that bacteria may develop resistance to QSIs. The big question is whether QSIs will meet the same fate as antibiotics? PMID:24194099

  4. Origin of aromatase inhibitory activity via proteochemometric modeling.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Saw; Spjuth, Ola; Lapins, Maris; Nabu, Sunanta; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-01

    Aromatase, the rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of androgen to estrogen, plays an essential role in the development of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Side effects due to aromatase inhibitors (AIs) necessitate the pursuit of novel inhibitor candidates with high selectivity, lower toxicity and increased potency. Designing a novel therapeutic agent against aromatase could be achieved computationally by means of ligand-based and structure-based methods. For over a decade, we have utilized both approaches to design potential AIs for which quantitative structure-activity relationships and molecular docking were used to explore inhibitory mechanisms of AIs towards aromatase. However, such approaches do not consider the effects that aromatase variants have on different AIs. In this study, proteochemometrics modeling was applied to analyze the interaction space between AIs and aromatase variants as a function of their substructural and amino acid features. Good predictive performance was achieved, as rigorously verified by 10-fold cross-validation, external validation, leave-one-compound-out cross-validation, leave-one-protein-out cross-validation and Y-scrambling tests. The investigations presented herein provide important insights into the mechanisms of aromatase inhibitory activity that could aid in the design of novel potent AIs as breast cancer therapeutic agents. PMID:27190705

  5. Origin of aromatase inhibitory activity via proteochemometric modeling

    PubMed Central

    Simeon, Saw; Spjuth, Ola; Lapins, Maris; Nabu, Sunanta; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E.S.

    2016-01-01

    Aromatase, the rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of androgen to estrogen, plays an essential role in the development of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Side effects due to aromatase inhibitors (AIs) necessitate the pursuit of novel inhibitor candidates with high selectivity, lower toxicity and increased potency. Designing a novel therapeutic agent against aromatase could be achieved computationally by means of ligand-based and structure-based methods. For over a decade, we have utilized both approaches to design potential AIs for which quantitative structure–activity relationships and molecular docking were used to explore inhibitory mechanisms of AIs towards aromatase. However, such approaches do not consider the effects that aromatase variants have on different AIs. In this study, proteochemometrics modeling was applied to analyze the interaction space between AIs and aromatase variants as a function of their substructural and amino acid features. Good predictive performance was achieved, as rigorously verified by 10-fold cross-validation, external validation, leave-one-compound-out cross-validation, leave-one-protein-out cross-validation and Y-scrambling tests. The investigations presented herein provide important insights into the mechanisms of aromatase inhibitory activity that could aid in the design of novel potent AIs as breast cancer therapeutic agents. PMID:27190705

  6. Origin of aromatase inhibitory activity via proteochemometric modeling.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Saw; Spjuth, Ola; Lapins, Maris; Nabu, Sunanta; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-01

    Aromatase, the rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of androgen to estrogen, plays an essential role in the development of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Side effects due to aromatase inhibitors (AIs) necessitate the pursuit of novel inhibitor candidates with high selectivity, lower toxicity and increased potency. Designing a novel therapeutic agent against aromatase could be achieved computationally by means of ligand-based and structure-based methods. For over a decade, we have utilized both approaches to design potential AIs for which quantitative structure-activity relationships and molecular docking were used to explore inhibitory mechanisms of AIs towards aromatase. However, such approaches do not consider the effects that aromatase variants have on different AIs. In this study, proteochemometrics modeling was applied to analyze the interaction space between AIs and aromatase variants as a function of their substructural and amino acid features. Good predictive performance was achieved, as rigorously verified by 10-fold cross-validation, external validation, leave-one-compound-out cross-validation, leave-one-protein-out cross-validation and Y-scrambling tests. The investigations presented herein provide important insights into the mechanisms of aromatase inhibitory activity that could aid in the design of novel potent AIs as breast cancer therapeutic agents.

  7. Detecting and treating breast cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Moonlee, Sun-Young; Bissell, Mina J.; Furuta, Saori; Meier, Roland; Kenny, Paraic A.

    2016-04-05

    The application describes therapeutic compositions and methods for treating cancer. For example, therapeutic compositions and methods related to inhibition of FAM83A (family with sequence similarity 83) are provided. The application also describes methods for diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors. For example, a method of diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors by detecting increased FAM83A levels is described.

  8. Potential utility of natural products as regulators of breast cancer-associated aromatase promoters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase, the key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, converts androstenedione to estrone and testosterone to estradiol. The enzyme is expressed in various tissues such as ovary, placenta, bone, brain, skin, and adipose tissue. Aromatase enzyme is encoded by a single gene CYP 19A1 and its expression is controlled by tissue-specific promoters. Aromatase mRNA is primarily transcribed from promoter I.4 in normal breast tissue and physiological levels of aromatase are found in breast adipose stromal fibroblasts. Under the conditions of breast cancer, as a result of the activation of a distinct set of aromatase promoters (I.3, II, and I.7) aromatase expression is enhanced leading to local overproduction of estrogen that promotes breast cancer. Aromatase is considered as a potential target for endocrine treatment of breast cancer but due to nonspecific reduction of aromatase activity in other tissues, aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are associated with undesirable side effects such as bone loss, and abnormal lipid metabolism. Inhibition of aromatase expression by inactivating breast tumor-specific aromatase promoters can selectively block estrogen production at the tumor site. Although several synthetic chemical compounds and nuclear receptor ligands are known to inhibit the activity of the tumor-specific aromatase promoters, further development of more specific and efficacious drugs without adverse effects is still warranted. Plants are rich in chemopreventive agents that have a great potential to be used in chemotherapy for hormone dependent breast cancer which could serve as a source for natural AIs. In this brief review, we summarize the studies on phytochemicals such as biochanin A, genistein, quercetin, isoliquiritigenin, resveratrol, and grape seed extracts related to their effect on the activation of breast cancer-associated aromatase promoters and discuss their aromatase inhibitory potential to be used as safer chemotherapeutic agents for specific hormone

  9. Aromatase: Contributions to Physiology and Disease in Women and Men.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, Jennifer; Naftolin, Fredrick

    2016-07-01

    Aromatase (estrogen synthetase; EC 1.14.14.1) catalyzes the demethylation of androgens' carbon 19, producing phenolic 18-carbon estrogens. Aromatase is most widely known for its roles in reproduction and reproductive system diseases, and as a target for inhibitor therapy in estrogen-sensitive diseases including cancer, endometriosis, and leiomyoma (141, 143). However, all tissues contain estrogen receptor-expressing cells, the majority of genes have a complete or partial estrogen response element that regulates their expression (61), and there are plentiful nonreceptor effects of estrogens (79); therefore, the effect of aromatase through the provision of estrogen is almost universal in terms of health and disease. This review will provide a brief but comprehensive overview of the enzyme, its role in steroidogenesis, the problems that arise with its functional mutations and mishaps, the roles in human physiology of aromatase and its product estrogens, its current clinical roles, and the effects of aromatase inhibitors. While much of the story is that of the consequences of the formation of its product estrogens, we also will address alternative enzymatic roles of aromatase as a demethylase or nonenzymatic actions of this versatile molecule. Although this short review is meant to be thorough, it is by no means exhaustive; rather, it is meant to reflect the cutting-edge, exciting properties and possibilities of this ancient enzyme and its products. PMID:27252161

  10. Design and Synthesis of Norendoxifen Analogues with Dual Aromatase Inhibitory and Estrogen Receptor Modulatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Liu, Jinzhong; Skaar, Todd C.; Flockhart, David A.; Cushman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Both selective estrogen receptor modulators and aromatase inhibitors are widely used for the treatment of breast cancer. Compounds with both aromatase inhibitory and estrogen receptor modulatory activities could have special advantages for treatment of breast cancer. Our previous efforts led to the discovery of norendoxifen as the first compound with dual aromatase inhibitory and estrogen receptor binding activities. To optimize its efficacy and aromatase selectivity versus other cytochrome P450 enzymes, a series of structurally related norendoxifen analogues were designed and synthesized. The most potent compound, 4'-hydroxynorendoxifen (10), displayed elevated inhibitory potency against aromatase and enhanced affinity for estrogen receptors when compared to norendoxifen. The selectivity of 10 for aromatase versus other cytochrome P450 enzymes was also superior to norendoxifen. 4'-Hydroxynorendoxifen is therefore an interesting lead for further development to obtain new anticancer agents of potential value for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25751283

  11. Immunohistochemical analysis of aromatase in metastatic lymph nodes of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shibahara, Yukiko; Miki, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Takanori; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    Aromatase is the key enzyme in intratumoral estrogen production in postmenopausal breast cancer and third generation aromatase inhibitors suppress this enzymatic reaction effectively. Aromatase inhibitor is administered to metastatic breast cancer patients customarily in which estrogen receptor had been demonstrated only in the primary tumor, not the metastatic sites. The status of aromatase in metastatic sites has not been well-characterized to date. We immunolocalized aromatase in 46 estrogen receptor positive primary breast cancers and paired metastatic lymph nodes, using immunohistochemistry. Immunoreactivity was detected in 44/46 primary tumors and 40/46 metastatic lymph nodes. A significant correlation was detected between the status of aromatase in primary and metastatic sites. Aromatase immunoreactivity was correlated with age, size of primary tumor and Ki-67 index. Aromatase immunoreactivity was also detected in adipose tissue surrounding the lymph nodes. In conclusion, aromatase status in primary tumors generally represents its status in metastatic lymph nodes. This indicates that the endocrine environment of estrogen receptor positive tumors remain stable during the metastatic process. PMID:23356222

  12. Exploring new chemical functionalities to improve aromatase inhibition of steroids.

    PubMed

    Varela, Carla L; Amaral, Cristina; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Costa, Saul C; Carvalho, Rui A; Costa, Giosuè; Alcaro, Stefano; Teixeira, Natércia A A; Tavares-da-Silva, Elisiário J; Roleira, Fernanda M F

    2016-06-15

    In this work, new potent steroidal aromatase inhibitors both in microsomes and in breast cancer cells have been found. The synthesis of the 3,4-(ethylenedioxy)androsta-3,5-dien-17-one (12), a new steroid containing a heterocycle dioxene fused in the A-ring, led to the discovery of a new reaction for which a mechanism is proposed. New structure-activity relationships were established. Some 5β-steroids, such as compound 4β,5β-epoxyandrostan-17-one (9), showed aromatase inhibitory activity, because they adopt a similar A-ring conformation as those of androstenedione, the natural substrate of aromatase. Moreover, new chemical features to increase planarity were disclosed, specifically the 3α,4α-cyclopropane ring, as in 3α,4α-methylen-5α-androstan-17-one (5) (IC50=0.11μM), and the Δ(9-11) double bond in the C-ring, as in androsta-4,9(11)-diene-3,17-dione (13) (IC50=0.25μM). In addition, induced-fit docking (IFD) simulations and site of metabolism (SoM) predictions helped to explain the recognition of new potent steroidal aromatase inhibitors within the enzyme. These insights can be valuable tools for the understanding of the molecular recognition process by the aromatase and for the future design of new steroidal inhibitors. PMID:27160054

  13. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A

    2016-07-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  14. Novel sulfonanilide analogs decrease aromatase activity in breast cancer cells: synthesis, biological evaluation, and ligand-based pharmacophore identification.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Tian, Ran; Darby, Michael V; Brueggemeier, Robert W

    2008-03-13

    Aromatase converts androgens to estrogens and is a particularly attractive target in the treatment of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Previously, the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide and analogs decreased aromatase expression and enzyme activity independent of COX-2 inhibition. In this manuscript, a combinatorial approach was used to generate diversely substituted novel sulfonanilides by parallel synthesis. Their pharmacological evaluation as agents for suppression of aromatase activity in SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells was extensively explored. A ligand-based pharmacophore model was elaborated for selective aromatase modulation (SAM) using the Catalyst HipHop algorithms. The best qualitative model consisted of four features: one aromatic ring, two hydrogen bond acceptors, and one hydrophobic function. Several lead compounds have also been tested in aromatase transfected MCF-7 cells, and they significantly suppressed cellular aromatase activity. The results suggest that both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms of these compounds are involved within the aromatase suppression effect. PMID:18271519

  15. Novel sulfonanilide analogs decrease aromatase activity in breast cancer cells: synthesis, biological evaluation, and ligand-based pharmacophore identification.

    PubMed

    Su, Bin; Tian, Ran; Darby, Michael V; Brueggemeier, Robert W

    2008-03-13

    Aromatase converts androgens to estrogens and is a particularly attractive target in the treatment of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Previously, the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide and analogs decreased aromatase expression and enzyme activity independent of COX-2 inhibition. In this manuscript, a combinatorial approach was used to generate diversely substituted novel sulfonanilides by parallel synthesis. Their pharmacological evaluation as agents for suppression of aromatase activity in SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells was extensively explored. A ligand-based pharmacophore model was elaborated for selective aromatase modulation (SAM) using the Catalyst HipHop algorithms. The best qualitative model consisted of four features: one aromatic ring, two hydrogen bond acceptors, and one hydrophobic function. Several lead compounds have also been tested in aromatase transfected MCF-7 cells, and they significantly suppressed cellular aromatase activity. The results suggest that both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms of these compounds are involved within the aromatase suppression effect.

  16. Resistance to BRAF inhibitors induces glutamine dependency in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Baenke, Franziska; Chaneton, Barbara; Smith, Matthew; Van Den Broek, Niels; Hogan, Kate; Tang, Haoran; Viros, Amaya; Martin, Matthew; Galbraith, Laura; Girotti, Maria R.; Dhomen, Nathalie; Gottlieb, Eyal; Marais, Richard

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors can extend progression-free and overall survival in melanoma patients whose tumors harbor mutations in BRAF. However, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these drugs. Here we show that BRAF mutant melanoma cells that have developed acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors display increased oxidative metabolism and increased dependency on mitochondria for survival. Intriguingly, the increased oxidative metabolism is associated with a switch from glucose to glutamine metabolism and an increased dependence on glutamine over glucose for proliferation. We show that the resistant cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial poisons and to inhibitors of glutaminolysis, suggesting that targeting specific metabolic pathways may offer exciting therapeutic opportunities to treat resistant tumors, or to delay emergence of resistance in the first-line setting. PMID:26365896

  17. Use of MR-based trabecular bone microstructure analysis at the distal radius for osteoporosis diagnostics: a study in post-menopausal women with breast cancer and treated with aromatase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Seifert-Klauss, Vanadin; Pencheva, Tsvetelina D.; Jungmann, Pia M.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Müller, Dirk; Bauer, Jan S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Purpose Treatment with aromatase inhibitor (AI) is recommended for post-menopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer. However, AI therapy is known to induce bone loss leading to osteoporosis with an increased risk for fragility fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether changes of magnetic resonance (MR)-based trabecular bone microstructure parameters as advanced imaging biomarker can already be detected in subjects with AI intake but still without evidence for osteoporosis according to dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-based bone mineral density (BMD) measurements as current clinical gold standard. Methods Twenty-one postmenopausal women (62±6 years of age) with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer, ongoing treatment with aromatase inhibitor for 23±15 months, and no evidence for osteoporosis (current DXA T-score greater than −2.5) were recruited for this study. Eight young, healthy women (24±2 years of age) were included as controls. All subjects underwent 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the distal radius to assess the trabecular bone microstructure. Results Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were not significantly (p>0.05) different between subjects with AI intake and controls, including apparent bone fraction (0.42±0.03 vs. 0.42±0.05), trabecular number (1.95±0.10 mm−1 vs 1.89±0.15 mm−1), trabecular separation (0.30±0.03 mm vs 0.31±0.06 mm), trabecular thickness (0.21±0.01 mm vs 0.22±0.02 mm), and fractal dimension (1.70±0.02 vs. 1.70±0.03). Conclusion These findings suggest that the initial deterioration of trabecular bone microstructure as measured by MRI and BMD loss as measured by DXA occur not sequentially but rather simultaneously. Thus, the use of MR-based trabecular bone microstructure assessment is limited as early diagnostic biomarker in this clinical setting. PMID:27252740

  18. The molecular mechanisms of acquired proteasome inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Andrew J.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    The development of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) has transformed the treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. To date, two PIs have been FDA approved, the boronate peptide bortezomib and, most recently, the epoxyketone peptide carfilzomib. However, intrinsic and acquired resistance to PIs, for which the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, may limit their efficacy. In this perspective, we discuss recent advances in the molecular understanding of PI resistance through acquired bortezomib resistance in human cell lines to evolved saliniosporamide A (marizomib) resistance in nature. Resistance mechanisms discussed include the upregulation of proteasome subunits and mutations of the catalytic β-subunits. Additionally, we explore potential strategies to overcome PI resistance. PMID:22978849

  19. Molecular breeding of polymerases for resistance to environmental inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Baar, Claudia; d'Abbadie, Marc; Vaisman, Alexandra; Arana, Mercedes E; Hofreiter, Michael; Woodgate, Roger; Kunkel, Thomas A; Holliger, Philipp

    2011-04-01

    Potent inhibitors limit the use of PCR assays in a wide spectrum of specimens. Here, we describe the engineering of polymerases with a broad resistance to complex environmental inhibitors using molecular breeding of eight different polymerase orthologues from the genus Thermus and directed evolution by CSR in the presence of inhibitors. Selecting for resistance to the inhibitory effects of Neomylodon bone powder, we isolated 2D9, a chimeric polymerase comprising sequence elements derived from DNA polymerases from Thermus aquaticus, Thermus oshimai, Thermus thermophilus and Thermus brockianus. 2D9 displayed a striking resistance to a broad spectrum of complex inhibitors of highly divergent composition including humic acid, bone dust, coprolite, peat extract, clay-rich soil, cave sediment and tar. The selected polymerase promises to have utility in PCR-based applications in a wide range of fields including palaeobiology, archaeology, conservation biology, forensic and historic medicine.

  20. Caught in a Network: Recovery from Aromatase Inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fadrozole is an inhibitor of aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We exposed female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas, FHM) to 0 or 30 ug/L fadrozole for 8 days, and fish were then held in clean water for 8 extra days. We analyzed ex vivo steroid production, pl...

  1. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  2. Patient's Anastrozole Compliance to Therapy (PACT) Program: Baseline Data and Patient Characteristics from a Population-Based, Randomized Study Evaluating Compliance to Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy in Postmenopausal Women with Hormone-Sensitive Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harbeck, Nadia; Blettner, Maria; Hadji, Peyman; Jackisch, Christian; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Windemuth-Kieselbach, Christine; Zaun, Silke; Haidinger, Renate; Schmitt, Doris; Schulte, Hilde; Nitz, Ulrike; Kreienberg, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The Patient's Anastrozole Compliance to Therapy (PACT) program is a large randomized study designed to assess whether the provision of educational materials (EM) could improve compliance with aromatase inhibitor therapy in postmenopausal women with early, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Patients and Methods The PACT study presented a large, homogeneous dataset. The baseline analysis included patient demographics and initial treatments and patient perceptions about treatment and quality of life. Results Overall, 4,923 patients were enrolled at 109 German breast cancer centers/clinics in cooperation with 1,361 office-based gynecologists/oncologists. 4,844 women were randomized 1:1 to standard therapy (n = 2,402) or standard therapy plus EM (n = 2,442). Prior breast-conserving surgery and mastectomy had been received by 76% and 24% of the patients, respectively. Radiotherapy was scheduled for 85% of the patients, adjuvant chemotherapy for 38%. Reflecting the postmenopausal, hormone-sensitive nature of this population, only 285 patients (7%) had received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions A comparison with epidemiological data from the West German Breast Center suggests that the patients in the PACT study are representative of a general postmenopausal early breast cancer population and that the findings may be applicable to ‘real-world’ Germany and beyond. Compliance data from PACT are eagerly anticipated. PMID:24419247

  3. BET inhibitor resistance emerges from leukaemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chun Yew; Gilan, Omer; Lam, Enid Y N; Rubin, Alan F; Ftouni, Sarah; Tyler, Dean; Stanley, Kym; Sinha, Devbarna; Yeh, Paul; Morison, Jessica; Giotopoulos, George; Lugo, Dave; Jeffrey, Philip; Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Carpenter, Christopher; Gregory, Richard; Ramsay, Robert G; Lane, Steven W; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Kouzarides, Tony; Johnstone, Ricky W; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Huntly, Brian J P; Prinjha, Rab K; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Dawson, Mark A

    2015-09-24

    Bromodomain and extra terminal protein (BET) inhibitors are first-in-class targeted therapies that deliver a new therapeutic opportunity by directly targeting bromodomain proteins that bind acetylated chromatin marks. Early clinical trials have shown promise, especially in acute myeloid leukaemia, and therefore the evaluation of resistance mechanisms is crucial to optimize the clinical efficacy of these drugs. Here we use primary mouse haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells immortalized with the fusion protein MLL-AF9 to generate several single-cell clones that demonstrate resistance, in vitro and in vivo, to the prototypical BET inhibitor, I-BET. Resistance to I-BET confers cross-resistance to chemically distinct BET inhibitors such as JQ1, as well as resistance to genetic knockdown of BET proteins. Resistance is not mediated through increased drug efflux or metabolism, but is shown to emerge from leukaemia stem cells both ex vivo and in vivo. Chromatin-bound BRD4 is globally reduced in resistant cells, whereas the expression of key target genes such as Myc remains unaltered, highlighting the existence of alternative mechanisms to regulate transcription. We demonstrate that resistance to BET inhibitors, in human and mouse leukaemia cells, is in part a consequence of increased Wnt/β-catenin signalling, and negative regulation of this pathway results in restoration of sensitivity to I-BET in vitro and in vivo. Together, these findings provide new insights into the biology of acute myeloid leukaemia, highlight potential therapeutic limitations of BET inhibitors, and identify strategies that may enhance the clinical utility of these unique targeted therapies.

  4. Nicotine Blocks Brain Estrogen Synthase (Aromatase): In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography Studies in Female Baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Biegon, A.; Biegon, A.; Kim, S.-W.; Logan, J.; Hooker, J.M.; Muench, L.; Fowler, J.S.

    2010-01-12

    Cigarette smoking and nicotine have complex effects on human physiology and behavior, including some effects similar to those elicited by inhibition of aromatase, the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. We report the first in vivo primate study to determine whether there is a direct effect of nicotine administration on brain aromatase. Brain aromatase availability was examined with positron emission tomography and the selective aromatase inhibitor [{sup 11}C]vorozole in six baboons before and after exposure to IV nicotine at .015 and .03 mg/kg. Nicotine administration produced significant, dose-dependent reductions in [{sup 11}C]vorozole binding. The amygdala and preoptic area showed the largest reductions. Plasma levels of nicotine and its major metabolite cotinine were similar to those found in cigarette smokers. Nicotine interacts in vivo with primate brain aromatase in regions involved in mood, aggression, and sexual behavior.

  5. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase 1 Regulates Resistance to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Marie Mei; Yoon, Bong-June; Osiewicz, Keith; Preston, Michael; Bundy, Brian; van Heeckeren, Anna M.; Werb, Zena; Soloway, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1)-deficient mice are resistant to Pseudomonas aeruginosa corneal infections. Corneas healed completely in TIMP-1-deficient mice, and infections were cleared faster in TIMP-1-deficient mice than in wild-type littermates. Genetic suppression studies using matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-deficient mice showed that MMP-9, MMP-3, and MMP-7 but not MMP-2 or MMP-12 are needed for resistance. Increased resistance was also seen during pulmonary infections. These results identify a novel pathway regulating infection resistance. PMID:15618213

  6. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R.; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G.; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S.; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2014-01-01

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a “DFG-out” covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:25349422

  7. Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance

    PubMed Central

    McKimm‐Breschkin, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: McKimm‐Breschkin (2012) Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: Antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 7(Suppl. 1), 25–36. There are two major classes of antivirals available for the treatment and prevention of influenza, the M2 inhibitors and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). The M2 inhibitors are cheap, but they are only effective against influenza A viruses, and resistance arises rapidly. The current influenza A H3N2 and pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are already resistant to the M2 inhibitors as are many H5N1 viruses. There are four NAIs licensed in some parts of the world, zanamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir, and a long‐acting NAI, laninamivir. This review focuses on resistance to the NAIs. Because of differences in their chemistry and subtle differences in NA structures, resistance can be both NAI‐ and subtype specific. This results in different drug resistance profiles, for example, the H274Y mutation confers resistance to oseltamivir and peramivir, but not to zanamivir, and only in N1 NAs. Mutations at E119, D198, I222, R292, and N294 can also reduce NAI sensitivity. In the winter of 2007–2008, an oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1) strain with an H274Y mutation emerged in the northern hemisphere and spread rapidly around the world. In contrast to earlier evidence of such resistant viruses being unfit, this mutant virus remained fully transmissible and pathogenic and became the major seasonal A(H1N1) virus globally within a year. This resistant A(H1N1) virus was displaced by the sensitive A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Approximately 0·5–1·0% of community A(H1N1)pdm09 isolates are currently resistant to oseltamivir. It is now apparent that variation in non‐active site amino acids can affect the fitness of the enzyme and compensate for mutations that confer high‐level oseltamivir resistance resulting in minimal impact on enzyme function. PMID:23279894

  8. ETS1 inactivation causes innate drug resistance to EGFR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tetsu, Osamu; Phuchareon, Janyaporn; Eisele, David W; McCormick, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are found in approximately 10% of lung cancers. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors, although promising, has surprisingly resulted in greater than 90% tumor reduction in only 5% of cases, prompting us to investigate the mechanism of innate drug resistance. PMID:27308601

  9. Glyceollin I reverses epithelial to mesenchymal transition in letrozole resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although aromatase inhibitors, such as letrozole; are standard endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with early stage metastatic estrogen-dependent breast cancer, the major limitation in managing this disease is the development of drug resistance; therefore, a better understanding of this proce...

  10. Competitive product inhibition of aromatase by natural estrogens.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Yarborough, C; Osawa, Y

    1993-03-01

    In order to better understand the function of aromatase, we carried out kinetic analyses to assess the ability of natural estrogens, estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), 16 alpha-OHE1, and estriol (E3), to inhibit aromatization. Human placental microsomes (50 micrograms protein) were incubated for 5 min at 37 degrees C with [1 beta-3H]testosterone (1.24 x 10(3) dpm 3H/ng, 35-150 nM) or [1 beta-3H,4-14C]androstenedione (3.05 x 10(3) dpm 3H/ng, 3H/14C = 19.3, 7-65 nM) as substrate in the presence of NADPH, with and without natural estrogens as putative inhibitors. Aromatase activity was assessed by tritium released to water from the 1 beta-position of the substrates. Natural estrogens showed competitive product inhibition against androgen aromatization. The Ki of E1, E2, 16 alpha-OHE1, and E3 for testosterone aromatization was 1.5, 2.2, 95, and 162 microM, respectively, where the Km of aromatase was 61.8 +/- 2.0 nM (n = 5) for testosterone. The Ki of E1, E2, 16 alpha-OHE1, and E3 for androstenedione aromatization was 10.6, 5.5, 252, and 1182 microM, respectively, where the Km of aromatase was 35.4 +/- 4.1 nM (n = 4) for androstenedione. These results show that estrogen inhibit the process of androgen aromatization and indicate that natural estrogens regulate their own synthesis by the product inhibition mechanism in vivo. Since natural estrogen binds to the active site of human placental aromatase P-450 complex as competitive inhibitors, natural estrogens might be further metabolized by aromatase. This suggests that human placental estrogen 2-hydroxylase activity is catalyzed by the active site of aromatase cytochrome P-450 and also agrees with the fact that the level of catecholestrogens in maternal plasma increases during pregnancy. The relative affinities and concentration of androgens and estrogens would control estrogen and catecholestrogen biosynthesis by aromatase.

  11. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T.; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Avadhani, Narayan G.; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Altieri, Dario C.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  12. The heat shock protein-90 inhibitor XL888 overcomes BRAF inhibitor resistance mediated through diverse mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Paraiso, Kim H. T.; Haarberg, H. Eirik; Wood, Elizabeth; Rebecca, Vito W.; Chen, Y. Ann; Xiang, Yun; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Sondak, Vernon K.; John, Jobin K.; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Koomen, John M.; Smalley, Keiran S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The clinical use of BRAF inhibitors is being hampered by the acquisition of drug resistance. This study demonstrates the potential therapeutic utility of the HSP90 inhibitor (XL888) in 6 different models of vemurafenib resistance. Experimental design The ability of XL888 to inhibit growth and to induce apoptosis and tumor regression of vemurafenib-resistant melanoma cell lines was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. A novel mass spectrometry-based pharmacodynamic assay was developed to measure intratumoral HSP70 levels following HSP90 inhibition in melanoma cell lines, xenografts and melanoma biopsies. Mechanistic studies were performed to determine the mechanism of XL888-induced apoptosis. Results XL888 potently inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis and prevented the growth of vemurafenib resistant melanoma cell lines in 3D cell culture, long-term colony formation assays and human melanoma mouse xenografts. The reversal of the resistance phenotype was associated with the degradation of PDGFRβ, COT, IGFR1, CRAF, ARAF, S6, cyclin D1 and AKT, which in turn led to the nuclear accumulation of FOXO3a, an increase in BIM expression and the downregulation of Mcl-1. In most resistance models, XL888 treatment increased BIM expression, decreased Mcl-1 expression, and induced apoptosis more effectively than dual MEK/PI3K inhibition. Conclusions HSP90 inhibition may be a highly effective strategy at managing the diverse array of resistance mechanisms being reported to BRAF inhibitors and appears to be more effective at restoring BIM expression and downregulating Mcl-1 expression than combined MEK/PI3K inhibitor therapy. PMID:22351686

  13. Detecting mechanisms of acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lo, Roger S; Shi, Hubing

    2014-01-01

    (V600)BRAF mutation was identified as an ideal target for clinical therapy due to its indispensable roles in supporting melanoma initiation and progression. Despite the fact that BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) can elicit anti-tumor responses in the majority of treated patients and confer overall survival benefits, acquired drug resistance is a formidable obstacle to long-term management of the disease. Several aberrant events including RTK upregulation, NRAS mutation, mutant BRAF amplification or alternative splicing, and MEK mutation have been reported as acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms. Clinially, detection of these resistance mechanisms help understand drug response patterns and help guide combinatorial therapeutic strategies. Therefore, quick and accurate diagnosis of the resistant mechanisms in tumor biopsies has become an important starting point for personalized therapy. In this chapter, we review the major acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms, highlight their therapeutic implications, and provide the diagnostic methods from clinical samples.

  14. Non-target-site resistance to ALS inhibitors in waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A waterhemp population (MCR) previously characterized as resistant to 4-hyroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) and photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors was found to have two different resistance responses to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors. Plants from the MCR population exhibiting high resistan...

  15. Screening of selected pesticides for inhibition of CYP19 aromatase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vinggaard, A M; Hnida, C; Breinholt, V; Larsen, J C

    2000-06-01

    Many pesticides are able to block or activate the steroid hormone receptors and/or to affect the levels of sex hormones, thereby potentially affecting the development or expression of the male and female reproductive system or both. This emphasizes the relevance of screening pesticides for a wide range of hormone-mimicking effects. Twenty-two pesticides were tested for their ability to affect CYP19 aromatase activity in human placental microsomes using the classical [(3)H](2)O method. Prochloraz, imazalil, propioconazole, fenarimol, triadimenol, triadimefon (all fungicides), and dicofol (an acaricide) gave rise to a statistically significant inhibition of aromatase activity. The IC(50)s of prochloraz, imazalil, propioconazole fenarimol, triadimenol, and triadimefon were calculated from dose-response curves to be 0.04, 0.34, 6.5, 10, 21 and 32 microM, respectively. The IC(50) of dicofol was greater than 50 microM. The positive control 4-hydroxyandrostendione (1 microM) caused an inhibition of aromatase activity by 74%. The compounds, which did not affect the aromatase activity, were bromopropylate, chlorfenvinphos, chlorobenzilate, chlorpyrifos, diuron, heptachlor, iprodion, linuron, pentachlorphenol, procymidon, propyzamide, quintozen, tetrachlorvinphos and tetradifon. With the purpose of comparing the results for fenarimol obtained with the microsomal system with data from an intact cell system, an aromatase assay based on JEG-3 cells was established. 4-Hydroxyandrostendione (1 microM) inhibited the aromatase activity in JEG-3 cells by 94%. The IC(50) for fenarimol in this system was 2 microM, slightly lower than that observed in the microsomal system. For the first time, fenarimol has been demonstrated to inhibit aromatase activity in human tissues and, furthermore, propioconazole, triadimefon, and triadimenol were identified as weak aromatase inhibitors. In conclusion, seven out of 22 tested pesticides turned out to be weak to moderate aromatase inhibitors in

  16. Aromatase inhibition by synthetic lactones and flavonoids in human placental microsomes and breast fibroblasts - A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwen, J.A. van Nijmeijer, S.; Mutarapat, T.; Ruchirawat, S.; Jong, P.C. de; Piersma, A.H.; Berg, M. van den

    2008-05-01

    Interference of exogenous chemicals with the aromatase enzyme can be useful as a tool to identify chemicals that could act either chemopreventive for hormone-dependent cancer or adverse endocrine disruptive. Aromatase is the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of steroids, as it converts androgens to estrogens. Certain flavonoids, plant derived chemicals, are known catalytic aromatase inhibitors. Various systems are in use to test aromatase inhibitory properties of compounds. Commonly used are microsomes derived from ovary or placental tissue characterized by high aromatase activity. To a lesser extent whole cell systems are used and specifically cell systems that are potential target tissue in breast cancer development. In this study aromatase inhibitory properties of fadrozole, 8-prenylnaringenin and a synthetic lactone (TM-7) were determined in human placental microsomes and in human primary breast fibroblasts. In addition, apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and two synthetic lactones (TM-8 and TM-9) were tested in human microsomes only. Comparison of the aromatase inhibitory potencies of these compounds between the two test systems showed that the measurement of aromatase inhibition in human placental microsomes is a good predictor of aromatase inhibition in human breast fibroblasts.

  17. The individual or combinational effects of Hesperetin and Letrozole on the activity and expression of aromatase in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Rahideh, S T; Shidfar, F; Nourbakhsh, M; Hoseini, M; Koohdani, F; Entezam, M; Keramatipour, M

    2016-05-30

    Aromatase catalyzes the last and rate-limiting step in estrogen biosynthesis. Inhibition of estrogen production is a common strategy for breast cancer treatment. Citrus flavonoids have been confirmed to exhibit efficacious biological activities, particularly in cancer therapy. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of hesperetin on the activity and expression of aromatase and compare this property with letrozole as an aromatase inhibitor in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays in this study demonstrated that hesperetin at a concentration of 200 μM decreased cell viability in a time dependent manner (P<0.05). Aromatase activity assay, based on 17β-Estradiol (E2) production from testosterone, revealed that hesperetin had no effect. Real-time PCR results indicated that treatment with 1μM concentration of hesperetin for 48 h significantly decreased relative aromatase expression (P =0.004). Combination of letrozole and hesperetin also had no effect on aromatase. The changes in activity paralleled the expression of aromatase. Likely, the reduction in aromatase activity was delayed in time along with the reduction in expression ratio; however additional studies are needed to confirm this. In conclusion, the present study showed that hesperetin could decrease expression of aromatase at low concentrations in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  18. Resistance mutations generate divergent antibiotic susceptibility profiles against translation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cocozaki, Alexis I.; Altman, Roger B.; Huang, Jian; Buurman, Ed T.; Kazmirski, Steven L.; Doig, Peter; Prince, D. Bryan; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Ferguson, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations conferring resistance to translation inhibitors often alter the structure of rRNA. Reduced susceptibility to distinct structural antibiotic classes may, therefore, emerge when a common ribosomal binding site is perturbed, which significantly reduces the clinical utility of these agents. The translation inhibitors negamycin and tetracycline interfere with tRNA binding to the aminoacyl-tRNA site on the small 30S ribosomal subunit. However, two negamycin resistance mutations display unexpected differential antibiotic susceptibility profiles. Mutant U1060A in 16S Escherichia coli rRNA is resistant to both antibiotics, whereas mutant U1052G is simultaneously resistant to negamycin and hypersusceptible to tetracycline. Using a combination of microbiological, biochemical, single-molecule fluorescence transfer experiments, and X-ray crystallography, we define the specific structural defects in the U1052G mutant 70S E. coli ribosome that explain its divergent negamycin and tetracycline susceptibility profiles. Unexpectedly, the U1052G mutant ribosome possesses a second tetracycline binding site that correlates with its hypersusceptibility. The creation of a previously unidentified antibiotic binding site raises the prospect of identifying similar phenomena in antibiotic-resistant pathogens in the future. PMID:27382179

  19. The STAT5 inhibitor pimozide decreases survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells resistant to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Gashin, Laurie B.; Terrell, Shariya; Klitgaard, Josephine L.; Santo, Loredana; Addorio, Martha R.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Griffin, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is an essential mediator of the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In CML, the BCR/ABL fusion kinase causes the constitutive activation of STAT5, thereby driving the expression of genes promoting survival. BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors have become the mainstay of therapy for CML, although CML cells can develop resistance through mutations in BCR/ABL. To overcome this problem, we used a cell-based screen to identify drugs that inhibit STAT-dependent gene expression. Using this approach, we identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as a STAT5 inhibitor. Pimozide decreases STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation, although it does not inhibit BCR/ABL or other tyrosine kinases. Furthermore, pimozide decreases the expression of STAT5 target genes and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CML cell lines. Pimozide also selectively inhibits colony formation of CD34+ bone marrow cells from CML patients. Importantly, pimozide induces similar effects in the presence of the T315I BCR/ABL mutation that renders the kinase resistant to presently available inhibitors. Simultaneously inhibiting STAT5 with pimozide and the kinase inhibitors imatinib or nilotinib shows enhanced effects in inhibiting STAT5 phosphorylation and in inducing apoptosis. Thus, targeting STAT5 may be an effective strategy for the treatment of CML and other myeloproliferative diseases. PMID:21233313

  20. Neuroprotective Actions of Brain Aromatase

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Colin J.; Duncan, Kelli A.; Walters, Bradley J.

    2009-01-01

    The steroidal regulation of vertebrate neuroanatomy and neurophysiology includes a seemingly unending list of brain areas, cellular structures and behaviors modulated by these hormones. Estrogens, in particular have emerged as potent neuromodulators, exerting a range of effects including neuroprotection and perhaps neural repair. In songbirds and mammals, the brain itself appears to be the site of injury-induced estrogen synthesis via the rapid transcription and translation of aromatase (estrogen synthase) in astroglia. This induction seems to occur regardless of the nature and location of primary brain damage. The induced expression of aromatase apparently elevates local estrogen levels enough to interfere with apoptotic pathways, thereby decreasing secondary degeneration and ultimately lessening the extent of damage. There is even evidence suggesting that aromatization may affect injury-induced cytogenesis. Thus, aromatization in the brain appears to confer neuroprotection by an array of mechanisms that involve the deceleration and acceleration of degeneration and repair respectively. We are only beginning to understand the factors responsible for the injury-induced transcription of aromatase in astroglia. In contrast, much of the manner in which local and circulating estrogens may achieve their neuroprotective effects has been elucidated. However, gaps in our knowledge include issues about the cell-specific regulation of aromatase expression, steroidal influences of aromatization distinct from estrogen formation, and questions about the role of constitutive aromatase in neuroprotection. Here we describe the considerable consensus and some interesting differences in knowledge gained from studies conducted on diverse animal models, experimental paradigms and preparations towards understanding the neuroprotective actions of brain aromatase. PMID:19450619

  1. Effect of ultra-low-dose estriol and lactobacilli vaginal tablets (Gynoflor®) on inflammatory and infectious markers of the vaginal ecosystem in postmenopausal women with breast cancer on aromatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Donders, G; Bellen, G; Neven, P; Grob, P; Prasauskas, V; Buchholz, S; Ortmann, O

    2015-10-01

    This study was a detailed microscopic analysis of the changes of vaginal microflora characteristics after application of 0.03 mg estriol-lactobacilli combination on the vaginal ecosystem in postmenopausal breast cancer (BC) survivors on aromatase inhibitors (AI) with severe atrophic vaginitis. A total of 16 BC women on AI applied daily one vaginal tablet of Gynoflor® for 28 days followed by a maintenance therapy of three tablets weekly for 8 weeks. During four follow up visits a smear from the upper lateral vaginal wall was analysed by phase contrast microscopy at 400 times magnification in order to classify the lactobacillary grades(LBG), bacterial vaginosis (BV), aerobic vaginitis (AV), vulvovaginal candidosis (VVC), proportional number of leukocytes and evidence of parabasal cells and epitheliolysis. LBG improved from 81% LBG-III at entry to 88% LBG-I&IIa after 2 weeks of initial therapy, which further improved upon follow up (p < 0.001). Whereas BV was a rare event, AV was frequent and substantially improved during treatment (p < 0.01). While at entry most patients had moderate or severe AV, after maintenance therapy no patient except one had AV. The number of leukocytes dropped dramatically from a score of 1.78 ± 0.70 to 1.06 ± 0.25 which was consistent till the end of the study (p < 0.01). Parabasal cells dropped from a score of 3.4 ± 0.64 at entry to 1.3 ± 0.60 at the final visit (p trend < 0.01). Starting from a low rate of Candida colonisation of 2/14 (14%), a sudden rise to 7/16 (44%) occurred after 2 weeks, to return back to base levels at subsequent visits. The vaginal use of ultra-low dose estriol and lactobacilli results in rapid and enduring improvement of all markers of the vaginal microflora and epithelial vaginal cell quality in women with breast cancer on AI with dyspareunia. Candida may develop soon after its use, but rapidly disappears again upon their prolonged use. Due to its excellent safety profiles and clinical efficacy we recommend

  2. HIV-1 integrase inhibitor resistance and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jose-Luis; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Gatell, Jose M; Shafer, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    With the approval in 2007 of the first integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, clinicians became better able to suppress virus replication in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who were harboring many of the most highly drug-resistant viruses. Raltegravir also provided clinicians with additional options for first-line therapy and for the simplification of regimens in patients with stable virological suppression. Two additional INIs in advanced clinical development-elvitegravir and S/GSK1349572-may prove equally versatile. However, the INIs have a relatively low genetic barrier to resistance in that 1 or 2 mutations are capable of causing marked reductions in susceptibility to raltegravir and elvitegravir, the most well-studied INIs. This perspective reviews the genetic mechanisms of INI resistance and their implications for initial INI therapy, the treatment of antiretroviral-experienced patients, and regimen simplification.

  3. Mechanisms of resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihua; Fu, Liwu

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is driven by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs, e.g., gefitinib and elrotinib) have been effectively used for clinical treatment. However, patients eventually develop drug resistance. Resistance to EGFR-TKIs is inevitable due to various mechanisms, such as the secondary mutation (T790M), activation of alternative pathways (c-Met, HGF, AXL), aberrance of the downstream pathways (K-RAS mutations, loss of PTEN), impairment of the EGFR-TKIs-mediated apoptosis pathway (BCL2-like 11/BIM deletion polymorphism), histologic transformation, ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter effusion, etc. Here we review and summarize the known resistant mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs and provide potential targets for development of new therapeutic strategies.

  4. MOLECULAR PATHWAYS: JAK/STAT PATHWAY: MUTATIONS, INHIBITORS, AND RESISTANCE

    PubMed Central

    Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the JAK/STAT pathway has been reported in a variety of disease states, including inflammatory conditions, hematologic malignancies, and solid tumors. For instance, a large proportion of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) carry the acquired gain-of-function JAK2 V617F somatic mutation. This knowledge has dramatically improved our understanding of the pathogenesis of MPNs and it has facilitated the development of therapeutics capable of suppressing the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT pathway, now recognized as a common underlying biological abnormality in MPNs. Ruxolitinib is an oral JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor that has recently been approved for the treatment of myelofibrosis and has been tested against other hematologic malignancies. A series of agents with different specificities against different members of the JAK family of proteins is currently undergoing evaluation in clinical trials for patients with MPNs, lymphoma, and solid tumors such as breast or pancreatic cancer. Despite their significant clinical activity exhibited in myelofibrosis, some patients fail to respond or progress during JAK kinase inhibitor therapy. Recent reports have shed light into the mechanisms of resistance to JAK kinase inhibitor therapy. Several approaches hold promise to overcome such resistance. PMID:23406773

  5. Identification of cyclohexanone derivatives that act as catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase I: effects on tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, Euphemia; Rewcastle, Gordon W; Joseph, Wayne R; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Larsen, Lesley; Baguley, Bruce C

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer is commonly treated with anti-estrogens or aromatase inhibitors, but resistant disease eventually develops and new therapies for such resistance are of great interest. We have previously isolated several tamoxifen-resistant variant sub-lines of the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line and provided evidence that they arose from expansion of pre-existing minor populations. We have searched for therapeutic agents that exhibit selective growth inhibition of the resistant lines and here investigate 2,6-bis(pyridin-3-ylmethylene)-cyclohexanone (RL90) and 2,6-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethylene)-cyclohexanone (RL91). We found that two of the tamoxifen-resistant sub-lines (TamR3 and TamC3) unexpectedly showed increased sensitivity to RL90 and RL91. We utilized growth inhibition assays, flow cytometry and immunoblotting to establish a mechanistic basis for their action. Treated sensitive cells showed S-phase selective DNA damage, as detected by histone H2AX phosphorylation. Cellular responses were similar to those induced by the topoisomerase I poison camptothecin. Although IC(50) values of camptothecin, RL90, RL91 were correlated, studies with purified mammalian topoisomerase I suggested that RL90 and RL91 differed from camptothecin by acting as catalytic topoisomerase I inhibitors. These drugs provide a platform for the further development of DNA damaging drugs that have selective effects on tamoxifen resistant breast cancer cells. The results also raise the question of whether clinical topoisomerase I poisons such as irinotecan and topotecan might be active in the treatment of some types of tamoxifen-resistant cancer.

  6. Structural basis for androgen specificity and oestrogen synthesis in human aromatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Debashis; Griswold, Jennifer; Erman, Mary; Pangborn, Walter

    2009-03-06

    Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the only enzyme in vertebrates known to catalyse the biosynthesis of all oestrogens from androgens. Aromatase inhibitors therefore constitute a frontline therapy for oestrogen-dependent breast cancer. In a three-step process, each step requiring 1 mol of O{sub 2}, 1 mol of NADPH, and coupling with its redox partner cytochrome P450 reductase, aromatase converts androstenedione, testosterone and 16{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone to oestrone, 17{beta}-oestradiol and 17{beta},16{alpha}-oestriol, respectively. The first two steps are C19-methyl hydroxylation steps, and the third involves the aromatization of the steroid A-ring, unique to aromatase. Whereas most P450s are not highly substrate selective, it is the hallmark androgenic specificity that sets aromatase apart. The structure of this enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane has remained unknown for decades, hindering elucidation of the biochemical mechanism. Here we present the crystal structure of human placental aromatase, the only natural mammalian, full-length P450 and P450 in hormone biosynthetic pathways to be crystallized so far. Unlike the active sites of many microsomal P450s that metabolize drugs and xenobiotics, aromatase has an androgen-specific cleft that binds the androstenedione molecule snugly. Hydrophobic and polar residues exquisitely complement the steroid backbone. The locations of catalytically important residues shed light on the reaction mechanism. The relative juxtaposition of the hydrophobic amino-terminal region and the opening to the catalytic cleft shows why membrane anchoring is necessary for the lipophilic substrates to gain access to the active site. The molecular basis for the enzyme's androgenic specificity and unique catalytic mechanism can be used for developing next-generation aromatase inhibitors.

  7. Avibactam and Inhibitor-Resistant SHV β-Lactamases

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Marisa L.; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Taracila, Magdalena A.

    2015-01-01

    β-Lactamase enzymes (EC 3.5.2.6) are a significant threat to the continued use of β-lactam antibiotics to treat infections. A novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor with activity against many class A and C and some class D β-lactamase variants, avibactam, is now available in the clinic in partnership with ceftazidime. Here, we explored the activity of avibactam against a variety of characterized isogenic laboratory constructs of β-lactamase inhibitor-resistant variants of the class A enzyme SHV (M69I/L/V, S130G, K234R, R244S, and N276D). We discovered that the S130G variant of SHV-1 shows the most significant resistance to inhibition by avibactam, based on both microbiological and biochemical characterizations. Using a constant concentration of 4 mg/liter of avibactam as a β-lactamase inhibitor in combination with ampicillin, the MIC increased from 1 mg/liter for blaSHV-1 to 256 mg/liter for blaSHV S130G expressed in Escherichia coli DH10B. At steady state, the k2/K value of the S130G variant when inactivated by avibactam was 1.3 M−1 s−1, versus 60,300 M−1 s−1 for the SHV-1 β-lactamase. Under timed inactivation conditions, we found that an approximately 1,700-fold-higher avibactam concentration was required to inhibit SHV S130G than the concentration that inhibited SHV-1. Molecular modeling suggested that the positioning of amino acids in the active site of SHV may result in an alternative pathway of inactivation when complexed with avibactam, compared to the structure of CTX-M-15–avibactam, and that S130 plays a role in the acylation of avibactam as a general acid/base. In addition, S130 may play a role in recyclization. As a result, we advance that the lack of a hydroxyl group at position 130 in the S130G variant of SHV-1 substantially slows carbamylation of the β-lactamase by avibactam by (i) removing an important proton acceptor and donator in catalysis and (ii) decreasing the number of H bonds. In addition, recyclization is most likely

  8. High Proteolytic Resistance of Spider-Derived Inhibitor Cystine Knots

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kyoko; Sugiura, Mika; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Proteolytic stability in gastrointestinal tract and blood plasma is the major obstacle for oral peptide drug development. Inhibitor cystine knots (ICKs) are linear cystine knot peptides which have multifunctional properties and could become promising drug scaffolds. ProTx-I, ProTx-II, GTx1-15, and GsMTx-4 were spider-derived ICKs and incubated with pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase in physiological conditions to find that all tested peptides were resistant to pepsin, and ProTx-II, GsMTx-4, and GTx1-15 showed resistance to all tested proteases. Also, no ProTx-II degradation was observed in rat blood plasma for 24 hours in vitro and ProTx-II concentration in circulation decreased to half in 40 min, indicating absolute stability in plasma and fast clearance from the system. So far, linear peptides are generally thought to be unsuitable in vivo, but all tested ICKs were not degraded by pepsin and stomach could be selected for the alternative site of drug absorption for fast onset of the drug action. Since spider ICKs are selective inhibitors of various ion channels which are related to the pathology of many diseases, engineered ICKs will make a novel class of peptide medicines which can treat variety of bothering symptoms. PMID:26843868

  9. MAPK pathway activation leads to Bim loss and histone deacetylase inhibitor resistance: rationale to combine romidepsin with an MEK inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arup R; Robey, Robert W; Luchenko, Victoria L; Zhan, Zhirong; Piekarz, Richard L; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Wilkerson, Julia; Showe, Louise C; Gottesman, Michael M; Collie, Nathan L; Bates, Susan E

    2013-05-16

    To identify molecular determinants of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI) resistance, we selected HuT78 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) cells with romidepsin in the presence of P-glycoprotein inhibitors to prevent transporter upregulation. Resistant sublines were 250- to 385-fold resistant to romidepsin and were resistant to apoptosis induced by apicidin, entinostat, panobinostat, belinostat, and vorinostat. A custom TaqMan array identified increased insulin receptor (INSR) gene expression; immunoblot analysis confirmed increased protein expression and a four- to eightfold increase in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) phosphorylation in resistant cells compared with parental cells. Resistant cells were exquisitely sensitive to MEK inhibitors, and apoptosis correlated with restoration of proapoptotic Bim. Romidepsin combined with MEK inhibitors yielded greater apoptosis in cells expressing mutant KRAS compared with romidepsin treatment alone. Gene expression analysis of samples obtained from patients with CTCL enrolled on the NCI1312 phase 2 study of romidepsin in T-cell lymphoma suggested perturbation of the MAPK pathway by romidepsin. Immunohistochemical analysis of Bim expression demonstrated decreased expression in some skin biopsies at disease progression. These findings implicate increased activation of MEK and decreased Bim expression as a resistance mechanism to HDIs, supporting combination of romidepsin with MEK inhibitors in clinical trials.

  10. Comparison of the effects of the PI3K/mTOR inhibitors NVP-BEZ235 and GSK2126458 on tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Rewcastle, Gordon W; Finlay, Graeme J; Baguley, Bruce C

    2011-01-01

    Background Treatment with anti-estrogens or aromatase inhibitors is commonly used for patients with estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers; however resistant disease develops almost inevitably, requiring a choice of secondary therapy. One possibility is to use inhibitors of the PI3K/mTOR pathway and several candidate drugs are in development. We examined the in vitro effects of two inhibitors of the PI3K/mTOR pathway on resistant MCF-7 cells. Results The derived sub-lines showed increased resistance to tamoxifen but none exhibited concomitantly increased sensitivity to the PI3K inhibitors. NVP-BEZ235 and GSK2126458 acted mainly by induction of cell cycle arrest, particularly in G1-phase, rather than by induction of apoptosis. The lines varied considerably in their utilization of the AKT, p70S6K and ERK pathways. NVP-BEZ235 and GSK2126458 inhibited AKT signaling but NVP-BEZ235 showed greater effects than GSK2126458 on p70S6K and rpS6 signaling with effects resembling those of rapamycin. Methods We cultured MCF-7 cells for prolonged periods either in the presence of the anti-estrogen tamoxifen (three sub-lines) or in estrogen free medium (two sub-lines) to mimic the effects of clinical treatment. We then analyzed the effects of two dual PI3K/mTOR phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitors, NVP-BEZ235 and GSK2126458, on the growth and signaling pathways of these MCF-7 sub-lines. The functional status of the PI3K, mTOR and ERK pathways was analyzed by measuring phosphorylation of AKT, p70S6K, rpS6 and ERK. Conclusion Increased resistance to tamoxifen in these MCF-7 sub-lines is not associated with hypersensitivity to PI3K inhibitors. While both drugs inhibited AKT signaling, NVP-BEZ235 resembled rapamycin in inhibiting the mTOR pathway. PMID:21464613

  11. Effects of Aromatase Inhibition and Androgen Activity on Serotonin and Behavior in Male Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Reddy, Arubala P.; Robertson, Nicola; Colemen, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Aggression in humans and animals has been linked to androgens and serotonin function. To further our understanding of the effect of androgens on serotonin and aggression in male macaques, we sought to manipulate circulating androgens and the activity of aromatase; and to then determine behavior and the endogenous availability of serotonin. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5-7 months and then treated for 3 months with [1] placebo, [2] testosterone (T), [3] T+Dutasteride (5a reductase inhibitor; AvodartTM), [4] T+Letrozole (non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor; FemeraTM), [5] Flutamide+ATD (androgen antagonist plus steroidal aromatase inhibitor) or [6] dihydrotestosterone (DHT)+ATD (n=5/group). Behavioral observations were made during treatments. At the end of the treatment period, each animal was sedated with propofol and administered a bolus of fenfluramine (5 mg/kg). Fenfluramine causes the release of serotonin proportional to endogenous availability and in turn, serotonin stimulates the secretion of prolactin. Therefore, serum prolactin concentrations reflect endogenous serotonin. Fenfluramine significantly increased serotonin/prolactin in all groups (p <0.0001). Fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin in the T-treated group was significantly higher than the other groups (p<0.0001). Castration partially reduced the serotonin/prolactin response; and Letrozole partially blocked the effect of T. Complete inhibition of aromatase with ATD, a non-competitve inhibitor, significantly and similarly reduced the fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin response in the presence or absence of DHT. Neither aggressive behavior nor yawning (indicators of androgen activity) correlated with serotonin/prolactin, but posited aromatase activity correlated significantly with prolactin (p<0.0008; r2 =0.95). In summary, androgens induced aggressive behavior but they did not regulate serotonin. Altogether, the data suggest that aromatase activity supports

  12. Effects of aromatase inhibition and androgen activity on serotonin and behavior in male macaques.

    PubMed

    Bethea, Cynthia L; Reddy, Arubala P; Robertson, Nicola; Coleman, Kristine

    2013-06-01

    Aggression in humans and animals has been linked to androgens and serotonin function. To further our understanding of the effect of androgens on serotonin and aggression in male macaques, we sought to manipulate circulating androgens and the activity of aromatase; and to then determine behavior and the endogenous availability of serotonin. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5-7 months and then treated for 3 months with (a) placebo; (b) testosterone (T); (c) T + Dutasteride (5a reductase inhibitor; AvodartTM); (d) T + Letrozole (nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor; FemeraTM); (e) Flutamide + ATD (androgen antagonist plus steroidal aromatase inhibitor); or (f) dihydrotestosterone (DHT) + ATD (n = 5/group). Behavioral observations were made during treatments. At the end of the treatment period, each animal was sedated with propofol and administered a bolus of fenfluramine (5 mg/kg). Fenfluramine causes the release of serotonin proportional to endogenous availability and in turn, serotonin stimulates the secretion of prolactin. Therefore, serum prolactin concentrations reflect endogenous serotonin. Fenfluramine significantly increased serotonin/prolactin in all groups (p < .0001). Fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin in the T-treated group was significantly higher than the other groups (p < .0001). Castration partially reduced the serotonin/prolactin response and Letrozole partially blocked the effect of T. Complete inhibition of aromatase with ATD, a noncompetitive inhibitor, significantly and similarly reduced the fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin response in the presence or absence of DHT. Neither aggressive behavior nor yawning (indicators of androgen activity) correlated with serotonin/prolactin, but posited aromatase activity correlated significantly with prolactin (p < .0008; r² = 0.95). In summary, androgens induced aggressive behavior but they did not regulate serotonin. Altogether, the data suggest that aromatase activity

  13. Small molecule inhibitor screen identifies synergistic activity of the bromodomain inhibitor CPI203 and bortezomib in drug resistant myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Matthew B.; Liu, Selina Qiuying; Davare, Monika A.; Spurgeon, Stephen E.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Druker, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite significant therapeutic progress in multiple myeloma, drug resistance is uniformly inevitable and new treatments are needed. Our aim was to identify novel, efficacious small-molecule combinations for use in drug resistant multiple myeloma. Experimental Design A panel of 116 small molecule inhibitors was used to screen resistant myeloma cell lines for potential therapeutic targets. Agents found to have enhanced activity in the bortezomib or melphalan resistant myeloma cell lines were investigated further in combination. Synergistic combinations of interest were evaluated in primary patient cells. Results The overall single-agent drug sensitivity profiles were dramatically different between melphalan and bortezomib resistant cells, however, the bromodomain inhibitor, CPI203, was observed to have enhanced activity in both the bortezomib and melphalan resistant lines compared to their wild-type counterparts. The combination of bortezomib and CPI203 was found to be synergistic in both the bortezomib and melphalan resistant cell lines as well as in a primary multiple myeloma sample from a patient refractory to recent proteasome inhibitor treatment. The CPI203-bortezomib combination led to enhanced apoptosis and anti-proliferative effects. Finally, in contrast to prior reports of synergy between bortezomib and other epigenetic modifying agents, which implicated MYC downregulation or NOXA induction, our analyses suggest that CPI203-bortezomib synergy is independent of these events. Conclusion Our preclinical data supports a role for the clinical investigation of the bromodomain inhibitor CPI203 combined with bortezomib or alkylating agents in resistant multiple myeloma. PMID:26254279

  14. Selective inhibition of aromatase by a dihydroisocoumarin from Xyris pterygoblephara.

    PubMed

    Endringer, Denise C; Guimarães, Keller G; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Pezzuto, John M; Braga, Fernão C

    2008-06-01

    Aromatase is a well-established target for the chemoprevention of breast cancer. The dihydroisocoumarin (3 R,4 R)-(-)-6-methoxy-1-oxo-3-pentyl-3,4-dihydro-1 H-isochromen-4-yl acetate (1) (IC 50 = 1.6 +/- 0.1 microM), isolated from aerial parts of Xyris pterygoblephara, showed aromatase inhibitory activity. The specificity of 1 was evaluated by inhibition assays with cytochrome P450 enzymes. CYP1A1 was inhibited modestly (IC 50 = 38.0 +/- 2.0 microM), while CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 enzymes were not affected. Dihydroisocoumarin 1 showed weak antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 (IC 50 = 66.9 +/- 2.3 microM) and LNCaP (IC 50 = 57.5 +/- 2.0 microM) cells and was inactive against LU-1 and HepG2 cells in culture. These results demonstrate the potential of dihydroisocoumarin 1 to serve as a selective aromatase inhibitor. PMID:18462007

  15. Drug Resistance Resulting from Kinase Dimerization Is Rationalized by Thermodynamic Factors Describing Allosteric Inhibitor Effects.

    PubMed

    Kholodenko, Boris N

    2015-09-22

    Treatment of cancer patients with ATP-competitive inhibitors of BRAF/CRAF kinases surprisingly increases total kinase activity, especially in wild-type BRAF cells, subverting the desired clinical outcome. Similar inhibition resistance is observed for numerous kinases involving homo/heterodimerization in their activation cycles. Here, I demonstrate that drug resistance resulting from kinase dimerization can be explained using thermodynamic principles. I show that allosteric regulation by inhibitors is described by thermodynamic factors that quantify inhibitor-induced changes in kinase dimerization and the difference in the drug affinity for a free monomer versus a dimer harboring one drug molecule. The analysis extends to kinase homo- and heterodimers, allows for their symmetric and asymmetric conformations, and predicts how thermodynamic factors influence dose-response dependencies. I show how two inhibitors, ineffective on their own, when combined can abolish drug resistance at lower doses than either inhibitor applied alone. Thus, the mechanistic models suggest ways to overcome resistance to kinase inhibitors.

  16. Kinesin-5 inhibitor resistance is driven by kinesin-12

    PubMed Central

    Sturgill, Emma G.; Norris, Stephen R.; Guo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton bipolarizes at the onset of mitosis to form the spindle. In animal cells, the kinesin-5 Eg5 primarily drives this reorganization by actively sliding MTs apart. Its primacy during spindle assembly renders Eg5 essential for mitotic progression, demonstrated by the lethal effects of kinesin-5/Eg5 inhibitors (K5Is) administered in cell culture. However, cultured cells can acquire resistance to K5Is, indicative of alternative spindle assembly mechanisms and/or pharmacological failure. Through characterization of novel K5I-resistant cell lines, we unveil an Eg5 motility-independent spindle assembly pathway that involves both an Eg5 rigor mutant and the kinesin-12 Kif15. This pathway centers on spindle MT bundling instead of Kif15 overexpression, distinguishing it from those previously described. We further show that large populations (∼107 cells) of HeLa cells require Kif15 to survive K5I treatment. Overall, this study provides insight into the functional plasticity of mitotic kinesins during spindle assembly and has important implications for the development of antimitotic regimens that target this process. PMID:27091450

  17. BRAF inhibitor resistance enhances vulnerability to arginine deprivation in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Ying; Wu, Chunjing; Chen, Shu-Mei; Shah, Sumedh S.; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Feun, Lynn G.; Kuo, Macus T.; Suarez, Miguel; Prince, Jeffrey; Savaraj, Niramol

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) has been used for treatment of melanomas harboring V600E mutation. Despite a high initial response rate, resistance to BRAFi is inevitable. Here, we demonstrate that BRAFi-resistant (BR) melanomas are susceptible to arginine deprivation due to inability to initiate re-expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, a key enzyme for arginine synthesis) as well as ineffective autophagy. Autophagy and ASS1 re-expression are known to protect melanoma cells from cell death upon arginine deprivation. When melanoma cells become BR cells by long-term in vitro incubation with BRAFi, c-Myc-mediated ASS1 re-expression and the levels of autophagy-associated proteins (AMPK-α1 and Atg5) are attenuated. Furthermore, our study uncovers that downregulation of deubiquitinase USP28 which results in more active c-Myc degradation via ubiquitin-proteasome machinery is the primary mechanism for inability to re-express ASS1 upon arginine deprivation in BR cells. Overexpression of USP28 in BR cells enhances c-Myc expression and hence increases ASS1 transcription upon arginine deprivation, and consequently leads to cell survival. On the other hand, overexpression of Atg5 or AMPK-α1 in BR cells can redirect arginine deprivation-induced apoptosis toward autophagy. The xenograft models also confirm that BR tumors possess lower expression of ASS1 and are hypersensitive to arginine deprivation. These biochemical changes in BRAFi resistance which make them vulnerable to arginine deprivation can be exploited for the future treatment of BR melanoma patients. PMID:26771234

  18. Inhibition of aromatase activity in human placental microsomes by 13-retro-antiprogestins.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Yarborough, C P; Elger, W; Chwalisz, K; Osawa, Y

    1995-02-01

    Mifepristone (RU 486), used clinically for the termination of early pregnancy, and its acetyl and 13-retro (13 alpha) analogs show potent antiproliferative effects against estrogen-dependent human breast tumors and endometriosis. However, there has been no report on direct inhibition of aromatase by antiprogesterones. Aromatase inhibitors have been shown to be effective against estrogen-dependent breast cancer. We evaluated the inhibition of aromatase by various antiprogestins (ZK 112.993, ZK 98.734, ZK 114.043, ZK 98.299, and ZK 114.863). Human placental microsomes were incubated with [1 beta-3H,4-14C] androstenedione (3-114 nM) in the presence of NADPH, with or without putative inhibitors (10-200 microM). Aromatase activity was assessed by tritium release to water from the 1 beta-position of the substrate. ZK 112.993 and ZK 98.734 did not show any inhibitory effect. The statistical analysis of the data using standard errors was obtained from replicate experiments. ZK 114.043 showed slight inhibition with a Ki of 54.8 +/- 6.4 microM (m +/- SE, n = 6) against androstenedione aromatization. The two 13-retro-steroids, ZK 98.299 and ZK 114.863, showed aromatase inhibition with Ki values of 19.0 +/- 1.5 microM (n = 7) and 12.7 +/- 0.94 microM (n = 7), respectively, which is weak with respect to some known potent inhibitors, but significant when compared with the other antiprogestins which were tested. The results suggest that the unnatural 13-retro-antiprogestin conformation may have a better fit to the aromatase active site than the natural 13 beta-antiprogestin conformation. (Steroids 60:234-238, 1995).

  19. Bacterial self-resistance to the natural proteasome inhibitor salinosporamide A.

    PubMed

    Kale, Andrew J; McGlinchey, Ryan P; Lechner, Anna; Moore, Bradley S

    2011-11-18

    Proteasome inhibitors have recently emerged as a therapeutic strategy in cancer chemotherapy, but susceptibility to drug resistance limits their efficacy. The marine actinobacterium Salinispora tropica produces salinosporamide A (NPI-0052, marizomib), a potent proteasome inhibitor and promising clinical agent in the treatment of multiple myeloma. Actinobacteria also possess 20S proteasome machinery, raising the question of self-resistance. We identified a redundant proteasome β-subunit, SalI, encoded within the salinosporamide biosynthetic gene cluster and biochemically characterized the SalI proteasome complex. The SalI β-subunit has an altered substrate specificity profile, 30-fold resistance to salinosporamide A, and cross-resistance to the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. An A49V mutation in SalI correlates to clinical bortezomib resistance from a human proteasome β5-subunit A49T mutation, suggesting that intrinsic resistance to natural proteasome inhibitors may predict clinical outcomes.

  20. Obesity is associated with inflammation and elevated aromatase expression in the mouse mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Howe, Louise R.; Bhardwaj, Priya; Du, Baoheng; Gravaghi, Claudia; Yantiss, Rhonda K.; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Blaho, Victoria A.; Hla, Timothy; Yang, Peiying; Kopelovich, Levy; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Elevated circulating estrogen levels are associated with increased risk of breast cancer in obese postmenopausal women. Following menopause, the biosynthesis of estrogens through CYP19 (aromatase)-mediated metabolism of androgen precursors occurs primarily in adipose tissue, and the resulting estrogens are then secreted into the systemic circulation. The potential links between obesity, inflammation and aromatase expression are unknown. In both dietary and genetic models of obesity, we observed necrotic adipocytes surrounded by macrophages forming crown-like structures (CLS) in the mammary glands and visceral fat. The presence of CLS was associated with activation of NF-κB and increased levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, Cox-2), which were paralleled by elevated levels of aromatase expression and activity in the mammary gland and visceral fat of obese mice. Analyses of the stromal-vascular and adipose fractions of the mammary gland suggested that macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory mediators induced aromatase and estrogen-dependent gene expression (PR, pS2) in adipocytes. Saturated fatty acids, which have been linked to obesity-related inflammation, stimulated NF-κB activity in macrophages leading to increased levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and Cox-2, each of which contributed to the induction of aromatase in preadipocytes. The discovery of the obesity→inflammation→aromatase axis in the mammary gland and visceral fat and its association with CLS, may provide insight into mechanisms underlying the increased risk of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in obese postmenopausal women, the reduced efficacy of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of breast cancer in these women, and their generally worse outcomes. The presence of CLS may be a biomarker of increased breast cancer risk or poor prognosis. PMID:21372033

  1. Inhibition of cytochrome p450 brain aromatase reduces two male specific sexual behaviours in the male Endler guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Stefan L E; Linderoth, Maria; Olsén, K Håkan

    2006-07-01

    In mammalian and avian vertebrate groups, androgens act as controlling agents on male aggression and courtship behaviour by their conversion to oestrogens by cytochrome P450 aromatase in well-defined brain regions. Despite the fact that bony fishes have exceptionally high brain aromatase activity, little is known about it's possible regulatory effects on the reproductive behaviours of teleosts. In this study, Endler guppy males (Poecilia reticulata) were subjected to 26-29 days of 24-h exposure to two different concentrations (15 and 100 microg/L) of the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole in the water. Compared with the control males, two of three courtship activities in males exposed to the higher concentration were reduced when they were paired with receptive stimulus females. Reduction in brain aromatase activity was confirmed in both exposed groups with the use of the tritiated water assay.

  2. Mechanisms of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Resistance and Strategies to Overcome Resistance in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoon Soo; Choi, Chang-Min

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations that lead to hyperactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling are detected in approximately 50% of lung adenocarcinoma in people from the Far East population and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are now the standard first line treatment for advanced disease. They have led to a doubling of progression-free survival and an increase in overall survival by more than 2 years. However, emergence of resistant clones has become the primary cause for treatment failure, and has created a new challenge in the daily management of patients with EGFR mutations. Identification of mechanisms leading to inhibitor resistance has led to new therapeutic modalities, some of which have now been adapted for patients with unsuccessful tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. In this review, we describe mechanisms of tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance and the available strategies to overcoming resistance. PMID:27790276

  3. Adaptive and Acquired Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors Converge on the MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Pengfei; Fu, Yujie; Chen, Minjiang; Jing, Ying; Wu, Jie; Li, Ke; Shen, Ying; Gao, Jian-Xin; Wang, Mengzhao; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    Both adaptive and acquired resistance significantly limits the efficacy of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors. However, the distinct or common mechanisms of adaptive and acquired resistance have not been fully characterized. Here, through systematic modeling of erlotinib resistance in lung cancer, we found that feedback reactivation of MAPK signaling following erlotinib treatment, which was dependent on the MET receptor, contributed to the adaptive resistance of EGFR inhibitors. Interestingly, acquired resistance to erlotinib was also associated with the MAPK pathway activation as a result of CRAF or NRAS amplification. Consequently, combined inhibition of EGFR and MAPK impeded the development of both adaptive and acquired resistance. These observations demonstrate that adaptive and acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors can converge on the same pathway and credential cotargeting EGFR and MAPK as a promising therapeutic approach in EGFR mutant tumors. PMID:27279914

  4. Investigation of aromatase inhibitory activity of metal complexes of 8-hydroxyquinoline and uracil derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Prachayasittikul, Veda; Pingaew, Ratchanok; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Estrogens play important roles in the pathogenesis and progression of breast cancer as well as estrogen-related diseases. Aromatase is a key enzyme in the rate-limiting step of estrogen production, in which its inhibition is one strategy for controlling estrogen levels to improve prognosis of estrogen-related cancers and diseases. Herein, a series of metal (Mn, Cu, and Ni) complexes of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ) and uracil derivatives (4–9) were investigated for their aromatase inhibitory and cytotoxic activities. Methods The aromatase inhibition assay was performed according to a Gentest™ kit using CYP19 enzyme, wherein ketoconazole and letrozole were used as reference drugs. The cytotoxicity was tested on normal embryonic lung cells (MRC-5) using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results Only Cu complexes (6 and 9) exhibited aromatase inhibitory effect with IC50 0.30 and 1.7 μM, respectively. Cytotoxicity test against MRC-5 cells showed that Mn and Cu complexes (5 and 6), as well as free ligand 8HQ, exhibited activity with IC50 range 0.74–6.27 μM. Conclusion Cu complexes (6 and 9) were found to act as a novel class of aromatase inhibitor. Our findings suggest that these 8HQ–Cu–uracil complexes are promising agents that could be potentially developed as a selective anticancer agent for breast cancer and other estrogen-related diseases. PMID:25152615

  5. Metabolism of ATP-binding cassette drug transporter inhibitors: complicating factor for multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cnubben, Nicole H P; Wortelboer, Heleen M; van Zanden, Jelmer J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; van Bladeren, Peter J

    2005-08-01

    Membrane transport proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport proteins play a central role in the defence of organisms against toxic compounds, including anticancer drugs. However, for compounds that are designed to display a toxic effect, this defence system diminishes their effectiveness. This is typically the case in the development of cellular resistance to anticancer drugs. Inhibitors of these transporters are thus potentially useful tools to reverse this transporter-mediated cellular resistance to anticancer drugs and, eventually, to enhance the effectiveness of the treatment of patients with drug-resistant cancer. This review highlights the various types of inhibitors of several multidrug resistance-related ABC proteins, and demonstrates that the metabolism of inhibitors, as illustrated by recent data obtained for various natural compound inhibitors, may have considerable implications for their effect on drug transport and their potential for treatment of drug resistance.

  6. Anhedonia Predicts Poorer Recovery among Youth with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment-Resistant Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMakin, Dana L.; Olino, Thomas M.; Porta, Giovanna; Dietz, Laura J.; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan R.; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Shamseddeen, Wael; Mayes, Taryn; Kennard, Betsy; Spirito, Anthony; Keller, Martin; Lynch, Frances L.; Dickerson, John F.; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify symptom dimensions of depression that predict recovery among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment-resistant adolescents undergoing second-step treatment. Method: The Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial included 334 SSRI treatment-resistant youth randomized to a medication…

  7. A nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor active on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates resistant to related inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M E; O'Brien, J A; Ruffing, T L; Schleif, W A; Sardana, V V; Byrnes, V W; Condra, J H; Hoffman, J M; Emini, E A

    1993-01-01

    Pyridinone derivatives are potent and specific inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) and HIV-1 replication in cell culture. However, the potential clinical usefulness of these compounds as monotherapeutic agents may be limited by the selection of inhibitor-resistant viral variants. Resistance in cell culture is due primarily to mutational alterations at RT amino acid residues 103 and 181. A recombinant HIV-1 RT containing both of these mutations was used to screen a panel of pyridinone analogs for inhibitory activity. L-696,229 and L-697,661, pyridinones currently undergoing clinical evaluation, were more than 4,000-fold weaker against the mutant enzyme than against the wild-type enzyme. In contrast, one derivative of L-696,229, L-702,019 (3-[2-(4,7-dichlorobenzoxazol-2-yl)ethyl]-5-ethyl-6-methylpyrid in-2(1H)-thione), showed only three-fold different potencies against the two enzymes. L-702,019 was also a potent inhibitor of the replication of mutant HIV-1 containing the individual mutations at amino acid 103 or 181 as well as of clinical isolates resistant to L-697,661 and L-696,229. Isolation and analysis of resistant viral variants in cell culture showed that significant resistance to L-702,019 could be engendered only by multiple amino acid substitutions in RT. Accordingly, these studies demonstrated the potential of identifying second-generation specific HIV-1 RT inhibitors that can overcome the viral resistance selected by the first generation of inhibitors. PMID:7685996

  8. Characterization of a mantle cell lymphoma cell line resistant to the Chk1 inhibitor PF-00477736.

    PubMed

    Restelli, Valentina; Chilà, Rosaria; Lupi, Monica; Rinaldi, Andrea; Kwee, Ivo; Bertoni, Francesco; Damia, Giovanna; Carrassa, Laura

    2015-11-10

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma characterized by the chromosomal translocation t(11;14) that leads to constitutive expression of cyclin D1, a master regulator of the G1-S phase. Chk1 inhibitors have been recently shown to be strongly effective as single agents in MCL. To investigate molecular mechanisms at the basis of Chk1 inhibitor activity, a MCL cell line resistant to the Chk1 inhibitor PF-00477736 (JEKO-1 R) was obtained and characterized. The JEKO-1 R cell line was cross resistant to another Chk1 inhibitor (AZD-7762) and to the Wee1 inhibitor MK-1775. It displayed a shorter doubling time than parental cell line, likely due to a faster S phase. Cyclin D1 expression levels were decreased in resistant cell line and its re-overexpression partially re-established PF-00477736 sensitivity. Gene expression profiling showed an enrichment in gene sets involved in pro-survival pathways in JEKO-1 R. Dasatinib treatment partly restored PF-00477736 sensitivity in resistant cells suggesting that the pharmacological interference of pro-survival pathways can overcome the resistance to Chk1 inhibitors. These data further corroborate the involvement of the t(11;14) in cellular sensitivity to Chk1 inhibitors, fostering the clinical testing of Chk1 inhibitors as single agents in MCL. PMID:26439697

  9. Structural and thermodynamic basis of resistance to HIV-1 protease inhibition: implications for inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Muzammil, Salman; Ohtaka, Hiroyasu; Schön, Arne; Vega, Sonia; Freire, Ernesto

    2003-12-01

    One of the most serious side effects associated with the therapy of HIV-1 infection is the appearance of viral strains that exhibit resistance to protease inhibitors. At the molecular level, resistance to protease inhibition predominantly takes the form of mutations within the protease molecule that preferentially lower the affinity of protease inhibitors with respect to protease substrates, while still maintaining a viable catalytic activity. Mutations associated with drug resistance occur within the active site cavity as well as distal sites. Active site mutations affect directly inhibitor/protease interactions while non-active site mutations affect inhibitor binding through long range cooperative perturbations. The effects of mutations associated with drug resistance are compounded by the presence of naturally occurring polymorphisms, especially those observed in non-B subtypes of HIV-1. The binding thermodynamics of all clinical inhibitors against the wild type protease, drug resistant mutations and non-B subtype HIV-1 proteases has been determined by high sensitivity isothermal titration calorimetry. In conjunction with structural information, these data have provided a precise characterization of the binding mechanism of different inhibitors and their response to mutations. Inhibitors that exhibit extremely high affinity and low susceptibility to the effects of mutations share common features and binding determinants even if they belong to different chemical scaffolds. These binding determinants define a set of rules and constraints for the design of better HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  10. Characterization of a mantle cell lymphoma cell line resistant to the Chk1 inhibitor PF-00477736

    PubMed Central

    Restelli, Valentina; Chilà, Rosaria; Lupi, Monica; Rinaldi, Andrea; Kwee, Ivo; Bertoni, Francesco; Damia, Giovanna; Carrassa, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma characterized by the chromosomal translocation t(11;14) that leads to constitutive expression of cyclin D1, a master regulator of the G1-S phase. Chk1 inhibitors have been recently shown to be strongly effective as single agents in MCL. To investigate molecular mechanisms at the basis of Chk1 inhibitor activity, a MCL cell line resistant to the Chk1 inhibitor PF-00477736 (JEKO-1 R) was obtained and characterized. The JEKO-1 R cell line was cross resistant to another Chk1 inhibitor (AZD-7762) and to the Wee1 inhibitor MK-1775. It displayed a shorter doubling time than parental cell line, likely due to a faster S phase. Cyclin D1 expression levels were decreased in resistant cell line and its re-overexpression partially re-established PF-00477736 sensitivity. Gene expression profiling showed an enrichment in gene sets involved in pro-survival pathways in JEKO-1 R. Dasatinib treatment partly restored PF-00477736 sensitivity in resistant cells suggesting that the pharmacological interference of pro-survival pathways can overcome the resistance to Chk1 inhibitors. These data further corroborate the involvement of the t(11;14) in cellular sensitivity to Chk1 inhibitors, fostering the clinical testing of Chk1 inhibitors as single agents in MCL. PMID:26439697

  11. Aromatase and cyclooxygenases: enzymes in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brueggemeier, Robert W; Richards, Jeanette A; Petrel, Trevor A

    2003-09-01

    Aromatase (estrogen synthase) is the cytochrome P450 enzyme complex that converts C19 androgens to C18 estrogens. Aromatase activity has been demonstrated in breast tissue in vitro, and expression of aromatase is highest in or near breast tumor sites. Thus, local regulation of aromatase by both endogenous factors as well as exogenous medicinal agents will influence the levels of estrogen available for breast cancer growth. The prostaglandin PGE2 increases intracellular cAMP levels and stimulates estrogen biosynthesis, and previous studies in our laboratories have shown a strong linear association between aromatase (CYP19) expression and expression of the cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) in breast cancer specimens. To further investigate the pathways regulating COX and CYP19 gene expression, studies were performed in normal breast stromal cells, in breast cancer cells from patients, and in breast cancer cell lines using selective pharmacological agents. Enhanced COX enzyme levels results in increased production of prostaglandins, such as PGE2. This prostaglandin increased aromatase activity in breast stromal cells, and studies with selective agonists and antagonists showed that this regulation of signaling pathways occurs through the EP1 and EP2 receptor subtypes. COX-2 gene expression was enhanced in breast cancer cell lines by ligands for the various peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), and differential regulation was observed between hormone-dependent and -independent breast cancer cells. Thus, the regulation of both enzymes in breast cancer involves complex paracrine interactions, resulting in significant consequences on the pathogenesis of breast cancer. PMID:14623550

  12. Structural Mechanism of the Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor Ponatinib (AP24534): Lessons for Overcoming Kinase Inhibitor Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tianjun; Commodore, Lois; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Yihan; Thomas, Mathew; Keats, Jeff; Xu, Qihong; Rivera, Victor M.; Shakespeare, William C.; Clackson, Tim; Dalgarno, David C.; Zhu, Xiaotian

    2012-01-20

    The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. However, drug resistance caused by kinase domain mutations has necessitated the development of new mutation-resistant inhibitors, most recently against the T315I gatekeeper residue mutation. Ponatinib (AP24534) inhibits both native and mutant BCR-ABL, including T315I, acting as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor. Here, we undertook a combined crystallographic and structure-activity relationship analysis on ponatinib to understand this unique profile. While the ethynyl linker is a key inhibitor functionality that interacts with the gatekeeper, virtually all other components of ponatinib play an essential role in its T315I inhibitory activity. The extensive network of optimized molecular contacts found in the DFG-out binding mode leads to high potency and renders binding less susceptible to disruption by single point mutations. The inhibitory mechanism exemplified by ponatinib may have broad relevance to designing inhibitors against other kinases with mutated gatekeeper residues.

  13. Aromatase inhibition remodels the clonal architecture of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher A.; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Lu, Charles; Griffith, Obi L; Griffith, Malachi; Shen, Dong; Hoog, Jeremy; Li, Tiandao; Larson, David E.; Watson, Mark; Davies, Sherri R; Hunt, Kelly; Suman, Vera J.; Snider, Jacqueline; Walsh, Thomas; Colditz, Graham A.; DeSchryver, Katherine; Wilson, Richard K.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ellis, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oestrogen-deprivation therapy is common in oestrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. To better understand the contributions of tumour heterogeneity and evolution to resistance, here we perform comprehensive genomic characterization of 22 primary tumours sampled before and after 4 months of neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor (NAI) treatment. Comparing whole-genome sequencing of tumour/normal pairs from the two time points, with coincident tumour RNA sequencing, reveals widespread spatial and temporal heterogeneity, with marked remodelling of the clonal landscape in response to NAI. Two cases have genomic evidence of two independent tumours, most obviously an ER− ‘collision tumour', which was only detected after NAI treatment of baseline ER+ disease. Many mutations are newly detected or enriched post treatment, including two ligand-binding domain mutations in ESR1. The observed clonal complexity of the ER+ breast cancer genome suggests that precision medicine approaches based on genomic analysis of a single specimen are likely insufficient to capture all clinically significant information. PMID:27502118

  14. Aromatase inhibition remodels the clonal architecture of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher A; Gindin, Yevgeniy; Lu, Charles; Griffith, Obi L; Griffith, Malachi; Shen, Dong; Hoog, Jeremy; Li, Tiandao; Larson, David E; Watson, Mark; Davies, Sherri R; Hunt, Kelly; Suman, Vera J; Snider, Jacqueline; Walsh, Thomas; Colditz, Graham A; DeSchryver, Katherine; Wilson, Richard K; Mardis, Elaine R; Ellis, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oestrogen-deprivation therapy is common in oestrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. To better understand the contributions of tumour heterogeneity and evolution to resistance, here we perform comprehensive genomic characterization of 22 primary tumours sampled before and after 4 months of neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor (NAI) treatment. Comparing whole-genome sequencing of tumour/normal pairs from the two time points, with coincident tumour RNA sequencing, reveals widespread spatial and temporal heterogeneity, with marked remodelling of the clonal landscape in response to NAI. Two cases have genomic evidence of two independent tumours, most obviously an ER- 'collision tumour', which was only detected after NAI treatment of baseline ER+ disease. Many mutations are newly detected or enriched post treatment, including two ligand-binding domain mutations in ESR1. The observed clonal complexity of the ER+ breast cancer genome suggests that precision medicine approaches based on genomic analysis of a single specimen are likely insufficient to capture all clinically significant information. PMID:27502118

  15. Probing the origins of aromatase inhibitory activity of disubstituted coumarins via QSAR and molecular docking

    PubMed Central

    Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Suvannang, Naravut; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of imidazole derivatives of 4,7-disubstituted coumarins as inhibitors of aromatase, a potential therapeutic protein target for the treatment of breast cancer. Herein, a series of 3,7- and 4,7-disubstituted coumarin derivatives (1-34) with R1 and R2 substituents bearing aromatase inhibitory activity were modeled as a function of molecular and quantum chemical descriptors derived from low-energy conformer geometrically optimized at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. Insights on origins of aromatase inhibitory activity was afforded by the computed set of 7 descriptors comprising of F10[N-O], Inflammat-50, Psychotic-80, H-047, BELe1, B10[C-O] and MAXDP. Such significant descriptors were used for QSAR model construction and results indicated that model 4 afforded the best statistical performance. Good predictive performance were achieved as verified from the internal (comprising the training and the leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) sets) and external sets affording the following statistical parameters: R2Tr = 0.9576 and RMSETr = 0.0958 for the training set; Q2CV = 0.9239 and RMSECV = 0.1304 for the LOO-CV set as well as Q2Ext = 0.7268 and RMSEExt = 0.2927 for the external set. Significant descriptors showed correlation with functional substituents, particularly, R1 in governing high potency as aromatase inhibitor. Molecular docking calculations suggest that key residues interacting with the coumarins were predominantly lipophilic or non-polar while a few were polar and positively-charged. Findings illuminated herein serve as the impetus that can be used to rationally guide the design of new aromatase inhibitors. PMID:26417339

  16. Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors Targeting Protein Backbone: An Effective Strategy for Combating Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Chapsal, Bruno D.; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-06-03

    The discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) and their utilization in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have been a major turning point in the management of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, despite the successes in disease management and the decrease of HIV/AIDS-related mortality, several drawbacks continue to hamper first-generation protease inhibitor therapies. The rapid emergence of drug resistance has become the most urgent concern because it renders current treatments ineffective and therefore compels the scientific community to continue efforts in the design of inhibitors that can efficiently combat drug resistance.

  17. Mixed lineage kinases activate MEK independently of RAF to mediate resistance to RAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Marusiak, Anna A.; Edwards, Zoe C.; Hugo, Willy; Trotter, Eleanor W.; Girotti, Maria R.; Stephenson, Natalie L.; Kong, Xiangju; Gartside, Michael G.; Fawdar, Shameem; Hudson, Andrew; Breitwieser, Wolfgang; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Marais, Richard; Lo, Roger S.; Brognard, John

    2014-01-01

    RAF inhibitor therapy yields significant reductions in tumour burden in the majority of V600E-positive melanoma patients; however, resistance occurs within 2–18 months. Here we demonstrate that the mixed lineage kinases (MLK1–4) are MEK kinases that reactivate the MEK/ERK pathway in the presence of RAF inhibitors. Expression of MLK1–4 mediates resistance to RAF inhibitors and promotes survival in V600E-positive melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, we observe upregulation of the MLKs in 9 of 21 melanoma patients with acquired drug resistance. Consistent with this observation, MLKs promote resistance to RAF inhibitors in mouse models and contribute to acquired resistance in a cell line model. Lastly, we observe that a majority of MLK1 mutations identified in patients are gain-of-function mutations. In summary, our data demonstrate a role for MLKs as direct activators of the MEK/ERK pathway with implications for melanomagenesis and resistance to RAF inhibitors. PMID:24849047

  18. Evolution of resistance to phytoene desaturase and protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitors--state of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Owens, Daniel K; Tranel, Patrick J; Preston, Christopher; Duke, Stephen O

    2014-09-01

    Two major classes of herbicides include inhibitors of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) and phytoene desaturase (PDS). Plants can evolve resistance to PPO and PDS inhibitors via several mechanisms that include physical changes, resulting in reduced uptake, physiological changes, resulting in compartmentalization or altered translocation, and biochemical changes, resulting in enhanced metabolic degradation or alterations of protein structures, leading to loss of sensitivity to the herbicides. This review discusses the involvement of some of these mechanisms in the various cases of resistance to PDS- and PPO-inhibiting herbicides, and highlights unique aspects of target-site resistance to these herbicides.

  19. The pan-PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 activates canonical WNT signaling to confer resistance in TNBC cells: resistance reversal with WNT inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-En; Yang, Lixin; Chen, Kemin; Wang, Yafan; Liu, Yun-Ru; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Gaur, Shikha; Hu, Shuya; Yen, Yun

    2015-05-10

    The pan-PI3K inhibitors are one treatment option for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, this treatment is ineffective for unknown reasons. Here, we report that aberrant expression of wingless-type MMTV integration site family (WNT) and activated WNT signals, which crosstalk with the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway through GSK3β, plays the most critical role in resistance to pan-PI3K inhibitors in TNBC cells. GDC-0941 is a pan-PI3K inhibitor that activates the WNT/beta-catenin pathway in TNBC cells through stimulation of WNT secretion. GDC-0941-triggered WNT/beta-catenin pathway activation was observed in MDA-MB-231 and HCC1937 cells, which are TNBC cell lines showing aberrant WNT/beta-catenin activation, and not in SKBR3 and MCF7 cells. This observation is further investigated in vivo. GDC-0941 exhibited minimal tumor inhibition in MDA-MB-231 cells, but it significantly suppressed tumor growth in HER-positive SK-BR3 cells. In vivo mechanism study revealed the activation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway by GDC-0941. A synergistic effect was observed when combined treatment with GDC-0941 and the WNT inhibitor LGK974 at low concentrations in MDA-MB-231 cells. These findings indicated that WNT pathway activation conferred resistance in TNBC cells treated with GDC-0941. This resistance may be further circumvented through combined treatment with pan-PI3K and WNT inhibitors. Future clinical trials of these two inhibitors are warranted.

  20. The pan-PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 activates canonical WNT signaling to confer resistance in TNBC cells: resistance reversal with WNT inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Huey-En; Yang, Lixin; Chen, Kemin; Wang, Yafan; Liu, Yun-Ru; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Gaur, Shikha; Hu, Shuya; Yen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The pan-PI3K inhibitors are one treatment option for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, this treatment is ineffective for unknown reasons. Here, we report that aberrant expression of wingless-type MMTV integration site family (WNT) and activated WNT signals, which crosstalk with the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway through GSK3β, plays the most critical role in resistance to pan-PI3K inhibitors in TNBC cells. GDC-0941 is a pan-PI3K inhibitor that activates the WNT/beta-catenin pathway in TNBC cells through stimulation of WNT secretion. GDC-0941-triggered WNT/beta-catenin pathway activation was observed in MDA-MB-231 and HCC1937 cells, which are TNBC cell lines showing aberrant WNT/beta-catenin activation, and not in SKBR3 and MCF7 cells. This observation is further investigated in vivo. GDC-0941 exhibited minimal tumor inhibition in MDA-MB-231 cells, but it significantly suppressed tumor growth in HER-positive SK-BR3 cells. In vivo mechanism study revealed the activation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway by GDC-0941. A synergistic effect was observed when combined treatment with GDC-0941 and the WNT inhibitor LGK974 at low concentrations in MDA-MB-231 cells. These findings indicated that WNT pathway activation conferred resistance in TNBC cells treated with GDC-0941. This resistance may be further circumvented through combined treatment with pan-PI3K and WNT inhibitors. Future clinical trials of these two inhibitors are warranted. PMID:25857298

  1. Topoisomerase Inhibitors: Fluoroquinolone Mechanisms of Action and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2016-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are widely used in clinical medicine and are the only current class of agents that directly inhibit bacterial DNA synthesis. Quinolones dually target DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV binding to specific domains and conformations so as to block DNA strand passage catalysis and stabilize DNA-enzyme complexes that block the DNA replication apparatus and generate double breaks in DNA that underlie their bactericidal activity. Resistance has emerged with clinical use of these agents and is common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include mutational alterations in drug target affinity and efflux pump expression and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParC subunits of gyrase and topoisomerase IV, respectively, and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include other antimicrobials as well as quinolones. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is because of Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, a mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. PMID:27449972

  2. Structural Basis of Resistance to Anti-Cytochrome bc1 Complex Inhibitors: Implication for Drug Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Lothar; Yu, Chang-An; Xia, Di

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance has devastating economic and social consequences, a testimonial of which is the rise and fall of inhibitors against the respiratory component cytochrome bc1 complex, a time tested and highly effective target for disease control. Unfortunately, the mechanism of resistance is a multivariate problem, including primarily mutations in the gene of the cytochrome b subunit but also activation of alternative pathways of ubiquinol oxidation and pharmacokinetic effects. There is a considerable interest in designing new bc1 inhibitors with novel modes of binding and lower propensity to induce the development of resistance. The accumulation of crystallographic data of bc1 complexes with and without inhibitors bound provides the structural basis for rational drug design. In particular, the cytochrome b subunit offers two distinct active sites that can be targeted for inhibition - the quinol oxidation site and the quinone reduction site. This review brings together available structural information of inhibited bc1 by various quinol oxidation- and reduction-site inhibitors, the inhibitor binding modes, conformational changes upon inhibitor binding of side chains in the active site and large scale domain movements of the iron-sulfur protein subunit. Structural data analysis provides a clear understanding of where and why existing inhibitors fail and points towards promising alternatives. PMID:23688079

  3. Structural basis of resistance to anti-cytochrome bc₁ complex inhibitors: implication for drug improvement.

    PubMed

    Esser, Lothar; Yu, Chang-An; Xia, Di

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance has devastating economic and social consequences, a testimonial of which is the rise and fall of inhibitors against the respiratory component cytochrome bc₁ complex, a time tested and highly effective target for disease control. Unfortunately, the mechanism of resistance is a multivariate problem, including primarily mutations in the gene of the cytochrome b subunit but also activation of alternative pathways of ubiquinol oxidation and pharmacokinetic effects. There is a considerable interest in designing new bc₁ inhibitors with novel modes of binding and lower propensity to induce the development of resistance. The accumulation of crystallographic data of bc₁ complexes with and without inhibitors bound provides the structural basis for rational drug design. In particular, the cytochrome b subunit offers two distinct active sites that can be targeted for inhibition - the quinol oxidation site and the quinone reduction site. This review brings together available structural information of inhibited bc₁ by various quinol oxidation- and reductionsite inhibitors, the inhibitor binding modes, conformational changes upon inhibitor binding of side chains in the active site and large scale domain movements of the iron-sulfur protein subunit. Structural data analysis provides a clear understanding of where and why existing inhibitors fail and points towards promising alternatives.

  4. Structure-Based Design of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors to Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh,A.; Sridhar, P.; Leshchenko, S.; Hussain, A.; Li, J.; Kovalevsky, A.; Walters, D.; Wedelind, J.; Grum-Tokars, V.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Structure-based design and synthesis of novel HIV protease inhibitors are described. The inhibitors are designed specifically to interact with the backbone of HIV protease active site to combat drug resistance. Inhibitor 3 has exhibited exceedingly potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potency. Furthermore, this inhibitor maintains impressive potency against a wide spectrum of HIV including a variety of multi-PI-resistant clinical strains. The inhibitors incorporated a stereochemically defined 5-hexahydrocyclopenta[b]furanyl urethane as the P2-ligand into the (R)-(hydroxyethylamino)sulfonamide isostere. Optically active (3aS,5R,6aR)-5-hydroxy-hexahydrocyclopenta[b]furan was prepared by an enzymatic asymmetrization of meso-diacetate with acetyl cholinesterase, radical cyclization, and Lewis acid-catalyzed anomeric reduction as the key steps. A protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of inhibitor 3-bound HIV-1 protease (1.35 Angstroms resolution) revealed extensive interactions in the HIV protease active site including strong hydrogen bonding interactions with the backbone. This design strategy may lead to novel inhibitors that can combat drug resistance.

  5. Two natural products, trans-phytol and (22E)-ergosta-6,9,22-triene-3β,5α,8α-triol, inhibit the biosynthesis of estrogen in human ovarian granulosa cells by aromatase (CYP19).

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiajia; Yuan, Yun; Lu, Danfeng; Du, Baowen; Xiong, Liang; Shi, Jiangong; Yang, Lijuan; Liu, Wanli; Yuan, Xiaohong; Zhang, Guolin; Wang, Fei

    2014-08-15

    Aromatase is the only enzyme in vertebrates to catalyze the biosynthesis of estrogens. Although inhibitors of aromatase have been developed for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer, the whole-body inhibition of aromatase causes severe adverse effects. Thus, tissue-selective aromatase inhibitors are important for the treatment of estrogen-dependent cancers. In this study, 63 natural products with diverse structures were examined for their effects on estrogen biosynthesis in human ovarian granulosa-like KGN cells. Two compounds-trans-phytol (SA-20) and (22E)-ergosta-6,9,22-triene-3β,5α,8α-triol (SA-48)-were found to potently inhibit estrogen biosynthesis (IC50: 1μM and 0.5μM, respectively). Both compounds decreased aromatase mRNA and protein expression levels in KGN cells, but had no effect on the aromatase catalytic activity in aromatase-overexpressing HEK293A cells and recombinant expressed aromatase. The two compounds decreased the expression of aromatase promoter I.3/II. Neither compound affected intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels, but they inhibited the phosphorylation or protein expression of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). The effects of these two compounds on extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and AKT/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway were examined. Inhibition of p38 MAPK could be the mechanism underpinning the actions of these compounds. Our results suggests that natural products structurally similar to SA-20 and SA-48 may be a new source of tissue-selective aromatase modulators, and that p38 MAPK is important in the basal control of aromatase in ovarian granulosa cells. SA-20 and SA-48 warrant further investigation as new pharmaceutical tools for the prevention and treatment of estrogen-dependent cancers. PMID:24853760

  6. Prospective Screening of Novel Antibacterial Inhibitors of Dihydrofolate Reductase for Mutational Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Kathleen M.; Viswanathan, Kishore; Wright, Dennis L.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to trimethoprim (TMP) resulting from point mutations in the enzyme drug target dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) drives the development of new antifolate inhibitors effective against methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus (MRSA). For the past several years we have used structure-based design to create propargyl-linked antifolates that are highly potent antibacterial agents. In order to focus priority on the development of lead compounds with a low propensity to induce resistance, we prospectively evaluated resistance profiles for two of these inhibitors in an MRSA strain. By selection with the lead inhibitors, we generated resistant strains that contain single point mutations F98Y and H30N associated with TMP resistance and one novel mutation, F98I, in DHFR. Encouragingly, the pyridyl propargyl-linked inhibitor selects mutants at low frequency (6.85 × 10−10 to 1.65 × 10−9) and maintains a low MIC (2.5 μg/ml) and a low mutant prevention concentration (1.25 μg/ml), strongly supporting its position as a lead compound. Results from this prospective screening method inform the continued design of antifolates effective against mutations at the Phe 98 position. Furthermore, the method can be used broadly to incorporate ideas for overcoming resistance early in the development process. PMID:22491688

  7. Molecular Characterization of Clinical Isolates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Resistant to the Protease Inhibitor Darunavir

    SciTech Connect

    Sasková, Klára Grantz; Koíek, Milan; Rezácová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jirí; Yashina, Tatyana; Kagan, Ron M.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2010-03-04

    Darunavir is the most recently approved human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease (PR) inhibitor (PI) and is active against many HIV type 1 PR variants resistant to earlier-generation PIs. Darunavir shows a high genetic barrier to resistance development, and virus strains with lower sensitivity to darunavir have a higher number of PI resistance-associated mutations than viruses resistant to other PIs. In this work, we have enzymologically and structurally characterized a number of highly mutated clinically derived PRs with high levels of phenotypic resistance to darunavir. With 18 to 21 amino acid residue changes, the PR variants studied in this work are the most highly mutated HIV PR species ever studied by means of enzyme kinetics and X-ray crystallography. The recombinant proteins showed major defects in substrate binding, while the substrate turnover was less affected. Remarkably, the overall catalytic efficiency of the recombinant PRs (5% that of the wild-type enzyme) is still sufficient to support polyprotein processing and particle maturation in the corresponding viruses. The X-ray structures of drug-resistant PRs complexed with darunavir suggest that the impaired inhibitor binding could be explained by change in the PR-inhibitor hydrogen bond pattern in the P2 binding pocket due to a substantial shift of the aminophenyl moiety of the inhibitor. Recombinant virus phenotypic characterization, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray structural analysis thus help to explain darunavir resistance development in HIV-positive patients.

  8. Actin remodeling confers BRAF inhibitor resistance to melanoma cells through YAP/TAZ activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Hwan; Kim, Jongshin; Hong, Hyowon; Lee, Si-Hyung; Lee, June-Koo; Jung, Eunji; Kim, Joon

    2016-03-01

    The activation of transcriptional coactivators YAP and its paralog TAZ has been shown to promote resistance to anti-cancer therapies. YAP/TAZ activity is tightly coupled to actin cytoskeleton architecture. However, the influence of actin remodeling on cancer drug resistance remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a pivotal role of actin remodeling in YAP/TAZ-dependent BRAF inhibitor resistance in BRAF V600E mutant melanoma cells. Melanoma cells resistant to the BRAF inhibitor PLX4032 exhibit an increase in actin stress fiber formation, which appears to promote the nuclear accumulation of YAP/TAZ. Knockdown of YAP/TAZ reduces the viability of resistant melanoma cells, whereas overexpression of constitutively active YAP induces resistance. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerization and actomyosin tension in melanoma cells suppresses both YAP/TAZ activation and PLX4032 resistance. Our siRNA library screening identifies actin dynamics regulator TESK1 as a novel vulnerable point of the YAP/TAZ-dependent resistance pathway. These results suggest that inhibition of actin remodeling is a potential strategy to suppress resistance in BRAF inhibitor therapies.

  9. Overcoming acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma via targeted inhibition of Hsp90 with ganetespib.

    PubMed

    Acquaviva, Jaime; Smith, Donald L; Jimenez, John-Paul; Zhang, Chaohua; Sequeira, Manuel; He, Suqin; Sang, Jim; Bates, Richard C; Proia, David A

    2014-02-01

    Activating BRAF kinase mutations serve as oncogenic drivers in over half of all melanomas, a feature that has been exploited in the development of new molecularly targeted approaches to treat this disease. Selective BRAF(V600E) inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, typically induce initial, profound tumor regressions within this group of patients; however, durable responses have been hampered by the emergence of drug resistance. Here, we examined the activity of ganetespib, a small-molecule inhibitor of Hsp90, in melanoma lines harboring the BRAF(V600E) mutation. Ganetespib exposure resulted in the loss of mutant BRAF expression and depletion of mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT signaling, resulting in greater in vitro potency and antitumor efficacy compared with targeted BRAF and MAP-ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. Dual targeting of Hsp90 and BRAF(V600E) provided combinatorial benefit in vemurafenib-sensitive melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, ganetespib overcame mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance to vemurafenib, the latter of which was characterized by reactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Continued suppression of BRAF(V600E) by vemurafenib potentiated sensitivity to MEK inhibitors after acquired resistance had been established. Ganetespib treatment reduced, but not abolished, elevations in steady-state ERK activity. Profiling studies revealed that the addition of a MEK inhibitor could completely abrogate ERK reactivation in the resistant phenotype, with ganetespib displaying superior combinatorial activity over vemurafenib. Moreover, ganetespib plus the MEK inhibitor TAK-733 induced tumor regressions in vemurafenib-resistant xenografts. Overall these data highlight the potential of ganetespib as a single-agent or combination treatment in BRAF(V600E)-driven melanoma, particularly as a strategy to overcome acquired resistance to selective BRAF inhibitors. PMID:24398428

  10. Identification and characterization of influenza variants resistant to a viral endonuclease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Suk; Kumar, Gyanendra; Shadrick, William R; Zhou, Wei; Jeevan, Trushar; Li, Zhenmei; Slavish, P Jake; Fabrizio, Thomas P; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webb, Thomas R; Webby, Richard J; White, Stephen W

    2016-03-29

    The influenza endonuclease is an essential subdomain of the viral RNA polymerase. It processes host pre-mRNAs to serve as primers for viral mRNA and is an attractive target for antiinfluenza drug discovery. Compound L-742,001 is a prototypical endonuclease inhibitor, and we found that repeated passaging of influenza virus in the presence of this drug did not lead to the development of resistant mutant strains. Reduced sensitivity to L-742,001 could only be induced by creating point mutations via a random mutagenesis strategy. These mutations mapped to the endonuclease active site where they can directly impact inhibitor binding. Engineered viruses containing the mutations showed resistance to L-742,001 both in vitro and in vivo, with only a modest reduction in fitness. Introduction of the mutations into a second virus also increased its resistance to the inhibitor. Using the isolated wild-type and mutant endonuclease domains, we used kinetics, inhibitor binding and crystallography to characterize how the two most significant mutations elicit resistance to L-742,001. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a new class of influenza therapeutics with reduced potential for the development of clinical endonuclease inhibitor-resistant influenza strains. PMID:26976575

  11. Identification and characterization of influenza variants resistant to a viral endonuclease inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Suk; Kumar, Gyanendra; Shadrick, William R.; Zhou, Wei; Jeevan, Trushar; Li, Zhenmei; Slavish, P. Jake; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webb, Thomas R.; Webby, Richard J.; White, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    The influenza endonuclease is an essential subdomain of the viral RNA polymerase. It processes host pre-mRNAs to serve as primers for viral mRNA and is an attractive target for antiinfluenza drug discovery. Compound L-742,001 is a prototypical endonuclease inhibitor, and we found that repeated passaging of influenza virus in the presence of this drug did not lead to the development of resistant mutant strains. Reduced sensitivity to L-742,001 could only be induced by creating point mutations via a random mutagenesis strategy. These mutations mapped to the endonuclease active site where they can directly impact inhibitor binding. Engineered viruses containing the mutations showed resistance to L-742,001 both in vitro and in vivo, with only a modest reduction in fitness. Introduction of the mutations into a second virus also increased its resistance to the inhibitor. Using the isolated wild-type and mutant endonuclease domains, we used kinetics, inhibitor binding and crystallography to characterize how the two most significant mutations elicit resistance to L-742,001. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a new class of influenza therapeutics with reduced potential for the development of clinical endonuclease inhibitor-resistant influenza strains. PMID:26976575

  12. Covalent EGFR inhibitor analysis reveals importance of reversible interactions to potency and mechanisms of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Phillip A; Kuzmic, Petr; Solowiej, James; Bergqvist, Simon; Bolanos, Ben; Almaden, Chau; Nagata, Asako; Ryan, Kevin; Feng, Junli; Dalvie, Deepak; Kath, John C; Xu, Meirong; Wani, Revati; Murray, Brion William

    2014-01-01

    Covalent inhibition is a reemerging paradigm in kinase drug design, but the roles of inhibitor binding affinity and chemical reactivity in overall potency are not well-understood. To characterize the underlying molecular processes at a microscopic level and determine the appropriate kinetic constants, specialized experimental design and advanced numerical integration of differential equations are developed. Previously uncharacterized investigational covalent drugs reported here are shown to be extremely effective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (kinact/Ki in the range 10(5)-10(7) M(-1)s(-1)), despite their low specific reactivity (kinact ≤ 2.1 × 10(-3) s(-1)), which is compensated for by high binding affinities (Ki < 1 nM). For inhibitors relying on reactivity to achieve potency, noncovalent enzyme-inhibitor complex partitioning between inhibitor dissociation and bond formation is central. Interestingly, reversible binding affinity of EGFR covalent inhibitors is highly correlated with antitumor cell potency. Furthermore, cellular potency for a subset of covalent inhibitors can be accounted for solely through reversible interactions. One reversible interaction is between EGFR-Cys797 nucleophile and the inhibitor's reactive group, which may also contribute to drug resistance. Because covalent inhibitors target a cysteine residue, the effects of its oxidation on enzyme catalysis and inhibitor pharmacology are characterized. Oxidation of the EGFR cysteine nucleophile does not alter catalysis but has widely varied effects on inhibitor potency depending on the EGFR context (e.g., oncogenic mutations), type of oxidation (sulfinylation or glutathiolation), and inhibitor architecture. These methods, parameters, and insights provide a rational framework for assessing and designing effective covalent inhibitors.

  13. Defining the Biological Domain of Applicability of Adverse Outcome Pathways Across Diverse Species: The Estrogen Receptor/Aromatase Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aromatase inhibitors (e.g. fadrozole, prochloraz) and estrogen receptor antagonists (e.g. tamoxifen) reduce the circulating concentration of 17β-estradiol, leading to reproductive dysfunction in affected organisms. While these toxic effects are well-characterized in fish and...

  14. X-ray structure of human aromatase reveals an androgen-specific active site.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debashis; Griswold, Jennifer; Erman, Mary; Pangborn, Walter

    2010-02-28

    Aromatase is a unique cytochrome P450 that catalyzes the removal of the 19-methyl group and aromatization of the A-ring of androgens for the synthesis of estrogens. All human estrogens are synthesized via this enzymatic aromatization pathway. Aromatase inhibitors thus constitute a frontline therapy for estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Despite decades of intense investigation, this enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane has eluded all structure determination efforts. We have determined the crystal structure of the highly active aromatase purified from human placenta, in complex with its natural substrate androstenedione. The structure shows the binding mode of androstenedione in the catalytically active oxidized high-spin ferric state of the enzyme. Hydrogen bond-forming interactions and tight packing hydrophobic side chains that complement the puckering of the steroid backbone provide the molecular basis for the exclusive androgenic specificity of aromatase. Locations of catalytic residues and water molecules shed new light on the mechanism of the aromatization step. The structure also suggests a membrane integration model indicative of the passage of steroids through the lipid bilayer.

  15. The pharmacogenomics of drug resistance to protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Nancy K; McLeod, Howard L

    2016-09-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor cell signaling is a major driver of most human cancers. This has led to development of numerous drugs targeting protein kinases, with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. Despite their high initial response rates and survival benefits, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies. This review article discusses examples of established mechanisms of drug resistance to anticancer therapies, including drug target mutations or gene amplifications, emergence of alternate signaling pathways, and pharmacokinetic variation. This reveals a role for pharmacogenomic analysis to identify and monitor for resistance, with possible therapeutic strategies to combat chemoresistance. PMID:27620953

  16. The pharmacogenomics of drug resistance to protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Nancy K; McLeod, Howard L

    2016-09-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor cell signaling is a major driver of most human cancers. This has led to development of numerous drugs targeting protein kinases, with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. Despite their high initial response rates and survival benefits, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies. This review article discusses examples of established mechanisms of drug resistance to anticancer therapies, including drug target mutations or gene amplifications, emergence of alternate signaling pathways, and pharmacokinetic variation. This reveals a role for pharmacogenomic analysis to identify and monitor for resistance, with possible therapeutic strategies to combat chemoresistance.

  17. Stabilization of mutant BRCA1 protein confers PARP inhibitor and platinum resistance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Neil; Johnson, Shawn F.; Yao, Wei; Li, Yu-Chen; Choi, Young-Eun; Bernhardy, Andrea J.; Wang, Yifan; Capelletti, Marzia; Sarosiek, Kristopher A.; Moreau, Lisa A.; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Wickramanayake, Anneka; Harrell, Maria I.; Liu, Joyce F.; D’Andrea, Alan D.; Miron, Alexander; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Breast Cancer Type 1 Susceptibility Protein (BRCA1)-deficient cells have compromised DNA repair and are sensitive to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Despite initial responses, the development of resistance limits clinical efficacy. Mutations in the BRCA C-terminal (BRCT) domain of BRCA1 frequently create protein products unable to fold that are subject to protease-mediated degradation. Here, we show HSP90-mediated stabilization of a BRCT domain mutant BRCA1 protein under PARP inhibitor selection pressure. The stabilized mutant BRCA1 protein interacted with PALB2-BRCA2-RAD51, was essential for RAD51 focus formation, and conferred PARP inhibitor as well as cisplatin resistance. Treatment of resistant cells with the HSP90 inhibitor 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin reduced mutant BRCA1 protein levels and restored their sensitivity to PARP inhibition. Resistant cells also acquired a TP53BP1 mutation that facilitated DNA end resection in the absence of a BRCA1 protein capable of binding CtIP. Finally, concomitant increased mutant BRCA1 and decreased 53BP1 protein expression occur in clinical samples of BRCA1-mutated recurrent ovarian carcinomas that have developed resistance to platinum. These results provide evidence for a two-event mechanism by which BRCA1-mutant tumors acquire anticancer therapy resistance. PMID:24085845

  18. Molecular Pathways: Resistance to Kinase Inhibitors and Implications for Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lovly, Christine M.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2014-01-01

    The development of targeted therapies has revolutionized the treatment of cancer patients. The identification of ‘druggable’ oncogenic kinases and the creation of small molecule inhibitors designed to specifically target these mutant kinases has become an important therapeutic paradigm across several different malignancies. Often these inhibitors induce dramatic clinical responses in molecularly defined cohorts. However, resistance to such targeted therapies is an inevitable consequence of this therapeutic approach. Resistance can be either primary (de novo) or acquired. Mechanisms leading to primary resistance may be categorized as tumor intrinsic factors or as patient/drug specific factors. Acquired resistance may be mediated by target gene modification, activation of ‘bypass tracks’ which serve as compensatory signaling loops, or histological transformation. This brief review is a snapshot of the complex problem of therapeutic resistance, with a focus on resistance to kinase inhibitors in EGFR mutant and ALK rearranged non-small cell lung cancer, BRAF mutant melanoma, and BCR-ABL positive chronic myeloid leukemia. We will describe specific mechanisms of primary and acquired resistance and then review emerging strategies to delay or overcome drug resistance. PMID:24789032

  19. Multiple myeloma acquires resistance to EGFR inhibitor via induction of pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Huang, Ruibin; Ding, Jianghua; Ji, Dexiang; Song, Bing; Yuan, Liya; Chang, Hong; Chen, Guoan

    2015-04-20

    Multiple myeloma (MM) was characterized by frequent mutations in KRAS/NRAS/BRAF within the EGFR pathway that could induce resistance to EGFR inhibitors. We here report that EGFR inhibition solely exhibited moderate inhibition in KRAS/NRAS/BRAF wildtype (triple-WT) MM cells, whilst had no effect in myeloma cells with any of the mutated genes. The moderate inhibitory effect was conferred by induction of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) when cells were treated with Gefitinib, the EGFR inhibitor. Combination of Gefitinib with PPP inhibitor 6AN effected synergistically in triple-WT cells. The inhibition could be restored by addition of NADPH. Dual EGFR/ERBB2 inhibitor Afatinib also exhibited similar effects. Further genetic silencing of EGFR, ERBB2 and mTOR indicated that major effect conferred by ERBB2 was via convergence to EGFR pathway in MM. Our results contributed to the individualized targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitors in MM.

  20. Genetic resistance to JAK2 enzymatic inhibitors is overcome by HSP90 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Weigert, Oliver; Lane, Andrew A.; Bird, Liat; Kopp, Nadja; Chapuy, Bjoern; van Bodegom, Diederik; Toms, Angela V.; Marubayashi, Sachie; Christie, Amanda L.; McKeown, Michael; Paranal, Ronald M.; Bradner, James E.; Yoda, Akinori; Gaul, Christoph; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Romanet, Vincent; Murakami, Masato; Tiedt, Ralph; Ebel, Nicolas; Evrot, Emeline; De Pover, Alain; Régnier, Catherine H.; Erdmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Francesco; Eck, Michael J.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Levine, Ross L.; Kung, Andrew L.; Baffert, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic inhibitors of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) are in clinical development for the treatment of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with rearrangements of the cytokine receptor subunit cytokine receptor–like factor 2 (CRLF2), and other tumors with constitutive JAK2 signaling. In this study, we identify G935R, Y931C, and E864K mutations within the JAK2 kinase domain that confer resistance across a panel of JAK inhibitors, whether present in cis with JAK2 V617F (observed in MPNs) or JAK2 R683G (observed in B-ALL). G935R, Y931C, and E864K do not reduce the sensitivity of JAK2-dependent cells to inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), which promote the degradation of both wild-type and mutant JAK2. HSP90 inhibitors were 100–1,000-fold more potent against CRLF2-rearranged B-ALL cells, which correlated with JAK2 degradation and more extensive blockade of JAK2/STAT5, MAP kinase, and AKT signaling. In addition, the HSP90 inhibitor AUY922 prolonged survival of mice xenografted with primary human CRLF2-rearranged B-ALL further than an enzymatic JAK2 inhibitor. Thus, HSP90 is a promising therapeutic target in JAK2-driven cancers, including those with genetic resistance to JAK enzymatic inhibitors. PMID:22271575

  1. EPHA2 Blockade Overcomes Acquired Resistance to EGFR Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Amato, Katherine R; Wang, Shan; Tan, Li; Hastings, Andrew K; Song, Wenqiang; Lovly, Christine M; Meador, Catherine B; Ye, Fei; Lu, Pengcheng; Balko, Justin M; Colvin, Daniel C; Cates, Justin M; Pao, William; Gray, Nathanael S; Chen, Jin

    2016-01-15

    Despite the success of treating EGFR-mutant lung cancer patients with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), all patients eventually acquire resistance to these therapies. Although various resistance mechanisms have been described, there are currently no FDA-approved therapies that target alternative mechanisms to treat lung tumors with acquired resistance to first-line EGFR TKI agents. Here we found that EPHA2 is overexpressed in EGFR TKI-resistant tumor cells. Loss of EPHA2 reduced the viability of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells harboring EGFR(T790M) mutations in vitro and inhibited tumor growth and progression in an inducible EGFR(L858R+T790M)-mutant lung cancer model in vivo. Targeting EPHA2 in erlotinib-resistant cells decreased S6K1-mediated phosphorylation of cell death agonist BAD, resulting in reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of EPHA2 by the small-molecule inhibitor ALW-II-41-27 decreased both survival and proliferation of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. ALW-II-41-27 was also effective in decreasing viability of cells with acquired resistance to the third-generation EGFR TKI AZD9291. Collectively, these data define a role for EPHA2 in the maintenance of cell survival of TKI-resistant, EGFR-mutant lung cancer and indicate that EPHA2 may serve as a useful therapeutic target in TKI-resistant tumors.

  2. EPHA2 Blockade Overcomes Acquired Resistance to EGFR Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Amato, Katherine R; Wang, Shan; Tan, Li; Hastings, Andrew K; Song, Wenqiang; Lovly, Christine M; Meador, Catherine B; Ye, Fei; Lu, Pengcheng; Balko, Justin M; Colvin, Daniel C; Cates, Justin M; Pao, William; Gray, Nathanael S; Chen, Jin

    2016-01-15

    Despite the success of treating EGFR-mutant lung cancer patients with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), all patients eventually acquire resistance to these therapies. Although various resistance mechanisms have been described, there are currently no FDA-approved therapies that target alternative mechanisms to treat lung tumors with acquired resistance to first-line EGFR TKI agents. Here we found that EPHA2 is overexpressed in EGFR TKI-resistant tumor cells. Loss of EPHA2 reduced the viability of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells harboring EGFR(T790M) mutations in vitro and inhibited tumor growth and progression in an inducible EGFR(L858R+T790M)-mutant lung cancer model in vivo. Targeting EPHA2 in erlotinib-resistant cells decreased S6K1-mediated phosphorylation of cell death agonist BAD, resulting in reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of EPHA2 by the small-molecule inhibitor ALW-II-41-27 decreased both survival and proliferation of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. ALW-II-41-27 was also effective in decreasing viability of cells with acquired resistance to the third-generation EGFR TKI AZD9291. Collectively, these data define a role for EPHA2 in the maintenance of cell survival of TKI-resistant, EGFR-mutant lung cancer and indicate that EPHA2 may serve as a useful therapeutic target in TKI-resistant tumors. PMID:26744526

  3. Unique Distribution of Aromatase in the Human Brain: In Vivo Studies With PET and [N-Methyl-11C]Vorozole

    SciTech Connect

    Biegon, A.; Biegon, A.; Kim, S.W.; Alexoff, D.; Millard, J.; Carter, P.; Hubbard, B.; King, P.; Logan, J.; Muench, L.; Pareto, D.; Schlyer, D.; Shea, C.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Xu, Y.; Fowler, J.

    2010-10-01

    Aromatase catalyzes the last step in estrogen biosynthesis. Brain aromatase is involved in diverse neurophysiological and behavioral functions including sexual behavior, aggression, cognition, and neuroprotection. Using positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiolabeled aromatase inhibitor [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]vorozole, we characterized the tracer distribution and kinetics in the living human brain. Six young, healthy subjects, three men and three women, were administered the radiotracer alone on two separate occasions. Women were scanned in distinct phases of the menstrual cycle. Specificity was confirmed by pretreatment with a pharmacological (2.5 mg) dose of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. PET data were acquired over a 90-min period and regions of interest placed over selected brain regions. Brain and plasma time activity curves, corrected for metabolites, were used to derive kinetic parameters. Distribution volume (V{sub T}) values in both men and women followed the following rank order: thalamus > amygdala = preoptic area > medulla (inferior olive) > accumbens, pons, occipital and temporal cortex, putamen, cerebellum, and white matter. Pretreatment with letrozole reduced VT in all regions, though the size of the reduction was region-dependent, ranging from {approx}70% blocking in thalamus andpreoptic area to {approx}10% in cerebellum. The high levels of aromatase in thalamus and medulla (inferior olive) appear to be unique to humans. These studies set the stage for the noninvasive assessment of aromatase involvement in various physiological and pathological processes affecting the human brain.

  4. Unique distribution of aromatase in the human brain: in vivo studies with PET and [N-methyl-11C]vorozole.

    PubMed

    Biegon, Anat; Kim, Sung Won; Alexoff, David L; Jayne, Millard; Carter, Pauline; Hubbard, Barbara; King, Payton; Logan, Jean; Muench, Lisa; Pareto, Deborah; Schlyer, David; Shea, Colleen; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Xu, Youwen; Fowler, Joanna S

    2010-11-01

    Aromatase catalyzes the last step in estrogen biosynthesis. Brain aromatase is involved in diverse neurophysiological and behavioral functions including sexual behavior, aggression, cognition, and neuroprotection. Using positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiolabeled aromatase inhibitor [N-methyl-(11)C]vorozole, we characterized the tracer distribution and kinetics in the living human brain. Six young, healthy subjects, three men and three women, were administered the radiotracer alone on two separate occasions. Women were scanned in distinct phases of the menstrual cycle. Specificity was confirmed by pretreatment with a pharmacological (2.5 mg) dose of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. PET data were acquired over a 90-min period and regions of interest placed over selected brain regions. Brain and plasma time activity curves, corrected for metabolites, were used to derive kinetic parameters. Distribution volume (V(T)) values in both men and women followed the following rank order: thalamus > amygdala = preoptic area > medulla (inferior olive) > accumbens, pons, occipital and temporal cortex, putamen, cerebellum, and white matter. Pretreatment with letrozole reduced V(T) in all regions, though the size of the reduction was region-dependent, ranging from ∼70% blocking in thalamus andpreoptic area to ∼10% in cerebellum. The high levels of aromatase in thalamus and medulla (inferior olive) appear to be unique to humans. These studies set the stage for the noninvasive assessment of aromatase involvement in various physiological and pathological processes affecting the human brain.

  5. Unique distribution of aromatase in the human brain: in vivo studies with PET and [N-methyl-11C]vorozole

    PubMed Central

    Biegon, Anat; Kim, Sung Won; Alexoff, David L.; Jayne, Millard; Carter, Pauline; Hubbard, Barbara; King, Payton; Logan, Jean; Muench, Lisa; Pareto, Deborah; Schlyer, David; Shea, Colleen; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Xu, Youwen; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2010-01-01

    Aromatase catalyzes the last step in estrogen biosynthesis. Brain aromatase is involved in diverse neurophysiological and behavioral functions including sexual behavior, aggression, cognition and neuroprotection. Using positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiolabeled aromatase inhibitor [N-methyl-11C]vorozole, we characterized the tracer distribution and kinetics in the living human brain. Six young, healthy subjects, 3 men and 3 women, were administered the radiotracer alone on two separate occasions. Women were scanned in distinct phases of the menstrual cycle. Specificity was confirmed by pretreatment with a pharmacological (2.5mg) dose of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. PET data were acquired over a 90 min period and regions of interest placed over selected brain regions. Brain and plasma time activity curves, corrected for metabolites, were used to derive kinetic parameters. Distribution volume (VT) values in both men and women followed the rank order: thalamus>amygdala=preoptic area>medulla(inferior olive) > accumbens, pons, occipital and temporal cortex, putamen, cerebellum and white matter. Pretreatment with letrozole reduced VT in all regions, though the size of the reduction was region dependent; ranging from ~70% blocking in thalamus and preoptic area to ~10% in cerebellum. The high levels of aromatase in thalamus and medulla (inferior olive) appear to be unique to humans. These studies set the stage for the non-invasive assessment of aromatase involvement in various physiological and pathological processes affecting the human brain. PMID:20842717

  6. High-Throughput Screening of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Resistant Genes in CML.

    PubMed

    Ma, Leyuan; Roderick, Justine; Kelliher, Michelle A; Green, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening in mammalian cells has proven to be a powerful tool for identifying new genes and molecular pathways relevant to many cellular processes and diseases. For example, screening for genes that, when inactivated, lead to resistance to cancer therapeutic drugs can reveal new mechanisms for how resistance develops and identify potential targetable strategies to overcome drug resistance. Here, we describe a detailed procedure for performing a high-throughput RNAi screen using a genome-wide human short hairpin RNA (shRNA) library for identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-resistance genes in a human CML cell line model. PMID:27581147

  7. JAK2 inhibition sensitizes resistant EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Sizhi P.; Chang, Qing; Mao, Ninghui; Daly, Laura A.; Vogel, Robert; Chan, Tyler; Liu, Shu Hui; Bournazou, Eirini; Schori, Erez; Zhang, Haiying; Brewer, Monica Red; Pao, William; Morris, Luc; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria; Manova-Todorova, Katia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Norton, Larry; Levine, Ross L.; Altan-Bonnet, Gregoire; Solit, David; Zinda, Michael; Huszar, Dennis; Lyden, David; Bromberg, Jacqueline F.

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinomas with mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) respond to EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), but resistance invariably occurs. We found that the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway was aberrantly increased in TKI-resistant EGFR-mutant non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. JAK2 inhibition restored sensitivity to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib in TKI-resistant cell lines and xenograft models of EGFR-mutant TKI-resistant lung cancer. JAK2 inhibition uncoupled EGFR from its negative regulator, suppressor of cytokine signaling 5 (SOCS5), consequently increasing EGFR abundance and restoring the tumor cells’ dependence on EGFR signaling. Furthermore, JAK2 inhibition led to heterodimerization of mutant and wild-type EGFR subunits, the activity of which was then blocked by TKIs. Our results reveal a mechanism whereby JAK2 inhibition overcomes acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors and support the use of combination therapy with JAK and EGFR inhibitors for the treatment of EGFR-dependent NSCLC. PMID:27025877

  8. Potential effect of Olea europea leaves, Sonchus oleraceus leaves and Mangifera indica peel extracts on aromatase activity in human placental microsomes and CYP19A1 expression in MCF-7 cell line: Comparative study.

    PubMed

    Shaban, N Z; Hegazy, W A; Abdel-Rahman, S M; Awed, O M; Khalil, S A

    2016-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) provide novel approaches to the adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers. In this study, different plant extracts from Olea europaea leaves (OLE), Sonchus oleraceus L. (SOE) and Mangifera indica peels (MPE) were prepared to identify phytoconstituents and measure antioxidant capacities. The effects of these three extracts on aromatase activity in human placental microsomes were evaluated. Additionally, the effects of these extracts on tissue-specific promoter expression of CYP19A1 gene in cell culture model (MCF-7) were assessed using qRT-PCR. Results showed a concentration-dependent decrease in aromatase activity after treatment with OLE and MPE, whereas, SOE showed a biphasic effect. The differential effects of OLE, SOE and MPE on aromatase expression showed that OLE seems to be the most potent suppressor followed by SOE and then MPE. These findings indicate that OLE has effective inhibitory action on aromatase at both the enzymatic and expression levels, in addition to its cytotoxic effect against MCF-7 cells. Also, MPE may be has the potential to be used as a tissue-specific aromatase inhibitor (selective aromatase inhibitor) and it may be promising to develop a new therapeutic agent against ER+ breast cancer. PMID:27585256

  9. Aromatase imaging with [N-methyl-C-11]vorozole PET in healthy men and women

    SciTech Connect

    Biegon, Anat; Fowler, Joanna S.; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Sung Won; Logan, Jean; Pareto, Deborah; Schlyer, David; Wang, Gene-Jack

    2015-02-19

    Aromatase, the last and obligatory enzyme catalyzing estrogen biosynthesis from androgenic precursors, can be labeled in vivo with ¹¹C-vorozole. Aromatase inhibitors are widely used in breast cancer and other endocrine conditions. The present study aims to provide baseline information defining aromatase distribution in healthy men and women, against which its perturbation in pathological situations can be studied. Methods: ¹¹C-vorozole (111-296 MBq/subject) was injected I.V in 13 men and 20 women (age range 23 to 67). PET data were acquired over a 90 minute period. Each subject had 4 scans, 2/day separated by 2-6 weeks, including brain and torso or pelvis scans. Young women were scanned at 2 discrete phases of the menstrual cycle (midcycle and late luteal). Men and postmenopausal women were also scanned following pretreatment with a clinical dose of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole (“blocking” studies). Time activity curves were obtained and standard uptake values (SUV) calculated for major organs including brain, heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen, muscle, bone and male and female reproductive organs (penis, testes, uterus, ovaries). Organ and whole body radiation exposures were calculated using Olinda software. Results: Liver uptake was higher than all other organs, but was not blocked by pretreatment with letrozole. Mean SUVs in men were higher than in women, and brain uptake was blocked by letrozole. Male brain SUVs were also higher than all other organs (ranging from 0.48±0.05 in lungs to 1.5±0.13 in kidneys). Mean ovarian SUVs (3.08±0.7) were comparable to brain levels and higher than all other organs. Furthermore, ovarian SUVs In young women around the time of ovulation (midcycle) were significantly higher than those measured in the late luteal phase, while aging and cigarette smoking reduced ¹¹C-vorozole uptake. Conclusions: PET with ¹¹C-vorozole is useful for assessing physiological changes in estrogen synthesis capacity in the human body

  10. Aromatase imaging with [N-methyl-C-11]vorozole PET in healthy men and women

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Biegon, Anat; Fowler, Joanna S.; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Sung Won; Logan, Jean; Pareto, Deborah; Schlyer, David; Wang, Gene-Jack

    2015-02-19

    Aromatase, the last and obligatory enzyme catalyzing estrogen biosynthesis from androgenic precursors, can be labeled in vivo with ¹¹C-vorozole. Aromatase inhibitors are widely used in breast cancer and other endocrine conditions. The present study aims to provide baseline information defining aromatase distribution in healthy men and women, against which its perturbation in pathological situations can be studied. Methods: ¹¹C-vorozole (111-296 MBq/subject) was injected I.V in 13 men and 20 women (age range 23 to 67). PET data were acquired over a 90 minute period. Each subject had 4 scans, 2/day separated by 2-6 weeks, including brain and torso or pelvismore » scans. Young women were scanned at 2 discrete phases of the menstrual cycle (midcycle and late luteal). Men and postmenopausal women were also scanned following pretreatment with a clinical dose of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole (“blocking” studies). Time activity curves were obtained and standard uptake values (SUV) calculated for major organs including brain, heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen, muscle, bone and male and female reproductive organs (penis, testes, uterus, ovaries). Organ and whole body radiation exposures were calculated using Olinda software. Results: Liver uptake was higher than all other organs, but was not blocked by pretreatment with letrozole. Mean SUVs in men were higher than in women, and brain uptake was blocked by letrozole. Male brain SUVs were also higher than all other organs (ranging from 0.48±0.05 in lungs to 1.5±0.13 in kidneys). Mean ovarian SUVs (3.08±0.7) were comparable to brain levels and higher than all other organs. Furthermore, ovarian SUVs In young women around the time of ovulation (midcycle) were significantly higher than those measured in the late luteal phase, while aging and cigarette smoking reduced ¹¹C-vorozole uptake. Conclusions: PET with ¹¹C-vorozole is useful for assessing physiological changes in estrogen synthesis capacity in the

  11. Bioengineering resistance to phytoene desaturase inhibitors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three natural somatic mutations at codon 304 of the phytoene desaturase gene (pds) of Hydrilla verticillata ( L. f. Royle) have been reported to provide resistance to the herbicide fluridone. We substituted the arginine 304 present in the wild-type H. verticillata phytoene desaturase (PDS) with all...

  12. Effects of AKT inhibitor therapy in response and resistance to BRAF inhibition in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical use of BRAF inhibitors for treatment of metastatic melanoma is limited by the development of drug resistance. In this study we investigated whether co-targeting the MAPK and the PI3K-AKT pathway can prevent emergence of resistance or provide additional growth inhibitory effects in vitro. Methods Anti-tumor effects of the combination of the BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) dabrafenib and GSK2141795B (AKTi) in a panel of 23 BRAF mutated melanoma cell lines were evaluated on growth inhibition by an ATP-based luminescent assay, on cell cycle and apoptosis by flow cytometry and on cell signaling by western blot. Moreover, we investigated the possibilities of delaying or reversing resistance or achieving further growth inhibition by combining AKTi with dabrafenib and/or the MEK inhibitor (MEKi) trametinib by using long term cultures. Results More than 40% of the cell lines, including PTEN-/- and AKT mutants showed sensitivity to AKTi (IC50 < 1.5 μM). The combination of dabrafenib and AKTi synergistically potentiated growth inhibition in the majority of cell lines with IC50 > 5 nM dabrafenib. Combinatorial treatment induced apoptosis only in cell lines sensitive to AKTi. In long term cultures of a PTEN-/- cell line, combinatorial treatment with the MAPK inhibitors, dabrafenib and trametinib, and AKTi markedly delayed the emergence of drug resistance. Moreover, combining AKTi with the MAPK inhibitors from the beginning provided superior growth inhibitory effects compared to addition of AKTi upon development of resistance to MAPK inhibitors in this particular cell line. Conclusions AKTi combined with BRAFi-based therapy may benefit patients with tumors harboring BRAF mutations and particularly PTEN deletions or AKT mutations. PMID:24735930

  13. Resistance to BET Bromodomain Inhibitors Is Mediated by Kinome Reprogramming in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurimchak, Alison M; Shelton, Claude; Duncan, Kelly E; Johnson, Katherine J; Brown, Jennifer; O'Brien, Shane; Gabbasov, Rashid; Fink, Lauren S; Li, Yuesheng; Lounsbury, Nicole; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Childers, Wayne E; Connolly, Denise C; Chernoff, Jonathan; Peterson, Jeffrey R; Duncan, James S

    2016-08-01

    Small-molecule BET bromodomain inhibitors (BETis) are actively being pursued in clinical trials for the treatment of a variety of cancers, but the mechanisms of resistance to BETis remain poorly understood. Using a mass spectrometry approach that globally measures kinase signaling at the proteomic level, we evaluated the response of the kinome to targeted BETi treatment in a panel of BRD4-dependent ovarian carcinoma (OC) cell lines. Despite initial inhibitory effects of BETi, OC cells acquired resistance following sustained treatment with the BETi JQ1. Through application of multiplexed inhibitor beads (MIBs) and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that BETi resistance is mediated by adaptive kinome reprogramming, where activation of compensatory pro-survival kinase networks overcomes BET protein inhibition. Furthermore, drug combinations blocking these kinases may prevent or delay the development of drug resistance and enhance the efficacy of BETi therapy. PMID:27452461

  14. Computer aided screening of potent inhibitor compounds against inhibitor resistant TEM β-lactamase mutants from traditional Chinese medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qifeng; Yin, Yanxia; Liu, Hanjie; Tian, Jinhong

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) type β-lactamase mutation is largely known. Therefore, it is of interest to identify new yet improved leads against IRT from traditional Chinese medicine. Hence, we screened more than 10,000 compounds from Chinese medicine (tcm@taiwan database) with mutant molecular IRT models through docking techniques. This exercise identified compounds affeic acid, curcumin, salvianolic acid E, ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid with high binding score with the mutants. This was further validated in vitro where salvianolic acid E combined with cefoperazone and sulbactam effectively inhibit the R244S mutant. PMID:25670878

  15. Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okabe, Seiichi Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Tanaka, Yuko; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells okabe et al. •Imatinib or nilotinib resistance was involved Src family kinase. •The BCR-ABL point mutation (E334V) was highly resistant to imatinib or nilotinib. •Ponatinib was a powerful strategy against imatinib or nilotinib resistant Ph-positive cells. -- Abstract: Because a substantial number of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia acquire resistance to ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), their management remains a challenge. Ponatinib, also known as AP24534, is an oral multi-targeted TKI. Ponatinib is currently being investigated in a pivotal phase 2 clinical trial. In the present study, we analyzed the molecular and functional consequences of ponatinib against imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant (R) K562 and Ba/F3 cells. The proliferation of imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant K562 cells did not decrease after treatment with imatinib or nilotinib. Src family kinase Lyn was activated. Point mutation Ba/F3 cells (E334 V) were also highly resistant to imatinib and nilotinib. Treatment with ponatinib for 72 h inhibited the growth of imatinib- and nilotinib-resistant cells. The phosphorylation of BCR-ABL, Lyn, and Crk-L was reduced. This study demonstrates that ponatinib has an anti-leukemia effect by reducing ABL and Lyn kinase activity and this information may be of therapeutic relevance.

  16. Placental expression and molecular characterization of aromatase cytochrome P450 in the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Conley, A J; Corbin, C J; Browne, P; Mapes, S M; Place, N J; Hughes, A L; Glickman, S E

    2007-07-01

    At birth, the external genitalia of female spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) are the most masculinized of any known mammal, but are still sexually differentiated. Placental aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom) is an important route of androgen metabolism protecting human female fetuses from virilization in utero. Therefore, placental P450arom expression was examined in spotted hyenas to determine levels during genital differentiation, and to compare molecular characteristics between the hyena and human placental enzymes. Hyena placental P450arom activity was determined at gestational days (GD) 31, 35, 45, 65 and 95 (term, 110), and the relative sensitivity of hyena and human placental enzyme to inhibition by the specific inhibitor, Letrozole, was also examined. Expression of hyena P450arom in placenta was localized by immuno-histochemistry, and a full-length cDNA was cloned for phylogenetic analysis. Aromatase activity increased from GD31 to a peak at 45 and 65, apparently decreasing later in gestation. This activity was more sensitive to inhibition by Letrozole than was human placental aromatase activity. Expression of P450arom was localized to syncytiotrophoblast and giant cells of mid-gestation placentas. The coding sequence of hyena P450arom was 94% and 86% identical to the canine and human enzymes respectively, as reflected by phylogenetic analyses. These data demonstrate for the first time that hyena placental aromatase activity is comparable to that of human placentas when genital differentiation is in progress. This suggests that even in female spotted hyenas clitoral differentiation is likely protected from virilization by placental androgen metabolism. Decreased placental aromatase activity in late gestation may be equally important in allowing androgen to program behaviors at birth. Although hyena P450arom is closely related to the canine enzyme, both placental anatomy and P450arom expression differ. Other hyaenids and carnivores must be investigated to

  17. The effect of opiates on the activity of human placental aromatase/CYP19.

    PubMed

    Zharikova, Olga L; Deshmukh, Sujal V; Kumar, Meena; Vargas, Ricardo; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N; Hankins, Gary D V; Ahmed, Mahmoud S

    2007-01-15

    Aromatase, cytochrome P450 19, is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of estrogens by the human placenta. It is also the major placental enzyme that metabolizes the opiates L-acetylmethadol (LAAM), methadone, and buprenorphine (BUP). Methadone and BUP are used in treatment of the opiate addict and are competitive inhibitors of testosterone conversion to estradiol (E(2)) and 16alpha-hydroxytestosterone (16-OHT) to estriol (E(3)) by aromatase. The aim of this investigation is to determine the effect of 20 opiates, which can be administered to pregnant patients for therapeutic indications or abused, on E(2) and E(3) formation by placental aromatase. Data obtained indicated that the opiates increased, inhibited, or had no effect on aromatase activity. Their effect on E(3) formation was more pronounced than that on E(2) due to the lower affinity of 16-OHT than testosterone to aromatase. The K(i) values for the opiates that inhibited E(3) formation were sufentanil, 7 +/- 1 microM; LAAM, 13 +/- 8 microM; fentanyl, 25 +/- 5 microM; oxycodone, 92 +/- 22 microM; codeine, 218 +/- 69 microM; (+)-pentazocine, 225 +/- 73 microM. The agonists morphine, heroin, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, propoxyphene, meperidine, levorphanol, dextrorphan, and (-)-pentazocine and the antagonists naloxone and naltrexone caused an increase in E(3) formation by 124-160% of control but had no effect on E(2) formation. Moreover, oxycodone and codeine did not inhibit E(2) formation and the IC(50) values for fentanyl, sufentanil, and (+)-pentazocine were >1000 microM. It is unlikely that the acute administration of the opiates that inhibit estrogen formation would affect maternal and/or neonatal outcome. However, the effects of abusing any of them during the entire pregnancy are unclear at this time. PMID:17118343

  18. Viral resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific pyridinone reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Nunberg, J H; Schleif, W A; Boots, E J; O'Brien, J A; Quintero, J C; Hoffman, J M; Emini, E A; Goldman, M E

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific pyridinone reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors prevent HIV-1 replication in cell culture (M. E. Goldman, J. H. Nunberg, J. A. O'Brien, J.C. Quintero, W. A. Schleif, K. F. Freund, S. L. Gaul, W. S. Saari, J. S. Wai, J. M. Hoffman, P. S. Anderson, D. J. Hupe, E. A. Emini, and A. M. Stern, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88:6863-6867, 1991). In contrast to nucleoside analog inhibitors, such as AZT, which need to be converted to triphosphates by host cells, these compounds act directly to inhibit RT via a mechanism which is noncompetitive with respect to deoxynucleoside triphosphates. As one approach to define the mechanism of action of pyridinone inhibitors, we isolated resistant mutants of HIV-1 in cell culture. Serial passage in the presence of inhibitor yielded virus which was 1,000-fold resistant to compounds of this class. Bacterially expressed RTs molecularly cloned from resistant viruses were also resistant. The resistant RT genes encoded two amino acid changes, K-103 to N and Y-181 to C, each of which contributed partial resistance. The mutation at amino acid 181 lies adjacent to the conserved YG/MDD motif found in most DNA and RNA polymerases. The mutation at amino acid 103 lies within a region of RT which may be involved in PPi binding. The resistant viruses, although sensitive to nucleoside analogs, were cross-resistant to the structurally unrelated RT inhibitors TIBO R82150 (R. Pauwels, K. Andries, J. Desmyter, D. Schols, M. J. Kukla, H. J. Breslin, A. Raeymaeckers, J. Van Gelder, R. Woestenborghs, J. Heykanti, K. Schellekens, M. A. C. Janssen, E. De Clercq, and P. A. J. Janssen, Nature [London] 343:470-474, 1990) and BI-RG-587 (V. J. Merluzzi, K. D. Hargrave, M. Labadia, K. Grozinger, M. Skoog, J. C. Wu, C.-K. Shih, K. Eckner, S. Hattox, J. Adams, A. S. Rosenthal, R. Faanes, R. J. Eckner, R. A. Koup, and J. L. Sullivan, Science 250:1411-1413, 1990). Thus, these nonnucleoside analog inhibitors may share a

  19. Photosensitive dissolution inhibitors and resists based on onium salt carboxylates

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Simison, Kelby L.

    2005-11-29

    A photoresist composition that employs onium salt carboxylates as thermally stable dissolution inhibitors. The photoresist composition can be either an onium carboxylate salt with a phenolic photoresist, such as novolac, or an onium cation protected carboxylate-containing resin such as an acrylic/acrylic acid copolymer. The onium carboxylate can be an onium cholate, wherein the onium cholate is an iodonium cholate. Particularly preferred iodonium cholates are alkyloxyphenylphenyl iodonium cholates and most particularly preferred is octyloxyphenyphenyl iodonium cholate. The photoresist composition will not create nitrogen or other gaseous byproducts upon exposure to radiation, does not require water for photoactivation, has acceptable UV radiation transmission characteristics, and is thermally stable at temperatures required for solvent removal.

  20. Circulating tumour DNA profiling reveals heterogeneity of EGFR inhibitor resistance mechanisms in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chabon, Jacob J; Simmons, Andrew D; Lovejoy, Alexander F; Esfahani, Mohammad S; Newman, Aaron M; Haringsma, Henry J; Kurtz, David M; Stehr, Henning; Scherer, Florian; Karlovich, Chris A; Harding, Thomas C; Durkin, Kathleen A; Otterson, Gregory A; Purcell, W Thomas; Camidge, D Ross; Goldman, Jonathan W; Sequist, Lecia V; Piotrowska, Zofia; Wakelee, Heather A; Neal, Joel W; Alizadeh, Ash A; Diehn, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) analysis facilitates studies of tumour heterogeneity. Here we employ CAPP-Seq ctDNA analysis to study resistance mechanisms in 43 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with the third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor rociletinib. We observe multiple resistance mechanisms in 46% of patients after treatment with first-line inhibitors, indicating frequent intra-patient heterogeneity. Rociletinib resistance recurrently involves MET, EGFR, PIK3CA, ERRB2, KRAS and RB1. We describe a novel EGFR L798I mutation and find that EGFR C797S, which arises in ∼33% of patients after osimertinib treatment, occurs in <3% after rociletinib. Increased MET copy number is the most frequent rociletinib resistance mechanism in this cohort and patients with multiple pre-existing mechanisms (T790M and MET) experience inferior responses. Similarly, rociletinib-resistant xenografts develop MET amplification that can be overcome with the MET inhibitor crizotinib. These results underscore the importance of tumour heterogeneity in NSCLC and the utility of ctDNA-based resistance mechanism assessment. PMID:27283993

  1. Circulating tumour DNA profiling reveals heterogeneity of EGFR inhibitor resistance mechanisms in lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Chabon, Jacob J.; Simmons, Andrew D.; Lovejoy, Alexander F.; Esfahani, Mohammad S.; Newman, Aaron M.; Haringsma, Henry J.; Kurtz, David M.; Stehr, Henning; Scherer, Florian; Karlovich, Chris A.; Harding, Thomas C.; Durkin, Kathleen A.; Otterson, Gregory A.; Purcell, W. Thomas; Camidge, D. Ross; Goldman, Jonathan W.; Sequist, Lecia V.; Piotrowska, Zofia; Wakelee, Heather A.; Neal, Joel W.; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Diehn, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) analysis facilitates studies of tumour heterogeneity. Here we employ CAPP-Seq ctDNA analysis to study resistance mechanisms in 43 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with the third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor rociletinib. We observe multiple resistance mechanisms in 46% of patients after treatment with first-line inhibitors, indicating frequent intra-patient heterogeneity. Rociletinib resistance recurrently involves MET, EGFR, PIK3CA, ERRB2, KRAS and RB1. We describe a novel EGFR L798I mutation and find that EGFR C797S, which arises in ∼33% of patients after osimertinib treatment, occurs in <3% after rociletinib. Increased MET copy number is the most frequent rociletinib resistance mechanism in this cohort and patients with multiple pre-existing mechanisms (T790M and MET) experience inferior responses. Similarly, rociletinib-resistant xenografts develop MET amplification that can be overcome with the MET inhibitor crizotinib. These results underscore the importance of tumour heterogeneity in NSCLC and the utility of ctDNA-based resistance mechanism assessment. PMID:27283993

  2. The interaction between Helminthosporium carbonum and maize: Induced resistance and the role of an inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cantone, F.A.

    1989-01-01

    Helminthosporium carbonum race 1 produces large, necrotic lesions on susceptible leaves of maize, whereas race 2 causes small, chlorotic flecks. Resistance to race 1 on susceptible leaves was induced when race 2 was inoculated for at least 10 h prior to a challenge inoculation with the pathogen and was manifest as a decrease in the number of appressoria and reduced penetration by race 1 conidia. Induced resistance was prevented or reversed when HC-toxin was added to challenge race 1 inoculum. The basis for protection appears to be a volatile, inhibitory compound produced by the host. This inhibitor was always associated with treatments that resulted in resistance, whereas no inhibitory activity was detected in diffusates from susceptible reactions. The appearance of inhibitor in diffusates coincided with the appearance of protection on the leaf. In addition to race 2 of H. carbonum, other fungi (H. victoriae, H. turcicum, and Alternaria) also induced production of the inhibitor as well as resistance to race 1. The inhibitor prevented the germination of conidia of all fungi tested. The growth of two phytopathogenic bacteria was also completely inhibited. Incorporation of {sup 3}H-leucine and {sup 14}C-uridine into protein and RNA, respectively, by conidia of H. carbonum was prevented within 15 min of exposure to inhibitor. In addition, respiration of conidia in inhibitor was reduced within 90 min to just 25% of the rate of conidia germinated in water. However, inhibitory activity of the diffusates was readily reversed when conidia were rinsed with water or when organic or amino acids were added to inhibited conidia. The addition of sodium acetate to race 2 and race 1 inocula resulted in lesion enlargement and also nullified inhibitory activity in vitro.

  3. Crizotinib-resistant NPM-ALK mutants confer differential sensitivity to unrelated Alk inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ceccon, Monica; Mologni, Luca; Bisson, William; Scapozza, Leonardo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2013-02-01

    The dual ALK/MET inhibitor crizotinib was recently approved for the treatment of metastatic and late-stage ALK+ NSCLC, and is currently in clinical trial for other ALK-related diseases. As predicted after other tyrosine kinase inhibitors' clinical experience, the first mutations that confer resistance to crizotinib have been described in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and in one patient inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Here, we focused our attention on the anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), where the oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK, responsible for 70% to 80% of cases, represents an ideal crizotinib target. We selected and characterized 2 human NPM-ALK+ ALCL cell lines, KARPAS-299 and SUP-M2, able to survive and proliferate at different crizotinib concentrations. Sequencing of ALK kinase domain revealed that a single mutation became predominant at high crizotinib doses in each cell line, namely L1196Q and I1171N in Karpas-299 and SUP-M2 cells, respectively. These mutations also conferred resistance to crizotinib in Ba/F3 cells expressing human NPM-ALK. The resistant cell populations, as well as mutated Ba/F3 cells, were characterized for sensitivity to two additional ALK inhibitors: the dual ALK/EGFR inhibitor AP26113 and NVP-TAE684. While L1196Q-positive cell lines were sensitive to both inhibitors, cells carrying I1171N substitution showed cross-resistance to all ALK inhibitors tested. This study provides potentially relevant information for the management of patients with ALCL that may relapse after crizotinib treatment.

  4. Trypsin inhibitors from Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum leaves involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Ribeiro, S F F; Gonçalves, L S A; Bento, C S; Sudré, C P; Vasconcelos, I M; Gomes, V M

    2014-11-07

    Several plant organs contain proteinase inhibitors, which are produced during normal plant development or are induced upon pathogen attack to suppress the enzymatic activity of phytopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we examined the presence of proteinase inhibitors, specifically trypsin inhibitors, in the leaf extract of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum inoculated with PepYMV (Pepper yellow mosaic virus). Leaf extract from plants with the accession number UENF 1624, which is resistant to PepYMV, was collected at 7 different times (0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 144 h). Seedlings inoculated with PepYMV and control seedlings were grown in a growth chamber. Protein extract from leaf samples was partially purified by reversed-phase chromatography using a C2/C18 column. Residual trypsin activity was assayed to detect inhibitors followed by Tricine-SDS-PAGE analysis to determine the N-terminal peptide sequence. Based on trypsin inhibitor assays, trypsin inhibitors are likely constitutively synthesized in C. baccatum var. pendulum leaf tissue. These inhibitors are likely a defense mechanism for the C. baccatum var. pendulum- PepYMV pathosystem.

  5. Trypsin inhibitors from Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum leaves involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Ribeiro, S F F; Gonçalves, L S A; Bento, C S; Sudré, C P; Vasconcelos, I M; Gomes, V M

    2014-01-01

    Several plant organs contain proteinase inhibitors, which are produced during normal plant development or are induced upon pathogen attack to suppress the enzymatic activity of phytopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we examined the presence of proteinase inhibitors, specifically trypsin inhibitors, in the leaf extract of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum inoculated with PepYMV (Pepper yellow mosaic virus). Leaf extract from plants with the accession number UENF 1624, which is resistant to PepYMV, was collected at 7 different times (0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 144 h). Seedlings inoculated with PepYMV and control seedlings were grown in a growth chamber. Protein extract from leaf samples was partially purified by reversed-phase chromatography using a C2/C18 column. Residual trypsin activity was assayed to detect inhibitors followed by Tricine-SDS-PAGE analysis to determine the N-terminal peptide sequence. Based on trypsin inhibitor assays, trypsin inhibitors are likely constitutively synthesized in C. baccatum var. pendulum leaf tissue. These inhibitors are likely a defense mechanism for the C. baccatum var. pendulum- PepYMV pathosystem. PMID:25501145

  6. Characterization of Inhibitor-Resistant Histone Deacetylase Activity in Plant-Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Baidyaroy, Dipnath; Brosch, Gerald; Graessle, Stefan; Trojer, Patrick; Walton, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    HC-toxin, a cyclic peptide made by the filamentous fungus Cochliobolus carbonum, is an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC) from many organisms. It was shown earlier that the HDAC activity in crude extracts of C. carbonum is relatively insensitive to HC-toxin as well as to the chemically unrelated HDAC inhibitors trichostatin and D85, whereas the HDAC activity of Aspergillus nidulans is sensitive (G. Brosch et al., Biochemistry 40:12855-12863, 2001). Here we report that HC-toxin-resistant HDAC activity was present in other, but not all, plant-pathogenic Cochliobolus species but not in any of the saprophytic species tested. The HDAC activities of the fungi Alternaria brassicicola and Diheterospora chlamydosporia, which also make HDAC inhibitors, were resistant. The HDAC activities of all C. carbonum isolates tested, except one non-toxin-producing isolate, were resistant. In a cross between a sensitive isolate and a resistant isolate, resistance genetically cosegregated with HC-toxin production. When fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography, extracts of resistant and sensitive isolates and species had two peaks of HDAC activity, one that was fully HC-toxin resistant and a second that was larger and sensitive. The first peak was consistently smaller in extracts of sensitive fungi than in resistant fungi, but the difference appeared to be insufficiently large to explain the differential sensitivities of the crude extracts. Differences in mRNA expression levels of the four known HDAC genes of C. carbonum did not account for the observed differences in HDAC activity profiles. When mixed together, resistant extracts protected extracts of sensitive C. carbonum but did not protect other sensitive Cochlibolus species or Neurospora crassa. Production of this extrinsic protection factor was dependent on TOXE, the transcription factor that regulates the HC-toxin biosynthetic genes. The results suggest that C. carbonum has multiple mechanisms of self-protection against

  7. Redundant kinase activation and resistance of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Fu, Li-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown dramatic effects against that tumors harboring EGFR activating mutations in the EGFR intracytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain and resulted in cell apoptosis. Unfortunately, a number of patients ultimately developed resistance by multiple mechanisms. Thus, elucidation of the mechanism of resistance to EGFR-TKIs can provide strategies for blocking or reversing the situation. Recent studies suggested that redundant kinase activation plays pivotal roles in escaping from the effects of EGFR-TKIs. Herein, we aimed to characterize several molecular events involved in the resistance to EGFR-TKIs mediated by redundant kinase activation. PMID:25520855

  8. Synthesis of Casimiroin and Optimization of Its Quinone Reductase 2 and Aromatase Inhibitory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Arup; Reddy, P.V. Narasimha; Sturdy, Megan; Marler, Laura; Pegan, Scott D.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Pezzuto, John M.; Cushman, Mark

    2009-08-07

    An efficient method has been developed to synthesize casimiroin (1), a component of the edible fruit of Casimiroa edulis, on a multigram scale in good overall yield. The route was versatile enough to provide an array of compound 1 analogues that were evaluated as QR2 and aromatase inhibitors. In addition, X-ray crystallography studies of QR2 in complex with compound 1 and one of its more potent analogues has provided insight into the mechanism of action of this new series of QR2 inhibitors. The initial biological investigations suggest that compound 1 and its analogues merit further investigation as potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. Perturbation biology nominates upstream-downstream drug combinations in RAF inhibitor resistant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Anil; Wang, Weiqing; Demir, Emek; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Jing, Xiaohong; Molinelli, Evan J; Babur, Özgün; Bemis, Debra L; Onur Sumer, Selcuk; Solit, David B; Pratilas, Christine A; Sander, Chris

    2015-08-18

    Resistance to targeted cancer therapies is an important clinical problem. The discovery of anti-resistance drug combinations is challenging as resistance can arise by diverse escape mechanisms. To address this challenge, we improved and applied the experimental-computational perturbation biology method. Using statistical inference, we build network models from high-throughput measurements of molecular and phenotypic responses to combinatorial targeted perturbations. The models are computationally executed to predict the effects of thousands of untested perturbations. In RAF-inhibitor resistant melanoma cells, we measured 143 proteomic/phenotypic entities under 89 perturbation conditions and predicted c-Myc as an effective therapeutic co-target with BRAF or MEK. Experiments using the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 affecting the level of c-Myc protein and protein kinase inhibitors targeting the ERK pathway confirmed the prediction. In conclusion, we propose an anti-cancer strategy of co-targeting a specific upstream alteration and a general downstream point of vulnerability to prevent or overcome resistance to targeted drugs.

  10. Metformin combined with p38 MAPK inhibitor improves cisplatin sensitivity in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    XIE, YA; PENG, ZHENG; SHI, MINGXING; JI, MEI; GUO, HONGJUN; SHI, HUIRONG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of metformin, combined with a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, on the sensitivity of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer to cisplatin. The expression and distribution of phosphorylated p38 MAPK (P-p38 MAPK) was confirmed in drug-resistant and primary ovarian cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. A bromodeoxyuridine ELISA kit was used to analyze the effects of metformin, SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, and metformin combined with SB203580, on the cell proliferation of SKOV3/DDP cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. The protein expression of P-p38 MAPK was significantly higher in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer, as compared with the primary ovarian cancer tissues. Metformin combined with SB203580 significantly enhanced the sensitivity of SKOV3/DDP cells to cisplatin. In conclusion, the p38 MAPK signaling pathway may be associated with cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer. Metformin, combined with the p38 MAPK inhibitor, significantly increased the sensitivity of SKOV3/DDP cells to cisplatin treatment. PMID:25118792

  11. Bisubstrate Inhibitors of Biotin Protein Ligase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resistant to Cyclonucleoside Formation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the etiological agent of tuberculosis, is the leading cause of bacterial infectious disease mortality. Biotin protein ligase (BirA) globally regulates lipid metabolism in Mtb through the posttranslational biotinylation of acyl coenzyme A carboxylases (ACCs) involved in lipid biosynthesis and is essential for Mtb survival. We previously developed a rationally designed bisubstrate inhibitor of BirA that displays potent enzyme inhibition and whole-cell activity against multidrug resistant and extensively drug resistant Mtb strains. Here we present the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a focused series of inhibitors, which are resistant to cyclonucleoside formation, a key decomposition pathway of our initial analogue. Improved chemical stability is realized through replacement of the adenosyl N-3 nitrogen and C-5′ oxygen atom with carbon as well as incorporation of a bulky group on the nucleobase to prevent the required syn-conformation necessary for proper alignment of N-3 with C-5′. PMID:24363833

  12. Drug Resistance Mutations Alter Dynamics of Inhibitor-Bound HIV-1 Protease.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yufeng; Myint, Wazo; Paulsen, Janet L; Schiffer, Celia A; Ishima, Rieko; Kurt Yilmaz, Nese

    2014-08-12

    Under the selective pressure of therapy, HIV-1 protease mutants resistant to inhibitors evolve to confer drug resistance. Such mutations can impact both the dynamics and structures of the bound and unbound forms of the enzyme. Flap+ is a multidrug-resistant variant of HIV-1 protease with a combination of primary and secondary resistance mutations (L10I, G48V, I54V, V82A) and a strikingly altered thermodynamic profile for darunavir (DRV) binding relative to the wild-type protease. We elucidated the impact of these mutations on protein dynamics in the DRV-bound state using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR relaxation experiments. Both methods concur in that the conformational ensemble and dynamics of protease are impacted by the drug resistance mutations in Flap+ variant. Surprisingly this change in ensemble dynamics is different from that observed in the unliganded form of the same variant (Cai, Y. et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 8, 3452-3462). Our comparative analysis of both inhibitor-free and bound states presents a comprehensive picture of the altered dynamics in drug-resistant mutant HIV-1 protease and underlies the importance of incorporating dynamic analysis of the whole system, including the unliganded state, into revealing drug resistance mechanisms. PMID:25136270

  13. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is the achille's heel of melanoma cells resistant to Braf-mutant inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    André, Fanny; Jonneaux, Aurélie; Scalbert, Camille; Garçon, Guillaume; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Balayssac, Stéphane; Rocchi, Stephane; Savina, Ariel; Formstecher, Pierre; Mortier, Laurent; Kluza, Jérome; Marchetti, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Vemurafenib/PLX4032, a selective inhibitor of mutant BRAFV600E, constitutes a paradigm shift in melanoma therapy. Unfortunately, acquired resistance, which unavoidably occurs, represents one major limitation to clinical responses. Recent studies have highlighted that vemurafenib activated oxidative metabolism in BRAFV600E melanomas expressing PGC1α. However, the oxidative state of melanoma resistant to BRAF inhibitors is unknown. We established representative in vitro and in vivo models of human melanoma resistant to vemurafenib including primary specimens derived from melanoma patients. Firstly, our study reveals that vemurafenib increased mitochondrial respiration and ROS production in BRAFV600E melanoma cell lines regardless the expression of PGC1α. Secondly, melanoma cells that have acquired resistance to vemurafenib displayed intrinsically high rates of mitochondrial respiration associated with elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress irrespective of the presence of vemurafenib. Thirdly, the elevated ROS level rendered vemurafenib-resistant melanoma cells prone to cell death induced by pro-oxidants including the clinical trial drug, elesclomol. Based on these observations, we propose that the mitochondrial oxidative signature of resistant melanoma constitutes a novel opportunity to overcome resistance to BRAF inhibition. PMID:24161908

  14. Compensatory Increase of Transglutaminase 2 Is Responsible for Resistance to mTOR Inhibitor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jingwen; Huang, Wenlong

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a crucial role in controlling cell growth and homeostasis. Deregulation of mTOR signaling is frequently observed in some cancers, making it an attractive drug target for cancer therapy. Although mTORC1 inhibitor rapalog-based therapy has shown positive results in various pre-clinical animal cancer studies, tumors rebound upon treatment discontinuation. Moreover, several recent clinical trials showed that the mTORC1 inhibitors rapamycin and rapalog only reduce the capacity for cell proliferation without promoting cell death, consistent with the concept that rapamycin is cytostatic and reduces disease progression but is not cytotoxic. It is imperative that rapamycin-regulated events and additional targets for more effective drug combinations be identified. Here, we report that rapamycin treatment promotes a compensatory increase in transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) levels in mTORC1-driven tumors. TGM2 inhibition potently sensitizes mTORC1-hyperactive cancer cells to rapamycin treatment, and a rapamycin-induced autophagy blockade inhibits the compensatory TGM2 upregulation. More importantly, tumor regression was observed in MCF-7-xenograft tumor-bearing mice treated with both mTORC1 and TGM2 inhibitors compared with those treated with either a single inhibitor or the vehicle control. These results demonstrate a critical role for the compensatory increase in transglutaminase 2 levels in promoting mTORC1 inhibitor resistance and suggest that rational combination therapy may potentially suppress cancer therapy resistance. PMID:26872016

  15. Compensatory Increase of Transglutaminase 2 Is Responsible for Resistance to mTOR Inhibitor Treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jingwen; Huang, Wenlong

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a crucial role in controlling cell growth and homeostasis. Deregulation of mTOR signaling is frequently observed in some cancers, making it an attractive drug target for cancer therapy. Although mTORC1 inhibitor rapalog-based therapy has shown positive results in various pre-clinical animal cancer studies, tumors rebound upon treatment discontinuation. Moreover, several recent clinical trials showed that the mTORC1 inhibitors rapamycin and rapalog only reduce the capacity for cell proliferation without promoting cell death, consistent with the concept that rapamycin is cytostatic and reduces disease progression but is not cytotoxic. It is imperative that rapamycin-regulated events and additional targets for more effective drug combinations be identified. Here, we report that rapamycin treatment promotes a compensatory increase in transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) levels in mTORC1-driven tumors. TGM2 inhibition potently sensitizes mTORC1-hyperactive cancer cells to rapamycin treatment, and a rapamycin-induced autophagy blockade inhibits the compensatory TGM2 upregulation. More importantly, tumor regression was observed in MCF-7-xenograft tumor-bearing mice treated with both mTORC1 and TGM2 inhibitors compared with those treated with either a single inhibitor or the vehicle control. These results demonstrate a critical role for the compensatory increase in transglutaminase 2 levels in promoting mTORC1 inhibitor resistance and suggest that rational combination therapy may potentially suppress cancer therapy resistance. PMID:26872016

  16. Resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors used in the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Wainberg, Mark A; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors that target the retroviral enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT) have played an indispensable role in the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection. They can be grouped into two distinct therapeutic groups, namely the nucleoside and nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs), and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). NRTIs form the backbones of most first- and second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens formulated for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. They are also used to prevent mother-to-child transmission, and as pre-exposure prophylaxis in individuals at risk of HIV-1 infection. The NNRTIs nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz and rilpivirine also used to form part of first-line ART regimens, although this is no longer recommended, while etravirine can be used in salvage ART regimens. A single-dose of NVP administered to both mother and child has routinely been used in resource-limited settings to reduce the rate of HIV-1 transmission. Unfortunately, the development of HIV-1 resistance to RT inhibitors can compromise the efficacy of these antiviral drugs in both the treatment and prevention arenas. Here, we provide an up-to-date review on drug-resistance mutations in HIV-1 RT, and discuss their cross-resistance profiles, molecular mechanisms and clinical significance. PMID:26517190

  17. RAS signaling promotes resistance to JAK inhibitors by suppressing BAD-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Peter S; Sarosiek, Kristopher A; Lin, Kevin H; Meggendorfer, Manja; Schnittger, Susanne; Letai, Anthony; Wood, Kris C

    2014-12-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) frequently have an activating mutation in the gene encoding Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). Thus, targeting the pathway mediated by JAK and its downstream substrate, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), may yield clinical benefit for patients with MPNs containing the JAK2(V617F) mutation. Although JAK inhibitor therapy reduces splenomegaly and improves systemic symptoms in patients, this treatment does not appreciably reduce the number of neoplastic cells. To identify potential mechanisms underlying this inherent resistance phenomenon, we performed pathway-centric, gain-of-function screens in JAK2(V617F) hematopoietic cells and found that the activation of the guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) RAS or its effector pathways [mediated by the kinases AKT and ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase)] renders cells insensitive to JAK inhibition. Resistant MPN cells became sensitized to JAK inhibitors when also exposed to inhibitors of the AKT or ERK pathways. Mechanistically, in JAK2(V617F) cells, a JAK2-mediated inactivating phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein BAD [B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2)-associated death promoter] promoted cell survival. In sensitive cells, exposure to a JAK inhibitor resulted in dephosphorylation of BAD, enabling BAD to bind and sequester the prosurvival protein BCL-XL (BCL-2-like 1), thereby triggering apoptosis. In resistant cells, RAS effector pathways maintained BAD phosphorylation in the presence of JAK inhibitors, yielding a specific dependence on BCL-XL for survival. In patients with MPNs, activating mutations in RAS co-occur with the JAK2(V617F) mutation in the malignant cells, suggesting that RAS effector pathways likely play an important role in clinically observed resistance.

  18. Modelling inhibition of avian aromatase by azole pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, A.K.; Devillers, J.; Bhunia, S.S.; Bro, E.

    2015-01-01

    The potential effects of pesticides and their metabolites on the endocrine system are of major concern to wildlife and human health. In this context, the azole pesticides have earned special attention due to their cytochrome P450 aromatase inhibition potential. Cytochrome P450 aromatase (CYP19) catalyses the conversion of androstenedione and testosterone into oestrone and oestradiol, respectively. Thus, aromatase modulates the oestrogenic balance essential not only for females, but also for male physiology, including gonadal function. Its inhibition affects reproductive organs, fertility and sexual behaviour in humans and wildlife species. Several studies have shown that azole pesticides are able to inhibit human and fish aromatases but the information on birds is lacking. Consequently, it appeared to be of interest to estimate the aromatase inhibition of azoles in three different avian species, namely Gallus gallus, Coturnix coturnix japonica and Taeniopygia guttata. In the absence of the crystal structure of the aromatase enzyme in these bird species, homology models for the individual avian species were constructed using the crystal structure of human aromatase (hAr) (pdb: 3EQM) that showed high sequence similarity for G. gallus (82.0%), T. guttata (81.9%) and C. japonica (81.2%). A homology model with Oncorhynchus mykiss (81.9%) was also designed for comparison purpose. The homology-modelled aromatase for each avian and fish species and crystal structure of human aromatase were selected for docking 46 structurally diverse azoles and related compounds. We showed that the docking behaviour of the chemicals on the different aromatases was broadly the same. We also demonstrated that there was an acceptable level of correlation between the binding score values and the available aromatase inhibition data. This means that the homology models derived on bird and fish species can be used to approximate the potential inhibitory effects of azoles on their aromatase. PMID

  19. Resistance to β-Lactamase Inhibitor Protein Does Not Parallel Resistance to Clavulanic Acid in TEM β-Lactamase Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, William A.; Locke, Troy R.; Jensen, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    In order to compare patterns of resistance to inhibition by clavulanic acid with patterns of resistance to inhibition by a β-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP), R164S, R244S, and R164S/R244S mutant forms of TEM β-lactamase were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis. When kinetic parameters were determined for these mutant and wild-type forms of TEM, the single mutants showed properties that were similar to those in the literature but the double mutant showed properties that were very different. The R164S/R244S double mutant form of TEM retained its resistance to inhibition by clavulanic acid (characteristic of the R244S mutation) but lost all its ability to hydrolyze ceftazidime (characteristic of the R164S mutation). While these characteristics are contrary to those previously reported for an R164S/R244S double mutant, this discrepancy resulted from the use of a defective mutant in the earlier study. Both the single and double mutant forms of TEM remained highly sensitive when tested for inhibition by BLIP, showing only slightly increased resistance compared to that of the wild type; this pattern of resistance is quite different from the pattern of clavulanic acid resistance. The slight increases in resistance to inhibition by BLIP seen in the mutants may have been related to the fact that all of the mutations effected changes in the net charge on the TEM protein that could impede interactions with BLIP. PMID:12384366

  20. Resistance Mechanisms for the Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Ibrutinib

    PubMed Central

    Woyach, Jennifer A.; Furman, Richard R.; Liu, Ta-Ming; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Zapatka, Marc; Ruppert, Amy S.; Xue, Ling; Li, Daniel Hsieh-Hsin; Steggerda, Susanne M.; Versele, Matthias; Dave, Sandeep S.; Zhang, Jenny; Yilmaz, Ayse Selen; Jaglowski, Samantha M.; Blum, Kristie A.; Lozanski, Arletta; Lozanski, Gerard; James, Danelle F.; Barrientos, Jacqueline C.; Lichter, Peter; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Buggy, Joseph J.; Chang, Betty Y.; Johnson, Amy J.; Byrd, John C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ibrutinib is an irreversible inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) and is effective in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Resistance to irreversible kinase inhibitors and resistance associated with BTK inhibition have not been characterized. Although only a small proportion of patients have had a relapse during ibrutinib therapy, an understanding of resistance mechanisms is important. We evaluated patients with relapsed disease to identify mutations that may mediate ibrutinib resistance. METHODS We performed whole-exome sequencing at baseline and the time of relapse on samples from six patients with acquired resistance to ibrutinib therapy. We then performed functional analysis of identified mutations. In addition, we performed Ion Torrent sequencing for identified resistance mutations on samples from nine patients with prolonged lymphocytosis. RESULTS We identified a cysteine-to-serine mutation in BTK at the binding site of ibrutinib in five patients and identified three distinct mutations in PLCγ2 in two patients. Functional analysis showed that the C481S mutation of BTK results in a protein that is only reversibly inhibited by ibrutinib. The R665W and L845F mutations in PLCγ2 are both potentially gain-of-function mutations that lead to autonomous B-cell–receptor activity. These mutations were not found in any of the patients with prolonged lymphocytosis who were taking ibrutinib. CONCLUSIONS Resistance to the irreversible BTK inhibitor ibrutinib often involves mutation of a cysteine residue where ibrutinib binding occurs. This finding, combined with two additional mutations in PLCγ2 that are immediately downstream of BTK, underscores the importance of the B-cell–receptor pathway in the mechanism of action of ibrutinib in CLL. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute and others.) PMID:24869598

  1. Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor I Inhibitor Sensitizes Drug-resistant Pancreatic Cancer Cells to Gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Jeong; Hwang, Jae Seok; Hong, Young Bin; Bae, Insoo; Seong, Yeon-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Background Resistance to gemcitabine is a major obstacle in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Previous exploration of protein kinase inhibitors demonstrated that blocking transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signal enhances the efficacy of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells. Materials and Methods We analyzed the cell viability after combinational treatment of TGFβ receptor I (TβRI) inhibitors, SB431542 and SB525334 with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, apoptotic cell death and cell migration were measured. Results Combination with TβRI inhibitors significantly augmented the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine in both parental and gemcitabine resistant pancreatic cancer cells. SB525334 significantly increased apoptotic cell death in gemcitabine-resistant cells. Treatment of SB525334 also reduced AKT signal pathway, which plays crucial role in gemcitabine resistance. Migration assay also revealed that blocking TβRI reduces cell migration. Conclusion Chemotherapeutic approaches using SB525334 might enhance the treatment benefit of the gemcitabine-containing regimens in the treatment of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:22399597

  2. Inhibitor-Resistant OXY-2-Derived β-Lactamase Produced by Klebsiella oxytoca

    PubMed Central

    Sirot, D.; Labia, R.; Pouedras, P.; Chanal-Claris, C.; Cerceau, C.; Sirot, J.

    1998-01-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca strains are generally moderately resistant to amoxicillin and ticarcillin due to the activities of the chromosomally encoded OXY-1 and OXY-2 class A β-lactamase families. These enzymes have the ability to hydrolyze not only penicillins but also cephalosporins, including cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam, and are inhibited by clavulanic acid. A Klebsiella oxytoca strain was isolated from a culture of blood from a patient who had been treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate (3 g/day) for 10 days 1 month earlier. This strain harbored an unusual phenotype characterized by resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanate. It produced an OXY-2-type β-lactamase (pI 6.3), as confirmed by PCR amplification with primers specific for the OXY-2-encoding gene. Gene sequencing revealed a point mutation (A→G) corresponding to the amino acid substitution Ser→Gly at position 130. This mutant enzyme was poorly inhibited by inhibitors, and its kinetic constants compared to those of the parent enzyme were characterized by an increased Km value for ticarcillin, with a drastically reduced activity against cephalosporins, as is observed with inhibitor-resistant TEM enzymes. The substitution Ser→Gly-130 was previously described in the inhibitor-resistant β-lactamase SHV-10 derived from an SHV-5 variant, but this is the first report of such a mutant in OXY enzymes from K. oxytoca. PMID:9736532

  3. A Novel Nitrobenzoate Microtubule Inhibitor that Overcomes Multidrug Resistance Exhibits Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Bo; Gong, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Wu, Shu-Ying; Li, Yi; Xu, Xian-Dong; Shang, Bo-Yang; Zhou, Jin-Ming; Zhu, Zhi-Ling; Si, Shu-Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major limitation for microtubule-binding agents in cancer treatment. Here we report a novel microtubule inhibitor (2-morpholin-4-yl-5-nitro-benzoic acid 4-methylsulfanyl-benzyl ester, IMB5046), its cytotoxicity against multidrug-resistant cell lines and its antitumor efficacy in animal models. IMB5046 disrupted microtubule structures in cells and inhibited purified tubulin polymerization in vitro. It bound to the colchicine pocket of tubulin. IMB5046 displayed potent cytotoxicity against multiple tumor cell lines with an IC50 range of 0.037-0.426 μM. Notably, several multidrug-resistant cell lines which were resistant to colchicine, vincristine and paclitaxel remained sensitive to IMB5046. IMB5046 was not a P-glycoprotein substrate. IMB5046 blocked cell cycle at G2/M phase and induced cell apoptosis. Microarray assay indicated that the differentially expressed genes after IMB5046 treatment were highly related to immune system, cell death and cancer. In a mouse xenograft model IMB5046 inhibited the growth of human lung tumor xenograft by 83% at a well-tolerated dose. It is concluded that IMB5046 is a tubulin polymerization inhibitor with novel chemical structure and can overcome multidrug resistance. It is a promising lead compound for cancer chemotherapy, especially for treatment of multidrug-resistant tumors. PMID:27510727

  4. Identification of PLX4032-resistance mechanisms and implications for novel RAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaehyuk; Landrette, Sean F; Wang, Tiffany; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Bjornson, Robert; Cheng, Elaine; Stiegler, Amy L; Gathiaka, Symon; Acevedo, Orlando; Boggon, Titus J; Krauthammer, Michael; Halaban, Ruth; Xu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    BRAF inhibitors improve melanoma patient survival, but resistance invariably develops. Here we report the discovery of a novel BRAF mutation that confers resistance to PLX4032 employing whole-exome sequencing of drug-resistant BRAF(V600K) melanoma cells. We further describe a new screening approach, a genome-wide piggyBac mutagenesis screen that revealed clinically relevant aberrations (N-terminal BRAF truncations and CRAF overexpression). The novel BRAF mutation, a Leu505 to His substitution (BRAF(L505H) ), is the first resistance-conferring second-site mutation identified in BRAF mutant cells. The mutation replaces a small nonpolar amino acid at the BRAF-PLX4032 interface with a larger polar residue. Moreover, we show that BRAF(L505H) , found in human prostate cancer, is itself a MAPK-activating, PLX4032-resistant oncogenic mutation. Lastly, we demonstrate that the PLX4032-resistant melanoma cells are sensitive to novel, next-generation BRAF inhibitors, especially the 'paradox-blocker' PLX8394, supporting its use in clinical trials for treatment of melanoma patients with BRAF-mutations. PMID:24283590

  5. A Novel Nitrobenzoate Microtubule Inhibitor that Overcomes Multidrug Resistance Exhibits Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan-Bo; Gong, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Wu, Shu-Ying; Li, Yi; Xu, Xian-Dong; Shang, Bo-Yang; Zhou, Jin-Ming; Zhu, Zhi-Ling; Si, Shu-Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major limitation for microtubule-binding agents in cancer treatment. Here we report a novel microtubule inhibitor (2-morpholin-4-yl-5-nitro-benzoic acid 4-methylsulfanyl-benzyl ester, IMB5046), its cytotoxicity against multidrug-resistant cell lines and its antitumor efficacy in animal models. IMB5046 disrupted microtubule structures in cells and inhibited purified tubulin polymerization in vitro. It bound to the colchicine pocket of tubulin. IMB5046 displayed potent cytotoxicity against multiple tumor cell lines with an IC50 range of 0.037–0.426 μM. Notably, several multidrug-resistant cell lines which were resistant to colchicine, vincristine and paclitaxel remained sensitive to IMB5046. IMB5046 was not a P-glycoprotein substrate. IMB5046 blocked cell cycle at G2/M phase and induced cell apoptosis. Microarray assay indicated that the differentially expressed genes after IMB5046 treatment were highly related to immune system, cell death and cancer. In a mouse xenograft model IMB5046 inhibited the growth of human lung tumor xenograft by 83% at a well-tolerated dose. It is concluded that IMB5046 is a tubulin polymerization inhibitor with novel chemical structure and can overcome multidrug resistance. It is a promising lead compound for cancer chemotherapy, especially for treatment of multidrug-resistant tumors. PMID:27510727

  6. Developmental regulation of aromatase activity in the rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Lephart, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    The brain of all mammalian species studied thus far contain an enzymatic activity (aromatase) that catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens. The activity is highest during prenatal development and contributes to the establishment of sex differences which determine adult gonadotropin secretion patterns and reproductive behavior. The studies presented in this dissertation represent a systematic effort to elucidate the mechanism(s) that control the initiation of and contribute to maintaining rat hypothalamic aromatase activity during pre- and postnatal development. Aromatase enzyme activity was measured by the {sup 3}H{sub 2}O release assay or by traditional estrogen product isolation. Brain aromatase mRNA was detected by hybridization to a cDNA encoding rat aromatase cytochrome P-450. In both males and females the time of puberty was associated with a decline in hypothalamic aromatase activity. This decline may represent a factor underlying the peri-pubertal decrease in the sensitivity to gonadal steroid feedback that accompanies completion of puberty. The results also indicate that androgens regulate brain aromatase levels during both the prepubertal and peri-pubertal stages of sexual development and that this regulation is transiently lost in young adults. Utilizing a hypothalamic organotypic culture system, aromatase activity in vitro was maintained for as long as two days. The results of studies of a variety of hormonal and metabolic regulators suggest that prenatal aromatase activity is regulated by factor(s) that function independently from the classical cyclic AMP and protein kinase C trans-membrane signaling pathways.

  7. Simian-Tropic HIV as a Model To Study Drug Resistance against Integrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wares, Melissa; Hassounah, Said; Mesplède, Thibault; Sandstrom, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance represents a key aspect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment failure. It is important to develop nonhuman primate models for studying issues of drug resistance and the persistence and transmission of drug-resistant viruses. However, relatively little work has been conducted using either simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or SIV/HIV recombinant viruses for studying resistance against integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). Here, we used a T-cell-tropic SIV/HIV recombinant virus in which the capsid and vif regions of HIV-1 were replaced with their SIV counterparts (simian-tropic HIV-1 [stHIV-1](SCA,SVIF)) to study the impact of a number of drug resistance substitutions in the integrase coding region at positions E92Q, G118R, E138K, Y143R, S153Y, N155H, and R263K on drug resistance, viral infectivity, and viral replication capacity. Our results show that each of these substitutions exerted effects that were similar to their effects in HIV-1. Substitutions associated with primary resistance against dolutegravir were more detrimental to stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) infectiousness than were resistance substitutions associated with raltegravir and elvitegravir, consistent with data that have been reported for HIV-1. These findings support the role of stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) as a useful model with which to evaluate the role of INSTI resistance substitutions on viral persistence, transmissibility, and pathogenesis in a nonhuman primate model. PMID:25583721

  8. Two natural products, trans-phytol and (22E)-ergosta-6,9,22-triene-3β,5α,8α-triol, inhibit the biosynthesis of estrogen in human ovarian granulosa cells by aromatase (CYP19)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiajia; Yuan, Yun; Lu, Danfeng; Du, Baowen; Xiong, Liang; Shi, Jiangong; Yang, Lijuan; Liu, Wanli; Yuan, Xiaohong; Zhang, Guolin; Wang, Fei

    2014-08-15

    Aromatase is the only enzyme in vertebrates to catalyze the biosynthesis of estrogens. Although inhibitors of aromatase have been developed for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer, the whole-body inhibition of aromatase causes severe adverse effects. Thus, tissue-selective aromatase inhibitors are important for the treatment of estrogen-dependent cancers. In this study, 63 natural products with diverse structures were examined for their effects on estrogen biosynthesis in human ovarian granulosa-like KGN cells. Two compounds—trans-phytol (SA-20) and (22E)-ergosta-6,9,22-triene-3β,5α,8α-triol (SA-48)—were found to potently inhibit estrogen biosynthesis (IC{sub 50}: 1 μM and 0.5 μM, respectively). Both compounds decreased aromatase mRNA and protein expression levels in KGN cells, but had no effect on the aromatase catalytic activity in aromatase-overexpressing HEK293A cells and recombinant expressed aromatase. The two compounds decreased the expression of aromatase promoter I.3/II. Neither compound affected intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels, but they inhibited the phosphorylation or protein expression of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). The effects of these two compounds on extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and AKT/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway were examined. Inhibition of p38 MAPK could be the mechanism underpinning the actions of these compounds. Our results suggests that natural products structurally similar to SA-20 and SA-48 may be a new source of tissue-selective aromatase modulators, and that p38 MAPK is important in the basal control of aromatase in ovarian granulosa cells. SA-20 and SA-48 warrant further investigation as new pharmaceutical tools for the prevention and treatment of estrogen-dependent cancers. - Highlights: • Two natural products inhibited estrogen biosynthesis in human ovarian granulosa cells. • They

  9. Paradox-Breaking RAF Inhibitors that Also Target SRC Are Effective in Drug-Resistant BRAF Mutant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Girotti, Maria Romina; Lopes, Filipa; Preece, Natasha; Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Zambon, Alfonso; Davies, Lawrence; Whittaker, Steven; Saturno, Grazia; Viros, Amaya; Pedersen, Malin; Suijkerbuijk, Bart M.J.M.; Menard, Delphine; McLeary, Robert; Johnson, Louise; Fish, Laura; Ejiama, Sarah; Sanchez-Laorden, Berta; Hohloch, Juliane; Carragher, Neil; Macleod, Kenneth; Ashton, Garry; Marusiak, Anna A.; Fusi, Alberto; Brognard, John; Frame, Margaret; Lorigan, Paul; Marais, Richard; Springer, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Summary BRAF and MEK inhibitors are effective in BRAF mutant melanoma, but most patients eventually relapse with acquired resistance, and others present intrinsic resistance to these drugs. Resistance is often mediated by pathway reactivation through receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/SRC-family kinase (SFK) signaling or mutant NRAS, which drive paradoxical reactivation of the pathway. We describe pan-RAF inhibitors (CCT196969, CCT241161) that also inhibit SFKs. These compounds do not drive paradoxical pathway activation and inhibit MEK/ERK in BRAF and NRAS mutant melanoma. They inhibit melanoma cells and patient-derived xenografts that are resistant to BRAF and BRAF/MEK inhibitors. Thus, paradox-breaking pan-RAF inhibitors that also inhibit SFKs could provide first-line treatment for BRAF and NRAS mutant melanomas and second-line treatment for patients who develop resistance. PMID:25500121

  10. Evaluation of small molecule SecA inhibitors against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinshan; Cui, Jianmei; Chaudhary, Arpana Sagwal; Hsieh, Ying-Hsin; Damera, Krishna; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Hsiuchin; Wang, Binghe; Tai, Phang C

    2015-11-01

    Due to the emergence and rapid spread of drug resistance in bacteria, there is an urgent need for the development of novel antimicrobials. SecA, a key component of the general bacterial secretion system required for viability and virulence, is an attractive antimicrobial target. Earlier we reported that systematical dissection of a SecA inhibitor, Rose Bengal (RB), led to the development of novel small molecule SecA inhibitors active against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. In this study, two potent RB analogs were further evaluated for activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains and for their mechanism of actions. These analogs showed inhibition on the ATPase activities of S. aureus SecA1 (SaSecA1) and SecA2 (SaSecA2), and inhibition of SaSecA1-dependent protein-conducting channel. Moreover, these inhibitors reduce the secretion of three toxins from S. aureus and exert potent bacteriostatic effects against three MRSA strains. Our best inhibitor SCA-50 showed potent concentration-dependent bactericidal activity against MRSA Mu50 strain and very importantly, 2-60 fold more potent inhibitory effect on MRSA Mu50 than all the commonly used antibiotics including vancomycin, which is considered the last resort option in treating MRSA-related infections. Protein pull down experiments further confirmed SaSecA1 as a target. Deletion or overexpression of NorA and MepA efflux pumps had minimal effect on the antimicrobial activities against S. aureus, indicating that the effects of SecA inhibitors were not affected by the presence of these efflux pumps. Our studies show that these small molecule analogs target SecA functions, have potent antimicrobial activities, reduce the secretion of toxins, and have the ability to overcome the effect efflux pumps, which are responsible for multi-drug resistance. Thus, targeting SecA is an attractive antimicrobial strategy against MRSA.

  11. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  12. Potential of Ergosterol Synthesis Inhibitors To Cause Resistance or Cross-Resistance in Trichophyton rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Celandroni, Francesco; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Salvetti, Sara; Senesi, Sonia; Bulgheroni, Anna; Mailland, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Superficial mycoses caused by Trichophyton rubrum are among the most common infections worldwide. T. rubrum infections are difficult to treat and are often associated with recurrences after interruption of the antifungal therapy. Nevertheless, reports on T. rubrum resistance to commonly used antifungal drugs are rare. In this study, we compared the in vitro resistance frequencies and development of resistance to terbinafine, itraconazole, amorolfine, and ciclopirox in T. rubrum. Results demonstrated that naturally occurring mutants were isolated at a frequency of 10−7 for itraconazole and 10−9 for terbinafine and amorolfine. To mimic conditions of body sites in which low drug levels are reached during therapy, T. rubrum was propagated for 10 transfers in media containing subinhibitory drug concentrations. Resistance to itraconazole, terbinafine, and amorolfine emerged at a higher frequency than was seen with spontaneous mutation. Itraconazole-resistant mutants also showed decreased susceptibility to amorolfine as well as to terbinafine, and amorolfine-resistant mutants were also less susceptible to terbinafine. No mutant resistant to ciclopirox was isolated, suggesting no propensity of T. rubrum to develop resistance to this drug. How different drug mechanisms of action can influence the onset of resistance is discussed. PMID:24614379

  13. BRAF inhibitor resistance mediated by the AKT pathway in an oncogenic BRAF mouse melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Perna, Daniele; Karreth, Florian A; Rust, Alistair G; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Rashid, Mamunur; Iorio, Francesco; Alifrangis, Constantine; Arends, Mark J; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Bollag, Gideon; Tuveson, David A; Adams, David J

    2015-02-10

    BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B) inhibitors elicit a transient anti-tumor response in ∼ 80% of BRAF(V600)-mutant melanoma patients that almost uniformly precedes the emergence of resistance. Here we used a mouse model of melanoma in which melanocyte-specific expression of Braf(V618E) (analogous to the human BRAF(V600E) mutation) led to the development of skin hyperpigmentation and nevi, as well as melanoma formation with incomplete penetrance. Sleeping Beauty insertional mutagenesis in this model led to accelerated and fully penetrant melanomagenesis and synchronous tumor formation. Treatment of Braf(V618E) transposon mice with the BRAF inhibitor PLX4720 resulted in tumor regression followed by relapse. Analysis of transposon insertions identified eight genes including Braf, Mitf, and ERas (ES-cell expressed Ras) as candidate resistance genes. Expression of ERAS in human melanoma cell lines conferred resistance to PLX4720 and induced hyperphosphorylation of AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1), a phenotype reverted by combinatorial treatment with PLX4720 and the AKT inhibitor MK2206. We show that ERAS expression elicits a prosurvival signal associated with phosphorylation/inactivation of BAD, and that the resistance of hepatocyte growth factor-treated human melanoma cells to PLX4720 can be reverted by treatment with the BAD-like BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Thus, we define a role for the AKT/BAD pathway in resistance to BRAF inhibition and illustrate an in vivo approach for finding drug resistance genes.

  14. BRAF inhibitor resistance mediated by the AKT pathway in an oncogenic BRAF mouse melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Perna, Daniele; Karreth, Florian A; Rust, Alistair G; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Rashid, Mamunur; Iorio, Francesco; Alifrangis, Constantine; Arends, Mark J; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Bollag, Gideon; Tuveson, David A; Adams, David J

    2015-02-10

    BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B) inhibitors elicit a transient anti-tumor response in ∼ 80% of BRAF(V600)-mutant melanoma patients that almost uniformly precedes the emergence of resistance. Here we used a mouse model of melanoma in which melanocyte-specific expression of Braf(V618E) (analogous to the human BRAF(V600E) mutation) led to the development of skin hyperpigmentation and nevi, as well as melanoma formation with incomplete penetrance. Sleeping Beauty insertional mutagenesis in this model led to accelerated and fully penetrant melanomagenesis and synchronous tumor formation. Treatment of Braf(V618E) transposon mice with the BRAF inhibitor PLX4720 resulted in tumor regression followed by relapse. Analysis of transposon insertions identified eight genes including Braf, Mitf, and ERas (ES-cell expressed Ras) as candidate resistance genes. Expression of ERAS in human melanoma cell lines conferred resistance to PLX4720 and induced hyperphosphorylation of AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1), a phenotype reverted by combinatorial treatment with PLX4720 and the AKT inhibitor MK2206. We show that ERAS expression elicits a prosurvival signal associated with phosphorylation/inactivation of BAD, and that the resistance of hepatocyte growth factor-treated human melanoma cells to PLX4720 can be reverted by treatment with the BAD-like BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Thus, we define a role for the AKT/BAD pathway in resistance to BRAF inhibition and illustrate an in vivo approach for finding drug resistance genes. PMID:25624498

  15. Compounds Triggering ER Stress Exert Anti-Melanoma Effects and Overcome BRAF Inhibitor Resistance.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Michaël; Lehraiki, Abdelali; Millet, Antoine; Rouaud, Florian; Plaisant, Magali; Jaune, Emilie; Botton, Thomas; Ronco, Cyril; Abbe, Patricia; Amdouni, Hella; Passeron, Thierry; Hofman, Veronique; Mograbi, Baharia; Dabert-Gay, Anne-Sophie; Debayle, Delphine; Alcor, Damien; Rabhi, Nabil; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Héliot, Laurent; Gonzalez-Pisfil, Mariano; Robert, Caroline; Moréra, Solange; Virougoux, Armelle; Gual, Philippe; Ali, Maruf M U; Bertolotto, Corine; Hofman, Paul; Ballotti, Robert; Benhida, Rachid; Rocchi, Stéphane

    2016-06-13

    We have discovered and developed a series of molecules (thiazole benzenesulfonamides). HA15, the lead compound of this series, displayed anti-cancerous activity on all melanoma cells tested, including cells isolated from patients and cells that developed resistance to BRAF inhibitors. Our molecule displayed activity against other liquid and solid tumors. HA15 also exhibited strong efficacy in xenograft mouse models with melanoma cells either sensitive or resistant to BRAF inhibitors. Transcriptomic, proteomic, and biochemical studies identified the chaperone BiP/GRP78/HSPA5 as the specific target of HA15 and demonstrated that the interaction increases ER stress, leading to melanoma cell death by concomitant induction of autophagic and apoptotic mechanisms.

  16. Compounds Triggering ER Stress Exert Anti-Melanoma Effects and Overcome BRAF Inhibitor Resistance.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Michaël; Lehraiki, Abdelali; Millet, Antoine; Rouaud, Florian; Plaisant, Magali; Jaune, Emilie; Botton, Thomas; Ronco, Cyril; Abbe, Patricia; Amdouni, Hella; Passeron, Thierry; Hofman, Veronique; Mograbi, Baharia; Dabert-Gay, Anne-Sophie; Debayle, Delphine; Alcor, Damien; Rabhi, Nabil; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Héliot, Laurent; Gonzalez-Pisfil, Mariano; Robert, Caroline; Moréra, Solange; Virougoux, Armelle; Gual, Philippe; Ali, Maruf M U; Bertolotto, Corine; Hofman, Paul; Ballotti, Robert; Benhida, Rachid; Rocchi, Stéphane

    2016-06-13

    We have discovered and developed a series of molecules (thiazole benzenesulfonamides). HA15, the lead compound of this series, displayed anti-cancerous activity on all melanoma cells tested, including cells isolated from patients and cells that developed resistance to BRAF inhibitors. Our molecule displayed activity against other liquid and solid tumors. HA15 also exhibited strong efficacy in xenograft mouse models with melanoma cells either sensitive or resistant to BRAF inhibitors. Transcriptomic, proteomic, and biochemical studies identified the chaperone BiP/GRP78/HSPA5 as the specific target of HA15 and demonstrated that the interaction increases ER stress, leading to melanoma cell death by concomitant induction of autophagic and apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:27238082

  17. Inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) beta-lactamases with different substitutions at position 244.

    PubMed Central

    Bret, L; Chaibi, E B; Chanal-Claris, C; Sirot, D; Labia, R; Sirot, J

    1997-01-01

    A novel inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) beta-lactamase was detected in an Escherichia coli isolate resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanate and susceptible to cephalothin. The substrate and inhibitor profiles of this beta-lactamase were similar to those of IRT-1 and IRT-2. The novel IRT's bla gene was sequenced, and the deduced amino acid sequence showed the amino acid replacement Arg for His-244 of the TEM-1 sequence. Substitutions for Arg-244 have been reported in three TEM-1 mutants: IRT-1 (which corresponds to TEM-31) (Cys), IRT-2/TEM-30 (Ser), and TEM-41 (Thr). We designated this novel beta-lactamase, which corresponds to TEM-51, IRT-15. PMID:9371365

  18. Structures of HIV Protease Guide Inhibitor Design to Overcome Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Irene T.; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Harrison, Robert W.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV/AIDS infection continues to be a major epidemic worldwide despite the initial promise of antiviral drugs. Current therapy includes a combination of drugs that inhibit two of the virally-encoded enzymes, the reverse transcriptase and the protease. The first generation of HIV protease inhibitors that have been in clinical use for treatment of AIDS since 1995 was developed with the aid of structural analysis of protease-inhibitor complexes. These drugs were successful in improving the life span of HIV-infected people. Subsequently, the rapid emergence of drug resistance has necessitated the design of new inhibitors that target mutant proteases. This second generation of antiviral protease inhibitors has been developed with the aid of data from medicinal chemistry, kinetics, and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Traditional computational methods such as molecular mechanics and dynamics can be supplemented with intelligent data mining approaches. One approach, based on similarities to the protease interactions with substrates, is to incorporate additional interactions with main chain atoms that cannot easily be eliminated by mutations. Our structural and inhibition data for darunavir have helped to understand its antiviral activity and effectiveness on drug resistant HIV and demonstrate the success of this approach.

  19. Resistance of Hepatitis C Virus to Inhibitors: Complexity and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Perales, Celia; Quer, Josep; Gregori, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Selection of inhibitor-resistant viral mutants is universal for viruses that display quasi-species dynamics, and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is no exception. Here we review recent results on drug resistance in HCV, with emphasis on resistance to the newly-developed, directly-acting antiviral agents, as they are increasingly employed in the clinic. We put the experimental observations in the context of quasi-species dynamics, in particular what the genetic and phenotypic barriers to resistance mean in terms of exploration of sequence space while HCV replicates in the liver of infected patients or in cell culture. Strategies to diminish the probability of viral breakthrough during treatment are briefly outlined. PMID:26561827

  20. Development of modern InhA inhibitors to combat drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tonge, Peter J; Kisker, Caroline; Slayden, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    Strategies for the development of novel tuberculosis chemotherapeutics against existing drug resistant strains involve the identification and inhibition of novel drug targets as well as the design and synthesis of compounds against historical targets. InhA, the enoyl reductase from the mycobacterial type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, is a target of the frontline chemotherapeutic, isoniazid (INH). Importantly, the majority of INH-resistant clinical isolates arise from mutations in KatG, the enzyme responsible for activating isoniazid, into its active form. Thus compounds that inhibit InhA without first requiring KatG activation will be active against the majority of INH resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review describes the role of InhA in cell wall biosynthesis and recent progress in the development of novel diphenyl ether-based InhA inhibitors that have activity against both sensitive and drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis.

  1. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  2. Triclosan Derivatives: Towards Potent Inhibitors of Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Freundlich, Joel S.; Wang, Feng; Vilchèze, Catherine; Gulten, Gulcin; Langley, Robert; Schiehser, Guy A.; Jacobus, David P.; Jacobs, Jr., William R.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2009-06-30

    Isoniazid (INH) is a frontline antitubercular drug that inhibits the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase InhA. Novel inhibitors of InhA that are not cross-resistant to INH represent a significant goal in antitubercular chemotherapy. The design, synthesis, and biological activity of a series of triclosan-based inhibitors is reported, including their promising efficacy against INH-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Triclosan has been previously shown to inhibit InhA, an essential enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis, the inhibition of which leads to the lysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using a structure-based drug design approach, a series of 5-substituted triclosan derivatives was developed. Two groups of derivatives with alkyl and aryl substituents, respectively, were identified with dramatically enhanced potency against purified InhA. The most efficacious inhibitor displayed an IC{sub 50} value of 21 nM, which was 50-fold more potent than triclosan. X-ray crystal structures of InhA in complex with four triclosan derivatives revealed the structural basis for the inhibitory activity. Six selected triclosan derivatives were tested against isoniazid-sensitive and resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Among those, the best inhibitor had an MIC value of 4.7 {mu}g mL{sup -1} (13 {mu}M), which represents a tenfold improvement over the bacteriocidal activity of triclosan. A subset of these triclosan analogues was more potent than isoniazid against two isoniazid-resistant M. tuberculosis strains, demonstrating the significant potential for structure-based design in the development of next generation antitubercular drugs.

  3. Targeting abnormal DNA double strand break repair in tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant chronic myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Lisa A.; Robert, Carine; Rapoport, Aaron P.; Gojo, Ivana; Baer, Maria R.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Rassool, Feyruz V.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to imatinib (IM) and other BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI)s is an increasing problem in leukemias caused by expression of BCR-ABL1. Since chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines expressing BCR-ABL1 utilize an alternative non-homologous end-joining pathway (ALT NHEJ) to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB)s, we asked whether this repair pathway is a novel therapeutic target in TKI-resistant disease. Notably, the steady state levels of two ALT NHEJ proteins, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and DNA ligase IIIα were increased in the BCR-ABL1-positive CML cell line K562 and, to a greater extent, in its imatinib resistant (IMR) derivative. Incubation of these cell lines with a combination of DNA ligase and PARP inhibitors inhibited ALT NHEJ and selectively decreased survival with the effect being greater in the IMR derivative. Similar results were obtained with TKI-resistant derivatives of two hematopoietic cell lines that had been engineered to stably express BCR-ABL1. Together our results show that the sensitivity of cell lines expressing BCR-ABL1 to the combination of DNA ligase and PARP inhibitors correlates with the steady state levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα, and ALT NHEJ activity. Importantly, analysis of clinical samples from CML patients confirmed that the expression levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα correlated with sensitivity to the DNA repair inhibitor combination. Thus, the expression levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα serve as biomarkers to identify a subgroup of CML patients who may be candidates for therapies that target the ALT NHEJ pathway when treatment with TKIs has failed. PMID:22641215

  4. Response and resistance to BET bromodomain inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shu, Shaokun; Lin, Charles Y; He, Housheng Hansen; Witwicki, Robert M; Tabassum, Doris P; Roberts, Justin M; Janiszewska, Michalina; Huh, Sung Jin; Liang, Yi; Ryan, Jeremy; Doherty, Ernest; Mohammed, Hisham; Guo, Hao; Stover, Daniel G; Ekram, Muhammad B; Peluffo, Guillermo; Brown, Jonathan; D'Santos, Clive; Krop, Ian E; Dillon, Deborah; McKeown, Michael; Ott, Christopher; Qi, Jun; Ni, Min; Rao, Prakash K; Duarte, Melissa; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Anders, Lars; Young, Richard A; Winer, Eric P; Letai, Antony; Barry, William T; Carroll, Jason S; Long, Henry W; Brown, Myles; Liu, X Shirley; Meyer, Clifford A; Bradner, James E; Polyak, Kornelia

    2016-01-21

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous and clinically aggressive disease for which there is no targeted therapy. BET bromodomain inhibitors, which have shown efficacy in several models of cancer, have not been evaluated in TNBC. These inhibitors displace BET bromodomain proteins such as BRD4 from chromatin by competing with their acetyl-lysine recognition modules, leading to inhibition of oncogenic transcriptional programs. Here we report the preferential sensitivity of TNBCs to BET bromodomain inhibition in vitro and in vivo, establishing a rationale for clinical investigation and further motivation to understand mechanisms of resistance. In paired cell lines selected for acquired resistance to BET inhibition from previously sensitive TNBCs, we failed to identify gatekeeper mutations, new driver events or drug pump activation. BET-resistant TNBC cells remain dependent on wild-type BRD4, which supports transcription and cell proliferation in a bromodomain-independent manner. Proteomic studies of resistant TNBC identify strong association with MED1 and hyper-phosphorylation of BRD4 attributable to decreased activity of PP2A, identified here as a principal BRD4 serine phosphatase. Together, these studies provide a rationale for BET inhibition in TNBC and present mechanism-based combination strategies to anticipate clinical drug resistance. PMID:26735014

  5. Response and resistance to BET bromodomain inhibitors in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Doris P.; Roberts, Justin M.; Janiszewska, Michalina; Huh, Sung Jin; Liang, Yi; Ryan, Jeremy; Doherty, Ernest; Mohammed, Hisham; Guo, Hao; Stover, Daniel G.; Ekram, Muhammad B.; Brown, Jonathan; D'Santos, Clive; Krop, Ian E.; Dillon, Deborah; McKeown, Michael; Ott, Christopher; Qi, Jun; Ni, Min; Rao, Prakash K.; Duarte, Melissa; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Anders, Lars; Young, Richard A.; Winer, Eric; Letai, Antony; Barry, William T.; Carroll, Jason S.; Long, Henry; Brown, Myles; Liu, X. Shirley; Meyer, Clifford A.; Bradner, James E.; Polyak, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous and clinically aggressive disease for which there is no targeted therapy1-3. BET bromodomain inhibitors, which have shown efficacy in several models of cancer4-6, have not been evaluated in TNBC. These inhibitors displace BET bromodomain proteins such as BRD4 from chromatin by competing with their acetyllysine recognition modules, leading to inhibition of oncogenic transcriptional programs7-9. Here we report the preferential sensitivity of TNBCs to BET bromodomain inhibition in vitro and in vivo, establishing a rationale for clinical investigation and further motivation to understand mechanisms of resistance. In paired cell lines selected for acquired resistance to BET inhibition from previously sensitive TNBCs, we failed to identify gatekeeper mutations, new driver events or drug pump activation. BET-resistant TNBC cells remain dependent on wild-type BRD4, which supports transcription and cell proliferation in a bromodomain-independent manner. Proteomic studies of resistant TNBC identify strong association with MED1 and hyper-phosphorylation of BRD4 attributable to decreased activity of PP2A, identified here as a principal BRD4 serine phosphatase. Together, these studies provide a rationale for BET inhibition in TNBC and present mechanism-based combination strategies to anticipate clinical drug resistance. PMID:26735014

  6. Inhibition of HSP90 by AT13387 delays the emergence of resistance to BRAF inhibitors and overcomes resistance to dual BRAF and MEK inhibition in melanoma models.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Tomoko; Paraiso, Kim H T; Hearn, Keisha; Rodriguez-Lopez, Ana M; Munck, Joanne M; Haarberg, H Eirik; Sondak, Vernon K; Thompson, Neil T; Azab, Mohammad; Lyons, John F; Smalley, Keiran S M; Wallis, Nicola G

    2014-12-01

    Emergence of clinical resistance to BRAF inhibitors, alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors, limits clinical responses in melanoma. Inhibiting HSP90 offers an approach to simultaneously interfere with multiple resistance mechanisms. Using the HSP90 inhibitor AT13387, which is currently in clinical trials, we investigated the potential of HSP90 inhibition to overcome or delay the emergence of resistance to these kinase inhibitors in melanoma models. In vitro, treating vemurafenib-sensitive cells (A375 or SK-MEL-28) with a combination of AT13387 and vemurafenib prevented colony growth under conditions in which vemurafenib treatment alone generated resistant colonies. In vivo, when AT13387 was combined with vemurafenib in a SK-MEL-28, vemurafenib-sensitive model, no regrowth of tumors was observed over 5 months, although 2 of 7 tumors in the vemurafenib monotherapy group relapsed in this time. Together, these data suggest that the combination of these agents can delay the emergence of resistance. Cell lines with acquired vemurafenib resistance, derived from these models (A375R and SK-MEL-28R) were also sensitive to HSP90 inhibitor treatment; key clients were depleted, apoptosis was induced, and growth in 3D culture was inhibited. Similar effects were observed in cell lines with acquired resistance to both BRAF and MEK inhibitors (SK-MEL-28RR, WM164RR, and 1205LuRR). These data suggest that treatment with an HSP90 inhibitor, such as AT13387, is a potential approach for combating resistance to BRAF and MEK inhibition in melanoma. Moreover, frontline combination of these agents with an HSP90 inhibitor could delay the emergence of resistance, providing a strong rationale for clinical investigation of such combinations in BRAF-mutated melanoma.

  7. Emerging Paradigms in the Development of Resistance to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gainor, Justin F.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2013-01-01

    The success of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in select patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has transformed management of the disease, placing new emphasis on understanding the molecular characteristics of tumor specimens. It is now recognized that genetic alterations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) define two unique subtypes of NSCLC that are highly responsive to genotype-directed TKIs. Despite this initial sensitivity, however, the long-term effectiveness of such therapies is universally limited by the development of resistance. Identifying the mechanisms underlying this resistance is an area of intense, ongoing investigation. In this review, we provide an overview of recent experience in the field, focusing on results from preclinical resistance models and studies of patient-derived, TKI-resistant tumor specimens. Although diverse TKI resistance mechanisms have been identified within EGFR-mutant and ALK-positive patients, we highlight common principles of resistance shared between these groups. These include the development of secondary mutations in the kinase target, gene amplification of the primary oncogene, and upregulation of bypass signaling tracts. In EGFR-mutant and ALK-positive patients alike, acquired resistance may also be a dynamic and multifactorial process that may necessitate the use of treatment combinations. We believe that insights into the mechanisms of TKI resistance in patients with EGFR mutations or ALK rearrangements may inform the development of novel treatment strategies in NSCLC, which may also be generalizable to other kinase-driven malignancies. PMID:24101047

  8. Essential role of insulin-like growth factor 2 in resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Chan; Min, Hye-Young; Jung, Hyun Jin; Park, Kwan Hee; Hyun, Seung Yeob; Cho, Jaebeom; Woo, Jong Kyu; Kwon, So Jung; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Lee, Ho-Young

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) are promising anticancer therapies and have been clinically used for the treatment of hematological malignancy. However, their efficacy in solid tumors is marginal and drug resistance hampers their further clinical utility. To develop novel strategies for the HDI-based anticancer therapeutics in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), in the present study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying resistance to HDI treatment in NSCLC cells. We show the STAT3-mediated IGF2/IGF-1R signaling cascade as a key modulator for both acquired and primary HDI resistance. Treatment with HDI up-regulated IGF2 transcription in NSCLC cells carrying intrinsic or acquired drug resistance via direct binding of STAT3 in IGF2 P3 and P4 promoters. Acetylated STAT3 emerged upon HDAC inhibition was protected from the proteasome-mediated degradation of STAT3 and functioned as a direct transcription factor for IGF2 expression. Genomic or pharmacological strategies targeting STAT3 diminished the HDI-induced IGF2 mRNA expression and overcame the resistance to HDI treatment in HDI-resistant NSCLC- or patient-derived tumor xenograft models. These findings provide new insights into the role of acetylated STAT3-mediated activation of IGF2 transcription in HDI resistance, suggesting IGF2 or STAT3 as novel targets to overcome HDI resistance in NSCLC. PMID:27086926

  9. Melatonin modulates aromatase activity and expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-García, Virginia; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Alonso-González, Carolina; Cos, Samuel

    2013-05-01

    Melatonin is known to suppress the development of endocrine-responsive breast cancers by interacting with the estrogen signaling pathways. Paracrine interactions between malignant epithelial cells and proximal stromal cells are responsible for local estrogen biosynthesis. In human breast cancer cells and peritumoral adipose tissue, melatonin downregulates aromatase, which transforms androgens into estrogens. The presence of aromatase on endothelial cells indicates that endothelial cells may contribute to tumor growth by producing estrogens. Since human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) express both aromatase and melatonin receptors, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of melatonin to regulate the activity and expression of aromatase on endothelial cells, thus, modulating local estrogen biosynthesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that melatonin inhibits the growth of HUVECs and reduces the local biosynthesis of estrogens through the downregulation of aromatase. These results are supported by three lines of evidence. Firstly, 1 mM of melatonin counteracted the testosterone-induced cell proliferation of HUVECs, which is dependent on the local biosynthesis of estrogens from testosterone by the aromatase activity of the cells. Secondly, we found that 1 mM of melatonin reduced the aromatase activity of HUVECs. Finally, by real‑time RT-PCR, we demonstrated that melatonin significantly downregulated the expression of aromatase as well as its endothelial-specific aromatase promoter region I.7. We conclude that melatonin inhibits aromatase activity and expression in HUVECs by regulating gene expression of specific aromatase promoter regions, thereby reducing the local production of estrogens. PMID:23450505

  10. Novel β-lactamase inhibitors: a therapeutic hope against the scourge of multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Richard R.; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Drawz, Sarah M.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence and prevalence of multi-drug resistance (MDR) among contemporary Gram-negative bacteria represents a significant threat to human health. Since their discovery, β-lactam antibiotics have been a major component of the armamentarium against these serious pathogens. Unfortunately, a wide range of β-lactamase enzymes have emerged that are capable of inactivating these powerful drugs. In the past 30 years, a major advancement in the battle against microbes has been the development of β-lactamase inhibitors, which restore the efficacy of β-lactam antibiotics (e.g., ampicillin/sulbactam, amoxicillin/clavulanate, ticarcillin/clavulanate, and piperacillin/tazobactam). Unfortunately, many newly discovered β-lactamases are not inactivated by currently available inhibitors. Is there hope? For the first time in many years, we can anticipate the development and introduction into clinical practice of novel inhibitors. Although these inhibitors may still not be effective for all β-lactamases, their introduction is still welcome. This review focuses on the novel β-lactamase inhibitors that are closest to being introduced in the clinic. PMID:24399995

  11. Polycomb repressive complex 2 structure with inhibitor reveals a mechanism of activation and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brooun, Alexei; Gajiwala, Ketan S.; Deng, Ya-Li; Liu, Wei; Bolaños, Ben; Bingham, Patrick; He, You-Ai; Diehl, Wade; Grable, Nicole; Kung, Pei-Pei; Sutton, Scott; Maegley, Karen A.; Yu, Xiu; Stewart, Al E.

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) mediates gene silencing through chromatin reorganization by methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27). Overexpression of the complex and point mutations in the individual subunits of PRC2 have been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis. Several inhibitors of the PRC2 activity have shown efficacy in EZH2-mutated lymphomas and are currently in clinical development, although the molecular basis of inhibitor recognition remains unknown. Here we report the crystal structures of the inhibitor-bound wild-type and Y641N PRC2. The structures illuminate an important role played by a stretch of 17 residues in the N-terminal region of EZH2, we call the activation loop, in the stimulation of the enzyme activity, inhibitor recognition and the potential development of the mutation-mediated drug resistance. The work presented here provides new avenues for the design and development of next-generation PRC2 inhibitors through establishment of a structure-based drug design platform. PMID:27122193

  12. Rapid emergence of hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor resistance is expected

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Libin; Perelson, Alan S; Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 170 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Current therapy, consisting of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV), leads to sustained viral elimination in only about 45% of patients treated. Telaprevir (VX-950), a novel HCV NS3-4A serine protease inhibitor, has demonstrated substantial antiviral activity in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection. However, some patients experience viral breakthrough during dosing, with drug resistant variants being 5%-20% of the virus population as early as day 2 after treatment initiation. Why viral variants appear such a short time after the start of dosing is unclear, especially since this has not been seen with monotherapy for either human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis B virus. Here, using a viral dynamic model, we explain why such rapid emergence of drug resistant variants is expected when potent HCV protease inhibitors are used as monotherapy. Surprisingly, our model also shows that such rapid emergence need not be the case with some potent HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors. Examining the case of telaprevir therapy in detail, we show the model fits observed dynamics of both wild-type and drug-resistant variants during treatment, and supports combination therapy of direct antiviral drugs with PEG-IFN and/or RBV for hepatitis C.

  13. Biochemical, inhibition and inhibitor resistance studies of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Ndongwe, Tanyaradzwa P; Adedeji, Adeyemi O; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Ryan, Emily M; Rai, Devendra K; Kirby, Karen A; Whatley, Angela S; Burke, Donald H; Johnson, Marc; Ding, Shilei; Zheng, Yi-Min; Liu, Shan-Lu; Kodama, Ei-Ichi; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A; Pathak, Vinay K; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2012-01-01

    We report key mechanistic differences between the reverse transcriptases (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus that can infect human cells. Steady and pre-steady state kinetics demonstrated that XMRV RT is significantly less efficient in DNA synthesis and in unblocking chain-terminated primers. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the gammaretroviral enzyme has a remarkably higher dissociation rate (k(off)) from DNA, which also results in lower processivity than HIV-1 RT. Transient kinetics of mismatch incorporation revealed that XMRV RT has higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT. We identified RNA aptamers that potently inhibit XMRV, but not HIV-1 RT. XMRV RT is highly susceptible to some nucleoside RT inhibitors, including Translocation Deficient RT inhibitors, but not to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. We demonstrated that XMRV RT mutants K103R and Q190M, which are equivalent to HIV-1 mutants that are resistant to tenofovir (K65R) and AZT (Q151M), are also resistant to the respective drugs, suggesting that XMRV can acquire resistance to these compounds through the decreased incorporation mechanism reported in HIV-1. PMID:21908397

  14. Biochemical, inhibition and inhibitor resistance studies of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Ndongwe, Tanyaradzwa P.; Adedeji, Adeyemi O.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Ryan, Emily M.; Rai, Devendra K.; Kirby, Karen A.; Whatley, Angela S.; Burke, Donald H.; Johnson, Marc; Ding, Shilei; Zheng, Yi-Min; Liu, Shan-Lu; Kodama, Ei-Ichi; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A.; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    We report key mechanistic differences between the reverse transcriptases (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus that can infect human cells. Steady and pre-steady state kinetics demonstrated that XMRV RT is significantly less efficient in DNA synthesis and in unblocking chain-terminated primers. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the gammaretroviral enzyme has a remarkably higher dissociation rate (koff) from DNA, which also results in lower processivity than HIV-1 RT. Transient kinetics of mismatch incorporation revealed that XMRV RT has higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT. We identified RNA aptamers that potently inhibit XMRV, but not HIV-1 RT. XMRV RT is highly susceptible to some nucleoside RT inhibitors, including Translocation Deficient RT inhibitors, but not to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. We demonstrated that XMRV RT mutants K103R and Q190M, which are equivalent to HIV-1 mutants that are resistant to tenofovir (K65R) and AZT (Q151M), are also resistant to the respective drugs, suggesting that XMRV can acquire resistance to these compounds through the decreased incorporation mechanism reported in HIV-1. PMID:21908397

  15. Neurite outgrowth resistance to rho kinase inhibitors in PC12 Adh cell.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hua; Hou, Xiaolin; Tao, Tingrui; Lv, Xiaoman; Zhang, Luyong; Duan, Weigang

    2015-05-01

    Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor is a promising agent for neural injury disorders, which mechanism is associated with neurite outgrowth. However, neurite outgrowth resistance occurred when PC12 Adh cell was treated with ROCK inhibitors for a longer time. PC12 Adh cells were treated with ROCK inhibitor Y27632 or NGF for different durations. Neurite outgrowth resistance occurred when PC12 Adh cell exposed to Y27632 (33 µM) for 3 or more days, but not happen when exposed to nerve growth factor (NGF, 100 ng/mL). The gene expression in the PC12 Adh cells treated with Y27632 (33 µM) or NGF (100 ng/mL) for 2 or 4 days was assayed by gene microarray, and the reliability of the results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Cluster analysis proved that the gene expression profile of PC12 Adh cell treated with Y27632 for 4 days was different from that treated with Y27632 for 2 days and those treated with NGF for 2 and 4 days, respectively. Pathway analysis hinted that the neurite outgrowth resistance could be associated with up-regulation of inflammatory pathways, especially rno04610 (complement and coagulation cascades), and down-regulation of cell cycle pathways, especially rno04110.

  16. Acquired resistance and clonal evolution in melanoma during BRAF inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangju; Hong, Aayoung; Koya, Richard C.; Moriceau, Gatien; Chodon, Thinle; Guo, Rongqing; Johnson, Douglas B.; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Kelley, Mark C.; Kefford, Richard F.; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Glaspy, John A.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; van Baren, Nicolas; Long, Georgina V.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors elicit rapid anti-tumor responses in the majority of patients with V600BRAF mutant melanoma, but acquired drug resistance is almost universal. We sought to identify the core resistance pathways and the extent of tumor heterogeneity during disease progression. We show that MAPK reactivation mechanisms were detected among 70% of disease-progressive tissues, with RAS mutations, mutant BRAF amplification and alternative splicing being most common. We also detected PI3K-PTEN-AKT-upregulating genetic alterations among 22% of progressive melanomas. Distinct molecular lesions, in both core drug escape pathways, were commonly detected concurrently in the same tumor or among multiple tumors from the same patient. Beyond harboring extensively heterogeneous resistance mechanisms, melanoma re-growth emerging from BRAF inhibitor selection displayed branched evolution marked by altered mutational spectra/signatures and increased fitness. Thus, melanoma genomic heterogeneity contributes significantly to BRAF inhibitor treatment failure, implying upfront, co-targeting of two core pathways as an essential strategy for durable responses. PMID:24265155

  17. A single intravenous administration of zoledronic acid prevents the bone loss and mechanical compromise induced by aromatase inhibition in rats.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Jürg A; Green, Jonathan R; Shen, Victor; Ingold, Peter; Rebmann, Andrea; Bhatnagar, Ajay S; Evans, Dean B

    2006-10-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that long-term estrogen deprivation using aromatase inhibitor therapy in postmenopausal women with breast cancer results in bone loss and increased fracture risk. Bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of bone resorption and have demonstrated efficacy in preventing bone loss in postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density (BMD) and in patients with breast cancer receiving estrogen deprivation therapy. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid on BMD and bone strength in rats treated with the aromatase inhibitor, letrozole. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography demonstrated that treatment of rats with daily oral letrozole (1 mg/kg) induced significant bone loss and cortical thinning compared with control animals (P < 0.01). A single prior intravenous dose of zoledronic acid dose dependently protected against letrozole-induced bone loss and cortical thinning, with the highest evaluated dose (20 microg/kg) resulting in BMD values that were not significantly different from controls over the 24 weeks of letrozole treatment. Furthermore, biomechanical testing of the distal femoral metaphysis demonstrated that zoledronic acid (20 microg/kg) significantly prevented the decrease in stiffness and elastic modulus induced by letrozole treatment. Taken together, these data support the use of zoledronic acid for the prevention of bone loss in women with breast cancer receiving aromatase inhibitor therapy.

  18. Orchard factors associated with resistance and cross resistance to sterol demethylation inhibitor fungicides in populations of Venturia inaequalis from Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Pfeufer, Emily E; Ngugi, Henry K

    2012-03-01

    Orchard management practices, such as destroying of overwintered inoculum and limiting the number of fungicide applications, are often recommended as tactics for slowing the development of resistance to sterol demethylation-inhibitor (DMI) fungicides in populations of Venturia inaequalis. However, there is little quantitative evidence relating the use of such practices to levels of resistance in orchards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of V. inaequalis isolates from Pennsylvania to DMI fungicides, and to identify orchard management factors related to the incidence of resistant isolates. In total, 644 single-spore V. inaequalis cultures obtained from 20 apple orchards in 2008 or 2009 were tested for sensitivity to myclobutanil, fenbuconazole, or difenoconazole. Growers provided management history of the sampled plots. Widespread shifts toward resistance to the three fungicides were noted, with mean effective concentration for 50% inhibition (EC(50)) values of 2.136, 0.786, and 0.187 μg/ml for myclobutanil, fenbuconazole, and difenoconazole, respectively. Cross resistance to the three fungicides was documented in high correlation (Spearman's r > 0.6) between mean EC(50) values for 14 orchards. Based on a 0.5-μg/ml threshold, 66 and 26% of isolates were resistant to myclobutanil and fenbuconazole, respectively, and 22% were cross resistant to the two fungicides. A significant between-year shift toward increased resistance was noted in two of three orchards surveyed in both years. Failure to use dormant copper sprays, older trees, larger orchards, orchards with ≤10 cultivars, and application of >4 DMI sprays were positively correlated (0.0001 < P < 0.05) with the incidence of resistant isolates. Isolates from orchards with >4 DMI sprays were four times as likely to be resistant to fenbuconazole (odds ratio = 4.57; P = 0.015). Isolates from orchards without dormant copper sprays were twice as likely to be cross-shifted toward resistance to all

  19. Bis-Tetrahydrofuran: a Privileged Ligand for Darunavir and a New Generation of HIV Protease Inhibitors That Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Sridhar, Perali Ramu; Kumaragurubaran, Nagaswamy; Koh, Yasuhiro; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-06-06

    Two inhibitors that incorporate bis-THF as an effective high-affinity P{sub 2} ligand for the HIV-1 protease substrate binding site maintain impressive potency against mutant strains resistant to currently approved protease inhibitors. Crystallographic structures of protein-ligand complexes help to explain the superior antiviral property of these inhibitors and their potency against a wide spectrum of HIV-1 strains.

  20. Are PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR Genes Involved in Mediating Resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in Barley?

    PubMed Central

    Marzin, Stephan; Hanemann, Anja; Sharma, Shailendra; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Günther; Röder, Marion S.

    2016-01-01

    A family of putative PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR (PEI) genes, which were detected in the genomic region co-segregating with the resistance gene Rrs2 against scald caused by Rhynchosporium commune in barley, were characterized and tested for their possible involvement in mediating resistance to the pathogen by complementation and overexpression analysis. The sequences of the respective genes were derived from two BAC contigs originating from the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’. For the genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3, HvPEI4 and HvPEI6, specific haplotypes for 18 resistant and 23 susceptible cultivars were detected after PCR-amplification and haplotype-specific CAPS-markers were developed. None of the tested candidate genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3 and HvPEI4 alone conferred a high resistance level in transgenic over-expression plants, though an improvement of the resistance level was observed especially with OE-lines for gene HvPEI4. These results do not confirm but also do not exclude an involvement of the PEI gene family in the response to the pathogen. A candidate for the resistance gene Rrs2 could not be identified yet. It is possible that Rrs2 is a PEI gene or another type of gene which has not been detected in the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’ or the full resistance reaction requires the presence of several PEI genes. PMID:26937960

  1. Selection of diverse and clinically relevant integrase inhibitor-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Nakahara, Koichiro; Seki, Takahiro; Miki, Shigeru; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kodama, Makoto; Endoh, Takeshi; Oosugi, Eiichi; Matsushita, Yoshihiro; Murai, Hitoshi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward; Foster, Scott; Underwood, Mark; Johns, Brian; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2008-11-01

    Resistance passage studies were conducted with five INIs (integrase inhibitors) that have been tested in clinical trials to date: a new naphthyridinone-type INI S/GSK-364735, raltegravir, elvitegravir, L-870,810 and S-1360. In establishing the passage system and starting from concentrations several fold above the EC(50) value, resistance mutations against S-1360 and related diketoacid-type compounds could be isolated from infected MT-2 cell cultures from day 14 to 28. Q148R and F121Y were the two main pathways of resistance to S/GSK-364735. Q148R/K and N155H, which were found in patients failing raltegravir treatment in Phase IIb studies, were observed during passage with raltegravir with this method. The fold resistance of 40 mutant molecular clones versus wild type virus was compared with these five INIs. The overall resistance pattern of S/GSK-364735 was similar to that of raltegravir and other INIs. However, different fold resistances of particular mutations were noted among different INIs, reflecting a potential to develop INIs with distinctly different resistant profiles.

  2. Probing Multidrug-Resistance and Protein-Ligand Interactions with Oxatricyclic Designed Ligands in HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Xu, Chun-Xiao; Rao, Kalapala V.; Baldridge, Abigail; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Weber, Irene T.; Aoki, Manabu; Miguel, Salcedo Pedro; Amano, Masayuki; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2010-10-29

    We report the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and X-ray crystallographic analysis of a new class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Compound 4 proved to be an extremely potent inhibitor toward various multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants, representing a near 10-fold improvement over darunavir (DRV). Compound 4 also blocked protease dimerization with at least 10-fold greater potency than DRV.

  3. High Affinity Inha Inhibitors with Activity Against Drug-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan,T.; Truglio, J.; Boyne, M.; Novichenok, P.; Zhang, X.; Stratton, C.; Li, H.; Kaur, T.; Amin, A.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Novel chemotherapeutics for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are required to combat the spread of tuberculosis, a disease that kills more than 2 million people annually. Using structure-based drug design, we have developed a series of alkyl diphenyl ethers that are uncompetitive inhibitors of InhA, the enoyl reductase enzyme in the MTB fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. The most potent compound has a Ki{prime} value of 1 nM for InhA and MIC{sub 99} values of 2-3 {micro}g mL{sup -1} (6-10 {micro}M) for both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of MTB. Overexpression of InhA in MTB results in a 9-12-fold increase in MIC{sub 99}, consistent with the belief that these compounds target InhA within the cell. In addition, transcriptional response studies reveal that the alkyl diphenyl ethers fail to upregulate a putative efflux pump and aromatic dioxygenase, detoxification mechanisms that are triggered by the lead compound triclosan. These diphenyl ether-based InhA inhibitors do not require activation by the mycobacterial KatG enzyme, thereby circumventing the normal mechanism of resistance to the front line drug isoniazid (INH) and thus accounting for their activity against INH-resistant strains of MTB.

  4. High-content screening identifies kinase inhibitors that overcome venetoclax resistance in activated CLL cells

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, Sina; Ylanko, Jarkko; Shi, Yonghong; Hariharan, Santosh; Oakes, Christopher C.; Brauer, Patrick M.; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan C.; Leber, Brian; Spaner, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Novel agents such as the Bcl-2 inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199) are changing treatment paradigms for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) but important problems remain. Although some patients exhibit deep and durable responses to venetoclax as a single agent, other patients harbor subpopulations of resistant leukemia cells that mediate disease recurrence. One hypothesis for the origin of resistance to venetoclax is by kinase-mediated survival signals encountered in proliferation centers that may be unique for individual patients. An in vitro microenvironment model was developed with primary CLL cells that could be incorporated into an automated high-content microscopy-based screen of kinase inhibitors (KIs) to identify agents that may improve venetoclax therapy in a personalized manner. Marked interpatient variability was noted for which KIs were effective; nevertheless, sunitinib was identified as the most common clinically available KI effective in overcoming venetoclax resistance. Examination of the underlying mechanisms indicated that venetoclax resistance may be induced by microenvironmental signals that upregulate antiapoptotic Bcl-xl, Mcl-1, and A1, which can be counteracted more efficiently by sunitinib than by ibrutinib or idelalisib. Although patient-specific drug responses are common, for many patients, combination therapy with sunitinib may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of venetoclax. PMID:27297795

  5. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-09-01

    Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3')-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. We demonstrated previously that ePK (eukaryotic protein kinase) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, owing to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. In addition, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. In the present study, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3')-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds, anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and PP (pyrazolopyrimidine), and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3')-Ia compared with ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3')-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant Escherichia coli strain. The structures described in the present paper and the inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23758273

  6. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stogios, Peter J.; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D.; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3’)-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. Previously we demonstrated that eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, due to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. As well, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. Here, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3’)-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds – anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and pyrazolopyrimidine (PP) – and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3’)-Ia versus ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP-derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3’)-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant E. coli strain. The structures presented here and these inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23758273

  7. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-09-01

    Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3')-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. We demonstrated previously that ePK (eukaryotic protein kinase) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, owing to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. In addition, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. In the present study, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3')-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds, anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and PP (pyrazolopyrimidine), and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3')-Ia compared with ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3')-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant Escherichia coli strain. The structures described in the present paper and the inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance.

  8. High affinity InhA inhibitors with activity against drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Todd J; Truglio, James J; Boyne, Melissa E; Novichenok, Polina; Zhang, Xujie; Stratton, Christopher F; Li, Huei-Jiun; Kaur, Tejinder; Amin, Amol; Johnson, Francis; Slayden, Richard A; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2006-02-17

    Novel chemotherapeutics for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are required to combat the spread of tuberculosis, a disease that kills more than 2 million people annually. Using structure-based drug design, we have developed a series of alkyl diphenyl ethers that are uncompetitive inhibitors of InhA, the enoyl reductase enzyme in the MTB fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. The most potent compound has a Ki' value of 1 nM for InhA and MIC99 values of 2-3 microg mL(-1) (6-10 microM) for both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of MTB. Overexpression of InhA in MTB results in a 9-12-fold increase in MIC99, consistent with the belief that these compounds target InhA within the cell. In addition, transcriptional response studies reveal that the alkyl diphenyl ethers fail to upregulate a putative efflux pump and aromatic dioxygenase, detoxification mechanisms that are triggered by the lead compound triclosan. These diphenyl ether-based InhA inhibitors do not require activation by the mycobacterial KatG enzyme, thereby circumventing the normal mechanism of resistance to the front line drug isoniazid (INH) and thus accounting for their activity against INH-resistant strains of MTB.

  9. Identification of Long Non-Coding RNAs Deregulated in Multiple Myeloma Cells Resistant to Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Ehsan; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Driscoll, James J.

    2016-01-01

    While the clinical benefit of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) for multiple myeloma (MM) treatment remains unchallenged, dose-limiting toxicities and the inevitable emergence of drug resistance limit their long-term utility. Disease eradication is compromised by drug resistance that is either present de novo or therapy-induced, which accounts for the majority of tumor relapses and MM-related deaths. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a broad class of RNA molecules, including long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), that do not encode proteins but play a major role in regulating the fundamental cellular processes that control cancer initiation, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. While lncRNAs have recently attracted significant attention as therapeutic targets to potentially improve cancer treatment, identification of lncRNAs that are deregulated in cells resistant to PIs has not been previously addressed. We have modeled drug resistance by generating three MM cell lines with acquired resistance to either bortezomib, carfilzomib, or ixazomib. Genome-wide profiling identified lncRNAs that were significantly deregulated in all three PI-resistant cell lines relative to the drug-sensitive parental cell line. Strikingly, certain lncRNAs deregulated in the three PI-resistant cell lines were also deregulated in MM plasma cells isolated from newly diagnosed patients compared to healthy plasma cells. Taken together, these preliminary studies strongly suggest that lncRNAs represent potential therapeutic targets to prevent or overcome drug resistance. More investigations are ongoing to expand these initial studies in a greater number of MM patients to better define lncRNAs signatures that contribute to PI resistance in MM. PMID:27782060

  10. Aberrant apoptotic machinery confers melanoma dual resistance to BRAFV600E inhibitor and immune effector cells: immunosensitization by a histone deacetylase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Jazirehi, Ali R; Nazarian, Ramin; Torres-Collado, Antoni Xavier; Economou, James S

    2014-01-01

    BRAFV600E-inhibitors (BRAFi; e.g., vemurafenib) and modern immune-based therapies such as PD-1/PD-L1 and CTLA-4 checkpoints blockade and adoptive cell transfer (ACT) have significantly improved the care of melanoma patients. Having these two effective (BRAFi and immunotherapy) therapies raises the question whether there is a rational biological basis for using them in combination. We developed an in vitro model to determine whether tumor resistance mechanisms to a small molecule inhibitor of a driver oncogene, and to cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)- and natural killer (NK) cell-delivered apoptotic death signals were exclusive or intersecting. We generated melanoma sublines resistant to BRAFi vemurafenib and to CTL recognizing the MART-1 melanoma antigen. Vemurafenib-resistant (VemR) sublines were cross-resistant to MART CTL and NK cells indicating that a common apoptotic pathway governing tumor response to both modalities was disrupted. Pretreatment of VemR melanomas with a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) restored sensitivity to MART CTL and NK apoptosis by skewing the apoptotic gene programs towards a proapoptotic phenotype. Our in vitro findings suggest that during the course of acquisition of BRAFi resistance, melanomas develop cross-resistance to CTL- and NK-killing. Further, aberrant apoptotic pathways, amenable by an FDA-approved chromatin remodeling drug, regulate tumor resistance mechanisms to immune effector cells. These results may provide rational molecular basis for further investigations to combine these therapies clinically. PMID:24660121

  11. HIV-1 Protease with 20 Mutations Exhibits Extreme Resistance to Clinical Inhibitors through Coordinated Structural Rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Aniana, Annie; Sayer, Jane M.; Louis, John M.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-06-28

    The escape mutant of HIV-1 protease (PR) containing 20 mutations (PR20) undergoes efficient polyprotein processing even in the presence of clinical protease inhibitors (PIs). PR20 shows >3 orders of magnitude decreased affinity for PIs darunavir (DRV) and saquinavir (SQV) relative to PR. Crystal structures of PR20 crystallized with yttrium, substrate analogue p2-NC, DRV, and SQV reveal three distinct conformations of the flexible flaps and diminished interactions with inhibitors through the combination of multiple mutations. PR20 with yttrium at the active site exhibits widely separated flaps lacking the usual intersubunit contacts seen in other inhibitor-free dimers. Mutations of residues 35-37 in the hinge loop eliminate interactions and perturb the flap conformation. Crystals of PR20/p2-NC contain one uninhibited dimer with one very open flap and one closed flap and a second inhibitor-bound dimer in the closed form showing six fewer hydrogen bonds with the substrate analogue relative to wild-type PR. PR20 complexes with PIs exhibit expanded S2/S2' pockets and fewer PI interactions arising from coordinated effects of mutations throughout the structure, in agreement with the strikingly reduced affinity. In particular, insertion of the large aromatic side chains of L10F and L33F alters intersubunit interactions and widens the PI binding site through a network of hydrophobic contacts. The two very open conformations of PR20 as well as the expanded binding site of the inhibitor-bound closed form suggest possible approaches for modifying inhibitors to target extreme drug-resistant HIV.

  12. Proteasome Inhibitor YSY01A Enhances Cisplatin Cytotoxicity in Cisplatin-Resistant Human Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Zhou, Quan; Yuan, Xia; Ge, Ze-mei; Ran, Fu-xiang; Yang, Hua-yu; Qiang, Guang-liang; Li, Run-tao; Cui, Jing-rong

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most common drugs used for treatment of solid tumors such as ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, the development of resistance against this cytotoxic agent limits its clinical use. Here we report that YSY01A, a novel proteasome inhibitor, is capable of suppressing survival of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. And YSY01A treatment enhances the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Specifically, YSY01A abrogates regulatory proteins important for cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis including NF-κB p65 and STAT3, resulting in down-regulation of Bcl-2. A dramatic increase in cisplatin uptake was also observed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following exposure to YSY01A. Taken together, YSY01A serves as a potential candidate for further development as anticancer therapeutics targeting the proteasome. PMID:27326257

  13. Converting potent indeno[1,2-b]indole inhibitors of protein kinase CK2 into selective inhibitors of the breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2.

    PubMed

    Jabor Gozzi, Gustavo; Bouaziz, Zouhair; Winter, Evelyn; Daflon-Yunes, Nathalia; Aichele, Dagmar; Nacereddine, Abdelhamid; Marminon, Christelle; Valdameri, Glaucio; Zeinyeh, Waël; Bollacke, Andre; Guillon, Jean; Lacoudre, Aline; Pinaud, Noël; Cadena, Silvia M; Jose, Joachim; Le Borgne, Marc; Di Pietro, Attilio

    2015-01-01

    A series of indeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione derivatives were synthesized as human casein kinase II (CK2) inhibitors. The most potent inhibitors contained a N(5)-isopropyl substituent on the C-ring. The same series of compounds was found to also inhibit the breast cancer resistance protein ABCG2 but with totally different structure-activity relationships: a N(5)-phenethyl substituent was critical, and additional hydrophobic substituents at position 7 or 8 of the D-ring or a methoxy at phenethyl position ortho or meta also contributed to inhibition. The best ABCG2 inhibitors, such as 4c, 4h, 4i, 4j, and 4k, behaved as very weak inhibitors of CK2, whereas the most potent CK2 inhibitors, such as 4a, 4p, and 4e, displayed limited interaction with ABCG2. It was therefore possible to convert, through suitable substitutions of the indeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione scaffold, potent CK2 inhibitors into selective ABCG2 inhibitors and vice versa. In addition, some of the best ABCG2 inhibitors, which displayed a very low cytotoxicity, thus giving a high therapeutic ratio, and appeared not to be transported, constitute promising candidates for further investigations.

  14. Evaluation of candidate biomarkers to predict cancer cell sensitivity or resistance to PARP-1 inhibitor treatment

    PubMed Central

    Oplustilova, Lenka; Wolanin, Kamila; Mistrik, Martin; Korinkova, Gabriela; Simkova, Dana; Bouchal, Jan; Lenobel, Rene; Bartkova, Jirina; Lau, Alan; O’Connor, Mark J.; Lukas, Jiri; Bartek, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Impaired DNA damage response pathways may create vulnerabilities of cancer cells that can be exploited therapeutically. One such selective vulnerability is the sensitivity of BRCA1- or BRCA2-defective tumors (hence defective in DNA repair by homologous recombination, HR) to inhibitors of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), an enzyme critical for repair pathways alternative to HR. While promising, treatment with PARP-1 inhibitors (PARP-1i) faces some hurdles, including (1) acquired resistance, (2) search for other sensitizing, non-BRCA1/2 cancer defects and (3) lack of biomarkers to predict response to PARP-1i. Here we addressed these issues using PARP-1i on 20 human cell lines from carcinomas of the breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and ovary. Aberrations of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex sensitized cancer cells to PARP-1i, while p53 status was less predictive, even in response to PARP-1i combinations with camptothecin or ionizing radiation. Furthermore, monitoring PARsylation and Rad51 foci formation as surrogate markers for PARP activity and HR, respectively, supported their candidacy for biomarkers of PARP-1i responses. As to resistance mechanisms, we confirmed the role of the multidrug resistance efflux transporters and its reversibility. More importantly, we demonstrated that shRNA lentivirus-mediated depletion of 53BP1 in human BRCA1-mutant breast cancer cells increased their resistance to PARP-1i. Given the preferential loss of 53BP1 in BRCA-defective and triple-negative breast carcinomas, our findings warrant assessment of 53BP1 among candidate predictive biomarkers of response to PARPi. Overall, this study helps characterize genetic and functional determinants of cellular responses to PARP-1i and contributes to the search for biomarkers to exploit PARP inhibitors in cancer therapy. PMID:22983061

  15. Apoptosis inhibitor TRIAP1 is a novel effector of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Adams, Caroline; Cazzanelli, Giulia; Rasul, Sabeena; Hitchinson, Ben; Hu, Yunhui; Coombes, R Charles; Raguz, Selina; Yagüe, Ernesto

    2015-07-01

    TP53-regulated inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (TRIAP1) is a novel apoptosis inhibitor that binds HSP70 in the cytoplasm and blocks the formation of the apoptosome and caspase-9 activation. TRIAP1 has been shown to be upregulated in many types of cancers; however, its role remains elusive. We determined the TRIAP1 mRNA levels in a panel of human tissues and found its expression to be ubiquitous. Normal breast, as well as non-tumorigenic breast cells, exhibited lower TRIAP1 mRNA levels than breast cancer cells or their drug-resistant derivatives. TRIAP1 is a small, evolutionarily conserved protein that is 76 amino acids long. We found that yeast cells, in which the TRIAP1 homologue was knocked out, had increased sensitivity to doxorubicin. Equally, RNA interference in breast cancer drug-resistant cells demonstrated that downregulation of TRIAP1 impaired cell growth in the presence of doxorubicin. As expected, caspase-9 activation was diminished after overexpression of TRIAP1 in drug-resistant cells. Importantly, stable transfections of a TRIAP1 expression plasmid in CAL51 cells led to a marked increase in the number of doxorubicin-resistant clones, that was abolished when cells expressed hairpins targeting TRIAP1. In addition, we showed that TRIAP1 expression was also triggered by estrogen deprivation in MCF-7 cells. Although both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies generated for the present study failed to robustly detect TRIAP1, we demonstrated that TRIAP1 represents a novel marker for drug resistance in breast cancer cells and it may be used in the stratification of breast cancer patients once a suitable antibody has been developed. Equally, these studies open potential drug development strategies for blocking TRIAP1 activity and avoiding drug resistance. PMID:25998939

  16. 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine resistance suppressed by a mutation conferring human immunodeficiency virus type 1 resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Larder, B A

    1992-01-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (NNRT) inhibitors (R82913; (+)-S-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-9-chloro-5-methyl-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)- imidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione; Cl-TIBO; and BI-RG-587, nevirapine) were used to select resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants by passage in cell cultures of wild-type or 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine; AZT)-resistant strains. Similar to other NNRT inhibitors, Cl-TIBO induced a single mutation (Y181 to C) in reverse transcriptase (RT) that accounted for the resistance. BI-RG-587 induced a different mutation (V106-->A) in AZT resistance backgrounds. A series of viable HIV-1 variants was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the RT, which harbored multiple drug resistance mutations, including Y181 to C. HIV-1 that was co-resistant to NNRT inhibitors and 2',3'-dideoxyinosine resulted when a 2',3'-dideoxyinosine resistance mutation (L74 to V) was also present in RT. By contrast, however, the Y181 to C mutation in an AZT resistance background significantly suppressed resistance to AZT, while it conferred resistance to NNRT inhibitors. However, the V106-->A substitution did not cause suppression of preexisting AZT resistance. Since certain combinations of nucleoside analogs and NNRT inhibitors might result in the development of co-resistance, careful analysis of clinical isolates obtained during combination therapy will be needed to determine the potential significance of these observations. PMID:1282792

  17. Mutations in G protein beta subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S.; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L.; Elpek, Kutlu G.; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W.; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J.; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Weinstock, David M.; Lane, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of G protein alpha subunits (Gα) occur in 4–5% of all human cancers1 but oncogenic alterations in beta subunits (Gβ) have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors, and disrupt Gα-Gβγ interactions. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered to some extent based on lineage; for example, all eleven GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms while 7 of 8 GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles in Cdkn2a-deficient bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, GNB1 mutations co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including BCR/ABL, JAK2 V617F and BRAF V600K. Co-expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 mutations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  18. Conjugation of Cisplatin Analogues and Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors to Overcome Cisplatin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Wilma; Crews, Brenda C.; Sárosi, Menyhárt B.; Daniel, Cristina M.; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Scholz, Matthias S.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) is an enzyme involved in tumorigenesis and is associated with tumor cell resistance against platinum-based antitumor drugs. Cisplatin analogues were conjugated with COX inhibitors (indomethacin, ibuprofen) to study the synergistic effects that were previously observed in combination treatments. The conjugates ensure concerted transport of both drugs into cells, and subsequent intracellular cleavage enables a dual-action mode. Whereas the platinum(II) complexes showed cytotoxicities similar to those of cisplatin, the platinum(IV) conjugates revealed highly increased cytotoxic activities and were able to completely overcome cisplatin-related resistance. Although some of the complexes are potent COX inhibitors, the conjugates appear to execute their cytotoxic action via COX-independent mechanisms. Instead, the increased lipophilicity and kinetic inertness of the conjugates seem to facilitate cellular accumulation of the platinum drugs and thus improve the efficacy of the antitumor agents. These conjugates are important tools for the elucidation of the direct influence of COX inhibitors on platinum-based anticancer drugs in tumor cells. PMID:25318459

  19. Response and resistance to NF-κB inhibitors in mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Meylan, Etienne; Oliver, Trudy G.; Feldser, David M.; Winslow, Monte M.; Bronson, Roderick; Jacks, Tyler

    2011-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is a frequently diagnosed cancer type and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. We recently demonstrated in an autochthonous mouse model of this disease that genetic inhibition of the NF-κB pathway affects both the initiation and maintenance of lung cancer, identifying this pathway as a promising therapeutic target. In this study, we tested the efficacy of small molecule NF-κB inhibitors in mouse models of lung cancer. In murine lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with high NF-κB activity, the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib efficiently reduced nuclear p65, repressed NF-κB target genes and rapidly induced apoptosis. Bortezomib also induced lung tumor regression in vivo and prolonged the survival of tumor bearing KrasLSL-G12D/wt;p53flox/flox mice. In contrast, KrasG12D/wt lung tumors, which have low levels of nuclear NF-κB, do not respond to Bortezomib, suggesting that nuclear NF-κB may be a biomarker to predict treatment response to drugs of this class. Following repeated treatment, initially sensitive lung tumors became resistant to Bortezomib. A second NF-κB inhibitor, Bay-117082, showed similar therapeutic efficacy and acquired-resistance in mice. Our results using preclinical mouse models support the NF-κB pathway as a potential therapeutic target for a defined subset of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:21874163

  20. CYP17A1 Inhibitors in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Lissette; Kovac, Jason R.; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) cases are diagnosed as a localized disease. Definitive treatment, active surveillance or watchful waiting are employed as therapeutic paradigms. The current standard of care for the treatment of metastatic PCa is either medical or surgical castration. Once PCa progresses in spite of castrate androgen levels it is termed ‘castration-resistant prostate cancer’ (CRPC). Patients may even exhibit rising PSA levels with possible bone, lymph node or solid organ metastases. In 2010, the only agent approved for the treatment of CRPC was docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent. It is now known that cells from patients with CRPC express androgen receptors (AR) and remain continuously influenced by androgens. As such, treatments with novel hormonal agents that specifically target the biochemical conversion of cholesterol to testosterone have come to the forefront. The use of cytochrome P450c17 (CYP17A1) inhibitor underlies one of the most recent advances in the treatment of CRPC. Abiraterone Acetate (AA) was the first CYP17A1 inhibitor approved in the United States. This review will discuss CRPC in general with a specific focus on AA and novel CYP17A1 inhibitors. AA clinical trials will be reviewed along with other novel adjunct treatments that may enhance the effectiveness of abiraterone therapy. Furthermore, the most recently identified CYP17A1 inhibitors Orteronel, Galeterone, VT-464, and CFG920 will also be explored. PMID:25560485

  1. Redistribution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants resistant to protease inhibitors after a protease inhibitor-sparing regimen.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Nicola; Seminari, Elena; Lazzarin, Adriano; Boeri, Enzo; Clementi, Massimo; Danise, Anna; Salpietro, Stefania; Fusetti, Giuliana; Castagna, Antonella

    2005-06-01

    The redistribution of mutations related to protease inhibitor (PI) resistance after a PI-sparing regimen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected, highly PI-experienced patients was prospectively assessed. Twenty-five patients failing a PI-including regimen were given PI-sparing antiretroviral therapy, and then followed for 24 weeks after PI resumption. Genotyping was performed by direct sequencing before and during the PI-sparing regimen. The median (interquartile range, IQR) baseline CD4+ T-lymphocyte count was 198 (120-255) cells/microl, and the median HIV-RNA level was 82,000 (41,000-300,000) copies/ml. Patients had experienced a median of 4.5 (4-5.25) PIs. The median number of PI mutations was eight (6-9). The PI-sparing regimen consisted of a median of three (3-4) drugs and lasted for a median of 53 (24-67) weeks. At the end of the study, the median number of PI mutations was 6.5 (6-9). The median change in the number of PI mutations was -1 (IQR from -1 to 0). A reduction from baseline was observed in 13 cases (52%); nine (36%) showed no change and three (12%) showed an increased number of PI substitutions. In highly PI-experienced patients, a PI-sparing regimen may lead to a reduction, no change, or increase in the number of PI mutations. The reduction is negligible in most cases.

  2. CTA095, a novel Etk and Src dual inhibitor, induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells and overcomes resistance to Src inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenchang; Liu, Ruiwu; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Ma, Ai-Hong; Changou, Chun; Yang, Joy C; Li, Yuanpei; Feng, Caihong; Luo, Yan; Mazloom, Anisha; Sanchez, Eduardo; Wang, Yan; Huang, Wenzhe; Patterson, Randen; Evans, Christopher P; Lam, Kit S; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2013-01-01

    Etk is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, which provides a strong survival signal in human prostate cancer cells. Src, another tyrosine kinase that cross-activates with Etk, has been shown to play an important role in prostate cancer metastasis. Herein, we discovered a new class of Etk inhibitors. Within those inhibitors, CTA095 was identified as a potent Etk and Src dual inhibitor. CTA095 was found to induce autophagy as well as apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells. In addition, CTA095 inhibited HUVEC cell tube formation and "wound healing" of human prostate cancer cells, implying its role in inhibition of angiogenesis and metastasis of human prostate cancer. More interestingly, CTA095 could overcome Src inhibitor resistance in prostate cancer cells. It induces apoptosis in Src inhibitor resistant prostate cancer cells, likely through a mechanism of down regulation of Myc and BCL2. This finding indicates that simultaneously targeting Etk and Src could be a promising approach to overcome drug resistance in prostate cancer. PMID:23967135

  3. CTA095, a Novel Etk and Src Dual Inhibitor, Induces Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells and Overcomes Resistance to Src Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenchang; Liu, Ruiwu; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Ma, Ai-Hong; Changou, Chun; Yang, Joy C.; Li, Yuanpei; Feng, Caihong; Luo, Yan; Mazloom, Anisha; Sanchez, Eduardo; Wang, Yan; Huang, Wenzhe; Patterson, Randen; Evans, Christopher P.; Lam, Kit S.; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2013-01-01

    Etk is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, which provides a strong survival signal in human prostate cancer cells. Src, another tyrosine kinase that cross-activates with Etk, has been shown to play an important role in prostate cancer metastasis. Herein, we discovered a new class of Etk inhibitors. Within those inhibitors, CTA095 was identified as a potent Etk and Src dual inhibitor. CTA095 was found to induce autophagy as well as apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells. In addition, CTA095 inhibited HUVEC cell tube formation and “wound healing” of human prostate cancer cells, implying its role in inhibition of angiogenesis and metastasis of human prostate cancer. More interestingly, CTA095 could overcome Src inhibitor resistance in prostate cancer cells. It induces apoptosis in Src inhibitor resistant prostate cancer cells, likely through a mechanism of down regulation of Myc and BCL2. This finding indicates that simultaneously targeting Etk and Src could be a promising approach to overcome drug resistance in prostate cancer. PMID:23967135

  4. ODM-201: a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fizazi, Karim; Albiges, Laurence; Loriot, Yohann; Massard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care for patients with advanced hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Despite an initial response, most patients progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The realization that CRPC remains driven by androgen receptor (AR) signaling has formed the basis for a new generation of agents targeting the AR axis. Two of these agents, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have been shown to prolong overall survival in patients with CRPC. Several other AR inhibitors are currently in development for the treatment of CRPC. The present article reviews ODM-201, a new-generation AR inhibitor with a unique molecular structure, in the treatment of CRPC. The design of an ongoing Phase III trial (ARAMIS) of ODM-201 in men with non-metastatic CRPC is also discussed, at a disease stage for which there is currently no approved treatment. PMID:26313416

  5. AroER Tri-Screen Is a Biologically Relevant Assay for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Modulating the Activity of Aromatase and/or the Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shiuan; Zhou, Dujin; Hsin, Li-Yu; Kanaya, Noriko; Wong, Cynthie; Yip, Richard; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Witt, Kristine; Teng, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the biosynthesis, metabolism, and functions of steroid hormones, including estrogens and androgens. Aromatase enzyme converts androgen to estrogen. Thus, EDCs against aromatase significantly impact estrogen- and/or androgen-dependent functions, including the development of breast cancer. The current study aimed to develop a biologically relevant cell-based high-throughput screening assay to identify EDCs that act as aromatase inhibitors (AIs), estrogen receptor (ER) agonists, and/or ER antagonists. The AroER tri-screen assay was developed by stable transfection of ER-positive, aromatase-expressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells with an estrogen responsive element (ERE) driven luciferase reporter plasmid. The AroER tri-screen can identify: estrogenic EDCs, which increase luciferase signal without 17β-estradiol (E2); anti-estrogenic EDCs, which inhibit the E2-induced luciferase signal; and AI-like EDCs, which suppress a testosterone-induced luciferase signal. The assay was first optimized in a 96-well plate format and then miniaturized into a 1536-well plate format. The AroER tri-screen was demonstrated to be suitable for high-throughput screening in the 1536-well plate format, with a 6.9-fold signal-to-background ratio, a 5.4% coefficient of variation, and a screening window coefficient (Z-factor) of 0.78. The assay suggested that bisphenol A (BPA) functions mainly as an ER agonist. Results from screening the 446 drugs in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Collection revealed 106 compounds that modulated ER and/or aromatase activities. Among these, two AIs (bifonazole and oxiconazole) and one ER agonist (paroxetine) were confirmed through alternative aromatase and ER activity assays. These findings indicate that AroER tri-screen is a useful high-throughput screening system for identifying ER ligands and aromatase-inhibiting chemicals. PMID:24496634

  6. A Balance between Inhibitor Binding and Substrate Processing Confers Influenza Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Liu, Ping; Bank, Claudia; Renzette, Nicholas; Prachanronarong, Kristina; Yilmaz, Lutfu S; Caffrey, Daniel R; Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Schiffer, Celia A; Kowalik, Timothy F; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Finberg, Robert W; Wang, Jennifer P; Bolon, Daniel N A

    2016-02-13

    The therapeutic benefits of the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor oseltamivir are dampened by the emergence of drug resistance mutations in influenza A virus (IAV). To investigate the mechanistic features that underlie resistance, we developed an approach to quantify the effects of all possible single-nucleotide substitutions introduced into important regions of NA. We determined the experimental fitness effects of 450 nucleotide mutations encoding positions both surrounding the active site and at more distant sites in an N1 strain of IAV in the presence and absence of oseltamivir. NA mutations previously known to confer oseltamivir resistance in N1 strains, including H275Y and N295S, were adaptive in the presence of drug, indicating that our experimental system captured salient features of real-world selection pressures acting on NA. We identified mutations, including several at position 223, that reduce the apparent affinity for oseltamivir in vitro. Position 223 of NA is located adjacent to a hydrophobic portion of oseltamivir that is chemically distinct from the substrate, making it a hotspot for substitutions that preferentially impact drug binding relative to substrate processing. Furthermore, two NA mutations, K221N and Y276F, each reduce susceptibility to oseltamivir by increasing NA activity without altering drug binding. These results indicate that competitive expansion of IAV in the face of drug pressure is mediated by a balance between inhibitor binding and substrate processing.

  7. Utilization of Putrescine in Tobacco Cell Lines Resistant to Inhibitors of Polyamine Synthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, Andrew; Malmberg, Russell L.

    1988-01-01

    Three tobacco cell lines have been analyzed which are resistant to lethal inhibitors of either putrescine production or conversion of putrescine into polyamines. Free and conjugated putrescine pools, the enzymic activities (arginine, ornithine, and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylases), and the growth characteristics during acidic stress were measured in suspension cultures of each cell line. One cell line, resistant to difluoromethylornithine (Dfr1) had a very low level of ornithine decarboxylase activity which was half insensitive to the inhibitor in vitro. Intracellular free putrescine in Dfr1 was elevated 10-fold which was apparently due to a 20-fold increase in the arginine decarboxylase activity. The increased free putrescine titer was not reflected in an increased level of spermidine, spermine, or putrescine conjugation. Dfr1 cultures survived acidic stress at molarities which were lethal to wild type cultures. Two other mutants, resistant to methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (Mgr3, Mgr12), had near normal levels of the three decarboxylases and normal titers of free putrescine, spermidine, and spermine. Both mutants however had elevated levels of conjugated putrescine. Mgr12 had an increased sensitivity to acidic medium. These results suggest that increased levels of free putrescine production may enhance the ability of tobacco cells to survive acid stress. This was supported by the observation that cytotoxic effects of inhibiting arginine decarboxylase in wild type cell lines were dependent on the acidity of the medium. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16665927

  8. Weight gain increases human aromatase expression in mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Zhao, Hong; Coon, John S; Ono, Masanori; Pearson, Elizabeth K; Bulun, Serdar E

    2012-05-15

    Adulthood weight gain predicts estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Because local estrogen excess in the breast likely contributes to cancer development, and aromatase is the key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, we investigated the role of local aromatase expression in weight gain-associated breast cancer risk in a humanized aromatase (Arom(hum)) mouse model containing the coding region and the 5'-regulatory region of the human aromatase gene. Compared with littermates on normal chow, female Arom(hum) mice on a high fat diet gained more weight, and had a larger mammary gland mass with elevated total human aromatase mRNA levels via promoters I.4 and II associated with increased levels of their regulators TNFα and C/EBPβ. There was no difference in total human aromatase mRNA levels in gonadal white adipose tissue. Our data suggest that diet-induced weight gain preferentially stimulates local aromatase expression in the breast, which may lead to local estrogen excess and breast cancer risk.

  9. Three-dimensional model of cytochrome P450 human aromatase.

    PubMed

    Loge, Cedric; Le Borgne, Marc; Marchand, Pascal; Robert, Jean-Michel; Le Baut, Guillaume; Palzer, Martina; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2005-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) structure of human aromatase (CYP 19) was modeled on the basis of the crystal structure of rabbit CYP2C5, the first solved X-ray structure of an eukaryotic cytochrome P450 and was evaluated by docking S-fadrozole and the steroidal competitive inhibitor (19R)-10-thiiranylestr-4-ene-3,17-dione, into the enzyme active site. According to a previous pharmacophoric hypothesis described in the literature, the cyano group of S-fadrozole partially mimics the steroid backbone C(17) carbonyl group of (19R)-10-thiiranylestr-4-ene-3,17-dione, and was oriented in a favorable position for H-bonding with the newly identified positively charged residues Lys 119 and Arg435. In addition, this model is consistent with the recent combined mutagenesis/modeling studies already published concerning the roles ofAsp309 and His480 in the aromatization of the steroid A ring. PMID:16408794

  10. Transfer and expression of ALS inhibitor resistance from Amaranthus palmeri to an A. spinosus X A. palmeri hybrid.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transfer of herbicide resistance among closely related weed species is a topic of growing concern. An Amaranthus palmeri X A. spinosus hybrid was confirmed resistant to several ALS inhibitors including imazethapyr, nicosulfuron, pyrithiobac and trifloxysulfuron. Enzyme assays indicated that the AL...

  11. Combination of PIM and JAK2 inhibitors synergistically suppresses cell proliferation and overcomes drug resistance of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Rita; Li, Zhifang; Sun, Fangxian; Barberis, Claude; Tabart, Michel; Patel, Vinod; Schio, Laurent; Hurley, Raelene; Chen, Bo; Cheng, Hong; Lengauer, Christoph; Pollard, Jack; Watters, James; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Wiederschain, Dmitri; Adrian, Francisco; Zhang, JingXin

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of JAK2 kinase are emerging as an important treatment modality for myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). However, similar to other kinase inhibitors, resistance to JAK2 inhibitors may eventually emerge through a variety of mechanisms. Effective drug combination is one way to enhance therapeutic efficacy and combat resistance against JAK2 inhibitors. To identify potential combination partners for JAK2 compounds in MPN cell lines, we performed pooled shRNA screen targeting 5,000 genes in the presence or absence of JAK2 blockade. One of the top hits identified was MYC, an oncogenic transcription factor that is difficult to inhibit directly, but could be targeted by modulation of upstream regulatory elements such as kinases. We demonstrate herein that PIM kinase inhibitors efficiently suppress MYC protein levels in MPN cell lines. Overexpression of MYC restores the viability of PIM inhibitor-treated cells, revealing causal relationship between MYC down-regulation and cell growth inhibition by PIM compounds. Combination of various PIM inhibitors with a JAK2 inhibitor results in significant synergistic growth inhibition of multiple MPN cancer cell lines and induction of apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed strong downregulation of phosphorylated forms of S6 and 4EBP1 by JAK2/PIM inhibitor combination treatment. Finally, such combination was effective in eradicating in vitro JAK2 inhibitor-resistant MPN clones, where MYC is consistently up-regulated. These findings demonstrate that simultaneous suppression of JAK2 and PIM kinase activity by small molecule inhibitors is more effective than either agent alone in suppressing MPN cell growth. Our data suggest that JAK2 and PIM combination might warrant further investigation for the treatment of JAK2-driven hematologic malignancies. PMID:24830942

  12. Baseline sensitivity and resistance risk assessmemt of Rhizoctonia cerealis to thifluzamide, a succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Lu, Jingle; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, MingGuo; Chen, Changjun

    2015-10-01

    During 2010-2012, a total of 120 isolates of Rhizoctonia cerealis were collected from wheat with symptoms of sharp eyespot in four provinces (Henan, Shandong, Anhui and Jiangsu) in China. All the isolates were determined for baseline sensitivity to thifluzamide, a succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDHI) with strong antifungal activity. The sampled pathogenic populations, never exposed to SDHIs, had similar sensitivity to trifluzamide (0.025-0.359 µg/ml) in the four regions and over the two years. The baseline sensitivity was distributed as a skewed unimodal curve with a mean EC50 value (effective concentrations for 50% inhibiting mycelial growth) of 0.064 ± 0.013 µg/ml. The resistance risk of R. cerealis to thifluzamide was further evaluated in vitro. Two thifluzamide-resistant mutants of R. cerealis were obtained by culturing on thifluzamide-amended plates. The resistance factors (RF = EC50 value of a mutant/EC50 value of the wild type progenitor of the mutant) were 120 and 40 for two R. cerealis mutants, respectively. All the mutants exhibited similar fitness after 10 successive transfers when compared to their wild-type parents in mycelial growth, sclerotia production, and virulence. However, the two thifluzamide-resistant mutants differed significantly in sensitivity to boscalid and flutolanil. Therefore, a low-to-moderate risk of resistance development was recommended for thifluzamide. PMID:26453237

  13. Benzimidazole analogs as WTA biosynthesis inhibitors targeting methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Wei; Pan, Jianping; Yang, Christine; Labroli, Marc; Pan, Weidong; Caldwell, John; Ha, Sookhee; Koseoglu, Sandra; Xiao, Jing C; Mayhood, Todd; Sheth, Payal R; Garlisi, Charles G; Wu, Jin; Lee, Sang Ho; Wang, Hao; Tan, Christopher M; Roemer, Terry; Su, Jing

    2016-10-01

    A series of benzimidazole analogs have been synthesized to improve the profile of the previous lead compounds tarocin B and 1. The syntheses, structure-activity relationships, and selected biochemical data of these analogs are described. The optimization efforts allowed the identification of 21, a fluoro-substituted benzimidazole, exhibiting potent TarO inhibitory activity and typical profile for a wall teichoic acid (WTA) biosynthesis inhibitor. Compound 21 displayed a potent synergistic and bactericidal effect in combination with imipenem against diverse methicillin-resistant Staphylococci. PMID:27575474

  14. Homology modeling and virtual screening of inhibitors against TEM- and SHV-type-resistant mutants: A multilayer filtering approach.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mohammad H; Balaramnavar, Vishal M; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Khan, Asad U

    2015-01-01

    TEM and SHV are class-A-type β-lactamases commonly found in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Previous studies reported S130G and K234R mutations in SHVs to be 41- and 10-fold more resistant toward clavulanic acid than SHV-1, respectively, whereas TEM S130G and R244S also showed the same level of resistance. These selected mutants confer higher level of resistance against clavulanic acid. They also show little susceptibility against other commercially available β-lactamase inhibitors. In this study, we have used docking-based virtual screening approach in order to screen potential inhibitors against some of the major resistant mutants of SHV and TEM types β-lactamase. Two different inhibitor-resistant mutants from SHV and TEM were selected. Moreover, we have retained the active site water molecules within each enzyme. Active site water molecules were placed within modeled structure of the mutant whose structure was unavailable with protein databank. The novelty of this work lies in the use of multilayer virtual screening approach for the prediction of best and accurate results. We are reporting five inhibitors on the basis of their efficacy against all the selected resistant mutants. These inhibitors were selected on the basis of their binding efficacies and pharmacophore features.

  15. Zoledronic Acid in Aromatase Inhibitor Induced Musculoskeletal Symptoms

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-12

    Ductal Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Paternal Retrieval Behavior Regulated by Brain Estrogen Synthetase (Aromatase) in Mouse Sires that Engage in Communicative Interactions with Pairmates

    PubMed Central

    Akther, Shirin; Huang, Zhiqi; Liang, Mingkun; Zhong, Jing; Fakhrul, Azam A. K. M.; Yuhi, Teruko; Lopatina, Olga; Salmina, Alla B.; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Higashida, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Matsuo, Mie; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Parental behaviors involve complex social recognition and memory processes and interactive behavior with children that can greatly facilitate healthy human family life. Fathers play a substantial role in child care in a small but significant number of mammals, including humans. However, the brain mechanism that controls male parental behavior is much less understood than that controlling female parental behavior. Fathers of non-monogamous laboratory ICR mice are an interesting model for examining the factors that influence paternal responsiveness because sires can exhibit maternal-like parental care (retrieval of pups) when separated from their pups along with their pairmates because of olfactory and auditory signals from the dams. Here we tested whether paternal behavior is related to femininity by the aromatization of testosterone. For this purpose, we measured the immunoreactivity of aromatase [cytochrome P450 family 19 (CYP19)], which synthesizes estrogen from androgen, in nine brain regions of the sire. We observed higher levels of aromatase expression in these areas of the sire brain when they engaged in communicative interactions with dams in separate cages. Interestingly, the number of nuclei with aromatase immunoreactivity in sires left together with maternal mates in the home cage after pup-removing was significantly larger than that in sires housed with a whole family. The capacity of sires to retrieve pups was increased following a period of 5 days spent with the pups as a whole family after parturition, whereas the acquisition of this ability was suppressed in sires treated daily with an aromatase inhibitor. The results demonstrate that the dam significantly stimulates aromatase in the male brain and that the presence of the pups has an inhibitory effect on this increase. These results also suggest that brain aromatization regulates the initiation, development, and maintenance of paternal behavior in the ICR male mice. PMID:26696812

  17. The novel β2-selective proteasome inhibitor LU-102 synergizes with bortezomib and carfilzomib to overcome proteasome inhibitor resistance of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Marianne; Bader, Juergen; Geurink, Paul P; Weyburne, Emily S; Mirabella, Anne C; Silzle, Tobias; Shabaneh, Tamer B; van der Linden, Wouter A; de Bruin, Gerjan; Haile, Sarah R; van Rooden, Eva; Appenzeller, Christina; Li, Nan; Kisselev, Alexei F; Overkleeft, Herman; Driessen, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Proteasome inhibitor resistance is a challenge for myeloma therapy. Bortezomib targets the β5 and β1 activity, but not the β2 activity of the proteasome. Bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells down-regulate the activation status of the unfolded protein response, and up-regulate β2 proteasome activity. To improve proteasome inhibition in bortezomib-resistant myeloma and to achieve more efficient UPR activation, we have developed LU-102, a selective inhibitor of the β2 proteasome activity. LU-102 inhibited the β2 activity in intact myeloma cells at low micromolar concentrations without relevant co-inhibition of β1 and β5 proteasome subunits. In proteasome inhibitor-resistant myeloma cells, significantly more potent proteasome inhibition was achieved by bortezomib or carfilzomib in combination with LU-102, compared to bortezomib/carfilzomib alone, resulting in highly synergistic cytotoxic activity of the drug combination via endoplasmatic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Combining bortezomib/carfilzomib with LU-102 significantly prolonged proteasome inhibition and increased activation of the unfolded protein response and IRE1-a activity. IRE1-α has recently been shown to control myeloma cell differentiation and bortezomib sensitivity (Leung-Hagesteijn, Cancer Cell 24:3, 289-304). Thus, β2-selective proteasome inhibition by LU-102 in combination with bortezomib or carfilzomib results in synergistic proteasome inhibition, activation of the unfolded protein response, and cytotoxicity, and overcomes bortezomib/carfilzomib resistance in myeloma cells in vitro.

  18. RING domain-deficient BRCA1 promotes PARP inhibitor and platinum resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Krais, John J; Bernhardy, Andrea J; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Cai, Kathy Q; Harrell, Maria I; Kim, Hyoung H; George, Erin; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Simpkins, Fiona; Johnson, Neil

    2016-08-01

    Patients with cancers that harbor breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) mutations initially respond well to platinum and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor (PARPi) therapy; however, resistance invariably arises in these patients and is a major clinical problem. The BRCA1185delAG allele is a common inherited mutation located close to the protein translation start site that is thought to produce a shortened, nonfunctional peptide. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms that lead to PARPi and platinum resistance in the SUM1315MO2 breast cancer cell line, which harbors a hemizygous BRCA1185delAG mutation. SUM1315MO2 cells were initially sensitive to PARPi and cisplatin but readily acquired resistance. PARPi- and cisplatin-resistant clones did not harbor secondary reversion mutations; rather, PARPi and platinum resistance required increased expression of a really interesting gene (RING) domain-deficient BRCA1 protein (Rdd-BRCA1). Initiation of translation occurred downstream of the frameshift mutation, probably at the BRCA1-Met-297 codon. In contrast to full-length BRCA1, Rdd-BRCA1 did not require BRCA1-associated RING domain 1 (BARD1) interaction for stability. Functionally, Rdd-BRCA1 formed irradiation-induced foci and supported RAD51 foci formation. Ectopic overexpression of Rdd-BRCA1 promoted partial PARPi and cisplatin resistance. Furthermore, Rdd-BRCA1 protein expression was detected in recurrent carcinomas from patients who carried germline BRCA1185delAG mutations. Taken together, these results indicate that RING-deficient BRCA1 proteins are hypomorphic and capable of contributing to PARPi and platinum resistance when expressed at high levels. PMID:27454289

  19. First characterization of inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) beta-lactamases in Klebsiella pneumoniae strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lemozy, J; Sirot, D; Chanal, C; Huc, C; Labia, R; Dabernat, H; Sirot, J

    1995-01-01

    Two clinical strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, TP 01 and TP 02, presented resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanate and were fully susceptible to cephalothin. These strains produced two beta-lactamases, SHV-1 and a TEM enzyme with a pI of 5.2. The previously described changes Arg-244-->Cys and Arg-244-->Ser in IRT-1 and IRT-2 (A. Belaaouaj, C. Lapoumeroulie, M. M. Caniça, G. Vedel, P. Nevot, R. Krishnamoorthy, and G. Paul, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 120:75-80, 1994) were found in TEM enzymes from the TP 01 and TP 02 strains, respectively. This is the first report of inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) in species other than Escherichia coli from the family Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:8585751

  20. Overcoming Resistance of Cancer Cells to PARP-1 Inhibitors with Three Different Drug Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Castel, David; Moshe, Itai; Mazal, Inbal; Cohen, Osher; Avivi, Camila; Rosenblatt, Kineret; Aviel-Ronen, Sarit; Schiby, Ginette; Yahalom, Joachim; Amariglio, Ninette; Pfeffer, Raphael; Lawrence, Yaacov; Toren, Amos; Rechavi, Gideon; Paglin, Shoshana

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARPis) show promise for treatment of cancers which lack capacity for homologous recombination repair (HRR). However, new therapeutic strategies are required in order to overcome innate and acquired resistance to these drugs and thus expand the array of cancers that could benefit from them. We show that human cancer cell lines which respond poorly to ABT-888 (a PARPi), become sensitive to it when co-treated with vorinostat (a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi)). Vorinostat also sensitized PARPis insensitive cancer cell lines to 6-thioguanine (6-TG)–a drug that targets PARPis sensitive cells. The sensitizing effect of vorinostat was associated with increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α which in and of itself increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to ABT-888. Importantly, these drug combinations did not affect survival of normal fibroblasts and breast cells, and significantly increased the inhibition of xenograft tumor growth relative to each drug alone, without affecting the mice weight or their liver and kidney function. Our results show that combination of vorinostat and ABT-888 could potentially prove useful for treatment of cancer with innate resistance to PARPis due to active HRR machinery, while the combination of vorinostat and 6-TG could potentially overcome innate or acquired resistance to PARPis due to secondary or reversal BRCA mutations, to decreased PARP-1 level or to increased expression of multiple drug resistant proteins. Importantly, drugs which increase phosphorylation of eIF2α may mimic the sensitizing effect of vorinostat on cellular response to PARPis or to 6-TG, without activating all of its downstream effectors. PMID:27196668

  1. Blood cholinesterase in rats fed an insect resistance apple clone containing a natural cholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Stoewsand, G S; Anderson, J L; Brown, S K

    1994-01-01

    A crab apple clone (Malus brevipes 1021), highly resistant to the apple maggot, is being used in breeding programs developing commercial apple cultivars. This study has discovered that this crab apple contains a natural cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor that caused a 17.5% in vitro inhibition of rat blood ChE activity. This crab apple also showed a relatively high total (titratable) acidity of 1.28%. The commercial, nonresistant, apple cultivar McIntosh was capable of causing a 7.9% inhibition of blood ChE in vitro. The total acidity in McIntosh was 0.45%. A 4-wk feeding study compared 2 groups of 5-wk-old Fischer 344 male rats fed diets containing 45% of either M. brevipes or McIntosh freeze-dried apples to a third (control) group of rats fed a semipurified diet. In vivo blood ChE activities were similar in all groups of rats, as well as hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cell counts. The liver mixed-function oxidase activity through aminopyrine N-demethylase in the rats fed the apple diets was higher than the controls, but p-nitroanisole O-demethylase activity was induced only in the animals fed the maggot-resistant crab apple. Lowered growth with concomitant lowered food intake, in the otherwise healthy rats fed the maggot-resistant crab apple diet, was attributed to the less palatable, highly acidic fruit. This study indicates that the natural ChE inhibitor in the insect-resistant apple M. brevipes is apparently detoxified upon ingestion.

  2. Profiling and Characterization of Influenza Virus N1 Strains Potentially Resistant to Multiple Neuraminidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Yun Hee; Song, Min-Suk; Lee, Eun-Young; Kim, Young-il; Kim, Eun-Ha; Park, Su-Jin; Park, Kuk Jin; Kwon, Hyeok-il; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q.; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Kim, Semi; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Kim, Myung Hee; Webby, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) have been widely used to control influenza virus infection, but their increased use could promote the global emergence of resistant variants. Although various mutations associated with NAI resistance have been identified, the amino acid substitutions that confer multidrug resistance with undiminished viral fitness remain poorly understood. We therefore screened a known mutation(s) that could confer multidrug resistance to the currently approved NAIs oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir by assessing recombinant viruses with mutant NA-encoding genes (catalytic residues R152K and R292K, framework residues E119A/D/G, D198N, H274Y, and N294S) in the backbones of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses. Of the 14 single and double mutant viruses recovered in the backbone of pH1N1, four variants (E119D, E119A/D/G-H274Y) exhibited reduced inhibition by all of the NAIs and two variants (E119D and E119D-H274Y) retained the overall properties of gene stability, replicative efficiency, pathogenicity, and transmissibility in vitro and in vivo. Of the nine recombinant H5N1 viruses, four variants (E119D, E119A/D/G-H274Y) also showed reduced inhibition by all of the NAIs, though their overall viral fitness was impaired in vitro and/or in vivo. Thus, single mutations or certain combination of the established mutations could confer potential multidrug resistance on pH1N1 or HPAI H5N1 viruses. Our findings emphasize the urgency of developing alternative drugs against influenza virus infection. IMPORTANCE There has been a widespread emergence of influenza virus strains with reduced susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). We screened multidrug-resistant viruses by studying the viral fitness of neuraminidase mutants in vitro and in vivo. We found that recombinant E119D and E119A/D/G/-H274Y mutant viruses demonstrated reduced inhibition by all of the NAIs tested in both the backbone of

  3. Proteasome inhibition reverses hedgehog inhibitor and taxane resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Steg, Adam D; Burke, Mata R; Amm, Hope M; Katre, Ashwini A; Dobbin, Zachary C; Jeong, Dae Hoon; Landen, Charles N

    2014-08-30

    The goal of this study was to determine whether combined targeted therapies, specifically those against the Notch, hedgehog and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways, could overcome ovarian cancer chemoresistance. Chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells were exposed to gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSI-I, Compound E) or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, alone and in combination with the hedgehog antagonist, LDE225. Bortezomib, alone and in combination with LDE225, was evaluated for effects on paclitaxel efficacy. Cell viability and cell cycle analysis were assessed by MTT assay and propidium iodide staining, respectively. Proteasome activity and gene expression were determined by luminescence assay and qPCR, respectively. Studies demonstrated that GSI-I, but not Compound E, inhibited proteasome activity, similar to bortezomib. Proteasome inhibition decreased hedgehog target genes (PTCH1, GLI1 and GLI2) and increased LDE225 sensitivity in vitro. Bortezomib, alone and in combination with LDE225, increased paclitaxel sensitivity through apoptosis and G2/M arrest. Expression of the multi-drug resistance gene ABCB1/MDR1 was decreased and acetylation of α-tubulin, a marker of microtubule stabilization, was increased following bortezomib treatment. HDAC6 inhibitor tubastatin-a demonstrated that microtubule effects are associated with hedgehog inhibition and sensitization to paclitaxel and LDE225. These results suggest that proteasome inhibition, through alteration of microtubule dynamics and hedgehog signaling, can reverse taxane-mediated chemoresistance. PMID:25216523

  4. Kinase Inhibitors that Increase the Sensitivity of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Vornhagen, Jay; Burnside, Kellie; Whidbey, Christopher; Berry, Jessica; Qin, Xuan; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus are Gram-positive bacteria that are the leading cause of recurrent infections in humans that include pneumonia, bacteremia, osteomyelitis, arthritis, endocarditis, and toxic shock syndrome. The emergence of methicillin resistant S. aureus strains (MRSA) has imposed a significant concern in sustained measures of treatment against these infections. Recently, MRSA strains deficient in expression of a serine/threonine kinase (Stk1 or PknB) were described to exhibit increased sensitivity to β-lactam antibiotics. In this study, we screened a library consisting of 280 drug-like, low-molecular-weight compounds with the ability to inhibit protein kinases for those that increased the sensitivity of wild-type MRSA to β-lactams and then evaluated their toxicity in mice. We report the identification of four kinase inhibitors, the sulfonamides ST085384, ST085404, ST085405, and ST085399 that increased sensitivity of WT MRSA to sub-lethal concentrations of β-lactams. Furthermore, these inhibitors lacked alerting structures commonly associated with toxic effects, and toxicity was not observed with ST085384 or ST085405 in vivo in a murine model. These results suggest that kinase inhibitors may be useful in therapeutic strategies against MRSA infections. PMID:26506394

  5. BCL-2 Inhibitors Sensitize Therapy-resistant Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells to VSV Oncolysis

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Sara; Beljanski, Vladimir; Van Grevenynghe, Julien; Richards, Stephanie; Ben Yebdri, Fethia; He, Zhong; Nichols, Carmen; Belgnaoui, S Mehdi; Steel, Courtney; Goulet, Marie-Line; Shamy, April; Brown, Dawn; Abesada, Guillermo; Haddad, Elias K; Hiscott, John

    2013-01-01

    Many primary cancers including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are resistant to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-induced oncolysis due to overexpression of the antiapoptotic and antiautophagic members of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) family. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of CLL cell death induced as a consequence of VSV infection in the presence of BCL-2 inhibitors, obatoclax, and ABT-737 in primary ex vivo CLL patient samples. Microarray analysis of primary CD19+ CD5+ CLL cells treated with obatoclax and VSV revealed changes in expression of genes regulating apoptosis, the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and cellular metabolism. A combined therapeutic effect was observed for VSV and BCL-2 inhibitors in cells from untreated patients and from patients unresponsive to standard of care therapy. In addition, combination treatment induced several markers of autophagy—LC3-II accumulation, p62 degradation, and staining of autophagic vacuoles. Inhibition of early stage autophagy using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) led to increased apoptosis in CLL samples. Mechanistically, a combination of BCL-2 inhibitors and VSV disrupted inhibitory interactions of Beclin-1 with BCL-2 and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1), thus biasing cells toward autophagy. We propose a mechanism in which changes in cellular metabolism, coupled with pharmacologic disruption of the BCL-2–Beclin-1 interactions, facilitate induction of apoptosis and autophagy to mediate the cytolytic effect of VSV. PMID:23689597

  6. Design, Synthesis, Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors to Combat Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M.

    2012-01-01

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants, in particular inhibitors containing 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp-29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies. PMID:22708897

  7. Kinase Inhibitors that Increase the Sensitivity of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus to β-Lactam Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Vornhagen, Jay; Burnside, Kellie; Whidbey, Christopher; Berry, Jessica; Qin, Xuan; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus are Gram-positive bacteria that are the leading cause of recurrent infections in humans that include pneumonia, bacteremia, osteomyelitis, arthritis, endocarditis, and toxic shock syndrome. The emergence of methicillin resistant S. aureus strains (MRSA) has imposed a significant concern in sustained measures of treatment against these infections. Recently, MRSA strains deficient in expression of a serine/threonine kinase (Stk1 or PknB) were described to exhibit increased sensitivity to β-lactam antibiotics. In this study, we screened a library consisting of 280 drug-like, low-molecular-weight compounds with the ability to inhibit protein kinases for those that increased the sensitivity of wild-type MRSA to β-lactams and then evaluated their toxicity in mice. We report the identification of four kinase inhibitors, the sulfonamides ST085384, ST085404, ST085405, and ST085399 that increased sensitivity of WT MRSA to sub-lethal concentrations of β-lactams. Furthermore, these inhibitors lacked alerting structures commonly associated with toxic effects, and toxicity was not observed with ST085384 or ST085405 in vivo in a murine model. These results suggest that kinase inhibitors may be useful in therapeutic strategies against MRSA infections. PMID:26506394

  8. Comprehensive mutant enzyme and viral variant assessment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase resistance to nonnucleoside inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, V W; Sardana, V V; Schleif, W A; Condra, J H; Waterbury, J A; Wolfgang, J A; Long, W J; Schneider, C L; Schlabach, A J; Wolanski, B S

    1993-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors comprise a class of structurally diverse compounds that are functionally related and specific for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RT. Viral variants resistant to these compounds arise readily in cell culture and in treated, infected human. Therefore, the eventual clinical usefulness of the nonnucleoside inhibitors will rely on a thorough understanding of the genetic and biochemical bases for resistance. A study was performed to assess the effects of substitutions at each RT amino acid residue that influences the enzyme's susceptibility to the various nonnucleoside compounds. Single substitutions were introduced into both purified enzyme and virus. The resulting patterns of resistance were markedly distinct for each of the tested inhibitors. For instance, a > 50-fold loss of enzyme susceptibility to BI-RG-587 was engendered by any of four individual substitutions, while the same level of relative resistance to the pyridinone derivatives was mediated only by substitution at residue 181. Similarly, substitution at residue 181. Similarly, substitution at residue 106 had a noted effect on virus resistance to BI-RG-587 but not to the pyridinones. The opposite effect was mediated by a substitution at residue 179. Such knowledge of nonucleoside inhibitor resistance profiles may help in understanding the basis for resistant virus selection during clinical studies of these compounds. PMID:7692811

  9. NF-κB drives acquired resistance to a novel mutant-selective EGFR inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Galvani, Elena; Sun, Jing; Leon, Leticia G; Sciarrillo, Rocco; Narayan, Ravi S; Sjin, Robert Tjin Tham; Lee, Kwangho; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Alfieri, Roberta R; Heynen, Guus J; Bernards, René; Smit, Egbert F; Pao, William; Peters, Godefridus J; Giovannetti, Elisa

    2015-12-15

    The clinical efficacy of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harbouring activating EGFR mutations is limited by the emergence of acquired resistance, mostly ascribed to the secondary EGFR-T790M mutation. Selective EGFR-T790M inhibitors have been proposed as a new, extremely relevant therapeutic approach. Here, we demonstrate that the novel irreversible EGFR-TKI CNX-2006, a structural analog of CO-1686, currently tested in a phase-1/2 trial, is active against in vitro and in vivo NSCLC models expressing mutant EGFR, with minimal effect on the wild-type receptor. By integration of genetic and functional analyses in isogenic cell pairs we provide evidence of the crucial role played by NF-κB1 in driving CNX-2006 acquired resistance and show that NF-κB activation may replace the oncogenic EGFR signaling in NSCLC when effective and persistent inhibition of the target is achieved in the presence of the T790M mutation. In this context, we demonstrate that the sole, either genetic or pharmacologic, inhibition of NF-κB is sufficient to reduce the viability of cells that adapted to EGFR-TKIs. Overall, our findings support the rational inhibition of members of the NF-κB pathway as a promising therapeutic option for patients who progress after treatment with novel mutant-selective EGFR-TKIs.

  10. The Relative Expression of Mig6 and EGFR Is Associated with Resistance to EGFR Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaofei; Izumchenko, Eugene; Solis, Luisa M.; Kim, Myoung Sook; Chatterjee, Aditi; Ling, Shizhang; Monitto, Constance L.; Harari, Paul M.; Hidalgo, Manuel; Goodman, Steve N.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Bedi, Atul; Sidransky, David

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of only a few tumors to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) can be explained by the presence of EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK) domain mutations. In addition, such mutations were rarely found in tumor types other than lung, such as pancreatic and head and neck cancer. In this study we sought to elucidate mechanisms of resistance to EGFR-targeted therapies in tumors that do not harbor TK sensitizing mutations in order to identify markers capable of guiding the decision to incorporate these drugs into chemotherapeutic regimens. Here we show that EGFR activity was markedly decreased during the evolution of resistance to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) erlotinib, with a concomitant increase of mitogen-inducible gene 6 (Mig6), a negative regulator of EGFR through the upregulation of the PI3K-AKT pathway. EGFR activity, which was more accurately predicted by the ratio of Mig6/EGFR, highly correlated with erlotinib sensitivity in panels of cancer cell lines of different tissue origins. Blinded testing and analysis in a prospectively followed cohort of lung cancer patients treated with gefitinib alone demonstrated higher response rates and a marked increased in progression free survival for patients with a low Mig6/EGFR ratio (approximately 100 days, P = 0.01). PMID:23935914

  11. NF-κB drives acquired resistance to a novel mutant-selective EGFR inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Elena; Sun, Jing; Leon, Leticia G.; Sciarrillo, Rocco; Narayan, Ravi S.; Tjin Tham Sjin, Robert; Lee, Kwangho; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Heideman, Daniëlle A.M.; Alfieri, Roberta R.; Heynen, Guus J.; Bernards, René; Smit, Egbert F.; Pao, William; Peters, Godefridus J.; Giovannetti, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harbouring activating EGFR mutations is limited by the emergence of acquired resistance, mostly ascribed to the secondary EGFR-T790M mutation. Selective EGFR-T790M inhibitors have been proposed as a new, extremely relevant therapeutic approach. Here, we demonstrate that the novel irreversible EGFR-TKI CNX-2006, a structural analog of CO-1686, currently tested in a phase-1/2 trial, is active against in vitro and in vivo NSCLC models expressing mutant EGFR, with minimal effect on the wild-type receptor. By integration of genetic and functional analyses in isogenic cell pairs we provide evidence of the crucial role played by NF-κB1 in driving CNX-2006 acquired resistance and show that NF-κB activation may replace the oncogenic EGFR signaling in NSCLC when effective and persistent inhibition of the target is achieved in the presence of the T790M mutation. In this context, we demonstrate that the sole, either genetic or pharmacologic, inhibition of NF-κB is sufficient to reduce the viability of cells that adapted to EGFR-TKIs. Overall, our findings support the rational inhibition of members of the NF-κB pathway as a promising therapeutic option for patients who progress after treatment with novel mutant-selective EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26015408

  12. Polygalacturonase inhibitor protein from fruits of anthracnose resistant and susceptible varieties of Chilli (Capsicum annuum L).

    PubMed

    Shivashankar, S; Thimmareddy, C; Roy, Tapas K

    2010-08-01

    Chilli fruit is highly susceptible to anthracnose infection at the stage of harvest maturity, due to which the fruit yield in the leading commercial variety Byadgi is severely affected. Field studies on screening of several varieties for resistance to anthracnose have shown that a variety of chilli AR-4/99K is resistant to anthracnose infection. In many crops, resistance to fungal attack has been correlated with PGIP activity in developing fruits based on which transgenic varieties have been developed with resistance to fungi. The present study was carried out to determine whether anthracnose resistance in AR-4/99K was due to the increased levels of PGIP alone and/ or due to differences, if any, in the properties of PGIP. Hence, a comparative study of the properties of polygalacturonase inhibitor protein (PGIP) isolated from fruits of anthracnose resistant chilli var AR-4/99K and a susceptible variety Byadgi was conducted with the objective of utilizing the information in genetic transformation studies. Both the PGIPs from anthracnose resistant and susceptible varieties of chilli exhibited similarities in the elution pattern on Sephadex gel, DEAE cellulose, PAGE and SDS-PAGE. The two PGIPs were active over a wide range of pH and temperature. Both PGIPs showed differential inhibitory activity against polygalacturonase (PG) secreted by Colletotrichum gleosporoides, C. capsici, C. lindemuthianum, Fusarium moniliforme and Sclerotium rolfsii. The inhibitory activity of PGIP from both resistant and susceptible varieties was the highest (82% and 76%, respectively) against the PG from Colletotrichum capsici, a pathogen causing anthracnose rot of chilli, while the activity was lower (1.27 to 12.3%) on the other fungal PGs. Although PGIP activity decreased with fruit maturation in both the varieties, the resistant variety maintained a higher activity at 45 days after flowering (DAF) as compared to the susceptible variety which helped it to overcome the infection by

  13. Polygalacturonase inhibitor protein from fruits of anthracnose resistant and susceptible varieties of Chilli (Capsicum annuum L).

    PubMed

    Shivashankar, S; Thimmareddy, C; Roy, Tapas K

    2010-08-01

    Chilli fruit is highly susceptible to anthracnose infection at the stage of harvest maturity, due to which the fruit yield in the leading commercial variety Byadgi is severely affected. Field studies on screening of several varieties for resistance to anthracnose have shown that a variety of chilli AR-4/99K is resistant to anthracnose infection. In many crops, resistance to fungal attack has been correlated with PGIP activity in developing fruits based on which transgenic varieties have been developed with resistance to fungi. The present study was carried out to determine whether anthracnose resistance in AR-4/99K was due to the increased levels of PGIP alone and/ or due to differences, if any, in the properties of PGIP. Hence, a comparative study of the properties of polygalacturonase inhibitor protein (PGIP) isolated from fruits of anthracnose resistant chilli var AR-4/99K and a susceptible variety Byadgi was conducted with the objective of utilizing the information in genetic transformation studies. Both the PGIPs from anthracnose resistant and susceptible varieties of chilli exhibited similarities in the elution pattern on Sephadex gel, DEAE cellulose, PAGE and SDS-PAGE. The two PGIPs were active over a wide range of pH and temperature. Both PGIPs showed differential inhibitory activity against polygalacturonase (PG) secreted by Colletotrichum gleosporoides, C. capsici, C. lindemuthianum, Fusarium moniliforme and Sclerotium rolfsii. The inhibitory activity of PGIP from both resistant and susceptible varieties was the highest (82% and 76%, respectively) against the PG from Colletotrichum capsici, a pathogen causing anthracnose rot of chilli, while the activity was lower (1.27 to 12.3%) on the other fungal PGs. Although PGIP activity decreased with fruit maturation in both the varieties, the resistant variety maintained a higher activity at 45 days after flowering (DAF) as compared to the susceptible variety which helped it to overcome the infection by

  14. A Urokinase Receptor-Bim Signaling Axis Emerges During EGFR Inhibitor Resistance in Mutant EGFR Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wykosky, Jill; Hu, Jingjing; Gomez, German G.; Taylor, Tiffany; Villa, Genaro R.; Pizzo, Donald; VandenBerg, Scott R.; Thorne, Amy Haseley; Chen, Clark C.; Mischel, Paul S.; Gonias, Steven. L.; Cavenee, Webster K.; Furnari, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    EGFR is the most common genetically altered oncogene in glioblastoma (GBM), but small molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have failed to yield durable clinical benefit. Here we show that in two novel model systems of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs, elevated expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) drives signaling through the MAPK pathway, which results in suppression of the pro-apoptotic BCL2-family member protein BIM (BCL2L11). In patient-derived GBM cells and genetic GBM models uPA is shown to suppress BIM levels through ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which can be reversed by siRNA mediated knockdown of uPA. TKI-resistant GBMs are re-sensitized to EGFR TKIs by pharmacological inhibition of MEK or a BH3 mimetic drug to replace BIM function. A link between the uPA-uPAR-ERK1/2 pathway and BIM has not been previously demonstrated in GBM, and involvement of this signaling axis in resistance provides rationale for a new strategy to target EGFR TKI-resistant GBM. PMID:25432173

  15. Functional Characterization of Cucumis metuliferus Proteinase Inhibitor Gene (CmSPI) in Potyviruses Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Su, Mei-Hsiu; Lin, Yu-Tsung; Chung, Chien-Hung; Ku, Hsin-Mei

    2015-07-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are ubiquitous proteins that block the active center or interact allosterically with proteinases and are involved in plant physiological processes and defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The CmSPI gene identified from Cucumis metuliferus encodes a serine type PI (8 kDa) that belongs to potato I type family. To evaluate the effect of silencing CmSPI gene on Papaya ringspot virus resistance, RNA interference (RNAi) with an inter-space hairpin RNA (ihpRNA) construct was introduced into a PRSV-resistant C. metuliferus line. CmSPI was down-regulated in CmSPI RNAi transgenic lines in which synchronously PRSV symptoms were evident at 21 day post inoculation. Alternatively, heterogeneous expression of CmSPI in Nicotiana benthamiana was also conducted and showed that CmSPI can provide resistance to Potato virus Y, another member of Potyvirus, in transgenic N. benthamiana lines. This study demonstrated that CmSPI plays an important role in resistant function against potyviruses in C. metuliferus and N. benthamiana. PMID:26184285

  16. Functional Characterization of Cucumis metuliferus Proteinase Inhibitor Gene (CmSPI) in Potyviruses Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Su, Mei-Hsiu; Lin, Yu-Tsung; Chung, Chien-Hung; Ku, Hsin-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are ubiquitous proteins that block the active center or interact allosterically with proteinases and are involved in plant physiological processes and defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The CmSPI gene identified from Cucumis metuliferus encodes a serine type PI (8 kDa) that belongs to potato I type family. To evaluate the effect of silencing CmSPI gene on Papaya ringspot virus resistance, RNA interference (RNAi) with an inter-space hairpin RNA (ihpRNA) construct was introduced into a PRSV-resistant C. metuliferus line. CmSPI was down-regulated in CmSPI RNAi transgenic lines in which synchronously PRSV symptoms were evident at 21 day post inoculation. Alternatively, heterogeneous expression of CmSPI in Nicotiana benthamiana was also conducted and showed that CmSPI can provide resistance to Potato virus Y, another member of Potyvirus, in transgenic N. benthamiana lines. This study demonstrated that CmSPI plays an important role in resistant function against potyviruses in C. metuliferus and N. benthamiana. PMID:26184285

  17. The Need for Development of New HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors in the Aftermath of Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) involves combinations of drugs to achieve maximal virological response and reduce the potential for the emergence of antiviral resistance. There are two broad classes of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Since the first classes of such compounds were developed, viral resistance against them has necessitated the continuous development of novel compounds within each class. This paper considers the NRTIs and NNRTIs currently in both preclinical and clinical development or approved for second line therapy and describes the patterns of resistance associated with their use, as well as the underlying mechanisms that have been described. Due to reasons of both affordability and availability, some reverse transcriptase inhibitors with low genetic barrier are more commonly used in resource-limited settings. Their use results to the emergence of specific patterns of antiviral resistance and so may require specific actions to preserve therapeutic options for patients in such settings. More recently, the advent of integrase strand transfer inhibitors represents another major step forward toward control of HIV infection, but these compounds are also susceptible to problems of HIV drug resistance. PMID:24278679

  18. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, fibroblast apoptosis resistance, and aging-related susceptibility to lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Tan; Akhter, Hasina; Jiang, Chunsun; MacEwen, Mark; Ding, Qiang; Antony, Veena; Thannickal, Victor John; Liu, Rui-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal lung disorder with unknown cause and no effective treatment. The incidence of and mortality from IPF increase with age, suggesting that advanced age is a major risk factor for IPF. The mechanism underlying the increased susceptibility of the elderly to IPF, however, is unknown. In this study, we show for the first time that the protein level of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a protease inhibitor which plays an essential role in the control of fibrinolysis, was significantly increased with age in mouse lung homogenate and lung fibroblasts. Upon bleomycin challenge, old mice experienced augmented PAI-1 induction and lung fibrosis as compared to young mice. Most interestingly, we show that fewer (myo)fibroblasts underwent apoptosis and more (myo)fibroblasts with increased level of PAI-1 accumulated in the lung of old than in young mice after bleomycin challenge. In vitro studies further demonstrate that fibroblasts isolated from lungs of old mice were resistant to H2O2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis and had augmented fibrotic responses to TGF-β1, compared to fibroblasts isolated from young mice. Inhibition of PAI-1 activity with a PAI-1 inhibitor, on the other hand, eliminated the aging-related apoptosis resistance and TGF-β1 sensitivity in isolated fibroblasts. Moreover, we show that knocking down PAI-1 in human lung fibroblasts with PAI-1 siRNA significantly increased their sensitivity to apoptosis and inhibited their responses to TGF-β1. Together, the results suggest that increased PAI-1 expression may underlie the aging-related sensitivity to lung fibrosis in part by protecting fibroblasts from apoptosis.

  19. Mutations in G protein β subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L; Elpek, Kutlu G; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L; Rodig, Scott J; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Marto, Jarrod A; Weinstock, David M; Lane, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in genes encoding G protein α (Gα) subunits occur in 4-5% of all human cancers, but oncogenic alterations in Gβ subunits have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors and disrupt Gα interactions with the Gβγ dimer. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered partly on the basis of lineage; for example, all 11 GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms, and seven of eight GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 variants in Cdkn2a-deficient mouse bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, mutations in the gene encoding GNB1 co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including the BCR-ABL fusion protein, the V617F substitution in JAK2 and the V600K substitution in BRAF. Coexpression of patient-derived GNB1 variants with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 alterations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  20. Enhancement of antibiotic activity by efflux inhibitors against multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Tatiane; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Maschmann, Raquel; Ramos, Daniela; von Groll, Andrea; Rossetti, Maria L.; Silva, Pedro A.; Viveiros, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis continues to increase and new approaches for its treatment are necessary. The identification of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates presenting efflux as part of their resistant phenotype has a major impact in tuberculosis treatment. In this work, we used a checkerboard procedure combined with the tetrazolium microplate-based assay (TEMA) to study single combinations between antituberculosis drugs and efflux inhibitors (EIs) against multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates using the fully susceptible strain H37Rv as reference. Efflux activity was studied on a real-time basis by a fluorometric method that uses ethidium bromide as efflux substrate. Quantification of efflux pump genes mRNA transcriptional levels were performed by RT-qPCR. The fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC) indicated synergistic activity for the interactions between isoniazid, rifampicin, amikacin, ofloxacin, and ethidium bromide plus the EIs verapamil, thioridazine and chlorpromazine. The FICs ranged from 0.25, indicating a four-fold reduction on the MICs, to 0.015, 64-fold reduction. The detection of active efflux by real-time fluorometry showed that all strains presented intrinsic efflux activity that contributes to the overall resistance which can be inhibited in the presence of the EIs. The quantification of the mRNA levels of the most important efflux pump genes on these strains shows that they are intrinsically predisposed to expel toxic compounds as the exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics were not necessary to increase the pump mRNA levels when compared with the non-exposed counterpart. The results obtained in this study confirm that the intrinsic efflux activity contributes to the overall resistance in multidrug resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and that the inhibition of efflux pumps by the EIs can enhance the clinical effect of antibiotics that are their substrates. PMID:25972842

  1. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and insulin levels in various insulin resistance states.

    PubMed

    Scelles, V; Raccah, D; Alessi, M C; Vialle, J M; Juhan-Vague, I; Vague, P

    1992-01-01

    Among obese insulin resistant subjects plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI 1) levels are closely associated with fasting insulin levels in cross sectional as well as intervention studies. Insulin concentration by itself does not seem to modulate PAI 1 levels at least in acute conditions. PAI 1 levels could be more directly related to the insulin resistant state than to hyperinsulinaemia. To elucidate further this phenomenon we compared insulin, triglyceride and PAI 1 levels in twenty control subjects and in three groups of patients presenting insulin resistance 14 obese subjects, 6 patients with Cushing disease and 7 with acromegaly. None of the tested subjects was diabetic. Fasting insulin levels were elevated in obese (21.4 +/- 8.0) hypercortisolic (20.3 +/- 11.0) and acromegalic patients (16.1 +/- 5.0) compared to controls (9.2 +/- 3.0 microU/ml, m +/- SD). PAI activity and PAI 1 antigen levels were elevated in the obese group only (34.3 +/- 13.0 for PAI 1 activity) and not in the others: 10.2 +/- 10.0, 7.0 +/- 4.6 I U/l for hypercortisolic and acromegalic patients respectively (normal controls 9.7 +/- 5.4). Triglyceride levels were also elevated among obese subjects 2.2 +/- 1.3 vs 1.1 +/- 0.4 mM/l in the controls; they were slightly higher than normal but not significantly in the hypercortisolic (1.5 +/- 0.6) and acromegalic (1.43 +/- 0.6 mM/l) patients. The mechanism of insulin resistance is different in the three conditions studied here. This may explain why elevated PAI 1 concentration are restricted to the common form of insulin resistance as seen in obese subjects. Therefore insulin resistant state per se is not associated with elevated PAI 1 levels.

  2. Transcriptional induction of GRP78/BiP by histone deacetylase inhibitors and resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Baumeister, Peter; Dong, Dezheng; Fu, Yong; Lee, Amy S.

    2009-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging as effective therapies in the treatment of cancer, and the role of HDACs in the regulation of promoters is rapidly expanding. GRP78/BiP is a stress inducible endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone with anti-apoptotic properties. We present here the mechanism for repression of the Grp78 promoter by histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). Our studies reveal that HDAC inhibitors specifically induce GRP78, and the induction level is amplified by ER stress. Through mutational analysis, we have identified the minimal Grp78 promoter and specific elements responsible for HDAC-mediated repression. We show the involvement of HDAC1 in the negative regulation of the Grp78 promoter not only by its induction in the presence of the HDAC inhibitors trichostatin A and MS-275, but also by exogenous overexpression and siRNA knockdown of specific HDACs. We present the results of chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis that reveals the binding of HDAC1 to the Grp78 promoter before but not after ER stress. Furthermore, overexpression of GRP78 confers resistance to HDAC inhibitor induced apoptosis in cancer cells and, conversely, suppression of GRP78 sensitizes them to HDAC inhibitor. These results define HDAC inhibitors as new agents that upregulate GRP78 without concomitantly inducing the ER or heat shock stress response, and suppression of GRP78 in tumors may provide a novel, adjunctive option to enhance anti-cancer therapies that utilize these compounds. PMID:19417144

  3. Overcoming multidrug resistance in Dox-resistant neuroblastoma cell lines via treatment with HPMA copolymer conjugates containing anthracyclines and P-gp inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Koziolová, Eva; Janoušková, Olga; Cuchalová, Lucie; Hvězdová, Zuzana; Hraběta, Jan; Eckschlager, Tomáš; Sivák, Ladislav; Ulbrich, Karel; Etrych, Tomáš; Šubr, Vladimír

    2016-07-10

    Water-soluble N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer conjugates bearing the anticancer drugs doxorubicin (Dox) or pirarubicin (THP), P-gp inhibitors derived from reversin 121 (REV) or ritonavir (RIT)), or both anticancer drug and P-gp inhibitor were designed and synthesized. All biologically active molecules were attached to the polymer carrier via pH-sensitive spacer enabling controlled release in mild acidic environment modeling endosomes and lysosomes of tumor cells. The cytotoxicity of the conjugates against three sensitive and Dox-resistant neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines, applied alone or in combination, was studied in vitro. All conjugates containing THP displayed higher cytotoxicity against all three Dox-resistant NB cell lines compared with the corresponding Dox-containing conjugates. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of conjugates containing both drug and P-gp inhibitor was up to 10 times higher than that of the conjugate containing only drug. In general, the polymer-drug conjugates showed higher cytotoxicity when conjugates containing inhibitors were added 8 or 16h prior to treatment compared with conjugates bearing both the inhibitor and the drug. The difference in cytotoxicity was more pronounced at the 16-h time point. Moreover, higher inhibitor:drug ratios resulted in higher cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity of the polymer-drug used in combination with polymer P-gp inhibitor was up to 84 times higher than that of the polymer-drug alone. PMID:27189135

  4. Biochemical Effect of Resistance Mutations against Synergistic Inhibitors of RSV RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Amy; Stevens, Sarah K.; Jordan, Paul C.; Gromova, Tatiana; Taylor, Joshua S.; Hong, Jin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Guangyi; Dyatkina, Natalia; Prhavc, Marija; Symons, Julian A.; Beigelman, Leo

    2016-01-01

    ALS-8112 is the parent molecule of ALS-8176, a first-in-class nucleoside analog prodrug effective in the clinic against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The antiviral activity of ALS-8112 is mediated by its 5'-triphosphate metabolite (ALS-8112-TP, or 2'F-4'ClCH2-cytidine triphosphate) inhibiting the RNA polymerase activity of the RSV L-P protein complex through RNA chain termination. Four amino acid mutations in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of L (QUAD: M628L, A789V, L795I, and I796V) confer in vitro resistance to ALS-8112-TP by increasing its discrimination relative to natural CTP. In this study, we show that the QUAD mutations specifically recognize the ClCH2 group of ALS-8112-TP. Among the four mutations, A789V conferred the greatest resistance phenotype, which was consistent with its putative position in the active site of the RdRp domain. AZ-27, a non-nucleoside inhibitor of RSV, also inhibited the RdRp activity, with decreased inhibition potency in the presence of the Y1631H mutation. The QUAD mutations had no effect on the antiviral activity of AZ-27, and the Y1631H mutation did not significantly increase the discrimination of ALS-8112-TP. Combining ALS-8112 with AZ-27 in vitro resulted in significant synergistic inhibition of RSV replication. Overall, this is the first mechanistic study showing a lack of cross-resistance between mutations selected by different classes of RSV polymerase inhibitors acting in synergy, opening the door to future potential combination therapies targeting different regions of the L protein. PMID:27163448

  5. Biochemical Effect of Resistance Mutations against Synergistic Inhibitors of RSV RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Deval, Jerome; Fung, Amy; Stevens, Sarah K; Jordan, Paul C; Gromova, Tatiana; Taylor, Joshua S; Hong, Jin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Guangyi; Dyatkina, Natalia; Prhavc, Marija; Symons, Julian A; Beigelman, Leo

    2016-01-01

    ALS-8112 is the parent molecule of ALS-8176, a first-in-class nucleoside analog prodrug effective in the clinic against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The antiviral activity of ALS-8112 is mediated by its 5'-triphosphate metabolite (ALS-8112-TP, or 2'F-4'ClCH2-cytidine triphosphate) inhibiting the RNA polymerase activity of the RSV L-P protein complex through RNA chain termination. Four amino acid mutations in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of L (QUAD: M628L, A789V, L795I, and I796V) confer in vitro resistance to ALS-8112-TP by increasing its discrimination relative to natural CTP. In this study, we show that the QUAD mutations specifically recognize the ClCH2 group of ALS-8112-TP. Among the four mutations, A789V conferred the greatest resistance phenotype, which was consistent with its putative position in the active site of the RdRp domain. AZ-27, a non-nucleoside inhibitor of RSV, also inhibited the RdRp activity, with decreased inhibition potency in the presence of the Y1631H mutation. The QUAD mutations had no effect on the antiviral activity of AZ-27, and the Y1631H mutation did not significantly increase the discrimination of ALS-8112-TP. Combining ALS-8112 with AZ-27 in vitro resulted in significant synergistic inhibition of RSV replication. Overall, this is the first mechanistic study showing a lack of cross-resistance between mutations selected by different classes of RSV polymerase inhibitors acting in synergy, opening the door to future potential combination therapies targeting different regions of the L protein. PMID:27163448

  6. Second-Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (Tki) as Salvage Therapy for Resistant or Intolerant Patients to Prior TKIs.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of target therapies, imatinib became the mainstay for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. However, despite the brilliant results obtained with this drug, more than 30% of patients discontinue therapy in long-term due to several reasons, including failure and/or intolerance. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are more potent drugs and have expanded inhibition against a broad spectrum of mutations resistant to imatinib. Both nilotinib and dasatinib have demonstrated in vitro and in vivo clinical activity against different types of mutations and various forms of resistance. However, patients with T315I mutation do not obtain an advantage from these drugs and a third generation inhibitor ponatinib, a pan-BCR drug, was tested with significant results. In this review, we report the results of second-and third-generation TKIs tested as second or third line therapy in patients resistant and/or intolerant to previous inhibitors.

  7. Characterization of irreversible kinase inhibitors by directly detecting covalent bond formation: a tool for dissecting kinase drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Klüter, Sabine; Simard, Jeffrey R; Rode, Haridas B; Grütter, Christian; Pawar, Vijaykumar; Raaijmakers, Hans C A; Barf, Tjeerd A; Rabiller, Matthias; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Rauh, Daniel

    2010-12-10

    Targeting protein kinases in cancer therapy with irreversible small-molecule inhibitors is moving to the forefront of kinase-inhibitor research and is thought to be an effective means of overcoming mutation-associated drug resistance in epidermal growth factor receptor kinase (EGFR). We generated a detection technique that allows direct measurements of covalent bond formation without relying on kinase activity, thereby allowing the straightforward investigation of the influence of steric clashes on covalent inhibitors in different resistant kinase mutants. The obtained results are discussed together with structural biology and biochemical studies of catalytic activity in both wild-type and gatekeeper mutated kinase variants to draw conclusions about the impact of steric hindrance and increased catalytic activity in drug-resistant kinase variants. PMID:21080395

  8. Second-Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (Tki) as Salvage Therapy for Resistant or Intolerant Patients to Prior TKIs.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of target therapies, imatinib became the mainstay for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. However, despite the brilliant results obtained with this drug, more than 30% of patients discontinue therapy in long-term due to several reasons, including failure and/or intolerance. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are more potent drugs and have expanded inhibition against a broad spectrum of mutations resistant to imatinib. Both nilotinib and dasatinib have demonstrated in vitro and in vivo clinical activity against different types of mutations and various forms of resistance. However, patients with T315I mutation do not obtain an advantage from these drugs and a third generation inhibitor ponatinib, a pan-BCR drug, was tested with significant results. In this review, we report the results of second-and third-generation TKIs tested as second or third line therapy in patients resistant and/or intolerant to previous inhibitors. PMID:24455112

  9. Medial amygdalar aromatase neurons regulate aggression in both sexes

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Elizabeth K.; Burke, Kenneth J.; Yang, Cindy F.; Bender, Kevin J.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Shah, Nirao M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Aromatase-expressing neuroendocrine neurons in the vertebrate male brain synthesize estradiol from circulating testosterone. This locally produced estradiol controls neural circuits underlying courtship vocalization, mating, aggression, and territory marking in male mice. How aromatase-expressing neuronal populations control these diverse estrogen-dependent male behaviors is poorly understood, and the function, if any, of aromatase-expressing neurons in females is unclear. Using targeted genetic approaches, we show that aromatase-expressing neurons within the male posterodorsal medial amygdala (MeApd) regulate components of aggression but not other estrogen-dependent male-typical behaviors. Remarkably, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons in females are specifically required for components of maternal aggression, which we show is distinct from intermale aggression in pattern and execution. Thus, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons control distinct forms of aggression in the two sexes. Moreover, our findings indicate that complex social behaviors are separable in a modular manner at the level of genetically identified neuronal populations. PMID:25620703

  10. Medial amygdalar aromatase neurons regulate aggression in both sexes.

    PubMed

    Unger, Elizabeth K; Burke, Kenneth J; Yang, Cindy F; Bender, Kevin J; Fuller, Patrick M; Shah, Nirao M

    2015-02-01

    Aromatase-expressing neuroendocrine neurons in the vertebrate male brain synthesize estradiol from circulating testosterone. This locally produced estradiol controls neural circuits underlying courtship vocalization, mating, aggression, and territory marking in male mice. How aromatase-expressing neuronal populations control these diverse estrogen-dependent male behaviors is poorly understood, and the function, if any, of aromatase-expressing neurons in females is unclear. Using targeted genetic approaches, we show that aromatase-expressing neurons within the male posterodorsal medial amygdala (MeApd) regulate components of aggression, but not other estrogen-dependent male-typical behaviors. Remarkably, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons in females are specifically required for components of maternal aggression, which we show is distinct from intermale aggression in pattern and execution. Thus, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons control distinct forms of aggression in the two sexes. Moreover, our findings indicate that complex social behaviors are separable in a modular manner at the level of genetically identified neuronal populations.

  11. PF-06463922, an ALK/ROS1 inhibitor, overcomes resistance to 1st and 2nd generation ALK inhibitors in pre-clinical models

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Helen Y.; Friboulet, Luc; Kodack, David P.; Engstrom, Lars D.; Li, Qiuhua; West, Melissa; Tang, Ruth W.; Wang, Hui; Tsaparikos, Konstantinos; Wang, Jinwei; Timofeevski, Sergei; Katayama, Ryohei; Dinh, Dac M.; Lam, Hieu; Lam, Justine L.; Yamazaki, Shinji; Hu, Wenyue; Patel, Bhushankumar; Bezwada, Divya; Frias, Rosa L.; Lifshits, Eugene; Mahmood, Sidra; Gainor, Justin F.; Affolter, Timothy; Lappin, Patrick B.; Gukasyan, Hovhannes; Lee, Nathan; Deng, Shibing; Jain, Rakesh K; Johnson, Ted W.; Shaw, Alice T.; Fantin, Valeria R.; Smeal, Tod

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the preclinical evaluation of PF-06463922, a potent and brain penetrant ALK/ROS1 inhibitor. Compared to other clinically available ALK inhibitors, PF-06463922 displayed superior potency against all known clinically acquired ALK mutations, including the highly resistant G1202R mutant. Furthermore, PF-06463922 treatment led to regression of EML4-ALK driven brain metastases, leading to prolonged mouse survival, in a superior manner. Finally, PF-06463922 demonstrated high selectivity and safety margins in a variety of preclinical studies. These results suggest that PF-06463922 will be highly effective for the treatment of patients with ALK-driven lung cancers, including those who relapsed on clinically available ALK inhibitors due to secondary ALK kinase domain mutations and/or due to the failed control of brain metastases. PMID:26144315

  12. Prevalence of Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors (INSTI) Resistance Mutations in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sui-Yuan; Lin, Pi-Han; Cheng, Chien-Lin; Chen, Mao-Yuan; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Hsieh, Szu-Min; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Su, Yi-Ching; Su, Li-Hsin; Chang, Shu-Fang; Liu, Wen-Chun; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy containing an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) plus two NRTIs has become the recommended treatment for antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected patients in the updated guidelines. We aimed to determine the prevalence of INSTI-related mutations in Taiwan. Genotypic resistance assays were performed on plasma from ARV-naïve patients (N = 948), ARV-experienced but INSTI-naive patients (N = 359), and raltegravir-experienced patients (N = 63) from 2006 to 2015. Major INSTI mutations were defined according to the IAS-USA list and other substitutions with a Stanford HIVdb score ≧ 10 to at least one INSTI were defined as minor mutations. Of 1307 HIV-1 samples from patients never exposed to INSTIs, the overall prevalence of major resistance mutations to INSTIs was 0.9% (n = 12), with an increase to 1.2% in 2013. Of these 12 sequences, 11 harboured Q148H/K/R, one Y143R, and none N155H. Of 30 sequences (47.6%) with INSTI-resistant mutations from raltegravir-experienced patients, 17 harboured Q148H/K/R, 8 N155H, and 6 Y143C/R. Other than these major mutations, the prevalence of minor mutations were 5.3% and 38.1%, respectively, in ARV-naive and raltegravir-experienced patients. The overall prevalence of INSTI mutations remains low in Taiwan. Surveillance of INSTI resistance is warranted due to circulation of polymorphisms contributing to INSTI resistance and expected increasing use of INSTIs. PMID:27779200

  13. Genetic correlates of in vivo viral resistance to indinavir, a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Condra, J H; Holder, D J; Schleif, W A; Blahy, O M; Danovich, R M; Gabryelski, L J; Graham, D J; Laird, D; Quintero, J C; Rhodes, A; Robbins, H L; Roth, E; Shivaprakash, M; Yang, T; Chodakewitz, J A; Deutsch, P J; Leavitt, R Y; Massari, F E; Mellors, J W; Squires, K E; Steigbigel, R T; Teppler, H; Emini, E A

    1996-01-01

    Indinavir (IDV) (also called CRIXIVAN, MK-639, or L-735,524) is a potent and selective inhibitor of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease. During early clinical trials, in which patients initiated therapy with suboptimal dosages of IDV, we monitored the emergence of viral resistance to the inhibitor by genotypic and phenotypic characterization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Development of resistance coincided with variable patterns of multiple substitutions among at least 11 protease amino acid residues. No single substitution was present in all resistant isolates, indicating that resistance evolves through multiple genetic pathways. Despite this complexity, all of 29 resistant isolates tested exhibited alteration of residues M-46 (to I or L) and/or V-82 (to A, F, or T), suggesting that screening of these residues may be useful in predicting the emergence of resistance. We also extended our previous finding that IDV-resistant viral variants exhibit various patterns of cross-resistance to a diverse panel of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Finally, we noted an association between the number of protease amino acid substitutions and the observed level of IDV resistance. No single substitution or pair of substitutions tested gave rise to measurable viral resistance to IDV. The evolution of this resistance was found to be cumulative, indicating the need for ongoing viral replication in this process. These observations strongly suggest that therapy should be initiated with the most efficacious regimen available, both to suppress viral spread and to inhibit the replication that is required for the evolution of resistance. PMID:8970946

  14. Management of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients Resistant to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Agnieszka; Uharek, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder associated with a characteristic chromosomal translocation called the Philadelphia chromosome. This oncogene is generated by the fusion of breakpoint cluster region (BCR) and Abelson leukemia virus (ABL) genes and encodes a novel fusion gene translating into a protein with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. The discovery and introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) irreversibly changed the landscape of CML treatment, leading to dramatic improvement in long-term survival rates. The majority of patients with CML in the chronic phase have a life expectancy comparable with that of healthy age-matched individuals. Although an enormous therapeutic improvement has been accomplished, there are still some unresolved issues in the treatment of patients with CML. One of the most important problems is based on the fact that TKIs can efficiently target proliferating mature cells but do not eradicate leukemic stem cells, allowing persistence of the malignant clone. Owing to the resistance mechanisms arising during the course of the disease, treatment with most of the approved BCR-ABL1 TKIs may become ineffective in a proportion of patients. This article highlights the different molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance being developed during treatment with TKIs as well as the pharmacological strategies to overcome it. Moreover, it gives an overview of novel drugs and therapies that are aiming in overcoming drug resistance, loss of response, and kinase domain mutations. PMID:26917943

  15. Identification of quinones as HER2 inhibitors for the treatment of trastuzumab resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; Sfondouris, Mary E; Bratton, Melyssa R; Nguyen, Thuy-Linh K; Townley, Ian; Klein Stevens, Cheryl L; Jones, Frank E

    2014-01-01

    HER2 overexpression is associated with aggressive breast cancer with high recurrence rate and poor patient prognosis. Treatment of HER2 overexpressing patients with the HER2 targeting therapy trastuzumab results in acquired resistance within a year. The HER2/EGFR dual kinase inhibitor lapatinib was shown to inhibit some trastuzumab resistant breast cancer cell lines and is currently in clinical trials. Our group has found two new quinone compounds that show excellent inhibition of breast tumor cells expressing HER2 or the trastuzumab resistant HER2 oncogenic isoform, HER2Δ16. Compound 4 ((1R,2S,3S)-1,2,3,5,8-pentahydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroanthracene-9,10-dione) and compound 5 (5,8-dihydroxy-2,3-bis(hydroxymethyl)naphthalene-1,4-dione) showed sub-micromolar inhibition potency against these cell lines. These compounds also inhibit auto-phosphorylation of the Y1248 and Y1068 residues of HER2 and EGFR, respectively.

  16. γ-Secretase inhibitor-resistant glioblastoma stem cells require RBPJ to propagate.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing

    2016-07-01

    Targeting glioblastoma stem cells with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) disrupts the Notch pathway and has shown some benefit in both pre-clinical models and in patients during phase I/II clinical trials. However, it is largely unknown why some glioblastoma (GBM) does not respond to GSI treatment. In this issue of the JCI, Xie et al. determined that GSI-resistant brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) from GBM express a higher level of the gene RBPJ, which encodes a mediator of canonical Notch signaling, compared to non-BTICs. Knockdown of RBPJ in BTICs decreased propagation in vitro and in vivo by inducing apoptosis. Interestingly, RBPJ was shown to regulate a different transcription program than Notch in BTICs by binding CDK9, thereby affecting Pol II-regulated transcript elongation. Targeting CDK9 or c-MYC, an upstream regulator of RBPJ, with small molecules also decreased BTIC propagation, and prolonged survival in mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts. This study not only provides a mechanism for GSI treatment resistance, but also identifies two potential therapeutic strategies to target GSI-resistant BTICs.

  17. Hyaluronic acid-bound letrozole nanoparticles restore sensitivity to letrozole-resistant xenograft tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Nair, Hareesh B; Huffman, Steven; Veerapaneni, Poornachand; Kirma, Nameer B; Binkley, Peter; Perla, Rao P; Evans, Dean B; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R

    2011-05-01

    Letrozole is a potent aromatase inhibitor and superior to other defined selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen in treating hormone-responsive postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Patients who receive this drug may become insensitive to the effects of estrogen deprivation induced by letrozole. Letrozole has known side effects on bone metabolism due to systemic ablation of estrogen production. The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic efficacy of hyaluronic acid-bound letrozole nanoparticles (HA-Letr-NPs) in restoring sensitivity to letrozole-resistant (LTLT-Ca) cells. To target letrozole to LTLT-Ca cells, hyaluronic acid-bound letrozole nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation using biodegradable PLGA-PEG co-polymer. Binding specificity of HA to CD44 on the cell surface was analyzed in vitro using FITC-CD44 Ab and CD44 siRNA by flow cytometry. Effects on in vitro cytotoxicity and aromatase enzymatic activity of HA-Letr-NPs were performed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, MCF-7 cells over-expressing aromatase (MCF-7/Aro), and LTLT-Ca cells resistant to letrozole. Preclinical efficacy of HA-Letr-NPs was examined in mice using LTLT-Ca xenograft tumors. HA-Letr-NPs were restricted to a maximum size of 100 nm. The in vitro drug release assay showed that the highest released concentration of letrozole occurred after 23 hours at 37 degrees C in phosphate-buffered saline. HA-Letr-NPs on MCF-7/Aro and LTLT-Ca cells showed an IC50 of 2 microM and 5 microM, respectively. HA-Letr-NPs were more efficacious in inhibiting tumor growth, reducing in vitro cellular and in vivo tumor aromatase enzyme activity more than the corresponding Letr-NPs or letrozole. HA-Letr-NPs restored and maintained a prolonged sensitivity and targeted delivery of letrozole in letrozole-resistant tumors in vivo. PMID:21780370

  18. Aromatase deficiency in a Chinese adult man caused by novel compound heterozygous CYP19A1 mutations: Effects of estrogen replacement therapy on the bone, lipid, liver and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhike; Wang, Ou; Nie, Min; Elison, Kathleen; Zhou, Dujin; Li, Mei; Jiang, Yan; Xia, Weibo; Meng, Xunwu; Chen, Shiuan; Xing, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Aromatase deficiency is a rare disorder resulting in estrogen insufficiency in humans. It has been reported in remarkably few men with loss-of-function mutations in the CYP19A1 gene encoding the aromatase, a cytochrome P450 enzyme that plays a crucial role in the biosynthesis of estrogens from androgens. We investigated a non-consanguineous family including an adult man with clinical features of aromatase deficiency, and studied the effects of estrogen replacement in the man. Methods We investigated the clinical and biochemical phenotype, performed CYP19A1 mutational analysis in the family and 50 unrelated persons, studied the effects of CYP19A1 mutations on aromatase protein structure, functionally characterized the mutations by cell-based aromatase activity assays, and studied the effects of estrogen replacement on the bone, lipid, liver and glucose metabolism. Results The man with clinical features of aromatase deficiency had novel compound heterozygous CYP19A1 mutations (Y81C and L451P) that were not found in 50 unrelated persons. Three-dimensional modeling predicted that Y81C and L451P mutants disrupted protein structure. Functional studies on the basis of in vitro expression showed that Y81C and L45P mutants significantly decreased the aromatase activity and catalytic efficiency. Estrogen replacement in the man increased bone mineral density, accelerated bone maturation, improved lipid profile and liver steatosis, and improved glucose levels but not insulin resistance. Conclusions We have identified two novel CYP19A1 missense mutations in an aromatase-deficient man. Estrogen replacement in the man shows great impact on recovering the impairments in the bone, lipid, liver and glucose metabolism, but fails to improve insulin resistance. PMID:25301327

  19. Genetic variation and relationships of constitutive and herbivore-induced glucosinolates, trypsin inhibitors, and herbivore resistance in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Cipollini, Donald F; Busch, Jeremiah W; Stowe, Kirk A; Simms, Ellen L; Bergelson, Joy

    2003-02-01

    We examined genetic variation in inducibility and in constitutive and herbivore-induced levels of glucosinolates, trypsin inhibitors, and resistance to herbivory in families of Brassica rapa originating from a wild population. We also examined phenotypic and genetic correlations among absolute levels of these traits in control and induced plants. We grew seedlings of 10 half-sib families in pairs in pots, and exposed one plant per pair to folivory by Trichoplusia ni larvae. Two days later, we sampled all plants for total glucosinolate and trypsin inhibitor levels and examined the preference and consumption by T. ni larvae of previously damaged (induced) and undamaged (control) plants. There was no significant variation among sire families in the induction of glucosinolates or trypsin inhibitors by T. ni feeding. Total glucosinolate levels in either control or induced plants did not vary by family. In contrast, trypsin inhibitor levels in both control and induced plants varied significantly by family. Trichoplusia ni fed less on induced plants than on control plants in the bioassay, but neither the induction of resistance by prior T. ni feeding nor absolute levels of damage done to control and induced plants varied significantly by sire family. Temporal blocking strongly affected trypsin inhibitor levels and the response of some families in the bioassays. There were no significant phenotypic or genetic correlations of levels of glucosinolates or trypsin inhibitors with each other or with damage in either control or induced plants. Overall, these results suggest that in the B. rapa population that we studied, both total glucosinolate content and biological resistance to herbivory by T. ni was nonvariable and almost universally inducible by prior T. ni feeding. In contrast, control and induced levels of trypsin inhibitors varied genetically and have the capacity to respond to future selection imposed by herbivores. However, the role of these defenses in constitutive

  20. Antitumor activity of pimasertib, a selective MEK 1/2 inhibitor, in combination with PI3K/mTOR inhibitors or with multi-targeted kinase inhibitors in pimasertib-resistant human lung and colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; D'Aiuto, Elena; Morgillo, Floriana; Vitagliano, Donata; Capasso, Anna; Costantino, Sarah; Ciuffreda, Loreta Pia; Merolla, Francesco; Vecchione, Loredana; De Vriendt, Veerle; Tejpar, Sabine; Nappi, Anna; Sforza, Vincenzo; Martini, Giulia; Berrino, Liberato; De Palma, Raffaele; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2013-11-01

    The RAS/RAF/MEK/MAPK and the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways are key regulators of proliferation and survival in human cancer cells. Selective inhibitors of different transducer molecules in these pathways have been developed as molecular targeted anti-cancer therapies. The in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity of pimasertib, a selective MEK 1/2 inhibitor, alone or in combination with a PI3K inhibitor (PI3Ki), a mTOR inhibitor (everolimus), or with multi-targeted kinase inhibitors (sorafenib and regorafenib), that block also BRAF and CRAF, were tested in a panel of eight human lung and colon cancer cell lines. Following pimasertib treatment, cancer cell lines were classified as pimasertib-sensitive (IC50 for cell growth inhibition of 0.001 µM) or pimasertib-resistant. Evaluation of basal gene expression profiles by microarrays identified several genes that were up-regulated in pimasertib-resistant cancer cells and that were involved in both RAS/RAF/MEK/MAPK and PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways. Therefore, a series of combination experiments with pimasertib and either PI3Ki, everolimus, sorafenib or regorafenib were conducted, demonstrating a synergistic effect in cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis with sustained blockade in MAPK- and AKT-dependent signaling pathways in pimasertib-resistant human colon carcinoma (HCT15) and lung adenocarcinoma (H1975) cells. Finally, in nude mice bearing established HCT15 and H1975 subcutaneous tumor xenografts, the combined treatment with pimasertib and BEZ235 (a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor) or with sorafenib caused significant tumor growth delays and increase in mice survival as compared to single agent treatment. These results suggest that dual blockade of MAPK and PI3K pathways could overcome intrinsic resistance to MEK inhibition.

  1. A Cell-Based Assay for Measuring Endogenous BcrAbl Kinase Activity and Inhibitor Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Steven B; Noel, Brett M; Parker, Laurie L

    2016-01-01

    Kinase enzymes are an important class of drug targets, particularly in cancer. Cell-based kinase assays are needed to understand how potential kinase inhibitors act on their targets in a physiologically relevant context. Current cell-based kinase assays rely on antibody-based detection of endogenous substrates, inaccurate disease models, or indirect measurements of drug action. Here we expand on previous work from our lab to introduce a 96-well plate compatible approach for measuring cell-based kinase activity in disease-relevant human chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines using an exogenously added, multi-functional peptide substrate. Our cellular models natively express the BcrAbl oncogene and are either sensitive or have acquired resistance to well-characterized BcrAbl tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This approach measures IC50 values comparable to established methods of assessing drug potency, and its robustness indicates that it can be employed in drug discovery applications. This medium-throughput assay could bridge the gap between single target focused, high-throughput in vitro assays and lower-throughput cell-based follow-up experiments. PMID:27598410

  2. A Cell-Based Assay for Measuring Endogenous BcrAbl Kinase Activity and Inhibitor Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Steven B.; Noel, Brett M.; Parker, Laurie L.

    2016-01-01

    Kinase enzymes are an important class of drug targets, particularly in cancer. Cell-based kinase assays are needed to understand how potential kinase inhibitors act on their targets in a physiologically relevant context. Current cell-based kinase assays rely on antibody-based detection of endogenous substrates, inaccurate disease models, or indirect measurements of drug action. Here we expand on previous work from our lab to introduce a 96-well plate compatible approach for measuring cell-based kinase activity in disease-relevant human chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines using an exogenously added, multi-functional peptide substrate. Our cellular models natively express the BcrAbl oncogene and are either sensitive or have acquired resistance to well-characterized BcrAbl tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This approach measures IC50 values comparable to established methods of assessing drug potency, and its robustness indicates that it can be employed in drug discovery applications. This medium-throughput assay could bridge the gap between single target focused, high-throughput in vitro assays and lower-throughput cell-based follow-up experiments. PMID:27598410

  3. Aromatase activity after a short-course of letrozole administration in adult men at sea level and at high altitude (with or without excessive erythrocytosis).

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Tapia, V; Gasco, M; Gonzales-Castañeda, C

    2012-02-01

    Men living at high altitudes in Peru compared to sea level counterparts have erythrocytosis (hemoglobin 16-21 g/dl) or excessive erythrocytosis (hemoglobin>21 g/dl). High testosterone (T) levels in men at high altitude (HA) were associated with excessive erythrocytosis. High androgen levels could be due to a low aromatase activity or to an elevated rate of conversion from precursors to testosterone. The aim of this study was to evaluate aromatase activity and rate of conversion from precursors to testosterone before and after administration of the aromatase enzyme inhibitor letrozole (5 mg/day) for a 5-day period to men at HA and at sea level (SL). The response to short term aromatase inhibition was assessed in 30 adult men living at sea level, 31 native men at HA with erythrocytosis (Hb 16-21 g/dl), and 35 men at HA with excessive erythrocytosis (Hb>21 g/dl). Serum hormone levels, estradiol/testosterone, testosterone/androstenedione, and testosterone/dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) ratios were measured. Men with erythrocytosis had lower basal serum T/androstenedione ratios than men with excessive erythrocytosis at HA and men at sea level. Men at HA with excessive erythrocytosis had higher T/DHEAS ratios than men with erythrocytosis and than those at sea level before and after letrozole administration. After letrozole administration, both groups of men at high altitude (with erythrocytosis or with excessive erythrocytosis) showed lower aromatase activities than those at sea level. In conclusion, higher serum testosterone levels in men with excessive erythrocytosis were associated with an increased rate of conversion from DHEAS to testosterone rather than to a lower aromatase activity.

  4. Bifendate-chalcone hybrids: a new class of potential dual inhibitors of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaoke; Ren, Zhiguang; Peng, Hui; Peng, Sixun; Zhang, Yihua

    2014-12-12

    We previously described bifendate-chalcone hybrids as potent P-glycoprotein inhibitors. In the present work, we determine whether these compounds could reverse breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2)-mediated multidrug resistance using HEK293/BCRP cells which was BCRP-transfected stable HEK293 cells. Results indicated that compounds 8d, 8f, 8g and 8h could significantly enhance mitoxantrone accumulation in HEK293/BCRP cells via inhibiting BCRP drug efflux function. The most active compound 8g exhibited little intrinsic cytotoxicity (IC₅₀>100 μM), and could reverse BCRP-mediated drug resistance independent of decreasing BCRP expression level. Notably, 8g had little inhibitory effect on multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), another drug efflux transporter. The present findings, together with the previous results, suggest that 8g might be act as dual inhibitors of P-gp and BCRP.

  5. Toremifene – Atamestane; Alone or In Combination: Predictions from the Preclinical Intratumoral Aromatase Model

    PubMed Central

    Sabnis, Gauri J; Macedo, Luciana; Goloubeva, Olga; Schayowitz, Adam; Zhu, Yue; Brodie, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Since most breast cancers occur in post-menopausal women and are hormone dependent, we developed a model system that mimics this situation. In this model, tumors of human estrogen receptor ER positive breast cancer cells stably transfected with aromatase (Ac-1) are grown in immune compromised mice. Using this model we have explored a number of therapeutic strategies to maximize the antitumor efficacy of antiestrogens (AEs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). This intratumoral aromatase xenograft model has proved accurate in predicting the outcome of several clinical trials. In this current study we compared the effect of an AE toremifene and steroidal AI atamestane, alone or in combination, on growth of hormone dependent human breast cancer. We have also compared toremifene plus atamestane combination with tamoxifen in this study. The growth of Ac-1 cells was inhibited by tamoxifen, toremifene and atamestane in vitro with IC50 values of 1.8±1.3μM, 1±0.3μM and 60.4±17.2μM, respectively. The combination of toremifene plus atamestane was found to be better than toremifene or atamestane alone in vitro. The effect of this combination was then studied in vivo using Ac-1 xenografts grown in ovariectomized female SCID mice. The mice were injected with toremifene (1000μg/day), atamestane (1000μg/day), tamoxifen (100μg/day), or the combination of toremifene plus atamestane. In this study, our results indicate that the combination of toremifene plus atamestane was as effective as toremifene or tamoxifen alone but may not provide any additional benefit over toremifene alone or tamoxifen alone. PMID:17942301

  6. Convergent loss of PTEN leads to clinical resistance to a PI(3)Kα inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Juric, Dejan; Castel, Pau; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Won, Helen H; Ellis, Haley; Ebbesen, Saya H; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Ramu, Avinash; Iyer, Gopa; Shah, Ronak H; Huynh, Tiffany; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Sgroi, Dennis; Isakoff, Steven; Thabet, Ashraf; Elamine, Leila; Solit, David B; Lowe, Scott W; Quadt, Cornelia; Peters, Malte; Derti, Adnan; Schegel, Robert; Huang, Alan; Mardis, Elaine R; Berger, Michael F; Baselga, José; Scaltriti, Maurizio

    2015-02-12

    Broad and deep tumour genome sequencing has shed new light on tumour heterogeneity and provided important insights into the evolution of metastases arising from different clones. There is an additional layer of complexity, in that tumour evolution may be influenced by selective pressure provided by therapy, in a similar fashion to that occurring in infectious diseases. Here we studied tumour genomic evolution in a patient (index patient) with metastatic breast cancer bearing an activating PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha, PI(3)Kα) mutation. The patient was treated with the PI(3)Kα inhibitor BYL719, which achieved a lasting clinical response, but the patient eventually became resistant to this drug (emergence of lung metastases) and died shortly thereafter. A rapid autopsy was performed and material from a total of 14 metastatic sites was collected and sequenced. All metastatic lesions, when compared to the pre-treatment tumour, had a copy loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) and those lesions that became refractory to BYL719 had additional and different PTEN genetic alterations, resulting in the loss of PTEN expression. To put these results in context, we examined six other patients also treated with BYL719. Acquired bi-allelic loss of PTEN was found in one of these patients, whereas in two others PIK3CA mutations present in the primary tumour were no longer detected at the time of progression. To characterize our findings functionally, we examined the effects of PTEN knockdown in several preclinical models (both in cell lines intrinsically sensitive to BYL719 and in PTEN-null xenografts derived from our index patient), which we found resulted in resistance to BYL719, whereas simultaneous PI(3)K p110β blockade reverted this resistance phenotype. We conclude that parallel genetic evolution of separate metastatic sites with different PTEN genomic alterations leads to a convergent PTEN-null phenotype resistant

  7. Catalytic efficiency of expressed aromatase following site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kadohama, N; Zhou, D; Chen, S; Osawa, Y

    1993-05-13

    Mutant aromatase cytochrome P-450s, expressed in CHO cells after transfection with cDNAs, have been characterized in terms of their catalytic efficiencies. After solubilization from microsomes, specific aromatase P-450 content of wild-type and mutants Pro308Phe, Asp309Asn, Asp309Ala and Phe406Arg was quantitated by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Microsomal aromatase activity was determined by the 3H-water method using [1 beta-3H]androstenedione as substrate. Estimations of the actual turnover rate (catalytic efficiency) were derived from the combined data. The P-450 content in the mutants varied but was always less than that in the wild type. Hence, the decreases in the Vmax observed in the mutant enzymes did not correlate completely with reductions in catalytic effectiveness. In recent studies on the structure-function relationship of aromatase cytochrome P-450, the observed reduction of enzyme activity in terms of Vmax following site-directed mutagenesis led to the assumption that there was a corresponding loss of catalytic effectiveness. The present study reveals that a lower P-450 content can contribute significantly to decreasing catalytic activity in the mutants. In fact, in mutant Phe406Arg which exhibited virtually no catalytically active aromatase, the specific P-450 content was below the detectable level. Because of its location, the result of this latter mutation could be a major structural perturbation of the heme-binding property. Thus, interpretation of losses and reductions in aromatase activity resulting from single amino-acid replacement should take into account changes in the specific content of aromatase cytochrome P-450.

  8. In Vitro Activity and Resistance Profile of Dasabuvir, a Nonnucleoside Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Koev, Gennadiy; Irvin, Michelle; Beyer, Jill; Liu, Yaya; Krishnan, Preethi; Reisch, Thomas; Mondal, Rubina; Wagner, Rolf; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Maring, Clarence; Collins, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Dasabuvir (ABT-333) is a nonnucleoside inhibitor of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase encoded by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B gene. Dasabuvir inhibited recombinant NS5B polymerases derived from HCV genotype 1a and 1b clinical isolates, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values between 2.2 and 10.7 nM, and was at least 7,000-fold selective for the inhibition of HCV genotype 1 polymerases over human/mammalian polymerases. In the HCV subgenomic replicon system, dasabuvir inhibited genotype 1a (strain H77) and 1b (strain Con1) replicons with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of 7.7 and 1.8 nM, respectively, with a 13-fold decrease in inhibitory activity in the presence of 40% human plasma. This level of activity was retained against a panel of chimeric subgenomic replicons that contained HCV NS5B genes from 22 genotype 1 clinical isolates from treatment-naive patients, with EC50s ranging between 0.15 and 8.57 nM. Maintenance of replicon-containing cells in medium containing dasabuvir at concentrations 10-fold or 100-fold greater than the EC50 resulted in selection of resistant replicon clones. Sequencing of the NS5B coding regions from these clones revealed the presence of variants, including C316Y, M414T, Y448C, Y448H, and S556G, that are consistent with binding to the palm I site of HCV polymerase. Consequently, dasabuvir retained full activity against replicons known to confer resistance to other polymerase inhibitors, including the S282T variant in the nucleoside binding site and the M423T, P495A, P495S, and V499A single variants in the thumb domain. The use of dasabuvir in combination with inhibitors targeting HCV NS3/NS4A protease (ABT-450 with ritonavir) and NS5A (ombitasvir) is in development for the treatment of HCV genotype 1 infections. PMID:25534735

  9. Investigate the Metabolic Reprogramming of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Enhanced Resistance to Mixed Fermentation Inhibitors via 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weihua; Chen, Yingying; Wei, Na; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    The fermentation inhibitors from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials, e.g., acetic acid and furfural, are notorious due to their negative effects on the cell growth and chemical production. However, the metabolic reprogramming of the cells under these stress conditions, especially metabolic response for resistance to mixed inhibitors, has not been systematically investigated and remains mysterious. Therefore, in this study, 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA), a powerful tool to elucidate the intracellular carbon flux distributions, has been applied to two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different tolerances to the inhibitors under acetic acid, furfural, and mixed (i.e., acetic acid and furfural) stress conditions to unravel the key metabolic responses. By analyzing the intracellular carbon fluxes as well as the energy and cofactor utilization under different conditions, we uncovered varied metabolic responses to different inhibitors. Under acetate stress, ATP and NADH production was slightly impaired, while NADPH tended towards overproduction. Under furfural stress, ATP and cofactors (including both NADH and NADPH) tended to be overproduced. However, under dual-stress condition, production of ATP and cofactors was severely impaired due to synergistic stress caused by the simultaneous addition of two fermentation inhibitors. Such phenomenon indicated the pivotal role of the energy and cofactor utilization in resisting the mixed inhibitors of acetic acid and furfural. Based on the discoveries, valuable insights are provided to improve the tolerance of S. cerevisiae strain and further enhance lignocellulosic fermentation.

  10. Investigate the Metabolic Reprogramming of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Enhanced Resistance to Mixed Fermentation Inhibitors via 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weihua; Chen, Yingying; Wei, Na; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    The fermentation inhibitors from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials, e.g., acetic acid and furfural, are notorious due to their negative effects on the cell growth and chemical production. However, the metabolic reprogramming of the cells under these stress conditions, especially metabolic response for resistance to mixed inhibitors, has not been systematically investigated and remains mysterious. Therefore, in this study, 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA), a powerful tool to elucidate the intracellular carbon flux distributions, has been applied to two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different tolerances to the inhibitors under acetic acid, furfural, and mixed (i.e., acetic acid and furfural) stress conditions to unravel the key metabolic responses. By analyzing the intracellular carbon fluxes as well as the energy and cofactor utilization under different conditions, we uncovered varied metabolic responses to different inhibitors. Under acetate stress, ATP and NADH production was slightly impaired, while NADPH tended towards overproduction. Under furfural stress, ATP and cofactors (including both NADH and NADPH) tended to be overproduced. However, under dual-stress condition, production of ATP and cofactors was severely impaired due to synergistic stress caused by the simultaneous addition of two fermentation inhibitors. Such phenomenon indicated the pivotal role of the energy and cofactor utilization in resisting the mixed inhibitors of acetic acid and furfural. Based on the discoveries, valuable insights are provided to improve the tolerance of S. cerevisiae strain and further enhance lignocellulosic fermentation. PMID:27532329

  11. Investigate the Metabolic Reprogramming of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Enhanced Resistance to Mixed Fermentation Inhibitors via 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weihua; Chen, Yingying; Wei, Na; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-01-01

    The fermentation inhibitors from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials, e.g., acetic acid and furfural, are notorious due to their negative effects on the cell growth and chemical production. However, the metabolic reprogramming of the cells under these stress conditions, especially metabolic response for resistance to mixed inhibitors, has not been systematically investigated and remains mysterious. Therefore, in this study, 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA), a powerful tool to elucidate the intracellular carbon flux distributions, has been applied to two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different tolerances to the inhibitors under acetic acid, furfural, and mixed (i.e., acetic acid and furfural) stress conditions to unravel the key metabolic responses. By analyzing the intracellular carbon fluxes as well as the energy and cofactor utilization under different conditions, we uncovered varied metabolic responses to different inhibitors. Under acetate stress, ATP and NADH production was slightly impaired, while NADPH tended towards overproduction. Under furfural stress, ATP and cofactors (including both NADH and NADPH) tended to be overproduced. However, under dual-stress condition, production of ATP and cofactors was severely impaired due to synergistic stress caused by the simultaneous addition of two fermentation inhibitors. Such phenomenon indicated the pivotal role of the energy and cofactor utilization in resisting the mixed inhibitors of acetic acid and furfural. Based on the discoveries, valuable insights are provided to improve the tolerance of S. cerevisiae strain and further enhance lignocellulosic fermentation. PMID:27532329

  12. Potent Allosteric Dengue Virus NS5 Polymerase Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Resistance Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Noble, Christian Guy; Seh, Cheah Chen; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; El Sahili, Abbas; Chan, Grace Kar Yarn; Lescar, Julien; Arora, Rishi; Benson, Timothy; Nilar, Shahul; Manjunatha, Ujjini; Wan, Kah Fei; Dong, Hongping; Xie, Xuping; Yokokawa, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses comprise major emerging pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV) or Zika virus (ZIKV). The flavivirus RNA genome is replicated by the RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of non-structural protein 5 (NS5). This essential enzymatic activity renders the RdRp attractive for antiviral therapy. NS5 synthesizes viral RNA via a “de novo” initiation mechanism. Crystal structures of the flavivirus RdRp revealed a “closed” conformation reminiscent of a pre-initiation state, with a well ordered priming loop that extrudes from the thumb subdomain into the dsRNA exit tunnel, close to the “GDD” active site. To-date, no allosteric pockets have been identified for the RdRp, and compound screening campaigns did not yield suitable drug candidates. Using fragment-based screening via X-ray crystallography, we found a fragment that bound to a pocket of the apo-DENV RdRp close to its active site (termed “N pocket”). Structure-guided improvements yielded DENV pan-serotype inhibitors of the RdRp de novo initiation activity with nano-molar potency that also impeded elongation activity at micro-molar concentrations. Inhibitors exhibited mixed inhibition kinetics with respect to competition with the RNA or GTP substrate. The best compounds have EC50 values of 1–2 μM against all four DENV serotypes in cell culture assays. Genome-sequencing of compound-resistant DENV replicons, identified amino acid changes that mapped to the N pocket. Since inhibitors bind at the thumb/palm interface of the RdRp, this class of compounds is proposed to hinder RdRp conformational changes during its transition from initiation to elongation. This is the first report of a class of pan-serotype and cell-active DENV RdRp inhibitors. Given the evolutionary conservation of residues lining the N pocket, these molecules offer insights to treat other serious conditions caused by flaviviruses. PMID:27500641

  13. Potent Allosteric Dengue Virus NS5 Polymerase Inhibitors: Mechanism of Action and Resistance Profiling.

    PubMed

    Lim, Siew Pheng; Noble, Christian Guy; Seh, Cheah Chen; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; El Sahili, Abbas; Chan, Grace Kar Yarn; Lescar, Julien; Arora, Rishi; Benson, Timothy; Nilar, Shahul; Manjunatha, Ujjini; Wan, Kah Fei; Dong, Hongping; Xie, Xuping; Shi, Pei-Yong; Yokokawa, Fumiaki

    2016-08-01

    Flaviviruses comprise major emerging pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV) or Zika virus (ZIKV). The flavivirus RNA genome is replicated by the RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of non-structural protein 5 (NS5). This essential enzymatic activity renders the RdRp attractive for antiviral therapy. NS5 synthesizes viral RNA via a "de novo" initiation mechanism. Crystal structures of the flavivirus RdRp revealed a "closed" conformation reminiscent of a pre-initiation state, with a well ordered priming loop that extrudes from the thumb subdomain into the dsRNA exit tunnel, close to the "GDD" active site. To-date, no allosteric pockets have been identified for the RdRp, and compound screening campaigns did not yield suitable drug candidates. Using fragment-based screening via X-ray crystallography, we found a fragment that bound to a pocket of the apo-DENV RdRp close to its active site (termed "N pocket"). Structure-guided improvements yielded DENV pan-serotype inhibitors of the RdRp de novo initiation activity with nano-molar potency that also impeded elongation activity at micro-molar concentrations. Inhibitors exhibited mixed inhibition kinetics with respect to competition with the RNA or GTP substrate. The best compounds have EC50 values of 1-2 μM against all four DENV serotypes in cell culture assays. Genome-sequencing of compound-resistant DENV replicons, identified amino acid changes that mapped to the N pocket. Since inhibitors bind at the thumb/palm interface of the RdRp, this class of compounds is proposed to hinder RdRp conformational changes during its transition from initiation to elongation. This is the first report of a class of pan-serotype and cell-active DENV RdRp inhibitors. Given the evolutionary conservation of residues lining the N pocket, these molecules offer insights to treat other serious conditions caused by flaviviruses. PMID:27500641

  14. A novel Pro197Glu substitution in acetolactate synthase (ALS) confers broad-spectrum resistance across ALS inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weitang; Yuan, Guohui; Du, Long; Guo, Wenlei; Li, Lingxu; Bi, Yaling; Wang, Jinxin

    2015-01-01

    Water chickweed (Myosoton aquaticum L.), a competitive broadleaf weed, is widespread in wheat fields in China. Tribenuron and pyroxsulam failed to control water chickweed in the same field in Qiaotian Village in 2011 and 2012, respectively. An initial tribenuron resistance confirmation test identified a resistant population (AH02). ALS gene sequencing revealed a previously unreported substitution of Glu for Pro at amino acid position 197 in resistant individuals. A purified subpopulation (WRR04) that was individually homozygous for the Pro197Glu substitution was generated and characterized in terms of its response to different classes of ALS inhibitors. A whole-plant experiment showed that the WRR04 population exhibited broad-spectrum resistance to tribenuron (SU, 318-fold), pyrithiobac sodium (PTB, > 197-fold), pyroxsulam (TP, 81-fold), florasulam (TP, > 36-fold) and imazethapyr (IMI, 11-fold). An in vitro ALS assay confirmed that the ALS from WRR04 showed high resistance to all the tested ALS inhibitors. These results established that the Pro197Glu substitution endows broad-spectrum resistance across ALS inhibitors in water chickweed. In addition, molecular markers were developed to rapidly identify the Pro197Glu mutation.

  15. Influence of inhibitors on the corrosion cracking resistance of 65G steel wire in hydrogen sulfide solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lubenskii, A.P.; Sokolova, T.I.

    1987-07-01

    Protection from hydrogen sulfide corrosion in the recovery and transport of natural gas is done with the use of inhibitors. In this paper the authors present results of an investigation into the resistance of steel to cracking under stress in aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide and calcium chloride in the presence of candidate inhibitors. Cold drawn wire of 65G steel was used. All the inhibitors were found to increase the resistance of steel to stress cracking but the degree of their influence on this form of corrosion failure varied. The decrease in their ability to retard stress corrosion cracking was found to be cause by chlorine anions and not by other factors such as the salting-out action of calcium chloride.

  16. Directed HIV-1 Evolution of Protease Inhibitor Resistance by Second-Generation Short Hairpin RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Schopman, Nick C. T.; Braun, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Despite the success of antiretroviral drugs in decreasing AIDS-related mortality, a substantial fraction of HIV-infected patients experience therapy failure due to the emergence of drug-resistant virus variants. For durable inhibition of HIV-1 replication, the emergence of such escape viruses must be controlled. In addition to antiretroviral drugs, RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy can be used to inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting the viral RNA genome. RNAi is an evolutionary conserved gene silencing mechanism that mediates the sequence-specific breakdown of the targeted mRNA. Here we investigated an alternative strategy combining the activity of a protease inhibitor (PI) with second-generation short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) designed to specifically block the emergence of PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. We demonstrate that dominant viral escape routes can be effectively blocked by second-generation shRNAs and that virus evolution can be redirected toward less-fit variants. These results are of importance for a deeper understanding of HIV-1 evolution under combined drug and RNAi pressure and may be used to design future therapeutic approaches. PMID:22064528

  17. Directed HIV-1 evolution of protease inhibitor resistance by second-generation short hairpin RNAs.

    PubMed

    Schopman, Nick C T; Braun, Anja; Berkhout, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Despite the success of antiretroviral drugs in decreasing AIDS-related mortality, a substantial fraction of HIV-infected patients experience therapy failure due to the emergence of drug-resistant virus variants. For durable inhibition of HIV-1 replication, the emergence of such escape viruses must be controlled. In addition to antiretroviral drugs, RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy can be used to inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting the viral RNA genome. RNAi is an evolutionary conserved gene silencing mechanism that mediates the sequence-specific breakdown of the targeted mRNA. Here we investigated an alternative strategy combining the activity of a protease inhibitor (PI) with second-generation short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) designed to specifically block the emergence of PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. We demonstrate that dominant viral escape routes can be effectively blocked by second-generation shRNAs and that virus evolution can be redirected toward less-fit variants. These results are of importance for a deeper understanding of HIV-1 evolution under combined drug and RNAi pressure and may be used to design future therapeutic approaches. PMID:22064528

  18. Registered report: Tumour micro-environment elicits innate resistance to RAF inhibitors through HGF secretion.

    PubMed

    Blum, David; LaBarge, Samuel

    2014-12-10

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of 50 papers in the field of cancer biology published between 2010 and 2012. This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from "Tumour micro-environment elicits innate resistance to RAF inhibitors through HGF secretion" by Straussman and colleagues, published in Nature in 2012 (Straussman et al., 2012). The key experiments being replicated in this study are from Figure 2A, C, and D (and Supplemental Figure 11) and Figure 4C (and Supplemental Figure 19) (Straussman et al., 2012). Figure 2 demonstrates resistance to drug sensitivity conferred by co-culture with some stromal cell lines and identifies the secreted factor responsible as HGF. In Figure 4, Straussman and colleagues show that blocking the HGF receptor MET abrogates HGF’s rescue of drug sensitivity. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by eLife.

  19. Different Resistance-Training Regimens Evoked a Similar Increase in Myostatin Inhibitors Expression.

    PubMed

    Santos, A R; Lamas, L; Ugrinowitsch, C; Tricoli, V; Miyabara, E H; Soares, A G; Aoki, M S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of different resistance-training regimens (S or P) on the expression of genes related to the MSTN signaling pathway in physically-active men. 29 male subjects with at least 2 years of experience in strength training were assigned to either a strength-training group (S; n=11) or a power-training group (P; n=11). The control group (C; n=7) was composed of healthy physically-active males. The S and the P groups performed high- and low-intensity squats, respectively, 3 times per week, for 8 weeks. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were collected before and after the training period. No change was observed in MSTN, ACTIIB, GASP-1 and FOXO-3 A gene expression after the training period. A similar increase in the gene expression of the inhibitory proteins of the MSTN signaling pathway, FLST (S: 4.2 fold induction and P: 3.7 fold induction, p<0.01) and FL-3 (S: 5.6 fold induction and P: 5.6 fold induction, p<0.01), was detected after the training period. SMAD-7 gene expression was similarly augmented after both training protocols (S: 2.5 fold induction; P: 2.8 fold induction; p<0.05). In conclusion, the resistance-training regimens (S and P) activated the expression of inhibitors of the MSTN signaling pathway in a similar manner. PMID:25822941

  20. Gamma-secretase inhibitors reverse glucocorticoid resistance in T-ALL

    PubMed Central

    Real, Pedro J.; Tosello, Valeria; Palomero, Teresa; Castillo, Mireia; Hernando, Eva; de Stanchina, Elisa; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Barnes, Kelly; Sawai, Catherine; Homminga, Irene; Meijerink, Jules; Aifantis, Iannis; Basso, Giuseppe; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Ai, Walden; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2009-01-01

    Summary Gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) block the activation of oncogenic NOTCH1 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). However, limited antileukemic cytotoxicity and severe gastrointestinal toxicity have restricted the clinical application of these targeted drugs. Here we show that combination therapy with GSIs plus glucocorticoids can improve the antileukemic effects of GSIs and reduce their gut toxicity in vivo. Inhibition of NOTCH1 signaling in glucocorticoid-resistant T-ALL restored glucocorticoid receptor auto-up-regulation and induced apoptotic cell death through induction of BIM expression. GSI treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest and accumulation of goblet cells in the gut mediated by upregulation of Klf4, a negative regulator of cell cycle required for goblet cell differentiation. In contrast, glucocorticoid treatment induced transcriptional upregulation of Ccnd2 and protected mice from developing intestinal goblet cell metaplasia typically induced by inhibition of NOTCH signaling with GSIs. These results support a role for glucocorticoids plus GSIs in the treatment of glucocorticoid-resistant T-ALL. PMID:19098907

  1. CS1 is a novel topoisomerase IIα inhibitor with favorable drug resistance profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yan; Chen, Wang; Zhao, Baobing; Hao, Huilin; Li, Zhenyu; Lu, Chunhua; Shen, Yuemao

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • CS1 is a novel nonintercalating topoisomerase IIα poison. • CS1 shows potent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity. • CS1 shows 6–10-fold less toxicity to normal cells compared with etoposide. • CS1 is not a substrate of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance irrelevant. - Abstract: DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II) is an essential nuclear enzyme and a validated target for anticancer agent screening. CS1, a novel 2-phenylnaphthalene, had potent cytotoxicity against nine tested tumor cell lines and showed 6–10-fold less toxicity against normal cell lines compared with etoposide. In addition, CS1 showed potential anti-multidrug resistance capabilities. kDNA decatenation, DNA relaxation and cleavage complex assays indicated that CS1 acted as a nonintercalating topoisomerase IIα (Topo IIα) inhibitor by stabilizing the DNA-Topo IIα cleavage complex. CS1 also induced DNA breaks in MDA-MB-231 cells evidenced by comet tails and the accumulation of γH2AX foci. The ability of CS1 in inducing DNA breaks mediated by Topo II resulted in G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, CS1 exhibited dramatic in vivo antitumor activity and lower toxicity compared with etoposide. This work supports the development of CS1 as a promising candidate for the treatment of cancer by targeting Topo IIα.

  2. A resurgence of β-lactamase inhibitor combinations effective against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bush, Karen

    2015-11-01

    β-Lactamase inhibitors (BLIs) have played an important role in combatting β-lactam resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, but their effectiveness has diminished with the evolution of diverse and deleterious varieties of β-lactamases. In this review, a new generation of BLIs and inhibitor combinations is presented, describing epidemiological information, pharmacodynamic studies, resistance identification and current clinical status. Novel serine BLIs of major interest include the non-β-lactams of the diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octanone (DBO) series. The DBOs avibactam, relebactam and RG6080 inhibit most class A and class C β-lactamases, with selected inhibition of class D enzymes by avibactam. The novel boronic acid inhibitor RPX7009 has a similar inhibitory profile. All of these inhibitors are being developed in combinations that are targeting primarily carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative pathogens. Two BLI combinations (ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam) were recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under the designation of a Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP). Other inhibitor combinations that have at least completed phase 1 clinical trials are ceftaroline fosamil/avibactam, aztreonam/avibactam, imipenem/relebactam, meropenem/RPX7009 and cefepime/AAI101. Although effective inhibitor combinations are in development for the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria with serine carbapenemases, better options are still necessary for pathogens that produce metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs). The aztreonam/avibactam combination demonstrates inhibitory activity against MBL-producing enteric bacteria owing to the stability of the monobactam to these enzymes, but resistance is still an issue for MBL-producing non-fermentative bacteria. Because all of the inhibitor combinations are being developed as parenteral drugs, an orally bioavailable combination would also be of interest.

  3. Tomato plants transformed with the inhibitor-of-virus-replication gene are partially resistant to Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Loebenstein, Gad; David, Dalia Rav; Leibman, Diana; Gal-On, Amit; Vunsh, Ron; Czosnek, Henryk; Elad, Yigal

    2010-03-01

    Tomato plants transformed with a cDNA clone encoding the inhibitor-of-virus-replication (IVR) gene were partially resistant to Botrytis cinerea. This resistance was observed as a significant reduction in the size of lesions induced by the fungus in transgenic plants compared with the lesions on the nontransgenic control plants. This resistance was weakened when plants were kept at an elevated temperature, 32 degrees C, before inoculation with B. cinerea compared with plants kept at 17 to 22 degrees C prior to inoculation. Resistance correlated with the presence of IVR transcripts, as detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. This is one of the few cases in which a gene associated with resistance to a virus also seems to be involved in resistance to a fungal disease.

  4. Overcoming resistance to first/second generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and ALK inhibitors in oncogene-addicted advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Romanidou, Ourania; Landi, Lorenza; Cappuzzo, Federico; Califano, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represent the two oncogenic events with an impact on current clinical practice. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and crizotinib are the standard of care for the treatment of EGFR mutant and ALK gene rearranged advanced NSCLC patients. Unfortunately, despite initial clinical benefit, acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs or crizotinib usually develops after an average of 10–12 months of treatment. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanisms of resistance to first/second generation EGFR-TKIs and crizotinib. In particular, we focus on strategies to overcome resistance due to secondary EGFR T790M mutation and mutations of the ALK domain. PMID:27239236

  5. TMC125, a Novel Next-Generation Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Active against Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Andries, Koen; Azijn, Hilde; Thielemans, Theo; Ludovici, Donald; Kukla, Michael; Heeres, Jan; Janssen, Paul; De Corte, Bart; Vingerhoets, Johan; Pauwels, Rudi; de Béthune, Marie-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1); however, currently marketed NNRTIs rapidly select resistant virus, and cross-resistance within the class is extensive. A parallel screening strategy was applied to test candidates from a series of diarylpyrimidines against wild-type and resistant HIV strains carrying clinically relevant mutations. Serum protein binding and metabolic stability were addressed early in the selection process. The emerging clinical candidate, TMC125, was highly active against wild-type HIV-1 (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 1.4 to 4.8 nM) and showed some activity against HIV-2 (EC50 = 3.5 μM). TMC125 also inhibited a series of HIV-1 group M subtypes and circulating recombinant forms and a group O virus. Incubation of TMC125 with human liver microsomal fractions suggested good metabolic stability (15% decrease in drug concentration and 7% decrease in antiviral activity after 120 min). Although TMC125 is highly protein bound, its antiviral effect was not reduced by the presence of 45 mg of human serum albumin/ml, 1 mg of α1-acid glycoprotein/ml, or 50% human serum. In an initial screen for activity against a panel of 25 viruses carrying single and double reverse transcriptase amino acid substitutions associated with NNRTI resistance, the EC50 of TMC125 was <5 nM for 19 viruses, including the double mutants K101E+K103N and K103N+Y181C. TMC125 also retained activity (EC50 < 100 nM) against 97% of 1,081 recent clinically derived recombinant viruses resistant to at least one of the currently marketed NNRTIs. TMC125 is a potent next generation NNRTI, with the potential for use in individuals infected with NNRTI-resistant virus. PMID:15561844

  6. Treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana seeds with an HSP90 inhibitor increases plant resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, Liudmyla

    2016-07-01

    Resistance of plants to unfavourable conditions is an important feature to use them as an autotrophic link of Life Support Systems in space exploration missions. It significantly depends on basic and stress-induced levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) in cells. It is known that HSP90 can bind and maintain heat shock transcription factors (HSF) as a monomer that lacks DNA binding activity and thereby regulate HSP expression. Modulation of activity of the HSP synthesis and resistance by HSP90 in plants is not well investigated. The objective of this study was to determine how treatment of seeds with an HSP90 inhibitor affects environmental responsiveness in Arabidopsis thaliana. Seed treatment with geldanamycin (GDA) was used to reduce HSP90 function. The affect of space flight stressors was simulated by gamma-irradiation and thermal upshift. Two series of experiments were carried out: 1) exposure of dry seeds to gamma-irradiation (1 kGy, ^{60}Co); 2) heat shock of seedlings. It was shown that GDA treatment of seeds stimulated the seedling growth after seed irradiation. It also increased both the basic thermotolerance (45°C for 45 min) and induced thermotolerance (45°C for 1,5-2,5 h after pretreatment at 37°C for 2 h) in seedlings. In addition, seed treatment with GDA had a prolonged effect on the HSP70 production in seedlings under normal and stressful conditions. It shows that the stimulatory effects of GDA may be caused by induction of HSP70 synthesis. The obtained data demonstrate that pre-treatment of seeds with GDA before planting allows inducing the stress resistance at least at early growth stages of plants.

  7. Rational combination of targeted therapies as a strategy to overcome the mechanisms of resistance to inhibitors of EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Damiano, Vincenzo; Gelardi, Teresa; Daniele, Gennaro; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2007-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been widely used as a target for novel anticancer agents, such as blocking antibodies and small molecular weight tyrosine kinase compounds. In spite of recent advances in cancer cell biology, leading to the introduction of clinically active new drugs, such as cetuximab, panitumumab and erlotinib, unfortunately disease control remains unsuccessful due to the presence of constitutive resistance to EGFR inhibitors in most patients and the development of acquired resistance in the responders. A large number of molecular abnormalities in tumor cells seem to partly contribute to their resistance to anti-EGFR therapy: increased angiogenesis, constitutive activation of downstream mediators, overexpression of other tyrosine kinase receptors. Moreover, some mutations in the EGFR receptor kinase domain seem to play a crucial role in determining the sensitivity of cancer cells to specific inhibitors by altering the conformation of the receptor and its activity. The development of rational combinations of anticancer agents and EGFR inhibitors, able to exert synergistic cytotoxic interactions, has been widely accepted and used in both preclinical and clinical studies. Although the failure of large clinical trial based on empirical combination of anti-EGFR and classic chemotherapeutic agents, several preclinical data seems to support the hypothesis that combining EGFR inhibitors and other novel agents could efficiently inhibit tumor growth and overcome intrinsic resistance to a single-agent based therapy. This review focuses on the role of complementary signalling pathways in the development of resistance to EGFR targeting agents and the rationale to combine novel inhibitors as anticancer therapy.

  8. Differential Regulation of Aromatase Isoforms and Tissue Responses to Environmental Chemicals in Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As in mammals, aromatase plays a basic role in fish reproduction. Unlike most mammals, with only one form of aromatase, fish have two distinct forms. One isoform, P450aromA, predominates in ovaries. Ovarian aromatase activity controls circulating levels of estrogens and is critic...

  9. The effects of the standardized extracts of Ginkgo biloba on steroidogenesis pathways and aromatase activity in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aromatase inhibitors that block estrogen synthesis are a proven first-line hormonal therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer. Although it is known that standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGb761) induces anti-carcinogenic effects like the aromatase inhibitors, the effects of EGb761 on steroidogenesis have not been studied yet. Therefore, the effects of EGb761 on steroidogenesis and aromatase activity was studied using a H295R cell model, which was a good in vitro model to predict effects on human adrenal steroidogenesis. Methods Cortisol, aldosterone, testosterone, and 17β-estradiol were evaluated in the H295R cells by competitive enzyme-linked immunospecific assay after exposure to EGb761. Real-time polymerase chain reaction were performed to evaluate effects on critical genes in steroid hormone production, specifically cytochrome P450 (CYP11/ 17/19/21) and the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (3β-HSD2 and 17β-HSD1/4). Finally, aromatase activities were measured with a tritiated water-release assay and by western blotting analysis. Results H295R cells exposed to EGb761 (10 and 100 μg/mL) showed a significant decrease in 17β-estradiol and testosterone, but no change in aldosterone or cortisol. Genes (CYP19 and 17β-HSD1) related to the estrogen steroidogenesis were significantly decreased by EGb761. EGb761 treatment of H295R cells resulted in a significant decrease of aromatase activity as measured by the direct and indirect assays. The coding sequence/ Exon PII of CYP19 gene transcript and protein level of CYP19 were significantly decreased by EGb761. Conclusions These results suggest that EGb761 could regulate steroidogenesis-related genes such as CYP19 and 17β-HSD1, and lead to a decrease in 17β-estradiol and testosterone. The present study provides good information on potential therapeutic effects of EGb761 on estrogen dependent breast cancer. PMID:27188280

  10. Increased resistance to proteasome inhibitors in multiple myeloma mediated by cIAP2 - implications for a combinatorial treatment

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Prasoon; Arngården, Linda; Hammarberg, Anna; Maes, Ken; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Vanderkerken, Karin; Wiklund, Helena Jernberg

    2015-01-01

    Despite the introduction of new treatment options for multiple myeloma (MM), a majority of patients relapse due to the development of resistance. Unraveling new mechanisms underlying resistance could lead to identification of possible targets for combinatorial treatment. Using TRAF3 deleted/mutated MM cell lines, we evaluated the role of the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2 (cIAP2) in drug resistance and uncovered the plausible mechanisms underlying this resistance and possible strategies to overcome this by combinatorial treatment. In MM, cIAP2 is part of the gene signature of aberrant NF-κB signaling and is heterogeneously expressed amongst MM patients. In cIAP2 overexpressing cells a decreased sensitivity to the proteasome inhibitors bortezomib, MG132 and carfilzomib was observed. Gene expression analysis revealed that 440 genes were differentially expressed due to cIAP2 overexpression. Importantly, the data imply that cIAPs are rational targets for combinatorial treatment in the population of MM with deleted/mutated TRAF3. Indeed, we found that treatment with the IAP inhibitor AT-406 enhanced the anti-MM effect of bortezomib in the investigated cell lines. Taken together, our results show that cIAP2 is an important factor mediating bortezomib resistance in MM cells harboring TRAF3 deletion/mutation and therefore should be considered as a target for combinatorial treatment. PMID:26036313

  11. Acquired resistance of non-small cell lung cancer to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Murakami, Akiko; Kobayashi, Isao; Kato, Motoyasu; Shukuya, Takehito; Tajima, Ken; Shimada, Naoko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-03-01

    Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) triggers anti-apoptotic signaling, proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance, which leads to development and progression of human epithelial cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Inhibition of EGFR by tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib and erlotinib has provided a new hope for the cure of NSCLC patients. However, acquired resistance to gefitinib and erlotinib via EGFR-mutant NSCLC has occurred through various molecular mechanisms such as T790M secondary mutation, MET amplification, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) overexpression, PTEN downregulation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and other mechanisms. This review will discuss the biology of receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition and focus on the molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors of EGFR-mutant NSCLC.

  12. Selection and characterization of hepatitis C virus replicons dually resistant to the polymerase and protease inhibitors HCV-796 and boceprevir (SCH 503034).

    PubMed

    Flint, Mike; Mullen, Stanley; Deatly, Anne M; Chen, Wei; Miller, Lynn Z; Ralston, Robert; Broom, Colin; Emini, Emilio A; Howe, Anita Y M

    2009-02-01

    HCV-796 is a nonnucleoside inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) polymerase, and boceprevir is an inhibitor of the NS3 serine protease. The emergence of replicon variants resistant to the combination of HCV-796 and boceprevir was evaluated. Combining the inhibitors greatly reduced the frequency with which resistant colonies arose; however, some resistant replicon cells could be isolated by the use of low inhibitor concentrations. These replicons were approximately 1,000-fold less susceptible to HCV-796 and 9-fold less susceptible to boceprevir. They also exhibited resistance to anthranilate nonnucleoside inhibitors of NS5B but were fully sensitive to inhibitors of different mechanisms: a pyranoindole, Hsp90 inhibitors, an NS5B nucleoside inhibitor, and pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN). The replicon was cleared from the combination-resistant cells by extended treatment with Peg-IFN. Mutations known to confer resistance to HCV-796 (NS5B C316Y) and boceprevir (NS3 V170A) were present in the combination-resistant replicons. These changes could be selected together and coexist in the same genome. The replicon bearing both changes exhibited reduced sensitivity to inhibition by HCV-796 and boceprevir but had a reduced replicative capacity.

  13. A role for FOXO1 in BCR–ABL1-independent tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wagle, M; Eiring, A M; Wongchenko, M; Lu, S; Guan, Y; Wang, Y; Lackner, M; Amler, L; Hampton, G; Deininger, M W; O'Hare, T; Yan, Y

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients who relapse on imatinib due to acquired ABL1 kinase domain mutations are successfully treated with second-generation ABL1-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (ABL-TKIs) such as dasatinib, nilotinib or ponatinib. However, ~40% of relapsed patients have uncharacterized BCR–ABL1 kinase-independent mechanisms of resistance. To identify these mechanisms of resistance and potential treatment options, we generated ABL-TKI-resistant K562 cells through prolonged sequential exposure to imatinib and dasatinib. Dual-resistant K562 cells lacked BCR–ABL1 kinase domain mutations, but acquired other genomic aberrations that were characterized by next-generation sequencing and copy number analyses. Proteomics showed that dual-resistant cells had elevated levels of FOXO1, phospho-ERK and BCL-2, and that dasatinib no longer inhibited substrates of the PI3K/AKT pathway. In contrast to parental cells, resistant cells were sensitive to growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by the class I PI3K inhibitor, GDC-0941 (pictilisib), which also induced FOXO1 nuclear translocation. FOXO1 was elevated in a subset of primary specimens from relapsed CML patients lacking BCR–ABL1 kinase domain mutations, and these samples were responsive to GDC-0941 treatment ex vivo. We conclude that elevated FOXO1 contributes to BCR–ABL1 kinase-independent resistance experienced by these CML patients and that PI3K inhibition coupled with BCR–ABL1 inhibition may represent a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:27044711

  14. Synergism between demethylation inhibitor fungicides or gibberellin inhibitor plant growth regulators and bifenthrin in a pyrethroid-resistant population of Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Ramoutar, D; Cowles, R S; Requintina, E; Alm, S R

    2010-10-01

    In 2007-2008, the "annual bluegrass weevil," Listronotus maculicollis Kirby (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a serious pest of Poa annua L. (Poales: Poaceae) on U.S. golf courses, was shown to be resistant to two pyrethroids, bifenthrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. In 2008, we showed that bifenthrin resistance was principally mediated by oxidase detoxification (cytochrome P450 [P450]). P450s can be inhibited by demethylation inhibitor fungicides and gibberellin inhibitor plant growth regulators, both of which are commonly used on golf courses. We tested these compounds for synergistic activity with bifenthin against a pyrethroid-resistant population of L. maculicollis. The LD50 value for bifenthrin was significantly reduced from 87 ng per insect (without synergists) to 9.6-40 ng per insect after exposure to the fungicides fenarimol, fenpropimorph, prochloraz, propiconazole, and pyrifenox and the plant growth regulators flurprimidol, paclobutrazol, and trinexapac-ethyl. Simulated field exposure with formulated products registered for use on turf revealed enhanced mortality when adult weevils were exposed to bifenthrin (25% mortality, presented alone) combined with field dosages of propiconizole, fenarimol, flurprimidol, or trinexapac-ethyl (range, 49-70% mortality).

  15. DYRK1B as therapeutic target in Hedgehog/GLI-dependent cancer cells with Smoothened inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Wolfgang; Hutzinger, Martin; Elmer, Dominik Patrick; Parigger, Thomas; Sternberg, Christina; Cegielkowski, Lukasz; Zaja, Mirko; Leban, Johann; Michel, Susanne; Hamm, Svetlana; Vitt, Daniel; Aberger, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of human malignancies displays aberrant activation of Hedgehog (HH)/GLI signaling, including cancers of the skin, brain, gastrointestinal tract and hematopoietic system. Targeting oncogenic HH/GLI signaling with small molecule inhibitors of the essential pathway effector Smoothened (SMO) has shown remarkable therapeutic effects in patients with advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma. However, acquired and de novo resistance to SMO inhibitors poses severe limitations to the use of SMO antagonists and urgently calls for the identification of novel targets and compounds. Here we report on the identification of the Dual-Specificity-Tyrosine-Phosphorylation-Regulated Kinase 1B (DYRK1B) as critical positive regulator of HH/GLI signaling downstream of SMO. Genetic and chemical inhibition of DYRK1B in human and mouse cancer cells resulted in marked repression of HH signaling and GLI1 expression, respectively. Importantly, DYRK1B inhibition profoundly impaired GLI1 expression in both SMO-inhibitor sensitive and resistant settings. We further introduce a novel small molecule DYRK1B inhibitor, DYRKi, with suitable pharmacologic properties to impair SMO-dependent and SMO-independent oncogenic GLI activity. The results support the use of DYRK1B antagonists for the treatment of HH/GLI-associated cancers where SMO inhibitors fail to demonstrate therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26784250

  16. Extreme multidrug resistant HIV-1 protease with 20 mutations is resistant to novel protease inhibitors with P1'-pyrrolidinone or P2-tris-tetrahydrofuran.

    PubMed

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Ghosh, Arun K; Rao, Kalapala Venkateswara; Xu, Chun-Xiao; Sayer, Jane M; Louis, John M; Weber, Irene T

    2013-05-23

    Extreme drug resistant mutant of HIV-1 protease (PR) bearing 20 mutations (PR20) has been studied with the clinical inhibitor amprenavir (1) and two potent antiviral investigational inhibitors GRL-02031 (2) and GRL-0519 (3). Clinical inhibitors are >1000-fold less active on PR20 than on wild-type enzyme, which is consistent with dissociation constants (KL) from isothermal titration calorimetry of 40 nM for 3, 178 nM for amprenavir, and 960 nM for 2. High resolution crystal structures of PR20-inhibitor complexes revealed altered interactions compared with the corresponding wild-type PR complexes in agreement with relative inhibition. Amprenavir lacks interactions due to PR20 mutations in the S2/S2' subsites relative to PR. Inhibitors 2 and 3 lose interactions with Arg8' in PR20 relative to the wild-type enzyme because Arg8' shifts to interact with mutated L10F side chain. Overall, inhibitor 3 compares favorably with darunavir in affinity for PR20 and shows promise for further development.

  17. Combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors: an effective therapeutic option in drug-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandip N; Leng, Xiaohong; Perazzona, Bastianella; Sun, Xiaoping; Lin, Yu-Hsi; Arlinghaus, Ralph B

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that JAK2 serves as a novel therapeutic target in Bcr-Abl+ chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We have reported the existence of an HSP90- associated high molecular weight network complex (HMWNC) that is composed of HSP90 client proteins BCR-ABL, JAK2, and STAT3 in wild type Bcr-Abl+ leukemic cells. Here we showed that the HSP90-HMWNC is present in leukemia cells from CML patients in blast stage, and in Imatinib (IM)-resistant 32Dp210 (T315I) leukemia cells. We found that the HSP90-HMWNC could be disassembled by depleting JAK2 with either Jak2-specific shRNA or treatment with JAK2 inhibitors (TG101209 or Ruxolitinib) and HSP90 inhibitor (AUY922). Combinational treatment with JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors diminished the activation of BCR-ABL, JAK2 and its downstream targets. As a result, the IM-resistant 32Dp210 T315I cells underwent apoptosis. When administered in mice bearing 32Dp210 T315I leukemia, combinational therapy using Ruxolitinib and AUY922 prolonged the survival significantly. Thus, a combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors could be a powerful strategy for the treatment of CML, especially in IM-resistant patients. PMID:27551334

  18. Combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors: an effective therapeutic option in drug-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Perazzona, Bastianella; Sun, Xiaoping; Lin, Yu-Hsi; Arlinghaus, Ralph B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that JAK2 serves as a novel therapeutic target in Bcr-Abl+ chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We have reported the existence of an HSP90- associated high molecular weight network complex (HMWNC) that is composed of HSP90 client proteins BCR-ABL, JAK2, and STAT3 in wild type Bcr-Abl+ leukemic cells. Here we showed that the HSP90-HMWNC is present in leukemia cells from CML patients in blast stage, and in Imatinib (IM)-resistant 32Dp210 (T315I) leukemia cells. We found that the HSP90-HMWNC could be disassembled by depleting JAK2 with either Jak2-specific shRNA or treatment with JAK2 inhibitors (TG101209 or Ruxolitinib) and HSP90 inhibitor (AUY922). Combinational treatment with JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors diminished the activation of BCR-ABL, JAK2 and its downstream targets. As a result, the IM-resistant 32Dp210 T315I cells underwent apoptosis. When administered in mice bearing 32Dp210 T315I leukemia, combinational therapy using Ruxolitinib and AUY922 prolonged the survival significantly. Thus, a combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors could be a powerful strategy for the treatment of CML, especially in IM-resistant patients. PMID:27551334

  19. Reduced Proteolytic Shedding of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases is a Post-Translational Mechanism of Kinase Inhibitor Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Miles A.; Oudin, Madeleine J.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Wang, Stephanie J.; Meyer, Aaron S.; Im, Hyungsoon; Frederick, Dennie T.; Tadros, Jenny; Griffith, Linda G.; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph; Flaherty, Keith T.; Gertler, Frank B.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    Kinase inhibitor resistance often involves upregulation of poorly understood “bypass” signaling pathways. Here, we show that extracellular proteomic adaptation is one path to bypass signaling and drug resistance. Proteolytic shedding of surface receptors, which can provide negative feedback on signaling activity, is blocked by kinase inhibitor treatment and enhances bypass signaling. In particular, MEK inhibition broadly decreases shedding of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including HER4, MET, and most prominently AXL, an ADAM10 and ADAM17 substrate, thus increasing surface RTK levels and mitogenic signaling. Progression-free survival of melanoma patients treated with clinical BRAF/MEK inhibitors inversely correlates with RTK shedding reduction following treatment, as measured non-invasively in blood plasma. Disrupting protease inhibition by neutralizing TIMP1 improves MAPK inhibitor efficacy, and combined MAPK/AXL inhibition synergistically reduces tumor growth and metastasis in xenograft models. Altogether, extracellular proteomic rewiring through reduced RTK shedding represents a surprising mechanism for bypass signaling in cancer drug resistance. PMID:26984351

  20. Dynamics and Flexibility of Human Aromatase Probed by FTIR and Time Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Sheila J.; Castrignanò, Silvia; Mei, Giampiero; Di Venere, Almerinda; Nicolai, Eleonora; Allegra, Paola; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Human aromatase (CYP19A1) is a steroidogenic cytochrome P450 converting androgens into estrogens. No ligand-free crystal structure of the enzyme is available to date. The crystal structure in complex with the substrate androstenedione and the steroidal inhibitor exemestane shows a very compact conformation of the enzyme, leaving unanswered questions on the conformational changes that must occur to allow access of the ligand to the active site. As H/D exchange kinetics followed by FTIR spectroscopy can provide information on the conformational changes in proteins where solvent accessibility is affected, here the amide I region was used to measure the exchange rates of the different elements of the secondary structure for aromatase in the ligand-free form and in the presence of the substrate androstenedione and the inhibitor anastrozole. Biphasic exponential functions were found to fit the H/D exchange data collected as a function of time. Two exchange rates were assigned to two populations of protons present in different flexible regions of the protein. The addition of the substrate androstenedione and the inhibitor anastrozole lowers the H/D exchange rates of the α-helices of the enzyme when compared to the ligand-free form. Furthermore, the presence of the inhibitor anastrozole lowers exchange rate constant (k1) for β-sheets from 0.22±0.06 min−1 for the inhibitor-bound enzyme to 0.12±0.02 min−1 for the free protein. Dynamics effects localised in helix F were studied by time resolved fluorescence. The data demonstrate that the fluorescence lifetime component associated to Trp224 emission undergoes a shift toward longer lifetimes (from ≈5.0 to ≈5.5 ns) when the substrate or the inhibitor are present, suggesting slower dynamics in the presence of ligands. Together the results are consistent with different degrees of flexibility of the access channel and therefore different conformations adopted by the enzyme in the free, substrate- and inhibitor

  1. Relationship of hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in Pima Indians.

    PubMed

    Nagi, D K; Tracy, R; Pratley, R

    1996-10-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is related to insulin resistance and several components of the insulin resistance syndrome, and PAI-1 levels are elevated in subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Many Pima Indians are obese, insulin-resistant, and hyperinsulinemic, and they have high rates of diabetes but a low risk of ischemic heart disease. In contrast to whites and Asians, PAI-1 activity is similar between nondiabetic and diabetic Pima Indians. We therefore examined the association of PAI-1 with hepatic and peripheral insulin action measured using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. To investigate if insulin per se has any effect on PAI-1 in vivo, we also assessed the effects of endogenous (during a 75-g oral glucose load) and exogenous (during hyperinsulinemic clamp) insulin on PAI-1 antigen. Twenty-one (14 men and seven women; mean age, 26.3 +/- 4.8 years) Pima Indians underwent a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a sequential hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Peripheral insulin action was measured as absolute glucose uptake (M value) and normalized to estimated metabolic body size (EMBS). Hepatic insulin action was measured as percent suppression of basal hepatic glucose output during hyperinsulinemia. PAI-1 antigen was determined using a two-site enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that detects only free PAI-1. PAI-1 antigen concentrations were significantly related to body mass index ([BMI] rs = .54, P = .012), waist (rs=.52, P=.016) and thigh (rs=.63, P=.002) circumference, and fasting plasma insulin concentration (rs=.59, P=.004). PAI-1 antigen concentrations were not significantly associated with peripheral glucose uptake (M value) during either low-dose (rs= -.01, P=NS) or high-dose (rs= -.11, P=NS) insulin infusion. PAI-1 antigen was negatively correlated with basal hepatic glucose output (rs= -.57, P=.013) and percent suppression of hepatic glucose output during hyperinsulinemia (rs= -.69, P=.005). However, this

  2. High Bone Mass-Causing Mutant LRP5 Receptors Are Resistant to Endogenous Inhibitors In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Niziolek, Paul J; MacDonald, Bryan T; Kedlaya, Rajendra; Zhang, Minjie; Bellido, Teresita; He, Xi; Warman, Matthew L; Robling, Alexander G

    2015-10-01

    Certain missense mutations affecting LRP5 cause high bone mass (HBM) in humans. Based on in vitro evidence, HBM LRP5 receptors are thought to exert their effects by providing resistance to binding/inhibition of secreted LRP5 inhibitors such as sclerostin (SOST) and Dickkopf homolog-1 (DKK1). We previously reported the creation of two Lrp5 HBM knock-in mouse models, in which the human p.A214V or p.G171V missense mutations were knocked into the endogenous Lrp5 locus. To determine whether HBM knock-in mice are resistant to SOST- or DKK1-induced osteopenia, we bred Lrp5 HBM mice with transgenic mice that overexpress human SOST in osteocytes ((8kb) Dmp1-SOST) or mouse DKK1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes ((2.3kb) Col1a1-Dkk1). We observed that the (8kb) Dmp1-SOST transgene significantly lowered whole-body bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), femoral and vertebral trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), and periosteal bone-formation rate (BFR) in wild-type mice but not in mice with Lrp5 p.G171V and p.A214V alleles. The (2.3kb) Col1a1-Dkk1 transgene significantly lowered whole-body BMD, BMC, and vertebral BV/TV in wild-type mice and affected p.A214V mice more than p.G171V mice. These in vivo data support in vitro studies regarding the mechanism of HBM-causing mutations, and imply that HBM LRP5 receptors differ in their relative sensitivity to inhibition by SOST and DKK1.

  3. High-bone-mass causing mutant LRP5 receptors are resistant to endogenous inhibitors in vivo†

    PubMed Central

    Niziolek, Paul J.; MacDonald, Bryan T.; Kedlaya, Rajendra; Zhang, Minjie; Bellido, Teresita; He, Xi; Warman, Matthew L.; Robling, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    Certain missense mutations affecting LRP5 cause high bone mass (HBM) in humans. Based on in vitro evidence, HBM LRP5 receptors are thought to exert their effects by providing resistance to binding/inhibition of secreted LRP5 inhibitors such as sclerostin (SOST) and Dickkopf homolog-1 (DKK1). We previously reported the creation of two Lrp5 HBM knock-in mouse models, in which the human p.A214V or p.G171V missense mutations were knocked into the endogenous Lrp5 locus. To determine whether HBM knock-in mice are resistant to SOST- or DKK1-induced osteopenia, we bred Lrp5 HBM mice with transgenic mice that overexpress human SOST in osteocytes (8kbDmp1-SOST) or mouse DKK1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes (2.3kbCol1a1-Dkk1). We observed that the 8kbDmp1-SOST transgene significantly lowered whole body BMD, BMC, femoral and vertebral BV/TV, and periosteal BFR in wild-type mice but not in mice with Lrp5 p.G171V and p.A214V alleles. The 2.3kbCol1a1-Dkk1 transgene significantly lowered whole body BMD, BMC, and vertebral BV/TV in wild-type mice and affected p.A214V mice more than p.G171V mice. These in vivo data support in vitro studies regarding the mechanism of HBM-causing mutations, and imply that HBM LRP5 receptors differ in their relative sensitivity to inhibition by SOST and DKK1. PMID:25808845

  4. Subtype diversity associated with the development of HIV-1 resistance to integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Bluma G; Lowe, Matthew; Moisi, Daniela; Hardy, Isabelle; Gagnon, Simon; Charest, Hugues; Baril, Jean Guy; Wainberg, Mark A; Roger, Michel

    2011-05-01

    We used genotypic and phylogenetic analysis to determine integrase diversity among subtypes, and studied natural polymorphisms and mutations implicated in resistance to integrase inhibitors (INI) in treatment-naïve persons (n = 220) and -experienced individuals (n = 24). Phylogenetics revealed 7 and 10% inter-subtype diversity in the integrase and reverse transcriptase (RT)/protease regions, respectively. Integrase sequencing identified a novel A/B recombinant in which all viruses in a male-sex-male (MSM) transmission cluster (n = 12) appeared to possess subtype B in integrase and subtype A in the remainder of the pol region. Natural variations and signature polymorphisms were observed at codon positions 140, 148, 151, 157, and 160 among HIV subtypes. These variations predicted higher genetic barriers to G140S and G140C in subtypes C, CRF02_AG, and A/CRF01_AE, as well as higher genetic barriers toward acquisition of V151I in subtypes CRF02_AG and A/CRF01_AE. The E157Q and E160Q mutational motif was observed in 35% of INI-naïve patients harboring subtype C infections, indicating intra-subtype variations. Thirteen patients failed raltegravir (RAL)-containing regimens within 8 ± 1 months, in association with the major Q148K/R/H and G140A/S (n = 8/24) or N155H (n = 5/24) mutational pathways. Of note, the remaining patients on RAL regimens for 14 ± 3 months harbored no or only minor integrase mutations/polymorphisms (T66I, T97A, H114P, S119P, A124S, G163R, I203M, R263K). These results demonstrate the importance of understanding subtype variability in the development of resistance to INIs.

  5. Molecular mechanism of viral resistance to a potent non-nucleoside inhibitor unveiled by molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Asthana, Shailendra; Shukla, Saumya; Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V

    2014-11-11

    Recently, we reported on a potent benzimidazole derivative (227G) that inhibits the growth of the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in cell-based and enzyme assays at nanomolar concentrations. The target of 227G is the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), and the I261M mutation located in motif I of the RdRp finger domain was found to induce drug resistance. Here we propose a molecular mechanism for the retained functionality of the enzyme in the presence of the inhibitor, on the basis of a thorough computational study of the apo and holo forms of the BVDV RdRp either in the wild type (wt) or in the form carrying the I261M mutation. Our study shows that although the mutation affects to some extent the structure of the apoenzyme, the functional dynamics of the protein appear to be largely maintained, which is consistent with the retained functionality of this natural mutant. Despite the binding site of 227G not collapsing or undergoing drastic structural changes upon introduction of the I261M substitution, these alterations reflect crucially on the binding mode of 227G, which is significantly different from that found in wt RdRp. In particular, while in the wt system the four loops lining the template entrance site embrace 227G and close the template passageway, in the I261M variant the template entrance is only marginally occluded, allowing in principle the translocation of the template to the interior of the enzyme. In addition, the mutated enzyme in the presence of 227G retains several characteristics of the wt apoprotein. Our work provides an original molecular picture of a resistance mechanism that is consistent with published experimental data.

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Resistance or Cross-Resistance to Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors Currently under Development as Microbicides ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Selhorst, Philippe; Vazquez, Ana C.; Terrazas-Aranda, Katty; Michiels, Johan; Vereecken, Katleen; Heyndrickx, Leo; Weber, Jan; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E.; Ariën, Kevin K.; Vanham, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Microbicides based on nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are currently being developed to protect women from HIV acquisition through sexual contact. However, the large-scale introduction of these products raises two major concerns. First, when these microbicides are used by undiagnosed HIV-positive women, they could potentially select for viral resistance, which may compromise subsequent therapeutic options. Second, NNRTI-based microbicides that are inactive against NNRTI-resistant strains might promote the selective transmission of these viruses. In order to address these concerns, drug resistance was selected in vitro by the serial passage of three viral isolates from subtypes B and C and CRF02_AG (a circulating recombinant form) in activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) under conditions of increasing concentrations of three NNRTIs (i.e., TMC120, UC781, and MIV-160) that are currently being developed as candidate microbicides. TMC120 and MIV-160 displayed a high genetic barrier to resistance development, whereas resistance to UC781 emerged rapidly, similarly to efavirenz and nevirapine. Phenotypically, the selected viruses appeared to be highly cross-resistant to current first-line therapeutic NNRTIs (i.e., delavirdine, nevirapine, and efavirenz), although they retained some susceptibility to the more recently developed NNRTIs lersivirine and etravirine. The ability of UC781, TMC120, and MIV-160 to inhibit the in vitro-selected NNRTI-resistant viruses was also limited, although residual activity could be observed for the candidate microbicide NNRTI MIV-170. Interestingly, only four p2/p7/p1/p6/PR/RT/INT recombinant NNRTI-resistant viruses (i.e., TMC120-resistant VI829, EFV-resistant VI829, MIV-160-resistant VI829, and EFV-resistant MP568) showed impairments in replicative fitness. Overall, these in vitro analyses demonstrate that due to potential cross-resistance, the large-scale introduction of single-NNRTI-based microbicides

  7. A mutation in reverse transcriptase of bis(heteroaryl)piperazine-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 that confers increased sensitivity to other nonnucleoside inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Dueweke, T J; Pushkarskaya, T; Poppe, S M; Swaney, S M; Zhao, J Q; Chen, I S; Stevenson, M; Tarpley, W G

    1993-01-01

    Several nonnucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) have been described, including Nevirapine, thiobenzimidazolone (TIBO) derivatives, pyridinone derivatives such as L-697,661, and the bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs). HIV-1 resistant to L-697,661 or Nevirapine emerges rapidly in infected patients treated with these drugs, and the resistance is caused primarily by substitutions at amino acids 181 and 103 of RT that also confer cross resistance to the other nonnucleoside inhibitors. We describe derivation and characterization of two BHAP-resistant HIV-1 variants that differ from this pattern of cross resistance. With both variants, HIV-1 resistance to BHAP RT inhibitors was caused by a RT mutation that results in a proline-to-leucine substitution at amino acid 236 (P236L). Rather than conferring cross resistance to other RT inhibitors, this substitution sensitized RT 7- to 10-fold to Nevirapine, TIBO R82913, and L-697,661 without influencing sensitivity to nucleoside analogue RT inhibitors. This sensitization caused by P236L was also observed in cell culture with BHAP-resistant HIV-1. The effects of the P236L RT substitution suggest that emergence of BHAP-resistant virus in vivo could produce a viral population sensitized to inhibition by these other nonnucleoside RT inhibitors. PMID:7685109

  8. Molecular basis for increased susceptibility of isolates with atazanavir resistance-conferring substitution I50L to other protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yanchunas, Joseph; Langley, David R; Tao, Li; Rose, Ronald E; Friborg, Jacques; Colonno, Richard J; Doyle, Michael L

    2005-09-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are highly effective drugs against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yet long-term therapeutic use is limited by emergence of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) protease substitutions that confer cross-resistance to multiple protease inhibitor drugs. Atazanavir is a highly potent HIV protease inhibitor with a distinct resistance profile that includes effectiveness against most HIV-1 isolates resistant to one or two PIs. The signature resistance substitution for atazanavir is I50L, and it is frequently (53%) accompanied by a compensatory A71V substitution that helps restore viability and increases atazanavir resistance levels. We measured the binding affinities of wild-type (WT) and I50L/A71V HIV-1 proteases to atazanavir and other currently approved PIs (ritonavir, lopinavir, saquinavir, nelfinavir, indinavir, and amprenavir) by isothermal titration calorimetry. Remarkably, we find that all of the PIs have 2- to 10-fold increased affinities for I50L/A71V protease, except for atazanavir. The results are also manifested by thermal stability measures of affinity for WT and I50L/A71V proteases. Additional biophysical and enzyme kinetics experiments show I50L/A71V protease is a stable enzyme with catalytic activity that is slightly reduced (34%) relative to the WT. Computational modeling reveals that the unique resistance phenotype of I50L/A71V protease likely originates from bulky tert-butyl groups at P2 and P2' (specific to atazanavir) that sterically clash with methyl groups on residue L50. The results of this study provide a molecular understanding of the novel hypersusceptibility of atazanavir-resistant I50L/A71V-containing clinical isolates to other currently approved PIs.

  9. Variability and resistance mutations in the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease in patients not treated with protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zeminian, Luciana Bonome; Padovani, Juliana Lara; Corvino, Sílvia Maria; Silva, Giovanni Faria; Pardini, Maria Inês de Moura Campos; Grotto, Rejane Maria Tommasini

    2013-02-01

    The goal of treatment of chronic hepatitis C is to achieve a sustained virological response, which is defined as exhibiting undetectable hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels in serum following therapy for at least six months. However, the current treatment is only effective in 50% of patients infected with HCV genotype 1, the most prevalent genotype in Brazil. Inhibitors of the serine protease non-structural protein 3 (NS3) have therefore been developed to improve the responses of HCV-infected patients. However, the emergence of drug-resistant variants has been the major obstacle to therapeutic success. The goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of resistance mutations and genetic polymorphisms in the NS3 genomic region of HCV from 37 patients infected with HCV genotype 1 had not been treated with protease inhibitors. Plasma viral RNA was used to amplify and sequence the HCV NS3 gene. The results indicate that the catalytic triad is conserved. A large number of substitutions were observed in codons 153, 40 and 91; the resistant variants T54A, T54S, V55A, R155K and A156T were also detected. This study shows that resistance mutations and genetic polymorphisms are present in the NS3 region of HCV in patients who have not been treated with protease inhibitors, data that are important in determining the efficiency of this new class of drugs in Brazil.

  10. Effects of sequence changes in the HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide on CCR5 inhibitor resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Johan Klasse, Per; Moore, John P.

    2012-07-05

    A rare pathway of HIV-1 resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as Vicriviroc (VCV) involves changes solely in the gp41 fusion peptide (FP). Here, we show that the G516V change is critical to VCV resistance in PBMC and TZM-bl cells, although it must be accompanied by either M518V or F519I to have a substantial impact. Modeling VCV inhibition data from the two cell types indicated that G516V allows both double mutants to use VCV-CCR5 complexes for entry. The model further identified F519I as an independent determinant of preference for the unoccupied, high-VCV affinity form of CCR5. From inhibitor-free reversion cultures, we also identified a substitution in the inner domain of gp120, T244A, which appears to counter the resistance phenotype created by the FP substitutions. Examining the interplay of these changes will enhance our understanding of Env complex interactions that influence both HIV-1 entry and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors.

  11. P1-Substituted Symmetry-Based Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors with Potent Antiviral Activity against Drug-Resistant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    DeGoey, David A.; Grampovnik, David J.; Chen, Hui-Ju; Flosi, William J.; Klein, Larry L.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Stoll, Vincent; Mamo, Mulugeta; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Kempf, Dale J.

    2013-03-07

    Because there is currently no cure for HIV infection, patients must remain on long-term drug therapy, leading to concerns over potential drug side effects and the emergence of drug resistance. For this reason, new and safe antiretroviral agents with improved potency against drug-resistant strains of HIV are needed. A series of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) with potent activity against both wild-type (WT) virus and drug-resistant strains of HIV was designed and synthesized. The incorporation of substituents with hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups at the P1 position of our symmetry-based inhibitor series resulted in significant potency improvements against the resistant mutants. By this approach, several compounds, such as 13, 24, and 29, were identified that demonstrated similar or improved potencies compared to 1 against highly mutated strains of HIV derived from patients who previously failed HIV PI therapy. Overall, compound 13 demonstrated the best balance of potency against drug resistant strains of HIV and oral bioavailability in pharmacokinetic studies. X-ray analysis of an HIV PI with an improved resistance profile bound to WT HIV protease is also reported.

  12. 3D-QSAR AND CONTOUR MAP ANALYSIS OF TARIQUIDAR ANALOGUES AS MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE PROTEIN-1 (MRP1) INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Prathusha; Inupakutika, Madhuri; Devireddy, Amith R.; Gunda, Shravan Kumar; Willmon, Thomas Mark; Ranjana, KC; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranaweera, Indrika; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Barr, Sharla; Varela, Manuel F.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to the successful chemotherapy towards several cancers is multidrug resistance of human cancer cells to anti-cancer drugs. An important contributor to multidrug resistance is the human multidrug resistance protein-1 transporter (MRP1), which is an efflux pump of the ABC (ATP binding cassette) superfamily. Thus, highly efficacious, third generation MRP1 inhibitors, like tariquidar analogues, are promising inhibitors of multidrug resistance and are under clinical trials. To maximize the efficacy of MRP1 inhibitors and to reduce systemic toxicity, it is important to limit the exposure of MRP1 inhibitors and anticancer drugs to normal tissues and to increase their co-localization with tumor cells. Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) associated with 3D-Quantitiative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies were performed on a series of tariquidar analogues, as selective MDR modulators. Best predictability was obtained with CoMFA model r2(non-cross-validated square of correlation coefficient) = 0.968, F value = 151.768 with five components, standard error of estimate = 0.107 while the CoMSIA yielded r2 = 0.982, F value = 60.628 with six components, and standard error of estimate = 0.154. These results indicate that steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic (lipophilic), and hydrogen bond donor substituents play significant roles in multidrug resistance modulation of tariquidar analogues upon MRP1. The tariquidar analogue and MRP1 binding and stability data generated from CoMFA and CoMSIA based 3D–contour maps may further aid in study and design of tariquidar analogues as novel, potent and selective MDR modulator drug candidates. PMID:26913287

  13. Effects of PDE type 5 inhibitors on left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Faria, Ana Paula Cabral de; Modolo, Rodrigo; Moreno, Beatriz Vaz Domingues; Moreno, Heitor

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RHTN) is a multifactorial disease characterized by blood pressure (BP) levels above goal (140/90 mmHg) in spite of the concurrent use of three or more antihypertensive drugs of different classes. Moreover, it is well known that RHTN subjects have high prevalence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD), which leads to increased risk of heart failure progression. This review gathers data from studies evaluating the effects of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors (administration of acute sildenafil and short-term tadalafil) on diastolic function, biochemical and hemodynamic parameters in patients with RHTN. Acute study with sildenafil treatment found that inhibition of PDE-5 improved hemodynamic parameters and diastolic relaxation. In addition, short-term study with the use of tadalafil demonstrated improvement of LVDD, cGMP and BNP-32 levels, regardless of BP reduction. No endothelial function changes were observed in the studies. The findings of acute and short-term studies revealed potential therapeutic effects of IPDE-5 drugs on LVDD in RHTN patients.

  14. [Cell senescence induced by histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate in rodent transformed cells resistant to apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Shitikova, Zh V; Aksenov, N D; Pospelov, V A; Pospelov, T V

    2011-01-01

    The capacity of HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate to induce senescence in cells derived from rat embryonic fibroblasts transformed by E1A+E1B19 kDa oncogenes has been studied. These transformants are resistant to apoptosis in response to gamma-irradiation and growth factor deprivation. The process of cell senescence was investigated by the analysis of cell growth curves, G1/S and G2/M cell cycle arrest, and senescent associated beta-galactosidase expression. The irreversibility of sodium butyrate antiproliferative activity was analyzed by clonogenic assay. We show that sodium butyrate suppresses proliferation and induces senescence in the E1A+E1B19 kDa transformed cells. Interestingly, NaB induces growth arrest due to accumulation of cells in G2/M phase, these cells are not tetraploid but mainly binuclear. Thus, in case of NaB induced senescence in E1A+E1B19 kDa transformed fibroblasts, the observed suppression of cell proliferation may be the result of cytokinesis failure leading to formation of binuclear and multinuclear cells incapable to proliferate.

  15. Effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor on diaphragmatic function after resistive loading.

    PubMed

    Bisnett, T; Anzueto, A; Andrade, F H; Rodney, G G; Napier, W R; Levine, S M; Maxwell, L C; Mureeba, P; Derdak, S D; Grisham, M B; Jenkinson, S G

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effect of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nomega-Nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME), on in vitro diphragmatic function both at rest (control) or after inspiratory resistive loading (IRL). Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, instrumented, and then the following experimental groups: (1) controls; (2) L-NAME (100 mg/kg/body weight intravenously alone); (3) IRL alone; and (4) L-NAME + IRL. The IRL protocol consisted of applying a variable resistor to the inspiratory limb of a two-way valve at 70% of maximal airway pressure until apnea. After the experiment, the animals were sacrificed and diaphragmatic strips were obtained for activity of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) and measurements of in vitro contractile properties: tetanic (Po) and twitch tensions (Pt). cNOS activity was significantly decreased in the L-NAME and L-NAME + IRL groups (P < or = 0.05) as compared with control and IRL groups. L-NAME alone did not affect Po or Pt. However, in both IRL groups, with and without was a significant decrease in Po and Pt. This reduction was comparable in both groups. In summary, our data showed that L-NAME resulted in a significant decrease cNOS activity, but in vitro contractility was impaired. PMID:11253784

  16. Effects of PDE type 5 inhibitors on left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Faria, Ana Paula Cabral de; Modolo, Rodrigo; Moreno, Beatriz Vaz Domingues; Moreno, Heitor

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RHTN) is a multifactorial disease characterized by blood pressure (BP) levels above goal (140/90 mmHg) in spite of the concurrent use of three or more antihypertensive drugs of different classes. Moreover, it is well known that RHTN subjects have high prevalence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD), which leads to increased risk of heart failure progression. This review gathers data from studies evaluating the effects of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors (administration of acute sildenafil and short-term tadalafil) on diastolic function, biochemical and hemodynamic parameters in patients with RHTN. Acute study with sildenafil treatment found that inhibition of PDE-5 improved hemodynamic parameters and diastolic relaxation. In addition, short-term study with the use of tadalafil demonstrated improvement of LVDD, cGMP and BNP-32 levels, regardless of BP reduction. No endothelial function changes were observed in the studies. The findings of acute and short-term studies revealed potential therapeutic effects of IPDE-5 drugs on LVDD in RHTN patients. PMID:25352458

  17. A Nexus Consisting of Beta-Catenin and Stat3 Attenuates BRAF Inhibitor Efficacy and Mediates Acquired Resistance to Vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Sinnberg, Tobias; Makino, Elena; Krueger, Marcel A; Velic, Ana; Macek, Boris; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Groll, Nicola; Pötz, Oliver; Czemmel, Stefan; Niessner, Heike; Meier, Friedegund; Ikenberg, Kristian; Garbe, Claus; Schittek, Birgit

    2016-06-01

    Acquired resistance to second generation BRAF inhibitors (BRAFis), like vemurafenib is limiting the benefits of long term targeted therapy for patients with malignant melanomas that harbor BRAF V600 mutations. Since many resistance mechanisms have been described, most of them causing a hyperactivation of the MAPK- or PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, one potential strategy to overcome BRAFi resistance in melanoma cells would be to target important common signaling nodes. Known factors that cause secondary resistance include the overexpression of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), alternative splicing of BRAF or the occurrence of novel mutations in MEK1 or NRAS. In this study we show that β-catenin is stabilized and translocated to the nucleus in approximately half of the melanomas that were analyzed and which developed secondary resistance towards BRAFi. We further demonstrate that β-catenin is involved in the mediation of resistance towards vemurafenib in vitro and in vivo. Unexpectedly, β-catenin acts mainly independent of the TCF/LEF dependent canonical Wnt-signaling pathway in resistance development, which partly explains previous contradictory results about the role of β-catenin in melanoma progression and therapy resistance. We further demonstrate that β-catenin interacts with Stat3 after chronic vemurafenib treatment and both together cooperate in the acquisition and maintenance of resistance towards BRAFi. PMID:27428425

  18. Recombinant C1 inhibitor P5/P3 variants display resistance to catalytic inactivation by stimulated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Eldering, E; Huijbregts, C C; Nuijens, J H; Verhoeven, A J; Hack, C E

    1993-03-01

    Proteolytic inactivation of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) by neutrophil elastase (HNE) is presumed to contribute to the deregulation of plasma cascade systems in septic shock. Here, we report a supplementary approach to construct serpins, in our case C1 inhibitor, that are resistant to catalytic inactivation by HNE. Instead of shifting the specificity of alpha 1-antitrypsin towards the proteases of the contact activation and complement systems, we attempted to obtain a C1 inhibitor species which resists proteolytic inactivation by HNE. 12 recombinant C1 inhibitor variants were produced with mainly conservative substitutions at the cleavage sites for HNE, 440-Ile and/or 442-Val. Three variants significantly resisted proteolytic inactivation, both by purified HNE, as well as by activated neutrophils. The increase in functional half-life in the presence of FMLP-stimulated cells was found to be 18-fold for the 440-Leu/442-Ala variant. Inhibitory function of these variants was relatively unimpaired, as examined by the formation of stable complexes with C1s, beta-Factor XIIa, kallikrein, and plasmin, and as determined by kinetic analysis. The calculated association rate constants (k(on)) were reduced twofold at most for C1s, and appeared unaffected for beta-Factor XIIa. The effect on the k(on) with kallikrein was more pronounced, ranging from a significant ninefold reduction to an unmodified rate. The results show that the reactive centre loop of C1 inhibitor can be modified towards decreased sensitivity for nontarget proteases without loss of specificity for target proteases. We conclude that this approach extends the possibilities of applying recombinant serpin variants for therapeutic use in inflammatory diseases.

  19. Microtiter plate-based assay for inhibitors of penicillin-binding protein 2a from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bobba, Sudheer; Ponnaluri, V K Chaithanya; Mukherji, Mridul; Gutheil, William G

    2011-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), the molecular determinant for high-level β-lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is intrinsically resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics. The development and characterization of new inhibitors targeting PBP2a would benefit from an effective and convenient assay for inhibitor binding. This study was directed toward the development of a fluorescently detected β-lactam binding assay for PBP2a from MRSA. Biotinylated ampicillin and biotinylated cephalexin were tested as tagging reagents for fluorescence detection by using a streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate. Both bound surprisingly well to PBP2a, with binding constants of 1.6 ± 0.4 μM and 13.6 ± 0.8 μM, respectively. Two forms of the assay were developed, a one-step direct competition form of the assay and a two-step indirect competition form of the assay, and both forms of the assay gave comparable results. This assay was then used to characterize PBP2a binding to ceftobiprole, which gave results consistent with previous studies of ceftobiprole-PBP2a binding. This assay was also demonstrated for screening for PBP2a inhibitors by screening a set of 13 randomly selected β-lactams for PBP2a inhibition at 750 μM. Meropenem was observed to give substantial inhibition in this screen, and a follow-up titration experiment determined its apparent K(i) to be 480 ± 70 μM. The availability of convenient and sensitive microtiter-plate based assays for the screening and characterization of PBP2a inhibitors is expected to facilitate the discovery and development of new PBP2a inhibitors for use in combating the serious public health problem posed by MRSA.

  20. The Effect of Clade-Specific Sequence Polymorphisms on HIV-1 Protease Activity and Inhibitor Resistance Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaranayake, Rajintha M.; Kolli, Madhavi; King, Nancy M.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Heroux, Annie; Kakizawa, Junko; Sugiura, Wataru; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-09-08

    The majority of HIV-1 infections around the world result from non-B clade HIV-1 strains. The CRF01{_}AE (AE) strain is seen principally in Southeast Asia. AE protease differs by {approx}10% in amino acid sequence from clade B protease and carries several naturally occurring polymorphisms that are associated with drug resistance in clade B. AE protease has been observed to develop resistance through a nonactive-site N88S mutation in response to nelfinavir (NFV) therapy, whereas clade B protease develops both the active-site mutation D30N and the nonactive-site mutation N88D. Structural and biochemical studies were carried out with wild-type and NFV-resistant clade B and AE protease variants. The relationship between clade-specific sequence variations and pathways to inhibitor resistance was also assessed. AE protease has a lower catalytic turnover rate than clade B protease, and it also has weaker affinity for both NFV and darunavir (DRV). This weaker affinity may lead to the nonactive-site N88S variant in AE, which exhibits significantly decreased affinity for both NFV and DRV. The D30N/N88D mutations in clade B resulted in a significant loss of affinity for NFV and, to a lesser extent, for DRV. A comparison of crystal structures of AE protease shows significant structural rearrangement in the flap hinge region compared with those of clade B protease and suggests insights into the alternative pathways to NFV resistance. In combination, our studies show that sequence polymorphisms within clades can alter protease activity and inhibitor binding and are capable of altering the pathway to inhibitor resistance.

  1. In silico identified targeted inhibitors of P-glycoprotein overcome multidrug resistance in human cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Follit, Courtney A; Brewer, Frances K; Wise, John G; Vogel, Pia D

    2015-10-01

    Failure of cancer chemotherapies is often linked to the over expression of ABC efflux transporters like the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp expression in cells leads to the elimination of a variety of chemically unrelated, mostly cytotoxic compounds. Administration of chemotherapeutics during therapy frequently selects for cells that over express P-gp and are therefore capable of robustly exporting diverse compounds, including chemotherapeutics, from the cells. P-gp thus confers multidrug resistance to a majority of drugs currently available for the treatment of cancers and diseases like HIV/AIDS. The search for P-gp inhibitors for use as co-therapeutics to combat multidrug resistances has had little success to date. In a previous study (Brewer et al., Mol Pharmacol 86: 716-726, 2014), we described how ultrahigh throughput computational searches led to the identification of four drug-like molecules that specifically interfere with the energy harvesting steps of substrate transport and inhibit P-gp catalyzed ATP hydrolysis in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that three of these compounds reversed P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance of cultured prostate cancer cells to restore sensitivity comparable to naïve prostate cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic drug, paclitaxel. Potentiation concentrations of the inhibitors were <3 μmol/L. The inhibitors did not exhibit significant toxicity to noncancerous cells at concentrations where they reversed multidrug resistance in cancerous cells. Our results indicate that these compounds with novel mechanisms of P-gp inhibition are excellent leads for the development of co-therapeutics for the treatment of multidrug resistances. PMID:26516582

  2. In silico identified targeted inhibitors of P-glycoprotein overcome multidrug resistance in human cancer cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Follit, Courtney A; Brewer, Frances K; Wise, John G; Vogel, Pia D

    2015-01-01

    Failure of cancer chemotherapies is often linked to the over expression of ABC efflux transporters like the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp expression in cells leads to the elimination of a variety of chemically unrelated, mostly cytotoxic compounds. Administration of chemotherapeutics during therapy frequently selects for cells that over express P-gp and are therefore capable of robustly exporting diverse compounds, including chemotherapeutics, from the cells. P-gp thus confers multidrug resistance to a majority of drugs currently available for the treatment of cancers and diseases like HIV/AIDS. The search for P-gp inhibitors for use as co-therapeutics to combat multidrug resistances has had little success to date. In a previous study (Brewer et al., Mol Pharmacol 86: 716–726, 2014), we described how ultrahigh throughput computational searches led to the identification of four drug-like molecules that specifically interfere with the energy harvesting steps of substrate transport and inhibit P-gp catalyzed ATP hydrolysis in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that three of these compounds reversed P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance of cultured prostate cancer cells to restore sensitivity comparable to naïve prostate cancer cells to the chemotherapeutic drug, paclitaxel. Potentiation concentrations of the inhibitors were <3 μmol/L. The inhibitors did not exhibit significant toxicity to noncancerous cells at concentrations where they reversed multidrug resistance in cancerous cells. Our results indicate that these compounds with novel mechanisms of P-gp inhibition are excellent leads for the development of co-therapeutics for the treatment of multidrug resistances. PMID:26516582

  3. Association of CDK4 germline and BRAF somatic mutations in a patient with multiple primary melanomas and BRAF inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Governa, Maurizio; Caprarella, Evelina; Dalla Pozza, Edoardo; Vigato, Enrico; Maritan, Monia; Caputo, Glenda G; Zannoni, Marina; Rosina, Paolo; Elefanti, Lisa; Stagni, Camilla; Menin, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    Many genetic alterations, including predisposing or somatic mutations, may contribute toward the development of melanoma. Although CDKN2A and CDK4 are high-penetrance genes for melanoma, MC1R is a low-penetrance gene that has been associated most consistently with the disease. Moreover, BRAF is the most frequently somatically altered oncogene and is a validated therapeutic target in melanoma. This paper reports a case of multiple primary melanoma with germline CDK4 mutation, MC1R variant, and somatic BRAF mutation in nine out of 10 melanomas, indicating that a common pathogenesis, because of a predisposing genetic background, may be shared among distinct subsequent melanomas of probable clonal origin. After 3 months of targeted therapy with BRAF inhibitor, our patient developed resistance with rapid progression of the disease leading to death. This is the first case in which early resistance to BRAF inhibitor has been reported in a patient with CDK4 germline mutation.

  4. Association of CDK4 germline and BRAF somatic mutations in a patient with multiple primary melanomas and BRAF inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Governa, Maurizio; Caprarella, Evelina; Dalla Pozza, Edoardo; Vigato, Enrico; Maritan, Monia; Caputo, Glenda G; Zannoni, Marina; Rosina, Paolo; Elefanti, Lisa; Stagni, Camilla; Menin, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    Many genetic alterations, including predisposing or somatic mutations, may contribute toward the development of melanoma. Although CDKN2A and CDK4 are high-penetrance genes for melanoma, MC1R is a low-penetrance gene that has been associated most consistently with the disease. Moreover, BRAF is the most frequently somatically altered oncogene and is a validated therapeutic target in melanoma. This paper reports a case of multiple primary melanoma with germline CDK4 mutation, MC1R variant, and somatic BRAF mutation in nine out of 10 melanomas, indicating that a common pathogenesis, because of a predisposing genetic background, may be shared among distinct subsequent melanomas of probable clonal origin. After 3 months of targeted therapy with BRAF inhibitor, our patient developed resistance with rapid progression of the disease leading to death. This is the first case in which early resistance to BRAF inhibitor has been reported in a patient with CDK4 germline mutation. PMID:26110554

  5. Resistance to amprenavir before and after treatment with lopinavir/ritonavir in highly protease inhibitor-experienced HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Hamid; Gianotti, Nicola; Danise, Anna; Seminari, Elena; Boeri, Enzo; Nozza, Silvia; Castagna, Antonella; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2004-01-01

    Genotypes in nine highly protease inhibitor (PI)-experienced patients were studied before and after lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) treatment. Resistance to amprenavir was the rule both before and after LPV/r treatment. Treatment with LPV/r can select for the 50 V mutation. In this setting, significant differences in the inference of the amprenavir phenotype from genotype were observed when using different algorithms.

  6. Inducible expression of a fusion gene encoding two proteinase inhibitors leads to insect and pathogen resistance in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Quilis, Jordi; López-García, Belén; Meynard, Donaldo; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; San Segundo, Blanca

    2014-04-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs)