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Sample records for aromatic carotenoid synthesized

  1. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis ORF Rv0654 encodes a carotenoid oxygenase mediating central and excentric cleavage of conventional and aromatic carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Scherzinger, Daniel; Scheffer, Erdmann; Bär, Cornelia; Ernst, Hansgeorg; Al-Babili, Salim

    2010-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is assumed to lack carotenoids, which are widespread pigments fulfilling important functions as radical scavengers and as a source of apocarotenoids. In mammals, the synthesis of apocarotenoids, including retinoic acid, is initiated by the β-carotene cleavage oxygenases I and II catalyzing either a central or an excentric cleavage of β-carotene, respectively. The M. tuberculosis ORF Rv0654 codes for a putative carotenoid oxygenase conserved in other mycobacteria. In the present study, we investigated the corresponding enzyme, here named M. tuberculosis carotenoid cleavage oxygenase (MtCCO). Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, we show that MtCCO converts several carotenoids and apocarotenoids in vitro. Moreover, the identification of the products suggests that, in contrast to other carotenoid oxygenases, MtCCO cleaves the central C15-C15' and an excentric double bond at the C13-C14 position, leading to retinal (C(20)), β-apo-14'-carotenal (C(22)) and β-apo-13-carotenone (C(18)) from β-carotene, as well as the corresponding hydroxylated products from zeaxanthin and lutein. Moreover, the enzyme cleaves also 3,3'-dihydroxy-isorenieratene representing aromatic carotenoids synthesized by other mycobacteria. Quantification of the products from different substrates indicates that the preference for each of the cleavage positions is determined by the hydroxylation and the nature of the ionone ring. The data obtained in the present study reveal MtCCO to be a novel carotenoid oxygenase and indicate that M. tuberculosis may utilize carotenoids from host cells and interfere with their retinoid metabolism.

  2. How Do Haloarchaea Synthesize Aromatic Amino Acids?

    PubMed Central

    Gulko, Miriam Kolog; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Gonzalez, Orland; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analysis of H. salinarum indicated that the de novo pathway for aromatic amino acid (AroAA) biosynthesis does not follow the classical pathway but begins from non-classical precursors, as is the case for M. jannaschii. The first two steps in the pathway were predicted to be carried out by genes OE1472F and OE1475F, while the 3rd step follows the canonical pathway involving gene OE1477R. The functions of these genes and their products were tested by biochemical and genetic methods. In this study, we provide evidence that supports the role of proteins OE1472F and OE1475F catalyzing consecutive enzymatic reactions leading to the production of 3-dehydroquinate (DHQ), after which AroAA production proceeds via the canonical pathway starting with the formation of DHS (dehydroshikimate), catalyzed by the product of ORF OE1477R. Nutritional requirements and AroAA uptake studies of the mutants gave results that were consistent with the proposed roles of these ORFs in AroAA biosynthesis. DNA microarray data indicated that the 13 genes of the canonical pathway appear to be utilised for AroAA biosynthesis in H. salinarum, as they are differentially expressed when cells are grown in medium lacking AroAA. PMID:25216252

  3. Carotenoids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This short article indicated that greater understanding of the biological functions of carotenoids mediated via their oxidative metabolites through their effects on these important cellular pathways and molecular targets, as well as their significance to cancer prevention, is needed. In considering ...

  4. The Aromatic Carotenoids in the Organic Matter of the Devonian Domanic Formation (on example of Tatarstan territory)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, Irina; Nosova, Fidania; Ostroukhov, Sergey; Pronin, Nikita

    2015-04-01

    This report contains the results of the studies of shale hydrocarbons (HC) from carbonate-siliceous rocks on the territory of Melekess depressoin and South-Tatar arch of Volga-Ural oil and gas province of the East European Platform. Studies were performed in the laboratory of Geochemistry of Combustible Minerals at the Institute of Geology and Petroleum Technology of the Kazan Federal University. The main object of this study is Domanicoid high-TOC rocks of Devonian time. They are mainly represented by dark gray, almost black bituminous limestones that are interbedded with calcareous siliceous shales and cherts. Complex studies include the following: - extraction of bitumen from the rock, - determination of organic carbon content, - determination of the group and elemental composition of the bitumen, - gas chromatographic studies of the alkanoic lube fractions of bitumoid and oil, - gas chromato-mass spectrometry of the naphthenic lube fractions of bitumoid and oil, - isotopic studies of bitumens and oils, - pyrolysis studies of the rock using the Rock -Eval method (before and after extraction), - study of trace-element composition of the rocks and petrologen, comparison in terms of adsorbed gas and studying of the composition of adsorbed gases. Simultaneously with the study of standard and generally accepted biomarkers, deep and detailed study of alkyl toluene, aromatic hydrocarbons (and aromatic carotenoids in particular) were conducted. The comparison and comparative correlation aromatic carotenoids with standard biomarkers (for example, with hopanes C30 and steranes C27:C28:C29). Attitude hopane/aromatic carotenoids is 0.05. This testifies to the dominance of the transformation of carotenoid compounds on bacterial activity in the water column. Bacterial activity in the studied samples is also high. Attitude steranes C29/aromatic carotenoids reaches 10-3. The study of aromatic carotenoids has allowed first in the region of Tatarstan to get a new information on

  5. A hydroxycinnamoyltransferase responsible for synthesizing suberin aromatics in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Jin-Ying; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Suberin, a polyester polymer in the cell wall of terrestrial plants, controls the transport of water and nutrients and protects plant from pathogenic infections and environmental stresses. Structurally, suberin consists of aliphatic and aromatic domains; p-hydroxycinnamates, such as ferulate, p-coumarate, and/or sinapate, are the major phenolic constituents of the latter. By analyzing the “wall-bound” phenolics of mutant lines of Arabidopsis deficient in a family of acyl-CoA dependent acyltransferase (BAHD) genes, we discovered that the formation of aromatic suberin in Arabidopsis, primarily in seed and root tissues, depends on a member of the BAHD superfamily of enzymes encoded by At5g41040. This enzyme exhibits an ω-hydroxyacid hydroxycinnamoyltransferase activity with an in vitro kinetic preference for feruloyl-CoA and 16-hydroxypalmitic acid. Knocking down or knocking out the At5g41040 gene in Arabidopsis reduces specifically the quantity of ferulate in suberin, but does not affect the accumulation of p-coumarate or sinapate. The loss of the suberin phenolic differentially affects the aliphatic monomer loads and alters the permeability and sensitivity of seeds and roots to salt stress. This highlights the importance of suberin aromatics in the polymer's function. PMID:19846769

  6. A carotenogenic gene cluster from Brevibacterium linens with novel lycopene cyclase genes involved in the synthesis of aromatic carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Krubasik, P; Sandmann, G

    2000-04-01

    The carotenogenic (crt) gene cluster from Brevibacterium linens, a member of the commercially important group of coryneform bacteria, was cloned and identified. An expression library of B. linens genes was constructed and a fragment of the crt cluster was obtained by functional complementation of a colourless B. flavum mutant, screening transformed cells for production of a yellow pigment. Subsequent screening of a cosmid library resulted in the cloning of the whole crt cluster from B. linens. All genes necessary for the synthesis of the aromatic carotenoid isorenieratene were identified on the basis of sequence homologies. In addition a novel type of lycopene cyclase was identified by complementation of a lycopene-accumulating B. flavum mutant. Two genes, named crt Yc and crt Yd, which code for polypeptides of 125 and 107 amino acids, respectively, are necessary to convert lycopene to beta-carotene. The amino acid sequences of these polypeptides show no similarity to any of the known lycopene cyclases. This is the first example of a carotenoid biosynthetic conversion in which two different gene products are involved, probably forming a heterodimer.

  7. Catalytic activity of in situ synthesized MoWNi sulfides in hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolyuk, Yu. A.; Maksimov, A. L.; Kolyagin, Yu. G.

    2017-02-01

    MoWNi-sulfide catalysts were obtained in situ by thermal decomposition of metal-polymer precursors based on the copolymers of polymaleic anhydride in a hydrocarbon raw material. The activity of the synthesized catalysts in hydrogenation of bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was studied, and the composition and structure of active phase nanoparticles were determined.

  8. Transformation of aromatic dyes using green synthesized silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Borase, Hemant P; Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Salunkhe, Rahul B; Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays, increasing use of nanoproducts in area of human and environmental applications raises concern about safety aspects of nanoparticles synthesized using traditional physicochemical methods. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesis at ambient parameters using latex of medicinally important plant Jatropha gossypifolia (J. gossypifolia) is reported in the present study. Potential of AgNPs in degradation of methylene blue and eosin B was also evaluated. Rapid formation of stable AgNPs was analyzed by visual color change from colorless to yellow-red after addition of latex in AgNO3 solution and by characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak at 430 nm in UV-Vis spectroscopy. FT-IR analysis, protein coagulation test showed capping of proteins, flavonoids, terpenoids and polyphenols of latex on surface of AgNPs. FE-SEM, HR-TEM analysis revealed spherical shape of AgNPs. Narrow size range of AgNPs (5-40 nm) observed in HR-TEM analysis. EDS analysis confirms the presence of elemental silver while XRD revealed crystalline nature of AgNPs. Zeta potential of -21.4 mV indicates high stability of AgNPs. Effects of different parameters (pH, temperature, incubation time) on nanosynthesis were studied in the present study. Dye reduction studies were performed using UV-Vis spectroscopy, TLC, FT-IR and HPLC analysis showing decreased absorbance maxima of both dyes with respect to time, change in R f values, changes in wave number, transmittance, and retention time of dyes after AgNPs addition. The rate constant for methylene blue and eosin B reduction by AgNPs was found to be 0.062 and 0.022 min(-1).

  9. Chemoenzymatic syntheses of prenylated aromatic small molecules using Streptomyces prenyltransferases with relaxed substrate specificities

    PubMed Central

    Kumano, Takuto; Richard, Stéphane B.; Noel, Joseph P.; Nishiyama, Makoto; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa

    2010-01-01

    NphB is a soluble prenyltransferase from Streptomyces sp. strain CL190 that attaches a geranyl group to a 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene-derived polyketide during the biosynthesis of anti-oxidant naphterpin. Here we report multiple chemoenzymatic syntheses of various prenylated compounds from aromatic substrates including flavonoids using two prenyltransferases NphB and SCO7190, a NphB homolog from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), as biocatalysts. NphB catalyzes carbon–carbon-based and carbon–oxygen-based geranylation of a diverse collection of hydroxyl-containing aromatic acceptors. Thus, this simple method using the prenyltransferases can be used to explore novel prenylated aromatic compounds with biological activities. Kinetic studies with NphB reveal that the prenylation reaction follows a sequential ordered mechanism. PMID:18682327

  10. Carotenoid β-Ring Hydroxylase and Ketolase from Marine Bacteria—Promiscuous Enzymes for Synthesizing Functional Xanthophylls

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Norihiko

    2011-01-01

    Marine bacteria belonging to genera Paracoccus and Brevundimonas of the α-Proteobacteria class can produce C40-type dicyclic carotenoids containing two β-end groups (β rings) that are modified with keto and hydroxyl groups. These bacteria produce astaxanthin, adonixanthin, and their derivatives, which are ketolated by carotenoid β-ring 4(4′)-ketolase (4(4′)-oxygenase; CrtW) and hydroxylated by carotenoid β-ring 3(3′)-hydroxylase (CrtZ). In addition, the genus Brevundimonas possesses a gene for carotenoid β-ring 2(2′)-hydroxylase (CrtG). This review focuses on these carotenoid β-ring-modifying enzymes that are promiscuous for carotenoid substrates, and pathway engineering for the production of xanthophylls (oxygen-containing carotenoids) in Escherichia coli, using these enzyme genes. Such pathway engineering researches are performed towards efficient production not only of commercially important xanthophylls such as astaxanthin, but also of xanthophylls minor in nature (e.g., β-ring(s)-2(2′)-hydroxylated carotenoids). PMID:21673887

  11. Syntheses of cytotoxic novel arctigenin derivatives bearing halogen and alkyl groups on aromatic rings.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Satoshi; Wukirsari, Tuti; Ochi, Yoshiaki; Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Nishi, Kosuke; Sugahara, Takuya; Akiyama, Koichi; Kishida, Taro

    2017-09-01

    The new lignano-9,9'-lactones (α,β-dibenzyl-γ-butyrolactone lignans), which showed the higher cytotoxicity than arctigenin, were synthesized. The well-known cytotoxic arctigenin showed activity against HL-60 cells (EC50=12μM), however, it was inactive against HeLa cells (EC50>100μM). The synthesized (3,4-dichloro, 2'-butoxy)-derivative 55 and (3,4-dichloro, 4'-butyl)-derivative 66 bearing the lignano-9,9'-lactone structures showed the EC50 values of 10μM and 9.4μM against HL-60 cells, respectively. Against HeLa cells, the EC50 value of the derivative 66 was 27μM. By comparing the activities with the corresponding 9,9'-epoxy structure (tetrahydrofuran compounds), the importance of the lactone structure of 55 and 66 for the higher activities was shown. The substituents on the aromatic ring of the lignano-9,9'-lactones affected the cytotoxicity level, observing more than 10-fold difference. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Total syntheses of angelicoin A, hericenone J, and hericenol A via migratory prenyl- and geranylation-aromatization sequences.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Jens; Calo, Frederick; Anderson, Katie; Pfaffeneder, Toni; Laclef, Sylvain; White, Andrew J P; Barrett, Anthony G M

    2012-01-06

    A five-step synthesis of the natural product angelicoin A using a late stage highly regioselective palladium(0)-catalyzed decarboxylative prenyl migration and aromatization sequence as the key step is reported. The method was extended with geranyl migration in eight-step total syntheses of hericenone J and hericenol A from geraniol.

  13. Aromatic carboxylate effect on dimensionality of three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ju-Wen; Gong, Chun-Hua; Hou, Li-Li; Tian, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2013-09-15

    Three new metal-organic coordination polymers [Co(4-bbc){sub 2}(bbbm)] (1), [Co(3,5-pdc)(bbbm)]·2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Co(1,4-ndc)(bbbm)] (3) (4-Hbbc=4-bromobenzoic acid, 3,5-H{sub 2}pdc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}ndc=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid and bbbm=1,1-(1,4-butanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Polymer 1 is a 1D chain formed by the bbbm ligands and Co{sup II} ions. Polymer 2 exhibits a 2D network with a (3·4·5)(3{sup 2}·4·5·6{sup 2}·7{sup 4}) topology. Polymer 3 possesses a 3D three-fold interpenetrating framework. The versatile structures of title polymers indicate that the aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of 1–3. Moreover, the thermal stability, electrochemical and luminescent properties of 1–3 were investigated. - graphical abstract: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. The aromatic carboxylates play a key role in the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were obtained. • The aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of three polymers. • The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated.

  14. Microbial monomers custom-synthesized to build true bio-derived aromatic polymers.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoya; Nguyen, Hieu Duc; Ito, Takashi; Zhou, Shengmin; Osada, Lisa; Tateyama, Seiji; Kaneko, Tatsuo; Takaya, Naoki

    2013-10-01

    Aromatic polymers include novel and extant functional materials although none has been produced from biotic building blocks derived from primary biomass glucose. Here we screened microbial aromatic metabolites, engineered bacterial metabolism and fermented the aromatic lactic acid derivative β-phenyllactic acid (PhLA). We expressed the Wickerhamia fluorescens gene (pprA) encoding a phenylpyruvate reductase in Escherichia coli strains producing high levels of phenylalanine, and fermented optically pure (>99.9 %) D-PhLA. Replacing pprA with bacterial ldhA encoding lactate dehydrogenase generated L-PhLA, indicating that the produced enzymes converted phenylpyruvate, which is an intermediate of phenylalanine synthesis, to these chiral PhLAs. Glucose was converted under optimized fermentation conditions to yield 29 g/l D-PhLA, which was purified from fermentation broth. The product satisfied the laboratory-scale chemical synthesis of poly(D-PhLA) with M w 28,000 and allowed initial physiochemical characterization. Poly(D-PhLA) absorbed near ultraviolet light, and has the same potential as all other biomass-derived aromatic bioplastics of phenylated derivatives of poly(lactic acid). This approach to screening and fermenting aromatic monomers from glucose exploits a new era of bio-based aromatic polymer design and will contribute to petroleum conservation and carbon dioxide fixation.

  15. Determination of polar aromatic amines using newly synthesized sol-gel titanium (IV) butoxide cyanopropyltriethoxysilane as solid phase extraction sorbent.

    PubMed

    Miskam, Mazidatulakmam; Abu Bakar, Nor Kartini; Mohamad, Sharifah

    2014-03-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) method has been developed using a newly synthesized titanium (IV) butoxide-cyanopropyltriethoxysilane (Ti-CNPrTEOS) sorbent for polar selective extraction of aromatic amines in river water sample. The effect of different parameters on the extraction recovery was studied using the SPE method. The applicability of the sorbents for the extraction of polar aromatic amines by the SPE was extensively studied and evaluated as a function of pH, conditioning solvent, sample loading volume, elution solvent and elution solvent volume. The optimum experimental conditions were sample at pH 7, dichloromethane as conditioning solvent, 10 mL sample loading volume and 5 mL of acetonitrile as the eluting solvent. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for solid phase extraction using Ti-CNPrTEOS SPE sorbent (0.01-0.2; 0.03-0.61 µg L(-1)) were lower compared with those achieved using Si-CN SPE sorbent (0.25-1.50; 1.96-3.59 µg L(-1)) and C18 SPE sorbent (0.37-0.98; 1.87-2.87 µg L(-1)) with higher selectivity towards the extraction of polar aromatic amines. The optimized procedure was successfully applied for the solid phase extraction method of selected aromatic amines in river water, waste water and tap water samples prior to the gas chromatography-flame ionization detector separation.

  16. Redesign, reconstruction, and directed extension of the Brevibacterium linens C40 carotenoid pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Park, Yun Hee; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the carotenoid biosynthetic pathways of Brevibacterium linens DSMZ 20426 were reconstructed, redesigned, and extended with additional carotenoid-modifying enzymes of other sources in a heterologous host Escherichia coli. The modular lycopene pathway synthesized an unexpected carotenoid structure, 3,4-didehydrolycopene, as well as lycopene. Extension of the novel 3,4-didehydrolycopene pathway with the mutant Pantoea lycopene cyclase CrtY(2) and the Rhodobacter spheroidene monooxygenase CrtA generated monocyclic torulene and acyclic oxocarotenoids, respectively. The reconstructed beta-carotene pathway synthesized an unexpected 7,8-dihydro-beta-carotene in addition to beta-carotene. Extension of the beta-carotene pathway with the B. linens beta-ring desaturase CrtU and Pantoea beta-carotene hydroxylase CrtZ generated asymmetric carotenoid agelaxanthin A, which had one aromatic ring at the one end of carotene backbone and one hydroxyl group at the other end, as well as aromatic carotenoid isorenieratene and dihydroxy carotenoid zeaxanthin. These results demonstrate that reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathways and extension with promiscuous enzymes in a heterologous host holds promise as a rational strategy for generating structurally diverse compounds that are hardly accessible in nature.

  17. Carotenoids in Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Henríquez, Vitalia; Escobar, Carolina; Galarza, Janeth; Gimpel, Javier

    Carotenoids are a class of isoprenoids synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms as well as by some non-photosynthetic bacteria and fungi with broad applications in food, feed and cosmetics, and also in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. Microalgae represent an important source of high-value products, which include carotenoids, among others. Carotenoids play key roles in light harvesting and energy transfer during photosynthesis and in the protection of the photosynthetic apparatus against photooxidative damage. Carotenoids are generally divided into carotenes and xanthophyls, but accumulation in microalgae can also be classified as primary (essential for survival) and secondary (by exposure to specific stimuli).In this chapter, we outline the high value carotenoids produced by commercially important microalgae, their production pathways, the improved production rates that can be achieved by genetic engineering as well as their biotechnological applications.

  18. Carotenoids of biotechnological importance.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are natural pigments with antioxidative functions that protect against oxidative stress. They are essential for humans and must be supplied through the diet. Carotenoids are the precursors for the visual pigment rhodopsin, and lutein and zeaxanthin must be accumulated in the yellow eye spot to protect the retina from excess light and ultraviolet damage. There is a global market for carotenoids as food colorants, animal feed, and nutraceuticals. Some carotenoids are chemically synthesized, whereas others are from natural sources. Microbial mass production systems of industrial interest for carotenoids are in use, and new ones are being developed by metabolic pathway engineering of bacteria, fungi, and plants. Several examples will be highlighted in this chapter.

  19. Unsymmetrically Extended Polyfused Aromatics Embedding Coronene and Perylene Frameworks: Syntheses and Properties.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Ho, Man-Tzu; Tao, Yu-Tai

    2016-01-15

    A series of polyfused aromatics containing coronene and perylene in their frameworks was successfully constructed by a modified Ramirez-Corey-Fuchs reaction as the key reaction. Typical six-membered annulation and atypical five-membered annulation through controlled reaction conditions led to a range of extensively conjugate aromatics as possible candidates for organic semiconductors. A significant p-type field-effect mobility of 0.42-0.64 cm(2)/V·s was obtained from one of the derivatives, dibenzo[a,d]coronene.

  20. Encapsulation of Carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Henelyta S.; Schuchmann, Heike P.; Engel, Robert; Walz, Elke; Briviba, Karlis

    Carotenoids are natural pigments, which are synthesized by microorganisms and plants. More than 600 naturally occurring carotenoids have been found in the nature. The main sources of carotenoids are fruits, vegetables, leaves, peppers, and certain types of fishes, sea foods, and birds. Carotenoids may protect cells against photosensitization and work as light-absorbing pigments during photosynthesis. Some carotenoids may inhibit the destructive effect of reactive oxygen species. Due to the antioxidative properties of carotenoids, many investigations regarding their protective effects against cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancers, as well as other degenerative illnesses, have been carried out in the last years (Briviba et al. 2004; Krinsky et al. 2004; Kirsh et al. 2006). A diet rich in carotenoids may also contribute to photoprotection against UV radiation (Stahl et al. 2006). In vitro studies have shown that carotenoids such as β-cryptoxanthin and lycopene stimulate bone formation and mineralization. The results may be related to prevention of osteoporosis (Kim et al. 2003; Yamaguchi and Uchiyama 2003; 2004; Yamaguchi et al. 2005).

  1. [Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in carotenoid-synthesizing fungi Blakeslea trispora and Neurospora crassa under the oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Gessler, N N; Sokolov, A V; Bykhovskiĭ, V Ia; Belozerskaia, T A

    2002-01-01

    The addition of menadione into the medium during cultivation of Neurospora crassa in the dark activated its constitutive superoxide dismutase. Exposure to light not only activated superoxide dismutase and catalase, but also increased the content of neurosporaxanthin. Superoxide dismutase activity in the mixed (+/-) mycelium of Blakeslea trispora synthesizing beta-carotene in the dark was much lower than that in Neurospora crassa. The superoxide dismutase activity further decreased in oxidative stress. The catalase activity decreased with an increase in the content of beta-carotene. Our results indicate that neurosporaxanthin possesses photoprotective properties in Neurospora crassa. In Blakeslea trispora (+/-) fungi, this compound acts as a major antioxidant during inactivation of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species.

  2. Marine Carotenoids: Biological Functions and Commercial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Vílchez, Carlos; Forján, Eduardo; Cuaresma, María; Bédmar, Francisco; Garbayo, Inés; Vega, José M.

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most common pigments in nature and are synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms and fungi. Carotenoids are considered key molecules for life. Light capture, photosynthesis photoprotection, excess light dissipation and quenching of singlet oxygen are among key biological functions of carotenoids relevant for life on earth. Biological properties of carotenoids allow for a wide range of commercial applications. Indeed, recent interest in the carotenoids has been mainly for their nutraceutical properties. A large number of scientific studies have confirmed the benefits of carotenoids to health and their use for this purpose is growing rapidly. In addition, carotenoids have traditionally been used in food and animal feed for their color properties. Carotenoids are also known to improve consumer perception of quality; an example is the addition of carotenoids to fish feed to impart color to farmed salmon. PMID:21556162

  3. Marine carotenoids: biological functions and commercial applications.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, Carlos; Forján, Eduardo; Cuaresma, María; Bédmar, Francisco; Garbayo, Inés; Vega, José M

    2011-03-03

    Carotenoids are the most common pigments in nature and are synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms and fungi. Carotenoids are considered key molecules for life. Light capture, photosynthesis photoprotection, excess light dissipation and quenching of singlet oxygen are among key biological functions of carotenoids relevant for life on earth. Biological properties of carotenoids allow for a wide range of commercial applications. Indeed, recent interest in the carotenoids has been mainly for their nutraceutical properties. A large number of scientific studies have confirmed the benefits of carotenoids to health and their use for this purpose is growing rapidly. In addition, carotenoids have traditionally been used in food and animal feed for their color properties. Carotenoids are also known to improve consumer perception of quality; an example is the addition of carotenoids to fish feed to impart color to farmed salmon.

  4. Hepatocyte-targeting gene delivery using a lipoplex composed of galactose-modified aromatic lipid synthesized with click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Mizuha; Mochizuki, Shinichi; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    Highly efficient drug carriers targeting hepatocyte is needed for treatment for liver diseases such as liver cirrhosis and virus infections. Galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine is known to be recognized and incorporated into the cells through asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) that is exclusively expressed on hepatocyte and hepatoma. In this study, we synthesized a galactose-modified lipid with aromatic ring with click chemistry. To make a complex with DNA, termed 'lipoplex', we prepared a binary micelle composed of cationic lipid; dioleoyltrimethylammoniumpropane (DOTAP) and galactose-modified lipid (D/Gal). We prepared lipoplex from plasmid DNA (pDNA) and D/Gal and examined the cell specificity and transfection efficiency. The lipoplex was able to interact with ASGPR immobilized on gold substrate in the quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor cell. The lipoplex induced high gene expression to HepG2 cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, but not to A549 cells, a human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line. The treatment with asialofetuin, which is a ligand for ASGPR and would work as a competitive inhibitor, before addition of the lipoplexes decreased the expression to HepG2 cells. These results indicate that D/Gal lipoplex was incorporated into HepG2 cells preferentially through ASGPR and the uptake was caused by galactose specific receptor. This delivery system to hepatocytes may overcome the problems for gene therapy and be used for treatment of hepatitis and hepatic cirrhosis.

  5. Hydrothermal chemistry of Th(IV) with aromatic dicarboxylates: New framework compounds and in situ ligand syntheses

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegelgruber, Kate L.; Knope, Karah E.; Frisch, Mark; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2008-02-15

    A novel thorium (IV) coordination polymer, Th(C{sub 5}H{sub 2}N{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1), has been prepared under the hydrothermal reaction of thorium nitrate tetrahydrate and 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid (H{sub 3}pdc). Compound 1 (orthorhombic, P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, a=6.9362(5) A, b=10.7806(8) A, c=17.9915(14) A, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.0210, wR{sub 2}=0.0470) consists of thorium metal centers connected via H{sub 3}pdc linkages to form an overall three-dimensional structure containing {pi}-{pi} interactions between the pyrazole rings. 2,3-Pyrazinedicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}pzdc) was explored as well to (1) study the effect of the location of the carboxylic groups around the aromatic ring and (2) produce heterometallic compounds. Thorium (IV) and copper (II) were combined with H{sub 2}pzdc, resulting in an interesting decomposition reaction characterized though the isolation of Th(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O (2) (monoclinic, C2/c, a=13.8507(12) A, b=7.8719(7) A, c=10.7961(16) A, {beta}=118.0310(10){sup o}, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.0160, wR{sub 2}=0.0349), Cu(C{sub 6}H{sub 2}N{sub 2}O{sub 4}) (3) (monoclinic, C2/c, a=11.499(3) A, b=7.502(2) A, c=7.402(2) A, {beta}=93.892(5){sup o}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0472, wR{sub 2}=0.0745) and Cu(C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}O{sub 2})(NO{sub 3})(H{sub 2}O) (4). The capture of these species provides mechanistic evidence for the formation of the oxalate anions observed in 2 via the decarboxylation of H{sub 2}pzdc to yield the linker in 4: 2-pyrazinecarboxylate anions. - Graphical abstract: 3,5-Pyrazoledicarboxylic and 2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid were utilized in synthesizing two novel thorium (IV) coordination polymers. Attempts to synthesize a Th-Cu bimetallic compound with 2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid resulted in a triphasic mixture (2, 3 and 4, respectively). The oxalate anion observed in Th(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O (2) is theorized to result from decarboxylation of 2

  6. Metabolic engineering towards biotechnological production of carotenoids in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, P C; Schmidt-Dannert, C

    2002-10-01

    Carotenoids are important natural pigments produced by many microorganisms and plants. Traditionally, carotenoids have been used in the feed, food and nutraceutical industries. The recent discoveries of health-related beneficial properties attributed to carotenoids have spurred great interest in the production of structurally diverse carotenoids for pharmaceutical applications. The availability of a considerable number of microbial and plant carotenoid genes that can be functionally expressed in heterologous hosts has opened ways for the production of diverse carotenoid compounds in heterologous systems. In this review, we will describe the recent progress made in metabolic engineering of non-carotenogenic microorganisms for improved carotenoid productivity. In addition, we will discuss the application of combinatorial and evolutionary strategies to carotenoid pathway engineering to broaden the diversity of carotenoid structures synthesized in recombinant hosts.

  7. Chemistry and biotechnology of carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Namitha, K K; Negi, P S

    2010-09-01

    Carotenoids are one of the most widespread groups of pigments in nature and more than 600 of these have been identified. Beside provitamin A activity, carotenoids are important as antioxidants and protective agents against various diseases. They are isoprenoids with a long polyene chain containing 3 to 15 conjugated double bonds, which determines their absorption spectrum. Cyclization at one or both ends occurs in hydrocarbon carotene, while xanthophylls are formed by the introduction of oxygen. In addition, modifications involving chain elongation, isomerization, or degradation are also found. The composition of carotenoids in food may vary depending upon production practices, post-harvest handling, processing, and storage. In higher plants they are synthesized in the plastid. Both mevalonate dependent and independent pathway for the formation of isopentenyl diphosphate are known. Isopentenyl diphosphate undergoes a series of addition and condensation reactions to form phytoene, which gets converted to lycopene. Cyclization of lycopene either leads to the formation of β-carotene and its derivative xanthophylls, β-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and violaxanthin or α-carotene and lutein. Even though most of the carotenoid biosynthetic genes have been cloned and identified, some aspects of carotenoid formation and manipulation in higher plants especially remain poorly understood. In order to enhance the carotenoid content of crop plants to a level that will be required for the prevention of diseases, there is a need for research in both the basic and the applied aspects.

  8. Chromoplast biogenesis and carotenoid accumulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chromoplasts are special organelles that possess superior ability to synthesize and store massive amounts of carotenoids. They are responsible for the distinctive colors found in fruits, flowers, and roots. Chromoplasts exhibit various morphologies and are derived from either pre-existing chloroplas...

  9. Extension of the carotenoid test to superficially porous C18 bonded phases, aromatic ligand types and new classical C18 bonded phases.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, E

    2012-11-30

    The recent introduction of new stationary phases for liquid chromatography based on superficially porous particles, called core-shell or fused-core, dramatically improved the separation performances through very high efficiency, due mainly to reduced eddy diffusion. However, few studies have evaluated the retention and selectivity of C18 phases based on such particles, despite some retention order change reported in literature between some of these phases. The carotenoid test has been developed a few years ago in the goal to compare the chromatographic properties of C18 bonded phases. Based on the analysis of carotenoid pigments by using Supercritical Fluid Chromatography (SFC), it allows, with a single analysis, to measure three main properties of reversed phase chromatography stationary phases: hydrophobicity, polar surface activity and shape selectivity. Previous studies showed the effect of the endcapping treatment, the bonding density, the pore size, and the type of bonding (monomeric vs. polymeric) on these studied properties, and described the classification map used for a direct column comparison. It was applied to ten ODS superficially porous stationary phases, showing varied chromatographic behaviors amongst these phases. As expected, due to the lower specific surface area, these superficially porous phases are less hydrophobic than the fully porous one. In regards of the polar surface activity (residual silanols) and to the shape selectivity, some of these superficially porous phases display close chromatographic properties (Poroshell 120, Halo C18, Ascentis Express, Accucore C18, Nucleoshell C18 on one side and Aeris Wide pore, Aeris peptide and Kinetex XDB on the other side), whereas others, Kinetex C18 and Halo peptide ES C18 display more specific ones. Besides, they can be compared to classical fully porous phases, in the goal to improve method transfer from fully to superficially porous particles. By the way, the paper also report the extension of

  10. Effect of heating rate and plant species on the size and uniformity of silver nanoparticles synthesized using aromatic plant extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Pinero, Jorge Luis; Terrón-Rebolledo, Manuel; Foroughbakhch, Rahim; Moreno-Limón, Sergio; Melendrez, M. F.; Solís-Pomar, Francisco; Pérez-Tijerina, Eduardo

    2016-11-01

    Mixing aqueous silver solutions with aqueous leaf aromatic plant extracts from basil, mint, marjoram and peppermint resulted in the synthesis of quasi-spherical silver nanoparticles in a range of size between 2 and 80 nm in diameter as analyzed by analytical high-resolution electron microscopy. The average size could be controlled by applying heat to the initial reaction system at different rates of heating, and by the specific botanical species employed for the reaction. Increasing the rate of heating resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the size of the nanoparticles produced, regardless of the species employed. This fact was more evident in the case of marjoram, which decreased the average diameter from 27 nm at a slow rate of heating to 8 nm at a high rate of heating. With regard to the species, minimum sizes of <10 nm were obtained with basil and peppermint, while marjoram and mint yielded an average size between 10 and 25 nm. The results indicate that aromatic plant extracts can be used to achieve the controlled synthesis of metal nanoparticles.

  11. Carotenoid biosynthesis in extremophilic Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2010-11-01

    Bacteria from the phylum Deinococcus-Thermus are known for their resistance to extreme stresses including radiation, oxidation, desiccation and high temperature. Cultured Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria are usually red or yellow pigmented because of their ability to synthesize carotenoids. Unique carotenoids found in these bacteria include deinoxanthin from Deinococcus radiodurans and thermozeaxanthins from Thermus thermophilus. Investigations of carotenogenesis will help to understand cellular stress resistance of Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria. Here, we discuss the recent progress toward identifying carotenoids, carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes and pathways in some species of Deinococcus-Thermus extremophiles. In addition, we also discuss the roles of carotenoids in these extreme bacteria.

  12. Carotenoids in Algae: Distributions, Biosyntheses and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Takaichi, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    For photosynthesis, phototrophic organisms necessarily synthesize not only chlorophylls but also carotenoids. Many kinds of carotenoids are found in algae and, recently, taxonomic studies of algae have been developed. In this review, the relationship between the distribution of carotenoids and the phylogeny of oxygenic phototrophs in sea and fresh water, including cyanobacteria, red algae, brown algae and green algae, is summarized. These phototrophs contain division- or class-specific carotenoids, such as fucoxanthin, peridinin and siphonaxanthin. The distribution of α-carotene and its derivatives, such as lutein, loroxanthin and siphonaxanthin, are limited to divisions of Rhodophyta (macrophytic type), Cryptophyta, Euglenophyta, Chlorarachniophyta and Chlorophyta. In addition, carotenogenesis pathways are discussed based on the chemical structures of carotenoids and known characteristics of carotenogenesis enzymes in other organisms; genes and enzymes for carotenogenesis in algae are not yet known. Most carotenoids bind to membrane-bound pigment-protein complexes, such as reaction center, light-harvesting and cytochrome b6f complexes. Water-soluble peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein (PCP) and orange carotenoid protein (OCP) are also established. Some functions of carotenoids in photosynthesis are also briefly summarized. PMID:21747749

  13. Hydrothermal chemistry of Th(IV) with aromatic dicarboxylates: New framework compounds and in situ ligand syntheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegelgruber, Kate L.; Knope, Karah E.; Frisch, Mark; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2008-02-01

    A novel thorium (IV) coordination polymer, Th(C 5H 2N 2O 4) 2(H 2O) 2 ( 1), has been prepared under the hydrothermal reaction of thorium nitrate tetrahydrate and 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid (H 3pdc). Compound 1 (orthorhombic, P2 12 12 1, a=6.9362(5) Å, b=10.7806(8) Å, c=17.9915(14) Å, Z=2, R1=0.0210, w R2=0.0470) consists of thorium metal centers connected via H 3pdc linkages to form an overall three-dimensional structure containing π- π interactions between the pyrazole rings. 2,3-Pyrazinedicarboxylic acid (H 2pzdc) was explored as well to (1) study the effect of the location of the carboxylic groups around the aromatic ring and (2) produce heterometallic compounds. Thorium (IV) and copper (II) were combined with H 2pzdc, resulting in an interesting decomposition reaction characterized though the isolation of Th(C 2O 4) 2(H 2O) 2·2H 2O ( 2) (monoclinic, C2/ c, a=13.8507(12) Å, b=7.8719(7) Å, c=10.7961(16) Å, β=118.0310(10)°, Z=2, R1=0.0160, w R2=0.0349), Cu(C 6H 2N 2O 4) ( 3) (monoclinic, C2/ c, a=11.499(3) Å, b=7.502(2) Å, c=7.402(2) Å, β=93.892(5)°, Z=4, R1=0.0472, w R2=0.0745) and Cu(C 5H 3N 2O 2)(NO 3)(H 2O) ( 4). The capture of these species provides mechanistic evidence for the formation of the oxalate anions observed in 2 via the decarboxylation of H 2pzdc to yield the linker in 4: 2-pyrazinecarboxylate anions.

  14. Carotenoids in marine animals.

    PubMed

    Maoka, Takashi

    2011-02-22

    Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine animal carotenoids from natural product chemistry, metabolism, food chain, and chemosystematic viewpoints, and also describe new structural carotenoids isolated from marine animals over the last decade.

  15. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Maoka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine animal carotenoids from natural product chemistry, metabolism, food chain, and chemosystematic viewpoints, and also describe new structural carotenoids isolated from marine animals over the last decade. PMID:21566799

  16. New silver(I) coordination polymers constructed from pyrazine derivatives and aromatic carboxylic acids: Syntheses, structures and photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Huang, Hua-Qi; Mei, Hong-Xin; Wang, Dan-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Xiang; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2015-11-01

    Five one-dimensional to three-dimensional coordination polymers have been synthesized by 2-chlorobenzoic acid (HL1), 2-nitrobenzoic acid (HL2), o-toluic acid (HL3), 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine (tpyz) and 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine (mpyz) in the presence of NH3·H2O in mixed solvents systems, namely, {Ag4(tpyz)2(L1)4}n (1), {Ag2(tpyz) (L2)2}n (2), {Ag2(tpyz) (L3)2}n (3), {Ag2(mpyz) (L1)2}n (4), {Ag(mpyz) (L2) (H2O)}n (5). All the complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra and X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 shows a 3D framework. The tpyz ligand links 1D chain which was connected by silver atom and L1 anion into 3D framework. Compounds 2 and 4 possess a similar 2D network with (4, 4) topology. Complex 3 also exhibits a two-dimensional structure. There is a 1D silver chain in 3, which is the main difference from 2 and 4. So, 3 shows three-connected (4 8, 3) topology. For 5, only one oxygen of L2 coordinated to Ag(I) ions. The L2 anions were arranged in both sides of the chain, which was connected by silver atoms and mpyz ligands. Then, the uncoordinated carboxylate oxygen with coordinated water 1molecule oxygen through the hydrogen bond made the resultant structure to a 3D framework. Complexes 1-5 spanning from one-dimensional chains to three-dimensional framework suggest that carboxylates and the kinds of pyrazine derivatives play significant roles in the formation of such coordination architectures. The photoluminescence and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the complexes were also investigated.

  17. Carotenoid biosynthetic genes in Brassica rapa: comparative genomic analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Li, Peirong; Zhang, Shujiang; Zhang, Shifan; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu; Sun, Rifei

    2015-07-03

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms. Despite much research on carotenoid biosynthesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there is a lack of information on the carotenoid pathway in Brassica rapa. To better understand its carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, we performed a systematic analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic genes at the genome level in B. rapa. We identified 67 carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa, which were orthologs of the 47 carotenoid genes in A. thaliana. A high level of synteny was observed for carotenoid biosynthetic genes between A. thaliana and B. rapa. Out of 47 carotenoid biosynthetic genes in A. thaliana, 46 were successfully mapped to the 10 B. rapa chromosomes, and most of the genes retained more than one copy in B. rapa. The gene expansion was caused by the whole-genome triplication (WGT) event experienced by Brassica species. An expression analysis of the carotenoid biosynthetic genes suggested that their expression levels differed in root, stem, leaf, flower, callus, and silique tissues. Additionally, the paralogs of each carotenoid biosynthetic gene, which were generated from the WGT in B. rapa, showed significantly different expression levels among tissues, suggesting differentiated functions for these multi-copy genes in the carotenoid pathway. This first systematic study of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa provides insights into the carotenoid metabolic mechanisms of Brassica crops. In addition, a better understanding of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa will contribute to the development of conventional and transgenic B. rapa cultivars with enriched carotenoid levels in the future.

  18. Auxiliary aromatic-acid effect on the structures of a series of Zn{sup II} coordination polymers: Syntheses, crystal structures, and photoluminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yanhong; Lan Yaqian; Shao Kuizhan; Su Zhongmin; Liao Yi

    2010-04-15

    Five novel Zn{sup II}-(pyridyl)imidazole derivative coordination polymers, [Zn(L){sub 2}] (1), [Zn{sub 2}(mu{sub 3}-OH)L(m-BDC)] (2), [Zn{sub 2}(mu{sub 3}-OH)L(p-BDC)].H{sub 2}O (3), [Zn{sub 2}L(BTC)(H{sub 2}O)].2.5H{sub 2}O (4) and [Zn{sub 3.5}(mu{sub 3}-OH)L{sub 2}(BTEC)(H{sub 2}O)].H{sub 2}O (5) (L=4-((2-(pyridine-2-yl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzoic acid, p-H{sub 2}BDC=1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, m-H{sub 2}BDC=1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid, H{sub 3}BTC=1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, H{sub 4}BTEC=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid), were successfully synthesized under hydrothermal conditions through varying auxiliary aromatic-acid ligands and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. Compound 1 exhibits a 1D chain linked via double L bridges. Compound 2 features a well-known pcu topology with bent dicarboxylate ligand (m-H{sub 2}BDC) as an auxiliary ligand, while 3 displays a bcu network with linear dicarboxylate ligand (p-H{sub 2}BDC) as an auxiliary ligand. The structure of compound 4 is a novel 3D (3,5)-connected network with (4.6{sup 2})(4.6{sup 4}.8{sup 2}.10.12{sup 2}) topology. It is interesting that compound 5 shows an intricate (3,4,8)-connected framework with (4.6{sup 2})(4{sup 2}.6{sup 3}.8)(4{sup 2}.6{sup 4})(4{sup 2}.6{sup 18}.7.8{sup 6}.10) topology. In addition, their infrared spectra (IR), X-ray powder diffraction (XPRD) and photoluminescent properties were also investigated in detail. - Graphical abstract: Five novel Zn{sup II}-organic architectures have been hydrothermally synthesized through varying auxiliary aromatic-acid ligands and characterized by X-ray diffraction, the photoluminescence properties of compounds 1-5 were studied.

  19. Metabolic engineering for the microbial production of carotenoids and related products with a focus on the rare C50 carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Heider, Sabine A E; Peters-Wendisch, Petra; Wendisch, Volker F; Beekwilder, Jules; Brautaset, Trygve

    2014-05-01

    Carotenoids, a subfamily of terpenoids, are yellow- to red-colored pigments synthesized by plants, fungi, algae, and bacteria. They are ubiquitous in nature and take over crucial roles in many biological processes as for example photosynthesis, vision, and the quenching of free radicals and singlet oxygen. Due to their color and their potential beneficial effects on human health, carotenoids receive increasing attention. Carotenoids can be classified due to the length of their carbon backbone. Most carotenoids have a C40 backbone, but also C30 and C50 carotenoids are known. All carotenoids are derived from isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) as a common precursor. Pathways leading to IPP as well as metabolic engineering of IPP synthesis and C40 carotenoid production have been reviewed expertly elsewhere. Since C50 carotenoids are synthesized from the C40 carotenoid lycopene, we will summarize common strategies for optimizing lycopene production and we will focus our review on the characteristics, biosynthesis, glycosylation, and overproduction of C50 carotenoids.

  20. Magnetized graphene layers synthesized on the carbon nanofibers as novel adsorbent for the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Rezvani-Eivari, Mostafa; Amiri, Amirhassan; Baghayeri, Mehdi; Ghaemi, Ferial

    2016-09-23

    The application of magnetized graphene (G) layers synthesized on the carbon nanofibers (CNFs) (m-G/CNF) was investigated as novel adsorbent for the magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Six important parameters, affecting the extraction efficiency of PAHs, including: amount of adsorbent, adsorption and desorption times, type and volume of the eluent solvent and salt content of the sample were evaluated. The optimum extraction conditions were obtained as: 5min for extraction time, 20mg for sorbent amount, dichloromethane as desorption solvent, 1mL for desorption solvent volume, 5min for desorption time and 15% (w/v) for NaCl concentration. Good performance data were obtained at the optimized conditions. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges from 0.012 to 100ngmL(-1) with correlation coefficients (r) between 0.9950 and 0.9967 for all the analytes. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) of the proposed method for the studied PAHs were 0.004-0.03ngmL(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for five replicates at two concentration levels (0.1 and 50ngmL(-1)) of PAHs were ranged from 3.4 to 5.7%. Appropriate relative recovery values, in the range of 95.5-99.9%, were also obtained for the real water sample analysis.

  1. Production and conversion of functional carotenoids by bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carotenoids are red, orange, and yellow color pigments composed of isoprenyl units. They are well known to have beneficial health effects including anti-oxidant activity, anti-cardiovascular disease, and anti-cancer effects. These carotenoids are mainly synthesized in plants and photosynthetic alg...

  2. Generation of structurally novel short carotenoids and study of their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se H; Kim, Moon S; Lee, Bun Y; Lee, Pyung C

    2016-02-23

    Recent research interest in phytochemicals has consistently driven the efforts in the metabolic engineering field toward microbial production of various carotenoids. In spite of systematic studies, the possibility of using C30 carotenoids as biologically functional compounds has not been explored thus far. Here, we generated 13 novel structures of C30 carotenoids and one C35 carotenoid, including acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic structures, through directed evolution and combinatorial biosynthesis, in Escherichia coli. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of various C30 carotenoid structures revealed that acyclic C30 carotenoids showed higher radical scavenging activity than did DL-α-tocopherol. We could assume high potential biological activity of the novel structures of C30 carotenoids as well, based on the neuronal differentiation activity observed for the monocyclic C30 carotenoid 4,4'-diapotorulene on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results demonstrate that a series of structurally novel carotenoids possessing biologically beneficial properties can be synthesized in E. coli.

  3. Carotenoid-Protein Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George; Helliwell, John R.

    Chapter 5 shows that the aggregation of carotenoid molecules can have a profound effect on their properties and hence their functioning in biological systems. Another important influence is the interaction between carotenoids and other molecules. The way that interactions of carotenoids with lipid bilayers influence the structure and properties of membranes and membrane-asociated processes is discussed in Chapter 10, and the aggregation of carotenoid molecules within the bilayers in Chapter 5. Of particular importance, though, are interactions between carotenoids and proteins. These allow the hydrophobic carotenoids to be transported, to exist, and to function in an aqueous environment. In some cases they may modify strongly the light-absorption properties and hence the colour and photochemistry of the carotenoids.

  4. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Intraerythrocytic Stages of Plasmodium falciparum*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Tonhosolo, Renata; D'Alexandri, Fabio L.; de Rosso, Veridiana V.; Gazarini, Marcos L.; Matsumura, Miriam Y.; Peres, Valnice J.; Merino, Emilio F.; Carlton, Jane M.; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Mercadante, Adriana Z.; Kimura, Emília A.; Katzin, Alejandro M.

    2009-01-01

    Carotenoids are widespread lipophilic pigments synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms and some nonphotosynthetic fungi and bacteria. All carotenoids are derived from the C40 isoprenoid precursor geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, and their chemical and physical properties are associated with light absorption, free radical scavenging, and antioxidant activity. Carotenoids are generally synthesized in well defined subcellular organelles, the plastids, which are also present in the phylum Apicomplexa, which comprises a number of important human parasites, such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Recently, it was demonstrated that Toxoplasma gondii synthesizes abscisic acid. We therefore asked if Plasmodium falciparum is also capable of synthesizing carotenoids. Herein, biochemical findings demonstrated the presence of carotenoid biosynthesis in the intraerythrocytic stages of the apicomplexan parasite P. falciparum. Using metabolic labeling with radioisotopes, in vitro inhibition tests with norflurazon, a specific inhibitor of plant carotenoid biosynthesis, the results showed that intraerythrocytic stages of P. falciparum synthesize carotenoid compounds. A plasmodial enzyme that presented phytoene synthase activity was also identified and characterized. These findings not only contribute to the current understanding of P. falciparum evolution but shed light on a pathway that could serve as a chemotherapeutic target. PMID:19203994

  5. Carotenoid:β-cyclodextrin stability is independent of pigment structure.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Elisabet; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2017-04-15

    Carotenoids refer to a wide class of lipophilic pigments synthesized by plants, exert photoprotective and antioxidant properties that are lost upon carotenoid degradation. Their inclusion into hydrophilic host-molecules could improve their stability. Cyclodextrins, provide a hydrophobic cavity in the core of their structure while the outer configuration is suitable with aqueous environments. Carotenoids can accommodate into the hydrophobic core of cyclodextrins and therefore, they are protected from exogenous stress. Literature reported that carotenoid structure could modulate stability of the complexes, however no conclusions can be drawn as the studies performed so far were not completely analogous. We describe the synthesis of several carotenoids/β-CDs inclusion complexes and provide experimental evidences that β-CDs inclusion renders these compounds more stability towards the oxidizing agents (2,2'-azobis, 2-methylpropionamidine dihydrochloride and hydrogen peroxide). Esterified carotenoids were also used in this work to screen the influence of this particular structural configuration of xanthophylls against oxidation.

  6. Carotenoid scarcity, synthetic pteridine pigments and the evolution of sexual coloration in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed Central

    Grether, G F; Hudon, J; Endler, J A

    2001-01-01

    Carotenoid-based sexual coloration is the classic example of an honest signal of mate quality. Animals cannot synthesize carotenoid pigments and ultimately depend on dietary sources. Thus, in carotenoid-poor environments, carotenoid coloration may be a direct indicator of foraging ability and an indirect indicator of health and vigour. Carotenoid coloration may also be affected, more directly, by parasites in some species. Carotenoids are not, however, the only conspicuous pigments available to animals. Pteridine pigments, with similar spectral properties, are displayed in the exoskeletons and wings of insects, the irides of birds and the skins of fishes, lizards and amphibians. Unlike carotenoids, pteridines are synthesized de novo by animals. We report that the orange spots that male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) display to females contain red pteridine pigments (drosopterins) in addition to carotenoids. We also examined the relationship between drosopterin production by males and carotenoid availability in the field. The results contrasted sharply with the hypothesis that males use drosopterins to compensate for carotenoid scarcity: males used more, not less, drosopterins in streams with higher carotenoid availability. The positive association between drosopterin use and carotenoid availability could reflect the costs of drosopterin synthesis or it could be a consequence of females preferring a particular pigment ratio or hue. Male guppies appear to use drosopterin pigments in a manner that dilutes, but does not eliminate, the indicator value of carotenoid coloration. PMID:11410150

  7. Diversifying Carotenoid Biosynthetic Pathways by Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Umeno, Daisuke; Tobias, Alexander V.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms and plants synthesize a diverse array of natural products, many of which have proven indispensable to human health and well-being. Although many thousands of these have been characterized, the space of possible natural products—those that could be made biosynthetically—remains largely unexplored. For decades, this space has largely been the domain of chemists, who have synthesized scores of natural product analogs and have found many with improved or novel functions. New natural products have also been made in recombinant organisms, via engineered biosynthetic pathways. Recently, methods inspired by natural evolution have begun to be applied to the search for new natural products. These methods force pathways to evolve in convenient laboratory organisms, where the products of new pathways can be identified and characterized in high-throughput screening programs. Carotenoid biosynthetic pathways have served as a convenient experimental system with which to demonstrate these ideas. Researchers have mixed, matched, and mutated carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes and screened libraries of these “evolved” pathways for the emergence of new carotenoid products. This has led to dozens of new pathway products not previously known to be made by the assembled enzymes. These new products include whole families of carotenoids built from backbones not found in nature. This review details the strategies and specific methods that have been employed to generate new carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in the laboratory. The potential application of laboratory evolution to other biosynthetic pathways is also discussed. PMID:15755953

  8. Carotenoid metabolism in plants.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Nazia; Li, Li; Lu, Shan; Khin, Nay Chi; Pogson, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are mostly C40 terpenoids, a class of hydrocarbons that participate in various biological processes in plants, such as photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, photoprotection, and development. Carotenoids also serve as precursors for two plant hormones and a diverse set of apocarotenoids. They are colorants and critical components of the human diet as antioxidants and provitamin A. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the genes and enzymes involved in carotenoid metabolism and describe recent progress in understanding the regulatory mechanisms underlying carotenoid accumulation. The importance of the specific location of carotenoid enzyme metabolons and plastid types as well as of carotenoid-derived signals is discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Isorenieratene Biosynthesis in Green Sulfur Bacteria Requires the Cooperative Actions of Two Carotenoid Cyclases▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, Julia A.; Romberger, Steven P.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    The cyclization of lycopene to γ- or β-carotene is a major branch point in the biosynthesis of carotenoids in photosynthetic bacteria. Four families of carotenoid cyclases are known, and each family includes both mono- and dicyclases, which catalyze the formation of γ- and β-carotene, respectively. Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) synthesize aromatic carotenoids, of which the most commonly occurring types are the monocyclic chlorobactene and the dicyclic isorenieratene. Recently, the cruA gene, encoding a conserved hypothetical protein found in the genomes of all GSB and some cyanobacteria, was identified as a lycopene cyclase. Further genomic analyses have found that all available fully sequenced genomes of GSB encode an ortholog of cruA. Additionally, the genomes of all isorenieratene-producing species of GSB encode a cruA paralog, now named cruB. The cruA gene from the chlorobactene-producing GSB species Chlorobaculum tepidum and both cruA and cruB from the brown-colored, isorenieratene-producing GSB species Chlorobium phaeobacteroides strain DSM 266T were heterologously expressed in lycopene- and neurosporene-producing strains of Escherichia coli, and the cruB gene of Chlorobium clathratiforme strain DSM 5477T was also heterologously expressed in C. tepidum by inserting the gene at the bchU locus. The results show that CruA is probably a lycopene monocyclase in all GSB and that CruB is a γ-carotene cyclase in isorenieratene-producing species. Consequently, the branch point for the synthesis of mono- and dicyclic carotenoids in GSB seems to be the modification of γ-carotene, rather than the cyclization of lycopene as occurs in cyanobacteria. PMID:18676669

  10. Carotenoid metabolism in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carotenoids are mostly C40 terpenoids, a class of hydrocarbons that participate in various biological processes in plants, such as photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, photoprotection, and development. Carotenoids also serve as precursors for two plant hormones and a diverse set of apocarotenoids. Th...

  11. Functions of Intact Carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    The traditional view that carotenoids are a class of plant pigments does not do justice to their versatility. This versatility will become clear from the overview of the biological roles of carotenoids, in animals and microorganisms as well as in plants, that is given in this Chapter. It has become customary and convenient to differentiate biological effects of carotenoids into functions, actions and associations [1]. `Functions' have been defined as effects or properties that are essential for the normal well-being of the organism. Biological responses that follow the administration of carotenoids in the diet or as supplements are considered as `actions'. When an effect is seen but a causal relationship to the carotenoid has not been demonstrated, this is described as an `association'. The line between these is often not clear, however.

  12. Biosynthesis of Carotenoids in Plants: Enzymes and Color.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Saavedra, Carolina; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most important biocolor isoprenoids responsible for yellow, orange and red colors found in nature. In plants, they are synthesized in plastids of photosynthetic and sink organs and are essential molecules for photosynthesis, photo-oxidative damage protection and phytohormone synthesis. Carotenoids also play important roles in human health and nutrition acting as vitamin A precursors and antioxidants. Biochemical and biophysical approaches in different plants models have provided significant advances in understanding the structural and functional roles of carotenoids in plants as well as the key points of regulation in their biosynthesis. To date, different plant models have been used to characterize the key genes and their regulation, which has increased the knowledge of the carotenoid metabolic pathway in plants. In this chapter a description of each step in the carotenoid synthesis pathway is presented and discussed.

  13. Carotenoids in unexpected places: gall midges, lateral gene transfer, and carotenoid biosynthesis in animals.

    PubMed

    Cobbs, Cassidy; Heath, Jeremy; Stireman, John O; Abbot, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Carotenoids are conjugated isoprenoid molecules with many important physiological functions in organisms, including roles in photosynthesis, oxidative stress reduction, vision, diapause, photoperiodism, and immunity. Until recently, it was believed that only plants, microorganisms, and fungi were capable of synthesizing carotenoids and that animals acquired them from their diet, but recent studies have demonstrated that two arthropods (pea aphid and spider mite) possess a pair of genes homologous to those required for the first step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Absent in all other known animal genomes, these genes appear to have been acquired by aphids and spider mites in one or several lateral gene transfer events from a fungal donor. We report the third case of fungal carotenoid biosynthesis gene homologs in an arthropod: flies from the family Cecidomyiidae, commonly known as gall midges. Using phylogenetic analyses we show that it is unlikely that lycopene cyclase/phytoene synthase and phytoene desaturase homologs were transferred singly to an ancient arthropod ancestor; instead we propose that genes were transferred independently from related fungal donors after divergence of the major arthropod lineages. We also examine variation in intron placement and copy number of the carotenoid genes that may underlie function in the midges. This trans-kingdom transfer of carotenoid genes may represent a key innovation, underlying the evolution of phytophagy and plant-galling in gall midges and facilitating their extensive diversification across plant lineages.

  14. Nutrition Updates "Carotenoids and Health"

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This symposium covered current topics in carotenoids and health, with special emphasis on healthy aging. The carotenoids covered were beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, and beta-cryptoxanthin. Topics included the best food sources of these carotenoids, the importance of carotenoids as antioxidants an...

  15. Carotenoids and Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Uragami, Chiasa; Cogdell, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are ubiquitous and essential pigments in photosynthesis. They absorb in the blue-green region of the solar spectrum and transfer the absorbed energy to (bacterio-)chlorophylls, and so expand the wavelength range of light that is able to drive photosynthesis. This is an example of singlet-singlet energy transfer, and so carotenoids serve to enhance the overall efficiency of photosynthetic light reactions. Carotenoids also act to protect photosynthetic organisms from the harmful effects of excess exposure to light. Triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophylls to carotenoids plays a key role in this photoprotective reaction. In the light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria and chlorophytes, carotenoids have an additional role of structural stabilization of those complexes. In this article we review what is currently known about how carotenoids discharge these functions. The molecular architecture of photosynthetic systems will be outlined first to provide a basis from which to describe carotenoid photochemistry, which underlies most of their important functions in photosynthesis.

  16. Carotenoids in Staple Cereals: Metabolism, Regulation, and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Shengnan; Xia, Xianchun; He, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids play a critical role in animal and human health. Animals and humans are unable to synthesize carotenoids de novo, and therefore rely upon diet as sources of these compounds. However, major staple cereals often contain only small amounts of carotenoids in their grains. Consequently, there is considerable interest in genetic manipulation of carotenoid content in cereal grain. In this review, we focus on carotenoid metabolism and regulation in non-green plant tissues, as well as genetic manipulation in staple cereals such as rice, maize, and wheat. Significant progress has been made in three aspects: (1) seven carotenogenes play vital roles in carotenoid regulation in non-green plant tissues, including 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase influencing isoprenoid precursor supply, phytoene synthase, β-cyclase, and ε-cyclase controlling biosynthesis, 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases responsible for degradation, and orange gene conditioning sequestration sink; (2) provitamin A-biofortified crops, such as rice and maize, were developed by either metabolic engineering or marker-assisted breeding; (3) quantitative trait loci for carotenoid content on chromosomes 3B, 7A, and 7B were consistently identified, eight carotenogenes including 23 loci were detected, and 10 gene-specific markers for carotenoid accumulation were developed and applied in wheat improvement. A comprehensive and deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid metabolism in crops will be beneficial in improving our precision in improving carotenoid contents. Genomic selection and gene editing are emerging as transformative technologies for provitamin A biofortification. PMID:27559339

  17. A new microporous carbon material synthesized via thermolysis of a porous aromatic framework embedded with an extra carbon source for low-pressure CO2 uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiming; Li, Baiyan; Williams, Kia; Gao, Wen-Yang; Ma, Shengqian

    2013-11-11

    Pre-introducing an extra carbon source into the porous aromatic framework of PAF-1 followed by thermolysis affords a new microporous carbon material, which demonstrates a CO2 uptake capacity of 93 cm(3) g(-1) (equivalent to 4.1 mmol g(-1) or 18.2 wt%) at 295 K and 1 bar.

  18. Biomarkers of carotenoid bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Granado-Lorencio, F; Blanco-Navarro, I; Pérez-Sacristán, B; Hernández-Álvarez, E

    2017-09-01

    The use of biomarkers constitutes an essential tool to assess the bioavailability of carotenoids in humans. The present article aims to review several methodological, host-related and modulating factors relevant on assessing and interpreting carotenoid bioavailability. Markers for carotenoid bioavailability can be broadly divided into direct, biochemical or "analytical" markers and indirect, physiological or "functional" indicators. Analytical markers usually refer to biochemical indicators of intake and/or status (short and long term exposure) while functional measures may be interpreted in terms of cumulative exposure, biological effect (bioactivity) or modification of risk factors. Both types of markers display advantages and limitations but, in general, a relationship exists among the type of marker, the biological specimen needed and the time required for a change. Humans may absorb a wide range of carotenes and xanthophylls and many of them may be found in serum and tissues. However, under physiological conditions, the several classes of dietary carotenoids may behave unequally leading to a different systemic profile and, moreover, they can be selectively accumulated at target tissues. In addition, some carotenoids may be chemically and enzymatically modified generating different oxidative metabolites and apocarotenoids. Quantitatively, the biological response upon carotenoid intervention (assessed by analytical and functional markers) is highly variable but the use of large doses and long-term protocols may lead to saturation effects and the loss of linearity in the response. Also, despite carotenoid exposition is considered to be safe, markers of overexposure include clinical signs (i.e. carotenodermia, corneal rings and retinopathy) and biochemical indicators (hypercarotenemia, xanthophyll esters). Overall, both host-related and methodological factors may influence analytical and functional markers to assess carotenoid bioavailability although the

  19. Carotenoid cation formation and the regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Holt, Nancy E; Zigmantas, Donatas; Valkunas, Leonas; Li, Xiao-Ping; Niyogi, Krishna K; Fleming, Graham R

    2005-01-21

    Photosynthetic light harvesting in excess light is regulated by a process known as feedback deexcitation. Femtosecond transient absorption measurements on thylakoid membranes show selective formation of a carotenoid radical cation upon excitation of chlorophyll under conditions of maximum, steady-state feedback deexcitation. Studies on transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants confirmed that this carotenoid radical cation formation is correlated with feedback deexcitation and requires the presence of zeaxanthin, the specific carotenoid synthesized during high light exposure. These results indicate that energy transfer from chlorophyll molecules to a chlorophyllzeaxanthin heterodimer, which then undergoes charge separation, is the mechanism for excess energy dissipation during feedback deexcitation.

  20. BIOSYNTHESIS OF YEAST CAROTENOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kenneth L.; Nakayama, T. O. M.; Chichester, C. O.

    1964-01-01

    Simpson, Kenneth L. (University of California, Davis), T. O. M. Nakayama, and C. O. Chichester. Biosynthesis of yeast carotenoids. J. Bacteriol. 88:1688–1694. 1964.—The biosynthesis of carotenoids was followed in Rhodotorula glutinis and in a new strain, 62-506. The treatment of the growing cultures by methylheptenone, or ionone, vapors permitted observations of the intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway. On the basis of concentration changes and accumulation in blocked pathways, the sequence of carotenoid formation is postulated as phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, β-zeacarotene, γ-carotene, torulin, a C40 aldehyde, and torularhodin. Torulin and torularhodin were established as the main carotenoids of 62-506. PMID:14240958

  1. Carotenoids in Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telfer, Alison; Pascal, Andrew; Gall, Andrew

    Carotenoids are the secret ingredient in photosynthesis; masked by the green of chlorophyll, they are only revealed in their true glory during senescence, when chlorophyll is degraded to display the glowing colours of autumn. Yet the presence of these orange and yellow pigments is absolutely essential for oxygenic photosynthesis. This Chapter will explain the importance of carotenoids to oxygenic organisms and also their roles in anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, where their presence is often more obvious but in other ways may be less crucial.

  2. Carotenoid limitation of sexual coloration along an environmental gradient in guppies

    PubMed Central

    Grether, G. F.; Hudon, J.; Millie, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Carotenoids produce most of the brilliant orange and yellow colours seen in animals, but animals cannot synthesize these pigments and must rely on dietary sources. The idea that carotenoids make good signals because they are a scarce limiting resource was proposed two decades ago and has become the leading hypothesis for the role of carotenoids in animal communication. To our knowledge, until now, however, there has been no direct evidence that carotenoids are a limiting resource in nature. We showed that carotenoid availability in the wild limits the expression of sexual coloration in guppies (Poecilia reticulata), a species in which females prefer males with brighter orange carotenoid-containing spots. Further, the degree of carotenoid limitation varies geographically along a replicated environmental gradient (rainforest canopy cover), which opens new avenues for testing signal evolution theory.

  3. Comparative analysis of carotenoid accumulation in two goji (Lycium barbarum L. and L. ruthenicum Murr.) fruits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongliang; Zeng, Shaohua; Sun, Wei; Wu, Min; Hu, Weiming; Shen, Xiaofei; Wang, Ying

    2014-12-16

    The traditional Chinese medicinal plants Lycium barbarum L. and L. ruthenicum Murr. are valued for the abundance of bioactive carotenoids and anthocyanins in their fruits, respectively. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms contributing to their species-specific bioactive profiles remain poorly understood. In this study, the red fruit (RF) of L. barbarum was found to accumulate high levels of carotenoids (primarily zeaxanthin), while they were undetectable in the black fruit (BF) of L. ruthenicum. Cytological and gene transcriptional analyses revealed that the chromoplast differentiation that occurs in the chloroplast during fruit ripening only occurs in RF, indicating that the lack of chromoplast biogenesis in BF leads to no sink for carotenoid storage and the failure to synthesize carotenoids. Similar enzyme activities of phytoene synthase 1 (PSY1), chromoplast-specific lycopene β-cyclase (CYC-B) and β-carotene hydroxylase 2 (CRTR-B2) were observed in both L. ruthenicum and L. barbarum, suggesting that the undetectable carotenoid levels in BF were not due to the inactivation of carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes. The transcript levels of the carotenoid biosynthetic genes, particularly PSY1, phytoene desaturase (PDS), ζ-carotene desaturase (ZDS), CYC-B and CRTR-B2, were greatly increased during RF ripening, indicating increased zeaxanthin biosynthesis. Additionally, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (CCD4) was expressed at much higher levels in BF than in RF, suggesting continuous carotenoid degradation in BF. The failure of the chromoplast development in BF causes low carotenoid biosynthesis levels and continuous carotenoid degradation, which ultimately leads to undetectable carotenoid levels in ripe BF. In contrast, the successful chromoplast biogenesis in RF furnishes the sink necessary for carotenoid storage. Based on this observation, the abundant zeaxanthin accumulation in RF is primarily determined via both the large carotenoid biosynthesis levels

  4. Carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase is involved in carotenoid biosynthesis in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Sun, Zongtao; Xu, Zhenjian; Shen, Shaochuan; Wang, Hu; Hua, Yuejin

    2008-12-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 synthesizes deinoxanthin, a unique carotenoid product, which contributes to cell resistance following various stresses. The biosynthetic pathway of deinoxanthin is unclear, although several enzymes are presumed to be involved. The gene (dr2250) predicted by gene homologue analysis to encode carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase (CrtD) was deleted to investigate its function. A mutant deficient in the gene homologue of crtLm (dr0801) was also constructed to verify the catalytic function of the gene product in the native host. Carotenoid analysis of the resultant mutants verified that DR2250 encodes carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase, which catalyses the C-3',4'-desaturation of the monocyclic precursor of deinoxanthin but not acyclic carotenoids. Mutation of the gene homologue of crtLm (dr0801) resulted in accumulation of lycopene, confirming that it encodes the lycopene cyclase in the native host. The lack of CrtD decreased the antioxidant capacity of the mutant deficient in dr2250 compared with the wild-type, indicating that the C-3',4'-desaturation step contributes to the antioxidant capacity of deinoxanthin in D. radiodurans.

  5. [Carotenoids as natural antioxidants].

    PubMed

    Igielska-Kalwat, Joanna; Gościańska, Joanna; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-04-07

    Human organisms have many defence mechanisms able to neutralise the harmful effects of the reactive species of oxygen. Antioxidants play an important role in reducing the oxidative damage to the human organism. Carotenoids are among the strongest antioxidants. They have 11 coupled double bonds, so they can be classified as polyisoprenoids, show low polarity and can occur in acyclic, monocyclic or bicyclic forms. The carotenoids of the strongest antioxidant properties are lycopene, lutein, astaxanthin and β-carotene. Carotenoids with strong antioxidant properties have found wide application in medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. These compounds are highly active against both reactive oxygen species and free radicals. Comparing β-carotene, astaxanthin and lycopene with other antioxidants (e.g. vitamin C and E), it can be concluded that these compounds have higher antioxidant activity, e.g. against singlet oxygen. Astaxanthin is a stronger antioxidant compared to β-carotene, vitamin E and vitamin C, respectively 54, 14 and 65 times. Carotenoids have a salutary effect on our body, making it more resistant and strong to fight chronic diseases. The purpose of this article is to review the literature concerning free radicals and their adverse effects on the human body and carotenoids, as strong, natural antioxidants.

  6. Carotenoids, chemistry, sources and physiology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter for the Enclyclopedia of Human Nutrition (3rd edition) summarizes the structure, chemical and physiological mechanisms, dietary sources, and metabolism of carotenoids. Carotenoids are a family of phytonutrients which have antioxidant properties under most physiological conditions. Num...

  7. Progress in Microbial Carotenoids Production.

    PubMed

    Saini, Ramesh Kumar; Keum, Young-Soo

    2017-03-01

    Carotenoids are versatile isoprenoids pigments, play a vital role in the cellular system, starting from antioxidant to gene regulation. Carotenoids are widely used in food, nutraceuticals, and cosmetics owing to their vitamin A, antioxidant and anticancer activities. The demand of carotenoids in various sectors has triggered the research to explore a commercially viable and environmentally friendly production. This article presents a short review of progress in carotenoids production from microbial platforms.

  8. Production of carotenoids by microalgae: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Varela, João C; Pereira, Hugo; Vila, Marta; León, Rosa

    2015-09-01

    Carotenoids are a wide group of lipophylic isoprenoids synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms and also by some non-photosynthetic bacteria and fungi. Animals, which cannot synthesize carotenoids de novo, must include them in their diet to fulfil essential provitamin, antioxidant, or colouring requirements. Carotenoids are indispensable in light harvesting and energy transfer during photosynthesis and in the protection of the photosynthetic apparatus against photooxidative damage. In this review, we outline the factors inducing carotenoid accumulation in microalgae, the knowledge acquired on the metabolic pathways responsible for their biosynthesis, and the recent achievements in the genetic engineering of this pathway. Despite the considerable progress achieved in understanding and engineering algal carotenogenesis, many aspects remain to be elucidated. The increasing number of sequenced microalgal genomes and the data generated by high-throughput technologies will enable a better understanding of carotenoid biosynthesis in microalgae. Moreover, the growing number of industrial microalgal species genetically modified will allow the production of novel strains with enhanced carotenoid contents.

  9. More than meets the eye: from carotenoid biosynthesis to new insights into apocarotenoid signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carotenoids are a class of isoprenoid compounds synthesized almost exclusively in plants and are involved in a myriad of roles including the provision of flower and fruit pigmentation for the attraction of pollinators and seed dispersing organisms. While carotenoids are essential throughout plant de...

  10. A Lewis acid-promoted cyclization of ethenetricarboxylate derivative aromatic compounds. Novel syntheses of oxindoles and benzofuranones via Friedel-Crafts intramolecular Michael addition.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shoko; Morikawa, Satoshi; Iwata, Yuko; Yamamoto, Machiko; Kuramoto, Kaori

    2004-11-07

    A novel cyclization reaction of ethenetricarboxylate derivative aromatic compounds in the presence of various Lewis acids gave benzo-annulated cyclic compounds such as oxindole and benzofuran derivatives via Friedel-Crafts intramolecular Michael addition in high yields. For example, the reaction of diethyl 2-[(N-methyl-N-phenylcarbamoyl)methylene]malonate (1a) in the presence of ZnCl2 at room temperature gave diethyl 2-(1-methyl-2-oxoindolin-3-yl)malonate (2a) in 98% yield. The reactions also proceeded with a catalytic amount of a Lewis acid such as AlCl3, ZnCl2, ZnBr2, Sc(OTf)3, or InBr3.

  11. Carotenoid fluorescence in Dunaliella salina

    PubMed Central

    van Es, Marjon A.; Janssen, Marcel; Brandenburg, Willem A.; Wijffels, René H.

    2010-01-01

    Dunaliella salina is a halotolerant green alga that is well known for its carotenoid producing capacity. The produced carotenoids are mainly stored in lipid globules. For various research purposes, such as production and extraction kinetics, we would like to determine and/or localise the carotenoid globules in vivo. In this study, we show that the carotenoid-rich globules emit clear green fluorescence, which can be used in, for example, fluorescence microscopy (e.g. CLSM) to obtain pictures of the cells and their carotenoid content. PMID:20835349

  12. Carotenoids and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Voutilainen, Sari; Nurmi, Tarja; Mursu, Jaakko; Rissanen, Tiina H

    2006-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death in Western countries. Nutrition has a significant role in the prevention of many chronic diseases such as CVD, cancers, and degenerative brain diseases. The major risk and protective factors in the diet are well recognized, but interesting new candidates continue to appear. It is well known that a greater intake of fruit and vegetables can help prevent heart diseases and mortality. Because fruit, berries, and vegetables are chemically complex foods, it is difficult to pinpoint any single nutrient that contributes the most to the cardioprotective effects. Several potential components that are found in fruit, berries, and vegetables are probably involved in the protective effects against CVD. Potential beneficial substances include antioxidant vitamins, folate, fiber, and potassium. Antioxidant compounds found in fruit and vegetables, such as vitamin C, carotenoids, and flavonoids, may influence the risk of CVD by preventing the oxidation of cholesterol in arteries. In this review, the role of main dietary carotenoids, ie, lycopene, beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin, in the prevention of heart diseases is discussed. Although it is clear that a higher intake of fruit and vegetables can help prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with heart diseases, more information is needed to ascertain the association between the intake of single nutrients, such as carotenoids, and the risk of CVD. Currently, the consumption of carotenoids in pharmaceutical forms for the treatment or prevention of heart diseases cannot be recommended.

  13. Plastids and carotenoid accumulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plastids are ubiquitously in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids except proplastids can synth...

  14. Carotenoid biosynthesis and overproduction in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Corynebacterium glutamicum contains the glycosylated C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin as yellow pigment. Starting from isopentenyl pyrophosphate, which is generated in the non-mevalonate pathway, decaprenoxanthin is synthesized via the intermediates farnesyl pyrophosphate, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, lycopene and flavuxanthin. Results Here, we showed that the genes of the carotenoid gene cluster crtE-cg0722-crtBIYeYfEb are co-transcribed and characterized defined gene deletion mutants. Gene deletion analysis revealed that crtI, crtEb, and crtYeYf, respectively, code for the only phytoene desaturase, lycopene elongase, and carotenoid C45/C50 ɛ-cyclase, respectively. However, the genome of C. glutamicum also encodes a second carotenoid gene cluster comprising crtB2I2-1/2 shown to be co-transcribed, as well. Ectopic expression of crtB2 could compensate for the lack of phytoene synthase CrtB in C. glutamicum ΔcrtB, thus, C. glutamicum possesses two functional phytoene synthases, namely CrtB and CrtB2. Genetic evidence for a crtI2-1/2 encoded phytoene desaturase could not be obtained since plasmid-borne expression of crtI2-1/2 did not compensate for the lack of phytoene desaturase CrtI in C. glutamicum ΔcrtI. The potential of C. glutamicum to overproduce carotenoids was estimated with lycopene as example. Deletion of the gene crtEb prevented conversion of lycopene to decaprenoxanthin and entailed accumulation of lycopene to 0.03 ± 0.01 mg/g cell dry weight (CDW). When the genes crtE, crtB and crtI for conversion of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to lycopene were overexpressed in C. glutamicum ΔcrtEb intensely red-pigmented cells and an 80 fold increased lycopene content of 2.4 ± 0.3 mg/g CDW were obtained. Conclusion C. glutamicum possesses a certain degree of redundancy in the biosynthesis of the C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin as it possesses two functional phytoene synthase genes. Already metabolic engineering of only the terminal reactions

  15. A poly(acrylonitrile)-functionalized porous aromatic framework synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization for the extraction of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yanfeng; Zhang, Chenxi; Tang, Qing; Mayes, Richard T.; Liao, Wei -Po; Liao, Chen; Tsouris, Costas; Stankovich, Joseph J.; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; Abney, Carter W.; Jiang, De-en; Brown, Suree; Dai, Sheng

    2015-10-30

    In order to ensure a sustainable reserve of fuel for nuclear power generation, tremendous research efforts have been devoted to developing advanced sorbent materials for extracting uranium from seawater. In this work, a porous aromatic framework (PAF) was surface-functionalized with poly(acrylonitrile) through atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Batches of this adsorbent were conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at room temperature or 80 °C prior to contact with a uranium-spiked seawater simulant, with minimal differences in uptake observed as a function of conditioning temperature. A maximum capacity of 4.81 g-U/kg-ads was obtained following 42 days contact with uranium-spiked filtered environmental seawater, which demonstrates a comparable adsorption rate. A kinetic investigation revealed extremely rapid uranyl uptake, with more than 80% saturation reached within 14 days. Furthermore, relying on the semiordered structure of the PAF adsorbent, density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal cooperative interactions between multiple adsorbent groups yield a strong driving force for uranium binding.

  16. A poly(acrylonitrile)-functionalized porous aromatic framework synthesized by atom-transfer radical polymerization for the extraction of uranium from seawater

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Yanfeng; Zhang, Chenxi; Tang, Qing; ...

    2015-10-30

    In order to ensure a sustainable reserve of fuel for nuclear power generation, tremendous research efforts have been devoted to developing advanced sorbent materials for extracting uranium from seawater. In this work, a porous aromatic framework (PAF) was surface-functionalized with poly(acrylonitrile) through atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Batches of this adsorbent were conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at room temperature or 80 °C prior to contact with a uranium-spiked seawater simulant, with minimal differences in uptake observed as a function of conditioning temperature. A maximum capacity of 4.81 g-U/kg-ads was obtained following 42 days contact with uranium-spiked filtered environmental seawater, whichmore » demonstrates a comparable adsorption rate. A kinetic investigation revealed extremely rapid uranyl uptake, with more than 80% saturation reached within 14 days. Furthermore, relying on the semiordered structure of the PAF adsorbent, density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal cooperative interactions between multiple adsorbent groups yield a strong driving force for uranium binding.« less

  17. Carotenoids and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Slattery, M L; Benson, J; Curtin, K; Ma, K N; Schaeffer, D; Potter, J D

    2000-02-01

    Carotenoids have numerous biological properties that may underpin a role for them as chemopreventive agents. However, except for beta-carotene, little is known about how dietary carotenoids are associated with common cancers, including colon cancer. The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between dietary alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxanthin and the risk of colon cancer. Data were collected from 1993 case subjects with first primary incident adenocarcinoma of the colon and from 2410 population-based control subjects. Dietary data were collected from a detailed diet-history questionnaire and nutrient values for dietary carotenoids were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture-Nutrition Coordinating Center carotenoid database (1998 updated version). Lutein was inversely associated with colon cancer in both men and women [odds ratio (OR) for upper quintile of intake relative to lowest quintile of intake: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.04; P = 0.04 for linear trend]. The greatest inverse association was observed among subjects in whom colon cancer was diagnosed when they were young (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.92; P = 0.02 for linear trend) and among those with tumors located in the proximal segment of the colon (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.51, 0.91; P < 0.01 for linear trend). The associations with other carotenoids were unremarkable. The major dietary sources of lutein in subjects with colon cancer and in control subjects were spinach, broccoli, lettuce, tomatoes, oranges and orange juice, carrots, celery, and greens. These data suggest that incorporating these foods into the diet may help reduce the risk of developing colon cancer.

  18. Carotenoids of Gemmatimonas aurantiaca (Gemmatimonadetes): identification of a novel carotenoid, deoxyoscillol 2-rhamnoside, and proposed biosynthetic pathway of oscillol 2,2'-dirhamnoside.

    PubMed

    Takaichi, Shinichi; Maoka, Takashi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Hanada, Satoshi

    2010-03-01

    Gemmatimonas aurantiaca strain T-27(T) is an orange-coloured, Gram-negative, facultatively aerobic, polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium belonging to a recently proposed phylum, Gemmatimonadetes. We purified its pigments and identified them as carotenoids and their glycoside derivatives using spectral data. The major carotenoid was (2S,2' S)-oscillol 2,2'-di-(alpha-l-rhamnoside), and the minor carotenoids were (2S)-deoxyoscillol 2-( alpha-l-rhamnoside) and didemethylspirilloxanthin. Deoxyoscillol 2-rhamnoside is a novel carotenoid. Oscillol 2,2'-diglycosides have hitherto only been reported in a limited number of cyanobacteria, and this is believed to be the first finding of such carotenoids in another bacterial phylum. Based on the identification of the carotenoids and the completion of the entire nucleotide sequence, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for the carotenoids and the corresponding genes and enzymes. We propose the involvement of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase (CrtE), phytoene synthase (CrtB) and phytoene desaturase (CrtI) for lycopene synthesis; and of carotenoid 1,2-hydratase (CruF) and carotenoid 2-O-rhamnosyltransferase (CruG) for oscillol 2,2'-dirhamnoside synthesis. Further, isopentenyl pyrophosphate could be synthesized by a non-mevalonate pathway (DXP pathway).

  19. Syntheses and structure characterization of ten acid-base hybrid crystals based on N-containing aromatic brønsted bases and mineral acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhihao; Jin, Shouwen; Li, Xiaoliang; Xiao, Xiao; Hu, Kaikai; Guo, Ming; Chi, Xinchen; Liu, Hui; Wang, Daqi

    2017-10-01

    Cocrystallization of the aromatic brønsted bases with a series of mineral acids gave a total of ten hybrid salts with the compositions: (2-methylquinoline)2: (hydrochloride acid): 3H2O [(HL1)+. (L1)·· (Cl-) · (H2O)3] (1), (6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine): (hydrochloride acid) [(HL2)+. (Cl-)] (2), (6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine): (nitric acid) [(HL2)+. (NO3-)] (3), (6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine): (sulfuric acid) [(HL2)+ · (HSO4)-] (4), (6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine): (phosphoric acid) [(HL2)+ · (H2PO4)-] (5), (5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine): (hydrochloride acid): 3H2O [(HL3)+ · (Cl-) (H2O)3] (6), (5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine): (hydrobromic acid): CH3OH [(HL3)+ · (Br)- · CH3OH] (7), (5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine): (sulfuric acid): H2O [(HL3)+ · (HSO4)- · H2O] (8), (2-aminophenol): (phosphoric acid) [(HL4)+ · (H2PO4)-] (9), and (2-amino-4-chlorophenol): (phosphoric acid) [(HL5)+ · (H2PO4)-] (10). The ten salts have been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, and elemental analysis, and the melting points of all the salts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The result reveals that among the ten investigated crystals the ring N of the heterocycle or the NH2 in the aminophenol are protonated when the acids are deprotonated, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong charge-assisted classical hydrogen bonds between the NH+/NH3+ and deprotonated acidic groups. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the salts indicated that a different family of additional CHsbnd O, CHsbnd Cl, CH3sbnd N, CH3sbnd O, CHsbnd Br, CH3sbnd Br, Brsbnd Cl, Clsbnd S, Osbnd S, Osbnd O, Brsbnd S, Hsbnd H, and π-π associations contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total high-dimensional frameworks. For the coexistence of the various weak nonbonding interactions these structures adopted homo or hetero supramolecular synthons or both. Some classical

  20. Carotenoid-binding proteins; accessories to carotenoid function.

    PubMed

    Pilbrow, Jodi; Garama, Daniel; Carne, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of the widespread biological importance of carotenoids is increasing. Accompanying this is the developing recognition that the interaction of carotenoids with other molecules, such as proteins, is also essential. Here the significance of carotenoid-protein interactions with respect to biological function is reviewed for three well characterised carotenoprotein complexes; crustacyanin, the orange carotenoid protein and glutathione-S-transferase P1. In addition a preliminary report is made on the recent partial purification of an echinenone-binding protein extracted from a New Zealand sea urchin, Evechinus chloroticus.

  1. Syntheses, structures, thermal stabilities and photoluminescent properties of three silver(I) complexes of 2-ethyl-3-methylpyrazine and different aromatic dicarboxylates with various silver units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Mei, Hong-Xin; Wang, Dan-Feng; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2015-07-01

    Three new silver(I) coordination compounds based on 2-ethyl-3-methylpyrazine (epyz), [Ag2(epyz)(pta] (1), [Ag4(epyz)2(ipa)2] (2) and [Ag8(epyz)4(npa)4] (3, H2pta = o-phthalic acid, H2ipa = m-phthalic acid, H2npa = 1,4-napthalenedicarboxylic acid), have been synthesized and have been characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 shows a two-dimensional network comprising Ag2 units linked by the organic ligands. In complex 2, tetrahedral Ag4 units are bridged by the organic linkers into a double-layer structure. In complex 3, the chains with alternating Ag3 and Ag5 units are connected by the organic ligands into a three-dimensional framework. The structural diversity of these compounds and the Ag units is highly dependent on different carboxylates and the coordination modes of the epyz ligand. The thermal stabilities and photoluminescence behaviors of these complexes were also discussed.

  2. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Chili Peppers (Capsicum spp.)

    PubMed Central

    del Rocío Gómez-García, María; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2013-01-01

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits’ yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed. PMID:24065101

  3. Generation of structurally novel short carotenoids and study of their biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se H.; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Bun Y.; Lee, Pyung C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research interest in phytochemicals has consistently driven the efforts in the metabolic engineering field toward microbial production of various carotenoids. In spite of systematic studies, the possibility of using C30 carotenoids as biologically functional compounds has not been explored thus far. Here, we generated 13 novel structures of C30 carotenoids and one C35 carotenoid, including acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic structures, through directed evolution and combinatorial biosynthesis, in Escherichia coli. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of various C30 carotenoid structures revealed that acyclic C30 carotenoids showed higher radical scavenging activity than did DL-α-tocopherol. We could assume high potential biological activity of the novel structures of C30 carotenoids as well, based on the neuronal differentiation activity observed for the monocyclic C30 carotenoid 4,4′-diapotorulene on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results demonstrate that a series of structurally novel carotenoids possessing biologically beneficial properties can be synthesized in E. coli. PMID:26902326

  4. Biochemistry and molecular biology of carotenoid biosynthesis in chili peppers (Capsicum spp.).

    PubMed

    Gómez-García, María del Rocío; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí

    2013-09-16

    Capsicum species produce fruits that synthesize and accumulate carotenoid pigments, which are responsible for the fruits' yellow, orange and red colors. Chili peppers have been used as an experimental model for studying the biochemical and molecular aspects of carotenoid biosynthesis. Most reports refer to the characterization of carotenoids and content determination in chili pepper fruits from different species, cultivars, varieties or genotypes. The types and levels of carotenoids differ between different chili pepper fruits, and they are also influenced by environmental conditions. Yellow-orange colors of chili pepper fruits are mainly due to the accumulation of α- and β-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin. Carotenoids such as capsanthin, capsorubin and capsanthin-5,6-epoxide confer the red colors. Chromoplasts are the sites of carotenoid pigment synthesis and storage. According to the most accepted theory, the synthesis of carotenoids in chili peppers is controlled by three loci: c1, c2 and y. Several enzymes participating in carotenoid biosynthesis in chili pepper fruits have been isolated and characterized, and the corresponding gene sequences have been reported. However, there is currently limited information on the molecular mechanisms that regulate this biosynthetic pathway. Approaches to gain more knowledge of the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed.

  5. Tissue-Specific Apocarotenoid Glycosylation Contributes to Carotenoid Homeostasis in Arabidopsis Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Michaela; Matsubara, Shizue; Beyer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Attaining defined steady-state carotenoid levels requires balancing of the rates governing their synthesis and metabolism. Phytoene formation mediated by phytoene synthase (PSY) is rate limiting in the biosynthesis of carotenoids, whereas carotenoid catabolism involves a multitude of nonenzymatic and enzymatic processes. We investigated carotenoid and apocarotenoid formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in response to enhanced pathway flux upon PSY overexpression. This resulted in a dramatic accumulation of mainly β-carotene in roots and nongreen calli, whereas carotenoids remained unchanged in leaves. We show that, in chloroplasts, surplus PSY was partially soluble, localized in the stroma and, therefore, inactive, whereas the membrane-bound portion mediated a doubling of phytoene synthesis rates. Increased pathway flux was not compensated by enhanced generation of long-chain apocarotenals but resulted in higher levels of C13 apocarotenoid glycosides (AGs). Using mutant lines deficient in carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs), we identified CCD4 as being mainly responsible for the majority of AGs formed. Moreover, changed AG patterns in the carotene hydroxylase mutants lutein deficient1 (lut1) and lut5 exhibiting altered leaf carotenoids allowed us to define specific xanthophyll species as precursors for the apocarotenoid aglycons detected. In contrast to leaves, carotenoid hyperaccumulating roots contained higher levels of β-carotene-derived apocarotenals, whereas AGs were absent. These contrasting responses are associated with tissue-specific capacities to synthesize xanthophylls, which thus determine the modes of carotenoid accumulation and apocarotenoid formation. PMID:26134165

  6. Tissue-Specific Apocarotenoid Glycosylation Contributes to Carotenoid Homeostasis in Arabidopsis Leaves.

    PubMed

    Lätari, Kira; Wüst, Florian; Hübner, Michaela; Schaub, Patrick; Beisel, Kim Gabriele; Matsubara, Shizue; Beyer, Peter; Welsch, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Attaining defined steady-state carotenoid levels requires balancing of the rates governing their synthesis and metabolism. Phytoene formation mediated by phytoene synthase (PSY) is rate limiting in the biosynthesis of carotenoids, whereas carotenoid catabolism involves a multitude of nonenzymatic and enzymatic processes. We investigated carotenoid and apocarotenoid formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in response to enhanced pathway flux upon PSY overexpression. This resulted in a dramatic accumulation of mainly β-carotene in roots and nongreen calli, whereas carotenoids remained unchanged in leaves. We show that, in chloroplasts, surplus PSY was partially soluble, localized in the stroma and, therefore, inactive, whereas the membrane-bound portion mediated a doubling of phytoene synthesis rates. Increased pathway flux was not compensated by enhanced generation of long-chain apocarotenals but resulted in higher levels of C13 apocarotenoid glycosides (AGs). Using mutant lines deficient in carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs), we identified CCD4 as being mainly responsible for the majority of AGs formed. Moreover, changed AG patterns in the carotene hydroxylase mutants lutein deficient1 (lut1) and lut5 exhibiting altered leaf carotenoids allowed us to define specific xanthophyll species as precursors for the apocarotenoid aglycons detected. In contrast to leaves, carotenoid hyperaccumulating roots contained higher levels of β-carotene-derived apocarotenals, whereas AGs were absent. These contrasting responses are associated with tissue-specific capacities to synthesize xanthophylls, which thus determine the modes of carotenoid accumulation and apocarotenoid formation. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Biological activities of carotenoid metabolites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Considerable research effort has been expended in an attempt to substantiate and understand the potential roles of carotenoids in human health and disease. Early studies dealt with beta-carotene and other provitamin A carotenoids, but more recent research efforts have focused on the potential roles ...

  8. Carotenoids and lung cancer prevention

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the molecular actions of carotenoids is critical for human studies involving carotenoids for prevention of lung cancer and cancers at other tissue sites. While the original hypothesis prompting the beta-carotene intervention trials was that beta-carotene exerts beneficial effects thro...

  9. Recent advances in understanding carotenoid-derived signaling molecules in regulating plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids (C40) are synthesized in plastids and perform numerous important functions in these organelles. In addition, carotenoids can be processed into smaller signaling molecules that regulate various phases of the plant's life cycle. Besides the relatively well-studied phytohormones abscisic acid (ABA) and strigolactones (SLs), additional carotenoid-derived signaling molecules have been discovered and shown to regulate plant growth and development. As a few excellent reviews summarized recent research on ABA and SLs, this mini review will focus on progress made on identification and characterization of the emerging carotenoid-derived signals. Overall, a better understanding of carotenoid-derived signaling molecules has immediate applications in improving plant biomass production which in turn will have far reaching impacts on providing food, feed, and fuel for the growing world population.

  10. Tropical bat as mammalian model for skin carotenoid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Ismael; Garrido-Fernández, Juan; Ríos, José; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio; Rodríguez-Herrera, Bernal

    2016-01-01

    Animals cannot synthesize carotenoid pigments de novo, and must consume them in their diet. Most mammals, including humans, are indiscriminate accumulators of carotenoids but inefficiently distribute them to some tissues and organs, such as skin. This limits the potential capacity of these organisms to benefit from the antioxidant and immunostimulatory functions that carotenoids fulfill. Indeed, to date, no mammal has been known to have evolved physiological mechanisms to incorporate and deposit carotenoids in the skin or hair, and mammals have therefore been assumed to rely entirely on other pigments such as melanins to color their integument. Here we use high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-TOF/MS) to show that the frugivorous Honduran white bat Ectophylla alba colors its skin bright yellow with the deposition of the xanthophyll lutein. The Honduran white bat is thus a mammalian model that may help developing strategies to improve the assimilation of lutein in humans to avoid macular degeneration. This represents a change of paradigm in animal physiology showing that some mammals actually have the capacity to accumulate dietary carotenoids in the integument. In addition, we have also discovered that the majority of the lutein in the skin of Honduran white bats is present in esterified form with fatty acids, thereby permitting longer-lasting coloration and suggesting bright color traits may have an overlooked role in the visual communication of bats. PMID:27621447

  11. Tropical bat as mammalian model for skin carotenoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Galván, Ismael; Garrido-Fernández, Juan; Ríos, José; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio; Rodríguez-Herrera, Bernal; Negro, Juan José

    2016-09-27

    Animals cannot synthesize carotenoid pigments de novo, and must consume them in their diet. Most mammals, including humans, are indiscriminate accumulators of carotenoids but inefficiently distribute them to some tissues and organs, such as skin. This limits the potential capacity of these organisms to benefit from the antioxidant and immunostimulatory functions that carotenoids fulfill. Indeed, to date, no mammal has been known to have evolved physiological mechanisms to incorporate and deposit carotenoids in the skin or hair, and mammals have therefore been assumed to rely entirely on other pigments such as melanins to color their integument. Here we use high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-TOF/MS) to show that the frugivorous Honduran white bat Ectophylla alba colors its skin bright yellow with the deposition of the xanthophyll lutein. The Honduran white bat is thus a mammalian model that may help developing strategies to improve the assimilation of lutein in humans to avoid macular degeneration. This represents a change of paradigm in animal physiology showing that some mammals actually have the capacity to accumulate dietary carotenoids in the integument. In addition, we have also discovered that the majority of the lutein in the skin of Honduran white bats is present in esterified form with fatty acids, thereby permitting longer-lasting coloration and suggesting bright color traits may have an overlooked role in the visual communication of bats.

  12. Biological roles of fungal carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Avalos, Javier; Carmen Limón, M

    2015-08-01

    Carotenoids are terpenoid pigments widespread in nature, produced by bacteria, fungi, algae and plants. They are also found in animals, which usually obtain them through the diet. Carotenoids in plants provide striking yellow, orange or red colors to fruits and flowers, and play important metabolic and physiological functions, especially relevant in photosynthesis. Their functions are less clear in non-photosynthetic microorganisms. Different fungi produce diverse carotenoids, but the mutants unable to produce them do not exhibit phenotypic alterations in the laboratory, apart of lack of pigmentation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the functional basis for carotenoid production in fungi. Different lines of evidence support a protective role of carotenoids against oxidative stress and exposure to visible light or UV irradiation. In addition, the carotenoids are intermediary products in the biosynthesis of physiologically active apocarotenoids or derived compounds. This is the case of retinal, obtained from the symmetrical oxidative cleavage of β-carotene. Retinal is the light-absorbing prosthetic group of the rhodopsins, membrane-bound photoreceptors present also in many fungal species. In Mucorales, β-carotene is an intermediary in the synthesis of trisporoids, apocarotenoid derivatives that include the sexual hormones the trisporic acids, and they are also presumably used in the synthesis of sporopollenin polymers. In conclusion, fungi have adapted their ability to produce carotenoids for different non-essential functions, related with stress tolerance or with the synthesis of physiologically active by-products.

  13. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Daucus carota.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kevin; Cerda, Ariel; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota) is one of the most important vegetable cultivated worldwide and the main source of dietary provitamin A. Contrary to other plants, almost all carrot varieties accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids in the root, resulting in a wide variety of colors, including those with purple, yellow, white, red and orange roots. During the first weeks of development the root, grown in darkness, is thin and pale and devoid of carotenoids. At the second month, the thickening of the root and the accumulation of carotenoids begins, and it reaches its highest level at 3 months of development. This normal root thickening and carotenoid accumulation can be completely altered when roots are grown in light, in which chromoplasts differentiation is redirected to chloroplasts development in accordance with an altered carotenoid profile. Here we discuss the current evidence on the biosynthesis of carotenoid in carrot roots in response to environmental cues that has contributed to our understanding of the mechanism that regulates the accumulation of carotenoids, as well as the carotenogenic gene expression and root development in D. carota.

  14. Food predictors of plasma carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Sara J; Willett, Walter C; Rosner, Bernard A; Eliassen, A Heather

    2013-10-11

    Empirical prediction models that weight food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) food items by their relation to nutrient biomarker concentrations may estimate nutrient exposure better than nutrient intakes derived from food composition databases. Carotenoids may especially benefit because contributing foods vary in bioavailability and assessment validity. Our objective was to develop empirical prediction models for the major plasma carotenoids and total carotenoids and evaluate their validity compared with dietary intakes calculated from standard food composition tables. 4180 nonsmoking women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) blood subcohort with previously measured plasma carotenoids were randomly divided into training (n = 2787) and testing (n = 1393) subsets. Empirical prediction models were developed in the training subset by stepwise selection from foods contributing ≥0.5% to intake of the relevant carotenoid. Spearman correlations between predicted and measured plasma concentrations were compared to Spearman correlations between dietary intake and measured plasma concentrations for each carotenoid. Three to 12 foods were selected for the α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin, lycopene, and total carotenoids prediction models. In the testing subset, Spearman correlations with measured plasma concentrations for the calculated dietary intakes and predicted plasma concentrations, respectively, were 0.31 and 0.37 for α-carotene, 0.29 and 0.31 for β-carotene, 0.36 and 0.41 for β-cryptoxanthin, 0.28 and 0.31 for lutein/zeaxanthin, 0.22 and 0.23 for lycopene, and 0.22 and 0.27 for total carotenoids. Empirical prediction models may modestly improve assessment of some carotenoids, particularly α-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin.

  15. Food Predictors of Plasma Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Sara J.; Willett, Walter C.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Eliassen, A. Heather

    2013-01-01

    Empirical prediction models that weight food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) food items by their relation to nutrient biomarker concentrations may estimate nutrient exposure better than nutrient intakes derived from food composition databases. Carotenoids may especially benefit because contributing foods vary in bioavailability and assessment validity. Our objective was to develop empirical prediction models for the major plasma carotenoids and total carotenoids and evaluate their validity compared with dietary intakes calculated from standard food composition tables. 4180 nonsmoking women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) blood subcohort with previously measured plasma carotenoids were randomly divided into training (n = 2787) and testing (n = 1393) subsets. Empirical prediction models were developed in the training subset by stepwise selection from foods contributing ≥0.5% to intake of the relevant carotenoid. Spearman correlations between predicted and measured plasma concentrations were compared to Spearman correlations between dietary intake and measured plasma concentrations for each carotenoid. Three to 12 foods were selected for the α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin, lycopene, and total carotenoids prediction models. In the testing subset, Spearman correlations with measured plasma concentrations for the calculated dietary intakes and predicted plasma concentrations, respectively, were 0.31 and 0.37 for α-carotene, 0.29 and 0.31 for β-carotene, 0.36 and 0.41 for β-cryptoxanthin, 0.28 and 0.31 for lutein/zeaxanthin, 0.22 and 0.23 for lycopene, and 0.22 and 0.27 for total carotenoids. Empirical prediction models may modestly improve assessment of some carotenoids, particularly α-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin. PMID:24152746

  16. Signal Functions of Carotenoid Colouration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blount, Jonathan D.; McGraw, Kevin J.

    The importance of carotenoids for natural colouration, in relation to other classes of pigments and structural colours, has been outlined in Chapter 10. But colour only has significance if it is perceived, identified and interpreted by other organisms (animals). In other words, colour is a means of communication, a signal. Now, in this Chapter, this new direction for carotenoid research, behavioural ecology, is highlighted. Various hypotheses that have been proposed to explain the signal functions of colour, and particularly of carotenoids, in plants and animals are discussed and the empirical evidence to support these hypotheses is presented.

  17. Carotenoid pigments and the selectivity of psittacofulvin-based coloration systems in parrots.

    PubMed

    McGraw, K J; Nogare, M C

    2004-07-01

    Carotenoid pigments are commonly used as colorants of feathers and bare parts by birds. However, parrots (Aves: Psittaciformes) use a novel class of plumage pigments (called psittacofulvins) that, like carotenoids, are lipid-soluble and red, orange, or yellow in color. To begin to understand how and why parrots use these pigments and not carotenoids in their feathers, we must first describe the distribution of these two types of pigments in the diet, tissues, and fluids of these birds. Here, we studied the carotenoid content of blood in five species of parrots with red in their plumage to see if they show the physiological ability to accumulate carotenoids in the body. Although Scarlet (Ara macao) and Greenwing Macaws (Ara chloroptera) and Eclectus (Eclectus roratus), African Gray (Psittacus erithacus) and Blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) Parrots all use psittacofulvins to color their feathers red, we found that they also circulated high concentrations of both dietary (lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin) and metabolically derived (anhydrolutein, dehydrolutein) carotenoids through blood at the time of feather growth, at levels comparable to those found in many other carotenoid-colored birds. These results suggest that parrots have the potential to use carotenoids for plumage pigmentation, but preferentially avoid depositing them in feathers, which is likely under the control of the maturing feather follicle. As there is no evidence of psittacofulvins in parrot blood at the tune of feather growth, we presume that these pigments are locally synthesized by growing feathers within the follicular tissue.

  18. Genetic modification in Bacillus subtilis for production of C30 carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Isamu

    2012-01-01

    C30 carotenoids, which have shorter backbones than C40 carotenoids, are known to be produced in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus that causes opportunistic infection. The first committed enzyme in the C30 carotenoid synthetic pathway is dehydrosqualene synthase CrtM. CrtM converts farnesyl pyrophosphate to dehydrosqualene. Dehydrosqualene desaturase CrtN then converts dehydrosqualene to the yellow C30 carotenoid, 4,4'-diaponeurosporene. This chapter describes a method to synthesize C30 carotenoids in Bacillus subtilis, which is generally recognized as a safe (GRAS) organism. Introduction of S. aureus crtM and crtN genes into B. subtilis results in yellow pigmentation. The B. subtilis transformant accumulates two C30 carotenoids, 4,4'-diapolycopene and 4,4'-diaponeurosporene. Furthermore, together with crtMN, introduction of S. aureus crtP and crtQ genes, which encode mixed function oxidase and glycosyltransferase, respectively, donates the ability to produce glycosylated C30 carotenoic acid. Thus, carotenoid biosynthesis genes of S. aureus is applicable to genetically modify B. subtilis in order to construct a safe organism producing C30 carotenoids.

  19. Analysis of carotenoid composition in petals of calendula (Calendula officinalis L.).

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Sanae; Maoka, Takashi; Sumitomo, Katsuhiko; Ohmiya, Akemi

    2005-11-01

    Nineteen carotenoids were identified in extracts of petals of orange- and yellow-flowered cultivars of calendula (Calendula officinalis L.). Ten carotenoids were unique to orange-flowered cultivars. The UV-vis absorption maxima of these ten carotenoids were at longer wavelengths than that of flavoxanthin, the main carotenoid of calendula petals, and it is clear that these carotenoids are responsible for the orange color of the petals. Six carotenoids had a cis structure at C-5 (C-5'), and it is conceivable that these (5Z)-carotenoids are enzymatically isomerized at C-5 in a pathway that diverges from the main carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. Among them, (5Z,9Z)-lycopene (1), (5Z,9Z,5'Z,9'Z)-lycopene (3), (5'Z)-gamma-carotene (4), and (5'Z,9'Z)-rubixanthin (5) has never before been identified. Additionally, (5Z,9Z,5'Z)-lycopene (2) has been reported only as a synthesized compound.

  20. Carotenoids play a positive role in the degradation of heterocycles by Sphingobium yanoikuyae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaorui; Gai, Zhonghui; Tao, Fei; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Microbial oxidative degradation is a potential way of removing pollutants such as heterocycles from the environment. During this process, reactive oxygen species or other oxidants are inevitably produced, and may cause damage to DNA, proteins, and membranes, thereby decreasing the degradation rate. Carotenoids can serve as membrane-integrated antioxidants, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Several genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway were cloned and characterized from a carbazole-degrading bacterium Sphingobium yanoikuyae XLDN2-5. In addition, a yellow-pigmented carotenoid synthesized by strain XLDN2-5 was identified as zeaxanthin that was synthesized from β-carotene through β-cryptoxanthin. The amounts of zeaxanthin and hydrogen peroxide produced were significantly and simultaneously enhanced during the biodegradation of heterocycles (carbazole < carbazole + benzothiophene < carbazole + dibenzothiophene). These higher production levels were consistent with the transcriptional increase of the gene encoding phytoene desaturase, one of the key enzymes for carotenoid biosynthesis. Sphingobium yanoikuyae XLDN2-5 can enhance the synthesis of zeaxanthin, one of the carotenoids, which may modulate membrane fluidity and defense against intracellular oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the positive role of carotenoids in the biodegradation of heterocycles, while elucidating the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the Sphingobium genus.

  1. Enhancement of carotenoid-to-chlorophyll singlet energy transfer by carotenoid-carotenoid interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Zurdo, J; Fernández-Cabrera, C; Ramírez, J M

    1992-01-01

    The apparent quantum yield of singlet-singlet spirilloxanthin-to-bacteriochlorophyll a energy transfer increases linearly with the residual spirilloxanthin content in Rhodospirillum rubrum membrane vesicles from which this carotenoid has been partially removed. Since it has been previously shown that carotenoid-carotenoid interaction is a linear function of the residual spirilloxanthin level in the major pigment-protein complex of those vesicles (Zurdo, J., R. M. Lozano, C. Fernandez-Cabrera, and J. M. Ramirez. 1991. Biochem. J. 274:881-884), it appears that such degenerate interaction enhances singlet energy transfer. Part of the enhancement may be explained if the energy donor is the spirilloxanthin 1Bu----1Ag (S2----S0) transition, because exciton coupling probably brings its energy closer to that of the Qx (S2----S0) transition of bacteriochlorophyll. In contrast, it seems that the possible stabilization of the spirilloxanthin 2Ag (S1) state would hardly improve energy transfer, because this hidden state probably lies below the S1 bacteriochlorophyll state. In any case, the stabilizing effects of carotenoid-carotenoid interactions seem insufficient to explain the enhancement of energy transfer. Direct or indirect effects of carotenoid dimerization on the three-dimensional structure of the pigment cluster appear to be required to account for such enhancement. PMID:1617133

  2. Enhancement of carotenoid-to-chlorophyll singlet energy transfer by carotenoid-carotenoid interaction.

    PubMed

    Zurdo, J; Fernández-Cabrera, C; Ramírez, J M

    1992-06-01

    The apparent quantum yield of singlet-singlet spirilloxanthin-to-bacteriochlorophyll a energy transfer increases linearly with the residual spirilloxanthin content in Rhodospirillum rubrum membrane vesicles from which this carotenoid has been partially removed. Since it has been previously shown that carotenoid-carotenoid interaction is a linear function of the residual spirilloxanthin level in the major pigment-protein complex of those vesicles (Zurdo, J., R. M. Lozano, C. Fernandez-Cabrera, and J. M. Ramirez. 1991. Biochem. J. 274:881-884), it appears that such degenerate interaction enhances singlet energy transfer. Part of the enhancement may be explained if the energy donor is the spirilloxanthin 1Bu----1Ag (S2----S0) transition, because exciton coupling probably brings its energy closer to that of the Qx (S2----S0) transition of bacteriochlorophyll. In contrast, it seems that the possible stabilization of the spirilloxanthin 2Ag (S1) state would hardly improve energy transfer, because this hidden state probably lies below the S1 bacteriochlorophyll state. In any case, the stabilizing effects of carotenoid-carotenoid interactions seem insufficient to explain the enhancement of energy transfer. Direct or indirect effects of carotenoid dimerization on the three-dimensional structure of the pigment cluster appear to be required to account for such enhancement.

  3. Red yeasts and carotenoid production: outlining a future for non-conventional yeasts of biotechnological interest.

    PubMed

    Mannazzu, Ilaria; Landolfo, Sara; Lopes da Silva, Teresa; Buzzini, Pietro

    2015-11-01

    Carotenoids are one of the most common classes of pigments that occur in nature. Due to their biological properties, they are widely used in phytomedicine and in the chemical, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, food and feed industries. Accordingly, their global market is continuously growing, and it is expected to reach about US$1.4 billion in 2018. Carotenoids can be easily produced by chemical synthesis, although their biotechnological production is rapidly becoming an appealing alternative to the chemical route, partly due to consumer concerns against synthetic pigments. Among the yeasts, and apart from the pigmented species Phaffia rhodozyma (and its teleomorph Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous), a handful of species of the genera Rhodosporidium, Rhodotorula, Sporobolomyces and Sporidiobolus are well known carotenoid producers. These are known as 'red yeasts', and their ability to synthesize mixtures of carotenoids from low-cost carbon sources has been broadly studied recently. Here, in agreement with the renewed interest in microbial carotenoids, the recent literature is reviewed regarding the taxonomy of the genera Rhodosporidium, Rhodotorula, Sporobolomyces and Sporidiobolus, the stress factors that influence their carotenogenesis, and the most advanced analytical tools for evaluation of carotenoid production. Moreover, a synopsis of the molecular and "-omic" tools available for elucidation of the metabolic pathways of the microbial carotenoids is reported.

  4. Carotenoids' production from halophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Moreno, María; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; García, María Teresa; Mellado, Encarnación

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids have received considerable attention due to their interesting industrial applications and, more importantly, their potential beneficial effects on human health. Halophiles comprise a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that need salts for optimal growth. The pigments produced by these halophilic organisms comprise phytoene, β-carotene, lycopene, derivatives of bacterioruberin, and salinixanthin. Here, we describe the procedure to obtain salinixanthin from the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber. Additionally, we describe the expression of the β-carotene biosynthetic genes crtE, crtY, crtI, and crtB from Pantoea agglomerans in the moderately halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata obtaining a strain able to produce practically pure β-carotene. Thus, the use of these halophilic microorganisms as a source of carotenoids constitutes an important commercial alternative in the production of carotenoids from biological sources.

  5. Supramolecular aromaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabıyık, Hande; Sevinçek, Resul; Karabıyık, Hasan

    2014-05-01

    We report experimental and theoretical evidences for supramolecular aromaticity as a new concept to be widely used in researches about molecular crystals. CSD survey regarding frequently encountered resonance-assisted H-bonds (RAHBs) in formic acid, formamide, formimidamide, formic acid-formamide, and formamide-formimidamide dimers shows that supramolecular quasirings formed by RAHBs have remarkable electronic delocalization within themselves, which is reminiscent of aromaticity at supramolecular level. This study criticizes and reevaluates the validity of conventional judgment which states that ring systems formed by intermolecular H-bonds cannot be aromatic. Thus, the term aromaticity can be extended to supramolecular systems formed by RAHBs. Supramolecular aromaticity has a multi-fold nature involving both σ- and π-delocalization, and σ-delocalization through RAHBs takes on a task of compensating σ-deficiency within quasirings. Atomic composition in donor-acceptor set of the dimers is descriptive for supramolecular aromaticity. We revised bond-valence parameters for RAHBs and they suggest that hypervalent character of H atoms is more pronounced than their hypovalent character in RAHBs. The σ-delocalized bonding within H-bonded quasirings necessitates hypervalent character of H atoms. Quantum chemical calculations based on adiabatic Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT) between the monomers reveal that topological parameters at ring critical points (RCPs) of the quasirings correlate well with Shannon's entropic aromaticity index. The presence of additional LP orbital on O atoms implying more diffused LP-orbitals in donor-acceptor set leads to the formation of resonance-disabling states reducing supramolecular aromaticity of a quasiring and energetic cost of the electron transfer between the monomers. There is a nonignorable electron transfer between the monomers even in the cases where H atoms are close to donor or acceptor atom. NBO analyses have revealed that

  6. Carotenoid-dependent signals and the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels in birds.

    PubMed

    Simons, Mirre J P; Maia, Rafael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-12-01

    Sexual selection has resulted in a wide array of ornaments used in mate choice, and such indicator traits signal quality honestly when they bear costs, precluding cheating. Carotenoid-dependent coloration has attracted considerable attention in this context, because investing carotenoids in coloration has to be traded off against its physiological functions; carotenoids are antioxidants and increase immunocompetence. This trade-off is hypothesized to underlie the honesty of carotenoid-dependent coloration, signaling the "handicap" of allocating carotenoids away from somatic maintenance toward sexual display. Utilizing recent advances in modeling adaptive evolution, we used a comparative approach to investigate the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels using a species-level phylogeny of 178 bird species. We find that the evolutionary optimum for carotenoid levels is higher in lineages that evolved carotenoid-dependent coloration, with strong attraction toward this optimum. Hence, carotenoids do not appear to be limiting, given that higher carotenoid levels readily evolve in response to the evolution of carotenoid-dependent coloration. These findings challenge the assumption that carotenoids are a scarce resource and thus also challenge the hypothesis that physiological resource value of carotenoids underlies honesty of carotenoid-dependent traits. Therefore, the comparative evidence suggests that other factors, such as the acquisition and incorporation of carotenoids, are involved in maintaining signal honesty.

  7. Fruit carotenoid-deficient mutants in tomato reveal a function of the plastidial isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI1) in carotenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pankratov, Ilya; McQuinn, Ryan; Schwartz, Jochanan; Bar, Einat; Fei, Zhangjun; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Zamir, Dani; Giovannoni, James J; Hirschberg, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Isoprenoids consist of a large class of compounds that are present in all living organisms. They are derived from the 5C building blocks isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP). In plants, IDP is synthesized in the cytoplasm from mevalonic acid via the MVA pathway, and in plastids from 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate through the MEP pathway. The enzyme IDP isomerase (IDI) catalyzes the interconversion between IDP and DMADP. Most plants contain two IDI enzymes, the functions of which are characteristically compartmentalized in the cells. Carotenoids are isoprenoids that play essential roles in photosynthesis and provide colors to flowers and fruits. They are synthesized in the plastids via the MEP pathway. Fruits of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) accumulate high levels of the red carotene lycopene. We have identified mutations in tomato that reduce overall carotenoid accumulation in fruits. Four alleles of a locus named FRUIT CAROTENOID DEFICIENT 1 (fcd1) were characterized. Map-based cloning of fcd1 indicated that this gene encodes the plastidial enzyme IDI1. Lack of IDI1 reduced the concentration of carotenoids in fruits, flowers and cotyledons, but not in mature leaves. These results indicate that the plastidial IDI plays an important function in carotenoid biosynthesis, thus highlighting its role in optimizing the ratio between IDP and DMADP as precursors for different downstream isoprenoid pathways.

  8. Carotenoid biosynthesis regulatory mechanisms in plants.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rashidi; Mohd Zaifuddin, Fatimah Azzahra; Hassan, Norazian Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids are bioactive compounds with remarkably special properties produced by plants in response to internal and external stresses. In this review paper, we focus on the subject of carotenoid biosynthesis and several factors that have been reported to significantly enhance or reduce carotenoid accumulation in studied plant species. These factors include varietal aspects, location, growing season, and type of stress experienced by a plant. In addition, we propose that there are three stress resistance mechanisms in plants: avoidance, tolerance, and acclimation. Better understanding of the environmental factors affecting carotenoid biosynthesis will help researchers to develop methods for enhancing the production of carotenoids and other pigments to desired concentrations in plant crops.

  9. Essential role of two tyrosines and two tryptophans on the photoprotection activity of the Orange Carotenoid Protein.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Adjélé; Punginelli, Claire; Couturier, Mohea; Perreau, François; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2011-03-01

    Photosynthetic organisms have developed photoprotective mechanisms to protect themselves from lethal high light intensities. One of these mechanisms involves the dissipation of excess absorbed light energy into heat. In cyanobacteria, light activation of a soluble carotenoid protein, the Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP), binding a keto carotenoid, is the key inducer of this mechanism. Blue-green light absorption triggers structural changes within the carotenoid and the protein, leading to the conversion of a dark orange form into a red active form. Here we report the role in photoconversion and photoprotection of individual conserved tyrosines and tryptophans surrounding the rings of the carotenoid. Our results demonstrate that the interaction between the keto group of the carotenoid and Tyr201 and Trp288 is essential for OCP photoactivity. In addition, these amino acids are responsible for carotenoid affinity and specificity. We have already demonstrated that the aromatic character of Tyr44 and Trp110 interacting with the hydroxyl ring is critical. Here we show that the replacement of Tyr44 by Ser affects the stability of the red form avoiding its accumulation at any temperature, while Trp110Ser is affected in the energy necessary to the orange to red conversion and in the interaction with the antenna. Collectively our data support the idea that the red form is essential for photoprotection but not sufficient. Specific conformational changes occurring in the protein seem to be critical to the events leading to energy dissipation.

  10. Carotenoid metabolism and regulation in horticultural crops

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hui; Zhang, Junxiang; Nageswaran, Divyashree; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of pigments widely distributed in nature. The vivid yellow, orange, and red colors of many horticultural crops are attributed to the overaccumulation of carotenoids, which contribute to a critical agronomic trait for flowers and an important quality trait for fruits and vegetables. Not only do carotenoids give horticultural crops their visual appeal, they also enhance nutritional value and health benefits for humans. As a result, carotenoid research in horticultural crops has grown exponentially over the last decade. These investigations have advanced our fundamental understanding of carotenoid metabolism and regulation in plants. In this review, we provide an overview of carotenoid biosynthesis, degradation, and accumulation in horticultural crops and highlight recent achievements in our understanding of carotenoid metabolic regulation in vegetables, fruits, and flowers. PMID:26504578

  11. Comparative biochemical studies of carotenoids in catfishes.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, M; Ikuno, Y; Nagata, S; Kodama, K; Matsuno, T

    2002-11-01

    The carotenoids of 12 species of Siluriformes fishes (eight families) were investigated from a comparative biochemical point of view. The patterns of carotenoids in catfishes belonging to the family Siluridae were quite different from those of the other seven families of catfishes (Bagridae, Amblycipitidae, Clariidae, Plotosidae, Ictaluridae, Callichthyidae and Malapteruridae). 7, 8-Dihydro-beta-carotene; 7, 8, 7', 8'- and 7, 8, 9, 10-tetrahydro-beta-carotene; (3R)-7', 8'-dihydro-beta-cryptoxanthin; 7, 8-dihydrolutein A; 7, 8-dihydrolutein B; parasiloxanthin; 7', 8'-dihydroparasiloxanthin; and 4 or 4'-hydroxyparasiloxanthin were characteristic carotenoids found in only one family, Siluridae, and these carotenoids accounted for 24-60% of total carotenoids. In catfishes belonging to the other seven families except Siluridae, the carotenoid patterns were very similar and the most predominant carotenoid was zeaxanthins (23-56%). Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  12. Polybenzimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergerrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Novel molecular weight controlled and endcapped polybenzimidazoles (PBI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenylbenzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The PBI are endcapped with mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. Mono(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazoles are synthesized by reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with aromatic (o-diamine)s in diphenylsulfone. Molecular weight controlled and endcapped PBI of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  13. Polybenzimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble polybenzimidazoles (PBI's) synthesized by nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)-benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic difluoride compounds in presence of anhydrous potassium carbonate. These polymers exhibit good thermal, thermo-oxidative, and chemical stability, and high mechanical properties. Using benzimidazole monomers, more economical, and new PBI's processed more easily than commercial PBI, without loss of desirable physical properties.

  14. Polybenzimidazoles Via Aromatic Nucleophilic Displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble polybenzimidazoles (PBI's) synthesized by nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)-benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic difluoride compounds in presence of anhydrous potassium carbonate. These polymers exhibit good thermal, thermo-oxidative, and chemical stability, and high mechanical properties. Using benzimidazole monomers, more economical, and new PBI's processed more easily than commercial PBI, without loss of desirable physical properties.

  15. Carotenoids in Adipose Tissue Biology and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Bonet, M Luisa; Canas, Jose A; Ribot, Joan; Palou, Andreu

    2016-01-01

    Cell, animal and human studies dealing with carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives as nutritional regulators of adipose tissue biology with implications for the etiology and management of obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases are reviewed. Most studied carotenoids in this context are β-carotene, cryptoxanthin, astaxanthin and fucoxanthin, together with β-carotene-derived retinoids and some other apocarotenoids. Studies indicate an impact of these compounds on essential aspects of adipose tissue biology including the control of adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis), adipocyte metabolism, oxidative stress and the production of adipose tissue-derived regulatory signals and inflammatory mediators. Specific carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives restrain adipogenesis and adipocyte hypertrophy while enhancing fat oxidation and energy dissipation in brown and white adipocytes, and counteract obesity in animal models. Intake, blood levels and adipocyte content of carotenoids are reduced in human obesity. Specifically designed human intervention studies in the field, though still sparse, indicate a beneficial effect of carotenoid supplementation in the accrual of abdominal adiposity. In summary, studies support a role of specific carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives in the prevention of excess adiposity, and suggest that carotenoid requirements may be dependent on body composition.

  16. Carotenoid-based coloration in cichlid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Sefc, Kristina M.; Brown, Alexandria C.; Clotfelter, Ethan D.

    2014-01-01

    Animal colors play important roles in communication, ecological interactions and speciation. Carotenoid pigments are responsible for many yellow, orange and red hues in animals. Whereas extensive knowledge on the proximate mechanisms underlying carotenoid coloration in birds has led to testable hypotheses on avian color evolution and signaling, much less is known about the expression of carotenoid coloration in fishes. Here, we promote cichlid fishes (Perciformes: Cichlidae) as a system in which to study the physiological and evolutionary significance of carotenoids. Cichlids include some of the best examples of adaptive radiation and color pattern diversification in vertebrates. In this paper, we examine fitness correlates of carotenoid pigmentation in cichlids and review hypotheses regarding the signal content of carotenoid-based ornaments. Carotenoid-based coloration is influenced by diet and body condition and is positively related to mating success and social dominance. Gaps in our knowledge are discussed in the last part of this review, particularly in the understanding of carotenoid metabolism pathways and the genetics of carotenoid coloration. We suggest that carotenoid metabolism and transport are important proximate mechanisms responsible for individual and population-differences in cichlid coloration that may ultimately contribute to diversification and speciation. PMID:24667558

  17. Carotenoid depletion in serum of young type-1 diabetics fed low-carotenoid diets.

    PubMed

    Granado, F; Olmedilla, B; Blanco, I

    2004-01-01

    Type-1 diabetics have been considered to be at risk for increased oxidative stress which has been implicated in the development of long-term diabetes complications. Evidence suggests that antioxidant activity may be an important mechanism by which carotenoids could confer protection in human health. Our aim was to compare the serum carotenoid depletion rate in type-1 diabetics and control subjects consuming low-carotenoid diets. Ten type-1 diabetics and 8 controls followed a very low-carotenoid diet for 21 days. Dietary intake was recorded daily and fasting blood samples collected at baseline and after 1, 2, 3, 6, 11, 15, 16, 17, and 21 days. Individual carotenoids in serum were analyzed by a validated HPLC method. In both groups, carotenoid intake was less than 5% of the season-adjusted carotenoid reference intake. These diets resulted in decreased serum carotenoid levels in both groups, although depletion curves, final mean concentrations and the estimated half-life of carotenoids in serum revealed no differences between type-1 diabetics and controls. Levels of other minor serum carotenoids, cis-isomers and keto-carotenoids, also decreased whereas serum retinol and alpha- and gamma-tocopherol did not change during the study. Upon a low-carotenoid intake, the depletion rate of carotenoids in serum in young type-1 diabetics does not differ from that observed in matched related controls. Copyright (c) 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Modern Breeding and Biotechnological Approaches to Enhance Carotenoid Accumulation in Seeds.

    PubMed

    Federico, M L; Schmidt, M A

    There is an increasing demand for carotenoids, which are fundamental components of the human diet, for example as precursors of vitamin A. Carotenoids are also potent antioxidants and their health benefits are becoming increasingly evident. Protective effects against prostate cancer and age-related macular degeneration have been proposed for lycopene and lutein/zeaxanthin, respectively. Additionally, β-carotene, astaxanthin and canthaxanthin are high-value carotenoids used by the food industry as feed supplements and colorants. The production and consumption of these carotenoids from natural sources, especially from seeds, constitutes an important step towards fortifying the diet of malnourished people in developing nations. Therefore, attempts to metabolically manipulate β-carotene production in plants have received global attention, especially after the generation of Golden Rice (Oryza sativa). The endosperms of Golden Rice seeds synthesize and accumulate large quantities of β-carotene (provitamin A), yielding a characteristic yellow color in the polished grains. Classical breeding efforts have also focused in the development of cultivars with elevated seed carotenoid content, with maize and other cereals leading the way. In this communication we will summarize transgenic efforts and modern breeding strategies to fortify various crop seeds with nutraceutical carotenoids.

  19. The aba mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is impaired in epoxy-carotenoid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, C.D.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The three mutant alleles of the ABA locus of Arabidopsis thaliana result in plants that are deficient in the plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA). The authors have used {sup 18}O{sub 2} to label ABA in water-stressed leaves of mutant and wild-type Arabidopsis. Analysis by selected ion monitoring and tandem mass spectrometry of ({sup 18}O)ABA and its catabolites, phaseic acid and ABA-glucose ester ({beta}-D-glucopyranosyl abscisate), indicates that the aba genotypes are impaired in ABA biosynthesis and have a small ABA precursor pool of compounds that contain oxygens on the rings, presumably oxygenated carotenoids (xanthophylls). Quantitation of the carotenoids form mutant and wild-type leaves establishes that the aba alleles cause a deficiency of the epoxy-carotenoids violaxanthin and neoxanthin and an accumulation of their biosynthetic precursor, zeaxanthin. These results provide evidence that ABA is synthesized by oxidative cleavage of epoxy-carotenoids (the indirect pathway). Furthermore the carotenoid mutant they describe undergoes normal greening. Thus the aba alleles provide an opportunity to study the physiological roles of epoxy-carotenoids in photosynthesis in a higher plants.

  20. Potential Role of Carotenoids as Antioxidants in Human Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fiedor, Joanna; Burda, Květoslava

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids constitute a ubiquitous group of isoprenoid pigments. They are very efficient physical quenchers of singlet oxygen and scavengers of other reactive oxygen species. Carotenoids can also act as chemical quenchers undergoing irreversible oxygenation. The molecular mechanisms underlying these reactions are still not fully understood, especially in the context of the anti- and pro-oxidant activity of carotenoids, which, although not synthesized by humans and animals, are also present in their blood and tissues, contributing to a number of biochemical processes. The antioxidant potential of carotenoids is of particular significance to human health, due to the fact that losing antioxidant-reactive oxygen species balance results in “oxidative stress”, a critical factor of the pathogenic processes of various chronic disorders. Data coming from epidemiological studies and clinical trials strongly support the observation that adequate carotenoid supplementation may significantly reduce the risk of several disorders mediated by reactive oxygen species. Here, we would like to highlight the beneficial (protective) effects of dietary carotenoid intake in exemplary widespread modern civilization diseases, i.e., cancer, cardiovascular or photosensitivity disorders, in the context of carotenoids’ unique antioxidative properties. PMID:24473231

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Deinococcus xibeiensis R13, a New Carotenoid-Producing Strain

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yaochi; Xu, Xian; Song, Ping; Jiang, Ling; Zhang, Zhidong

    2013-01-01

    Deinococcus xibeiensis strain R13, isolated from radiation-contaminated soils, synthesizes a unique ketocarotenoid, deinoxanthin. Here, we present a 3.49-Mb assembly of its genome sequence, which can help us find the key genes of the deinoxanthin biosynthesis pathways and modify genes obtaining a high yield of the new carotenoid. PMID:24309735

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Deinococcus xibeiensis R13, a New Carotenoid-Producing Strain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaochi; Xu, Xian; Song, Ping; Jiang, Ling; Zhang, Zhidong; Huang, He

    2013-12-05

    Deinococcus xibeiensis strain R13, isolated from radiation-contaminated soils, synthesizes a unique ketocarotenoid, deinoxanthin. Here, we present a 3.49-Mb assembly of its genome sequence, which can help us find the key genes of the deinoxanthin biosynthesis pathways and modify genes obtaining a high yield of the new carotenoid.

  3. Carotenoids in a Corynebacterineae, Gordonia terrae AIST-1: carotenoid glucosyl mycoloyl esters.

    PubMed

    Takaichi, Shinichi; Maoka, Takashi; Akimoto, Naoshige; Carmona, Marvelisa L; Yamaoka, Yukiho

    2008-10-01

    We isolated a strain of Corynebacterineae from surface seawater from the Inland Sea of Japan. This strain, AIST-1, was determined to be a strain of Gordonia terrae based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The colony was red-colored, and the pigments were identified to be carotenoid derivatives. The structures of two major carotenoids were (2'S)-deoxymyxol 1'-glucoside, a dihydroxyl derivative of gamma-carotene with 12 conjugated double bonds, and (2'S)-4-ketodeoxymyxol 1'-glucoside. Their glucosyl acyl esters and mycoloyl esters were also identified. While these carotenoid moieties have been found in only a few other bacteria, the carotenoid mycoloyl esters are novel carotenoid derivatives. The type strain of G. terrae NBRC 10016T also contained the same carotenoids, but the composition of the two carotenoid glucosides was low and the total carotenoid content was less than one tenth of that of strain AIST-1.

  4. A novel method for screening a vertebrate transcriptome for genes involved in carotenoid binding and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pointer, M A; Prager, M; Andersson, S; Mundy, N I

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoid-based colour signals are widespread in the animal kingdom and common textbook examples of sexually selected traits. Carotenoid pigments must be obtained through the diet as all animals lack the enzymatic machinery necessary to synthesize them from scratch. Once ingested, carotenoids are metabolized, stored, transported and deposited, and some or all of these processes may be limiting for signal production and thus subjected to social or sexual selection on phenotypic coloration. Very little is known about which genes and physiological pathways are involved in carotenoid pigmentation which is unfortunate, as genetic information would allow us to investigate the biochemical consequences of sexual selection. In this study, we present a transcriptome-screening technique and apply it to a carotenoid-signalling bird species, the southern red bishop Euplectes orix, to uncover the gene(s) responsible for the conversion of dietary β-carotene (orange) to canthaxanthin (bright red). The transcriptome, extracted from the liver of a male entering his breeding moult, is expressed within bacterial cells genetically modified to synthesize beta-carotene. Effects of expressed E. orix proteins on the structure or amount of β-carotene are initially detected by eye (based on colour change) and subsequently confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Here, we demonstrate the validity of the technique and provide a list of candidate genes involved in the carotenoid pigmentation pathway. We believe that this method could be applied to other species and tissues and that this may help researchers uncover the genetic basis of carotenoid coloration in vertebrates.

  5. Microalgae as Sources of Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Ana Catarina; Amaro, Helena M.; Malcata, Francisco Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Marine microalgae constitute a natural source of a variety of drugs for pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications—which encompass carotenoids, among others. A growing body of experimental evidence has confirmed that these compounds can play important roles in prevention (and even treatment) of human diseases and health conditions, e.g., cancer, cardiovascular problems, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, muscular dystrophy, cataracts and some neurological disorders. The underlying features that may account for such favorable biological activities are their intrinsic antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antitumoral features. In this invited review, the most important issues regarding synthesis of carotenoids by microalgae are described and discussed—from both physiological and processing points of view. Current gaps of knowledge, as well as technological opportunities in the near future relating to this growing field of interest, are also put forward in a critical manner. PMID:21731554

  6. Carotenoid accumulation in orange-pigmented Capsicum annuum fruit, regulated at multiple levels

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Uribe, Laura; Guzman, Ivette; Rajapakse, Wathsala; Richins, Richard D.; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2012-01-01

    The pericarp of Capsicum fruit is a rich dietary source of carotenoids. Accumulation of these compounds may be controlled, in part, by gene transcription of biosynthetic enzymes. The carotenoid composition in a number of orange-coloured C. annuum cultivars was determined using HPLC and compared with transcript abundances for four carotenogenic enzymes, Psy, LcyB, CrtZ-2, and Ccs determined by qRT-PCR. There were unique carotenoid profiles as well as distinct patterns of transcription of carotenogenic enzymes within the seven orange-coloured cultivars. In one cultivar, ‘Fogo’, carrying the mutant ccs-3 allele, transcripts were detected for this gene, but no CCS protein accumulated. The premature stop termination in ccs-3 prevented expression of the biosynthetic activity to synthesize the capsanthin and capsorubin forms of carotenoids. In two other orange-coloured cultivars, ‘Orange Grande’ and ‘Oriole’, both with wild-type versions of all four carotenogenic enzymes, no transcripts for Ccs were detected and no red pigments accumulated. Finally, in a third case, the orange-coloured cultivar, Canary, transcripts for all four of the wild-type carotenogenic enzymes were readily detected yet no CCS protein appeared to accumulate and no red carotenoids were synthesized. In the past, mutations in Psy and Ccs have been identified as the loci controlling colour in the fruit. Now there is evidence that a non-structural gene may control colour development in Capsicum. PMID:21948863

  7. Carotenoid changes of intact watermelons after storage.

    PubMed

    Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Collins, Julie K

    2006-08-09

    Watermelon contains lycopene, a red carotenoid pigment that has strong antioxidant properties. The lycopene content of watermelon is substantial, contributing 8-20 mg per 180 g serving. There are no reports on carotenoid changes in whole watermelon during storage. Three types of watermelon, open-pollinated seeded, hybrid seeded, and seedless types, were stored at 5, 13, and 21 degrees C for 14 days and flesh color, composition, and carotenoid content were compared to those of fruit not stored. Watermelons stored at 21 degrees C had increased pH, chroma, and carotenoid content compared to fresh fruit. Compared to fresh fruit, watermelons stored at 21 degrees C gained 11-40% in lycopene and 50-139% in beta-carotene, whereas fruit held at 13 degrees C changed little in carotenoid content. These results indicate that carotenoid biosynthesis in watermelons can be affected by temperature and storage.

  8. Carotenoids in Aquaculture: Fish and Crustaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerkeng, Bjorn

    This Chapter deals with selected topics on the use of carotenoids for colouration in aquaculture and incudes examples from ecological studies which support our understanding of functions and actions of carotenoids and colouration in fishes and crustaceans. Animal colours may be physical or structural in origin [1], e.g. Tyndall blues and iridescent diffraction colours, or they may be due to pigments, including carotenoids (Chapter 10).

  9. Carotenoid photoprotection in artificial photosynthetic antennas.

    PubMed

    Kloz, Miroslav; Pillai, Smitha; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T M

    2011-05-11

    A series of phthalocyanine-carotenoid dyads in which a phenylamino group links a phthalocyanine to carotenoids having 8-11 backbone double bonds were examined by visible and near-infrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy combined with global fitting analysis. The series of molecules has permitted investigation of the role of carotenoids in the quenching of excited states of cyclic tetrapyrroles. The transient behavior varied dramatically with the length of the carotenoid and the solvent environment. Clear spectroscopic signatures of radical species revealed photoinduced electron transfer as the main quenching mechanism for all dyads dissolved in a polar solvent (THF), and the quenching rate was almost independent of carotenoid length. However, in a nonpolar solvent (toluene), quenching rates displayed a strong dependence on the conjugation length of the carotenoid and the mechanism did not include charge separation. The lack of any rise time components of a carotenoid S(1) signature in all experiments in toluene suggests that an excitonic coupling between the carotenoid S(1) state and phthalocyanine Q state, rather than a conventional energy transfer process, is the major mechanism of quenching. A pronounced inhomogeneity of the system was observed and attributed to the presence of a phenyl-amino linker between phthalocyanine and carotenoids. On the basis of accumulated work on various caroteno-phthalocyanine dyads and triads, we have now identified three mechanisms of tetrapyrrole singlet excited state quenching by carotenoids in artificial systems: (i) Car-Pc electron transfer and recombination; (ii)(1) Pc to Car S(1) energy transfer and fast internal conversion to the Car ground state; (iii) excitonic coupling between (1)Pc and Car S(1) and ensuing internal conversion to the ground state of the carotenoid. The dominant mechanism depends upon the exact molecular architecture and solvent environment. These synthetic systems are providing a deeper understanding

  10. Foraging for carotenoids: do colorful male hihi target carotenoid-rich foods in the wild?

    PubMed Central

    Thorogood, Rose; Karadas, Filiz; Raubenheimer, David; Kilner, Rebecca M.; Ewen, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary access to carotenoids is expected to determine the strength of carotenoid-based signal expression and potentially to maintain signal honesty. Species that display carotenoid-based yellow, orange, or red plumage are therefore expected to forage selectively for carotenoid-rich foods when they are depositing these pigments during molt, but whether they actually do so is unknown. We set out to address this in the hihi (Notiomystis cincta), a New Zealand passerine where males, but not females, display yellow carotenoid-based plumage. We measured circulating carotenoid concentrations in male and female hihi during breeding and molt, determined the nutritional content of common foods in the hihi diet, and conducted feeding observations of male and female hihi during molt. We found that although male and female hihi do not differ significantly in plasma carotenoid concentration, male hihi have a greater proportion of carotenoid-rich foods in their diet than do females. This is a consequence of a greater fruit and lower invertebrate intake than females and an avoidance of low-carotenoid content fruit. By combining behavioral observations with quantification of circulating carotenoids, we present evidence that colorful birds forage to maximize carotenoid intake, a conclusion we would not have drawn had we examined plasma carotenoids alone. PMID:25214753

  11. Foraging for carotenoids: do colorful male hihi target carotenoid-rich foods in the wild?

    PubMed

    Walker, Leila K; Thorogood, Rose; Karadas, Filiz; Raubenheimer, David; Kilner, Rebecca M; Ewen, John G

    2014-09-01

    Dietary access to carotenoids is expected to determine the strength of carotenoid-based signal expression and potentially to maintain signal honesty. Species that display carotenoid-based yellow, orange, or red plumage are therefore expected to forage selectively for carotenoid-rich foods when they are depositing these pigments during molt, but whether they actually do so is unknown. We set out to address this in the hihi (Notiomystis cincta), a New Zealand passerine where males, but not females, display yellow carotenoid-based plumage. We measured circulating carotenoid concentrations in male and female hihi during breeding and molt, determined the nutritional content of common foods in the hihi diet, and conducted feeding observations of male and female hihi during molt. We found that although male and female hihi do not differ significantly in plasma carotenoid concentration, male hihi have a greater proportion of carotenoid-rich foods in their diet than do females. This is a consequence of a greater fruit and lower invertebrate intake than females and an avoidance of low-carotenoid content fruit. By combining behavioral observations with quantification of circulating carotenoids, we present evidence that colorful birds forage to maximize carotenoid intake, a conclusion we would not have drawn had we examined plasma carotenoids alone.

  12. Carotenoid stabilized gold and silver nanoparticles derived from the Actinomycete Gordonia amicalis HS-11 as effective free radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Sowani, Harshada; Mohite, Pallavi; Damale, Shailesh; Kulkarni, Mohan; Zinjarde, Smita

    2016-12-01

    The Actinomycete Gordonia amicalis HS-11 produced orange pigments when cultivated on n-hexadecane as the sole carbon source. When cells of this pigmented bacterium were incubated with 1mM chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) or silver nitrate (AgNO3), pH 9.0, at 25°C, gold and silver nanoparticles, respectively, were obtained in a cell associated manner. It was hypothesized that the pigments present in the cells may be mediating metal reduction reactions. After solvent extraction and High Performance Liquid Chromatography, two major pigments displaying UV-vis spectra characteristic of carotenoids were isolated. These were identified on the basis of Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (APCI-MS) in the positive mode as 1'-OH-4-keto-γ-carotene (Carotenoid K) and 1'-OH-γ-carotene (Carotenoid B). The hydroxyl groups present in the carotenoids were eliminated under alkaline conditions and provided the reducing equivalents necessary for synthesizing nanoparticles. Cell associated and carotenoid stabilized nanoparticles were characterized by different analytical techniques. In vitro free radical scavenging activities of cells (control, gold and silver nanoparticle loaded), purified carotenoids and carotenoid stabilized gold and silver nanoparticles were evaluated. Silver nanoparticle loaded cells and carotenoid stabilized silver nanoparticles exhibited improved nitric oxide (NO) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activities compared to their control and gold counterparts. This paper thus reports cell associated nanoparticle synthesis by G. amicalis, describes for the first time the role of carotenoid pigments in metal reduction processes and demonstrates enhanced free radical scavenging activities of the carotenoid stabilized nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Polybenzoxazole via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Polybenzoxazoles (PBO) are heterocyclic macromolecules which were first synthesized in a two-step process by the initial formation of aromatic diacid chlorides with bis(o-aminophenol)s through solution condensation of aromatic diacid chlorides with bis(o-aminophenol)s followed by thermal cyclodehydration. Since then several methods were utilized in their synthesis. The most common synthetic method for PBO involves a polycondensation of bis(o-aminophenol)s with aromatic diacid diphenyl esters. Another preparative route involves the solution polycondensation of the hydrochloride salts of bis(o-amino phenol)s with aromatic diacids in polyphosphoric acid. Another synthetic method involves the initial formation of poly(o-hydroxy amide)s from silylated bis(o-aminophenol)s with aromatic diacid chlorides followed by thermal cyclodehydration to PBO. A recent preparative route involves the reaction of aromatic bisphenols with bis(fluorophenyl) benzoxazoles by the displacement reaction to form PBO. The novelty of the present invention is that high molecular weight PBO of new chemical structures are prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties.

  14. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis: A Colorful Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Sola, M. Águila; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are a family of pigments that participate in light harvesting and are essential for photoprotection against excess light. Furthermore, they act as precursors for the production of apocarotenoid hormones such as abscisic acid and strigolactones. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the genes and enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway (which is now almost completely elucidated) and on the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We also discuss the relevance of Arabidopsis as a model system for the study of carotenogenesis and how metabolic engineering approaches in this plant have taught important lessons for carotenoid biotechnology. PMID:22582030

  15. Aromatic graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Das, D. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-04-13

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  16. Aromatic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  17. Synthesizing speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siltanen, Samuli

    2015-01-01

    Samuli Siltanen explains how solving an "inverse problem" will improve the quality of life of people who can't speak and have to use voice synthesizers - particularly women and children, whose only current option is to sound like an adult male.

  18. Waveform synthesizer

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Nelson, Melvin A.

    1981-01-01

    A method of producing optical and electrical pulses of desired shape. An optical pulse of arbitrary but defined shape illuminates one end of an array of optical fiber waveguides of differing lengths to time differentiate the input pulse. The optical outputs at the other end of the array are combined to form a synthesized pulse of desired shape.

  19. Differential Contribution of the First Two Enzymes of the MEP Pathway to the Supply of Metabolic Precursors for Carotenoid and Chlorophyll Biosynthesis in Carrot (Daucus carota)

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kevin; Quiroz, Luis F.; Rodriguez-Concepción, Manuel; Stange, Claudia R.

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids and chlorophylls are photosynthetic pigments synthesized in plastids from metabolic precursors provided by the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The first two steps in the MEP pathway are catalyzed by the deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR) enzymes. While DXS has been recently shown to be the main flux-controlling step of the MEP pathway, both DXS and DXR enzymes have been proven to be able to promote an increase in MEP-derived products when overproduced in diverse plant systems. Carrot (Daucus carota) produces photosynthetic pigments (carotenoids and chlorophylls) in leaves and in light-exposed roots, whereas only carotenoids (mainly α- and β-carotene) accumulate in the storage root in darkness. To evaluate whether DXS and DXR activities influence the production of carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot leaves and roots, the corresponding Arabidopsis thaliana genes were constitutively expressed in transgenic carrot plants. Our results suggest that DXS is limiting for the production of both carotenoids and chlorophylls in roots and leaves, whereas the regulatory role of DXR appeared to be minor. Interestingly, increased levels of DXS (but not of DXR) resulted in higher transcript abundance of endogenous carrot genes encoding phytoene synthase, the main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. These results support a central role for DXS on modulating the production of MEP-derived precursors to synthesize carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot, confirming the pivotal relevance of this enzyme to engineer healthier, carotenoid-enriched products. PMID:27630663

  20. Beta-carotene-rich carotenoid-protein preparation and exopolysaccharide production by Rhodotorula rubra GED8 grown with a yogurt starter culture.

    PubMed

    Frengova, Ginka I; Simova, Emilina D; Beshkova, Dora M

    2006-01-01

    The underlying method for obtaining a beta-carotene-rich carotenoid-protein preparation and exopolysaccharides is the associated cultivation of the carotenoid-synthesizing lactose-negative yeast strain Rhodotorula rubra GED8 with the yogurt starter culture (Lactobacillus bulgaricus 2-11 + Streptococcus thermophilus 15HA) in whey ultrafiltrate (45 g lactose/l) with a maximum carotenoid yield of 13.37 mg/l culture fluid on the 4.5th day. The chemical composition of the carotenoid-protein preparation has been identified. The respective carotenoid and protein content is 497.4 microg/g dry cells and 50.3% per dry weight, respectively. An important characteristic of the carotenoid composition is the high percentage (51.1%) of beta-carotene (a carotenoid pigment with the highest provitamin A activity) as compared to 12.9% and 33.7%, respectively, for the other two individual pigments--torulene and torularhodin. Exopolysaccharides (12.8 g/l) synthesized by the yeast and lactic acid cultures, identified as acid biopolymers containing 7.2% glucuronic acid, were isolated in the cell-free supernatant. Mannose, produced exclusively by the yeast, predominated in the neutral carbohydrate biopolymer component (76%). The mixed cultivation of R. rubra GED8 with the yogurt starter (L. bulgaricus 2-11 + S. thermophilus 15HA) in ultrafiltrate under conditions of intracellular production of maximum amount of carotenoids and exopolysaccharides synthesis enables combined utilization of the culture fluid from the fermentation process.

  1. Evaluation of the Relationship between the Incubation Time and Carotenoid Production in Rhodotorula Slooffiae and R. Mucilaginosa Isolated from Leather Tanning Wastewater 

    PubMed Central

    Sadat Naghavi, Farzaneh; Hanachi, Parichehr; Soudi, Mohammad Reza; Saboora, Azra; Ghorbani, Atefeh

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Carotenoids which are naturally synthesized by fungi such as yeasts can act as an antioxidant which is closely related to their ability to decrease the risk of a variety of degenerative diseases. In recent years, the increase of demand for carotenoids obtained from natural sources has promoted major efforts to improve carotenoid production from biological sources such as pigmented yeasts. The aim of this study was comparing incubation time and carotenoid production in Rhodotorula slooffiae and R. mucilaginosa isolated from leather tanning wastewater. Materials and Methods: To isolate the carotenoid pigment, cells were suspended in acetone and broken using a homogenizer, followed by centrifugation and separation of supernatant. In order to study the effect of incubation time, samples were held at 30 ˚С in a shaker at 150 rpm for 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hr. For analytical evaluation, pigments were measured spectrophotometrically at 450 nm using the extinction coefficient E1%450=2500. Results: The results showed that the content of total carotenoid in R. slooffiae was the highest when samples were incubated for 72 hr. Overall, R. mucilaginosa had more potential to produce carotenoid. The best incubation periods for R. slooffiae and R. mucilaginosa were 72 hr and 48 hr, respectively. Conclusion: It seemed that the maximum rate of total carotenoid was not directly associated with the maximum amount of cell biomass and the type of carotenoid and their relative amount may vary depending on genus of yeast. PMID:24379970

  2. Bioinformatic and molecular analysis of hydroxymethylbutenyl diphosphate synthase (GCPE) gene expression during carotenoid accumulation in ripening tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Querol, Jordi; Lois, Luisa María; Imperial, Santiago; Boronat, Albert

    2003-07-01

    Carotenoids are plastidic isoprenoid pigments of great biological and biotechnological interest. The precursors for carotenoid production are synthesized through the recently elucidated methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we have identified a tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cDNA sequence encoding a full-length protein with homology to the MEP pathway enzyme hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase (HDS, also called GCPE). Comparison with other plant and bacterial HDS sequences showed that the plant enzymes contain a plastid-targeting N-terminal sequence and two highly conserved plant-specific domains in the mature protein with no homology to any other sequence in the databases. The ubiquitous distribution of HDS-encoding expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the tomato collections suggests that the corresponding gene is likely expressed throughout the plant. The role of HDS in controlling the supply of precursors for carotenoid biosynthesis was estimated from the bioinformatic and molecular analysis of transcript abundance in different stages of fruit development. No significant changes in HDS gene expression were deduced from the statistical analysis of EST distribution during fruit ripening, when an active MEP pathway is required to support a massive accumulation of carotenoids. RNA blot experiments confirmed that similar transcript levels were present in both the wild-type and carotenoid-depleted yellow ripe ( r) mutant fruit independent of the stage of development and the carotenoid composition of the fruit. Together, our results are consistent with a non-limiting role for HDS in carotenoid biosynthesis during tomato fruit ripening.

  3. The relationship between carotenoids and sunlight response in members of the family Micrococcaceae.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Magdalena; Costa, Cristina S; Pizarro, Ramón A; Oppezzo, Oscar J

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the photoprotective effect of carotenoids in phylogentically related bacteria, which synthesize structurally different pigments. Two organisms were isolated from the same environment. Their 16S rDNA sequences and phenotypic characteristics identified them as members of the family Micrococcaceae. Reverse phase HPLC and absorption spectroscopy revealed that one of them, designated RMB40, synthesized 3 carotenoids with 9 conjugated double bonds, whilst the other, designated RMB42, synthesized a single and more hydrophobic pigment carrying 11 conjugated double bonds. Survival curves were obtained during sunlight exposure for both organisms and for carotenoid deficient mutants derived from them. Increased sunlight sensitivity was found in the carotenoidless mutant derived from RMB42. In contrast, pigment depletion had no appreciable effect on the sunlight response of RMB40. It is concluded that the structure of bacterial carotenoid probably exert an important influence on the effectiveness of these compounds to provide photoprotection in vivo. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Carotenoid metabolism and regulation in horticultural crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of pigments widely distributed in nature. The vivid yellow, orange, and red colors in many horticultural crops attribute to overaccumulation of carotenoids, which contribute to a critical agronomic trait for flowers and an important quality trait for fruits and vegeta...

  5. Method of producing purified carotenoid compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggink, Laura (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of producing a carotenoid in solid form includes culturing a strain of Chlorophyta algae cells in a minimal inorganic medium and separating the algae comprising a solid form of carotenoid. In one embodiment f the invention, the strain of Chlorophyta algae cells includes a strain f Chlamydomonas algae cells.

  6. Functional properties of carotenoids originating from algae.

    PubMed

    Christaki, Efterpi; Bonos, Eleftherios; Giannenas, Ilias; Florou-Paneri, Panagiota

    2013-01-15

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid molecules which are synthesised de novo by photosynthetic plants, fungi and algae and are responsible for the orange, yellow and some red colours of various fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids are lipophilic compounds, some of which act as provitamins A. These compounds can be divided into xanthophylls and carotenes. Many macroalgae and microalgae are rich in carotenoids, where these compounds aid in the absorption of sunlight. Industrially, these carotenoids are used as food pigments (in dairy products, beverages, etc.), as feed additives, in cosmetics and in pharmaceuticals, especially nowadays when there is an increasing demand by consumers for natural products. Production of carotenoids from algae has many advantages compared to other sources; for example, their production is cheap, easy and environmentally friendly; their extraction is easier, with higher yields, and there is no lack of raw materials or limited seasonal variation. Recently, there has been considerable interest in dietary carotenoids with respect to their antioxidant properties and their ability to reduce the incidence of some chronic diseases where free radicals are involved. Possibly, carotenoids protect cells from oxidative stress by quenching singlet oxygen damage with various mechanisms. Therefore, carotenoids derived from algae could be a leading natural resource in the research for potential functional ingredients. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. New tetrathiafulvalenes with thienyl- and other aromatic substituents, including fluorinated ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashev, G.; Shklyaeva, E.; Popov, S.; Nedugov, A.

    2004-04-01

    A set of new tetrathiafulvalenes incorporating thienyl, aromatic, fluorinated aromatic substituens as well as oxadiazole moieties, attached to the tetrathiafulvalene core by long aliphatic chains, were synthesized. Key words. tetrathiafulvalene thiophene fluorine.

  8. Insight into the Strong Antioxidant Activity of Deinoxanthin, a Unique Carotenoid in Deinococcus Radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hong-Fang

    2010-01-01

    Deinoxanthin (DX) is a unique carotenoid synthesized by Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radioresistant organisms known. In comparison with other carotenoids, DX was proven to exhibit significantly stronger reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity, which plays an important role in the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. In this work, to gain deeper insights into the strong antioxidant activity of DX, the parameters characterizing ROS-scavenging potential were calculated by means of quantum chemical calculations. It was found that DX possesses lower lowest triplet excitation energy for its unique structure than other carotenoids, such as β-carotene and zeaxanthin, which endows DX strong potential in the energy transfer-based ROS-scavenging process. Moreover, the H-atom donating potential of DX is similar to zeaxanthin according to the theoretical homolytic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy. Thus, the large number of conjugated double bonds should be crucial for its strong antioxidant activity. PMID:21151452

  9. Insight into the strong antioxidant activity of deinoxanthin, a unique carotenoid in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Fang

    2010-11-10

    Deinoxanthin (DX) is a unique carotenoid synthesized by Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radioresistant organisms known. In comparison with other carotenoids, DX was proven to exhibit significantly stronger reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity, which plays an important role in the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. In this work, to gain deeper insights into the strong antioxidant activity of DX, the parameters characterizing ROS-scavenging potential were calculated by means of quantum chemical calculations. It was found that DX possesses lower lowest triplet excitation energy for its unique structure than other carotenoids, such as β-carotene and zeaxanthin, which endows DX strong potential in the energy transfer-based ROS-scavenging process. Moreover, the H-atom donating potential of DX is similar to zeaxanthin according to the theoretical homolytic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy. Thus, the large number of conjugated double bonds should be crucial for its strong antioxidant activity.

  10. Hybrid Ionosilica containing aromatic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thach, U. D.; Prelot, B.; Hesemann, P.

    2015-07-01

    Ionosilicas are defined as mesostructured silica based materials bearing covalently bound ionic groups. These materials, situated at the interface of ionic liquids and structured silica mesophases, are usually synthesized following template directed hydrolysis-polycondensation procedures starting from silylated ionic compounds. Here, we report new ammonium type hybrid ionosilicas containing aromatic groups which can serve as a new platform for the design of functional materials, for applications in the areas of ion exchange reactions, drug delivery or wastewater treatment.

  11. CAROTENOIDS AND THE VISUAL CYCLE

    PubMed Central

    Wald, George

    1935-01-01

    1. Carotenoids have been identified and their quantities measured in the eyes of several frog species. The combined pigment epithelium and choroid layer of an R. pipiens or esculenta eye contain about 1γ of xanthophyll and about 4γ of vitamin A. During light adaptation the xanthophyll content falls 10 to 20 per cent. 2. Light adapted retinas contain about 0.2–0.3 γ of vitamin A alone. 3. Dark adapted retinas contain only a trace of vitamin A. The destruction of their visual purple with chloroform liberates a hitherto undescribed carotenoid, retinene. The bleaching of visual purple to visual yellow by light also liberates retinene. Free retinene is removed from the isolated retina by two thermal processes: reversion to visual purple and decomposition to colorless products, including vitamin A. This is the source of the vitamin A of the light adapted retina. 4. Isolated retinas which have been bleached and allowed to fade completely contain several times as much vitamin A as retinas from light adapted animals. The visual purple system therefore expends vitamin A and is dependent upon the diet for its replacement. 5. Visual purple behaves as a conjugated protein in which retinene is the prosthetic group. 6. Vitamin A is the precursor of visual purple as well as the product of its decomposition. The visual processes therefore constitute a cycle. PMID:19872932

  12. Levels of Lycopene β-Cyclase 1 Modulate Carotenoid Gene Expression and Accumulation in Daucus carota

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Juan Camilo; Pizarro, Lorena; Fuentes, Paulina; Handford, Michael; Cifuentes, Victor; Stange, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are synthesized and accumulated in plastids through a highly regulated pathway. Lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) is a key enzyme involved directly in the synthesis of α-carotene and β-carotene through the cyclization of lycopene. Carotenoids are produced in both carrot (Daucus carota) leaves and reserve roots, and high amounts of α-carotene and β-carotene accumulate in the latter. In some plant models, the presence of different isoforms of carotenogenic genes is associated with an organ-specific function. D. carota harbors two Lcyb genes, of which DcLcyb1 is expressed in leaves and storage roots during carrot development, correlating with an increase in carotenoid levels. In this work, we show that DcLCYB1 is localized in the plastid and that it is a functional enzyme, as demonstrated by heterologous complementation in Escherichia coli and over expression and post transcriptional gene silencing in carrot. Transgenic plants with higher or reduced levels of DcLcyb1 had incremented or reduced levels of chlorophyll, total carotenoids and β-carotene in leaves and in the storage roots, respectively. In addition, changes in the expression of DcLcyb1 are accompanied by a modulation in the expression of key endogenous carotenogenic genes. Our results indicate that DcLcyb1 does not possess an organ specific function and modulate carotenoid gene expression and accumulation in carrot leaves and storage roots. PMID:23555569

  13. Levels of lycopene β-cyclase 1 modulate carotenoid gene expression and accumulation in Daucus carota.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Juan Camilo; Pizarro, Lorena; Fuentes, Paulina; Handford, Michael; Cifuentes, Victor; Stange, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are synthesized and accumulated in plastids through a highly regulated pathway. Lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) is a key enzyme involved directly in the synthesis of α-carotene and β-carotene through the cyclization of lycopene. Carotenoids are produced in both carrot (Daucus carota) leaves and reserve roots, and high amounts of α-carotene and β-carotene accumulate in the latter. In some plant models, the presence of different isoforms of carotenogenic genes is associated with an organ-specific function. D. carota harbors two Lcyb genes, of which DcLcyb1 is expressed in leaves and storage roots during carrot development, correlating with an increase in carotenoid levels. In this work, we show that DcLCYB1 is localized in the plastid and that it is a functional enzyme, as demonstrated by heterologous complementation in Escherichia coli and over expression and post transcriptional gene silencing in carrot. Transgenic plants with higher or reduced levels of DcLcyb1 had incremented or reduced levels of chlorophyll, total carotenoids and β-carotene in leaves and in the storage roots, respectively. In addition, changes in the expression of DcLcyb1 are accompanied by a modulation in the expression of key endogenous carotenogenic genes. Our results indicate that DcLcyb1 does not possess an organ specific function and modulate carotenoid gene expression and accumulation in carrot leaves and storage roots.

  14. Carotenoid gene expression explains the difference of carotenoid accumulation in carrot root tissues.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Florent; Hartmann, Laura; Dubois-Laurent, Cécile; Welsch, Ralf; Huet, Sébastien; Hamama, Latifa; Briard, Mathilde; Peltier, Didier; Gagné, Séverine; Geoffriau, Emmanuel

    2017-04-01

    Main conclusion Variations in gene expression can partially explain the difference of carotenoid accumulation in secondary phloem and xylem of fleshy carrot roots. The carrot root is well divided into two different tissues separated by vascular cambium: the secondary phloem and xylem. The equilibrium between these two tissues represents an important issue for carrot quality, but the knowledge about the respective carotenoid accumulation is sparse. The aim of this work was (i) to investigate if variation in carotenoid biosynthesis gene expression could explain differences in carotenoid content in phloem and xylem tissues and (ii) to investigate if this regulation is differentially modulated in the respective tissues by water-restricted growing conditions. In this work, five carrot genotypes contrasting by their root color were studied in control and water-restricted conditions. Carotenoid content and the relative expression of 13 genes along the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway were measured in the respective tissues. Results showed that in orange genotypes and the purple one, carotenoid content was higher in phloem compared to xylem. For the red one, no differences were observed. Moreover, in control condition, variations in gene expression explained the different carotenoid accumulations in both tissues, while in water-restricted condition, no clear association between gene expression pattern and variations in carotenoid content could be detected except in orange-rooted genotypes. This work shows that the structural aspect of carrot root is more important for carotenoid accumulation in relation with gene expression levels than the consequences of expression changes upon water restriction.

  15. Synthesizing Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Jonathan; Corron, Ned; Hayes, Scott; Pethel, Shawn

    2007-03-01

    Chaos is usually attributed only to nonlinear systems. Yet it was recently shown that chaotic waveforms can be synthesized by linear superposition of randomly polarized basis functions. The basis function contains a growing oscillation that terminates in a large pulse. We show that this function is easily realized when viewed backward in time as a pulse followed by ringing decay. Consequently, a linear filter driven by random pulses outputs a waveform that, when viewed backward in time, exhibits essential qualities of chaos, i.e. determinism and a positive Lyapunov exponent. This phenomenon suggests that chaos may be connected to physical theories whose framework is not that of a deterministic dynamical system. We demonstrate that synthesizing chaos requires a balance between the topological entropy of the random source and the dissipation in the filter. Surprisingly, using different encodings of the random source, the same filter can produce both Lorenz-like and R"ossler-like waveforms. The different encodings can be viewed as grammar restrictions on a more general encoding that produces a chaotic superset encompassing the Lorenz and R"ossler paradigms of nonlinear dynamics. Thus, the language of deterministic chaos provides a useful description for a class of signals not generated by a deterministic system.

  16. The Importance of Carotenoid Dose in Supplementation Studies with Songbirds.

    PubMed

    Koch, Rebecca E; Wilson, Alan E; Hill, Geoffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoid coloration is the one of the most frequently studied ornamental traits in animals. Many studies of carotenoid coloration test the associations between carotenoid coloration and measures of performance, such as immunocompetence and oxidative state, proceeding from the premise that carotenoids are limited resources. Such studies commonly involve supplementing the diets of captive birds with carotenoids. In many cases, however, the amount of carotenoid administered is poorly justified, and even supposedly carotenoid-limited diets may saturate birds' systems. To quantify the relationships among the amount of carotenoids administered in experiments, levels of circulating carotenoids, and quantities of carotenoids deposited into colored ornaments, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 published studies that supplemented carotenoids to one of seven songbird species. We used allometric scaling equations to estimate the per-gram carotenoid consumption of each study's subjects, and we used meta-regression to evaluate the effects of this carotenoid dose on differences in coloration and plasma carotenoid levels between supplemented and control groups of birds. After accounting for supplementation duration and species, we observed a significant positive correlation between carotenoid intake and response of plasma carotenoid level to supplementation. The presence of supplemental carotenoids also tended to increase the expression of ornamental coloration, but the magnitude of the carotenoid dose did not significantly affect how strongly coloration changed with supplementation. Further, coloration effect sizes had no significant relationship with plasma carotenoid effect sizes. We also found significant heterogeneity in responses among studies and species, and the parameters used to measure color significantly affected response to supplementation. Our results emphasize the importance of performing dosage trials to determine what supplementation levels provide limited

  17. Phytochrome-mediated Carotenoids Biosynthesis in Ripening Tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R L; Jen, J J

    1975-09-01

    Red light induced and far red light inhibited carotenoid biosynthesis in ripening tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) when compared to controls kept in the dark. Red illumination following far red illumination reversed the inhibitory action of far red light on carotenoid biosynthesis, suggesting a phytochrome-mediated process. Quantitation of individual carotenoids favored the hypothesis of two separate carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in tomatoes.

  18. Native carotenoids composition of some tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Enrique; Giuffrida, Daniele; Menchaca, Dania; Dugo, Paola; Torre, Germana; Meléndez-Martinez, Antonio J; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-10-15

    Many tropical fruits can be considered a reservoir of bioactive substances with a special interest due to their possible health-promoting properties. The interest in carotenoids from a nutritional standpoint has recently greatly increased, because of their important health benefits. Here we report the native carotenoids composition in six tropical fruits from Panama, which is considered a region of great biodiversity. The native carotenoid composition was directly investigated by an HPLC-DAD-APCI-MS methodology, for the first time. In Corozo 32 different carotenoids were detected, including a high content of β-carotene and lycopene. Sastra showed the highest content of zeaxanthin among the fruit investigated. In Sapote 22 different carotenoids were detected, including β-carotene and 10 different zeaxanthin-di-esters. Frutita showed a very high content of the apo-carotenoid β-citraurin, and of a number of its esters. In Maracuyà chino 14 carotenoids were detected, including a high amounts of mono-esterified lauric acid with β-cryptoxanthin and with cryptocapsin. Mamey rojo was characterised by ketocarotenoids with κ rings, both hydroxylated and not hydroxylated.

  19. Carotenoids and health in older people.

    PubMed

    Woodside, Jayne V; McGrath, Alanna J; Lyner, Natalie; McKinley, Michelle C

    2015-01-01

    As the proportion of older people increases, so will chronic disease incidence and the proportion of the population living with disability. Therefore, new approaches to maintain health for as long as possible in this age group are required. Carotenoids are a group of polyphenolic compounds found predominantly in fruit and vegetables that have been proposed to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Such properties may impact on the risk diseases which predominate in older people, and also ageing-related physiological changes. Working out the effect of carotenoid intake versus fruit and vegetable intake is difficult, and the strong correlation between individual carotenoid intakes also complicates any attempt to examine individual carotenoid health effects. Similarly, research to determine whether carotenoids consumed as supplements have similar benefits to increased dietary intake through whole foods, is still required. However, reviewing the recent evidence suggests that carotenoid intake and status are relatively consistently associated with reduced CVD risk, although β-carotene supplementation does not reduce CVD risk and increases lung cancer risk. Increased lycopene intake may reduce prostate cancer progression, with a potential role for carotenoids at other cancer sites. Lutein and zeaxanthin have a plausible role in the maintenance of eye health, whilst an association between carotenoid intake and cognitive and physical health appears possible, although research is limited to date. Given this accruing evidence base to support a specific role for certain carotenoids and ageing, current dietary advice to consume a diet rich in fruit and vegetables would appear prudent, and efforts maintained to encourage increased intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Carotenoid Photoprotection in Artificial Photosynthetic Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Kloz, Miroslav; Pillai, Smitha; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T. M.

    2011-04-14

    A series of phthalocyanine-carotenoid dyads in which a phenylamino group links a phthalocyanine to carotenoids having 8-11 backbone double bonds were examined by visible and near-infrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy combined with global fitting analysis. The series of molecules has permitted investigation of the role of carotenoids in the quenching of excited states of cyclic tetrapyrroles. The transient behavior varied dramatically with the length of the carotenoid and the solvent environment. Clear spectroscopic signatures of radical species revealed photoinduced electron transfer as the main quenching mechanism for all dyads dissolved in a polar solvent (THF), and the quenching rate was almost independent of carotenoid length. However, in a nonpolar solvent (toluene), quenching rates displayed a strong dependence on the conjugation length of the carotenoid and the mechanism did not include charge separation. The lack of any rise time components of a carotenoid S1 signature in all experiments in toluene suggests that an excitonic coupling between the carotenoid S1 state and phthalocyanine Q state, rather than a conventional energy transfer process, is the major mechanism of quenching. A pronounced inhomogeneity of the system was observed and attributed to the presence of a phenyl-amino linker between phthalocyanine and carotenoids. On the basis of accumulated work on various caroteno-phthalocyanine dyads and triads, we have now identified three mechanisms of tetrapyrrole singlet excited state quenching by carotenoids in artificial systems: (i) Car-Pc electron transfer and recombination; (ii)1Pc to Car S1 energy transfer and fast internal conversion to the Car ground state; (iii) excitonic coupling between 1Pc and Car S1 and ensuing internal conversion to the ground state of the carotenoid. The dominant mechanism depends upon the exact molecular architecture and solvent environment

  1. Extraction and chromatography of carotenoids from pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung Sook; Burri, Betty Jane C; Quan, Zhejiu; Neidlinger, Terry R

    2005-05-06

    Vitamin A deficiency is a health problem in Southeast Asia that can be corrected by feeding orange fruits and vegetables such as mango. Pumpkin is a traditional Korean food that is easy to store and is already believed to have health benefits. We extracted carotenoids from pumpkin by liquid-liquid extraction and by supercritical fluid extraction. We measured carotenoids by reversed-phase chromatography with diode array detection. The major carotenoid in pumpkin (> 80%) is beta-carotene, with lesser amounts of lutein, lycopene, alpha-carotene and cis-beta-carotene. Pumpkin is a rich source of beta-carotene and might be useful for preventing Vitamin A deficiency.

  2. Interrelationships between maternal carotenoid status and newborn infant macular pigment optical density and carotenoid status.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Bradley S; Chan, Gary; Hoffman, Robert O; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S

    2013-08-15

    Deposition of the macular pigment carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin in the human retina occurs early in life. In this study, we examined the interrelationships of maternal carotenoid status and newborn infant macular pigment levels and systemic carotenoid status. As a secondary measure, we also evaluated the effects of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) on carotenoid status in term newborn infants. We measured mother and infant skin carotenoids using resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS), serum carotenoids by HPLC, and mother breast milk carotenoids by HPLC. We measured infant macular pigment levels using noninvasive blue light reflectometry. We enrolled 30 healthy term infants, their mothers, and 10 IUGR infants and their mothers. A subset of 16 infants was imaged for macular pigment optical density (MPOD). Infant serum zeaxanthin levels correlated with MPOD (r = 0.68, P = 0.007). Mother serum zeaxanthin levels correlated with infant MPOD (r = 0.59, P = 0.032). Infant and mother serum lutein did not correlate with MPOD. Mother-infant correlations were found for total serum carotenoids (r = 0.42, P = 0.020) and skin carotenoids (r = 0.48, P = 0.001). No difference was seen between IUGR infants and controls in total serum or skin carotenoids. Mothers of IUGR infants had lower total serum carotenoids (P = 0.019) and breast milk carotenoids than controls (P = 0.006). Our findings suggest that maternal zeaxanthin status may play a more important role than lutein status in macular pigment deposition in utero. Controlled trials are needed to determine whether maternal zeaxanthin prenatal supplementation can raise infant macular pigment levels and/or improve ocular function.

  3. Interrelationships Between Maternal Carotenoid Status and Newborn Infant Macular Pigment Optical Density and Carotenoid Status

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Bradley S.; Chan, Gary; Hoffman, Robert O.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakov, Igor V.; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Deposition of the macular pigment carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin in the human retina occurs early in life. In this study, we examined the interrelationships of maternal carotenoid status and newborn infant macular pigment levels and systemic carotenoid status. As a secondary measure, we also evaluated the effects of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) on carotenoid status in term newborn infants. Methods. We measured mother and infant skin carotenoids using resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS), serum carotenoids by HPLC, and mother breast milk carotenoids by HPLC. We measured infant macular pigment levels using noninvasive blue light reflectometry. Results. We enrolled 30 healthy term infants, their mothers, and 10 IUGR infants and their mothers. A subset of 16 infants was imaged for macular pigment optical density (MPOD). Infant serum zeaxanthin levels correlated with MPOD (r = 0.68, P = 0.007). Mother serum zeaxanthin levels correlated with infant MPOD (r = 0.59, P = 0.032). Infant and mother serum lutein did not correlate with MPOD. Mother–infant correlations were found for total serum carotenoids (r = 0.42, P = 0.020) and skin carotenoids (r = 0.48, P = 0.001). No difference was seen between IUGR infants and controls in total serum or skin carotenoids. Mothers of IUGR infants had lower total serum carotenoids (P = 0.019) and breast milk carotenoids than controls (P = 0.006). Conclusions. Our findings suggest that maternal zeaxanthin status may play a more important role than lutein status in macular pigment deposition in utero. Controlled trials are needed to determine whether maternal zeaxanthin prenatal supplementation can raise infant macular pigment levels and/or improve ocular function. PMID:23838770

  4. Holographic films from carotenoid pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxqui-López, S.; Lecona-Sánchez, J. F.; Santacruz-Vázquez, C.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    Carotenoids pigments presents in pineapple can be more than just natural dyes, which is one of the applications that now at day gives the chemical industry. In this research shown that can be used in implementing of holographic recording Films. Therefore we describe the technique how to obtain this kind of pigments trough spay drying of natural pineapple juice, which are then dissolved with water in a proportion of 0.1g to 1mL. The obtained sample is poured into glass substrates using the gravity method, after a drying of 24 hours in laboratory normal conditions the films are ready. The films are characterized by recording transmission holographic gratings (LSR 445 NL 445 nm) and measuring the diffraction efficiency holographic parameter. This recording material has good diffraction efficiency and environmental stability.

  5. Carotenoid maintenance handicap and the physiology of carotenoid-based signalisation of health.

    PubMed

    Vinkler, Michal; Albrecht, Tomás

    2010-01-01

    Despite a reasonable scientific interest in sexual selection, the general principles of health signalisation via ornamental traits remain still unresolved in many aspects. This is also true for the mechanism preserving honesty of carotenoid-based signals. Although it is widely accepted that this type of ornamentation reflects an allocation trade-off between the physiological utilisation of carotenoids (mainly in antioxidative processes) and their deposition in ornaments, some recent evidence suggests more complex interactions. Here, we further develop the models currently proposed to explain the honesty of carotenoid-based signalisation of heath status by adding the handicap principle concept regulated by testosterone. We propose that under certain circumstances carotenoids may be dangerous for the organism because they easily transform into toxic cleavage products. When reserves of other protective antioxidants are insufficient, physiological trade-offs may exist between maintenance of carotenoids for ornament expression and their removal from the body. Furthermore, we suggest that testosterone which enhances ornamentation by increasing carotenoid bioavailability may also promote oxidative stress and hence lower antioxidant reserves. The presence of high levels of carotenoids required for high-quality ornament expression may therefore represent a handicap and only individuals in prime health could afford to produce elaborate colourful ornaments. Although further testing is needed, this 'carotenoid maintenance handicap' hypothesis may offer a new insight into the physiological aspects of the relationship between carotenoid function, immunity and ornamentation.

  6. Carotenoid bioaccessibility in pulp and fresh juice from carotenoid-rich sweet oranges and mandarins.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, María Jesús; Cilla, Antonio; Barberá, Reyes; Zacarías, Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Citrus fruits are a good source of carotenoids for the human diet; however, comparative studies of carotenoids in different citrus food matrices are scarce. In this work the concentration and bioaccessibility of carotenoids in sweet oranges and mandarins with marked differences in carotenoid composition were evaluated in pulp and compared to those in fresh juice. The pulp and juice of the red-fleshed Cara Cara sweet orange variety was highly rich in carotenes (mainly lycopene and phytoene) compared to standard Navel orange, while β-cryptoxanthin and phytoene predominated in mandarins. Total carotenoid content in the pulp of the ordinary Navel orange and in the red-fleshed Cara Cara orange, as well as in the Clementine mandarin were higher than in the corresponding juices, although individual carotenoids were differentially affected by juice preparation. Bioaccessibility of the bioactive carotenoids (the ones described to be absorbed by humans) was greater in both pulp and juice of the carotenoid-rich Cara Cara orange compared to the Navel orange while increasing levels of β-cryptoxanthin were detected in the bioaccessible fractions of pulp and juice of mandarins postharvest stored at 12 °C compared to freshly-harvested fruits. Overall, results indicated that higher soluble bioactive carotenoids from citrus fruits and, consequently, potential nutritional and health benefits are obtained by the consumption of pulp with respect to fresh juice.

  7. Carotenoid maintenance handicap and the physiology of carotenoid-based signalisation of health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinkler, Michal; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Despite a reasonable scientific interest in sexual selection, the general principles of health signalisation via ornamental traits remain still unresolved in many aspects. This is also true for the mechanism preserving honesty of carotenoid-based signals. Although it is widely accepted that this type of ornamentation reflects an allocation trade-off between the physiological utilisation of carotenoids (mainly in antioxidative processes) and their deposition in ornaments, some recent evidence suggests more complex interactions. Here, we further develop the models currently proposed to explain the honesty of carotenoid-based signalisation of heath status by adding the handicap principle concept regulated by testosterone. We propose that under certain circumstances carotenoids may be dangerous for the organism because they easily transform into toxic cleavage products. When reserves of other protective antioxidants are insufficient, physiological trade-offs may exist between maintenance of carotenoids for ornament expression and their removal from the body. Furthermore, we suggest that testosterone which enhances ornamentation by increasing carotenoid bioavailability may also promote oxidative stress and hence lower antioxidant reserves. The presence of high levels of carotenoids required for high-quality ornament expression may therefore represent a handicap and only individuals in prime health could afford to produce elaborate colourful ornaments. Although further testing is needed, this ‘carotenoid maintenance handicap’ hypothesis may offer a new insight into the physiological aspects of the relationship between carotenoid function, immunity and ornamentation.

  8. Overexpression of ZWF1 and POS5 improves carotenoid biosynthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Shi, F; Zhan, W

    2015-10-01

    Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing exogenous carotenogenic genes can synthesize carotenoids. NADPH is a key cofactor for carotenoid biosynthesis, while glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Zwf1) and an NADH kinase (Pos5) are the two main NADPH-supplying sources in S. cerevisiae. Here, the effect of ZWF1 and POS5 overexpression on carotenoid yield in recombinant S. cerevisiae was explored. The initial carotenogenic strain Sc-EYBIH+I which expressed crtE, crtYB, crtI, cHMG1 and another copy of crtI could synthesize 1·35 ± 0·13 mg l(-1) of lycopene and 0·32 ± 0·02 mg l(-1) of β-carotene. When ZWF1 was overexpressed (Sc-EYBIZH+I), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity increased by 103-fold, the transcription level of crtE and crtI increased significantly, the lycopene and β-carotene yield increased to 2·29 ± 0·06 and 0·38 ± 0·02 mg l(-1) respectively. When POS5 was overexpressed (Sc-EYBIPH+I), NAD kinase activity increased by 5·5-fold, the transcription level of crtE, crtYB and crtI increased obviously, the lycopene and β-carotene yield increased to 2·50 ± 0·11 and 0·53 ± 0·03 mg l(-1) respectively. Therefore, improvement of NADPH supply contributed to carotenoids biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae and overexpression of POS5 was more effective than overexpression of ZWF1. This study provides a new strategy for enhancing carotenoid biosynthesis. NADPH is a key cofactor for carotenoid biosynthesis. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Zwf1) and an NADH kinase (Pos5) are effective NADPH-supplying sources in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When ZWF1 and POS5 were overexpressed in a carotenoid-producing S. cerevisiae strain individually, the total yield of lycopene and β-carotene increased by 59·9% and 81·4%, respectively, and the final product β-carotene yield increased by 18·8% and 65·6% respectively. This suggests the improvement of NADPH supply as a useful strategy for carotenoids biosynthesis. © 2015 The Society

  9. Evaluation of the antioxidant effects of carotenoids from Deinococcus radiodurans through targeted mutagenesis, chemiluminescence, and DNA damage analyses.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Xu, Zhenjian; Sun, Zongtao; Lin, Jun; Hua, Yuejin

    2007-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is highly resistant to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidant effect of carotenoids in D. radiodurans was investigated by using a targeted mutation of the phytoene synthase gene to block the carotenoid synthesis pathway and by evaluating the survival of cells under environmental stresses. The colorless mutant R1DeltacrtB of D. radiodurans failed to synthesize carotenoids, and was more sensitive to ionizing radiation, hydrogen peroxide, and desiccation than the wild type, suggesting that carotenoids in D. radiodurans help in combating environmental stresses. Chemiluminescence analyses showed that deinoxanthin, a major product in the carotenoid synthesis pathway, had significantly stronger scavenging ability on H2O2 and singlet oxygen than two carotenes (lycopene and beta-carotene) and two xanthophylls (zeaxanthin and lutein). Deinoxanthin also exhibited protective effect on DNA. Our findings suggest that the stronger antioxidant effect of deinoxanthin contribute to the resistance of D. radiodurans. The higher antioxidant effect of deinoxanthin may be attributed to its distinct chemical structure which has an extended conjugated double bonds and the presence of a hydroxyl group at C-1' position, compared with other tested carotenoids.

  10. Mechanisms of provitamin A (carotenoid) and vitamin A (retinol) transport into and out of intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    During, Alexandrine; Harrison, Earl H

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the mechanisms of intestinal retinol (ROL) and carotenoid transport. When differentiated Caco-2 cells were incubated with ROL for varying times, cellular ROL plateaued within 2 h, whereas retinyl ester (RE) formation increased continuously. ROL and RE efflux into basolateral medium (BM) increased linearly with time, ROL in the nonlipoprotein fraction and REs in chylomicrons (CMs). In contrast to carotenoids, ROL uptake was proportional to ROL concentration (0.5-110 microM). ROL efflux into BM occurred via two processes: a) a saturable process at low concentrations (<10 microM) and b) a nonsaturable process at higher concentrations. When ROL-loaded cells were maintained on retinoid-free medium, free ROL, but not REs, was secreted into BM. Glyburide significantly reduced ROL efflux but not ROL uptake. Inhibition of ABCA1 protein expression by small interfering RNAs decreased ROL efflux but not carotenoid efflux. Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) inhibition did not affect ROL transport but decreased carotenoid uptake. The present data suggest that a) ROL enters intestinal cells by diffusion, b) ROL efflux is partly facilitated, probably by the basolateral transporter ABCA1, and c) newly synthesized REs, but not preformed esters, are incorporated into CM and secreted. In contrast to ROL transport, carotenoid uptake is mediated by the apical transporter SR-BI, and carotenoid efflux occurs exclusively via their secretion in CM.

  11. Latin American food sources of carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Amaya, D B

    1999-09-01

    Latin America has a wide variety of carotenogenic foods, notable for the diversity and high levels of carotenoids. A part of this natural wealth has been analyzed. Carrot, red palm oil and some cultivars of squash and pumpkin are sources of both beta-carotene and alpha-carotene. beta-carotene is the principal carotenoid of the palm fruits burití, tucumã and bocaiuva, other fruits such as loquat, marolo and West Indian cherry, and sweet potato. Buriti also has high amounts of alpha-carotene and gamma-carotene. beta-Cryptoxanthin is the major carotenoid in caja, nectarine, orange-fleshed papaya, orange, peach, tangerine and the tree tomato. Lycopene predominates in tomato, red-fleshed papaya, guava, pitanga and watermelon. Pitanga also has substantial amounts of beta-cryptoxanthin, gamma-carotene and rubixanthin. Zeaxanthin, principal carotenoid of corn, is also predominant only in piquí. delta-Carotene is the main carotenoid of the peach palm and zeta-carotene of passion fruit. Lutein and beta-carotene, in high concentrations, are encountered in the numerous leafy vegetables of the region, as well as in other green vegetables and in some varieties of squash and pumpkin. Violaxanthin is the principal carotenoid of mango and mamey and is also found in appreciable amounts in green vegetables. Quantitative, in some cases also qualitative, differences exist among cultivars of the same food. Generally, carotenoids are in greater concentrations in the peel than in the pulp, increase considerably during ripening and are in higher levels in foods produced in hot places. Other Latin America indigenous carotenogenic foods must be investigated before they are supplanted by introduced crops, which are often poorer sources of carotenoids.

  12. Coprophagy: an unusual source of essential carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Negro, J J; Grande, J M; Tella, J L; Garrido, J; Hornero, D; Donázar, J A; Sanchez-Zapata, J A; BenItez, J R; Barcell, M

    2002-04-25

    The rare Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus) stands out among the Old World vultures (Family Accipitridae) because of its brightly ornamented head, which is coloured yellow by carotenoid pigments, and its practice of feeding on faeces. Here we show that Egyptian vultures obtain these pigments from the excrement of ungulates. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that faeces can be used as a source of carotenoids by a vertebrate.

  13. Correlations Between Macular, Skin, and Serum Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Conrady, Christopher D.; Bell, James P.; Besch, Brian M.; Gorusupudi, Aruna; Farnsworth, Kelliann; Ermakov, Igor; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Ocular and systemic measurement and imaging of the macular carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin have been employed extensively as potential biomarkers of AMD risk. In this study, we systematically compare dual wavelength retinal autofluorescence imaging (AFI) of macular pigment with skin resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) and serum carotenoid levels in a clinic-based population. Methods Eighty-eight patients were recruited from retina and general ophthalmology practices from a tertiary referral center and excluded only if they did not have all three modalities tested, had a diagnosis of macular telangiectasia (MacTel) or Stargardt disease, or had poor AFI image quality. Skin, macular, and serum carotenoid levels were measured by RRS, AFI, and HPLC, respectively. Results Skin RRS measurements and serum zeaxanthin concentrations correlated most strongly with AFI macular pigment volume under the curve (MPVUC) measurements up to 9° eccentricity relative to MPVUC or rotationally averaged macular pigment optical density (MPOD) measurements at smaller eccentricities. These measurements were reproducible and not significantly affected by cataracts. We also found that these techniques could readily identify subjects taking oral carotenoid-containing supplements. Conclusions Larger macular pigment volume AFI and skin RRS measurements are noninvasive, objective, and reliable methods to assess ocular and systemic carotenoid levels. They are an attractive alternative to psychophysical and optical methods that measure MPOD at a limited number of eccentricities. Consequently, skin RRS and MPVUC at 9° are both reasonable biomarkers of macular carotenoid status that could be readily adapted to research and clinical settings. PMID:28728169

  14. Correlations Between Macular, Skin, and Serum Carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Conrady, Christopher D; Bell, James P; Besch, Brian M; Gorusupudi, Aruna; Farnsworth, Kelliann; Ermakov, Igor; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S

    2017-07-01

    Ocular and systemic measurement and imaging of the macular carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin have been employed extensively as potential biomarkers of AMD risk. In this study, we systematically compare dual wavelength retinal autofluorescence imaging (AFI) of macular pigment with skin resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) and serum carotenoid levels in a clinic-based population. Eighty-eight patients were recruited from retina and general ophthalmology practices from a tertiary referral center and excluded only if they did not have all three modalities tested, had a diagnosis of macular telangiectasia (MacTel) or Stargardt disease, or had poor AFI image quality. Skin, macular, and serum carotenoid levels were measured by RRS, AFI, and HPLC, respectively. Skin RRS measurements and serum zeaxanthin concentrations correlated most strongly with AFI macular pigment volume under the curve (MPVUC) measurements up to 9° eccentricity relative to MPVUC or rotationally averaged macular pigment optical density (MPOD) measurements at smaller eccentricities. These measurements were reproducible and not significantly affected by cataracts. We also found that these techniques could readily identify subjects taking oral carotenoid-containing supplements. Larger macular pigment volume AFI and skin RRS measurements are noninvasive, objective, and reliable methods to assess ocular and systemic carotenoid levels. They are an attractive alternative to psychophysical and optical methods that measure MPOD at a limited number of eccentricities. Consequently, skin RRS and MPVUC at 9° are both reasonable biomarkers of macular carotenoid status that could be readily adapted to research and clinical settings.

  15. Human ocular carotenoid-binding proteins†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Binxing; Vachali, Preejith

    2014-01-01

    Two dietary carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, are specifically delivered to the human macula at the highest concentration anywhere in the body. Whenever a tissue exhibits highly selective uptake of a compound, it is likely that one or more specific binding proteins are involved in the process. Over the past decade, our laboratory has identified and characterized several carotenoid-binding proteins from human retina including a pi isoform of glutathione S-transferase (GSTP1) as a zeaxanthin-binding protein, a member of the steroidogenic acute regulatory domain (StARD) family as a lutein-binding protein, and tubulin as a less specific, but higher capacity site for carotenoid deposition. In this article, we review the purification and characterization of these carotenoid-binding proteins, and we relate these ocular carotenoid-binding proteins to the transport and uptake role of serum lipoproteins and scavenger receptor proteins in a proposed pathway for macular pigment carotenoid delivery to the human retina. PMID:20820671

  16. [Investigation needs on carotenoids in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Muñoz de Chávez, M; Chávez, A; Calvo, C

    1999-09-01

    Many recent papers show the important role of bioactive phytochemicals to maintain a good health status. Among them the carotenoids are the best known. About 637 have been described and possibly 70 of them could have an important role in human health, 16 have been found in human brain in high amounts. Most of the studies have found relations between the carotenoids and chronic non-communicable diseases like several types of cancer, atherogenic disease and some degenerative pathology of the eye. This relation is mediated by genes and age. Studies of carotenoids are of scientific and economic interest for Latin America as many tropical products are high sources of these compounds. Therefore the first task is to analyze them and iniciate some evaluation on its metabolic availability. A coordinated regional work is proposed, in which 40 or 50 fruits and vegetables are analyzed in terms of the seven carotenoids most related to human health. At the same time it will be important to start epidemiological studies that will compare groups with different levels of consumption of fruits and vegetables and make chronic disease risk analysis. In some countries of the Latin American region, with the support of FAO and INFOODS, some courses and meetings are taking place so that in a short time period the carotenoid composition of the important regional foods will be completed and a carotenoid regional food composition table be published.

  17. Rhodotorula glutinis-potential source of lipids, carotenoids, and enzymes for use in industries.

    PubMed

    Kot, Anna M; Błażejak, Stanisław; Kurcz, Agnieszka; Gientka, Iwona; Kieliszek, Marek

    2016-07-01

    Rhodotorula glutinis is capable of synthesizing numerous valuable compounds with a wide industrial usage. Biomass of this yeast constitutes sources of microbiological oils, and the whole pool of fatty acids is dominated by oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acid. Due to its composition, the lipids may be useful as a source for the production of the so-called third-generation biodiesel. These yeasts are also capable of synthesizing carotenoids such as β-carotene, torulene, and torularhodin. Due to their health-promoting characteristics, carotenoids are commonly used in the cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and food industries. They are also used as additives in fodders for livestock, fish, and crustaceans. A significant characteristic of R. glutinis is its capability to produce numerous enzymes, in particular, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL). This enzyme is used in the food industry in the production of L-phenylalanine that constitutes the substrate for the synthesis of aspartame-a sweetener commonly used in the food industry.

  18. Carotenoid-oxygenases: Key Players for Carotenoid Function and Homeostasis in Mammalian Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Glenn P.; Amengual, Jaume; Palczewski, Grzegorz; Babino, Darwin; von Lintig, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Humans depend on a dietary intake of lipids to maintain optimal health. Among various classes of dietary lipids, the physiological importance of carotenoids is still controversially discussed. On one hand, it is well established that carotenoids such as β,β-carotene are a major source for vitamin A that plays critical roles for vision and many aspects of cell physiology. On the other hand, large clinical trials have failed to show clear health benefits of carotenoids supplementation and even suggest adverse health effects in individuals at risk of disease. In recent years, key molecular players for carotenoid metabolism have been identified, including an evolutionarily well conserved family of carotenoid-oxygenases. Studies in knockout mouse models for these enzymes revealed that carotenoid metabolism is a highly regulated process and that this regulation already takes place at the level of intestinal absorption. These studies also provided evidence that of β,β-carotene conversion can influence retinoid-dependent processes in the mouse embryo and in adult tissues. Moreover, these analyses provide an explanation for adverse health effects of carotenoids by showing that a pathological accumulation of these compounds can induce oxidative stress in mitochondria and cell signaling pathways related to disease. Advancing knowledge about carotenoid metabolism will contribute to a better understanding of the biochemical and physiological roles of these important micronutrients in health and disease. PMID:21569862

  19. Resonance Raman spectroscopic evaluation of skin carotenoids as a biomarker of carotenoid status for human studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status, as assessed by RRS, has been suggested as a promising biomarker for use in human studies. This manuscript describes...

  20. Carotenoid-enriched transgenic corn delivers bioavailable carotenoids to poultry and protects them against coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Nogareda, Carmina; Moreno, Jose A; Angulo, Eduardo; Sandmann, Gerhard; Portero, Manuel; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are health-promoting organic molecules that act as antioxidants and essential nutrients. We show that chickens raised on a diet enriched with an engineered corn variety containing very high levels of four key carotenoids (β-carotene, lycopene, zeaxanthin and lutein) are healthy and accumulate more bioavailable carotenoids in peripheral tissues, muscle, skin and fat, and more retinol in the liver, than birds fed on standard corn diets (including commercial corn supplemented with colour additives). Birds were challenged with the protozoan parasite Eimeria tenella and those on the high-carotenoid diet grew normally, suffered only mild disease symptoms (diarrhoea, footpad dermatitis and digital ulcers) and had lower faecal oocyst counts than birds on the control diet. Our results demonstrate that carotenoid-rich corn maintains poultry health and increases the nutritional value of poultry products without the use of feed additives.

  1. Nucleophilic fluorination of aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R

    2014-03-18

    Iodylbenzene derivatives substituted with electron donating as well as electron withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring are used as precursors in aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The iodyl group (IO.sub.2) is regiospecifically substituted by nucleophilic fluoride to provide the corresponding fluoroaryl derivatives. No-carrier-added [F-18]fluoride ion derived from anhydrous [F-18](F/Kryptofix, [F-18]CsF or a quaternary ammonium fluoride (e.g., Me.sub.4NF, Et.sub.4NF, n-Bu.sub.4NF, (PhCH.sub.2).sub.4NF) exclusively substitutes the iodyl moiety in these derivatives and provides high specific activity F-18 labeled fluoroaryl analogs. Iodyl derivatives of a benzothiazole analog and 6-iodyl-L-dopa derivatives have been synthesized as precursors and have been used in the preparation of no-carrier-added [F-18]fluorobenzothiazole as well as 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa.

  2. Events Surrounding the Early Development of Euglena Chloroplasts: 7. Inhibition of Carotenoid Biosynthesis by the Herbicide SAN 9789 (4-Chloro-5-(methylamino)-2-(alpha,alpha,alpha,-trifluoro-m-tolyl)-3-(2H)pyridazinone) and Its Developmental Consequences.

    PubMed

    Vaisberg, A J; Schiff, J A

    1976-02-01

    The herbicide SAN 9789 (4-chloro-5-(methylamino)-2-(alpha,alpha,alpha-trifluoro-m-tolyl-3- (2H)pyridazinone) blocks carotenoid synthesis in growing and resting cells of Euglena at concentrations of 20 to 100 mug/ml without affecting cell viability. Although the inhibition is immediate and complete, in resting cells no decrease in already synthesized carotenoids is found indicating a lack of turnover. In cells growing in the dark, carotenoids are diluted out as the cells divide. Cells dividing in the light in the presence of SAN 9789, eventually lose viability, presumably because of photooxidations usually prevented by carotenoids. During 72 hours of light-induced plastid development in dark-grown resting cells, none of the usual carotenoids increase while phytoene accumulates, indicating that SAN 9789 blocks carotenoid synthesis at this point. Chlorophyll synthesis and membrane formation are also blocked by the herbicide, but these inhibitions appear to be secondary to the inhibition of carotenoid synthesis. That carotenoid levels are strongly correlated with and may control the synthesis of chlorophyll and the formation of plastid membranes is suggested by the following data. (a) If dark-grown dividing cells are placed in the presence of the herbicide for various periods, rested and exposed to light in the presence of the drug, different amounts of carotenoids remain in the cells and the amount of chlorophyll finally synthesized is proportional to the amount of carotenoids present. (b) Photodestruction of chlorophyll is excluded, since the same amounts of chlorophyll are formed at intensities of 10 to 100 foot-candles of light. (c) Photoconversion of protochlorophyll(ide) to chlorophyll(ide) in dark-grown cells is not blocked by the herbicide. (d) Initial rates of chlorophyll synthesis are the same in treated and nontreated cells. (e) The extent of membrane formation appears to parallel the amount of carotenoids present as judged by electron microscopy.

  3. Functional analysis of gamma-carotene ketolase involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zongtao; Shen, Shaochuan; Tian, Bing; Wang, Hu; Xu, Zhenjian; Wang, Liangyan; Hua, Yuejin

    2009-11-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 synthesizes a unique ketocarotenoid product named deinoxanthin. The detailed steps involved in the biosynthesis of deinoxanthin remain unresolved. A carotene ketolase homologue encoded by dr0093 was inactivated by gene mutation to verify its function in the native host D. radiodurans. Analysis of the carotenoids in the resultant mutant R1DeltacrtO demonstrated that dr0093 encodes gamma-carotene ketolase (CrtO) catalysing the introduction of one keto group into the C-4 position of gamma-carotene derivatives to form ketolated carotenoids. The mutant R1DeltacrtO became more sensitive to H(2)O(2) treatment than the wild-type strain R1, indicating that the C-4 keto group is important for the antioxidant activity of carotenoids in D. radiodurans. Carotenoid extracts from mutant R1DeltacrtO exhibited lower 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity than those from the wild-type strain R1. The enhanced antioxidant ability of ketocarotenoids in D. radiodurans might be attributed to its extended conjugated double bonds and relative stability by the C-4 keto group substitution.

  4. Carotenoids in DPPC vesicles: membrane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socaciu, Carmen; Lausch, Carsten; Diehl, Horst A.

    1999-09-01

    Incorporation of carotenoids into membranes is supposed to change their physical properties with consequences to signal transduction and membrane protein activities. Here the physical parameters membrane fluidity, micropolarity and anisotropy are considered and measured in multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidyicholine (DPPC) after incorporation of 1, 2.5 and 5 mol% β-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin, or astaxhanthin using 4 mol% pyrene or 1 μM 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) as fluorescent labels. Contrary to other investigations, no significant change in membrane fluidity (as evaluated by the pyrene excimer method) can be found. But a change of micropolarity in the pyrene label environment is obtained from the pyrene monomer fluorescence emission fine structure after incorporation of carotenoids. The membrane anisotropy is enhanced significantly only by those carotenoids which incorporate worst into the membrane. This leads to the hypothesis that carotenoid incorporation into membranes is governed not only by carotenoid polarity hut also by their ability to change membrane anisotropy.

  5. Functions of Carotenoid Metabolites and Breakdown Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    It is not only intact carotenoids but also fragments of carotenoid molecules that have important natural functions and actions. The electron-rich polyene chain of the carotenoids is very susceptible to oxidative breakdown, which may be enzymic or non-enzymic. Central cleavage gives C20 compounds, retinoids, as described in Chapter 16. Cleavage at other positions gives smaller fragments, notably C10, C13 and C15 compounds that retain the carotenoid end group. The formation of these is described in Chapter 17 and in Volume 3, Chapter 4. Oxidative breakdown can also take place during storage, processing and curing of plant material, and the products contribute to the desired aroma/flavour properties of, for example, tea, wine and tobacco. The importance of vitamin A (C20) in animals is well known. Vitamin A deficiency is still a major concern in many parts of the world. It can lead to blindness and serious ill-health or death, especially in young children. Volatile smaller carotenoid fragments (`norisoprenoids') are widespread scent/flavour compounds in plants.

  6. Absorbance changes of carotenoids in different solvents.

    PubMed

    Zang, L Y; Sommerburg, O; van Kuijk, F J

    1997-01-01

    Carotenoids are typically measured in tissues with the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and quantitation is usually done by calibrating with stock solutions in solvents. Four carotenoids including lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and beta-carotene were dissolved in hexane and methanol respectively, and their absorbance characteristics were compared. Lutein shows absorbance spectra that are almost independent of solvents at various concentrations. Spectra of zeaxanthin, lycopene and beta-carotene were found to be more solvent-dependent. The absorbance of zeaxanthin at lambda max is about approximately 2 times larger in methanol than in hexane at the higher concentrations, and increased non-linearly with increasing concentration in hexane. The absorbance of lycopene at lambda max in hexane is approximately 4 fold larger than in methanol, but the absorbance of the methanol sample can be recovered by re-extracting this sample in hexane. The absorbance of beta-carotene in hexane is larger than in methanol, and increased linearly with increasing concentration. But beta-carotene showed a non-linear concentration effect in methanol. There are very small variations in lambda max for all four carotenoids between hexane and methanol, due to differences in molar extinction coefficients. The non-linear concentration effects for these carotenoids are probably due to differences in solubility leading to the formation of microcrystals. Thus, care should be taken with quantitation of tissue carotenoid values, when they depend on measurement of concentrations in stock solutions.

  7. Bioactivity of Carotenoids - Chasms of Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Torsten

    2017-02-10

    Carotenoid dietary intake, especially within fruits/vegetables and their plasma levels have been associated in many epidemiological studies with a reduced risk of several chronic diseases, including type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, several types of cancer, and agerelated macular degeneration. However, intervention trials with isolated carotenoids (as supplements) have fallen short of fulfi lling the hopes that were placed in these lipophilic pigments, often producing no positive or even adverse effects, such as increased lung cancer rate or total mortality. More recent studies have suggested that certain metabolites, and not necessarily the native compounds may be (the most) biologically active ones, such as certain apocarotenals (originating following enzymatic cleavage) and other more polar compounds, acting as more suitable electrophiles to react with transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-KB) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). In addition, it appears that questions of dosing are likewise crucial, as may be interactions of non-provitamin A carotenoids and their derivatives with retinoic acid receptors (RAR) or retinoid X receptors (RXR). Furthermore, our picture on carotenoid metabolism may be incomplete, as our knowledge on e. g. the interaction with the microbiota is virtually nil. In this position article, it is aimed to highlight some of the discrepancies that appear to trouble carotenoid-related research, and point out some of the existing gaps in our knowledge.

  8. Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health?

    PubMed Central

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are a class of natural, fat-soluble pigments found principally in plants. They have potential antioxidant biological properties because of their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. Epidemiologic studies supported the hypothesis that antioxidants could be used as an inexpensive means of both primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. In fact, the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) in the vessels plays a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The resistance of LDL to oxidation is increased by high dietary antioxidant intake, so that carotenoids, as part of food patterns such as the Mediterranean diet, may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular health too. Further properties of carotenoids leading to a potential reduction of cardiovascular risk are represented by lowering of blood pressure, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein), and improvement of insulin sensitivity in muscle, liver, and adipose tissues. In addition, recent nutrigenomics studies have focused on the exceptional ability of carotenoids in modulating the expression of specific genes involved in cell metabolism. The aim of this review is to focus attention to this effect of some carotenoids to prevent CVD. PMID:25660385

  9. Metabolism of carotenoid pigments in birds.

    PubMed

    Brush, A H

    1990-09-01

    Carotenoid pigments are an important component in the plumage of birds. The metabolic precursors are dietary in origin but many species have the capacity to chemically modify and selectively deposit the pigments. The ensuing plumage patterns are important in communication and identification. The bright yellows, oranges, and reds are due mostly to xanthophylls; keto and hydroxy carotenes. Some are deposited unmodified (e.g., lutein) whereas others are modified chemically (canthaxanthin, astaxanthin). Early workers concentrated on demonstrating that feather carotenoids were derived from the diet and deposited selectively. Progress in defining and solving biological problems depended on advances in chemical and analytical techniques. Subsequent investigation showed that various plumage colormorphs, seasonal plumage changes or colors in common mutant, were due to relatively simple chemical changes in carotenoids but had profound biological consequences. Equally important was the realization that many of these processes were under genetic control. Validation came from feeding studies of flamingos and finches. Recent studies have employed the plumage carotenoids to test hypotheses of genetic divergence, to relate plumage color to environmental process, and to demonstrate the influence of synthetic changes on color. Understanding the processes has advanced with the introduction of high-resolution separation techniques and the ability to determine both conformation and absolute configuration. The next steps will be in the direction of understanding the enzymatic modification, transport, and tissue selectivity of feather carotenoids.

  10. Iridophores and not carotenoids account for chromatic variation of carotenoid-based coloration in common lizards (Lacerta vivipara).

    PubMed

    San-Jose, Luis M; Granado-Lorencio, Fernando; Sinervo, Barry; Fitze, Patrick S

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Carotenoids typically need reflective background components to shine. Such components, iridophores, leucophores, and keratin- and collagen-derived structures, are generally assumed to show no or little environmental variability. Here, we investigate the origin of environmentally induced variation in the carotenoid-based ventral coloration of male common lizards (Lacerta vivipara) by investigating the effects of dietary carotenoids and corticosterone on both carotenoid- and background-related reflectance. We observed a general negative chromatic change that was prevented by β-carotene supplementation. However, chromatic changes did not result from changes in carotenoid-related reflectance or skin carotenoid content but from changes in background-related reflectance that may have been mediated by vitamin A1. An in vitro experiment showed that the encountered chromatic changes most likely resulted from changes in iridophore reflectance. Our findings demonstrate that chromatic variation in carotenoid-based ornaments may not exclusively reflect differences in integumentary carotenoid content and, hence, in qualities linked to carotenoid deposition (e.g., foraging ability, immune response, or antioxidant capacity). Moreover, skin carotenoid content and carotenoid-related reflectance were related to male color polymorphism, suggesting that carotenoid-based coloration of male common lizards is a multicomponent signal, with iridophores reflecting environmental conditions and carotenoids reflecting genetically based color morphs.

  11. Carotenoid profiling and the expression of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in developing coffee grain.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Andrew J; Kuntz, Marcel; Moreau, Helene; McCarthy, James

    2010-06-01

    Roasted coffee contains a complex array of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which make an important contribution to the characteristic flavour and aroma of the final beverage. It is thought that a few of the potent coffee aroma components, such as "beta-damascenone", could be derived from carotenoid precursors. In order to further investigate the potential link between carotenoids and coffee aroma profiles, we have measured the carotenoid content in developing coffee grain. The data obtained confirms the presence of lutein in the grain, and additionally shows that the immature coffee grain also contains significant amounts of beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin. Complimentary quantitative gene expression analysis revealed that all the carotenoid biosynthetic genes examined are expressed in the grain, and that the transcript levels are gene and stage dependent. Furthermore, consistent with the reduction of the carotenoid levels at the last stage of grain development (mature-red), most of the transcript levels were also found to be lower at the final developmental stage. Quantitative expression analysis of the carotenoid genes was also carried out for the developing pericarp tissue of the coffee cherries. Again, all the genes examined were expressed, and in most cases, the highest transcript levels were detected around the large green-yellow stages, a period when carotenoid synthesis is probably greatest.

  12. Subchromoplast sequestration of carotenoids affects regulatory mechanisms in tomato lines expressing different carotenoid gene combinations.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Marilise; Mora, Leticia; Enfissi, Eugenia M A; Bramley, Peter M; Fraser, Paul D

    2013-11-01

    Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway in recent years has successfully enhanced the carotenoid contents of crop plants. It is now clear that only increasing biosynthesis is restrictive, as mechanisms to sequestrate these increased levels in the cell or organelle should be exploited. In this study, biosynthetic pathway genes were overexpressed in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) lines and the effects on carotenoid formation and sequestration revealed. The bacterial Crt carotenogenic genes, independently or in combination, and their zygosity affect the production of carotenoids. Transcription of the pathway genes was perturbed, whereby the tissue specificity of transcripts was altered. Changes in the steady state levels of metabolites in unrelated sectors of metabolism were found. Of particular interest was a concurrent increase of the plastid-localized lipid monogalactodiacylglycerol with carotenoids along with membranous subcellular structures. The carotenoids, proteins, and lipids in the subchromoplast fractions of the transgenic tomato fruit with increased carotenoid content suggest that cellular structures can adapt to facilitate the sequestration of the newly formed products. Moreover, phytoene, the precursor of the pathway, was identified in the plastoglobule, whereas the biosynthetic enzymes were in the membranes. The implications of these findings with respect to novel pathway regulation mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Assembly of photoactive orange carotenoid protein from its domains unravels a carotenoid shuttle mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moldenhauer, Marcus; Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Buhrke, David; Zlenko, Dmitry V; Tavraz, Neslihan N; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Hildebrandt, Peter; Maksimov, Eugene G; Friedrich, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The photoswitchable orange carotenoid protein (OCP) is indispensable for cyanobacterial photoprotection by quenching phycobilisome fluorescence upon photoconversion from the orange OCP(O) to the red OCP(R) form. Cyanobacterial genomes frequently harbor, besides genes for orange carotenoid proteins (OCPs), several genes encoding homologs of OCP's N- or C-terminal domains (NTD, CTD). Unlike the well-studied NTD homologs, called Red Carotenoid Proteins (RCPs), the role of CTD homologs remains elusive. We show how OCP can be reassembled from its functional domains. Expression of Synechocystis OCP-CTD in carotenoid-producing Escherichia coli yielded violet-colored proteins, which, upon mixing with the RCP-apoprotein, produced an orange-like photoswitchable form that further photoconverted into a species that quenches phycobilisome fluorescence and is spectroscopically indistinguishable from RCP, thus demonstrating a unique carotenoid shuttle mechanism. Spontaneous carotenoid transfer also occurs between canthaxanthin-coordinating OCP-CTD and the OCP apoprotein resulting in formation of photoactive OCP. The OCP-CTD itself is a novel, dimeric carotenoid-binding protein, which can coordinate canthaxanthin and zeaxanthin, effectively quenches singlet oxygen and interacts with the Fluorescence Recovery Protein. These findings assign physiological roles to the multitude of CTD homologs in cyanobacteria and explain the evolutionary process of OCP formation.

  14. An in vitro digestion method adapted for carotenoids and carotenoid esters: moving forward towards standardization.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Daniele Bobrowski; Mariutti, Lilian Regina Barros; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti

    2016-12-07

    In vitro digestion methods are a useful approach to predict the bioaccessibility of food components and overcome some limitations or disadvantages associated with in vivo methodologies. Recently, the INFOGEST network published a static method of in vitro digestion with a proposal for assay standardization. The INFOGEST method is not specific for any food component; therefore, we aimed to adapt this method to assess the in vitro bioaccessibility of carotenoids and carotenoid esters in a model fruit (Byrsonima crassifolia). Two additional steps were coupled to the in vitro digestion procedure, centrifugation at 20 000g for the separation of the aqueous phase containing mixed micelles and exhaustive carotenoid extraction with an organic solvent. The effect of electrolytes, enzymes and bile acids on carotenoid micellarization and stability was also tested. The results were compared with those found with a simpler method that has already been used for carotenoid bioaccessibility analysis. These values were in the expected range for free carotenoids (5-29%), monoesters (9-26%) and diesters (4-28%). In general, the in vitro bioaccessibility of carotenoids assessed by the adapted INFOGEST method was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those assessed by the simplest protocol, with or without the addition of simulated fluids. Although no trend was observed, differences in bioaccessibility values depended on the carotenoid form (free, monoester or diester), isomerization (Z/E) and the in vitro digestion protocol. To the best of our knowledge, it was the first time that a systematic identification of carotenoid esters by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS after in vitro digestion using the INFOGEST protocol was carried out.

  15. Okenane, a biomarker for purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae), and other new carotenoid derivatives from the 1640 Ma Barney Creek Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocks, Jochen J.; Schaeffer, Philippe

    2008-03-01

    Carbonates of the 1640 million years (Ma) old Barney Creek Formation (BCF), McArthur Basin, Australia, contain more than 22 different C 40 carotenoid derivatives including lycopane, γ-carotane, β-carotane, chlorobactane, isorenieratane, β-isorenieratane, renieratane, β-renierapurpurane, renierapurpurane and the monoaromatic carotenoid okenane. These biomarkers extend the geological record of carotenoid derivatives by more than 1000 million years. Okenane is potentially derived from the red-colored aromatic carotenoid okenone. Based on a detailed review of the ecology and physiology of all extant species that are known to contain okenone, we interpret fossil okenane as a biomarker for planktonic purple sulfur bacteria of the family Chromatiaceae. Okenane is strictly a biomarker for anoxic and sulfidic conditions in the presence of light (photic zone euxinia) and indicates an anoxic/oxic transition (temporarily) located at less than 25 m depth and, with a high probability, less than 12 m depth. For the BCF, we also interpret renierapurpurane, renieratane and β-renierapurpurane as biomarkers for Chromatiaceae with a possible contribution of cyanobacterial synechoxanthin to the renierapurpurane pool. Although isorenieratane may, in principle, be derived from actinobacteria, in the BCF these biomarkers almost certainly derive from sulfide-oxidizing phototrophic green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae). Biological precursors of γ-carotane, β-carotane and lycopane are found among numerous autotrophic and almost all phototrophic organisms in the three domains of life. In the BCF, a paucity of diagnostic eukaryotic steroids suggests that algae were rare and, therefore, that cyanobacterial carotenoids such as β-carotene, echinenone, canthaxanthin and zeaxanthin are the most likely source of observed β-carotane. γ-Carotane may be derived from cyanobacteria, Chlorobiaceae and green non-sulfur bacteria (Chloroflexi), while the most likely biological sources for lycopane

  16. Photodegradation of carotenoids in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, D.A.

    1987-04-01

    Photodegradation of vitamins in vitro is responsible for large losses of these nutrients in foods, beverages, and semisynthetic liquid formula diets. In vivo photodegradation of vitamins has been reported for riboflavin in jaundiced infants exposed to blue light and for folate in patients with chronic psoriasis given photochemotherapy. Two recent studies of normal subjects have also shown that photodegradation of carotenoids in plasma occurs with cumulative exposure of the skin to an artificial light source having maximal spectral emission in the UVA range. Females showed a larger effect of the UV light on their plasma carotenoid levels than males. These observations have identified a need for further investigation of the role of sunlight exposure as a determinant of plasma carotenoid levels and vitamin A status in human subjects.

  17. Carotenoid diagenesis in a marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, C. D.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The major carotenoids at three levels (3, 40, and 175 m below the sediment-water interface) in a core from a marine sediment (Cariaco Trench, off Venezuela) have been examined. Mass and electronic spectral data have provided evidence for the onset of a progressive reduction of carotenoids in the geological column. The time scale of the process appears to depend on the particular carotenoid. Reduction of up to two double bonds is observed for the diol, zeaxanthin, in the oldest sediment (about 340,000 years old) but no reduction is observed in the younger samples (about 5000 and 56,000 years old). The diketone, canthaxanthin, shows evidence of reduction of up to two double bonds in the 56,000-yr sample and up to five double bonds in the oldest sample. No reduction of beta-carotene was observed in any of the samples.

  18. Carotenoid diagenesis in a marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, C. D.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The major carotenoids at three levels (3, 40, and 175 m below the sediment-water interface) in a core from a marine sediment (Cariaco Trench, off Venezuela) have been examined. Mass and electronic spectral data have provided evidence for the onset of a progressive reduction of carotenoids in the geological column. The time scale of the process appears to depend on the particular carotenoid. Reduction of up to two double bonds is observed for the diol, zeaxanthin, in the oldest sediment (about 340,000 years old) but no reduction is observed in the younger samples (about 5000 and 56,000 years old). The diketone, canthaxanthin, shows evidence of reduction of up to two double bonds in the 56,000-yr sample and up to five double bonds in the oldest sample. No reduction of beta-carotene was observed in any of the samples.

  19. Carotenoids: more than just beta-carotene.

    PubMed

    Gellenbeck, K W

    1998-12-01

    Fruits and vegetables of the human diet contain many of the over 600 carotenoid pigments that have been identified in plants. Led by work with beta-carotene, researchers have constantly been learning more about the metabolism of these compounds in the human body. Research work is now expanding beyond beta-carotene in an effort to understand what happens to all the pigments found in the human diet. This discussion briefly looks at research results on the carotenoids found in human serum as well as the effects of supplementation. Recent confusing results from large intervention trials with beta-carotene and lung cancer incidence are emphasized in relation to supplementation doses and beta-carotene source (synthetic vs. natural). The summation of results emphasizes the importance of the broad spectrum of carotenoids in the diet and relates to supplementation products currently being designed for the marketplace.

  20. Carotenoid and tocopherol composition of leaves, buds, and flowers of Capparis spinosa grown wild in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Tlili, Nizar; Nasri, Nizar; Saadaoui, Ezzeddine; Khaldi, Abdelhamid; Triki, Saida

    2009-06-24

    High-performance liquid chromatography was used to determine carotenoids (beta-carotene, lutein, neoxanthin, and violaxanthin) and tocopherols of leaves, buds, and flowers of Tunisian Capparis spinosa. This plant shows strong resistance to hard environmental conditions, and it is one of the most commonly found aromatics in the Mediterranean kitchen. In this study, the means of the total carotenoids were 3452.5 +/- 1639.4, 1002 +/- 518.5, and 342.7 +/- 187.9 microg/g fresh weight (FW) in leaves, buds, and flowers, respectively. Lutein accounts for the high content. Violaxanthin provided the lowest portion of the total carotenoids. The principal form of tocopherol detected in leaves was alpha-tocopherol (20.19 +/- 10 mg/100 g FW). In buds and flowers, there were both alpha- (49.12 +/- 17.48 and 28.68 +/- 9.13 mg/100 g FW, respectively) and gamma-tocopherol (48.13 +/- 15.08 and 27.8 +/- 16.01 mg/100 g FW, respectively). The combined content of pro-vitamin A and vitamin E in capers encourages researchers to more explore and find developments for this plant.

  1. Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, a carotenoid producing yeast strain from a Patagonian high-altitude lake.

    PubMed

    Libkind, D; Brizzio, S; van Broock, M

    2004-01-01

    The red yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain CRUB 0138 (previously identified as R. lactosa) was isolated from a high-altitude Patagonian Lake Toncek (1700 m a.s.l.), and assigned with mucilaginosa species. Its biochemical, physiological and molecular features were assessed and compared to R. mucilaginosa PYCC 5166 type strain using a polyphasic approach; in addition, biomass and carotenoid pigment production at different C/N ratios were determined in an incubator shaker. Phenetic characterization by means of 70 current physiological tests including assimilation of aldaric acids and aromatic compounds, and also the ability to grow with amino acids as sole carbon sources, was carried out. According to numerical taxonomy calculations, similarity indexes between R. mucilaginosa CRUB 0138 and PYCC 5166 type strain were 0.86 and 0.77, corresponding to a complete set of physiological tests and MSP-PCR (Mini/Micro Satellite Primed PCR; (GTG)5, M13 and (GAC)5 primers were employed) fingerprinting. Killer activity against 2 native strains, Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae and R. mucilaginosa was detected. Maximum biomass-glucose conversion efficiency (87%) and maximum carotenoid yield (2.32 mg/L) were obtained at C/N = 5 in culture medium containing 10 and 40 g/L glucose, respectively. Different C/N ratios did not influence carotenoid pigment production but low C/N enhanced biomass yield.

  2. Dietary carotenoids are associated with cardiovascular disease risk biomarkers mediated by serum carotenoid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chung, Sang-Jin; McCullough, Marjorie L; Song, Won O; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Koo, Sung I; Chun, Ock K

    2014-07-01

    Hyperlipidemia and elevated circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations are cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Previous studies indicated that higher serum carotenoid concentrations were inversely associated with some of these biomarkers. However, whether dietary carotenoid intake is inversely associated with these CVD risk biomarkers is not well known. We assessed the associations between individual dietary carotenoid intake and CVD risk biomarkers and tested whether the serum carotenoid concentrations explain (mediate) or influence the strength of (moderate) the associations, if any association exists. Dietary data collected from 2 24-h dietary recalls and serum measurements in adult men (n = 1312) and women (n = 1544) from the NHANES 2003-2006 were used. Regression models designed for survey analysis were used to examine the associations between individual dietary carotenoids and log-transformed blood cholesterol, CRP, and tHcy. The corresponding individual serum carotenoid concentration was considered as mediator (and moderator if applicable). After adjustment for covariates, significant inverse associations with LDL cholesterol were observed for dietary β-carotene (P < 0.05) and lutein + zeaxanthin (P < 0.001), and with tHcy for dietary β-carotene (P < 0.05), lycopene (P < 0.05), and total carotenoids (P < 0.05). Dietary lutein + zeaxanthin intake was also positively associated with HDL cholesterol concentrations (P < 0.01). Most of these associations were null after additional adjustment for corresponding serum carotenoid concentrations, indicating the complete mediation effects of serum carotenoids. Serum β-carotene significantly moderated the associations between dietary β-carotene and CRP (P-interaction < 0.05), and quartile 4 of dietary β-carotene was associated with lower CRP concentrations only among participants with serum β-carotene > 0.43 μmol/L. In this population-based cross-sectional study

  3. Structure and Properties of Carotenoid Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaane-Jensen, Synnove; Lutnees, Bjart Frode

    Naturally occurring carotenoids are familiar as yellow, orange or red pigments with λmax below 600 nm in organic solvents. Carotenoids with short polyene chains, such as the triene phytoene (44) and the pentaene phytofluene (42), absorb light only in the UV region and are colourless. Compounds that absorb light in the near infrared (NIR) region above ca. 900 nm are also colourless, unless they also absorb light in the 600-900 nm region, in which case they appear blue. True carotenoproteins (Chapter 6) are purple-blue and absorb light above 600 nm.

  4. Genetic basis and fitness correlates of dynamic carotenoid-based ornamental coloration in male and female common kestrels Falco tinnunculus.

    PubMed

    Vergara, P; Fargallo, J A; Martínez-Padilla, J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic basis of sexual ornaments is essential to understand their evolution through sexual selection. Although carotenoid-based ornaments have been instrumental in the study of sexual selection, given the inability of animals to synthesize carotenoids de novo, they are generally assumed to be influenced solely by environmental variation. However, very few studies have directly estimated the role of genes and the environment in shaping variation in carotenoid-based traits. Using long-term individual-based data, we here explore the evolutionary potential of a dynamic, carotenoid-based ornament (namely skin coloration), in male and female common kestrels. We first estimate the amount of genetic variation underlying variation in hue, chroma and brightness. After correcting for sex differences, the chroma of the orange-yellow eye ring coloration was significantly heritable (h2±SE=0.40±0.17), whereas neither hue (h2=0) nor brightness (h2=0.02) was heritable. Second, we estimate the strength and shape of selection acting upon chromatic (hue and chroma) and achromatic (brightness) variation and show positive and negative directional selection on female but not male chroma and hue, respectively, whereas brightness was unrelated to fitness in both sexes. This suggests that different components of carotenoid-based signals traits may show different evolutionary dynamics. Overall, we show that carotenoid-based coloration is a complex and multifaceted trait. If we are to gain a better understanding of the processes responsible for the generation and maintenance of variation in carotenoid-based coloration, these complexities need to be taken into account.

  5. Carotenoids Database: structures, chemical fingerprints and distribution among organisms.

    PubMed

    Yabuzaki, Junko

    2017-01-01

    To promote understanding of how organisms are related via carotenoids, either evolutionarily or symbiotically, or in food chains through natural histories, we built the Carotenoids Database. This provides chemical information on 1117 natural carotenoids with 683 source organisms. For extracting organisms closely related through the biosynthesis of carotenoids, we offer a new similarity search system 'Search similar carotenoids' using our original chemical fingerprint 'Carotenoid DB Chemical Fingerprints'. These Carotenoid DB Chemical Fingerprints describe the chemical substructure and the modification details based upon International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) semi-systematic names of the carotenoids. The fingerprints also allow (i) easier prediction of six biological functions of carotenoids: provitamin A, membrane stabilizers, odorous substances, allelochemicals, antiproliferative activity and reverse MDR activity against cancer cells, (ii) easier classification of carotenoid structures, (iii) partial and exact structure searching and (iv) easier extraction of structural isomers and stereoisomers. We believe this to be the first attempt to establish fingerprints using the IUPAC semi-systematic names. For extracting close profiled organisms, we provide a new tool 'Search similar profiled organisms'. Our current statistics show some insights into natural history: carotenoids seem to have been spread largely by bacteria, as they produce C30, C40, C45 and C50 carotenoids, with the widest range of end groups, and they share a small portion of C40 carotenoids with eukaryotes. Archaea share an even smaller portion with eukaryotes. Eukaryotes then have evolved a considerable variety of C40 carotenoids. Considering carotenoids, eukaryotes seem more closely related to bacteria than to archaea aside from 16S rRNA lineage analysis. : http://carotenoiddb.jp.

  6. Functional in situ evaluation of photosynthesis-protecting carotenoids in mutants of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Lutz; Vioque, Agustin; Sandmann, Gerhard

    2005-03-01

    Cyanobacteria possess different carotenoids as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. In Synechocystis PCC6803, zeaxanthin, echinenone, beta-carotene and myxoxanthophyll are synthesized. By disruption of the ketolase and hydroxylase genes, it was possible to obtain mutants devoid of either zeaxanthin, echinenone, or a combination of both carotenoids. With these mutants, their function in protecting photosynthetic electron transport under high light stress as well as chlorophyll and carotenoid degradation after initiation of singlet oxygen or radical formation was analyzed. Wild type Synechocystis is very well protected against high light-mediated photooxidation. Absence of echinenone affects photosynthetic electron transport to only a small extent. However, complete depletion of zeaxanthin together with a modification of myxoxanthophyll resulted in strong photoinhibition of overall photosynthetic electron transport as well as the photosystem II reaction. In the double mutant lacking both carotenoids the effects were additive. The light saturation curves of photosynthetic electron transport of the high light-treated mutants exhibited not only a lower saturation value but also smaller slopes. Using methylviologen or methylene blue as a radical or singlet oxygen generators, respectively, massive degradation of chlorophyll and carotenoids, indicative of photooxidative destruction of the photosynthetic apparatus, was observed, especially in the mutants devoid of zeaxanthin.

  7. Improvement of stability and carotenoids fraction of virgin olive oils by addition of microalgae Scenedesmus almeriensis extracts.

    PubMed

    Limón, Piedad; Malheiro, Ricardo; Casal, Susana; Acién-Fernández, F Gabriel; Fernández-Sevilla, José M; Rodrigues, Nuno; Cruz, Rebeca; Bermejo, Ruperto; Pereira, José Alberto

    2015-05-15

    Humans are not capable of synthesizing carotenoids de novo and thus, their presence in human tissues is entirely of dietary origin. Consumption of essential carotenoids is reduced due to the lower intake of fruits and vegetables. Microalgae are a good source of carotenoids that can be exploited. In the present work, carotenoids rich extracts from Scenedesmus almeriensis were added to extra-virgin olive oils at different concentrations (0.1 and 0.21 mg/mL) in order to enhance the consumption of these bioactives. Extracts brought changes in olive oils color, turning them orange-reddish. Quality of olive oils was improved, since peroxidation was inhibited. Olive oils fatty acids and tocopherols were not affected. β-carotene and lutein contents increase considerably, as well as oxidative stability, improving olive oils shelf-life and nutritional value. Inclusion of S. almeriensis extracts is a good strategy to improve and enhance the consumption of carotenoids, since olive oil consumption is increasing.

  8. The relationship between carotenoid biosynthesis and the assembly of the light-harvesting LH2 complex in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, H P; Hunter, C N

    1994-01-01

    Coloured carotenoids play some undefined role in the assembly of a functional light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complex in photosynthetic bacteria. We have used a series of transposon Tn5 insertion mutants disrupted at various stages of the carotenoid-biosynthetic pathway, together with an LH2 deletion/insertion mutant, to investigate this effect in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Mutants were initially characterized by low-temperature absorbance spectroscopy and ultrastructural analysis: Northern-blot analysis demonstrated normal pucBA transcripts for LH2 polypeptides in all the carotenoid mutants. Analysis of translation of the puc transcript and investigation of the fate of any resulting LH2 polypeptides by SDS/PAGE, Western-blot and pulse-chase experiments clearly demonstrated that, in the absence of coloured carotenoids, the LH2 alpha- and beta-polypeptides are synthesized but are rapidly turned over and do not become stably integrated into the membrane. Complementation of mutants with lesions in the crtB and crtI genes, encoding phytoene synthase and phytoene desaturase respectively, with the cloned R. sphaeroides crtI gene, resulted in restoration of carotenoid biosynthesis and stable assembly of the LH2 complex in the crtI mutant but not in the crtB mutant, despite the presence of the CrtI protein. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:8129720

  9. Accumulation of Paprika Carotenoids in Human Plasma and Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Azusa; Ichihara, Takashi; Takaha, Takeshi; Kuriki, Takashi; Nihei, Hideko; Kawamoto, Kazuhisa; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Maoka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation (incorporation) of paprika carotenoid in human plasma and erythrocytes was investigated. A paprika carotenoid supplement (14 mg/day) was ingested for 4 weeks by 5 young healthy volunteers (3 men and 2 women). After 2 weeks of carotenoid ingestion, the carotenoid levels in plasma and erythrocytes increased by 1.2-fold and 2.2-fold, respectively. Characteristic carotenoids found in paprika (capsanthin, cucurbitaxanthin A, and cryptocapsin) were detected in both plasma and erythrocytes. An oxidative metabolite of capsanthin (capsanthone) was also found in both plasma and erythrocytes.

  10. Carotenoid composition and in vitro pharmacological activity of rose hips.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Györgyi; Molnár, Péter; Radó-Turcsi, Erika; Deli, József; Kawase, Masami; Satoh, Kazue; Tanaka, Toru; Tani, Satoru; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Gyémánt, Nóra; Molnár, József

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare carotenoid extracts of Rose hips (Rosa canina L.) with regard to their phytochemical profiles and their in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), cytotoxic, multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal and radical scavenging activity. Carotenoid composition was investigated in the different fractionation of rose hips, using extraction methods. Six main carotenoids - epimers of neochrome, lutein, zeaxanthin, rubixanthin, lycopene, β,β-carotene - were identified from Rose hips by their chromatographic behavior and UV-visible spectra, which is in accordance with other studies on carotenoids in this plant material. The active principles in the carotenoid extract might differ, depending upon the extraction procedures.

  11. The carotenoid-continuum: carotenoid-based plumage ranges from conspicuous to cryptic and back again

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Carotenoids are frequently used by birds to colour their plumage with green, yellow, orange or red hues, and carotenoid-based colours are considered honest signals of quality, although they may have other functions, such as crypsis. It is usually assumed that red through yellow colours have a signalling function while green is cryptic. Here we challenge this notion using the yellow and green colouration of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus), great tits (Parus major) and greenfinches (Carduelis chloris) as a model. Results The relationship between colouration (chroma, computed using visual sensitivities of conspecifics) and detectability (contrast against natural backgrounds as perceived by conspecifics and avian predators) followed a similar curvilinear pattern for yellow and green plumage with minimum detectability at intermediate levels of carotenoid deposition. Thus, for yellow and green plumage, colours at or close to the point of minimum detectability may aid in crypsis. This may be the case for blue and great tit green and yellow plumage, and greenfinch green plumage, all of which had comparably low levels of detectability, while greenfinch yellow plumage was more chromatic and detectable. As yellow and green blue tit colouration are strongly affected by carotenoid availability during moult, variation in pigment availability between habitats may affect the degree of background-matching or the costliness of producing cryptic plumage. Conclusions Increasing carotenoid-deposition in the integument does not always lead to more conspicuous colours. In some cases, such as in blue or great tits, carotenoid deposition may be selected through enhanced background-matching, which in turn suggests that producing cryptic plumage may entail costs. We stress however, that our data do not rule out a signalling function of carotenoid-based plumage in tits. Rather, it shows that alternative functions are plausible and that assuming a signalling function based solely on

  12. Carotenoids from Haloarchaea and Their Potential in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo-Baños, Montserrat; Garbayo, Inés; Vílchez, Carlos; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2015-08-25

    The production of pigments by halophilic archaea has been analysed during the last half a century. The main reasons that sustains this research are: (i) many haloarchaeal species possess high carotenoids production availability; (ii) downstream processes related to carotenoid isolation from haloarchaea is relatively quick, easy and cheap; (iii) carotenoids production by haloarchaea can be improved by genetic modification or even by modifying several cultivation aspects such as nutrition, growth pH, temperature, etc.; (iv) carotenoids are needed to support plant and animal life and human well-being; and (v) carotenoids are compounds highly demanded by pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food markets. Several studies about carotenoid production by haloarchaea have been reported so far, most of them focused on pigments isolation or carotenoids production under different culture conditions. However, the understanding of carotenoid metabolism, regulation, and roles of carotenoid derivatives in this group of extreme microorganisms remains mostly unrevealed. The uses of those haloarchaeal pigments have also been poorly explored. This work summarises what has been described so far about carotenoids production by haloarchaea and their potential uses in biotechnology and biomedicine. In particular, new scientific evidence of improved carotenoid production by one of the better known haloarchaeon (Haloferax mediterranei) is also discussed.

  13. Carotenoids from Haloarchaea and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo-Baños, Montserrat; Garbayo, Inés; Vílchez, Carlos; Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    The production of pigments by halophilic archaea has been analysed during the last half a century. The main reasons that sustains this research are: (i) many haloarchaeal species possess high carotenoids production availability; (ii) downstream processes related to carotenoid isolation from haloarchaea is relatively quick, easy and cheap; (iii) carotenoids production by haloarchaea can be improved by genetic modification or even by modifying several cultivation aspects such as nutrition, growth pH, temperature, etc.; (iv) carotenoids are needed to support plant and animal life and human well-being; and (v) carotenoids are compounds highly demanded by pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food markets. Several studies about carotenoid production by haloarchaea have been reported so far, most of them focused on pigments isolation or carotenoids production under different culture conditions. However, the understanding of carotenoid metabolism, regulation, and roles of carotenoid derivatives in this group of extreme microorganisms remains mostly unrevealed. The uses of those haloarchaeal pigments have also been poorly explored. This work summarises what has been described so far about carotenoids production by haloarchaea and their potential uses in biotechnology and biomedicine. In particular, new scientific evidence of improved carotenoid production by one of the better known haloarchaeon (Haloferax mediterranei) is also discussed. PMID:26308012

  14. Changes in carotenoids during processing and storage of foods.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Amaya, D B

    1999-09-01

    Being highly unsaturated, carotenoids are susceptible to isomerization and oxidation during processing and storage of foods. Isomerization of trans-carotenoids to cis-carotenoids, promoted by contact with acids, heat treatment and exposure to light, diminishes the color and the vitamin A activity of carotenoids. The major cause of carotenoid loss, however, is enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidation, which depends on the availability of oxygen and the carotenoid structure. It is stimulated by light, heat, some metals, enzymes and peroxides and is inhibited by antioxidants. Data on percentage losses of carotenoids during food processing and storage are somewhat conflicting, but carotenoid degradation is known to increase with the destruction of the food cellular structure, increase of surface area or porosity, length and severity of the processing conditions, storage time and temperature, transmission of light and permeability to O2 of the packaging. Contrary to lipid oxidation, for which the mechanism is well established, the oxidation of carotenoids is not well understood. It involves initially epoxidation, formation of apocarotenoids and hydroxylation. Subsequent fragmentations presumably result in a series of compounds of low molecular masses. Completely losing its color and biological activities, the carotenoids give rise to volatile compounds which contribute to the aroma/flavor, desirable in tea and wine and undesirable in dehydrated carrot. Processing can also influence the bioavailability of carotenoids, a topic that is currently of great interest.

  15. A carotenoid health index based on plasma carotenoids and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Michael S

    2011-12-01

    While there have been many studies on health outcomes that have included measurements of plasma carotenoids, this data has not been reviewed and assembled into a useful form. In this review sixty-two studies of plasma carotenoids and health outcomes, mostly prospective cohort studies or population-based case-control studies, are analyzed together to establish a carotenoid health index. Five cutoff points are established across the percentiles of carotenoid concentrations in populations, from the tenth to ninetieth percentile. The cutoff points (mean ± standard error of the mean) are 1.11 ± 0.08, 1.47 ± 0.08, 1.89 ± 0.08, 2.52 ± 0.13, and 3.07 ± 0.20 µM. For all cause mortality there seems to be a low threshold effect with protection above every cutoff point but the lowest. But for metabolic syndrome and cancer outcomes there tends to be significant positive health outcomes only above the higher cutoff points, perhaps as a triage effect. Based on this data a carotenoid health index is proposed with risk categories as follows: very high risk: <1 µM, high risk: 1-1.5 µM, moderate risk: 1.5-2.5 µM, low risk: 2.5-4 µM, and very low risk: >4 µM. Over 95 percent of the USA population falls into the moderate or high risk category of the carotenoid health index.

  16. Resonance Raman spectroscopic evaluation of skin carotenoids as a biomarker of carotenoid status for human studies.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Susan T; Cartmel, Brenda; Scarmo, Stephanie; Jahns, Lisa; Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner

    2013-11-15

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status has been suggested as a promising biomarker for human studies. This manuscript describes research done relevant to the development of this biomarker, including its reproducibility, validity, feasibility for use in field settings, and factors that affect the biomarker such as diet, smoking, and adiposity. Recent studies have evaluated the response of the biomarker to controlled carotenoid interventions, both supplement-based and dietary [e.g., provision of a high-carotenoid fruit and vegetable (F/V)-enriched diet], demonstrating consistent response to intervention. The totality of evidence supports the use of skin carotenoid status as an objective biomarker of F/V intake, although in the cross-sectional setting, diet explains only some of the variation in this biomarker. However, this limitation is also a strength in that skin carotenoids may effectively serve as an integrated biomarker of health, with higher status reflecting greater F/V intake, lack of smoking, and lack of adiposity. Thus, this biomarker holds promise as both a health biomarker and an objective indicator of F/V intake, supporting its further development and utilization for medical and public health purposes.

  17. Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Evaluation of Skin Carotenoids as a Biomarker of Carotenoid Status for Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Susan T.; Cartmel, Brenda; Scarmo, Stephanie; Jahns, Lisa; Ermakov, Igor V.; Gellermann, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status has been suggested as a promising biomarker for human studies. This manuscript describes research done relevant to the development of this biomarker, including its reproducibility, validity, feasibility for use in field settings, and factors that affect the biomarker such as diet, smoking, and adiposity. Recent studies have evaluated the response of the biomarker to controlled carotenoid interventions, both supplement-based and dietary [e.g., provision of a high-carotenoid fruit and vegetable (F/V)-enriched diet], demonstrating consistent response to intervention. The totality of evidence supports the use of skin carotenoid status as an objective biomarker of F/V intake, although in the cross-sectional setting, diet explains only some of the variation in this biomarker. However, this limitation is also a strength in that skin carotenoids may effectively serve as an integrated biomarker of health, with higher status reflecting greater F/V intake, lack of smoking, and lack of adiposity. Thus, this biomarker holds promise as both a health biomarker and an objective indicator of F/V intake, supporting its further development and utilization for medical and public health purposes. PMID:23823930

  18. Ultrafast spectroscopy tracks carotenoid configurations in the orange and red carotenoid proteins from cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Šlouf, Václav; Kuznetsova, Valentyna; Fuciman, Marcel; de Carbon, Céline Bourcier; Wilson, Adjélé; Kirilovsky, Diana; Polívka, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    A quenching mechanism mediated by the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) is one of the ways cyanobacteria protect themselves against photooxidative stress. Here, we present a femtosecond spectroscopic study comparing OCP and RCP (red carotenoid protein) samples binding different carotenoids. We confirmed significant changes in carotenoid configuration upon OCP activation reported by Leverenz et al. (Science 348:1463-1466. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa7234 , 2015) by comparing the transient spectra of OCP and RCP. The most important marker of these changes was the magnitude of the transient signal associated with the carotenoid intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) state. While OCP with canthaxanthin exhibited a weak ICT signal, it increased significantly for canthaxanthin bound to RCP. On the contrary, a strong ICT signal was recorded in OCP binding echinenone excited at the red edge of the absorption spectrum. Because the carbonyl oxygen responsible for the appearance of the ICT signal is located at the end rings of both carotenoids, the magnitude of the ICT signal can be used to estimate the torsion angles of the end rings. Application of two different excitation wavelengths to study OCP demonstrated that the OCP sample contains two spectroscopically distinct populations, none of which is corresponding to the photoactivated product of OCP.

  19. Influence of Phenylalanine on Carotenoid Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, L.; Ni, X.; Luo, X.

    2015-01-01

    The carotenoids lutein and β-carotene form, in 1:1 ethanol-water mixtures H-aggregates, of different strengths. The effects of phenylalanine on these aggregates were recorded by UV-Vis absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and Raman spectra. The H-aggregate of lutein was characterized by a large 78 nm blue shift in the absorption spectra, confirming the strong coupling between hydroxyl groups of adjacent molecules. The 15 nm blue shift in the β-carotene mixture also indicates that it was assembled by weak coupling between polyenes. After adding phenylalanine, the reducing absorption strength of the aggregates of lutein and reappearance of vibrational substructure indicate that the hydroxyl and amino groups of phenylalanine may coordinate to lutein and disaggregate the H-aggregates. However, phenylalanine had no effect on aggregates of β-carotene. The Raman spectra show three bands of carotenoids whose intensities decreased with increasing phenylalanine concentration. The frequency of ν1 corresponding to the length of the conjugated region was more sensitive to the solution of lutein. This coordination of phenylalanine to lutein could increase the length of the conjugated region. In addition, phenylalanine significantly affected the excited electronic states of carotenoids, which were crucial in the energy transfer from carotenoids to chlorophyll a in vivo.

  20. Long-lived coherence in carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. A.; Cannon, E.; Van Dao, L.; Hannaford, P.; Quiney, H. M.; Nugent, K. A.

    2010-08-01

    We use two-colour vibronic coherence spectroscopy to observe long-lived vibrational coherences in the ground electronic state of carotenoid molecules, with decoherence times in excess of 1 ps. Lycopene and spheroidene were studied isolated in solution, and within the LH2 light-harvesting complex extracted from purple bacteria. The vibrational coherence time is shown to increase significantly for the carotenoid in the complex, providing further support to previous assertions that long-lived electronic coherences in light-harvesting complexes are facilitated by in-phase motion of the chromophores and surrounding proteins. Using this technique, we are also able to follow the evolution of excited state coherences and find that for carotenoids in the light-harvesting complex the langS2|S0rang superposition remains coherent for more than 70 fs. In addition to the implications of this long electronic decoherence time, the extended coherence allows us to observe the evolution of the excited state wavepacket. These experiments reveal an enhancement of the vibronic coupling to the first vibrational level of the C-C stretching mode and/or methyl-rocking mode in the ground electronic state 70 fs after the initial excitation. These observations open the door to future experiments and modelling that may be able to resolve the relaxation dynamics of carotenoids in solution and in natural light-harvesting systems.

  1. The regulation of carotenoid pigmentation in flowers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changfu; Bai, Chao; Sanahuja, Georgina; Yuan, Dawei; Farré, Gemma; Naqvi, Shaista; Shi, Lianxuan; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul

    2010-12-01

    Carotenoids fulfill many processes that are essential for normal growth and development in plants, but they are also responsible for the breathtaking variety of red-to-yellow colors we see in flowers and fruits. Although such visual diversity helps to attract pollinators and encourages herbivores to distribute seeds, humans also benefit from the aesthetic properties of flowers and an entire floriculture industry has developed on the basis that new and attractive varieties can be produced. Over the last decade, much has been learned about the impact of carotenoid metabolism on flower color development and the molecular basis of flower color. A number of different regulatory mechanisms have been described ranging from the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in carotenoid synthesis to the control of carotenoid storage in sink organs. This means we can now explain many of the natural colorful varieties we see around us and also engineer plants to produce flowers with novel and exciting varieties that are not provided by nature.

  2. Continuous production of carotenoids from Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Kleinegris, Dorinde M M; Janssen, Marcel; Brandenburg, Willem A; Wijffels, René H

    2011-03-07

    During the in situ extraction of β-carotene from Dunaliella salina, the causal relationship between carotenoid extraction and cell death indicated that cell growth and cell death should be at equilibrium for a continuous in situ extraction process. In a flat-panel photobioreactor that was operated as a turbidostat cell numbers of stressed cells were kept constant while attaining a continuous well-defined light-stress. In this way it was possible to study the balance between cell growth and cell death and determine whether both could be increased to reach higher volumetric productivities of carotenoids. In the two-phase system a volumetric productivity of 8.3 mg β-carotene L(RV)(-1)d(-1) was obtained. In situ extraction contributed only partly to this productivity. The major part came from net production of carotenoid-rich biomass, due to a high growth rate of the cells and subsequent dilution of the reactor. To reach equilibrium between cell growth and cell death, sparging rates of dodecane could have been increased. However, already at the applied sparging rate of 286 L(dod)L(RV)(-1)min(-1) emulsion formation of the dodecane in the aqueous phase appeared. In a turbidostat without in situ extraction a volumetric productivity of 13.5 mg β-caroteneL(RV)(-1)d(-1) was reached, solely based on the continuous production of carotenoid-rich biomass. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Galloxanthin, a carotenoid from the chicken retina.

    PubMed

    WALD, G

    1948-05-20

    A new carotenoid has been isolated from the chicken retina for which the name galloxanthin is proposed. This substance has the properties of a hydroxy carotenoid or xanthophyll. It has not yet been crystallized. On a chromatogram of calcium carbonate it is adsorbed just below astaxanthin and above lutein. The absorption spectrum of galloxanthin lies in a region where natural carotenoids have not ordinarily been found. Its main, central absorption band falls at about 400 mmicro. The position of its spectrum suggests a conjugated system of eight double bonds. This relatively short polyene structure must be reconciled with very strong adsorption affinities. With antimony trichloride, galloxanthin yields a deep blue product, possessing a main absorption band at 785 to 795 mmicro, and a secondary maximum at about 710 mmicro which may not be due to galloxanthin itself. Galloxanthin appears to be one of the carotenoid filter pigments associated with cone vision in the chicken. It may act as an auxiliary to the other filter pigments in differentiating colors; or its primary function may be to exclude violet and near ultraviolet radiations for which the eye has a large chromatic aberration.

  4. Accumulation and bioavailability of dietary carotenoids in vegetable crops.

    PubMed

    Kopsell, Dean A; Kopsell, David E

    2006-10-01

    Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments found in many vegetable crops that are reported to have the health benefits of cancer and eye disease reduction when consumed in the diet. Research shows that environmental and genetic factors can significantly influence carotenoid concentrations in vegetable crops, and that changing cultural management strategies could be advantageous, resulting in increased vegetable carotenoid concentrations. Improvements in vegetable carotenoid levels have been achieved using traditional breeding methods and molecular transformations to stimulate biosynthetic pathways. Postharvest and processing activities can alter carotenoid chemistry, and ultimately affect bioavailability. Bioavailability data emphasize the importance of carotenoid enhancement in vegetable crops and the need to characterize potential changes in carotenoid composition during cultivation, storage and processing before consumer purchase.

  5. Oxidative stress does not influence carotenoid mobilization and plumage pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Caroline; Andersson, Staffan

    2008-02-07

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to create a link between 'good genes' and carotenoid coloration via an allocation conflict between external pigmentation and internal antioxidant functions. However, although carotenoid displays have been extensively investigated, there are no experimental tests of the antioxidant efficiency of carotenoids in vivo. We induced oxidative stress in a small passerine (the great tit, Parus major) under both carotenoid deprivation and supplementation, and investigated the effect on carotenoid mobilization (i.e. plasma) and allocation (i.e. deposition in feather incorporation and liver storage). We found no effects of the stressor on either mobilization or allocation of carotenoids. These results reject the previously suggested superior role of carotenoid's function as antioxidant in vivo with important implications for signal content and honesty.

  6. A review on factors influencing bioaccessibility and bioefficacy of carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshani, A M B

    2017-05-24

    Vitamin A deficiency is one of the most prevalent deficiency disorders in the world. As shown by many studies plant food based approaches have a real potential on prevention of vitamin A deficiency in a sustainable way. Carotenoids are important as precursors of vitamin A as well as for prevention of cancers, coronary heart diseases, age-related macular degeneration, cataract etc. Bioaccessibility and bioefficacy of carotenoids are known to be influenced by numerous factors including dietary factors such as fat, fiber, dosage of carotenoid, location of carotenoid in the plant tissue, heat treatment, particle size of food, carotenoid species, interactions among carotenoids, isomeric form and molecular linkage and subject characteristics. Therefore even when carotenoids are found in high quantities in plant foods their utilization may be unsatisfactory because some factors are known to interfere as negative effectors.

  7. Macular and serum carotenoid concentrations in patients with malabsorption syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ward, Matthew S; Zhao, Da You; Bernstein, Paul S

    2008-03-01

    The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin are believed to protect the human macula by absorbing blue light and quenching free radicals. Intestinal malabsorption syndromes such as celiac and Crohn's disease are known to cause deficiencies of lipid-soluble nutrients. We hypothesized that subjects with nutrient malabsorption syndromes will demonstrate lower carotenoid levels in the macula and blood, and that these lower levels may correlate with early-onset maculopathy. Resonance Raman spectrographic (RRS) measurements of macular carotenoid levels were collected from subjects with and without a history of malabsorption syndromes. Carotenoids were extracted from serum and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Subjects with malabsorption (n = 22) had 37% lower levels of macular carotenoids on average versus controls (n = 25, P < 0.001). Malabsorption was not associated with decreased serum carotenoid levels. Convincing signs of early maculopathy were not observed. We conclude that intestinal malabsorption results in lower macular carotenoid levels.

  8. Physalis alkekengi carotenoidic extract inhibitor of soybean lipoxygenase-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Chedea, Veronica Sanda; Pintea, Adela; Bunea, Andrea; Braicu, Cornelia; Stanila, Andreea; Socaciu, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the carotenoidic saponified extract of Physalis alkekengi sepals (PA) towards the lipoxygenase (LOX) oxidation of linoleic acid. Lipoxygenase activity in the presence of carotenoids, standard and from extract, was followed by its kinetic behaviour determining the changes in absorption at 234 nm. The standard carotenoids used were β-carotene (β-car), lutein (Lut), and zeaxanthin (Zea). The calculated enzymatic specific activity (ESA) after 600 s of reaction proves that PA carotenoidic extract has inhibitory effect on LOX oxidation of linoleic acid. A longer polyenic chain of carotenoid structure gives a higher ESA during the first reaction seconds. This situation is not available after 600 s of reaction and may be due to a destruction of this structure by cooxidation of carotenoids, besides the classical LOX reaction. The PA carotenoidic extract inhibiting the LOX-1 reaction can be considered a source of lipoxygenase inhibitors.

  9. Intraspecific Variation in Carotenoids of Brassica oleracea var. sabellica.

    PubMed

    Mageney, Vera; Baldermann, Susanne; Albach, Dirk C

    2016-04-27

    Carotenoids are best known as a source of natural antioxidants. Physiologically, carotenoids are part of the photoprotection in plants as they act as scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An important source of carotenoids in European food is Brassica oleracea. Focusing on the most abundant carotenoids, we estimated the contents of ß-carotene, (9Z)-neoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and lutein as well as those of chlorophylls a and b to assess their variability in Brassica oleracea var. sabellica. Our analyses included more than 30 cultivars categorized in five distinct sets grouped according to morphological characteristics or geographical origin. Our results demonstrated specific carotenoid patterns characteristic for American, Italian, and red-colored kale cultivars. Moreover, we demonstrated a tendency of high zeaxanthin proportions under traditional harvest conditions, which accord to low-temperature regimes. We also compared the carotenoid patterns of self-generated hybrid lines. Corresponding findings indicated that crossbreeding has a high potential for carotenoid content optimization in kale.

  10. Identification of Plastoglobules as a Site of Carotenoid Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Rottet, Sarah; Devillers, Julie; Glauser, Gaétan; Douet, Véronique; Besagni, Céline; Kessler, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids play an essential role in light harvesting and protection from excess light. During chloroplast senescence carotenoids are released from their binding proteins and are eventually metabolized. Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (CCD4) is involved in carotenoid breakdown in senescing leaf and desiccating seed, and is part of the proteome of plastoglobules (PG), which are thylakoid-associated lipid droplets. Here, we demonstrate that CCD4 is functionally active in PG. Leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana ccd4 mutants constitutively expressing CCD4 fused to yellow fluorescent protein showed strong fluorescence in PG and reduced carotenoid levels upon dark-induced senescence. Lipidome-wide analysis indicated that β-carotene, lutein, and violaxanthin were the principle substrates of CCD4 in vivo and were cleaved in senescing chloroplasts. Moreover, carotenoids were shown to accumulate in PG of ccd4 mutant plants during senescence, indicating translocation of carotenoids to PG prior to degradation. PMID:28018391

  11. Oxidative stress does not influence carotenoid mobilization and plumage pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Isaksson, Caroline; Andersson, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    Summary Oxidative stress has been suggested to create a link between ‘good genes’ and carotenoid coloration via an allocation conflict between external pigmentation and internal antioxidant functions. However, although carotenoid displays have been extensively investigated, there are no experimental tests of the antioxidant efficiency of carotenoids in vivo. We induced oxidative stress in a small passerine (the great tit, Parus major) under both carotenoid deprivation and supplementation, and investigated the effect on carotenoid mobilization (i.e. plasma) and allocation (i.e. deposition in feather incorporation and liver storage). We found no effects of the stressor on either mobilization or allocation of carotenoids. These results reject the previously suggested superior role of carotenoid's function as antioxidant in vivo with important implications for signal content and honesty. PMID:18029305

  12. What are carotenoids signaling? Immunostimulatory effects of dietary vitamin E, but not of carotenoids, in Iberian green lizards.

    PubMed

    Kopena, Renata; López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    In spite that carotenoid-based sexual ornaments are one of the most popular research topics in sexual selection of animals, the antioxidant and immunostimulatory role of carotenoids, presumably signaled by these colorful ornaments, is still controversial. It has been suggested that the function of carotenoids might not be as an antioxidant per se, but that colorful carotenoids may indirectly reflect the levels of nonpigmentary antioxidants, such as melatonin or vitamin E. We experimentally fed male Iberian green lizards (Lacerta schreiberi) additional carotenoids or vitamin E alone, or a combination of carotenoids and vitamin E dissolved in soybean oil, whereas a control group only received soybean oil. We examined the effects of the dietary supplementations on phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced skin-swelling immune response and body condition. Lizards that were supplemented with vitamin E alone or a combination of vitamin E and carotenoids had greater immune responses than control lizards, but animals supplemented with carotenoids alone had lower immune responses than lizards supplemented with vitamin E and did not differ from control lizards. These results support the hypothesis that carotenoids in green lizards are not effective as immunostimulants, but that they may be visually signaling the immunostimulatory effects of non-pigmentary vitamin E. In contrast, lizards supplemented with carotenoids alone have higher body condition gains than lizards in the other experimental groups, suggesting that carotenoids may be still important to improve condition.

  13. What are carotenoids signaling? Immunostimulatory effects of dietary vitamin E, but not of carotenoids, in Iberian green lizards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopena, Renata; López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    In spite that carotenoid-based sexual ornaments are one of the most popular research topics in sexual selection of animals, the antioxidant and immunostimulatory role of carotenoids, presumably signaled by these colorful ornaments, is still controversial. It has been suggested that the function of carotenoids might not be as an antioxidant per se, but that colorful carotenoids may indirectly reflect the levels of nonpigmentary antioxidants, such as melatonin or vitamin E. We experimentally fed male Iberian green lizards ( Lacerta schreiberi) additional carotenoids or vitamin E alone, or a combination of carotenoids and vitamin E dissolved in soybean oil, whereas a control group only received soybean oil. We examined the effects of the dietary supplementations on phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced skin-swelling immune response and body condition. Lizards that were supplemented with vitamin E alone or a combination of vitamin E and carotenoids had greater immune responses than control lizards, but animals supplemented with carotenoids alone had lower immune responses than lizards supplemented with vitamin E and did not differ from control lizards. These results support the hypothesis that carotenoids in green lizards are not effective as immunostimulants, but that they may be visually signaling the immunostimulatory effects of non-pigmentary vitamin E. In contrast, lizards supplemented with carotenoids alone have higher body condition gains than lizards in the other experimental groups, suggesting that carotenoids may be still important to improve condition.

  14. Dissecting carotenoid from structural components of carotenoid-based coloration: a field experiment with great tits (Parus major).

    PubMed

    Jacot, Alain; Romero-Diaz, Cristina; Tschirren, Barbara; Richner, Heinz; Fitze, Patrick S

    2010-07-01

    Carotenoid-based yellowish to red plumage colors are widespread visual signals used in sexual and social communication. To understand their ultimate signaling functions, it is important to identify the proximate mechanism promoting variation in coloration. Carotenoid-based colors combine structural and pigmentary components, but the importance of the contribution of structural components to variation in pigment-based colors (i.e., carotenoid-based colors) has been undervalued. In a field experiment with great tits (Parus major), we combined a brood size manipulation with a simultaneous carotenoid supplementation in order to disentangle the effects of carotenoid availability and early growth condition on different components of the yellow breast feathers. By defining independent measures of feather carotenoid content (absolute carotenoid chroma) and background structure (background reflectance), we demonstrate that environmental factors experienced during the nestling period, namely, early growth conditions and carotenoid availability, contribute independently to variation in yellow plumage coloration. While early growth conditions affected the background reflectance of the plumage, the availability of carotenoids affected the absolute carotenoid chroma, the peak of maximum ultraviolet reflectance, and the overall shape, that is, chromatic information of the reflectance curves. These findings demonstrate that environment-induced variation in background structure contributes significantly to intraspecific variation in yellow carotenoid-based plumage coloration.

  15. Regulation of carotenoid accumulation and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in citrus juice sacs in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Kato, Masaya; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Takagi, Toshihiko; Kiriiwa, Yoshikazu; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Nesumi, Hirohisa

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, to investigate the mechanisms regulating carotenoid accumulation in citrus, a culture system was set up in vitro with juice sacs of three citrus varieties, Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.), Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck), and Lisbon lemon (Citrus limon Burm.f.). The juice sacs of all the three varieties enlarged gradually with carotenoid accumulation. The changing patterns of carotenoid content and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in juice sacs in vitro were similar to those ripening on trees in the three varieties. Using this system, the changes in the carotenoid content and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in response to environmental stimuli were investigated. The results showed that carotenoid accumulation was induced by blue light treatment, but was not affected by red light treatment in the three varieties. Different regulation of CitPSY expression, which was up-regulated by blue light while unaffected by red light, led to different changes in carotenoid content in response to these two treatments in Satsuma mandarin and Valencia orange. In all three varieties, increases in carotenoid content were observed with sucrose and mannitol treatments. However, the accumulation of carotenoid in the two treatments was regulated by distinct mechanisms at the transcriptional level. With abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, the expression of the genes investigated in this study was up-regulated in Satsuma mandarin and Lisbon lemon, indicating that ABA induced its own biosynthesis at the transcriptional level. This feedback regulation of ABA led to decreases in carotenoid content. With gibberellin (GA) treatment, carotenoid content was significantly decreased in the three varieties. Changes in the expression of genes related to carotenoid metabolism varied among the three varieties in response to GA treatment. These results provided insights into improving carotenoid content and composition in citrus during fruit

  16. Regulation of carotenoid accumulation and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in citrus juice sacs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Kato, Masaya; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Takagi, Toshihiko; Kiriiwa, Yoshikazu; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Nesumi, Hirohisa

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, to investigate the mechanisms regulating carotenoid accumulation in citrus, a culture system was set up in vitro with juice sacs of three citrus varieties, Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.), Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck), and Lisbon lemon (Citrus limon Burm.f.). The juice sacs of all the three varieties enlarged gradually with carotenoid accumulation. The changing patterns of carotenoid content and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in juice sacs in vitro were similar to those ripening on trees in the three varieties. Using this system, the changes in the carotenoid content and the expression of carotenoid metabolic genes in response to environmental stimuli were investigated. The results showed that carotenoid accumulation was induced by blue light treatment, but was not affected by red light treatment in the three varieties. Different regulation of CitPSY expression, which was up-regulated by blue light while unaffected by red light, led to different changes in carotenoid content in response to these two treatments in Satsuma mandarin and Valencia orange. In all three varieties, increases in carotenoid content were observed with sucrose and mannitol treatments. However, the accumulation of carotenoid in the two treatments was regulated by distinct mechanisms at the transcriptional level. With abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, the expression of the genes investigated in this study was up-regulated in Satsuma mandarin and Lisbon lemon, indicating that ABA induced its own biosynthesis at the transcriptional level. This feedback regulation of ABA led to decreases in carotenoid content. With gibberellin (GA) treatment, carotenoid content was significantly decreased in the three varieties. Changes in the expression of genes related to carotenoid metabolism varied among the three varieties in response to GA treatment. These results provided insights into improving carotenoid content and composition in citrus during fruit

  17. Mate choice for a male carotenoid-based ornament is linked to female dietary carotenoid intake and accumulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The coevolution of male traits and female mate preferences has led to the elaboration and diversification of sexually selected traits; however the mechanisms that mediate trait-preference coevolution are largely unknown. Carotenoid acquisition and accumulation are key determinants of the expression of male sexually selected carotenoid-based coloration and a primary mechanism maintaining the honest information content of these signals. Carotenoids also influence female health and reproduction in ways that may alter the costs and benefits of mate choice behaviours and thus provide a potential biochemical link between the expression of male traits and female preferences. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated the dietary carotenoid levels of captive female house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) and assessed their mate choice behavior in response to color-manipulated male finches. Results Females preferred to associate with red males, but carotenoid supplementation did not influence the direction or strength of this preference. Females receiving a low-carotenoid diet were less responsive to males in general, and discrimination among the colorful males was positively linked to female plasma carotenoid levels at the beginning of the study when the diet of all birds was carotenoid-limited. Conclusions Although female preference for red males was not influenced by carotenoid intake, changes in mating responsiveness and discrimination linked to female carotenoid status may alter how this preference is translated into choice. The reddest males, with the most carotenoid rich plumage, tend to pair early in the breeding season. If carotenoid-related variations in female choice behaviour shift the timing of pairing, then they have the potential to promote assortative mating by carotenoid status and drive the evolution of carotenoid-based male plumage coloration. PMID:22233462

  18. Carotenoid Production by Halophilic Archaea Under Different Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Calegari-Santos, Rossana; Diogo, Ricardo Alexandre; Fontana, José Domingos; Bonfim, Tania Maria Bordin

    2016-05-01

    Carotenoids are pigments that may be used as colorants and antioxidants in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Since they also benefit human health, great efforts have been undertaken to search for natural sources of carotenoids, including microbial ones. The optimization of culture conditions to increase carotenoid yield is one of the strategies used to minimize the high cost of carotenoid production by microorganisms. Halophilic archaea are capable of producing carotenoids according to culture conditions. Their main carotenoid is bacterioruberin with 50 carbon atoms. In fact, the carotenoid has important biological functions since it acts as cell membrane reinforcement and it protects the microorganism against DNA damaging agents. Moreover, carotenoid extracts from halophilic archaea have shown high antioxidant capacity. Therefore, current review summarizes the effect of different culture conditions such as salt and carbon source concentrations in the medium, light incidence, and oxygen tension on carotenoid production by halophilic archaea and the strategies such as optimization methodology and two-stage cultivation already used to increase the carotenoid yield of these microorganisms.

  19. Transcript abundance of phytoene synthase 1 and phytoene synthase 2 is associated with natural variation of storage root carotenoid pigmentation in carrot

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds synthesized in plants which serve as photoprotectants and provide plant tissues with red, orange and yellow pigmentation. These compounds are important in human health, as they serve as both vitamin A precursors as well as having antioxidant properties. Carrot pr...

  20. Modification of carotenoid levels by abscission agents and expression of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in 'valencia' sweet orange.

    PubMed

    Alferez, Fernando; Pozo, Luis V; Rouseff, Russell R; Burns, Jacqueline K

    2013-03-27

    The effect of 5-chloro-3-methyl-4-nitro-1H-pyrazole (CMNP) and ethephon on peel color, flavedo carotenoid gene expression, and carotenoid accumulation was investigated in mature 'Valencia' orange ( Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) fruit flavedo at three maturation stages. Abscission agent application altered peel color. CMNP was more effective than ethephon in promoting green-to-red (a) and blue-to-yellow (b) color at the middle and late maturation stages and total carotenoid changes at all maturation stages. Altered flow of carotenoid precursors during maturation due to abscission agents was suggested by changes in phytoene desaturase (Pds) and ζ-carotene desaturase (Zds) gene expression. However, each abscission agent affected downstream expression differentially. Ethephon application increased β-carotene hydroxilase (β-Chx) transcript accumulation 12-fold as maturation advanced from the early to middle and late stages. CMNP markedly increased β- and ε-lycopene cyclase (Lcy) transcript accumulation 45- and 15-fold, respectively, at midmaturation. Patterns of carotenoid accumulation in flavedo were supported in part by gene expression changes. CMNP caused greater accumulation of total flavedo carotenoids at all maturation stages when compared with ethephon or controls. In general, CMNP treatment increased total red carotenoids more than ethephon or the control but decreased total yellow carotenoids at each maturation stage. In control fruit flavedo, total red carotenoids increased and yellow carotenoids decreased as maturation progressed. Trends in total red carotenoids during maturation were consistent with measured a values. Changes in carotenoid accumulation and expression patterns in flavedo suggest that regulation of carotenoid accumulation is under transcriptional, translational, and post-translational control.

  1. Differential effects of early- and late-life access to carotenoids on adult immune function and ornamentation in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael W; McGraw, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Environmental conditions early in life can affect an organism's phenotype at adulthood, which may be tuned to perform optimally in conditions that mimic those experienced during development (Environmental Matching hypothesis), or may be generally superior when conditions during development were of higher quality (Silver Spoon hypothesis). Here, we tested these hypotheses by examining how diet during development interacted with diet during adulthood to affect adult sexually selected ornamentation and immune function in male mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). Mallards have yellow, carotenoid-pigmented beaks that are used in mate choice, and the degree of beak coloration has been linked to adult immune function. Using a 2 × 2 factorial experimental design, we reared mallards on diets containing either low or high levels of carotenoids (nutrients that cannot be synthesized de novo) throughout the period of growth, and then provided adults with one of these two diets while simultaneously quantifying beak coloration and response to a variety of immune challenges. We found that both developmental and adult carotenoid supplementation increased circulating carotenoid levels during dietary treatment, but that birds that received low-carotenoid diets during development maintained relatively higher circulating carotenoid levels during an adult immune challenge. Individuals that received low levels of carotenoids during development had larger phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced cutaneous immune responses at adulthood; however, dietary treatment during development and adulthood did not affect antibody response to a novel antigen, nitric oxide production, natural antibody levels, hemolytic capacity of the plasma, or beak coloration. However, beak coloration prior to immune challenges positively predicted PHA response, and strong PHA responses were correlated with losses in carotenoid-pigmented coloration. In sum, we did not find consistent support for either the Environmental

  2. Differential Effects of Early- and Late-Life Access to Carotenoids on Adult Immune Function and Ornamentation in Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Michael W.; McGraw, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental conditions early in life can affect an organism’s phenotype at adulthood, which may be tuned to perform optimally in conditions that mimic those experienced during development (Environmental Matching hypothesis), or may be generally superior when conditions during development were of higher quality (Silver Spoon hypothesis). Here, we tested these hypotheses by examining how diet during development interacted with diet during adulthood to affect adult sexually selected ornamentation and immune function in male mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). Mallards have yellow, carotenoid-pigmented beaks that are used in mate choice, and the degree of beak coloration has been linked to adult immune function. Using a 2×2 factorial experimental design, we reared mallards on diets containing either low or high levels of carotenoids (nutrients that cannot be synthesized de novo) throughout the period of growth, and then provided adults with one of these two diets while simultaneously quantifying beak coloration and response to a variety of immune challenges. We found that both developmental and adult carotenoid supplementation increased circulating carotenoid levels during dietary treatment, but that birds that received low-carotenoid diets during development maintained relatively higher circulating carotenoid levels during an adult immune challenge. Individuals that received low levels of carotenoids during development had larger phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced cutaneous immune responses at adulthood; however, dietary treatment during development and adulthood did not affect antibody response to a novel antigen, nitric oxide production, natural antibody levels, hemolytic capacity of the plasma, or beak coloration. However, beak coloration prior to immune challenges positively predicted PHA response, and strong PHA responses were correlated with losses in carotenoid-pigmented coloration. In sum, we did not find consistent support for either the Environmental

  3. Optical absorption spectra of dications of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevarajan, J.A.; Wei, C.C.; Jeevarajan, A.S.; Kispert, L.D.

    1996-04-04

    Quantitative optical absorption spectra of the cation radicals and the dications of canthaxanthin (I), {beta}carotene (II), 7`-cyano-7`-ethoxycarbonyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (III), and 7`,7`-dimethyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (IV) in dichloromethane solution are reported. Exclusive formation of dications occurs when the carotenoids are oxidized with ferric chloride. Addition of neutral carotenoid to the dications results in equilibrium formation of cation radicals. Oxidation with iodine in dichloromethane affords only cation radicals; electrochemical oxidation under suitable conditions yields both dications and cation radicals. Values of the optical parameters depend on the nature of the oxidative medium. The oscillator strengths calculated for gas phase cation radicals and dications of I-IV using the INDO/S method show the same trend as the experimental values. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Biotechnological production of value-added carotenoids from microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Wichuk, Kristine; Brynjólfsson, Sigurður; Fu, Weiqi

    2014-01-01

    We recently evaluated the relationship between abiotic environmental stresses and lutein biosynthesis in the green microalga Dunaliella salina and suggested a rational design of stress-driven adaptive evolution experiments for carotenoids production in microalgae. Here, we summarize our recent findings regarding the biotechnological production of carotenoids from microalgae and outline emerging technology in this field. Carotenoid metabolic pathways are characterized in several representative algal species as they pave the way for biotechnology development. The adaptive evolution strategy is highlighted in connection with enhanced growth rate and carotenoid metabolism. In addition, available genetic modification tools are described, with emphasis on model species. A brief discussion on the role of lights as limiting factors in carotenoid production in microalgae is also included. Overall, our analysis suggests that light-driven metabolism and the photosynthetic efficiency of microalgae in photobioreactors are the main bottlenecks in enhancing biotechnological potential of carotenoid production from microalgae. PMID:24691165

  5. Carotenoid extraction methods: A review of recent developments.

    PubMed

    Saini, Ramesh Kumar; Keum, Young-Soo

    2018-02-01

    The versatile use of carotenoids in feed, food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries has emphasized the optimization of extraction methods to obtain the highest recovery. The choice of method for carotenoid extraction from food matrices is crucial, owing to the presence of diverse carotenoids with varied levels of polarity, and the presence of various physical and chemical barriers in the food matrices. This review highlights the theoretical aspects and recent developments of various conventional and nonconventional methods used for the extraction of carotenoids, including ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE), pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). Recent applications of non-toxic and environmentally safe solvents (green solvents) and ionic liquids (IL) for carotenoid extraction are also described. Additionally, future research challenges in the context of carotenoids extractions are also identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bioaccessibility of carotenoids from Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gille, Andrea; Trautmann, Andreas; Posten, Clemens; Briviba, Karlis

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae can contribute to a balanced diet because of their composition. Beside numerous essential nutrients, carotenoids are in the focus for food applications. The bioavailability of carotenoids from photoautotrophic-cultivated Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C. reinhardtii) was compared. An in vitro digestion model was used to investigate carotenoid bioaccessibility. Furthermore, the effect of sonication on bioaccessibility was assessed. Lutein was the main carotenoid in both species. C. reinhardtii showed higher amounts of lutein and β-carotene than C. vulgaris. In contrast to C. reinhardtii, no β-carotene and only 7% of lutein were bioaccessible in nonsonicated C. vulgaris. Sonication increased the bioaccessibility of carotenoids from C. vulgaris to a level comparable with C. reinhardtii (β-carotene: ≥ 10%; lutein: ≥ 15%). Thus, C. reinhardtii represents a good carotenoid source for potential use in foods without processing, while the application of processing methods, like sonication, is necessary for C. vulgaris.

  7. Marine carotenoids: Bioactivities and potential benefits to human health.

    PubMed

    Chuyen, Hoang Van; Eun, Jong-Bang

    2017-08-13

    Among natural pigments, carotenoids play important roles in physiological functions. The characteristics of carotenoids and their effects on human health have been reported for a long time, but most studies have focused on carotenoids from vegetables, fruits, and other parts of higher plants. Few reports are available on carotenoids from marine sources, such as seaweeds, microalgae, and marine animals, which have attracted attention in recent decades. Hundreds of carotenoids have been identified and isolated from marine organisms and their beneficial physiological functions, such as anticancer, antiobesity, antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and cardioprotective activities have been reported. The purpose of this review is to discuss the literature on the beneficial bioactivities of some of the most abundant marine carotenoids, including fucoxanthin, astaxanthin, cantaxanthin, peridinin, fucoxanthinol, and halocynthiaxanthin.

  8. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  9. Optimal nutrition: vitamin A and the carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Thurnham, D I; Northrop-Clewes, C A

    1999-05-01

    There are two major dietary sources of vitamin A: easily absorbed retinyl palmitate in foods of animal origin, and poorly bioavailable carotenoids from plant foods. Plasma retinol is tightly controlled, probably by regulation of retinol-binding protein (RBP) formation in the liver, and only hormonal factors (e.g. oral contraceptives) and infection will alter the homeostasis. Delivery of retinol to the tissues is facilitated by the RBP-retinol complex; however, there is evidence that this mechanism can be bypassed when very high doses of vitamin A are given. Some retinyl ester may be released to tissues from chylomicrons when the latter bind to tissue lipoprotein receptors during their passage from the gut to the liver following a meal. High-dose vitamin A therapy is a means of rapidly improving vitamin A status in persons with sub-optimal vitamin A nutrition but there are dangers of toxic symptoms (e.g. teratogenicity) from excess vitamin A usage. Evidence is presented to suggest that the plasma retinol: RBP may be a guide to optimal vitamin A status, since values less than one frequently occur in less-developed countries and during infection. In contrast to plasma retinol, plasma carotenoids reflect the dietary intake of plant foods. However, absorption is limited by poor bioavailability and a saturable uptake mechanism in competition with other phytochemicals. Recent work on bioavailability suggests that the calculation of plant food vitamin A activity should be re-examined. Illness has little influence on plasma levels except by suppressing appetite. Carotenoids are generally regarded as non-toxic yet intervention studies with beta-carotene in smokers have been associated with increased lung cancer and heart disease. Some carotenoids are important as vitamin A precursors, but the physiological importance of their antioxidant properties is not known and consequently the amount needed for optimal nutrition is uncertain.

  10. Basicity of aromatic amines from liquid chromatographic behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Mcnair, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic investigation was conducted to determine whether the adsorption of weakly basic aromatic amines on slightly acidic silica gel adsorbents could be used to study their relative basicity. Under proper conditions, a linear correlation between pKb and log of capacity factor was observed. This finding may prove useful in helping to predict the relative basicity of closely related aromatic diamines, especially new amines being synthesized for polymer synthesis.

  11. Poly(1,3,4-oxadiazoles) via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Wolf, Peter (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Poly(1,3,4-oxadiazoles) (POX) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl) 1,3,4-oxadiazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as sulfolane or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl) 1,3,4-oxadiazole monomers are synthesized by reacting 4-hydroxybenzoic hydrazide with phenyl 4-hydrobenzoate in the melt and also by reacting aromatic dihydrazides with two moles of phenyl 4-hydroxybenzoate in the melt. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight POX of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the large variety of activated aromatic dihalides which are available.

  12. Neutral Diboron Analogues of Archetypal Aromatic Species by Spontaneous Cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Arrowsmith, Merle; Böhnke, Julian; Braunschweig, Holger; Celik, Mehmet Ali; Claes, Christina; Ewing, William C; Krummenacher, Ivo; Lubitz, Katharina; Schneider, Christoph

    2016-09-05

    Among the numerous routes organic chemists have developed to synthesize benzene derivatives and heteroaromatic compounds, transition-metal-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions are the most elegant. In contrast, cycloaddition reactions of heavier alkene and alkyne analogues, though limited in scope, proceed uncatalyzed. In this work we present the first spontaneous cycloaddition reactions of lighter alkene and alkyne analogues. Selective addition of unactivated alkynes to boron-boron multiple bonds under ambient conditions yielded diborocarbon equivalents of simple aromatic hydrocarbons, including the first neutral 6 π-aromatic diborabenzene compound, a 2 π-aromatic triplet biradical 1,3-diborete, and a phosphine-stabilized 2 π-homoaromatic 1,3-dihydro-1,3-diborete. DFT calculations suggest that all three compounds are aromatic and show frontier molecular orbitals matching those of the related aromatic hydrocarbons, C6 H6 and C4 H4 (2+) , and homoaromatic C4 H5 (+) .

  13. Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments of prochloron (prochlorophyta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paerl, H. W.; Lewin, R. A.; Cheng, L.

    1983-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a gradient-elution technique was utilized to separate and quantify chlorophylls a and b as well as major carotenoid pigments present in freeze-dried preprations of prochloron-didemnid associations and in Prochloron cells separated from host colonies. Results confirm earlier spectrophotometric evidence for both chlorophylls a and b in this prokaryote. Chlorophyll a:b ratios range from 4.14 to 19.71; generally good agreement was found between ratios determined in isolated cell preprations and in symbiotic colonies (in hospite). These values are 1.5 to 5-fold higher than ratios determined in a variety of eukaryotic green plants. The carotenoids in Prochloron are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to those found in various freshwater and marine blue-green algae (cyanopbytes) from high-light environments. However, Prochloron differs from cyanophytes by the absence of myxoxanthophyll and related glycosidic carotenoids. It pigment characteristics are considered sufficiently different from those of cyanophytes to justify its assignment to a separate algal division.

  14. Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments of prochloron (prochlorophyta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paerl, H. W.; Lewin, R. A.; Cheng, L.

    1983-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a gradient-elution technique was utilized to separate and quantify chlorophylls a and b as well as major carotenoid pigments present in freeze-dried preprations of prochloron-didemnid associations and in Prochloron cells separated from host colonies. Results confirm earlier spectrophotometric evidence for both chlorophylls a and b in this prokaryote. Chlorophyll a:b ratios range from 4.14 to 19.71; generally good agreement was found between ratios determined in isolated cell preprations and in symbiotic colonies (in hospite). These values are 1.5 to 5-fold higher than ratios determined in a variety of eukaryotic green plants. The carotenoids in Prochloron are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to those found in various freshwater and marine blue-green algae (cyanopbytes) from high-light environments. However, Prochloron differs from cyanophytes by the absence of myxoxanthophyll and related glycosidic carotenoids. It pigment characteristics are considered sufficiently different from those of cyanophytes to justify its assignment to a separate algal division.

  15. A Unified Picture of S* in Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In π-conjugated chain molecules such as carotenoids, coupling between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom is of central importance. It governs both dynamic and static properties, such as the time scales of excited state relaxation as well as absorption spectra. In this work, we treat vibronic dynamics in carotenoids on four electronic states (|S0⟩, |S1⟩, |S2⟩, and |Sn⟩) in a physically rigorous framework. This model explains all features previously associated with the intensely debated S* state. Besides successfully fitting transient absorption data of a zeaxanthin homologue, this model also accounts for previous results from global target analysis and chain length-dependent studies. Additionally, we are able to incorporate findings from pump-deplete-probe experiments, which were incompatible to any pre-existing model. Thus, we present the first comprehensive and unified interpretation of S*-related features, explaining them by vibronic transitions on either S1, S0, or both, depending on the chain length of the investigated carotenoid. PMID:27509302

  16. [Carotenoid pigments: structural and physicochemical considerations].

    PubMed

    Meléndez-Martínez, Antonio J; Vicario, Isabel M; Heredia, Francisco J

    2007-06-01

    Carotenoid are ubiquitous compounds serving a series of functions that make them special. Thus, they are regarded as essential compounds for life mainly due to the different roles they perform in photosynthesis as we currently know it. For many years, the nutritional relevance ot carotenoids was due to some of them exhibiting vitamin A activity, although the interest in these pigments has expanded dramatically in the last years owing to a large variety of surveys that seem to indicate that they are antioxidant and may be beneficial for the prevention of several chronic non-transmissible human diseases, albeit there is some controversy in this regard. In any case, it is clear that the different functions and effects attributed to these isoprenoids stem from their physical and chemical properties, the latter being due to their chemical structure. Due to the diverse benefitial actions carotenoids are responsible for and, above all, to their nutritional importance, the main objective of this review is to describe such features, whose knowledge is indispensable to have a holistic view of the different roles they play and for the design of new studies.

  17. Development of a rapid, simple assay of plasma total carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plasma total carotenoids can be used as an indicator of risk of chronic disease. Laboratory analysis of individual carotenoids by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is time consuming, expensive, and not amenable to use beyond a research laboratory. The aim of this research is to establish a rapid, simple, and inexpensive spectrophotometric assay of plasma total carotenoids that has a very strong correlation with HPLC carotenoid profile analysis. Results Plasma total carotenoids from 29 volunteers ranged in concentration from 1.2 to 7.4 μM, as analyzed by HPLC. A linear correlation was found between the absorbance at 448 nm of an alcohol / heptane extract of the plasma and plasma total carotenoids analyzed by HPLC, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.989. The average coefficient of variation for the spectrophotometric assay was 6.5% for the plasma samples. The limit of detection was about 0.3 μM and was linear up to about 34 μM without dilution. Correlations between the integrals of the absorption spectra in the range of carotenoid absorption and total plasma carotenoid concentration gave similar results to the absorbance correlation. Spectrophotometric assay results also agreed with the calculated expected absorbance based on published extinction coefficients for the individual carotenoids, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.988. Conclusion The spectrophotometric assay of total carotenoids strongly correlated with HPLC analysis of carotenoids of the same plasma samples and expected absorbance values based on extinction coefficients. This rapid, simple, inexpensive assay, when coupled with the carotenoid health index, may be useful for nutrition intervention studies, population cohort studies, and public health interventions. PMID:23006902

  18. Carotenoid Antenna Binding and Function in Retinal Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-13

    REPORT Carotenoid antenna binding and function in retinal proteins 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Xanthorhodopsin, a proton pump from the...eubacterium Salinibacter ruber, is a unique dual chromophore system that contains, in addition to retinal, the carotenoid salinixanthin as a light... carotenoid ring near the retinal ring. Substitution of the small glycine with bulky tryptophan in this site eliminates binding. The second factor is the 4

  19. The carotenoid dioxygenase gene family in maize, sorghum, and rice

    PubMed Central

    Vallabhaneni, Ratnakar; Bradbury, Louis M. T.; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids and their apocarotenoid derivatives play essential physiological and developmental roles and provide plants tolerance to a variety of stresses. Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases mediate the degradation of carotenoids to apocarotenoids. A better understanding of biosynthesis vs. degradation could be useful for controlling carotenoid levels leading to improved plant fitness and/or enhanced content of nutritionally valuable carotenoids. The Poaceae (grass) plant family contains many crops of agronomic value. Therefore this study focused on characterizing the carotenoid dioxygenase gene family in the grass species maize, rice, and sorghum with comparison made to newly identified gene families in two non-seed plants as well as an alga and previously identified eudicot genes. Genome analysis was used to map grass genes encoding the carotenoid dioxygenases to chromosome locations. Sequences of encoded proteins were phylogenetically compared. CCD8b was identified as a new class of cleavage dioxygenases that may play a specialized role in apocarotenoid biogenesis. A simple PCR assay was developed to measure CCD1 gene copy number which is known to vary in maize. Using a panel of maize inbred lines varying in carotenoid content, linear regression analysis revealed a statistically significant negative correlation between copy number of CCD1 and carotenoid content, an effect likely mediated through the resulting elevated levels of endosperm CCD1 transcripts in high copy number lines. The PCR assay adds to a growing toolbox for metabolic engineering of maize endosperm carotenoids. This new tool can be used to select maize lines that are less likely to promote endosperm carotenoid degradation, thus predicting optimal results in metabolic engineering of endosperm provitamin A and/or nonprovitamin A carotenoids. PMID:20670614

  20. ProCarDB: a database of bacterial carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Nupur, L N U; Vats, Asheema; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Raghava, Gajendra P S; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Ashwani

    2016-05-26

    Carotenoids have important functions in bacteria, ranging from harvesting light energy to neutralizing oxidants and acting as virulence factors. However, information pertaining to the carotenoids is scattered throughout the literature. Furthermore, information about the genes/proteins involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids has tremendously increased in the post-genomic era. A web server providing the information about microbial carotenoids in a structured manner is required and will be a valuable resource for the scientific community working with microbial carotenoids. Here, we have created a manually curated, open access, comprehensive compilation of bacterial carotenoids named as ProCarDB- Prokaryotic Carotenoid Database. ProCarDB includes 304 unique carotenoids arising from 50 biosynthetic pathways distributed among 611 prokaryotes. ProCarDB provides important information on carotenoids, such as 2D and 3D structures, molecular weight, molecular formula, SMILES, InChI, InChIKey, IUPAC name, KEGG Id, PubChem Id, and ChEBI Id. The database also provides NMR data, UV-vis absorption data, IR data, MS data and HPLC data that play key roles in the identification of carotenoids. An important feature of this database is the extension of biosynthetic pathways from the literature and through the presence of the genes/enzymes in different organisms. The information contained in the database was mined from published literature and databases such as KEGG, PubChem, ChEBI, LipidBank, LPSN, and Uniprot. The database integrates user-friendly browsing and searching with carotenoid analysis tools to help the user. We believe that this database will serve as a major information centre for researchers working on bacterial carotenoids.

  1. Ultrastructural deposition forms and bioaccessibility of carotenoids and carotenoid esters from goji berries (Lycium barbarum L.).

    PubMed

    Hempel, Judith; Schädle, Christopher N; Sprenger, Jasmin; Heller, Annerose; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2017-03-01

    Goji berries (Lycium barbarum L.) have been known to contain strikingly high levels of zeaxanthin, while the physical deposition form and bioaccessibility of the latter was yet unknown. In the present study, we associated ripening-induced modifications in the profile of carotenoids with fundamental changes of the deposition state of carotenoids in goji berries. Unripe fruit contained common chloroplast-specific carotenoids being protein-bound within chloroplastidal thylakoids. The subsequent ripening-induced transformation of chloroplasts to tubular chromoplasts was accompanied by an accumulation of up to 36mg/100g FW zeaxanthin dipalmitate and further minor xanthophyll esters, prevailing in a presumably liquid-crystalline state within the nano-scaled chromoplast tubules. The in vitro digestion unraveled the enhanced liberation and bioaccessibility of zeaxanthin from these tubular aggregates in goji berries as compared to protein-complexed lutein from spinach. Goji berries therefore might represent a more potent source of macular pigments than green leafy vegetables like spinach.

  2. Production of the Marine Carotenoid Astaxanthin by Metabolically Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Henke, Nadja A; Heider, Sabine A E; Peters-Wendisch, Petra; Wendisch, Volker F

    2016-06-30

    Astaxanthin, a red C40 carotenoid, is one of the most abundant marine carotenoids. It is currently used as a food and feed additive in a hundred-ton scale and is furthermore an attractive component for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications with antioxidant activities. Corynebacterium glutamicum, which naturally synthesizes the yellow C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin, is an industrially relevant microorganism used in the million-ton amino acid production. In this work, engineering of a genome-reduced C. glutamicum with optimized precursor supply for astaxanthin production is described. This involved expression of heterologous genes encoding for lycopene cyclase CrtY, β-carotene ketolase CrtW, and hydroxylase CrtZ. For balanced expression of crtW and crtZ their translation initiation rates were varied in a systematic approach using different ribosome binding sites, spacing, and translational start codons. Furthermore, β-carotene ketolases and hydroxylases from different marine bacteria were tested with regard to efficient astaxanthin production in C. glutamicum. In shaking flasks, the C. glutamicum strains developed here overproduced astaxanthin with volumetric productivities up to 0.4 mg·L(-1)·h(-1) which are competitive with current algae-based production. Since C. glutamicum can grow to high cell densities of up to 100 g cell dry weight (CDW)·L(-1), the recombinant strains developed here are a starting point for astaxanthin production by C. glutamicum.

  3. Production of the Marine Carotenoid Astaxanthin by Metabolically Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Nadja A.; Heider, Sabine A. E.; Peters-Wendisch, Petra; Wendisch, Volker F.

    2016-01-01

    Astaxanthin, a red C40 carotenoid, is one of the most abundant marine carotenoids. It is currently used as a food and feed additive in a hundred-ton scale and is furthermore an attractive component for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications with antioxidant activities. Corynebacterium glutamicum, which naturally synthesizes the yellow C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin, is an industrially relevant microorganism used in the million-ton amino acid production. In this work, engineering of a genome-reduced C. glutamicum with optimized precursor supply for astaxanthin production is described. This involved expression of heterologous genes encoding for lycopene cyclase CrtY, β-carotene ketolase CrtW, and hydroxylase CrtZ. For balanced expression of crtW and crtZ their translation initiation rates were varied in a systematic approach using different ribosome binding sites, spacing, and translational start codons. Furthermore, β-carotene ketolases and hydroxylases from different marine bacteria were tested with regard to efficient astaxanthin production in C. glutamicum. In shaking flasks, the C. glutamicum strains developed here overproduced astaxanthin with volumetric productivities up to 0.4 mg·L−1·h−1 which are competitive with current algae-based production. Since C. glutamicum can grow to high cell densities of up to 100 g cell dry weight (CDW)·L−1, the recombinant strains developed here are a starting point for astaxanthin production by C. glutamicum. PMID:27376307

  4. Isolation of Streptomyces globisporus and Blakeslea trispora mutants with increased carotenoid content.

    PubMed

    Matselyukh, B P; Matselyukh, D Ya; Golembiovska, S L; Polishchuk, L V; Lavrinchuk, V Ya

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpigmented mutants of Streptomyces globisporus 1912-Hp7 and Blakeslea trispora 18(+), 184(-) were isolated by action of hydrogen peroxide and nitrosoguanidine, correspondingly, from initial strains S. globisporus 1912-4Lcp and B. trispora 72(-), 198(+). The carotenoids of dry biomass of obtained strains, rubbed thoroughly with glass powder by a pestle in porcelain mortar were extracted by acetone and purified by TLC. Identification of the individual carotenoids was performed by means of HPLC and LC/MS spectrometry. It was shown that strain S. globisporus 1912-4Crt produced beta-carotene/lycopene (6.91/3.24 mg/L), mutants 1912-4Lcp and 1912-7Hp synthesized only lycopene (26.05 and 50.9 mg/L, respectively), and strains B. trispora 18(+) and 184(-)-beta-carotene (6.2% in dry biomass or more 2.5 g/L) without illumination in shake flasks. It is the first example of high constitutive production of the carotenoids by the representative of genus Streptomyces without photoinduction or increased synthesis of sigma factor The improved strains of B. trispora 18(+) and 184(-) can be used for biotechnological production of beta-carotene in industrial conditions.

  5. Effects of carotenoids from lucerne, marigold and tomato on egg yolk pigmentation and carotenoid composition.

    PubMed

    Karadas, F; Grammenidis, E; Surai, P F; Acamovic, T; Sparks, N H C

    2006-10-01

    1. The effects of various sources of natural carotenoids (Px alfalfa concentrate, tomato powder and marigold extract) as feed additives in quail diets on egg yolk pigmentation and carotenoid composition were investigated. 2. Adult Japanese quail were fed one of 5 different diets for 23 d: three diets each contained Px alfalfa concentrate (PX) or tomato powder (TP) or marigold extract (MG), one diet contained marigold extract and tomato powder (MG + TP) and a control diet (wheat/barley based) was low in carotenoid. All products were added at a rate of 2%, apart from marigold extract which was added at a rate of 0.2%. 3. Visual assessment of yolk colour (Roche colour fan) showed a stabilised yolk colour of 1.6, 7.7, 8.5, 8.8 and 10.6 for the control, PX, TP, MG and MG + TP treatments, respectively. 4. The total carotenoid concentration of the egg yolks were 2.2, 22.4, 4.1, 39.0 and 37.7 microg/g for the experimental groups fed the following diets: control, PX, TP, MG and MG + TP, respectively. Deposition of retinol, alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol in the egg yolk was unaffected by treatments. 5. Lutein was shown to be the major carotenoid in the egg yolk, comprising 1.65, 17.97, 2.03, 31.14 and 28.57 microg/g in control, PX, TP, MG and MG + TP, respectively. Inclusion of TP in the quail diet resulted in lycopene transfer to the egg. 6. It was concluded that, in comparison with the control group, there was an increase in the yolk concentrations of lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and beta-carotene in eggs produced by female quail fed diets supplemented with natural carotenoids.

  6. A Carotenoid Health Index Based on Plasma Carotenoids and Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    While there have been many studies on health outcomes that have included measurements of plasma carotenoids, this data has not been reviewed and assembled into a useful form. In this review sixty-two studies of plasma carotenoids and health outcomes, mostly prospective cohort studies or population-based case-control studies, are analyzed together to establish a carotenoid health index. Five cutoff points are established across the percentiles of carotenoid concentrations in populations, from the tenth to ninetieth percentile. The cutoff points (mean ± standard error of the mean) are 1.11 ± 0.08, 1.47 ± 0.08, 1.89 ± 0.08, 2.52 ± 0.13, and 3.07 ± 0.20 µM. For all cause mortality there seems to be a low threshold effect with protection above every cutoff point but the lowest. But for metabolic syndrome and cancer outcomes there tends to be significant positive health outcomes only above the higher cutoff points, perhaps as a triage effect. Based on this data a carotenoid health index is proposed with risk categories as follows: very high risk: <1 µM, high risk: 1-1.5 µM, moderate risk: 1.5-2.5 µM, low risk: 2.5-4 µM, and very low risk: >4 µM. Over 95 percent of the USA population falls into the moderate or high risk category of the carotenoid health index. PMID:22292108

  7. Formation of stable enols from 1,4-dilithio-1,3-dienes and acid chlorides by a de-aromatization/Michael addition/re-aromatization domino process.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiaoshu; Wang, Chao; Li, Dongzhen; Xi, Zhenfeng

    2007-07-07

    Stable enols were synthesized from the reaction of (1Z,3Z)-1,4-dilithio-1,3-dienes with acid chlorides and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis. These stable enols were formed by a novel de-aromatization/Michael addition/re-aromatization domino process.

  8. Specific Appetite for Carotenoids in a Colorful Bird

    PubMed Central

    Senar, Juan Carlos; Møller, Anders Pape; Ruiz, Iker; Negro, Juan José; Broggi, Juli; Hohtola, Esa

    2010-01-01

    Background Since carotenoids have physiological functions necessary for maintaining health, individuals should be selected to actively seek and develop a specific appetite for these compounds. Methodology/Principal Findings Great tits Parus major in a diet choice experiment, both in captivity and the field, preferred carotenoid-enriched diets to control diets. The food items did not differ in any other aspects measured besides carotenoid content. Conclusions/Significance Specific appetite for carotenoids is here demonstrated for the first time, placing these compounds on a par with essential nutrients as sodium or calcium. PMID:20502717

  9. A mitochondrial enzyme degrades carotenoids and protects against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Amengual, Jaume; Lobo, Glenn P; Golczak, Marcin; Li, Hua Nan M; Klimova, Tatyana; Hoppel, Charles L; Wyss, Adrian; Palczewski, Krzysztof; von Lintig, Johannes

    2011-03-01

    Carotenoids are the precursors for vitamin A and are proposed to prevent oxidative damage to cells. Mammalian genomes encode a family of structurally related nonheme iron oxygenases that modify double bonds of these compounds by oxidative cleavage and cis-to-trans isomerization. The roles of the family members BCMO1 and RPE65 for vitamin A production and vision have been well established. Surprisingly, we found that the third family member, β,β-carotene-9',10'-oxygenase (BCDO2), is a mitochondrial carotenoid-oxygenase with broad substrate specificity. In BCDO2-deficient mice, carotenoid homeostasis was abrogated, and carotenoids accumulated in several tissues. In hepatic mitochondria, accumulated carotenoids induced key markers of mitochondrial dysfunction, such as manganese superoxide dismutase (9-fold), and reduced rates of ADP-dependent respiration by 30%. This impairment was associated with an 8- to 9-fold induction of phosphor-MAP kinase and phosphor-AKT, markers of cell signaling pathways related to oxidative stress and disease. Administration of carotenoids to human HepG2 cells depolarized mitochondrial membranes and resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, our studies in BCDO2-deficient mice and human cell cultures indicate that carotenoids can impair respiration and induce oxidative stress. Mammalian cells thus express a mitochondrial carotenoid-oxygenase that degrades carotenoids to protect these vital organelles.

  10. Involvement of Ethylene in Phytochrome-mediated Carotenoid Synthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bin G.; Burg, Stanley P.

    1972-01-01

    Accumulation of carotenoid pigments in the shoot apex of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum cv. Alaska) seedlings is completely prevented by ethylene. Under certain conditions carotenoid synthesis is normally controlled by endogenously produced ethylene. The gas completely inhibits carotenoid synthesis induced either by continuous white light or brief illumination with red light, but only partially inhibits light-induced chlorophyll formation. Far red illumination followed by red illumination reverses the action of red light on carotenoid synthesis. Red light-induced carotenogenesis is partly or wholly caused by phytochrome-mediated inhibition of ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:16658014

  11. Accumulation of Carotenoids and Expression of Carotenoid Biosynthetic Genes during Maturation in Citrus Fruit1

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masaya; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Sugiura, Minoru; Hyodo, Hiroshi; Yano, Masamichi

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between carotenoid accumulation and the expression of carotenoid biosynthetic genes during fruit maturation was investigated in three citrus varieties, Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.), Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck), and Lisbon lemon (Citrus limon Burm.f.). We cloned the cDNAs for phytoene synthase (CitPSY), phytoene desaturase (CitPDS), ζ-carotene (car) desaturase (CitZDS), carotenoid isomerase (CitCRTISO), lycopene β-cyclase (CitLCYb), β-ring hydroxylase (CitHYb), zeaxanthin (zea) epoxidase (CitZEP), and lycopene ε-cyclase (CitLCYe) from Satsuma mandarin, which shared high identities in nucleotide sequences with Valencia orange, Lisbon lemon, and other plant species. With the transition of peel color from green to orange, the change from β,ε-carotenoid (α-car and lutein) accumulation to β,β-carotenoid (β-car, β-cryptoxanthin, zea, and violaxanthin) accumulation was observed in the flavedos of Satsuma mandarin and Valencia orange, accompanying the disappearance of CitLCYe transcripts and the increase in CitLCYb transcripts. Even in green fruit, high levels of β,ε-carotenoids and CitLCYe transcripts were not observed in the juice sacs. As fruit maturation progressed in Satsuma mandarin and Valencia orange, a simultaneous increase in the expression of genes (CitPSY, CitPDS, CitZDS, CitLCYb, CitHYb, and CitZEP) led to massive β,β-xanthophyll (β-cryptoxanthin, zea, and violaxanthin) accumulation in both the flavedo and juice sacs. The gene expression of CitCRTISO was kept low or decreased in the flavedo during massive β,β-xanthophyll accumulation. In the flavedo of Lisbon lemon and Satsuma mandarin, massive accumulation of phytoene was observed with a decrease in the transcript level for CitPDS. Thus, the carotenoid accumulation during citrus fruit maturation was highly regulated by the coordination of the expression among carotenoid biosynthetic genes. In this paper, the mechanism leading to diversity in

  12. Directed evolution of carotenoid synthases for the production of unnatural carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Furubayashi, Maiko; Umeno, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Directed evolution is a well-established strategy to confer novel catalytic functions to the enzymes. Thanks to the relative ease of establishing color screening, carotenogenic enzymes can be rapidly evolved in the laboratory for novel functions. The combinatorial usages of the evolvants result in the creation of diverse set of novel, sometimes unnatural carotenoids. This chapter describes the directed evolution of diapophytoene (C(30) carotenoid) synthase CrtM to function in the foreign C(40) pathway, and the use of the CrtM variants thus obtained for the production of novel backbone structures.

  13. PRACTICAL SYNTHESIS OF AROMATIC DITHIOCARBAMATES

    PubMed Central

    Padungros, Panuwat; Wei, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT Oxidation-sensitive N,N-diaryl dithiocarbamates (DTCs) are synthesized in good yields by the generation of metal amide salts from N-benzoyl precursors, followed by addition of CS2. para-Substituted diphenylamines are prepared by electrophilic aromatic substitution of diphenylbenzamide and saponification. Deacylation of electron-rich species such as bis(p-dimethylaminophenyl)benzamide is challenging because of the oxidative sensitivity of the anionic intermediate but could be achieved in good yield by using n-BuLi to generate a hemiaminal adduct, prior to acidification. The N,N-diaryl DTCs are stable as alkali salts and can be used to produce densely packed monolayers on gold surfaces. PMID:25999616

  14. Synthesis of perfluoroalkylene aromatic diamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Ito, T. I.; Nakahara, J. H.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Analogues of methylene dianilines were synthesized, in which the methylene group between the two aromatic nuclei was replaced by various perfluoroalkylene linkage. The hydrolytic thermal, and thermal oxidative stabilities of PMR Polyimides derived from these diamines were determined. Three types of PMR Polyimide discs were fabricated from the dimethyl ester of 3,3', 4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, the methyl ester of 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, and one of the following three diamines: methyl dianiline, 1,3-bis(4-aminophenyl)hexafluoropropane, and 2,2-bis(4-aminophenyl)hexafluoropropane. The polyimide based on 2,2-bis(4-aminophenyl)hexafluoropropane exhibited the best hydrolytic, thermal, and thermal oxidative stability as determined by moisture uptake and thermogravimetric analysis.

  15. Carotenoids and Carotenoid Esters of Red and Yellow Physalis (Physalis alkekengi L. and P. pubescens L.) Fruits and Calyces.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Hempel, Judith; Schweiggert, Ralf M; Ni, Yuanying; Carle, Reinhold

    2017-08-02

    Carotenoid profiles of fruits and calyces of red (Physalis alkekengi L.) and yellow (P. pubescens L.) Physalis were characterized by HPLC-DAD-APCI-MS(n). Altogether 69 carotenoids were detected in red Physalis, thereof, 45 were identified. In yellow Physalis, 40 carotenoids were detected and 33 were identified. Zeaxanthin esters with various fatty acids were found to be the most abundant carotenoids in red Physalis, accounting for 51-63% of total carotenoids, followed by β-cryptoxanthin esters (16-24%). In yellow Physalis, mainly free carotenoids such as lutein and β-carotene were found. Total carotenoid contents ranged between 19.8 and 21.6 mg/100 g fresh red Physalis fruits and 1.28-1.38 mg/100 g fresh yellow Physalis fruits, demonstrating that Physalis fruits are rich sources of dietary carotenoids. Yellow Physalis calyces contained only 153-306 μg carotenoids/g dry weight, while those of red Physalis contained substantially higher amounts (14.6-17.6 mg/g dry weight), thus possibly exhibiting great potential as a natural source for commercial zeaxanthin extraction.

  16. Health Effects of Carotenoids during Pregnancy and Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Zielińska, Monika A.; Wesołowska, Aleksandra; Pawlus, Beata; Hamułka, Jadwiga

    2017-01-01

    Adequate nutrition is particularly important during pregnancy since it is needed not only for maintaining the health of the mother, but also determines the course of pregnancy and its outcome, fetus development as well as the child’s health after birth and during the later period of life. Data coming from epidemiological and interventions studies support the observation that carotenoids intake provide positive health effects in adults and the elderly population. These health effects are the result of their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies have also demonstrated the significant role of carotenoids during pregnancy and infancy. Some studies indicate a correlation between carotenoid status and lower risk of pregnancy pathologies induced by intensified oxidative stress, but results of these investigations are equivocal. Carotenoids have been well studied in relation to their beneficial role in the prevention of preeclampsia. It is currently hypothesized that carotenoids can play an important role in the prevention of preterm birth and intrauterine growth restriction. Carotenoid status in the newborn depends on the nutritional status of the mother, but little is known about the transfer of carotenoids from the mother to the fetus. Carotenoids are among the few nutrients found in breast milk, in which the levels are determined by the mother’s diet. Nutritional status of the newborn directly depends on its diet. Both mix feeding and artificial feeding may cause depletion of carotenoids since infant formulas contain only trace amounts of these compounds. Carotenoids, particularly lutein and zeaxanthin play a significant role in the development of vision and nervous system (among others, they are important for the development of retina as well as energy metabolism and brain electrical activity). Furthermore, more scientific evidence is emerging on the role of carotenoids in the prevention of disorders affecting preterm infants, who are

  17. Carotenoid metabolic profiling and transcriptome-genome mining reveal functional equivalence among blue-pigmented copepods and appendicularia.

    PubMed

    Mojib, Nazia; Amad, Maan; Thimma, Manjula; Aldanondo, Naroa; Kumaran, Mande; Irigoien, Xabier

    2014-06-01

    The tropical oligotrophic oceanic areas are characterized by high water transparency and annual solar radiation. Under these conditions, a large number of phylogenetically diverse mesozooplankton species living in the surface waters (neuston) are found to be blue pigmented. In the present study, we focused on understanding the metabolic and genetic basis of the observed blue phenotype functional equivalence between the blue-pigmented organisms from the phylum Arthropoda, subclass Copepoda (Acartia fossae) and the phylum Chordata, class Appendicularia (Oikopleura dioica) in the Red Sea. Previous studies have shown that carotenoid-protein complexes are responsible for blue coloration in crustaceans. Therefore, we performed carotenoid metabolic profiling using both targeted and nontargeted (high-resolution mass spectrometry) approaches in four different blue-pigmented genera of copepods and one blue-pigmented species of appendicularia. Astaxanthin was found to be the principal carotenoid in all the species. The pathway analysis showed that all the species can synthesize astaxanthin from β-carotene, ingested from dietary sources, via 3-hydroxyechinenone, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin, adonirubin or adonixanthin. Further, using de novo assembled transcriptome of blue A. fossae (subclass Copepoda), we identified highly expressed homologous β-carotene hydroxylase enzymes and putative carotenoid-binding proteins responsible for astaxanthin formation and the blue phenotype. In blue O. dioica (class Appendicularia), corresponding putative genes were identified from the reference genome. Collectively, our data provide molecular evidences for the bioconversion and accumulation of blue astaxanthin-protein complexes underpinning the observed ecological functional equivalence and adaptive convergence among neustonic mesozooplankton.

  18. Composition of the phyllospheric microbial populations on vegetable plants with different glucosinolate and carotenoid compositions.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Silke; Krumbein, Angelika; Schreiner, Monika

    2008-08-01

    The plant phyllosphere is intensely colonized by a complex and highly diverse microbial population and shows pronounced plant-species-specific differences. The mechanisms and influencing factors determining whether and in which density microorganisms colonize plant phyllosphere tissues are not yet fully understood. One of the key influencing factors is thought to be phytochemical concentration and composition. Therefore, correlations between various concentrations of individual glucosinolates and carotenoids in four different plant species-Brassica juncea, Brassica campestris, Cichorium endivia, and Spinacea oleracea-and the phyllospheric bacterial population size associated with the aerial parts of the same plants were analyzed. The concentration of various individual glucosinolates and carotenoids were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. The phyllospheric bacterial population size including both nonculturable and culturable organisms was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the physiological profile of the culturable microbial community was analyzed using the Biolog system. Results show significant differences between plant species in both concentration and composition of secondary metabolites, bacterial population size, and microbial community composition in three consecutively performed experiments. An interesting and underlying trend was that bacterial density was positively correlated to concentrations of beta-carotene in the plant phyllosphere of the four plant species examined. Likewise, the alkenyl glucosinolates, 2-propenyl, 3-butenyl, and 4-pentenyl, concentrations were positively correlated to the bacterial population density, whereas the aromatic glucosinolate 2-phenylethyl showed a negative correlation to the phyllospheric bacterial population size. Thus, we report for the first time the relationship between individual glucosinolate and carotenoid concentrations and the phyllospheric bacterial

  19. Heterologous carotenoid-biosynthetic enzymes: functional complementation and effects on carotenoid profiles in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Song, Gyu Hyeon; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Choi, Bo Hyun; Han, Se Jong; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2013-01-01

    A limited number of carotenoid pathway genes from microbial sources have been studied for analyzing the pathway complementation in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. In order to systematically investigate the functionality of carotenoid pathway enzymes in E. coli, the pathway genes of carotenogenic microorganisms (Brevibacterium linens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, Rhodopirellula baltica, and Pantoea ananatis) were modified to form synthetic expression modules and then were complemented with Pantoea agglomerans pathway enzymes (CrtE, CrtB, CrtI, CrtY, and CrtZ). The carotenogenic pathway enzymes in the synthetic modules showed unusual activities when complemented with E. coli. For example, the expression of heterologous CrtEs of B. linens, C. glutamicum, and R. baltica influenced P. agglomerans CrtI to convert its substrate phytoene into a rare product-3,4,3',4'-tetradehydrolycopene-along with lycopene, which was an expected product, indicating that CrtE, the first enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, can influence carotenoid profiles. In addition, CrtIs of R. sphaeroides and R. capsulatus converted phytoene into an unusual lycopene as well as into neurosporene. Thus, this study shows that the functional complementation of pathway enzymes from different sources is a useful methodology for diversifying biosynthesis as nature does.

  20. Heterologous Carotenoid-Biosynthetic Enzymes: Functional Complementation and Effects on Carotenoid Profiles in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyu Hyeon; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Choi, Bo Hyun; Han, Se Jong

    2013-01-01

    A limited number of carotenoid pathway genes from microbial sources have been studied for analyzing the pathway complementation in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. In order to systematically investigate the functionality of carotenoid pathway enzymes in E. coli, the pathway genes of carotenogenic microorganisms (Brevibacterium linens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, Rhodopirellula baltica, and Pantoea ananatis) were modified to form synthetic expression modules and then were complemented with Pantoea agglomerans pathway enzymes (CrtE, CrtB, CrtI, CrtY, and CrtZ). The carotenogenic pathway enzymes in the synthetic modules showed unusual activities when complemented with E. coli. For example, the expression of heterologous CrtEs of B. linens, C. glutamicum, and R. baltica influenced P. agglomerans CrtI to convert its substrate phytoene into a rare product—3,4,3′,4′-tetradehydrolycopene—along with lycopene, which was an expected product, indicating that CrtE, the first enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, can influence carotenoid profiles. In addition, CrtIs of R. sphaeroides and R. capsulatus converted phytoene into an unusual lycopene as well as into neurosporene. Thus, this study shows that the functional complementation of pathway enzymes from different sources is a useful methodology for diversifying biosynthesis as nature does. PMID:23144136

  1. Expression of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes and changes in carotenoids during ripening in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Namitha, Kanakapura Krishnamurthy; Archana, Surya Narayana; Negi, Pradeep Singh

    2011-04-01

    To study the expression pattern of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes, changes in their expression at different stages of maturity in tomato fruit (cv. Arka Ahuti) were investigated. The genes regulating carotenoid production were quantified by a dot blot method using a DIG (dioxigenin) labelling and detection kit. The results revealed that there was an increase in the levels of upstream genes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway such as 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), 4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (Lyt B), phytoene synthase (PSY), phytoene desaturase (PDS) and ζ-carotene desaturase (ZDS) by 2-4 fold at the breaker stage as compared to leaf. The lycopene and β-carotene content was analyzed by HPLC at different stages of maturity. The lycopene (15.33 ± 0.24 mg per 100 g) and β-carotene (10.37 ± 0.46 mg per 100 g) content were found to be highest at 5 days post-breaker and 10 days post-breaker stage, respectively. The lycopene accumulation pattern also coincided with the color values at different stages of maturity. These studies may provide insight into devising gene-based strategies for enhancing carotenoid accumulation in tomato fruits.

  2. Comparative in vitro bioaccessibility of carotenoids from relevant contributors to carotenoid intake.

    PubMed

    Granado-Lorencio, Fernando; Olmedilla-Alonso, Begoña; Herrero-Barbudo, Carmen; Pérez-Sacristan, Belén; Blanco-Navarro, Inmaculada; Blazquez-García, Silvia

    2007-07-25

    To compare the in vitro bioaccessibility of lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, and alpha-and beta-carotenes from relevant dietary contributors, a gastrointestinal model was used to assess the stability, isomerization, carotenol ester hydrolysis, and micellarization. Salivar, gastric, duodenal, and micellar phases were extracted, with and without saponification, and analyzed by using a quality-controlled HPLC method. The stability of carotenoids under digestion conditions was >75%, regardless of the food analyzed, whereas micellarization ranged from 5 to 100%, depending on the carotenoid and the food. cis-Isomers were maintained in processed foods, but increased in fresh foods. Xanthophyll ester hydrolysis was incomplete (<40%), and both free and ester forms were incorporated into supernatants, regardless of the xanthophyll involved and the food assessed. In vitro bioaccesibility varies widely both for different carotenoids in a given food and for a given carotenoid in different foods. Although in vitro bioaccesibility may not be enough to predict the in vivo bioavailability, it may be relevant for the food industry and for food-based dietary guidelines.

  3. Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avila, Walter B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Described is a microscale organic chemistry experiment which demonstrates one feasible route in preparing ortho-substituted benzoic acids and provides an example of nucleophilic aromatic substitution chemistry. Experimental procedures and instructor notes for this activity are provided. (CW)

  4. Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avila, Walter B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Described is a microscale organic chemistry experiment which demonstrates one feasible route in preparing ortho-substituted benzoic acids and provides an example of nucleophilic aromatic substitution chemistry. Experimental procedures and instructor notes for this activity are provided. (CW)

  5. A molecular genetic analysis of carotenoid biosynthesis and the effects of carotenoid mutations on other photosynthetic genes in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    The nine known R. capsulatus carotenoid genes are contained within the 46 kilobase (kb) photosynthesis gene cluster. An 11 kb subcluster containing eight of these genes has been cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. A new gene, crtK, has been located in the middle of the subcluster. The carotenoid gene cluster contains sequences homologous to Escherichia coli ..omega../sup 70/ promoters, rho-independent transcription terminators, and prokaryotic transcriptional factor binding sites. The phenotypes and genotypes of ten transposon Tn5.7 insertion mutations within the carotenoid gene cluster have been analyzed, by characterization of the carotenoids accumulated and high resolution mapping of the Tn5.7 insertions. The enzymatic blockages in previously uncharacterized early carotenoid mutants have been determined using a new in vitro synthesis system, suggesting specific roles for the CrtB and CrtE gene products. The expression of six of the eight carotenoid genes in the cluster is induced upon the shift from dark chemoheterotrophic to anaerobic photosynthetic growth. The magnitude of the induction is equivalent to that of genes encoding structural photosynthesis polypeptides, although the carotenoid genes are induced earlier after the growth shift. Different means of regulating photosynthesis genes in R. capsulatus are discussed, and a rationale for the temporal pattern of expression of the carotenoid genes during photosynthetic adaptation is presented. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the two dehydrogenases of the R. capsulatus carotenoid biosynthesis pathway reveals two regions of strong similarity. The effect of carotenoid mutations on the photosynthetic phenotype has been studied by examining growth rates, pigments, pigment-protein complexes and gene expression for a complete set of carotenoid mutants. 161 refs.

  6. The effects of dietary carotenoid supplementation and retinal carotenoid accumulation on vision-mediated foraging in the house finch.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Matthew B; McGraw, Kevin J

    2011-01-01

    For many bird species, vision is the primary sensory modality used to locate and assess food items. The health and spectral sensitivities of the avian visual system are influenced by diet-derived carotenoid pigments that accumulate in the retina. Among wild House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), we have found that retinal carotenoid accumulation varies significantly among individuals and is related to dietary carotenoid intake. If diet-induced changes in retinal carotenoid accumulation alter spectral sensitivity, then they have the potential to affect visually mediated foraging performance. In two experiments, we measured foraging performance of house finches with dietarily manipulated retinal carotenoid levels. We tested each bird's ability to extract visually contrasting food items from a matrix of inedible distracters under high-contrast (full) and dimmer low-contrast (red-filtered) lighting conditions. In experiment one, zeaxanthin-supplemented birds had significantly increased retinal carotenoid levels, but declined in foraging performance in the high-contrast condition relative to astaxanthin-supplemented birds that showed no change in retinal carotenoid accumulation. In experiments one and two combined, we found that retinal carotenoid concentrations predicted relative foraging performance in the low- vs. high-contrast light conditions in a curvilinear pattern. Performance was positively correlated with retinal carotenoid accumulation among birds with low to medium levels of accumulation (∼0.5-1.5 µg/retina), but declined among birds with very high levels (>2.0 µg/retina). Our results suggest that carotenoid-mediated spectral filtering enhances color discrimination, but that this improvement is traded off against a reduction in sensitivity that can compromise visual discrimination. Thus, retinal carotenoid levels may be optimized to meet the visual demands of specific behavioral tasks and light environments.

  7. The Effects of Dietary Carotenoid Supplementation and Retinal Carotenoid Accumulation on Vision-Mediated Foraging in the House Finch

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, Matthew B.; McGraw, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    Background For many bird species, vision is the primary sensory modality used to locate and assess food items. The health and spectral sensitivities of the avian visual system are influenced by diet-derived carotenoid pigments that accumulate in the retina. Among wild House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), we have found that retinal carotenoid accumulation varies significantly among individuals and is related to dietary carotenoid intake. If diet-induced changes in retinal carotenoid accumulation alter spectral sensitivity, then they have the potential to affect visually mediated foraging performance. Methodology/Principal Findings In two experiments, we measured foraging performance of house finches with dietarily manipulated retinal carotenoid levels. We tested each bird's ability to extract visually contrasting food items from a matrix of inedible distracters under high-contrast (full) and dimmer low-contrast (red-filtered) lighting conditions. In experiment one, zeaxanthin-supplemented birds had significantly increased retinal carotenoid levels, but declined in foraging performance in the high-contrast condition relative to astaxanthin-supplemented birds that showed no change in retinal carotenoid accumulation. In experiments one and two combined, we found that retinal carotenoid concentrations predicted relative foraging performance in the low- vs. high-contrast light conditions in a curvilinear pattern. Performance was positively correlated with retinal carotenoid accumulation among birds with low to medium levels of accumulation (∼0.5–1.5 µg/retina), but declined among birds with very high levels (>2.0 µg/retina). Conclusion/Significance Our results suggest that carotenoid-mediated spectral filtering enhances color discrimination, but that this improvement is traded off against a reduction in sensitivity that can compromise visual discrimination. Thus, retinal carotenoid levels may be optimized to meet the visual demands of specific behavioral tasks and

  8. Front-surface absorbance spectra of wheat flour: determination of carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Zandomeneghi, M; Festa, C; Carbonaro, L; Galleschi, L; Lenzi, A; Calucci, L

    2000-06-01

    Front-surface absorbance spectra of wheat flours in the 250-650 nm region can be obtained by measuring reflectance spectra with a conventional spectrofluorometer suitably set to detect light scattered from powder samples. The spectra recorded on flour samples, obtained from seeds of four bread and five durum wheats, show high-intensity absorption bands due to aromatic amino acids of wheat proteins and low-intensity bands due to chromophores bound to low-molecular-weight compounds. The intensity of these last bands is proportional to the concentration of the corresponding chromophores present in the flour; thus, it can be used to measure the content of the compounds containing the chromophore(s). In particular, a quantitative determination of the carotenoids actually present in the flours is made, obtaining information on the original content of the seeds. This determination is important, as, for example, xanthophylls are well-known antioxidants and free-radical scavengers involved in aging processes of seeds. Reflectance measurements on powder samples are far more economic in terms of time and materials consumption than methods such as extraction and HPLC analysis of extracts and, in addition, give an evaluation of the overall content of carotenoids with absorption bands in the spectral range 450-500 nm. Application of the technique to other food powders with low-intensity absorption bands in the near-UV and vis region is possible.

  9. Regulatory control of carotenoid accumulation in winter squash during storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Postharvest storage of fruits and vegetables is often required and frequently results in nutritional quality change. In this study, we investigated carotenoid storage plastids, carotenoid content, and its regulation during 3-month storage of winter squash butternut fruits. We showed that storage imp...

  10. Consumption of carotenoid-rich diet improves plasma inflammatory markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multiple studies have investigated the effects of carotenoids on a limited selection of cytokines. However, inflammation is a complex system involving numerous interacting cytokines. In this study, a broad array of 30 cytokines was measured after consumption of low- and high-carotenoid diets. Nine m...

  11. Manipulation of Carotenoid Content in Plants to Improve Human Health.

    PubMed

    Alós, Enriqueta; Rodrigo, Maria Jesús; Zacarias, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are essential components for human nutrition and health, mainly due to their antioxidant and pro-vitamin A activity. Foods with enhanced carotenoid content and composition are essential to ensure carotenoid feasibility in malnourished population of many countries around the world, which is critical to alleviate vitamin A deficiency and other health-related disorders. The pathway of carotenoid biosynthesis is currently well understood, key steps of the pathways in different plant species have been characterized and the corresponding genes identified, as well as other regulatory elements. This enables the manipulation and improvement of carotenoid content and composition in order to control the nutritional value of a number of agronomical important staple crops. Biotechnological and genetic engineering-based strategies to manipulate carotenoid metabolism have been successfully implemented in many crops, with Golden rice as the most relevant example of β-carotene improvement in one of the more widely consumed foods. Conventional breeding strategies have been also adopted in the bio-fortification of carotenoid in staple foods that are highly consumed in developing countries, including maize, cassava and sweet potatoes, to alleviate nutrition-related problems. The objective of the chapter is to summarize major breakthroughs and advances in the enhancement of carotenoid content and composition in agronomical and nutritional important crops, with special emphasis to their potential impact and benefits in human nutrition and health.

  12. Ultrafast time-resolved vibrational spectroscopies of carotenoids in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the application of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopies to the studies of carotenoids in photosynthesis. The focus is on the ultrafast time regime and the study of photophysics and photochemistry of carotenoids by femtosecond time-resolved stimulated Raman and four-wave mixing spectroscopies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems.

  13. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  14. Trimerization of aromatic nitriles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Triazine compounds and cross-linked polymer compositions were made by heating aromatic nitriles to a temperature in the range of about 100 C to about 700 C, in the presence of a catalyst or mixture of catalysts. Aromatic nitrile-modified (terminated and/or appended) imide, benzimidazole, imidazopyrrolone, quinoxaline, and other condensation type prepolymers or their precopolymers were made which were trimerized with or without a filler by the aforementioned catalytic trimerization process.

  15. Aromatic Polyimide Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A mechanically undensified aromatic polyimide foam is made from an aromatic polyimide precursor solid residuum and has the following combination of properties: a density according to ASTM D-3574A of about 0.5 pounds/cu.ft to about 20 pounds/cu.ft; a compression strength according to ASTM D-3574C of about 1.5 psi to about 1500 psi; and a limiting oxygen index according to ASTM D-2863 of about 35% oxygen to about 75% oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The aromatic polyimide foam has no appreciable solid inorganic contaminants which are residues of inorganic blowing agents. The aromatic polyimide which constitutes the aromatic polyimide foam has a glass transition temperature (Tg) by differential scanning calorimetry of about 235 C to about 400 C; and a thermal stability of 0 to about 1% weight loss at 204 C as determined by thermogravinietric analysis (TGA). The aromatic polyimide foam has utility as foam insulation and as structural foam, for example, for aeronautical, aerospace and maritime applications.

  16. Molecular Factors Controlling Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting by Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Polívka, Tomáš; Frank, Harry A.

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids are naturally-occurring pigments that absorb light in the spectral region in which the sun irradiates maximally. These molecules transfer this energy to chlorophylls, initiating the primary photochemical events of photosynthesis. Carotenoids also regulate the flow of energy within the photosynthetic apparatus and protect it from photo-induced damage caused by excess light absorption. To carry out these functions in nature, carotenoids are bound in discrete pigment-protein complexes in close proximity to chlorophylls. A few 3D structures of these carotenoid complexes have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Thus, the stage is set for attempting to correlate the structural information with the spectroscopic properties of carotenoids to understand the molecular mechanism(s) of their function in photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we summarize current spectroscopic data describing the excited state energies and ultrafast dynamics of purified carotenoids in solution and bound in light-harvesting complexes from purple bacteria, marine algae, and green plants. Many of these complexes can be modified using mutagenesis or pigment exchange which facilitates making the correlations between structure and function. We describe the structural and electronic factors controlling the function of carotenoids as energy donors. We also discuss unresolved issues related to the nature of spectroscopically dark excited states, which could play a role in light-harvesting. To illustrate the interplay between structural determinations and spectroscopic investigations that exemplifies work in the field, we describe the spectroscopic properties of four light-harvesting complexes whose structures have been determined to atomic resolution. The first, the LH2 complex from the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, contains the carotenoid, rhodopin glucoside. The second is the LHCII trimeric complex from higher plants which uses the carotenoids, lutein, neoxanthin

  17. Molecular factors controlling photosynthetic light harvesting by carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Polívka, Tomás; Frank, Harry A

    2010-08-17

    Carotenoids are naturally occurring pigments that absorb light in the spectral region in which the sun irradiates maximally. These molecules transfer this energy to chlorophylls, initiating the primary photochemical events of photosynthesis. Carotenoids also regulate the flow of energy within the photosynthetic apparatus and protect it from photoinduced damage caused by excess light absorption. To carry out these functions in nature, carotenoids are bound in discrete pigment-protein complexes in the proximity of chlorophylls. A few three-dimensional structures of these carotenoid complexes have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Thus, the stage is set for attempting to correlate the structural information with the spectroscopic properties of carotenoids to understand the molecular mechanism(s) of their function in photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we summarize current spectroscopic data describing the excited state energies and ultrafast dynamics of purified carotenoids in solution and bound in light-harvesting complexes from purple bacteria, marine algae, and green plants. Many of these complexes can be modified using mutagenesis or pigment exchange which facilitates the elucidation of correlations between structure and function. We describe the structural and electronic factors controlling the function of carotenoids as energy donors. We also discuss unresolved issues related to the nature of spectroscopically dark excited states, which could play a role in light harvesting. To illustrate the interplay between structural determinations and spectroscopic investigations that exemplifies work in the field, we describe the spectroscopic properties of four light-harvesting complexes whose structures have been determined to atomic resolution. The first, the LH2 complex from the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, contains the carotenoid rhodopin glucoside. The second is the LHCII trimeric complex from higher plants which uses the carotenoids

  18. Carotenoids and their isomers: color pigments in fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Hock-Eng; Prasad, K Nagendra; Kong, Kin-Weng; Jiang, Yueming; Ismail, Amin

    2011-02-18

    Fruits and vegetables are colorful pigment-containing food sources. Owing to their nutritional benefits and phytochemicals, they are considered as 'functional food ingredients'. Carotenoids are some of the most vital colored phytochemicals, occurring as all-trans and cis-isomers, and accounting for the brilliant colors of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids extensively studied in this regard include β-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin. Coloration of fruits and vegetables depends on their growth maturity, concentration of carotenoid isomers, and food processing methods. This article focuses more on several carotenoids and their isomers present in different fruits and vegetables along with their concentrations. Carotenoids and their geometric isomers also play an important role in protecting cells from oxidation and cellular damages.

  19. Carotenoid incorporation into microsomes: yields, stability and membrane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socaciu, Carmen; Jessel, Robert; Diehl, Horst A.

    2000-12-01

    The carotenoids β-carotene (BC), lycopene (LYC), lutein (LUT), zeaxanthin (ZEA), canthaxanthin (CTX) and astaxanthin (ASTA) have been incorporated into pig liver microsomes. Effective incorporation concentrations in the range of about 1-6 nmol/mg microsomal protein were obtained. A stability test at room temperature revealed that after 3 h BC and LYC had decayed totally whereas, gradually, CTX (46%), LUT (21%), ASTA (17%) and ZEA (5%) decayed. Biophysical parameters of the microsomal membrane were changed hardly by the incorporation of carotenoids. A small rigidification may occur. Membrane anisotropy seems to offer only a small tolerance for incorporation of carotenoids and seems to limit the achievable incorporation concentrations of the carotenoids into microsomes. Microsomes instead of liposomes should be preferred as a membrane model to study mutual effects of carotenoids and membrane dynamics.

  20. Marine Carotenoids against Oxidative Stress: Effects on Human Health.

    PubMed

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2015-09-30

    Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments that are produced in some plants, algae, fungi, and bacterial species, which accounts for their orange and yellow hues. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants thanks to their ability to quench singlet oxygen, to be oxidized, to be isomerized, and to scavenge free radicals, which plays a crucial role in the etiology of several diseases. Unusual marine environments are associated with a great chemical diversity, resulting in novel bioactive molecules. Thus, marine organisms may represent an important source of novel biologically active substances for the development of therapeutics. In this respect, various novel marine carotenoids have recently been isolated from marine organisms and displayed several utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Marine carotenoids (astaxanthin, fucoxanthin, β-carotene, lutein but also the rare siphonaxanthin, sioxanthin, and myxol) have recently shown antioxidant properties in reducing oxidative stress markers. This review aims to describe the role of marine carotenoids against oxidative stress and their potential applications in preventing and treating inflammatory diseases.

  1. Magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopic studies of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, L.D.

    1991-05-01

    It is our goal to study the role of a host lattice in the formation of radicals and excited singlet and triplet states that are relevant to photosynthesis. Particular emphasis is being placed on determining what is special about carotenoids that natural photosynthetic systems require them as antennae as well as for protection. We are thus manipulating the host matrix so as to understand the carotenoid function (protection, quenching, energy transfer and antenna) and the structure of carotenoid cations. To characterize their properties, we have carried out EPR, ENDOR, optical, molecular orbital and electrochemical studies of carotenoids and carotenoid cations produced chemically, electrochemically, radiolytically (x-ray irradiated freon matrices) and photolytically (solution photolysis by excimer radiation) as a function of the host matrix. 36 refs.

  2. Carotenoids in Marine Invertebrates Living along the Kuroshio Current Coast

    PubMed Central

    Maoka, Takashi; Akimoto, Naoshige; Tsushima, Miyuki; Komemushi, Sadao; Mezaki, Takuma; Iwase, Fumihito; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Sameshima, Naomi; Mori, Miho; Sakagami, Yoshikazu

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids of the corals Acropora japonica, A. secale, and A. hyacinthus, the tridacnid clam Tridacna squamosa, the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci, and the small sea snail Drupella fragum were investigated. The corals and the tridacnid clam are filter feeders and are associated with symbiotic zooxanthellae. Peridinin and pyrrhoxanthin, which originated from symbiotic zooxanthellae, were found to be major carotenoids in corals and the tridacnid clam. The crown-of-thorns starfish and the sea snail D. fragum are carnivorous and mainly feed on corals. Peridinin-3-acyl esters were major carotenoids in the sea snail D. fragum. On the other hand, ketocarotenoids such as 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin and astaxanthin were major carotenoids in the crown-of-thorns starfish. Carotenoids found in these marine animals closely reflected not only their metabolism but also their food chains. PMID:21892355

  3. Carotenoids in marine invertebrates living along the Kuroshio current coast.

    PubMed

    Maoka, Takashi; Akimoto, Naoshige; Tsushima, Miyuki; Komemushi, Sadao; Mezaki, Takuma; Iwase, Fumihito; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Sameshima, Naomi; Mori, Miho; Sakagami, Yoshikazu

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids of the corals Acropora japonica, A. secale, and A. hyacinthus, the tridacnid clam Tridacna squamosa, the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci, and the small sea snail Drupella fragum were investigated. The corals and the tridacnid clam are filter feeders and are associated with symbiotic zooxanthellae. Peridinin and pyrrhoxanthin, which originated from symbiotic zooxanthellae, were found to be major carotenoids in corals and the tridacnid clam. The crown-of-thorns starfish and the sea snail D. fragum are carnivorous and mainly feed on corals. Peridinin-3-acyl esters were major carotenoids in the sea snail D. fragum. On the other hand, ketocarotenoids such as 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin and astaxanthin were major carotenoids in the crown-of-thorns starfish. Carotenoids found in these marine animals closely reflected not only their metabolism but also their food chains.

  4. Carotenoids Assist in Cyanobacterial Photosystem II Assembly and Function

    PubMed Central

    Zakar, Tomas; Laczko-Dobos, Hajnalka; Toth, Tunde N.; Gombos, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids (carotenes and xanthophylls) are ubiquitous constituents of living organisms. They are protective agents against oxidative stresses and serve as modulators of membrane microviscosity. As antioxidants they can protect photosynthetic organisms from free radicals like reactive oxygen species that originate from water splitting, the first step of photosynthesis. We summarize the structural and functional roles of carotenoids in connection with cyanobacterial Photosystem II. Although carotenoids are hydrophobic molecules, their complexes with proteins also allow cytoplasmic localization. In cyanobacterial cells such complexes are called orange carotenoid proteins, and they protect Photosystem II and Photosystem I by preventing their overexcitation through phycobilisomes (PBS). Recently it has been observed that carotenoids are not only required for the proper functioning, but also for the structural stability of PBSs. PMID:27014318

  5. Carotenoids and their fatty-acid esters in banana peel.

    PubMed

    Subagio, A; Morita, N; Sawada, S

    1996-12-01

    In relation to banana ripening, banana peel was examined for carotenoid pigments by a combination of alumina column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Carotenoids and their fatty-acid esters were first separated by an alumina column into five fractions, of which each was further subfractionated by HPLC with different kinds of solvent. The carotenoid content of the banana peel was in the range of 3-4 micrograms per gram as lutein equivalent. The ingredients of the carotenoids were ascertained to consist of lutein, beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, violaxanthin, auroxanthin, neoxanthin, isolutein, beta-cryptoxanthin and alpha-cryptoxanthin. Most of the oxygenated carotenoids were found to occur in the esterified form, mainly with myristate, and to a lesser extent with laurate, palmitate or caprate.

  6. Illuminating colors: regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation by light.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Briardo; Martinez-Garcia, Jaime F; Stange, Claudia; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2017-06-01

    Light stimulates the biosynthesis of carotenoids and regulates the development of plastid structures to accommodate these photoprotective pigments. Work with Arabidopsis revealed molecular factors coordinating carotenoid biosynthesis and storage with photosynthetic development during deetiolation, when underground seedlings emerge to the light. Some of these factors also adjust carotenoid biosynthesis in response to plant proximity (i.e., shade), a mechanism that was readapted in tomato to monitor fruit ripening progression. While light positively impacts carotenoid production and accumulation in most cases, total carotenoid levels decrease in roots of colored carrot cultivars when illuminated. The recent discovery that such cultivars might be photomorphogenic mutants provides an explanation for this striking phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physiological stress links parasites to carotenoid-based colour signals.

    PubMed

    Mougeot, F; Martínez-Padilla, J; Bortolotti, G R; Webster, L M I; Piertney, S B

    2010-03-01

    Vertebrates commonly use carotenoid-based traits as social signals. These can reliably advertise current nutritional status and health because carotenoids must be acquired through the diet and their allocation to ornaments is traded-off against other self-maintenance needs. We propose that the coloration more generally reveals an individual's ability to cope with stressful conditions. We tested this idea by manipulating the nematode parasite infection in free-living red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scoticus) and examining the effects on body mass, carotenoid-based coloration of a main social signal and the amount of corticosterone deposited in feathers grown during the experiment. We show that parasites increase stress and reduce carotenoid-based coloration, and that the impact of parasites on coloration was associated with changes in corticosterone, more than changes in body mass. Carotenoid-based coloration appears linked to physiological stress and could therefore reveal an individual's ability to cope with stressors.

  8. A mitochondrial enzyme degrades carotenoids and protects against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Amengual, Jaume; Lobo, Glenn P.; Golczak, Marcin; Li, Hua Nan M.; Klimova, Tatyana; Hoppel, Charles L.; Wyss, Adrian; Palczewski, Krzysztof; von Lintig, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are the precursors for vitamin A and are proposed to prevent oxidative damage to cells. Mammalian genomes encode a family of structurally related nonheme iron oxygenases that modify double bonds of these compounds by oxidative cleavage and cis-to-trans isomerization. The roles of the family members BCMO1 and RPE65 for vitamin A production and vision have been well established. Surprisingly, we found that the third family member, β,β-carotene-9′,10′-oxygenase (BCDO2), is a mitochondrial carotenoid-oxygenase with broad substrate specificity. In BCDO2-deficient mice, carotenoid homeostasis was abrogated, and carotenoids accumulated in several tissues. In hepatic mitochondria, accumulated carotenoids induced key markers of mitochondrial dysfunction, such as manganese superoxide dismutase (9-fold), and reduced rates of ADP-dependent respiration by 30%. This impairment was associated with an 8- to 9-fold induction of phosphor-MAP kinase and phosphor-AKT, markers of cell signaling pathways related to oxidative stress and disease. Administration of carotenoids to human HepG2 cells depolarized mitochondrial membranes and resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, our studies in BCDO2-deficient mice and human cell cultures indicate that carotenoids can impair respiration and induce oxidative stress. Mammalian cells thus express a mitochondrial carotenoid-oxygenase that degrades carotenoids to protect these vital organelles.—Amengual, J., Lobo, G. P., Golczak, M., Li, H. N. M., Klimova, T., Hoppel, C. L., Wyss, A., Palczewski, K., von Lintig, J. A mitochondrial enzyme degrades carotenoids and protects against oxidative stress. PMID:21106934

  9. Carotenoid profiling in tubers of different potato (Solanum sp) cultivars: accumulation of carotenoids mediated by xanthophyll esterification.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Orozco, Rebeca; Gallardo-Guerrero, Lourdes; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso

    2013-12-01

    The carotenoid profile of sixty potato cultivars (commercial, bred, old and native cultivars) has been characterised in order to provide information to be used in selective breeding programs directed to improve the nutritional value of this important staple food. Cultivars were segregated into three groups according to the major pigment in the carotenoid profile: violaxanthin (37 cultivars; especially those with higher carotenoid content), lutein (16 cultivars), and neoxanthin (7 cultivars). Other minor carotenoids were antheraxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin and β-carotene, while zeaxanthin was absent in all sample. The total carotenoid content ranged from 50.0 to 1552.0 μg/100 g dry wt, with an average value of about 435.3 μg/100 g dry wt. Sipancachi, Poluya and Chaucha native cultivars showed the highest carotenoid content (1020.0, 1478.2 and 1551.2 μg/100 g dry wt, respectively). Xanthophyll esters were present in most cultivars, mainly as diesterified forms, being observed a direct correlation between the carotenoid content and the esterified fraction, suggesting that the esterification process facilitates the accumulation of these lipophilic compounds within the plastids. Therefore, the presence of xanthophyll esters should be a phenotypic character to be included in the breeding studies, and more efforts should be dedicated to the understanding of the biochemical process leading to this structural modification of carotenoids in plants.

  10. Single v. multiple measures of skin carotenoids by resonance Raman spectroscopy as a biomarker of usual carotenoid status.

    PubMed

    Scarmo, Stephanie; Cartmel, Brenda; Lin, Haiqun; Leffell, David J; Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S; Mayne, Susan T

    2013-09-14

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method of assessing carotenoid status in the skin, which has been suggested as an objective indicator of fruit/vegetable intake. The present study assessed agreement and identified predictors of single v. multiple RRS measures of skin carotenoid status. A total of seventy-four participants had their skin carotenoid status measured in the palm of the hand by RRS at six time points over 6 months. Questionnaires were administered to collect information on demographic, lifestyle and dietary data. Mean age of the participants was 36.6 years, 62.2% were female, 83.8% Caucasian and 85.1% were non-smoking at baseline. There was a good agreement between a single measure of skin carotenoids by RRS and multiple measures (weighted κ = 0.80; 95% CI 0.72, 0.88). The same variables were significantly associated with carotenoid status based on single or multiple measures, including a positive association with intake of total carotenoids (P< 0.01) and an inverse association with season of measurement (P≤ 0.05). The exception was recent sun exposure, which emerged as a significant predictor of lower carotenoid status only when using multiple RRS measures (P≤ 0.01). A single RRS measure was reasonably accurate at classifying usual skin carotenoid status. Researchers using RRS may want to take into account other factors that are associated with the biomarker, including season of measurement and recent sun exposure.

  11. Single v. multiple measures of skin carotenoids by resonance Raman spectroscopy as a biomarker of usual carotenoid status

    PubMed Central

    Scarmo, Stephanie; Cartmel, Brenda; Lin, Haiqun; Leffell, David J.; Ermakov, Igor V.; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S.; Mayne, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method of assessing carotenoid status in the skin, which has been suggested as an objective indicator of fruit/vegetable intake. The present study assessed agreement and identified predictors of single v. multiple RRS measures of skin carotenoid status. A total of seventy-four participants had their skin carotenoid status measured in the palm of the hand by RRS at six time points over 6 months. Questionnaires were administered to collect information on demographic, lifestyle and dietary data. Mean age of the participants was 36.6 years, 62.2% were female, 83.8% Caucasian and 85.1% were non-smoking at baseline. There was a good agreement between a single measure of skin carotenoids by RRS and multiple measures (weighted κ = 0.80; 95% CI 0.72, 0.88). The same variables were significantly associated with carotenoid status based on single or multiple measures, including a positive association with intake of total carotenoids (P<0.01) and an inverse association with season of measurement (P≤0.05). The exception was recent sun exposure, which emerged as a significant predictor of lower carotenoid status only when using multiple RRS measures (P≤0.01). A single RRS measure was reasonably accurate at classifying usual skin carotenoid status. Researchers using RRS may want to take into account other factors that are associated with the biomarker, including season of measurement and recent sun exposure. PMID:23351238

  12. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  13. Bio-Based Aromatic Epoxy Monomers for Thermoset Materials.

    PubMed

    Ng, Feifei; Couture, Guillaume; Philippe, Coralie; Boutevin, Bernard; Caillol, Sylvain

    2017-01-18

    The synthesis of polymers from renewable resources is a burning issue that is actively investigated. Polyepoxide networks constitute a major class of thermosetting polymers and are extensively used as coatings, electronic materials, adhesives. Owing to their outstanding mechanical and electrical properties, chemical resistance, adhesion, and minimal shrinkage after curing, they are used in structural applications as well. Most of these thermosets are industrially manufactured from bisphenol A (BPA), a substance that was initially synthesized as a chemical estrogen. The awareness on BPA toxicity combined with the limited availability and volatile cost of fossil resources and the non-recyclability of thermosets implies necessary changes in the field of epoxy networks. Thus, substitution of BPA has witnessed an increasing number of studies both from the academic and industrial sides. This review proposes to give an overview of the reported aromatic multifunctional epoxide building blocks synthesized from biomass or from molecules that could be obtained from transformed biomass. After a reminder of the main glycidylation routes and mechanisms and the recent knowledge on BPA toxicity and legal issues, this review will provide a brief description of the main natural sources of aromatic molecules. The different epoxy prepolymers will then be organized from simple, mono-aromatic di-epoxy, to mono-aromatic poly-epoxy, to di-aromatic di-epoxy compounds, and finally to derivatives possessing numerous aromatic rings and epoxy groups.

  14. Carotenoid composition of hydroponic leafy vegetables.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mieko; Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B

    2003-04-23

    Because hydroponic production of vegetables is becoming more common, the carotenoid composition of hydroponic leafy vegetables commercialized in Campinas, Brazil, was determined. All samples were collected and analyzed in winter. Lactucaxanthin was quantified for the first time and was found to have concentrations similar to that of neoxanthin in the four types of lettuce analyzed. Lutein predominated in cress, chicory, and roquette (75.4 +/- 10.2, 57.0 +/- 10.3, and 52.2 +/- 12.6 microg/g, respectively). In the lactucaxanthin-containing lettuces, beta-carotene and lutein were the principal carotenoids (ranging from 9.9 +/- 1.5 to 24.6 +/- 3.1 microg/g and from 10.2 +/- 1.0 to 22.9 +/- 2.6 microg/g, respectively). Comparison of hydroponic and field-produced curly lettuce, taken from neighboring farms, showed that the hydroponic lettuce had significantly lower lutein, beta-carotene, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin contents than the conventionally produced lettuce. Because the hydroponic farm had a polyethylene covering, less exposure to sunlight and lower temperatures may have decreased carotenogenesis.

  15. Research on Aromatic Poly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiebooms, Rafael Hugo Ludo

    1995-11-01

    A detailed analysis of the literature indicated that substituents can only be used at the level of improving properties during processing, that end groups are only important for those polymers where the energy difference between the aromatic and quinoid structure is very small, and that stability of pi delocalisation is the most important tool for the design of low bandgap polymers. From our research it appeared that, based on a detailed NMR and FT-Raman analysis of oligomers and model compounds, the low band gap of PITN could be associated with the quinoid structure. However, a theoretical analysis of the UV-vis data of a series of aromatic isothianaphthene oligomers indicates that a substantial lowering of the band gap can be obtained in planar aromatic isothianaphthene systems. A parallel investigation of PTFITN, a soluble isothianaphthene analogue, gave some indications that this polymer should possess an aromatic structure. The aromatic structure makes it possible that the fluorines probably induce non planarity such that inter ring pi -conjugation is lowered to a considerable extent. This could explain the increased band gap of 2.1eV observed by Swann et al.^{[1] }. Analysis of a series of aza-analogues of PITN revealed that in these materials it should be possible to combine a planar aromatic geometry with enhanced processability. The 4,5-diaza and 4,7-diaza isothianaphthene polymers can therefore be considered as very promising low band gap materials. Finally, we showed that it is possible to combine the aromatic isothianaphthene ring system with another heterocycle such as thiophene in a formal copolymer. Through the development of a highly specific and efficient synthesis route to 1,3-dithienylisothianaphthene (DTI, 4), we established the basis for the further synthesis and study of formal copolymers with tailor-made electronic properties. ftn ^{[1]}M. J. Swann, G. Brooke, D. Bloor. Synth.Met., 55-57, 281-286, (1993).

  16. Portable Speech Synthesizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibfritz, Gilbert H.; Larson, Howard K.

    1987-01-01

    Compact speech synthesizer useful traveling companion to speech-handicapped. User simply enters statement on board, and synthesizer converts statement into spoken words. Battery-powered and housed in briefcase, easily carried on trips. Unit used on telephones and face-to-face communication. Synthesizer consists of micro-computer with memory-expansion module, speech-synthesizer circuit, batteries, recharger, dc-to-dc converter, and telephone amplifier. Components, commercially available, fit neatly in 17-by 13-by 5-in. briefcase. Weighs about 20 lb (9 kg) and operates and recharges from ac receptable.

  17. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, M.; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with increasing age. Other carotenoids, such as lycopene and beta-carotene, play an important role as well in the protection of skin from UV and short-wavelength visible radiation. Lutein and lycopene may also have protective function for cardiovascular health, and lycopene may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer. Motivated by the growing importance of carotenoids in health and disease, and recognizing the lack of any accepted noninvasive technology for the detection of carotenoids in living human tissue, we explore resonance Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach for noninvasive, laser optical carotenoid detection. We review the main results achieved recently with the Raman detection approach. Initially we applied the method to the detection of macular carotenoid pigments, and more recently to the detection of carotenoids in human skin and mucosal tissues. Using skin carotenoid Raman instruments, we measure the carotenoid response from the stratum corneum layer of the palm of the hand for a population of 1375 subjects and develope a portable skin Raman scanner for field studies. These experiments reveal that carotenoids are a good indicator of antioxidant status. They show that people with high oxidative stress, like smokers, and subjects with high sunlight exposure, in general, have reduced skin carotenoid levels, independent of their dietary carotenoid consumption. We find the Raman technique to be precise, specific, sensitive, and well suitable for clinical as well as

  18. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue.

    PubMed

    Ermakov, Igor V; Sharifzadeh, M; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with increasing age. Other carotenoids, such as lycopene and beta-carotene, play an important role as well in the protection of skin from UV and short-wavelength visible radiation. Lutein and lycopene may also have protective function for cardiovascular health, and lycopene may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer. Motivated by the growing importance of carotenoids in health and disease, and recognizing the lack of any accepted noninvasive technology for the detection of carotenoids in living human tissue, we explore resonance Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach for noninvasive, laser optical carotenoid detection. We review the main results achieved recently with the Raman detection approach. Initially we applied the method to the detection of macular carotenoid pigments, and more recently to the detection of carotenoids in human skin and mucosal tissues. Using skin carotenoid Raman instruments, we measure the carotenoid response from the stratum corneum layer of the palm of the hand for a population of 1375 subjects and develop a portable skin Raman scanner for field studies. These experiments reveal that carotenoids are a good indicator of antioxidant status. They show that people with high oxidative stress, like smokers, and subjects with high sunlight exposure, in general, have reduced skin carotenoid levels, independent of their dietary carotenoid consumption. We find the Raman technique to be precise, specific, sensitive, and well suitable for clinical as well as

  19. Enhancement of carotenoid production by disrupting the C22-sterol desaturase gene (CYP61) in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is a basidiomycetous yeast that synthesizes astaxanthin, which is a carotenoid with a great biotechnological impact. The ergosterol and carotenoid synthesis pathways are derived from the mevalonate pathway, and in both pathways, cytochrome P450 enzymes are involved. Results In this study, we isolated and described the X. dendrorhous CYP61 gene, which encodes a cytochrome P450 involved in ergosterol biosynthesis. This gene is composed of nine exons and encodes a 526 amino acid polypeptide that shares significant percentages of identity and similitude with the C22-sterol desaturase, CYP61, from other fungi. Mutants derived from different parental strains were obtained by disrupting the CYP61 gene with an antibiotic selection marker. These mutants were not able to produce ergosterol and accumulated ergosta-5,8,22-trien-3-ol and ergosta-5,8-dien-3-ol. Interestingly, all of the mutants had a more intense red color phenotype than their respective parental strains. The carotenoid composition was qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by RP-HPLC, revealing that the carotenoid content was higher in the mutant strains without major changes in their composition. The expression of the HMGR gene, which encodes an enzyme involved in the mevalonate pathway (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase), was analyzed by RT-qPCR showing that its transcript levels are higher in the CYP61 mutants. Conclusions These results suggest that in X. dendrorhous, ergosterol regulates HMGR gene expression by a negative feedback mechanism and in this way; it contributes in the regulation of the carotenoid biosynthesis. PMID:23075035

  20. Carotenoid-based plumage colouration is associated with blood parasite richness and stress protein levels in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus).

    PubMed

    del Cerro, Sara; Merino, Santiago; Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Lobato, Elisa; Ruiz-de-Castañeda, Rafael; Rivero-de Aguilar, Juan; Martínez, Javier; Morales, Judith; Tomás, Gustavo; Moreno, Juan

    2010-04-01

    Carotenoids are molecules that birds are not able to synthesize and therefore, must be acquired through their diet. These pigments, besides their function of giving birds red and yellow colouration when deposited in feathers, seem to act as immune-stimulators and antioxidants in the organism. Hence, only the healthiest individuals would be able to express carotenoid-based ornaments to a larger extent without compromising the physiological functions of carotenoids. Various studies have reported that birds infected by parasites are paler than those uninfected, but, to our knowledge, none of them has assessed the possible effect of multiple infections by blood parasites on plumage colour. By comparing the yellow colour in the breast plumage of blue tits, Cyanistes caeruleus, between birds infected by different numbers of blood parasite genera, we found that those birds infected by more than one genus were paler than those parasitized just by one. In addition, we examined the potential role of carotenoid-based plumage colour of blue tits as a long-term indicator of other parameters of health status, such as body condition and immunoglobulin and heat shock protein (HSP) levels. Our results indicate that more brightly coloured birds had lower HSP70 levels than paler birds, but we did not find any significant association between colour and body condition or immunoglobulin levels. In addition, we found a positive significant association between Haemoproteus density of infection and HSP60 levels. Overall, these results support the role of carotenoid-based colours as indicators of health status in blue tits and show detrimental effects of parasitism on this character.

  1. Coordinate expression of multiple bacterial carotenoid genes in canola leading to altered carotenoid production.

    PubMed

    Ravanello, Monica P; Ke, Dangyang; Alvarez, Julie; Huang, Bihua; Shewmaker, Christine K

    2003-10-01

    Carotenoids have drawn much attention recently because of their potentially positive benefits to human health as well as their utility in both food and animal feed. Previous work in canola (Brassica napus) seed over-expressing the bacterial phytoene synthase gene (crtB) demonstrated a change in carotenoid content, such that the total levels of carotenoids, including phytoene and downstream metabolites like beta-carotene, were elevated 50-fold, with the ratio of beta- to alpha-carotene being 2:1. This result raised the possibility that the composition of metabolites in this pathway could be modified further in conjunction with the increased flux obtained with crtB. Here we report on the expression of additional bacterial genes for the enzymes geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (crtE), phytoene desaturase (crtI) and lycopene cyclase (crtY and the plant B. napus lycopene beta-cyclase) engineered in conjunction with phytoene synthase (crtB) in transgenic canola seed. Analysis of the carotenoid levels by HPLC revealed a 90% decrease in phytoene levels for the double construct expressing crtB in conjunction with crtI. The transgenic seed from all the double constructs, including the one expressing the bacterial crtB and the plant lycopene beta-cyclase showed an increase in the levels of total carotenoid similar to that previously observed by expressing crtB alone but minimal effects were observed with respect to the ratio of beta- to alpha-carotene compared to the original construct. However, the beta- to alpha-carotene ratio was increased from 2:1 to 3:1 when a triple construct consisting of the bacterial phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase and lycopene cyclase genes were expressed together. This result suggests that the bacterial genes may form an aggregate complex that allows in vivo activity of all three proteins through substrate channeling. This finding should allow further manipulation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway for downstream products with

  2. Influence of nitrogen and sulfur on biomass production and carotenoid and glucosinolate concentrations in watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.).

    PubMed

    Kopsell, Dean A; Barickman, T Casey; Sams, Carl E; McElroy, J Scott

    2007-12-26

    Watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) is a perennial herb rich in the secondary metabolites of glucosinolates and carotenoids. 2-phenethyl isothiocyanate, the predominate isothiocyanate hydrolysis product in watercress, can reduce carcinogen activation through inhibition of phase I enzymes and induction of phase II enzymes. Sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) have been shown to influence concentrations of both glucosinolates and carotenoids in a variety of vegetable crops. Our research objectives were to determine how several levels of N and S fertility interact to affect watercress plant tissue biomass production, tissue C/N ratios, concentrations of plant pigments, and glucosinolate concentrations. Watercress was grown using nutrient solution culture under a three by three factorial arrangement, with three S (8, 16, and 32 mg/L) and three N (6, 56, and 106 mg/L) fertility concentrations. Watercress shoot tissue biomass, tissue %N, and tissue C/N ratios were influenced by N but were unaffected by changes in S concentrations or by the interaction of NxS. Tissue pigment concentrations of beta-carotene, lutein, 5,6-epoxylutein, neoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and the chlorophyll pigments responded to changes in N treatment concentrations but were unaffected by S concentrations or through N x S interactions. Watercress tissue concentrations of aromatic, indole, and total glucosinolate concentrations responded to changes in N treatments; whereas aliphatic, aromatic, and total glucosinolates responded to changes in S treatment concentrations. Individual glucosinolates of glucobrassicin, 4-methoxyglucobrassicin, and gluconasturriin responded to N fertility treatments, while gluconapin, glucobrassicin, and gluconasturiin responded to changes in S fertility concentrations. Increases in carotenoid and glucosinolate concentrations through fertility management would be expected to influence the nutritional value of watercress in human diets.

  3. Light-harvesting complexes from purple sulfur bacteria Allochromatium minutissimum assembled without carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, A A; Makhneva, Z K

    2012-03-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides, where the amount of LH2 presented in the membrane was directly correlated to the amount of the carotenoids synthesized (H.P. Lang, C.N. Hunter, The relationship between carotenoid biosynthesis and the assembly of the light harvesting LH2 complex in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Biochem. J. 298 (1994) 197-205). Our results show that although the presence of Car molecules is important for the stability of the LH2 complexes the overall native structure can be maintained without any Cars at least in the case of purple sulfur bacteria.

  4. Carotenoids, total polyphenols and antioxidant activity of grapes (Vitis vinifera) cultivated in organic and conventional systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Organic agriculture involve plants which are cultivated without using synthetic pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers and promotes biodiversity, biological cycles and improve the product quality. The carotenoids, total polyphenols and the antioxidant activity from skins of some wine and table grapes cultivated in organic and conventional agriculture were studied. Results The main carotenoids identified using high performance liquid chromatography were lutein and ß-carotene. Muscat Ottonel variety has the highest ß-carotene concentration 504.9 μg/kg for organic and 593.2 μg/kg for conventional grapes. For the organic farming, the total polyphenols content were in the range of 163.23 – 1341.37 mg GAE/kg fresh weight (FW) and 148.47 – 1231.38 mg GAE/kg FW for the conventional grapes. The highest ORAC values were obtained for blue-black variety Napoca in both farming system (43.5 ± 0.95 μmol TE/g organic; 40.4 ± 0.5 μmol TE/g conventional) and lowest for Aromat de Iaşi (16.8 ± 0.6 μmol TE/g organic; 14.7 ± 1.6 μmol TE/g conventional). Napoca variety showed also the highest antioxidant activity measured by DPPH method in both cultivated system. Conclusion Nine grape varieties cultivated in organic and conventional systems were compared regarding the carotenoids, total polyphenols and antioxidant activity. The white grape varieties have a higher carotenoids content compared with the blue-black cultivars while the blue-black varieties contain higher TPC and exhibit higher antioxidant activity (except for Muscat Hamburg-ORAC). Vitis vinifera grape skins originating from wine or table grape varieties can be used as a potential source of natural antioxidants. PMID:22762349

  5. The aromatic ene reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The ene reaction is a pericyclic process in which an alkene with an allylic hydrogen atom (the ene donor) reacts with a second unsaturated species (the enophile) to form a new product with a transposed π-bond. The aromatic ene reaction, in which the alkene component is embedded in an aromatic ring, has only been reported in a few (four) instances and has proceeded in low yield (≤6%). Here, we show efficient aromatic ene reactions in which a thermally generated aryne intermediate engages a pendant m-alkylarene substituent to produce a dearomatized isotoluene, itself another versatile but rare reactive intermediate. Our experiments were guided by computational studies that revealed structural features conducive to the aromatic ene process. We proceeded to identify a cascade comprising three reactions: (1) hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (for aryne generation), (2) intramolecular aromatic ene and (3) bimolecular Alder ene. The power of this cascade is evident from the structural complexity of the final products, the considerable scope, and the overall efficiency of these multistage, reagent- and by-product-free, single-pot transformations.

  6. The aromatic ene reaction

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The ene reaction is a pericyclic process in which an alkene having an allylic hydrogen atom (the ene donor) reacts with a second unsaturated species (the enophile) to form a new product with a transposed π-bond. The aromatic ene reaction, in which the alkene component is embedded in an aromatic ring, has only been reported in a few (four) instances and has proceeded in low yield (≤6%). Here we show efficient aromatic ene reactions in which a thermally generated aryne engages a pendant m-alkylarene substituent to produce a dearomatized isotoluene, itself another versatile but rare reactive intermediate. Our experiments were guided by computational studies that revealed structural features conducive to the aromatic ene process. We proceeded to identify a cascade comprising three reactions: (i) hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (for aryne generation), (ii) intramolecular aromatic ene, and (iii) bimolecular Alder ene. The power of this cascade is evident from the structural complexity of the final products, the considerable scope, and the overall efficiency of these multi-stage, reagent- and byproduct-free, single-pot transformations. PMID:24345944

  7. Electronic absorption and ground state structure of carotenoid molecules.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Pinto, Maria M; Sansiaume, Elodie; Hashimoto, Hideki; Pascal, Andrew A; Gall, Andrew; Robert, Bruno

    2013-09-26

    Predicting the complete electronic structure of carotenoid molecules remains an extremely complex problem, particularly in anisotropic media such as proteins. In this paper, we address the electronic properties of nine relatively simple carotenoids by the combined use of electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopies. Linear carotenoids exhibit an excellent correlation between (i) the inverse of their conjugation chain length N, (ii) the energy of their S0 → S2 electronic transition, and (iii) the position of their ν1 Raman band (corresponding to the stretching mode of their conjugated C═C bonds). For cyclic carotenoids such as β-carotene, this correlation is also observed between the latter two parameters (S0 → S2 energy and ν1 frequency), whereas their "nominal" conjugation length N does not follow the same relationship. We conclude that β-carotene and cyclic carotenoids in general exhibit a shorter effective conjugation length than that expected from their chemical structure. In addition, the effect of solvent polarizability on these molecular parameters was investigated for four of the carotenoids used in this study. We demonstrate that resonance Raman spectroscopy can discriminate between the different effects underlying shifts in the S0 → S2 transition of carotenoid molecules.

  8. THE CAROTENOID BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAY: THINKING IN ALL DIMENSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Shumskaya, Maria; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2013-01-01

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway serves manifold roles in plants related to photosynthesis, photoprotection, development, stress hormones, and various volatiles and signalling apocarotenoids. The pathway also produces compounds that impact human nutrition and metabolic products that contribute to fragrance and flavour of food and non-food crops. It is no surprise that the pathway has been a target of metabolic engineering, most prominently in the case of Golden Rice. The future success and predictability of metabolic engineering of carotenoids rests in the ability to target carotenoids for specific physiological purposes as well as to simultaneously modify carotenoids along with other desired traits. Here, we ask whether predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway is indeed possible. Despite a long history of research on the pathway, at this point in time we can only describe the pathway as a parts list and have almost no knowledge of the location of the complete pathway, how it is assembled, and whether there exists any trafficking of the enzymes or the carotenoids themselves. We discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the “complete” pathway and make the argument that predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway (and other pathways) will require investigation of the three dimensional state of the pathway as it may exist in plastids of different ultrastructures. Along with this message we point out the need to develop new types of visualization tools and resources that better reflect the dynamic nature of biosynthetic pathways. PMID:23683930

  9. Raman measurement of carotenoid composition in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    The carotenoids lycopene and beta-carotene are powerful antioxidants in skin and are thought to act as scavengers for free radicals and singlet oxygen. The role of carotenoid species in skin health is of strong current interest. We demonstrate the possibility to use Resonance Raman spectroscopy for fast, non-invasive, highly specific, and quantitative detection of beta-carotene and lycopene in human skin. Analyzing Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue and green laser excitation, we were able to characterize quantitatively the relative concentrations of each carotenoid species in-vivo. In the selective detection, we take advantage of different Raman cross-section spectral profiles for beta-carotene and lycopene molecules, and obtain a quantitative assessment of individual long-chain carotenoid species in the skin rather than their cumulative levels. Preliminary dual-wavelength Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different subjects. The technique holds promise for rapid screening of carotenoid compositions in human skin in large populations and may be suitable in clinical studies for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  10. Carotenoids acts as reinforcers of the Acholeplasma laidlawii lipid bilayer.

    PubMed Central

    Rottem, S; Markowitz, O

    1979-01-01

    Acholeplasma laidlawii cells grown with oleic acid produced much more colored carotenoids than did cells grown with elaidic acid. The amount of carotenoids was decreased 80 to 90% by growing the cells with 0.05 M propionate, resulting in a marked increase in the mobility of both 5-doxylstearate and 12-doxylstearate incorporated into the membranes. The fatty acid composition of the propionate-grown cells differed from that of cells grown without propionate by containing odd-numbered rather than even-numbered saturated fatty acids, but the ratios of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids were the same. To determine whether the carotenoids are the cause for the restricted mobility in the membranes, the carotenoids were selectively removed from A. laidlawii membranes by incubating the membranes with phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The carotenoid-depleted membranes showed an increase in the mobility of the hydrocarbon chains of the spin-labeled fatty acids. Furthermore, the incorporation of carotenoids into artificial membrane vesicles restricted the mobility of the hydrocarbon chain. Our results support the notion that the carotenoids in A. laidlawii act as a rigid insert reinforcing the membrane bilayer. PMID:533770

  11. A complex carotenoid palette tunes avian colour vision.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Matthew B; Collins, Aaron M; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M Carter; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Corbo, Joseph C

    2015-10-06

    The brilliantly coloured cone oil droplets of the avian retina function as long-pass cut-off filters that tune the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors and are hypothesized to enhance colour discrimination and improve colour constancy. Although it has long been known that these droplets are pigmented with carotenoids, their precise composition has remained uncertain owing to the technical challenges of measuring these very small, dense and highly refractile optical organelles. In this study, we integrated results from high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral microscopy and microspectrophotometry to obtain a comprehensive understanding of oil droplet carotenoid pigmentation in the chicken (Gallus gallus). We find that each of the four carotenoid-containing droplet types consists of a complex mixture of carotenoids, with a single predominant carotenoid determining the wavelength of the spectral filtering cut-off. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the predominant carotenoid type in the oil droplets of long-wavelength-sensitive, medium-wavelength-sensitive and short-wavelength-sensitive type 2 cones are astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and galloxanthin, respectively. In addition, the oil droplet of the principal member of the double cone contains a mixture of galloxanthin and two hydroxycarotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). Short-wavelength-absorbing apocarotenoids are present in all of the droplet types, providing filtering of light in a region of the spectrum where filtering by hydroxy- and ketocarotenoids may be incomplete. Thus, birds rely on a complex palette of carotenoid pigments within their cone oil droplets to achieve finely tuned spectral filtering.

  12. Limiting immunopathology: Interaction between carotenoids and enzymatic antioxidant defences.

    PubMed

    Babin, A; Saciat, C; Teixeira, M; Troussard, J-P; Motreuil, S; Moreau, J; Moret, Y

    2015-04-01

    The release of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) during the inflammatory response generates damages to host tissues, referred to as immunopathology, and is an important factor in ecological immunology. The integrated antioxidant system, comprising endogenous antioxidant enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase SOD, and catalase CAT) and dietary antioxidants (e.g. carotenoids), helps to cope with immune-mediated oxidative stress. Crustaceans store large amounts of dietary carotenoids for yet unclear reasons. While being immunostimulants and antioxidants, the interaction of these pigments with antioxidant enzymes remains unclear. Here, we tested the interaction between dietary supplementation with carotenoids and immune challenge on immune defences and the activity of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT, in the amphipod crustacean Gammarus pulex. Dietary supplementation increased the concentrations of circulating carotenoids and haemocytes in the haemolymph, while the immune response induced the consumption of circulating carotenoids and a drop of haemocyte density. Interestingly, supplemented gammarids exhibited down-regulated SOD activity but high CAT activity compared to control ones. Our study reveals specific interactions of dietary carotenoids with endogenous antioxidant enzymes, and further underlines the potential importance of carotenoids in the evolution of immunity and/or of antioxidant mechanisms in crustaceans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The metabolomics of carotenoids in engineered cell factory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guan-Nan; Zhu, Yue-Hui; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2009-07-01

    Carotenoids such as beta-carotene, lycopene, and antheraxanthin have plenty of scientific and commercial value. The comprehensive investigation of carotenoids drives people to improve and develop all kinds of analytical techniques to approach or even achieve "versatile" analysis. The metabolic engineering efforts in plants and algae have progressed rapidly, aiming to enable the use of plants and algae as "cell factories" for producing specific or novel carotenoids, such as beta-carotene (provitamin A) in Gold rice, while the emerging technologies of metabolomics support it by providing comprehensive analysis of carotenoids biochemical characterizations. This review describes metabolomics as a high-throughput platform to study carotenoids, including the engineering methods in the plants or algae, the bioinformatics for metabolomics, and the metabolomics of carotenoids in engineered cell factory. Modern systems biology tools, together with the development of genomics and metabolomics databases, will dramatically facilitate the advancement of our knowledge in gene-to-metabolite networks in plants. Metabolomics accompanying genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics as well as bioinformatics facilitate metabolic engineering efforts towards designing superior biocatalysts in cell factories. Ongoing advances in biological techniques coupled with crucial metabolic networks will further promote plants and algae as attractive platforms for the production of numerous high-value compounds such as carotenoids.

  14. Biotechnological production of carotenoids by yeasts: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mata-Gómez, Luis Carlos; Montañez, Julio César; Méndez-Zavala, Alejandro; Aguilar, Cristóbal Noé

    2014-01-21

    Nowadays, carotenoids are valuable molecules in different industries such as chemical, pharmaceutical, poultry, food and cosmetics. These pigments not only can act as vitamin A precursors, but also they have coloring and antioxidant properties, which have attracted the attention of the industries and researchers. The carotenoid production through chemical synthesis or extraction from plants is limited by low yields that results in high production costs. This leads to research of microbial production of carotenoids, as an alternative that has shown better yields than other aforementioned. In addition, the microbial production of carotenoids could be a better option about costs, looking for alternatives like the use of low-cost substrates as agro-industrials wastes. Yeasts have demonstrated to be carotenoid producer showing an important growing capacity in several agro-industrial wastes producing high levels of carotenoids. Agro-industrial wastes provide carbon and nitrogen source necessary, and others elements to carry out the microbial metabolism diminishing the production costs and avoiding pollution from these agro-industrial wastes to the environmental. Herein, we discuss the general and applied concepts regarding yeasts carotenoid production and the factors influencing carotenogenesis using agro-industrial wastes as low-cost substrates.

  15. Biotechnological production of carotenoids by yeasts: an overview

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, carotenoids are valuable molecules in different industries such as chemical, pharmaceutical, poultry, food and cosmetics. These pigments not only can act as vitamin A precursors, but also they have coloring and antioxidant properties, which have attracted the attention of the industries and researchers. The carotenoid production through chemical synthesis or extraction from plants is limited by low yields that results in high production costs. This leads to research of microbial production of carotenoids, as an alternative that has shown better yields than other aforementioned. In addition, the microbial production of carotenoids could be a better option about costs, looking for alternatives like the use of low-cost substrates as agro-industrials wastes. Yeasts have demonstrated to be carotenoid producer showing an important growing capacity in several agro-industrial wastes producing high levels of carotenoids. Agro-industrial wastes provide carbon and nitrogen source necessary, and others elements to carry out the microbial metabolism diminishing the production costs and avoiding pollution from these agro-industrial wastes to the environmental. Herein, we discuss the general and applied concepts regarding yeasts carotenoid production and the factors influencing carotenogenesis using agro-industrial wastes as low-cost substrates. PMID:24443802

  16. Physalis alkekengi Carotenoidic Extract Inhibitor of Soybean Lipoxygenase-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chedea, Veronica Sanda; Pintea, Adela; Bunea, Andrea; Braicu, Cornelia; Stanila, Andreea; Socaciu, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the carotenoidic saponified extract of Physalis alkekengi sepals (PA) towards the lipoxygenase (LOX) oxidation of linoleic acid. Lipoxygenase activity in the presence of carotenoids, standard and from extract, was followed by its kinetic behaviour determining the changes in absorption at 234 nm. The standard carotenoids used were β-carotene (β-car), lutein (Lut), and zeaxanthin (Zea). The calculated enzymatic specific activity (ESA) after 600 s of reaction proves that PA carotenoidic extract has inhibitory effect on LOX oxidation of linoleic acid. A longer polyenic chain of carotenoid structure gives a higher ESA during the first reaction seconds. This situation is not available after 600 s of reaction and may be due to a destruction of this structure by cooxidation of carotenoids, besides the classical LOX reaction. The PA carotenoidic extract inhibiting the LOX-1 reaction can be considered a source of lipoxygenase inhibitors. PMID:24511537

  17. Modulation of the carotenoid bioaccessibility through liposomal encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chen; Zhang, Yating; Abbas, Shabbar; Feng, Biao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xia, Shuqin

    2014-11-01

    The low bioaccessibility of carotenoids is currently a challenge to their incorporation in pharmaceutics, nutraceuticals and functional foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the modulating effects of liposome encapsulation on the bioaccessibility, and its relationship with carotenoid structure and incorporated concentration. The physical stability of liposomes, lipid digestibility, carotenoids release and bioaccessibility were investigated during incubation in a simulated gastrointestinal tract. Analysis on the liposome size and morphology showed that after digestion, the majority of particles maintained spherical shape with only an increase of size in liposomes loading β-carotene or lutein. However, a large proportion of heterogeneous particles were visible in the micelle phase of liposomes loading lycopene or canthaxanthin. It was also found that the release of lutein and β-carotene from liposomes was inhibited in a simulated gastric fluid, while was slow and sustained in a simulated intestinal fluid. By contrast, lycopene and canthaxanthin exhibited fast and considerable release in the gastrointestinal media. Both carotenoid bioaccessibility and micellization content decreased with the increase of incorporated concentration. Anyway, the bioaccessibility of carotenoids after encapsulated in liposomes was in the following order: lutein>β-carotene>lycopene>canthaxanthin. Bivariate correlation analysis revealed that carotenoid bioaccessibility depended strongly on the incorporating ability of carotenoids into a lipid bilayer, loading content, and nature of the system.

  18. A complex carotenoid palette tunes avian colour vision

    PubMed Central

    Toomey, Matthew B.; Collins, Aaron M.; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M. Carter; Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    The brilliantly coloured cone oil droplets of the avian retina function as long-pass cut-off filters that tune the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors and are hypothesized to enhance colour discrimination and improve colour constancy. Although it has long been known that these droplets are pigmented with carotenoids, their precise composition has remained uncertain owing to the technical challenges of measuring these very small, dense and highly refractile optical organelles. In this study, we integrated results from high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral microscopy and microspectrophotometry to obtain a comprehensive understanding of oil droplet carotenoid pigmentation in the chicken (Gallus gallus). We find that each of the four carotenoid-containing droplet types consists of a complex mixture of carotenoids, with a single predominant carotenoid determining the wavelength of the spectral filtering cut-off. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the predominant carotenoid type in the oil droplets of long-wavelength-sensitive, medium-wavelength-sensitive and short-wavelength-sensitive type 2 cones are astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and galloxanthin, respectively. In addition, the oil droplet of the principal member of the double cone contains a mixture of galloxanthin and two hydroxycarotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). Short-wavelength-absorbing apocarotenoids are present in all of the droplet types, providing filtering of light in a region of the spectrum where filtering by hydroxy- and ketocarotenoids may be incomplete. Thus, birds rely on a complex palette of carotenoid pigments within their cone oil droplets to achieve finely tuned spectral filtering. PMID:26446559

  19. Carotenoid accumulation in the tissues of zebra finches: predictors of integumentary pigmentation and implications for carotenoid allocation strategies.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Kevin J; Toomey, Matthew B

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoid pigments produce the bright yellow to red ornamental colors of many animals, especially birds, and must ultimately be derived from the diet. However, they are also valuable for many physiological functions (e.g., antioxidants, immunostimulants, photoprotection, visual tuning, yolk nourishment to embryos), and as a result they are present in numerous internal body tissues (e.g., liver, adipose tissue, retina) whose carotenoid types and amounts are rarely studied in the context of color acquisition. Because male and female animals typically place different priorities on fitness-enhancing activities (e.g., gametic investment in females, sexual attraction in males), carotenoid allocation may track such investment patterns in the two sexes, and we can test for such sex-specific priorities of carotenoids by assessing body-tissue distributions of these pigments. We used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify and quantify carotenoid pigments from the plasma, liver, adipose tissue, and retina as well as the beak and legs of male and female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), a species in which males display sexually attractive, red, carotenoid-based beak coloration and females also display some (albeit a less rich orange) beak color. To our knowledge, this is the first study of the predictors of carotenoid-based leg coloration-another potentially important visual signal-in this species. The same suite of dietary (e.g., lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin) and metabolically derived (e.g., dehydrolutein, anhydrolutein) yellow and orange carotenoids was present in plasma, liver, and adipose tissue of both sexes. Retina contained two different metabolites (astaxanthin and galloxanthin) that serve specific functions in association with unique photoreceptor types in the eye. Beaks were enriched with four red ketocarotenoid derivatives in both sexes (alpha-doradexanthin, adonirubin, astaxanthin, and canthaxanthin), while the carotenoid profile of legs

  20. Oxidation of carotenoids by heat and tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Hurst, John S; Contreras, Janice E; Siems, Werner G; Van Kuijk, Frederik J G M

    2004-01-01

    The stability to autoxidation of the polar carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, was compared to that of the less polar carotenoids, beta-carotene and lycopene at physiologically or pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of 2 and 6 microM, after exposure to heat or cigarette smoke. Three methodological approaches were used: 1) Carotenoids dissolved in solvents with different polarities were incubated at 37 and 80 degrees C for different times. 2) Human plasma samples were subjected to the same temperature conditions. 3) Methanolic carotenoid solutions and plasma were also exposed to whole tobacco smoke from 1-5 unfiltered cigarettes. The concentrations of individual carotenoids in different solvents were determined spectrophotometrically. Carotenoids from plasma were extracted and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography. Carotenoids were generally more stable at 37 than at 80 degrees C. In methanol and dichloromethane the thermal degradation of beta-carotene and lycopene was faster than that of lutein and zeaxanthin. However, in tetrahydrofuran beta-carotene and zeaxanthin degraded faster than lycopene and lutein. Plasma carotenoid levels at 37 degrees C did not change, but decreased at 80 degrees C. The decrease of beta-carotene and lycopene levels was higher than those for lutein and zeaxanthin. Also in the tobacco smoke experiments the highest autoxidation rates were found for beta-carotene and lycopene at 2 microM, but at 6 microM lutein and zeaxanthin depleted to the same extent as beta-carotene. These data support our previous studies suggesting that oxidative stress degrade beta-carotene and lycopene faster than lutein and zeaxanthin. The only exception was the thermal degradation of carotenoids solubilized in tetrahydrofuran, which favors faster breakdown of beta-carotene and zeaxanthin.

  1. Structural and Functional Roles of Carotenoids in Chlorosomes

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Juan B.; Collins, Aaron M.; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Torkkeli, Mika; Löflund, Benita; Serimaa, Ritva E.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Tuma, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Chlorosomes are large light-harvesting complexes found in three phyla of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes are primarily composed of self-assembling pigment aggregates. In addition to the main pigment, bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e, chlorosomes also contain variable amounts of carotenoids. Here, we use X-ray scattering and electron cryomicroscopy, complemented with absorption spectroscopy and pigment analysis, to compare the morphologies, structures, and pigment compositions of chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus grown under two different light conditions and Chlorobaculum tepidum. High-purity chlorosomes from C. aurantiacus contain about 20% more carotenoid per bacteriochlorophyll c molecule when grown under low light than when grown under high light. This accentuates the light-harvesting function of carotenoids, in addition to their photoprotective role. The low-light chlorosomes are thicker due to the overall greater content of pigments and contain domains of lamellar aggregates. Experiments where carotenoids were selectively extracted from intact chlorosomes using hexane proved that they are located in the interlamellar space, as observed previously for species belonging to the phylum Chlorobi. A fraction of the carotenoids are localized in the baseplate, where they are bound differently and cannot be removed by hexane. In C. tepidum, carotenoids cannot be extracted by hexane even from the chlorosome interior. The chemical structure of the pigments in C. tepidum may lead to π-π interactions between carotenoids and bacteriochlorophylls, preventing carotenoid extraction. The results provide information about the nature of interactions between bacteriochlorophylls and carotenoids in the protein-free environment of the chlorosome interior. PMID:23396908

  2. Variability of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Orange Colored Capsicum spp.

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Ivette; Hamby, Shane; Romero, Joslynn; Bosland, Paul W.; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2010-01-01

    Pepper, Capsicum spp., is a worldwide crop valued for heat, nutrition, and rich pigment content. Carotenoids, the largest group of plant pigments, function as antioxidants and as vitamin A precursors. The most abundant carotenoids in ripe pepper fruits are β-carotene, capsanthin, and capsorubin. In this study, the carotenoid composition of orange fruited Capsicum lines was defined along with the allelic variability of the biosynthetic enzymes. The carotenoid chemical profiles present in seven orange pepper varieties were determined using a novel UPLC method. The orange appearance of the fruit was due either to the accumulation of β-carotene, or in two cases, due to only the accumulation of red and yellow carotenoids. Four carotenoid biosynthetic genes, Psy, Lcyb, CrtZ-2, and Ccs were cloned and sequenced from these cultivars. This data tested the hypothesis that different alleles for specific carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes are associated with specific carotenoid profiles in orange peppers. While the coding regions within Psy and CrtZ-2 did not change in any of the lines, the genomic sequence contained introns not previously reported. Lcyb and Ccs contained no introns but did exhibit polymorphisms resulting in amino acid changes; a new Ccs variant was found. When selectively breeding for high provitamin A levels, phenotypic recurrent selection based on fruit color is not sufficient, carotenoid chemical composition should also be conducted. Based on these results, specific alleles are candidate molecular markers for selection of orange pepper lines with high β-carotene and therefore high pro-vitamin A levels. PMID:20582146

  3. Carotenoids in white- and red-fleshed loquat fruits.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun-Hua; Xu, Chang-Jie; Sun, Chong-De; Li, Xian; Chen, Kun-Song

    2007-09-19

    Fruits of 23 loquat ( Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) cultivars, of which 11 were white-fleshed and 12 red-fleshed, were analyzed for color, carotenoid content, and vitamin A values. Color differences between two loquat groups were observed in the peel as well as in the flesh. beta-Carotene and lutein were the major carotenoids in the peel, which accounted for about 60% of the total colored carotenoids in both red- and white-fleshed cultivars. beta-Cryptoxanthin and, in some red-fleshed cultivars, beta-carotene were the most abundant carotenoids in the flesh, and in total, they accounted for over half of the colored carotenoids. Neoxanthin, violaxanthin, luteoxanthin, 9- cis-violaxanthin, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeta-carotene were also identified, while zeaxanthin, alpha-carotene, and lycopene were undetectable. Xanthophylls were highly esterified. On average, 1.3- and 10.8-fold higher levels of colored carotenoids were observed in the peel and flesh tissue of red-fleshed cultivars, respectively. The percentage of beta-carotene among colored carotenoids was higher in both the peel and the flesh of red-fleshed cultivars. Correlations between the levels of total colored carotenoids and the color indices were analyzed. The a* and the ratio of a*/ b* were positively correlated with the total content of colored carotenoids, while L*, b*, and H degrees correlated negatively. Vitamin A values, as retinol equivalents (RE), of loquat flesh were 0.49 and 8.77 microg/g DW (8.46 and 136.41 microg/100 g FW) on average for white- and red-fleshed cultivars, respectively. The RE values for the red-fleshed fruits were higher than fruits such as mango, red watermelon, papaya, and orange as reported in the literature, suggesting that loquat is an excellent source of provitamin A.

  4. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei; Yokoya, Takayoshi; Kambe, Takashi; Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L. T.; Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-07-01

    'Aromatic hydrocarbon' implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (Kxpicene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (Tc's) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting Kxpicene phase with a Tc as high as 14 K, so we now know that Kxpicene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides Kxpicene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rbxpicene and Caxpicene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for Kxpicene and Rbxpicene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of Tc that is clearly observed in some phases of aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors, suggesting behavior not explained by the standard BCS picture of superconductivity. In this article, we describe the present status of this research field, and discuss its future prospects.

  5. Selection and taxonomic identification of carotenoid-producing marine actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Romero, Francisco; Fernández-Chimeno, Rosa Isabel; de la Fuente, Juan Luis; Barredo, José-Luis

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids are important pigments produced by plants and many microorganisms, including fungi, microalgae, cyanobacteria, and bacteria. Marine actinomycetes are a group of bacteria that produce a variety of metabolites with economic potential. Here, we describe a general method of selecting marine actinomycetes as carotenoids' producers. The screening is carried out at two levels: the first one involves a quick selection of strains by visual color inspection, and the second consists in the analysis of the extracts by HPLC. The taxonomic analysis of the producing strains gives us an overview of the groups of actinomycetes in which carotenoids can be found.

  6. Voltage-dependent absorbance change of carotenoids in halophilic archaebacteria.

    PubMed

    Seki, S I; Sasabe, H; Tomioka, H

    1996-10-02

    Membrane vesicles of wild-type Halobacterium sp. mex strain show a wavy absorbance change which has not been so far reported in halophilic archaebacteria. A white mutant strain lacking carotenoids did not show the wavy absorbance change. The wavy absorbance change in the range of 440-590 nm was induced by a red flash (600-640 nm), which photoexcited electrogenic ion pumps, mex bacteriorhodopsin and mex halorhodopsin but not carotenoids. The wavy change was also caused by K+ diffusion potentials without light. These results suggest that the wavy absorbance change in the membrane vesicles is the voltage-dependent absorbance change of the carotenoids.

  7. Carotenoid Composition of the Fruit of Red Mamey (Pouteria sapota).

    PubMed

    Murillo, Enrique; Turcsi, Erika; Szabó, Ildikó; Mosquera, Yesuri; Agócs, Attila; Nagy, Veronika; Gulyás-Fekete, Gergely; Deli, József

    2016-09-28

    The detailed carotenoid analysis of red mamey (Pouteria sapota) was achieved by HPLC-DAD-MS, chemical tests, and cochromatography with authentic samples. Altogether 47 components were detected and 34 identified from the total extract or after fractionation with column chromatography. The main carotenoids were cryptocapsin, sapotexanthin, and capsanthin 5,6-epoxide. Some further minor components containing the κ-end group with or without a hydroxy group and their 5,6-epoxy precursors were identified. Some comments are made about the biosynthesis of κ-carotenoids in red mamey.

  8. Subchromoplast Sequestration of Carotenoids Affects Regulatory Mechanisms in Tomato Lines Expressing Different Carotenoid Gene Combinations[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Marilise; Mora, Leticia; Enfissi, Eugenia M.A.; Bramley, Peter M.; Fraser, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway in recent years has successfully enhanced the carotenoid contents of crop plants. It is now clear that only increasing biosynthesis is restrictive, as mechanisms to sequestrate these increased levels in the cell or organelle should be exploited. In this study, biosynthetic pathway genes were overexpressed in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) lines and the effects on carotenoid formation and sequestration revealed. The bacterial Crt carotenogenic genes, independently or in combination, and their zygosity affect the production of carotenoids. Transcription of the pathway genes was perturbed, whereby the tissue specificity of transcripts was altered. Changes in the steady state levels of metabolites in unrelated sectors of metabolism were found. Of particular interest was a concurrent increase of the plastid-localized lipid monogalactodiacylglycerol with carotenoids along with membranous subcellular structures. The carotenoids, proteins, and lipids in the subchromoplast fractions of the transgenic tomato fruit with increased carotenoid content suggest that cellular structures can adapt to facilitate the sequestration of the newly formed products. Moreover, phytoene, the precursor of the pathway, was identified in the plastoglobule, whereas the biosynthetic enzymes were in the membranes. The implications of these findings with respect to novel pathway regulation mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24249831

  9. Theoretical investigation of carotenoid ultraviolet spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, João B. L.; Durães, Jussara A.; Sales, Maria J. A.; Vilela, Alessandra F. A.; E Silva, Geraldo M.; Gargano, Ricardo

    We have determined the π band-gaps of the main carotenoids present in poly(methyl)methacrylate/buriti blends, namely, trans-β-carotene, 13-cis-β-carotene, 9-cis-β-carotene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. Semiempirical, model Hamiltonian, and density functional calculations were carried out to study these structures. The geometries were fully optimized using AM1, PM3, and B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) methods. The TD-DFT and ZINDO/S methods were applied for the calculation of the electronic absorption spectra of the optimized B3LYP geometries. The calculated spectra using the polarizable continuum model for the solvent effects were compared with the available experimental.

  10. New aromatic biomarkers and possible maturity indicators found in New Albany Shale extracts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Wood, K.V.

    1986-01-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons from benzene extracts of New Albany Shale were characterized. A biomarker that has a molecular weight of 546 and a structural configuration consistent with that of an alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbon (C40H66) was tentatively identified. It was found that the relative concentrations of the biomarker are indicative of differing levels of thermal maturity of the shale organic matter. A 40-carbon bicyclic carotenoid (C40H48) is proposed as the geochemical precursor of this biomarker. Thermal maturity of the shale organic matter can also be differentiated by observing differences in "fingerprints" as obtained by field-ionization mass spectrometry on the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction. Using this technique, we found that the more mature shale samples from southeastern Illinois contain more low molecular weight extractable aromatic hydrocarbons and the less mature shale samples from northwestern Illinois contain more high molecular weight extractable aromatic hydrocarbons. It was demonstrated that field-ionization and tandem mass spectrometric techniques through fingerprint and individual compound identification, are useful for shale aromatic hydrocarbon fraction characterization and for thermal maturation interpretation. ?? 1986.

  11. Polybenzimidazole via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers were prepared from phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate and aromatic bis(o-diamine)s. These monomers were used in the synthesis of soluble polybenzimidazoles. The reaction involved the aromatic nucleophilic displacement of various di(hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds in the presence of an alkali metal base. These polymers exhibited lower glass transition temperatures, improved solubility, and better compression moldability over their commercial counterparts.

  12. Aromatic ketones with terminal vinyl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Uvarova, L.R.; Burykina, L.K.; Zubareva, M.M.; Polyanskii, I.D.

    1988-12-20

    The Friedel-Crafts acylation of a hydrocarbon by an acylating agent containing bromoalkyl substituents gave a series of new ketones. Their subsequent dehydrobromination with potassium tert-butoxide gave high yields of aromatic ketones containing terminal vinyl groups. The reaction was conducted both with /beta/-bromoethylbenzene and with 4-(/beta/-bromoethyl)-benzoyl chloride and also with both compounds simultaneously. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed by the PMR, IR, UV, and mass spectra and also by the data from elemental analysis.

  13. Extended Corannulenes: Aromatic Bowl/Sheet Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Amit K; Linden, Anthony; Zoppi, Laura; Baldridge, Kim K; Siegel, Jay S

    2015-09-07

    Among sheet/sheet polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) hybrids, a buckybowl-graphene hybrid has been used as a model to explore the effects of physical properties of PAHs with distinct planar and bowl regions. Activation of a C(Ar)-F bond was used to synthesize this corannulene/graphenic hybrid. Photophysical and voltammetric studies together with high-level computations revealed curvature and extended π-effects on the properties of these materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Subcellular Localization of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Selstam, Eva; Norling, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis pathway of carotenoids in cyanobacteria is partly described. However, the subcellular localization of individual steps is so far unknown. Carotenoid analysis of different membrane subfractions in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 shows that “light” plasma membranes have a high carotenoid/protein ratio, when compared to “heavier” plasma membranes or thylakoids. The localization of CrtQ and CrtO, two well-defined carotenoid synthesis pathway enzymes in Synechocystis, was studied by epitope tagging and western blots. Both enzymes are locally more abundant in plasma membranes than in thylakoids, implying that the plasma membrane has higher synthesis rates of β-carotene precursor molecules and echinenone. PMID:26083372

  15. Carotenoids from guava (Psidium guajava l.): isolation and structure elucidation.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, A Z; Steck, A; Pfander, H

    1999-01-01

    Sixteen carotenoids were isolated from the flesh of Brazilian red guavas (Psidium guajava L.). Their structures were established by means of UV-visible, 400 and 500 MHz (1)H NMR, 120 and 125 MHz (13)C NMR, mass, and circular dichroism spectra. The carotenoids were identified as phytofluene, (all-E)-, (9Z)-, (13Z)-, and (15Z)-beta-carotene, (all-E)-gamma-carotene, (all-E)-, (9Z)-, (13Z)-, and (15Z)-lycopene, (all-E,3R)-beta-cryptoxanthin, (all-E, 3R)-rubixanthin, (all-E,3S,5R,8S)-cryptoflavin, (all-E,3R,3'R, 6'R)-lutein, (all-E,3S,5R,6R,3'S,5'R,8'R)-, and (all-E,3S,5R,6R,3'S, 5'R,8'S)-neochrome. Thirteen of the carotenoids identified are reported as guava carotenoids for the first time.

  16. Anticancer properties of carotenoids in prostate cancer. A review.

    PubMed

    Soares, Nathalia da Costa Pereira; Teodoro, Anderson Junger; Lotsch, Priscila Falagan; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Borojevic, Radovan

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer of men in the world. Several epidemiological studies have linked increased carotenoids consumption with decreased prostate cancer risk. These findings are supported by in vitro and in vivo experiments showing that carotenoids not only enhance the antioxidant response of prostate cells, but that they are able to inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis and decrease the metastatic capacity of prostate cancer cells. However, clear clinical evidence supporting the use of carotenoids in prevention or treatment of prostate cancer is not available, due to the limited number of published randomized clinical trials, and the varying protocols used in the existing studies. The scope of the present review is to discuss the potential impact of carotenoids on prostate cancer by giving an overview of the molecular mechanisms and in vitro / in vivo effects.

  17. Effects of exogenous glucose on carotenoid accumulation in tomato leaves.

    PubMed

    Mortain-Bertrand, Anne; Stammitti, Linda; Telef, Nadège; Colardelle, Patrice; Brouquisse, Renaud; Rolin, Dominique; Gallusci, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the effect of carbohydrate on carotenoid accumulation in leaves, excised plants of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum var. cerasiformae, wva 106) were supplied with glucose through the transpiration stream for 48 h. We report here that sugar accumulation in leaves led to a decrease of carotenoid content, which was related to the reduction of Chl. The decrease in carotenoid amount correlated with a sugar-induced repression of genes encoding enzymes of the carotenoid and of the Rohmer pathways. The lower 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase transcript level probably leads to a decreased metabolic flux through the methylerythritol pathway and subsequently to a lower amount of substrate available for plastidic isoprenoid synthesis. Differences between responses of young (sink) and mature (source) leaves to carbohydrate accumulation are discussed.

  18. Maternally invested carotenoids compensate costly ectoparasitism in the hihi

    PubMed Central

    Ewen, John G.; Thorogood, Rose; Brekke, Patricia; Cassey, Phillip; Karadas, Filiz; Armstrong, Doug P.

    2009-01-01

    Dietary ingested carotenoid biomolecules have been linked to both improved health and immunity in nestling birds. Here, we test whether maternally invested egg carotenoids can offset the cost of parasitism in developing nestling hihi (Notiomystis cincta) from the bloodsucking mite (Ornithonyssus bursa). Our results reveal clear negative effects of parasitism on nestlings, and that maternally derived carotenoids compensate this cost, resulting in growth parameters and ultimate mass achieved being similar to nonparasitized young. Our results offer an unique example of a direct positive relationship between enhanced maternal investment of carotenoids and an ability to cope with a specific and costly parasite in young birds. As O. bursa infestations reduce population viability in hihi, our findings also highlight the importance of key nutritional resources for endangered bird populations to better cope with common parasite infestations. PMID:19620733

  19. Enzymic Pathways for Formation of Carotenoid Cleavage Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Peter; Zorn, Holger

    Degraded carotenoids (apocarotenoids, norisoprenoids) have been a subject of intensive research for several decades. From the perspective of human physiology and nutrition, the retinoids, acting as vitamins, signalling molecules, and visual pigments, attracted the greatest attention (Chapters 15 and 16). Plant scientists, however, detected a wealth of different apocarotenoids, presumably derived by the excentric cleavage of carotenoids in various species, the plant hormone abscisic acid (1, Scheme 6) being the best-investigated example. With the onset of fruit ripening, flower opening or senescence of green tissues, carotenoids are degraded oxidatively to smaller, volatile compounds. The natural biological functions of the reaction products are outlined in Chapter 15. As many of these apocarotenoids act as potent flavour compounds, food chemists and flavourists worldwide have investigated meticulously their structural and sensory properties. Many aspects of carotenoid metabolites and breakdown products as aroma compounds are presented in a comprehensive book [1].

  20. Multiplexed chirp waveform synthesizer

    DOEpatents

    Dudley, Peter A.; Tise, Bert L.

    2003-09-02

    A synthesizer for generating a desired chirp signal has M parallel channels, where M is an integer greater than 1, each channel including a chirp waveform synthesizer generating at an output a portion of a digital representation of the desired chirp signal; and a multiplexer for multiplexing the M outputs to create a digital representation of the desired chirp signal. Preferably, each channel receives input information that is a function of information representing the desired chirp signal.

  1. No detectable carotenoid concentrations in serum of llamas and alpacas.

    PubMed

    Raila, J; Schweigert, F J; Stanitznig, A; Lambacher, B; Franz, S; Baldermann, S; Wittek, T

    2016-11-09

    Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments and important for a variety of physiological functions. They are major dietary vitamin A precursors and act as lipophilic antioxidants in a variety of tissues and are associated with important health benefits in humans and animals. All animals must acquire carotenoids from their diet, but to our knowledge, there are no studies investigating the intestinal carotenoid absorption and their blood concentrations in New World camelids. The present study aimed to assess the serum concentrations of selected carotenoids in llamas (n = 13) and alpacas (n = 27). Serum carotenoids as well as retinol (vitamin A) and α-tocopherol (vitamin E) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and these were unable to detect any carotenoids (α- and β-carotene, α- and β-cryptoxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene) in the samples. The concentrations of retinol in alpacas (2.89 ± 1.13 μmol/l; mean ± SD) were higher (p = 0.024) than those found in llamas (2.05 ± 0.87 μmol/l); however, the concentrations of α-tocopherol were not significantly (p = 0.166) different (llamas: 3.98 ± 1.83 μmol/l; alpacas: 4.95 ± 2.14 μmol/l). The results show that both llamas and alpacas are not able to absorb intact carotenoids, but efficiently convert provitamin A carotenoids to retinol.

  2. Skin total carotenoids predict plasma carotenoid levels during a 28-week experimental feeding study with varying levels of vegetables and fruit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective biomarkers are needed to assess adherence to vegetable and fruit intervention trials. This study compared plasma carotenoid concentrations to non-invasive skin carotenoid assessments. Thirty participants consumed a low-carotenoid diet (6 wk, Phases 1 & 3), a provided diet containing 6 c/da...

  3. Aromatization of 1,6,7,7a-tetrahydro-2H-indol-2-ones by a novel process. Preparation of key-intermediate methyl 1-benzyl-5-methoxy-1H-indole-3-acetate and the syntheses of serotonin, melatonin, and bufotenin.

    PubMed

    Revial, Gilbert; Jabin, Ivan; Lim, Sethy; Pfau, Michel

    2002-04-05

    Imine 7 of 1,4-cyclohexanedione mono-ethylene ketal 6 was reacted with maleic anhydride, affording the cyclized adduct 8. Methyl esterification of 8, accompanied by transacetalization, led to the dihydrooxindole derivative 10. Aromatization of 10 was then accomplished with POCl(3), leading directly to the key-intermediate title compound 11 in 74% yield from ketone 6. Serotonin, melatonin, and bufotenin were then obtained by standard reactions.

  4. Meal triacylglycerol profile modulates postprandial absorption of carotenoids in humans.

    PubMed

    Goltz, Shellen R; Campbell, Wayne W; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Failla, Mark L; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2012-06-01

    Dietary lipids are considered to be primary potentiators of carotenoid absorption, yet the amount and source required to optimize bioavailability has not been systematically evaluated. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of both amount and source of triacylglycerols on postprandial absorption of carotenoids from vegetable salads. Healthy subjects (n = 29) were randomized using a Latin square design (3 × 3) and consumed three identical salads with 3, 8, or 20 g of canola oil, soybean oil, or butter. Blood was collected from 0-10 h and triacylglycerol-rich fractions (TRLs) were isolated by ultracentrifugation. Carotenoid contents of TRL fractions were analyzed by HPLC-DAD. Considering all lipid sources, 20 g of lipid promoted higher absorption compared to 3 and 8 g for all carotenoid species (p < 0.05), except for α-carotene (p = 0.07). The source of lipid had less impact on the absorption of carotenoids than amount of lipid. Pooling results from all lipid amounts, monounsaturated fatty acid rich canola oil trended toward enhancing absorption of lutein and α-carotene compared to saturated fatty acid rich butter (p = 0.06 and p = 0.08, respectively). While both amount and source of co-consumed lipid affect carotenoid bioavailability from vegetables, amount appears to exert a stronger effect. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Dove, Carla J.; Grimaldi, David A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-06-01

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Bioavailability of natural carotenoids in human skin compared to blood.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Martina C; Darvin, Maxim E; Vollert, Henning; Lademann, Jürgen

    2010-10-01

    Skin functions and structure are significantly influenced by nutrients. Antioxidants protect the supportive layer of the skin against any damaging irradiation effects and the action of free radicals. A lack of suitable methods means that the pharmacokinetic properties of systemically applied carotenoids transferred into the skin remain poorly understood. In this study, a natural kale extract or placebo oil were given orally to 22 healthy volunteers for 4 weeks. Carotenoid bioaccessibility was evaluated using non-invasive resonance Raman spectroscopy on the palm and forehead skin. For the analysis of the blood serum, the standard HPLC method was used. The blood and skin levels of the carotenoids increased significantly during the study but compared to the blood serum values, increases in skin were delayed and depended on the dermal area as well as on the carotenoid. Lycopene, measured as being low in the extract, increases more in the skin compared to the blood indicating that the natural mixture of the extract stabilizes the antioxidative network in the skin. After supplementation had ended, the carotenoids decreased much faster in the blood than in the skin. The delayed decrease in the skin may indicate a peripheral buffer function of the skin for carotenoids.

  7. Raman detection of carotenoid pigments in the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellermann, Werner; Ermakov, Igor V.; McClane, Robert W.; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2000-04-01

    We have used resonance Raman scattering as a novel, non- invasive, in-vivo optical technique to measure the concentration of carotenoid pigment in the human retina. Using argon laser excitation we are able to measure two strong carotenoid resonance Raman signals at 1159 and 1525 wave numbers, respectively. The required laser power levels are within the limits given by safety standards for ocular exposure. Of the approximately ten carotenoid pigment found in normal human serum, the species lutein and zeaxanthin are concentrated in high amounts in the cells of the human macula, which is an approximately 5 mm diameter area of the retina in which the visual acuity is highest. These carotenoids give the macula a characteristic yellow coloration, and it is speculated that these molecules function as filter to attenuate photochemical damage and/or image degradation under bright UV/blue light exposures. In addition, they are thought to act as free-radical scavenging antioxidants. Studies have shown that there may be a link between macular degenerative diseases, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the US, and the presence or absence of the carotenoids. We describe an instrument capable of measuring the macular carotenoids in human subjects in a non-invasive, rapid and quantitative way.

  8. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel B; Nascimbene, Paul C; Dove, Carla J; Grimaldi, David A; James, Helen F

    2014-06-09

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Dove, Carla J.; Grimaldi, David A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-01-01

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy. PMID:24909554

  10. Carotenoid binding to proteins: Modeling pigment transport to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-10-15

    Carotenoid pigments play numerous important physiological functions in human organism. Very special is a role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the retina of an eye and in particular in its central part, the macula lutea. In the retina, carotenoids can be directly present in the lipid phase of the membranes or remain bound to the protein-pigment complexes. In this work we address a problem of binding of carotenoids to proteins and possible role of such structures in pigment transport to lipid membranes. Interaction of three carotenoids, beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin with two proteins: bovine serum albumin and glutathione S-transferase (GST) was investigated with application of molecular spectroscopy techniques: UV-Vis absorption, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Interaction of pigment-protein complexes with model lipid bilayers formed with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine was investigated with application of FTIR, Raman imaging of liposomes and electrophysiological technique, in the planar lipid bilayer models. The results show that in all the cases of protein and pigment studied, carotenoids bind to protein and that the complexes formed can interact with membranes. This means that protein-carotenoid complexes are capable of playing physiological role in pigment transport to biomembranes.

  11. Role of carotenoids in the phototropic response of corn seedings

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Poff, K.L.

    1981-10-01

    The herbicide 4 chloro-5-(methylamino)-2-..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..,-trifluoro-m-tolyl)-3(2H)- pyridazinone (SAN 9789), which blocks the synthesis in higher plants of colored carotenoids but not of flavins, was used to examine the involvement of carotenoids in corn seeding phototropism. It was concluded that ''bulk'' carotenoids are not the photoreceptor pigment based on the results that increasing concentrations of SAN 9789 (up to 100 micromolar) did not alter the phototropic sensitivity to 380 nanometers light (using geotropism as a control) and did not increase the threshold intensities of fluence response curves for both 380 and 450 nanometers light even though carotenoid content was reduced to 1 to 2% of normal. SAN 9789 treatment, however, did reduce seedling sensitivity toward 450 nanometers light indicating that carotenoids are involved in phototropism. Carotenoids, which are located mainly in the primary leaves, may act in phototropism as an internal screen, enhancing the light intensity gradient across the seedling and thus contributing to the ability of the seedling to perceive light direction. These results, indicate that the action spectra for phototropic responses can be significantly affected by the absorbance of screening pigments in vivo thus altering its shape from the in vitro absorption spectrum of the photoreceptor pigment.

  12. Cancer chemoprevention by natural carotenoids as an efficient strategy.

    PubMed

    Bolhassani, Azam

    2015-01-01

    The use of specific compounds to suppress the growth of tumors or reverse carcinogenesis is defined as chemoprevention. Natural products have been known as one of the most important resources of anticancer agents. Among them, carotenoids are lipophilic molecules accumulating in lipophilic compartments including lipoproteins and/or membranes. Various carotenoids were used as major phytonutrients to inhibit the development of tumors in vitro and in vivo. They have shown different functions such as scavenging free radicals, inhibition of angiogenesis, prevention of cell propagation, and apoptosis induction in lung, colon, breast and prostate. Regarding these roles, most carotenoids possess anti-oxidant properties. However, their therapeutic use is problematic due to the lack of solubility of carotenoids in water. Hence, recent studies have been focused on uncommon carotenoids soluble in water because of their glycosylated form, such as crocin(s) extracted from saffron. These structures with their cytotoxicity effects on human cancer cells are suggested as the most suitable compounds for cancer treatment. Herein, we summarize different functions of carotenoids for suppressing tumor growth.

  13. Heterosis for carotenoid concentration and profile in maize hybrids.

    PubMed

    Burt, Andrew J; Grainger, Christopher M; Shelp, Barry J; Lee, Elizabeth A

    2011-12-01

    Production of high-lutein maize grain is of particular interest as a value-added feed source to produce high-lutein eggs. In this paper, it is demonstrated that heterosis for total carotenoid concentration and for the ratio of lutein to zeaxanthin (L:Z ratio), or profile type, exists infrequently in yellow dent crosses. However, yellow dent inbred maize lines A619 and CG102, both possessing high-lutein profiles, produce F1 seed with a classic overdominant expression of lutein levels (i.e., 49 µg/g dry weight (DW) above the high-parent value). Reciprocal crosses of A619 and CG102 with one another and with two high-zeaxanthin (i.e., low lutein), high-carotenoid lines both suggest that the A619 and CG102 high-lutein phenotypes are achieved by different and complementary genotypes. The contribution of CG102 to the heterotic response was examined using a QTL-based approach that involved phenotyping the mapping population in a testcross to A619. Significant QTL were found at loci known to be involved in the carotenoid pathway but also at loci proximate to, but separate from, known carotenoid pathway steps. Exploiting an overdominant heterotic response for lutein and total carotenoids should be given strong consideration as a viable method of producing high-carotenoid hybrid maize lines.

  14. Carotenoids microencapsulation by spray drying method and supercritical micronization.

    PubMed

    Janiszewska-Turak, Emilia

    2017-09-01

    Carotenoids are used as natural food colourants in the food industry. As unstable natural pigments they need protection. This protection can involve the microencapsulation process. There are numerous techniques that can be used for carotenoid protection, but two of them -spray drying and supercritical micronization - are currently the most commonly used. The objective of this paper is to describe these two techniques for carotenoid microencapsulation. In this review information from articles from the last five years was taken into consideration. Pigments described in the review are all carotenoids. Short summary of carotenoids sources was presented. For the spray drying technique, a review of carrier material and process conditions was made. Moreover, a short description of some of the most suitable processes involving supercritical fluids for carotenoids (astaxanthin, β-carotene, lutein and lycopene) encapsulation was given. These include the Supercritical Antisolvent process (SAS), Particles from Gas-Saturated Solutions (PGSS), Supercritical Fluid Extraction From an Emulsion (SFEE) and Solution Enhanced Dispersion by Supercritical fluids (SEDS). In most cases the studies, independently of the described method, were conducted on the laboratory scale. In some a scale-up was also tested. In the review a critical assessment of the used methods was made. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of genotype and environment on citrus juice carotenoid content.

    PubMed

    Dhuique-Mayer, Claudie; Fanciullino, Anne-Laure; Dubois, Cecile; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2009-10-14

    A selection of orange and mandarin varieties belonging to the same Citrus accession and cultivated in Mediterranean (Corsica), subtropical (New Caledonia), and tropical areas (principally Tahiti) were studied to assess the effect of genotype and environmental conditions on citrus juice carotenoid content. Juices from three sweet orange cultivars, that is, Pera, Sanguinelli, and Valencia ( Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck), and two mandarin species ( Citrus deliciosa Ten and Citrus clementina Hort. ex Tan), were analyzed by HPLC using a C(30) column. Annual carotenoid content variations in Corsican fruits were evaluated. They were found to be very limited compared to variations due to varietal influences. The statistical analysis (PCA, dissimilarity tree) results based on the different carotenoid compounds showed that citrus juice from Corsica had a higher carotenoid content than citrus juices from tropical origins. The tropical citrus juices were clearly differentiated from citrus juices from Corsica, and close correlations were obtained between beta-cryptoxanthin and phytoene (r = 0.931) and beta-carotene and phytoene (r = 0.918). More broadly, Mediterranean conditions amplified interspecific differentiation, especially by increasing the beta-cryptoxanthin and cis-violaxanthin content in oranges and beta-carotene and phytoene-phytofluene content in mandarins. Thus, at a quantitative level, environmental conditions also had a major role in determining the levels of carotenoids of nutritional interest, such as the main provitamin A carotenoids in citrus juice (beta-cryptoxanthin and beta-carotene).

  16. Triplet excited state spectra and dynamics of carotenoids from the thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-13

    Light-harvesting complex 2 from the anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and flash photolysis spectroscopy. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements show that carotenoids play a negligible role as supportive energy donors and transfer excitation to bacteriochlorophyll-a with low energy transfer efficiency of ~30%. HPLC analysis determined that the dominant carotenoids in the complex are rhodopin and spirilloxanthin. Carotenoid excited triplet state formation upon direct (carotenoid) or indirect (bacteriochlorophyll-a Q{sub x} band) excitation shows that carotenoid triplets are mostly localized on spirilloxanthin. In addition, no triplet excitation transfer between carotenoids was observed. Such specific carotenoid composition and spectroscopic results strongly suggest that this organism optimized carotenoid composition in the light-harvesting complex 2 in order to maximize photoprotective capabilities of carotenoids but subsequently drastically suppressed their supporting role in light-harvesting process.

  17. Evidence for decreased interaction and improved carotenoid bioavailability by sequential delivery of a supplement.

    PubMed

    Salter-Venzon, Dawna; Kazlova, Valentina; Izzy Ford, Samantha; Intra, Janjira; Klosner, Allison E; Gellenbeck, Kevin W

    2017-05-01

    Despite the notable health benefits of carotenoids for human health, the majority of human diets worldwide are repeatedly shown to be inadequate in intake of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables, according to current health recommendations. To address this deficit, strategies designed to increase dietary intakes and subsequent plasma levels of carotenoids are warranted. When mixed carotenoids are delivered into the intestinal tract simultaneously, competition occurs for micelle formation and absorption, affecting carotenoid bioavailability. Previously, we tested the in vitro viability of a carotenoid mix designed to deliver individual carotenoids sequentially spaced from one another over the 6 hr transit time of the human upper gastrointestinal system. We hypothesized that temporally and spatially separating the individual carotenoids would reduce competition for micelle formation, improve uptake, and maximize efficacy. Here, we test this hypothesis in a double-blind, repeated-measure, cross-over human study with 12 subjects by comparing the change of plasma carotenoid levels for 8 hr after oral doses of a sequentially spaced carotenoid mix, to a matched mix without sequential spacing. We find the carotenoid change from baseline, measured as area under the curve, is increased following consumption of the sequentially spaced mix compared to concomitant carotenoids delivery. These results demonstrate reduced interaction and regulation between the sequentially spaced carotenoids, suggesting improved bioavailability from a novel sequentially spaced carotenoid mix.

  18. Plasma carotenoid- and retinol-weighted multi-SNP scores and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Sara J.; Lindström, Sara; Eliassen, A. Heather; Rosner, Bernard A.; Chen, Constance; Barrdahl, Myrto; Brinton, Louise; Buring, Julie; Canzian, Federico; Chanock, Stephen; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hazra, Aditi; Henderson, Brian; Hoover, Robert; Hüsing, Anika; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Marchand, Loic Le; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lund, Eiliv; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Peplonska, Beata; Riboli, Elio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sánchez, María-José; Tjønneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; van Gils, Carla H.; Yeager, Meredith; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Ziegler, Regina G.; Willett, Walter C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary and circulating carotenoids have been inversely associated with breast cancer risk, but observed associations may be due to confounding. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1), a gene encoding the enzyme involved in the first step of synthesizing vitamin A from dietary carotenoids, have been associated with circulating carotenoid concentrations and may serve as unconfounded surrogates for those biomarkers. We determined associations between variants in BCMO1 and breast cancer risk in a large cohort consortium. Methods We used unconditional logistic regression to test four SNPs in BCMO1 for associations with breast cancer risk in 9,226 cases and 10,420 controls from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We also tested weighted multi-SNP scores composed of the two SNPs with strong, confirmed associations with circulating carotenoid concentrations. Results Neither the individual SNPs nor the weighted multi-SNP scores were associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio (95% confidence interval) comparing extreme quintiles of weighted multi-SNP scores =1.04 (0.94–1.16) for β-carotene, 1.08 (0.98–1.20) for α-carotene, 1.04 (0.94–1.16) for β-cryptoxanthin, 0.95 (0.87–1.05) for lutein/zeaxanthin, and 0.92 (0.83–1.02) for retinol). Furthermore, no associations were observed when stratifying by estrogen receptor status, but power was limited. Conclusions Our results do not support an association between SNPs associated with circulating carotenoid concentrations and breast cancer risk. Impact Future studies will need additional genetic surrogates and/or sample sizes at least three times larger to contribute evidence of a causal link between carotenoids and breast cancer. PMID:23515144

  19. Molecular cloning and expression in photosynthetic bacteria of a soybean cDNA coding for phytoene desaturase, an enzyme of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, G E; Viitanen, P V; Pecker, I; Chamovitz, D; Hirschberg, J; Scolnik, P A

    1991-01-01

    Carotenoids are orange, yellow, or red photo-protective pigments present in all plastids. The first carotenoid of the pathway is phytoene, a colorless compound that is converted into colored carotenoids through a series of desaturation reactions. Genes coding for carotenoid desaturases have been cloned from microbes but not from plants. We report the cloning of a cDNA for pds1, a soybean (Glycine max) gene that, based on a complementation assay using the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, codes for an enzyme that catalyzes the two desaturation reactions that convert phytoene into zeta-carotene, a yellow carotenoid. The 2281-base-pair cDNA clone analyzed contains an open reading frame with the capacity to code for a 572-residue protein of predicted Mr 63,851. Alignment of the deduced Pds1 peptide sequence with the sequences of fungal and bacterial carotenoid desaturases revealed conservation of several amino acid residues, including a dinucleotide-binding motif that could mediate binding to FAD. The Pds1 protein is synthesized in vitro as a precursor that, upon import into isolated chloroplasts, is processed to a smaller mature form. Hybridization of the pds1 cDNA to genomic blots indicated that this gene is a member of a low-copy-number gene family. One of these loci was genetically mapped using restriction fragment length polymorphisms between Glycine max and Glycine soja. We conclude that pds1 is a nuclear gene encoding a phytoene desaturase enzyme that, as its microbial counterparts, contains sequence motifs characteristic of flavoproteins. Images PMID:1862081

  20. Vitamin C, provitamin A carotenoids, and other carotenoids in high-pressurized orange juice during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción; Plaza, Lucía; De Ancos, Begoña; Cano, M Pilar

    2003-01-29

    Vitamin C, provitamin A carotenoids, and other carotenoids were measured in freshly squeezed juices from oranges (Citrus sinensis L. var. Valencia late) that were subjected to high-pressure (HP) treatment. Also, the stability of these compounds was studied during refrigerated storage at 4 degrees C. HP treatment is an alternative to heat preservation methods for foods; therefore, it is essential to assess the impact of HP on bioactive compounds. Several processes that combine HP treatment with heat treatment for various time periods were assayed: T0, fresh juice (without treatment); T1, 100 MPa/60 degrees C/5 min; T2, 350 MPa/30 degrees C/2.5 min; T3, 400 MPa/40 degrees C/1 min. Fresh and treated samples were kept refrigerated (4 degrees C) over 10 days. After application of HP and during the refrigeration period, the qualitative and quantitative determination of vitamin C, provitamin A carotenoids (beta- and alpha-carotene; beta- and alpha-cryptoxanthin), and the xanthophylls zeaxanthin and lutein was achieved by high-performance liquid chromatography. T1 and T3 juices showed a decrease in ascorbic acid and total vitamin C just after HP treatment (D0) compared with T0 juices. On the contrary, T2 juices, just after HP treatment (D0), had the same levels of both compounds compared to untreated juices. T1, T2, and T3 treatments led to an increase in the extraction of carotenoids and provitamin A carotenoids. Total carotenoid content after the 10-day refrigerated storage period resulted in no significant quantitative changes in T1 juices, whereas in T2 and T3 juices small losses were found at the end of the storage period (20.56 and 9.16%, respectively). These losses could be influenced by the depleted protection of vitamin C toward carotenoid oxidation during the same period. A similar trend was found in provitamin A carotenoids for the different treated juices.

  1. Integrated reforming/aromatization process

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1990-06-26

    This patent describes an integrated process for increasing the gasoline yield from a catalytic reforming process. It comprises: charging a naphtha boiling range feedstream to a catalytic reforming reaction zone under reforming conversion conditions; withdrawing a reactor effluent stream from the reforming reaction zone; separating the reactor effluent stream into a hydrogen-rich gas stream and an unstabilized reformate stream; further separating the unstabilized reformate in a fractionator into an overhead stream containing C{sub 4} - components and a bottom stream containing C{sub 6} + components; charging the fractionator overhead stream to a catalytic aromatization zone under aromatization conversion conditions; withdrawing an aromatization zone effluent stream from the aromatization zone; cooling the aromatization zone effluent stream; separating the cooled aromatization zone effluent steam into a C{sub 4} - stream and a C{sub 5} + stream; and refluxing the C{sub 5} + aromatic gasoline stream to the fractionation zone.

  2. Cyclophanes containing large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ghasemabadi, Parisa Ghods; Yao, Tieguang; Bodwell, Graham J

    2015-09-21

    Cyclophanes have been firmly entrenched as a distinct class of compounds for well over half a century. The two main factors that have kept this field of chemistry going so strongly for such a long time are tremendous structural diversity and the interesting behaviour that is often observed. Although a very large number cyclophanes has been reported, only a very small proportion of them contain polycyclic aromatic systems that can be thought of as "large", i.e. with ≥4 rings. This Review puts the spotlight on such cyclophanes, illuminating both the chemistry that was used to synthesize them and what was learned from studying them. Context for the main body is provided by the careful consideration of the anatomy of a cyclophane and the classification of general synthetic approaches. The subsequent sections cover eleven different PAHs and are organized primarily according to increasing size of the aromatic system, starting with pyrene (C16, the only large polycyclic aromatic system to have been incorporated into numerous cyclophanes) and ending with hexabenzo[bc,ef,hi,kl,no,qr]coronene (C42).

  3. Alpha and omega of carotenoid cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, M R

    2004-01-01

    molecular oxygen and is activated by ferrous ions. It is highly specific for 15:15' ethylenic bond of carotenoids although it has fairly broad specificity towards a number of carotenoids with at least one intact beta-ionone ring. The dioxygenase was recently cloned from Drosophila melanogaster and from the chicken intestine. The recombinant protein was found to form retinal as the sole cleavage product of beta-carotene. No apo-carotenoids were formed. Therefore, it is unequivocally proven that the major, if not the sole, pathway of beta-carotene cleavage to vitamin A is by oxidative cleavage of the central ethylenic bond of beta-carotene to yield two molecules of retinal. Most recently, human dioxygenase has also been cloned. Thus, the wisdom, vision and epoch-making mission of Jim Olson in the science of beta-carotene metabolism have been accomplished. I have no doubt that the impact of his original discovery of the dioxygenase and its importance in vitamin A nutriture should be forthcoming in the near future.

  4. Carotenoids, carotenoid esters, and anthocyanins of yellow-, orange-, and red-peeled cashew apples (Anacardium occidentale L.).

    PubMed

    Schweiggert, Ralf M; Vargas, Ester; Conrad, Jürgen; Hempel, Judith; Gras, Claudia C; Ziegler, Jochen U; Mayer, Angelika; Jiménez, Víctor; Esquivel, Patricia; Carle, Reinhold

    2016-06-01

    Pigment profiles of yellow-, orange-, and red-peeled cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) apples were investigated. Among 15 identified carotenoids and carotenoid esters, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin palmitate were the most abundant in peels and pulp of all samples. Total carotenoid concentrations in the pulp of yellow- and red-peeled cashew apples were low (0.69-0.73 mg/100g FW) compared to that of orange-peeled samples (2.2mg/100g FW). The color difference between the equally carotenoid-rich yellow and red colored samples indicated the presence of a further non-carotenoid pigment type in red peels. Among four detected anthocyanins, the major anthocyanin was unambiguously identified as 7-O-methylcyanidin 3-O-β-D-galactopyranoside by NMR spectroscopy. Red and yellow peel color was chiefly determined by the presence and absence of anthocyanins, respectively, while the orange appearance of the peel was mainly caused by increased carotenoid concentrations. Thus, orange-peeled fruits represent a rich source of provitamin A (ca. 124 μg retinol-activity-equivalents/100g pulp, FW).

  5. Diversity, physiology, and evolution of avian plumage carotenoids and the role of carotenoid-protein interactions in plumage color appearance.

    PubMed

    LaFountain, Amy M; Prum, Richard O; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    The diversity of vibrant plumage colors in birds has evolved as a direct result of social and environmental pressures. To fully understand these underlying pressures it is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms for the creation of novel plumage colors which include the metabolic transformations of dietary carotenoids and spectral tuning of the molecules within the feather protein environment. Recent advances in this field have greatly expanded the number and breadth of avian species for which plumage pigmentation has been characterized, making it possible to reconstruct the phylogenetic history of carotenoid usage in plumage. Resonance Raman and classical Raman spectroscopic techniques have been employed with great effect in the study of carotenoids in situ. The application of these methods have two benefits: to identify carotenoids in feathers that are unavailable for destructive sampling; and to study the spectral tuning resulting from the interaction between the carotenoids and the proteins to which they are bound. This review presents a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the molecular factors controlling the coloration of avian carotenoid plumage obtained through the application of both bioanalytical and spectroscopic methodologies.

  6. Evolution of carotenoid pigmentation in caciques and meadowlarks (Icteridae): repeated gains of red plumage coloration by carotenoid C4-oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Nicholas R; McGraw, Kevin J; Omland, Kevin E

    2014-03-01

    Many animals use carotenoid pigments to produce yellow, orange, and red coloration. In birds, at least 10 carotenoid compounds have been documented in red feathers; most of these are produced through metabolic modification of dietary precursor compounds. However, it is poorly understood how lineages have evolved the biochemical mechanisms for producing red coloration. We used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify the carotenoid compounds present in feathers from 15 species across two clades of blackbirds (the meadowlarks and allies, and the caciques and oropendolas; Icteridae), and mapped their presence or absence on a phylogeny. We found that the red plumage found in meadowlarks includes different carotenoid compounds than the red plumage found in caciques, indicating that these gains of red color are convergent. In contrast, we found that red coloration in two closely related lineages of caciques evolved twice by what appear to be similar biochemical mechanisms. The C4-oxygenation of dietary carotenoids was responsible for each observed transition from yellow to red plumage coloration, and has been commonly reported by other researchers. This suggests that the C4-oxygenation pathway may be a readily evolvable means to gain red coloration using carotenoids.

  7. High carotenoid production by a halotolerant bacterium, Kocuria sp. strain QWT-12 and anticancer activity of its carotenoid

    PubMed Central

    Sarvari, Sajad; Moakedi, Faezeh

    2017-01-01

    Halophilic prokaryotes are extremophile microorganisms that grow optimally in media containing salts and almost appeared pigmented. Many of them contain high concentrations of carotenoids. Amongst 15 strains of halophilic prokaryotes isolated from industrial tannery wastewater in Qom, a Gram-stain-positive coccoid, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, halotolerant bacterium designated as strain QWT-12 showed high capacity in the production of carotenoids in a wide range of culture medium factors. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that this strain belongs to the genus Kocuria. Carotenoids from this strain were extracted by methanol. MTT assay for extracted carotenoid was carried out against seven cancer cell lines belonging to breast, lung and prostate cancer with negative control of fibroblast cell line through six concentration levels to find out IC50. Based on statistical analysis of data from MTT assay, IC50 of 1, 4 and 8 mg/ml for MCF-7, (A549 and MDA-MB-468) and MDA-MB-231 respectively. Additionally, qualitative carotenoid determination was carried out using spectrophotometric method in 300-600 nm and thin layer chromatography, respectively. According to the obtained results from mass spectrophotometry, absorption spectrum of strain QWT-12 is similar to the absorption spectrum of the carotenoid neurosporene. PMID:28827999

  8. Analysis of carotenoid accumulation and expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes in different organs of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Kim, Jae Kwang; Lee, Jeongyeo; Park, Woo Tae; Kwon, Do Yeon; Kim, Yeon Bok; Kim, Haeng Hoon; Kim, Hye Ran; Park, Sang Un

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between carotenoid accumulation and expression of carotenoid biosynthesis genes was investigated in the flowers, stems, young leaves, old leaves, and roots of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the mRNA levels of BrPSY, BrPDS, BrZDS, BrLCYB, BrLCYE, BrCHXB, and BrZEP leading to the production of carotenoids were highest in the flowers or the leaves and lowest in the roots of Chinese cabbage. In contrast, the mRNA expression of BrNCED, a gene involved in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, was highest in the roots. High-performance liquid chromatography revealed that carotenoids, namely, lutein and β-carotene, were distributed predominantly in the flowers and leaves, with very little in the underground organ, the roots. Specifically, old leaves contained 120.3 μg/g lutein and 103.93 μg/g β-carotene, which is the most potent dietary precursor of vitamin A. Moreover, we found a relatively large amount of cis isomers of β-carotene, namely, 9-cis β-carotene and 13-cis β-carotene, in Chinese cabbage. These results provide insight into carotenoid biosynthetic mechanisms in Chinese cabbage and may be helpful in the metabolic engineering of carotenoid biosynthesis in plants. PMID:27540344

  9. Thraustochytrids as production organisms for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), squalene, and carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Aasen, Inga Marie; Ertesvåg, Helga; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan; Liu, Bin; Brautaset, Trygve; Vadstein, Olav; Ellingsen, Trond E

    2016-05-01

    Thraustochytrids have been applied for industrial production of the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic (DHA) since the 1990s. During more than 20 years of research on this group of marine, heterotrophic microorganisms, considerable increases in DHA productivities have been obtained by process and medium optimization. Strains of thraustochytrids also produce high levels of squalene and carotenoids, two other commercially interesting compounds with a rapidly growing market potential, but where yet few studies on process optimization have been reported. Thraustochytrids use two pathways for fatty acid synthesis. The saturated fatty acids are produced by the standard fatty acid synthesis, while DHA is synthesized by a polyketide synthase. However, fundamental knowledge about the relationship between the two pathways is still lacking. In the present review, we extract main findings from the high number of reports on process optimization for DHA production and interpret these in the light of the current knowledge of DHA synthesis in thraustochytrids and lipid accumulation in oleaginous microorganisms in general. We also summarize published reports on squalene and carotenoid production and review the current status on strain improvement, which has been hampered by the yet very few published genome sequences and the lack of tools for gene transfer to the organisms. As more sequences now are becoming available, targets for strain improvement can be identified and open for a system-level metabolic engineering for improved productivities.

  10. Control of carotenoid biosynthesis through a heme-based cis-trans isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Jesús; Kloss, Brian; Hosler, Jonathan P.; Geng, Jiafeng; Liu, Aimin; Modi, Anuja; Dawson, John H.; Sono, Masanori; Shumskaya, Maria; Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Love, James D.; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize carotenoids essential for plant development and survival. These metabolites also serve as essential nutrients for human health. The biosynthetic pathway leading to all plant carotenoids occurs in chloroplasts and other plastids and requires 15-cis-ζ-carotene isomerase (Z-ISO). It was not certain whether isomerization was achieved by Z-ISO alone or in combination with other enzymes. Here we show that Z-ISO is a bona fide enzyme and integral membrane protein. Z-ISO independently catalyzes the cis-to-trans isomerization of the 15–15′ C=C bond in 9,15,9′-cis-ζ-carotene to produce the substrate required by the following biosynthetic pathway enzyme. We discovered that isomerization depends upon a ferrous heme b cofactor that undergoes redox-regulated ligand-switching between the heme iron and alternate Z-ISO amino acid residues. Heme b-dependent isomerization of a large, hydrophobic compound in a membrane is unprecedented. As an isomerase, Z-ISO represents a new prototype for heme b proteins and potentially utilizes a novel chemical mechanism. PMID:26075523

  11. New insights into the formation of fungal aromatic polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Jason M.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2011-01-01

    Fungal aromatic polyketides constitute a large family of bioactive natural products and are synthesized by the non-reducing group of iterative polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs). Their diverse structures arise from selective enzymatic modifications of reactive enzyme-bound poly-β-keto intermediates. How iterative PKSs control starter unit selection, polyketide chain initiation and elongation, intermediate folding and cyclization, selective redox or modification reactions during assembly, and product release are central mechanistic questions underlying iterative catalysis. This review highlights recent insights into these questions, with a particular focus on the biosynthetic programming of fungal aromatic polyketides, and draws comparisons to the allied biosynthetic processes in bacteria. PMID:21079635

  12. Validation model for Raman based skin carotenoid detection.

    PubMed

    Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a rapid objective non-invasive optical method for the detection of carotenoid compounds in human tissue in vivo. Carotenoids are of interest due to their functions as antioxidants and/or optical absorbers of phototoxic light at deep blue and near UV wavelengths. In the macular region of the human retina, carotenoids may prevent or delay the onset of age-related tissue degeneration. In human skin, they may help prevent premature skin aging, and are possibly involved in the prevention of certain skin cancers. Furthermore, since carotenoids exist in high concentrations in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, and are routinely taken up by the human body through the diet, skin carotenoid levels may serve as an objective biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake. Before the Raman method can be accepted as a widespread optical alternative for carotenoid measurements, direct validation studies are needed to compare it with the gold standard of high performance liquid chromatography. This is because the tissue Raman response is in general accompanied by a host of other optical processes which have to be taken into account. In skin, the most prominent is strongly diffusive, non-Raman scattering, leading to relatively shallow light penetration of the blue/green excitation light required for resonant Raman detection of carotenoids. Also, sizable light attenuation exists due to the combined absorption from collagen, porphyrin, hemoglobin, and melanin chromophores, and additional fluorescence is generated by collagen and porphyrins. In this study, we investigate for the first time the direct correlation of in vivo skin tissue carotenoid Raman measurements with subsequent chromatography derived carotenoid concentrations. As tissue site we use heel skin, in which the stratum corneum layer thickness exceeds the light penetration depth, which is free of optically confounding chromophores, which can be easily optically accessed for in vivo RRS

  13. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Carotenoid and Chlorophyll Harmonophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarz, Danielle Barbara

    Information regarding the structure and function of living tissues and cells is instrumental to the advancement of cell biology and biophysics. Nonlinear optical microscopy can provide such information, but only certain biological structures generate nonlinear optical signals. Therefore, structural specificity can be achieved by introducing labels for nonlinear optical microscopy. Few studies exist in the literature about labels that facilitate harmonic generation, coined "harmonophores". This thesis consists of the first major investigation of harmonophores for third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy. Carotenoids and chlorophylls were investigated as potential harmonophores. Their nonlinear optical properties were studied by the THG ratio technique. In addition, a tunable refractometer was built in order to determine their second hyperpolarizability (gamma). At 830 nm excitation wavelength, carotenoids and chlorophylls were found to have large negative gamma values however, at 1028 nm, the sign of gamma reversed for carotenoids and remained negative for chlorophylls. Consequently, at 1028 nm wavelength, THG signal is canceled with mixtures of carotenoids and chlorophylls. Furthermore, when such molecules are covalently bonded as dyads or interact within photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, it is found that additive effects with the gamma values still play a role, however, the overall gamma value is also influenced by the intra-pigment and inter-pigment interaction. The nonlinear optical properties of aggregates containing chlorophylls and carotenoids were the target of subsequent investigations. Carotenoid aggregates were imaged with polarization-dependent second harmonic generation and THG microscopy. Both techniques revealed crystallographic information pertaining to H and J aggregates and beta-carotene crystalline aggregates found in orange carrot. In order to demonstrate THG enhancement due to labeling, cultured cells were labeled with carotenoid

  14. Dietary supplementation with a natural carotenoid mixture decreases oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kiokias, S; Gordon, M H

    2003-09-01

    To determine whether dietary supplementation with a natural carotenoid mixture counteracts the enhancement of oxidative stress induced by consumption of fish oil. A randomised double-blind crossover dietary intervention. Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition, School of Food Biosciences, The University of Reading, Whiteknights PO Box 226, Reading RG6 6AP, UK. A total of 32 free-living healthy nonsmoking volunteers were recruited by posters and e-mails in The University of Reading. One volunteer withdrew during the study. The volunteers consumed a daily supplement comprising capsules containing fish oil (4 x 1 g) or fish oil (4 x 1 g) containing a natural carotenoid mixture (4 x 7.6 mg) for 3 weeks in a randomised crossover design separated by a 12 week washout phase. The carotenoid mixture provided a daily intake of beta-carotene (6.0 mg), alpha-carotene (1.4 mg), lycopene (4.5 mg), bixin (11.7 mg), lutein (4.4 mg) and paprika carotenoids (2.2 mg). Blood and urine samples were collected on days 0 and 21 of each dietary period. The carotenoid mixture reduced the fall in ex vivo oxidative stability of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) induced by the fish oil (P=0.045) and it reduced the extent of DNA damage assessed by the concentration of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in urine (P=0.005). There was no effect on the oxidative stability of plasma ex vivo assessed by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity test. beta-Carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene and lutein were increased in the plasma of subjects consuming the carotenoid mixture. Plasma triglyceride levels were reduced significantly more than the reduction for the fish oil control (P=0.035), but total cholesterol, HDL and LDL levels were not significantly changed by the consumption of the carotenoid mixture. Consumption of the natural carotenoid mixture lowered the increase in oxidative stress induced by the fish oil as assessed by ex vivo oxidative stability of LDL and DNA degradation product in urine. The carotenoid

  15. Natural variation in expression of genes associated with carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several groups have reported on massive accumulation of total carotenoids in cassava storage root (CSR). Naturally occurring color variation associated with carotenoid accumulation was observed in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root of landraces from Amazon. Here carotenoid profiles from...

  16. Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering for Marine Carotenoids: New Opportunities and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chonglong; Kim, Jung-Hun; Kim, Seon-Won

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids are a class of diverse pigments with important biological roles such as light capture and antioxidative activities. Many novel carotenoids have been isolated from marine organisms to date and have shown various utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. In this review, we summarize the pathways and enzymes of carotenoid synthesis and discuss various modifications of marine carotenoids. The advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for carotenoid production are also reviewed, in hopes that this review will promote the exploration of marine carotenoid for their utilizations. PMID:25233369

  17. Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering for marine carotenoids: new opportunities and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chonglong; Kim, Jung-Hun; Kim, Seon-Won

    2014-09-17

    Carotenoids are a class of diverse pigments with important biological roles such as light capture and antioxidative activities. Many novel carotenoids have been isolated from marine organisms to date and have shown various utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. In this review, we summarize the pathways and enzymes of carotenoid synthesis and discuss various modifications of marine carotenoids. The advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology for carotenoid production are also reviewed, in hopes that this review will promote the exploration of marine carotenoid for their utilizations.

  18. Carotenoids: actual knowledge on food sources, intakes, stability and bioavailability and their protective role in humans.

    PubMed

    Maiani, Giuseppe; Castón, María Jesús Periago; Catasta, Giovina; Toti, Elisabetta; Cambrodón, Isabel Goñi; Bysted, Anette; Granado-Lorencio, Fernando; Olmedilla-Alonso, Begoña; Knuthsen, Pia; Valoti, Massimo; Böhm, Volker; Mayer-Miebach, Esther; Behsnilian, Diana; Schlemmer, Ulrich

    2009-09-01

    Carotenoids are one of the major food micronutrients in human diets and the overall objective of this review is to re-examine the role of carotenoids in human nutrition. We have emphasized the attention on the following carotenoids present in food and human tissues: beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, alpha-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin; we have reported the major food sources and dietary intake of these compounds. We have tried to summarize positive and negative effects of food processing, storage, cooking on carotenoid content and carotenoid bioavailability. In particular, we have evidenced the possibility to improve carotenoids bioavailability in accordance with changes and variations of technology procedures.

  19. Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase (CmCCD4a) Contributes to White Color Formation in Chrysanthemum Petals1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Ohmiya, Akemi; Kishimoto, Sanae; Aida, Ryutaro; Yoshioka, Satoshi; Sumitomo, Katsuhiko

    2006-01-01

    The white petals of chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.) are believed to contain a factor that inhibits the accumulation of carotenoids. To find this factor, we performed polymerase chain reaction-Select subtraction screening and obtained a clone expressed differentially in white and yellow petals. The deduced amino acid sequence of the protein (designated CmCCD4a) encoded by the clone was highly homologous to the sequence of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase. All the white-flowered chrysanthemum cultivars tested showed high levels of CmCCD4a transcript in their petals, whereas most of the yellow-flowered cultivars showed extremely low levels. Expression of CmCCD4a was strictly limited to flower petals and was not detected in other organs, such as the root, stem, or leaf. White petals turned yellow after the RNAi construct of CmCCD4a was introduced. These results indicate that in white petals of chrysanthemums, carotenoids are synthesized but are subsequently degraded into colorless compounds, which results in the white color. PMID:16980560

  20. Graviresponsiveness and abscisic-acid content of roots of carotenoid-deficient mutants of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Smith, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The abscisic-acid (ABA) content of roots of the carotenoid-deficient w-3, vp-5, and vp-7 mutants of Z. mays was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with an analysis sensitivity of 6 ng ABA g-1 fresh weight (FW). Roots of normal seedlings of the same lines were characterized by the following amounts of ABA (as ng ABA g-1 FW, +/- standard deviation): w-3, 279 +/- 43; vp-5, 237 +/- 26; vp-7, 338 +/- 61. We did not detect any ABA in roots of any of the mutants. Thus, the lack of carotenoids in these mutants correlated positively with the apparent absence of ABA. Primary roots of normal and mutant seedlings were positively gravitropic, with no significant differences in the curvatures of roots of normal as compared with mutant seedlings. These results indicate that ABA 1) is synthesized in maize roots via the carotenoid pathway, and 2) is not necessary for positive gravitropism by primary roots of Z. mays.

  1. Graviresponsiveness and abscisic-acid content of roots of carotenoid-deficient mutants of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Smith, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The abscisic-acid (ABA) content of roots of the carotenoid-deficient w-3, vp-5, and vp-7 mutants of Z. mays was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with an analysis sensitivity of 6 ng ABA g-1 fresh weight (FW). Roots of normal seedlings of the same lines were characterized by the following amounts of ABA (as ng ABA g-1 FW, +/- standard deviation): w-3, 279 +/- 43; vp-5, 237 +/- 26; vp-7, 338 +/- 61. We did not detect any ABA in roots of any of the mutants. Thus, the lack of carotenoids in these mutants correlated positively with the apparent absence of ABA. Primary roots of normal and mutant seedlings were positively gravitropic, with no significant differences in the curvatures of roots of normal as compared with mutant seedlings. These results indicate that ABA 1) is synthesized in maize roots via the carotenoid pathway, and 2) is not necessary for positive gravitropism by primary roots of Z. mays.

  2. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Carotenoids and Lycopenes Chemistry; Metabolism, Absorption, Nutrition, and Allied Health Claims--A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Perveen, Rashida; Suleria, Hafiz Ansar Rasul; Anjum, Faqir Muhammad; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Pasha, Imran; Ahmad, Sarfraz

    2015-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is one of the most essential herbaceous plants that have been probed against various life sight related disorders owing to array of phytochemicals. It is important source of vitamin C, potassium, folic acid, and carotenoids, such as lycopene. Carotenoids are the pigments synthesized during fruit ripening and responsible for the final red color of the tomato. Consumption of tomato and tomato-based products contribute to the absorption of carotenoids and lycopenes in human serum. Lycopene is chemically acyclic carotene with 11 conjugated double bonds, normally in transconfiguration while isomerization occur in blood plasma for its better absorption. It has ability for adenosine deaminase inhibition that plays important role in the regression of tumor. Tomato also contain other active compounds, namely, neoxanthin, lutein, α-cryptoxanthin, α-carotene, β-carotene, cyclolycopene, and β-carotene 5, 6-epoxide. These components provide synergistic effect against various threats but still need further attention of the researchers. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have elucidated the potential of tomato against variety of metabolic syndromes. Latest research highlights the relationship between consuming tomato and its products with reduced risk of various maladies like obesity, hyperglycemic and hypercholesterolemic attributes, cardiovascular disorders, and cancer insurgences. Moreover, tomato and its bioactive components hold potential to become effective modules in diet-based regimens; however, integrated research and meta-analysis are still required to enhance meticulousness.

  3. Identification of line-specific strategies for improving carotenoid production in synthetic maize through data-driven mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Comas, Jorge; Benfeitas, Rui; Vilaprinyo, Ester; Sorribas, Albert; Solsona, Francesc; Farré, Gemma; Berman, Judit; Zorrilla, Uxue; Capell, Teresa; Sandmann, Gerhard; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul; Alves, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Plant synthetic biology is still in its infancy. However, synthetic biology approaches have been used to manipulate and improve the nutritional and health value of staple food crops such as rice, potato and maize. With current technologies, production yields of the synthetic nutrients are a result of trial and error, and systematic rational strategies to optimize those yields are still lacking. Here, we present a workflow that combines gene expression and quantitative metabolomics with mathematical modeling to identify strategies for increasing production yields of nutritionally important carotenoids in the seed endosperm synthesized through alternative biosynthetic pathways in synthetic lines of white maize, which is normally devoid of carotenoids. Quantitative metabolomics and gene expression data are used to create and fit parameters of mathematical models that are specific to four independent maize lines. Sensitivity analysis and simulation of each model is used to predict which gene activities should be further engineered in order to increase production yields for carotenoid accumulation in each line. Some of these predictions (e.g. increasing Zmlycb/Gllycb will increase accumulated β-carotenes) are valid across the four maize lines and consistent with experimental observations in other systems. Other predictions are line specific. The workflow is adaptable to any other biological system for which appropriate quantitative information is available. Furthermore, we validate some of the predictions using experimental data from additional synthetic maize lines for which no models were developed.

  4. PULSE SYNTHESIZING GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1963-08-01

    >An electronlc circuit for synthesizing electrical current pulses having very fast rise times includes several sinewave generators tuned to progressively higher harmonic frequencies with signal amplitudes and phases selectable according to the Fourier series of the waveform that is to be synthesized. Phase control is provided by periodically triggering the generators at precisely controlled times. The outputs of the generators are combined in a coaxial transmission line. Any frequency-dependent delays that occur in the transmission line can be readily compensated for so that the desired signal wave shape is obtained at the output of the line. (AEC)

  5. Carotenoids in bird testes: links to body carotenoid supplies, plumage coloration, body mass and testes mass in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus).

    PubMed

    Rowe, Melissah; Tourville, Elizabeth A; McGraw, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoid pigments can be allocated to different parts of the body to serve specific functions. In contrast to other body tissues, studies of carotenoid resources in the testes of animals are relatively scarce. We used high-performance liquid chromatography to determine the types and concentrations of carotenoids in the testes of house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus). Additionally, we examined the relationships between testes carotenoid concentrations and carotenoid pools in other body tissues, as well as body mass, testes mass and plumage coloration. We detected low concentrations of several carotenoids - lutein (the predominant carotenoid), zeaxanthin, anhydrolutein, β-cryptoxanthin, β-carotene and an unknown carotene - in the testes of wild house finches. We also found that testes lutein levels were significantly and positively associated with circulating lutein levels, while the concentration of zeaxanthin in testes was positively associated with zeaxanthin levels in liver, though in this instance the relationship was much weaker and only marginally significant. Furthermore, lutein levels in testes were significantly negatively associated with testes mass. Finally, plumage coloration was not associated with either the concentration of carotenoids in the testes or relative testes mass. These results suggest that testes carotenoids are reflective of the pool of circulating carotenoids in house finches, and that plumage coloration is unlikely to signal either the carotenoid content of testes tissue or a male's capacity for sperm production. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOEpatents

    Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-10-19

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  7. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl (18E) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOEpatents

    Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1993-01-01

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  8. Effects of white, blue, and red light-emitting diodes on carotenoid biosynthetic gene expression levels and carotenoid accumulation in sprouts of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.).

    PubMed

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeon Bok; Kim, Jae Kwang; Kim, Sun-Ju; Lee, Sanghyun; Chung, Sun-Ok; Park, Sang Un

    2013-12-18

    In this study, the optimum wavelengths of light required for carotenoid biosynthesis were determined by investigating the expression levels of carotenoid biosynthetic genes and carotenoid accumulation in sprouts of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.) exposed to white, blue, and red light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Most carotenoid biosynthetic genes showed higher expression in sprouts irradiated with white light at 8 days after sowing than in those irradiated with blue and red lights. The dominant carotenoids in tartary buckwheat sprouts were lutein and β-carotene. The richest accumulation of total carotenoids was observed in sprouts grown under white light (1282.63 μg g(-1) dry weight), which was relatively higher than that in sprouts grown under blue and red lights (940.86 and 985.54 μg g(-1), respectively). This study might establish an effective strategy for maximizing the production of carotenoids and other important secondary metabolites in tartary buckwheat sprouts by using LED technology.

  9. Improving Carotenoid Extraction from Tomato Waste by Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Luengo, Elisa; Álvarez, Ignacio; Raso, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, the influence of the application of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) of different intensities (3–7 kV/cm and 0–300 μs) on the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel and pulp in a mixture of hexane:acetone:ethanol was studied with the aim of increasing extraction yield or reducing the percentage of the less green solvents in the extraction medium. According to the cellular disintegration index, the optimum treatment time for the permeabilization of tomato peel and pulp at different electric field strengths was 90 μs. The PEF permeabilization of tomato pulp did not significantly increase the carotenoid extraction. However, a PEF treatment at 5 kV/cm improved the carotenoid extraction from tomato peel by 39% as compared with the control in a mixture of hexane:ethanol:acetone (50:25:25). Further increments of electric field from 5 to 7 kV/cm did not increase significantly the extraction of carotenoids. The presence of acetone in the solvent mixture did not positively affect the carotenoid extraction when the tomato peels were PEF-treated. Response surface methodology was used to determine the potential of PEF for reducing the percentage of hexane in a hexane:ethanol mixture. The application of a PEF treatment allowed reducing the hexane percentage from 45 to 30% without affecting the carotenoid extraction yield. The antioxidant capacity of the extracts obtained from tomato peel was correlated with the carotenoid concentration and it was not affected by the PEF treatment. PMID:25988115

  10. A complex carotenoid palette tunes avian color vision.

    DOE PAGES

    Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Toomey, Matthew B.; Collins, Aaron M.; ...

    2015-10-07

    The brilliantly coloured cone oil droplets of the avian retina function as long-pass cut-off filters that tune the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors and are hypothesized to enhance colour discrimination and improve colour constancy. Although it has long been known that these droplets are pigmented with carotenoids, their precise composition has remained uncertain owing to the technical challenges of measuring these very small, dense and highly refractile optical organelles. In this study, we integrated results from high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral microscopy and microspectrophotometry to obtain a comprehensive understanding of oil droplet carotenoid pigmentation in the chicken (Gallus gallus). We findmore » that each of the four carotenoid-containing droplet types consists of a complex mixture of carotenoids, with a single predominant carotenoid determining the wavelength of the spectral filtering cut-off. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the predominant carotenoid type in the oil droplets of long-wavelength-sensitive, medium-wavelength-sensitive and short-wavelength-sensitive type 2 cones are astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and galloxanthin, respectively. In addition, the oil droplet of the principal member of the double cone contains a mixture of galloxanthin and two hydroxycarotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). Short-wavelength-absorbing apocarotenoids are present in all of the droplet types, providing filtering of light in a region of the spectrum where filtering by hydroxy- and ketocarotenoids may be incomplete. Furthermore, birds rely on a complex palette of carotenoid pigments within their cone oil droplets to achieve finely tuned spectral filtering.« less

  11. A complex carotenoid palette tunes avian color vision.

    SciTech Connect

    Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Toomey, Matthew B.; Collins, Aaron M.; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M. Carter; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2015-10-07

    The brilliantly coloured cone oil droplets of the avian retina function as long-pass cut-off filters that tune the spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors and are hypothesized to enhance colour discrimination and improve colour constancy. Although it has long been known that these droplets are pigmented with carotenoids, their precise composition has remained uncertain owing to the technical challenges of measuring these very small, dense and highly refractile optical organelles. In this study, we integrated results from high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral microscopy and microspectrophotometry to obtain a comprehensive understanding of oil droplet carotenoid pigmentation in the chicken (Gallus gallus). We find that each of the four carotenoid-containing droplet types consists of a complex mixture of carotenoids, with a single predominant carotenoid determining the wavelength of the spectral filtering cut-off. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the predominant carotenoid type in the oil droplets of long-wavelength-sensitive, medium-wavelength-sensitive and short-wavelength-sensitive type 2 cones are astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and galloxanthin, respectively. In addition, the oil droplet of the principal member of the double cone contains a mixture of galloxanthin and two hydroxycarotenoids (lutein and zeaxanthin). Short-wavelength-absorbing apocarotenoids are present in all of the droplet types, providing filtering of light in a region of the spectrum where filtering by hydroxy- and ketocarotenoids may be incomplete. Furthermore, birds rely on a complex palette of carotenoid pigments within their cone oil droplets to achieve finely tuned spectral filtering.

  12. Carotenoids modulate cytokine production in Peyer's patch cells ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Hasegawa, Isao; Yahagi, Nobuo; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Takano, Fumihide; Ohta, Tomihisa

    2010-08-11

    This study investigated the effects of carotenoid and capsaicin constituents of Capsicum on intestinal immune responses in mice. Peyer's patch (PP) cells were isolated from mice orally administered with capsaicin, or one of three carotenoids (beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, or lycopene), at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 consecutive days. Collagenase-separated PP cells were then cultured in the presence or absence of concanavalin A (Con A). PP cells from mice treated with capsaicin, beta-carotene, or beta-cryptoxanthin all showed significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-gamma production when costimulated with 5 microg/mL Con A, with capsaicin having the greatest effect (approximately two times greater than in normal mice). No increase in the production of IL-2 or IL-4 was observed when PP cells from mice were cultured without Con A. We further tested the combined efficacy of carotenoids and capsaicin on intestinal T-cell cytokine production. Oral administration of capsaicin with beta-carotene, both at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days, increased IFN-gamma and IL-2 production in cultured PP cells costimulated with Con A. In contrast, oral administration of beta-cryptoxanthin counteracted the stimulatory effect of capsaicin treatment on T-helper cytokine production. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the population of IFN-gamma(+) and IL-4(+) cells in PPs from mice administered capsaicin and/or carotenoids did not change, which suggested that the effects of carotenoids and capsaicin on cytokine production were not due to changes in the lymphoid population in PPs. These results indicate that carotenoids and capsaicin, which are common components of foods such as Capsicum, mutually modulate T-cell immune responses to exogenous or endogenous inducers such as antigens in PPs, without changing the lymphoid population. Carotenoids modulate the potentiality of cytokine production in T cells or indirectly activate T cells but have no triggering effect such as Con A.

  13. Carotenoids of Microalgae Used in Food Industry and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gateau, Hélène; Solymosi, Katalin; Marchand, Justine; Schoefs, Benoît

    2017-01-01

    Since the industrial revolution, the consumption of processed food increased dramatically. During processing, food material loses many of its natural properties. The simple restoration of the original properties of the processed food as well as fortification require food supplementation with compounds prepared chemically or of natural origin. The observations that natural food additives are safer and better accepted by consumers than synthetic ones have strongly increased the demand for natural compounds. Because some of them have only a low abundance or are even rare, their market price can be very high. This is the case for most carotenoids of natural origin to which this review is dedicated. The increasing demand for food additives of natural origin contributes to an accelerated depletion of traditional natural resources already threatened by intensive agriculture and pollution. To overcome these difficulties and satisfy the demand, alternative sources for natural carotenoids have to be found. In this context, photosynthetic microalgae present a very high potential because they contain carotenoids and are able to produce particular carotenoids under stress. Their potential also resides in the fact that only ten thousands of microalgal strains have been described while hundred thousands of species are predicted to exist. Carotenoids have been known for ages for their antioxidant and coloring properties, and a large body of evidence has been accumulated about their health potential. This review summarizes both the medicinal and food industry applications of microalgae with emphasis on the former. In addition, traditional and alternative microalgal sources used for industrial carotenoid extraction, the chemical and physical properties, the biosynthesis and the localization of carotenoids in algae are also briefly discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. The Signaling State of Orange Carotenoid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Maksimov, Eugene G.; Shirshin, Evgeny A.; Sluchanko, Nikolai N.; Zlenko, Dmitry V.; Parshina, Evgenia Y.; Tsoraev, Georgy V.; Klementiev, Konstantin E.; Budylin, Gleb S.; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Friedrich, Thomas; Fadeev, Victor V.; Paschenko, Vladimir Z.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Orange carotenoid protein (OCP) is the photoactive protein that is responsible for high light tolerance in cyanobacteria. We studied the kinetics of the OCP photocycle by monitoring changes in its absorption spectrum, intrinsic fluorescence, and fluorescence of the Nile red dye bound to OCP. It was demonstrated that all of these three methods provide the same kinetic parameters of the photocycle, namely, the kinetics of OCP relaxation in darkness was biexponential with a ratio of two components equal to 2:1 independently of temperature. Whereas the changes of the absorption spectrum of OCP characterize the geometry and environment of its chromophore, the intrinsic fluorescence of OCP reveals changes in its tertiary structure, and the fluorescence properties of Nile red indicate the exposure of hydrophobic surface areas of OCP to the solvent following the photocycle. The results of molecular-dynamics studies indicated the presence of two metastable conformations of 3′-hydroxyechinenone, which is consistent with characteristic changes in the Raman spectra. We conclude that rotation of the β-ionylidene ring in the C-terminal domain of OCP could be one of the first conformational rearrangements that occur during photoactivation. The obtained results suggest that the photoactivated form of OCP represents a molten globule-like state that is characterized by increased mobility of tertiary structure elements and solvent accessibility. PMID:26244741

  15. Facile Formation of Redox-Active Totally Organic Nanoparticles in Water by In Situ Reduction of Organic Precursors Stabilized through Aromatic-Aromatic Interactions by Aromatic Polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Mario E; Garcés-Jerez, Pablo; Fernández, Daniel; Aros-Perez, Gustavo; González-Cabrera, Diego; Álvarez, Eduardo; Cañas, Ignacio; Oyarzun-Ampuero, Felipe; Moreno-Villoslada, Ignacio

    2016-11-01

    The formation of redox-active, totally organic nanoparticles in water is achieved following a strategy similar to that used to form metal nanoparticles. It is based on two fundamental concepts: i) complexation through aromatic-aromatic interactions of a water-soluble precursor aromatic molecule with polyelectrolytes bearing complementary charged aromatic rings, and ii) reduction of the precursor molecule to achieve stabilized nanoparticles. Thus, formazan nanoparticles are synthesized by reduction of a tetrazolium salt with ascorbic acid using polyelectrolytes bearing benzene sulfonate residues of high linear aromatic density, but cannot be formed in the presence of nonaromatic polyelectrolytes. The red colored nanoparticles are efficiently encapsulated in calcium alginate beads, showing macroscopic homogeneity. Bleaching kinetics with chlorine show linear rates on the order of tenths of milli-meters per minute. A linear behavior of the dependence of the rate of bleaching on the chlorine concentration is found, showing the potential of the nanoparticles for chlorine sensing. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Stability of bacterial carotenoids in the presence of iron in a model of the gastric compartment - comparison with dietary reference carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Sy, Charlotte; Dangles, Olivier; Borel, Patrick; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine

    2015-04-15

    Recently isolated spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria, Bacillus indicus HU36 and Bacillus firmus GB1 are sources of carotenoids (∼fifteen distinct yellow and orange pigments and ∼thirteen distinct pink pigments, respectively). They are glycosides of oxygenated lycopene derivatives (apo-lycopenoids) and are assumed to be more heat- and gastric-stable than common carotenoids. In this study, the oxidation by O2 of the bacterial carotenoids was initiated by free iron (Fe(II) and Fe(III)) or by heme iron (metmyoglobin) in a mildly acidic aqueous solution mimicking the gastro-intestinal compartment and compared to the oxidation of the common dietary carotenoids β-carotene, lycopene and astaxanthin. Under these conditions, all bacterial carotenoids appear more stable in the presence of heme iron vs. free iron. Carotenoid autoxidation initiated by Fe(II) is relatively fast and likely involves reactive oxygen-iron species derived from Fe(II) and O2. By contrast, the corresponding reaction with Fe(III) is kinetically blocked by the slow preliminary reduction of Fe(III) into Fe(II) by the carotenoids. The stability of carotenoids toward autoxidation increases as follows: β-carotenecarotenoids react more quickly than reference carotenoids with Fe(III), but much more slowly than the reference carotenoids with Fe(II). This reaction is correlated with the structure of the carotenoids, which can have opposite effects in a micellar system: bacterial carotenoids with electro-attracting terminal groups have a lower reducing capacity than β-carotene and lycopene. However, their polar head favours their location close to the interface of micelles, in closer contact with oxidative species. Kinetic analyses of the iron-induced autoxidation of astaxanthin and HU36 carotenoids has been performed and gives insights in the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Wisdom, Intelligence & Creativity Synthesized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    How is it that smart administrators who want to do a good job often find themselves in situations that degenerate into confrontation and, ultimately, termination? In this article, the author discusses why in terms of a model of leadership--which he refers to it as WICS, an acronym for wisdom, intelligence and creativity synthesized. He describes…

  18. Wisdom, Intelligence & Creativity Synthesized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    How is it that smart administrators who want to do a good job often find themselves in situations that degenerate into confrontation and, ultimately, termination? In this article, the author discusses why in terms of a model of leadership--which he refers to it as WICS, an acronym for wisdom, intelligence and creativity synthesized. He describes…

  19. The Journal Synthesizing Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Zev

    The journal synthesizing activity is intended to combine aspects of the formal essay with that of a diary. Activities associated with lecture topics are written up as short journal entries of approximately five typewritten pages and are turned in during the weekly class session at which the related topic is being discussed. The journal project…

  20. Synthesized night vision goggle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haixian

    2000-06-01

    A Synthesized Night Vision Goggle that will be described int his paper is a new type of night vision goggle with multiple functions. It consists of three parts: main observing system, picture--superimposed system (or Cathode Ray Tube system) and Charge-Coupled Device system.

  1. Syntheses of ylidenbutenolide-modified derivatives of peridinin and their stereochemical and spectral characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Takayuki; Aoki, Kazuyoshi; Iwashita, Takashi; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Frank, Harry A; Katsumura, Shigeo

    2010-06-07

    Peridinin is a light-harvesting carotenoid found in oceanic photosynthetic organisms. It possesses a unique gamma-ylidenbutenolide function and engages in energy transfer to chlorophyll a with very high (>90%) efficiency. In order to examine the relationship between the unique structure of peridinin and its facility in carrying out energy transfer, we have synthesized two different ylidenbutenolide-modified derivatives of peridinin. In this communication, the details of the syntheses are described as are the stereochemical and spectral characteristics of the derivatives; the novel ylidenbutenolide functional group stabilizes the molecule and maintains the conjugated pi-electron system in an all-trans configuration.

  2. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (Pl) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethylacetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrroldinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperature under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl)imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxyphenyl)imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight Pl of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  3. Polyimidazoles via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Polyimidazoles (PI) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The reactions are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N,N-dimethyl acetamide, sulfolane, N-methylpyrrolidinone, dimethylsulfoxide, or diphenylsulfone using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl) imidazole monomers are prepared by reacting an aromatic aldehyde with a dimethoxybenzil or by reacting an aromatic dialdehyde with a methoxybenzil in the presence of ammonium acetate. The di(methoxyphenyl) imidazole is subsequently treated with aqueous hydrobromic acid to give the di(hydroxphenyl) imidazole monomer. This synthetic route has provided high molecular weight PI of new chemical structure, is economically and synthetically more favorable than other routes, and allows for facile chemical structure variation due to the availability of a large variety of activated aromatic dihalides and dinitro compounds.

  4. The Requirement for Carotenoids in the Assembly and Function of the Photosynthetic Complexes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Santabarbara, Stefano; Casazza, Anna Paola; Ali, Kulsam; Economou, Chloe K.; Wannathong, Thanyanun; Zito, Francesca; Redding, Kevin E.; Rappaport, Fabrice; Purton, Saul

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the importance of carotenoids on the accumulation and function of the photosynthetic apparatus using a mutant of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacking carotenoids. The FN68 mutant is deficient in phytoene synthase, the first enzyme of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, and therefore is unable to synthesize any carotenes and xanthophylls. We find that FN68 is unable to accumulate the light-harvesting complexes associated with both photosystems as well as the RC subunits of photosystem II. The accumulation of the cytochrome b6f complex is also strongly reduced to a level approximately 10% that of the wild type. However, the residual fraction of assembled cytochrome b6f complexes exhibits single-turnover electron transfer kinetics comparable to those observed in the wild-type strain. Surprisingly, photosystem I is assembled to significant levels in the absence of carotenoids in FN68 and possesses functional properties that are very similar to those of the wild-type complex. PMID:23161889

  5. Carotenoids in durian fruit pulp during growth and postharvest ripening.

    PubMed

    Wisutiamonkul, Apinya; Promdang, Somnuk; Ketsa, Saichol; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2015-08-01

    Durian (Durio zibethinus) cvs. Chanee and Monthong fruit were severed from the tree during 14 day intervals, from 10 weeks after anthesis until commercial maturity. We determined the pulp (i.e. aril; fruit flesh) carotenoid composition, together with pulp firmness, color and total soluble solids (TSS) and postharvest quality. In ripe cv. Chanee fruit the main carotenoids were β-carotene (about 80%), and α-carotene (20%), with minor levels of lutein and zeaxanthin. In ripe fruit total carotenoid concentration (expressed per gram FW) was about 9-fold higher in cv. Chanee than in cv. Monthong. Large differences between the cultivars were also found in β-carotene levels (about 11 times more in cv. Chanee), and even larger ones in those of α-carotene. Differences in lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations were small. Pulp color was deeper yellow in cv. Chanee than in cv. Monthong, which was correlated with α-carotene and β-carotene concentrations. Durian contains a high fat percentage, which is conducive to carotenoid uptake. It is concluded that it is advisable to consume cv. Chanee rather than cv. Monthong if intake of carotenoids is considered important. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Simultaneous detection of carotenoids and vitamin E in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Sommerburg, O; Zang, L Y; van Kuijk, F J

    1997-08-01

    A simplified method for analysis of the antioxidants carotenoids and vitamin E in human plasma is presented. The method is based on high-performance liquid chromatography with a single column, a flow-rate gradient, and detection at 450 and 290 nm with a diode array detector. It gives good separation of the vitamin E isomers and the major carotenoids in plasma, with a 25 min analysis time. It was found that hydrolysis of triglycerides and cholesterol esters is required to obtain good recovery of non-polar carotenoids such as lycopene, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene. Two methods were used for hydrolysis of the non-polar lipids, saponification with ethanolic KOH and digestion with an enzyme mixture of lipase and cholesterol esterase. It was found that the enzymatic digestion gave the best recoveries, better than 94% for all of the antioxidants, and preserved several carotenoids. A plasma pool is used for day to day calibration of the method, which eliminates the need for stock solutions of carotenoids that are stable for only a month due to oxidative breakdown and their tendency to crystallize when stored at -20 degrees C in organic solvents.

  7. Bioaccessibility of carotenoids from transgenic provitamin A biofortified sorghum.

    PubMed

    Lipkie, Tristan E; De Moura, Fabiana F; Zhao, Zuo-Yu; Albertsen, Marc C; Che, Ping; Glassman, Kimberly; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2013-06-19

    Biofortified sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) lines are being developed to target vitamin A deficiency in Sub-Saharan Africa, but the delivery of provitamin A carotenoids from such diverse germplasms has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to screen vectors and independent transgenic events for the bioaccessibility of provitamin A carotenoids using an in vitro digestion model. The germplasm background and transgenic sorghum contained 1.0-1.5 and 3.3-14.0 μg/g β-carotene equivalents on a dry weight basis (DW), respectively. Test porridges made from milled transgenic sorghum contained up to 250 μg of β-carotene equivalents per 100 g of porridge on a fresh weight basis (FW). Micellarization efficiency of all-trans-β-carotene was lower (p < 0.05) from transgenic sorghum (1-5%) than from null/nontransgenic sorghum (6-11%) but not different between vector constructs. Carotenoid bioaccessibility was significantly improved (p < 0.05) by increasing the amount of coformulated lipid in test porridges from 5% w/w to 10% w/w. Transgenic sorghum event Homo188-A contained the greatest bioaccessible β-carotene content, with a 4-8-fold increase from null/nontransgenic sorghum. While the bioavailability and bioconversion of provitamin A carotenoids from these grains must be confirmed in vivo, these data support the notion that biofortification of sorghum can enhance total and bioaccessible provitamin A carotenoid levels.

  8. Circulating carotenoids and subsequent risk of rheumatoid arthritis in women.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Cui, Jing; Sparks, Jeffrey A; Malspeis, Susan; Costenbader, Karen H; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Lu, Bing

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the associations between circulating carotenoids and future risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We conducted a nested case-control study consisting of 227 incident RA cases and 671 matched controls with prospectively measured plasma carotenoids (α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene and lutein/zeaxanthin) levels in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II). Each incident RA case was matched with 3 healthy controls. Serologic phenotype of RA was determined by rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) obtained by chart review. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confident intervals (95% CI) for RA risk associated with each circulating carotenoid after adjusting for matching factors and other covariates. The median time from blood draw until RA diagnosis was 8.6 years. In the multivariable models, no significant associations were found between any plasma carotenoids and risk of RA. We further examined the associations for two subtypes of RA, and found associations of circulating α-carotene and β-carotene with reduced risk of seronegative RA. After correction for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method, the findings did not reach statistical significance. Circulating carotenoids levels are not associated with reduced risk of RA. Further investigations using large prospective cohorts are needed to confirm our findings.

  9. Carotenoids as a Source of Antioxidants in the Diet.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Ana Augusta Odorissi; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids, widely distributed fat-soluble pigments, are responsible for the attractive colorations of several fruits and vegetables commonly present in our daily diet. They are particularly abundant in yellow-orange fruits (carrots, tomatoes, pumpkins, peppers, among others) and, although masked by chlorophylls, in dark green leafy vegetables. Several health benefits have been attributed to carotenoids or to foods rich in these pigments, by means of different mechanisms-of-action, including the role as provitamin A of almost 50 different carotenoids and the antioxidant activity that protects cells and tissues from damage of free radicals and singlet oxygen, providing enhancement of the immune function, protection from sunburn reactions and delaying the onset of certain types of cancer. Common food sources and the efficiency of the absorption of carotenoids, analytical approaches used for measurement of their antioxidant effect and an overview of some epidemiological studies that have been performed to assess the beneficial impact of carotenoids in human health are outlined in this chapter.

  10. A comprehensive review on the colorless carotenoids phytoene and phytofluene.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-Martínez, Antonio J; Mapelli-Brahm, Paula; Benítez-González, Ana; Stinco, Carla M

    2015-04-15

    Carotenoids and their derivatives are versatile isoprenoids involved in many varied actions, hence their importance in the agri-food industry, nutrition, health and other fields. All carotenoids are derived from the colorless carotenes phytoene and phytofluene, which are oddities among carotenoids due to their distinct chemical structure. They occur together with lycopene in tomato and other lycopene-containing foods. Furthermore, they are also present in frequently consumed products like oranges and carrots, among others. The intake of phytoene plus phytofluene has been shown to be higher than that of lycopene and other carotenoids in Luxembourg. This is likely to be common in other countries. However, they are not included in food carotenoid databases, hence they have not been linked to health benefits in epidemiological studies. Interestingly, there are evidences in vitro, animal models and humans indicating that they may provide health benefits. In this sense, the study of these colorless carotenes in the context of food science, nutrition and health should be further encouraged. In this work, we review much of the existing knowledge concerning their chemical characteristics, physico-chemical properties, analysis, distribution in foods, bioavailability and likely biological activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Carotenoids production in different culture conditions by Sporidiobolus pararoseus.

    PubMed

    Han, Mei; He, Qian; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids produced by Sporidiobolus pararoseus were studied. It was found that biomass was connected with carbon source, temperature, and pH, but carotenoids proportion was seriously influenced by dissolved oxygen and nitrogen source. Different carotenoids could be obtained by using selected optimum conditions. In the end we established the strategies to produce β-carotene or torulene. Fed-batch fermentation in fermentor was used to prove the authenticity of our conclusions. The cell biomass, β-carotene content, and β-carotene proportion could reach 56.32 g/L, 18.92 mg/L and 60.43%, respectively, by using corn steep liquor at 0-5% of dissolved oxygen saturation. β-Carotene content was 271% higher than before this addition. The cell biomass, torulene content, and torulene proportion could reach 62.47 g/L, 31.74 mg/L, and 70.41%, respectively, by using yeast extract at 30-35% of dissolved oxygen saturation. Torulene content was 152% higher than before this addition. The strategy for enhancing specific carotenoid production by selected fermentation conditions may provide an alternative approach to enhance carotenoid production with other strains.

  12. Marine Carotenoids against Oxidative Stress: Effects on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Riccioni, Graziano; D’Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments that are produced in some plants, algae, fungi, and bacterial species, which accounts for their orange and yellow hues. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants thanks to their ability to quench singlet oxygen, to be oxidized, to be isomerized, and to scavenge free radicals, which plays a crucial role in the etiology of several diseases. Unusual marine environments are associated with a great chemical diversity, resulting in novel bioactive molecules. Thus, marine organisms may represent an important source of novel biologically active substances for the development of therapeutics. In this respect, various novel marine carotenoids have recently been isolated from marine organisms and displayed several utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Marine carotenoids (astaxanthin, fucoxanthin, β-carotene, lutein but also the rare siphonaxanthin, sioxanthin, and myxol) have recently shown antioxidant properties in reducing oxidative stress markers. This review aims to describe the role of marine carotenoids against oxidative stress and their potential applications in preventing and treating inflammatory diseases. PMID:26437420

  13. Improving carotenoids production in yeast via adaptive laboratory evolution.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Luis H; Gomez, Jose M; Kao, Katy C

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution is an important tool for the engineering of strains for industrially relevant phenotypes. Traditionally, adaptive laboratory evolution has been implemented to improve robustness of industrial strains under diverse operational conditions; however due to the required coupling between growth and survival, its application for increased production of secondary metabolites generally results in decreased production due to the metabolic burden imposed by, or toxicity of, the produced compound. In this study, adaptive laboratory evolution was successfully applied to improve carotenoids production in an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae producer strain by exploiting the antioxidant properties of carotenoids. Short-term evolution experiment using periodic hydrogen peroxide shocking schemes resulted in a 3-fold increase in carotenoids production (from 6 mg/g dry cell weight to up to 18 mg/g dry cell weight). Subsequent transcriptome analysis was used to elucidate the molecular mechanisms for increased carotenoids production. Upregulation of genes related with lipid biosynthesis and mevalonate biosynthesis pathways were commonly observed in the carotenoids hyper-producers analyzed. © 2013 Published by International Metabolic Engineering Society on behalf of International Metabolic Engineering Society.

  14. Yolk carotenoids increase fledging success in great tit nestlings.

    PubMed

    Marri, Viviana; Richner, Heinz

    2014-10-01

    Avian mothers can influence offspring phenotype through the deposition of different compounds into eggs, such as antibodies, hormones and antioxidants. The concentration of carotenoids in yolk is larger than in maternal plasma, suggesting an important role of these compounds for offspring development. Since carotenoids have to be acquired from the diet, they may be available in limiting amounts to the mothers. Here, we investigated the role of egg carotenoids for offspring growth by experimentally increasing the concentration of yolk lutein, the main carotenoid in great tit (Parus major) yolk. We subsequently measured body condition, oxidative stress, immune response, plumage colouration and fledging success. Lutein increased body mass soon after hatching and fledging success, but did not affect tarsus length, oxidative stress, immune response and plumage colouration. The higher content of yolk lutein could have increased body mass by reducing oxidative stress caused by high metabolic rates of rapidly growing embryos or by promoting cell differentiation and proliferation. The positive effect of lutein on fledging success seems to be mediated by its influence on body mass 3 days post-hatch, since these two traits were correlated. The finding that our treatment did not affect traits measured later in the nestling period, except for fledging success, suggests that yolk lutein has short-term effects that are essential to increase survival until fledging. Our study shows the positive effect of yolk lutein on offspring survival in the great tit, and therefore suggests an important role of carotenoid-mediated maternal effects.

  15. [Isolation and identification of a strain converting levoglucosan to carotenoid].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixuan; Chen, Yuru; Sun, Huan; Liu, Junli; Wei, Min; Xia, Wenjing

    2014-07-04

    In order to use cellulosic biomass effectively, we screened a strain that can convert levoglucosan efficiently to carotenoids. Strain ZS1 was isolated from soil using levoglucosan of cellulosis pyrolysis products as sole carbon source. It was identified based on rDNA ITS sequence analysis and morphological characteristics. Phylogenetic tree was constructed to determine its taxonomic status. The conversion rate of levoglucosan was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Carotenoid in fermentation liquid was detected by spectrophotometry. The results show that ZS1 could ferment levoglucosan efficiently and the consumption rate of levoglucosan reached 67.0% after 4 days. Strain ZS1 was identified as Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae (CGMCC NO: 6365) based on the morphology features and ITS sequence analysis. After optimization of culture conditions, the conversion rate of levoglucosan reached 98.7% after 5 days. The content of carotenoid in cells was 427.1 microg/g (cell dry weight). After conversion, 460.4 microg/g (levoglucosan) of carotenoids could be produced with levoglucosan as carbon source. The strain capable fermenting levoglucosan was identified as R. kratochvilovae that could produce carotenoids with levoglucosan as carbon source.

  16. Lipid Class, Carotenoid, and Toxin Dynamics of Karenia Brevis (Dinophyceae) During Diel Vertical Migration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Karenia brevis’ (Hansen and Moestrup) internal lipid, carotenoid, and toxin concentrations are influenced by its ability to use ambient light and nutrients for growth and reproduction. This project investigated changes of K. brevis toxicity, lipid class and carotenoid concentrat...

  17. Stability of carotenoids recovered from shrimp waste and their use as colorant in fish sausage.

    PubMed

    Sachindra, N M; Mahendrakar, N S

    2010-01-01

    The stability of carotenoids recovered from shrimp waste using organic solvents and vegetable oils as affected by antioxidants and pigment carriers was evaluated during storage under different conditions. Solvent extracted carotenoid incorporated into alginate and starch as carriers was stored in metallised polyester and polypropylene pouches. Oil extracted carotenoids were stored in transparent and amber bottles. Also the use of recovered pigments as colorants in fish sausage was evaluated. Antioxidants, packaging material and storage period had a significant effect (p≤0.001) on the reduction of carotenoid content, while type of carrier had marginal effect (p≥0.05) on solvent extracted carotenoids during storage. Carotenoid content in pigmented oil was significantly affected by antioxidants (p≤0.001), packaging material (p≤0.05) and storage period (p≤0.001). Addition of carotenoid to the sausage enhanced the sensory colour, flavour and overall quality score of sausage and the added carotenoid was stable during processing.

  18. Development of carotenoid-enriched vegetables with increased nutritional quality and visual appearance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carotenoids are a class of red, orange and yellow pigments widely distributed in nature. Biotech approach has been proved to be effective in successfully engineering of carotenoid content in food crops with better health and visual appearance....

  19. Comparison of carotenoid accumulation and biosynthetic gene expression between Valencia and Rohde Red Valencia sweet oranges

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carotenoid accumulation and biosynthetic gene expression levels during fruit maturation were compared between ordinary Valencia (VAL) and its more deeply colored mutant Rohde Red Valencia orange (RRV). The two cultivars exhibited different carotenoid profiles and regulatory mechanisms in flavedo and...

  20. Dietary supplementation with carotenoids improves immunity without increasing its cost in a crustacean.

    PubMed

    Babin, Aurélie; Biard, Clotilde; Moret, Yannick

    2010-08-01

    Costs of immunity include self-harming autoreactivity through the production of cytotoxic chemicals. While carotenoids stimulate immunity and reduce oxidative stress during immune activity in vertebrates, their involvement in invertebrate immunity is unclear. Recently, a positive correlation between immune defenses and concentration of carotenoids in the hemolymph was demonstrated in the crustacean Gammarus pulex, suggesting an important role of carotenoids in invertebrate immunity. We tested the causality of this relationship by using a dietary supplementation with carotenoids and measuring several immune parameters. We found that dietary carotenoids had a broad immunostimulating effect, enhancing phenoloxidase activity and resistance to a bacterial infection. When immune challenged, gammarids fed with carotenoids did not pay an additional survival cost because of autoreactivity, despite their intensified immune activity. Therefore, dietary carotenoids improved gammarids' immunity without inducing additional self-harming. This underlines the importance of carotenoids in both the regulation and the evolution of immunity in G. pulex.

  1. The Or gene enhances carotenoid accumulation and stability during post-harvest storage of potato tubers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Provitamin A carotenoids in staple crops are not very stable during storage and their loss compromises nutritional quality. To elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying carotenoid accumulation and stability, we investigated transgenic potato tubers that express the cauliflower Orange (Or) gene...

  2. Lipid Class, Carotenoid, and Toxin Dynamics of Karenia Brevis (Dinophyceae) During Diel Vertical Migration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Karenia brevis’ (Hansen and Moestrup) internal lipid, carotenoid, and toxin concentrations are influenced by its ability to use ambient light and nutrients for growth and reproduction. This project investigated changes of K. brevis toxicity, lipid class and carotenoid concentrat...

  3. Three-dimensional Structures of Carotenoids by X-ray Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helliwell, Madeleine

    The number of crystal structures of carotenoid molecules and carotenoid derivatives deposited in the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre [1] is still relatively small, but has increased compared with the previous survey [2]. The list is summarized in Table 1.

  4. Poly(N-arylenebenzimidazole)s via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Novel poly(N-arylenebenzimidazole)s (PNABls) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of novel di(hydroxyphenyl-N-arylene benzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl-N-arylenebenzimidazole) monomers are synthesized by reacting phenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate with bis(2-aminoanilino)arylenes in diphenylsulfone. Moderate molecular weight PNABIs of new chemical structures were prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties. The use of the novel di(hydroxyphenyI-N-arylenebenzimidazole)s permits a more economical and easier way to prepare PNABIs than previous routes.

  5. Poly(N-arylenbenzimidazoles) via aromatic nucleophilic displacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel poly(N-arylenebenzimidazole)s (PNABIs) are prepared by the aromatic nucleophilic displacement reaction of novel di(hydroxyphenyl-N-arylene benzimidazole) monomers with activated aromatic dihalides or activated aromatic dinitro compounds. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or N,N-dimethylacetamide using alkali metal bases such as potassium carbonate at elevated temperatures under nitrogen. The di(hydroxyphenyl N-arylenebenzimidazole) monomers are synthesized by reacting phenyl 4-hydroxybenzoate with bis(2-aminoanilino) arylenes in diphenylsulfone. Moderate molecular weight PNABIs of new chemical structures were prepared that exhibit a favorable combination of physical and mechanical properties. The use of the novel di(hydroxyphenyl N-arylenebenzimidazole)s permits a more economical and easier way to prepare PNABIs than previous routes.

  6. Contorted polycyclic aromatics.

    PubMed

    Ball, Melissa; Zhong, Yu; Wu, Ying; Schenck, Christine; Ng, Fay; Steigerwald, Michael; Xiao, Shengxiong; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: This Account describes a body of research in the design, synthesis, and assembly of molecular materials made from strained polycyclic aromatic molecules. The strain in the molecular subunits severely distorts the aromatic molecules away from planarity. We coined the term "contorted aromatics" to describe this class of molecules. Using these molecules, we demonstrate that the curved pi-surfaces are useful as subunits to make self-assembled electronic materials. We have created and continue to study two broad classes of these "contorted aromatics": discs and ribbons. The figure that accompanies this conspectus displays the three-dimensional surfaces of a selection of these "contorted aromatics". The disc-shaped contorted molecules have well-defined conformations that create concave pi-surfaces. When these disc-shaped molecules are substituted with hydrocarbon side chains, they self-assemble into columnar superstructures. Depending on the hydrocarbon substitution, they form either liquid crystalline films or macroscopic cables. In both cases, the columnar structures are photoconductive and form p-type, hole- transporting materials in field effect transistor devices. This columnar motif is robust, allowing us to form monolayers of these columns attached to the surface of dielectrics such as silicon oxide. We use ultrathin point contacts made from individual single-walled carbon nanotubes that are separated by a few nanometers to probe the electronic properties of short stacks of a few contorted discs. We find that these materials have high mobility and can sense electron-deficient aromatic molecules. The concave surfaces of these disc-shaped contorted molecules form ideal receptors for the molecular recognition and assembly with spherical molecules such as fullerenes. These interfaces resemble ball-and-socket joints, where the fullerene nests itself in the concave surface of the contorted disc. The tightness of the binding between the two partners can be

  7. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Orellana, P. A.; Laroze, D.

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  8. Genetic architecture controlling variation in grain carotenoid composition and concentrations in two maize populations.

    PubMed

    Kandianis, Catherine B; Stevens, Robyn; Liu, Weiping; Palacios, Natalia; Montgomery, Kevin; Pixley, Kevin; White, Wendy S; Rocheford, Torbert

    2013-11-01

    Genetic control of maize grain carotenoid profiles is coordinated through several loci distributed throughout three secondary metabolic pathways, most of which exhibit additive, and more importantly, pleiotropic effects. The genetic basis for the variation in maize grain carotenoid concentrations was investigated in two F2:3 populations, DEexp × CI7 and A619 × SC55, derived from high total carotenoid and high β-carotene inbred lines. A comparison of grain carotenoid concentrations from population DEexp × CI7 grown in different environments revealed significantly higher concentrations and greater trait variation in samples harvested from a subtropical environment relative to those from a temperate environment. Genotype by environment interactions was significant for most carotenoid traits. Using phenotypic data in additive, environment-specific genetic models, quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for absolute and derived carotenoid traits in each population, including those specific to the isomerization of β-carotene. A multivariate approach for these correlated traits was taken, using carotenoid trait principal components (PCs) that jointly accounted for 97 % or more of trait variation. Component loadings for carotenoid PCs were interpreted in the context of known substrate-product relationships within the carotenoid pathway. Importantly, QTL for univariate and multivariate traits were found to cluster in close proximity to map locations of loci involved in methyl-erythritol, isoprenoid and carotenoid metabolism. Several of these genes, including lycopene epsilon cyclase, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase1 and beta-carotene hydroxylase, were mapped in the segregating populations. These loci exhibited pleiotropic effects on α-branch carotenoids, total carotenoid profile and β-branch carotenoids, respectively. Our results confirm that several QTL are involved in the modification of carotenoid profiles, and suggest genetic targets that could be

  9. Fluorinated aromatic diamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); O'Rell, Michael K. (Inventor); Hom, Jim M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a novel aromatic diamine and more particularly to the use of said diamine for the preparation of thermally stable high-molecular weight polymers including, for example, polyamides, polyamideimides, polyimides, and the like. This diamine is obtained by reacting a stoichometric amount of a disodium salt of 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane with 4-chloronitrobenzene to obtain an intermediate, 2,2-bis[4-(4-nitrophenoxy)phenyl] hexafluoropropane, which is reduced to the corresponding 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl] hexafluoropropane.

  10. Candidate genes for carotenoid coloration in vertebrates and their expression profiles in the carotenoid-containing plumage and bill of a wild bird.

    PubMed

    Walsh, N; Dale, J; McGraw, K J; Pointer, M A; Mundy, N I

    2012-01-07

    Carotenoid-based coloration has attracted much attention in evolutionary biology owing to its role in honest, condition-dependent signalling. Knowledge of the genetic pathways that regulate carotenoid coloration is crucial for an understanding of any trade-offs involved. We identified genes with potential roles in carotenoid coloration in vertebrates via (i) carotenoid uptake (SR-BI, CD36), (ii) binding and deposition (StAR1, MLN64, StAR4, StAR5, APOD, PLIN, GSTA2), and (iii) breakdown (BCO2, BCMO1). We examined the expression of these candidate loci in carotenoid-coloured tissues and several control tissues of the red-billed quelea (Quelea quelea), a species that exhibits a male breeding plumage colour polymorphism and sexually dimorphic variation in bill colour. All of the candidate genes except StAR1 were expressed in both the plumage and bill of queleas, indicating a potential role in carotenoid coloration in the quelea. However, no differences in the relative expression of any of the genes were found among the quelea carotenoid phenotypes, suggesting that other genes control the polymorphic and sexually dimorphic variation in carotenoid coloration observed in this species. Our identification of a number of potential carotenoid genes in different functional categories provides a critical starting point for future work on carotenoid colour regulation in vertebrate taxa.

  11. Candidate genes for carotenoid coloration in vertebrates and their expression profiles in the carotenoid-containing plumage and bill of a wild bird

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, N.; Dale, J.; McGraw, K. J.; Pointer, M. A.; Mundy, N. I.

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoid-based coloration has attracted much attention in evolutionary biology owing to its role in honest, condition-dependent signalling. Knowledge of the genetic pathways that regulate carotenoid coloration is crucial for an understanding of any trade-offs involved. We identified genes with potential roles in carotenoid coloration in vertebrates via (i) carotenoid uptake (SR-BI, CD36), (ii) binding and deposition (StAR1, MLN64, StAR4, StAR5, APOD, PLIN, GSTA2), and (iii) breakdown (BCO2, BCMO1). We examined the expression of these candidate loci in carotenoid-coloured tissues and several control tissues of the red-billed quelea (Quelea quelea), a species that exhibits a male breeding plumage colour polymorphism and sexually dimorphic variation in bill colour. All of the candidate genes except StAR1 were expressed in both the plumage and bill of queleas, indicating a potential role in carotenoid coloration in the quelea. However, no differences in the relative expression of any of the genes were found among the quelea carotenoid phenotypes, suggesting that other genes control the polymorphic and sexually dimorphic variation in carotenoid coloration observed in this species. Our identification of a number of potential carotenoid genes in different functional categories provides a critical starting point for future work on carotenoid colour regulation in vertebrate taxa. PMID:21593031

  12. Effect of Carotenoid Supplemented Formula on Carotenoid Bioaccumulation in Tissues of Infant Rhesus Macaques: A Pilot Study Focused on Lutein

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sookyoung; Neuringer, Martha; Johnson, Emily E.; Kuchan, Matthew J.; Pereira, Suzette L.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Erdman, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Lutein is the predominant carotenoid in the developing primate brain and retina, and may have important functional roles. However, its bioaccumulation pattern during early development is not understood. In this pilot study, we investigated whether carotenoid supplementation of infant formula enhanced lutein tissue deposition in infant rhesus macaques. Monkeys were initially breastfed; from 1 to 3 months of age they were fed either a formula supplemented with lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and lycopene, or a control formula with low levels of these carotenoids, for 4 months (n = 2/group). All samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Final serum lutein in the supplemented group was 5 times higher than in the unsupplemented group. All brain regions examined showed a selective increase in lutein deposition in the supplemented infants. Lutein differentially accumulated across brain regions, with highest amounts in occipital cortex in both groups. β-carotene accumulated, but zeaxanthin and lycopene were undetectable in any brain region. Supplemented infants had higher lutein concentrations in peripheral retina but not in macular retina. Among adipose sites, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibited the highest lutein level and was 3-fold higher in the supplemented infants. The supplemented formula enhanced carotenoid deposition in several other tissues. In rhesus infants, increased intake of carotenoids from formula enhanced their deposition in serum and numerous tissues and selectively increased lutein in multiple brain regions. PMID:28075370

  13. New Insight into the Cleavage Reaction of Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120 Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase in Natural and Nonnatural Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinsol; Kim, Se Hyeuk

    2013-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of carotenoids at a specific double bond to generate apocarotenoids. In this study, we investigated the activity and substrate preferences of NSC3, a CCD of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, in vivo and in vitro using natural and nonnatural carotenoid structures. NSC3 cleaved β-apo-8′-carotenal at 3 positions, C-13C-14, C-15C-15′, and C-13′C-14′, revealing a unique cleavage pattern. NSC3 cleaves the natural structure of carotenoids 4,4′-diaponeurosporene, 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4′-al, 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4′-oic acid, 4,4′-diapotorulene, and 4,4′-diapotorulen-4′-al to generate novel cleavage products (apo-14′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-13′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-10′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-14′-diapotorulenal, and apo-10′-diapotorulenal, respectively). The study of carotenoids with natural or nonnatural structures produced by using synthetic modules could provide information valuable for understanding the cleavage reactions or substrate preferences of other CCDs in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23524669

  14. Effect of Carotenoid Supplemented Formula on Carotenoid Bioaccumulation in Tissues of Infant Rhesus Macaques: A Pilot Study Focused on Lutein.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sookyoung; Neuringer, Martha; Johnson, Emily E; Kuchan, Matthew J; Pereira, Suzette L; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Erdman, John W

    2017-01-10

    Lutein is the predominant carotenoid in the developing primate brain and retina, and may have important functional roles. However, its bioaccumulation pattern during early development is not understood. In this pilot study, we investigated whether carotenoid supplementation of infant formula enhanced lutein tissue deposition in infant rhesus macaques. Monkeys were initially breastfed; from 1 to 3 months of age they were fed either a formula supplemented with lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and lycopene, or a control formula with low levels of these carotenoids, for 4 months (n = 2/group). All samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Final serum lutein in the supplemented group was 5 times higher than in the unsupplemented group. All brain regions examined showed a selective increase in lutein deposition in the supplemented infants. Lutein differentially accumulated across brain regions, with highest amounts in occipital cortex in both groups. β-carotene accumulated, but zeaxanthin and lycopene were undetectable in any brain region. Supplemented infants had higher lutein concentrations in peripheral retina but not in macular retina. Among adipose sites, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibited the highest lutein level and was 3-fold higher in the supplemented infants. The supplemented formula enhanced carotenoid deposition in several other tissues. In rhesus infants, increased intake of carotenoids from formula enhanced their deposition in serum and numerous tissues and selectively increased lutein in multiple brain regions.

  15. New insight into the cleavage reaction of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase in natural and nonnatural carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinsol; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2013-06-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of carotenoids at a specific double bond to generate apocarotenoids. In this study, we investigated the activity and substrate preferences of NSC3, a CCD of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, in vivo and in vitro using natural and nonnatural carotenoid structures. NSC3 cleaved β-apo-8'-carotenal at 3 positions, C-13 C-14, C-15 C-15', and C-13' C-14', revealing a unique cleavage pattern. NSC3 cleaves the natural structure of carotenoids 4,4'-diaponeurosporene, 4,4'-diaponeurosporen-4'-al, 4,4'-diaponeurosporen-4'-oic acid, 4,4'-diapotorulene, and 4,4'-diapotorulen-4'-al to generate novel cleavage products (apo-14'-diaponeurosporenal, apo-13'-diaponeurosporenal, apo-10'-diaponeurosporenal, apo-14'-diapotorulenal, and apo-10'-diapotorulenal, respectively). The study of carotenoids with natural or nonnatural structures produced by using synthetic modules could provide information valuable for understanding the cleavage reactions or substrate preferences of other CCDs in vivo and in vitro.

  16. Carotenoid silk coloration is controlled by a carotenoid-binding protein, a product of the Yellow blood gene

    PubMed Central

    Sakudoh, Takashi; Sezutsu, Hideki; Nakashima, Takeharu; Kobayashi, Isao; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Uchino, Keiro; Banno, Yutaka; Iwano, Hidetoshi; Maekawa, Hideaki; Tamura, Toshiki; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Tsuchida, Kozo

    2007-01-01

    Mechanisms for the uptake and transport of carotenoids, essential nutrients for humans, are not well understood in any animal system. The Y (Yellow blood) gene, a critical cocoon color determinant in the silkworm Bombyx mori, controls the uptake of carotenoids into the intestinal mucosa and the silk gland. Here we provide evidence that the Y gene corresponds to the intracellular carotenoid-binding protein (CBP) gene. In the Y recessive strain, the absence of an exon, likely due to an incorrect mRNA splicing caused by a transposon-associated genomic deletion, generates a nonfunctional CBP mRNA, resulting in colorless hemolymph and white cocoons. Enhancement of carotenoid uptake and coloration of the white cocoon was achieved by germ-line transformation with the CBP gene. This study demonstrates the existence of a genetically facilitated intracellular process beyond passive diffusion for carotenoid uptake in the animal phyla, and paves the way for modulating silk color and lipid content through genetic engineering. PMID:17496138

  17. Carotenoid and color changes in traditionally flaked and extruded products.

    PubMed

    Cueto, Mario; Farroni, Abel; Schoenlechner, Regine; Schleining, Gerhard; Buera, Pilar

    2017-08-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of process and formulation on individual carotenoid loss in traditionally prepared cornflakes and those prepared by extrusion. The first step in the traditional process (maize grits cooking) promoted a 60% lutein content reduction and 40% in zeaxanthin loss, showing lutein more susceptibility to isomerization and decomposition. After toasting, the last step, the total loss averaged 80% for both compounds. The extruded maize in a plain formulation showed a 35% lutein and zeaxanthin reduction. However, in samples containing quinoa the decrease reached 60%, and the major loss (80%) was found in chia-containing formulations. Correlations between the color coordinate b(∗), total and individual carotenoid content, were obtained. It is of a major importance that the efforts to increase carotenoid content in raw materials are complemented with attempts to reduce the losses during processing.

  18. Carotenoid cation radicals: electrochemical, optical, and EPR study

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, J.L.; Kramer, V.J.; Ding, R.; Kispert, L.D.

    1988-03-30

    The general aim of this investigation is to determine whether carotenoid cation radicals can be produced, and stabilized, electrochemically. Hence, the authors have undertaken a detailed study of the electrooxidation of various carotenoids (..beta..-carotene (I), ..beta..-apo-8'-carotenal (II), and canthaxanthin (III) using the techniques of cyclic voltammetry, controlled-potential electrolysis (cpe) in conjunction with optical spectroscopy, and EPR spectroscopy coupled with in situ electrolysis. They report the successful generation of carotenoid cation radicals via electrochemical oxidation and, furthermore, the stabilization of these radicals for several minutes in CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 4/Cl/sub 2/ solvents.

  19. The Metabolic and Developmental Roles of Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase4 from Potato1[W

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Raymond; Ducreux, Laurence J.M.; Morris, Wayne L.; Morris, Jenny A.; Suttle, Jeffrey C.; Ramsay, Gavin; Bryan, Glenn J.; Hedley, Pete E.; Taylor, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    The factors that regulate storage organ carotenoid content remain to be fully elucidated, despite the nutritional and economic importance of this class of compound. Recent findings suggest that carotenoid pool size is determined, at least in part, by the activity of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase4 (CCD4) activity affects potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber carotenoid content. Microarray analysis revealed elevated expression of the potato CCD4 gene in mature tubers from white-fleshed cultivars compared with higher carotenoid yellow-fleshed tubers. The expression level of the potato CCD4 gene was down-regulated using an RNA interference (RNAi) approach in stable transgenic lines. Down-regulation in tubers resulted in an increased carotenoid content, 2- to 5-fold higher than in control plants. The increase in carotenoid content was mainly due to elevated violaxanthin content, implying that this carotenoid may act as the in vivo substrate. Although transcript level was also reduced in plant organs other than tubers, such as leaves, stems, and roots , there was no change in carotenoid content in these organs. However, carotenoid levels were elevated in flower petals from RNAi lines. As well as changes in tuber carotenoid content, tubers from RNAi lines exhibited phenotypes such as heat sprouting, formation of chain tubers, and an elongated shape. These results suggest that the product of the CCD4 reaction may be an important factor in tuber heat responses. PMID:20688977

  20. Absorption and distribution kinetics of the 13C-labeled tomato carotenoid phytoene in healthy adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytoene is a tomato carotenoid which may contribute to the apparent health benefits of tomato consumption. While phytoene is a less prominent tomato carotenoid than lycopene, it is a major carotenoid in various human tissues. Phytoene distribution to plasma lipoproteins and tissues differs from lyc...

  1. Novel expression patterns of carotenoid pathway-related gene in citrus leaves and maturing fruits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carotenoids are abundant in citrus fruits and vary among cultivars and species. In the present study, HPLC and real-time PCR were used to investigate the expression patterns of 23 carotenoid biosynthesis gene family members and their possible relation with carotenoid accumulation in flavedo, juice s...

  2. Effects of carotenoids, immune activation and immune suppression on the intensity of chronic coccidiosis in greenfinches.

    PubMed

    Sepp, Tuul; Karu, Ulvi; Sild, Elin; Männiste, Marju; Hõrak, Peeter

    2011-03-01

    Allocation trade-offs of carotenoids between their use in the immune system and production of integumentary colouration have been suggested as a proximate mechanism maintaining honesty of signal traits. We tested how dietary carotenoid supplementation, immune activation and immune suppression affect intensity of coccidian infection in captive greenfinches Carduelis chloris, a passerine with carotenoid-based plumage. Immune activation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) decreased body mass among birds not supplemented with lutein, while among the carotenoid-fed birds, PHA had no effect on mass dynamics. Immune suppression with dexamethasone (DEX) induced loss of body mass and reduced the swelling response to PHA. DEX and PHA increased the concentration of circulating heterophils. Lutein supplementation increased plasma carotenoid levels but had no effect on the swelling response induced by PHA. PHA and DEX treatments did not affect plasma carotenoids. Immune stimulation by PHA suppressed the infection, but only among carotenoid-supplemented birds. Priming of the immune system can thus aid in suppressing chronic infection but only when sufficient amount of carotenoids is available. Our experiment shows the importance of carotenoids in immune response, but also the complicated nature of this impact, which could be the reason for inconsistent results in studies investigating the immunomodulatory effects of carotenoids. The findings about involvement of carotenoids in modulation of an immune response against coccidiosis suggest that carotenoid-based ornaments may honestly signal individuals' ability to manage chronic infections. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolic Regulation of Carotenoid-Enriched Golden Rice Line

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Dipak; Ghosh, Subhrajyoti; Paul, Soumitra; Sarkar, Sailendra N.; Datta, Swapan K.; Datta, Karabi

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is the leading cause of blindness among children and is associated with high risk of maternal mortality. In order to enhance the bioavailability of vitamin A, high carotenoid transgenic golden rice has been developed by manipulating enzymes, such as phytoene synthase (psy) and phytoene desaturase (crtI). In this study, proteome and metabolite analyses were carried out to comprehend metabolic regulation and adaptation of transgenic golden rice after the manipulation of endosperm specific carotenoid pathways. The main alteration was observed in carbohydrate metabolism pathways of the transgenic seeds. The 2D based proteomic studies demonstrated that carbohydrate metabolism-related enzymes, such as pullulanase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase, were primarily up-regulated in transgenic rice seeds. In addition, the enzyme PPDK was also elevated in transgenic seeds thus enhancing pyruvate biosynthesis, which is the precursor in the carotenoids biosynthetic pathway. GC-MS based metabolite profiling demonstrated an increase in the levels of glyceric acid, fructo-furanose, and galactose, while decrease in galactonic acid and gentiobiose in the transgenic rice compared to WT. It is noteworthy to mention that the carotenoid content, especially β-carotene level in transgenic rice (4.3 μg/g) was significantly enhanced. The present study highlights the metabolic adaptation process of a transgenic golden rice line (homozygous T4 progeny of SKBR-244) after enhancing carotenoid biosynthesis. The presented information would be helpful in the development of crops enriched in carotenoids by expressing metabolic flux of pyruvate biosynthesis. PMID:27840631

  4. Metabolic Regulation of Carotenoid-Enriched Golden Rice Line.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Dipak; Ghosh, Subhrajyoti; Paul, Soumitra; Sarkar, Sailendra N; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is the leading cause of blindness among children and is associated with high risk of maternal mortality. In order to enhance the bioavailability of vitamin A, high carotenoid transgenic golden rice has been developed by manipulating enzymes, such as phytoene synthase (psy) and phytoene desaturase (crtI). In this study, proteome and metabolite analyses were carried out to comprehend metabolic regulation and adaptation of transgenic golden rice after the manipulation of endosperm specific carotenoid pathways. The main alteration was observed in carbohydrate metabolism pathways of the transgenic seeds. The 2D based proteomic studies demonstrated that carbohydrate metabolism-related enzymes, such as pullulanase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase, were primarily up-regulated in transgenic rice seeds. In addition, the enzyme PPDK was also elevated in transgenic seeds thus enhancing pyruvate biosynthesis, which is the precursor in the carotenoids biosynthetic pathway. GC-MS based metabolite profiling demonstrated an increase in the levels of glyceric acid, fructo-furanose, and galactose, while decrease in galactonic acid and gentiobiose in the transgenic rice compared to WT. It is noteworthy to mention that the carotenoid content, especially β-carotene level in transgenic rice (4.3 μg/g) was significantly enhanced. The present study highlights the metabolic adaptation process of a transgenic golden rice line (homozygous T4 progeny of SKBR-244) after enhancing carotenoid biosynthesis. The presented information would be helpful in the development of crops enriched in carotenoids by expressing metabolic flux of pyruvate biosynthesis.

  5. Dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sluijs, I; Cadier, E; Beulens, J W J; van der A, D L; Spijkerman, A M W; van der Schouw, Y T

    2015-04-01

    Carotenoids may reduce diabetes risk, due to their antioxidant properties. However, the association between dietary carotenoids intake and type 2 diabetes risk is still unclear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine whether higher dietary carotenoid intakes associate with reduced type 2 diabetes risk. Data from 37,846 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition- Netherlands study were analyzed. Dietary intakes of β-carotene, α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein & zeaxanthin and the sum of these carotenoids were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Incident type 2 diabetes was mainly self-reported, and verified against general practitioner information. Mean ±SD total carotenoid intake was 10 ± 4 mg/day. During a mean ±SD follow-up of 10 ± 2 years, 915 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained. After adjustment for age, sex, diabetes risk factors, dietary intake, waist circumference and BMI, higher β-carotene intakes associated inversely with diabetes risk [Hazard Ratio quartile 4 versus quartile 1 (HR(Q4)): 0.78 (95%CI:0.64,0.95), P-linear trend 0.01]. For α-carotene, a borderline significant reduced risk was observed, with a HR(Q4) of 0.85 (95%CI:0.70,1.03), and P-linear trend 0.05. β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein & zeaxanthin, and the sum of all carotenoids did not associate with diabetes risk. This study shows that diets high in β-carotene and α-carotene are associated with reduced type 2 diabetes in generally healthy men and women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Animal models in carotenoids research and lung cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jina; Kim, Yuri

    2011-10-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have consistently demonstrated that individuals who eat more fruits and vegetables (which are rich in carotenoids) and who have higher serum β-carotene levels have a lower risk of cancer, especially lung cancer. However, two human intervention trials conducted in Finland and in the United States have reported contrasting results with high doses of β-carotene supplementation increasing the risk of lung cancer among smokers. The failure of these trials to demonstrate actual efficacy has resulted in the initiation of animal studies to reproduce the findings of these two studies and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the harmful or protective effects of carotenoids in lung carcinogenesis. Although these studies have been limited by a lack of animal models that appropriately represent human lung cancer induced by cigarette smoke, ferrets and A/J mice are currently the most widely used models for these types of studies. There are several proposed mechanisms for the protective effects of carotenoids on cigarette smoke-induced lung carcinogenesis, and these include antioxidant/prooxidant effects, modulation of retinoic acid signaling pathway and metabolism, induction of cytochrome P450, and molecular signaling involved in cell proliferation and/or apoptosis. The technical challenges associated with animal models include strain-specific and diet-specific effects, differences in the absorption and distribution of carotenoids, and differences in the interactions of carotenoids with other antioxidants. Despite the problems associated with extrapolating from animal models to humans, the understanding and development of various animal models may provide useful information regarding the protective effects of carotenoids against lung carcinogenesis.

  7. Carotenoid biosynthesis in the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Francis X; Lee, Hansel; Gantt, Elisabeth

    2007-03-01

    Cyanidioschyzon merolae is considered to be one of the most primitive of eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms. To obtain insights into the origin and evolution of the pathway of carotenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic plants, the carotenoid content of C. merolae was ascertained, genes encoding enzymes of carotenoid biosynthesis in this unicellular red alga were identified, and the activities of two candidate pathway enzymes of particular interest, lycopene cyclase and beta-carotene hydroxylase, were examined. C. merolae contains perhaps the simplest assortment of chlorophylls and carotenoids found in any eukaryotic photosynthetic organism: chlorophyll a, beta-carotene, and zeaxanthin. Carotenoids with epsilon-rings (e.g., lutein), found in many other red algae and in green algae and land plants, were not detected, and the lycopene cyclase of C. merolae quite specifically produced only beta-ringed carotenoids when provided with lycopene as the substrate in Escherichia coli. Lycopene beta-ring cyclases from several bacteria, cyanobacteria, and land plants also proved to be high-fidelity enzymes, whereas the structurally related epsilon-ring cyclases from several plant species were found to be less specific, yielding products with beta-rings as well as epsilon-rings. C. merolae lacks orthologs of genes that encode the two types of beta-carotene hydroxylase found in land plants, one a nonheme diiron oxygenase and the other a cytochrome P450. A C. merolae chloroplast gene specifies a polypeptide similar to members of a third class of beta-carotene hydroxylases, common in cyanobacteria, but this gene did not produce an active enzyme when expressed in E. coli. The identity of the C. merolae beta-carotene hydroxylase therefore remains uncertain.

  8. Specific oxidative cleavage of carotenoids by VP14 of maize

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.H.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.; Gage, D.A.; Tan, Bao Cai

    1997-06-20

    The plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) is formed by the oxidative cleavage of an epoxy-carotenoid. The synthesis of other apocarotenoids, such as vitamin A in animals, may occur by a similar mechanism. In ABA biosynthesis, oxidative cleavage is the first committed reaction and is believed to be the key regulatory step. A new ABA-deficient mutant of maize has been identified and the corresponding gene, Vp14, has been cloned. The recombinant VP14 protein catalyzes the cleavage of 9-cis-epoxy-carotenoids to form C{sub 25} apo-aldehydes and xanthoxin, a precursor of ABA in higher plants.

  9. Identification of carotenoids from the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yatsunami, Rie; Ando, Ai; Yang, Ying; Takaichi, Shinichi; Kohno, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yuriko; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Fukui, Toshiaki; Nakasone, Kaoru; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Sekine, Mitsuo; Takashina, Tomonori; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The carotenoids produced by extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica were extracted and identified by their chemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic characteristics (UV-Vis and mass spectrometry). The composition (mol%) was 68.1% bacterioruberin, 22.5% monoanhydrobacterioruberin, 9.3% bisanhydrobacterioruberin, <0.1% isopentenyldehydrorhodopin, and trace amounts of lycopene and phytoene. The in vitro scavenging capacity of a carotenoid, bacterioruberin, extracted from Haloarcula japonica cells against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals was evaluated. The antioxidant capacity of bacterioruberin was much higher than that of β -carotene. PMID:24672517

  10. "Carbo-aromaticity" and novel carbo-aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cocq, Kévin; Lepetit, Christine; Maraval, Valérie; Chauvin, Remi

    2015-09-21

    While the concept of aromaticity is being more and more precisely delineated, the category of "aromatic compounds" is being more and more expanded. This is illustrated by an introductory highlight of the various types of "aromaticity" previously invoked, and by a focus on the recently proposed "aromatic character" of the "two-membered rings" of the acetylene and butatriene molecules. This serves as a general foundation for the definition of "carbo-aromaticity", the relevance of which is surveyed through recent results in the synthetic, physical, and theoretical chemistry of carbo-mers and in particular macrocyclic-polycyclic representatives constituting a natural family of "novel aromatic compounds". With respect to their parent molecules, carbo-mers are constitutionally defined as "carbon-enriched", and can also be functionally regarded as "π-electron-enriched". This is exemplified by recent experimental and theoretical results on functional, aromatic, rigid, σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-benzene archetypes of various substitution patterns, with emphasis on the quadrupolar pattern. For the purpose of comparison, several types of non-aromatic references of carbo-benzenes are then considered, i.e. freely rotating σ,π-acyclic carbo-n-butadienes and flexible σ-cyclic, π-acyclic carbo-cyclohexadienes, and to "pro-aromatic" congeners, i.e. rigid σ,π-macrocyclic carbo-quinoids. It is shown that functional carbo-mers are entering the field of "molecular materials" for properties such as linear or nonlinear optical properties (e.g. dichromism and two-photon absorption) and single molecule conductivity. Since total or partial carbo-mers of aromatic carbon-allotropes of infinite size such as graphene (graphynes and graphdiynes) and graphite ("graphitynes") have long been addressed at the theoretical or conceptual level, recent predictive advances on the electrical, optical and mechanical properties of such carbo-materials are surveyed. Very preliminary experimental results

  11. Aromatic and heterocyclic perfluoroalkyl sulfides. Methods of preparation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Summary This review covers all of the common methods for the syntheses of aromatic and heterocyclic perfluoroalkyl sulfides, a class of compounds which is finding increasing application as starting materials for the preparation of agrochemicals, pharmaceutical products and, more generally, fine chemicals. A systematic approach is taken depending on the mode of incorporation of the SRF groups and also on the type of reagents used. PMID:20978611

  12. Specificity of the cyanobacterial orange carotenoid protein: influences of orange carotenoid protein and phycobilisome structures.

    PubMed

    Jallet, Denis; Thurotte, Adrien; Leverenz, Ryan L; Perreau, François; Kerfeld, Cheryl A; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2014-02-01

    Cyanobacteria have developed a photoprotective mechanism that decreases the energy arriving at the reaction centers by increasing thermal energy dissipation at the level of the phycobilisome (PB), the extramembranous light-harvesting antenna. This mechanism is triggered by the photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP), which acts both as the photosensor and the energy quencher. The OCP binds the core of the PB. The structure of this core differs in diverse cyanobacterial strains. Here, using two isolated OCPs and four classes of PBs, we demonstrated that differences exist between OCPs related to PB binding, photoactivity, and carotenoid binding. Synechocystis PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) OCP, but not Arthrospira platensis PCC 7345 (hereafter Arthrospira) OCP, can attach echinenone in addition to hydroxyechinenone. Arthrospira OCP binds more strongly than Synechocystis OCP to all types of PBs. Synechocystis OCP can strongly bind only its own PB in 0.8 m potassium phosphate. However, if the Synechocystis OCP binds to the PB at very high phosphate concentrations (approximately 1.4 m), it is able to quench the fluorescence of any type of PB, even those isolated from strains that lack the OCP-mediated photoprotective mechanism. Thus, the determining step for the induction of photoprotection is the binding of the OCP to PBs. Our results also indicated that the structure of PBs, at least in vitro, significantly influences OCP binding and the stabilization of OCP-PB complexes. Finally, the fact that the OCP induced large fluorescence quenching even in the two-cylinder core of Synechococcus elongatus PBs strongly suggested that OCP binds to one of the basal allophycocyanin cylinders.

  13. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  14. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  15. Determination of the aromatic compounds in plant cuticular waxes using FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubis, Eligiusz N.; Dubis, Alina T.; Popławski, J.

    2001-09-01

    The infrared study of the aromatic components of hops ( Humulus lupulus) cuticular wax was performed. HATR FT-IR technique for fresh leaves and their extract analysis was applied. Phenylmethyl myristate, 2-phenylethyl myristate and docosyl benzoate were synthesized and used as reference standards. An absorption band in the range of 709-966 cm -1 indicates the presence of aromatic esters in plant cuticular waxes.

  16. ZEAXANTHIN EPOXIDASE Activity Potentiates Carotenoid Degradation in Maturing Seed1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Magallanes-Lundback, Maria; Lipka, Alexander E.; Angelovici, Ruthie; DellaPenna, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway has enabled altering the composition and content of carotenoids in various plants, but to achieve desired nutritional impacts, the genetic components regulating carotenoid homeostasis in seed, the plant organ consumed in greatest abundance, must be elucidated. We used a combination of linkage mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and pathway-level analysis to identify nine loci that impact the natural variation of seed carotenoids in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). ZEAXANTHIN EPOXIDASE (ZEP) was the major contributor to carotenoid composition, with mutants lacking ZEP activity showing a remarkable 6-fold increase in total seed carotenoids relative to the wild type. Natural variation in ZEP gene expression during seed development was identified as the underlying mechanism for fine-tuning carotenoid composition, stability, and ultimately content in Arabidopsis seed. We previously showed that two CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE enzymes, CCD1 and CCD4, are the primary mediators of seed carotenoid degradation, and here we demonstrate that ZEP acts as an upstream control point of carotenoid homeostasis, with ZEP-mediated epoxidation targeting carotenoids for degradation by CCD enzymes. Finally, four of the nine loci/enzymatic activities identified as underlying natural variation in Arabidopsis seed carotenoids also were identified in a recent GWAS of maize (Zea mays) kernel carotenoid variation. This first comparison of the natural variation in seed carotenoids in monocots and dicots suggests a surprising overlap in the genetic architecture of these traits between the two lineages and provides a list of likely candidates to target for selecting seed carotenoid variation in other species. PMID:27208224

  17. A Facile Solid‐Phase Route to Renewable Aromatic Chemicals from Biobased Furanics

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajan, Shanmugam; Genuino, Homer C.; van der Waal, Jan C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; van Haveren, Jacco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Renewable aromatics can be conveniently synthesized from furanics by introducing an intermediate hydrogenation step in the Diels–Alder (DA) aromatization route, to effectively block retro‐DA activity. Aromatization of the hydrogenated DA adducts requires tandem catalysis, using a metal‐based dehydrogenation catalyst and solid acid dehydration catalyst in toluene. Herein it is demonstrated that the hydrogenated DA adducts can instead be conveniently converted into renewable aromatics with up to 80 % selectivity in a solid‐phase reaction with shorter reaction times using only an acidic zeolite, that is, without solvent or dehydrogenation catalyst. Hydrogenated adducts from diene/dienophile combinations of (methylated) furans with maleic anhydride are efficiently converted into renewable aromatics with this new route. The zeolite H‐Y was found to perform the best and can be easily reused after calcination. PMID:26684008

  18. A Facile Solid-Phase Route to Renewable Aromatic Chemicals from Biobased Furanics.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, Shanmugam; Genuino, Homer C; van der Waal, Jan C; de Jong, Ed; Weckhuysen, Bert M; van Haveren, Jacco; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; van Es, Daan S

    2016-01-22

    Renewable aromatics can be conveniently synthesized from furanics by introducing an intermediate hydrogenation step in the Diels-Alder (DA) aromatization route, to effectively block retro-DA activity. Aromatization of the hydrogenated DA adducts requires tandem catalysis, using a metal-based dehydrogenation catalyst and solid acid dehydration catalyst in toluene. Herein it is demonstrated that the hydrogenated DA adducts can instead be conveniently converted into renewable aromatics with up to 80% selectivity in a solid-phase reaction with shorter reaction times using only an acidic zeolite, that is, without solvent or dehydrogenation catalyst. Hydrogenated adducts from diene/dienophile combinations of (methylated) furans with maleic anhydride are efficiently converted into renewable aromatics with this new route. The zeolite H-Y was found to perform the best and can be easily reused after calcination.

  19. Explaining Synthesized Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanBaalen, Jeffrey; Robinson, Peter; Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, Thomas; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Motivated by NASA's need for high-assurance software, NASA Ames' Amphion project has developed a generic program generation system based on deductive synthesis. Amphion has a number of advantages, such as the ability to develop a new synthesis system simply by writing a declarative domain theory. However, as a practical matter, the validation of the domain theory for such a system is problematic because the link between generated programs and the domain theory is complex. As a result, when generated programs do not behave as expected, it is difficult to isolate the cause, whether it be an incorrect problem specification or an error in the domain theory. This paper describes a tool we are developing that provides formal traceability between specifications and generated code for deductive synthesis systems. It is based on extensive instrumentation of the refutation-based theorem prover used to synthesize programs. It takes augmented proof structures and abstracts them to provide explanations of the relation between a specification, a domain theory, and synthesized code. In generating these explanations, the tool exploits the structure of Amphion domain theories, so the end user is not confronted with the intricacies of raw proof traces. This tool is crucial for the validation of domain theories as well as being important in everyday use of the code synthesis system. It plays an important role in validation because when generated programs exhibit incorrect behavior, it provides the links that can be traced to identify errors in specifications or domain theory. It plays an important role in the everyday use of the synthesis system by explaining to users what parts of a specification or of the domain theory contribute to what pieces of a generated program. Comments are inserted into the synthesized code that document these explanations.

  20. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jong-Su; Keum, Young-Soo; Li, Qing X.

    2009-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms. PMID:19440284

  1. Synthesizing folded band chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corron, Ned J.; Hayes, Scott T.; Pethel, Shawn D.; Blakely, Jonathan N.

    2007-04-01

    A randomly driven linear filter that synthesizes Lorenz-like, reverse-time chaos is shown also to produce Rössler-like folded band wave forms when driven using a different encoding of the random source. The relationship between the topological entropy of the random source, dissipation in the linear filter, and the positive Lyapunov exponent for the reverse-time wave form is exposed. The two drive encodings are viewed as grammar restrictions on a more general encoding that produces a chaotic superset encompassing both the Lorenz butterfly and Rössler folded band paradigms of nonlinear dynamics.

  2. Light- induced electron transfer and ATP synthesis in a carotene synthesizing insect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valmalette, Jean Christophe; Dombrovsky, Aviv; Brat, Pierre; Mertz, Christian; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2012-08-01

    A singular adaptive phenotype of a parthenogenetic insect species (Acyrthosiphon pisum) was selected in cold conditions and is characterized by a remarkable apparition of a greenish colour. The aphid pigments involve carotenoid genes well defined in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria and amazingly present in the aphid genome, likely by lateral transfer during evolution. The abundant carotenoid synthesis in aphids suggests strongly that a major and unknown physiological role is related to these compounds beyond their canonical anti-oxidant properties. We report here that the capture of light energy in living aphids results in the photo induced electron transfer from excited chromophores to acceptor molecules. The redox potentials of molecules involved in this process would be compatible with the reduction of the NAD+ coenzyme. This appears as an archaic photosynthetic system consisting of photo-emitted electrons that are in fine funnelled into the mitochondrial reducing power in order to synthesize ATP molecules.

  3. Carotenoid-based bill and eye ring coloration as honest signals of condition: an experimental test in the red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Viñuela, Javier

    2008-09-01

    Carotenoid pigments cannot be synthesized by vertebrates but must be ingested through the diet. As they seem to be a limited resource, carotenoid-based ornaments are particularly interesting as possible honest signals of individual quality, in particular of foraging efficiency and nutritional status. Some studies have demonstrated the condition dependence of carotenoid-based plumage in birds. However, many other carotenoid-pigmented bare parts (i.e. skin, caruncles, bills, cere, and tarsi) are present in birds but, in comparison with plumage, little is known about these traits as indicators of individual quality. Here, we show that the eye ring pigmentation and bill redness of the red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa) are positively associated to body condition and recent changes in body mass. Also, we found a negative relationship between these two traits and heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, an indicator of physiological stress (the relationship with bill redness being significant only for males). In an experiment, we found that after a period of reduction in food intake (with the consequent loss of body mass), food-restricted birds showed lower eye ring pigmentation than ad-libitum-fed birds. Therefore, different ornaments seem to reflect changes in body condition but at different speeds or intensities (eye ring, a fleshy ornament, appears to respond more rapidly to changes in the nutritional status than a keratinized structure as the bill). These results indicate that carotenoid-based ornaments are condition-dependent traits in the red-legged partridge, being therefore susceptible to be employed as honest signals of quality in sexual selection.

  4. Carotenoid-based bill and eye ring coloration as honest signals of condition: an experimental test in the red-legged partridge ( Alectoris rufa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Viñuela, Javier

    2008-09-01

    Carotenoid pigments cannot be synthesized by vertebrates but must be ingested through the diet. As they seem to be a limited resource, carotenoid-based ornaments are particularly interesting as possible honest signals of individual quality, in particular of foraging efficiency and nutritional status. Some studies have demonstrated the condition dependence of carotenoid-based plumage in birds. However, many other carotenoid-pigmented bare parts (i.e. skin, caruncles, bills, cere, and tarsi) are present in birds but, in comparison with plumage, little is known about these traits as indicators of individual quality. Here, we show that the eye ring pigmentation and bill redness of the red-legged partridge ( Alectoris rufa) are positively associated to body condition and recent changes in body mass. Also, we found a negative relationship between these two traits and heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, an indicator of physiological stress (the relationship with bill redness being significant only for males). In an experiment, we found that after a period of reduction in food intake (with the consequent loss of body mass), food-restricted birds showed lower eye ring pigmentation than ad-libitum-fed birds. Therefore, different ornaments seem to reflect changes in body condition but at different speeds or intensities (eye ring, a fleshy ornament, appears to respond more rapidly to changes in the nutritional status than a keratinized structure as the bill). These results indicate that carotenoid-based ornaments are condition-dependent traits in the red-legged partridge, being therefore susceptible to be employed as honest signals of quality in sexual selection.

  5. Patterns of serum carotenoid accumulation and skin colour variation in kestrel nestlings in relation to breeding conditions and different terms of carotenoid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Casagrande, Stefania; Costantini, David; Fanfani, Alberto; Tagliavini, James; Dell'Omo, Giacomo

    2007-02-01

    Carotenoids are pigments synthesised by autotrophic organisms. For nestlings of raptorial species, which obtain carotenoids from the consumption of other heterotrophic species, the access to these pigments can be crucial. Carotenoids, indeed, have fundamental health maintenance functions, especially important in developing individuals as nestling kestrels. The aim of this study was to investigate how body carotenoid levels and skin pigmentation vary in kestrel nestlings (Falco tinnunculus) in relation to nesting parameters. Furthermore, we experimentally altered carotenoid availability (short- medium- and long-term) for nestlings and investigated skin and serum variance. The skin colour variance of 151 nestlings was explained by nest of origin, age and by the body condition (body mass corrected by age), older nestlings with higher body condition being redder. No difference in skin colour was detected between sexes. Differences in hue (skin "redness") between treatments did not emerge during the first week, but did occur 15 days after administration between long-term supplemented and control chicks. In contrast, the serum carotenoid concentration showed a treatment-dependent increase after 5 days from the first carotenoid administration and at least after two supplemented feedings. In general, hue but not serum carotenoids, was correlated with the body condition of nestlings. Based on the increased skin pigmentation of nestling kestrels in the long-term experimental group, we suggest carotenoid availability to be limited for colour expression. The small increase of serum carotenoids due to supplementation is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a physiological constraint on these pigments, as well as an environmental limitation. The presented results are useful for the understanding of carotenoid uptake and accumulation by a wild raptorial species, located at the top of the food web, highlighting that carotenoids are a limited resource for kestrel nestlings.

  6. SYNTH: A spectrum synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, W. K.; McKinnon, A. D.; Miley, H. S.; Panisko, M. E.; Savard, R. M.

    1993-10-01

    A computer code has been written at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to synthesize the results of typical gamma ray spectroscopy experiments. The code, dubbed SYNTH, allows a user to specify physical characteristics of a gamma ray source, the quantity of the nuclides producing the radiation, the source-to-detector distance and the presence of absorbers, the type and size of the detector, and the electronic set up used to gather the data. In the process of specifying the parameters needed to synthesize a spectrum, several interesting intermediate results are produced, including a photopeak transmission function versus energy, a detector efficiency curve, and a weighted list of gamma and x rays produced from a set of nuclides. All of these intermediate results are available for graphical inspection and for printing. SYNTH runs on personal computers. It is menu driven and can be customized to user specifications. SYNTH contains robust support for coaxial germanium detectors and some support for sodium iodide detectors. SYNTH is not a finished product. A number of additional developments are planned. However, the existing code has been compared carefully to spectra obtained from National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) certified standards with very favorable results. Examples of the use of SYNTH and several spectral results are presented.

  7. Programmable electronic synthesized capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A predetermined and variable synthesized capacitance which may be incorporated into the resonant portion of an electronic oscillator for the purpose of tuning the oscillator comprises a programmable operational amplifier circuit. The operational amplifier circuit has its output connected to its inverting input, in a follower configuration, by a network which is low impedance at the operational frequency of the circuit. The output of the operational amplifier is also connected to the noninverting input by a capacitor. The noninverting input appears as a synthesized capacitance which may be varied with a variation in gain-bandwidth product of the operational amplifier circuit. The gain-bandwidth product may, in turn, be varied with a variation in input set current with a digital to analog converter whose output is varied with a command word. The output impedance of the circuit may also be varied by the output set current. This circuit may provide very small ranges in oscillator frequency with relatively large control voltages unaffected by noise.

  8. Catalytic aromatization of methane.

    PubMed

    Spivey, James J; Hutchings, Graham

    2014-02-07

    Recent developments in natural gas production technology have led to lower prices for methane and renewed interest in converting methane to higher value products. Processes such as those based on syngas from methane reforming are being investigated. Another option is methane aromatization, which produces benzene and hydrogen: 6CH4(g) → C6H6(g) + 9H2(g) ΔG°(r) = +433 kJ mol(-1) ΔH°(r) = +531 kJ mol(-1). Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction show that benzene formation is insignificant below ∼600 °C, and that the formation of solid carbon [C(s)] is thermodynamically favored at temperatures above ∼300 °C. Benzene formation is insignificant at all temperatures up to 1000 °C when C(s) is included in the calculation of equilibrium composition. Interestingly, the thermodynamic limitation on benzene formation can be minimized by the addition of alkanes/alkenes to the methane feed. By far the most widely studied catalysts for this reaction are Mo/HZSM-5 and Mo/MCM-22. Benzene selectivities are generally between 60 and 80% at methane conversions of ∼10%, corresponding to net benzene yields of less than 10%. Major byproducts include lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and higher molecular weight substituted aromatics. However, carbon formation is inevitable, but the experimental findings show this can be kinetically limited by the use of H2 or oxidants in the feed, including CO2 or steam. A number of reactor configurations involving regeneration of the carbon-containing catalyst have been developed with the goal of minimizing the cost of regeneration of the catalyst once deactivated by carbon deposition. In this tutorial review we discuss the thermodynamics of this process, the catalysts used and the potential reactor configurations that can be applied.

  9. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dilbeck, Preston L; Tang, Qun; Mothersole, David J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M

    2016-06-23

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC═C + NC═O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides strains incorporate their native carotenoids spheroidene (N = 10) and spheroidenone (N = 11), as well as longer-chain analogues including spirilloxanthin (N = 13) and diketospirilloxantion (N = 15) normally found in Rhodospirillum rubrum. Measurements of the properties of the carotenoid first singlet excited state (S1) in antennas from the Rb. sphaeroides set show that carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) interactions are similar to those in LH2 complexes from various other bacterial species and thus are not significantly impacted by differences in polypeptide composition. Instead, variations in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer are primarily regulated by the N-determined energy of the carotenoid S1 excited state, which for long-chain (N ≥ 13) carotenoids is not involved in energy transfer. Furthermore, the role of the long-chain carotenoids switches from a light-harvesting supporter (via energy transfer to BChl a) to a quencher of the BChl a S1 excited state B850*. This quenching is manifested as a substantial (∼2-fold) reduction of the B850* lifetime and the B850* fluorescence quantum yield for LH2 housing the longest carotenoids.

  10. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC=C + NC=O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides s