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Sample records for array photoacoustic tomographic

  1. Array-based photoacoustic spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, S. Thomas; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chen, Yu

    2005-03-22

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. A photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array including a body having at least three recesses or affinity masses connected thereto is used in conjunction with a photoacoustic spectroscopy system. At least one acoustic detector is positioned near the recesses or affinity masses for detection of acoustic waves emitted from species of interest within the recesses or affinity masses.

  2. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel and photoacoustic spectroscopy method for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.; Green, David

    2005-03-29

    Methods and apparatus for analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically coupled with the vessel body. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  3. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessels and photoacoustic spectroscopy methods for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.

    2006-02-14

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically positioned near the sample cells. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  4. Photoacoustic imaging using acoustic reflectors to enhance planar arrays.

    PubMed

    Ellwood, Robert; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2014-12-01

    Planar sensor arrays have advantages when used for photoacoustic imaging: they do not require the imaging target to be enclosed, and they are easier to manufacture than curved arrays. However, planar arrays have a limited view of the acoustic field due to their finite size; therefore, not all of the acoustic waves emitted from a photoacoustic source can be recorded. This loss of data results in artifacts in the reconstructed photoacoustic image. A detection array configuration which combines a planar Fabry–Pérot sensor with perpendicular acoustic reflectors is described and experimentally implemented. This retains the detection advantages of the planar sensor while increasing the effective detection aperture in order to improve the reconstructed photoacoustic image.

  5. Hybrid Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Tomograph for Real-Time Finger Imaging.

    PubMed

    Oeri, Milan; Bost, Wolfgang; Sénégond, Nicolas; Tretbar, Steffen; Fournelle, Marc

    2017-10-01

    We report a target-enclosing, hybrid tomograph with a total of 768 elements based on capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer technology and providing fast, high-resolution 2-D/3-D photoacoustic and ultrasound tomography tailored to finger imaging. A freely programmable ultrasound beamforming platform sampling data at 80 MHz was developed to realize plane wave transmission under multiple angles. A multiplexing unit enables the connection and control of a large number of elements. Fast image reconstruction is provided by GPU processing. The tomograph is composed of four independent and fully automated movable arc-shaped transducers, allowing imaging of all three finger joints. The system benefits from photoacoustics, yielding high optical contrast and enabling visualization of finger vascularization, and ultrasound provides morphologic information on joints and surrounding tissue. A diode-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used to broaden the spectrum of emitted wavelengths to provide multispectral imaging. Custom-made optical fiber bundles enable illumination of the region of interest in the plane of acoustic detection. Precision in positioning of the probe in motion is ensured by use of a motor-driven guide slide. The current position of the probe is encoded by the stage and used to relate ultrasound and photoacoustic signals to the corresponding region of interest of the suspicious finger joint. The system is characterized in phantoms and a healthy human finger in vivo. The results obtained promise to provide new opportunities in finger diagnostics and establish photoacoustic/ultrasound-tomography in medical routine. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqi; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-02-21

    We present a study through extensive simulation that considers the impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data collected from media mimicking breast tissue. We found that while the impact of scattering heterogeneities/targets is modest on photoacoustic recovery of optical absorption coefficients, the impact of scattering contrast caused by adipose tissue, a layer of normal tissue along the boundary of the breast, is dramatic on reconstruction of optical absorption coefficients using photoacoustic data-up to 25.8% relative error in recovering the absorption coefficient is estimated in such cases. To overcome this problem, we propose a new method to enhance photoacoustic recovery of the optical absorption coefficient in heterogeneous media by considering inhomogeneous scattering coefficient distribution provided by diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Results from extensive simulations show that photoacoustic recovery of absorption coefficient maps can be improved considerably with a priori scattering information from DOT.

  7. A high-speed photoacoustic tomography system based on a commercial ultrasound and a custom transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Cannata, Jonathan; DeBusschere, Derek; Hu, Changhong; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul

    2010-02-01

    Building photoacoustic imaging systems by using stand-alone ultrasound (US) units makes it convenient to take advantage of the state-of-the-art ultrasonic technologies. However, the sometimes limited receiving sensitivity and the comparatively narrow bandwidth of commercial US probes with elements driving long cables may not be sufficient for high quality photoacoustic imaging. In this work, a high-speed photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system has been developed using a commercial US unit and a custom built 128-element PVDF transducer array. Since the US unit supports simultaneous signal acquisition from 64 parallel receive channels, PAT data for synthetic image formation from a 64 or 128 element array aperture can be acquired after a single or dual laser firing, respectively. The PVDF array provides satisfactory receiving sensitivity and uniquely broad detection bandwidth, which enables good image quality for tomographic photoacoustic imaging. A specially designed 128-channel preamplifier board that connects the preamps directly to the PVDF elements not only enables impedance matching but also further elevates the signal-to-noise ratio in detecting weak photoacoustic signals. To examine the performance of this imaging system, experiments on phantoms were conducted and the results were compared with those acquired with commercial US probes.

  8. Thin polymer etalon arrays for high-resolution photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yang; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ashkenazi, Shai; Witte, Russell; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Thin polymer etalons are demonstrated as high-frequency ultrasound sensors for three-dimensional (3-D) high-resolution photoacoustic imaging. The etalon, a Fabry-Perot optical resonator, consists of a thin polymer slab sandwiched between two gold layers. It is probed with a scanning continuous-wave (CW) laser for ultrasound array detection. Detection bandwidth of a 20-μm-diam array element exceeds 50 MHz, and the ultrasound sensitivity is comparable to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) equivalents of similar size. In a typical photoacoustic imaging setup, a pulsed laser beam illuminates the imaging target, where optical energy is absorbed and acoustic waves are generated through the thermoelastic effect. An ultrasound detection array is formed by scanning the probing laser beam on the etalon surface in either a 1-D or a 2-D configuration, which produces 2-D or 3-D images, respectively. Axial and lateral resolutions have been demonstrated to be better than 20 μm. Detailed characterizations of the optical and acoustical properties of the etalon, as well as photoacoustic imaging results, suggest that thin polymer etalon arrays can be used as ultrasound detectors for 3-D high-resolution photoacoustic imaging applications. PMID:19123679

  9. Small-animal whole-body imaging using a photoacoustic full ring array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun; Guo, Zijian; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In this report, we present a novel 3D photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system for small-animal whole-body imaging. The PACT system, based on a 512-element full-ring transducer array, received photoacoustic signals primarily from a 2-mm-thick slice. The light was generated by a pulse laser, and can either illuminate from the top or be reshaped to illuminate the sample from the side, using a conical lens and an optical condenser. The PACT system was capable of acquiring an in-plane image in 1.6 s; by scanning the sample in the elevational direction, a 3D tomographic image could be constructed. We tested the system by imaging a cylindrical phantom made of human hairs immersed in a scattering medium. The reconstructed image achieved an in-plane resolution of 0.1 mm and an elevational resolution of 1 mm. After deconvolution in the elevational direction, the 3D image was found to match well with the phantom. The system was also used to image a baby mouse in situ; the spinal cord and ribs can be seen easily in the reconstructed image. Our results demonstrate that the PACT system has the potential to be used for fast small-animal whole-body tomographic imaging.

  10. Photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticles arrayed on thermal insulation layer.

    PubMed

    Namura, Kyoko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji

    2013-04-08

    Efficient photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticles on a porous SiO(2) layer was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The Au nanoparticle arrays/porous SiO(2)/SiO(2)/Ag mirror sandwiches, namely, local plasmon resonators, were prepared by dynamic oblique deposition (DOD). Photoacoustic measurements were performed on the local plasmon resonators, whose optical absorption was varied from 0.03 (3%) to 0.95 by varying the thickness of the dielectric SiO(2) layer. The sample with high absorption (0.95) emitted a sound that was eight times stronger than that emitted by graphite (0.94) and three times stronger than that emitted by the sample without the porous SiO(2) layer (0.93). The contribution of the porous SiO(2) layer to the efficient photoacoustic emission was analyzed by means of a numerical method based on a one-dimensional heat transfer model. The result suggested that the low thermal conductivity of the underlying porous layer reduces the amount of heat escaping from the substrate and contributes to the efficient photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticle arrays. Because both the thermal conductivity and the spatial distribution of the heat generation can be controlled by DOD, the local plasmon resonators produced by DOD are suitable for the spatio-temporal modulation of the local temperature.

  11. Toroidal sensor arrays for real-time photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, Anton S; Cherepetskaya, Elena B; Karabutov, Alexander A; Makarov, Vladimir A

    2017-07-01

    This article addresses theoretical and numerical investigation of image formation in photoacoustic (PA) imaging with complex-shaped concave sensor arrays. The spatial resolution and the size of sensitivity region of PA and laser ultrasonic (LU) imaging systems are assessed using sensitivity maps and spatial resolution maps in the image plane. This paper also discusses the relationship between the size of high-sensitivity regions and the spatial resolution of real-time imaging systems utilizing toroidal arrays. It is shown that the use of arrays with toroidal geometry significantly improves the diagnostic capabilities of PA and LU imaging to investigate biological objects, rocks, and composite materials.

  12. Toroidal sensor arrays for real-time photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, Anton S.; Cherepetskaya, Elena B.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Makarov, Vladimir A.

    2017-07-01

    This article addresses theoretical and numerical investigation of image formation in photoacoustic (PA) imaging with complex-shaped concave sensor arrays. The spatial resolution and the size of sensitivity region of PA and laser ultrasonic (LU) imaging systems are assessed using sensitivity maps and spatial resolution maps in the image plane. This paper also discusses the relationship between the size of high-sensitivity regions and the spatial resolution of real-time imaging systems utilizing toroidal arrays. It is shown that the use of arrays with toroidal geometry significantly improves the diagnostic capabilities of PA and LU imaging to investigate biological objects, rocks, and composite materials.

  13. Piezoelectric annular array for large depth of field photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Passler, K.; Nuster, R.; Gratt, S.; Burgholzer, P.; Paltauf, G.

    2011-01-01

    A piezoelectric detection system consisting of an annular array is investigated for large depth of field photoacoustic imaging. In comparison to a single ring detection system, X-shaped imaging artifacts are suppressed. Sensitivity and image resolution studies are performed in simulations and in experiments and compared to a simulated spherical detector. In experiment an eight ring detection systems offers an extended depth of field over a range of 16 mm with almost constant lateral resolution. PMID:21991555

  14. Photoacoustic tomography of small animal brain with a curved array transducer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmai; Maurudis, Anastasios; Gamelin, John; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V

    2009-01-01

    We present the application of a curved array photoacoustic tomographic imaging system that can provide rapid, high-resolution photoacoustic imaging of small animal brains. The system is optimized to produce a B-mode, 90-deg field-of-view image at sub-200-microm resolution at a frame rate of approximately 1 frame/second when a 10-Hz pulse repetition rate laser is employed. By rotating samples, a complete 360-deg scan can be achieved within 15 s. In previous work, two-dimensional (2-D) ex vivo mouse brain cortex imaging has been reported. We report three-dimensional (3-D) small animal brain imaging obtained with the curved array system. The results are presented as a series of 2-D cross-sectional images. Besides structural imaging, the blood oxygen saturation of the animal brain cortex is also measured in vivo. In addition, the system can measure the time-resolved relative changes in blood oxygen saturation level in the small animal brain cortex. Last, ultrasonic gel coupling, instead of the previously adopted water coupling, is conveniently used in near-real-time 2-D imaging.

  15. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L; Shung, K Kirk; Zhang, Hao F; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging.

  16. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhang, Hao F.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging. PMID:23162708

  17. Light focusing and two-dimensional imaging through scattering media using the photoacoustic transmission matrix with an ultrasound array.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, Thomas; Gateau, Jérôme; Katz, Ori; Bossy, Emmanuel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    We implement the photoacoustic transmission matrix approach on a two-dimensional photoacoustic imaging system, using a 15 MHz linear ultrasound array. Using a black leaf skeleton as a complex absorbing structure, we demonstrate that the photoacoustic transmission matrix approach allows to reveal structural features that are invisible in conventional photoacoustic images, as well as to selectively control light focusing on absorbing targets, leading to a local enhancement of the photoacoustic signal.

  18. Teleseismic tomographic images from the Deep Probe passive seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H.; Dueker, K.

    2002-12-01

    Tomographic images from the Deep Probe passive source experiment reveal remarkable lithospheric velocity structures beneath the Proterozoic and Archean provinces in Colorado, Wyoming and Montana. Two 400-km long line arrays were deployed to straddle the Cheyenne belt, a suture zone separating the Archean Wyoming and Proterozoic Colorado. Using multi-channel cross-correlation technique, about 5000 teleseismic P-wave times are picked from the two arrays. Summary rays are constructed to reduce the size tomographic system of equations and equalize ray path coverage, hence resolution. Our preliminary observations are: (1) A low velocity anomaly extends to ~150 km depth beneath the 10 ma Grand Mesa volcanic field in Western Colorado. (2) Dipping high velocity anomalies appear at 200 - 300 km depth beneath the Cheyenne belt. Dipping high velocity anomaly beneath the Cheyenne belt is also seen 200 km to the East, in the tomographic images from the CD-ROM experiment. Given the Cheyenne belt is a suture zone, these dipping high velocity anomalies may represent Proterozoic lithospheric segments embedded in the upper mantle after the 1.8 ga collision of the Yavapai island arc terrane and the Archean Wyoming craton.

  19. Photoacoustic-guided ultrasound therapy with a dual-mode ultrasound array.

    PubMed

    Prost, Amaury; Funke, Arik; Tanter, Mickaël; Aubry, Jean-François; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustics has recently been proposed as a potential method to guide and/or monitor therapy based on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). We experimentally demonstrate the creation of a HIFU lesion at the location of an optical absorber, by use of photoacoustic signals emitted by the absorber detected on a dual mode transducer array. To do so, a dedicated ultrasound array intended to both detect photoacoustic waves and emit HIFU with the same elements was used. Such a dual-mode array provides automatically coregistered reference frames for photoacoustic detection and HIFU emission, a highly desired feature for methods involving guidance or monitoring of HIFU by use of photoacoustics. The prototype is first characterized in terms of both photoacoustic and HIFU performances. The probe is then used to perform an idealized scenario of photoacoustic-guided therapy, where photoacoustic signals generated by an absorbing thread embedded in a piece of chicken breast are used to automatically refocus a HIFU beam with a time-reversal mirror and necrose the tissue at the location of the absorber.

  20. Photoacoustic-guided ultrasound therapy with a dual-mode ultrasound array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, Amaury; Funke, Arik; Tanter, Mickaël; Aubry, Jean-François; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustics has recently been proposed as a potential method to guide and/or monitor therapy based on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). We experimentally demonstrate the creation of a HIFU lesion at the location of an optical absorber, by use of photoacoustic signals emitted by the absorber detected on a dual mode transducer array. To do so, a dedicated ultrasound array intended to both detect photoacoustic waves and emit HIFU with the same elements was used. Such a dual-mode array provides automatically coregistered reference frames for photoacoustic detection and HIFU emission, a highly desired feature for methods involving guidance or monitoring of HIFU by use of photoacoustics. The prototype is first characterized in terms of both photoacoustic and HIFU performances. The probe is then used to perform an idealized scenario of photoacoustic-guided therapy, where photoacoustic signals generated by an absorbing thread embedded in a piece of chicken breast are used to automatically refocus a HIFU beam with a time-reversal mirror and necrose the tissue at the location of the absorber.

  1. Slit-enabled linear-array photoacoustic tomography with near isotropic spatial resolution in three dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuehang; Wang, Depeng; Zhang, Yumiao; Geng, Jumin; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Xia, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Due to its unique capability of visualizing optical absorption in deep tissues, photoacoustic tomography is increasingly used in biomedical imaging. Among various types of transducer arrays, the linear array is perhaps the most widely used in photoacoustic tomography, because it is commercially available and readily allows ultrasound imaging. However, the three-dimensional imaging capability of a linear array is limited, due to its poor elevational resolution. While various scanning schemes have been proposed to address this problem, they all suffer from long scanning time. To address this issue, we introduce slit-enabled three-dimensional photoacoustic tomography. The metal slit, placed at the array focus, causes the incoming photoacoustic waves to diffract along the elevation direction and hence significantly improves the elevation detection aperture and resolution. We tested the new system in both phantoms and animals. The slit improves the elevation resolution by ten times without compromising scanning time. PMID:26696175

  2. Guided Wave Annular Array Sensor Design for Improved Tomographic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koduru, Jaya Prakash; Rose, Joseph L.

    2009-03-01

    Guided wave tomography for structural health monitoring is fast emerging as a reliable tool for the detection and monitoring of hotspots in a structure, for any defects arising from corrosion, crack growth etc. To date guided wave tomography has been successfully tested on aircraft wings, pipes, pipe elbows, and weld joints. Structures practically deployed are subjected to harsh environments like exposure to rain, changes in temperature and humidity. A reliable tomography system should take into account these environmental factors to avoid false alarms. The lack of mode control with piezoceramic disk sensors makes it very sensitive to traces of water leading to false alarms. In this study we explore the design of annular array sensors to provide mode control for improved structural tomography, in particular, addressing the false alarm potential of water loading. Clearly defined actuation lines in the phase velocity dispersion curve space are calculated. A dominant in-plane displacement point is found to provide a solution to the water loading problem. The improvement in the tomographic images with the annular array sensors in the presence of water traces is clearly illustrated with a series of experiments. An annular array design philosophy for other problems in NDE/SHM is also discussed.

  3. Investigation of a diffuse optical measurements-assisted quantitative photoacoustic tomographic method in reflection geometry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Aguirre, Andres

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Photoacoustic tomography provides the distribution of absorbed optical energy density, which is the product of optical absorption coefficient and optical fluence distribution. We report the experimental investigation of a novel fitting procedure that quantitatively determines the optical absorption coefficient of chromophores. The experimental setup consisted of a hybrid system of a 64-channel photoacoustic imaging system with a frequency-domain diffused optical measurement system. The fitting procedure included a complete photoacoustic forward model and an analytical solution of a target chromophore using the diffusion approximation. The fitting procedure combines the information from the photoacoustic image and the background information from the diffuse optical measurements to minimize the photoacoustic measurements and forward model data and recover the target absorption coefficient quantitatively. 1-cm-cube phantom absorbers of high and low contrasts were imaged at depths of up to 3.0 cm. The fitted absorption coefficient results were at least 80% of their true values. The sensitivities of this fitting procedure to target location, target radius, and background optical properties were also investigated. We found that this fitting procedure was most sensitive to the accurate determination of the target radius and depth. Blood sample in a thin tube of radius 0.58 mm, simulating a blood vessel, was also studied. The photoacoustic images and fitted absorption coefficients are presented. These results demonstrate the clinical potential of this fitting procedure to quantitatively characterize small lesions in breast imaging. PMID:22734743

  4. Attempts to increase penetration of photoacoustic system using LED array light souce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agano, Toshitaka; Sato, Naoto; Nakatsuka, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hanaoka, Takamitsu; Morisono, Koji; Shigeta, Yusuke

    2015-03-01

    When we consider the needle visualization in the field of point of care by utilizing the photoacoustic imaging system, and using the conventional solid state laser light source, the issue arises such as device size and not a green system due to the high power consumption. Therefore, we aimed at an environmentally friendly and compact system with low power consumption by using a NIR-LED array light source. The intensity of NIR-LED light is weak, but, by averaging photoacoustic signals with multiple pulse, we have improved S/N of the photoacoustic signal. As a result, we've achieved penetration depth of 30mm.

  5. Frequency-domain photoacoustic phased array probe for biomedical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Telenkov, Sergey; Alwi, Rudolf; Mandelis, Andreas; Worthington, Arthur

    2011-12-01

    We report the development of a frequency-domain biomedical photoacoustic imaging system that utilizes a continuous-wave laser source with a custom intensity modulation pattern, ultrasonic phased array for signal detection, and processing coupled with a beam-forming algorithm for reconstruction of photoacoustic correlation images. Sensitivity to optical contrast was demonstrated using tissue-mimicking phantoms and in-vivo tissue samples.

  6. Deep-penetration photoacoustic array imaging of calcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Tsai-Chu; Cheng, Yao-Yu; Tein, Wan-Ting; Luo, Shih-Bin; Chiou, De-Yi; Chung, Ren-Jei; Li, Meng-Lin

    2013-06-01

    Calcifications are one of the most important indicators for early breast cancer detection. We explore the feasibility of deep-penetration photoacoustic (PA) imaging of calcifications based on a medical ultrasound array imaging platform. Intralipid and chicken breast phantoms embedded with different-sized hydroxyapatite (HA) particles, which are the major components of calcifications, were imaged to verify the equipment's capability and penetration depth for the visualization of calcifications. An optimal near-infrared excitation wavelength was selected to maximize PA signals of HAs, resulting in a better HA signal-to-blood ratio. We demonstrated that PA imaging is capable of visualizing 0.5-mm HA particles at a depth of 3 cm in chicken breast phantoms. The noise-equivalent penetration depth of the system for visualizing 0.5-mm HA particles in the human breast was estimated to be about 2.9 to 3.5 cm, which is clinically relevant as calcifications are usually found at a depth of 0.6 to 3.0 cm. Moreover, the feasibility of differentiating HA from blood by the PA spectroscopic technique was presented and the mechanism of the HA signal generation was discussed. The results show that PA imaging is a promising technique for real-time visualization of breast calcifications.

  7. Handheld array-based photoacoustic probe for guiding needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Erpelding, Todd N.; Maslov, Konstantin; Jankovic, Ladislav; Akers, Walter J.; Song, Liang; Achilefu, Samuel; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Pashley, Michael D.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-07-01

    By modifying a clinical ultrasound array system, we develop a novel handheld photoacoustic probe for image-guided needle biopsy. The integration of optical fiber bundles for pulsed laser light delivery enables photoacoustic image-guided insertion of a needle into rat axillary lymph nodes with accumulated indocyanine green (ICG). Strong photoacoustic contrast of the needle is achieved. After subcutaneous injection of the dye in the left forepaw, sentinel lymph nodes are easily detected, in vivo and in real time, beneath 2-cm-thick chicken breast overlaying the axillary region. ICG uptake in axillary lymph nodes is confirmed with fluorescence imaging both in vivo and ex vivo. These results demonstrate the clinical potential of this handheld photoacoustic system for facile identification and needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes for cancer staging and metastasis detection in humans.

  8. 3-D Deep Penetration Photoacoustic Imaging with a 2-D CMUT Array.

    PubMed

    Ma, Te-Jen; Kothapalli, Sri Rajasekhar; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Oralkan, Omer; Kamaya, Aya; Wygant, Ira O; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2010-10-11

    In this work, we demonstrate 3-D photoacoustic imaging of optically absorbing targets embedded as deep as 5 cm inside a highly scattering background medium using a 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array with a center frequency of 5.5 MHz. 3-D volumetric images and 2-D maximum intensity projection images are presented to show the objects imaged at different depths. Due to the close proximity of the CMUT to the integrated frontend circuits, the CMUT array imaging system has a low noise floor. This makes the CMUT a promising technology for deep tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  9. A photoacoustic imaging system employing a curved-phased ultrasonic array and parallel electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurudis, Anastasios; Huang, Fei; Guo, Puyun; Yan, Shikui; Castillo, Diego; Wang, Lihong V.; Zhu, Quing

    2006-02-01

    Real-time photoacoustic imaging requires ultrasonic array receivers and parallel data acquisition systems for the simultaneous detection of weak photoacoustic signals. In this paper, we introduce a newly completed ultrasonic receiving array system and report preliminary results of our measured point spread function. The system employs a curved ultrasonic phased array consisting of 128-elements, which span a quarter of a complete circle. The center frequency of the array is 5 MHz and the bandwidth is greater than 60%. In order to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio for photoacoustic signal detection, we utilized special designs for the analog front-end electronics. First, the 128 transducer-element signals were routed out using a 50-Ohm impedance matching PCB board to sustain signal integrity. We also utilize 128 low-noise pre-amplifiers, connected directly to the ultrasonic transducer, to amplify the weak photoacoustic signals before they were multiplexed to a variable-gain multi-stage amplifier chain. All front-end circuits were placed close to the transducer array to minimize signal lose due to cables and therefore improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Sixteen analog-to-digital converters were used to sample signals at a rate of 40 mega-samples per second with a resolution of 10-bits per sample. This allows us to perform a complete electronic scan of all 128 elements using just eight laser pulses.

  10. Real-time clinically oriented array-based in vivo combined photoacoustic and power Doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Jeffery, Dean; Wiebe, Edward; Zemp, Roger J.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has great potential for identifying vascular regions for clinical imaging. In addition to assessing angiogenesis in cancers, there are many other disease processes that result in increased vascularity that present novel targets for photoacoustic imaging. Doppler imaging can provide good localization of large vessels, but poor imaging of small or low flow speed vessels and is susceptible to motion artifacts. Photoacoustic imaging can provide visualization of small vessels, but due to the filtering effects of ultrasound transducers, only shows the edges of large vessels. Thus, we have combined photoacoustic imaging with ultrasound power Doppler to provide contrast agent- free vascular imaging. We use a research-oriented ultrasound array system to provide interlaced ultrasound, Doppler, and photoacoustic imaging. This system features realtime display of all three modalities with adjustable persistence, rejection, and compression. For ease of use in a clinical setting, display of each mode can be disabled. We verify the ability of this system to identify vessels with varying flow speeds using receiver operating characteristic curves, and find that as flow speed falls, photoacoustic imaging becomes a much better method for identifying blood vessels. We also present several in vivo images of the thyroid and several synovial joints to assess the practicality of this imaging for clinical applications.

  11. In vivo three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging based on a clinical matrix array ultrasound probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Erpelding, Todd N.; Jankovic, Ladislav; Guo, Zijian; Robert, Jean-Luc; David, Guillaume; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-06-01

    We present an integrated photoacoustic and ultrasonic three-dimensional (3-D) volumetric imaging system based on a two-dimensional (2-D) matrix array ultrasound probe. A wavelength-tunable dye laser pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser serves as the light source and a modified commercial ultrasound imaging system (iU22, Philips Healthcare) with a 2-D array transducer (X7-2, Philips Healthcare) detects both the pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic signals. A multichannel data acquisition system acquires the RF channel data. The imaging system enables rendering of co-registered 3-D ultrasound and photoacoustic images without mechanical scanning. The resolution along the azimuth, elevation, and axial direction are measured to be 0.69, 0.90 and 0.84 mm for photoacoustic imaging. In vivo 3-D photoacoustic mapping of the sentinel lymph node was demonstrated in a rat model using methylene blue dye. These results highlight the clinical potential of 3-D PA imaging for identification of sentinel lymph nodes for cancer staging in humans.

  12. In vivo imaging of inducible tyrosinase gene expression with an ultrasound array-based photoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    Tyrosinase, a key enzyme in the production of melanin, has shown promise as a reporter of genetic activity. While green fluorescent protein has been used extensively in this capacity, it is limited in its ability to provide information deep in tissue at a reasonable resolution. As melanin is a strong absorber of light, it is possible to image gene expression using tyrosinase with photoacoustic imaging technologies, resulting in excellent resolutions at multiple-centimeter depths. While our previous work has focused on creating and imaging MCF-7 cells with doxycycline-controlled tyrosinase expression, we have now established the viability of these cells in a murine model. Using an array-based photoacoustic imaging system with 5 MHz center frequency, we capture interleaved ultrasound and photoacoustic images of tyrosinase-expressing MCF-7 tumors both in a tissue mimicking phantom, and in vivo. Images of both the tyrosinase-expressing tumor and a control tumor are presented as both coregistered ultrasound-photoacoustic B-scan images and 3-dimensional photoacoustic volumes created by mechanically scanning the transducer. We find that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible with a signal level 12dB greater than that of the control tumor in vivo. Phantom studies with excised tumors show that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible at depths in excess of 2cm, and have suggested that our imaging system is sensitive to a transfection rate of less than 1%.

  13. Isotropic-resolution linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography through inverse Radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Xia, Jun; Li, Lei; Wang, Lidai; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Linear transducer arrays are readily available for ultrasonic detection in photoacoustic computed tomography. They offer low cost, hand-held convenience, and conventional ultrasonic imaging. However, the elevational resolution of linear transducer arrays, which is usually determined by the weak focus of the cylindrical acoustic lens, is about one order of magnitude worse than the in-plane axial and lateral spatial resolutions. Therefore, conventional linear scanning along the elevational direction cannot provide high-quality three-dimensional photoacoustic images due to the anisotropic spatial resolutions. Here we propose an innovative method to achieve isotropic resolutions for three-dimensional photoacoustic images through combined linear and rotational scanning. In each scan step, we first elevationally scan the linear transducer array, and then rotate the linear transducer array along its center in small steps, and scan again until 180 degrees have been covered. To reconstruct isotropic three-dimensional images from the multiple-directional scanning dataset, we use the standard inverse Radon transform originating from X-ray CT. We acquired a three-dimensional microsphere phantom image through the inverse Radon transform method and compared it with a single-elevational-scan three-dimensional image. The comparison shows that our method improves the elevational resolution by up to one order of magnitude, approaching the in-plane lateral-direction resolution. In vivo rat images were also acquired.

  14. Coherent-weighted three-dimensional image reconstruction in linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Depeng; Wang, Yuehang; Zhou, Yang; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Xia, Jun

    2016-01-01

    While the majority of photoacoustic imaging systems used custom-made transducer arrays, commercially-available linear transducer arrays hold the benefits of affordable price, handheld convenience and wide clinical recognition. They are not widely used in photoacoustic imaging primarily because of the poor elevation resolution. Here, without modifying the imaging geometry and system, we propose addressing this limitation purely through image reconstruction. Our approach is based on the integration of two advanced image reconstruction techniques: focal-line-based three-dimensional image reconstruction and coherent weighting. We first numerically validated our approach through simulation and then experimentally tested it in phantom and in vivo. Both simulation and experimental results proved that the method can significantly improve the elevation resolution (up to 4 times in our experiment) and enhance object contrast. PMID:27231634

  15. Coherent-weighted three-dimensional image reconstruction in linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Depeng; Wang, Yuehang; Zhou, Yang; Lovell, Jonathan F; Xia, Jun

    2016-05-01

    While the majority of photoacoustic imaging systems used custom-made transducer arrays, commercially-available linear transducer arrays hold the benefits of affordable price, handheld convenience and wide clinical recognition. They are not widely used in photoacoustic imaging primarily because of the poor elevation resolution. Here, without modifying the imaging geometry and system, we propose addressing this limitation purely through image reconstruction. Our approach is based on the integration of two advanced image reconstruction techniques: focal-line-based three-dimensional image reconstruction and coherent weighting. We first numerically validated our approach through simulation and then experimentally tested it in phantom and in vivo. Both simulation and experimental results proved that the method can significantly improve the elevation resolution (up to 4 times in our experiment) and enhance object contrast.

  16. Photoacoustic imaging of the human forearm using 40 MHz linear-array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Haroon; Breathnach, Aedán.; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2014-02-01

    In this work photoacoustic imaging (PAI) based on multi element linear-array transducer, combined with multichannel collecting system was used for in vivo imaging of microcirculation of the human forearm. The Vevo® 2100 LAZR PAT system (VISUALSONICS) was used for imaging which simultaneously collects high-resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic signals. 3D PA and high frequency ultrasound scans, measured 30.5 mm (length) x 14.1 mm (width) x 10 mm (depth) were acquired from the area of forearm skin using 40 MHz frequency transducer at 860 nm wavelength. 3D structural and functional (microcirculation) maps of the forearm skin were obtained. The multi element linear-array transducer based PAI has been found promising in terms of resolution, imaging depth and imaging speed for in vivo microcirculation imaging within human skin.

  17. Interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging with a clinical linear array ultrasound probe for guiding nerve blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; West, Simeon J.; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate identification of tissue structures such as nerves and blood vessels is critically important for interventional procedures such as nerve blocks. Ultrasound imaging is widely used as a guidance modality to visualize anatomical structures in real-time. However, identification of nerves and small blood vessels can be very challenging, and accidental intra-neural or intra-vascular injections can result in significant complications. Multi-spectral photoacoustic imaging can provide high sensitivity and specificity for discriminating hemoglobin- and lipid-rich tissues. However, conventional surface-illumination-based photoacoustic systems suffer from limited sensitivity at large depths. In this study, for the first time, an interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging (IMPA) system was used to image nerves in a swine model in vivo. Pulsed excitation light with wavelengths in the ranges of 750 - 900 nm and 1150 - 1300 nm was delivered inside the body through an optical fiber positioned within the cannula of an injection needle. Ultrasound waves were received at the tissue surface using a clinical linear array imaging probe. Co-registered B-mode ultrasound images were acquired using the same imaging probe. Nerve identification was performed using a combination of B-mode ultrasound imaging and electrical stimulation. Using a linear model, spectral-unmixing of the photoacoustic data was performed to provide image contrast for oxygenated and de-oxygenated hemoglobin, water and lipids. Good correspondence between a known nerve location and a lipid-rich region in the photoacoustic images was observed. The results indicate that IMPA is a promising modality for guiding nerve blocks and other interventional procedures. Challenges involved with clinical translation are discussed.

  18. Realtime photoacoustic microscopy in vivo with a 30-MHz ultrasound array transducer.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Roger J; Song, Liang; Bitton, Rachel; Shung, K Kirk; Wang, Lihong V

    2008-05-26

    We present a novel high-frequency photoacoustic microscopy system capable of imaging the microvasculature of living subjects in realtime to depths of a few mm. The system consists of a high-repetition-rate Q-switched pump laser, a tunable dye laser, a 30-MHz linear ultrasound array transducer, a multichannel high-frequency data acquisition system, and a shared-RAM multi-core-processor computer. Data acquisition, beamforming, scan conversion, and display are implemented in realtime at 50 frames per second. Clearly resolvable images of 6-microm-diameter carbon fibers are experimentally demonstrated at 80 microm separation distances. Realtime imaging performance is demonstrated on phantoms and in vivo with absorbing structures identified to depths of 2.5-3 mm. This work represents the first high-frequency realtime photoacoustic imaging system to our knowledge.

  19. A custom-made linear array transducer for photoacoustic breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Heijblom, Michelle; Van Hespen, Johan; van Veldhoven, Spiridon; Prins, Christian; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2012-02-01

    A custom-made first prototype of a linear array ultrasound transducer for breast imaging is presented. Large active area transducer elements (5 mm × 5 mm) with 1 MHz resonance frequency are chosen to obtain a relatively high sensitivity. Acoustic lenses are used to enlarge the narrow acceptance angle of such transducer elements. The minimum detectable pressure, frequency bandwidth and electrical impedance of the transducer elements are characterized. The results show the transducer has a minimum detectable pressure of 0.8 Pa, which is superior than the transducers used in the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope system previously developed in our group. The bandwidth of the transducer is relative small, however it can be improved when using optimized matching layer thickness in future. We also observed a strong lateral resonance at 330 kHz, which may cause problems in various aspects for a photoacoustic imaging system. We discuss the future improvement and plans for the transducer optimizations.

  20. Ultrasound-array-based real-time photoacoustic microscopy of human pulsatile dynamics in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liang; Maslov, Konstantin; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-03-01

    With a refined ultrasound-array-based real-time photoacoustic microscopy (UA-PAM) system, we demonstrate the feasibility of noninvasive in vivo imaging of human pulsatile dynamics. The system, capable of real-time B-scan imaging at 50 Hz and high-speed 3-D imaging, is validated by imaging the subcutaneous microvasculature in rats and humans. After the validation, a human artery around the palm-wrist area is imaged, and its pulsatile dynamics, including the arterial pulsatile motion and changes in hemoglobin concentration, is monitored with 20-ms B-scan imaging temporal resolution. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of real-time photoacoustic imaging of human physiological dynamics. Our results show that UA-PAM can potentially enable many new possibilities for studying functional and physiological dynamics in both preclinical and clinical imaging settings.

  1. 64-line-sensor array: fast imaging system for photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratt, Sibylle; Nuster, Robert; Wurzinger, Gerhild; Bugl, Markus; Paltauf, Guenther

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional photoacoustic tomography with line sensors, which integrate the pressure along their length, has shown to produce accurate images of small animals. To reduce the scanning time and to enable in vivo applications, a detection array is built consisting of 64 piezoelectric line sensors which are arranged on a semi-cylinder. When measuring line integrated pressure signals around the imaging object, the three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging problem is reduced to a set of two-dimensional reconstructions and the measurement setup requires only a single axis of rotation. The shape and size of the array were adapted to the given problem of biomedical imaging and small animal imaging in particular. The length and width of individual line elements had to be chosen in order to take advantage of the favorable line integrating properties, maintaining the requested resolution of the image. For data acquisition the signals from the 64 elements are amplified and multiplexed into a 32 channel digitizer. Single projection images are recorded with two laser pulses within 0.2 seconds, as determined by the laser pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. Phantom experiments are used for characterization of the line-array. Compared to previous implementations with a single line sensor scanning around an object, with the developed array the data acquisition time can be reduced from about one hour to about one minute.

  2. Ultrasound array photoacoustic microscopy for dynamic in vivo 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liang; Maslov, Konstantin; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Using realtime ultrasound array photoacoustic microscopy (UA-PAM), we demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasive in vivo imaging of human pulsatile dynamics, as well as 3-D dynamic imaging of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in a murine model. The system, capable of realtime B-scan imaging at 50 Hz and high-speed 3-D imaging, was validated by imaging the subcutaneous microvasculature in rats and humans. After the validation, a human superficial palmar was imaged, and its pulsatile dynamics monitored, with 20-ms B-scan imaging temporal resolution. In addition, noninvasive photoacoustic sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping with high spatial resolution has the potential to reduce the false negative rate and eliminate the use of radioactive tracers. Upon intra-dermal injection of Evans blue, the system maps SLNs accurately in mice and rats. Furthermore, the ~6 s 3-D imaging temporal resolution offers the capability to quantitatively and noninvasively monitor the dye dynamics in SLNs in vivo through sequential 3-D imaging. The demonstrated capability suggests that high-speed 3-D photoacoustic imaging should facilitate the understanding of the dynamics of various dyes in SLNs, and potentially help identify SLNs with high accuracy. With the results shown in this study, we believe that UA-PAM can potentially enable many new possibilities for studying functional and physiological dynamics in both preclinical and clinical imaging settings.

  3. Deeply penetrating in vivo photoacoustic imaging using a clinical ultrasound array system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulhong; Erpelding, Todd N; Jankovic, Ladislav; Pashley, Michael D; Wang, Lihong V

    2010-07-26

    Using a hand-held photoacoustic probe integrated with a clinical ultrasound array system, we successfully imaged objects deeply positioned in biological tissues. The optical contrasts were enhanced by methylene blue with a concentration of ~30 mM. The penetration depth reached ~5.2 cm in chicken breast tissue by using 650-nm wavelength, which is ~4.7 times the 1/e optical penetration depth. This imaging depth was achieved using a laser fluence on the tissue surface of only 3 mJ/cm(2), which is 1/7 of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) safety limit (20 mJ/cm(2)). The noise equivalent sensitivity at this depth was ~11 mM. Further, after intradermal injection of methylene blue in a rat, a sentinel lymph node was easily detected in vivo, beneath a 2-cm thick layer of chicken breast. Also, blood located 3.5 cm deep in the rat was clearly imaged with intrinsic contrast. We have photoacoustically guided insertion of a needle into a rat sentinel lymph node with accumulated methylene blue. These results highlight the clinical potential of photoacoustic image-guided identification and needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes for axillary staging in breast cancer patients.

  4. Standoff photoacoustic detections with high-sensitivity microphones and acoustic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Chen-Chia; Khurgin, Jacob; Samuels, Alan; Trivedi, Sudhir; Gupta, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    Standoff detection of dangerous chemicals like explosives, nerve gases, and harmful aerosols has continuously been an important subject due to the serious concern about terrorist threats to both overseas and homeland lives and facility. Compared with other currently available standoff optical detection techniques, like Raman, photo-thermal, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy,...etc., photoacoustic (PA) sensing has the advantages of background free and very high detection sensitivity, no need of back reflection surfaces, and 1/R instead of 1/R2 signal decay distance dependence. Furthermore, there is still a great room for PA sensitivity improvement by using different PA techniques, including lockin amplifier, employing new microphones, and microphone array techniques. Recently, we have demonstrated standoff PA detection of isopropanol vapor, solid phase TNT and RDX at a standoff distance. To further calibrate the detection sensitivity, we use nerve gas simulants that were generated and calibrated by a commercial vapor generator. For field operations, array of microphones and microphone-reflector pairs can be utilized to achieve noise rejection and signal enhancement. We have experimentally demonstrated signal enhancement and noise reduction using an array of 4 microphone/4 reflector system as well as an array of 16-microphone/1 reflector. In this work we will review and compare different standoff techniques and discuss the advantages of using different photoacoustic techniques. We will also discuss new advancement of using new types of microphone and the performance comparison of using different structure of microphone arrays and combining lock-in amplifier with acoustic arrays. Demonstration of out-door real-time operations with high power mid-IR laser and microphone array will be presented.

  5. Transparent Fabry-Perot polymer film ultrasound array for backward-mode photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Paul C.; Zhang, Edward Z. Y.; Cox, Benjamin T.

    2004-07-01

    A novel optical ultrasound sensor has been developed for backward-mode photoacoustic imaging. The sensor is based on a Fabry Perot polymer film interferometer, the mirrors of which are transparent to 1064nm, but highly reflective at 850nm. When illuminated by a CW interrogating laser source at the latter wavelength, the system acts as a resonant Fabry Perot (FP) sensing cavity, the reflected intensity output of which is dependent upon acoustically-induced changes in the optical thickness of the polymer film. By optically addressing different regions of the sensor, a notional ultrasound array of arbitrary aperture and dimensionality can be synthesised. The system was demonstrated in backward mode by transmitting 1064nm excitation laser pulses through the sensor into an Intralipid scattering solution (μa=0.03mm-1, μs'=1mm-1) containing various absorbing structures and detecting the resulting photoacoustic signals over a line. A 1D depth profile of a 1.3mm thick absorbing polymer sheet (´a=0.8mm-1) immersed to a depth of 12mm in the Intralipid solution was obtained by performing an 11mm linescan. In another experiment, a 3-layer structure consisting of 0.076mm thick line absorbers was immersed in Intralipid and a 2D image reconstructed from the detected photoacoustic signals using an inverse k-space reconstruction algorithm. Lateral resolution was 0.4mm and the vertical resolution 0.1mm. The ability of this system to map wideband photoacoustic signals with high sensitivity in backward mode may provide a useful tool for high resolution imaging of superficial tissue structures such as the skin microvasculature.

  6. Photoacoustic projection imaging using a 64-channel fiber optic detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Felbermayer, Karoline; Bouchal, Klaus-Dieter; Veres, Istvan A.; Grün, Hubert; Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present photoacoustic projection imaging with a 64-channel integrating line detector array, which average the pressure over cylindrical surfaces. For imaging, the line detectors are arranged parallel to each other on a cylindrical surface surrounding a specimen. Thereby, the three-dimensional imaging problem is reduced to a twodimensional problem, facilitating projection imaging. After acquisition of a dataset of pressure signals, a twodimensional photoacoustic projection image is reconstructed. The 64 channel line detector array is realized using optical fibers being part of interferometers. The parts of the interferometers used to detect the ultrasonic pressure waves consist of graded-index polymer-optical fibers (POFs), which exhibit better sensitivity than standard glass-optical fibers. Ultrasonic waves impinging on the POFs change the phase of light in the fiber-core due to the strain-optic effect. This phase shifts, representing the pressure signals, are demodulated using high-bandwidth balanced photo-detectors. The 64 detectors are optically multiplexed to 16 detection channels, thereby allowing fast imaging. Results are shown on a Rhodamine B dyed microsphere.

  7. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of surface adsorbed molecules using a nanostructured coupled resonator array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Seonghwan; Van Neste, C. W.; Lee, Moonchan; Jeon, Sangmin; Thundat, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method of obtaining photoacoustic spectroscopic signals for trace amounts of surface adsorbed molecules using a nanostructured coupled resonator array is described. Explosive molecules adsorbed on a nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide cantilever, which has hexagonally ordered nanowells with diameters and well-to-well distances of 35 nm and 100 nm, respectively, are excited using pulsed infrared (IR) light with a frequency matching the common mode resonance frequency of the coupled resonator. The common mode resonance amplitudes of the coupled resonator as a function of illuminating IR wavelength present a photoacoustic IR absorption spectrum representing the chemical signatures of the adsorbed explosive molecules. In addition, the mass of the adsorbed molecules as an orthogonal signal for quantitative analysis is determined by measuring the variation of the localized, individual mode resonance frequency of a cantilever on the array. The limit of detection of the ternary mixture of explosive molecules (1:1:1 of trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) is estimated to be ˜100 ng cm-2. These multi-modal signals enable us to perform quantitative and rapid chemical sensing and analysis in ambient conditions.

  8. Photoacoustic technique for the characterization of plasmonic properties of 2D periodic arrays of gold nanoholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronijevic, E.; Leahu, G.; Mussi, V.; Sibilia, C.; Bovino, F. A.

    2017-02-01

    We apply photo-acoustic (PA) technique to examine plasmonic properties of 2D periodic arrays of nanoholes etched in gold/chromium layer upon a glass substrate. The pitch of these arrays lies in the near IR, and this, under appropriate wave vector matching conditions in the visible region, allows for the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) guided along a dielectric - metal surface. SPP offered new approaches in light guiding and local field intensity enhancement, but their detection is often difficult due to the problematic discrimination of their contribution from the overall scattering. Here PA measures the energy absorbed due to the non-radiative decay of SPPs. We report on the absorption enhancement by presenting the spatial mapping of absorption under the incidence angles and wavelength that correspond to the efficient excitation of SPPs. Moreover, a comparison with optical transmission measurements is carried out, underlining the applicability and sensitivity of PA technique.

  9. Realistic photoacoustic image simulations of collections of solid spheres using linear array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Subhajit; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C.; Saha, Ratan K.

    2015-03-01

    A methodology for simulating photoacoustic (PA) images of samples with solid spherical absorbers acquired using linear array transducer is described. Two types of numerical phantoms (i.e., polystyrene beads suspended in agar medium) of two different size regimes were imaged with a 40 MHz linear array transducer utilizing this approach. The frequency domain features and statistics of the simulated signals were quantified for tissue characterization. The midband fit at 40 MHz was found to be about 35 dB higher for the sample with larger beads (radius ~7.36 μm) than that of the sample with smaller particles (radius ~ 1.77 μm). The scale parameter of the generalized gamma distribution function was found to be nearly 51 times greater for the former sample compared to the latter sample. The method developed here shows potential to be used a s a fast simulation tool for the PA imaging of collection of absorbers mimicking biological tissue.

  10. Photoacoustic elastography.

    PubMed

    Hai, Pengfei; Yao, Junjie; Li, Guo; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2016-02-15

    Elastography can noninvasively map the elasticity distribution in biological tissue, which can potentially be used to reveal disease conditions. In this Letter, we have demonstrated photoacoustic elastography by using a linear-array photoacoustic computed tomography system. The feasibility of photoacoustic elastography was first demonstrated by imaging the strains of single-layer and bilayer gelatin phantoms with various stiffness values. The measured strains agreed well with theoretical values, with an average error of less than 5.2%. Next, in vivo photoacoustic elastography was demonstrated on a mouse leg, where the fat and muscle distribution was mapped based on the elasticity contrast. We confirmed the photoacoustic elastography results by ultrasound elastography performed simultaneously.

  11. Continuous real-time photoacoustic demodulation via field programmable gate array for dynamic imaging of zebrafish cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Scott P; Shelton, Ryan L; Maxson, Ryan T; Applegate, Brian E

    2013-01-01

    A four dimensional data set of the cardiac cycle of a zebrafish embryo was acquired using postacquisition synchronization of real time photoacoustic b-scans. Utilizing an off-axis photoacoustic microscopy (OA-PAM) setup, we have expanded upon our previous work with OA-PAM to develop a system that can sustain 100 kHz line rates while demodulating the bipolar photoacoustic signal in real-time. Real-time processing was accomplished by quadrature demodulation on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) in line with the signal digitizer. Simulated data acquisition verified the system is capable of real-time processing up to a line rate of 1 MHz. Galvanometer-scanning of the excitation laser inside the focus of the ultrasonic transducer enables real data acquisition of a 200 by 200 by 200 pixel, volumetric data set across a 2 millimeter field of view at a rate of 2.5 Hz.

  12. Continuous real-time photoacoustic demodulation via field programmable gate array for dynamic imaging of zebrafish cardiac cycle

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Scott P.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Maxson, Ryan T.; Applegate, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    A four dimensional data set of the cardiac cycle of a zebrafish embryo was acquired using postacquisition synchronization of real time photoacoustic b-scans. Utilizing an off-axis photoacoustic microscopy (OA-PAM) setup, we have expanded upon our previous work with OA-PAM to develop a system that can sustain 100 kHz line rates while demodulating the bipolar photoacoustic signal in real-time. Real-time processing was accomplished by quadrature demodulation on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) in line with the signal digitizer. Simulated data acquisition verified the system is capable of real-time processing up to a line rate of 1 MHz. Galvanometer-scanning of the excitation laser inside the focus of the ultrasonic transducer enables real data acquisition of a 200 by 200 by 200 pixel, volumetric data set across a 2 millimeter field of view at a rate of 2.5 Hz. PMID:24010007

  13. Single-side access, isotropic resolution, and multispectral three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging with rotate-translate scanning of ultrasonic detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Gesnik, Marc; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can achieve high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of optical absorbers at penetration depths of ˜1 cm in biological tissues by detecting optically induced high ultrasound frequencies. Tomographic acquisition with ultrasound linear arrays offers an easy implementation of single-side access, parallelized, and high-frequency detection, but usually comes with an image quality impaired by the directionality of the detectors. Indeed, a simple translation of the array perpendicular to its median imaging plane is often used, but results both in a poor resolution in the translation direction and strong limited-view artifacts. To improve the spatial resolution and the visibility of complex structures while retaining a planar detection geometry, we introduce, in this paper, a rotate-translate scanning scheme and investigate the performance of a scanner implemented at 15 MHz center frequency. The developed system achieved a quasi-isotropic uniform 3-D resolution of ˜170 μm over a cubic volume of side length 8.5 mm, i.e., an improvement in the resolution in the translation direction by almost one order of magnitude. Dual-wavelength imaging was also demonstrated with ultrafast wavelength shifting. The validity of our approach was shown in vitro. We discuss the ability to enable in vivo imaging for preclinical and clinical studies.

  14. High-throughput fiber-array transvaginal ultrasound/photoacoustic probe for ovarian cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Hassan S.; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Wang, Tianheng; Zhu, Quing

    2014-03-01

    A high-throughput ultrasound/photoacoustic probe for delivering high contrast and signal-to-noise ratio images was designed, constructed, and tested. The probe consists of a transvaginal ultrasound array integrated with four 1mm-core optical fibers and a sheath. The sheath encases transducer and is lined with highly reflecting aluminum for high intensity light output and uniformity while at the same time remaining below the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) recommended by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The probe design was optimized by simulating the light fluence distribution in Zemax. The performance of the probe was evaluated by experimental measurements of the fluence and real-time imaging of polyethylene-tubing filled with blood. These results suggest that our probe has great potential for in vivo imaging and characterization of ovarian cancer.

  15. A prototype high-resolution animal positron tomograph with avalanche photodiode arrays and LSO crystals.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, S I; Pichler, B J; Boening, G; Rafecas, M; Pimpl, W; Lorenz, E; Schmitz, N; Schwaiger, M

    2001-02-01

    and mice showed the feasibility of in vivo imaging using this PET scanner. The first LSO-APD prototype tomograph has been successfully introduced for in vivo animal imaging. APD arrays in combination with LSO crystals offer new design possibilities for positron tomographs with finely granulated detector channels.

  16. Tomographic imaging of absolute optical absorption coefficient in turbid media using combined photoacoustic and diffusing light measurements.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Huabei

    2007-09-01

    We present a new method that can provide high resolution images of absolute optical absorption coefficient in heterogeneous turbid media. In this method, acoustic measurements in conventional photoacoustic tomography are combined with diffusing light measurements to separate the product of absorption coefficient and optical fluence or photon density. We validate this method using a series of tissuelike phantom experiments. The experimental results show that targets as small as 0.5 mm in diameter with optical absorption contrasts as low as 1.5 relative to a 50 mm diameter scattering background medium can be clearly detected.

  17. Continuous, high-speed, volumetric photoacoustic microscopy via a field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattison, Scott P.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Maxson, Ryan T.; Applegate, Brian E.

    2013-03-01

    The ability to collect data in real time is important in all biological imaging modalities that aim to image dynamic processes. Photoacoustic Microscopy (PAM) is a rapidly growing biomedical imaging technique that is often used to image microvasculature and melanoma, and is capable of fully rendering three-dimensional images. However, due to the bi-polar nature of the PAM signal, post processing through demodulation is required to accurately display morphological data. Typically, demodulation requires post processing of the data, limiting its use in real-time applications. This results in many PAM systems displaying data through maximum amplitude projection (MAP) images, completely ignoring the axial dimension of their scans and throwing away useful data. We overcome this processing limit by utilizing a configurable integrated circuit known as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The FPGA allows us to perform quadrature demodulation of the photoacoustic signal as it is being collected. The result is a PAM system capable of producing continuous, morphologically accurate B-scans and volumes at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the laser. This allows us to generate accurately rendered volumes at the same speed as MAP images. With a 100 KHz actively q-switched laser we are able to generate 200 by 200 pixel b-scans at a rate of 500 Hz. The imaging potential of the system has been demonstrated in volumes of human hair phantoms and chick embryo vasculature. This system is capable of 50 x 50 x 50 volume stacks processed and displayed at better than video rate.

  18. Combined microphone array and lock-in amplifier operations for outdoor photo-acoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammad; Lay, Joshua; Wang, Chen-Chia; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Khurgin, Jacob; Sen-Choa, Fow

    2005-05-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) standoff photoacoustic (PA) sensing of explosive chemicals and nerve gas stimulants at calibrated concentration have been demonstrated in door. When they are operated out door, array beam forming technique has to be employed to reject ambient noise and enhance signal. Lock-in amplifier usually needs to be used to achieve weak signal detection in a noisy environment. If we can combine these two techniques we will be able to reject both spatial and temporal noise and achieve a great signal to noise ratio (SNR) performance. From the best of our knowledge no literature has described how to combine these two techniques. In this work we demonstrated combined array and lock in amplifier operation in outdoor environment. A simplified system includes a signal generator, a speaker source, a lock in amplifier, 4 spy-phones with 4 parabolic reflectors to collect the acoustic signal, a National-Instrument NI6259 data acquisition system with both A to D (ADC) and D to A converters (DAC), and a PC. To combine these two techniques, each of the array collected signals was digitized by the ADC. Their path delays were adjusted in the computer to synchronize the phase. By using a PC controlled ADC the processing time is very long (~1s). To synchronize them without using costly high-speed customer made hardware, we delayed the reference signal by send it through the same ADC- PCDAC path as the array signals. By doing so, a good lock-in operation with stable phase was obtained.

  19. A micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Y.; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Wang, Lihong V.; Zou, Jun

    2015-03-01

    To achieve real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT), massive transducer arrays and data acquisition (DAQ) electronics are needed to receive the PA signals simultaneously, which results in complex and high-cost ultrasound receiver systems. To address this issue, we have developed a new PA data acquisition approach using acoustic time delay. Optical fibers were used as parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs) to create different time delays in multiple channels of PA signals. This makes the PA signals reach a single-element transducer at different times. As a result, they can be properly received by single-channel DAQ electronics. However, due to their small diameter and fragility, using optical fiber as acoustic delay lines poses a number of challenges in the design, construction and packaging of the PADLs, thereby limiting their performances and use in real imaging applications. In this paper, we report the development of new silicon PADLs, which are directly made from silicon wafers using advanced micromachining technologies. The silicon PADLs have very low acoustic attenuation and distortion. A linear array of 16 silicon PADLs were assembled into a handheld package with one common input port and one common output port. To demonstrate its real-time PAT capability, the silicon PADL array (with its output port interfaced with a single-element transducer) was used to receive 16 channels of PA signals simultaneously from a tissue-mimicking optical phantom sample. The reconstructed PA image matches well with the imaging target. Therefore, the silicon PADL array can provide a 16× reduction in the ultrasound DAQ channels for real-time PAT.

  20. Development of Real-Time 3-D Photoacoustic Imaging System Employing Spherically Curved Array Transducer.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Tabata, Takuya; Takagi, Ryo; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2017-08-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a promising imaging modality to visualize specific living tissues based on the light absorption coefficients without dyeing. In this paper, a real-time PA imaging system with a tunable laser was newly developed with an originally designed spherically curved array transducer. Five different series of experiments were conducted to validate the PA measurement system. The peak frequency of the transducer response was 17.7 MHz, and a volume-imaging rate of 3-D volume imaging was 10-20 volumes per second. The spatial resolution of imaging was 90- [Formula: see text] along both the axial and lateral directions. The developed imaging system could measure a difference on an absorption coefficient of gold nanorods. Additionally, the PA imaging could visualize the in vivo microvasculatures of a human hand. This PA imaging system with higher spatial-temporal resolution and the tunable laser further should enhance our understanding of not only basic properties of the photo acoustics but also clinical applications.

  1. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging: a simple solution for clinical ultrasound systems with linear arrays.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Leonardo G; Olafsson, Ragnar; Bauer, Daniel R; Witte, Russell S

    2013-01-07

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information during a routine breast exam for cancer. PAI enhances contrast between blood vessels and background tissue, which can help characterize suspicious lesions. However, most PAI systems are either not compatible with commercial ultrasound systems or inefficiently deliver light to the region of interest, effectively reducing the sensitivity of the technique. To address and potentially overcome these limitations, we developed an accessory for a standard linear ultrasound array that optimizes light delivery for PAI. The photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to help direct laser illumination to the region of interest. This study compares the PED with standard fiber bundle illumination in scattering and non-scattering media. In scattering media with the same incident fluence, the PED enhanced the photoacoustic signal by 18 dB at a depth of 5 mm and 6 dB at a depth of 20 mm. To demonstrate in vivo feasibility, we also used the device to image a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. The PED identified blood vessels at the periphery of the tumor, suggesting that PAI provides complementary contrast to standard pulse echo ultrasound. The PED is a simple and inexpensive solution that facilitates the translation of PAI technology to the clinic for routine screening of breast cancer.

  2. Limited-view photoacoustic imaging based on linear-array detection and filtered mean-backprojection-iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Songbo; Yang, Sihua; Guo, Hua

    2009-12-01

    Most existing photoacoustic tomography techniques require collecting complete projection data that are acquired on a defined circle surrounding the object. However, in clinical application, the object can only be approached from a limited angle mostly. Furthermore, with the incomplete projection data acquired in limited view, the general filtered backprojection algorithm will streak image artifacts nearby the reconstructed location of absorbers. In this paper, we present a limited-view-scanning photoacoustic imaging system with a linear transducer array and develop a filtered mean-backprojection-iteration (FMBPI) algorithm to reconstruct the absorbed optical deposit distribution. The FMBPI algorithm combines the terseness of the filtered backprojection algorithm with the accuracy of the iterative reconstruction algorithm. Numerical simulation and experimental results validate that the algorithm can effectively reconstruct high-quality image with limited-view data. It is also demonstrated that with the FMBPI algorithm, the limited-view-scanning multielement photoacoustic imaging system has a great potential to be applied in fast noninvasive clinic diagnosis of breast cancer at the early stage.

  3. Real-time photoacoustic tomograpghy using linear array probe and detection of line structure using Hough transform.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Won; Park, Jaebyung; Shin, Dong Ho; Song, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Kyeong-Seop

    2015-01-01

    A real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system is developed using a linear array probe and phantom images are acquired with a pattern of line structure. Moreover, it is attempted to detect line structures from the acquired images by Hough transform. This effort leads to the measurement of a process of magenta passing through a tube and acquisition of images at a speed of about 2 frame/sec. Besides, it is confirmed that the Hough transform applied on the acquired PAT images has the detection rate of about 50% for delineating a line structure.

  4. High-frequency annular array with coaxial illumination for dual-modality ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filoux, Erwan; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chitnis, Parag V.; Aristizábal, Orlando; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a combined ultrasound and photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) system used to obtain high-quality, co-registered images of mouse-embryo anatomy and vasculature. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >20 MHz) is utilized to obtain high-resolution anatomical images of small animals while PAI provides high-contrast images of the vascular network. The imaging system is based on a 40 MHz, 5-element, 6 mm aperture annular-array transducer with a 800 μm diameter hole through its central element. The transducer was integrated in a cage-plate assembly allowing for a collimated laser beam to pass through the hole so that the optical and acoustic beams were collinear. The assembly was mounted on a two-axis, motorized stage to enable the simultaneous acquisition of co-registered HFU and PA volumetric data. Data were collected from all five elements in receive and a synthetic-focusing algorithm was applied in post-processing to beamform the data and increase the spatial resolution and depth-of-field (DOF) of the HFU and PA images. Phantom measurements showed that the system could achieve high-resolution images (down to 90 μm for HFU and 150 μm for PAI) and a large DOF of >8 mm. Volume renderings of a mouse embryo showed that the scanner allowed for visualizing morphologically precise anatomy of the entire embryo along with corresponding co-registered vasculature. Major head vessels, such as the superior sagittal sinus or rostral vein, were clearly identified as well as limb bud vasculature.

  5. A 3D High Frequency Array Based 16 Channel Photoacoustic Microscopy System for In Vivo Micro-vascular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Roger; Yen, Jesse; Wang, L.V.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a novel photoacoustic microscopy imaging system with promise for studying the structure of tissue microvasculature for applications in visualizing angiogenesis. A new sixteen channel analog and digital high frequency array based photoacoustic microscopy system (PAM) was developed using an Nd:YLF pumped tunable dye laser, a 30MHz piezo composite linear array transducer and a custom multi-channel receiver electronics system. Using offline delay and sum beamforming and beamsteering, phantom images were obtained from a 6µm carbon fiber in water at a depth of 8mm. The measured -6dB lateral and axial spatial resolution of the system was 100±5µm and 45±5µm, respectively. The dynamic focusing capability of the system was demonstrated by imaging a composite carbon fiber matrix through a 12.5mm imaging depth. Next, 2-D in vivo images were formed of vessels around 100µm in diameter in the human hand. 3-D in vivo images were also formed of micro-vessels 3mm below the surface of the skin in two Sprague Dawley rats. PMID:19131292

  6. Multi-view Hilbert transformation in full-ring-transducer-array based photoacoustic computed tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Guo; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles to form images of absorbed optical energy density within tissue. Based on the photoacoustic effect, PAT directly and quantitatively measures specific optical absorption. A full-ring ultrasonic transducer array based photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system was recently developed for small animal whole-body imaging with a full-view detection angle and high in-plane resolution (100 µm). However, due to the band-pass frequency response of the piezoelectric transducer elements, the reconstructed images present bipolar (both positive and negative) pixel values, which is artificial and counterintuitive for physicians and biologists seeking to interpret the image. Moreover, bipolar pixel values hinder quantification of physiological parameters, such as oxygen saturation and blood flow speed. Unipolar images can be obtained by deconvolving the raw channel data with the transducer's electrical impulse response and applying non-negativity during iteration, but this process requires complex transducer modeling and time-consuming computation. Here, we present a multi-view Hilbert transformation method to recover the unipolar initial pressure for full-ring PACT. Multi-view Hilbert transformation along the acoustic wave propagation direction minimizes reconstruction artifacts during envelope extraction and maintains the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. The in-plane isotropic spatial resolution of this method was quantified to 168 μm within a 20 × 20 mm2 field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was first validated by numerical simulations and then demonstrated with ex-vivo mouse brain structural imaging and in-vivo mouse wholebody imaging.

  7. Visualization of tumor-related blood vessels in human breast by photoacoustic imaging system with a hemispherical detector array

    PubMed Central

    Toi, M.; Asao, Y.; Matsumoto, Y.; Sekiguchi, H.; Yoshikawa, A.; Takada, M.; Kataoka, M.; Endo, T.; Kawaguchi-Sakita, N.; Kawashima, M.; Fakhrejahani, E.; Kanao, S.; Yamaga, I.; Nakayama, Y.; Tokiwa, M.; Torii, M.; Yagi, T.; Sakurai, T.; Togashi, K.; Shiina, T.

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive measurement of the distribution and oxygenation state of hemoglobin (Hb) inside the tissue is strongly required to analyze the tumor-associated vasculatures. We developed a photoacoustic imaging (PAI) system with a hemispherical-shaped detector array (HDA). Here, we show that PAI system with HDA revealed finer vasculature, more detailed blood-vessel branching structures, and more detailed morphological vessel characteristics compared with MRI by the use of breast shape deformation of MRI to PAI and their fused image. Morphologically abnormal peritumoral blood vessel features, including centripetal photoacoustic signals and disruption or narrowing of vessel signals, were observed and intratumoral signals were detected by PAI in breast cancer tissues as a result of the clinical study of 22 malignant cases. Interestingly, it was also possible to analyze anticancer treatment-driven changes in vascular morphological features and function, such as improvement of intratumoral blood perfusion and relevant changes in intravascular hemoglobin saturation of oxygen. This clinical study indicated that PAI appears to be a promising tool for noninvasive analysis of human blood vessels and may contribute to improve cancer diagnosis. PMID:28169313

  8. Visualization of tumor-related blood vessels in human breast by photoacoustic imaging system with a hemispherical detector array.

    PubMed

    Toi, M; Asao, Y; Matsumoto, Y; Sekiguchi, H; Yoshikawa, A; Takada, M; Kataoka, M; Endo, T; Kawaguchi-Sakita, N; Kawashima, M; Fakhrejahani, E; Kanao, S; Yamaga, I; Nakayama, Y; Tokiwa, M; Torii, M; Yagi, T; Sakurai, T; Togashi, K; Shiina, T

    2017-02-07

    Noninvasive measurement of the distribution and oxygenation state of hemoglobin (Hb) inside the tissue is strongly required to analyze the tumor-associated vasculatures. We developed a photoacoustic imaging (PAI) system with a hemispherical-shaped detector array (HDA). Here, we show that PAI system with HDA revealed finer vasculature, more detailed blood-vessel branching structures, and more detailed morphological vessel characteristics compared with MRI by the use of breast shape deformation of MRI to PAI and their fused image. Morphologically abnormal peritumoral blood vessel features, including centripetal photoacoustic signals and disruption or narrowing of vessel signals, were observed and intratumoral signals were detected by PAI in breast cancer tissues as a result of the clinical study of 22 malignant cases. Interestingly, it was also possible to analyze anticancer treatment-driven changes in vascular morphological features and function, such as improvement of intratumoral blood perfusion and relevant changes in intravascular hemoglobin saturation of oxygen. This clinical study indicated that PAI appears to be a promising tool for noninvasive analysis of human blood vessels and may contribute to improve cancer diagnosis.

  9. Fiber-optic annular detector array for large depth of field photoacoustic macroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Höllinger, Astrid; Jakoby, Bernhard; Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    We report on a novel imaging system for large depth of field photoacoustic scanning macroscopy. Instead of commonly used piezoelectric transducers, fiber-optic based ultrasound detection is applied. The optical fibers are shaped into rings and mainly receive ultrasonic signals stemming from the ring symmetry axes. Four concentric fiber-optic rings with varying diameters are used in order to increase the image quality. Imaging artifacts, originating from the off-axis sensitivity of the rings, are reduced by coherence weighting. We discuss the working principle of the system and present experimental results on tissue mimicking phantoms. The lateral resolution is estimated to be below 200 μm at a depth of 1.5 cm and below 230 μm at a depth of 4.5 cm. The minimum detectable pressure is in the order of 3 Pa. The introduced method has the potential to provide larger imaging depths than acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy and an imaging resolution similar to that of photoacoustic computed tomography.

  10. Linear-array-based photoacoustic imaging of human microcirculation with a range of high frequency transducer probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Haroon; Breathnach, Aedán; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2015-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) with a linear-array-based probe can provide a convenient means of imaging the human microcirculation within its native structural context and adds functional information. PAI using a multielement linear transducer array combined with multichannel collecting system was used for in vivo volumetric imaging of the blood microcirculation, the total concentration of hemoglobin (HbT), and the hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) within human tissue. Three-dimensional (3-D) PA and ultrasound (US) volumetric scans were acquired from the forearm skin by linearly translating the transducer with a stepper motor over a region of interest, while capturing two-dimensional images using 15, 21, and 40 MHz frequency transducer probes. For the microvasculature imaging, PA images were acquired at 800- and 1064-nm wavelengths. For the HbT and sO2 estimates, PA images were collected at 750- and 850-nm wavelengths. 3-D microcirculation, HbT, and sO2 maps of the forearm skin were obtained from normal subjects. The linear-array-based PAI has been found promising in terms of resolution, imaging depth, and imaging speed for in vivo microcirculation imaging within human skin. We believe that a reflection type probe, similar to existing clinical US probes, is most likely to succeed in real clinical applications. Its advantages include ease of use, speed, and familiarity for radiographers and clinicians.

  11. Verification of computed tomographic estimates of cochlear implant array position: a micro-CT and histologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Teymouri, Jessica; Hullar, Timothy E; Holden, Timothy A; Chole, Richard A

    2011-08-01

    To determine the efficacy of clinical computed tomographic (CT) imaging to verify postoperative electrode array placement in cochlear implant (CI) patients. Nine fresh cadaver heads underwent clinical CT scanning, followed by bilateral CI insertion and postoperative clinical CT scanning. Temporal bones were removed, trimmed, and scanned using micro-CT. Specimens were then dehydrated, embedded in either methyl methacrylate or LR White resin, and sectioned with a diamond wafering saw. Histology sections were examined by 3 blinded observers to determine the position of individual electrodes relative to soft tissue structures within the cochlea. Electrodes were judged to be within the scala tympani, scala vestibuli, or in an intermediate position between scalae. The position of the array could be estimated accurately from clinical CT scans in all specimens using micro-CT and histology as a criterion standard. Verification using micro-CT yielded 97% agreement, and histologic analysis revealed 95% agreement with clinical CT results. A composite, 3-dimensional image derived from a patient's preoperative and postoperative CT images using a clinical scanner accurately estimates the position of the electrode array as determined by micro-CT imaging and histologic analyses. Information obtained using the CT method provides valuable insight into numerous variables of interest to patient performance such as surgical technique, array design, and processor programming and troubleshooting.

  12. Clamshell tomograph

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    1984-01-01

    In brief, the invention is a tomograph modified to be in a clamshell configuration so that the ring or rings may be moved to multiple sampling positions. The tomograph includes an array of detectors arranged in successive adjacent relative locations along a closed curve in a first position in a selected plane, and means for securing the detectors in the relative locations in a first sampling position. The securing means is movable in the plane in two sections and pivotable at one p The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California.

  13. Photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghua; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (also called optoacoustic or thermoacoustic imaging) has the potential to image animal or human organs, such as the breast and the brain, with simultaneous high contrast and high spatial resolution. This article provides an overview of the rapidly expanding field of photoacoustic imaging for biomedical applications. Imaging techniques, including depth profiling in layered media, scanning tomography with focused ultrasonic transducers, image forming with an acoustic lens, and computed tomography with unfocused transducers, are introduced. Special emphasis is placed on computed tomography, including reconstruction algorithms, spatial resolution, and related recent experiments. Promising biomedical applications are discussed throughout the text, including (1) tomographic imaging of the skin and other superficial organs by laser-induced photoacoustic microscopy, which offers the critical advantages, over current high-resolution optical imaging modalities, of deeper imaging depth and higher absorption contrasts, (2) breast cancer detection by near-infrared light or radio-frequency-wave-induced photoacoustic imaging, which has important potential for early detection, and (3) small animal imaging by laser-induced photoacoustic imaging, which measures unique optical absorption contrasts related to important biochemical information and provides better resolution in deep tissues than optical imaging.

  14. Photoacoustics and speed-of-sound dual mode imaging with a long depth-of-field by using annular ultrasound array.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiuning; Tao, Chao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2017-03-20

    Speed-of-sound and optical absorption reflect the structure and function of tissues from different aspects. A dual-mode microscopy system based on a concentric annular ultrasound array is proposed to simultaneously acquire the long depth-of-field images of speed-of-sound and optical absorption of inhomogeneous samples. First, speed-of-sound is decoded from the signal delay between each element of the annular array. The measured speed-of-sound could not only be used as an image contrast, but also improve the resolution and accuracy of spatial location of photoacoustic image in inhomogeneous acoustic media. Secondly, benefitting from dynamic focusing of annular array and the measured speed-of-sound, it is achieved an advanced acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy with a precise position and a long depth-of-field. The performance of the dual-mode imaging system has been experimentally examined by using a custom-made annular array. The proposed dual-mode microscopy might have the significances in monitoring the biological physiological and pathological processes.

  15. Double Stage Delay Multiply and Sum Beamforming Algorithm: Application to Linear-Array Photoacoustic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Mahloojifar, Ali; Orooji, Mahdi; Adabi, Saba; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-04-05

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging medical imaging modality capable of providing high spatial resolution of Ultrasound (US) imaging and high contrast of optical imaging. Delay-and-Sum (DAS) is the most common beamforming algorithm in PAI. However, using DAS beamformer leads to low resolution images and considerable contribution of offaxis signals. A new paradigm namely Delay-Multiply-and-Sum (DMAS), which was originally used as a reconstruction algorithm in confocal microwave imaging, was introduced to overcome the challenges in DAS. DMAS was used in PAI systems and it was shown that this algorithm results in resolution improvement and sidelobe degrading. However, DMAS is still sensitive to high levels of noise, and resolution improvement is not satisfying. Here, we propose a novel algorithm based on DAS algebra inside DMAS formula expansion, Double Stage DMAS (DSDMAS), which improves the image resolution and levels of sidelobe, and is much less sensitive to high level of noise compared to DMAS. The performance of DS-DMAS algorithm is evaluated numerically and experimentally. The resulted images are evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively using established quality metrics including signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), full-widthhalf- maximum (FWHM) and contrast ratio (CR). It is shown that DS-DMAS outperforms DAS and DMAS at the expense of higher computational load. DS-DMAS reduces the lateral valley for about 15 dB and improves the SNR and FWHM better than 13% and 30%, respectively. Moreover, the levels of sidelobe are reduced for about 10 dB in comparison with those in DMAS.

  16. Photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2011-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, which is based on the photoacoustic effect, has developed extensively over the last decade. Possessing many attractive characteristics such as the use of nonionizing electromagnetic waves, good resolution and contrast, portable instrumention, and the ability to partially quantitate the signal, photoacoustic techniques have been applied to the imaging of cancer, wound healing, disorders in the brain, and gene expression, among others. As a promising structural, functional, and molecular imaging modality for a wide range of biomedical applications, photoacoustic imaging can be categorized into two types of systems: photoacoustic tomography (PAT), which is the focus of this article, and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). We first briefly describe the endogenous (e.g., hemoglobin and melanin) and the exogenous (e.g., indocyanine green [ICG], various gold nanoparticles, single-walled carbon nanotubes [SWNTs], quantum dots [QDs], and fluorescent proteins) contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. Next, we discuss in detail the applications of nontargeted photoacoustic imaging. Recently, molecular photoacoustic (MPA) imaging has gained significant interest, and a few proof-of-principle studies have been reported. We summarize the current state of the art of MPA imaging, including the imaging of gene expression and the combination of photoacoustic imaging with other imaging modalities. Last, we point out obstacles facing photoacoustic imaging. Although photoacoustic imaging will likely continue to be a highly vibrant research field for years to come, the key question of whether MPA imaging could provide significant advantages over nontargeted photoacoustic imaging remains to be answered in the future.

  17. Compact photoacoustic tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalva, Sandeep Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a non-ionizing biomedical imaging modality which finds applications in brain imaging, tumor angiogenesis, monitoring of vascularization, breast cancer imaging, monitoring of oxygen saturation levels etc. Typical PAT systems uses Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light illumination, single element large ultrasound transducer (UST) as detector. By holding the UST in horizontal plane and moving it in a circular motion around the sample in full 2π radians photoacoustic data is collected and images are reconstructed. The horizontal positioning of the UST make the scanning radius large, leading to larger water tank and also increases the load on the motor that rotates the UST. To overcome this limitation, we present a compact photoacoustic tomographic (ComPAT) system. In this ComPAT system, instead of holding the UST in horizontal plane, it is held in vertical plane and the photoacoustic waves generated at the sample are detected by the UST after it is reflected at 45° by an acoustic reflector attached to the transducer body. With this we can reduce the water tank size and load on the motor, thus overall PAT system size can be reduced. Here we show that with the ComPAT system nearly similar PA images (phantom and in vivo data) can be obtained as that of the existing PAT systems using both flat and cylindrically focused transducers.

  18. Iterative photoacoustic image reconstruction for three-dimensional imaging by conventional linear-array detection with sparsity regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Hamid; Honarvar, Mohammad; Tang, Shuo; Salcudean, Septimiu E.

    2017-03-01

    Iterative image reconstruction algorithms have the potential to reduce the computational time required for photoacoustic tomography (PAT). An iterative deconvolution-based photoacoustic reconstruction with sparsity regularization (iDPARS) is presented which enables us to solve large-scale problems. The method deals with the limited angle of view and the directivity effects associated with clinically relevant photoacoustic tomography imaging with conventional ultrasound transducers. Our Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) implementation is able to reconstruct large 3-D volumes (100×100×100) in less than 10 minutes. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate iDPARS provides better images than DAS in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio and Root-Mean-Square errors.

  19. Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic effect, has come a long way over the last decade. Possessing many attractive characteristics such as the use of non-ionizing electromagnetic waves, good resolution/contrast, portable instrumention, as well as the ability to quantitate the signal to a certain extent, photoacoustic techniques have been applied for the imaging of cancer, wound healing, disorders in the brain, gene expression, among others. As a promising structural, functional and molecular imaging modality for a wide range of biomedical applications, photoacoustic imaging systems can be briefly categorized into two types: photoacoustic tomography (PAT, the focus of this chapter) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). We will first briefly describe the endogenous (e.g. hemoglobin and melanin) and exogenous contrast agents (e.g. indocyanine green, various gold nanoparticles, single-walled carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, and fluorescent proteins) for photoacoustic imaging. Next, we will discuss in detail the applications of non-targeted photoacoustic imaging. Recently, molecular photoacoustic (MPA) imaging has gained significant interest and a few proof-of-principle studies have been reported. We will summarize the current state-of-the-art of MPA imaging, including the imaging of gene expression and combination of photoacoustic imaging with other imaging modalities. Lastly, we will point out the obstacles facing photoacoustic imaging. Although photoacoustic imaging will likely continue to be a highly vibrant research field for the years to come, the key question of whether MPA imaging could provide significant advantages over non-targeted photoacoustic imaging remains to be demonstrated in the future. PMID:21880823

  20. Linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography for label-free high-throughput detection and quantification of circulating melanoma tumor cell clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Ruiying; Ma, Jun; Li, Yang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-03-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters arise from multicellular grouping in the primary tumor and elevate the metastatic potential by 23 to 50 fold compared to single CTCs. High throughout detection and quantification of CTC clusters is critical for understanding the tumor metastasis process and improving cancer therapy. In this work, we report a linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography (LA-PAT) system capable of label-free high-throughput CTC cluster detection and quantification in vivo. LA-PAT detects CTC clusters and quantifies the number of cells in them based on the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of photoacoustic signals. The feasibility of LA-PAT was first demonstrated by imaging CTC clusters ex vivo. LA-PAT detected CTC clusters in the blood-filled microtubes and computed the number of cells in the clusters. The size distribution of the CTC clusters measured by LA-PAT agreed well with that obtained by optical microscopy. We demonstrated the ability of LA-PAT to detect and quantify CTC clusters in vivo by imaging injected CTC clusters in rat tail veins. LA-PAT detected CTC clusters immediately after injection as well as when they were circulating in the rat bloodstreams. Similarly, the numbers of cells in the clusters were computed based on the CNRs of the photoacoustic signals. The data showed that larger CTC clusters disappear faster than the smaller ones. The results prove the potential of LA-PAT as a promising tool for both preclinical tumor metastasis studies and clinical cancer therapy evaluation.

  1. Fundamental considerations for multiwavelength photoacoustic molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemp, Roger J.; Li, Li; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-02-01

    Photoacoustic technology offers great promise for molecular imaging in vivo since it offers significant penetration, and optical contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution. In this article we examine fundamental technical issues impacting capabilities of photoacoustic tomography for molecular imaging. First we examine how reconstructed photoacoustic tomography images are related to true absorber distributions by studying the modulation transfer function of a circular scanning tomographic system employing a modified filtered backprojection algorithm. We then study factors influencing quantitative estimation by developing a forward model of photoacoustic signal generation, and show conditions for which the system of equations can be inverted. Errors in the estimated optical fluence are shown to be a source of bias in estimates of molecular agent concentration. Finally we discuss noise propagation through the matrix inversion procedure and discuss implications for molecular imaging sensitivity and system design.

  2. Multiple-illumination photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Quinn M.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    Previously we described the potential for multiple illumination photoacoustic tomography to provide quantitative reconstructions, however this work used only simulated data. We have developed a custom photoacoustic-ultrasound tomography system capable of multiple illuminations and parallel acquisition from a 256 element 5 MHz transducer ring array with 8-cm diameter. The multiple illumination scheme uses a free-space light delivery geometry where a rotational stage scans a pulsed laser beam onto different incident locations around the sample. For each illumination location a photoacoustic image is reconstructed using a modified backprojection algorithm. Images from different source locations have the potential to be combined to form an improved deep-tissue image using our previously developed iterative algorithms. We complement the photoacoustic imaging data with unique ultrasound imaging data. Most previous ultrasound tomography methods have used migration algorithms, iterative ray-based analysis, wave-equation modeling, or frequency-based algorithms that all demand large amounts of data and computational power. We propose a new UST method that offers isotropic resolution, provides scattering contrast, as well as the potential for measuring ultrasound scattering anisotropy and decoupling density and compressibility contributions. The imaging system is driven by a Verasonics scan engine and programmed for both ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging modes. Resolution has been measured to be 150 μm for ultrasound and 200 μm for photoacoustic images. Imaging capabilities are demonstrated on phantoms with custom-tailored ultrasound scattering and optical properties, as well as in murine models.

  3. Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) refers to imaging that is based on the photoacoustic effect. Although the photoacoustic effect as a physical phenomenon was first reported on by Alexander Graham Bell in 1880 [1], PAT as an imaging technology was developed only after the advent of ultrasonic transducers, computers, and lasers [2-31]. A review on biomedical photoacoustics is available [32]. The motivation for PAT is to combine optical-absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution for deep imaging in the optical quasi-diffusive or diffusive regime. In PAT, the tissue is irradiated by usually a short-pulsed laser beam to achieve a thermal and acoustic impulse response (Fig. 19.1). Locally absorbed light is converted into heat, which is further converted to a pressure rise via thermo-elastic expansion. The initial pressure rise - determined by the local optical absorption coefficient (μ â ), fluence (ψ) and other thermal and mechanical properties - propagates as an ultrasonic wave, which is referred to as a photoacoustic wave.

  4. Label-free high-throughput detection and quantification of circulating melanoma tumor cell clusters by linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Ruiying; Ma, Jun; Li, Yang; Shao, Jin-Yu; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-04-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters, arising from multicellular groupings in a primary tumor, greatly elevate the metastatic potential of cancer compared with single CTCs. High-throughput detection and quantification of CTC clusters are important for understanding the tumor metastatic process and improving cancer therapy. Here, we applied a linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography (LA-PAT) system and improved the image reconstruction for label-free high-throughput CTC cluster detection and quantification in vivo. The feasibility was first demonstrated by imaging CTC cluster ex vivo. The relationship between the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) and the number of cells in melanoma tumor cell clusters was investigated and verified. Melanoma CTC clusters with a minimum of four cells could be detected, and the number of cells could be computed from the CNR. Finally, we demonstrated imaging of injected melanoma CTC clusters in rats in vivo. Similarly, the number of cells in the melanoma CTC clusters could be quantified. The data showed that larger CTC clusters had faster clearance rates in the bloodstream, which agreed with the literature. The results demonstrated the capability of LA-PAT to detect and quantify melanoma CTC clusters in vivo and showed its potential for tumor metastasis study and cancer therapy.

  5. Tomographic image of crust and upper mantle off the Boso Peninsula using data from an ocean-bottom seismograph array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Aki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Hino, Ryota; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Sugioka, Hiroko; Nakano, Masaru; Obana, Koichiro; Nakahigashi, Kazuo; Shinohara, Masanao

    2017-08-01

    We determined the three-dimensional structure of the crust and upper mantle off the Boso Peninsula, Japan, by analyzing seismograms recorded by ocean-bottom seismometers and land stations between 2011 and 2013. We employed seismic tomography to determine the P- and S-wave velocity structures and earthquake locations simultaneously. The tomographic image shows that the mantle parts of the Pacific and the Philippine Sea plates have high-velocity anomalies. The upper boundary of the Philippine Sea plate is delineated as approximately 2-6 km shallower than that previously estimated from land-based data for the area 140.5°E-141.5°E and 35°N-35.5°N. A pronounced low-velocity anomaly in P- and S-waves with low- V p/ V s ratio (1.5-1.6) was observed at depths shallower than 20 km in the overriding North American plate. This anomaly may be caused by the presence of rocks with a low- V p/ V s ratio, such as quartzite, and the water expelled from the subducted Pacific and Philippine Sea plates.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Photoacoustic Imaging.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    DIODE LASER AS THE OPTICAL SOURCE ......... 1 6. IIIG RESOLUTION ACOUSTO-OPTIC LASER PROBE .............. 21 6-1. Introduction...4 * - S.1 SECTION 5 IMAGING WITH A DIODE LASER AS THE OPTICAL SOURCE .,, We have recently imaged photoacoustically...with micron resolution using a 5 milliwatt diode laser as the optical source. This demonstration is an indication of the tremendous sensitivity that we

  7. Photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Favro, L. D.; Kuo, P. K.

    1982-09-01

    Considerable improvements have been achieved in the design of the photoacoustic microscope, including new sample cells, and better microcomputer hardware, firmware, and software for the scan control and data acquisition. The ND:YAG laser system has been made operational and has been used to obtain preliminary data in the development of a time-domain photoacoustic microscope (pulse-echo termal wave imaging). Scan control instrumentation has been developed for this instrument, as well as electronics for data acquisition in the time domain. Theoretical calculations of pulsed thermal wave propagation and scattering have been carried out for comparison with experiment. Calculations for photoacoustic signals (CW) from model subsurface defects have carried out and compared with experimental results. A key result is the theoretical prediction, and experimental verification that closed subsurface lateral cracks have a very characteristic photoacoustic phase signature which allows their discrimination from subsurface voids (or open cracks). Calculations have also been carried out for subsurfaces spherical voids and tilted closed cracks. These calculations themselves were made possible because of our development of a very genera theorem for SPAM using gas-filled cells, which greatly simplifies the theoretical calculations of the effects of thermal wave scattering from arbitrarily shaped flaws in solids.

  8. Verification of Computed Tomographic Estimates of Cochlear Implant Array Position: A Micro-CT and Histological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Teymouri, Jessica; Hullar, Timothy E.; Holden, Timothy A.; Chole, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of clinical computed tomography (CT) imaging to verify post-operative electrode array placement in cochlear implant (CI) patients. Study Design Nine fresh cadaver heads underwent clinical CT scanning, followed by bilateral cochlear implant insertion and post-operative clinical CT scanning. Temporal bones were removed, trimmed, and scanned using microCT. Specimens were then dehydrated, embedded in either methyl methacrylate or LR White resin, and sectioned with a diamond wafering saw. Histology sections were examined by three blinded observers to determine the position of individual electrodes relative to soft tissue structures within the cochlea. Electrodes were judged to be within the scala tympani, scala vestibuli, or in an intermediate position between scalae. Results The position of the array could be estimated accurately from clinical CT scans in all specimens using microCT and histology as a gold standard. Verification utilizing microCT yielded 97% agreement, and histological analysis revealed 95% agreement with clinical CT results. Conclusions A composite, three-dimensional image derived from a patient’s pre- and post-operative CT images using a clinical scanner accurately estimates the position of the electrode array as determined by microCT imaging and histological analyses. Information obtained using the CT method provides valuable insight into numerous variables of interest to patient performance such as surgical technique, array design, and processor programming and trouble-shooting. PMID:21725264

  9. A Portable Laser Photoacoustic Methane Sensor Based on FPGA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwei; Wang, Huili; Liu, Xianyong

    2016-09-21

    A portable laser photoacoustic sensor for methane (CH₄) detection based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is reported. A tunable distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser in the 1654 nm wavelength range is used as an excitation source. The photoacoustic signal processing was implemented by a FPGA device. A small resonant photoacoustic cell is designed. The minimum detection limit (1σ) of 10 ppm for methane is demonstrated.

  10. A Portable Laser Photoacoustic Methane Sensor Based on FPGA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwei; Wang, Huili; Liu, Xianyong

    2016-01-01

    A portable laser photoacoustic sensor for methane (CH4) detection based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is reported. A tunable distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser in the 1654 nm wavelength range is used as an excitation source. The photoacoustic signal processing was implemented by a FPGA device. A small resonant photoacoustic cell is designed. The minimum detection limit (1σ) of 10 ppm for methane is demonstrated. PMID:27657079

  11. A method for reconstructing tomographic images of evoked neural activity with electrical impedance tomography using intracranial planar arrays.

    PubMed

    Aristovich, Kirill Y; dos Santos, Gustavo Sato; Packham, Brett C; Holder, David S

    2014-06-01

    A method is presented for reconstructing images of fast neural evoked activity in rat cerebral cortex recorded with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and a 6 × 5 mm(2) epicortical planar 30 electrode array. A finite element model of the rat brain and inverse solution with Tikhonov regularization were optimized in order to improve spatial resolution and accuracy. The optimized FEM mesh had 7 M tetrahedral elements, with finer resolution (0.05 mm) near the electrodes. A novel noise-based image processing technique based on t-test significance improved depth localization accuracy from 0.5 to 0.1 mm. With the improvements, a simulated perturbation 0.5 mm in diameter could be localized in a region 4 × 5 mm(2) under the centre of the array to a depth of 1.4 mm, thus covering all six layers of the cerebral cortex with an accuracy of <0.1 mm. Simulated deep brain hippocampal or thalamic activity could be localized with an accuracy of 0.5 mm with a 256 electrode array covering the brain. Parallel studies have achieved a temporal resolution of 2 ms for imaging fast neural activity by EIT during evoked activity; this encourages the view that fast neural EIT can now resolve the propagation of depolarization-related fast impedance changes in cerebral cortex and deeper in the brain with a resolution equal or greater to the dimension of a cortical column.

  12. Photoacoustic cystography.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2013-06-11

    Conventional pediatric cystography, which is based on diagnostic X-ray using a radio-opaque dye, suffers from the use of harmful ionizing radiation. The risk of bladder cancers in children due to radiation exposure is more significant than many other cancers. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of nonionizing and noninvasive photoacoustic (PA) imaging of urinary bladders, referred to as photoacoustic cystography (PAC), using near-infrared (NIR) optical absorbents (i.e. methylene blue, plasmonic gold nanostructures, or single walled carbon nanotubes) as an optical-turbid tracer. We have successfully imaged a rat bladder filled with the optical absorbing agents using a dark-field confocal PAC system. After transurethral injection of the contrast agents, the rat's bladders were photoacoustically visualized by achieving significant PA signal enhancement. The accumulation was validated by spectroscopic PA imaging. Further, by using only a laser pulse energy of less than 1 mJ/cm(2) (1/20 of the safety limit), our current imaging system could map the methylene-blue-filled-rat-bladder at the depth of beyond 1 cm in biological tissues in vivo. Both in vivo and ex vivo PA imaging results validate that the contrast agents were naturally excreted via urination. Thus, there is no concern regarding long-term toxic agent accumulation, which will facilitate clinical translation.

  13. Tomographic Imaging of the Magmatic System at Mount St. Helens with the iMUSH Broadband Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C. W.; Creager, K. C.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Moran, S. C.; Abers, G. A.; Schmandt, B.; Vidale, J. E.; Houston, H.; Denlinger, R. P.; Williams, M. C. B.

    2015-12-01

    We deployed 70 broadband seismometers in the summer of 2014 to image the velocity structure beneath Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington, USA as part of a collaborative project called imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH). Our goal is to illuminate the MSH magmatic system, using active- and passive-source seismology, magnetotellurics and petrology. Details of the velocity structure, coupled with other geophysical and geologic data, can help constrain the geometry and physical state of any bodies of melt beneath the volcano. The broadband array has a diameter of ~100 km centered on MSH with an average station spacing of 10 km, and will remain deployed through summer 2016. It is augmented by dozens of permanent stations in the area. We determine P-wave arrival times using Antelope software and incorporate permanent network picks for the region. We use the program struct3DP to invert travel times to obtain a 3-D seismic velocity model and relocate hypocenters, computing travel times using a 3-D eikonal-equation solver. There were more than 500 useable local events during the first year of iMUSH broadband recording, which to date have provided 5000 arrival times, with the number growing rapidly. The local events include 23 active shots that were set off in the summer of 2014 as part of the iMUSH experiment, which recorded with good signal-to-noise ratios across the entire array. The absolute P times will be augmented by differential times calculated by cross-correlation between observations at the same station for nearby event pairs. These will be incorporated into our model using double-difference tomography. We anticipate that our 3D velocity model will provide the highest resolution image of volcanic plumbing at MSH thus far. Our model interpretation will incorporate results from active-source and ambient noise tomography, receiver functions, magnetotellurics, and petrology.

  14. Photoacoustic microcantilevers

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN; Van Neste, Charles W [Kingston, TN; Brown, Gilbert M [Knoxville, TN; Senesac, Lawrence R [Knoxville, TN

    2012-06-05

    A system generates a photoacoustic spectrum in an open or closed environment with reduced noise. A source focuses a beam on a target substance disposed on a base. The base supports a cantilever that measures acoustic waves generated as light is absorbed by the target substance. By focusing a chopped/pulsed light beam on the target substance, a range of optical absorbance may be measured as the wavelength of light changes. An identifying spectrum of the target may detected by monitoring the vibration intensity variation of the cantilever as a function of illuminating wavelength or color.

  15. Prospects of photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-01-01

    Commercially available high-resolution three-dimensional optical imaging modalities—including confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography—have fundamentally impacted biomedicine. Unfortunately, such tools cannot penetrate biological tissue deeper than the optical transport mean free path (∼1 mm in the skin). Photoacoustic tomography, which combines strong optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality, has broken through this fundamental depth limitation and achieved superdepth high-resolution optical imaging. In parallel, radio frequency-or microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography is being actively developed to combine radio frequency or microwave contrast with ultrasonic resolution. In this Vision 20∕20 article, the prospects of photoacoustic tomography are envisaged in the following aspects: (1) photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption emerging as a mainstream technology, (2) melanoma detection using photoacoustic microscopy, (3) photoacoustic endoscopy, (4) simultaneous functional and molecular photoacoustic tomography, (5) photoacoustic tomography of gene expression, (6) Doppler photoacoustic tomography for flow measurement, (7) photoacoustic tomography of metabolic rate of oxygen, (8) photoacoustic mapping of sentinel lymph nodes, (9) multiscale photoacoustic imaging in vivo with common signal origins, (10) simultaneous photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography of the breast, (11) photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography of the brain, and (12) low-background thermoacoustic molecular imaging. PMID:19175133

  16. Parallel acoustic delay lines for photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yapici, Murat Kaya; Kim, Chulhong; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Jeon, Mansik; Guo, Zijian; Cai, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Achieving real-time photoacoustic (PA) tomography typically requires multi-element ultrasound transducer arrays and their associated multiple data acquisition (DAQ) electronics to receive PA waves simultaneously. We report the first demonstration of a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system using optical fiber-based parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs). By employing PADLs to introduce specific time delays, the PA signals (on the order of a few micro seconds) can be forced to arrive at the ultrasonic transducers at different times. As a result, time-delayed PA signals in multiple channels can be ultimately received and processed in a serial manner with a single-element transducer, followed by single-channel DAQ electronics. Our results show that an optically absorbing target in an optically scattering medium can be photoacoustically imaged using the newly developed PADL-based PAT system. Potentially, this approach could be adopted to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of ultrasonic array receiver systems. PMID:23139043

  17. Integrative System of Fast Photoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tan

    An integrative fast (Photoacoustic) PA imaging system based on multi-element linear ultrasonic transducer array was developed, which integrates laser delivery, photoacoustic excitation and photoacoustic detection into a portable system. It collects PA signals by a multi-element linear transducer array in a reflection mode. The PA images with high spatial resolution and high contrast were obtained. Compared to other existing PA imaging methods, the integrative PA imaging system is characterized by rapidness, convenience and high practicality. The integrative system is mobile and portable, and it is suitable for imaging samples in natural condition with various different shapes. It will provide a novel and effective PA imaging approach for clinic diagnosis of neoplasm and tissue functional imaging in vivo, and has potential to be developed into a practical apparatus used in the early non-invasive detection of breast-cancer.

  18. 4-D photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  19. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  20. Photoacoustic imaging with rotational compounding for improved signal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, A.; Heinmiller, A.; Jose, J.; Needles, A.; Hirson, D.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy with linear array transducers enables fast two-dimensional, cross-sectional photoacoustic imaging. Unfortunately, most ultrasound transducers are only sensitive to a very narrow angular acceptance range and preferentially detect signals along the main axis of the transducer. This often limits photoacoustic microscopy from detecting blood vessels which can extend in any direction. Rotational compounded photoacoustic imaging is introduced to overcome the angular-dependency of detecting acoustic signals with linear array transducers. An integrate system is designed to control the image acquisition using a linear array transducer, a motorized rotational stage, and a motorized lateral stage. Images acquired at multiple angular positions are combined to form a rotational compounded image. We found that the signal-to-noise ratio improved, while the sidelobe and reverberation artifacts were substantially reduced. Furthermore, the rotational compounded images of excised kidneys and hindlimb tumors of mice showed more structural information compared with any single image collected.

  1. Laser Photoacoustic Technique Detects Photo-Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liange, R. H.; Coulter, D. R.; Gupta, A.

    1986-01-01

    Laser photoacoustic instrument detects small amounts of oxidation in polymers. Instrument used to evaluate resistance to oxidation in Sunlight of polymer encapsulants for solar-cell arrays. With instrument, researchers monitor samples for early stages of photooxidation and study primary mechanisms of oxidation and degradation. Effects of these mechanisms masked during later stages.

  2. Simulation of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system in COMSOL and comparison of two popular reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowmiya, C.; Thittai, Arun K.

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a molecular cum functional imaging modality based on differential optical absorption of the incident laser pulse by the endogeneous tissue chromophores. Several numerical simulations and finite element models have been developed in the past to describe and study Photoacoustic (PA) signal generation principles and study the effect of variation in PA parameters. Most of these simulation work concentrate on analyzing extracted 1D PA signals and each of them mostly describe only few of the building blocks of a Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) imaging system. Papers describing simulation of the entire PAT system in one simulation platform, along with reconstruction is seemingly rare. This study attempts to describe how a commercially available Finite Element software (COMSOL(R)), can serve as a single platform for simulating PAT that couples the electromagnetic, thermodynamic and acoustic pressure physics involved in PA phenomena. Further, an array of detector elements placed at the boundary in the FE model can provide acoustic pressure data that can be exported to Matlab(R) to perform tomographic image reconstruction. The performance of two most commonly used image reconstruction techniques; namely, Filtered Backprojection (FBP) and Synthetic Aperture (SA) beamforming are compared. Results obtained showed that the lateral resolution obtained using FBP vs. SA largely depends on the aperture parameters. FBP reconstruction was able to provide a slightly better lateral resolution for smaller aperture while SA worked better for larger aperture. This interesting effect is currently being investigated further. Computationally FBP was faster, but it had artifacts along the spherical shell on which the data is projected.

  3. Reflection-artifact-free photoacoustic imaging using PAFUSion (photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, Mithun; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-03-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a main challenge to deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients generated by the skin surface and superficial vasculature will propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts. These artifacts can cause problems in image interpretation and limit imaging depth. In its basic version, PAFUSion mimics the inward travelling wave-field from blood vessel-like PA sources by applying focused ultrasound pulses, and thus provides a way to identify reflection artifacts. In this work, we demonstrate reflection artifact correction in addition to identification, towards obtaining an artifact-free photoacoustic image. In view of clinical applications, we implemented an improved version of PAFUSion in which photoacoustic data is backpropagated to imitate the inward travelling wave-field and thus the reflection artifacts of a more arbitrary distribution of PA sources that also includes the skin melanin layer. The backpropagation is performed in a synthetic way based on the pulse-echo acquisitions after transmission on each single element of the transducer array. We present a phantom experiment and initial in vivo measurements on human volunteers where we demonstrate significant reflection artifact reduction using our technique. The results provide a direct confirmation that reflection artifacts are prominent in clinical epi-photoacoustic imaging, and that PAFUSion can reduce these artifacts significantly to improve the deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of carotid artery atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizinga, Pieter; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; de Jong, Nico; Springeling, Geert; Robertus, Jan Lukas; van der Lugt, Aad; van Soest, Gijs

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a method for photoacoustic imaging of the carotid artery, tailored toward detection of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions. A common human carotid artery was obtained at autopsy, embedded in a neck mimicking phantom and imaged with a multimodality imaging system using interstitial illumination. Light was delivered through a 1.25-mm-diameter optical probe that can be placed in the pharynx, allowing the carotid artery to be illuminated from within the body. Ultrasound imaging and photoacoustic signal detection is achieved by an external 8-MHz linear array coupled to an ultrasound imaging system. Spectroscopic analysis of photoacoustic images obtained in the wavelength range from 1130 to 1250 nm revealed plaque-specific lipid accumulation in the collagen structure of the artery wall. These spectroscopic findings were confirmed by histology.

  5. Miniaturized photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Robinson, Alex; Nielson, Gregory N.; Resnick, Paul J.

    2016-08-09

    A low-power miniaturized photoacoustic sensor uses an optical microphone made by semiconductor fabrication techniques, and optionally allows for all-optical communication to and from the sensor. This allows integration of the photoacoustic sensor into systems with special requirements, such as those that would be reactive in an electrical discharge condition. The photoacoustic sensor can also be operated in various other modes with wide application flexibility.

  6. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  7. Phase-domain photoacoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Ruochong; Feng, Xiaohua; Liu, Siyu; Ding, Ran; Kishor, Rahul; Qiu, Lei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2017-01-01

    As one of the fastest-growing imaging modalities in recent years, photoacoustic imaging has attracted tremendous research interest for various applications including anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging. The majority of the photoacoustic imaging systems are based on the time-domain pulsed photoacoustic method, which utilizes a pulsed laser source to induce a wideband photoacoustic signal, revealing optical absorption contrast. An alternative way is the frequency-domain photoacoustic method utilizing the chirping modulation of laser intensity to achieve lower system cost. In this paper, we report another way of the photoacoustic method, called phase-domain photoacoustic sensing, which explores the phase difference between two consequent intensity-modulated laser pulse induced photoacoustic measurements to reveal the optical properties. The basic principle is introduced, modeled, and experimentally validated in this paper, which opens another potential pathway to perform photoacoustic sensing and imaging, eliminating acoustic detection variations beyond the conventional time-domain and frequency-domain photoacoustic methods.

  8. Combined 3D photoacoustic and 2D fluorescence imaging of indocyanine green contrast agent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosik, Ivan; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging uses laser induced ultrasound transients to generate optical absorption maps of the illuminated volume. In this work, we used a custom built photoacoustic imaging system consisting of a 60-channel transducer array, a 50 MHz data acquisition system, and an Nd:YAG pumped OPO laser, to perform simultaneous photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. A single 780 nm laser pulse generated both ultrasound and fluorescence, enabling reconstruction of images for both modalities with near perfect temporal co-registration. The result highlighted the ability of photoacoustic imaging to supplement fluorescence data when optical scatter reduces fluorescence resolution beyond its useful range.

  9. In vivo demonstration of reflection artifact reduction in photoacoustic imaging using synthetic aperture photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mithun Kuniyil Ajith; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a critical problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. High light fluence beneath the probe results in photoacoustic transients, which propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures. These reflection artifacts cause problems in image interpretation and significantly impact the contrast and imaging depth. We recently proposed a method called PAFUSion (Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to identify such reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. In its initial version, PAFUSion mimics the inward-travelling wavefield from small blood vessel-like PA sources by applying ultrasound pulses focused towards these sources, and thus provides a way to identify the resulting reflection artifacts. In this work, we demonstrate reduction of reflection artifacts in phantoms and in vivo measurements on human volunteers. In view of the spatially distributed PA sources that are found in clinical applications, we implemented an improved version of PAFUSion where photoacoustic signals are backpropagated to imitate the inward travelling wavefield and thus the reflection artifacts. The backpropagation is performed in a synthetic way based on the pulse-echo acquisitions after transmission on each single element of the transducer array. The results provide a direct confirmation that reflection artifacts are prominent in clinical epi-photoacoustic imaging, and that PAFUSion can strongly reduce these artifacts to improve deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging. PMID:27570690

  10. In vivo demonstration of reflection artifact reduction in photoacoustic imaging using synthetic aperture photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion).

    PubMed

    Singh, Mithun Kuniyil Ajith; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-08-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a critical problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. High light fluence beneath the probe results in photoacoustic transients, which propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures. These reflection artifacts cause problems in image interpretation and significantly impact the contrast and imaging depth. We recently proposed a method called PAFUSion (Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to identify such reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. In its initial version, PAFUSion mimics the inward-travelling wavefield from small blood vessel-like PA sources by applying ultrasound pulses focused towards these sources, and thus provides a way to identify the resulting reflection artifacts. In this work, we demonstrate reduction of reflection artifacts in phantoms and in vivo measurements on human volunteers. In view of the spatially distributed PA sources that are found in clinical applications, we implemented an improved version of PAFUSion where photoacoustic signals are backpropagated to imitate the inward travelling wavefield and thus the reflection artifacts. The backpropagation is performed in a synthetic way based on the pulse-echo acquisitions after transmission on each single element of the transducer array. The results provide a direct confirmation that reflection artifacts are prominent in clinical epi-photoacoustic imaging, and that PAFUSion can strongly reduce these artifacts to improve deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  11. Photoacoustic clutter reduction by inversion of a linear scatter model using plane wave ultrasound measurements

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Hans-Martin; Beckmann, Martin F.; Schmitz, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging aims to visualize light absorption properties of biological tissue by receiving a sound wave that is generated inside the observed object as a result of the photoacoustic effect. In clinical applications, the strong light absorption in human skin is a major problem. When high amplitude photoacoustic waves that originate from skin absorption propagate into the tissue, they are reflected back by acoustical scatterers and the reflections contribute to the received signal. The artifacts associated with these reflected waves are referred to as clutter or skin echo and limit the applicability of photoacoustic imaging for medical applications severely. This study seeks to exploit the acoustic tissue information gained by plane wave ultrasound measurements with a linear array in order to correct for reflections in the photoacoustic image. By deriving a theory for clutter waves in k-space and a matching inversion approach, photoacoustic measurements compensated for clutter are shown to be recovered. PMID:27446669

  12. Photoacoustic clutter reduction by inversion of a linear scatter model using plane wave ultrasound measurements.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Hans-Martin; Beckmann, Martin F; Schmitz, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging aims to visualize light absorption properties of biological tissue by receiving a sound wave that is generated inside the observed object as a result of the photoacoustic effect. In clinical applications, the strong light absorption in human skin is a major problem. When high amplitude photoacoustic waves that originate from skin absorption propagate into the tissue, they are reflected back by acoustical scatterers and the reflections contribute to the received signal. The artifacts associated with these reflected waves are referred to as clutter or skin echo and limit the applicability of photoacoustic imaging for medical applications severely. This study seeks to exploit the acoustic tissue information gained by plane wave ultrasound measurements with a linear array in order to correct for reflections in the photoacoustic image. By deriving a theory for clutter waves in k-space and a matching inversion approach, photoacoustic measurements compensated for clutter are shown to be recovered.

  13. Pharmacokinetic Monitoring of Indocyanine Green for Tumor Detection Using Photoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Si-Hua; Yin, Guang-Zhi; Xing, Da

    2010-09-01

    We report tumor detection using a photoacoustic technique for the imaging of angiogenesis and monitoring of agent pharmacokinetics on an animal model. We take 532-nm laser pulses to excite photoacoustic signals of blood vessels with acquisition by a broadband hydrophone, and the morphological characteristics of tumor angiogenesis are successfully image depicted. Furthermore, tumor pharmacokinetics is preformed and analyzed with fast multielement photoacoustic imaging of the intravenous-injected indocyanine green (ICG). Photoacoustic signals of ICG are excited with 805 nm laser pulses and recorded by transducer array as a function of time. The difference between the photoacoustic signal from the tumor side and that from the normal side is observed, and the ICG clearance velocity in the tumor area is found to lag behind that in the normal area. Experimental results demonstrate that photoacoustic imaging of morphological parameter and pharmacokinetics with specific agent may provide high sensitive approach for tumor detection and localization.

  14. Photoacoustic image-guided needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Erpelding, Todd N.; Akers, Walter J.; Maslov, Konstantin; Song, Liang; Jankovic, Ladislav; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Achilefu, Samuel; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    We have implemented a hand-held photoacoustic and ultrasound probe for image-guided needle biopsy using a modified clinical ultrasound array system. Pulsed laser light was delivered via bifurcated optical fiber bundles integrated with the hand-held ultrasound probe. We photoacoustically guided needle insertion into rat sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) following accumulation of indocyanine green (ICG). Strong photoacoustic image contrast of the needle was achieved. After intradermal injection of ICG in the left forepaw, deeply positioned SLNs (beneath 2-cm thick chicken breast) were easily indentified in vivo and in real time. Further, we confirmed ICG uptake in axillary lymph nodes with in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging. These results demonstrate the clinical potential of this hand-held photoacoustic system for facile identification and needle biopsy of SLNs for cancer staging and metastasis detection in humans.

  15. Photoacoustics with coherent light

    PubMed Central

    Bossy, Emmanuel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the mid-nineties, photoacoustic imaging of biological tissue has been one of the fastest growing biomedical imaging modality, and its basic principles are now considered as well established. In particular, light propagation in photoacoustic imaging is generally considered from the perspective of transport theory. However, recent breakthroughs in optics have shown that coherent light propagating through optically scattering medium could be manipulated towards novel imaging approaches. In this article, we first provide an introduction to the relevant concepts in the field, and then review the recent works showing that it is possible to exploit the coherence of light in conjunction with photoacoustics. We illustrate how the photoacoustic effect can be used as a powerful feedback mechanism for optical wavefront shaping in complex media, and conversely show how the coherence of light can be exploited to enhance photoacoustic imaging, for instance in terms of spatial resolution or for designing minimally invasive endoscopic devices. Finally, we discuss the current challenges and perspectives down the road towards practical applications in the field of photoacoustic imaging. PMID:27069874

  16. FIB-tomographic studies on chemical vapor deposition grown SnO2 nanowire arrays on TiO2 (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haoyun; Liu, Yi; Wu, Hong; Xiong, Xiang; Pan, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Tin oxide nanowire arrays on titania (001) have been successfully fabricated by chemical vapor deposition of Sn(O t Bu)4 precursor. The morphologies and structures of ordered SnO2 nanowires (NWs) were analyzed by cross-sectional SEM, HR-TEM and AFM. An FIB-tomography technique was applied in order to reconstruct a 3D presentation of ordered SnO2 nanowires. The achieved 3D analysis showed the spatial orientation and angles of ordered SnO2 NWs can be obtained in a one-shot experiment, and the distribution of Au catalysts showed the competition between 1D and 2D growth. The SnO2 nanowire arrays can be potentially used as a diameter- and surface-dependent sensing unit for the detection of gas- and bio-molecules.

  17. Grueneisen Relaxation Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-10-01

    The temperature-dependent property of the Grueneisen parameter has been employed in photoacoustic imaging mainly to measure tissue temperature. Here we explore this property using a different approach and develop Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM), a technique that images nonradiative absorption with confocal optical resolution. GR-PAM sequentially delivers two identical laser pulses with a microsecond-scale time delay. The first laser pulse generates a photoacoustic signal and thermally tags the in-focus absorbers. When the second laser pulse excites the tagged absorbers within the thermal relaxation time, a photoacoustic signal stronger than the first one is produced, owing to the temperature dependence of the Grueneisen parameter. GR-PAM detects the amplitude difference between the two colocated photoacoustic signals, confocally imaging the nonradiative absorption. We greatly improved axial resolution from 45 μm to 2.3 μm and, at the same time, slightly improved lateral resolution from 0.63 μm to 0.41 μm. In addition, the optical sectioning capability facilitates the measurement of the absolute absorption coefficient without fluence calibration.

  18. Multi-contrast Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie

    Photoacoustic microscopy is a hybrid imaging modality with high spatial resolution, moderate imaging depth, excellent imaging contrast and functional imaging capability. Taking full advantage of this powerful weapon, we have investigated different anatomical, functional, flow dynamic and metabolic parameter measurements using photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, Evans-blue dye was used to enhance photoacoustic microscopy of capillaries; label-free transverse and axial blood flow was measured based on bandwidth broadening and time shift of the photoacoustic signals; metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified in vivo from all the five parameters measured by photoacoustic microcopy; whole cross-sectional imaging of small intestine was achieved on a double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of focus and imaging depth; hemodynamic imaging was performed on a MEMS-mirror enhanced photoacoustic microscopy with a cross-sectional imaging rate of 400 Hz. As a maturing imaging technique, PAM is expected to find new applications in both fundamental life science and clinical practice.

  19. Stimulated Raman photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving label-free, molecular-specific imaging with high spatial resolution in deep tissue is often considered the grand challenge of optical imaging. To accomplish this goal, significant optical scattering in tissues has to be overcome while achieving molecular specificity without resorting to extrinsic labeling. We demonstrate the feasibility of developing such an optical imaging modality by combining the molecularly specific stimulated Raman excitation with the photoacoustic detection. By employing two ultrashort excitation laser pulses, separated in frequency by the vibrational frequency of a targeted molecule, only the specific vibrational level of the target molecules in the illuminated tissue volume is excited. This targeted optical absorption generates ultrasonic waves (referred to as stimulated Raman photoacoustic waves) which are detected using a traditional ultrasonic transducer to form an image following the design of the established photoacoustic microscopy. PMID:21059930

  20. Computationally intelligent pulsed photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukić, Mladena; Ćojbašić, Žarko; Rabasović, Mihailo D.; Markushev, Dragan D.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the application of computational intelligence in pulsed photoacoustics is discussed. Feedforward multilayer perception networks are applied for real-time simultaneous determination of the laser beam spatial profile and vibrational-to-translational relaxation time of the polyatomic molecules in gases. Networks are trained and tested with theoretical data adjusted for a given experimental set-up. Genetic optimization has been used for calculation of the same parameters, fitting the photoacoustic signals with a different number of generations. Observed benefits from the application of computational intelligence in pulsed photoacoustics and advantages over previously developed methods are discussed, such as real-time operation, high precision and the possibility of finding solutions in a wide range of parameters, similar to in experimental conditions. In addition, the applicability for practical uses, such as the real-time in situ measurements of atmospheric pollutants, along with possible further developments of obtained results, is argued.

  1. Photoacoustic tomography using a Michelson interferometer with quadrature phase detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speirs, Rory W.; Bishop, Alexis I.

    2013-07-01

    We present a pressure sensor based on a Michelson interferometer, for use in photoacoustic tomography. Quadrature phase detection is employed allowing measurement at any point on the mirror surface without having to retune the interferometer, as is typically required by Fabry-Perot type detectors. This opens the door to rapid full surface detection, which is necessary for clinical applications. Theory relating acoustic pressure to detected acoustic particle displacements is used to calculate the detector sensitivity, which is validated with measurement. Proof-of-concept tomographic images of blood vessel phantoms have been taken with sub-millimeter resolution at depths of several millimeters.

  2. Photoacoustic ultrasound sources from diffusion-limited aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Krutik; Brubaker, Morgan; Kotlerman, Alexander; Salazar, Robert; Wolf, Eli; Weld, David M.

    2016-10-01

    Metallic diffusion-limited aggregate (DLA) films are well-known to exhibit near-perfect broadband optical absorption. We demonstrate that such films also manifest a substantial and relatively material-independent photoacoustic response, as a consequence of their random nanostructure. We theoretically and experimentally analyze the photoacoustic phenomena in DLA films and show that they can be used to create broadband air-coupled acoustic sources. These sources are inexpensive and simple to fabricate and work into the ultrasonic regime. We illustrate the device possibilities by building and testing an optically addressed acoustic phased array capable of producing virtually arbitrary acoustic intensity patterns in air.

  3. Photoacoustic angiography of the breast.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Robert A; Lam, Richard B; Reinecke, Daniel R; Del Rio, Stephen P; Doyle, Ryan P

    2010-11-01

    The authors report a noninvasive technique and instrumentation for visualizing vasculature in the breast in three dimensions without using either ionizing radiation or exogenous contrast agents, such as iodine or gadolinium. Vasculature is visualized by virtue of its high hemoglobin content compared to surrounding breast parenchyma. The technique is compatible with dynamic contrast-enhanced studies. Photoacoustic sonic waves were stimulated in the breast with a pulsed laser operating at 800 nm and a mean exposure of 20 mJ/pulse over an area of approximately 20 cm2. These waves were subsequently detected by a hemispherical array of piezoelectric transducers, the temporal signals from which were filtered and backprojected to form three-dimensional images with nearly uniform k-space sampling. Three-dimensional vascular images of a human volunteer demonstrated a clear visualization of vascular anatomy with submillimeter spatial resolution to a maximum depth of 40 mm using a 24 s image acquisition protocol. Spatial resolution was nearly isotropic and approached 250 microm over a 64 x 64 x 50 mm field of view. The authors have successfully visualized submillimeter breast vasculature to a depth of 40 mm using an illumination intensity that is 32 times less than the maximum permissible exposure according to the American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers. Clearly, the authors can achieve greater penetration depth in the breast by increasing the intensity and the cross-sectional area of the illumination beam. Given the 24 s image acquisition time without contrast agent, dynamic, contrast-enhanced, photoacoustic breast imaging using optically absorbing contrast agents is conceivable in the future.

  4. Photoacoustic molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, William L., Jr.; Reinecke, Daniel; DeGrado, Timothy; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Kruger, Robert A.

    2007-02-01

    It is well documented that photoacoustic imaging has the capability to differentiate tissue based on the spectral characteristics of tissue in the optical regime. The imaging depth in tissue exceeds standard optical imaging techniques, and systems can be designed to achieve excellent spatial resolution. A natural extension of imaging the intrinsic optical contrast of tissue is to demonstrate the ability of photoacoustic imaging to detect contrast agents based on optically absorbing dyes that exhibit well defined absorption peaks in the infrared. The ultimate goal of this project is to implement molecular imaging, in which Herceptin TM, a monoclonal antibody that is used as a therapeutic agent in breast cancer patients that over express the HER2 gene, is labeled with an IR absorbing dye, and the resulting in vivo bio-distribution is mapped using multi-spectral, infrared stimulation and subsequent photoacoustic detection. To lay the groundwork for this goal and establish system sensitivity, images were collected in tissue mimicking phantoms to determine maximum detection depth and minimum detectable concentration of Indocyanine Green (ICG), a common IR absorbing dye, for a single angle photoacoustic acquisition. A breast mimicking phantom was constructed and spectra were also collected for hemoglobin and methanol. An imaging schema was developed that made it possible to separate the ICG from the other tissue mimicking components in a multiple component phantom. We present the results of these experiments and define the path forward for the detection of dye labeled Herceptin TM in cell cultures and mice models.

  5. Photoacoustic elastic oscillation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2015-08-10

    Photoacoustic imaging and sensing have been studied extensively to probe the optical absorption of biological tissue in multiple scales ranging from large organs to small molecules. However, its elastic oscillation characterization is rarely studied and has been an untapped area to be explored. In literature, photoacoustic signal induced by pulsed laser is commonly modelled as a bipolar "N-shape" pulse from an optical absorber. In this paper, the photoacoustic damped oscillation is predicted and modelled by an equivalent mass-spring system by treating the optical absorber as an elastic oscillator. The photoacoustic simulation incorporating the proposed oscillation model shows better agreement with the measured signal from an elastic phantom, than conventional photoacoustic simulation model. More interestingly, the photoacoustic damping oscillation effect could potentially be a useful characterization approach to evaluate biological tissue's mechanical properties in terms of relaxation time, peak number and ratio beyond optical absorption only, which is experimentally demonstrated in this paper.

  6. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  7. Photoacoustic imaging of clinical metal needle by a LED light source integrated transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agano, Toshitaka; Sato, Naoto; Nakatsuka, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hanaoka, Takamitsu; Morisono, Koji; Shigeta, Yusuke; Tanaka, Chizuyo

    2016-03-01

    We have achieved penetration depth of 30mm by photoacoustic imaging system using LED light source integrated transducer to image a clinical metal needle inserted into a tissue mimicking phantom. We developed the transducer that integrated near-infrared LED array light source, which was connected to a photoacoustic imaging system which drove LED array light source and controlled photoacoustic data acquisition process. Conventionally solid-state laser has been used as the light source for photoacoustic imaging system. Because LED is diffused light source, laser safety glasses is not necessary, also inflexible fibers are not used to guide light close to a transducer, and we integrated LED light source inside the transducer, which became compact and practical size for conventional ultrasound equipment users. We made LED light source unit as detachable to the transducer easily, so wave-length of light can be selectable by changing the LED light source unit.

  8. Pulsed photoacoustic flow imaging with a handheld system.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Pim J; Daoudi, Khalid; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-02-01

    Flow imaging is an important technique in a range of disease areas, but estimating low flow speeds, especially near the walls of blood vessels, remains challenging. Pulsed photoacoustic flow imaging can be an alternative since there is little signal contamination from background tissue with photoacoustic imaging. We propose flow imaging using a clinical photoacoustic system that is both handheld and portable. The system integrates a linear array with 7.5 MHz central frequency in combination with a high-repetition-rate diode laser to allow high-speed photoacoustic imaging--ideal for this application. This work shows the flow imaging performance of the system in vitro using microparticles. Both two-dimensional (2-D) flow images and quantitative flow velocities from 12 to 75  mm/s were obtained. In a transparent bulk medium, flow estimation showed standard errors of ∼7% the estimated speed; in the presence of tissue-realistic optical scattering, the error increased to 40% due to limited signal-to-noise ratio. In the future, photoacoustic flow imaging can potentially be performed in vivo using fluorophore-filled vesicles or with an improved setup on whole blood.

  9. Initial results of imaging melanoma metastasis in resected human lymph nodes using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jithin; Grootendorst, Diederik J.; Vijn, Thomas W.; Wouters, Michel W.; van Boven, Hester; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Ruers, Theo J. M.; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-09-01

    The pathological status of the sentinel lymph node is important for accurate melanoma staging, ascertaining prognosis and planning treatment. The standard procedure involves biopsy of the node and histopathological assessment of its status. Drawbacks of this examination include a finite sampling of the node with the likelihood of missing metastases, and a significant time-lag before histopathological results are available to the surgeon. We studied the applicability of photoacoustic computed tomographic imaging as an intraoperative modality for examining the status of resected human sentinel lymph nodes. We first applied the technique to image ex vivo pig lymph nodes carrying metastases-simulating melanoma cells using multiple wavelengths. The experience gained was applied to image a suspect human lymph node. We validated the photoacoustic imaging results by comparing a reconstructed slice with a histopathological section through the node. Our results suggest that photoacoustics has the potential to develop into an intraoperative imaging method to detect melanoma metastases in sentinel lymph nodes.

  10. Photoacoustic Measurements in Brain Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Kasili, P.M.; Mobley, J.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1999-09-19

    In this work, we develop and evaluate the photoacoustic technique for recording spectra of white and gray mammalian brain tissues. In addition to the experimental work, we also discuss the geometric aspects of photoacoustic signal generation using collimated light. Spectra constructed from the peak-to-peak amplitude of the photoacoustic waveforms indicate differences in the two tissue types at wavelengths between 620 and 695 nm. The potential of the technique for non-invasive diagnosis is discussed.

  11. Internal Water Vapor Photoacoustic Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor absorption is ubiquitous in the infrared wavelength range where photoacoustic trace gas detectors operate. This technique allows for discontinuous wavelength tuning by temperature-jumping a laser diode from one range to another within a time span suitable for photoacoustic calibration. The use of an internal calibration eliminates the need for external calibrated reference gases. Commercial applications include an improvement of photoacoustic spectrometers in all fields of use.

  12. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Chemical Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    micropipette onto a single photoresist-coated substrate. The substrate was oriented to allow complete coverage by the glycerol/ water solution. Following...pulse laser-induced photoacoustics," Anal. Chem. 70, 3, 651 ( 1998 ). [10] M. H. Xu and L. H. V. Wang, "Photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine," Rev. Sci...1976). [25] A. C. Tam, "Photoacoustics: Spectroscopy and other applications", in Ultrasensitive Laser Spectroscopy, D. S. Klinger , Ed. (Academic

  13. Partially coherent lensfree tomographic microscopy⋄

    PubMed Central

    Isikman, Serhan O.; Bishara, Waheb; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Optical sectioning of biological specimens provides detailed volumetric information regarding their internal structure. To provide a complementary approach to existing three-dimensional (3D) microscopy modalities, we have recently demonstrated lensfree optical tomography that offers high-throughput imaging within a compact and simple platform. In this approach, in-line holograms of objects at different angles of partially coherent illumination are recorded using a digital sensor-array, which enables computing pixel super-resolved tomographic images of the specimen. This imaging modality, which forms the focus of this review, offers micrometer-scale 3D resolution over large imaging volumes of, for example, 10–15 mm3, and can be assembled in light weight and compact architectures. Therefore, lensfree optical tomography might be particularly useful for lab-on-a-chip applications as well as for microscopy needs in resource-limited settings. PMID:22193016

  14. Medical tomograph system using ultrasonic transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, Richard C. (Inventor); Nathan, Robert (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonic energy transmission in rectilinear array scanning patterns of soft tissue provides projection density values of the tissue which are recorded as a function of scanning position and angular relationship, .theta., of the subject with a fixed coordinate system. A plurality of rectilinear scan arrays in the same plane for different angular relationships .theta..sub.1 . . . .theta..sub.n thus recorded are superimposed. The superimposition of intensity values thus yields a tomographic image of an internal section of the tissue in the scanning plane.

  15. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  16. Non-Contact Photoacoustic Imaging Using a Commercial Heterodyne Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chao; Feng, Ting; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Shengchun; Cheng, Qian; Oliver, David E; Wang, Xueding; Xu, Guan

    2016-12-01

    Most current photoacoustic imaging (PAI) systems employ piezoelectric transducers to receive photoacoustic signals, which requires coupling medium to facilitate photoacoustic wave propagation and are not favored in many applications. Here, we report an all-optical non-contact PAI system based on a commercial heterodyne interferometer working at 1550 nm. The interferometer remotely detects ultrasound-induced surface vibration and does not involve any physical contact with the sample. The theoretically predicated and experimentally measured noise equivalent detection limits of the optical sensor are about 4.5 and 810 Pa over 1.2 MHz bandwidth. Using a raster-scan PAI system equipped with the non-contact design, stereotactic boundaries of an artificial tumor in a pig brain were accurately delineated. The non-contact design also enables the tomographic PAI of biological tissue samples in a non-invasive manner. The preliminary results and analyses reveal that the heterodyne interferometer-based non-contact PAI system holds good potential in biomedical imaging.

  17. Towards nonionizing photoacoustic cystography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Jeon, Mansik; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Normally, urine flows down from kidneys to bladders. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the abnormal flow of urine from bladders back to kidneys. VUR commonly follows urinary tract infection and leads to renal infection. Fluoroscopic voiding cystourethrography and direct radionuclide voiding cystography have been clinical gold standards for VUR imaging, but these methods are ionizing. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a novel and nonionizing process for VUR mapping in vivo, called photoacoustic cystography (PAC). Using a photoacoustic (PA) imaging system, we have successfully imaged a rat bladder filled with clinically being used methylene blue dye. An image contrast of ~8 was achieved. Further, spectroscopic PAC confirmed the accumulation of methylene blue in the bladder. Using a laser pulse energy of less than 1 mJ/cm2, bladder was clearly visible in the PA image. Our results suggest that this technology would be a useful clinical tool, allowing clinicians to identify bladder noninvasively in vivo.

  18. Photoacoustic transient imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschi, J. L.; Marty-Dessus, D.; Severac, H.; Boucher, Jean-Marc; Bastie, A.

    1993-01-01

    A collimated laser diode associated with a small, short focal length objective lens produces a focused laser beam on the top of a sample glued onto a piezoelectric transducer. This laser beam is horizontally scanned on the surface and its intensity is modulated by a square wave using a TTL signal generator. This system induces acoustic waves in the sample. With a specially designed control circuitry, by combining this acoustic signal and the scanned laser beam, imaging of the subsurface is possible. The transient analysis developed is described and we show how to select cut-away views of the subsurface specimen with some applications in failure analysis of integrated circuits. We present the apparatus, the transient photoacoustic signal theory, and make a comparison between scanning photoacoustic (SPAM) and scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM).

  19. Sensitivity of photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Building on its high spatial resolution, deep penetration depth and excellent image contrast, 3D photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has grown tremendously since its first publication in 2005. Integrating optical excitation and acoustic detection, PAM has broken through both the optical diffusion and optical diffraction limits. PAM has 100% relative sensitivity to optical absorption (i.e., a given percentage change in the optical absorption coefficient yields the same percentage change in the photoacoustic amplitude), and its ultimate detection sensitivity is limited only by thermal noise. Focusing on the engineering aspects of PAM, this Review discusses the detection sensitivity of PAM, compares the detection efficiency of different PAM designs, and summarizes the imaging performance of various endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. It then describes representative PAM applications with high detection sensitivity, and outlines paths to further improvement. PMID:25302158

  20. Multi-wavelength Laser Photoacoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Photoacoustics, detection, nerve agents, DIMP, DMMP, DEMP, TEP 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF...DMMP), diethyl methyl phosphonate (DEMP), diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP), dimethyl polysiloxane (DIME), triethyl phosphate ( TEP ), tributyl...photoacoustic PAS PA spectroscopy QC quantum-cascade TBP tributyl phosphate TEP triethyl phosphate VOCs volatile organic compounds 11 NO. OF

  1. Tutorial on photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-06-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has become one of the fastest growing fields in biomedical optics. Unlike pure optical imaging, such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, PAT employs acoustic detection to image optical absorption contrast with high-resolution deep into scattering tissue. So far, PAT has been widely used for multiscale anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging of biological tissues. We focus on PAT's basic principles, major implementations, imaging contrasts, and recent applications.

  2. Tutorial on photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has become one of the fastest growing fields in biomedical optics. Unlike pure optical imaging, such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, PAT employs acoustic detection to image optical absorption contrast with high-resolution deep into scattering tissue. So far, PAT has been widely used for multiscale anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging of biological tissues. We focus on PAT’s basic principles, major implementations, imaging contrasts, and recent applications. PMID:27086868

  3. Photoacoustic computed microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lei; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is emerging as a powerful technique for imaging microvasculature at depths beyond the ~1 mm depth limit associated with confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy and optical coherence tomography. PAM, however, is currently qualitative in nature and cannot quantitatively measure important functional parameters including oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhemoglobin (HbR), oxygen saturation (sO2), blood flow (BF) and rate of oxygen metabolism (MRO2). Here we describe a new photoacoustic microscopic method, termed photoacoustic computed microscopy (PACM) that combines current PAM technique with a model-based inverse reconstruction algorithm. We evaluate the PACM approach using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate its in vivo imaging ability of quantifying HbO2, HbR, sO2, cerebral BF and cerebral MRO2 at the small vessel level in a rodent model. This new technique provides a unique tool for neuroscience research and for visualizing microvasculature dynamics involved in tumor angiogenesis and in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24828539

  4. Ultrasound-heated photoacoustic flowmetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I; Xing, Wenxin; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-11-01

    We report the development of photoacoustic flowmetry assisted by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). This novel method employs HIFU to generate a heating impulse in the flow medium, followed by photoacoustic monitoring of the thermal decay process. Photoacoustic flowmetry in a continuous medium remains a challenge in the optical diffusive regime. Here, both the HIFU heating and photoacoustic detection can focus at depths beyond the optical diffusion limit (~1 mm in soft tissue). This method can be applied to a continuous medium, i.e., a medium without discrete scatterers or absorbers resolvable by photoacoustic imaging. Flow speeds up to 41 mm·s-1 have been experimentally measured in a blood phantom covered by 1.5-mm-thick tissue.

  5. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tyler; Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Lu, Huihong; Mathewson, Kory; Walsh, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J

    2009-11-23

    We report on the development of an imaging system capable of combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging based on a fast-scanning single-element 25-MHz ultrasound transducer and a unique light-delivery system. The system is capable of 20 ultrasound frames per second and slower photoacoustic frame rates limited by laser pulse-repetition rates. Laser and ultrasound pulses are interlaced for co-registration of photoacoustic and ultrasound images. In vivo imaging of a human finger permits ultrasonic visualization of vessel structures and speckle changes indicative of blood flow, while overlaid photoacoustic images highlight some small vessels that are not clear from the ultrasound scan. Photoacoustic images provide optical absorption contrast co-registered in the structural and blood-flow context of ultrasound with high-spatial resolution and may prove important for clinical diagnostics and basic science of the microvasculature.

  6. Optical tomographic imaging of small animals.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H

    2005-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography is emerging as a viable new biomedical imaging modality. Using visible and near-infrared light this technique can probe the absorption and scattering properties of biological tissues. The main applications are currently in brain, breast, limb and joint imaging; however, optical tomographic imaging of small animals is attracting increasing attention. This interest is fuelled by recent advances in the transgenic manipulation of small animals that has led to many models of human disease. In addition, an ever increasing number of optically reactive biochemical markers has become available, which allow diseases to be detected at the molecular level long before macroscopic symptoms appear. The past three years have seen an array of novel technological developments that have led to the first optical tomographic studies of small animals in the areas of cerebral ischemia and cancer.

  7. Combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of pancreatic cancer using nanocage contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Kimberly; Shah, Jignesh; Gomez, Sobeyda; Gensler, Heidi; Karpiouk, Andrei; Brannon-Peppas, L.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-02-01

    A new metallodielectric nanoparticle consisting of a silica core and silver outer cage was developed for the purpose of enhancing photoacoustic imaging contrast in pancreatic tissue. These nanocages were injected into an ex vivo porcine pancreas and imaged using a combined photoacoustic and ultrasound (PAUS) assembly. This custom-designed PAUS assembly delivered 800 nm light through a fiber optical light delivery system integrated with 128 element linear array transducer operating at 7.5 MHz center frequency. Imaging results prove that the nanocage contrast agents have the ability to enhance photoacoustic imaging contrast. Furthermore, the value of the combined PAUS imaging modality was demonstrated as the location of nanocages against background native tissue was evident. Future applications of these nanocage contrast agents could include targeting them to pancreatic cancer for enhancement of photoacoustic imaging for diagnosis and therapy.

  8. Reflection mode photoacoustic imaging through infant skull toward noninvasive imaging of neonatal brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Chamberland, David L.; Xi, Guohua; Carson, Paul L.

    2009-02-01

    The feasibility of transcranial imaging of neonatal brains with reflection mode photoacoustic technology has been explored. By using unembalmed infant skulls and fresh canine brains, experiments have been conducted to examine the ultrasound and light attenuation in the skull bone as well as consequent photoacoustic images through the skull. Mapping of blood vessels in a transcranial manner has been successfully achieved by employing the raster scan of a single-element transducer or a 2D PVDF array transducer. Experimental results indicate that noninvasive photoacoustic imaging of neonatal brain with a depth of 2 cm or more beneath the skull is feasible when working with near-infrared light. This study suggests that the emerging photoacoustic technology may become a powerful tool in the future for noninvasive diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis of disorders in prenatal or neonatal brains.

  9. Fiber optic photoacoustic probe with ultrasonic tracking for guiding minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Mosse, Charles A.; Colchester, Richard J.; Mari, Jean Martial; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; West, Simeon J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-07-01

    In a wide range of clinical procedures, accurate placement of medical devices such as needles and catheters is critical to optimize patient outcomes. Ultrasound imaging is often used to guide minimally invasive procedures, as it can provide real-time visualization of patient anatomy and medical devices. However, this modality can provide low image contrast for soft tissues, and poor visualization of medical devices that are steeply angled with respect to the incoming ultrasound beams. Photoacoustic sensors can provide information about the spatial distributions of tissue chromophores that could be valuable for guiding minimally invasive procedures. In this study, a system for guiding minimally invasive procedures using photoacoustic sensing was developed. This system included a miniature photoacoustic probe with three optical fibers: one with a bare end for photoacoustic excitation of tissue, a second for photoacoustic excitation of an optically absorbing coating at the distal end to transmit ultrasound, and a third with a Fabry-Perot cavity at the distal end for receiving ultrasound. The position of the photoacoustic probe was determined with ultrasonic tracking, which involved transmitting pulses from a linear-array ultrasound imaging probe at the tissue surface, and receiving them with the fiber-optic ultrasound receiver in the photoacoustic probe. The axial resolution of photoacoustic sensing was better than 70 μm, and the tracking accuracy was better than 1 mm in both axial and lateral dimensions. By translating the photoacoustic probe, depth scans were obtained from different spatial positions, and two-dimensional images were reconstructed using a frequency-domain algorithm.

  10. Organosilicon phantom for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avigo, Cinzia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Armanetti, Paolo; Kusmic, Claudia; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Meucci, Sandro; Masciullo, Cecilia; Cecchini, Marco; Pini, Roberto; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technique. Although commercially available photoacoustic imaging systems currently exist, the technology is still in its infancy. Therefore, the design of stable phantoms is essential to achieve semiquantitative evaluation of the performance of a photoacoustic system and can help optimize the properties of contrast agents. We designed and developed a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom with exceptionally fine geometry; the phantom was tested using photoacoustic experiments loaded with the standard indocyanine green dye and compared to an agar phantom pattern through polyethylene glycol-gold nanorods. The linearity of the photoacoustic signal with the nanoparticle number was assessed. The signal-to-noise ratio and contrast were employed as image quality parameters, and enhancements of up to 50 and up to 300%, respectively, were measured with the PDMS phantom with respect to the agar one. A tissue-mimicking (TM)-PDMS was prepared by adding TiO2 and India ink; photoacoustic tests were performed in order to compare the signal generated by the TM-PDMS and the biological tissue. The PDMS phantom can become a particularly promising tool in the field of photoacoustics for the evaluation of the performance of a PA system and as a model of the structure of vascularized soft tissues.

  11. Organosilicon phantom for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Avigo, Cinzia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Armanetti, Paolo; Kusmic, Claudia; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Meucci, Sandro; Masciullo, Cecilia; Cecchini, Marco; Pini, Roberto; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technique. Although commercially available photoacoustic imaging systems currently exist, the technology is still in its infancy. Therefore, the design of stable phantoms is essential to achieve semiquantitative evaluation of the performance of a photoacoustic system and can help optimize the properties of contrast agents. We designed and developed a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom with exceptionally fine geometry; the phantom was tested using photoacoustic experiments loaded with the standard indocyanine green dye and compared to an agar phantom pattern through polyethylene glycol-gold nanorods. The linearity of the photoacoustic signal with the nanoparticle number was assessed. The signal-tonoiseratio and contrast were employed as image quality parameters, and enhancements of up to 50 and up to 300%, respectively, were measured with the PDMS phantom with respect to the agar one. A tissue-mimicking (TM)-PDMS was prepared by adding TiO2 and India ink; photoacoustic tests were performed in order to compare the signal generated by the TM-PDMS and the biological tissue. The PDMS phantom can become a particularly promising tool in the field of photoacoustics for the evaluation of the performance of a PA system and as a model of the structure of vascularized soft tissues.

  12. Kinky tomographic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; Bilisoly, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    We address the issue of how to make decisions about the degree of smoothness demanded of a flexible contour used to model the boundary of a 2D object. We demonstrate the use of a Bayesian approach to set the strength of the smoothness prior for a tomographic reconstruction problem. The Akaike Information Criterion is used to determine whether to allow a kink in the contour.

  13. Medical ultrasonic tomographic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C.; Lecroissette, D. H.; Nathan, R.; Wilson, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    An electro-mechanical scanning assembly was designed and fabricated for the purpose of generating an ultrasound tomogram. A low cost modality was demonstrated in which analog instrumentation methods formed a tomogram on photographic film. Successful tomogram reconstructions were obtained on in vitro test objects by using the attenuation of the fist path ultrasound signal as it passed through the test object. The nearly half century tomographic methods of X-ray analysis were verified as being useful for ultrasound imaging.

  14. Picosecond measurements using photoacoustic detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heritier, J.-M.; Siegman, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    A report is presented of experimental results on picosecond time-resolved photoacoustic measurements of excited-state lifetimes, cross sections, and polarization properties for organic dye molecules in solution, using a new technique in which the total photoacoustic impulse produced by two ultrashort optical pulses with variable time delay between them is detected. The picosecond photoacoustic detection technique reported here appears to be a promising new way to observe weak excited-state cross sections and to perform picosecond lifetime measurements in a large variety of weakly absorbing and/or nonfluorescing atomic and molecular systems.

  15. Clinical photoacoustic imaging of cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid technique that shines laser light on tissue and measures optically induced ultrasound signal. There is growing interest in the clinical community over this new technique and its possible clinical applications. One of the most prominent features of photoacoustic imaging is its ability to characterize tissue, leveraging differences in the optical absorption of underlying tissue components such as hemoglobin, lipids, melanin, collagen and water among many others. In this review, the state-of-the-art photoacoustic imaging techniques and some of the key outcomes pertaining to different cancer applications in the clinic are presented. PMID:27669961

  16. Photoacoustic measurement of liquid viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Cunguang; Xing, Da

    2010-05-01

    In this letter, we report on the use of photoacoustic method to measure the viscosity of viscous liquids. The theoretical and experimental study was performed on the influence of viscosity effects on photoacoustic generation. We provide evidence that the frequency spectrum of photoacoustic signal is precisely related to the viscosity. Measurements are validated on different water-glycerol mixtures. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained. This present method provides an insight into in situ viscosity measurements, which has potential for noninvasive detection of blood viscosity.

  17. Differential-absorption photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Wen; Eary, Janet F; Jia, Congxian; Huang, Lingyun; Ashkenazi, Shai; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2009-08-15

    We present differential-absorption photoacoustic imaging, which detects the difference between transient and ground-state absorption, for contrast enhancement based on suppressing undesired objects. Two tubes were imaged. One contains a Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP) dye solution and serves as an object of interest, while the other contains an IR-783 (from Sigma-Aldrich) dye solution and serves as an object to suppress. Although the IR-783 tube dominates the conventional photoacoustic image, it is suppressed by 43 dB and consequently significantly overwhelmed by the PtOEP tube in the differential-absorption photoacoustic image. Imaging depth in this mode is also discussed.

  18. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, several algorithms that allow for quantitative photoacoustic reconstruction of tissue optical, acoustic and physiological properties are described in a finite-element method based framework. These quantitative reconstruction algorithms are compared, and the merits and limitations associated with these methods are discussed. In addition, a multispectral approach is presented for concurrent reconstructions of multiple parameters including deoxyhaemoglobin, oxyhaemoglobin and water concentrations as well as acoustic speed. Simulation and in vivo experiments are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the reconstruction algorithms presented. PMID:19581254

  19. Combined ultrasonic and photoacoustic system for deep tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Erpelding, Todd N.; Jankovic, Ladislav; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    A combined ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging system is presented that is capable of deep tissue imaging. The system consists of a modified clinical ultrasound array system and tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser. The system is designed for noninvasive detection of sentinel lymph nodes and guidance of needle biopsies for axillary lymph node staging in breast cancer patients. Using a fraction of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) safety limit, photoacoustic imaging of methylene blue achieved penetration depths of greater than 5 cm in chicken breast tissue. Photoacoustic imaging sensitivity was measured by varying the concentration of methylene blue dye placed at a depth of 3 cm within surrounding chicken breast tissue. Signal-to-noise ratio, noise equivalent sensitivity, and axial spatial resolution were quantified versus depth based on in vivo and chicken breast tissue experiments. The system has been demonstrated in vivo for detecting sentinel lymph nodes in rats following intradermal injection of methylene blue. These results highlight the clinical potential of photoacoustic image-guided identification and needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes for axillary staging in breast cancer patients.

  20. Photoacoustic imaging and temperature measurement for photothermal cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jignesh; Park, Suhyun; Aglyamov, Salavat; Larson, Timothy; Ma, Li; Sokolov, Konstantin; Johnston, Keith; Milner, Thomas; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2009-01-01

    Photothermal therapy is a noninvasive, targeted, laser-based technique for cancer treatment. During photothermal therapy, light energy is converted to heat by tumor-specific photoabsorbers. The corresponding temperature rise causes localized cancer destruction. For effective treatment, however, the presence of photoabsorbers in the tumor must be ascertained before therapy and thermal imaging must be performed during therapy. This study investigates the feasibility of guiding photothermal therapy by using photoacoustic imaging to detect photoabsorbers and to monitor temperature elevation. Photothermal therapy is carried out by utilizing a continuous wave laser and metal nanocomposites broadly absorbing in the near-infrared optical range. A linear array-based ultrasound imaging system is interfaced with a nanosecond pulsed laser to image tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex-vivo animal tissue before and during photothermal therapy. Before commencing therapy, photoacoustic imaging identifies the presence and spatial location of nanoparticles. Thermal maps are computed by monitoring temperature-induced changes in the photoacoustic signal during the therapeutic procedure and are compared with temperature estimates obtained from ultrasound imaging. The results of our study suggest that photoacoustic imaging, augmented by ultrasound imaging, is a viable candidate to guide photoabsorber-enhanced photothermal therapy. PMID:18601569

  1. Study of the compact fiber optic photoacoustic ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Zou, Xiaotian; Wang, Xingwei

    2012-04-01

    Recently, many studies have been exerted on developing ultrasonic transducers that can feature high frequencies for better resolutions and compact sizes for the limit space nondestructive testing applications. Conventional ultrasonic transducers, which are made by piezoelectric materials, suffer from issues such as low frequencies and bulky sizes due to the difficulty of dicing piezoelectric materials into smaller pieces. On the other hand, generating ultrasonic signals by photoacoustic principle is a promising way to generate a high frequency ultrasonic pulse. Optical fiber is a very compact material that can carry the light energy. By combining the photoacoustic principle and the optical fiber together, a novel ultrasonic transducer that features a high frequency and a compact size could be achieved. In this paper, an ultrasonic transducer using gold nanoparticles as the photoacoustic generation material is described. Gold nanoparticles are deposited on the end surface of an optical fiber acting as the ultrasonic generator. A cavity and a diaphragm are fabricated in the center of the fiber using as the ultrasonic receiver. A phase array technique is applied to the transducer to steer the direction of the acoustic beam. Simulation results demonstrated that the photoacoustic ultrasonic transducer is feasible.

  2. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-05-18

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  3. Calcium Sensor for Photoacoustic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sheryl; Seeger, Markus; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Mishra, Anurag; Sigmund, Felix; Stelzl, Anja; Lauri, Antonella; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Rolbieski, Hannes; Preller, Matthias; Deán Ben, Xosé Luís; Razansky, Daniel; Orschmann, Tanja; Desbordes, Sabrina; Vetschera, Paul; Bach, Thorsten; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil Gregor

    2017-09-25

    We introduce a selective and cell-permeable Calcium (Ca(2+)) Sensor for Photoacoustics (CaSPA) which is a versatile imaging technique that allows for fast volumetric mapping of photoabsorbing molecules with deep tissue penetration. To optimize for Ca(2+)-dependent photoacoustic signal changes, we synthesized a selective metallochromic sensor with high extinction coefficient, a low quantum yield, and high photobleaching resistance. Micromolar concentrations of Ca(2+) lead to a robust blueshift of the absorbance of CaSPA which translated into an accompanying decrease of the peak photoacoustic signal. The acetoxymethyl esterified sensor variant was readily taken up by cells without toxic effects and thus allowed us for the first time to perform live imaging of Ca(2+) fluxes in genetically unmodified cells, tissue culture as well as in zebrafish larval brain via combined fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging.

  4. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-05-01

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  5. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; Conley, Benjamin; Hogan, Roy; Boslough, Mark; Gonzales, Gigi; Spurný, Pavel

    2017-02-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with -11 to -13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally. Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that -12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. The photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs.

  6. Photoacoustic thermography of tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Haixin; Tai, Stephen; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Photoacoustic (PA) techniques can measure temperature in biological tissues because PA signal amplitude is sensitive to tissue temperature. So far, temperature-measuring PA techniques have focused on sensing of temperature changes at a single position. In this work, we photoacoustically measured spatial distribution of temperature in deep tissue. By monitoring the temperature at a single position using a thermocouple, the relationship between the PA signal amplitude and the actual temperature was determined. The relationship was then used to translate a PA image into a temperature map. This study showed that it is possible to calibrate the system for the temperature range of hyperthermia using single-point measurements over a smaller temperature range. Our experimental results showed a precision of −0.8±0.4°C (mean±standard error) in temperature measurement, and a spatial resolution as fine as 1.0 mm. PA techniques can be potentially applied to monitor temperature distribution deep in tissue during hyperthermia treatment of cancer. PMID:24522803

  7. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors

    PubMed Central

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; Conley, Benjamin; Hogan, Roy; Boslough, Mark; Gonzales, GiGi; Spurný, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with −11 to −13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally. Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that −12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. The photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs. PMID:28145486

  8. Photoacoustic sounds from meteors

    DOE PAGES

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; ...

    2017-02-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with –11 to –13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally.more » Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that –12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. As a result, the photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs.« less

  9. Photoacoustical radiation dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, S.; Vargas, H.; Cesar, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    A new type of radiation dosimeter using the photoacoustical effect is described. The photoacoustical radiation dosimeter (PARD) is capable of directly measuring the energy absorbed in the detecting element. For a completely absorbing element, the energy fluence rate in the radiation beam is measured. It is thus a calorimetric dosimeter. Since the energy sensor can be calibrated with another form of energy, it has the potential for being an absolute radiation dosemeter. Measurements were made using 50 to 100 kVp x rays with exposure rates at the detector of 2.6 x 10/sup -6/ C/kg/s (10 mR/s) to 5 x 10/sup -5/ C/kg/s (200 mR/s). The minimum measurable exposure rate at 90 kVp is 5 x 10/sup -7/ C/kg/s (2 mR/s). For a given x-ray spectrum, the PARD has a linear response with radiation intensity and an inverse response with chopping frequency. With appropriate design parameters, we believe the PARD may be used to measure any photon energy or any type of radiation particle.

  10. Photoacoustic tomography of vascular compliance in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-12-01

    Characterization of blood vessel elastic properties can help in detecting thrombosis and preventing life-threatening conditions such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography (VE-PAT) is proposed to measure blood vessel compliance in humans. Implemented on a linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography system, VE-PAT can quantify blood vessel compliance changes due to simulated thrombosis and occlusion. The feasibility of the VE-PAT system was first demonstrated by measuring the strains under uniaxial loading in perfused blood vessel phantoms and quantifying their compliance changes due to the simulated thrombosis. The VE-PAT system detected a decrease in the compliances of blood vessel phantoms with simulated thrombosis, which was validated by a standard compression test. The VE-PAT system was then applied to assess blood vessel compliance in a human subject. Experimental results showed a decrease in compliance when an occlusion occurred downstream from the measurement point in the blood vessels, demonstrating VE-PAT's potential for clinical thrombosis detection.

  11. Vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of vascular elasticity can help detect thrombosis and prevent life-threatening conditions such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Here, we propose vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography (VE-PAT) to measure vascular elasticity in humans. VE-PAT was developed by incorporating a linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography system with a customized compression stage. By measuring the deformation of blood vessels under uniaxial loading, VE-PAT was able to quantify the vascular compliance. We first demonstrated the feasibility of VE-PAT in blood vessel phantoms. In large vessel phantoms, VE-PAT detected a decrease in vascular compliance due to simulated thrombosis, which was validated by a standard compression test. In small blood vessel phantoms embedded 3 mm deep in gelatin, VE-PAT detected elasticity changes at depths that are difficult to image using other elasticity imaging techniques. We then applied VE-PAT to assess vascular compliance in a human subject and detected a decrease in vascular compliance when an occlusion occurred downstream from the measurement point, demonstrating the potential of VE-PAT in clinical applications such as detection of deep venous thrombosis.

  12. Photoacoustic tomography of vascular compliance in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Characterization of blood vessel elastic properties can help in detecting thrombosis and preventing life-threatening conditions such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography (VE-PAT) is proposed to measure blood vessel compliance in humans. Implemented on a linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography system, VE-PAT can quantify blood vessel compliance changes due to simulated thrombosis and occlusion. The feasibility of the VE-PAT system was first demonstrated by measuring the strains under uniaxial loading in perfused blood vessel phantoms and quantifying their compliance changes due to the simulated thrombosis. The VE-PAT system detected a decrease in the compliances of blood vessel phantoms with simulated thrombosis, which was validated by a standard compression test. The VE-PAT system was then applied to assess blood vessel compliance in a human subject. Experimental results showed a decrease in compliance when an occlusion occurred downstream from the measurement point in the blood vessels, demonstrating VE-PAT’s potential for clinical thrombosis detection. PMID:26720875

  13. Transurethral light delivery for prostate photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has broad clinical potential to enhance prostate cancer detection and treatment, yet it is challenged by the lack of minimally invasive, deeply penetrating light delivery methods that provide sufficient visualization of targets (e.g., tumors, contrast agents, brachytherapy seeds). We constructed a side-firing fiber prototype for transurethral photoacoustic imaging of prostates with a dual-array (linear and curvilinear) transrectal ultrasound probe. A method to calculate the surface area and, thereby, estimate the laser fluence at this fiber tip was derived, validated, applied to various design parameters, and used as an input to three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. Brachytherapy seeds implanted in phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo canine prostates at radial distances of 5 to 30 mm from the urethra were imaged with the fiber prototype transmitting 1064 nm wavelength light with 2 to 8 mJ pulse energy. Prebeamformed images were displayed in real time at a rate of 3 to 5 frames per second to guide fiber placement and beamformed offline. A conventional delay-and-sum beamformer provided decreasing seed contrast (23 to 9 dB) with increasing urethra-to-target distance, while the short-lag spatial coherence beamformer provided improved and relatively constant seed contrast (28 to 32 dB) regardless of distance, thus improving multitarget visualization in single and combined curvilinear images acquired with the fiber rotating and the probe fixed. The proposed light delivery and beamforming methods promise to improve key prostate cancer detection and treatment strategies.

  14. Photoacoustic measurement of epidermal melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viator, John A.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Aguilar, Guillermo; Choi, Bernard; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2003-06-01

    Most dermatologic laser procedures must consider epidermal melanin, as it is a broadband optical absorber which affects subsurface fluence, effectively limiting the amount of light reaching the dermis and targeted chromophores. An accurate method for quantifying epidermal melanin content would aid clinicians in determining proper light dosage for therapeutic laser procedures. While epidermal melanin content has been quantified non-invasively using optical methods, there is currently no way to determine the melanin distribution in the epidermis. We have developed a photoacoustic probe that uses a Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 532nm to generate acoustic pulses in skin in vivo. The probe contained a piezoelectric element that detected photoacoustic waves which were then analyzed for epidermal melanin content, using a photoacoustic melanin index (PAMI). We tested 15 human subjects with skin types I--VI using the photoacoustic probe. We also present photoacoustic data for a human subject with vitiligo. Photoacoustic measurement showed melanin in the vitiligo subject was almost completely absent.

  15. Leiomyosarcoma: computed tomographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, A.J.; Zornoza, J.; Shirkhoda, A.

    1984-07-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 118 patients with the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma were reviewed. The tumor masses visualized in these patients were often quite large; extensive necrotic or cystic change was a frequent finding. Calcification was not observed in these tumors. The liver was the most common site of metastasis in these patients, with marked necrosis of the liver lesions a common finding. Other manifestations of tumor spread included pulmonary metastases, mesenteric or omental metastases, retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, soft-tissue metastases, bone metastases, splenic metastases, and ascites. Although the CT appearance of leiomyosarcoma is not specific, these findings, when present, suggest consideration of this diagnosis.

  16. A novel fiber laser development for photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavas, Seydi; Aytac-Kipergil, Esra; Arabul, Mustafa U.; Erkol, Hakan; Akcaalan, Onder; Eldeniz, Y. Burak; Ilday, F. Omer; Unlu, Mehmet B.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy, as an imaging modality, has shown promising results in imaging angiogenesis and cutaneous malignancies like melanoma, revealing systemic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, tracing drug efficiency and assessment of therapy, monitoring healing processes such as wound cicatrization, brain imaging and mapping. Clinically, photoacoustic microscopy is emerging as a capable diagnostic tool. Parameters of lasers used in photoacoustic microscopy, particularly, pulse duration, energy, pulse repetition frequency, and pulse-to-pulse stability affect signal amplitude and quality, data acquisition speed and indirectly, spatial resolution. Lasers used in photoacoustic microscopy are typically Q-switched lasers, low-power laser diodes, and recently, fiber lasers. Significantly, the key parameters cannot be adjusted independently of each other, whereas microvasculature and cellular imaging, e.g., have different requirements. Here, we report an integrated fiber laser system producing nanosecond pulses, covering the spectrum from 600 nm to 1100 nm, developed specifically for photoacoustic excitation. The system comprises of Yb-doped fiber oscillator and amplifier, an acousto-optic modulator and a photonic-crystal fiber to generate supercontinuum. Complete control over the pulse train, including generation of non-uniform pulse trains, is achieved via the AOM through custom-developed field-programmable gate-array electronics. The system is unique in that all the important parameters are adjustable: pulse duration in the range of 1-3 ns, pulse energy up to 10 μJ, repetition rate from 50 kHz to 3 MHz. Different photocoustic imaging probes can be excited with the ultrabroad spectrum. The entire system is fiber-integrated; guided-beam-propagation rendersit misalignment free and largely immune to mechanical perturbations. The laser is robust, low-cost and built using readily available components.

  17. Integrated transrectal probe for translational ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Kevan L.; Harrison, Tyler; Usmani, Nawaid; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    A compact photoacoustic transrectal probe is constructed for improved imaging in brachytherapy treatment. A 192 element 5 MHz linear transducer array is mounted inside a small 3D printed casing along with an array of optical fibers. The device is fed by a pump laser and tunable NIR-optical parametric oscillator with data collected by a Verasonics ultrasound platform. This assembly demonstrates improved imaging of brachytherapy seeds in phantoms with depths up to 5 cm. The tuneable excitation in combination with standard US integration provides adjustable contrast between the brachytherapy seeds, blood filled tubes and background tissue.

  18. Photoacoustic tomography using orthogonal Fabry-Pérot sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, Robert; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Fabry-Pérot sensors have been used to produce in-vivo photoacoustic images of exquisite quality. However, for ease of construction and interrogation, they are produced in a planar form. Planar arrays suffer from a limited detection aperture, which leads to artifacts in the reconstruction of the initial pressure distribution. Here, an L-shaped detection geometry is described that allows a greater field of view by placing a second planar array orthogonal to the first. This captures data from the deeper lying regions of interest and mitigates the limited view, thus reducing artifacts in the reconstructed initial pressure distribution.

  19. Photoacoustic tomography using orthogonal Fabry-Pérot sensors.

    PubMed

    Ellwood, Robert; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Fabry–Pérot sensors have been used to produce in-vivo photoacoustic images of exquisite quality. However, for ease of construction and interrogation, they are produced in a planar form. Planar arrays suffer from a limited detection aperture, which leads to artifacts in the reconstruction of the initial pressure distribution. Here, an L-shaped detection geometry is described that allows a greater field of view by placing a second planar array orthogonal to the first. This captures data from the deeper lying regions of interest and mitigates the limited view, thus reducing artifacts in the reconstructed initial pressure distribution.

  20. Photoacoustic Effect and the Physics of Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, F. Alan

    1980-01-01

    Discussions are presented for implementing photoacoustic spectroscopy as a technique for describing the photoacoustic effect. This technique makes it possible to study optical absorption in samples which are usually difficult to study. It is suggested that this approach makes understanding of the photoacoustic effect accessible even at the…

  1. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of nude mice vasculature using a photoacoustic imaging system based on a commercial ultrasound scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Ladislav; Shahzad, Khalid; Wang, Yao; Burcher, Michael; Scholle, Frank-Detlef; Hauff, Peter; Mofina, Sabine; Skobe, Mihaela

    2008-02-01

    In-vivo photoacoustic/ultrasound (PA/US) imaging of nude mice was investigated using a photoacoustic imaging system based on a commercial ultrasound scanner HDI-5000. Raw per-channel data was captured and beamformed to generate each individual photoacoustic image with a single laser shot. An ultra-broadband CL15-7 linear array with a center frequency of 8 MHz, combined with a Schott Glass fiber bundle, was used as a compact high resolution imaging probe, with lateral and axial PA resolutions of about 300µm and 200µm, respectively. The imaging system worked in a dual PA-US mode, with the ultrasound outlining the tissue structure and the photoacoustic image showing the blood vessels. PA signals were generated by exposing mice to ultra-short optical pulses from a Nd:YAG-pumped OPO laser operating in a wavelength range of 700-950nm. The corresponding ultrasound images were generated in the regular B-mode with standard delay-and-sum beamforming algorithm. The system resolution was sufficiently high to identify and clearly distinguish the dorsal artery and the two lateral veins in the mouse tail. Both the saphena artery and the ischiatic vein on the cross-section of the mouse leg were clearly outlined in the PA images and correctly overlaid on the ultrasound image of the tissue structure. Similarly, cross-section PA images of the mouse abdomen revealed mesenteric vasculatures located below the abdominal wall. Finally, a successful PA imaging of the mouse thoracic cavity unveiled the ascending and descending aorta. These initial results demonstrate a great potential for a dual photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging modality implemented on a commercial ultrasound imaging scanner.

  2. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds with transurethral light delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel approach to photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds utilizing an existing urinary catheter for transurethral light delivery. Two canine prostates were surgically implanted with brachyther- apy seeds under transrectal ultrasound guidance. One prostate was excised shortly after euthanasia and fixed in gelatin. The second prostate was imaged in the native tissue environment shortly after euthanasia. A urinary catheter was inserted in the urethra of each prostate. A 1-mm core diameter optical fiber coupled to a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into the urinary catheter. Light from the fiber was either directed mostly parallel to the fiber axis (i.e. end-fire fire) or mostly 90° to the fiber axis (i.e. side-fire fiber). An Ultrasonix SonixTouch scanner, transrectal ultrasound probe with curvilinear (BPC8-4) and linear (BPL9-5) arrays, and DAQ unit were utilized for synchronized laser light emission and photoacoustic signal acquisition. The implanted brachytherapy seeds were visualized at radial distances of 6-16 mm from the catheter. Multiple brachytherapy seeds were si- multaneously visualized with each array of the transrectal probe using both delay-and-sum (DAS) and short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming. This work is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds using a transurethral light delivery method.

  3. Photoacoustic point spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Van Neste, Charles W [Kingston, TN; Senesac, Lawrence R [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN

    2011-06-14

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a photoacoustic spectrum in an open or closed environment with reduced noise. A source may emit a beam to a target substance coated on a detector that measures acoustic waves generated as a result of a light beam being absorbed by the target substance. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target substance on the detector, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance as the wavelength of light is changed. Rejection may decrease the intensity of the acoustic waves on the detector while absorption may increase the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  4. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Van Neste, Charles W [Kingston, TN; Senesac, Lawrence R [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  5. Intravascular Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Su, Jimmy L.; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Smalling, Richard W.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging is a catheter-based, minimally invasive, imaging modality capable of providing high-resolution optical absorption map of the arterial wall. Integrated with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging, combined IVPA and IVUS imaging can be used to detect and characterize atherosclerotic plaques building up in the inner lining of an artery. In this paper, we present and discuss various representative applications of combined IVPA/IVUS imaging of atherosclerosis, including assessment of the composition of atherosclerotic plaques, imaging of macrophages within the plaques, and molecular imaging of biomarkers associated with formation and development of plaques. In addition, imaging of coronary artery stents using IVPA and IVUS imaging is demonstrated. Furthermore, the design of an integrated IVUS/IVPA imaging catheter needed for in vivo clinical applications is discussed. PMID:21359138

  6. Photoacoustic imaging: a potential new tool for arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding

    2012-12-01

    The potential application of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technology to diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis has been explored. The feasibility of our bench-top joint imaging systems in delineating soft articular tissue structures in a noninvasive manner was validated first on rat models and then on human peripheral joints. Based on the study on commonly used arthritis rat models, the capability of PAI to differentiate arthritic joints from the normal was also examined. With sufficient imaging depth, PAI can realize tomographic imaging of a human peripheral joint or a small-animal joint as a whole organ noninvasively. By presenting additional optical contrast and tissue functional information such as blood volume and blood oxygen saturation, PAI may provide an opportunity for early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, and for monitoring of therapeutic outcomes with improved sensitivity and accuracy.

  7. The derivative-free Fourier shell identity for photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Baddour, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    In X-ray tomography, the Fourier slice theorem provides a relationship between the Fourier components of the object being imaged and the measured projection data. The Fourier slice theorem is the basis for X-ray Fourier-based tomographic inversion techniques. A similar relationship, referred to as the 'Fourier shell identity' has been previously derived for photoacoustic applications. However, this identity relates the pressure wavefield data function and its normal derivative measured on an arbitrary enclosing aperture to the three-dimensional Fourier transform of the enclosed object evaluated on a sphere. Since the normal derivative of pressure is not normally measured, the applicability of the formulation is limited in this form. In this paper, alternative derivations of the Fourier shell identity in 1D, 2D polar and 3D spherical polar coordinates are presented. The presented formulations do not require the normal derivative of pressure, thereby lending the formulas directly adaptable for Fourier based absorber reconstructions.

  8. Nondestructive Evaluation of Compound Weld Defect by Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Daijiroh; Endoh, Haruo; Hoshimiya, Tsutomu

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of a compound defect in the weld metal of an aluminum plate has been demonstrated using a photoacoustic microscope (PAM). The compound defect is a blowhole, which was formed in the weld metal during welding. Experiments were carried out at different modulation frequencies to achieve depth profiling by changing the thermal diffusion length. Furthermore, X-ray tomographic imaging and scanning laser microscopy (SLM) were also used for comparison with the obtained PAM images. The PAM measurement, which is useful when only front-surface illumination is available, can achieve a spatial resolution comparable to those of X-ray micrography and SLM measurements for internal and surface defects, respectively.

  9. Photoacoustic tomography and sensing in biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changhui; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    Photoacoustics has been broadly studied in biomedicine, for both human and small animal tissues. Photoacoustics uniquely combines the absorption contrast of light or radio frequency waves with ultrasound resolution. Moreover, it is non-ionizing and non-invasive, and is the fastest growing new biomedical method, with clinical applications on the way. This article provides a brief review of recent developments in photoacoustics in biomedicine, from basic principles to applications. The emphasized areas include the new imaging modalities, hybrid detection methods, photoacoustic contrast agents, and the photoacoustic Doppler effect, as well as translational research topics. PMID:19724102

  10. Fluence compensated photoacoustic tomography in small animals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Altaf; Pool, Martin; Daoudi, Khalid; de Vries, Liesbeth G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-03-01

    Light fluence inside turbid media can be experimentally mapped by measuring ultrasonically modulated light (Acousto-optics). To demonstrate the feasibility of fluence corrected Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, we have realized a tri-modality (i.e. photoacoustic, acousto-optic and ultrasound) tomographic small animal imaging system. Wherein PA imaging provides high resolution map of absorbed optical energy density, Acousto-optics yields the fluence distribution map in the corresponding PA imaging plane and Ultrasound provides morphological information. Further, normalization of the PA image with the acousto-optically measured fluence map results in an image that directly represents the optical absorption. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is commonly found overexpressed in human cancers, among which breast cancers, resulting in a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Identification of HER2-expression is clinically relevant, because cancers overexpressing this marker are amenable to HER2-directed therapies, among which antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Here, we investigate the feasibility and advantage of acousto-optically assisted fluence compensated PA imaging over PA imaging alone in visualizing and quantifying HER2 expression. For this experiment, nude mice were xenografted with human breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474 (both HER2 overexpressing), as well as HER2-negative MDA-MB-231. To visualize HER2 expression in these mice, HER2 monoclonal antibody pertuzumab (Perjeta®, Roche), was conjugated to near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW (800CW, LICOR Biosciences) at a ratio of 1∶2 antibody to 800CW. When xenograft tumors measured ≥ 100 mm3, mice received 100 µg 800CW-pertuzumab intravenously. Three days post injection, mice were scanned for fluorescence signal with an IVIS scanner. After fluorescence scans, mice were euthanized and imaged in our PA tomographic imaging system.

  11. Recent advances in photoacoustic endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Tae-Jong; Cho, Young-Seok

    2013-11-16

    Imaging based on photoacoustic effect relies on illuminating with short light pulses absorbed by tissue absorbers, resulting in thermoelastic expansion, giving rise to ultrasonic waves. The ultrasonic waves are then detected by detectors placed around the sample. Photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) is one of four major implementations of photoacoustic tomography that have been developed recently. The prototype PAE was based on scanning mirror system that deflected both the light and the ultrasound. A recently developed mini-probe was further miniaturized, and enabled simultaneous photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging. This PAE-endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) system can offer high-resolution vasculature information in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and display differences between optical and mechanical contrast compared with single-mode EUS. However, PAE for endoscopic GI imaging is still at the preclinical stage. In this commentary, we describe the technological improvements in PAE for possible clinical application in endoscopic GI imaging. In addition, we discuss the technical details of the ultrasonic transducer incorporated into the photoacoustic endoscopic probe.

  12. Tomographic diagnostics of nonthermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, Natalia

    2009-10-01

    In the previous work [1], we discussed a ``technology'' of tomographic method and relations between the tomographic diagnostics in thermal (equilibrium) and nonthermal (nonequilibrium) plasma sources. The conclusion has been made that tomographic reconstruction in thermal plasma sources is the standard procedure at present, which can provide much useful information on the plasma structure and its evolution in time, while the tomographic reconstruction of nonthermal plasma has a great potential at making a contribution to understanding the fundamental problem of substance behavior in strongly nonequilibrium conditions. Using medical terminology, one could say, that tomographic diagnostics of the equilibrium plasma sources studies their ``anatomic'' structure, while reconstruction of the nonequilibrium plasma is similar to the ``physiological'' examination: it is directed to study the physical mechanisms and processes. The present work is focused on nonthermal plasma research. The tomographic diagnostics is directed to study spatial structures formed in the gas discharge plasmas under the influence of electrical and gravitational fields. The ways of plasma ``self-organization'' in changing and extreme conditions are analyzed. The analysis has been made using some examples from our practical tomographic diagnostics of nonthermal plasma sources, such as low-pressure capacitive and inductive discharges. [0pt] [1] Denisova N. Plasma diagnostics using computed tomography method // IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 2009 37 4 502.

  13. Tomographic 3D-PIV and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsinga, Gerrit E.; Wieneke, Bernhard; Scarano, Fulvio; Schröder, Andreas

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry is a 3D PIV technique based on the illumination, recording, reconstruction and analysis of tracer-particle motion within a three-dimensional measurement volume. The recently developed technique makes use of several simultaneous views of the illuminated particles, typically 4, and their three-dimensional reconstruction as a light-intensity distribution by means of optical tomography. The reconstruction is performed with the MART algorithm (multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique), yielding a 3D distribution of light intensity discretized over an array of voxels. The reconstructed tomogram pair is then analyzed by means of 3D crosscorrelation with an iterative multigrid volume-deformation technique, returning the three-component velocity vector distribution over the measurement volume. The implementation of the tomographic technique in time-resolved mode by means of high repetition rate PIV hardware has the capability to yield 4D velocity information. The first part of the chapter describes the operation principles and gives a detailed assessment of the tomographic reconstruction algorithm performance based upon a computer-simulated experiment. The second part of the chapter proposes four applications on two flow cases: 1. the transitional wake behind a circular cylinder; 2. the turbulent boundary layer developing over a flat plate. For the first case, experiments in air at ReD = 2700 are described together with the experimental assessment of the tomographic reconstruction accuracy. In this experiment a direct comparison is made between the results obtained by tomographic PIV and stereo-PIV. Experiments conducted in a water facility on the cylinder wake shows the extension of the technique to time-resolved measurements in water at ReD = 540 by means of a low repetition rate PIV system. A high data yield is obtained using high-resolution cameras (2k × 2k pixels) returning 650k vectors per volume. Measurements of the

  14. Photoacoustic effect in piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetsel, G. C., Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Audiofrequency signals produced by the absorption of chopped light in silvered piezoelectric ceramic discs have been measured as a function of chopping frequency, optical wavelength, optical power, transducer size, and size of illuminated area. The results show that the detected signal varies inversely as angular frequency, is not strongly wavelength dependent in the 0.45-3.4-microns range, is linearly dependent on optical power up to at least 100 mW, is larger for smaller discs, and is approximately independent of the illuminated area for a given disc. A one-dimensional theoretical model of the photoacoustic effect in terms of the various hybrid stress, electric, and thermal material parameters is compared with the experimental results; the principal features of the data are explained by the model. The importance of the photoacoustic signal generated in the transducer to photoacoustic spectroscopy of transparent solids is discussed.

  15. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    The Global War on Terror has made rapid detection and identification of chemical and biological agents a priority for Military and Homeland Defense applications. Reliable real-time detection of these threats is complicated by our enemy's use of a diverse range of materials. Therefore, an adaptable platform is necessary. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace detection of gaseous media. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-billion (ppb) or sub-ppb range. The versatility of PAS also allows for the investigation of solid and liquid analytes. Current research utilizes quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with an air-coupled solid-phase photoacoustic cell design for the detection of condensed phase material films deposited on a surface. Furthermore, variation of the QCL pulse repetition rate allows for identification and molecular discrimination of analytes based solely on photoacoustic spectra collected at different film depths.

  16. Noninvasive optical fiber photoacoustic microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Edward P. C.; Chan, Becky L.; Wylie, Ian W.

    1985-10-01

    A microprobe has been designed for the noninvasive detection of photoacoustic signals. It is made up of a fused silica optical fiber which has a core diameter of 600 μm and is coupled to a piezoelectric ceramic transducer. It can detect the laser-induced photoacoustic waves in a 5×10-5 M aqueous ferroin solution, though its sensitivity is approximately 70 times less than that of a typical photoacoustic cell. The probe makes a good contact with any curved surface, and can be easily moved all over a cell to tap signals at many points. Thus, surface profiling of signal intensities is allowed. Other application advantages and design improvements are also discussed.

  17. Identification and removal of reflection artifacts in minimally invasive photoacoustic imaging for accurate visualization of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, Mithun; Parameshwarappa, Vinay; Hendriksen, Ellen; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2017-03-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by the high signal from the optical fiber/ needle tip reflecting off the seed is an important problem in minimally invasive photoacoustic imaging of brachytherapy seeds. The presence of these artifacts confounds the interpretation of images and reduces contrast. We apply a new method called PAFUSion (Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to identify and reduce reflection artifacts generated in interstitial illumination imaging of brachytherapy seeds. We present the system comprising of a US imager and linear array, with illumination provided via a cutting needle. Non-radioactive brachytherapy seeds are implanted in a tissue mimicking phantom and ex vivo porcine tissue. The PAFUSion-corrected imaging results successfully demonstrate that our approach can identify and strongly reduce reflection artifacts in the context of photoacoustic needle. The phantom result also shows that multi-spectral photoacoustics can separate signals between the seeds and other optical absorbers.

  18. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of condensed matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a new analytical tool that provides a simple nondestructive technique for obtaining information about the electronic absorption spectrum of samples such as powders, semisolids, gels, and liquids. It can also be applied to samples which cannot be examined by conventional optical methods. Numerous applications of this technique in the field of inorganic and organic semiconductors, biology, and catalysis have been described. Among the advantages of photoacoustic spectroscopy, the signal is almost insensitive to light scattering by the sample and information can be obtained about nonradiative deactivation processes. Signal saturation, which can modify the intensity of individual absorption bands in special cases, is a drawback of the method.

  19. Optimization of the image reconstruction procedure in multi-focal photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Hongying; Wang, Depeng; Meng, Jing; Song, Liang; Ying, Leslie; Xia, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic-computed microscopy (PACM) differs from conventional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) imaging techniques in a way that thousands of optical foci are generated simultaneously using a two-dimensional microlens array, and raster-scanning these optical foci provides wide-field images. A major limitation of PACM is the slow imaging speed caused by the high power pulsed lasers and large amount of acoustic detectors. Here, we addressed this problem through compressed sensing and image inpainting. Compressed sensing minimizes the number of transducer elements used to acquire each frame, while inpainting minimizes the scanning steps. Combining these two approaches, we improved the imaging speed by sixteen times.

  20. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Using internal illumination with an optical fiber in the oral cavity, we demonstrate, for the first time, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) of the deep brain of rats in vivo. The experiment was performed on a full-ring-array PACT system, with the capability of providing high-speed cross-sectional imaging of the brain. Compared with external illumination through the cranial skull, internal illumination delivers more light to the base of the brain. Consequently, in vivo photoacoustic images clearly reveal deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  1. In vitro and ex vivo evaluation of silica-coated super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) as biomedical photoacoustic contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwi, Rudolf; Telenkov, Sergey A.; Mandelis, Andreas; Leshuk, Timothy; Gu, Frank; Oladepo, Sulayman; Michaelian, Kirk; Dickie, Kristopher

    2013-03-01

    The employment of contrast agents in photoacoustic imaging has gained significant attention within the past few years for their biomedical applications. In this study, the use of silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPION) was investigated as a contrast agent in biomedical photoacoustic imaging. SPIONs have been widely used as Food-and-Drug-Administration (FDA)-approved contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and are known to have an excellent safety profile. Using our frequency-domain photoacoustic correlation technique ("the photoacoustic radar") with modulated laser excitation, we examined the effects of nanoparticle size, concentration and biological medium (e.g. serum, sheep blood) on its photoacoustic response in turbid media (intralipid solution). Maximum detection depth and minimum measurable SPION concentration were determined experimentally. The detection was performed using a single element transducer. The nanoparticle-induced optical contrast ex vivo in dense muscular tissues (avian pectus) was evaluated using a phased array photoacoustic probe and the strong potential of silicacoated SPION as a possible photoacoustic contrast agent was demonstrated. This study opens the way for future clinical applications of nanoparticle-enhanced photoacoustic imaging in cancer therapy.

  2. Transurethral light delivery for prostate photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Photoacoustic imaging has broad clinical potential to enhance prostate cancer detection and treatment, yet it is challenged by the lack of minimally invasive, deeply penetrating light delivery methods that provide sufficient visualization of targets (e.g., tumors, contrast agents, brachytherapy seeds). We constructed a side-firing fiber prototype for transurethral photoacoustic imaging of prostates with a dual-array (linear and curvilinear) transrectal ultrasound probe. A method to calculate the surface area and, thereby, estimate the laser fluence at this fiber tip was derived, validated, applied to various design parameters, and used as an input to three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. Brachytherapy seeds implanted in phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo canine prostates at radial distances of 5 to 30 mm from the urethra were imaged with the fiber prototype transmitting 1064 nm wavelength light with 2 to 8 mJ pulse energy. Prebeamformed images were displayed in real time at a rate of 3 to 5 frames per second to guide fiber placement and beamformed offline. A conventional delay-and-sum beamformer provided decreasing seed contrast (23 to 9 dB) with increasing urethra-to-target distance, while the short-lag spatial coherence beamformer provided improved and relatively constant seed contrast (28 to 32 dB) regardless of distance, thus improving multitarget visualization in single and combined curvilinear images acquired with the fiber rotating and the probe fixed. The proposed light delivery and beamforming methods promise to improve key prostate cancer detection and treatment strategies. PMID:25734406

  3. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  4. A Combined Reconstruction Algorithm for Limited-View Multi-Element Photoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di-Wu; Xing, Da; Zhao, Xue-Hui; Pan, Chang-Ning; Fang, Jian-Shu

    2010-05-01

    We present a photoacoustic imaging system with a linear transducer array scanning in limited-view fields and develop a combined reconstruction algorithm, which is a combination of the limited-field filtered back projection (LFBP) algorithm and the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) algorithm, to reconstruct the optical absorption distribution. In this algorithm, the LFBP algorithm is exploited to reconstruct the original photoacoustic image, and then the SIRT algorithm is used to improve the quality of the final reconstructed photoacoustic image. Numerical simulations with calculated incomplete data validate the reliability of this algorithm and the reconstructed experimental results further demonstrate that the combined reconstruction algorithm effectively reduces the artifacts and blurs and yields better quality of reconstruction image than that with the LFBP algorithm.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging by using a bundle of thin hollow-optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, A.; Iwai, K.; Katagiri, T.; Matsuura, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a photoacoustic imaging system composed of a flexible bundle of thin hollow-optical fibers that enables endoscopic diagnosis. The hollow-fiber bundle involves 37 fibers with an inner diameter of 100 μm and the total diameter of the bundle is 1.2 mm. A laser beam for photoacoustic excitation is scanned at the input end of fiber bundle and therefore, no scanning mechanism is necessary at the distal end. In addition, owing to the small numerical aperture of hollow optical fibers, a high resolution image is obtained without using a micro-lens array at the end. By using the fiber bundle probe, photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels in the ovarian membrane of fish were successfully obtained with a laser fluence of around 2.8 mJ/cm2.

  6. Superconducting microphone for photoacoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Costa Ribeiro, P.; Labrunie, M.; Von der Weid, J.P.; Symko, O.G.

    1982-11-01

    A superconducting microphone has been developed for photoacoustic spectroscopy at low temperatures. The microphone consists of a thin mylar membrane coated with a film of lead whose motion is detected by SQUID magnetometer. For the simple set-up presented here, the limiting pressure sensitivity is 7.5 x 10/sup -14/ atmospheres/Hz/sup 1/2/.

  7. Accelerated high-resolution photoacoustic tomography via compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, Simon; Beard, Paul; Betcke, Marta; Cox, Ben; Huynh, Nam; Lucka, Felix; Ogunlade, Olumide; Zhang, Edward

    2016-12-01

    Current 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) systems offer either high image quality or high frame rates but are not able to deliver high spatial and temporal resolution simultaneously, which limits their ability to image dynamic processes in living tissue (4D PAT). A particular example is the planar Fabry-Pérot (FP) photoacoustic scanner, which yields high-resolution 3D images but takes several minutes to sequentially map the incident photoacoustic field on the 2D sensor plane, point-by-point. However, as the spatio-temporal complexity of many absorbing tissue structures is rather low, the data recorded in such a conventional, regularly sampled fashion is often highly redundant. We demonstrate that combining model-based, variational image reconstruction methods using spatial sparsity constraints with the development of novel PAT acquisition systems capable of sub-sampling the acoustic wave field can dramatically increase the acquisition speed while maintaining a good spatial resolution: first, we describe and model two general spatial sub-sampling schemes. Then, we discuss how to implement them using the FP interferometer and demonstrate the potential of these novel compressed sensing PAT devices through simulated data from a realistic numerical phantom and through measured data from a dynamic experimental phantom as well as from in vivo experiments. Our results show that images with good spatial resolution and contrast can be obtained from highly sub-sampled PAT data if variational image reconstruction techniques that describe the tissues structures with suitable sparsity-constraints are used. In particular, we examine the use of total variation (TV) regularization enhanced by Bregman iterations. These novel reconstruction strategies offer new opportunities to dramatically increase the acquisition speed of photoacoustic scanners that employ point-by-point sequential scanning as well as reducing the channel count of parallelized schemes that use detector arrays.

  8. Forward-viewing photoacoustic imaging probe with bundled ultra-thin hollow optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, A.; Iwai, K.; Katagiri, T.; Matsuura, Y.

    2016-07-01

    A photoacoustic imaging system composed of a flexible bundle of thin hollow-optical fibers is proposed for endoscopic diagnosis. In this system, a bundle of 127 hollow-optical fibers with an inner diameter of 100 μm was fabricated. The total diameter of the bundle was 2.1 mm, and the minimum bending radius was around 10 mm. Owing to the small numerical aperture of hollow optical fibers, a high resolution image was obtained without using a lens array at the distal end. In the imaging system, the hollow fibers in the bundle were aligned at the input end, so the hollow fibers were sequentially excited by linearly scanning the laser beam at the input end. Photoacoustic imaging systems consisting of the bundled fibers for excitation of acoustic wave and piezoelectric probes for detection of photoacoustic signals were built. By using the systems, photoacoustic images of blood vessels in the ovarian membrane of fish were taken to test the feasibility of the system. As a result, photoacoustic images of the vessel were successfully obtained with a laser fluence of around 6.6 mJ cm-2.

  9. Multi-acoustic lens design methodology for a low cost C-scan photoacoustic imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinni, Bhargava; Han, Zichao; Brown, Nicholas; Vallejo, Pedro; Jacobs, Tess; Knox, Wayne; Dogra, Vikram; Rao, Navalgund

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and implemented a novel acoustic lens based focusing technology into a prototype photoacoustic imaging camera. All photoacoustically generated waves from laser exposed absorbers within a small volume get focused simultaneously by the lens onto an image plane. We use a multi-element ultrasound transducer array to capture the focused photoacoustic signals. Acoustic lens eliminates the need for expensive data acquisition hardware systems, is faster compared to electronic focusing and enables real-time image reconstruction. Using this photoacoustic imaging camera, we have imaged more than 150 several centimeter size ex-vivo human prostate, kidney and thyroid specimens with a millimeter resolution for cancer detection. In this paper, we share our lens design strategy and how we evaluate the resulting quality metrics (on and off axis point spread function, depth of field and modulation transfer function) through simulation. An advanced toolbox in MATLAB was adapted and used for simulating a two-dimensional gridded model that incorporates realistic photoacoustic signal generation and acoustic wave propagation through the lens with medium properties defined on each grid point. Two dimensional point spread functions have been generated and compared with experiments to demonstrate the utility of our design strategy. Finally we present results from work in progress on the use of two lens system aimed at further improving some of the quality metrics of our system.

  10. Coregistered three-dimensional ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system for ovarian tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Andres; Guo, Puyun; Gamelin, John; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary M.; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-09-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers, with a five-year survival rate of only 30% or less. Current imaging techniques are limited in sensitivity and specificity in detecting early stage ovarian cancer prior to its widespread metastasis. New imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed to reduce the high mortality of this disease. One such promising technique is photoacoustic imaging. We develop a 1280-element coregistered 3-D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system based on a 1.75-D acoustic array. Volumetric images over a scan range of 80 deg in azimuth and 20 deg in elevation can be achieved in minutes. The system has been used to image normal porcine ovarian tissue. This is an important step toward better understanding of ovarian cancer optical properties obtained with photoacoustic techniques. To the best of our knowledge, such data are not available in the literature. We present characterization measurements of the system and compare coregistered ultrasound and photoacoustic images of ovarian tissue to histological images. The results show excellent coregistration of ultrasound and photoacoustic images. Strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea and low absorption from follicles, is demonstrated.

  11. Direct ultrasound to video registration using photoacoustic markers from a single image pose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Choti, Michael A.; Kang, Jin U.; Taylor, Russell H.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Fusion of video and other imaging modalities is common in modern surgical scenarios to provide surgeons with additional information. Doing so requires the use of interventional guidance equipment and surgical navigation systems to register the tools and devices used in surgery with each other. In this work, we focus explicitly on registering ultrasound with a stereocamera system using photoacoustic markers. Previous work has shown that photoacoustic markers can be used to register three-dimensional ultrasound with video resulting in target registration errors lower than the current available systems. Photoacoustic markers are non-collinear laser spots projected onto some surface. They can be simultaneously visualized by a stereocamera system and in an ultra-sound volume because of the photoacoustic effect. This work replaces the three-dimensional ultrasound volume with images from a single ultrasound image pose. While an ultrasound volume provides more information than an ultrasound image, it has its disadvantages such as higher cost and slower acquisition rate. However, in general, it is difficult to register two-dimensional with three-dimensional spatial data. We propose the use of photoacoustic markers viewed by a convex array ultrasound transducer. Each photoacoustic markers wavefront provides information on its elevational position, resulting in three-dimensional spatial data. This development enhances this methods practicality as convex array transducers are more common in surgical practice than three-dimensional transducers. This work is demonstrated on a synthetic phantom. The resulting target registration error for this experiment was 2.47mm and the standard deviations was 1.29mm, which is comparable to current available systems.

  12. Acoustic resonance phase locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-08-19

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell to generate a photoacoustic signal, the acoustic source having a source frequency; continuously measuring detection phase of the photoacoustic signal with respect to source frequency or a harmonic thereof; and employing the measured detection phase to provide magnitude and direction for correcting the source frequency to the resonance frequency.

  13. Biomedical photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Beard, Paul

    2011-08-06

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging, is a new biomedical imaging modality based on the use of laser-generated ultrasound that has emerged over the last decade. It is a hybrid modality, combining the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. In essence, a PA image can be regarded as an ultrasound image in which the contrast depends not on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, but its optical properties, specifically optical absorption. As a consequence, it offers greater specificity than conventional ultrasound imaging with the ability to detect haemoglobin, lipids, water and other light-absorbing chomophores, but with greater penetration depth than purely optical imaging modalities that rely on ballistic photons. As well as visualizing anatomical structures such as the microvasculature, it can also provide functional information in the form of blood oxygenation, blood flow and temperature. All of this can be achieved over a wide range of length scales from micrometres to centimetres with scalable spatial resolution. These attributes lend PA imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine, preclinical research and basic biology for studying cancer, cardiovascular disease, abnormalities of the microcirculation and other conditions. With the emergence of a variety of truly compelling in vivo images obtained by a number of groups around the world in the last 2-3 years, the technique has come of age and the promise of PA imaging is now beginning to be realized. Recent highlights include the demonstration of whole-body small-animal imaging, the first demonstrations of molecular imaging, the introduction of new microscopy modes and the first steps towards clinical breast imaging being taken as well as a myriad of in vivo preclinical imaging studies. In this article, the underlying physical principles of the technique, its practical

  14. Biomedical photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging, is a new biomedical imaging modality based on the use of laser-generated ultrasound that has emerged over the last decade. It is a hybrid modality, combining the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. In essence, a PA image can be regarded as an ultrasound image in which the contrast depends not on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, but its optical properties, specifically optical absorption. As a consequence, it offers greater specificity than conventional ultrasound imaging with the ability to detect haemoglobin, lipids, water and other light-absorbing chomophores, but with greater penetration depth than purely optical imaging modalities that rely on ballistic photons. As well as visualizing anatomical structures such as the microvasculature, it can also provide functional information in the form of blood oxygenation, blood flow and temperature. All of this can be achieved over a wide range of length scales from micrometres to centimetres with scalable spatial resolution. These attributes lend PA imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine, preclinical research and basic biology for studying cancer, cardiovascular disease, abnormalities of the microcirculation and other conditions. With the emergence of a variety of truly compelling in vivo images obtained by a number of groups around the world in the last 2–3 years, the technique has come of age and the promise of PA imaging is now beginning to be realized. Recent highlights include the demonstration of whole-body small-animal imaging, the first demonstrations of molecular imaging, the introduction of new microscopy modes and the first steps towards clinical breast imaging being taken as well as a myriad of in vivo preclinical imaging studies. In this article, the underlying physical principles of the technique, its practical

  15. Photoacoustic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional flow cytometry using scattering and fluorescent detection methods has been a fundamental tool of biological discoveries for many years. Invasive extraction of cells from a living organism, however, may lead to changes in cell properties and prevents the long-term study of cells in their native environment. Here, we summarize recent advances of new generation flow cytometry for in vivo noninvasive label-free or targeted detection of cells in blood, lymph, bone, cerebral and plant vasculatures using photoacoustic (PA) detection techniques, multispectral high-pulse-repetition-rate lasers, tunable ultrasharp (up to 0.8 nm) rainbow plasmonic nanoprobes, positive and negative PA contrasts, in vivo magnetic enrichment, time-of-flight cell velocity measurement, PA spectral analysis, and integration of PA, photothermal (PT), fluorescent, and Raman methods. Unique applications of this tool are reviewed with a focus on ultrasensitive detection of normal blood cells at different functional states (e.g., apoptotic and necrotic) and rare abnormal cells including circulating tumor cells (CTCs), cancer stem cells, pathogens, clots, sickle cells as well as pharmokinetics of nanoparticles, dyes, microbubbles and drug nanocarriers. Using this tool we discovered that palpation, biopsy, or surgery can enhance CTC release from primary tumors, increasing the risk of metastasis. The novel fluctuation flow cytometry provided the opportunity for the dynamic study of blood rheology including red blood cell aggregation and clot formation in different medical conditions (e.g., blood disorders, cancer, or surgery). Theranostics, as a combination of PA diagnosis and PT nanobubble-amplified multiplex therapy, was used for eradication of CTCs, purging of infected blood, and thrombolysis of clots using PA guidance to control therapy efficiency. In vivo flow cytometry using a portable fiber-based devices can provide a breakthrough platform for early diagnosis of cancer, infection and

  16. Slip-ring-based multi-transducer photoacoustic tomography system.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zijian; Li, Wenzhao; Li, Changhui

    2016-06-15

    Although the transducer array-based photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system provides fast imaging speed, its high cost and system complexity hinder its implementations. In this Letter, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the electrical slip ring was used to develop a PAT system that compromises the cost and the imaging speed. This system enables using multiple transducers to image the target simultaneously and continuously. In addition, it is versatile to use different transducers. The performance of this PAT system has been demonstrated by both phantom and in vivo animal experiments.

  17. Real-time photoacoustic imaging system for clinical burn diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Taiichiro; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Iwaya, Keiichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Sato, Shunichi; Iwai, Toshiaki

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a real-time (8~30 fps) photoacoustic (PA) imaging system with a linear-array transducer for burn diagnosis. In this system, PA signals originating from blood in the noninjured tissue layer located under the injured tissue layer are detected. The phantom study showed that thin light absorbers embedded in the tissue-mimicking scattering medium at depths of > 3 mm can be imaged with high contrast. The diagnostic experiments using rat burn models showed good agreements between the injury depths (zones of stasis) indicated by PA imaging and those by histological analysis. These results demonstrate the potential usefulness of the present system for clinical burn diagnosis.

  18. Optical-resolution photoacoustic endomicroscopy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Rao, Bin; Yao, Junjie; Yeh, Cheng-Hung; Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has become a major experimental tool of photoacoustic tomography, with unique imaging capabilities for various biological applications. However, conventional imaging systems are all table-top embodiments, which preclude their use in internal organs. In this study, by applying the OR-PAM concept to our recently developed endoscopic technique, called photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE), we created an optical-resolution photoacoustic endomicroscopy (OR-PAEM) system, which enables internal organ imaging with a much finer resolution than conventional acoustic-resolution PAE systems. OR-PAEM has potential preclinical and clinical applications using either endogenous or exogenous contrast agents. PMID:25798315

  19. Prognostic utility of coronary computed tomographic angiography

    PubMed Central

    Otaki, Yuka; Berman, Daniel S.; Min, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) employing CT scanners of 64-detector rows or greater represents a noninvasive method that enables accurate detection and exclusion of anatomically obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), providing excellent diagnostic information when compared to invasive angiography. There are numerous potential advantages of CCTA beyond simply luminal stenosis assessment including quantification of atherosclerotic plaque volume as well as assessment of plaque composition, extent, location and distribution. In recent years, an array of studies has evaluated the prognostic utility of CCTA findings of CAD for the prediction of major adverse cardiac events, all-cause death and plaque instability. This prognostic information enhances risk stratification and, if properly acted upon, may improve medical therapy and/or behavioral changes that may enhance event-free survival. The goal of the present article is to summarize the current status of the prognostic utility of CCTA findings of CAD. PMID:23809386

  20. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  1. Caveats on tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, Gillian; Panza, Giuliano; Artemieva, Irina; Bastow, Ian; Cammarano, Fabio; Evans, John; Hamilton, Warren; Julian, Bruce; Lustrino, Michele; Thybo, Hans; Yanovskaya, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Geological models of the mantle and its geodynamic evolution rely essentially on joint interpretations of published seismic tomography images and petrological/geochemical data. This approach tends to neglect the fundamental limitations of, and uncertainties in, seismic tomography and geochemistry. Counter-intuitively, teleseismic tomography cannot image the three-dimensional structure of the mantle. Tomography cannot determine with certainty the strengths of calculated anomalies, since the results depend on subjective choices of inversion parameters. However, anomaly strengths are still commonly translated directly into critical geological properties such as temperature, density, and convective motion with little justification. Tomography does not return thermal or geological information, but seismological parameters, and assumptions are required to translate these seismic results into other physical properties. Resolution- and error-assessment methods cannot encapsulate the true errors, and are insensitive to critical experimental limitations that invalidate parts of most derived structures. Much of Earth's mantle is unsampled by crossing seismic waves. One must know what regions are well sampled in order to understand which parts of published images are reliable and which are not. Other tomographic limitations and uncertainties involve theory, correcting for the crust, and choice of what background model to subtract to reveal anomalies. Methods do exist for retrieving absolute wave speeds, and not just differences from a starting model, and the former should be preferred. Finally, the selection of cross-sections for publication is subjective, and can give a misleading impression of the three-dimensional structure retrieved. It is common to overestimate the power of geochemistry to identify magma sources. Geochemistry is limited by our poor knowledge of the thermal structure of the mantle and the size and the distribution of geochemical and mineralogical

  2. Photoacoustic mammography capable of simultaneously acquiring photoacoustic and ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Asao, Yasufumi; Hashizume, Yohei; Suita, Takahiro; Nagae, Ken-Ichi; Fukutani, Kazuhiko; Sudo, Yoshiaki; Matsushita, Toshikazu; Kobayashi, Shuichi; Tokiwa, Mariko; Yamaga, Iku; Fakhrejahani, Elham; Torii, Masae; Kawashima, Masahiro; Takada, Masahiro; Kanao, Shotaro; Kataoka, Masako; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Toi, Masakazu

    2016-11-01

    We have constructed a prototype photoacoustic mammography system (PAM-02) capable of simultaneously acquiring photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) images. Each PA, US, and fused PA/US image can be acquired over a wide area of the breast using the scanning module of a US transducer, a PA detector, and optical prisms. The resolution of the PA images exhibits improvement from 2 to 1 mm compared to images acquired using our previous prototype. The maximum scan area of PAM-02 is 90 mm along the horizontal axis and 150 mm along the vertical axis. In a phantom experiment, the available depth was at least 45 mm. A representative example of the application of the PAM-02 prototype in clinical research at Kyoto University is presented and shows S-factor images, which are considered an approximation parameter related to hemoglobin saturation of tumor-related blood vessels. We confirmed the applicability of the system for anatomical and biological research.

  3. Photoacoustic mammography capable of simultaneously acquiring photoacoustic and ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asao, Yasufumi; Hashizume, Yohei; Suita, Takahiro; Nagae, Ken-ichi; Fukutani, Kazuhiko; Sudo, Yoshiaki; Matsushita, Toshikazu; Kobayashi, Shuichi; Tokiwa, Mariko; Yamaga, Iku; Fakhrejahani, Elham; Torii, Masae; Kawashima, Masahiro; Takada, Masahiro; Kanao, Shotaro; Kataoka, Masako; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Toi, Masakazu

    2016-11-01

    We have constructed a prototype photoacoustic mammography system (PAM-02) capable of simultaneously acquiring photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) images. Each PA, US, and fused PA/US image can be acquired over a wide area of the breast using the scanning module of a US transducer, a PA detector, and optical prisms. The resolution of the PA images exhibits improvement from 2 to 1 mm compared to images acquired using our previous prototype. The maximum scan area of PAM-02 is 90 mm along the horizontal axis and 150 mm along the vertical axis. In a phantom experiment, the available depth was at least 45 mm. A representative example of the application of the PAM-02 prototype in clinical research at Kyoto University is presented and shows S-factor images, which are considered an approximation parameter related to hemoglobin saturation of tumor-related blood vessels. We confirmed the applicability of the system for anatomical and biological research.

  4. Detection of ICG at low concentrations by photoacoustic imaging system using LED light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigeta, Yusuke; Agano, Toshitaka; Sato, Naoto; Nakatsuka, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hanaoka, Takamitsu; Morisono, Koji; Tanaka, Chizuyo

    2017-03-01

    Recently, various type of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) that can visualize properties and distribution of light absorber have been researched. We developed PAI system using LED light source and evaluated characteristics of photoacoustic signal intensity versus Indocyanine Green (ICG) concentration. In this experiment, a linear type PZT array transducer (128-elements, 10.0MHz center frequency) was used to be able to transmit and receive ultrasound and also detect photoacoustic signal from the target object. The transducer was connected to the PAI system, and two sets of LED light source that had 850nm wavelength chip array were set to the both side of the transducer. The transducer head was placed at a distance of 20 mm from the target in the water bath. The target object was a tube filled with ICG in it. The tubes containing ICG at concentrations from 300nanomolar to 3millimolar were made by diluting original ICG solution. We measured the photoacoustic signal strength from RF signal generated from the ICG in the tube, and the results showed that the intensity of the signal was almost linear response to the concentration in log-log scale.

  5. Photoacoustic tomography: principles and advances

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging imaging modality that shows great potential for preclinical research and clinical practice. As a hybrid technique, PAT is based on the acoustic detection of optical absorption from either endogenous chromophores, such as oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin, or exogenous contrast agents, such as organic dyes and nanoparticles. Because ultrasound scatters much less than light in tissue, PAT generates high-resolution images in both the optical ballistic and diffusive regimes. Over the past decade, the photoacoustic technique has been evolving rapidly, leading to a variety of exciting discoveries and applications. This review covers the basic principles of PAT and its different implementations. Strengths of PAT are highlighted, along with the most recent imaging results. PMID:25642127

  6. Nonionizing photoacoustic cystography in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulhong; Jeon, Mansik; Wang, Lihong V

    2011-09-15

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a novel and nonionizing process for bladder imaging in vivo, called photoacoustic cystography (PAC). Using a photoacoustic imaging system, we have successfully imaged a rat bladder filled with clinically used Methylene Blue (MB) dye. An image contrast of ~8 was achieved. Further, spectroscopic PAC confirmed the accumulation of MB in the bladder. Using a laser pulse energy of less than 1 mJ/cm² (1/20 of the ANSI safety limit), a deeply (1.2 cm) positioned bladder in biological tissues was clearly visible in the PA image. Our results suggest that PAC can potentially provide a nonionizing, relatively cheap, and portable tool for bladder mapping. Among our clinical interests, nonionizing PAC with an injection of MB can potentially monitor vesicoureteral reflux in children.

  7. Vibration-based photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Rajian, Justin R.; Wang, Pu; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging employing molecular overtone vibration as contrast mechanism opens a new avenue for deep tissue imaging with chemical bond selectivity. Here, we demonstrate vibration-based photoacoustic tomography with an imaging depth on the centimeter scale. To provide sufficient pulse energy at the overtone transition wavelengths, we constructed a compact, barium nitrite crystal-based Raman laser for excitation of 2nd overtone of C-H bond. Using a 5-ns Nd:YAG laser as pumping source, up to 105 mJ pulse energy at 1197 nm was generated. Vibrational photoacoutic spectroscopy and tomography of phantom (polyethylene tube) immersed in whole milk was performed. With a pulse energy of 47 mJ on the milk surface, up to 2.5 cm penetration depth was reached with a signal-to-noise ratio of 12.

  8. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  9. Photoacoustic characterization of ovarian tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Andres; Gamelin, John; Guo, Puyun; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers with a five-year survival rate of only 30%. Because current imaging techniques (ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET) are not capable of detecting ovarian cancer early, most diagnoses occur in later stages (III/IV). Thus many women are not correctly diagnosed until the cancer becomes widely metastatic. On the other hand, while the majority of women with a detectable ultrasound abnormality do not harbor a cancer, they all undergo unnecessary oophorectomy. Hence, new imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed for improving the specificity of ovarian cancer detection and characterization. One such technique is photoacoustic imaging, which has great potential to reveal early tumor angiogenesis through intrinsic optical absorption contrast from hemoglobin or extrinsic contrast from conjugated agents binding to appropriate molecular receptors. To better understand the cancer disease process of ovarian tissue using photoacoustic imaging, it is necessary to first characterize the properties of normal ovarian tissue. We have imaged ex-vivo ovarian tissue using a 3D co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system. The system is capable of volumetric imaging by means of electronic focusing. Detecting and visualizing small features from multiple viewing angles is possible without the need for any mechanical movement. The results show strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea, and low absorption from follicles. We will present correlation of photoacoustic images from animals with histology. Potential application of this technology would be the noninvasive imaging of the ovaries for screening or diagnostic purposes.

  10. Virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-07-01

    A virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy at 1064 nm wavelength (VISPAM) system was designed and fabricated by integrating a commercial type surgical microscope and laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) with a 1064 nm pulsed laser. Based on simple augmented reality device, VISPAM could simultaneously provide 2D depth-resolved photoacoustic and magnified microscope images of surgery regions on the same vision of surgeon via an eyepiece of the microscope. The invisible 1064 nm laser removed the interruption of surgical sight due to visible laser scanning of previous report, and decreased the danger of tissue damage caused by over irradiated laser. In addition, to approach the real practical surgery application, a needle-type transducer was utilized without a water bath for PA signal coupling. In order to verify our system's performance, we conducted needle guiding as ex vivo phantom study and needle guiding and injection of carbon particles mixtures into a melanoma tumor region as in vivo study. We expect that VISPAM can be essential tool of brain and ophthalmic microsurgery.

  11. Coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound correlation and imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-09-01

    Both photoacoustics and ultrasound have been researched extensively but separately. In this letter, we report an initial study on the coherent correlation between pulsed photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave. By illuminating an object with a pulsed laser and external ultrasound sequentially, both the endogenous photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave are received and coherently correlated, demonstrating enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. Image contrast of the proposed coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging is also demonstrated to be improved significantly on vessel-mimicking phantom, due to fusion of the optical absorption and ultrasound reflection contrasts by coherent correlation of either conventional laser-induced photoacoustic imaging or pulse-echo ultrasound imaging separately.

  12. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Analysis of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Zhao, Bin-xing; Xiao, Hong-tao; Tong, Rong-sheng; Gao, Chun-ming

    2013-09-01

    Chinese medicine is a historic cultural legacy of China. It has made a significant contribution to medicine and healthcare for generations. The development of Chinese herbal medicine analysis is emphasized by the Chinese pharmaceutical industry. This study has carried out the experimental analysis of ten kinds of Chinese herbal powder including Fritillaria powder, etc., based on the photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) method. First, a photoacoustic spectroscopy system was designed and constructed, especially a highly sensitive solid photoacoustic cell was established. Second, the experimental setup was verified through the characteristic emission spectrum of the light source, obtained by using carbon as a sample in the photoacoustic cell. Finally, as the photoacoustic spectroscopy analysis of Fritillaria, etc., was completed, the specificity of the Chinese herb medicine analysis was verified. This study shows that the PAS can provide a valid, highly sensitive analytical method for the specificity of Chinese herb medicine without preparing and damaging samples.

  13. Characterization of novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laoui, Samir

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid imaging modality that takes advantage of the high contrast of pure optical imaging and the high intrinsic resolution of ultrasound without the necessity of ionizing radiation. Photoacoustic imaging (PM) is neither purely optical nor purely acoustical in nature, but a combination of the two. It is fundamentally based on light excitation and ultrasonic detection. Photoacoustic imaging has been successful without the introduction of exogenous contrast agents; however, to image deeper regions of biological tissue, a contrast agent is necessary. Several types of photoacoustic contrast agents have been made available for diagnostic purposes; however, the majority of literature has focused on gold nanoparticle systems for which the surface-plasmon resonance effect is important. The only option currently available for molecular PM contrast agents is to choose an existing near infrared absorbing fluorescent probes with the hope that they may generate a substantial photoacoustic (PA) response. However, these dyes have been designed with an optimized fluorescence emission response and are not anticipated to generate an adequate photoacoustic response. This dissertation addresses this lack of precedence in the literature for understanding the mechanism of a photoacoustic signal generation from strongly absorbing dye molecules including BODIPY, cyanine and curcumin systems. This work represents preliminary efforts in bringing novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents (MPACs) into the photoacoustic imaging arena. To this end, photoacoustic and optical Z-scan experiments, and quenching studies were employed to demonstrate correlation of photoacoustic emission enhancement with excited state absorption mechanisms. To investigate further the photoacoustic emission in a practical imaging setting, MPACs were imaged using a recently developed photoacoustic imaging tomography system which was constructed exclusively for the purpose of this study.

  14. Photoacoustic Imaging with a Commercial Ultrasound System and a Custom Probe

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueding; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Hu, Changhong; Carson, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    Building photoacoustic imaging (PAI) systems by using stand-alone ultrasound (US) units makes it convenient to take advantage of the state-of-the-art ultrasonic technologies. However, the sometimes limited receiving sensitivity and the comparatively narrow bandwidth of commercial US probes may not be sufficient to acquire high quality photoacoustic images. In this work, a high-speed PAI system has been developed using a commercial US unit and a custom built 128-element piezoelectric-polymer array (PPA) probe using a P(VDF-TrFE) film and flexible circuit to define the elements. Since the US unit supports simultaneous signal acquisition from 64 parallel receive channels, PAI data for synthetic image formation from a 64 or 128 element array aperture can be acquired after a single or dual laser firing, respectively. Therefore, 2D B-scan imaging can be achieved with a maximum frame rate up to 10 Hz, limited only by the laser repetition rate. The uniquely properties of P(VDF-TrFE) facilitated a wide -6 dB receiving bandwidth of over 120 % for the array. A specially designed 128-channel preamplifier board made the connection between the array and the system cable which not only enabled element electrical impedance matching but also further elevated the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to further enhance the detection of weak photoacoustic signals. Through the experiments on phantoms and rabbit ears, the good performance of this PAI system was demonstrated. PMID:21276653

  15. High resolution functional photoacoustic tomography of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaoqi; Yao, Lei; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei; Heldermon, Coy D.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of functional photoacoustic tomography (fPAT) for high resolution detection and characterization of breast cancer and to demonstrate for the first time quantitative hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation images of breasts that were formed with model-based reconstruction of tomographic photoacoustic data. Methods: The study was HIPAA compliant and was approved by the university institutional review board. Written informed consents were obtained from all the participants. Ten cases, including six cancer and four healthy (mean age = 50 yr; age range = 41–66 yr), were examined. Functional images of breast tissue including absolute total hemoglobin concentration (Hb{sub T}) and oxygen saturation (StO{sub 2}%) were obtained by fPAT and cross validated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) readings and/or histopathology. Results: Hb{sub T} and StO{sub 2}% maps from all six pathology-confirmed cancer cases (60%) show clear detection of tumor, while MR images indicate clear detection of tumor for five of six cancer cases; one small tumor was read as near-complete-resolution by MRI. The average Hb{sub T} and StO{sub 2}% value of suspicious lesion area for the cancer cases was 61.6 ± 18.9 μM/l and 67.5% ± 5.2% compared to 25.6 ± 7.4 μM/l and 65.2% ± 3.8% for background normal tissue. Conclusions: fPAT has the potential to be a significant add-on in breast cancer detection and characterization as it provides submillimeter resolution functional images of breast lesions.

  16. Acceleration of tomographic hyperspectral restoration algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schau, Harvey C.

    2006-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging spectrometers have proven to be both versatile and powerful instruments with applications in diverse areas such as medical diagnosis, land usage, military target detection, and art forgery. In many applications scanning systems cannot be effectively employed and true "flash" operation is necessary. Multiplex systems have been developed which can gather information in multispectral bands simultaneously, and then produce a datacube after mathematical restoration. Such system enjoy compact size, robust construction, inexpensive costs and zero moving parts at the cost of highly complex mathematical restoration operations. Currently the limiting feature of such tomographic hyperspectral imagers such as the FMDIS [1,2] is the speed of restoration. Due to the large sizes of the restoration kernel, restorations are typically recursive and require many iterations to achieve satisfactory results. Little can be done to make the systems smaller since the size is determined by the number of colors and pixel size of the focal plane arrays (FPA) employed. Thus, techniques must be investigated to speed up the restoration either by reducing the number of iterations or reducing the number of operations within an iteration. It is assumed that little can be done to reduce the number of operations in an iteration since the operations are done in sparse format, we therefore investigate reducing the number of iterations through mathematical accelerations. We assume this acceleration will work to advantage regardless of the mechanism (PC-based or dedicated processor such as a gate array) by which the restoration is implemented.

  17. Hard X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomographic Nanoimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gorelick, S.; David, C.; Trtik, P.; Jefimovs, K.; Mokso, R.

    2011-09-01

    Synchrotron-based full-field tomographic microscopy established itself as a tool for noninvasive investigations. Many beamlines worldwide routinely achieve micrometer spatial resolution while the isotropic 100-nm barrier is reached and trespassed only by few instruments, mainly in the soft x-ray regime. We present an x-ray, full-field microscope with tomographic capabilities operating at 10 keV and with a 3D isotropic resolution of 144 nm recently installed at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source. Custom optical components, including a beam-shaping condenser and phase-shifting dot arrays, were used to obtain an ideal, aperture-matched sample illumination and very sensitive phase-contrast imaging. The instrument has been successfully used for the nondestructive, volumetric investigation of single, unstained cells.

  18. Ultrasound to video registration using a bi-plane transrectal probe with photoacoustic markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Kang, Hyun Jae; Zhang, Haichong K.; Taylor, Russell H.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-03-01

    Modern surgical scenarios typically provide surgeons with additional information through fusion of video and other imaging modalities. To provide this information, the tools and devices used in surgery must be registered together with interventional guidance equipment and surgical navigation systems. In this work, we focus explicitly on registering ultrasound with a stereo camera system using photoacoustic markers. Previous work has shown that photoacoustic markers can be used in this registration task to achieve target registration errors lower than the current available systems. Photoacoustic markers are defined as a set of non-collinear laser spots projected onto some surface. They can be simultaneously visualized by a stereo camera system and an ultrasound transducer because of the photoacoustic effect. In more recent work, the three-dimensional ultrasound volume was replaced by images from a single ultrasound image pose from a convex array transducer. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but the accuracy was lacking due to the physical limitations of the convex array transducer. In this work, we propose the use of a bi-plane transrectal ultrasound transducer. The main advantage of using this type of transducer is that the ultrasound elements are no longer restricted to a single plane. While this development would be limited to prostate applications, liver and kidney applications are also feasible if a suitable transducer is built. This work is demonstrated in two experiments, one without photoacoustic sources and one with. The resulting target registration error for these experiments were 1.07mm±0.35mm and 1.27mm+/-0.47mm respectively, both of which are better than current available navigation systems.

  19. Wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar imager (WM-DPARI): accurate monitoring of absolute hemoglobin oxygen saturation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Soo Sean; Lashkari, Bahman; Dovlo, Edem; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Accurate monitoring of blood oxy-saturation level (SO2) in human breast tissues is clinically important for predicting and evaluating possible tumor growth at the site. In this work, four different non-invasive frequency-domain photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities were compared for their absolute SO2 characterization capability using an in-vitro sheep blood circulation system. Among different PA modes, a new WM-DPAR imaging modality could estimate the SO2 with great accuracy when compared to a commercial blood gas analyzer. The developed WM-DPARI theory was further validated by constructing SO2 tomographic images of a blood-containing plastisol phantom. PMID:27446691

  20. Wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar imager (WM-DPARI): accurate monitoring of absolute hemoglobin oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Soo Sean; Lashkari, Bahman; Dovlo, Edem; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Accurate monitoring of blood oxy-saturation level (SO2 ) in human breast tissues is clinically important for predicting and evaluating possible tumor growth at the site. In this work, four different non-invasive frequency-domain photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities were compared for their absolute SO2 characterization capability using an in-vitro sheep blood circulation system. Among different PA modes, a new WM-DPAR imaging modality could estimate the SO2 with great accuracy when compared to a commercial blood gas analyzer. The developed WM-DPARI theory was further validated by constructing SO2 tomographic images of a blood-containing plastisol phantom.

  1. Tomographic imaging with polarized light.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Vadim Y; Zacharakis, Giannis; Spiliopoulos, George; Favicchio, Rosy; Correia, Teresa; Arridge, Simon R; Ripoll, Jorge

    2012-06-01

    We report three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of optical parameters for the mesoscopic light scattering regime from experimentally obtained datasets by using polarized light. We present a numerically inexpensive approximation to the radiative transfer equation governing the polarized light transport. This approximation is employed in the reconstruction algorithm, which computes two optical parameters by using parallel and perpendicular polarizations of transmitted light. Datasets were obtained by imaging a scattering phantom embedding highly absorbing inclusions. Reconstruction results are presented and discussed.

  2. Tomographic Neutron Imaging using SIRT

    SciTech Connect

    Gregor, Jens; FINNEY, Charles E A; Toops, Todd J

    2013-01-01

    Neutron imaging is complementary to x-ray imaging in that materials such as water and plastic are highly attenuating while material such as metal is nearly transparent. We showcase tomographic imaging of a diesel particulate filter. Reconstruction is done using a modified version of SIRT called PSIRT. We expand on previous work and introduce Tikhonov regularization. We show that near-optimal relaxation can still be achieved. The algorithmic ideas apply to cone beam x-ray CT and other inverse problems.

  3. Photoacoustic effect induced by negative luminescence device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, T.; Peura, J.; Matveev, B. A.; Remennyy, M. A.; Stus', N. M.

    2010-07-01

    The cantilever enhanced photoacoustic trace gas detection technique has been combined with mid-infrared light emitting diodes (LEDs) producing significant negative luminescence at a reverse bias. In contrast to normal positive photoacoustic phenomenon the negative luminescence of the LED creates wavelength specific cooling of the gas under study and pressure drop in the photoacoustic sample cell, which can be detected by a cantilever microphone. In experiments a LED operating at 5.5 μm wavelength range was used to detect acetone vapor.

  4. Handheld optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Pengfei; Xu, Song; Shi, Junhui; Li, Lei; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-04-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) offers label-free in vivo imaging with high spatial resolution by acoustically detecting optical absorption contrasts via the photoacoustic effect. We developed a compact handheld OR-PAM probe for fast photoacoustic imaging. Different from benchtop microscopes, the handheld probe provides flexibility in imaging various anatomical sites. Resembling a cup in size, the probe uses a two-axis water-immersible microelectromechanical system mirror to scan both the illuminating optical beam and resultant acoustic beam. The system performance was tested in vivo by imaging the capillary bed in a mouse ear and both the capillary bed and a mole on a human volunteer.

  5. Development of MEMS photoacoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Eichenfield, Matthew S.; Griffin, Benjamin; Harvey, Heidi Alyssa; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Langlois, Eric; Resnick, Paul James; Shaw, Michael J.; Young, Ian; Givler, Richard C.; Reinke, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    After years in the field, many materials suffer degradation, off-gassing, and chemical changes causing build-up of measurable chemical atmospheres. Stand-alone embedded chemical sensors are typically limited in specificity, require electrical lines, and/or calibration drift makes data reliability questionable. Along with size, these "Achilles' heels" have prevented incorporation of gas sensing into sealed, hazardous locations which would highly benefit from in-situ analysis. We report on development of an all-optical, mid-IR, fiber-optic based MEMS Photoacoustic Spectroscopy solution to address these limitations. Concurrent modeling and computational simulation are used to guide hardware design and implementation.

  6. Identification and removal of laser-induced noise in photoacoustic imaging using singular value decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Emma R.; Xia, Wenfeng; Clarkson, Matthew J.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-01-01

    Singular value decomposition (SVD) was used to identify and remove laser-induced noise in photoacoustic images acquired with a clinical ultrasound scanner. This noise, which was prominent in the radiofrequency data acquired in parallel from multiple transducer elements, was induced by the excitation light source. It was modelled by truncating the SVD matrices so that only the first few largest singular value components were retained, and subtracted prior to image reconstruction. The dependency of the signal amplitude and the number of the largest singular value components used for noise modeling was investigated for different photoacoustic source geometries. Validation was performed with simulated data and measured noise, and with photoacoustic images acquired from the human forearm and finger in vivo using L14-5/38 and L40-8/12 linear array clinical imaging probes. The use of only one singular value component was found to be sufficient to achieve near-complete removal of laser-induced noise from reconstructed images. This method has strong potential to increase image quality for a wide range of photoacoustic imaging systems with parallel data acquisition. PMID:28101402

  7. Identification and removal of laser-induced noise in photoacoustic imaging using singular value decomposition.

    PubMed

    Hill, Emma R; Xia, Wenfeng; Clarkson, Matthew J; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2017-01-01

    Singular value decomposition (SVD) was used to identify and remove laser-induced noise in photoacoustic images acquired with a clinical ultrasound scanner. This noise, which was prominent in the radiofrequency data acquired in parallel from multiple transducer elements, was induced by the excitation light source. It was modelled by truncating the SVD matrices so that only the first few largest singular value components were retained, and subtracted prior to image reconstruction. The dependency of the signal amplitude and the number of the largest singular value components used for noise modeling was investigated for different photoacoustic source geometries. Validation was performed with simulated data and measured noise, and with photoacoustic images acquired from the human forearm and finger in vivo using L14-5/38 and L40-8/12 linear array clinical imaging probes. The use of only one singular value component was found to be sufficient to achieve near-complete removal of laser-induced noise from reconstructed images. This method has strong potential to increase image quality for a wide range of photoacoustic imaging systems with parallel data acquisition.

  8. An interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging platform for the guidance of minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-07-01

    Precise and efficient guidance of medical devices is of paramount importance for many minimally invasive procedures. These procedures include fetal interventions, tumor biopsies and treatments, central venous catheterisations and peripheral nerve blocks. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used for guidance, but it often provides insufficient contrast with which to identify soft tissue structures such as vessels, tumors, and nerves. In this study, a hybrid interventional imaging system that combines ultrasound imaging and multispectral photoacoustic imaging for guiding minimally invasive procedures was developed and characterized. The system provides both structural information from ultrasound imaging and molecular information from multispectral photoacoustic imaging. It uses a commercial linear-array ultrasound imaging probe as the ultrasound receiver, with a multimode optical fiber embedded in a needle to deliver pulsed excitation light to tissue. Co-registration of ultrasound and photoacoustic images is achieved with the use of the same ultrasound receiver for both modalities. Using tissue ex vivo, the system successfully discriminated deep-located fat tissue from the surrounding muscle tissue. The measured photoacoustic spectrum of the fat tissue had good agreement with the lipid spectrum in literature.

  9. Investigation of effective system designs for transcranial photoacoustic tomography of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuhashi, Kenji; Schoonover, Robert W.; Huang, Chao; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) holds great promise for transcranial brain imaging. However, the strong reflection, scattering and attenuation of acoustic waves in the skull present significant challenges to developing this method. We report on a systematic computer-simulation study of transcranial brain imaging using PACT. The goal of this study was to identify an effective imaging system design that can be translated for clinical use. The propagation of photoacoustic waves through a model skull was studied by use of an elastic finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The acoustic radiation pattern from a photoacoustic source just beneath the skull was observed with a ring transducer array that was level with the source. The observed radiation pattern was found to contain stronger contributions from waves that were converted to shear waves in skull than longitudinal waves that did not undergo mode conversion. Images reconstructed from the pressure data that contain shear wave components possess better resolution than images reconstructed from the data that only contain the longitudinal wave signals. These observations revealed that the detection system should be designed to capture photoacoustic signals that travel through the skull in the form of shear waves as well as in the form of longitudinal waves. A preliminary investigation on the effect of the presence of absorption in the skull is also reported. This study provides an insight into the wave phenomena in transcranial PACT imaging, as well as a concrete detection design strategy that mitigates the degraded resolution of reconstructed images.

  10. Target detection and quantification using a hybrid hand-held diffuse optical tomography and photoacoustic tomography system

    PubMed Central

    Kumavor, Patrick D.; Xu, Chen; Aguirre, Andres; Gamelin, John; Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Zanganeh, Saeid; Alqasemi, Umar; Yang, Yi; Zhu, Quing

    2011-01-01

    We present a photoacoustic tomography-guided diffuse optical tomography approach using a hand-held probe for detection and characterization of deeply-seated targets embedded in a turbid medium. Diffuse optical tomography guided by coregistered ultrasound, MRI, and x ray has demonstrated a great clinical potential to overcome lesion location uncertainty and to improve light quantification accuracy. However, due to the different contrast mechanisms, some lesions may not be detectable by a nonoptical modality but yet have high optical contrast. Photoacoustic tomography utilizes a short-pulsed laser beam to diffusively penetrate into tissue. Upon absorption of the light by the target, photoacoustic waves are generated and used to reconstruct, at ultrasound resolution, the optical absorption distribution that reveals optical contrast. However, the robustness of optical property quantification of targets by photoacoustic tomography is complicated because of the wide range of ultrasound transducer sensitivity, the orientation and shape of the targets relative to the ultrasound array, and the uniformity of the laser beam. We show in this paper that the relative optical absorption map provided by photoacoustic tomography can potentially guide the diffuse optical tomography to accurately reconstruct target absorption maps. PMID:21529079

  11. Photoacoustic tomography imaging of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yixiong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Xu, Kexin; Zhang, Fan; Yao, Jianquan

    2005-01-01

    Non-invasive laser-induced photoacoustic tomography is attracting more and more attentions in the biomedical optical imaging field. This imaging modality takes the advantages in that the tomography image has the optical contrast similar to the optical techniques while enjoying the high spatial resolution comparable to the ultrasound. Currently, its biomedical applications are mainly focused on breast cancer diagnosis and small animal imaging. In this paper, we report in detail a photoacoustic tomography experiment system constructed in our laboratory. In our system, a Q-switched ND:YAG pulse laser operated at 532nm with a 10ns pulse width is employed to generate photoacoustic signal. A tissue-mimicking phantom was built to test the system. When imaged, the phantom and detectors were immersed in a water tank to facilitate the acoustic detection. Based on filtered back-projection process of photoacoustic imaging, the two-dimension distribution of optical absorption in tissue phantom was reconstructed.

  12. High-sensitivity photoacoustic leak testing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eric; Dowling, David R; Whelan, Timothy; Spiesberger, John L

    2003-10-01

    The photoacoustic effect may be exploited for the detection and localization of gas leaks from otherwise sealed components. The technique involves filling the test component with a tracer gas, and radiating the component to produce photoacoustic sound from any leak site where tracer gas is present. This paper describes demonstration experiments utilizing 10.6-micro radiation from a carbon-dioxide laser and sulfur hexafluoride as a tracer gas for photoacoustic leak testing at leak rates between 6 x 10(-5) cm3/s (1 cm3 in 4.6 h) and 5 x 10(-9) cm3/s (1 cm3 in 6.3 years). The technique may reach or exceed the capabilities of the most sensitive commercial leak test systems using helium mass-spectrometers. In addition, comparison of the measured results to a simple scaling law suggests that tracer gas cloud geometry influences the photoacoustic signal amplitude.

  13. Temperature mapping using photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Haixin; Erpelding, Todd N.; Jankovic, Ladislav; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) and thermoacoustic (TA) effects are based on the generation of acoustic waves after tissues absorb electromagnetic energy. The amplitude of the acoustic signal is related to the temperature of the absorbing target tissue. A combined photoacoustic and thermoacoustic imaging system built around a modified commercial ultrasound scanner was used to obtain an image of the target's temperature, using reconstructed photoacoustic or thermoacoustic images. To demonstrate these techniques, we used photoacoustic imaging to monitor the temperature changes of methylene blue solution buried at a depth of 1.5 cm in chicken breast tissue from 12 to 42 °C. We also used thermoacoustic imaging to monitor the temperature changes of porcine muscle embedded in 2 cm porcine fat from 14 to 28 °C. The results demonstrate that these techniques can provide noninvasive real-time temperature monitoring of embedded objects and tissue.

  14. Photoacoustic excitation profiles of gold nanoparticles☆

    PubMed Central

    Feis, Alessandro; Gellini, Cristina; Salvi, Pier Remigio; Becucci, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of the laser-induced photoacoustic signal amplitude has been measured for water dispersions of 10, 61, and 93 nm diameter gold nanospheres. The whole region of the localized surface plasmon resonance has been covered. This “photoacoustic excitation profile” can be overlayed with the extinction spectrum between 450 nm and 600 nm in the case of the smallest nanoparticles. At variance, the larger-sized nanoparticles display a progressive deviation from the extinction spectrum at longer wavelength, where the photoacoustic signal becomes relatively smaller. Considering that photoacoustics is intrinsically insensitive to light scattering, at least for optically thin samples, the results are in agreement with previous theoretical work predicting (i) an increasing contribution of scattering to extinction when the nanoparticle size increases and (ii) a larger scattering component at longer wavelengths. Therefore, the method has a general validity and can be applied to selectively determine light absorption by plasmonic systems. PMID:25302155

  15. Matched Field Tomographic Inversion for Geoacoustic Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Matched Field Tomographic Inversion for Geoacoustic Properties N.Ross Chapman School of Earth and Ocean Sciences University of Victoria PO Box 3055...sound propagation in shallow water. The long term goal of this work is to develop a new tomographic inversion method based on matched field processing of...broadband data for estimating geoacoustic properties over an extended region of the ocean bottom. OBJECTIVES Matched field tomographic inversion is a

  16. Photoacoustic imaging of the excited state lifetime of fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Laufer, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging using pump-probe excitation has been shown to allow the detection and visualization of fluorescent contrast agents. The technique relies upon inducing stimulated emission using pump and probe pulses at excitation wavelengths that correspond to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. By changing the time delay between the pulses, the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore is modulated to vary the amount of thermalized energy, and hence PA signal amplitude, to provide fluorophore-specific PA contrast. In this study, this approach was extended to the detection of differences in the excited state lifetime of fluorophores. PA waveforms were measured in solutions of a near-infrared fluorophore using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. The lifetime of the fluorophore solutions was varied by using different solvents and quencher concentrations. By calculating difference signals and by plotting their amplitude as a function of pump-probe time delay, a correlation with the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore was observed. The results agreed with the output of a forward model of the PA signal generation in fluorophores. The application of this method to tomographic PA imaging of differences in the excited state lifetime was demonstrated in tissue phantom experiments.

  17. Photo-acoustic tomography in a rotating measurement setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Moradifam, Amir

    2016-10-01

    Photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) aims to leverage the photo-acoustic coupling between optical absorption of light sources and ultrasound (US) emission to obtain high contrast reconstructions of optical parameters with the high resolution of sonic waves. Quantitative PAT often involves a two-step procedure: first the map of sonic emission is reconstructed from US boundary measurements; and second optical properties of biological tissues are evaluated. We consider here a practical measurement setting in which such a separation does not apply. We assume that the optical source and an array of ultrasonic transducers are mounted on a rotating frame (in two or three dimensions) so that the light source rotates at the same time as the US measurements are acquired. As a consequence, we no longer have the option to reconstruct a map of sonic emission corresponding to a given optical illumination. We propose here a framework where the two steps are combined into one and an absorption map is directly reconstructed from the available US measurements.

  18. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of Entamoeba histolytica strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Silva, E. F.; Orozco, E.; de Menezes, L. F.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of E. histolytica are studied using photoacoustic spectroscopy. It is shown that the pathogenic strain presents a spectrum similar to that of iron sulfur proteins. The non-pathogenic strain does not show any relevant absorption at the studied wavelength range. The differences observed between the optical absorption spectra of both strains opens the possibility of using photoacoustic spectroscopy as a reliable and simple technique to identify different types of E. histolytica strains.

  19. Multi-spectral photoacoustic elasticity tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yubin; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a spectrally resolved photoacoustic imaging method, namely multi-spectral photoacoustic elasticity tomography (PAET) for quantifying the physiological parameters and elastic modulus of biological tissues. We theoretically and experimentally examined the PAET imaging method using simulations and in vitro experimental tests. Our simulation and in vitro experimental results indicated that the reconstructions were quantitatively accurate in terms of sizes, the physiological and elastic properties of the targets. PMID:27699101

  20. Photoacoustic cell using elliptical acoustic focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heritier, J.-M.; Fouquet, J. E.; Siegman, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell has been developed in the form of an elliptical cylinder in which essentially all the acoustic energy generated by a laser beam passing down one axis is focused onto a cylindrical acoustic tranducer located along the other axis. Preliminary measurements on a liquid-filled cell of this design show high sensitivity and a notably clean impulse response. A similar design may be useful for photoacoustic measurements in vapors as well.

  1. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of β-hematin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, Edward B.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Custer, John R.; Beerntsen, Brenda; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Malaria affects over 200 million individuals annually, resulting in 800 000 fatalities. Current tests use blood smears and can only detect the disease when 0.1-1% of blood cells are infected. We are investigating the use of photoacoustic flowmetry to sense as few as one infected cell among 10 million or more normal blood cells, thus diagnosing infection before patients become symptomatic. Photoacoustic flowmetry is similar to conventional flow cytometry, except that rare cells are targeted by nanosecond laser pulses to induce ultrasonic responses. This system has been used to detect single melanoma cells in 10 ml of blood. Our objective is to apply photoacoustic flowmetry to detection of the malaria pigment hemozoin, which is a byproduct of parasite-digested hemoglobin in the blood. However, hemozoin is difficult to purify in quantities greater than a milligram, so a synthetic analog, known as β-hematin was derived from porcine hemin. The specific purpose of this study is to establish the efficacy of using β-hematin, rather than hemozoin, for photoacoustic measurements. We characterized β-hematin using UV-vis spectroscopy, TEM, and FTIR, then tested the effects of laser irradiation on the synthetic product. We finally determined its absorption spectrum using photoacoustic excitation. UV-vis spectroscopy verified that β-hematin was distinctly different from its precursor. TEM analysis confirmed its previously established nanorod shape, and comparison of the FTIR results with published spectroscopy data showed that our product had the distinctive absorbance peaks at 1661 and 1206 cm-1. Also, our research indicated that prolonged irradiation dramatically alters the physical and optical properties of the β-hematin, resulting in increased absorption at shorter wavelengths. Nevertheless, the photoacoustic absorption spectrum mimicked that generated by UV-vis spectroscopy, which confirms the accuracy of the photoacoustic method and strongly suggests that

  2. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of β-hematin

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Edward B.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Custer, John R.; Beerntsen, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Malaria affects over 200 million individuals annually, resulting in 800,000 fatalities. Current tests use blood smears and can only detect the disease when 0.1–1% of blood cells are infected. We are investigating the use of photoacoustic flowmetry to sense as few as one infected cell among 10 million or more normal blood cells, thus diagnosing infection before patients become symptomatic. Photoacoustic flowmetry is similar to conventional flow cytometry, except that rare cells are targeted by nanosecond laser pulses to induce ultrasonic responses. This system has been used to detect single melanoma cells in 10 ml of blood. Our objective is to apply photoacoustic flowmetry to detection of the malaria pigment hemozoin, which is a byproduct of parasite-digested hemoglobin in the blood. However, hemozoin is difficult to purify in quantities greater than a milligram, so a synthetic analog, known as β-hematin was derived from porcine haemin. The specific purpose of this study is to establish the efficacy of using β-hematin, rather than hemozoin, for photoacoustic measurements. We characterized β-hematin using UV-vis spectroscopy, TEM, and FTIR, then tested the effects of laser irradiation on the synthetic product. We finally determined its absorption spectrum using photoacoustic excitation. UV-vis spectroscopy verified that β-hematin was distinctly different from its precursor. TEM analysis confirmed its previously established nanorod shape, and comparison of the FTIR results with published spectroscopy data showed that our product had the distinctive absorbance peaks at 1661 and 1206 cm−1. Also, our research indicated that prolonged irradiation dramatically alters the physical and optical properties of the β-hematin, resulting in increased absorption at shorter wavelengths. Nevertheless, the photoacoustic absorption spectrum mimicked that generated by UV-vis spectroscopy, which confirms the accuracy of the photoacoustic method and strongly suggests that

  3. An adaptive filtered back-projection for photoacoustic image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, He; Bustamante, Gilbert; Peterson, Ralph; Ye, Jing Yong

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an improved filtered-back-projection (FBP) algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), which allows image reconstruction with higher quality compared to images reconstructed through traditional algorithms. Methods: A rigorous expression of a weighting function has been derived directly from a photoacoustic wave equation and used as a ramp filter in Fourier domain. The authors’ new algorithm utilizes this weighting function to precisely calculate each photoacoustic signal’s contribution and then reconstructs the image based on the retarded potential generated from the photoacoustic sources. In addition, an adaptive criterion has been derived for selecting the cutoff frequency of a low pass filter. Two computational phantoms were created to test the algorithm. The first phantom contained five spheres with each sphere having different absorbances. The phantom was used to test the capability for correctly representing both the geometry and the relative absorbed energy in a planar measurement system. The authors also used another phantom containing absorbers of different sizes with overlapping geometry to evaluate the performance of the new method for complicated geometry. In addition, random noise background was added to the simulated data, which were obtained by using an arc-shaped array of 50 evenly distributed transducers that spanned 160° over a circle with a radius of 65 mm. A normalized factor between the neighbored transducers was applied for correcting measurement signals in PAT simulations. The authors assumed that the scanned object was mounted on a holder that rotated over the full 360° and the scans were set to a sampling rate of 20.48 MHz. Results: The authors have obtained reconstructed images of the computerized phantoms by utilizing the new FBP algorithm. From the reconstructed image of the first phantom, one can see that this new approach allows not only obtaining a sharp image but also showing

  4. An adaptive filtered back-projection for photoacoustic image reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Bustamante, Gilbert; Peterson, Ralph; Ye, Jing Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an improved filtered-back-projection (FBP) algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), which allows image reconstruction with higher quality compared to images reconstructed through traditional algorithms. Methods: A rigorous expression of a weighting function has been derived directly from a photoacoustic wave equation and used as a ramp filter in Fourier domain. The authors’ new algorithm utilizes this weighting function to precisely calculate each photoacoustic signal’s contribution and then reconstructs the image based on the retarded potential generated from the photoacoustic sources. In addition, an adaptive criterion has been derived for selecting the cutoff frequency of a low pass filter. Two computational phantoms were created to test the algorithm. The first phantom contained five spheres with each sphere having different absorbances. The phantom was used to test the capability for correctly representing both the geometry and the relative absorbed energy in a planar measurement system. The authors also used another phantom containing absorbers of different sizes with overlapping geometry to evaluate the performance of the new method for complicated geometry. In addition, random noise background was added to the simulated data, which were obtained by using an arc-shaped array of 50 evenly distributed transducers that spanned 160° over a circle with a radius of 65 mm. A normalized factor between the neighbored transducers was applied for correcting measurement signals in PAT simulations. The authors assumed that the scanned object was mounted on a holder that rotated over the full 360° and the scans were set to a sampling rate of 20.48 MHz. Results: The authors have obtained reconstructed images of the computerized phantoms by utilizing the new FBP algorithm. From the reconstructed image of the first phantom, one can see that this new approach allows not only obtaining a sharp image but also showing

  5. Tomographic elastography of contracting skeletal muscles from their natural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Archer, Akibi

    2009-11-01

    Conventional elastography techniques require an external mechanical or radiation excitation to measure noninvasively the viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscles and thus monitor human motor functions. We developed instead a passive elastography technique using only an array of skin-mounted accelerometers to record the low-frequency vibrations of the biceps brachii muscle naturally generated during voluntary contractions and to determine their two-dimensional directionality. Cross-correlating these recordings provided travel-times measurements of these muscle vibrations between multiple sensor pairs. Travel-time tomographic inversions yielded spatial variations of their propagation velocity during isometric elbow flexions which indicated a nonuniform longitudinal stiffening of the biceps.

  6. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging: in vitro studies of magnetic trapping with simultaneous photoacoustic detection of rare circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chen-wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Jia, Congxian; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been demonstrated to be a promising modality in molecular imaging for detection of nanoparticle-targeted diseased cells or tissues. However, intrinsic absorbers, such as blood, produce strong PA background signals that severely degrade the detection sensitivity and specificity of targeted objects. Magnetomotive photoacoustic (mmPA) imaging, a newly developed molecular imaging modality, introduced dynamic manipulation into traditional PA imaging. Unlike conventional PA imaging, magnetomotive manipulation with simultaneous ultrasound/PA imaging of agents incorporating magnetic nanoparticles enables direct visualization of the signal generating object and can dramatically reduce background signals from strong optical absorbers. This paper briefly reviews recent developments in mmPA imaging, including uses of composite contrast agent, design of magnet system, and data processing for motion filtering. The use of mmPA imaging in detecting rare circulating tumor cells in blood vessels, which remains a big challenge for real-time in vivo examination using current methodologies, was also addressed. Fusion Images (ultrasound + photoacousitc) of manipulation of magnetic-gold nanorod contrast agent targeted polystyrene beads in ink solution flowing with a rate of 12 ml/min [1]. Images (a) and (b) were acquired with a cone magnet array at two different positions, and (c) is the differential image of (a) and (b). A bipolar color scale is used to display the sign of the difference. Triangles indicate the magnet positions. PMID:23420803

  7. Photoacoustic signal simulation and detection optimization based on laser-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Du, Yi; Zhao, Qingliang; Li, Qian; Chai, Xinyu; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2014-11-01

    Laser-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (LSOR-PAM) has a high application potential in ophthalmology and other clinical fields because of its high resolution and imaging speed. The stationary unfocused ultrasonic transducer of this system decides the efficiency and field of view (FOV) of photoacoustic signal detection, but the refraction and attenuation of laser generated photoacoustic signal in different tissue mediums will cause signal strength and direction distribution uneven. In this study, we simulated the photoacoustic signal propagation and detection in compound medium models with different tissue parameters using k-space method based on LSOR-PAM imaging principle. The results show a distance related signal strength attenuation and FOV changes related to transducer angle. Our study provides a method for photoacoustic signal detection optimization for different complex tissue structure with LSOR-PAM.

  8. Endobronchial Photoacoustic Microscopy for Staging of Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0183 TITLE: Endobronchial Photoacoustic Microscopy for Staging of Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Huabei...W81XWH-14-1-0183 Endobronchial Photoacoustic Microscopy for Staging of Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0183 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Photoacoustic imaging, photoacoustic microscopy, lung cancer 14. ABSTRACT This research is aimed at developing a new endoscopic

  9. Tomographic PIV: principles and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarano, F.

    2013-01-01

    A survey is given of the major developments in three-dimensional velocity field measurements using the tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The appearance of tomo-PIV dates back seven years from the present review (Elsinga et al 2005a 6th Int. Symp. PIV (Pasadena, CA)) and this approach has rapidly spread as a versatile, robust and accurate technique to investigate three-dimensional flows (Arroyo and Hinsch 2008 Topics in Applied Physics vol 112 ed A Schröder and C E Willert (Berlin: Springer) pp 127-54) and turbulence physics in particular. A considerable number of applications have been achieved over a wide range of flow problems, which requires the current status and capabilities of tomographic PIV to be reviewed. The fundamental aspects of the technique are discussed beginning from hardware considerations for volume illumination, imaging systems, their configurations and system calibration. The data processing aspects are of uppermost importance: image pre-processing, 3D object reconstruction and particle motion analysis are presented with their fundamental aspects along with the most advanced approaches. Reconstruction and cross-correlation algorithms, attaining higher measurement precision, spatial resolution or higher computational efficiency, are also discussed. The exploitation of 3D and time-resolved (4D) tomographic PIV data includes the evaluation of flow field pressure on the basis of the flow governing equation. The discussion also covers a-posteriori error analysis techniques. The most relevant applications of tomo-PIV in fluid mechanics are surveyed, covering experiments in air and water flows. In measurements in flow regimes from low-speed to supersonic, most emphasis is given to the complex 3D organization of turbulent coherent structures.

  10. Ovarian metastases: Computed tomographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Megibow, A.J.; Hulnick, D.H.; Bosniak, M.A.; Balthazar, E.J.

    1985-07-01

    Computed tomographic scans of 34 patients with ovarian metastases were reviewed to assess the radiographic appearances and to correlate these with the primary neoplasms. Primary neoplasms were located in the colon (20 patients), breast (six), stomach (five), small bowel (one), bladder (one), and Wilms tumor of the kidney (one). The radiographic appearance of the metastatic lesions could be described as predominantly cystic (14 lesions), mixed (12 lesions), or solid (seven lesions). The cystic and mixed lesions tended to be larger in overall diameter than the solid. The metastases from gastric carcinoma appeared solid in four of five cases. The metastases from the other neoplasms had variable appearances simulating primary ovarian carcinoma.

  11. Detecting both melanoma depth and volume in vivo with a handheld photoacoustic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Li, Guo; Zhu, Liren; Li, Chiye; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    We applied a linear-array-based photoacoustic probe to detect the tumor depth and volume of melanin-containing melanoma in nude mice in vivo. We demonstrated the ability of this linear-array-based system to measure both the depth and volume of melanoma through phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments. The volume detection ability also enables us to accurately calculate the rate of growth of the tumor, which is important in quantifying tumor activity. Our results show that this system can be used for clinical melanoma diagnosis and treatment at the bedside.

  12. Breast imaging using the Twente photoacoustic mammoscope (PAM): new clinical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; Ten Tije, Ellen; Xia, Wenfeng; van Hespen, Johan; Klaase, Joost; van den Engh, Frank; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-07-01

    Worldwide, yearly about 450,000 women die from the consequences of breast cancer. Current imaging modalities are not optimal in discriminating benign from malignant tissue. Visualizing the malignancy-associated increased hemoglobin concentration might significantly improve early diagnosis of breast cancer. Since photoacoustic imaging can visualize hemoglobin in tissue with optical contrast and ultrasound-like resolution, it is potentially an ideal method for early breast cancer imaging. The Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM) has been developed specifically for breast imaging. Recently, a large clinical study has been started in the Medisch Spectrum Twente in Oldenzaal using PAM. In PAM, the breast is slightly compressed between a window for laser light illumination and a flat array ultrasound detector. The measurements are performed using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, pulsed at 1064 nm and a 1 MHz unfocused ultrasound detector array. Three-dimensional data are reconstructed using a delay and sum reconstruction algorithm. Those reconstructed images are compared with conventional imaging and histopathology. In the first phase of the study 12 patients with a malignant lesion and 2 patients with a benign cyst have been measured. The results are used to guide developments in photoacoustic mammography in order to pave the way towards an optimal technique for early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  13. Photoacoustic biopsy: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Tomlins, Scott A.; Siddiqui, Javed; Davis, Mandy A.; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Wei, John T.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode the information associated with both physical microstructures and chemical contents in biological tissues. A two-dimensional physio-chemical spectrogram (PCS) can be formulated by combining the power spectra of PA signals acquired at a series of optical wavelengths. The analysis of PCS, or namely PA physio-chemical analysis (PAPCA), enables the quantification of the concentrations and the spatial distributions of a variety of chemical components in the tissue. The chemical components and their distribution are the two major features observed in the biopsy procedures which have been regarded as the gold standard of the diagnosis of many diseases. Taking non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and prostate cancer for example, this study investigates the feasibility of PAPCA in characterizing the histopathological changes in the diseased conditions in biological tissue. A catheter based setup facilitating measurement in deep tissues was also proposed and tested.

  14. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  15. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique’s benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument’s flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system. PMID:24887743

  16. Quantitative photoacoustic elastography in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Gong, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-06-01

    We report quantitative photoacoustic elastography (QPAE) capable of measuring Young's modulus of biological tissue in vivo in humans. By combining conventional PAE with a stress sensor having known stress-strain behavior, QPAE can simultaneously measure strain and stress, from which Young's modulus is calculated. We first demonstrate the feasibility of QPAE in agar phantoms with different concentrations. The measured Young's modulus values fit well with both the empirical expectation based on the agar concentrations and those measured in an independent standard compression test. Next, QPAE was applied to quantify the Young's modulus of skeletal muscle in vivo in humans, showing a linear relationship between muscle stiffness and loading. The results demonstrated the capability of QPAE to assess the absolute elasticity of biological tissue noninvasively in vivo in humans, indicating its potential for tissue biomechanics studies and clinical applications.

  17. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  18. Array signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Haykin, S.; Justice, J.H.; Owsley, N.L.; Yen, J.L.; Kak, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    This is the first book to be devoted completely to array signal processing, a subject that has become increasingly important in recent years. The book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1, which is introductory, reviews some basic concepts in wave propagation. The remaining five chapters deal with the theory and applications of array signal processing in (a) exploration seismology, (b) passive sonar, (c) radar, (d) radio astronomy, and (e) tomographic imaging. The various chapters of the book are self-contained. The book is written by a team of five active researchers, who are specialists in the individual fields covered by the pertinent chapters.

  19. Photoacoustic tomography of the human finger: towards the assessment of inflammatory joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, P.; Biswas, S. K.; Bernelot Moens, H. J.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory arthritis is often manifested in finger joints. The growth of new or withdrawal of old blood vessels can be a sensitive marker for these diseases. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has great potential in this respect since it allows the sensitive and highly resolved visualization of blood. We systematically investigated PA imaging of finger vasculature in healthy volunteers using a newly developed PA tomographic system. We present the PA results which show excellent detail of the vasculature. Vessels with diameters ranging between 100 μm and 1.5 mm are visible along with details of the skin, including the epidermis and the subpapillary plexus. The focus of all the studies is at the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints, and in the context of ultimately visualizing the inflamed synovial membrane in patients. This work is important in laying the foundation for detailed research into PA imaging of the phalangeal vasculature in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Photoacoustic imaging with planoconcave optical microresonator sensors: feasibility studies based on phantom imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenheim, James A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.

    2017-03-01

    The planar Fabry-Pérot (FP) sensor provides high quality photoacoustic (PA) images but beam walk-off limits sensitivity and thus penetration depth to ≍1 cm. Planoconcave microresonator sensors eliminate beam walk-off enabling sensitivity to be increased by an order-of-magnitude whilst retaining the highly favourable frequency response and directional characteristics of the FP sensor. The first tomographic PA images obtained in a tissue-realistic phantom using the new sensors are described. These show that the microresonator sensors provide near identical image quality as the planar FP sensor but with significantly greater penetration depth (e.g. 2-3cm) due to their higher sensitivity. This offers the prospect of whole body small animal imaging and clinical imaging to depths previously unattainable using the FP planar sensor.

  1. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated.

  2. All-optical endoscopic probe for high resolution 3D photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Zhang, E.; Desjardins, A. E.; Beard, P. C.

    2017-03-01

    A novel all-optical forward-viewing photoacoustic probe using a flexible coherent fibre-optic bundle and a Fabry- Perot (FP) ultrasound sensor has been developed. The fibre bundle, along with the FP sensor at its distal end, synthesizes a high density 2D array of wideband ultrasound detectors. Photoacoustic waves arriving at the sensor are spatially mapped by optically scanning the proximal end face of the bundle in 2D with a CW wavelength-tunable interrogation laser. 3D images are formed from the detected signals using a time-reversal image reconstruction algorithm. The system has been characterized in terms of its PSF, noise-equivalent pressure and field of view. Finally, the high resolution 3D imaging capability has been demonstrated using arbitrary shaped phantoms and duck embryo.

  3. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated. PMID:25069009

  4. A new approach to depict bone surfaces in finger imaging using photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S. K.; van Es, P.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-03-01

    Imaging the vasculature close around the finger joints is of interest in the field of rheumatology. Locally increased vasculature in the synovial membrane of these joints can be a marker for rheumatoid arthritis. In previous work we showed that part of the photoacoustically induced ultrasound from the epidermis reflects on the bone surface within the finger. These reflected signals could be wrongly interpreted as new photoacoustic sources. In this work we show that a conventional ultrasound reconstruction algorithm, that considers the skin as a collection of ultrasound transmitters and the PA tomography probe as the detector array, can be used to delineate bone surfaces of a finger. This can in the future assist in the localization of the joint gaps. This can provide us with a landmark to localize the region of the inflamed synovial membrane. We test the approach on finger mimicking phantoms.

  5. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-07-01

    Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated.

  6. Sono-photoacoustic imaging of gold nanoemulsions: Part II. Real time imaging

    PubMed Central

    Arnal, Bastien; Wei, Chen-Wei; Perez, Camilo; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Lombardo, Michael; Pelivanov, Ivan; Pozzo, Lilo D.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging using exogenous agents can be limited by degraded specificity due to strong background signals. This paper introduces a technique called sono-photoacoustics (SPA) applied to perfluorohexane nanodroplets coated with gold nanospheres. Pulsed laser and ultrasound (US) excitations are applied simultaneously to the contrast agent to induce a phase-transition ultimately creating a transient microbubble. The US field present during the phase transition combined with the large thermal expansion of the bubble leads to 20–30 dB signal enhancement. Aqueous solutions and phantoms with very low concentrations of this agent were probed using pulsed laser radiation at diagnostic exposures and a conventional US array used both for excitation and imaging. Contrast specificity of the agent was demonstrated with a coherent differential scheme to suppress US and linear PA background signals. SPA shows great potential for molecular imaging with ultrasensitive detection of targeted gold coated nanoemulsions and cavitation-assisted theranostic approaches. PMID:25893170

  7. Detecting abnormal vasculature from photoacoustic signals using wavelet-packet features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalev, Jason; Kolios, Michael C.

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic systems can produce high-resolution, high-contrast images of vascular structures. To reconstruct images at very high-resolution, signals must be collected from many transducer locations, which can be time consuming due to limitations in transducer array technology. A method is presented to quickly discriminate between normal and abnormal tissue based on the structural morphology of vasculature. To demonstrate that the approach may be useful for cancer detection, a special simulator that produces photoacoustic signals from 3D models of vascular tissue is developed. Results show that it is possible to differentiate tissue classes even when it is not possible to resolve individual blood vessels. Performance of the algorithm remains strong as the number of transducer locations decreases and in the presence of noise.

  8. Single laser pulse generates dual photoacoustic signals for differential contrast photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zhang, Ruochong; Liu, Siyu; Ding, Ran; Kishor, Rahul; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2017-04-04

    Photoacoustic sensing and imaging techniques have been studied widely to explore optical absorption contrast based on nanosecond laser illumination. In this paper, we report a long laser pulse induced dual photoacoustic (LDPA) nonlinear effect, which originates from unsatisfied stress and thermal confinements. Being different from conventional short laser pulse illumination, the proposed method utilizes a long square-profile laser pulse to induce dual photoacoustic signals. Without satisfying the stress confinement, the dual photoacoustic signals are generated following the positive and negative edges of the long laser pulse. More interestingly, the first expansion-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits positive waveform due to the initial sharp rising of temperature. On the contrary, the second contraction-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits exactly negative waveform due to the falling of temperature, as well as pulse-width-dependent signal amplitude. An analytical model is derived to describe the generation of the dual photoacoustic pulses, incorporating Gruneisen saturation and thermal diffusion effect, which is experimentally proved. Lastly, an alternate of LDPA technique using quasi-CW laser excitation is also introduced and demonstrated for both super-contrast in vitro and in vivo imaging. Compared with existing nonlinear PA techniques, the proposed LDPA nonlinear effect could enable a much broader range of potential applications.

  9. One dimensional wavefront sensor development for tomographic flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.; Pierson, R.; Chen, E.

    1995-08-01

    Optical diagnostics are extremely useful in fluid mechanics because they generally have high inherent bandwidth, and are non-intrusive. However, since optical probe measurements inherently integrate all information along the optical path, it is often difficult to isolate out-of-plane components in 3-dimensional flow events. It is also hard to make independent measurements of internal flow structure. Using an arrangement of one-dimensional wavefront sensors, we have developed a system that uses tomographic reconstruction to make two-dimensional measurements in an arbitrary flow. These measurements provide complete information in a plane normal to the flow. We have applied this system to the subsonic free jet because of the wide range of flow scales available. These measurements rely on the development of a series of one-dimensional wavefront sensors that are used to measure line-integral density variations in the flow of interest. These sensors have been constructed using linear CCD cameras and binary optics lenslet arrays. In designing these arrays, we have considered the coherent coupling between adjacent lenses and have made comparisons between theory and experimental noise measurements. The paper will present examples of the wavefront sensor development, line-integral measurements as a function of various experimental parameters, and sample tomographic reconstructions.

  10. Multicolor photoacoustic imaging by a single transducer with piezoelectric copolymer film in a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Miya; Tsujita, Kazuhiro; Bansaku, Isao; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    We built a photoacoustic tomographic (PAT) imaging system by scanning a single detector (φ 3.5 mm) made of piezoelectric copolymer poly(vinylidene difluoride-trifluoroethylene), P(VDF-TrFE), which had been fabricated for diagnostic photoacoustic measurement of cartilage tissues in our group. The PAT images of a phantom were obtained at two excitation wavelength of 687.5 nm and 795 nm. The phantom was made of agar including a black hair and agarose gels dissolving indocyanine green (ICG) and methylene blue (MB). Laser pulses (685-900 nm) were generated from a Ti:Sappire tunable laser to excite ICG and MB molecules. The PAT image at 687.5 nm shows signals due to all absorption sources. This is good agreement with dimension of the phantom. The PAT image at 795 nm shows a strong signal due to the ICG-dyed gel and almost no signal due to the MB-dyed gel. This result indicated that absorption sources were extracted by excitation wavelength according to their absorption spectra. The signal/noise ratio of the PAT images were compared between the P(VDF-TrFE) transducer in our group and a PZT transducer (Parametrics V309, 5 MHz, φ 12.7 mm) which is commercially available. The P(VDF-TrFE) transducer was more sensitive by 9 times (120 times per area) than the PZT transducer. By using this imaging system with a P(VDF-TrFE) transducer which is highly sensitive in a wide frequency range, we will achieve frequency analysis of the PAT images to associate photoacoustic waveforms with physical properties of sample tissues.

  11. Miniature photoacoustic chemical sensor using microelectromechanical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrino, Paul M.; Polcawich, Ronald G.; Firebaugh, Samara L.

    2004-08-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace gas detection. The technique also possesses favorable detection characteristics when the system dimensions are scaled to a micro-system design. The objective of present work is to incorporate two strengths of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and chemical and biological sensing into a monolithic MEMS photoacoustic trace gas sensor. A miniaturized macro-cell design was studied as a means to examine performance and design issues as the photoacoustics is scaled to a dimension approaching the MEMS level. Performance of the macro-cell was tested using standard organo-phosphate nerve gas simulants, Dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) and Diisoprpyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP). Current MEMS work centered on fabrication of a multi-layer cell subsystem to be incorporated in the full photoacoustic device. Preliminary results were very positive for the macro-cell sensitivity (ppb levels) and specificity indicating that the scaled cell maintains sensitivity. Several bonding schemes for a three-dimension MEMS photoacoustic cavity were investigated with initial results of a low temperature AuSn bond proving most feasible.

  12. Acoustic property measurements in a photoacoustic imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willemink, René G. H.; Manohar, Srirang; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdi; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2007-07-01

    Photoacoustics is a hybrid imaging technique that combines the contrast available to optical imaging with the resolution that is possessed by ultrasound imaging. The technique is based on generating ultrasound from absorbing structures in tissue using pulsed light. In photoacoustic (PA) computerized tomography (CT) imaging, reconstruction of the optical absorption in a subject, is performed for example by filtered backprojection. The backprojection is performed along circular paths in image space instead of along straight lines as in X-ray CT imaging. To achieve this, the speed-of-sound through the subject is usually assumed constant. An unsuitable speed-of-sound can degrade resolution and contrast. We discuss here a method of actually measuring the speed-of- sound distribution using ultrasound transmission through the subject under photoacoustic investigation. This is achieved in a simple approach that does not require any additional ultrasound transmitter. The method uses a passive element (carbon fiber) that is placed in the imager in the path of the illumination which generates ultrasound by the photoacoustic effect and behaves as an ultrasound source. Measuring the time-of-flight of this ultrasound transient by the same detector used for conventional photoacoustics, allows a speed-of-sound image to be reconstructed. This concept is validated on phantoms.

  13. Comparison study on the feasibility of photoacoustic power spectrum analysis in osteoporosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weizhen; Zhu, Yunhao; Feng, Ting; Wang, Huaideng; Yuan, Jie; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a progressive bone disease which is characterized by a decrease in the bone mass and deterioration in bone micro-architecture. In theory, photoacoustic (PA) imaging analysis has potential to obtain the characteristics of the bone effectively. Previous study demonstrated that photoacoustic spectral analysis (PASA) method with the qualified parameter slope could provide an objective assessment of bone microstructure and deterioration. In this study, we tried to compare PASA method with the traditional quantitative ultrasound (QUS) method in osteoporosis assessment. Numerical simulations of both PA and ultrasound (US) signal are performed on computerized tomographic (CT) images of trabecular bone with different bone mineral densities (BMDs). Ex vivo experiments were conducted on porcine femur bone model of different BMDs. We compared the quantified parameter slope and the broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) coefficient from the PASA and QUS among different bone models, respectively. Both the simulation and ex vivo experiment results show that bone with low BMD has a higher slope value and lower BUA value. Our result demonstrated that the PASA method has the same efficacy with QUS in bone assessment, considering PA is a non-ionizing, non-invasive technique, PASA method holds potential for clinical diagnosis in osteoporosis and other bone diseases.

  14. Photoacoustic imaging: consideration of bandwidth of ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yi; Xing, Da; Wang, Yi; Gu, Huaiming; Yang, Diwu; Chen, Qun

    2005-04-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is a potential and noninvasive medical imaging technology. It combines the advantages of pure optic imaging and pure ultrasound imaging. Photoacoustic signals induced by a short pulse laser cover a wide spectral range. We have explored the frequency spectrum of absorbers with different sizes and the influence of photoacoustic signals with different spectral components on photoacoustic imaging. The simulations and experiments demonstrated that the major frequency ranges of photoacoustic pressures of absorbers with diameters of ~cm, ~mm and hundreds of mm are about 20kHz~300kHz, 70kHz~2.5MHz and 400kHz~20MHz, respectively. The low spectral components of photoacoustic signals contribute to the non-boundary region of absorbers, and the high spectral components contribute to small structures, especially, to boundaries. It suggests that the ultrasonic transducers used to detect photoacoustic pressures should be designed and selected according to the frequency ranges of absorbers.

  15. Miniaturization of photoacoustic cell for smart endoscope to improve sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wadamori, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Ultrathin endoscopes, such as transnasal endo-scopes, have been developed to alleviate discomfort during diagnosis and therapy. However, their application to optional diagnostics is limited since many optional diagnostic instruments are designed to fit through larger side channels. The aim of this study was to develop a smart endoscope that can obtain various diagnoses based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. The photoacoustic process comprises complex energy conversions involving optical, thermal, and elastic processes. This work focused on the scaling potential of photoacoustic sensors. Photoacoustic sensors with two different volumes were developed, and the amplitudes and frequency responses of the photoacoustic signals for silicone rubbers with six different Young's moduli were investigated. The results showed that photoacoustic signals can be enhanced by reducing the volumes of the sensors. Embedding a miniaturized photoacoustic sensor in an endoscope was confirmed to improve the sensitivity.

  16. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  17. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  18. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  19. Multimodal photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography scanner using an all optical detection scheme for 3D morphological skin imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Edward Z.; Povazay, Boris; Laufer, Jan; Alex, Aneesh; Hofer, Bernd; Pedley, Barbara; Glittenberg, Carl; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Beard, Paul; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive, multimodal photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography (PAT/OCT) scanner for three-dimensional in vivo (3D) skin imaging is described. The system employs an integrated, all optical detection scheme for both modalities in backward mode utilizing a shared 2D optical scanner with a field-of-view of ~13 × 13 mm2. The photoacoustic waves were detected using a Fabry Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor placed on the surface of the skin. The sensor is transparent in the spectral range 590-1200 nm. This permits the photoacoustic excitation beam (670-680 nm) and the OCT probe beam (1050 nm) to be transmitted through the sensor head and into the underlying tissue thus providing a backward mode imaging configuration. The respective OCT and PAT axial resolutions were 8 and 20 µm and the lateral resolutions were 18 and 50-100 µm. The system provides greater penetration depth than previous combined PA/OCT devices due to the longer wavelength of the OCT beam (1050 nm rather than 829-870 nm) and by operating in the tomographic rather than the optical resolution mode of photoacoustic imaging. Three-dimensional in vivo images of the vasculature and the surrounding tissue micro-morphology in murine and human skin were acquired. These studies demonstrated the complementary contrast and tissue information provided by each modality for high-resolution 3D imaging of vascular structures to depths of up to 5 mm. Potential applications include characterizing skin conditions such as tumors, vascular lesions, soft tissue damage such as burns and wounds, inflammatory conditions such as dermatitis and other superficial tissue abnormalities. PMID:21833358

  20. Multimodal photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography scanner using an all optical detection scheme for 3D morphological skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Edward Z; Povazay, Boris; Laufer, Jan; Alex, Aneesh; Hofer, Bernd; Pedley, Barbara; Glittenberg, Carl; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Beard, Paul; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    A noninvasive, multimodal photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography (PAT/OCT) scanner for three-dimensional in vivo (3D) skin imaging is described. The system employs an integrated, all optical detection scheme for both modalities in backward mode utilizing a shared 2D optical scanner with a field-of-view of ~13 × 13 mm(2). The photoacoustic waves were detected using a Fabry Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor placed on the surface of the skin. The sensor is transparent in the spectral range 590-1200 nm. This permits the photoacoustic excitation beam (670-680 nm) and the OCT probe beam (1050 nm) to be transmitted through the sensor head and into the underlying tissue thus providing a backward mode imaging configuration. The respective OCT and PAT axial resolutions were 8 and 20 µm and the lateral resolutions were 18 and 50-100 µm. The system provides greater penetration depth than previous combined PA/OCT devices due to the longer wavelength of the OCT beam (1050 nm rather than 829-870 nm) and by operating in the tomographic rather than the optical resolution mode of photoacoustic imaging. Three-dimensional in vivo images of the vasculature and the surrounding tissue micro-morphology in murine and human skin were acquired. These studies demonstrated the complementary contrast and tissue information provided by each modality for high-resolution 3D imaging of vascular structures to depths of up to 5 mm. Potential applications include characterizing skin conditions such as tumors, vascular lesions, soft tissue damage such as burns and wounds, inflammatory conditions such as dermatitis and other superficial tissue abnormalities.

  1. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang; McClelland, John; Lu, Meng

    2014-04-21

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  2. Ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lidai; Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-11-15

    Blood flow speed is an important functional parameter. Doppler ultrasound flowmetry lacks sufficient sensitivity to slow blood flow (several to tens of millimeters per second) in deep tissue. To address this challenge, we developed ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy combining ultrasonic thermal tagging with photoacoustic imaging. Focused ultrasound generates a confined heat source in acoustically absorptive fluid. Thermal waves propagate with the flow and are directly visualized in pseudo color using photoacoustic computed tomography. The Doppler shift is employed to calculate the flow speed. This method requires only acoustic and optical absorption, and thus is applicable to continuous fluid. A blood flow speed as low as 0.24  mm·s(-1)} was successfully measured. Deep blood flow imaging was experimentally demonstrated under 5-mm-thick chicken breast tissue.

  3. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Krista; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Springeling, Geert; van Beusekom, Heleen M. M.; Oosterhuis, J. Wolter; van Soest, Gijs

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerotic plaque. We specifically imaged lipid content, a key factor in vulnerable plaques that may lead to myocardial infarction. An integrated intravascular photoacoustics (IVPA) and ultrasound (IVUS) catheter with an outer diameter of 1.25 mm was developed. The catheter comprises an angle-polished optical fiber adjacent to a 30 MHz single-element transducer. The ultrasonic transducer was optically isolated to eliminate artifacts in the PA image. We performed measurements on a cylindrical vessel phantom and isolated point targets to demonstrate its imaging performance. Axial and lateral point spread function widths were 110 μm and 550 μm, respectively, for PA and 89 μm and 420 μm for US. We imaged two fresh human coronary arteries, showing different stages of disease, ex vivo. Specific photoacoustic imaging of lipid content, is achieved by spectroscopic imaging at different wavelengths between 1180 and 1230 nm.

  4. Ultrasonically Encoded Photoacoustic Flowgraphy in Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidai; Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-11-01

    Blood flow speed is an important functional parameter. Doppler ultrasound flowmetry lacks sufficient sensitivity to slow blood flow (several to tens of millimeters per second) in deep tissue. To address this challenge, we developed ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy combining ultrasonic thermal tagging with photoacoustic imaging. Focused ultrasound generates a confined heat source in acoustically absorptive fluid. Thermal waves propagate with the flow and are directly visualized in pseudo color using photoacoustic computed tomography. The Doppler shift is employed to calculate the flow speed. This method requires only acoustic and optical absorption, and thus is applicable to continuous fluid. A blood flow speed as low as 0.24mm·s-1 was successfully measured. Deep blood flow imaging was experimentally demonstrated under 5-mm-thick chicken breast tissue.

  5. Early detection of dental caries using photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Witte, R.; Koh, I.; Ashkenazi, S.; O'Donnell, M.

    2006-02-01

    For decades, visual, tactile and radiographic examinations have been the standard for diagnosing caries. Nonetheless, the extent of variation in the diagnosis of dental caries is substantial among dental practitioners using these traditional techniques. Therefore, a more reliable standard for detecting incipient caries would be desirable. Using photoacoustics, near-infrared (NIR) optical contrast between sound and carious dental tissues can be relatively easily and accurately detected at ultrasound resolution. In this paper, a pulsed laser (Nd:YAG, Quanta-Ray) was used to probe extracted human molars at different disease stages determined from periapical radiographs. Both fundamental (1064nm) and first harmonic (532nm) pulses (15ns pulse length, 100mJ at fundamental and 9mJ at first harmonic , 10Hz pulse repetition rate) were used to illuminate the occlusal surface of tooth samples placed in a water tank. The photoacoustic signal was recorded with an unfocused wideband single-element piezoelectric transducer (centered at 12 MHz, bandwidth 15 MHz) positioned at small angle (less than 30 degrees) to the laser beam close to the occlusal surface. At the fundamental wavelength, total photoacoustic energy increases from normal to incipient stage disease by as much as a factor of 10. Differences between photoacoustic energy at the fundamental and first harmonic wavelength further indicate spectral absorption changes of the underlying structure with disease progression. Using a focused laser beam, an extracted molar with suspected incipient caries was scanned along the occulusal surface to help localize the caries inside enamel and dentin. The significantly increasing photoacoustic signal at a specific scan line both at fundamental and first harmonic indicates the local development of the incipient caries. The photoacoustic results compare well with visual inspection after layer by layer dissection. Preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of detecting incipient

  6. Investigation of photoacoustic spectroscopy for biomolecular detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswadi, Saher M.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Barsalou, Norman; Elliott, Rowe W.

    2006-02-01

    We are developing a non- or minimally-invasive method for detecting and measuring specific drugs and biomolecules in vivo using photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). This pilot study investigated the feasibility of detecting the concentration of certain drugs in the vitreous or aqueous of the eye. As a prototype for using PAS for molecular detection in vivo, the technique was applied to the detection in a surrogate eye, of drugs with known optical spectrum such as Trypan Blue, Rose Bengal, and Amphotericin B (AB), at concentrations as low as 1 μg/ml. Chopped CW, or short pulse, Q-switch lasers, were used as pumping sources to generate ultrasonic photoacoustic signals in an ocular phantom containing the drug solutions. In addition to an ultrasonic hydrophone, the photothermal deflection technique (PhDT), a non-contact optical method with high sensitivity and fast response, were used to record the photoacoustic signals. The data from both detectors were compared over a range of drug concentrations. The photoacoustic signal generated from the retina was used as a reference, to measure the attenuation of light through drug solutions of different concentrations in the ocular phantom. The results indicated that photoacoustic spectroscopy is feasible in ocular phantoms incorporating ex vivo ocular tissue. The signals recorded using PAS were to be found to be linearly dependent on drug concentration, as predicted by theory. The photoacoustic method was found to be sensitive to drug concentrations as low as 1 μg/ml, a clinically relevant concentration for many drugs. Future work will be directed at adapting this method for in vivo measurement, and enhancing its sensitivity by using a tunable laser as the pump source.

  7. Thermoacoustic and photoacoustic sensing of temperature.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Manojit; Wang, Lihong V

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel temperature-sensing technique using thermoacoustic and photoacoustic measurements. This noninvasive method has been demonstrated using a tissue phantom to have high temporal resolution and temperature sensitivity. Because both photoacoustic and thermoacoustic signal amplitudes depend on the temperature of the source object, the signal amplitudes can be used to monitor the temperature. A temperature sensitivity of 0.15 degrees C was obtained at a temporal resolution as short as 2 s, taking the average of 20 signals. The deep-tissue imaging capability of this technique can potentially lead us to in vivo temperature monitoring in thermal or cryogenic applications.

  8. Thermoacoustic and photoacoustic sensing of temperature

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Manojit; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel temperature-sensing technique using thermoacoustic and photoacoustic measurements. This noninvasive method has been demonstrated using a tissue phantom to have high temporal resolution and temperature sensitivity. Because both photoacoustic and thermoacoustic signal amplitudes depend on the temperature of the source object, the signal amplitudes can be used to monitor the temperature. A temperature sensitivity of 0.15°C was obtained at a temporal resolution as short as 2 s, taking the average of 20 signals. The deep-tissue imaging capability of this technique can potentially lead us to in vivo temperature monitoring in thermal or cryogenic applications. PMID:19895126

  9. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seunghoon Kim, Sehui Kim, Jeehyun E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu; Lee, Changho Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  10. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Changho; Kim, Sehui; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2013-11-01

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  11. Determination of Tequila Quality by Photoacoustic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Pérez, Atzin; Pérez-Castañeda, J. I.; Castañeda-Guzmán, R.; Pérez-Ruiz, S. J.

    2013-09-01

    A pulsed laser photoacoustic (PLPA) technique is proposed to distinguish original from adulterated tequila. In fact, it brings a reliable cheaper and more sensible method in adulteration detection, in comparison with traditional techniques. The method proposed is comparative and non-destructive, and it is based on a correlation analysis of photoacoustic signals, obtained by exciting tequila samples with short laser pulses (7 ns), in the UV region (355 nm). Eleven samples of tequila were analyzed. From a reference sample, all other samples were classified.

  12. Tomographic Imaging on Distributed Unattended Ground Sensor Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    around the next corner, what is upstairs, where is the person in a red jacket , or even what was the person in the red jacket doing 5 minutes ago...cameras and detectors to seismic , acoustic, magnetic, smoke, toxin, and temperature sensors. A working example of just such a network was developed at

  13. Tomographic inversion for ALIS noise and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Björn

    1998-11-01

    In this report the problems of resolution and noise sensitivity of tomographic reconstructions from ground-based multistation imaging of aurora with the auroral large imaging system (ALIS) are considered. ALIS is a ground-based grid of high-performance CCD-imaging stations at high latitudes. For evaluation of the resolution and noise sensitivity of current tomographic reconstruction procedures a full model simulation of the ALIS system is presented. The results show that relative errors are typically in the range 0.05-0.1 for typical noise levels in measurements of aurora. A general method to estimate resolution in a tomographic imaging system is developed and used to give estimates of the horizontal and vertical resolution. Its current limitations and future perspective are briefly discussed. A method to retrieve feasible tomographic reconstructions from a few image projections with variable noise level are outlined.

  14. Photoacoustic sensor for medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Marcus; Groninga, Hinrich G.; Harde, Hermann

    2004-03-01

    The development of new optical sensor technologies has a major impact on the progress of diagnostic methods. Of the permanently increasing number of non-invasive breath tests, the 13C-Urea Breath Test (UBT) for the detection of Helicobacter pylori is the most prominent. However, many recent developments, like the detection of cancer by breath test, go beyond gastroenterological applications. We present a new detection scheme for breath analysis that employs an especially compact and simple set-up. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS) represents an offset-free technique that allows for short absorption paths and small sample cells. Using a single-frequency diode laser and taking advantage of acoustical resonances of the sample cell, we performed extremely sensitive and selective measurements. The smart data processing method contributes to the extraordinary sensitivity and selectivity as well. Also, the reasonable acquisition cost and low operational cost make this detection scheme attractive for many biomedical applications. The experimental set-up and data processing method, together with exemplary isotope-selective measurements on carbon dioxide, are presented.

  15. Lifetime-weighted photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, A.; Shao, P.; Shi, W.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-12-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been utilized to quantify the lifetime profile of exogenous agents using a series of pump-probe pulses with a varying time delay; however, current techniques typically lead to long acquisition times which are sensitive to motion and cause absorption or photobleaching. We introduce a technique called lifetime-weighted imaging, which uses only three laser pulses to preferentially weight signals from chromophores with long lifetimes (including exogenous contrast agents with triplet excited states such as methylene blue and porphyrins) while nulling chromophores with short picosecond- to nanosecond-scale lifetimes (including hemoglobin). This technique detects the PA signal from a probe pulse either with or without a pump pulse. By subtracting the probe-only signal from the pump-present probe signal, we effectively eliminate signals from chromophores with short lifetimes while preserving PA signals from chromophores with long-lifetimes. We demonstrate the oxygen-dependent lifetime of both methylene blue and porphyrin-lipids and demonstrate both ground-state recovery and excited-state lifetime-weighted imaging. Lifetime-weighted PA imaging may have applications in many molecular imaging application including: photodynamic therapy dosimetry guidance and oxygen sensing.

  16. Fundus Camera Guided Photoacoustic Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tan; Li, Hao; Song, Wei; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of fundus camera guided photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) system and its multimodal imaging capabilities. Methods We integrated PAOM and a fundus camera consisting of a white-light illuminator and a high-sensitivity, high-speed CCD. The fundus camera captures both retinal anatomy and PAOM illumination at the same time to provide a real-time feedback when we position the PAOM illuminating light. We applied the integrated system to image rat eyes in vivo and used full-spectrum, visible (VIS), and near infrared (NIR) illuminations in fundus photography. Results Both albino and pigmented rat eyes were imaged in vivo. During alignment, different trajectories of PAOM laser scanning were successfully visualized by the fundus camera, which reduced the PAOM alignment time from several minutes to 30 s. In albino eyes, in addition to retinal vessels, main choroidal vessels were observed using VIS-illumination, which is similar to PAOM images. In pigmented eyes, the radial striations of retinal nerve fiber layer were visualized by fundus photography using full-spectrum illumination; meanwhile, PAOM imaged both retinal vessels and the retinal pigmented epithelium melanin distribution. Conclusions The results demonstrated that PAOM can be well-integrated with fundus camera without affecting its functionality. The fundus camera guidance is faster and easier comparing with our previous work. The integrated system also set the stage for the next-step verification between oximetry methods based on PAOM and fundus photography. PMID:24131226

  17. Photoacoustic microscopy of human teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin; Cai, Xin; Favazza, Christopher; Yao, Junjie; Li, Li; Duong, Steven; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Holtzman, Jennifer; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) utilizes short laser pulses to deposit energy into light absorbers and sensitively detects the ultrasonic waves the absorbers generate in response. PAM directly renders a three-dimensional spatial distribution of sub-surface optical absorbers. Unlike other optical imaging technologies, PAM features label-free optical absorption contrast and excellent imaging depths. Standard dental imaging instruments are limited to X-ray and CCD cameras. Subsurface optical dental imaging is difficult due to the highly-scattering enamel and dentin tissue. Thus, very few imaging methods can detect dental decay or diagnose dental pulp, which is the innermost part of the tooth, containing the nerves, blood vessels, and other cells. Here, we conducted a feasibility study on imaging dental decay and dental pulp with PAM. Our results showed that PAM is sensitive to the color change associated with dental decay. Although the relative PA signal distribution may be affected by surface contours and subsurface reflections from deeper dental tissue, monitoring changes in the PA signals (at the same site) over time is necessary to identify the progress of dental decay. Our results also showed that deep-imaging, near-infrared (NIR) PAM can sensitively image blood in the dental pulp of an in vitro tooth. In conclusion, PAM is a promising tool for imaging both dental decay and dental pulp.

  18. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for process analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is based on the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by analyte molecules. The absorbed energy is measured by detecting pressure fluctuations in the form of sound waves or shock pulses. In contrast to conventional absorption spectroscopy (such as UV/Vis spectroscopy), PAS allows the determination of absorption coefficients over several orders of magnitude, even in opaque and strongly scattering samples. Small absorption coefficients, such as those encountered during trace gas monitoring, can be detected with cells with relatively short pathlengths. Furthermore, PA techniques allow absorption spectra of solid samples (including powders, chips or large objects) to be determined, and they permit depth profiling of layered systems. These features mean that PAS can be used for on-line monitoring in technical processes without the need for sample preparation and to perform depth-resolved characterization of industrial products. This article gives an overview on PA excitation and detection schemes employed in analytical chemistry, and reviews applications of PAS in process analytical technology and characterization of industrial products.

  19. Tomographic Imaging: Visualization of the Unseeable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaochuan

    2009-03-01

    Tomographic imaging is a noninvasive approach to acquiring information within the subject under study, and it plays an increasingly important role in the improvement of health care by providing valuable information for diagnosis of diseases, for guidance of disease treatment and therapy, and for assessment/monitoring of treatment response. It has also found a wide variety of applications in other disciplines, ranging from molecular imaging to material sciences to security scan to paleontology. Over the last 30 years, biomedical imaging has involved into an important discipline in its own right. Physics and mathematics form the foundation of advanced tomographic imaging. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represent two well-known tomographic imaging modalities. In this talk, I will first introduce the basic physics and mathematics principles on which some of the advanced tomographic imaging techniques such as CT are based, with an emphasis on what and how physical signals are detected, how they are used for producing images, and what physical information is that can be extracted from these images. I will then touch upon some of the recent exciting advances in tomographic imaging technology, followed by a brief discussion of some of the important applications of advanced tomographic imaging in medicine and other areas.

  20. Imaging breast lesions using the Twente photoacoustic mammoscope: ongoing clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijblom, M.; Piras, D.; Xia, W.; van Hespen, J. C. G.; van den Engh, F. M.; Klaase, J. M.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2012-02-01

    Current imaging modalities are often not able to detect early stages of breast cancer with high imaging contrast. Visualizing malignancy-associated increased hemoglobin concentrations might improve breast cancer diagnosis. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize hemoglobin in tissue with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, which makes it potentially ideal for breast imaging. The Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM) has been designed specifically for this purpose. Based on a successful pilot study in 2007, a large clinical study using PAM has been started in December 2010. PAM uses a pulsed Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm to illuminate a region of interest on the breast. Photoacoustic signals are detected with a 1MHz, unfocused ultrasound detector array. Three dimensional data are reconstructed using an acoustic backprojection algorithm. Those reconstructed images are compared with conventional imaging and histopathology. In the first phase of the study, the goal was to optimize the visualization of malignancies. We performed sixteen technically acceptable measurements on confined breast malignancies. In the reconstructed volumes of all malignancies, a confined high contrast region could be identified at the expected lesion depth. After ten successful measurements, the illumination area was increased and the fluence was substantially decreased. This caused a further significant increase in PAM lesion contrast.

  1. Photoacoustic tomography: applications for atherosclerosis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a debilitating condition that increases a patient’s risk for intermittent claudication, limb amputation, myocardial infarction, and stroke, thereby causing approximately 50% of deaths in the western world. Current diagnostic imaging techniques, such as ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and optical imaging remain suboptimal for detecting development of early stage plaques. This is largely due to the lack of compositional information, penetration depth, and/or clinical efficiency of these traditional imaging techniques. Photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising modality that could address some of these limitations to improve the diagnosis and characterization of atherosclerosis-related diseases. Photoacoustic imaging uses near-infrared light to induce acoustic waves, which can be used to recreate compositional images of tissue. Recent developments in photoacoustic techniques show its potential in noninvasively characterizing atherosclerotic plaques deeper than traditional optical imaging approaches. In this review, we discuss the significance and development of atherosclerosis, current and novel clinical diagnostic methods, and recent works that highlight the potential of photoacoustic imaging for both experimental and clinical studies of atherosclerosis.

  2. Texture generation in compressional photoacoustic elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, J. W.; Zabihian, B.; Widlak, T.; Glatz, T.; Liu, M.; Drexler, W.; Scherzer, O.

    2015-03-01

    Elastography is implemented by applying a mechanical force to a specimen and visualizing the resulting displacement. As a basis of elastographic imaging typically ultrasound, optical coherence tomography or magnetic resonance imaging are used. Photoacoustics has not been viewed as a primary imaging modality for elastography, but only as a complementary method to enhance the contrast in ultrasound elastography. The reason is that photoacoustics is considered speckle free [3], which hinders application of speckle tracking algorithms. However, while conventional ultrasound only uses a single frequency, photoacoustics utilizes a broad frequency spectrum. We are therefore able to generate artificial texture by using a frequency band limited part of the recorded data. In this work we try to assess the applicability of this technique to photoacoustic tomography. We use Agar phantoms with predefined Young's moduli and laterally apply a 50μm static compression. Pre- and post compression data are recorded via a Fabry Pérot interferometer planar sensor setup and reconstructed via a non-uniform-FFT reconstruction algorithm. A displacement vector field, between pre- and post compressed data is then determined via optical flow algorithms. While the implementation of texture generation during post processing reduces image quality overall, it turns out that it improves the detection of moving patterns and is therefore better suited for elastography.

  3. Photoacoustic generation by multiple picosecond pulse excitation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tan; Wang, Jing; Petrov, Georgi I; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Zhang, Hao F

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that higher amplitude of ultrashort laser induced photoacoustic signal can be achieved by multiple-pulse excitation when the temporal duration of the pulse train is less than the minimum of the medium's thermal relaxation time and stress relaxation time. Thus, improved signal-to-noise ratio can thus be attained through multiple-pulse excitation while minimizing the energy of each pulse. The authors used a Michelson interferometer together with a picoseconds laser system to introduce two 6 ps pulses separated by a controllable delay by introducing a path length difference between the two arms of the interferometer. The authors then employed a series of three interferometers to create a pulse train consisting of eight pulses. The average pulse energy was 11 nJ and the temporal span of the pulse train was less than 1 ns. The detected peak-to-peak amplitude of the multiple-pulse induced photoacoustic waves were linearly dependent on the number of pulses in the pulse train and such a linearity held for different optical absorption coefficients. The signal-to-noise ratio improved when the number of pulses increased. Moreover, nonlinear effects were not detected and no photoacoustic saturation effect was observed. The authors have shown that multiple-pulse excitation improves the signal-to-noise ratio through an accumulated energy deposition effect. This method is invaluable for photoacoustic measurements that require ultrashort laser pulses with minimized pulse energy to avoid laser damage.

  4. Dual-wavelengths photoacoustic temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yu; Jian, Xiaohua; Dong, Fenglin; Cui, Yaoyao

    2017-02-01

    Thermal therapy is an approach applied in cancer treatment by heating local tissue to kill the tumor cells, which requires a high sensitivity of temperature monitoring during therapy. Current clinical methods like fMRI near infrared or ultrasound for temperature measurement still have limitations on penetration depth or sensitivity. Photoacoustic temperature sensing is a newly developed temperature sensing method that has a potential to be applied in thermal therapy, which usually employs a single wavelength laser for signal generating and temperature detecting. Because of the system disturbances including laser intensity, ambient temperature and complexity of target, the accidental errors of measurement is unavoidable. For solving these problems, we proposed a new method of photoacoustic temperature sensing by using two wavelengths to reduce random error and increase the measurement accuracy in this paper. Firstly a brief theoretical analysis was deduced. Then in the experiment, a temperature measurement resolution of about 1° in the range of 23-48° in ex vivo pig blood was achieved, and an obvious decrease of absolute error was observed with averagely 1.7° in single wavelength pattern while nearly 1° in dual-wavelengths pattern. The obtained results indicates that dual-wavelengths photoacoustic sensing of temperature is able to reduce random error and improve accuracy of measuring, which could be a more efficient method for photoacoustic temperature sensing in thermal therapy of tumor.

  5. Photoacoustic radiation force on a microbubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkol, Hakan; Aytac-Kipergil, Esra; Unlu, Mehmet Burcin

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the radiation force on a microbubble due to the photoacoustic wave which is generated by using a pulsed laser. In particular, we focus on the dependence of pulsed laser parameters on the radiation force. In order to do so, we first obtain a new and comprehensive analytical solution to the photoacoustic wave equation based on the Fourier transform for various absorption profiles. Then, we write an expression of the radiation force containing explicit laser parameters, pulse duration, and beamwidth of the laser. Furthermore, we calculate the primary radiation force acting on a microbubble. We show that laser parameters and the position of the microbubble relative to a photoacoustic source have a considerable effect on the primary radiation force. By means of recent developments in laser technologies that render tunability of pulse duration and repetition frequency possible, an adjustable radiation force can be applied to microbubbles. High spatial control of applied force is ensured on account of smaller focal spots achievable by focused optics. In this context, conventional piezoelectric acoustic source applications could be surpassed. In addition, it is possible to increase the radiation force by making source wavelength with the absorption peak of absorber concurrent. The application of photoacoustic radiation force can open a cache of opportunities such as manipulation of microbubbles used as contrast agents and as carrier vehicles for drugs and genes with a desired force along with in vivo applications.

  6. Photoacoustic characterization of human ovarian tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Andres; Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Sanders, Mary M.; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2010-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has a five-year survival rate of only 30%, which represents the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers. The reason for that is that the current imaging techniques are not capable of detecting ovarian cancer early. Therefore, new imaging techniques, like photoacoustic imaging, that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed for improving the specificity of ovarian cancer detection and characterization. Using a coregistered photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system we have studied thirty-one human ovaries ex vivo, including normal and diseased. In order to compare the photoacoustic imaging results from all the ovaries, a new parameter using the RF data has been derived. The preliminary results show higher optical absorption for abnormal and malignant ovaries than for normal postmenopausal ones. To estimate the quantitative optical absorption properties of the ovaries, additional ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography images have been acquired. Good agreement between the two techniques has been observed. These results demonstrate the potential of a co-registered photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  7. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  8. Snowpack permittivity profile retrieval from tomographic SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekioua, Badreddine; Davy, Matthieu; Ferro-Famil, Laurent; Tebaldini, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with 3D structure characterization and permittivity profile retrieval of snowpacks by tomographic SAR data processing. The acquisition system is a very high resolution ground based SAR system, developed and operated by the SAPHIR team, of IETR, University of Rennes-1 (France). It consists mainly of a vector network analyser and a multi-static antenna system, moving along two orthogonal directions, so as to obtain a two-dimensional synthetic array. Data were acquired during the AlpSAR campaign carried by the European Space Agency and led by ENVEO. In this study, tomographic imaging is performed using Time Domain Back Projection and consists in coherently combining the different recorded backscatter contributions. The assumption of free-space propagation during the focusing process is discussed and illustrated by focusing experimental data. An iterative method for estimating true refractive indices of the snow layers is presented. The antenna pattern is also compensated for. The obtained tomograms after refractive index correction are compared to the stratigraphy of the observed snowpack.

  9. Photoacoustic spectral characterization of perfluorocarbon droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Perfluorocarbon droplets containing optical absorbing nanoparticles have been developed for use as theranostic agents (for both imaging and therapy) and as dual-mode contrast agents. Droplets can be used as photoacoustic contrast agents, vaporized via optical irradiation, then the resulting bubbles can be used as ultrasound imaging and therapeutic agents. The photoacoustic signals from micron-sized droplets containing silica coated gold nanospheres were measured using ultra-high frequencies (100-1000 MHz). The spectra of droplets embedded in a gelatin phantom were compared to a theoretical model which calculates the pressure wave from a spherical homogenous liquid undergoing thermoelastic expansion resulting from laser absorption. The location of the spectral features of the theoretical model and experimental spectra were in agreement after accounting for increases in the droplet sound speed with frequency. The agreement between experiment and model indicate that droplets (which have negligible optical absorption in the visible and infrared spectra by themselves) emitted pressure waves related to the droplet composition and size, and was independent of the physical characteristics of the optical absorbing nanoparticles. The diameter of individual droplets was calculated using three independent methods: the time domain photoacoustic signal, the time domain pulse echo ultrasound signal, and a fit to the photoacoustic model, then compared to the diameter as measured by optical microscopy. It was found the photoacoustic and ultrasound methods calculated diameters an average of 2.6% of each other, and 8.8% lower than that measured using optical microscopy. The discrepancy between the calculated diameters and the optical measurements may be due to the difficulty in resolving the droplet edges after being embedded in the translucent gelatin medium.

  10. Photoacoustic sample vessel and method of elevated pressure operation

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, Tom; Yonker, Clement R.

    2004-05-04

    An improved photoacoustic vessel and method of photoacoustic analysis. The photoacoustic sample vessel comprises an acoustic detector, an acoustic couplant, and an acoustic coupler having a chamber for holding the acoustic couplant and a sample. The acoustic couplant is selected from the group consisting of liquid, solid, and combinations thereof. Passing electromagnetic energy through the sample generates an acoustic signal within the sample, whereby the acoustic signal propagates through the sample to and through the acoustic couplant to the acoustic detector.

  11. Feasibility of Prostate Cancer Diagnosis by Transrectal Photoacoustic Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    11-1-0232 TITLE: Feasibility of Prostate Cancer Diagnosis by Transrectal Photoacoustic Imaging PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Hanli Liu... Photoacoustic Imaging Hanli Liu University of Texas at Arlington Arlington, TX 76019 There is no effective imaging tool currently available for prostate... photoacoustic (PA) imaging [4]. It has been reported that the ratio of the imaging depth to spatial resolution can reach to ~100 for PA techniques

  12. Photoacoustic Doppler flow measurement in optically scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2007-12-01

    We recently observed the photoacoustic Doppler effect from flowing small light-absorbing particles. Here, we apply the effect to measure blood-mimicking fluid flow in an optically scattering medium. The light scattering in the medium decreases the amplitude of the photoacoustic Doppler signal but does not affect either the magnitude or the directional discrimination of the photoacoustic Doppler shift. This technology may hold promise for a new Doppler method for measuring blood flow in microcirculation with high sensitivity.

  13. Characterization of photoacoustic tomography system with dual illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutani, Kazuhiko; Someda, Yasuhiro; Taku, Masakazu; Asao, Yasufumi; Kobayashi, Shuichi; Yagi, Takayuki; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Sugie, Tomoharu; Toi, Masakazu

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we characterized a newly developed imaging system, "dual illumination mode photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system". The PAT system can simultaneously or separately illuminate biological tissues from a forward and backward direction toward an array transducer. The shape of the custom-made transducer is rectangular, which allows direct illumination of tissue surfaces in front of the array transducer through a holding plate from the backward direction. The transducer frequency was designed at 1 MHz by considering the trade-off relationship between ultrasound attenuation and image resolution. A Ti:Sa laser optically pumped with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, having a tunable wavelength of 700 to 900 nm, was chosen for deep light penetration in tissues. The laser light was sufficiently expanded and homogenized to keep the level of laser-pulse fluence on the sample surface under the ANSI safety limit. System performance was tested with phantoms. The results of our study showed that the system visualized all the absorbers embedded in a 50-mm-thick tissue-mimicking phantom with a lateral resolution of 2{3 mm.

  14. Measurement of photoacoustic transducer position by robotic source placement and nonlinear parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Ephrat, Pinhas; Seabrook, Adam

    2008-02-01

    Source localization by photoacoustic tomography is dependent on time-of-flight pressure data collected by one or more transducers at multiple positions about the imaged object. Errors in transducer position lead directly to errors in source localization. The objective of this work was to develop a method for experimental determination of transducer position for the purpose of (i) comparison of the measured to the expected transducer position, and (ii) automated calibration of transducer position in scanning and array setups. Our approach was to acquire the time of arrival data at each transducer using a small, point-like photoacoustic source from many locations in the imaged volume. Source placement was controlled with a 3D robotic gantry (accuracy +/-0.01 mm). Time of arrival data for all source locations was used to compute a vector of source-transducer distances. The coordinates of each transducer location were then found by nonlinear parameter estimation for a function that related the source distance to the known source location and the unknown transducer location. Application of the method to a planar array of 14 transducers resulted in identification of the position of each element in the transducer array. This finding suggested that the method may be useful for (i) mapping transducer positions during validation and calibration studies, (ii) measuring the effective position of transducers that are asymmetric or have fabrication errors, and (iii) obtaining the mapping relationship between the imaging system and the imaging volume in situations where coregistration of image data from other modalities is desired.

  15. Multifunctional microbubbles and nanobubbles for photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Qin, Ruogu; Xu, Jeff S.; Wang, Lihong V.; Xu, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    We develop a novel dual-modal contrast agent-encapsulated-ink poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microbubbles and nanobubbles-for photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging. Soft gelatin phantoms with embedded tumor simulators of encapsulated-ink PLGA microbubbles and nanobubbles in various concentrations are clearly shown in both photoacoustic and ultrasound images. In addition, using photoacoustic imaging, we successfully image the samples positioned below 1.8-cm-thick chicken breast tissues. Potentially, simultaneous photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging enhanced by encapsulated-dye PLGA microbubbles or nanobubbles can be a valuable tool for intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins.

  16. Photoacoustic imaging of the bladder: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Aya; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Chung, Benjamin I; Oralkan, Omer; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2013-07-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a promising new technology that combines tissue optical characteristics with ultrasound transmission and can potentially visualize tumor depth in bladder cancer. We imaged simulated tumors in 5 fresh porcine bladders with conventional pulse-echo sonography and photoacoustic imaging. Isoechoic biomaterials of different optical qualities were used. In all 5 of the bladder specimens, photoacoustic imaging showed injected biomaterials, containing varying degrees of pigment, better than control pulse-echo sonography. Photoacoustic imaging may be complementary to diagnostic information obtained by cystoscopy and urine cytologic analysis and could potentially obviate the need for biopsy in some tumors before definitive treatment.

  17. Multifunctional microbubbles and nanobubbles for photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chulhong; Qin, Ruogu; Xu, Jeff S.; Wang, Lihong V.; Xu, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    We develop a novel dual-modal contrast agent—encapsulated-ink poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microbubbles and nanobubbles—for photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging. Soft gelatin phantoms with embedded tumor simulators of encapsulated-ink PLGA microbubbles and nanobubbles in various concentrations are clearly shown in both photoacoustic and ultrasound images. In addition, using photoacoustic imaging, we successfully image the samples positioned below 1.8-cm-thick chicken breast tissues. Potentially, simultaneous photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging enhanced by encapsulated-dye PLGA microbubbles or nanobubbles can be a valuable tool for intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins. PMID:20210423

  18. Multifunctional microbubbles and nanobubbles for photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulhong; Qin, Ruogu; Xu, Jeff S; Wang, Lihong V; Xu, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    We develop a novel dual-modal contrast agent-encapsulated-ink poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microbubbles and nanobubbles-for photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging. Soft gelatin phantoms with embedded tumor simulators of encapsulated-ink PLGA microbubbles and nanobubbles in various concentrations are clearly shown in both photoacoustic and ultrasound images. In addition, using photoacoustic imaging, we successfully image the samples positioned below 1.8-cm-thick chicken breast tissues. Potentially, simultaneous photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging enhanced by encapsulated-dye PLGA microbubbles or nanobubbles can be a valuable tool for intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries and therapeutic margins.

  19. Variable temperature photoacoustic spectroscopy. II. Temperature characteristic and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechthold, P. S.; Campagna, M.

    1981-03-01

    The temperature dependent photoacoustic signal of a carbon black sample is investigated with a previously described low temperature photoacoustic cell. Examples are given to demonstrate the utility of variable temperature photoacoustic spectroscopy: The photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin which is contained in the purple membrane fragments of halobacterium halobium is studied. In this experiment some photointermediates are shown to be preferentially populated and frozen out at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of the electronic ground state of solid Fe-(III)-diethyl-dithiocarbamate is investigated for the first time spectroscopically in the visible and ultraviolet spectral range. Excitonic levels in semiconductors are for the first time inspected by the photoacoustic technique.

  20. Model-based tomographic reconstruction

    DOEpatents

    Chambers, David H; Lehman, Sean K; Goodman, Dennis M

    2012-06-26

    A model-based approach to estimating wall positions for a building is developed and tested using simulated data. It borrows two techniques from geophysical inversion problems, layer stripping and stacking, and combines them with a model-based estimation algorithm that minimizes the mean-square error between the predicted signal and the data. The technique is designed to process multiple looks from an ultra wideband radar array. The processed signal is time-gated and each section processed to detect the presence of a wall and estimate its position, thickness, and material parameters. The floor plan of a building is determined by moving the array around the outside of the building. In this paper we describe how the stacking and layer stripping algorithms are combined and show the results from a simple numerical example of three parallel walls.

  1. Singular value decomposition analysis of a photoacoustic imaging system and 3D imaging at 0.7 FPS.

    PubMed

    Roumeliotis, Michael B; Stodilka, Robert Z; Anastasio, Mark A; Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J L

    2011-07-04

    Photoacoustic imaging is a non-ionizing imaging modality that provides contrast consistent with optical imaging techniques while the resolution and penetration depth is similar to ultrasound techniques. In a previous publication [Opt. Express 18, 11406 (2010)], a technique was introduced to experimentally acquire the imaging operator for a photoacoustic imaging system. While this was an important foundation for future work, we have recently improved the experimental procedure allowing for a more densely populated imaging operator to be acquired. Subsets of the imaging operator were produced by varying the transducer count as well as the measurement space temporal sampling rate. Examination of the matrix rank and the effect of contributing object space singular vectors to image reconstruction were performed. For a PAI system collecting only limited data projections, matrix rank increased linearly with transducer count and measurement space temporal sampling rate. Image reconstruction using a regularized pseudoinverse of the imaging operator was performed on photoacoustic signals from a point source, line source, and an array of point sources derived from the imaging operator. As expected, image quality increased for each object with increasing transducer count and measurement space temporal sampling rate. Using the same approach, but on experimentally sampled photoacoustic signals from a moving point-like source, acquisition, data transfer, reconstruction and image display took 1.4 s using one laser pulse per 3D frame. With relatively simple hardware improvements to data transfer and computation speed, our current imaging results imply that acquisition and display of 3D photoacoustic images at laser repetition rates of 10Hz is easily achieved.

  2. Advanced devices for photoacoustic imaging to improve cancer and cerebrovascular medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla Marien, Leonardo Gabriel

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information for breast cancer staging. Despite these promising studies, PAI remains an unfeasible option for clinics due to the cost to implement, the required large modification in user conduct and the inflexibility of the hardware to accommodate other applications for the incremental enhancement in diagnostic information. The research described in this dissertation addresses these issues by designing attachments to clinical ultrasound probes and incorporating custom detectors into commercial ultrasound scanners. The ultimate benefit of these handheld devices is to expand the capability of current ultrasound systems and facilitate the translation of PAI to enhance cancer diagnostics and neurosurgical outcomes. Photoacoustic enabling devices (PEDs) were designed as attachments to two clinical ultrasound probes optimized for breast cancer diagnostics. PAI uses pulsed laser excitation to create transient heating (<1°C) and thermoelastic expansion that is detected as an ultrasonic emission. These ultrasonic emissions are remotely sensed to construct noninvasive images with optical contrast at depths much greater than other optical modalities. The PEDs are feasible in terms of cost, user familiarity and flexibility for various applications. Another possible application for PAI is in assisting neurosurgeons treating aneurysms. Aneurysms are often treated by placing a clip to prevent blood flow into the aneurysm. However, this procedure has risks associated with damaging nearby vessels. One of the developed PEDs demonstrated the feasibility to three-dimensionally image tiny microvasculature (<0.3mm) beyond large blood occlusions (>2.4mm) in a phantom model. The capability to use this during surgery would suggest decreasing the risks associated with these treatments. However, clinical ultrasound arrays are not clinically feasible for microsurgical applications due to

  3. Steering in spin tomographic probability representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, V. I.; Markovich, L. A.

    2016-09-01

    The steering property known for two-qubit state in terms of specific inequalities for the correlation function is translated for the state of qudit with the spin j = 3 / 2. Since most steering detection inequalities are based on the correlation functions we introduce analogs of such functions for the single qudit systems. The tomographic probability representation for the qudit states is applied. The connection between the correlation function in the two-qubit system and the single qudit is presented in an integral form with an intertwining kernel calculated explicitly in tomographic probability terms.

  4. Removal of filling materials from oval-shaped canals using laser irradiation: a micro-computed tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Keleş, Ali; Arslan, Hakan; Kamalak, Aliye; Akçay, Merve; Sousa-Neto, Manoel D; Versiani, Marco Aurélio

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of lasers in removing filling remnants from oval-shaped canals after retreatment procedures with rotary instruments using micro-computed tomographic imaging. The root canals of 42 mandibular canines were prepared and obturated using the warm vertical compaction technique. Retreatment was performed with rotary instruments, and the specimens were distributed in 3 groups (n = 14) according to the laser device used in a later stage of retreatment procedure: Er:YAG, Er:YAG laser-based photon-induced photoacoustic streaming, and Nd:YAG. The specimens were scanned in a micro-computed tomographic device after root canal filling and each stage of retreatment at a resolution of 13.68 μm. The percentage differences of the remaining filling material before and after laser application within and between groups were statistically compared using the paired sample t test and 1-way analysis of variance test, respectively. Significance level was set at 5%. Overall, filling residues were located mainly in the apical third and into canal irregularities after the retreatment procedures. After using rotary instruments, the mean percentage volume of the filling remnants ranged from 13%-16%, with no statistical significant difference between groups (P > .05). Within groups, additional laser application had a significant reduction in the amount of the remaining filling materials (P < .05). A comparison between groups showed that Er:YAG laser application after the use of rotary instruments had a significantly higher removal of filling remnants (~13%) than Er:YAG laser-based photon-induced photoacoustic streaming (~4%) and Nd:YAG (~3%) (P < .05). None of the retreatment procedures completely removed the filling materials. The additional use of lasers improved the removal of filling material after the retreatment procedure with rotary instruments. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. Flat-panel-detector-based volume tomographic angiography imaging: detector evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Ruola; Zhang, Dinghua; Chen, Biao; Conover, David L.; Yu, Rongfeng

    1999-09-01

    Recent development of large area flat panel solid state detector arrays indicates that flat panel image sensors have some common potential advantages: compactness, absence of geometric distortion and veiling glare with the benefits of high resolution, high DQE, high frame rate and high dynamic range, small image lag (less than 1%) and excellent linearity (approximately 1%). The advantages of the new flat-panel detector make it a promising candidate for cone beam volume tomographic angiography imaging. The purpose of this study is to characterize a Selenium thin film transistor (STFT) flat panel detector-based imaging system for cone beam volume tomographic angiography imaging applications. A prototype STFT detector-based cone beam volume tomographic angiography imaging system has been designed and constructed based on the modification of a GE 8800 CT scanner. This system is evaluated using a vascular phantom with different x-ray spectra, different sizes of vessels and different iodine concentration levels. The results indicate that with the currently available STFT flat panel detector, 90 kVp is the optimal kVp to achieve the highest signal-to-noise ratio for volume tomographic angiography imaging and the low contrast resolution of the system is 4 mg/ml iodine for a 2 mm vessel.

  6. Photoacoustic and Photothermal Effects in Particulate Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, Gerald, J.

    2009-04-30

    A summary of the research areas investigated by the author during the grant period is given. Experiments and theory have been carried out on the photoacoustic effect arising from a number of physical and chemical processes. A number of studies of the photoacoustic effect as it occurs in transient grating experiments have been completed. The research done with the Ludwig-Soret effect on the generation of shock waves is reported. Other research, such as that carried out on interferometric and beam deflection microphones, the use of microphones in vacuum as momentum flux detectors, and chemical generation of sonoluminescence is listed. A list of published research including selected publications, a complete list of journal articles, books, review articles, and reviews are given.

  7. Human teeth model using photoacoustic frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, a novel photo-acoustic technique modality utilizing a frequency- modulated Q-switch Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm and coherent frequency domain signal processing is introduced for impulse and frequency responses of biological tissues. We present a photoacoustic technique to monitor the temporal behavior of temperature and pressure in an excised sample of human teeth after either a single laser pulse or during multiple laser pulses at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) from 5 Hz to 100 Hz. Knowledge of the dynamic characteristics of structural elements often means the difference between normal and abnormal tissue. The determination of the resonance characteristics of structures is termed "modal analysis." The results of our study suggest that it is possible to identify the impulse, frequency response and resonance modes of simplified human teeth. This data provided a powerful tool to differentiate between normal and decay teeth.

  8. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Patimisco, Pietro; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS) for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimental QEPAS methods such as: on-beam and off-beam QEPAS, quartz-enhanced evanescent wave photoacoustic detection, modulation-cancellation approach and mid-IR single mode fiber-coupled sensor systems will be reviewed and analysed. A QEPAS sensor operating in the THz range, employing a custom-made quartz-tuning fork and a THz quantum cascade laser will be also described. Finally, we evaluated data reported during the past decade and draw relevant and useful conclusions from this analysis. PMID:24686729

  9. A photoacoustic spectrometer for trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, E. M.; Bezerra, E.; Scalabrin, A.

    2005-06-01

    A high-resolution external laser photoacoustic spectrometer has been developed for trace gas detection with absorption transitions in coincidence with CO2 laser emission lines (9,2-10,9 μm: 920-1086 cm-1). The CO2 laser operates in 90 CW lines with power of up to 15 W. A PC-controlled step motor can tune the laser lines. The resonance frequency of first longitudinal mode of the photoacoustic cell is at 1600 Hz. The cell Q-factor and cell constant are measured close to 50 and 28 mVcmW-1, respectively. The spectrometer has been tested in preliminary studies to analyze the absorption transitions of ozone (O_3). The ethylene (C_2H_4) from papaya fruit is also investigated using N2 as carrier gas at a constant flow rate.

  10. Ultrahigh resolution photoacoustic microscopy via transient absorption

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Ryan L.; Applegate, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a novel, hybrid imaging modality, Transient Absorption Ultrasonic Microscopy (TAUM), which takes advantage of the optical nonlinearities afforded by transient absorption to achieve ultrahigh-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. The theoretical point spread function for TAUM is functionally equivalent to confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy, potentially enabling cellular/subcellular photoacoustic imaging. A prototype TAUM system was designed, built, and used to image a cross-section through several capillaries in the excised cheek pouch of a Syrian Hamster. The well-resolved capillaries in the TAUM image provided experimental evidence of the spatial resolution. These results suggest that TAUM has excellent potential for producing volumetric images with cellular/subcellular resolution in three dimensions deep inside living tissue. PMID:21258499

  11. Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy: a review.

    PubMed

    Patimisco, Pietro; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2014-03-28

    A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS) for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimental QEPAS methods such as: on-beam and off-beam QEPAS, quartz-enhanced evanescent wave photoacoustic detection, modulation-cancellation approach and mid-IR single mode fiber-coupled sensor systems will be reviewed and analysed. A QEPAS sensor operating in the THz range, employing a custom-made quartz-tuning fork and a THz quantum cascade laser will be also described. Finally, we evaluated data reported during the past decade and draw relevant and useful conclusions from this analysis.

  12. Microcantilever Actuation by Laser Induced Photoacoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Naikun; Zhao, Dongfang; Jia, Ran; Liu, Duo

    2016-01-01

    We present here a combined theoretical and experimental investigation on effective excitation of microcantilever by using photoacoustic waves. The photoacoustic waves arose from a vibrating Al foil induced by an intensity-modulated laser. We demonstrate that, superior to photothermal excitation, this new configuration avoids direct heating of the microcantilever, thus minimizing undesired thermal effects on the vibration of microcantilever, while still keeps the advantage of being a remote, non-contact excitation method. We also measured the vibration amplitude of the microcantilever as a function of distance between the microcantilever and the Al foil and found that the amplitudes decay gradually according to the inverse distance law. This method is universal and can be adopted in bio-microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) for the detection of small signals where detrimental thermal effects must be avoided. PMID:26814360

  13. Microcantilever Actuation by Laser Induced Photoacoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Naikun; Zhao, Dongfang; Jia, Ran; Liu, Duo

    2016-01-01

    We present here a combined theoretical and experimental investigation on effective excitation of microcantilever by using photoacoustic waves. The photoacoustic waves arose from a vibrating Al foil induced by an intensity-modulated laser. We demonstrate that, superior to photothermal excitation, this new configuration avoids direct heating of the microcantilever, thus minimizing undesired thermal effects on the vibration of microcantilever, while still keeps the advantage of being a remote, non-contact excitation method. We also measured the vibration amplitude of the microcantilever as a function of distance between the microcantilever and the Al foil and found that the amplitudes decay gradually according to the inverse distance law. This method is universal and can be adopted in bio-microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) for the detection of small signals where detrimental thermal effects must be avoided.

  14. Noninvasive photoacoustic microscopy of methemoglobin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Min; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Due to the various causes of methemoglobinemia and its potential to be confused with other diseases, in vivo measurements of methemoglobin have significant applications in the clinic. Using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), we quantified the average and the distributed percentage of methemoglobin both in vitro and in vivo. Based on the absorption spectra of methemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, and deoxyhemoglobin, three wavelengths were chosen to differentiate methemoglobin from the others. The methemoglobin concentrations calculated from the photoacoustic signals agreed well with the preset concentrations. Then we imaged the methemoglobin percentage in microtubes that mimicked blood vessels. Average percentages calculated for five samples with different methemoglobin concentrations also agreed well with the preset values. Finally, we demonstrated the ability of PAM to detect methemoglobin in vivo in a mouse ear. Our results show that PAM can quantitatively image methemoglobin distribution in vivo. PMID:25760655

  15. Noninvasive photoacoustic microscopy of methemoglobin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Min; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Various causes can lead to methemoglobinemia, and it has the potential to be confused with other diseases. In vivo measurements of methemoglobin have significant applications in the clinics. We quantified the average and the distributed percentage of methemoglobin both in vitro and in vivo using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). Based on the absorption spectra of methemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, and deoxyhemoglobin, three wavelengths were chosen to differentiate methemoglobin from the others. We imaged the methemoglobin percentage in microtubes that mimicked blood vessels as a phantom experiment. The methemoglobin concentrations calculated from the photoacoustic signals were in accordance with the preset concentrations. We also demonstrated the ability of PAM to quantitatively image methemoglobin distribution in vivo in a mouse ear.

  16. Optical fiber photoacoustic-photothermal probe.

    PubMed

    Beard, P C; Pérennès, F; Draguioti, E; Mills, T N

    1998-08-01

    We describe the operation of an all-optical probe that provides an alternative means of implementing photoacoustic and photothermal investigative techniques, particularly those used in biomedical applications. The probe is based on a transparent, acoustically and thermally sensitive Fabry-Perot polymer film sensor mounted at the end of an optical fiber. We demonstrate the ability of the system to make photoacoustic and photothermal measurements simultaneously and evaluate its photothermal response, using a nonscattering liquid target of known and adjustable absorption coefficient. The acoustic and thermal noise floors were 2 kPa and 6 x 10(-3) degrees C , respectively, obtained over a 25-MHz measurement bandwidth and 30 signal averages.

  17. Contactless photoacoustic imaging of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berer, Thomas; Hochreiner, Armin; Grün, Hubert; Burgholzer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we report on remote photoacoustic imaging using an interferometric technique. By utilizing a two-wave mixing interferometer ultrasonic displacements are measured without any physical contact to the sample. This technique allows measurement of the displacements also on rough surfaces. Mixing a plane reference beam with the speckled beam originating from the sample surface is done in a Bi12SiO20 photorefractive crystal. After data acquisition the structure of the specimen is reconstructed using a Fourier-domain synthetic focusing aperture technique. We show three-dimensional imaging on tissue-mimicking phantoms and biological samples. Furthermore, we show remote photoacoustic measurements on a human forearm in-vivo.

  18. Rotary-scanning optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Weizhi; Xi, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) is currently one of the fastest evolving photoacoustic imaging modalities. It has a comparable spatial resolution to pure optical microscopic techniques such as epifluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, and two-photon microscopy, but also owns a deeper penetration depth. In this paper, we report a rotary-scanning (RS)-ORPAM that utilizes a galvanometer scanner integrated with objective to achieve rotary laser scanning. A 15 MHz cylindrically focused ultrasonic transducer is mounted onto a motorized rotation stage to follow optical scanning traces synchronously. To minimize the loss of signal to noise ratio, the acoustic focus is precisely adjusted to reach confocal with optical focus. Black tapes and carbon fibers are firstly imaged to evaluate the performance of the system, and then in vivo imaging of vasculature networks inside the ears and brains of mice is demonstrated using this system.

  19. Photoacoustic-guided convergence of light through optically diffusive media.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanting; Silverman, Ronald H; Liu, Liping; Chitnis, Parag V; Lee, Kotik K; Chen, Y C

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate that laser beams can be converged toward a light-absorbing target through optically diffusive media by using photoacoustic-guided interferometric focusing. The convergence of light is achieved by shaping the wavefront of the incident light with a deformable mirror to maximize the photoacoustic signal, which is proportional to the scattered light intensity at the light absorber.

  20. Image chorioretinal vasculature in albino rats using photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qing; Liu, Tan; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2011-12-01

    We imaged the microvascular network in both the retina and the choroid in an albino rat eye using photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy guided by optical coherence tomography. Relying on optical absorption and ultrasonic detection, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy can image both retinal and choroidal vessel networks with high contrast.

  1. Hands-on resonance-enhanced photoacoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, Manfred

    2001-10-01

    The design of an improved photoacoustic converter cell using kitchen equipment is described. It operates by changing manually the Helmholtz resonance frequency of bottles by adjusting the distance between the bottleneck and the outer ear. The experiment helps to gain insights in ear performance, in photoacoustic detection methods, in resonance phenomena and their role for detecting small periodic signals in the presence of noise.

  2. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of gaseous biomarker in simulated breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; U-Thainual, Paweena; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a photoacoustic detector integrated with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to measure biomarkers in gas samples independently. Simulated exhaled breath samples were created by mixing varying concentrations of acetone, ammonia and ethane. The results of these measurements demonstrate the potential of photoacoustic spectroscopy to detect biomarkers from human breath.

  3. Photoacoustic technique applied to the study of skin and leather

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.; Varela, J.; Hernandez, L.; Gonzalez, A.

    1998-08-28

    In this paper the photoacoustic technique is used in bull skin for the determination of thermal and optical properties as a function of the tanning process steps. Our results show that the photoacoustic technique is sensitive to the study of physical changes in this kind of material due to the tanning process.

  4. Photoacoustic technique applied to the study of skin and leather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Varela, J.; Hernández, L.; González, A.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper the photoacoustic technique is used in bull skin for the determination of thermal and optical properties as a function of the tanning process steps. Our results show that the photoacoustic technique is sensitive to the study of physical changes in this kind of material due to the tanning process.

  5. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging of nanoparticles in cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jason R; Frey, Wolfgang; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2013-02-26

    Quantitative visualization of nanoparticles in cells and tissues, while preserving the spatial information, is very challenging. A photoacoustic imaging technique to depict the presence and quantity of nanoparticles is presented. This technique is based on the dependence of the photoacoustic signal on both the nanoparticle quantity and the laser fluence. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging is a robust technique that does not require knowledge of the local fluence, but a relative change in the fluence. This eliminates the need for sophisticated methods or models to determine the energy distribution of light in turbid media. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging was first applied to nanoparticle-loaded cells, and quantitation was validated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging was then extended to xenograft tumor tissue sections, and excellent agreement with traditional histopathological analysis was demonstrated. Our results suggest that quantitative photoacoustic imaging may be used in many applications including the determination of the efficiency and effectiveness of molecular targeting strategies for cell studies and animal models, the quantitative assessment of photoacoustic contrast agent biodistribution, and the validation of in vivo photoacoustic imaging.

  6. Acoustic and photoacoustic characterization of micron-sized perfluorocarbon emulsions.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-09-01

    Perfluorocarbon droplets containing nanoparticles (NPs) have recently been investigated as theranostic and dual-mode contrast agents. These droplets can be vaporized via laser irradiation or used as photoacoustic contrast agents below the vaporization threshold. This study investigates the photoacoustic mechanism of NP-loaded droplets using photoacoustic frequencies between 100 and 1000 MHz, where distinct spectral features are observed that are related to the droplet composition. The measured photoacoustic spectrum from NP-loaded perfluorocarbon droplets was compared to a theoretical model that assumes a homogenous liquid. Good agreement in the location of the spectral features was observed, which suggests the NPs act primarily as optical absorbers to induce thermal expansion of the droplet as a single homogenous object. The NP size and composition do not affect the photoacoustic spectrum; therefore, the photoacoustic signal can be maximized by optimizing the NP optical absorbing properties. To confirm the theoretical parameters in the model, photoacoustic, ultrasonic, and optical methods were used to estimate the droplet diameter. Photoacoustic and ultrasonic methods agreed to within 1.4%, while the optical measurement was 8.5% higher; this difference decreased with increasing droplet size. The small discrepancy may be attributed to the difficulty in observing the small droplets through the partially translucent phantom.

  7. Multifunctional photosensitizer-based contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U S; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-18

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  8. Scattered light: improving photoacoustic spectral measurement with a drug tablet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rong; Jiang, Yue-song; Yu, Lan; Wen, Dong-hai; Hua, Hou-qiang; Wu, Xiao-fang

    2013-08-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a powerful tool for the study of the absorption spectra of solid samples. Scattered light, which used to be a main error source in conventional absorption spectroscopy, is not a problem for PAS, and furthermore, in this paper it is helpful for photoacoustic spectroscopy measurement. In this work, the photoacoustic spectra of an olanzapine tablet and its powder have been investigated. Differential analysis was used to eliminate the background signal generated by the photoacoustic cell. It is found that the photoacoustic spectrum of olanzapine in the powdered olanzapine tablet has the same spectral features as that of the pure olanzapine powder, while the photoacoustic spectrum of the olanzapine tablet does not have, although the ingredients in both are completely the same. This phenomenon can be interpreted as the light scattering effects in the powdered olanzapine tablet. The light scattering effects in a solid mixture amplify the photoacoustic spectral features of the main light-absorbing ingredient in the mixture, rather than enhance the measured photoacoustic signal over the whole measured wavelength range, which is different from the influence of light scattering effects on a single-ingredient solid powder. Based on this work, a method is proposed to preliminarily fast identify the light-absorbing ingredient in a solid mixture. Using the method, a drug tablet can be measured directly in solid state and hardly need sample preprocessing, and thus the time for composition analyses will be reduced significantly.

  9. CO 2-laser photoacoustic detection of gaseous n-pentylacetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herecová, Lenka; Hejzlar, Tomáš; Pavlovský, Jiří; Míček, Dalibor; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Kubát, Pavel; Janečková, Radmila; Nevrlý, Václav; Bitala, Petr; Střižík, Michal; Klouda, Karel; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2009-07-01

    The absorption spectra of gaseous n-pentylacetate were investigated by FT IR spectroscopy as well as CO 2-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy for simulation of the dispersion of a nerve agent (sarin) within a modeled atmospheric boundary layer. Three CO 2-laser emission lines were used for photoacoustic detection of n-pentylacetate with detection limit in the range of 1-3 ppm.

  10. Endobronchial Photoacoustic Microscopy for Staging of Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Microscopy for Staging of Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Huabei Jiang CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Florida Gainsville, FL 32611...TYPE Annual report 3. DATES COVERED 1 Jun 2014 - 31 May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Endobronchial Photoacoustic Microscopy for Staging of Lung ...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This project is to propose an endoscopic photoacoustic imaging method for lung cancer staging. In order

  11. Photoacoustic-guided convergence of light through optically diffusive media

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Fanting; Silverman, Ronald H.; Liu, Liping; Chitnis, Parag V.; Lee, Kotik K.; Chen, Y. C.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that laser beams can be converged toward a light-absorbing target through optically diffusive media by using photoacoustic-guided interferometric focusing. The convergence of light is achieved by shaping the wavefront of the incident light with a deformable mirror to maximize the photoacoustic signal, which is propor tional to the scattered light intensity at the light absorber. PMID:21633446

  12. Spatial interference encoding patterns based photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiri, Amihai; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-10-01

    Single sensor (pixel) signals require scanning of the sample in order to obtain spatial information. In this paper we show that using interference, optically induced signals can be reconstructed when recorded using interference pattern excitation, rather than a point illumination. This method reduces the need for dense scanning and requires a small number of scans, or can eliminate the need for scanning in some cases. It is shown that this method can be used in particular in 2D photo-acoustic imaging.

  13. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  14. Photoacoustics of disperse systems: Below cavitation threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Egerev, Sergey; Ovchinnikov, Oleg

    2012-05-24

    The paper considers photoacoustic (PA) conversion while irradiating suspensions in extra-small volume probes with laser pulses having small fluence values. Only linear and nonlinear thermooptical laser sound generation regimes were observed. Thus, good repeatability of acoustic signal parameters informative about probe content was achieved. The experiment conducted has shown how one can avoid the decrease of particles detection sensitivity for the thermooptical mode.

  15. Thermally Enhanced Photoacoustic Radar Imaging of Biotissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and imaging depth of photoacoustic (PA) imaging remain limited for clinical applications. The temperature can influence PA signals; the SNR of PA signals can be increased at higher temperatures. Therefore, the imaging quality and depth can be improved by the assistance of heating. Experimental results showed that the maximum imaging depth can be doubled by raising the temperature of the absorbers ( ex-vivo beef muscle) uniformly from to , and the SNR can be increased.

  16. Multiscale Functional and Molecular Photoacoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) combines rich optical absorption contrast with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound at depths in tissue. The high scalability of PAT has enabled anatomical imaging of biological structures ranging from organelles to organs. The inherent functional and molecular imaging capabilities of PAT have further allowed it to measure important physiological parameters and track critical cellular activities. Integration of PAT with other imaging technologies provides complementary capabilities and can potentially accelerate the clinical translation of PAT.

  17. Photoacoustic microscopy of ceramic turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Kinnick, R. R.; Heitman, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Scanning photoacoustic microscopy (SPAM) is evaluated as a nondestructive technique for the detection of both surface and subsurface flaws in polycrystalline ceramics, such as those currently under consideration for the high temperature components of small vehicular and industrial gas turbine engines; the fracture strength of these brittle materials is controlled by small, 25-200 micron flaws. Attention is given to the correlation of SPAM-detected flaws with actual, fracture-controlling flaws in ceramic turbine blades.

  18. Quantification and Reconstruction in Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zijian

    Optical absorption is closely associated with many physiological important parameters, such as the concentration and oxygen saturation of hemoglobin. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAT requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. We demonstrate the method using the optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) and the acoustical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM) in the optical ballistic regime and in the optical diffusive regime, respectively. The data acquisition speed in photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is limited by the laser repetition rate and the number of parallel ultrasound detecting channels. Reconstructing an image with fewer measurements can effectively accelerate the data acquisition and reduce the system cost. We adapted Compressed Sensing (CS) for the reconstruction in PACT. CS-based PACT was implemented as a non-linear conjugate gradient descent algorithm and tested with both phantom and in vivo experiments. Speckles have been considered ubiquitous in all scattering-based coherent imaging technologies. As a coherent imaging modality based on optical absorption, photoacoustic (PA) tomography (PAT) is generally devoid of speckles. PAT suppresses speckles by building up prominent boundary signals, via a mechanism similar to that of specular reflection. When imaging smooth boundary absorbing targets, the speckle visibility in PAT, which is defined as the ratio of the square root of the average power of speckles to that of boundaries, is inversely proportional to the square root of the absorber density. If the surfaces of the absorbing targets have uncorrelated height fluctuations, however, the boundary features may become fully developed speckles. The findings were validated by simulations

  19. Dual-modal whole eye photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ning; Ren, Qiushi; Li, Changhui

    2014-09-01

    We developed a prototype dual-modal ocular imaging system integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and high-frequency ultrasound imaging modalities. This system can perform high-resolution ocular imaging from the anterior region down to the fundus area. The novel system successfully imaged the murine eyes in vivo, including iris, lens, retina, and retinal pigment epithelium. Our results demonstrated that this system has a great potential in the diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases.

  20. Quantitative imaging of bilirubin by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Noninvasive detection of both bilirubin concentration and its distribution is important for disease diagnosis. Here we implemented photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to detect bilirubin distribution. We first demonstrate that our PAM system can measure the absorption spectra of bilirubin and blood. We also image bilirubin distributions in tissuemimicking samples, both without and with blood mixed. Our results show that PAM has the potential to quantitatively image bilirubin in vivo for clinical applications.

  1. Photoacoustic imaging of voltage signals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging of brain voltage signals is significantly limited in depth due to optical scattering and the absorptive property of brain tissue. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging promises to break this hard limit by utilizing both ballistic and diffused photons. To demonstrate the feasibility of PA, we used an in vivo mouse model. The brain cortex tissue was stained with dipicrylamine dye, electrically stimulated, and imaged with a customized dual-isosbestic-wavelength PA microscope (DIW-PAM). DIW-PAM separates voltage-induced PA signals from blood-induced PA signals and thereby allows recording the voltage response of mouse cortex tissue without interference from hemoglobin responses. The resting state PA voltage response signal exhibited a noise-like signal in the frequency domain. Upon 3 Hz electrical stimulation, the PA voltage response signal showed frequency peaks of 3.2 Hz and 6.3 Hz (Fig. 1). Although dipicrylamine dye is not fast enough for recording neuron action potentials, it served well for the purpose of this feasibility study. In conclusion, we successfully demonstrated in vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse brain voltage signals for the first time. If a fast voltage-sensitive dye is available, using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) instead of PA microscopy could allow acquiring full-field PA action potential images at a speed limited only by the laser pulse repetition rate.

  2. Imaging hypoxia using 3D photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The objective is to develop a multivariate in vivo hemodynamic model of tissue oxygenation (MiHMO2) based on 3D photoacoustic spectroscopy. Introduction: Low oxygen levels, or hypoxia, deprives cancer cells of oxygen and confers resistance to irradiation, some chemotherapeutic drugs, and oxygen-dependent therapies (phototherapy) leading to treatment failure and poor disease-free and overall survival. For example, clinical studies of patients with breast carcinomas, cervical cancer, and head and neck carcinomas (HNC) are more likely to suffer local reoccurrence and metastasis if their tumors are hypoxic. A novel method to non invasively measure tumor hypoxia, identify its type, and monitor its heterogeneity is devised by measuring tumor hemodynamics, MiHMO2. Material and Methods: Simulations are performed to compare tumor pO2 levels and hypoxia based on physiology - perfusion, fractional plasma volume, fractional cellular volume - and its hemoglobin status - oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration - based on in vivo measurements of breast, prostate, and ovarian tumors. Simulations of MiHMO2 are performed to assess the influence of scanner resolutions and different mathematic models of oxygen delivery. Results: Sensitivity of pO2 and hypoxic fraction to photoacoustic scanner resolution and dependencies on model complexity will be presented using hemodynamic parameters for different tumors. Conclusions: Photoacoustic CT spectroscopy provides a unique ability to monitor hemodynamic and cellular physiology in tissue, which can be used to longitudinally monitor tumor oxygenation and its response to anti-angiogenic therapies.

  3. Photoacoustic and Colorimetric Visualization of Latent Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Huang, Peng; Yi, Chenglin; Ning, Bo; Hu, Song; Nie, Liming; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Nie, Zhihong

    2015-12-22

    There is a high demand on a simple, rapid, accurate, user-friendly, cost-effective, and nondestructive universal method for latent fingerprint (LFP) detection. Herein, we describe a combination imaging strategy for LFP visualization with high resolution using poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride)-b-polystyrene (PSMA-b-PS) functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs). This general approach integrates the merits of both colorimetric imaging and photoacoustic imaging. In comparison with the previous methods, our strategy is single-step and does not require the signal amplification by silver staining. The PSMA-b-PS functionalized GNPs have good stability, tunable color, and high affinity for universal secretions (proteins/polypeptides/amino acids), which makes our approach general and flexible for visualizing LFPs on different substrates (presumably with different colors) and from different people. Moreover, the unique optical property of GNPs enables the photoacoustic imaging of GNPs-deposited LFPs with high resolution. This allows observation of level 3 hyperfine features of LFPs such as the pores and ridge contours by photoacoustic imaging. This technique can potentially be used to identify chemicals within LFP residues. We believe that this dual-modality imaging of LFPs will find widespread use in forensic investigations and medical diagnostics.

  4. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  5. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Norris, Francesca; Cleary, Jon; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Johnson, Peter; Scambler, Pete; Lythgoe, Mark; Beard, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The ability to noninvasively image embryonic vascular anatomy in mouse models is an important requirement for characterizing the development of the normal cardiovascular system and malformations in the heart and vascular supply. Photoacoustic imaging, which can provide high resolution non invasive images of the vasculature based upon optical absorption by endogenous hemoglobin, is well suited to this application. In this study, photoacoustic images of mouse embryos were obtained ex vivo and in vivo. The images show intricate details of the embryonic vascular system to depths of up to 10 mm, which allowed whole embryos to be imaged in situ. To achieve this, an all-optical photoacoustic scanner and a novel time reversal image reconstruction algorithm, which provide deep tissue imaging capability while maintaining high spatial resolution and contrast were employed. This technology may find application as an imaging tool for preclinical embryo studies in developmental biology as well as more generally in preclinical and clinical medicine for studying pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  6. Photoacoustic imaging and characterization of the microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Song; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    Photoacoustic (optoacoustic) tomography, combining optical absorption contrast and highly scalable spatial resolution (from micrometer optical resolution to millimeter acoustic resolution), has broken through the fundamental penetration limit of optical ballistic imaging modalities—including confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography—and has achieved high spatial resolution at depths down to the diffusive regime. Optical absorption contrast is highly desirable for microvascular imaging and characterization because of the presence of endogenous strongly light-absorbing hemoglobin. We focus on the current state of microvascular imaging and characterization based on photoacoustics. We first review the three major embodiments of photoacoustic tomography: microscopy, computed tomography, and endoscopy. We then discuss the methods used to characterize important functional parameters, such as total hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and blood flow. Next, we highlight a few representative applications in microvascular-related physiological and pathophysiological research, including hemodynamic monitoring, chronic imaging, tumor-vascular interaction, and neurovascular coupling. Finally, several potential technical advances toward clinical applications are suggested, and a few technical challenges in contrast enhancement and fluence compensation are summarized. PMID:20210427

  7. Quantitative analysis in medicine using photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Haisch, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, or photoacoustic tomography, is a 2D or 3D optical imaging method based on localized optical absorption of pulsed laser radiation. By a spatially resolved detection of the following thermoelastic expansion, the local distribution of the absorption can be determined. The technique has been proven to have significant potential for the imaging of human and animal organs and single blood vessels, combining high contrast with good spatial resolution. The contrast is based on the specific optical absorption of certain components in the visible and near-infrared spectral range, for most applications of blood. Generally, the images represent the local distribution of blood in a qualitative or semiquantitative way. Although photoacoustic imaging is capable of revealing absolute and spatially resolved concentrations of endogenous (such as oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin) or artificial (such as tumor markers) chromophores, only a very limited number of publications have dealt with this demanding task. In this report, the problems involved and possible solutions are reviewed and summarized.

  8. Acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Katheryne E; Wang, Tzu Yin; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound and combined optical and ultrasonic (photoacoustic) molecular imaging have shown great promise in the visualization and monitoring of cancer through imaging of vascular and extravascular molecular targets. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with molecularly targeted microbubbles can detect early-stage cancer through the visualization of targets expressed on the angiogenic vasculature of tumors. Ultrasonic molecular imaging can be extended to the imaging of extravascular targets through use of nanoscale, phase-change droplets and photoacoustic imaging, which provides further molecular information on cancer given by the chemical composition of tissues and by targeted nanoparticles that can interact with extravascular tissues at the receptor level. A new generation of targeted contrast agents goes beyond merely increasing imaging signal at the site of target expression but shows activatable and differential contrast depending on their interactions with the tumor microenvironment. These innovations may further improve our ability to detect and characterize tumors. In this review, recent developments in acoustic and photoacoustic molecular imaging of cancer are discussed.

  9. Photoacoustic Microscopy of Vickers Indentations in Metals with Piezoelectric Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazov, A. L.; Morozov, N. F.; Muratikov, K. L.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of mechanical stress influence on the thermoelastic photoacoustic signals inside Vickers indents in steel and nanonickel has been experimentally demonstrated. It has been shown that photoacoustic signal changes due to external stresses can be reversible or irreversible, depending on the indent orientation and the stress applied to the sample. Reversible changes in the photoacoustic signal can reach significant values at the level of tens percent of the average signal amplitude from the sample. Relative changes in the photoacoustic signal amplitudes have been theoretically evaluated for Vickers-indented and non-indented areas, taking into account the dependence of the elastic modulus of metals on temperature. It has been shown that this theoretical consideration provides qualitative explanation of differences in the behavior of photoacoustic signals under stress in indented and non-indented areas in metals.

  10. Programmable Real-time Clinical Photoacoustic and Ultrasound Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeesu; Park, Sara; Jung, Yuhan; Chang, Sunyeob; Park, Jinyong; Zhang, Yumiao; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has attracted interest for its capacity to capture functional spectral information with high spatial and temporal resolution in biological tissues. Several photoacoustic imaging systems have been commercialized recently, but they are variously limited by non-clinically relevant designs, immobility, single anatomical utility (e.g., breast only), or non-programmable interfaces. Here, we present a real-time clinical photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system which consists of an FDA-approved clinical ultrasound system integrated with a portable laser. The system is completely programmable, has an intuitive user interface, and can be adapted for different applications by switching handheld imaging probes with various transducer types. The customizable photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system is intended to meet the diverse needs of medical researchers performing both clinical and preclinical photoacoustic studies. PMID:27731357

  11. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Moore, Michael J; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  12. Programmable Real-time Clinical Photoacoustic and Ultrasound Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeesu; Park, Sara; Jung, Yuhan; Chang, Sunyeob; Park, Jinyong; Zhang, Yumiao; Lovell, Jonathan F; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-10-12

    Photoacoustic imaging has attracted interest for its capacity to capture functional spectral information with high spatial and temporal resolution in biological tissues. Several photoacoustic imaging systems have been commercialized recently, but they are variously limited by non-clinically relevant designs, immobility, single anatomical utility (e.g., breast only), or non-programmable interfaces. Here, we present a real-time clinical photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system which consists of an FDA-approved clinical ultrasound system integrated with a portable laser. The system is completely programmable, has an intuitive user interface, and can be adapted for different applications by switching handheld imaging probes with various transducer types. The customizable photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system is intended to meet the diverse needs of medical researchers performing both clinical and preclinical photoacoustic studies.

  13. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Strohm, Eric M.; Moore, Michael J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level. PMID:27114911

  14. Tomographic Gamma Scanner Experience: Three Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, David J.

    2014-06-30

    This is a summary of field applications of tomographic gamma scanning (TGS). Three cases are shown: enriched uranium scanning at Rocky Flats, heat-source plutonium at LANL, and plutonium-bearing pyrochemical salts at Rocky Flats. Materials are taken from the references shown below.

  15. A TOMOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE FOR MAGNETIZED BEAM MATCHING.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    To maintain low electron beam temperatures in the proposed RHIC electron cooler, careful matching of the magnetized beam from the source to the cooler solenoid is mandatory. We propose a tomographic technique to diagnose matching conditions. First simulation results will be presented.

  16. High Energy Computed Tomographic Inspection of Munitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED AD-E403 815 Technical Report AREIS-TR-16006 HIGH ENERGY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC INSPECTION OF MUNITIONS...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) November 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HIGH ENERGY COMPUTED...otherwise be accomplished by other nondestructive testing methods. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Radiography High energy Computed tomography (CT

  17. Compact Positron Tomograph for Prostate Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Qi, W. Moses, R. Huesman, and T. Budinger, at "Conceptual design of a compact positron tomograph for prostate imag- Cr 3000 ing’ IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci...35, pp. 598-602, 1988.2000 [4] L. E. Adam, J. S. Karp, and G. Brix , "Investigation of scattered radiotion in 3D whole-body positron emission using

  18. Tomographic reconstruction of picosecond acoustic strain propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Wright, Oliver B.; Li Voti, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    By means of an ultrafast optical technique, picosecond acoustic strain pulses in a transparent medium are tomographically visualized. The authors reconstruct strain pulses in Au-coated glass from time-domain reflectivity changes as a function of the optical angle of incidence, with ˜1ps temporal and ˜100nm spatial resolutions.

  19. Tomographic Image Compression Using Multidimensional Transforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villasenor, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a method for compressing tomographic images obtained using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) by applying transform compression using all available dimensions. This takes maximum advantage of redundancy of the data, allowing significant increases in compression efficiency and performance. (13 references) (KRN)

  20. Computed tomographic findings in bilateral adrenal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, G.E.; Baert, A.L.; Kint, E.J.; Pringot, J.H.; Goddeeris, P.G.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis are reported in two cases that demonstrate two typical different clinical and morphological manifestations of the disease. The incidence and CT appearance of adrenal tuberculosis are discussed, with emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  1. Tomographic methods in flow diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a viewpoint of tomography that should be well adapted to currently available optical measurement technology as well as the needs of computational and experimental fluid dynamists. The goals in mind are to record data with the fastest optical array sensors; process the data with the fastest parallel processing technology available for small computers; and generate results for both experimental and theoretical data. An in-depth example treats interferometric data as it might be recorded in an aeronautics test facility, but the results are applicable whenever fluid properties are to be measured or applied from projections of those properties. The paper discusses both computed and neural net calibration tomography. The report also contains an overview of key definitions and computational methods, key references, computational problems such as ill-posedness, artifacts, missing data, and some possible and current research topics.

  2. Theranostic probe for simultaneous in vivo photoacoustic imaging and confined photothermolysis by pulsed laser at 1064 nm in 4T1 breast cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Ku, Geng; Pageon, Laura; Li, Chun

    2014-11-01

    Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(ii) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined photothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were taken up in each gram of tumor tissue at 24 h after intravenous injection of 64Cu-labeled PEG-CuS NPs. For both photoacoustic imaging and therapeutic studies, nanosecond (ns)-pulsed laser was delivered with Q-switched Nd:YAG at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Unlike conventional photothermal ablation therapy mediated by continuous wave laser with which heat could spread to the surrounding normal tissue, interaction of CuS NPs with short pulsed laser deliver heat rapidly to the treatment volume keeping the thermal damage confined to the target tissues. Our data demonstrated that it is possible to use a single-compartment nanoplatform to achieve both photoacoustic tomography and highly selective tumor destruction at 1064 nm in small animals.Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(ii) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined photothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were

  3. Non-contact photoacoustic tomography and ultrasonography for brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and ultrasonography (US) of biological tissues usually rely on transducer arrays for the detection of ultrasound. Obtaining the best sensitivity requires a physical contact with the tissue using an intermediate coupling fluid (water or gel). This type of contact is a major drawback for several applications such as neurosurgery. Laser-ultrasonics is an established optical technique for the non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound in industrial materials. In this paper, the non-contact detection scheme used in laser-ultrasonics is adapted to allow probing of ultrasound in biological tissues while remaining below laser exposure safety limits. Both non-contact PAT (NCPAT) and non-contact US (NCUS) are demonstrated experimentally using a single-frequency detection laser emitting suitably shaped pulses and a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer. It is shown that an acceptable sensitivity is obtained while remaining below the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) of biological tissues. Results obtained ex vivo with a calf brain specimen show that sub-mm endogenous and exogenous inclusions can be detected at depths exceeding 1 cm. When fully developed, the technique could be a unique diagnostic tool in neurosurgery providing deep imaging of blood vessels, blood clots and blood oxygenation.

  4. Whole-body ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography of small animals in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad R.; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Wang, Kun; Anastasio, Mark; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-05-01

    We report a novel small-animal whole-body imaging system called ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT). RC-PACT is based on a confocal design of free-space ring-shaped light illumination and 512-element full-ring ultrasonic array signal detection. The free-space light illumination maximizes the light delivery efficiency, and the full-ring signal detection ensures a full two-dimensional view aperture for accurate image reconstruction. Using cylindrically focused array elements, RC-PACT can image a thin cross section with 0.10 to 0.25 mm in-plane resolutions and 1.6 s/frame acquisition time. By translating the mouse along the elevational direction, RC-PACT provides a series of cross-sectional images of the brain, liver, kidneys, and bladder.

  5. Direct Estimation of Optical Parameters From Photoacoustic Time Series in Quantitative Photoacoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, Aki; Cox, Ben T; Arridge, Simon R; Goh, Hwan; Kaipio, Jari P; Tarvainen, Tanja

    2016-11-01

    Estimation of optical absorption and scattering of a target is an inverse problem associated with quantitative photoacoustic tomography. Conventionally, the problem is expressed as two folded. First, images of initial pressure distribution created by absorption of a light pulse are formed based on acoustic boundary measurements. Then, the optical properties are determined based on these photoacoustic images. The optical stage of the inverse problem can thus suffer from, for example, artefacts caused by the acoustic stage. These could be caused by imperfections in the acoustic measurement setting, of which an example is a limited view acoustic measurement geometry. In this work, the forward model of quantitative photoacoustic tomography is treated as a coupled acoustic and optical model and the inverse problem is solved by using a Bayesian approach. Spatial distribution of the optical properties of the imaged target are estimated directly from the photoacoustic time series in varying acoustic detection and optical illumination configurations. It is numerically demonstrated, that estimation of optical properties of the imaged target is feasible in limited view acoustic detection setting.

  6. Simultaneous photoacoustic and optical attenuation imaging of single cells using photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michael J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique for simultaneously acquiring photoacoustic images as well as images based on the optical attenuation of single cells in a human blood smear was developed. An ultra-high frequency photoacoustic microscope equipped with a 1 GHz transducer and a pulsed 532 nm laser was used to generate the images. The transducer and 20X optical objective used for laser focusing were aligned coaxially on opposing sides of the sample. Absorption of laser photons by the sample yielded conventional photoacoustic (PA) signals, while incident photons which were not attenuated by the sample were absorbed by the transducer, resulting in the formation of a photoacoustic signal (tPA) within the transducer itself. Both PA and tPA signals, which are separated in time, were recorded by the system in a single RF-line. Areas of strong signal in the PA images corresponded to dark regions in the tPA images. Additional details, including the clear delineation of the cell cytoplasm and features in red blood cells, were visible in the tPA image but not the corresponding PA image. This imaging method has applications in probing the optical absorption and attenuation characteristics of biological cells with sub-cellular resolution.

  7. Planoconcave optical microresonator sensors for photoacoustic imaging: pushing the limits of sensitivity (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenheim, James A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.

    2016-03-01

    Most photoacoustic scanners use piezoelectric detectors but these have two key limitations. Firstly, they are optically opaque, inhibiting backward mode operation. Secondly, it is difficult to achieve adequate detection sensitivity with the small element sizes needed to provide near-omnidirectional response as required for tomographic imaging. Planar Fabry-Perot (FP) ultrasound sensing etalons can overcome both of these limitations and have proved extremely effective for superficial (<1cm) imaging applications. To achieve small element sizes (<100μm), the etalon is illuminated with a focused laser beam. However, this has the disadvantage that beam walk-off due to the divergence of the beam fundamentally limits the etalon finesse and thus sensitivity - in essence, the problem is one of insufficient optical confinement. To overcome this, novel planoconcave micro-resonator sensors have been fabricated using precision ink-jet printed polymer domes with curvatures matching that of the laser wavefront. By providing near-perfect beam confinement, we show that it is possible to approach the maximum theoretical limit for finesse (f) imposed by the etalon mirror reflectivities (e.g. f=400 for R=99.2% in contrast to a typical planar sensor value of f<50). This yields an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity over a planar FP sensor with the same acoustic bandwidth. Furthermore by eliminating beam walk-off, viable sensors can be made with significantly greater thickness than planar FP sensors. This provides an additional sensitivity gain for deep tissue imaging applications such as breast imaging where detection bandwidths in the low MHz can be tolerated. For example, for a 250 μm thick planoconcave sensor with a -3dB bandwidth of 5MHz, the measured NEP was 4 Pa. This NEP is comparable to that provided by mm scale piezoelectric detectors used for breast imaging applications but with more uniform frequency response characteristics and an order-of-magnitude smaller element

  8. Traveltime tomographic inversion of obs data, offshore western Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrussani, G.; Rossi, G.; Camerlenghi, A.

    2003-04-01

    We present the results of the tomographic inversion of the data acquired within the HYDRATECH project offshore western Svalbard in the immediate vicinity of the Knipovich Ridge system. The data acquisition encompassed continuous single-channel high-resolution seismic reflection profiling, simultaneous multicomponent-OBS recording, echo-sounding. The acoustic source consisted of an array of two sleeve guns. The OBS instruments are from IFREMER, GEOMAR and Tromsø University: they were separated by 400 m, while the spacing between parallel seismic profiles was set to 200 m, crossing the OBS stations. The seismic lines, spanning a relevant azimuth interval, are typically about 10 km long, resulting in offsets of more than 5 km from the OBS instruments. The seismic profiles show a well-stratified sequence of reflections down to about 400-500 ms below the seabed, dipping southwestwards. The BSR is mostly evident on the downslope profiles at about 250 ms below sea-bed, being parallel to the sea floor reflection, with opposite polarity, and causing a change in amplitude and frequency content, and sometimes also in polarity. In order to define the velocity changes above and below the BSR, and therefore to identify the presence of gas hydrates and free gas below them, a total number of ten events were chosen (4 above the BSR and 6 below it). The picked horizons were selected among many others, based on the velocity profile obtained at the university of Birmingham through 2-D inversion of one OBS data (Westbrook et al., this session). To help the picking of the corresponding events on the OBS data, we built a preliminary model, based on the travel-times picked on the single channel data, converted to depth using initially the same one dimension velocity function and then the models obtained throughout the tomographic iterations. The travel-times so calculated and projected on the OBS gathers, allowed an easier identification of the events, and the use of a semi

  9. Photoacoustic Imaging: Semiconducting Oligomer Nanoparticles as an Activatable Photoacoustic Probe with Amplified Brightness for In Vivo Imaging of pH (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    PubMed

    Miao, Qingqing; Lyu, Yan; Ding, Dan; Pu, Kanyi

    2016-05-01

    Despite the great potential of photoacoustic imaging in the life sciences, the development of smart activatable photoacoustic probes remains elusive. On page 3662, K. Pu and co-workers report a facile nanoengineering approach based on semiconducting oligomer nano-particles to develop ratiometric photoacoustic probes with amplified brightness and enhanced sensing capability for accurate photoacoustic mapping of pH in the tumors of living mice.

  10. Fine-resolution photoacoustic imaging of the eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Ronald H.; Kong, Fanting; Lloyd, Harriet O.; Chen, Y. C.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are widely used techniques for diagnostic imaging of the eye. OCT provides excellent resolution, but limited penetration. Ultrasound provides better penetration, but an order-of-magnitude poorer resolution than OCT. Photoacoustic imaging is relatively insensitive to scattering, and so offers a potential means to image deeper than OCT. Furthermore, photoacoustic imaging detects optical absorption, a parameter that is independent of that detected by conventional ultrasound or OCT. Our aim was to develop a photoacoustic system suitable for imaging the eye. Methods: We developed a prototype system utilizing a focused 20 MHz ultrasound probe with a central aperture through which optics were introduced. The prototype system produced 1-μJ, 5-nsec pulses at 532 or 1064 nm with a 20-μm spot size at a 500 Hz repetition rate. The photoacoustic probe was mounted onto computer-controlled linear stages and pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic images obtained on ex vivo pig eyes and in vivo mouse eyes. Results: Lateral resolution was significantly improved by use of a laser spot size much smaller than the acoustic beamwidth. Photoacoustic signals were obtained primarily from melanin in ex vivo tissues and from melanin and hemoglobin in vivo. Image fusion allowed superposition of photoacoustic signals upon the anatomic features detected by conventional ultrasound. Conclusion: Photoacoustic imaging detects the presence of clinically relevant pigments, such as melanin and oxyand deoxy-hemoglobin, and, potentially, from other pathologic pigments occurring in disease conditions (tumors, nevii, macular degeneration). Fine-resolution photoacoustic data provides information not detected in current ophthalmic imaging modalities.

  11. Biological tissue component evaluation by measuring photoacoustic spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namita, Takeshi; Murata, Yuya; Tokuyama, Junji; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has garnered constant attention as a non-invasive modality for visualizing details of the neovascularization structure of tumors, or the distribution of oxygen saturation, which is related to the tumor grade. However, photoacoustic imaging is applicable not only for vascular imaging but also for diagnosing properties of various tissues such as skin or muscle diseases, fat related to arteriosclerosis or fatty liver, cartilage related to arthritis, and fibrous tissues related to hepatitis. The photoacoustic signal intensity is wavelength-dependent and proportional to the absorption coefficient and thermal acoustic conversion efficiency (i.e. Grüneisen parameter) of the target biological tissue. To ascertain the appropriate wavelength range for biological tissue imaging and to evaluate tissue properties, photoacoustic spectra of various tissues (e.g., skin, muscle, and adipose tissue) were measured using a hydrophone (9 mm diameter) at 680-1600 nm wavelengths. Results confirmed that respective tissues have unique photoacoustic spectra. However, almost all samples have peaks around 1200 nm and 1400-1500 nm for wavelengths where the light absorbance of lipid or water is high. The main components of biological tissues are water, protein, and lipid. Results confirmed that photoacoustic spectra reflect the tissue components well. To evaluate the feasibility of the tissue characterization using photoacoustic methods, the photoacoustic signal intensity ratio between two wavelength regions was calculated as described above. Signal intensity ratios agreed well with the composition ratio between water and lipid in samples. These analyses verified the feasibility of evaluating tissue properties using photoacoustic methods.

  12. 24 CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Erik C. Westman

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method of emplacing the array in a long, horizontal borehole. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  13. Photoacoustic tomography: Ultrasonically beating optical diffusion and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong

    2014-03-01

    A decade of research has pushed photoacoustic computed tomography to the forefront of molecular-level imaging, notes SPIE Fellow Lihong Wang (Washington University, St. Louis) in his plenary talk, "Photoacoustic Tomography: Ultrasonically Beating Optical Diffusion and Diffraction." Modern optical microscopy has resolution and diffraction limitations. But noninvasive functional photoacoustic computed tomography has overcome this limit, offering deep penetration with optical contrast and ultrasonic resolution of 1 cm depth or more -- up to 7 cm of penetration in some cases, such as evaluating sentinel lymph nodes for breast cancer staging. This opens up applications in whole body imaging, brain function, oxygen saturation, label-free cell analysis, and noninvasive cancer biopsies.

  14. Vibrational Photoacoustic Tomography: Chemical Imaging beyond the Ballistic Regime

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Proof-of-concept of vibrational photoacoustic tomography is demonstrated with a homebuilt Raman laser generating greater than 100 mJ of energy per pulse at 1197 nm wavelength. We employed this system for excitation of second overtone transition of C-H bonds. Vibrational photoacoustic signal from C-H rich polyethylene tube phantom placed under 3 cm thick chicken breast tissue was obtained with a signal to noise ratio of 2.5. Further, we recorded photoacoustic image of a polyethylene ring placed under 5 mm chicken tissue with excellent contrast. This development opens new opportunities of performing label free vibrational imaging in the deep tissue regime. PMID:24224071

  15. Vibrational Photoacoustic Tomography: Chemical Imaging beyond the Ballistic Regime.

    PubMed

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Li, Rui; Wang, Pu; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-10-03

    Proof-of-concept of vibrational photoacoustic tomography is demonstrated with a homebuilt Raman laser generating greater than 100 mJ of energy per pulse at 1197 nm wavelength. We employed this system for excitation of second overtone transition of C-H bonds. Vibrational photoacoustic signal from C-H rich polyethylene tube phantom placed under 3 cm thick chicken breast tissue was obtained with a signal to noise ratio of 2.5. Further, we recorded photoacoustic image of a polyethylene ring placed under 5 mm chicken tissue with excellent contrast. This development opens new opportunities of performing label free vibrational imaging in the deep tissue regime.

  16. Application of pulsed photoacoustics in water at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Freeborn, S S; Hannigan, J; MacKenzie, H A

    1999-08-20

    The application of pulsed photoacoustics to the study of liquids at pressures of up to 350 bars is discussed. The design and development of an in-line sensor for the subsea monitoring of crude oil concentrations in water is reported. Crude oil detection sensitivities at parts per million concentrations were achieved with prototype instrumentation. A comparison of experimental results and a theoretical prediction of the pressure dependence of the pulsed photoacoustic response from water is outlined. The results demonstrate that existing models that describe pulsed photoacoustic generation in liquids are applicable to high-pressure conditions.

  17. Application of Pulsed Photoacoustics in Water at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeborn, Scott S.; Hannigan, John; MacKenzie, Hugh A.

    1999-08-01

    The application of pulsed photoacoustics to the study of liquids at pressures of up to 350 bars is discussed. The design and development of an in-line sensor for the subsea monitoring of crude oil concentrations in water is reported. Crude oil detection sensitivities at parts per million concentrations were achieved with prototype instrumentation. A comparison of experimental results and a theoretical prediction of the pressure dependence of the pulsed photoacoustic response from water is outlined. The results demonstrate that existing models that describe pulsed photoacoustic generation in liquids are applicable to high-pressure conditions.

  18. Photoacoustic emission from fluorescent nanodiamonds enhanced with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bailin; Fang, Chia-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Peterson, Ralph; Maswadi, Saher; Glickman, Randolph D; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Ye, Jing Yong

    2012-07-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) have drawn much attention in recent years for biomedical imaging applications due to their desired physical properties including excellent photostability, high biocompatibility, extended far-red fluorescence emission, and ease of surface functionalization. Here we explore a new feature of FNDs, i.e. their photoacoustic emission capability, which may lead to potential applications of using FNDs as a dual imaging contrast agent for combined fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging modalities. We observed significant enhancement of photoacoustic emission from FNDs when they were conjugated with gold nanoparticles (GNPs).

  19. Compressed sensing based virtual-detector photoacoustic microscopy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jing; Liu, Chengbo; Zheng, Jiaxiang; Lin, Riqiang; Song, Liang

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is becoming a vital tool for various biomedical studies, including functional and molecular imaging of cancer. However, due to the use of a focused ultrasonic transducer for photoacoustic detection, the image quality of conventional PAM degrades rapidly away from the ultrasonic focal zone. To improve the image quality of PAM for out-of-focus regions, we have developed compressed sensing based virtual-detector photoacoustic microscopy (CS-PAM). Through phantom and in vivo experiments, it has been demonstrated that CS-PAM can effectively extend the depth of focus of PAM, and thus may greatly expand its potential biomedical applications.

  20. Photon-phonon synergy: photoacoustic tomography and beyond (Presentation Video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is expected to impact biology and medicine broadly by providing multiscale in vivo functional and molecular imaging of structures ranging from subcellular organelles to organs, enabling a noninvasive look at subcutaneous tissue at a deep level. Lihong Wang holds the Gene K. Beare Distinguished Professorship of Biomedical Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, and is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Biomedical Optics. Wang was awarded the 2015 Britton Chance Biomedical Optics Award for his pioneering technical contributions and visionary leadership in the development and application of photoacoustic tomography, photoacoustic microscopy, and photon transport modeling.

  1. Blood pulse wave velocity measured by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Blood pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important indicator for vascular stiffness. In this letter, we present electrocardiogram-synchronized photoacoustic microscopy for in vivo noninvasive quantification of the PWV in the peripheral vessels of mice. Interestingly, strong correlation between blood flow speed and ECG were clearly observed in arteries but not in veins. PWV is measured by the pulse travel time and the distance between two spot of a chose vessel, where simultaneously recorded electrocardiograms served as references. Statistical analysis shows a linear correlation between the PWV and the vessel diameter, which agrees with known physiology. Keywords: photoacoustic microscopy, photoacoustic spectroscopy, bilirubin, scattering medium.

  2. Imaging nonmelanoma skin cancers with combined ultrasound-photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunar, Ulas; Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Morgan, Janet; Zeitouni, Natalie

    2013-03-01

    PDT has become a treatment of choice especially for the cases with multiple sites and large areas. However, the efficacy of PDT is limited for thicker and deeper tumors. Depth and size information as well as vascularity can provide useful information to clinicians for planning and evaluating PDT. High-resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging can provide information regarding skin structure and vascularity. We utilized combined ultrasound-photoacoustic microscopy for imaging a basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tumor pre-PDT and the results indicate that combined ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging can be useful tool for PDT planning by providing both structural and functional contrasts.

  3. Video-rate tomographic phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Holbrow, Charles J.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Tomographic phase microscopy measures the 3-D refractive index distribution of cells and tissues by combining the information from a series of angle-dependent interferometric phase images. In the original device, the frame rate was limited to 0.1 frames per second (fps) by the technique used to acquire phase images, preventing measurements of moving or rapidly changing samples. We describe an improved tomographic phase microscope in which phase images are acquired via a spatial fringe pattern demodulation method, enabling a full tomogram acquisition rate of 30 fps. In addition, in this system the refractive index is calculated by a diffraction tomography algorithm that accounts for the effects of diffraction in the 3-D reconstruction. We use the instrument to quantitatively monitor rapid changes in refractive index within defined subregions of cells due to exposure to acetic acid or changes in medium osmolarity.

  4. Dedicated 3D photoacoustic breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Robert A.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Lam, Richard B.; Reinecke, Daniel R.; Del Rio, Stephen P.; Steed, Doreen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the design and imaging methodology of a photoacoustic scanner dedicated to imaging hemoglobin distribution throughout a human breast. Methods: The authors developed a dedicated breast photoacoustic mammography (PAM) system using a spherical detector aperture based on our previous photoacoustic tomography scanner. The system uses 512 detectors with rectilinear scanning. The scan shape is a spiral pattern whose radius varies from 24 to 96 mm, thereby allowing a field of view that accommodates a wide range of breast sizes. The authors measured the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) using a target comprised of 1-mm dots printed on clear plastic. Each dot absorption coefficient was approximately the same as a 1-mm thickness of whole blood at 756 nm, the output wavelength of the Alexandrite laser used by this imaging system. The target was immersed in varying depths of an 8% solution of stock Liposyn II-20%, which mimics the attenuation of breast tissue (1.1 cm−1). The spatial resolution was measured using a 6 μm-diameter carbon fiber embedded in agar. The breasts of four healthy female volunteers, spanning a range of breast size from a brassiere C cup to a DD cup, were imaged using a 96-mm spiral protocol. Results: The CNR target was clearly visualized to a depth of 53 mm. Spatial resolution, which was estimated from the full width at half-maximum of a profile across the PAM image of a carbon fiber, was 0.42 mm. In the four human volunteers, the vasculature was well visualized throughout the breast tissue, including to the chest wall. Conclusions: CNR, lateral field-of-view and penetration depth of our dedicated PAM scanning system is sufficient to image breasts as large as 1335 mL, which should accommodate up to 90% of the women in the United States. PMID:24320471

  5. Multimodal system for non-contact photoacoustic imaging, optical coherence tomography, and mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiss-Holzinger, E.; Brandstetter, M.; Langer, G.; Buchsbaum, A.; Burgholzer, P.; Lendl, B.; Berer, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a multimodal optical setup, allowing non-contact photoacoustic imaging, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and non-contact mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. Photoacoustic signals are generated using a Nd:YAG laser and a tunable quantum cascade laser for photoacoustic imaging and spectroscopy, respectively. Photoacoustic signals are acquired by measuring the surface displacement of a specimen using a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In the same fiber-optic network a spectral-domain OCT system is realized. Light from the photoacoustic detection laser and the OCT source are multiplexed into one fiber and the same objective is used for both imaging modalities. Light reflected from specimens is demultiplexed and guided to the respective imaging systems. To allow fast non-contact PAI and OCT imaging the detection spot is scanned across the specimens' surface using a galvanometer scanner. As the same fiber-network and optical components are used for photoacoustic and OCT imaging the obtained images are co-registered intrinsically. Imaging is demonstrated on tissue mimicking and biological samples; spectral information is obtained for polystyrene and hemoglobin.

  6. FPGA-Based Reconfigurable Processor for Ultrafast Interlaced Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Aguirre, Andrés; Zhu, Quing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report, to the best of our knowledge, a unique field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based reconfigurable processor for real-time interlaced co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging and its application in imaging tumor dynamic response. The FPGA is used to control, acquire, store, delay-and-sum, and transfer the data for real-time co-registered imaging. The FPGA controls the ultrasound transmission and ultrasound and photoacoustic data acquisition process of a customized 16-channel module that contains all of the necessary analog and digital circuits. The 16-channel module is one of multiple modules plugged into a motherboard; their beamformed outputs are made available for a digital signal processor (DSP) to access using an external memory interface (EMIF). The FPGA performs a key role through ultrafast reconfiguration and adaptation of its structure to allow real-time switching between the two imaging modes, including transmission control, laser synchronization, internal memory structure, beamforming, and EMIF structure and memory size. It performs another role by parallel accessing of internal memories and multi-thread processing to reduce the transfer of data and the processing load on the DSP. Furthermore, because the laser will be pulsing even during ultrasound pulse-echo acquisition, the FPGA ensures that the laser pulses are far enough from the pulse-echo acquisitions by appropriate time-division multiplexing (TDM). A co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system consisting of four FPGA modules (64-channels) is constructed, and its performance is demonstrated using phantom targets and in vivo mouse tumor models. PMID:22828830

  7. FPGA-based reconfigurable processor for ultrafast interlaced ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Aguirre, Andrés; Zhu, Quing

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we report, to the best of our knowledge, a unique field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based reconfigurable processor for real-time interlaced co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging and its application in imaging tumor dynamic response. The FPGA is used to control, acquire, store, delay-and-sum, and transfer the data for real-time co-registered imaging. The FPGA controls the ultrasound transmission and ultrasound and photoacoustic data acquisition process of a customized 16-channel module that contains all of the necessary analog and digital circuits. The 16-channel module is one of multiple modules plugged into a motherboard; their beamformed outputs are made available for a digital signal processor (DSP) to access using an external memory interface (EMIF). The FPGA performs a key role through ultrafast reconfiguration and adaptation of its structure to allow real-time switching between the two imaging modes, including transmission control, laser synchronization, internal memory structure, beamforming, and EMIF structure and memory size. It performs another role by parallel accessing of internal memories and multi-thread processing to reduce the transfer of data and the processing load on the DSP. Furthermore, because the laser will be pulsing even during ultrasound pulse-echo acquisition, the FPGA ensures that the laser pulses are far enough from the pulse-echo acquisitions by appropriate time-division multiplexing (TDM). A co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system consisting of four FPGA modules (64-channels) is constructed, and its performance is demonstrated using phantom targets and in vivo mouse tumor models.

  8. In-vivo continuous monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation by photoacoustic transesophageal echocardiography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Subramaniam, Balachundhar; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Andrawes, Michael N.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-02-01

    Mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), measured from pulmonary arteries, is a gold-standard measure of the dynamic balance between the oxygen supply and demand in the body. In critical care, continuous monitoring of SvO2 plays a vital role in early detection of circulatory shock and guiding goal-oriented resuscitation. In current clinical practice, SvO2 is measured by invasive pulmonary artery catheters (PAC), which are associated with a 10% risk of severe complications. To address the unmet clinical need for a non-invasive SvO2 monitor, we are developing a new technology termed photoacoustic transesophageal echocardiography (PA-TEE). PA-TEE integrates transesophageal echocardiography with photoacoustic oximetry, and enables continuous assessment of SvO2 through an esophageal probe that can be inserted into the body in a minimally invasive manner. We have constructed a clinically translatable PA-TEE prototype, which features a mobile OPO laser, a modified ultrasonography console and a dual-modality esophageal probe. Comprised of a rotatable acoustic array detector, a flexible optical fiber bundle and a light-integrating acoustic lens, the oximetric probe has an outer diameter smaller than 15 mm and will be tolerable for most patients. Through custom-made C++/Qt software, our device acquires and displays ultrasonic and photoacoustic images in real time to guide the deployment of the probe. SvO2 is calculated on-line and updated every second. PA-TEE has now been used to evaluate SvO2 in living swine. Our findings show that changing the fraction of oxygen in the inspired gas modulates SvO2 measured by PA-TEE. Statistic comparison between SvO2 measurements from PA-TEE in vivo the gold-standard laboratorial analysis on blood samples drawn from PACs will be presented.

  9. Micro-optical-mechanical system photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack; Benett, William J.; Tooker, Angela C.; Alameda, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    All-optical photoacoustic spectrometer sensing systems (PASS system) and methods include all the hardware needed to analyze the presence of a large variety of materials (solid, liquid and gas). Some of the all-optical PASS systems require only two optical-fibers to communicate with the opto-electronic power and readout systems that exist outside of the material environment. Methods for improving the signal-to-noise are provided and enable mirco-scale systems and methods for operating such systems.

  10. Photoacoustic NO detection for asthma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, Markus; Wolff, Marcus; Harde, Hermann

    2009-07-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide was of high interest in breath analyses in the past few years. After its first detection in human breath in 1991, numerous publications uncovered the role of NO and its relation to different diseases. A strong relationship between an asthmatic eosinophilic airway inflammation and an increased NO level is medically confirmed. In this study a new photoacoustic detection system for nitric oxide based on a pulsed quantum cascade laser is introduced. The laser's single mode emission provides adequate selectivity to differentiate NO from other molecules in the sample. The demonstrated detection sensitivity allows in principle an application of the new system as diagnostic tool for asthma.

  11. Monkey brain cortex imaging by photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmai; Wang, Lihong V

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is applied to image the brain cortex of a monkey through the intact scalp and skull ex vivo. The reconstructed PAT image shows the major blood vessels on the monkey brain cortex. For comparison, the brain cortex is imaged without the scalp, and then imaged again without the scalp and skull. Ultrasound attenuation through the skull is also measured at various incidence angles. This study demonstrates that PAT of the brain cortex is capable of surviving the ultrasound signal attenuation and distortion caused by a relatively thick skull.

  12. Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, M; Springston, S; Koontz, A; Aiken, A

    2013-01-17

    The photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS) measures light absorption by aerosol particles. As the particles pass through a laser beam, the absorbed energy heats the particles and in turn the surrounding air, which sets off a pressure wave that can be detected by a microphone. The PASS instruments deployed by ARM can also simultaneously measure the scattered laser light at three wavelengths and therefore provide a direct measure of the single-scattering albedo. The Operator Manual for the PASS-3100 is included here with the permission of Droplet Measurement Technologies, the instrument’s manufacturer.

  13. Photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mul, Frits F. M.; Pilatou, Magdalena C.; Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2002-10-01

    To localize and monitor the blood content in tissue we developed very sensitive photoacoustical detectors. In these detectors a PVdF-layer has been used as piezo-electric material and also fibers for the illumination of the sample are integrated. The resolution is about 20 im in depth and about 50-100 im laterally. The wavelengths ofthe laser light were 532and 1064 nm. With these colors we can measure at different depths in tissue. We will report measurements on real tissue: vessels in chicken breast, in the human arm, and in test animals at various positions.

  14. Fingerprint imaging of dry finger using photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Young; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2017-03-01

    Fingerprint imaging has been widely used in biometric identification systems. This work presents a photoacoustic (PA) fingerprint imaging system that provides acoustic resolution using a pulsed laser and focused ultrasound transducer operating as a receiver. This PA system can measure dry fingers with a wide-range laser field based on the differences in the ultrasound coupling between the fingertip areas contacting and not contacting a solid plate. To demonstrate and validate the image accuracy of the PA system, PA fingerprint images were compared to images captured using a pulse-echo ultrasound system and an ink-pressed fingerprint scan.

  15. Testing fruit quality by photoacoustic spectroscopy assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, C.; Dumitras, D. C.; Patachia, M.; Banita, S.

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted with the aim of testing the hypothesis that raspberry and strawberry fruits from nonorganic farming release more ethylene gas compounds compared to organic ones. At the same time, the experiments focused on evaluation of the potential and capabilities of the laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) method in the assessment of fruit quality related to the effects of nitrogen. Ethylene gas can be harmful and carcinogenic, because it can accelerate the natural ripening process of physiologically mature fruits and makes the fruits more consistent in size. With the advantages of LPAS, we demonstrate that the concentration of ethylene from nonorganic raspberry and strawberry fruits is greater than from organic ones.

  16. Electromechanical film as a photoacoustic transducer.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Albert; Sand, Johan; Saarela, Jaakko; Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Toivonen, Juha; Hernberg, Rolf

    2009-09-14

    An electromechanical film, EMFi, is utilized as a transducer in a photoacoustic (PA) gas sensor. The film is a sensitive acoustic transducer, it is easily formable, and it exhibits a wide frequency response regardless of its large surface area. As a demonstration of its capabilities, the EMFi-based PA detector is used to measure NO(2) with pulsed excitation at 436 and 473 nm. The minimum detectable absorption coefficient is extrapolated to be 5.10(-7) cm(-1). Improvements for EMFi-based PA detector are discussed.

  17. Tomographic imaging using poissonian detector data

    DOEpatents

    Aspelmeier, Timo; Ebel, Gernot; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-10-15

    An image reconstruction method for reconstructing a tomographic image (f.sub.j) of a region of investigation within an object (1), comprises the steps of providing detector data (y.sub.i) comprising Poisson random values measured at an i-th of a plurality of different positions, e.g. i=(k,l) with pixel index k on a detector device and angular index l referring to both the angular position (.alpha..sub.l) and the rotation radius (r.sub.l) of the detector device (10) relative to the object (1), providing a predetermined system matrix A.sub.ij assigning a j-th voxel of the object (1) to the i-th detector data (y.sub.i), and reconstructing the tomographic image (f.sub.j) based on the detector data (y.sub.i), said reconstructing step including a procedure of minimizing a functional F(f) depending on the detector data (y.sub.i) and the system matrix A.sub.ij and additionally including a sparse or compressive representation of the object (1) in an orthobasis T, wherein the tomographic image (f.sub.j) represents the global minimum of the functional F(f). Furthermore, an imaging method and an imaging device using the image reconstruction method are described.

  18. Addition of Tomographic Capabilities to NMIS

    SciTech Connect

    Mullens, J.A.

    2003-03-11

    This paper describes tomographic capabilities for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS). The tomographic capabilities add weapons component spatial and material properties information that result in a more detailed item signature (template) and provide more information for physical attributes analyses. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) is used routinely to confirm the identity of HEU components in sealed containers. It does this through a radiation signature acquired by shining a {sup 252}Cf source through the container and measuring the radiation at four detectors stacked vertically on the other side. This measurement gives a gamma and neutron radiation transmission profile of the weapons component, mixed with the radiation production due to the induced fissions in the fissile materials. This information is sufficient to match an ''unknown'' weapons component signature to a template signature from a reference item when measuring under controlled conditions. Tomography measures the interior of an item by making transmission measurements from all angles around the item, whereas NMIS makes the measurements from a single angle. Figure 1 is a standard example of tomographic reconstruction, the Shepp-Logan human brain phantom. The measured quantity is attenuation so high values (white) are highly attenuating areas.

  19. Quantitative assessment of photoacoustic tomography systems integrating clinical ultrasound transducers using novel tissue-simulating phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) systems based on commercial ultrasound instruments have the benefit of dualmodality imaging, which increases their appeal from a clinical standpoint. However, factors that influence PAT system performance have not been thoroughly investigated and standardized test methods have not been established for image quality evaluation. To address these issues we have adapted phantom-based approaches from ultrasound imaging standards and implemented them to assess a PAT system developed for vascular imaging. Our system comprises a tunable near-infrared pulsed laser and a commercial ultrasound imaging system, including four interchangeable linear array clinical ultrasound transducers with varying center frequencies, acoustic bandwidths and geometries. Phantoms consisted of a customized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastisol gel that simulates both optical and acoustic properties of breast tissue. One phantom incorporates a sub-resolution filament array suitable for bimodal ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging, while another contains an array of hemoglobin-filled cylindrical inclusions at various depths. Key performance characteristics were evaluated, including spatial resolution, signal uniformity, contrast, and penetration depth. These characteristics were evaluated at 750 nm at radiant exposures below ANSI safety limits. Effects of transducer properties on imaging performance were evaluated. Axial and lateral resolution ranged from 0.27-0.83 mm and 0.28-1.8 mm, respectively, and penetration depths from 1.9-4.2 cm were achieved. These results demonstrate variation in PAT system performance based on clinical transducer selection, as well as the utility of realistic phantom-based test methods in performing benchtop evaluations of system performance.

  20. Thermal stability of biodegradable plasmonic nanoclusters in photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Soon Joon; Murthy, Avinash; Johnston, Keith P.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2012-01-01

    The photothermal stability of plasmonic nanoparticles is critically important to perform reliable photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy. Recently, biodegradable nanoclusters composed of sub-5 nm primary gold particles and a biodegradable polymer have been reported as clinically-translatable contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. After cellular internalization, the nanoclusters degrade into 5 nm primary particles for efficient excretion from the body. In this paper, three different sizes of biodegradable nanoclusters were synthesized and the optical properties and photothermal stability of the nanoclusters were investigated and compared to that of gold nanorods. The results of our study indicate that 40 nm and 80 nm biodegradable nanoclusters demonstrate higher photothermal stability compared to gold nanorods. Furthermore, 40 nm nanoclusters produce higher photoacoustic signal than gold nanorods at a given concentration of gold. Therefore, the biodegradable plasmonic nanoclusters can be effectively used for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy. PMID:23388774

  1. Thermal stability of biodegradable plasmonic nanoclusters in photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soon Joon; Murthy, Avinash; Johnston, Keith P; Sokolov, Konstantin V; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2012-12-31

    The photothermal stability of plasmonic nanoparticles is critically important to perform reliable photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy. Recently, biodegradable nanoclusters composed of sub-5 nm primary gold particles and a biodegradable polymer have been reported as clinically-translatable contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. After cellular internalization, the nanoclusters degrade into 5 nm primary particles for efficient excretion from the body. In this paper, three different sizes of biodegradable nanoclusters were synthesized and the optical properties and photothermal stability of the nanoclusters were investigated and compared to that of gold nanorods. The results of our study indicate that 40 nm and 80 nm biodegradable nanoclusters demonstrate higher photothermal stability compared to gold nanorods. Furthermore, 40 nm nanoclusters produce higher photoacoustic signal than gold nanorods at a given concentration of gold. Therefore, the biodegradable plasmonic nanoclusters can be effectively used for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy.

  2. Modeling skull's acoustic attenuation and dispersion on photoacoustic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, L.; Behnam, H.; Nasiriavanaki, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    Despite the great promising results of a recent new transcranial photoacoustic brain imaging technology, it has been shown that the presence of the skull severely affects the performance of this imaging modality. In this paper, we investigate the effect of skull on generated photoacoustic signals with a mathematical model. The developed model takes into account the frequency dependence attenuation and acoustic dispersion effects occur with the wave reflection and refraction at the skull surface. Numerical simulations based on the developed model are performed for calculating the propagation of photoacoustic waves through the skull. From the simulation results, it was found that the skull-induced distortion becomes very important and the reconstructed image would be strongly distorted without correcting these effects. In this regard, it is anticipated that an accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in transcranial photoacoustic brain imaging.

  3. Application of the Pulsed Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in Biomedicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Juarez, G.; Sims, M. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Viator, J. A.

    2008-08-11

    The use of optical spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool in biomedical applications and research has grown considerably in the last two decades. One of them is the pulsed photoacoustic or optoacoustic, which promises to be one of the most important tools for disease diagnostic studies, because while most spectroscopies exploit the optical nature of the light-tissue interaction, this field of photoacoustics uses optical energy to generate an acoustic wave which propagates in the tissue environment. The acoustic wave propagation is fundamentally related to various tissue properties and an analysis of the wave dynamics can provide insights into these properties. This work presents a review on pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy of several photoacoustic methods to derive information about tissue and tissue phantoms.

  4. Cylindrical mirror multipass Lissajous system for laser photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lu-yuan; Qiang, Shi; Wu, Guo-rong; Qi, Li; Feng, Dang; Zhu, Qing-shi; Hong, Zhang

    2002-05-01

    A simple optical multiple reflection system is developed with two cylindrical concave mirrors at an appropriate spacing. The two cylindrical mirrors have different focal lengths and their principal sections are orthogonal. The alternate focusing of the two cylindrical mirrors at different direction keep the reflecting spots small. The reflecting spots fall on Lissajous patterns on the cylindrical mirrors. The mathematics for this optical system is described and the calculated coordinates of beam spots are very close matches of the experimental observations. The cylindrical mirror optical system is easy to construct and align, with a suitable method for obtaining long optical paths and a large number of passes in small volumes. In a photoacoustic spectrometer the beam family enhance the effective power in the photoacoustic cell and thus the signal-to-noise ratio of photoacoustic signal. An experimental result for photoacoustic spectrum of HDSe gas is given.

  5. Water-soluble dopamine-based polymers for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Repenko, Tatjana; Fokong, Stanley; De Laporte, Laura; Go, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan; Kuehne, Alexander J C

    2015-04-11

    Here we present a facile synthetic method yielding a linear form of polydopamine via Kumada-coupling, which can be converted into water-soluble melanin, generating high contrast in photoacoustic imaging.

  6. On the speckle-free nature of photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zijian; Li, Li; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A long-standing conundrum is why photoacoustic tomography (PAT) possesses the unique ability to produce images devoid of speckle artifacts while all other coherent imaging technologies do not. Methods: In this paper, we explain the inherent mechanism that suppresses speckle in PAT, and the analysis was validated by simulations based on an experimental PAT system. Results: We found that the speckle-free feature of PAT results directly from the optical absorption contrast. Conclusions: All optical absorbers expand on laser excitation, and therefore all initial photoacoustic pressure rises are positive, which engenders strong correlations among the photoacoustic waves from the absorbers. As a result, prominent boundaries always build up in photoacoustic images and suppress the interior speckle. PMID:19810480

  7. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oncology: Translational Preclinical and Early Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Valluru, Keerthi S.; Wilson, Katheryne E.

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has evolved into a clinically translatable platform with the potential to complement existing imaging techniques for the management of cancer, including detection, characterization, prognosis, and treatment monitoring. In photoacoustic imaging, tissue is optically excited to produce ultrasonographic images that represent a spatial map of optical absorption of endogenous constituents such as hemoglobin, fat, melanin, and water or exogenous contrast agents such as dyes and nanoparticles. It can therefore provide functional and molecular information that allows noninvasive soft-tissue characterization. Photoacoustic imaging has matured over the years and is currently being translated into the clinic with various clinical studies underway. In this review, the current state of photoacoustic imaging is presented, including techniques and instrumentation, followed by a discussion of potential clinical applications of this technique for the detection and management of cancer. © RSNA, 2016 PMID:27429141

  8. Fast integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changhoon; Cho, Seunghee; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Sungjo; Park, Hyoeun; Kim, Jinmoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Kang, Yeonsu; Jang, Kiyuk; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    In cardiology, a vulnerable plaque is considered to be a key subject because it is strongly related to atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. Because conventional intravascular imaging devices exhibit several limitations with regard to vulnerable plaque detection, the need for an effective lipid imaging modality has been continuously suggested. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a medical imaging technique with a high level of ultrasound (US) resolution and strong optical contrast. In this study, we successfully developed an integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound (IV-PAUS) imaging system with a catheter diameter of 1.2 mm for lipid-rich atherosclerosis imaging. An Nd:YAG pulsed laser with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm was utilized. IV-PAUS offers 5-mm depth penetration and axial and lateral PA imaging resolutions of 94 μm and 203 μm, respectively, as determined by imaging a 6-μm carbon fiber. We initially obtained 3-dimensional (3D) co-registered PA/US images of metal stents. Subsequently, we successfully obtained 3D coregistered PA/US ex vivo images using an iliac artery from a rabbit atherosclerosis model. Accordingly, lipid-rich plaques were sufficiently differentiated from normal tissue in the ex vivo experiment. We validated these findings histologically to confirm the lipid content.

  9. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of diabetic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Arie; Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-06-01

    We used functional photoacoustic microscopy to image diabetes-induced damage to the microvasculature. To produce an animal model for Type 1 diabetes, we used streptozotocin (STZ), which is particularly toxic to the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas in mammals. A set number of ND4 Swiss Webster mice received intraperitoneal injections of STZ for five consecutive days at 50 mg/kg. Most mice developed a significant rise in blood glucose level (≈ 400 mg/dL) within three weeks of the first injection. Changes in vasculature and hemodynamics were monitored for six weeks. The mouse ear was imaged with an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope at a main blood vessel branch from the root of the ear. There are noticeable and measurable changes associated with the disease, including decreased vessel diameter and possible occlusion due to vessel damage and polyurea. We also observed an increase in the blood flow speed in the vein and a decrease in the artery, which could be due to compensation for the dehydration and vessel diameter changes. Functional and metabolic parameters such as hemoglobin oxygen saturation, oxygen extraction fraction, and oxygen consumption rate were also measured, but showed no significant change.

  10. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of diabetic vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Arie; Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-06-01

    We used functional photoacoustic microscopy to image diabetes-induced damage to the microvasculature. To produce an animal model for Type 1 diabetes, we used streptozotocin (STZ), which is particularly toxic to the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas in mammals. A set number of ND4 Swiss Webster mice received intraperitoneal injections of STZ for five consecutive days at 50 mg/kg. Most mice developed a significant rise in blood glucose level (~400 mg/dL) within three weeks of the first injection. Changes in vasculature and hemodynamics were monitored for six weeks. The mouse ear was imaged with an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope at a main blood vessel branch from the root of the ear. There are noticeable and measurable changes associated with the disease, including decreased vessel diameter and possible occlusion due to vessel damage and polyurea. We also observed an increase in the blood flow speed in the vein and a decrease in the artery, which could be due to compensation for the dehydration and vessel diameter changes. Functional and metabolic parameters such as hemoglobin oxygen saturation, oxygen extraction fraction, and oxygen consumption rate were also measured, but showed no significant change.

  11. A UV-Vis photoacoustic spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Joseph R; Mathews, L Dalila; Smith, Geoffrey D

    2014-06-17

    A novel photoacoustic spectrophotometer (PAS) for the measurement of gas-phase and aerosol absorption over the UV-visible region of the spectrum is described. Light from a broadband Hg arc lamp is filtered in eight separate bands from 300 to 700 nm using bandpass interference filters (centered at 301 nm, 314 nm, 364 nm, 405 nm, 436 nm, 546 nm, 578 and 687 nm) and modulated with an optical chopper before entering the photoacoustic cell. All wavelength bands feature a 20-s detection limit of better than 3.0 Mm(-1) with the exception of the lower-intensity 687 nm band for which it is 10.2 Mm(-1). Validation measurements of gas-phase acetone and nigrosin aerosol absorption cross sections at several wavelengths demonstrate agreement to within 10% with those measured previously (for acetone) and those predicted by Mie theory (for nigrosin). The PAS instrument is used to measure the UV-visible absorption spectrum of ambient aerosol demonstrating a dramatic increase in the UV region with absorption increasing by 300% from 405 to 301 nm. This type of measurement throughout the UV-visible region and free from artifacts associated with filter-based methods has not been possible previously, and we demonstrate its promise for classifying and quantifying different types of light-absorbing ambient particles.

  12. Advanced laser systems for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, Marc; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Gross, Daniel; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-03-01

    We describe the ongoing development of laser systems for advanced photoacoustic imaging (PAI). We discuss the characteristics of these laser systems and their particular benefits for soft tissue imaging and next-generation breast cancer diagnostics. We provide an overview of laser performance and compare this with other laser systems that have been used for early-stage development of PAI. These advanced systems feature higher pulse energy output at clinically relevant repetition rates, as well as a novel wavelength-cycling output pulse format. Wavelength cycling provides pulse sequences for which the output repeatedly alternates between two wavelengths that provide differential imaging. This capability improves co-registration of captured differential images. We present imaging results of phantoms obtained with a commercial ultrasound detector system and a wavelength-cycling laser source providing ~500 mJ/pulse at 755 and 797 nm, operating at 25 Hz. The results include photoacoustic images and corresponding pulse-echo data from a tissue mimicking phantom containing inclusions, simulating tumors in the breast. We discuss the application of these systems to the contrast-enhanced detection of various tissue types and tumors.

  13. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of diabetic vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Krumholz, Arie; Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We used functional photoacoustic microscopy to image diabetes-induced damage to the microvasculature. To produce an animal model for Type 1 diabetes, we used streptozotocin (STZ), which is particularly toxic to the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas in mammals. A set number of ND4 Swiss Webster mice received intraperitoneal injections of STZ for five consecutive days at 50 mg/kg. Most mice developed a significant rise in blood glucose level (∼400 mg/dL) within three weeks of the first injection. Changes in vasculature and hemodynamics were monitored for six weeks. The mouse ear was imaged with an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope at a main blood vessel branch from the root of the ear. There are noticeable and measurable changes associated with the disease, including decreased vessel diameter and possible occlusion due to vessel damage and polyurea. We also observed an increase in the blood flow speed in the vein and a decrease in the artery, which could be due to compensation for the dehydration and vessel diameter changes. Functional and metabolic parameters such as hemoglobin oxygen saturation, oxygen extraction fraction, and oxygen consumption rate were also measured, but showed no significant change. PMID:22734725

  14. Bone assessment via thermal photoacoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Tian, Chao; Perosky, Joseph; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Deng, Cheri X.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility of an innovative biomedical diagnostic technique, thermal photoacoustic (TPA) measurement, for nonionizing and non-invasive assessment of bone health is investigated. Unlike conventional photoacoustic PA methods which are mostly focused on the measurement of absolute signal intensity, TPA targets the change in PA signal intensity as a function of the sample temperature, i.e. the temperature dependent Grueneisen parameter which is closely relevant to the chemical and molecular properties in the sample. Based on the differentiation measurement, the results from TPA technique is less susceptible to the variations associated with sample and system, and could be quantified with improved accurately. Due to the fact that the PA signal intensity from organic components such as blood changes faster than that from non-organic mineral under the same modulation of temperature, TPA measurement is able to objectively evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) and its loss as a result of osteoporosis. In an experiment on well established rat models of bone loss and preservation, PA measurements of rat tibia bones were conducted over a temperature range from 370 C to 440 C. The slope of PA signal intensity verses temperature was quantified for each specimen. The comparison among three groups of specimens with different BMD shows that bones with lower BMD have higher slopes, demonstrating the potential of the proposed TPA technique in future clinical management of osteoporosis.

  15. Bone Assessment via Thermal Photoacoustic Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Tian, Chao; Perosky, Joseph E.; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Du, Sidan

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of an innovative biomedical diagnostic technique, thermal photoacoustic (TPA) measurement, for non-ionizing and non-invasive assessment of bone health is investigated. Unlike conventional photoacoustic PA methods which are mostly focused on the measurement of absolute signal intensity, TPA targets the change in PA signal intensity as a function of the sample temperature, i.e. the temperature dependent Grueneisen parameter which is closely relevant to the chemical and molecular properties in the sample. Based on the differentiation measurement, the results from TPA technique are less susceptible to the variations associated with sample and system, and could be quantified with improved accurately. Due to the fact that the PA signal intensity from organic components such as blood changes faster than that from non-organic mineral under the same modulation of temperature, TPA measurement is able to objectively evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) and its loss as a result of osteoporosis. In an experiment on well-established rat models of bone loss and preservation, PA measurements of rat tibia bones were conducted over a temperature range from 37 °C to 44 °C. The slope of PA signal intensity verses temperature was quantified for each specimen. The comparison among three groups of specimens with different BMD shows that bones with lower BMD have higher slopes, demonstrating the potential of the proposed TPA technique in future clinical management of osteoporosis. PMID:25872057

  16. COMPAS: Compositional mineralogy with a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. Hayden

    1992-01-01

    There is an important need for an in situ method of mineral and rock identification and quantification that provides true absorption spectra for a wide spectral range for lunar lander/rover missions. Many common minerals such as feldspars, magnetite, ilmenite, and amorphous fine solids or glasses, can exhibit flat spectral reflectances in the 400-2500 nm spectral region that render inaccurate or difficult their spectral detection and quantitative analysis. Ideal rock and mineral spectra are, of course, pure absorption spectra that are independent of the spectral effects of scattering, particle size, and distribution that can result in a suppression or distortion of their spectral features. This ideal seldom pertains to real samples. Since sample preparation is difficult and may fundamentally alter the observed diffuse spectral reflectance, an in situ spectral measurement method for rocks and minerals on the Moon, insensitive to the sample morphology, would be invaluable. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a well-established technique appropriate for this task that has been widely applied in condensed-phase spectral studies of complex, highly light scattering, unprepared samples of everything from coal to whole blood, including rock and mineral characterization. A Compositional Mineralogy Photoacoustic Spectrometer, or COMPAS, can enable in situ spectral measurement of rocks and minerals, bypassing the major limitations of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. COMPAS spectral capabilities for rock and mineral samples will be incorporated into an instrument prototype specifically for lunar measurements, compatible with rover capabilities.

  17. Photoacoustic study of the photostability of sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Cruz, V. M. F. R.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Barja, P. R.

    2008-01-01

    Although solar radiation is essential for maintenance of life in Earth, excessive exposition to the ultraviolet radiation emitted by the sun may cause sunburns, early aging and even cancer lesions. Sunscreens act absorbing or reflecting ultraviolet radiation; in this way, they protect the skin against the damages caused by excessive absorption of ultraviolet radiation. Sunscreens must present photostability, that is the capacity of a product to be retained in skin without degradation by light incidence. The present study aimed to evaluate, through photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) measurements, the photostability of a sunscreen commercially available in Brazil. PAS measurements were performed at 19 Hz, for wavelengths between 270 nm and 400 nm, using a sunscreen with solar protection factor (SPF) 15 applied in skin samples. Photoacoustic spectra of the sunscreen applied to the skin were obtained and analyzed as a function of time after application. Photostability was then evaluated by the comparative study of the integrated areas of the absorption curves for the sunscreen applied to the skin. Results indicate that the sunscreen analyzed was photostable for a large period and was not completely removed by cleaning.

  18. Photoacoustic microtomography using optical interferometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuster, Robert; Holotta, Markus; Kremser, Christian; Grossauer, Harald; Burgholzer, Peter; Paltauf, Günther

    2010-03-01

    A device for three-dimensional (3-D) photoacoustic tomography with resolution in the range of tens of micrometers is presented that uses a light beam for interferometric detection of acoustic waves. Reconstruction of the 3-D initial pressure distribution from the signals representing line integrals of the acoustic field is a two-step process. It uses an inversion of 2-D wave propagation to obtain line projections of the initial pressure distribution and the inverse Radon transform. The light beam, propagating freely in a water bath, is scanned either in an arc- or box-shaped curve around the object. Simulations are performed to compare the two scanning procedures. The projection images are obtained either using the filtered back projection algorithm for the π-arc scanning mode or the frequency domain algorithm for the box scanning mode. While the former algorithm provides slightly better image quality, the latter is about 20 times faster. The ability of the photoacoustic tomography device to create 3-D images with constant resolution throughout the reconstruction volume is demonstrated experimentally using a human hair phantom. These measurements revealed a 3-D resolution below 100 μm. In a second experiment, 3-D imaging of an isolated mouse heart is demonstrated to show the applicability for preclinical and biological research.

  19. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yao, Da-Kang; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-02-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has achieved submicron lateral resolution in showing subcellular structures; however, relatively few endogenous subcellular contrasts have so far been imaged. Given that the hemeprotein, mostly cytochromes in general cells, is optically absorbing around the Soret peak (~420 nm), we implemented label-free PAM of cytochromes in cytoplasm for the first time. By measuring the photoacoustic spectra of the oxidized and reduced states of fibroblast lysate and fitting the difference spectrum with three types of cytochromes, we found that the three cytochromes account for more than half the optical absorption in the cell lysate at 420 nm wavelength. Fixed fibroblasts on slides were imaged by PAM at 422 and 250 nm wavelengths to reveal cytoplasms and nuclei, respectively, as confirmed by standard staining histology. PAM was also applied to label-free histology of mouse ear sections by showing cytoplasms and nuclei of various cells. PAM of cytochromes in cytoplasm is expected to be a high-throughput, label-free technique for studying live cell functions, which cannot be accomplished by conventional histology.

  20. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of cytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yao, Da-Kang; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-02-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has achieved submicron lateral resolution in showing subcellular structures; however, relatively few endogenous subcellular contrasts have so far been imaged. Given that the hemeprotein, mostly cytochromes in general cells, is optically absorbing around the Soret peak (˜420 nm), we implemented label-free PAM of cytochromes in cytoplasm for the first time. By measuring the photoacoustic spectra of the oxidized and reduced states of fibroblast lysate and fitting the difference spectrum with three types of cytochromes, we found that the three cytochromes account for more than half the optical absorption in the cell lysate at 420 nm wavelength. Fixed fibroblasts on slides were imaged by PAM at 422 and 250 nm wavelengths to reveal cytoplasms and nuclei, respectively, as confirmed by standard staining histology. PAM was also applied to label-free histology of mouse ear sections by showing cytoplasms and nuclei of various cells. PAM of cytochromes in cytoplasm is expected to be a high-throughput, label-free technique for studying live cell functions, which cannot be accomplished by conventional histology.

  1. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of cytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yao, Da-Kang; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has achieved submicron lateral resolution in showing subcellular structures; however, relatively few endogenous subcellular contrasts have so far been imaged. Given that the hemeprotein, mostly cytochromes in general cells, is optically absorbing around the Soret peak (∼420  nm), we implemented label-free PAM of cytochromes in cytoplasm for the first time. By measuring the photoacoustic spectra of the oxidized and reduced states of fibroblast lysate and fitting the difference spectrum with three types of cytochromes, we found that the three cytochromes account for more than half the optical absorption in the cell lysate at 420 nm wavelength. Fixed fibroblasts on slides were imaged by PAM at 422 and 250 nm wavelengths to reveal cytoplasms and nuclei, respectively, as confirmed by standard staining histology. PAM was also applied to label-free histology of mouse ear sections by showing cytoplasms and nuclei of various cells. PAM of cytochromes in cytoplasm is expected to be a high-throughput, label-free technique for studying live cell functions, which cannot be accomplished by conventional histology. PMID:23370407

  2. Laser photoacoustic sensor for air toxicity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Coorg R.; Lei, Jie; Shi, Wenhui; Li, Guangkun; Dunayevskiy, Ilya; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2012-06-01

    US EPA's Clean Air Act lists 187 hazardous air pollutants (HAP) or airborne toxics that are considered especially harmful to health, and hence the measurement of their concentration is of great importance. Numerous sensor systems have been reported for measuring these toxic gases and vapors. However, most of these sensors are specific to a single gas or able to measure only a few of them. Thus a sensor capable of measuring many of the toxic gases simultaneously is desirable. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) sensors have the potential for true broadband measurement when used in conjunction with one or more widely tunable laser sources. An LPAS gas analyzer equipped with a continuous wave, room temperature IR Quantum Cascade Laser tunable over the wavelength range of 9.4 μm to 9.7 μm was used for continuous real-time measurements of multiple gases/chemical components. An external cavity grating tuner was used to generate several (75) narrow line output wavelengths to conduct photoacoustic absorption measurements of gas mixtures. We have measured various HAPs such as Benzene, Formaldehyde, and Acetaldehyde in the presence of atmospheric interferents water vapor, and carbon dioxide. Using the preliminary spectral pattern recognition algorithm, we have shown our ability to measure all these chemical compounds simultaneously in under 3 minutes. Sensitivity levels of a few part-per-billion (ppb) were achieved with several of the measured compounds with the preliminary laboratory system.

  3. Diagnostic of human teeth using photoacoustic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.; Badr, Y.; Gadallah, M.; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.

    2006-02-01

    Laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LIPS) can be used to measure trace-element concentration in materials, down to parts-per-million. In this paper we investigate the use of laser-induced photoacoustic response in carious teeth detection. First, we found the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser of a wavelength of 1064 nm to produce detectable response in teeth. Then, we implemented two detection techniques using a piezoelectric transducer and Michelson Interferometer. The accurately detected response of a tooth sample by the piezoelectric transducer was analyzed using spectral analysis. However, in dentistry we do not necessarily mead an exact quantitative measurement; thus we designed a more physically realizable system that measures the acoustically-induced surface displacement using Michelson Interferometer. Monitoring this surface displacement we were able to determine the physical and optical properties of the tooth sample which could be used as a basis in diagnostics. The responses obtained by both detectors were equally confined to the categorization of a carious tooth from a normal one.

  4. Gold nanorods: contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, C.; Gopal, R. Raja; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Manohar, S.

    2007-07-01

    Gold nanorods are seen as possible contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging since they have strong absorption peaks at near-infrared wavelengths. Also they are easy to conjugate with various proteins. If these particles can be conjugated with cancer affinity proteins then these particles can accumulate specifically at a tumor site. By detecting the presence of accumulation of gold nanorods inside the tissue the indirect detection of tumor can be realized. When these particles are irradiated with light pulses of appropriate temporal properties and energy the temperature around these particles can be high enough to induce apoptosis or necrosis in the surrounding cells. In order to use these particles at their full potential we must determine precisely their optical properties. We simulated the optical properties of gold nanorods synthesized by us using the DDSCAT code. The simulated spectra agree qualitatively with the spectra determined using spectrometry and also determined using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Further the values of molar extinction coefficient derived from the simulations were similar to the data measured experimentally by other groups. These results validated qualitatively the model used in the simulations. During simulations we found that the choice of the dielectric function used in simulations plays an important role in the results.

  5. Combined photoacoustic and acoustic imaging of human breast specimens in the mammographic geometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhixing; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J Brian; Pinsky, Renee W; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2013-11-01

    A photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system was designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3-D ultrasound (AUS). The goal of the work described here was to validate the design and evaluate its performance in human breast tissues for non-invasive imaging of deeply positioned structures covering such geometry. The good penetration of near-infrared light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad-bandwidth, 572-element, 2-D polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) array at a low center frequency of 1 MHz were used with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. Pseudo-lesions filled with dilute blood were imaged in three human breast specimens at various depths up to 49 mm. With near-infrared light illumination and 256-sample averaging, the extrapolated maximum depth in imaging a 2.4-mm blood-rich lesion with a 3-dB contrast-to-noise ratio in a compressed breast was 54 mm. Three-dimensional photoacoustic volume image stacks of the breasts were co-registered with 3-D ultrasound image stacks, suggesting for the first time that PAVI, based on the intrinsic tissue contrast, can visualize tissue interfaces other than those with blood, including the inner skin surface and connective tissue sheets. With the designed system, PAVI revealed satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides in the mammographic geometry with mild compression.

  6. Toward the detection of intraplaque hemorrhage in carotid artery lesions using photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabul, Mustafa Umit; Heres, Maarten; Rutten, Marcel C. M.; van Sambeek, Marc R.; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Lopata, Richard G. P.

    2017-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) may have the ability to reveal the composition and the anatomical structure of carotid plaques, which determines its mechanical properties and vulnerability. We used PAI and plane wave ultrasound (PUS) imaging to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) images of endarterectomy samples ex vivo and compared the results with histology to investigate the potential of PAI-based identification of intraplaque hemorrhage. Seven carotid plaque samples were obtained from patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy and imaged with a fully integrated hand-held photoacoustic (PA) probe, consisting of a pulsed diode laser (tpulse=130 ns, Epulse=1 mJ, λ=808 nm) and a linear array transducer (fc=7.5 MHz). The samples were rotated 360 deg with 10 deg steps, and data were spatially compounded to obtain complete 3-D images of the plaques. Areas of high absorption in the 3-D datasets were identified and compared to histological data of the plaques. Data in six out of seven endarterectomy samples revealed the presence of intraplaque hemorrhages that were not visible in the PUS images. Due to the noninvasive nature of PAI, this ex vivo study may elucidate preclinical studies toward the in vivo, noninvasive, vulnerability assessment of the atherosclerotic carotid plaque.

  7. Low-noise small-size microring ultrasonic detectors for high-resolution photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Small size polymer microring resonators have been exploited for photoacoustic (PA) imaging. To demonstrate the advantages of the wide acceptance angle of ultrasound detection of small size microrings, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), and delay-and-sum beamforming PA imaging was conducted. In PAT, we compared the imaging quality using different sizes of detectors with similar noise-equivalent pressures and the same wideband response: 500 μm hydrophone and 100, 60, and 40 μm microrings. The results show significantly improved imaging contrast and high resolution over the whole imaging region using smaller size detectors. The uniform high resolution in PAT imaging using 40 μm microrings indicates the potential to resolve microvasculature over a large imaging region. The improved lateral resolution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional delay-and-sum beamforming PA imaging using a synthetic array demonstrate another advantageous application of small microrings. The small microrings can also be applied to other ultrasound-related imaging applications. PMID:21639569

  8. Comparison of transrectal photoacoustic, Doppler, and magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Horiguchi, Akio; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Irisawa, Kaku; Wada, Takatsugu; Asano, Tomohiko

    2016-03-01

    Transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) is the most popular imaging modality for diagnosing and treating prostate cancer. TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is mandatory for the histological diagnosis of patients with elevated serum prostatespecific antigen (PSA), but its diagnostic accuracy is not satisfactory due to TRUS's low resolution. As a result, a considerable number of patients are required to undergo an unnecessary repeated biopsy. Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) can be used to provide microvascular network imaging using hemoglobin as an intrinsic, optical absorption molecule. We developed an original TRUS-type PAI probe consisting of a micro-convex array transducer with an optical illumination system to provide superimposed PAI and ultrasound images. TRUS-type PAI has the advantage of having much higher resolution and greater contrast than does Doppler TRUS. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of the transrectal PAI system. We performed a clinical trial to compare the image of the cancerous area obtained by transrectal PAI with that obtained by TRUS Doppler during prostate biopsy. The obtained prostate biopsy cores were stained with anti-CD34 antibodies to provide a microvascular distribution map. We also confirmed its consistency with PAI and pre-biopsy MRI findings. Our study demonstrated that transrectal identification of tumor angiogenesis under superimposed photoacoustic and ultrasound images was easier than that under TRUS alone. We recognized a consistent relationship between PAI and MRI findings in most cases. However, there were no correspondences in some cases.

  9. Comparison of photoacoustic image reconstruction algorithms using the channelized Hotelling observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petschke, Adam; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of task-based image-quality metrics to compare various photoacoustic image-reconstruction algorithms, including a method based on the pseudoinverse of the system matrix, simple backprojection, filtered backprojection, and a method based on the Fourier transform. We use a three-dimensional forward model with a linear transducer array to simulate a photoacoustic imaging system. The reconstructed images correspond with two-dimensional slices of the object and are 128×128 pixels. In order to compare the algorithms, we use channelized Hotelling observers that predict the detection ability of human observers. We use two sets of channels: constant Q and difference of Gaussian spatial frequency channels. We look at three tasks, identification of a point source in a uniform background, identification of a 0.5-mm cube in a uniform background, and identification of a point source in a lumpy background. For the lumpy background task, which is the most realistic of the tasks, the method based on the pseudoinverse performs best according to both sets of channels.

  10. k-Wave: MATLAB toolbox for the simulation and reconstruction of photoacoustic wave fields.

    PubMed

    Treeby, Bradley E; Cox, B T

    2010-01-01

    A new, freely available third party MATLAB toolbox for the simulation and reconstruction of photoacoustic wave fields is described. The toolbox, named k-Wave, is designed to make realistic photoacoustic modeling simple and fast. The forward simulations are based on a k-space pseudo-spectral time domain solution to coupled first-order acoustic equations for homogeneous or heterogeneous media in one, two, and three dimensions. The simulation functions can additionally be used as a flexible time reversal image reconstruction algorithm for an arbitrarily shaped measurement surface. A one-step image reconstruction algorithm for a planar detector geometry based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT) is also included. The architecture and use of the toolbox are described, and several novel modeling examples are given. First, the use of data interpolation is shown to considerably improve time reversal reconstructions when the measurement surface has only a sparse array of detector points. Second, by comparison with one-step, FFT-based reconstruction, time reversal is shown to be sufficiently general that it can also be used for finite-sized planar measurement surfaces. Last, the optimization of computational speed is demonstrated through parallel execution using a graphics processing unit.

  11. Photoacoustic Chemical Sensing: Ultracompact Sources and Standoff Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    design. This design includes quantum cascade laser ( QCL )-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-scale photoacoustic sensors that provide detection...limits at parts-per-billion (ppb) levels for chemical targets. Current gas sensing research utilizes an ultra compact QCL , SpriteIR, in combination...with a MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell for trace gas detection. At approximately one tenth the size of a standard commercially available QCL

  12. Modification of a commercial spectrophotometer for photoacoustic measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Harris, J.M.; Eyring, E.M.

    1983-11-01

    This note describes how a commercial UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer may be adapted to function as a double beam photoacoustic spectrophotometer operating at visible wavelengths. Modification of a Varian Cary 17 spectrophotometer was carried out first by dismounting the photomultiplier tube detector module and the cell compartment of the spectrophotometer. The sample and the reference beams were focused through two externally mounted quartz lenses onto the sample and reference photoacoustic cells, respectively.

  13. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography based on the radiative transfer equation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lei; Sun, Yao; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-06-15

    We describe a method for quantitative photoacoustic tomography (PAT) based on the radiative transfer equation (RTE) coupled with the Helmholtz photoacoustic wave equation. This RTE-based quantitative PAT allows for accurate recovery of absolute absorption coefficient images of heterogeneous media and provides significantly improved image reconstruction for the cases where the photon diffusion approximation may fail. The method and associated finite element reconstruction algorithm are validated using a series of tissuelike phantom experiments.

  14. A photoacoustic technique to measure the properties of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to non-invasively determine the diameter and sound speed of single cells using a combined ultrasonic and photoacoustic technique. Two cell lines, B16-F1 melanoma cells and MCF7 breast cancer cells were examined using this technique. Using a 200 MHz transducer, the ultrasound backscatter from a single cell in suspension was recorded. Immediately following, the cell was irradiated with a 532 nm laser and the resulting photoacoustic wave recorded by the same transducer. The melanoma cells contain optically absorbing melanin particles, which facilitated photoacoustic wave generation. MCF7 cells have negligible optical absorption at 532 nm; the cells were permeabilized and stained with trypan blue prior to measurements. The measured ultrasound and photoacoustic power spectra were compared to theoretical equations with the cell diameter and sound speed as variables (Anderson scattering model for ultrasound, and a thermoelastic expansion model for photoacoustics). The diameter and sound speed were extracted from the models where the spectral shape matched the measured signals. However the photoacoustic spectrum for the melanoma cell did not match theory, which is likely because melanin particles are located around the cytoplasm, and not within the nucleus. Therefore a photoacoustic finite element model of a cell was developed where the central region was not used to generate a photoacoustic wave. The resulting power spectrum was in better agreement with the measured signal than the thermoelastic expansion model. The MCF7 cell diameter obtained using the spectral matching method was 17.5 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 16 μm, while the melanoma cell diameter obtained was 22 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 21 μm. The sound speed measured from the MCF7 and melanoma cell was 1573 and 1560 m/s, respectively, which is within acceptable values that have been published in literature.

  15. Photoacoustic method for measuring concentration of chemical species

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, S Thomas [West Richland, WA; Posakony, Gerald J [Richland, WA; Amonette, James E [Richland, WA; Foster-Mills, Nancy S [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a transducer for photoacoustic detection having at least two piezoelectric elements wherein at least a first piezoelectric element has a first frequency and at least a second piezoelectric element has a second frequency. The improvement according to the present invention is that at least two piezoelectric elements are longitudinal elements for longitudinal waves; and the first frequency is different from said second frequency. In other words, the invention is a multi-frequency longitudinal transducer for photoacoustic detection.

  16. Contrast-enhanced photoacoustic imaging of live lobster nerve cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Russell S.; Huang, S.; Ashkenazi, S.; Kim, K.; O'Donnell, M.

    2007-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging provides optical contrast with good penetration and high spatial resolution, making it an attractive tool for noninvasive neural applications. We chose a commercial dye (NK2761) commonly used for optical imaging of membrane potential to enhance photoacoustic images of the live lobster nerve cord. The abdominal segment of the nerve cord was excised, stained and positioned in a custom neural recording system, enabling electrical stimulation and recording of compound action potentials. Photoacoustic and pulse echo images were also collected using a commercial ultrasound scanner and a 10-MHz linear probe. A wavelength-tunable pulsed laser source (Surelite TM, 5 ns, ~15 mJ, 30 mJ/cm2) operating at 20 Hz produced photoacoustic waves. Longitudinal photoacoustic scans of a 25-mm segment of the excised nerve cord, including ganglionic and axonal processes, were collected and displayed every 7 seconds. Without the contrast agent, an average of 10 scans produced a peak photoacoustic signal 6 dB over background noise. An additional 29 dB was obtained after the nerve was submerged in the dye for 20 minutes. The gain decreased to 23 dB and 14 dB at 810 nm and 910 nm, respectively - consistent with the dye's optical absorbance measured using a portable spectrometer. The contrast-enhanced photoacoustic signal had a broad spectrum peaking at 4 MHz, and, after high pass filtering, images approached 200-μm spatial resolution. The hybrid imaging system, which provided several hours of electrical stimulation and recording, represents a robust testbed to develop novel photoacoustic contrast for neural applications.

  17. Photoacoustic thermal flowmetry with a single light source.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Lan, Bangxin; Hu, Leo; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Yao, Junjie

    2017-09-01

    We report a photoacoustic thermal flowmetry based on optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) using a single laser source for both thermal tagging and photoacoustic excitation. When an optically absorbing medium is flowing across the optical focal zone of OR-PAM, a small volume of the medium within the optical focus is repeatedly illuminated and heated by a train of laser pulses with a high repetition rate. The average temperature of the heated volume at each laser pulse is indicated by the photoacoustic signal excited by the same laser pulse due to the well-established linear relationship between the Grueneisen coefficient and the local temperature. The thermal dynamics of the heated medium volume, which are closely related to the flow speed, can therefore be measured from the time course of the detected photoacoustic signals. Here, we have developed a lumped mathematical model to describe the time course of the photoacoustic signals as a function of the medium's flow speed. We conclude that the rising time constant of the photoacoustic signals is linearly dependent on the flow speed. Thus, the flow speed can be quantified by fitting the measured photoacoustic signals using the derived mathematical model. We first performed proof-of-concept experiments using defibrinated bovine blood flowing in a plastic tube. The experiment results have demonstrated that the proposed method has high accuracy (∼±6%) and a wide range of measurable flow speeds. We further validated the method by measuring the blood flow speeds of the microvasculature in a mouse ear in vivo. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  18. Multigrid-based reconstruction algorithm for quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengfu; Montcel, Bruno; Yuan, Zhen; Liu, Wanyu; Vray, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a multigrid inversion framework for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction. The forward model of optical fluence distribution and the inverse problem are solved at multiple resolutions. A fixed-point iteration scheme is formulated for each resolution and used as a cost function. The simulated and experimental results for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction show that the proposed multigrid inversion can dramatically reduce the required number of iterations for the optimization process without loss of reliability in the results. PMID:26203371

  19. Biomedical photoacoustics beyond thermal expansion using triggered nanodroplet vaporization for contrast-enhanced imaging.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Katheryne; Homan, Kimberly; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-01-10

    Since being discovered by Alexander Bell, photoacoustics may again be seeing major resurgence in biomedical imaging. Photoacoustics is a non-ionizing, functional imaging modality capable of high contrast images of optical absorption at depths significantly greater than traditional optical imaging techniques. Optical contrast agents have been used to extend photoacoustics to molecular imaging. Here we introduce an exogenous contrast agent that utilizes vaporization for photoacoustic signal generation, providing significantly higher signal amplitude than that from the traditionally used mechanism, thermal expansion. Our agent consists of liquid perfluorocarbon nanodroplets with encapsulated plasmonic nanoparticles, entitled photoacoustic nanodroplets. Upon pulsed laser irradiation, liquid perfluorocarbon undergoes a liquid-to-gas phase transition generating giant photoacoustic transients from these dwarf nanoparticles. Once triggered, the gaseous phase provides ultrasound contrast enhancement. We demonstrate in phantom and animal studies that photoacoustic nanodroplets act as dual-contrast agents for both photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging through optically triggered vaporization.

  20. Simulations of Time Reversing Arrays in Shallow Ocean Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    34Time-reversing array retrofocusing in noisy environments," submitted to J. Acoust. Soc. Am, August 1999. PATENTS Dowling, D.R., and Yonak S.H...34Multiple microphone photoacoustic leak detection and localization system and method," filed October 1998, now pending. [Although this patent was not...directly supported by ONR, the essential idea in this patent is acoustic time reversal.

  1. Circulating tumor cell detection using photoacoustic spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-03-01

    A method to detect and differentiate circulating melanoma tumor cells (CTCs) from blood cells using ultrasound and photoacoustic signals with frequencies over 100 MHz is presented. At these frequencies, the acoustic wavelength is similar to the dimensions of a cell, which results in unique features in the signal; periodically varying minima and maxima occur throughout the power spectrum. The spacing between minima depends on the ratio of the size to sound speed of the cell. Using a 532 nm pulsed laser and a 375 MHz center frequency wide-bandwidth transducer, the ultrasound and photoacoustic signals were measured from single cells. A total of 80 cells were measured, 20 melanoma cells, 20 white blood cells (WBCs) and 40 red blood cells (RBCs). The photoacoustic spectral spacing Δf between minima was 95 +/- 15 MHz for melanoma cells and greater than 230 MHz for RBCs. No photoacoustic signal was detected from WBCs. The ultrasonic spectral spacing between minima was 46 +/- 9 MHz for melanoma cells and 98 +/- 11 for WBCs. Both photoacoustic and ultrasound signals were detected from melanoma cells, while only ultrasound signals were detected from WBCs. RBCs showed distinct photoacoustic spectral variations in comparison to any other type of cell. Using the spectral spacing and signal amplitudes, each cell type could be grouped together to aid in cell identification. This method could be used for label-free counting and classifying cells in a sample.

  2. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of macrophages using molecularly targeted gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Joshi, Pratixa; Sapozhnikova, Veronika; Amirian, James; Litovsky, Silvio H.; Smalling, Richard; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2010-02-01

    Using contrast agents with desired targeting moiety and optical absorption, intravascular photoacoustic imaging may be used to identify various biomarkers expressed during the progression of atherosclerotic lesions. In this paper, we present intravascular photoacoustic imaging of macrophages in the atherosclerotic lesions using bio-conjugated gold nanoparticles as the contrast agent. Atherosclerotic lesions were created in the aorta of a New Zealand white rabbit subjected to a high cholesterol diet and balloon injury. The rabbit was injected with 20 nm spherical gold nanoparticles conjugated with antibodies. The macrophages with internalized gold nanoparticles were imaged by intravascular photoacoustic imaging in the near infrared range; this was possible because of plasmon resonance coupling between closely spaced gold nanoparticles internalized by macrophages. The multi-wavelength intravascular photoacoustic images of the diseased aorta were analyzed to identify the presence and location of macrophages labeled with gold nanoparticles. Spectroscopic intravascular photoacoustic image showing the distribution of gold nanoparticles was further confirmed by the gold-specific silver staining of the tissue crosssection. The results of our study suggest that molecular intravascular photoacoustic imaging can be used to image macrophages in atherosclerosis.

  3. Catheter tracking in an interventional photoacoustic surgical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Itsarachaiyot, Yuttana; Kim, Younsu; Zhang, Haichong K.; Taylor, Russell H.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2017-03-01

    In laparoscopic medical procedures, accurate tracking of interventional tools such as catheters are necessary. Current practice for tracking catheters often involve using fluoroscopy, which is best avoided to minimize radiation dose to the patient and the surgical team. Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging imaging modality that can be used for this purpose and does not currently have a general tool tracking solution. Photoacoustic-based catheter tracking would increase its attractiveness, by providing both an imaging and tracking solution. We present a catheter tracking method based on the photoacoustic effect. Photoacoustic markers are simultaneously observed by a stereo camera as well as a piezoelectric element attached to the tip of a catheter. The signals received by the piezoelectric element can be used to compute its position relative to the photoacoustic markers using multilateration. This combined information can be processed to localize the position of the piezoelectric element with respect to the stereo camera system. We presented the methods to enable this work and demonstrated precisions of 1-3mm and a relative accuracy of less than 4% in four independent locations, which are comparable to conventional systems. In addition, we also showed in another experiment a reconstruction precision up to 0.4mm and an estimated accuracy up to 0.5mm. Future work will include simulations to better evaluate this method and its challenges and the development of concurrent photoacoustic marker projection and its associated methods.

  4. Three-dimensional photoacoustic endoscopic imaging of the rabbit esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joon Mo; Favazza, Christopher; Yao, Junjie; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-01-01

    We report photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopic images of two intact rabbit esophagi. To investigate the esophageal lumen structure and microvasculature, we performed in vivo and ex vivo imaging studies using a 3.8-mm diameter photoacoustic endoscope and correlated the images with histology. Several interesting anatomic structures were newly found in both the in vivo and ex vivo images, which demonstrates the potential clinical utility of this endoscopic imaging modality. In the ex vivo imaging experiment, we acquired high-resolution motion-artifact-free three-dimensional photoacoustic images of the vasculatures distributed in the walls of the esophagi and extending to the neighboring mediastinal regions. Blood vessels with apparent diameters as small as 190 μm were resolved. Moreover, by taking advantage of the dual-mode high-resolution photoacoustic and ultrasound endoscopy, we could better identify and characterize the anatomic structures of the esophageal lumen, such as the mucosal and submucosal layers in the esophageal wall, and an esophageal branch of the thoracic aorta. In this paper, we present the first photoacoustic images showing the vasculature of a vertebrate esophagus and discuss the potential clinical applications and future development of photoacoustic endoscopy.

  5. Photoacoustic-based nanomedicine for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Sim, Changbeom; Kim, Haemin; Moon, Hyungwon; Lee, Hohyeon; Chang, Jin Ho; Kim, Hyuncheol

    2015-04-10

    Photoacoustic imaging is the latest promising diagnostic modality that has various advantages such as high spatial resolution, deep penetration depth, and use of non-ionizing radiation. It also employs a non-invasive imaging technique and optically functionalized imaging. The goal of this study was to develop a nanomedicine for simultaneous cancer therapy and diagnosis based on photoacoustic imaging. Human serum albumin nanoparticles loaded with melanin and paclitaxel (HMP-NPs) were developed using the desolvation technique. The photoacoustic-based diagnostic and chemotherapeutic properties of HMP-NPs were evaluated through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The size and zeta potential of the HMP-NPs were found to be 192.8±21.11nm and -22.2±4.39mV, respectively. In in vitro experiments, HMP-NPs produced increased photoacoustic signal intensity because of the loaded melanin and decreased cellular viability because of the encapsulated paclitaxel, compared to the free human serum albumin nanoparticles (the control). In vivo experiments showed that the HMP-NPs efficiently accumulated inside the tumor, resulting in the enhanced photoacoustic signal intensity in the tumor site, compared to the normal tissues. The in vivo chemotherapy study demonstrated that HMP-NPs had the capability to treat cancer for an extended period. In conclusion, HMP-NPs were simultaneously capable of photoacoustic diagnostic and chemotherapy against cancer.

  6. Quantitative photoacoustic image reconstruction improves accuracy in deep tissue structures.

    PubMed

    Mastanduno, Michael A; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2016-10-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is emerging as a potentially powerful imaging tool with multiple applications. Image reconstruction for PAI has been relatively limited because of limited or no modeling of light delivery to deep tissues. This work demonstrates a numerical approach to quantitative photoacoustic image reconstruction that minimizes depth and spectrally derived artifacts. We present the first time-domain quantitative photoacoustic image reconstruction algorithm that models optical sources through acoustic data to create quantitative images of absorption coefficients. We demonstrate quantitative accuracy of less than 5% error in large 3 cm diameter 2D geometries with multiple targets and within 22% error in the largest size quantitative photoacoustic studies to date (6cm diameter). We extend the algorithm to spectral data, reconstructing 6 varying chromophores to within 17% of the true values. This quantitiative PA tomography method was able to improve considerably on filtered-back projection from the standpoint of image quality, absolute, and relative quantification in all our simulation geometries. We characterize the effects of time step size, initial guess, and source configuration on final accuracy. This work could help to generate accurate quantitative images from both endogenous absorbers and exogenous photoacoustic dyes in both preclinical and clinical work, thereby increasing the information content obtained especially from deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging studies.

  7. In situ photoacoustic characterization for porous silicon growing: Detection principles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Gutierrez, C. F.; Castaño-Yepes, J. D.; Rodriguez-García, M. E.

    2016-05-14

    There are a few methodologies for monitoring the in-situ formation of Porous Silicon (PS). One of the methodologies is photoacoustic. Previous works that reported the use of photoacoustic to study the PS formation do not provide the physical explanation of the origin of the signal. In this paper, a physical explanation of the origin of the photoacoustic signal during the PS etching is provided. The incident modulated radiation and changes in the reflectance are taken as thermal sources. In this paper, a useful methodology is proposed to determine the etching rate, porosity, and refractive index of a PS film by the determination of the sample thickness, using scanning electron microscopy images. This method was developed by carrying out two different experiments using the same anodization conditions. The first experiment consisted of growth of the samples with different etching times to prove the periodicity of the photoacoustic signal, while the second one considered the growth samples using three different wavelengths that are correlated with the period of the photoacoustic signal. The last experiment showed that the period of the photoacoustic signal is proportional to the laser wavelength.

  8. High frame rate photoacoustic imaging using clinical ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivasubramanian, Kathyayini; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a potential hybrid imaging modality which is gaining attention in the field of medical imaging. Typically a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used to excite the tissue and generate photoacoustic signals. But, they are not suitable for clinical applications owing to their high cost, large size. Also, their low pulse repetition rate (PRR) of few tens of hertz prevents them from being used in real-time PAT. So, there is a growing need for an imaging system capable of real-time imaging for various clinical applications. In this work, we are using a nanosecond pulsed laser diode as an excitation source and a clinical ultrasound imaging system to obtain the photoacoustic imaging. The excitation laser is ~803 nm in wavelength with energy of ~1.4 mJ per pulse. So far, the reported frame rate for photoacoustic imaging is only a few hundred Hertz. We have demonstrated up to 7000 frames per second framerate in photoacoustic imaging (B-mode) and measured the flow rate of fast moving obje ct. Phantom experiments were performed to test the fast imaging capability and measure the flow rate of ink solution inside a tube. This fast photoacoustic imaging can be used for various clinical applications including cardiac related problems, where the blood flow rate is quite high, or other dynamic studies.

  9. In situ photoacoustic characterization for porous silicon growing: Detection principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Gutierrez, C. F.; Castaño-Yepes, J. D.; Rodriguez-García, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    There are a few methodologies for monitoring the in-situ formation of Porous Silicon (PS). One of the methodologies is photoacoustic. Previous works that reported the use of photoacoustic to study the PS formation do not provide the physical explanation of the origin of the signal. In this paper, a physical explanation of the origin of the photoacoustic signal during the PS etching is provided. The incident modulated radiation and changes in the reflectance are taken as thermal sources. In this paper, a useful methodology is proposed to determine the etching rate, porosity, and refractive index of a PS film by the determination of the sample thickness, using scanning electron microscopy images. This method was developed by carrying out two different experiments using the same anodization conditions. The first experiment consisted of growth of the samples with different etching times to prove the periodicity of the photoacoustic signal, while the second one considered the growth samples using three different wavelengths that are correlated with the period of the photoacoustic signal. The last experiment showed that the period of the photoacoustic signal is proportional to the laser wavelength.

  10. Quantitative photoacoustic image reconstruction improves accuracy in deep tissue structures

    PubMed Central

    Mastanduno, Michael A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is emerging as a potentially powerful imaging tool with multiple applications. Image reconstruction for PAI has been relatively limited because of limited or no modeling of light delivery to deep tissues. This work demonstrates a numerical approach to quantitative photoacoustic image reconstruction that minimizes depth and spectrally derived artifacts. We present the first time-domain quantitative photoacoustic image reconstruction algorithm that models optical sources through acoustic data to create quantitative images of absorption coefficients. We demonstrate quantitative accuracy of less than 5% error in large 3 cm diameter 2D geometries with multiple targets and within 22% error in the largest size quantitative photoacoustic studies to date (6cm diameter). We extend the algorithm to spectral data, reconstructing 6 varying chromophores to within 17% of the true values. This quantitiative PA tomography method was able to improve considerably on filtered-back projection from the standpoint of image quality, absolute, and relative quantification in all our simulation geometries. We characterize the effects of time step size, initial guess, and source configuration on final accuracy. This work could help to generate accurate quantitative images from both endogenous absorbers and exogenous photoacoustic dyes in both preclinical and clinical work, thereby increasing the information content obtained especially from deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging studies. PMID:27867695

  11. Tomographic spectral imaging: Data acquisition and analysis via multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotula, Paul G.; Sorensen, N. R.

    2011-07-01

    Tomographic spectral imaging is a powerful technique for the three-dimensional (3-D) analysis of materials. Using a focused ion-beam/scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer, 3-D microanalysis can be performed on individual regions of a sample, such as defects, with microanalytical spatial resolution of better than 300 nm typically. The focused ion-beam can serially section at comparable thicknesses to sequentially reveal new analytical surfaces within the specimen. After each slice a full 2-spatial dimension spectral image, consisting of a complete spectrum at each point in the 2-D array, is acquired with the scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer on the same platform. The process is repeated multiple times to result in a 3-D or tomographic spectral image. The challenge is to effectively and efficiently analyze the tomographic spectral image to extract chemical phase distributions. Therefore, automated multivariate statistical analysis methods were developed and applied to these images. Sandia's Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis multivariate statistical analysis software requires no a priori information to find even very weak signals hidden in the data sets. The result of the analysis is a small number of chemical components which describe the 3-D phase distribution in the volume of material sampled. These 3-D phases can then be effectively visualized with off-the-shelf 3-D rendering software.

  12. Photoacoustic imaging of hidden dental caries by using a fiber-based probing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Takuya; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2017-04-01

    Photoacoustic method to detect hidden dental caries is proposed. It was found that high frequency ultrasonic waves are generated from hidden carious part when radiating laser light to occlusal surface of model tooth. By making a map of intensity of these high frequency components, photoacoustic images of hidden caries were successfully obtained. A photoacoustic imaging system using a bundle of hollow optical fiber was fabricated for using clinical application, and clear photoacoustic image of hidden caries was also obtained by this system.

  13. Wavefront Healing and Tomographic Resolution of Superplumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, J.; Zhou, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic tomography revealed two very broad S-wave anomalies at the bottom of the mantle, one under Africa and the other under the southern Pacific. Traditional tomographic results show strong anti-correlation between bulk sound wave speed and S wave speed perturbations, supporting at least partially chemical origin of deep mantle superplumes. The core-mantle boundary regions are best sampled by core diffracted waves while wave front healing effects of diffracted waves have been ignored in tomographic studies. To investigate the resolution of deep mantle superplumes as well as the robustness of the anti correlation between bulk sound wave speed and S wave speed, we use Spectral Element Method (SEM) to simulate global seismic wave propagation in 3-D plume models at periods down to 10s. We measure frequency-dependent P-wave and S-wave travel time anomalies caused by 3-D plume structures using a multi-taper technique, and calculate bulk sound speed perturbations based on measured P-wave and S-wave traveltimes. The comparison between measured delay times and ray-theory predictions shows that different healing rates between P waves and S waves in thermal plume models can lead to significant artifact as anti-correlation between bulk sound speed and S-wave speed perturbations. The strength of this artifact depends on epicenter distance and wave frequency. The artifact in anti-correlation is also confirmed in tomographic inversions using Pdiff and Sdiff traveltimes calculated from SEM seismograms. We show that resolutions of superplumes as well as artifacts in the anti-correlation are dependent upon the length scale of the anomalies, the frequency of the wave as well as source-receiver distribution.

  14. Enhanced photoacoustic neuroimaging with gold nanorods and PEBBLEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Russell S.; Kim, K.; Agarwal, A.; Fan, W.; Kopelman, R.; Kotov, N.; Kipke, D.; O'Donnell, M.

    2008-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging provides excellent optical contrast with decent penetration and high spatial resolution, making it attractive for a variety of neural applications. We evaluated optical contrast agents with high absorption in the near infrared (NIR) as potential enhancers for PA neuroimaging: optical dyes, gold nanorods (GNRs) and PEBBLEs loaded with indocyanine green. Two PA systems were developed to test these agents in excised neural tissue and in vivo mouse brain. Lobster nerves were stained with the agents for 30 minutes and placed in a hybrid nerve chamber capable of electrical stimulation and recording, optical spectroscopy and PA imaging. Contrast agents boosted the PA signal by at least 30 dB using NIR illumination from a tunable pulsed laser. Photobleaching may be a limiting factor for optical dyes-the PA signal decreased steadily with laser illumination. The second setup enabled in vivo transcranial imaging of the mouse brain. A custom clinical ultrasound scanner and a 10-MHz linear array provided near real-time images during and after an injection of 2 nM gold nanorods into the tail vein. The peak PA signal from the brain vasculature was enhanced by up to 2 dB at 710 nm. Temporal dynamics of the PA signal were also consistent with mixing of the GNRs in the blood. These studies provide a baseline for enhanced PA imaging in neural tissue. The smart contrast agents employed in this study can be further engineered for molecular targeting and controlled drug delivery with potential treatment for a myriad of neural disorders.

  15. Synergistic image reconstruction for hybrid ultrasound and photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Thomas P.; Wang, Kun; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) image reconstruction methods assume that the object and surrounding medium are described by a constant speed-of-sound (SOS) value. In order to accurately recover fine structures, SOS heterogeneities should be quantified and compensated for during PACT reconstruction. To address this problem, several groups have proposed hybrid systems that combine PACT with ultrasound computed tomography (USCT). In such systems, a SOS map is reconstructed first via USCT. Consequently, this SOS map is employed to inform the PACT reconstruction method. Additionally, the SOS map can provide structural information regarding tissue, which is complementary to the functional information from the PACT image. We propose a paradigm shift in the way that images are reconstructed in hybrid PACT-USCT imaging. Inspired by our observation that information about the SOS distribution is encoded in PACT measurements, we propose to jointly reconstruct the absorbed optical energy density and SOS distributions from a combined set of USCT and PACT measurements, thereby reducing the two reconstruction problems into one. This innovative approach has several advantages over conventional approaches in which PACT and USCT images are reconstructed independently: (1) Variations in the SOS will automatically be accounted for, optimizing PACT image quality; (2) The reconstructed PACT and USCT images will possess minimal systematic artifacts because errors in the imaging models will be optimally balanced during the joint reconstruction; (3) Due to the exploitation of information regarding the SOS distribution in the full-view PACT data, our approach will permit high-resolution reconstruction of the SOS distribution from sparse array data.

  16. Photoacoustic computed tomography without accurate ultrasonic transducer responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Qiwei; Wang, Kun; Xia, Jun; Zhu, Liren; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) image reconstruction methods assume that the object and surrounding medium are described by a constant speed-of-sound (SOS) value. In order to accurately recover fine structures, SOS heterogeneities should be quantified and compensated for during PACT reconstruction. To address this problem, several groups have proposed hybrid systems that combine PACT with ultrasound computed tomography (USCT). In such systems, a SOS map is reconstructed first via USCT. Consequently, this SOS map is employed to inform the PACT reconstruction method. Additionally, the SOS map can provide structural information regarding tissue, which is complementary to the functional information from the PACT image. We propose a paradigm shift in the way that images are reconstructed in hybrid PACT-USCT imaging. Inspired by our observation that information about the SOS distribution is encoded in PACT measurements, we propose to jointly reconstruct the absorbed optical energy density and SOS distributions from a combined set of USCT and PACT measurements, thereby reducing the two reconstruction problems into one. This innovative approach has several advantages over conventional approaches in which PACT and USCT images are reconstructed independently: (1) Variations in the SOS will automatically be accounted for, optimizing PACT image quality; (2) The reconstructed PACT and USCT images will possess minimal systematic artifacts because errors in the imaging models will be optimally balanced during the joint reconstruction; (3) Due to the exploitation of information regarding the SOS distribution in the full-view PACT data, our approach will permit high-resolution reconstruction of the SOS distribution from sparse array data.

  17. Model-based Tomographic Reconstruction Literature Search

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Lehman, S K

    2005-11-30

    In the process of preparing a proposal for internal research funding, a literature search was conducted on the subject of model-based tomographic reconstruction (MBTR). The purpose of the search was to ensure that the proposed research would not replicate any previous work. We found that the overwhelming majority of work on MBTR which used parameterized models of the object was theoretical in nature. Only three researchers had applied the technique to actual data. In this note, we summarize the findings of the literature search.

  18. A COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC STUDY OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Siddharatha; Lal, Narottam; Tewari, S.C.; Dalal, P.K.; Kohli, Neera; Srivastava, Shrikant

    1997-01-01

    Fifty schizophrenic patients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria, and group matched normal healthy controls were selected for the study The case and control groups have been compared in terms of VBR, WSF and WTF. In the study schizophrenics have been divided into positive, negative and mixed subgroups on basis of SAPS and SANS, and these subgroups are compared with each other for VBR, WSF & WTF. Tomographic abnormalities were noted in schizophrenics, particularly with negative and mixed subtypes, when compared to controls. PMID:21584057

  19. Fast tomographic reconstruction on multicore computers.

    PubMed

    Agulleiro, J I; Fernandez, J J

    2011-02-15

    Tomo3D implements a multithreaded vectorized approach to tomographic reconstruction that takes full advantage of the computer power in modern multicore computers. Full resolution tomograms are generated at high speed on standard computers with no special system requirements. Tomo3D has the most common reconstruction methods implemented, namely weighted Back-projection (WBP) and simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT). It proves to be competitive with current graphic processor unit solutions in terms of processing time, in the order of a few seconds with WBP or minutes with SIRT. The program is compatible with standard packages, which easily allows integration in the electron tomography workflow.

  20. Cranial computed tomographic abnormalities in leptomeningeal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Glass, J.P.; Geoffray, A.; Wallace, S.

    1984-11-01

    Sixty-four (57.6%) of 111 cancer patients with cerebrospinal fluid cytology positive for malignant cells had cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans within 2 weeks before or after a lumbar puncture. Twenty-two (34.3%) of the 64 had abnormal CT findings indicative of leptomeningeal metastasis. Thirteen (59.6%) of these 22 patients had associated parenchymal metastases. Recognition of leptomeningeal disease may alter the management of patients with parenchymal metastases. Communicating hydrocephalus in cancer patients should be considered to be related to leptomeningeal metastasis until proven otherwise.