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Sample records for array x-ray detector

  1. X-ray source considerations in operation of digital detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Terrence; Wendt, Scott

    2014-02-18

    Digital Detector Arrays (DDA) are increasingly replacing film in radiography applications. Standards exist for characterizing the performance of these detectors, and for using them in specific inspections. We have observed that the selection of the x-ray source to use with these detectors can also have a significant influence on the performance. We look at differences between standard, and micro-focus x-ray tubes, and end-window vs. side-window micro-focus tubes. We find that for best results, one must calibrate the DDA for the source settings used during an inspection. This is particularly true for variable-focus sources.

  2. X-ray characterization of a multichannel smart-pixel array detector.

    PubMed

    Ross, Steve; Haji-Sheikh, Michael; Huntington, Andrew; Kline, David; Lee, Adam; Li, Yuelin; Rhee, Jehyuk; Tarpley, Mary; Walko, Donald A; Westberg, Gregg; Williams, George; Zou, Haifeng; Landahl, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Voxtel VX-798 is a prototype X-ray pixel array detector (PAD) featuring a silicon sensor photodiode array of 48 × 48 pixels, each 130 µm × 130 µm × 520 µm thick, coupled to a CMOS readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The first synchrotron X-ray characterization of this detector is presented, and its ability to selectively count individual X-rays within two independent arrival time windows, a programmable energy range, and localized to a single pixel is demonstrated. During our first trial run at Argonne National Laboratory's Advance Photon Source, the detector achieved a 60 ns gating time and 700 eV full width at half-maximum energy resolution in agreement with design parameters. Each pixel of the PAD holds two independent digital counters, and the discriminator for X-ray energy features both an upper and lower threshold to window the energy of interest discarding unwanted background. This smart-pixel technology allows energy and time resolution to be set and optimized in software. It is found that the detector linearity follows an isolated dead-time model, implying that megahertz count rates should be possible in each pixel. Measurement of the line and point spread functions showed negligible spatial blurring. When combined with the timing structure of the synchrotron storage ring, it is demonstrated that the area detector can perform both picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. PMID:26698064

  3. X-ray Characterization of a Multichannel Smart-Pixel Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Steve; Haji-Sheikh, Michael; Huntington, Andrew; Kline, David; Lee, Adam; Li, Yuelin; Rhee, Jehyuk; Tarpley, Mary; Walko, Donald A.; Westberg, Gregg; Williams, George; Zou, Haifeng; Landahl, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Voxtel VX-798 is a prototype X-ray pixel array detector (PAD) featuring a silicon sensor photodiode array of 48 x 48 pixels, each 130 mu m x 130 mu m x 520 mu m thick, coupled to a CMOS readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The first synchrotron X-ray characterization of this detector is presented, and its ability to selectively count individual X-rays within two independent arrival time windows, a programmable energy range, and localized to a single pixel is demonstrated. During our first trial run at Argonne National Laboratory's Advance Photon Source, the detector achieved a 60 ns gating time and 700 eV full width at half-maximum energy resolution in agreement with design parameters. Each pixel of the PAD holds two independent digital counters, and the discriminator for X-ray energy features both an upper and lower threshold to window the energy of interest discarding unwanted background. This smart-pixel technology allows energy and time resolution to be set and optimized in software. It is found that the detector linearity follows an isolated dead-time model, implying that megahertz count rates should be possible in each pixel. Measurement of the line and point spread functions showed negligible spatial blurring. When combined with the timing structure of the synchrotron storage ring, it is demonstrated that the area detector can perform both picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements.

  4. Pixel array detector for time-resolved x-ray scattering (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodricks, Brian G.; Barna, Sandor L.; Gruner, Sol M.; Shepherd, John A.; Tate, Mark W.; Wixted, Robert L.

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a large area hybrid pixel detector designed for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray scattering experiments in which limited frames, with a high framing rate, are required. The final design parameters call for a 1024×1024 pixel array device with 150-micron pixels that is 100% quantum efficient for x-rays with energy up to 20 keV, with a framing rate in the microsecond range. The device will consist of a fully depleted diode array bump bonded to a CMOS electronic storage capacitor array with eight frames per pixel. The two devices may be separated by a x-ray blocking layer that protects the radiation-sensitive electronics layer from damage. The signal is integrated in the electronics layer and stored in one of eight CMOS capacitors. After eight frames are taken, the data are then read out, using clocking electronics external to the detector, and stored in a RAM disk. Results will be presented on the development of a prototype 4×4 pixel electronics layer that is capable of storing at least 10,000 12-keV x-ray photons for a capacity of over 50 million electrons with a noise corresponding to 2 x-ray photons per pixel. The diode detective layer and electronics storage layer along with the radiation damage and blocking layers will be discussed.

  5. Development of Ta-based STJ X-ray Detector Arrays for Synchrotron Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, M. H.; Friedrich, S.; Hall, J. A.; Harris, J.; Cantor, R.

    2014-08-01

    We are developing a cryogen-free Ta-based superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector for soft X-ray spectroscopy at synchrotrons. With an energy resolution 10 times higher than conventional solid-state X-ray detectors and count-rate capabilities above 5 kHz/pixel, STJ detectors offer potentially increased sensitivity for fluorescence-yield X-ray absorption spectroscopy (FY-XAS). We have developed 36-pixel arrays of 208 208 m Ta STJs with an energy resolution of 9 eV FWHM at the 525 eV oxygen K line. Compared to earlier Nb-based STJs, Ta-STJs offer improved energy resolution and absorption efficiency and extend the operating range to several keV. Here we describe the integration of the 36-pixel arrays into a cryogen-free, user-friendly X-ray spectrometer. A computer-controlled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator coupled to a two-stage pulse tube refrigerator allows operation below 100 mK. The detector chip is located at the end of a 42 cm shielded snout for insertion into the analysis chamber. The system is currently being commissioned at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron.

  6. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S; Weiss, Joel T; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-03-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8-12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10-100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed. PMID:26917125

  7. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S; Weiss, Joel T; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-03-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8-12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10-100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed.

  8. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2016-01-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed. PMID:26917125

  9. Development of an ultra-low-power x-ray-photon-resolving imaging detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shunming; Downey, Stephen; Gaalema, Stephen; Gates, James L.; Jernigan, J. Garrett; Kaaret, Philip; MacIntosh, Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Wall, Bruce

    2010-08-01

    We report on progress to develop and demonstrate CZT and Si hybrid detector arrays for future NASA missions in X-ray and Gamma-ray astronomy. The primary goal for these detectors is consistent with the design concept for the EXIST mission1 and will also be appropriate for other NASA applications and ground-based projects. In particular we target science instruments that have large aperture (multiple square meters) and therefore require a low power ROIC (readout integrated circuits) design (< 10 microwatt per pixel in quiescent mode). The design also must achieve good energy resolution for single photon detection for X rays in the range 5-600 keV with a CZT sense layer and 2-30 keV with a Si sense layer. The target CZT arrays are 2 cm × 2 cm with 600 micron square-shaped pixels. The low power smart pixel detects rare X-ray hits with an adjustable threshold setting. A test array of 7 × 5 pixels with a 5 mm thick CZT sense layer demonstrates that the low power pixel can successfully detect X-rays with {50 readout noise electrons RMS.

  10. Spectral X-Ray Diffraction using a 6 Megapixel Photon Counting Array Detector

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2016-01-01

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging. PMID:27041789

  11. Arrays of silicon drift detectors for an extraterrestrial X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehak, Pavel; Carini, Gabriella; Chen, Wei; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Fried, Jack; Li, Zheng; Pinelli, Donald A.; Peter Siddons, D.; Vernon, Emerson; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Ramsey, Brian D.

    2010-12-01

    Arrays of Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) were designed, produced and tested. These arrays are the central part of an X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) for measuring the abundances of light surface elements (C-Fe) fluoresced by ambient radiation on the investigated celestial object. The basic building element (or cell) of the arrays consists of a single hexagonal SDD. Signal electrons drift toward the center of the hexagon where a very low capacitance anode is located. The hexagonal shape of an individual SDD allows for a continuous covering of large detection areas of various shapes. To match the number of SDD cells with the external Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), two arrays, one with 16 and another with 64 cells were developed. One side of SDDs, called the window side, is a continuous thin rectifying junction through which the X-ray radiation enters the detector. The opposite side, called the device side contains electron collecting anodes as well as all other electrodes needed to generate the drift field and to sink leakage current produced on Si-SiO 2 interface. On both sides of the detector array there is a system of guard rings, which smoothly adjusts the voltage of the boundary cells to the ground potential of the silicon outside the sensitive volume. The drift voltage inside the detector is generated by an implanted rectifying contact, which forms a hexagonal spiral. This spiral produces the main valley where signal electrons drift as well as the voltage divider to produce the drift field. System performance is shown by a spectrum of Mn X-rays produced by the decay of 55Fe.

  12. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Cheng-Jun Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Zhang, Bangmin; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M.; Venkatesan, T.

    2014-04-15

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  13. Analysis of the x-ray refraction using an array-structured detector

    SciTech Connect

    Coan, Paola; Bravin, Alberto

    2007-04-30

    A crystal-less method for analyzing the phase shifts of an x-ray beam passed through a sample is here presented. An array-structured detector is used both to record and analyze the refracted and scattered radiation. Experimental studies of simple phase objects confirmed that images show features similar or equivalent to the ones produced using an analyzer crystal with comparable signal-to-noise ratio values. Using a detector for analyzing the refraction presents evident advantages in terms of optical stability. In addition, with a single acquisition, several refraction angles can be simultaneously analyzed permitting a better exploitation of the dose delivered to the sample.

  14. Synchrotron x-ray photoconductor detector arrays made on MBE grown CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, S.S.; Montano, P.A. |; Rodricks, B.; Sivananthan, S.; Faurie, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    We have been fabricating x-ray photoconductor linear array detectors using molecular beam epitaxially (MBE) grown (111)B undoped CdTe layers on (100) Si substrates. A novel technique was developed to remove the Si and to mount the fragile MBE grown CdTe layers onto insulating ceramic substrates. 256 channel linear photoconductor array devices were fabricated on the resulting CdTe layers. The resistivity of MBE (111)B CdTe was high (> 10{sup 8} {Omega}cm) enough to utilize the material for low energy (8 to 25 keV) x-ray detectors. The stability of the detectors are satisfactory, and they were tested at room temperature routinely for over a year. The performance of the photoconductor was greatly improved when the detector was cooled to 230K. Due to its reduced dark current at low temperatures, the dynamic range of the detector response increased to nearly four decades at 230K. 29 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Graphical user interface for a dual-module EMCCD x-ray detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Huang, Ying; Qu, Bin; Gupta, Sandesh K.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    A new Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed using Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) for a high-resolution, high-sensitivity Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII), which is a new x-ray detector for radiographic and fluoroscopic imaging, consisting of an array of Electron-Multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) each having a variable on-chip electron-multiplication gain of up to 2000x to reduce the effect of readout noise. To enlarge the field-of-view (FOV), each EMCCD sensor is coupled to an x-ray phosphor through a fiberoptic taper. Two EMCCD camera modules are used in our prototype to form a computer-controlled array; however, larger arrays are under development. The new GUI provides patient registration, EMCCD module control, image acquisition, and patient image review. Images from the array are stitched into a 2kx1k pixel image that can be acquired and saved at a rate of 17 Hz (faster with pixel binning). When reviewing the patient's data, the operator can select images from the patient's directory tree listed by the GUI and cycle through the images using a slider bar. Commonly used camera parameters including exposure time, trigger mode, and individual EMCCD gain can be easily adjusted using the GUI. The GUI is designed to accommodate expansion of the EMCCD array to even larger FOVs with more modules. The high-resolution, high-sensitivity EMCCD modular-array SSXII imager with the new user-friendly GUI should enable angiographers and interventionalists to visualize smaller vessels and endovascular devices, helping them to make more accurate diagnoses and to perform more precise image-guided interventions.

  16. Super-resolution x-ray imaging by CdTe discrete detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, T.; Ishida, Y.; Morii, H.; Tomita, Y.; Ohashi, G.; Temmyo, J.; Hatanaka, Y.

    2005-08-01

    512-pixel CdTe super-liner imaging scanner was developed. This device was consist with 512 chips of M-π-n CdTe diode detector fabricated by excimer laser doping process, 8 chips of photon-counting mode 64ch ASIC with FPGA circuit, USB2.0 interface with 1-CPU. It has 5 discriminated levels and over 2Mcps count rate for X-ray penetration imaging. This imaging scanner has 512 discrete CdTe chips for detector arrays with the length of 2.0mm, width of 0.8mm and thickness of 0.5mm. These chips were mounted in four plover array rows for high-resolution imaging with 0.5mm-pitch, therefore the pixel pitch was over the pixel width. When images were taken with scanning system with this arrays, we could obtain over-resolution than pixel width. In this paper, this "over-resolution" imaging will be called "super resolution imaging". In high-resolution imaging device, the pixel devices on one substrate were formed by integrated process, or many discrete detector chips were installed on circuit board, usually. In the latter case, it is easer to make each detector chips than former case, and it are no need to consider charge sharing phenomena compare with one-chip pixel devices. However, a decrease in pixel pitch makes the mount to the detector chip to the ASIC board difficult because the handling will also be difficult The super-resolution technique in this scanner by pixel-shift method for X-ray imaging is shown in this paper

  17. Two dimensional extensible array configuration for EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Vasan, S N Swetadri; Cartwright, A N; Titus, A H; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic x- ray detector to be used for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The heart of the detector is a 1024 × 1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm(2) (Model CCD201-20, e2v Technologies, Inc.), bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Our aim is to design an array of these detectors that could be extended to any arbitrary X × Y size in two dimensions to provide a larger field of view (FOV). A physical configuration for a 3×3 array is presented that includes two major sub-systems. First is an optical front end that includes (i) a phosphor to convert the x-ray photons into light photons, and (ii) a fused array of FOTs that focuses light photons from the phosphor onto an array of EMCCD's optically coupled using FOPs. Second is an electronic front end that includes (i) an FPGA board used for generating clocks and for data acquisition (ii) driver boards to drive and digitize the analog output from the EMCCDs, (iii) a power board, and (iv) headboards to hold the EMCCD's while they are connected to their respective driver board using flex cables. This configuration provides a larger FOV as well as region-of- interest (ROI) high-resolution imaging as required by modern neurovascular procedures.

  18. Two dimensional extensible array configuration for EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Cartwright, A. N.; Titus, A. H.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic x-ray detector to be used for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The heart of the detector is a 1024 ×1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2 (Model CCD201-20, e2v Technologies, Inc.), bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Our aim is to design an array of these detectors that could be extended to any arbitrary X × Y size in two dimensions to provide a larger field of view (FOV). A physical configuration for a 3×3 array is presented that includes two major sub-systems. First is an optical front end that includes (i) a phosphor to convert the x-ray photons into light photons, and (ii) a fused array of FOTs that focuses light photons from the phosphor onto an array of EMCCD's optically coupled using FOPs. Second is an electronic front end that includes (i) an FPGA board used for generating clocks and for data acquisition (ii) driver boards to drive and digitize the analog output from the EMCCDs, (iii) a power board, and (iv) headboards to hold the EMCCD's while they are connected to their respective driver board using flex cables. This configuration provides a larger FOV as well as region-of-interest (ROI) high-resolution imaging as required by modern neurovascular procedures.

  19. Two dimensional extensible array configuration for EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P.; Vasan, S.N. Swetadri; Cartwright, A. N.; Titus, A. H.; Bednarek, D.R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic x- ray detector to be used for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The heart of the detector is a 1024 × 1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2 (Model CCD201-20, e2v Technologies, Inc.), bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Our aim is to design an array of these detectors that could be extended to any arbitrary X × Y size in two dimensions to provide a larger field of view (FOV). A physical configuration for a 3×3 array is presented that includes two major sub-systems. First is an optical front end that includes (i) a phosphor to convert the x-ray photons into light photons, and (ii) a fused array of FOTs that focuses light photons from the phosphor onto an array of EMCCD's optically coupled using FOPs. Second is an electronic front end that includes (i) an FPGA board used for generating clocks and for data acquisition (ii) driver boards to drive and digitize the analog output from the EMCCDs, (iii) a power board, and (iv) headboards to hold the EMCCD's while they are connected to their respective driver board using flex cables. This configuration provides a larger FOV as well as region-of- interest (ROI) high-resolution imaging as required by modern neurovascular procedures. PMID:22822419

  20. High density processing electronics for superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, W. K.; Harris, J. T.; Friedrich, S.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) are excellent soft x-ray (100-2000 eV) detectors, particularly for synchrotron applications, because of their ability to obtain energy resolutions below 10 eV at count rates approaching 10 kcps. In order to achieve useful solid detection angles with these very small detectors, they are typically deployed in large arrays - currently with 100+ elements, but with 1000 elements being contemplated. In this paper we review a 5-year effort to develop compact, computer controlled low-noise processing electronics for STJ detector arrays, focusing on the major issues encountered and our solutions to them. Of particular interest are our preamplifier design, which can set the STJ operating points under computer control and achieve 2.7 eV energy resolution; our low noise power supply, which produces only 2 nV/√Hz noise at the preamplifier's critical cascode node; our digital processing card that digitizes and digitally processes 32 channels; and an STJ I-V curve scanning algorithm that computes noise as a function of offset voltage, allowing an optimum operating point to be easily selected. With 32 preamplifiers laid out on a custom 3U EuroCard, and the 32 channel digital card in a 3U PXI card format, electronics for a 128 channel array occupy only two small chassis, each the size of a National Instruments 5-slot PXI crate, and allow full array control with simple extensions of existing beam line data collection packages.

  1. Silicon array detector system for high-rate, low-noise x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Krieger, B.; Maier, M.R.; Yaver, H.; Lindstrom, D.; Rutgersson, M.; Tull, C.R.

    1999-08-01

    A silicon array detector system is being developed for x-ray fluorescence applications at synchrotron light sources. The detector is wire-bonded to integrated circuits, which feature 32 channels of charge-sensitive preamplifiers followed by variable-gain pulse shaping amplifiers. The ICs directly drive CAMAC-based A/D boards designed for this application. The data are transferred from the custom designed 16-channel ADC modules via FERABUS readout to commercially available histogramming modules and memory lookup units. The system features fully parallel signal processing to maintain high count-rate capability and to preserve the position information. Special LabVIEW-based software has been developed for data acquisition and analysis. The system, currently being assembled for 64 channels, can easily be expanded by increasing the number of detection channels and hardware modules.

  2. ANL CT Image Reconstruction Algorithm for Utilizing Digital X-ray Detector Array

    2004-08-05

    Reconstructs X-ray computed tomographic images from large data sets known as 16-bit binary sinograms. The algorithm uses the concept of generation of an image from carefully obtained multiple l-D or 2-0 X-ray projections. The individual projections are filtered using a digital Fast Fourier Transform. The literature refers to this as filtered back projection. The software is capable of processing a large file for reconstructing single images or volumetnc (3-D) images from large area high resolutionmore » digital X-ray detectors.« less

  3. Linear fitting of multi-threshold counting data with a pixel-array detector for spectral X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichney, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments and modeling are described to perform spectral fitting of multi-threshold counting measurements on a pixel-array detector. An analytical model was developed for describing the probability density function of detected voltage in X-ray photon-counting arrays, utilizing fractional photon counting to account for edge/corner effects from voltage plumes that spread across multiple pixels. Each pixel was mathematically calibrated by fitting the detected voltage distributions to the model at both 13.5 keV and 15.0 keV X-ray energies. The model and established pixel responses were then exploited to statistically recover images of X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray energy in a simulated multi-wavelength and multi-counting threshold experiment. PMID:25178010

  4. X-ray tests of a microchannel plate detector and amorphous silicon pixel array readout for neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, R. M.; Street, R.; Feller, B.; Fraser, G. W.; Watterson, J. I. W.; Lanza, R. C.; Dowson, J.; Ross, D.; Martindale, A.; Abbey, A. F.; Vernon, D.

    2007-03-01

    High-performance large area imaging detectors for fast neutrons in the 5-14 MeV energy range do not exist at present. The aim of this project is to combine microchannel plates or MCPs (or similar electron multiplication structures) traditionally used in image intensifiers and X-ray detectors with amorphous silicon (a-Si) pixel arrays to produce a composite converter and intensifier position sensitive imaging system. This detector will provide an order of magnitude improvement in image resolution when compared with current millimetre resolution limits obtained using phosphor or scintillator-based hydrogen rich converters. In this study we present the results of the initial experimental evaluation of the prototype system. This study was carried out using a medical X-ray source for the proof of concept tests, the next phase will involve neutron imaging tests. The hybrid detector described in this study is a unique development and paves the way for large area position sensitive detectors consisting of MCP or microsphere plate detectors and a-Si or polysilicon pixel arrays. Applications include neutron and X-ray imaging for terrestrial applications. The technology could be extended to space instrumentation for X-ray astronomy.

  5. Development of a fast pixel array detector for use in microsecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A large-area pixel x-ray detector is being developed to collect eight successive frames of wide dynamic range two-dimensional images at 200kHz rates. Such a detector, in conjunction with a synchrotron radiation x-ray source, will enable time-resolved x-ray studies of proteins and other materials on time scales which have previously been inaccessible. The detector will consist of an array of fully-depleted 150 micron square diodes connected to a CMOS integrated electronics layer with solder bump-bonding. During each framing period, the current resulting from the x-rays stopped in the diodes is integrated in the electronics layer, and then stored in one of eight storage capacitors underneath the pixel. After the last frame, the capacitors are read out at standard data transmission rates. The detector has been designed for a well-depth of at least 10,000 x-rays (at 20keV), and a noise level of one x-ray. Ultimately, the authors intend to construct a detector with over one million pixels (1024 by 1024). They present the results of their development effort and various features of the design. The electronics design is discussed, with special attention to the performance requirements. The choice and design of the detective diodes, as they relate to x-ray stopping power and charge collection, are presented. An analysis of various methods of bump bonding is also presented. Finally, the authors discuss the possible need for a radiation-blocking layer, to be placed between the electronics and the detective layer, and various methods they have pursued in the construction of such a layer.

  6. Segmented Monolithic Germanium Detector Arrays for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ethan L. Hull

    2011-03-27

    The experimental results from the Phase I effort were extremely encouraging. During Phase I PHDs Co. made the first strides toward a new detector technology that could have great impact on synchrotron x-ray absorption (XAS) measurements, and x-ray detector technology in general. Detector hardware that allowed critical demonstration measurements of our technology was designed and fabricated. This new technology allows good charge collection from many pixels on a single side of a multi-element monolithic germanium planar detector. The detector technology provides “dot-like” collection electrodes having very low capacitance. The detector technology appears to perform as anticipated in the Phase I proposal. In particular, the 7-pixel detector studied showed remarkable properties; making it an interesting example of detector physics. The technology is enabled by the use of amorphous germanium contact technology on germanium planar detectors. Because of the scalability associated with the fabrication of these technologies at PHDs Co., we anticipate being able to supply larger detector systems at significantly lower cost than systems made in the conventional manner.

  7. Characterization of a Prototype TES-Based Anti-coincidence Detector for Use with Future X-ray Calorimeter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, S. E.; Yoon, W. S.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lee, S.-J.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Sultana, M.

    2016-07-01

    For future X-ray observatories utilizing transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters, an anti-coincidence detector (anti-co) is required to discriminate X-ray (˜ 0.1-10 keV) signals from non-X-ray background events, such as ionizing particles. We have developed a prototype anti-co that utilizes TESs, which will be compatible with the TES focal-plane arrays planned for future X-ray observatories. This anti-co is based upon the cryogenic dark matter search II detector design. It is a silicon wafer covered with superconducting collection fins and TES microcalorimeters. Minimum ionizing particles deposit energy while passing through the silicon. The athermal phonons produced by these events are absorbed in the superconducting fins, breaking Cooper pairs. The resulting quasiparticles diffuse along the superconducting fin, producing a signal when they reach the TES. By determining a correlation between detections in the anti-co and the X-ray detector one can identify and flag these background events. We have fabricated and tested a single-channel prototype anti-co device on a 1.5 × 1.9 cm^2 chip. We have measured the signals in this device from photons of several energies between 1.5 and 60 keV, as well as laboratory background events, demonstrating a threshold ˜ 100 times lower than is needed to detect minimum ionizing particles.

  8. Soft x-ray intensity profile measurements of electron cyclotron heated plasmas using semiconductor detector arrays in GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, R. Imai, T.; Kariya, T.; Numakura, T.; Eguchi, T.; Kawarasaki, R.; Nakazawa, K.; Kato, T.; Sato, F.; Nanzai, H.; Uehara, M.; Endo, Y.; Ichimura, M.

    2014-11-15

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray analyses of electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using semiconductor detector arrays in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The detector array has 16-channel for the measurements of plasma x-ray profiles so as to make x-ray tomographic reconstructions. The characteristics of the detector array make it possible to obtain spatially resolved plasma electron temperatures down to a few tens eV and investigate various magnetohydrodynamic activities. High power electron cyclotron heating experiment for the central-cell region in GAMMA 10 has been started in order to reduce the electron drag by increasing the electron temperature.

  9. Soft x-ray intensity profile measurements of electron cyclotron heated plasmas using semiconductor detector arrays in GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.

    PubMed

    Minami, R; Imai, T; Kariya, T; Numakura, T; Eguchi, T; Kawarasaki, R; Nakazawa, K; Kato, T; Sato, F; Nanzai, H; Uehara, M; Endo, Y; Ichimura, M

    2014-11-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray analyses of electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using semiconductor detector arrays in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The detector array has 16-channel for the measurements of plasma x-ray profiles so as to make x-ray tomographic reconstructions. The characteristics of the detector array make it possible to obtain spatially resolved plasma electron temperatures down to a few tens eV and investigate various magnetohydrodynamic activities. High power electron cyclotron heating experiment for the central-cell region in GAMMA 10 has been started in order to reduce the electron drag by increasing the electron temperature.

  10. Elemental X-ray Imaging Using the Maia Detector Array: The Benefits and Challenges of Large Solid-Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, C.G.; De Geronimo, G.; Kirkham, R.; Hough, R.M.; Moorhead, G.; Siddons, D.P.; de Jonge, M.D.; Paterson, D.J.; Howard, D.L.; Cleverley, J.S.

    2009-11-13

    The fundamental parameter method for quantitative SXRF and PIXE analysis and imaging using the dynamic analysis method is extended to model the changing X-ray yields and detector sensitivity with angle across large detector arrays. The method is implemented in the GeoPIXE software and applied to cope with the large solid-angle of the new Maia 384 detector array and its 96 detector prototype developed by CSIRO and BNL for SXRF imaging applications at the Australian and NSLS synchrotrons. Peak-to-background is controlled by mitigating charge-sharing between detectors through careful optimization of a patterned molybdenum absorber mask. A geological application demonstrates the capability of the method to produce high definition elemental images up to {approx}100 M pixels in size.

  11. Spectral Resolution for Five-Element, Filtered, X-Ray Detector (XRD) Arrays Using the Methods of Backus and Gilbert

    SciTech Connect

    FEHL,DAVID LEE; BIGGS,F.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.

    2000-01-17

    The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining spectra from a 5-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors (XRD's). This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ({le}2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with the unfold method currently in use. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV black-body) and the unfold. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model.

  12. Improving resolution of solid state linear array x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borras, Guillem; Odet, Christophe; Vuorinen, Kimmo; Gaffiot, Frederic; Jacquemod, Gilles

    1998-04-01

    Linear solid-state detectors are nowadays a widespread media in industrial and medical x-ray imaging. The resolution reached with this system has been largely improved in these past years, but is still too poor for some high resolution applications. We first have carried out an optimization of the detector characteristics through a behavioral simulation using a hardware description language. Furthermore, our work concerned the resolution enhancement for this kind of detectors via signal processing. Our approach takes into account the modeled point spread function (PSF) of the system. This modeled PSF is obtained with a new edge technique. The knowledge about the system response is used in a restoration scheme in order to improve the response of the detector to the high frequencies in the digital image. The restoration problem is an ill posed problem ad uses an inverse Wiener filtering. Another intrinsic limitation of solid-state detectors is the spatial sampling step. In order to overcome this problem, we also tested the feasibility of a finer sampling of the acquired image, buy interlacing several slightly shifted acquisitions of the same test object. The restoration applied to this finer sampled signal results in a resolution enhancement that is theoretically impossible to reach with a single detector acquisition. Some experimental results obtained on a variable bar-space pattern phantom are presented. This kind of phantom allows for a precise evaluation of the modulation transfer function on the acquired and processed images. The contribution of the image processing to the restoration enhancement can thus be quantified.

  13. The development and test of multi-anode microchannel array detector systems. Part 2: Soft X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Detector systems based on the high gain microchannel plate (MCP) electron multiplier were used extensively for imaging at soft X-ray wavelengths both on the ground and in space. The latest pulse counting electronic readout systems provide zero readout noise, spatial resolutions (FWHM) of 25 microns or better and can determine the arrival times of detected photons to an accuracy of the order of 100 ns. These systems can be developed to produce detectors with active areas of 100 nm in diameter or greater. The use of CsI photocathodes produces very high detective quantum efficiencies at wavelengths between about 100 and 1A (approximately 0.1 to 10 keV) with moderate energy resolution. The operating characteristics of the different types of soft X-ray MCP detector systems are described and the prospects for future developments are discussed.

  14. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Bionta, Richard M.; Ables, Elden

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  15. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  16. Final Scientific/Technical Report: Electronics for Large Superconducting Tunnel Junction Detector Arrays for Synchrotron Soft X-ray Research

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, William K

    2009-03-06

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors offer a an approach to detecting soft x-rays with energy resolutions 4-5 times better and at rates 10 faster than traditions semiconductor detectors. To make such detectors feasible, however, then need to be deployed in large arrays of order 1000 detectors, which in turn implies that their processing electronics must be compact, fully computer controlled, and low cost per channel while still delivering ultra-low noise performance so as to not degrade the STJ's performance. We report on our progress in designing a compact, low cost preamplifier intended for this application. In particular, we were able to produce a prototype preamplifier of 2 sq-cm area and a parts cost of less than $30 that matched the energy resolution of the best conventional system to date and demonstrated its ability to acquire an STJ I-V curve under computer control, the critical step for determining and setting the detectors' operating points under software control.

  17. Evaluation of a photon-counting hybrid pixel detector array with a synchrotron X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponchut, C.; Visschers, J. L.; Fornaini, A.; Graafsma, H.; Maiorino, M.; Mettivier, G.; Calvet, D.

    2002-05-01

    A photon-counting hybrid pixel detector (Medipix-1) has been characterized using a synchrotron X-ray source. The detector consists of a readout ASIC with 64×64 independent photon-counting cells of 170×170 μm 2 pitch, bump-bonded to a 300 μm thick silicon sensor, read out by a PCIbus-based electronics, and a graphical user interface (GUI) software. The intensity and the energy tunability of the X-ray source allow characterization of the detector in the time, space, and energy domains. The system can be read out on external trigger at a frame rate of 100 Hz with 3 ms exposure time per frame. The detector response is tested up to more than 7×10 5 detected events/pixel/s. The point-spread response shows <2% crosstalk between neighboring pixels. Fine scanning of the detector surface with a 10 μm beam reveals no loss in sensitivity between adjacent pixels as could result from charge sharing in the silicon sensor. Photons down to 6 keV can be detected after equalization of the thresholds of individual pixels. The obtained results demonstrate the advantages of photon-counting hybrid pixel detectors and particularly of the Medipix-1 chip for a wide range of X-ray imaging applications, including those using synchrotron X-ray beams.

  18. Direct x-ray sensing CCD array for intraoral dental x-ray imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, John D.; Williams, Donald W.; Langford, D. S.

    1994-05-01

    A commercial prototype electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct sensing CCD array has been developed. Image quality parameters were measured using x-ray sources at the National Institute of Standard and Technology radiation physical department in Gaithersburg, MD. Detector response to x-rays in the 10 to 70 keV energy range was measured. The beam hardening effects of human anatomy on a typical 70 kVp spectra was measured using a tissue-equivalent dental phantom.

  19. Solid-state photon-counting hybrid detector array for high-resolution multi-energy X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sia, R.; Kleinfelder, S.; Nagarkar, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    We present in this article the development of a photon-counting, energy-discriminating modular detector based on a pixelated CdZnTe sensor coupled pixel-by-pixel to a novel Digital Pixel Sensor (DPS) readout. The detector is designed for munitions inspection, breast X-ray CT and SPECT/MRI. The current DPS design can also be used to read out other solid-state sensors. The prototype detector is 5.5 mm×5.5 mm in size, and consists of 19×19 pixels on a 250 μm pitch. The DPS is designed in a 0.35 μm process, and every pixel includes a preamplifier, a leakage-current subtraction circuit, an auto-zeroed programmable-gain stage, five comparators, a variable-delay reset circuit and five 16 bit counters. The module is expected to operate at high X-ray fluence exceeding 80 MHz/mm 2, and to improve resolution and contrast in images, while significantly enhancing their signal-to-noise ratio, and assist in identifying material composition via dual-energy imaging. The detector design, fabrication and anticipated performance are discussed.

  20. High resolution collimator system for X-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W.; Cain, Dallas E.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution in an X-ray computerized tomography (CT) inspection system is achieved by using a collimator/detector combination to limit the beam width of the X-ray beam incident on a detector element to the desired resolution width. In a detector such as a high pressure Xenon detector array, a narrow tapered collimator is provided above a wide detector element. The collimator slits have any desired width, as small as a few mils at the top, the slit width is easily controlled, and they are fabricated on standard machines. The slit length determines the slice thickness of the CT image.

  1. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  2. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. The potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed.

  3. Large detector array and real-time processing and elemental image projection of X-ray and proton microprobe fluorescence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, C. G.; Siddons, D. P.; Moorhead, G.; Kirkham, R.; Dunn, P. A.; Dragone, A.; De Geronimo, G.

    2007-07-01

    A detector concept is described that integrates a large solid-angle detector array developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory and a high speed pipelined parallel processing engine developed at CSIRO for machine vision, with an embedded implementation of the Dynamic Analysis method for fluorescence spectra deconvolution and image projection, to yield a detection system capable of energy-dispersive detection, spectral deconvolution and real-time elemental imaging at ˜10 8 events per second for PIXE elemental imaging using the nuclear microprobe and SXRF elemental imaging using the synchrotron X-ray microprobe.

  4. Development of a Silicon Drift Detector Array: An X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer for Remote Surface Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Carini, Gabriella A.; Wei, Chen; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kramer, Georgiana; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Keister, Jeffrey W.; Zheng, Li; Ramsey, Brian D.; Rehak, Pavel; Siddons, D. Peter

    2009-01-01

    Over the past three years NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory to develop a modular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) intended for fine surface mapping of the light elements of the moon. The value of fluorescence spectrometry for surface element mapping is underlined by the fact that the technique has recently been employed by three lunar orbiter missions; Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1, and Chang e. The SDD-XRS instrument we have been developing can operate at a low energy threshold (i.e. is capable of detecting Carbon), comparable energy resolution to Kaguya (<150 eV at 5.9 keV) and an order of magnitude lower power requirement, making much higher sensitivities possible. Furthermore, the intrinsic radiation resistance of the SDD makes it useful even in radiation-harsh environments such as that of Jupiter and its surrounding moons.

  5. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with

  6. A positron-sensitive photon detector for the UV or X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zutavern, F. J.; Schnatterly, S. E.; Källne, E.; Franck, C. P.; Aton, T.; Rife, J.

    1980-05-01

    This paper describes the conversion of a light sensitive self-scanning silicon photodiode array into a soft X-ray detector. We combine a photodiode array, a UHV compatible soft X-ray sensitive phosphor and read out electronics. The detector has been tested in the soft X-ray and UV regions. The results indicate a high quantum efficiency in the soft X-ray region.

  7. First results of a novel Silicon Drift Detector array designed for low energy X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachevski, Alexandre; Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Brigo, Elena; Bufon, Jernej; Carrato, Sergio; Castoldi, Andrea; Cautero, Giuseppe; Fabiani, Sergio; Giacomini, Gabriele; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Giuressi, Dario; Guazzoni, Chiara; Kourousias, George; Liu, Chang; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Montemurro, Giuseppe Vito; Picciotto, Antonino; Piemonte, Claudio; Rashevskaya, Irina; Shi, Yongbiao; Stolfa, Andrea; Vacchi, Andrea; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Zorzi, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    We developed a trapezoidal shaped matrix with 8 cells of Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) featuring a very low leakage current (below 180 pA/cm2 at 20 °C) and a shallow uniformly implanted p+ entrance window that enables sensitivity down to few hundreds of eV. The matrix consists of a completely depleted volume of silicon wafer subdivided into 4 square cells and 4 half-size triangular cells. The energy resolution of a single square cell, readout by the ultra-low noise SIRIO charge sensitive preamplifier, is 158 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV and 0 °C. The total sensitive area of the matrix is 231 mm2 and the wafer thickness is 450 μm. The detector was developed in the frame of the INFN R&D project ReDSoX in collaboration with FBK, Trento. Its trapezoidal shape was chosen in order to optimize the detection geometry for the experimental requirements of low energy X-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) spectroscopy, aiming at achieving a large detection angle. We plan to exploit the complete detector at the TwinMic spectromicroscopy beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron (Trieste, Italy). The complete system, composed of 4 matrices, increases the solid angle coverage of the isotropic photoemission hemisphere about 4 times over the present detector configuration. We report on the layout of the SDD matrix and of the experimental set-up, as well as the spectroscopic performance measured both in the laboratory and at the experimental beamline.

  8. X-Ray Detector Simulations - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tina, Adrienne

    2015-08-20

    The free-electron laser at LCLS produces X-Rays that are used in several facilities. This light source is so bright and quick that we are capable of producing movies of objects like proteins. But making these movies would not be possible without a device that can detect the X-Rays and produce images. We need X-Ray cameras. The challenges LCLS faces include the X-Rays’ high repetition rate of 120 Hz, short pulses that can reach 200 femto-seconds, and extreme peak brightness. We need detectors that are compatible with this light source, but before they can be used in the facilities, they must first be characterized. My project was to do just that, by making a computer simulation program. My presentation discusses the individual detectors I simulated, the details of my program, and how my project will help determine which detector is most useful for a specific experiment.

  9. X-ray grid-detector apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Boone, John M.; Lane, Stephen M.

    1998-01-27

    A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

  10. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Carini, Gabriella; Denes, Peter; Gruener, Sol; Lessner, Elianne

    2012-08-01

    The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) X-ray and neutron user facilities attract more than 12,000 researchers each year to perform cutting-edge science at these state-of-the-art sources. While impressive breakthroughs in X-ray and neutron sources give us the powerful illumination needed to peer into the nano- to mesoscale world, a stumbling block continues to be the distinct lag in detector development, which is slowing progress toward data collection and analysis. Urgently needed detector improvements would reveal chemical composition and bonding in 3-D and in real time, allow researchers to watch “movies” of essential life processes as they happen, and make much more efficient use of every X-ray and neutron produced by the source The immense scientific potential that will come from better detectors has triggered worldwide activity in this area. Europe in particular has made impressive strides, outpacing the United States on several fronts. Maintaining a vital U.S. leadership in this key research endeavor will require targeted investments in detector R&D and infrastructure. To clarify the gap between detector development and source advances, and to identify opportunities to maximize the scientific impact of BES user facilities, a workshop on Neutron and X-ray Detectors was held August 1-3, 2012, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Participants from universities, national laboratories, and commercial organizations from the United States and around the globe participated in plenary sessions, breakout groups, and joint open-discussion summary sessions. Sources have become immensely more powerful and are now brighter (more particles focused onto the sample per second) and more precise (higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution). To fully utilize these source advances, detectors must become faster, more efficient, and more discriminating. In supporting the mission of today’s cutting-edge neutron and X-ray sources, the workshop identified six detector research challenges

  11. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Goodman, Claude A.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels.

  12. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  13. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  14. A multilayered approach to superconducting tunnel junction x ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippert, E. D.; Song, S. N.; Ketterson, J. B.; Maglic, S. R.; Lomatch, S.; Thomas, C.; Cheida, M. A.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    'First generation' superconducting tunnel junction X-ray detectors (characterized by a single tunnel junction in direct contact with its substrate, with totally external amplification) remain more than an order of magnitude away from their theoretical energy resolutions which are in the order of eV's. The difficulties that first generation devices are encountering are being attacked by a 'second generation' of superconducting X-ray detector designs including quasiparticle trapping configurations and Josephson junction arrays. A second generation design concept, the multilayered superconducting tunnel junction X-ray detector, consisting of tens to hundreds of tunnel junctions stacked on top of one another (a superlattice), is presented. Some of the possibilities of this engineered materials approach include the tuning of phonon transmission characteristics of the material, suppression of parasitic quasiparticle trapping and intrinsic amplification.

  15. Active microstructured x-ray optical arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michette, Alan G.; Pfauntsch, Slawka J.; Sahraei, Shahin; Shand, Matthew; Morrison, Graeme R.; Hart, David; Vojnovic, Boris; Stevenson, Tom; Parkes, William; Dunare, Camelia; Willingale, Richard; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Button, Tim W.; Zhang, Dou; Rodriguez-Sanmartin, Daniel; Wang, Hongchang; Smith, Andy D.

    2009-05-01

    The UK Smart X-Ray Optics consortium is developing novel reflective adaptive/active x-ray optics for small-scale laboratory applications, including studies of radiation-induced damage to biological material. The optics work on the same principle as polycapillaries, using configured arrays of channels etched into thin silicon, such that each x-ray photon reflects at most once off a channel wall. Using two arrays in succession provides two reflections and thus the Abbe sine condition can be approximately satisfied, reducing aberrations. Adaptivity is achieved by flexing one or both arrays using piezo actuation, which can provide further reduction of aberrations as well as controllable focal lengths. Modelling of such arrays for used on an x-ray microprobe, based on a microfocus source with an emitting region approximately 1μm in diameter, shows that a focused flux approximately two orders of magnitude greater than possible with a zone plate of comparable focal length is possible, assuming that the channel wall roughness is less than about 2nm.

  16. Optimized Volumetric Scanning for X-Ray Array Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Foudray, A M; Wang, A; Kallman, J S; Martz, H

    2009-09-29

    Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) is the science and technology of determining non-invasively the internal structure of manufactured parts, objects, and materials. NDE application areas include medicine, industrial manufacturing, military, homeland security, and airport luggage screening. X-ray measurement systems are most widely used because of their ability to image through a wide range of material densities (from human tissue in medical applications to the dense materials of weapon components). Traditional x-ray systems involve a single source and detector system that rotate and/or translate about the object under evaluation. At each angular location, the source projects x-rays through the object. The rays undergo attenuation proportional to the density of the object's constitutive material. The detector records a measure of the attenuation. Mathematical algorithms are used to invert the forward attenuated ray projection process to form images of the object. This is known as computed tomography (CT). In recent years, the single-source x-ray NDE systems have been generalized to arrays of x-ray sources. Array sources permit multiple views of the object with fewer rotations and translations of the source/detector system. The spatially diverse nature of x-ray array sources has the potential of reducing data collection time, reducing imaging artifacts, and increasing the resolution of the resultant images. Most of the existing CT algorithms were not derived from array source models with a spatially diverse set of viewing perspectives. Single-source x-ray CT data collection, processing, and imaging methods and algorithms are not applicable when the source location is expanded from one dimension (a rotating and/or translating point source) to two (a rotating and/or translating array). They must be reformulated. The goal of this project is to determine the applicability of x-ray array sources to problems of interest to LLNL and its customers. It is believed array source

  17. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOEpatents

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

  18. Characterization and error analysis of an N×N unfolding procedure applied to filtered, photoelectric x-ray detector arrays. I. Formulation and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Olson, R. E.; Ruiz, C. L.; Hohlfelder, J. J.; Mix, L. P.; Biggs, F.; Berninger, M.; Frederickson, P. O.; Frederickson, R.

    2010-12-01

    An algorithm for spectral reconstructions (unfolds) and spectrally integrated flux estimates from data obtained by a five-channel, filtered x-ray-detector array (XRD) is described in detail and characterized. This diagnostic is a broad-channel spectrometer, used primarily to measure time-dependent soft x-ray flux emitted by z-pinch plasmas at the Z pulsed-power accelerator (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA), and serves as both a plasma probe and a gauge of accelerator performance. The unfold method, suitable for online analysis, arises naturally from general assumptions about the x-ray source and spectral properties of the channel responses; a priori constraints control the ill-posed nature of the inversion. The unfolded spectrum is not assumed to be Planckian. This study is divided into two consecutive papers. This paper considers three major issues: (a) Formulation of the unfold method.—The mathematical background, assumptions, and procedures leading to the algorithm are described: the spectral reconstruction Sunfold(E,t)—five histogram x-ray bins j over the x-ray interval, 137≤E≤2300eV at each time step t—depends on the shape and overlap of the calibrated channel responses and on the maximum electrical power delivered to the plasma. The x-ray flux Funfold is estimated as ∫Sunfold(E,t)dE. (b) Validation with simulations.—Tests of the unfold algorithm with known static and time-varying spectra are described. These spectra included—but were not limited to—Planckian spectra Sbb(E,T) (25≤T≤250eV), from which noise-free channel data were simulated and unfolded. For Planckian simulations with 125≤T≤250eV and typical responses, the binwise unfold values Sj and the corresponding binwise averages ⟨Sbb⟩j agreed to ˜20%, except where Sbb≪max⁡{Sbb}. Occasionally, unfold values Sj≲0 (artifacts) were encountered. The algorithm recovered ≳90% of the x-ray flux over the wider range, 75≤T≤250eV. For lower T, the

  19. Filtered fluorescer x-ray detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, H.C.; Emig, J.A.; Thoe, R.S.; Springer, P.T.; Hernandez, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, an instrument capable of measuring x-rays between 8 and 90 keV was conceived to help understand conditions pertaining to pulsed power research. This resulted in the development of a versatile device that would incrementally detect x-rays emitted at predetermined energy bands over this range. To accomplish this, an array of well characterized filter-fluorescer combinations were produced which would allow fluoresced x-rays to be observed by time resolved electro-optical devices. As many as sixteen channels could be utilized with each channel having a corresponding background channel. Upon completion of the device, a three week series of experiments was then successfully carried out.

  20. A mixed approach to artifacts minimization in a continuous-rotate X-ray based tomographic imaging system using linear detector array.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Umesh; Ramakrishna, G S

    2002-10-01

    Adaptation of a general-purpose digital radiographic scintillator-based linear detector array (LDA) in a continuous-rotate third generation X-ray industrial tomographic imaging system and the resulting artifacts are discussed. Sources of error in the projection data are identified and a mixed approach, involving neighborhood averaging and row-wise application of a low-pass filter for the minimization of artifacts in the reconstructed images using weighted convolution back projection algorithm is illustrated. It is observed that the recently launched LDA can easily be adapted for industrial tomographic imaging of low-density specimen in a cost effective way by incorporating the suggested artifact removal technique in the given configuration.

  1. Small pixel CZT detector for hard X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew David; Cernik, Robert; Chen, Henry; Hansson, Conny; Iniewski, Kris; Jones, Lawrence L.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.

    2011-10-01

    A new small pixel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for hard X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray performance of four detectors is presented and the detectors are analysed in terms of the energy resolution of each pixel. The detectors were made from CZT crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) bonded to a 20×20 application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition (DAQ) system. The detectors had an array of 20×20 pixels on a 250 μm pitch, with each pixel gold-stud bonded to an energy resolving circuit in the ASIC. The DAQ system digitised the ASIC output with 14 bit resolution, performing offset corrections and data storage to disc in real time at up to 40,000 frames per second. The detector geometry and ASIC design was optimised for X-ray spectroscopy up to 150 keV and made use of the small pixel effect to preferentially measure the electron signal. A 241Am source was used to measure the spectroscopic performance and uniformity of the detectors. The average energy resolution (FWHM at 59.54 keV) of each pixel ranged from 1.09±0.46 to 1.50±0.57 keV across the four detectors. The detectors showed good spectral performance and uniform response over almost all pixels in the 20×20 array. A large area 80×80 pixel detector will be built that will utilise the scalable design of the ASIC and the large areas of monolithic spectroscopic grade THM grown CZT that are now available. The large area detector will have the same performance as that demonstrated here.

  2. CCD sensors in synchrotron X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, M. G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I. S.; Kraimer, M. R.; Westbrook, E. M.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1988-04-01

    The intense photon flux from advanced synchrotron light sources, such as the 7-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, require integrating-type detectors. Charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are well suited as synchrotron X-ray detectors. When irradiated indirectly via a phosphor followed by reducing optics, diffraction patterns of 100 cm 2 can be imaged on a 2 cm 2 CCD. With a conversion efficiency of ˜ 1 CCD electron/X-ray photon, a peak saturation capacity of > 10 6 X-rays can be obtained. A programmable CCD controller operating at a clock frequency of 20 MHz has been developed. The readout rate is 5 × 10 6 pixels/s and the shift rate in the parallel registers is 10 6 lines/s. The test detector was evaluated in two experiments. In protein crystallography diffraction patterns have been obtained from a lysozyme crystal using a conventional rotating anode X-ray generator. Based on these results we expect to obtain at a synchrotron diffraction images at a rate of ˜ 1 frame/s or a complete 3-dimensional data set from a single crystal in ˜ 2 min. In electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), the CCD was used in a parallel detection mode which is similar to the mode array detectors are used in dispersive EXAFS. With a beam current corresponding to 3 × 10 9 electron/s on the detector, a series of 64 spectra were recorded on the CCD in a continuous sequence without interruption due to readout. The frame-to-frame pixel signal fluctuations had σ = 0.4% from which DQE = 0.4 was obtained, where the detector conversion efficiency was 2.6 CCD electrons/X-ray photon. These multiple frame series also showed the time-resolved modulation of the electron microscope optics by stray magnetic fields.

  3. Synchrotron Area X-ray Detectors, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, Sol M.

    2010-06-23

    X-ray experiments are very frequently detector limited at today's storage ring synchrotron radiation (SR) sources, and will be even more so at future Energy Recovery Linac and X-ray Free Electron Laser sources. Image plate and phosphor-coupled CCD detectors that predominate at present-day sources were outgrowths of technologies initially developed for the medical and astronomical communities, respectively, with resultant limitations for SR. These limitations are enumerated. The growth of commercial silicon foundries and design tools enabling the production of large, customized integrated circuits is beginning to have a profound impact on SR detectors and is ushering in the age of 'designer detectors'. Novel area Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) are starting to appear in which each pixel has dedicated, complex circuitry capable of high speed and, in some cases, significant data processing power for specific applications. PADs now at, or near the horizon will be described. Integrated circuit methods continue to develop at a rapid pace. Implications for future x-ray detectors will be discussed.

  4. Deep diode arrays for X-ray detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemel, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    Temperature gradient zone melting process was used to form p-n junctions in bulk of high purity silicon wafers. These diodes were patterned to form arrays for X-ray spectrometers. The whole fabrication processes for these X-ray detectors are reviewed in detail. The p-n junctions were evaluated by (1) the dark diode I-V measurements, (2) the diode C sub I - V measurements, and (3) the MOS C-V measurements. The results showed that these junctions were linearly graded in charge distribution with low reverse bias leakage current flowing through them (few nA at -10 volts). The X-ray detection experiments showed that an FWHM of 500 eV was obtained from these diodes with a small bias of just -5 volts (for X-ray source Fe55). A theoretical model was proposed to explain the extra peaks found in the energy spectra and a very interesting point - cross talk effect was pointed out. This might be a solution to the problem of making really high resolution X-ray spectrometers.

  5. X-ray imaging and imaging spectroscopy of fusion plasmas and light-source experiments with spherical optics and pixel array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Zhang, L.

    2012-10-01

    High resolution (λ/Δλ ~10,000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixelarray detector (PAD) is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature (Ti) and plasma flow-velocityprofiles in magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of microns. A new concept of using matched pairs of spherically bent crystals for monochromatic stigmatic 2D x-ray imaging of mm sized sources offers the possibility of spatial resolution of microns and large solid angle, relative to that achieved with pinhole imaging. Other potential applications of the 2D imaging schemes include x-ray lithography and x-ray microscopy for biological and materials science research. Measurements from MFE plasmas, as well as laboratory experiments and ray tracing computations validating the 1D imaging spectroscopy and 2D x-ray imaging techniques will be presented.

  6. X-Ray Detector Research at MSFC for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Vision for Space Exploration has specific goals aimed at exploring the Solar System. This vision, under presidential mandate includes landing humans on the moon before the end of the next decade, paving the way for eventual journeys to Mars and beyond. The first missions to the moon will be in the form of both Orbiters and Landers, with the goal of paving the way for human return. One of the instruments we are currently working on,in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory, is a lunar orbiter fluorescent x-ray spectrometer to finely map the light elements (down to Carbon) on surface of the moon. Funded NASA s Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program the instrument is based on silicon drift detector arrays read out by custom ASICs. These offer the promise of high spectral resolution, necessary for resolving weak lines against a strong background continuum, and very low power requirements, necessary for large areas (greater than 500 square centimeters) required for future lunar missions. Further, the inherent radiation hardness of these detectors makes them ideal candidates for exploring the Jovian system, where the harsh radiation environment from Jupiter s radiation belts creates unfavorable detector conditions. Looking beyond our solar system, in the hard x-ray regime (20-80keV.), we are studying Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride pixilated detectors as feasible candidates for focal plane detectors of a hard x-ray telescope. This energy region bridges the gap between thermal and non-thermal x-ray emission from astronomical sources, will allow us to better understand supernovae nucleosynthesis (such as through the Ti-44 lines at 68keV and 78keV), Active Galactic Nuclei and other compact objects, more completely. The detectors that we are characterizing are 2mm in thickness and are pixilated with a 16x16 array of 300 micrometer pitch pixels (50micometer gap). These detectors are designed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, material is from e

  7. Superconducting tunnel junction detectors for soft x-ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeve, P.; Hijmering, R. A.; Martin, D. D. E.; Jerjen, I.; Peacock, A.; Venn, R.

    2006-06-01

    The requirement on energy resolution for detectors in future X-ray satelite missions such as XEUS (X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy mission) is <2eV in the soft x-ray range of 50-2000 eV, with a detection efficiency >80%. In addition, the requirements for field of view and angular resolution demand a detector array of typically 150x150 micron sized pixels in a 30x30 pixel format. DROIDs (Distributed Read Out Imaging Devices), consisting of a superconducting absorber strip with superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) as read-out devices on either end, can fulfill these requirements. The amplitudes of the two signals from the STJs provide information on the absorption position and the energy of the incoming photon in the absorber. In this paper we present the development status of Ta/Al 1-D DROIDs, as well as the the short term development program that should result in a full size XEUS array.

  8. Large area x-ray detectors for cargo radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, C.; Albagli, D.; Bendahan, J.; Castleberry, D.; Gordon, C.; Hopkins, F.; Ross, W.

    2007-04-01

    Large area x-ray detectors based on phosphors coupled to flat panel amorphous silicon diode technology offer significant advances for cargo radiologic imaging. Flat panel area detectors provide large object coverage offering high throughput inspections to meet the high flow rate of container commerce. These detectors provide excellent spatial resolution when needed, and enhanced SNR through low noise electronics. If the resolution is reduced through pixel binning, further advances in SNR are achievable. Extended exposure imaging and frame averaging enables improved x-ray penetration of ultra-thick objects, or "select-your-own" contrast sensitivity at a rate many times faster than LDAs. The areal coverage of flat panel technology provides inherent volumetric imaging with the appropriate scanning methods. Flat panel area detectors have flexible designs in terms of electronic control, scintillator selection, pixel pitch, and frame rates. Their cost is becoming more competitive as production ramps up for the healthcare, nondestructive testing (NDT), and homeland protection industries. Typically used medical and industrial polycrystalline phosphor materials such as Gd2O2S:Tb (GOS) can be applied to megavolt applications if the phosphor layer is sufficiently thick to enhance x-ray absorption, and if a metal radiator is used to augment the quantum detection efficiency and reduce x-ray scatter. Phosphor layers ranging from 0.2-mm to 1-mm can be "sandwiched" between amorphous silicon flat panel diode arrays and metal radiators. Metal plates consisting of W, Pb or Cu, with thicknesses ranging from 0.25-mm to well over 1-mm can be used by covering the entire area of the phosphor plate. In some combinations of high density metal and phosphor layers, the metal plate provides an intensification of 25% in signal due to electron emission from the plate and subsequent excitation within the phosphor material. This further improves the SNR of the system.

  9. Direct X-Ray Response Of Charge-Coupled Devices And Photodiode Linear Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launspach, J.; Bourgade, J. L.; Cavailler, C.; de Mascureau, J.; Mens, A.; Sauneuf, R.

    1986-08-01

    For x-ray calibration of detectors used on laser created plasma experiments we have developed and characterized two kinds of sources : classical continuous x-ray sources operating at 1.8 keV and 5.4 keV and a pulsed source obtained by modifying a plasma Focus device. Calibration data for x-ray Charge - Coupled Devices (CCD) and photodiode linear array cameras are presented.

  10. Development of mercuric iodide uncooled x ray detectors and spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    1990-01-01

    The results obtained in the development of miniature, lowpower, light weight mercuric iodide, HgI2, x ray spectrometers for future space missions are summarized. It was demonstrated that HgI2 detectors can be employed in a high resolution x ray spectrometer, operating in a scanning electron microscope. Also, the development of HgI2 x ray detectors to augment alpha backscattering spectrometers is discussed. These combination instruments allow for the identification of all chemical elements, with the possible exception of hydrogen, and their respective concentrations. Additionally, further investigations of questions regarding radiation damage effects in the HgI2 x ray detectors are reported.

  11. Small area silicon diffused junction x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Pehl, R.H.; Larsh, A.E.

    1981-10-01

    The low temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy x-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 cm/sup 2/ and a thickness of 100 ..mu..m. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values indicating that the defects introduced by the high temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low energy x-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 to 150/sup 0/K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low energy x-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon diffused junction technology to x-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon x-ray detector designs.

  12. Performance of an X-ray imaging detector based on a structured scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenonius, Olof; Sahlholm, Anna; Wiklund, Per; Linnros, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Structured scintillator plates have been fabricated by filling thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI) into a silicon pore array. Their X-ray imaging properties have been characterized using a standard dental X-ray source and a charge coupled device (CCD) detector. Results indicate that finer structured pore arrays provide superior imaging resolution while their light output is lower. Direct absorption of X-ray quanta in the CCD is a significant contributor of detector noise. This can be avoided by using a thick fibre optic plate or, in certain cases, by using a hot-pixel software algorithm.

  13. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    PubMed Central

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors. PMID:25995846

  14. Bandpass x-ray diode and x-ray multiplier detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1982-09-27

    An absorption-edge of an x-ray absorption filter and a quantum jump of a photocathode determine the bandpass characteristics of an x-ray diode detector. An anode, which collects the photoelectrons emitted by the photocathode, has enhanced amplification provided by photoelectron-multiplying means which include dynodes or a microchannel-plate electron-multiplier. Suppression of undesired high frequency response for a bandpass x-ray diode is provided by subtracting a signal representative of energies above the passband from a signal representative of the overall response of the bandpass diode.

  15. Magnetically-coupled microcalorimeter arrays for x-ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandler, Simon

    The "X-ray Surveyor" has been listed by NASA as one of the four major large mission concepts to be studied in the next Astrophysics Decadal Review in its preliminary list of large concepts. One of the key instruments on such a mission would be a very large format X-ray microcalorimeter array, with an array size of greater than 100 thousand pixels. Magnetically-coupled microcalorimeters (MCC) are one of the technologies with the greatest potential to meet the requirements of this mission, and this proposal is one to carry out research specifically to reach the goals of this vision. The "X-ray Surveyor" is a concept for a future mission that will make X-ray observations that are instrumental to understanding the quickly emerging population of galaxies and supermassive black holes at z ~10. The observations will trace the formation of galaxies and their assembly into large-scale structures starting from the earliest possible epochs. This mission would be observing baryons and large-scale physical processes outside of the very densest regions in the local Universe. This can be achieved with an X-ray observatory with similar angular resolution as Chandra but with significantly improved optic area and detector sensitivity. Chandra-scale angular resolution (1" or better) is essential in building more powerful, higher throughput observatories to avoid source confusion and remain photon-limited rather than background-limited. A prime consideration for the microcalorimeter camera on this type of mission is maintaining ~ 1 arcsec spatial resolution over the largest possible field of view, even if this means a slight trade-off against the spectral resolution. A uniform array of 1" pixels covering at least 5'x5' field of view is desired. To reduce the number of sensors read out, in geometries where extremely fine pitch (~50 microns) is desired, the most promising technologies are those in which a thermal sensor such an MCC can read out a sub-array of 20-25 individual 1'

  16. Flexible amorphous silicon PIN diode x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, Michael; Bawolek, Edward; Smith, Joseph T.; Raupp, Gregory B.; Morton, David

    2013-05-01

    A low temperature amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film transistor (TFT) and amorphous silicon PIN photodiode technology for flexible passive pixel detector arrays has been developed using active matrix display technology. The flexible detector arrays can be conformed to non-planar surfaces with the potential to detect x-rays or other radiation with an appropriate conversion layer. The thin, lightweight, and robust backplanes may enable the use of highly portable x-ray detectors for use in the battlefield or in remote locations. We have fabricated detector arrays up to 200 millimeters along the diagonal on a Gen II (370 mm x 470 mm rectangular substrate) using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) a-Si as the active layer and PECVD silicon nitride (SiN) as the gate dielectric and passivation. The a-Si based TFTs exhibited an effective saturation mobility of 0.7 cm2/V-s, which is adequate for most sensing applications. The PIN diode material was fabricated using a low stress amorphous silicon (a-Si) PECVD process. The PIN diode dark current was 1.7 pA/mm2, the diode ideality factor was 1.36, and the diode fill factor was 0.73. We report on the critical steps in the evolution of the backplane process from qualification of the low temperature (180°C) TFT and PIN diode process on the 150 mm pilot line, the transfer of the process to flexible plastic substrates, and finally a discussion and demonstration of the scale-up to the Gen II (370 x 470 mm) panel scale pilot line.

  17. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  18. A new soft x-ray pulse height analysis array in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu Yi; Yang, J. W.; Song, X. Y.; Liao, M.; Li, X.; Yuan, G. L.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Pan, C. H.

    2009-12-15

    A new soft x-ray pulse height analysis (PHA) array including nine independent subsystems, on basis of a nonconventional software multichannel analysis system and a silicon drift detector (SDD) linear array consisting of nine high performance SDD detectors, has been developed in the HL-2A tokamak. The use of SDD has greatly improved the measurement accuracy and the spatiotemporal resolutions of the soft x-ray PHA system. Since the ratio of peak to background counts obtained from the SDD PHA system is very high, p/b{>=}3000, the soft x-ray spectra measured by the SDD PHA system can approximatively be regarded as electron velocity distribution. The electron velocity distribution can be well derived in the pure ohmic and auxiliary heating discharges. The performance of the new soft x-ray PHA array and the first experimental results with some discussions are presented.

  19. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII): An EMCCD-Based X-Ray Detector

    PubMed Central

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Yadava, Girijesh; Patel, Vikas; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The solid-state x-ray image intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD-based x-ray detector designed to satisfy an increasing need for high-resolution real-time images, while offering significant improvements over current flat panel detectors (FPDs) and x-ray image intensifiers (XIIs). FPDs are replacing XIIs because they reduce/eliminate veiling glare, pincushion or s-shaped distortions and are physically flat. However, FPDs suffer from excessive lag and ghosting and their performance has been disappointing for low-exposure-per-frame procedures due to excessive instrumentation-noise. XIIs and FPDs both have limited resolution capabilities of ~3 cycles/mm. To overcome these limitations a prototype SSXII module has been developed, consisting of a 1k × 1k, 8 μm pixel EMCCD with a fiber-optic input window, which views a 350 μm thick CsI(Tl) phosphor via a 4:1 magnifying fiber-optic-taper (FOT). Arrays of such modules will provide a larger field-of-view. Detector MTF, DQE, and instrumentation-noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were measured to evaluate the SSXIIs performance using a standard x-ray spectrum (IEC RQA5), allowing for comparison with current state-of-the-art detectors. The MTF was 0.20 at 3 cycles/mm, comparable to standard detectors, and better than 0.05 up to 7 cycles/mm, well beyond current capabilities. DQE curves indicate no degradation from high-angiographic to low-fluoroscopic exposures (< 2% deviation in overall DQE from 1.3 mR to 2.7 μR), demonstrating negligible instrumentation-noise, even with low input signal intensities. An INEE of < 0.2 μR was measured for the highest-resolution mode (32 μm effective pixel size). Comparison images between detector technologies qualitatively demonstrate these improved imaging capabilities provided by the SSXII. PMID:18836568

  20. X-ray and gamma ray astronomy detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decher, Rudolf; Ramsey, Brian D.; Austin, Robert

    1994-01-01

    X-ray and gamma ray astronomy was made possible by the advent of space flight. Discovery and early observations of celestial x-rays and gamma rays, dating back almost 40 years, were first done with high altitude rockets, followed by Earth-orbiting satellites> once it became possible to carry detectors above the Earth's atmosphere, a new view of the universe in the high-energy part of the electromagnetic spectrum evolved. Many of the detector concepts used for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy were derived from radiation measuring instruments used in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and other fields. However, these instruments, when used in x-ray and gamma ray astronomy, have to meet unique and demanding requirements related to their operation in space and the need to detect and measure extremely weak radiation fluxes from celestial x-ray and gamma ray sources. Their design for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy has, therefore, become a rather specialized and rapidly advancing field in which improved sensitivity, higher energy and spatial resolution, wider spectral coverage, and enhanced imaging capabilities are all sought. This text is intended as an introduction to x-ray and gamma ray astronomy instruments. It provides an overview of detector design and technology and is aimed at scientists, engineers, and technical personnel and managers associated with this field. The discussion is limited to basic principles and design concepts and provides examples of applications in past, present, and future space flight missions.

  1. Accurate determination of segmented X-ray detector geometry

    PubMed Central

    Yefanov, Oleksandr; Mariani, Valerio; Gati, Cornelius; White, Thomas A.; Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in X-ray detector technology have resulted in the introduction of segmented detectors composed of many small detector modules tiled together to cover a large detection area. Due to mechanical tolerances and the desire to be able to change the module layout to suit the needs of different experiments, the pixels on each module might not align perfectly on a regular grid. Several detectors are designed to permit detector sub-regions (or modules) to be moved relative to each other for different experiments. Accurate determination of the location of detector elements relative to the beam-sample interaction point is critical for many types of experiment, including X-ray crystallography, coherent diffractive imaging (CDI), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and spectroscopy. For detectors with moveable modules, the relative positions of pixels are no longer fixed, necessitating the development of a simple procedure to calibrate detector geometry after reconfiguration. We describe a simple and robust method for determining the geometry of segmented X-ray detectors using measurements obtained by serial crystallography. By comparing the location of observed Bragg peaks to the spot locations predicted from the crystal indexing procedure, the position, rotation and distance of each module relative to the interaction region can be refined. We show that the refined detector geometry greatly improves the results of experiments. PMID:26561117

  2. Accurate determination of segmented X-ray detector geometry.

    PubMed

    Yefanov, Oleksandr; Mariani, Valerio; Gati, Cornelius; White, Thomas A; Chapman, Henry N; Barty, Anton

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in X-ray detector technology have resulted in the introduction of segmented detectors composed of many small detector modules tiled together to cover a large detection area. Due to mechanical tolerances and the desire to be able to change the module layout to suit the needs of different experiments, the pixels on each module might not align perfectly on a regular grid. Several detectors are designed to permit detector sub-regions (or modules) to be moved relative to each other for different experiments. Accurate determination of the location of detector elements relative to the beam-sample interaction point is critical for many types of experiment, including X-ray crystallography, coherent diffractive imaging (CDI), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and spectroscopy. For detectors with moveable modules, the relative positions of pixels are no longer fixed, necessitating the development of a simple procedure to calibrate detector geometry after reconfiguration. We describe a simple and robust method for determining the geometry of segmented X-ray detectors using measurements obtained by serial crystallography. By comparing the location of observed Bragg peaks to the spot locations predicted from the crystal indexing procedure, the position, rotation and distance of each module relative to the interaction region can be refined. We show that the refined detector geometry greatly improves the results of experiments.

  3. Accurate determination of segmented X-ray detector geometry.

    PubMed

    Yefanov, Oleksandr; Mariani, Valerio; Gati, Cornelius; White, Thomas A; Chapman, Henry N; Barty, Anton

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in X-ray detector technology have resulted in the introduction of segmented detectors composed of many small detector modules tiled together to cover a large detection area. Due to mechanical tolerances and the desire to be able to change the module layout to suit the needs of different experiments, the pixels on each module might not align perfectly on a regular grid. Several detectors are designed to permit detector sub-regions (or modules) to be moved relative to each other for different experiments. Accurate determination of the location of detector elements relative to the beam-sample interaction point is critical for many types of experiment, including X-ray crystallography, coherent diffractive imaging (CDI), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and spectroscopy. For detectors with moveable modules, the relative positions of pixels are no longer fixed, necessitating the development of a simple procedure to calibrate detector geometry after reconfiguration. We describe a simple and robust method for determining the geometry of segmented X-ray detectors using measurements obtained by serial crystallography. By comparing the location of observed Bragg peaks to the spot locations predicted from the crystal indexing procedure, the position, rotation and distance of each module relative to the interaction region can be refined. We show that the refined detector geometry greatly improves the results of experiments. PMID:26561117

  4. The development and characterization of neutron-damaged GaAs x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, P.T.

    1988-09-09

    Photoconductive x-ray detectors are becoming an important x-ray diagnostic as a result of their small size, fast response time, and high sensitivity. We are developing a discrete array of neutron- damaged GaAs detectors to be used in an imaging x-ray spectrometer, and we describe herein the techniques we use to fabricate and characterize them for an upcoming experiment. Using a 225-ps x-ray pulse from a laser-produced plasma, we measured the sensitivity and time response of the detectors to be 7.1 mA/W and on the order of 150 ps FWHM, respectively. The carrier mobility is 741 cm/sup 2//V/center dot/s at a bias of 2 /times/ 10/sup 4/V/cm. 6 figs.

  5. X-ray imaging using a 320 x 240 hybrid GaAs pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Irsigler, R.; Andersson, J.; Alverbro, J.

    1999-06-01

    The authors present room temperature measurements on 200 {micro}m thick GaAs pixel detectors, which were hybridized to silicon readout circuits. The whole detector array contains 320 x 240 square shaped pixel with a pitch of 38 {micro}m and is based on semi-insulating liquid-encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs material. After fabricating and dicing, the detector chips were indium bump flip chip bonded to CMOS readout circuits based on charge integration and finally evaluated. This readout chip was originally designed for the readout of flip chip bonded infrared detectors, but appears to be suitable for X-ray applications as well. A bias voltage between 50 V and 100 V was sufficient to operate the detector at room temperature. The detector array did respond to x-ray radiation by an increase in current due to production of electron hole pairs by the ionization processes. Images of various objects and slit patterns were acquired by using a standard X-ray source for dental imaging. The new X-ray hybrid detector was analyzed with respect to its imaging properties. Due to the high absorption coefficient for X-rays in GaAs and the small pixel size, the sensor shows a high modulation transfer function up to the Nyquist frequency.

  6. Charge-coupled device area x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, Sol M.; Tate, Mark W.; Eikenberry, Eric F.

    2002-08-01

    Charge-coupled device (CCD) area x-ray detector technology is reviewed. CCD detectors consist of a serial chain of signal components, such as phosphors, fiber optics or lenses, image intensifiers and the CCD which serve to convert the x-ray energy to light or electron-hole pairs and to record the spatially resolved image. The various combinations of components that have been used to make CCD detectors are described and the properties of each of the critical components are discussed. Calibration and correction procedures required for accurate data collection are described. The review closes with a brief description of future directions for solid-state area x-ray detectors.

  7. Improved x-ray spectroscopy with room temperature CZT detectors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Shannon G; Shikhaliev, Polad M; Matthews, Kenneth L

    2011-09-01

    Compact, room temperature x-ray spectroscopy detectors are of interest in many areas including diagnostic x-ray imaging, radiation protection and dosimetry. Room temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors are promising candidates for these applications. One of the major problems for CZT detectors is low-energy tailing of the energy spectrum due to hole trapping. Spectral post-correction methods to correct the tailing effect do not work well for a number of reasons; thus it is advisable to eliminate the hole trapping effect in CZT using physical methods rather than correcting an already deteriorated energy spectrum. One method is using a CZT detector with an electrode configuration which modifies the electric field in the CZT volume to decrease low-energy tailing. Another method is to irradiate the CZT surface at a tilted angle, which modifies depth of interaction to decrease low-energy tailing. Neither method alone, however, eliminates the tailing effect. In this work, we have investigated the combination of modified electric field and tilted angle irradiation in a single detector to further decrease spectral tailing. A planar CZT detector with 10 × 10 × 3 mm³ size and CZT detector with 5 × 5 × 5 mm³ size and cap-shaped electrode were used in this study. The cap-shaped electrode (referred to as CAPture technology) modifies the electric field distribution in the CZT volume and decreases the spectral tailing effect. The detectors were investigated at 90° (normal) and 30° (tilted angle) irradiation modes. Two isotope sources with 59.6 and 122 keV photon energies were used for gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. X-ray spectroscopy was performed using collimated beams at 60, 80 and 120 kVp tube voltages, in both normal and tilted angle irradiation. Measured x-ray spectra were corrected for K x-ray escape fractions that were calculated using Monte Carlo methods. The x-ray spectra measured with tilted angle CAPture detector at 60, 80 and 120

  8. The Gated X-ray Detector for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, J A; Barnes, C; Archuleta, T; Casper, L; Fatherley, V; Heinrichs, T; King, R; Landers, D; Lopez, F; Sanchez, P; Sandoval, G; Schrank, L; Walsh, P; Bell, P; Brown, M; Costa, R; Holder, J; Montalongo, S; Pederson, N

    2006-05-18

    Two new gated x-ray imaging cameras have recently been designed, constructed and delivered to the National Ignition Facility in Livermore, CA. These Gated X-ray Detectors are each designed to fit within an aluminum airbox with a large capacity cooling plane and are fitted with an array of environmental housekeeping sensors. These instruments are significant different from earlier generations of gated x-ray images due in parts to an innovative impendence matching scheme, advanced phosphor screens, pulsed phosphor circuits, precision assembly fixturing, unique system monitoring and complete remote computer control. Preliminary characterization has shown repeatable uniformity between imaging strips, improved spatial resolution and no detectable impendence reflections.

  9. Automated Hybridization of X-ray Absorber Elements-A Path to Large Format Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S.; Kelley, R.; Allen, C.; Kilbourne, C.; Costen, N.; Miller, T.

    2007-01-01

    In the design of microcalorimeters, it is often desirable to produce the X-ray absorber separately from the detector element. In this case, the attachment of the absorber to the detector element with the required thermal and mechanical characteristics is a major challenge. In such arrays, the attachment has been done by hand. This process is not easily extended to the large format arrays required for future X- ray astronomy missions such as the New x-ray Telescope or NeXT. In this paper we present an automated process for attaching absorber tiles to the surface of a large-scale X-ray detector array. The absorbers are attached with stycast epoxy to a thermally isolating polymer structure made of SU-8. SU-8 is a negative epoxy based photo resist produced by Microchem. We describe the fabrication of the X-ray absorbers and their suspension on a handle die in an adhesive matrix. We describe the production process for the polymer isolators on the detector elements. We have developed a new process for the alignment, and simultaneous bonding of the absorber tiles to an entire detector array. This process uses equipment and techniques used in the flip-chip bonding industry and approaches developed in the fabrication of the XRS-2 instrument. XRS-2 was an X-ray spectrometer that was launched on the Suzaku telescope in July 10, 2005. We describe the process and show examples of sample arrays produced by this process. Arrays with up to 300 elements have been bonded. The present tests have used dummy absorbers made of Si. In future work, we will demonstrate bonding of HgTe absorbers.

  10. Spatial resolution of a hard x-ray CCD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Pereira, Nino R.; Weber, Bruce V.; Schumer, Joseph W.; Apruzese, John P.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Boyer, Craig N.; Skirlo, Scott

    2010-08-10

    The spatial resolution of an x-ray CCD detector was determined from the widths of the tungsten x-ray lines in the spectrum formed by a crystal spectrometer in the 58 to 70 keV energy range. The detector had 20{mu}m pixel, 1700 by 1200 pixel format, and a CsI x-ray conversion scintillator. The spectral lines from a megavolt x-ray generator were focused on the spectrometer's Rowland circle by a curved transmission crystal. The line shapes were Lorentzian with an average width after removal of the natural and instrumental line widths of 95{mu}m (4.75 pixels). A high spatial frequency background, primarily resulting from scattered gamma rays, was removed from the spectral image by Fourier analysis. The spectral lines, having low spatial frequency in the direction perpendicular to the dispersion, were enhanced by partially removing the Lorentzian line shape and by fitting Lorentzian curves to broad unresolved spectral features. This demonstrates the ability to improve the spectral resolution of hard x-ray spectra that are recorded by a CCD detector with well-characterized intrinsic spatial resolution.

  11. Spatial resolution of a hard x-ray CCD detector.

    PubMed

    Seely, John F; Pereira, Nino R; Weber, Bruce V; Schumer, Joseph W; Apruzese, John P; Hudson, Lawrence T; Szabo, Csilla I; Boyer, Craig N; Skirlo, Scott

    2010-08-10

    The spatial resolution of an x-ray CCD detector was determined from the widths of the tungsten x-ray lines in the spectrum formed by a crystal spectrometer in the 58 to 70 keV energy range. The detector had 20 microm pixel, 1700 by 1200 pixel format, and a CsI x-ray conversion scintillator. The spectral lines from a megavolt x-ray generator were focused on the spectrometer's Rowland circle by a curved transmission crystal. The line shapes were Lorentzian with an average width after removal of the natural and instrumental line widths of 95 microm (4.75 pixels). A high spatial frequency background, primarily resulting from scattered gamma rays, was removed from the spectral image by Fourier analysis. The spectral lines, having low spatial frequency in the direction perpendicular to the dispersion, were enhanced by partially removing the Lorentzian line shape and by fitting Lorentzian curves to broad unresolved spectral features. This demonstrates the ability to improve the spectral resolution of hard x-ray spectra that are recorded by a CCD detector with well-characterized intrinsic spatial resolution.

  12. Microcalorimeter array development for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigot, C.; Agnese, P.; Navick, X. F.; Pelliciari, C.; Sauvageot, J. L.

    2003-05-01

    A development of X-ray sensitive microcalorimeter arrays is presently being undertaken to provide a spectroimager of high-energy resolution which could fit the focal plane of the X-ray astronomy spatial missions of the new generation (ESLAB 1999/093/SA). The infrared-sensitive arrays which have been realized at LETI in collaboration with the SAp, for the PACS experiment on board the Herschel satellite (Proceedings of the SPIE Conference of Orlando, 5-9 April 1999, 3698-38), are taken as the basis of this development which will rely conservatively on standard technology.

  13. Investigation of Micropatent Gaseous Detector for X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongbang; Liang, En-Wei; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yangheng

    2016-07-01

    We present an investigation of the Micropatent Gaseous Detector (THGEM and MicroMegas) for the X-ray polarimeter. THGEMs with different thickness and diameter have been studied with vary electrical parameter. The energy resolution of 15.9% with 5.9 keV X-rays was obtained for the thinner-THGEM. MicroMegas with ITO glass has been assembled and tested in Ne-5%CF _{4} which emits light during the electron multiplication. The track of the primary photoelectron excited by the incident X-ray was imaged on an intensified CCD. For the expected sensitivity of the polarimeter, we used the Monte Carlo package Geant4 and Garfield to simulate the charge distribution of the photoelectron, diffusion of the charge track during drift and track image of the detector. The associated Monte Carlo calculation of energy resolution dependence on drift electric field and induction field has been compared with the experimental results.

  14. Optimization of niobium tunnel junctions as X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulnier, Gregory G.; Zacher, Robert A.; Van Vechten, Deborah; Boyer, Craig; Lovellette, Michael N.; Fritz, Gilbert G.; Soulen, Robert J.; Kang, Joonhee; Blamire, Mark; Kirk, Eugenie C. G.

    1992-01-01

    We report on our ongoing work using Nb/Al/AlO(x)/Nb junctions for the detection of X-rays. Detectors based on superconducting tunneling junctions offer the prospect of resolution over an order of magnitude higher than is obtainable with the current generation of semiconductor-based detectors. Results of measurements taken at 1.85 K (a temperature achievable with current space flight technology) include the current-voltage (I-V) curve, subgap current vs temperature, the dependence of the superconducting current on the applied magnetic field (Fraunhofer pattern), X-ray pulses, and the spectra from a 6 keV X-ray source which gave an intrinsic device resolution of approximately 700 eV. The collection of more than 10 exp 5 electrons per 6 keV photon is established.

  15. High resolution, low energy avalanche photodiode X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, R.; Vanderpuye, K.; Entine, G.; Squillante, M. R.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes have been fabricated, and their performance as X-ray detectors has been measured. Photon sensitivity and energy resolution were measured as a function of size and operating parameters. Noise thresholds as low as 212 eV were obtained at room temperature, and backscatter X-ray fluorescence data were obtained for aluminum and other light elements. It is concluded that the results with the X-ray detector are extremely encouraging, and the performance is challenging the best available proportional counters. While not at the performance level of either cryogenic silicon or HgI2, these device operate at room temperature and can be reproduced in large numbers and with much larger areas than typically achieved with HgI2. In addition, they are rugged and appear to be indefinitely stable.

  16. Next-generation detectors for x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, Richard M.; Holland, Andrew D.; Mukerjee, Kallol; Keay, Adam; Turner, Martin J. L.; Abbey, Antony F.; Hutchinson, Ian B.; Ashton, T. J. R.; Beardmore, Andrew P.; Short, Alexander D. T.; Pool, Peter J.; Burt, David; Vernon, D.

    2004-09-01

    The next generation of X-ray astronomy instruments will require position sensitive detectors in the form of charge coupled devices (CCDs) for X-ray spectroscopy and imaging that will have the ability to probe the X-ray universe with a greater efficiency. This will require the development of CCDs with structures that will improve on the quantum efficiency of the current state of the art over a broader spectral range in addition to reducing spectral features, which may affect spectral resolution and signal to background levels. These devices will also have to be designed to withstand the harsh radiation environments associated with orbits that extend beyond the Earth"s magnetosphere. The next generation X-ray telescopes will incorporate larger X-ray optics that will allow deeper observations of the X-ray universe and sensors will have to compensate for this by an increased readout speed. This study will aim to describe some of the results obtained from test CCD structures that may fit many of the requirements described above.

  17. Photon crosstalk in pixel array for x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Giyoon; Kang, Dong-uk; Lee, Daehee; Cho, Gyuseong

    2014-09-01

    A large-area X-ray CMOS image sensor (LXCIS) is widely used in mammography, non-destructive inspection, and animal CT. For LXCIS, in spite of weakness such as low spatial and energy resolution, a Indirect method using scintillator like CsI(Tl) or Gd2O2S is still well-used because of low cost and easy manufacture. A photo-diode for X-ray imaging has large area about 50 ~ 200 um as compared with vision image sensors. That is because X-ray has feature of straight and very small light emission of a scintillator. Moreover, notwithstanding several structure like columnar, the scintillator still emit a diffusible light. This diffusible light from scintillator can make spatial crosstalk in X-ray photodiode array because of a large incidence angle. Moreover, comparing with vision image sensors, X-ray sensor doesn't have micro lens for gathering the photons to photo-diode. In this study, we simulated the affection of spatial crosstalk in X-ray sensor by comparing optical sensor. Additionally, the chip, which was fabricated in 0.18 um 1P5M process by Hynix in Korea, was tested to know the effect of spatial crosstalk by changing design parameters. From these works, we found out that spatial crosstalk is affected by pixel pitch, incident angle of photons, and micro lens on each pixels.

  18. Hard X-ray spatial array diagnostics on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, D. W.; Chen, Z. Y. Luo, Y. H.; Tong, R. H.; Yan, W.; Jin, W.; Zhuang, G.

    2014-11-15

    A spatially distributed hard X-ray detection array has been developed to diagnose the loss of runaway electron with toroidal and poloidal resolution. The hard X-ray radiation in the energy ranges of 0.3–1 MeV resulted from runaway electrons can be measured. The detection array consists of 12 CdTe detectors which are arranged surrounding the tokamak. It is found that most runaway electrons which transport to plasma boundary tend to loss on limiters. The application of electrode biasing probe resulted in enhancement of local runaway loss. Resonant magnetic perturbations enhanced the runaway electrons diffusion and showed an asymmetric poloidal loss rate.

  19. Hard X-ray spatial array diagnostics on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Huang, D W; Chen, Z Y; Luo, Y H; Tong, R H; Yan, W; Jin, W; Zhuang, G

    2014-11-01

    A spatially distributed hard X-ray detection array has been developed to diagnose the loss of runaway electron with toroidal and poloidal resolution. The hard X-ray radiation in the energy ranges of 0.3-1 MeV resulted from runaway electrons can be measured. The detection array consists of 12 CdTe detectors which are arranged surrounding the tokamak. It is found that most runaway electrons which transport to plasma boundary tend to loss on limiters. The application of electrode biasing probe resulted in enhancement of local runaway loss. Resonant magnetic perturbations enhanced the runaway electrons diffusion and showed an asymmetric poloidal loss rate.

  20. The Speedster-EXD - A New Event-Triggered Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher; Falcone, A.; Prieskorn, Z.; Burrows, D. N.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development of a new Teledyne Imaging Systems hybrid CMOS x-ray detector called the Speedster-EXD which is capable of event-triggered read-out. Hybrid CMOS detectors currently have many advantages over CCDs including lower susceptibility to radiation damage, lower power consumption, and faster read out time to avoid pile-up. In addition to these advantages, the Speedster-EXD has new in-pixel circuitry which includes CDS subtraction to reduce read noise and a CTIA amplifier to eliminate interpixel capacitance crosstalk. The new circuitry also includes an in-pixel comparator that triggers on x-ray events. The comparator feature allows the detector to only read pixels in which an x-ray is detected. This feature increases the detector array effective frame rate by orders of magnitude. The current advantages of hybrid CMOS x-ray detectors combined with the new in-pixel circuitry makes the Speedster-EXD an ideal candidate for future high throughput x-ray missions requiring large-format silicon imagers.

  1. Stacked, filtered multi-channel X-ray diode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeil, L. P.; Dutra, E. C.; Compton, S. M.; Jacoby, B. A.; Raphaelian, M. L.

    2015-08-01

    There are many types of X-ray diodes that are used for X-ray flux or spectroscopic measurements and for estimating the spectral shape of the VUV to soft X-ray spectrum. However, a need arose for a low cost, robust X-ray diode to use for experiments in hostile environments on multiple platforms, and for experiments that utilize forces that may destroy the diode(s). Since the typical proposed use required a small size with a minimal single line-of-sight, a parallel array could not be used. So, a stacked, filtered multi-channel X-ray diode array was developed, called the MiniXRD. To achieve significant cost savings while maintaining robustness and ease of field setup, repair, and replacement, we designed the system to be modular. The filters were manufactured in-house and cover the range from 450 eV to 5000 eV. To achieve the line-of-sight accuracy needed, we developed mounts and laser alignment techniques. We modeled and tested elements of the diode design at NSTec Livermore Operations (NSTec / LO) to determine temporal response and dynamic range, leading to diode shape and circuitry changes to optimize impedance and charge storage. We fielded individual and stacked systems at several national facilities as ancillary `ride-along' diagnostics to test and improve the design usability. We present the MiniXRD system performance which supports consideration as a viable low-cost alternative for multiple-channel low-energy X-ray measurements. This diode array is currently at Technical Readiness Level (TRL) 6.

  2. Measurements of High Energy X-Ray Dose Distributions Using Multi-Dimensional Fiber-Optic Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Dong Hyun; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Bongsoo; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Tack, Gye-Rae; Yi, Jeong Han; Kim, Sin; Cho, Hyosung

    In this study, we have fabricated multi-dimensional fiber-optic radiation detectors with organic scintillators, plastic optical fibers and photo-detectors such as photodiode array and a charge-coupled device. To measure the X-ray dose distributions of the clinical linear accelerator in the tissue-equivalent medium, we have fabricated polymethylmethacrylate phantoms which have one-dimensional and two-dimensional fiber-optic detector arrays inside. The one-dimensional and two-dimensional detector arrays can be used to measure percent depth doses and surface dose distributions of high energy X-ray in the phantom respectively.

  3. Portable X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, V.

    1999-10-25

    The X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detection System was designed and built by Ames Laboratory and the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University. The system uses a C-frame inspection head with an X-ray tube mounted on one side of the frame and an imaging unit and a high purity germanium detector on the other side. the inspection head is portable and can be easily positioned around ventilation ducts and pipes up to 36 inches in diameter. Wide angle and narrow beam X-ray shots are used to identify the type of holdup material and the amount of the contaminant. Precise assay data can be obtained within minutes of the interrogation. A profile of the containerized holdup material and a permanent record of the measurement are immediately available.

  4. Charge-coupled-device X-ray detector performance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautz, M. W.; Berman, G. E.; Doty, J. P.; Ricker, G. R.

    1987-01-01

    A model that predicts the performance characteristics of CCD detectors being developed for use in X-ray imaging is presented. The model accounts for the interactions of both X-rays and charged particles with the CCD and simulates the transport and loss of charge in the detector. Predicted performance parameters include detective and net quantum efficiencies, split-event probability, and a parameter characterizing the effective thickness presented by the detector to cosmic-ray protons. The predicted performance of two CCDs of different epitaxial layer thicknesses is compared. The model predicts that in each device incomplete recovery of the charge liberated by a photon of energy between 0.1 and 10 keV is very likely to be accompanied by charge splitting between adjacent pixels. The implications of the model predictions for CCD data processing algorithms are briefly discussed.

  5. A space fiber-optic x-ray burst detector

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Casperson, D.E.; Echave, M.A.; Edwards, B.C.; Miller, J.R.; Saylor, W.W.; Sweet, M.R.; Valencia, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    We describe a novel, lightweight x-ray burst detector that can be embedded in a satellite structure, thus forming a ``smart skin,`` which has minimal impact on the host satellite. The design is based on two types of optical fibers coupled to photodiodes. The first is a scintillating fiber, which gives a fast signal for timing. The second is a germanium-doped silica fiber, which darkens for a few milliseconds when irradiated with a burst of x rays. The resulting slow signal is used to discriminate against electrostatic discharges. The coincidence of a fast signal from the scintillating fiber with a slow signal from the darkening fiber is the signature of an x-ray burst. The response is linear at low doses and becomes nonlinear at high doses. We have two techniques to test the instrument in a space experiment scheduled for 1994. First, a small, space-qualified flash x-ray unit can illuminate the fibers. Second, we can detect space background radiation. The cumulative dose will be monitored by RADFET dosimeters. Future work on embedding the fibers and the electronics as Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) in the spacecraft skin could lead to use of these detectors on many satellites.

  6. Measurements of Si hybrid CMOS x-ray detector characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, Stephen D.; Falcone, Abe D.; Burrows, David N.; Cook, Robert; Bai, Yibin; Farris, Mark

    2009-08-01

    The development of Hybrid CMOS Detectors (HCDs) for X-Ray telescope focal planes will place them in contention with CCDs on future satellite missions due to their faster frame rates, flexible readout scenarios, lower power consumption, and inherent radiation hardness. CCDs have been used with great success on the current generation of X-Ray telescopes (e.g. Chandra, XMM, Suzaku, and Swift). However their bucket-brigade readout architecture, which transfers charge across the chip with discrete component readout electronics, results in clockrate limited readout speeds that cause pileup (saturation) of bright sources and an inherent susceptibility to radiation induced displacement damage that limits mission lifetime. In contrast, HCDs read pixels with low power, on-chip multiplexer electronics in a random access fashion. Faster frame rates achieved with multi-output readout design will allow the next generation's larger effective area telescopes to observe bright sources free of pileup. Radiation damaged lattice sites effect a single pixel instead of an entire row. Random access, multi-output readout will allow for novel readout modes such as simultaneous bright-source-fast/whole-chip-slow readout. In order for HCDs to be useful as X-Ray detectors, they must show noise and energy resolution performance similar to CCDs while retaining advantages inherent to HCDs. We will report on readnoise, conversion gain, and energy resolution measurements of an X-Ray enhanced Teledyne HAWAII-1RG (H1RG) HCD and describe techniques of H1RG data reduction.

  7. Installation of soft X-ray array diagnostics and its application to tomography reconstruction using synthetic KSTAR X-ray images

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Hun; Jang, Juhyeok; Hong, Joohwan; Jang, Siwon; Choe, Wonho; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Kim, Junghee

    2014-11-15

    Four-array system of soft X-ray diagnostics was installed on KSTAR tokamak. Each array has 32 viewing chords of two photo-diode array detectors with spatial resolution of 2 cm. To estimate signals from the soft X-ray radiation power, typical n{sub e}, T{sub e}, and argon impurity line radiation profiles in KSTAR are chosen. The photo-diodes were absolutely calibrated as a function of the incident photon energy in 2–40 keV range with a portable X-ray tube. Two-dimensional T{sub e} image properties by multi-energy method were simulated and visualized with six combinations of beryllium filter sets within the dynamic range of signal ratio.

  8. HEXITEC: A Next Generation Hard X-ray Detector for Solar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert; Inglis, Andrew R.; Gregory, Kyle; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew; Veale, Matthew C.; Panessa, Marco

    2016-05-01

    There is an increasing demand in solar physics for high resolution X-ray spectroscopic imaging. Such observations would present ground-breaking opportunities to study the poorly understood high energy processes in the solar corona such as solar flares, coronal heating, etc. However, such observations require a new breed of solid-state detectors sensititve to high energy X-rays with fine independent pixels to subsample the point spread function (PSF) of the X-ray optics. They must also be capable of handling very high count rates as photon fluxes from solar flares often cause pileup in current detectors. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) has recently developed a new Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector system, dubbed HEXITEC (High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology). It is an 80x80 array of 250 micron independent pixels sensitive in the 4--80 keV band and capable of a high full frame readout rate of 10 kHz. HEXITEC provides the smallest independently read out pixels currently available, and are well matched to the few arcsecond PSF produced by the current and next generation hard X-ray focusing optics. NASA's Goddard and Marshall Space Flight Centers are collaborating with RAL to develop these detectors for use on future space-borne hard X-ray focusing telescopes. In this poster we show the latest results on HEXITEC's imaging capability, high read out rate, and energy sensitivity and reveal it to be ideal for such future instruments. The potential observations obtained by combining HEXITEC with the next generation of X-ray focusing optics could to revolutionize our understanding of high energy processes in the solar corona.

  9. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan, Jing; Yang, Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang, Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing, Zhenxue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 × 2 detector

  10. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan Jing; Yang Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing Zhenxue

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. Methods: A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. Results: The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 x 2 detector binning

  11. Hard x-ray response of pixellated CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbene, L.; Caccia, S.; Bertuccio, G.

    2009-06-15

    In recent years, the development of cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for x-ray and gamma ray spectrometry has grown rapidly. The good room temperature performance and the high spatial resolution of pixellated CdZnTe detectors make them very attractive in space-borne x-ray astronomy, mainly as focal plane detectors for the new generation of hard x-ray focusing telescopes. In this work, we investigated on the spectroscopic performance of two pixellated CdZnTe detectors coupled with a custom low noise and low power readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The detectors (10x10x1 and 10x10x2 mm{sup 3} single crystals) have an anode layout based on an array of 256 pixels with a geometric pitch of 0.5 mm. The ASIC, fabricated in 0.8 mum BiCMOS technology, is equipped with eight independent channels (preamplifier and shaper) and characterized by low power consumption (0.5 mW/channel) and low noise (150-500 electrons rms). The spectroscopic results point out the good energy resolution of both detectors at room temperature [5.8% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 59.5 keV for the 1 mm thick detector; 5.5% FWHM at 59.5 keV for the 2 mm thick detector) and low tailing in the measured spectra, confirming the single charge carrier sensing properties of the CdZnTe detectors equipped with a pixellated anode layout. Temperature measurements show optimum performance of the system (detector and electronics) at T=10 deg.C and performance degradation at lower temperatures. The detectors and the ASIC were developed by our collaboration as two small focal plane detector prototypes for hard x-ray multilayer telescopes operating in the 20-70 keV energy range.

  12. A newly developed multilayer semiconductor x-ray detector for the observations of wide energy-range x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, M.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Yatsu, K.; Tamano, T.; Miyoshi, S.; Kondoh, T.; Saitoh, Y.; Sato, K.; Miyahara, S.; Hirano, K.; Maezawa, H.

    1995-02-01

    For the purpose of the developments of wide-energy-range-sensitive x-ray detectors, we have designed and fabricated a new-type multilayer semiconductor x-ray detector. This new-type detector has been characterized using synchrotron radiation from a 2.5-GeV positron storage ring at the Photon Factory of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK). This new detector is essentially composed of four layers of commercially available photodiodes. Each photodiode is made from a 300-μm thick, and a 10×10-mm square-shaped wafer. For the common affiliation of these individual photodiodes, the quantum efficiency normalized by the photon energy η/E begins to decrease at 8 keV, and then η/E decreases down to 26% at 20 keV. On the other hand, for our newly designed detector a flat response even in the 10-20-keV energy regime (beam line 15C at the Photon Factory) is observed, and even at 100 keV η/E<30% is still anticipated. This new x-ray detector has various advantages: (i) A compact, and (ii) outgas-free detector for a high-vacuum use, along with (iii) a high degree of immunity to ambient magnetic fields. Furthermore, (iv) the combination of the x-ray signal outputs from each detector layer provides information on the x-ray emitting electron energies. These properties are quite suitable for the use of the fusion-oriented plasma x-ray diagnostics under intense-magnetic field and high-vacuum conditions so as to interpret wide-band x-ray emitting electron-velocity distribution functions from the x-ray data.

  13. Room temperature semiconductor detectors for hard x-ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Ann M.; Stahle, Carl M.; Lisse, Casey M.; Babu, Sachi; Gehrels, Neil A.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Shu, Peter K.

    1994-09-01

    Room temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) and mercuric iodide (HgI2) semiconductor hard X-ray detectors are currently being evaluated at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for use in future balloon and satellite applications. PoRTIA, a small engineering prototype hard X-ray (20 - 150 keV) balloon instrument will contain both a CdZnTe and a HgI2 detector, each 6.5 cm2 x .15 - .2 cm and sharing the same 5 degree(s) field-of-view. PoRTIA will be launched from Alice Springs, Australia in the Spring of 1995 as a piggyback instrument aboard the GRIS balloon payload. PoRTIA will provide valuable information about detector efficiency, durability and material dependent detector background components at balloon altitudes as it observes the Crab Nebula. In addition, a CdZnTe research and development program has been initiated to develop the capability to produce improved CdZnTe detectors for astrophysics applications. The work at Goddard continues in an effort to develop CdZnTe detectors with improvements in electronics, contacts and packaging methods.

  14. Quality control measurements for digital x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, N. W.; Mackenzie, A.; Honey, I. D.

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes a digital radiography (DR) quality control protocol for DR detectors from the forthcoming report from the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). The protocol was applied to a group of six identical caesium iodide (CsI) digital x-ray detectors to assess reproducibility of methods, while four further detectors were assessed to examine the wider applicability. Twelve images with minimal spatial frequency processing are required, from which the detector response, lag, modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and threshold contrast-detail (c-d) detectability are calculated. The x-ray spectrum used was 70 kV and 1 mm added copper filtration, with a target detector air kerma of 2.5 µGy for the NNPS and c-d results. In order to compare detector performance with previous imaging technology, c-d data from four screen/film systems were also acquired, at a target optical density of 1.5 and an average detector air kerma of 2.56 µGy. The DR detector images were typically acquired in 20 min, with a further 45 min required for image transfer and analysis. The average spatial frequency for the 50% point of the MTF for six identical detectors was 1.29 mm-1 ± 0.05 (3.9% coefficient of variation (cov)). The air kerma set for the six systems was 2.57 µGy ± 0.13 (5.0% cov) and the NNPS at this air kerma was 1.42 × 10-5 mm2 (6.5% cov). The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measured for the six identical detectors was 0.60 at 0.5 mm-1, with a maximum cov of 10% at 2.9 mm-1, while the average DQE was 0.56 at 0.5 mm-1 for three CsI detectors from three different manufacturers. Comparable c-d performance was found for these detectors (5.9% cov) with an average threshold contrast of 0.46% for 11 mm circular discs. The average threshold contrast for the S/F systems was 0.70% at 11 mm, indicating superior imaging performance for the digital systems. The protocol was found to be quick, reproducible and gave an in

  15. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  16. Fast photoconductor CdTe detectors for synchrotron x-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Sung Shik; Faurie, J.P.; Wang, Kemei; Montano, P.A. |; Huang Qiang; Rodricks, B.

    1993-09-01

    The Advanced Photon Source will be that brightest source of synchrotron x-rays when it becomes operational in 1996. During normal operation, the ring will be filled with 20 bunches of positrons with an interbunch spacing of 177 ns and a bunch width of 119 ps. To perform experiments with x-rays generated by positrons on these time scales one needs extremely high speed detectors. To achieve the necessary high speed, we are developing MBE-grown CdTe-base photoconductive position sensitive array detectors. The arrays fabricated have 64 pixels with a gap of 100 {mu}m between pixels. The high speed response of the devices was tested using a short pulse laser. X-ray static measurements were performed using an x-ray tube and synchrotron radiation to study the device`s response to flux and wavelength changes. This paper presents the response of the devices to some of these tests and discusses different physics aspects to be considered when designing high speed detectors.

  17. Dependence of x-ray sensitivity of direct conversion x-ray detectors on x-ray exposure and exposure history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mohammad Z.; Yunus, Mohammad; Kasap, Safa O.

    2004-05-01

    The dependence of the x-ray sensitivity of a-Se based x-ray image detectors on repeated x-ray exposures and exposure history is studied by considering deep trapping of charge carriers, trapped charges due to previous exposures, bimolecular recombination, space charge effects and electric field dependent electron-hole pair creation energy. We numerically solve the continuity equations of both holes and electrons, trapping rate equations, and the Poison equation across the photoconductor for long pulse x-ray exposures. The electric field distribution across the photoconductor and the relative x-ray sensitivity as a function of cumulated x-ray exposure have been studied for both mammographic and chest radiographic applications. The electric field distribution across the photoconductor has been found to vary widely for high exposures. The relative x-ray sensitivity decreases with increasing cumulated x-ray exposure and tents to saturate. The sensitivity reduction at negative bias is more pronounced than at positive bias.

  18. Development of Thin-Window Silicon Drift Detector for X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Carini, G.A.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Gaskin, J.A.; Keister, J.W.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Rehak, P.; Siddons, D.P.

    2009-10-01

    A new set of thin-window silicon drift detectors composed of an array of hexagonal shaped detectors has been designed, constructed and tested for X-ray spectroscopy. Each individual ThinWinSDD has a thin entrance window on one side and a spiral shaped hexagonal cathode around a center anode on the other side. To produce the thin entrance window a 10 keV implantation of boron through a 500 A silicon dioxide was used. The implantation was followed by an annealing at 700 C for 30 min and a reactive ion etching step to ensure the removal of silicon dioxide from the smallest feature (5 mum). An aluminum layer is coated in the same vacuum system after back-sputtering. This step involves removing the native oxide that has formed on the top of the silicon substrate and then sputtering a 1100 A thick layer of aluminum onto the X-ray entrance window. The aluminum layer must be thick enough to block visible light, but thin enough to be transparent to soft X-rays down to 280 eV. We discuss first test results that include detector leakage current measurements and the response for multiple detectors exposed to the National Synchrotron Light Source's UV beam line U3C located at Brookhaven National Laboratory for X-ray energies as low as 280 eV.

  19. Characterization of an x-ray hybrid CMOS detector with low interpixel capacitive crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher V.; Bongiorno, Stephen D.; Burrows, David N.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Prieskorn, Zachary R.

    2012-07-01

    We present the results of x-ray measurements on a hybrid CMOS detector that uses a H2RG ROIC and a unique bonding structure. The silicon absorber array has a 36μm pixel size, and the readout array has a pitch of 18μm but only one readout circuit line is bonded to each 36x36μm absorber pixel. This unique bonding structure gives the readout an effective pitch of 36μm. We find the increased pitch between readout bonds significantly reduces the interpixel capacitance of the CMOS detector reported by Bongiorno et al. 20101 and Kenter et al. 2005.2

  20. Polarization effects in thallium bromide x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kozorezov, A.; Wigmore, J. K.; Gostilo, V.; Shorohov, M.; Owens, A.; Quarati, F.; Webb, M. A.

    2010-09-15

    We present the results of a detailed experimental study of polarization effects in thallium bromide planar x-ray detectors. Measurements were carried out in the range 10-100 keV by scanning a highly focused x-ray beam, 50 {mu}m in diameter, from a synchrotron source across the detector. Above a certain radiation threshold the detector response showed a systematic degradation of its spectroscopic characteristics, peak channel position, peak height, and energy resolution. Using a pump-and-probe technique, we studied the dynamics of spectral degradation, the spatial extent and relaxation of the polarized region, and the dependence of the detector response on bias voltage and temperature. For comparison, we modeled polarization effects induced by the charging of traps by both electrons and holes using a model based on recent theoretical work of Bale and Szeles. We calculated the charge collection efficiency and spectral line shapes as functions of exposure time, beam position, count rate, and photon energy, and obtained credible agreement with experimental results.

  1. Pulse pile-up in hard X-ray detector systems. [for solar X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    When pulse-height spectra are measured by a nuclear detection system at high counting rates, the probability that two or more pulses will arrive within the resolving time of the system is significant. This phenomenon, pulse pile-up, distorts the pulse-height spectrum and must be considered in the interpretation of spectra taken at high counting rates. A computational technique for the simulation of pile-up is developed. The model is examined in the three regimes where (1) the time between pulses is long compared to the detector-system resolving time, (2) the time between pulses is comparable to the resolving time, and (3) many pulses occur within the resolving time. The technique is used to model the solar hard X-ray experiment on the OSO-7 satellite; comparison of the model with data taken during three large flares shows excellent agreement. The paper also describes rule-of-thumb tests for pile-up and identifies the important detector design factors for minimizing pile-up, i.e., thick entrance windows and short resolving times in the system electronics.

  2. Flight Performance and Laboratory Tests of CZT detectors for Hard X-ray Focal Planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne; Harrison, F.; Chen, H.; Cook, W.; Craig, B.; Kruse-Madsen, K.; Boggs, S.; Wunderer, C.; Zoglauer, A.

    2006-09-01

    The next generation of hard X-ray instruments will employ focusing telescopes, which can achieve orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity compared to current instruments on modest sized platforms. Solid state Cadmium Zinc Telluride pixel detectors have recently been developed and implemented as focal plane detectors for these new telescopes, since they can achieve good imaging and spectral performance from X-ray energies of a few keV to greater than 100 keV. We have developed a high-performance Cd(Zn)Te pixel detector for use with the High Energy Focusing Telescope balloon experiment, and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Explorer mission. We present laboratory measurement as well as flight data from the HEFT program that demonstrate the spectral resolution, imaging performance, quantum efficiency, and background levels achievable for balloon and space platforms using the HEFT/NuSTAR hybrid configuration.

  3. Test of a High Throughput Detector on the X-ray Crystal Spectrometer of the EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Shi, Yuejiang; Wang, Fudi; Wan, Baonian; Manfred, Bitter; Kenneth, W. Hill; Sang-gon, Lee; Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Jizong; Xu, Jingcui; Shen, Yongcai

    2013-02-01

    An attempt was made to improve the spatio-temporal resolution of the tangential X-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) by evaluating experimentally the applicability of a novel X-ray photon detection technology for measuring the satellite spectra of Ar XVII with a high counting rate. High-resolution experimental data on the profiles of ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity facilitate the studies of the mechanisms underlining important physical phenomena, such as plasma heating, L-H transition and momentum transport. Based on silicon diode array and single-photon counting technology, a relatively small area (83.8×33.5 mm2) two-dimensional detector was successfully installed and tested in the recent EAST campaign. X-ray photon counting rate higher than 20 MHz was observed for the first time, and high quality satellite spectra were recorded for ion temperature and plasma rotation measurement, indicating that the new technology is suitable for the next-step high-resolution XCS on EAST, and the deployment of a detector array with a much larger X-ray sensing area is planned for better plasma coverage.

  4. CONTINUING THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 100 FEMTOSECOND X-RAY DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Zenghu Chang

    2005-06-14

    The detector is an x-ray streak camera running in accumulation mode for time resolved x-ray studies at the existing third generation synchrotron facilities and will also be used for the development and applications of the fourth generation x-ray sources. We have made significant progress on both the detector development and its applications at Synchrotron facilities.

  5. CONTINUING THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 100 FEMTOSECOND X-RAY DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Zenghu Chang

    2005-06-20

    The detector is an x-ray streak camera running in accumulation mode for time resolved x-ray studies at the existing third generation synchrotron facilities and will also be used for the development and applications of the fourth generation x-ray sources. We have made significant progress on both the detector development and its applications at Synchrotron facilities.

  6. Compton polarimeter as a focal plane detector for hard X-ray telescope: sensitivity estimation with Geant4 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, T.; Vadawale, S. V.; Pendharkar, J.

    2013-04-01

    X-ray polarimetry can be an important tool for investigating various physical processes as well as their geometries at the celestial X-ray sources. However, X-ray polarimetry has not progressed much compared to the spectroscopy, timing and imaging mainly due to the extremely photon-hungry nature of X-ray polarimetry leading to severely limited sensitivity of X-ray polarimeters. The great improvement in sensitivity in spectroscopy and imaging was possible due to focusing X-ray optics which is effective only at the soft X-ray energy range. Similar improvement in sensitivity of polarisation measurement at soft X-ray range is expected in near future with the advent of GEM based photoelectric polarimeters. However, at energies >10 keV, even spectroscopic and imaging sensitivities of X-ray detector are limited due to lack of focusing optics. Thus hard X-ray polarimetry so far has been largely unexplored area. On the other hand, typically the polarisation degree is expected to increase at higher energies as the radiation from non-thermal processes is dominant fraction. So polarisation measurement in hard X-ray can yield significant insights into such processes. With the recent availability of hard X-ray optics (e.g. with upcoming NuSTAR, Astro-H missions) which can focus X-rays from 5 KeV to 80 KeV, sensitivity of X-ray detectors in hard X-ray range is expected to improve significantly. In this context we explore feasibility of a focal plane hard X-ray polarimeter based on Compton scattering having a thin plastic scatterer surrounded by cylindrical array scintillator detectors. We have carried out detailed Geant4 simulation to estimate the modulation factor for 100 % polarized beam as well as polarimetric efficiency of this configuration. We have also validated these results with a semi-analytical approach. Here we present the initial results of polarisation sensitivities of such focal plane Compton polarimeter coupled with the reflection efficiency of present era hard X-ray

  7. High-contrast X-ray micro-tomography of low attenuation samples using large area hybrid semiconductor pixel detector array of 10 × 5 Timepix chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, J.; Krejci, F.; Bartl, B.; Dudak, J.; Kuba, J.; Kvacek, J.; Zemlicka, J.

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors provide excellent imaging properties such as unlimited dynamic range, high spatial resolution, high frame rate and energy sensitivity. Nevertheless, a limitation in the use of these devices for imaging has been the small sensitive area of a few square centimetres. In the field of microtomography we make use of a large area pixel detector assembled from 50 Timepix edgeless chips providing fully sensitive area of 14.3 × 7.15 cm2. We have successfully demonstrated that the enlargement of the sensitive area enables high-quality tomographic measurements of whole objects with high geometrical magnification without any significant degradation in resulting reconstructions related to the chip tilling and edgeless sensor technology properties. The technique of micro-tomography with the newly developed large area detector is applied for samples formed by low attenuation, low contrast materials such a seed from Phacelia tanacetifolia, a charcoalified wood sample and a beeswax seal sample.

  8. Eiger: a single-photon counting x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, I.; Bergamaschi, A.; Billich, H.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Henrich, B.; Jungmann, J.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2014-05-01

    Eiger is a single-photon counting x-ray pixel detector being developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) for applications at synchrotron light sources. It follows the widely utilized and successful Pilatus detector. The main features of Eiger are a pixel size of 75 × 75 μm2, high frame rate capability of 22 kHz and negligible dead time between frames of 4 μs. This article contains a detailed description of Eiger detector systems, from the 500 kpixel single-module detector to large-area multi-modules systems. The calibration and performance of the first 500 kpixel system that is in routine user operation are also presented. Furthermore, a method of calibrating the energy of single-photon counting detectors along the detector gain axis is introduced. This approach has the advantage that the detector settings can be optimized at all energies for count rate capabilities. Rate capabilities of the system are reported for energies between 6 and 16 keV.

  9. Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Matthias; Mears, Carl A.; Labov, Simon E.; Hiller, Larry J.; Barfknecht, Andrew T.

    2003-03-04

    A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

  10. Characterization of a mammographic system based on single photon counting pixel arrays coupled to GaAs x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Amendolia, S. R.; Bisogni, M. G.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Paternoster, G.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.

    2009-04-15

    The authors report on the imaging capabilities of a mammographic system demonstrator based on GaAs pixel detectors operating in single photon counting (SPC) mode. The system imaging performances have been assessed by means of the transfer functions: The modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) have been measured following the guidelines of the IEC 62220-1-2 protocol. The transfer function analysis has shown the high spatial resolution capabilities of the GaAs detectors. The MTF calculated at the Nyquist frequency (2.94 cycles/mm) is indeed 60%. The DQE, measured with a standard mammographic beam setup (Mo/Mo, 28 kVp, with 4 mm Al added filter) and calculated at zero frequency, is 46%. Aiming to further improve the system's image quality, the authors investigate the DQE limiting factors and show that they are mainly related to system engineering. For example, the authors show that optimization of the image equalization procedure increases the DQE(0) up to 74%, which is better than the DQE(0) of most clinical mammographic systems. The authors show how the high detection efficiency of GaAs detectors and the noise discrimination associated with the SPC technology allow optimizing the image quality in mammography. In conclusion, the authors propose technological solutions to exploit to the utmost the potentiality of GaAs detectors coupled to SPC electronics.

  11. X-ray imaging performance of scintillator-filled silicon pore arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Matthias; Engel, Klaus Juergen; Menser, Bernd; Badel, Xavier; Linnros, Jan

    2008-03-15

    The need for fine detail visibility in various applications such as dental imaging, mammography, but also neurology and cardiology, is the driver for intensive efforts in the development of new x-ray detectors. The spatial resolution of current scintillator layers is limited by optical diffusion. This limitation can be overcome by a pixelation, which prevents optical photons from crossing the interface between two neighboring pixels. In this work, an array of pores was etched in a silicon wafer with a pixel pitch of 50 {mu}m. A very high aspect ratio was achieved with wall thicknesses of 4-7 {mu}m and pore depths of about 400 {mu}m. Subsequently, the pores were filled with Tl-doped cesium iodide (CsI:Tl) as a scintillator in a special process, which includes powder melting and solidification of the CsI. From the sample geometry and x-ray absorption measurement the pore fill grade was determined to be 75%. The scintillator-filled samples have a circular active area of 16 mm diameter. They are coupled with an optical sensor binned to the same pixel pitch in order to measure the x-ray imaging performance. The x-ray sensitivity, i.e., the light output per absorbed x-ray dose, is found to be only 2.5%-4.5% of a commercial CsI-layer of similar thickness, thus very low. The efficiency of the pores to transport the generated light to the photodiode is estimated to be in the best case 6.5%. The modulation transfer function is 40% at 4 lp/mm and 10%-20% at 8 lp/mm. It is limited most likely by the optical gap between scintillator and sensor and by K-escape quanta. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is determined at different beam qualities and dose settings. The maximum DQE(0) is 0.28, while the x-ray absorption with the given thickness and fill factor is 0.57. High Swank noise is suspected to be the reason, mainly caused by optical scatter inside the CsI-filled pores. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations of the photon transport inside the pore array

  12. X-ray imaging performance of scintillator-filled silicon pore arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Matthias; Engel, Klaus Jürgen; Menser, Bernd; Badel, Xavier; Linnros, Jan

    2008-03-01

    The need for fine detail visibility in various applications such as dental imaging, mammography, but also neurology and cardiology, is the driver for intensive efforts in the development of new x-ray detectors. The spatial resolution of current scintillator layers is limited by optical diffusion. This limitation can be overcome by a pixelation, which prevents optical photons from crossing the interface between two neighboring pixels. In this work, an array of pores was etched in a silicon wafer with a pixel pitch of 50 microm. A very high aspect ratio was achieved with wall thicknesses of 4-7 microm and pore depths of about 400 microm. Subsequently, the pores were filled with Tl-doped cesium iodide (CsI:Tl) as a scintillator in a special process, which includes powder melting and solidification of the CsI. From the sample geometry and x-ray absorption measurement the pore fill grade was determined to be 75%. The scintillator-filled samples have a circular active area of 16 mm diameter. They are coupled with an optical sensor binned to the same pixel pitch in order to measure the x-ray imaging performance. The x-ray sensitivity, i.e., the light output per absorbed x-ray dose, is found to be only 2.5%-4.5% of a commercial CsI-layer of similar thickness, thus very low. The efficiency of the pores to transport the generated light to the photodiode is estimated to be in the best case 6.5%. The modulation transfer function is 40% at 4 lp/mm and 10%-20% at 8 lp/mm. It is limited most likely by the optical gap between scintillator and sensor and by K-escape quanta. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is determined at different beam qualities and dose settings. The maximum DQE(0) is 0.28, while the x-ray absorption with the given thickness and fill factor is 0.57. High Swank noise is suspected to be the reason, mainly caused by optical scatter inside the CsI-filled pores. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations of the photon transport inside the pore array

  13. X-Rays Compton Detectors For Biomedical Application

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Paolo; Fontana, Cristiano Lino; Moschini, Giuliano; Baldazzi, Giuseppe; Navarria, Francesco; Battistella, Andrea; Bello, Michele; Bollini, Dante; Bonvicini, Valter; Rashevsky, Alexander; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Vacchi, Andrea; Gennaro, Gisella; Uzunov, Nikolay

    2011-06-01

    Collimators are usually needed to image sources emitting X-rays that cannot be focused. Alternately, one may employ a Compton Camera (CC) and measure the direction of the incident X-ray by letting it interact with a thin solid, liquid or gaseous material (Tracker) and determine the scattering angle. With respect to collimated cameras, CCs allow higher gamma-ray efficiency in spite of lighter geometry, and may feature comparable spatial resolution. CCs are better when the X-ray energy is high and small setups are required. We review current applications of CCs to Gamma Ray Astronomy and Biomedical systems stressing advantages and drawbacks. As an example, we focus on a particular CC we are developing, which is designed to image small animals administered with marked pharmaceuticals, and assess the bio-distribution and targeting capability of these latter. This camera has to address some requirements: relatively high activity of the imaged objects; detection of gamma-rays of different energies that may range from 140 keV (Tc99m) to 511 keV; presence of gamma and beta radiation with energies up to 2 MeV in case of 188Re. The camera consists of a thin position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detector as Tracker, and a further downstream position-sensitive system employing scintillating crystals and a multi-anode photo-multiplier (Calorimeter). The choice of crystal, pixel size, and detector geometry has been driven by measurements and simulations with the tracking code GEANT4. Spatial resolution, efficiency and scope are discussed.

  14. Pixelated transmission-mode diamond X-ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tianyi; Ding, Wenxiang; Gaowei, Mengjia; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Bohon, Jen; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication and testing of a prototype transmission-mode pixelated diamond X-ray detector (pitch size 60–100 µm), designed to simultaneously measure the flux, position and morphology of an X-ray beam in real time, are described. The pixel density is achieved by lithographically patterning vertical stripes on the front and horizontal stripes on the back of an electronic-grade chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond. The bias is rotated through the back horizontal stripes and the current is read out on the front vertical stripes at a rate of ∼1 kHz, which leads to an image sampling rate of ∼30 Hz. This novel signal readout scheme was tested at beamline X28C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (white beam, 5–15 keV) and at beamline G3 at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (monochromatic beam, 11.3 keV) with incident beam flux ranges from 1.8 × 10−2 to 90 W mm−2. Test results show that the novel detector provides precise beam position (positional noise within 1%) and morphology information (error within 2%), with an additional software-controlled single channel mode providing accurate flux measurement (fluctuation within 1%). PMID:26524304

  15. Pixelated transmission-mode diamond X-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyi; Ding, Wenxiang; Gaowei, Mengjia; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Bohon, Jen; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication and testing of a prototype transmission-mode pixelated diamond X-ray detector (pitch size 60-100 µm), designed to simultaneously measure the flux, position and morphology of an X-ray beam in real time, are described. The pixel density is achieved by lithographically patterning vertical stripes on the front and horizontal stripes on the back of an electronic-grade chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond. The bias is rotated through the back horizontal stripes and the current is read out on the front vertical stripes at a rate of ∼ 1 kHz, which leads to an image sampling rate of ∼ 30 Hz. This novel signal readout scheme was tested at beamline X28C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (white beam, 5-15 keV) and at beamline G3 at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (monochromatic beam, 11.3 keV) with incident beam flux ranges from 1.8 × 10(-2) to 90 W mm(-2). Test results show that the novel detector provides precise beam position (positional noise within 1%) and morphology information (error within 2%), with an additional software-controlled single channel mode providing accurate flux measurement (fluctuation within 1%).

  16. Novel Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detector Developments for Future Large Area and High Resolution X-ray Astronomy Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, Abe

    In the coming years, X-ray astronomy will require new soft X-ray detectors that can be read very quickly with low noise and can achieve small pixel sizes over a moderately large focal plane area. These requirements will be present for a variety of X-ray missions that will attempt to address science that was highly ranked by the Decadal Review, including missions with science that over-laps with that of IXO and ATHENA, as well as other missions addressing science topics beyond those of IXO and ATHENA. An X-ray Surveyor mission was recently endorsed by the NASA long term planning document entitled "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions," and a detailed description of one possible realization of such a mission has been referred to as SMART-X, which was described in a recent NASA RFI response. This provides an example of a future mission concept with these requirements since it has high X-ray throughput and excellent spatial resolution. We propose to continue to modify current active pixel sensor designs, in particular the hybrid CMOS detectors that we have been working with for several years, and implement new in-pixel technologies that will allow us to achieve these ambitious and realistic requirements on a timeline that will make them available to upcoming X-ray missions. This proposal is a continuation of our program that has been working on these developments for the past several years.

  17. Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Hall, J; Cantor, R

    2009-09-23

    We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle {Omega}/4{pi} {approx} 10{sup -3}, offers an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to {approx}1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

  18. Highly multiplexible thermal kinetic inductance detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ulbricht, Gerhard Mazin, Benjamin A.; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex B.; Bockstiegel, Clint; Bumble, Bruce

    2015-06-22

    For X-ray imaging spectroscopy, high spatial resolution over a large field of view is often as important as high energy resolution, but current X-ray detectors do not provide both in the same device. Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors (TKIDs) are being developed as they offer a feasible way to combine the energy resolution of transition edge sensors with pixel counts approaching CCDs and thus promise significant improvements for many X-ray spectroscopy applications. TKIDs are a variation of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) and share their multiplexibility: working MKID arrays with 2024 pixels have recently been demonstrated and much bigger arrays are under development. In this work, we present a TKID prototype, which is able to achieve an energy resolution of 75 eV at 5.9 keV, even though its general design still has to be optimized. We further describe TKID fabrication, characterization, multiplexing, and working principle and demonstrate the necessity of a data fitting algorithm in order to extract photon energies. With further design optimizations, we expect to be able to improve our TKID energy resolution to less than 10 eV at 5.9 keV.

  19. Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Stephan; Drury, Owen B.; Hall, John; Cantor, Robin

    2010-06-23

    We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle {Omega}/4{pi}{approx_equal}10{sup -3}, offers an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to {approx}1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

  20. Advanced X-Ray Timing Array (AXTAR) Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Thompson, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    The animation depicts NASA's concept for a next-generation Advanced X-ray Timing Mission. The models and their textures doe not necessarily represent the final iteration. Delivery specifications include launch with Taurus II or Falcon 9, mass of 2650 kg, with a circular low earth orbit at approximately 600 km. The inclination depends on the launch vehicle and spacecraft mass. AXTAR's prime instrument will probe the physics of neutron stars and black holes through X-ray timing and spectral measurements. The primary instrument will be the Large Area Timing Array (LATA). The Sky Monitor Clusters configuration consists of 27 Sky Monitor cameras th at are grouped in five clusters. This configuration will achieve approximately 85 percent all sky coverage. Spacecraft components include a science bus to house the LATA of supermodules; a spacecraft bus to house components such as propulsion tanks, avionics, and reaction wheels; solar arrays configured from space-qualified GaAs 3-junction cells; star trackers for attitude knowledge; a propulsion system of four pods, each containing one 100 lbf and two 5 lbf engines; a launch vehicle adaptor; and a radiation shield.

  1. 2-D soft x-ray arrays in the EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaiyun; Xu, Liqing; Hu, Liqun; Duan, Yanmin; Li, Xueqin; Yuan, Yi; Mao, Songtao; Sheng, Xiuli; Zhao, Jinlong

    2016-06-01

    A high spatial and temporal resolution soft x-ray (SXR) imaging diagnostic has been installed in EAST for the study of magnetohydrodynamics activities and core high-Z impurity transport. Up to 122 lines of sight view the poloidal plasma from three directions (two up-down symmetrical horizontal arrays and one vertical array), which renders the diagnostic able to provide detailed tomographic reconstructions under various conditions. Fourier-Bessel method based on flux coordinates was employed for 2-D SXR tomographic reconstruction. Examples of several events measured by SXR diagnostic in EAST are shown, namely the crash patterns of sawtooth, periodical burst of edge localized modes, and the transport of high-Z intrinsic impurities.

  2. A computer controlled television detector for light, X-rays and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalata, K.

    1981-01-01

    A versatile, high resolution, software configurable, two-dimensional intensified vidicon quantum detector system has been developed for multiple research applications. A thin phosphor convertor allows the detection of X-rays below 20 keV and non-relativistic particles in addition to visible light, and a thicker scintillator can be used to detect X-rays up to 100 keV and relativistic particles. Faceplates may be changed to allow any active area from 1 to 40 mm square, and active areas up to 200 mm square are possible. The image is integrated in a digital memory on any software specified array size up to 4000 x 4000. The array size is selected to match the spatial resolution, which ranges from 10 to 100 microns depending on the operating mode, the active area, and the photon or particle energy. All scan and data acquisition parameters are under software control to allow optimal data collection for each application.

  3. The nuclear spectroscopic telescope array (NuSTAR) high-energy X-ray mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Harrison, Fiona A.; An, Hongjun; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Cook, Rick; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Fuerst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian; Hailey, Charles J.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Markwardt, Craig; Mao, Peter; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Rana, Vikram R.; Stern, Daniel K.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas; Walton, Dominic; Westergaard, Niels J.

    2014-07-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission was launched on 2012 June 13 and is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit operating above ~10 keV. NuSTAR flies two co-aligned Wolter-I conical approximation X-ray optics, coated with Pt/C and W/Si multilayers, and combined with a focal length of 10.14 meters this enables operation from 3-79 keV. The optics focus onto two focal plane arrays, each consisting of 4 CdZnTe pixel detectors, for a field of view of 12.5 arcminutes. The inherently low background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than 100-fold improvement in sensitivity, and with an effective point spread function FWHM of 18 arcseconds (HPD ~1), NuSTAR provides a leap of improvement in resolution over the collimated or coded mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. We present in-orbit performance details of the observatory and highlight important science results from the first two years of the mission.

  4. Interconnect and bonding techniques for pixelated X-ray and gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A.; Veale, M. C.; Duarte, D. D.; Bell, S. J.; Wilson, M. D.; Lipp, J. D.; Seller, P.

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade, the Detector Development Group at the Technology Department of the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), U.K., established a variety of fabrication and bonding techniques to build pixelated X-ray and γ-ray detector systems such as the spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector HEXITEC [1]. The fabrication and bonding of such devices comprises a range of processes including material surface preparation, photolithography, stencil printing, flip-chip and wire bonding of detectors to application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC). This paper presents interconnect and bonding techniques used in the fabrication chain for pixelated detectors assembled at STFC. For this purpose, detector dies (~ 20× 20 mm2) of high quality, single crystal semiconductors, such as cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are cut to the required thickness (up to 5mm). The die surfaces are lapped and polished to a mirror-finish and then individually processed by electroless gold deposition combined with photolithography to form 74× 74 arrays of 200 μ m × 200 μ m pixels with 250 μ m pitch. Owing to a lack of availability of CZT wafers, lithography is commonly carried out on individual detector dies which represents a significant technical challenge as the edge of the pixel array and the surrounding guard band lies close to the physical edge of the crystal. Further, such detector dies are flip-chip bonded to readout ASIC using low-temperature curing silver-loaded epoxy so that the stress between the bonded detector die and the ASIC is minimized. In addition, this reduces crystalline modifications of the detector die that occur at temperature greater than 150\\r{ }C and have adverse effects on the detector performance. To allow smaller pitch detectors to be bonded, STFC has also developed a compression cold-weld indium bump bonding technique utilising bumps formed by a photolithographic lift-off technique.

  5. MÖNCH, a small pitch, integrating hybrid pixel detector for X-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinapoli, R.; Bergamaschi, A.; Cartier, S.; Greiffenberg, D.; Johnson, I.; Jungmann, J. H.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2014-05-01

    PSI is developing several new detector families based on charge integration and analog readout (CI) to respond to the needs of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), where a signal up to ~ 104 photons impinging simultaneously on a pixel make single photon counting detectors unusable. MÖNCH is a novel hybrid silicon pixel detector where CI is combined with a challengingly small pixel size of 25 × 25 μm2. CI enables the detector to process several incoming photon simultaneously in XFEL applications. Moreover, due to the small pixel size, the charge produced by an impinging photon is often shared. In low flux experiments the analog information provided by single photons can be used either to obtain spectral information or to improve the position resolution by interpolation. Possible applications are resonant and non-resonant inelastic X-ray scattering or X-ray tomography with X-ray tubes. Two prototype ASICs were designed in UMC 110 nm technology. MÖNCH01 contains only some test cells used to assess technology performance and make basic design choices. MÖNCH02 is a fully functional, small scale prototype of 4 × 4 mm2, containing an array of 160 × 160 pixels. This array is subdivided in five blocks, each featuring a different pixel architecture. Two blocks have statically selectable preamplifier gains and target synchrotron applications. In low gain mode they should provide single photon sensitivity (at 6-12 keV) as well as a reasonable dynamic range for such a small area ( > 120 photons). In high gain they target high resolution, low flux experiments where charge sharing can be exploited to reach μm resolution. Three other architectures address possible uses at XFELs and implement automatic switching between two gains to increase the dynamic range, as well as input overvoltage control. The paper presents the MÖNCH project and first results obtained with the MÖNCH02 prototype.

  6. Position sensitive x-ray spectrophotometer using microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Bumble, Bruce; Day, Peter K.; Eckart, Megan E.; Golwala, Sunil; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2006-11-27

    The surface impedance of a superconductor changes when energy is absorbed and Cooper pairs are broken to produce single electron (quasiparticle) excitations. This change may be sensitively measured using a thin-film resonant circuit called a microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID). The practical application of MKIDs for photon detection requires a method of efficiently coupling the photon energy to the MKID. The authors present results on position sensitive x-ray detectors made by using two aluminum MKIDs on either side of a tantalum photon absorber strip. Diffusion constants, recombination times, and energy resolution are reported. MKIDs can easily be scaled into large arrays.

  7. CdTe focal plane detector for hard x-ray focusing optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew D.; Veale, Matthew C.; Schneider, Andreas; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Gregory, Kyle; Inglis, Andrew; Panessa, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The demand for higher resolution x-ray optics (a few arcseconds or better) in the areas of astrophysics and solar science has, in turn, driven the development of complementary detectors. These detectors should have fine pixels, necessary to appropriately oversample the optics at a given focal length, and an energy response also matched to that of the optics. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory have developed a 3-side buttable, 20 mm x 20 mm CdTe-based detector with 250 μm square pixels (80x80 pixels) which achieves 1 keV FWHM @ 60 keV and gives full spectroscopy between 5 keV and 200 keV. An added advantage of these detectors is that they have a full-frame readout rate of 10 kHz. Working with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Marshall Space Flight Center, 4 of these 1mm-thick CdTe detectors are tiled into a 2x2 array for use at the focal plane of a balloon-borne hard-x-ray telescope, and a similar configuration could be suitable for astrophysics and solar space-based missions. This effort encompasses the fabrication and testing of flightsuitable front-end electronics and calibration of the assembled detector arrays. We explain the operation of the pixelated ASIC readout and measurements, front-end electronics development, preliminary X-ray imaging and spectral performance, and plans for full calibration of the detector assemblies. Work done in conjunction with the NASA Centers is funded through the NASA Science Mission Directorate Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program.

  8. CdTe Focal Plane Detector for Hard X-Ray Focusing Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew D.; Veale, Matthew C.; Schneider, Andreas; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Inglis, Andrew; Panessa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The demand for higher resolution x-ray optics (a few arcseconds or better) in the areas of astrophysics and solar science has, in turn, driven the development of complementary detectors. These detectors should have fine pixels, necessary to appropriately oversample the optics at a given focal length, and an energy response also matched to that of the optics. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory have developed a 3-side buttable, 20 millimeter x 20 millimeter CdTe-based detector with 250 micrometer square pixels (80 x 80 pixels) which achieves 1 kiloelectronvolt FWHM (Full-Width Half-Maximum) @ 60 kiloelectronvolts and gives full spectroscopy between 5 kiloelectronvolts and 200 kiloelectronvolts. An added advantage of these detectors is that they have a full-frame readout rate of 10 kilohertz. Working with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Marshall Space Flight Center, 4 of these 1 millimeter-thick CdTe detectors are tiled into a 2 x 2 array for use at the focal plane of a balloon-borne hard-x-ray telescope, and a similar configuration could be suitable for astrophysics and solar space-based missions. This effort encompasses the fabrication and testing of flight-suitable front-end electronics and calibration of the assembled detector arrays. We explain the operation of the pixelated ASIC readout and measurements, front-end electronics development, preliminary X-ray imaging and spectral performance, and plans for full calibration of the detector assemblies. Work done in conjunction with the NASA Centers is funded through the NASA Science Mission Directorate Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program.

  9. Lithographically patterned magnetic calorimeter X-ray detectors with integrated SQUID readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, B. L.; Irwin, K. D.; Hilton, G. C.; Pappas, D. P.; Ullom, J. N.; Huber, M. E.

    2004-03-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and performance of a fully lithographically patterned magnetic microcalorimeter X-ray detector. The detector is fabricated on the same chip as a low-noise SQUID that measures the change in the magnetic sensor film's magnetization as the film is heated by absorbed X-rays. Our proof-of-principle detectors use a 100 μm×100 μm-2 μm paramagnetic Au:Er film coupled to a low-noise on-chip SQUID via a meandering superconducting pickup loop that also provides the magnetic field bias to the film. Absorption of 6 keV X-rays in the film causes heating on the order of 1 mK with a decay time of 1 ms or less, the fastest reported using a magnetic calorimeter. However, the resolution is currently poor due to poor Au:Er film properties and non-optimized coupling to the SQUID. We describe the design and fabrication of this device and present measurements of the heat capacity, decay time constant and effective thermal conductance of the microcalorimeter as a function of temperature. Because the SQUID and calorimeter are lithographically patterned on the same substrate, this technology can be readily applied to the fabrication of arrays of multiplexed magnetic microcalorimeter detectors.

  10. The speedster-EXD: a new event-triggered hybrid CMOS x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher V.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Prieskorn, Zachary R.; Burrows, David N.

    2014-07-01

    We present preliminary characterization of the Speedster-EXD, a new event driven hybrid CMOS detector (HCD) developed in collaboration with Penn State University and Teledyne Imaging Systems. HCDs have advantages over CCDs including lower susceptibility to radiation damage, lower power consumption, and faster read-out time to avoid pile-up. They are deeply depleted and able to detect x-rays down to approximately 0.1 keV. The Speedster-EXD has additional in-pixel features compared to previously published HCDs including: (1) an in-pixel comparator that enables read out of only the pixels with signal from an x-ray event, (2) four different gain modes to optimize either full well capacity or energy resolution, (3) in-pixel CDS subtraction to reduce read noise, and (4) a low-noise, high-gain CTIA amplifier to eliminate interpixel capacitance crosstalk. When using the comparator feature, the user can set a comparator threshold and only pixels above the threshold will be read out. This feature can be run in two modes including single pixel readout in which only pixels above the threshold are read out and 3x3 readout where a 3×3 region centered on the central pixel of the X-ray event is read out. The comparator feature of the Speedster-EXD increases the detector array effective frame rate by orders of magnitude. The new features of the Speedster-EXD hybrid CMOS x-ray detector are particularly relevant to future high throughput x-ray missions requiring large-format silicon imagers.

  11. Multi-energy x-ray detector calibration for Te and impurity density (nZ) measurements of MCF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Efthimion, P.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rissi, M.; Donath, T.; Luethi, B.; Stratton, B.

    2016-11-01

    Soft x-ray detection with the new "multi-energy" PILATUS3 detector systems holds promise as a magnetically confined fusion (MCF) plasma diagnostic for ITER and beyond. The measured x-ray brightness can be used to determine impurity concentrations, electron temperatures, ne 2 Z eff products, and to probe the electron energy distribution. However, in order to be effective, these detectors which are really large arrays of detectors with photon energy gating capabilities must be precisely calibrated for each pixel. The energy-dependence of the detector response of the multi-energy PILATUS3 system with 100 K pixels has been measured at Dectris Laboratory. X-rays emitted from a tube under high voltage bombard various elements such that they emit x-ray lines from Zr-Lα to Ag-Kα between 1.8 and 22.16 keV. Each pixel on the PILATUS3 can be set to a minimum energy threshold in the range from 1.6 to 25 keV. This feature allows a single detector to be sensitive to a variety of x-ray energies, so that it is possible to sample the energy distribution of the x-ray continuum and line-emission. PILATUS3 can be configured for 1D or 2D imaging of MCF plasmas with typical spatial energy and temporal resolution of 1 cm, 0.6 keV, and 5 ms, respectively.

  12. Multi-energy x-ray detector calibration for Te and impurity density (nZ) measurements of MCF plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Efthimion, P.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rissi, M.; Donath, T.; Luethi, B.; et al

    2016-09-07

    Here, soft x-ray detection with the new "multi-energy" PILATUS3 detector systems holds promise as a magnetically confined fusion (MCF) plasma diagnostic for ITER and beyond. The measured x-ray brightness can be used to determine impurity concentrations, electron temperatures, n2eZeff products, and to probe the electron energy distribution. However, in order to be effective, these detectors which are really large arrays of detectors with photon energy gating capabilities must be precisely calibrated for each pixel. The energy-dependence of the detector response of the multi-energy PILATUS3 system with 100 K pixels has been measured at Dectris Laboratory. X-rays emitted from a tubemore » under high voltage bombard various elements such that they emit x-ray lines from Zr-Lα to Ag-Kα between 1.8 and 22.16 keV. Each pixel on the PILATUS3 can be set to a minimum energy threshold in the range from 1.6 to 25 keV. This feature allows a single detector to be sensitive to a variety of x-ray energies, so that it is possible to sample the energy distribution of the x-ray continuum and line-emission. PILATUS3 can be configured for 1D or 2D imaging of MCF plasmas with typical spatial energy and temporal resolution of 1 cm, 0.6 keV, and 5 ms, respectively.« less

  13. Two new types of microneedle array fabricated by x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yigui; Sugiyama, Susumu

    2004-12-01

    The microneedle for blood extraction and painless injection is a rapidly growing area of interest in bio-applications. Two new types of microneedle array are designed and developed for biomedical application. The one is hollow PMMA microneedle array with very shape tip fabricated by two times X-ray lithography (one time is with X-ray mask and one time is without X-ray mask). The other is PMMA microneedle array with tips and fluid channels fabricated by an X-ray lithography technique. The resist stage of the X-ray system driven by actuators is to realize movement lithography.

  14. Development of a TES-Based Anti-Coincidence Detector for Future X-ray Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Microcalorimeters onboard future x-ray observatories require an anti-coincidence detector to remove environmental backgrounds. In order to most effectively integrate this anticoincidence detector with the main microcalorimeter array, both instruments should use similar read-out technology. The detectors used in the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) use a phonon measurement technique that is well suited for an anti-coincidence detector with a microcalorimeter array using SQUID readout. This technique works by using a transition-edge sensor (TES) connected to superconducting collection fins to measure the athermal phonon signal produced when an event occurs in the substrate crystal. Energy from the event propagates through the crystal to the superconducting collection fins, creating quasiparticles, which are then trapped as they enter the TES where they produce a signal. We are currently developing a prototype anti-coincidence detector for future x-ray missions and have recently fabricated test devices with Mo/Au TESs and Al collection fins. We will present results from the first tests of these devices which indicate a proof of concept that quasiparticle trapping is occurring in these materials.

  15. Development of a TES-Based Anti-Coincidence Detector for Future X-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Catherine N.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Sultana, M.

    2012-01-01

    Microcalorimeters onboard future x-ray observatories require an anticoincidence detector to remove environmental backgrounds. In order to most effectively integrate this anti-coincidence detector with the main microcalorimeter array, both instruments should use similar read-out technology. The detectors used in the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) use a phonon measurement technique that is well suited for an anti-coincidence detector with a microcalorimeter array using SQUID readout. This technique works by using a transition-edge sensor (TES) connected to superconducting collection fins to measure the athermal phonon signal produced when an event occurs in the substrate crystal. Energy from the event propagates through the crystal to the superconducting collection fins, creating quasiparticles, which are then trapped as they enter the TES where they produce a signal. We are currently developing a prototype anti-coincidence detector for future x-ray missions and have recently fabricated test devices with Mo/Au TESs and Al collection fins. We present results from the first tests of these devices which indicate a proof of concept that quasiparticle trapping is occurring in these materials.

  16. X-ray diamond detectors with energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Conte, G.; Girolami, M.; Salvatori, S.; Ralchenko, V.

    2007-10-29

    Polycrystalline diamond detectors with energy resolving capability of the impinging beam were realized and tested by using a miniature pyroelectric x-ray pulse generator. Microstrip structures were defined by photolithography aimed to reduce parasitic capacitances and to perform characterization measurements in a sandwich configuration. Leakage currents as low as 20 pA at 500 V were measured on a 270 {mu}m thick device. Pulse height distributions were carried out around Ta L{alpha} (8.14 keV) and Cu K{alpha} (8.05 keV) characteristic lines of the source. Energy resolution at 200 V was found equal to 9% with an increase to 11% at 500 V. When the bias was increased to the maximum voltage the sample shows an Ohmic behavior.

  17. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.

  18. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced. PMID:25931071

  19. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; et al

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a newmore » generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.« less

  20. Development of Kilo-Pixel Arrays of Transition-Edge Sensors for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Ray, C. A.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Reintsema, C. D.; Smith, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing kilo-pixel arrays of transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters for future X-ray astronomy observatories or for use in laboratory astrophysics applications. For example, Athena/XMS (currently under study by the european space agency) would require a close-packed 32x32 pixel array on a 250-micron pitch with < 3.0 eV full-width-half-maximum energy resolution at 6 keV and at count-rates of up to 50 counts/pixel/second. We present characterization of 32x32 arrays. These detectors will be readout using state of the art SQUID based time-domain multiplexing (TDM). We will also present the latest results in integrating these detectors and the TDM readout technology into a 16 row x N column field-able instrument.

  1. The X-ray response of CdZnTe detectors to be used as future spectroscopic detectors for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, S.; Bavdaz, M.; Castelletto, B.; Peacock, A.; Scholze, F.; Ulm, G.; Gagliardi, M.-A.; Nenonen, S.; Tuomi, T.; Juvonen, M.; Rantamäki, R.

    1998-12-01

    The next generation of X-ray astrophysics missions may well extend the energy range beyond the current limit of about 10keV studied by the existing X-ray Astrophysics space missions such as ASCA or future missions such as AXAF and XMM to be launched in the next few years. To address with a high degree of sensitivity the astrophysical problems associated with X-ray emission in the X-ray band from 0.2 to 100keV a significant extension of the capabilities of focusing X-ray optics and imaging broad band hard X-ray detectors will be required. Future missions such as INTEGRAL, BASIS and EXIST will make use of CdZnTe or CdTe detectors for imaging spectroscopy down to about 5keV with a spectral resolution between 3% and 7% at 100keV. This is about a factor of 10 away from what is theoretically possible and mainly caused by the poor crystal quality. In this paper experimental results on the study of the X-ray response of CdZnTe detectors are presented. The detector response to photons with energies between 1 and 5keV has been investigated using synchrotron radiation and a preliminary model to describe the detector response developed. The limitations on the energy resolution, due to incomplete charge collection and spatial non-uniformities, are presented based on the detailed mapping of the energy response of a detector exposed to highly monochromatised synchrotron radiation. At higher energies results have been obtained using a 241Am radioactive source and an electron cyclotron resonance source so as to establish the detector performance and overall response to medium- and higher-energy X-ray photons up to 60keV. Based on these results the performance of the detectors are compared with Si(Li) and HPGe solid-state detectors.

  2. Recent developments in transition-edge strip detectors for solar x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, Adam J.; Deiker, Steven W.; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent D.; Martinez-Galarce, Dennis S.; Shing, Lawrence; Stern, Robert A.; Ullom, Joel N.; Vale, Leila R.

    2008-07-01

    LMSAL and NIST are developing position-sensitive x-ray strip detectors based on Transition Edge Sensor (TES) microcalorimeters optimized for solar physics. By combining high spectral (E/ΔE ~1600) and temporal (single photon Δt ~10μs) resolutions with imaging capabilities, these devices will be able to study high-temperature (>10 MK) x-ray lines as never before. Diagnostics from these lines should provide significant new insight into the physics of both microflares and the early stages of flares. Previously, the large size of traditional TESs, along with the heat loads associated with wiring large arrays, presented obstacles to using these cryogenic detectors for solar missions. Implementing strip detector technology at small scales, however, addresses both issues: here, a line of substantially smaller effective pixels requires only two TESs, decreasing both the total array size and the wiring requirements for the same spatial resolution. Early results show energy resolutions of Δ ΕFWHM ~30eV and spatial resolutions of ~10-15 μm, suggesting the strip-detector concept is viable.

  3. Recent Developments in Transition-Edge Strip Detectors for Solar X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, Adam J.; Deiker, Steven W.; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent D.; Martinez-Galarce, Dennis S.; Shing, Lawrence; Stern, Robert A.; Ullom, Joel N.; Vale, Leila R.

    2008-01-01

    LMSAL and NIST are developing position-sensitive x-ray strip detectors based on Transition Edge Sensor (TES) microcalorimeters optimized for solar physics. By combining high spectral (E/ delta E approximately equals 1600) and temporal (single photon delta t approximately equals 10 micro s) resolutions with imaging capabilities, these devices will be able to study high-temperature (>l0 MK) x-ray lines as never before. Diagnostics from these lines should provide significant new insight into the physics of both microflares and the early stages of flares. Previously, the large size of traditional TESs, along with the heat loads associated with wiring large arrays, presented obstacles to using these cryogenic detectors for solar missions. Implementing strip detector technology at small scales, however, addresses both issues: here, a line of substantially smaller effective pixels requires only two TESs, decreasing both the total array size and the wiring requirements for the same spatial resolution. Early results show energy resolutions of delta E(sub fwhm) approximately equals 30 eV and spatial resolutions of approximately 10-15 micron, suggesting the strip-detector concept is viable.

  4. Performance of Gas Scintillation Proportional Counter Array for High-Energy X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Apple, Jeffery

    2004-01-01

    A focal plane array of high-pressure gas scintillation proportional counters (GSPC) for a High Energy X-Ray Observatory (HERO) is developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The array is consisted from eight GSPCs and is a part of balloon born payload scheduled to flight in May 2004. These detectors have an active area of approximately 20 square centimeters, and are filled with a high pressure (10(exp 6) Pa) xenon-helium mixture. Imaging is via crossed-grid position-sensitive phototubes sensitive in the UV region. The performance of the GSPC is well matched to that of the telescopes x-ray optics which have response to 75 keV and a focal spot size of approximately 500 microns. The detector's energy resolution, 4% FWHM at 60 keV, is adequate for resolving the broad spectral lines of astrophysical importance and for accurate continuum measurements. Results of the on-earth detector calibration will be presented and in-flight detector performance will be provided, as available.

  5. Novel X-ray Communication Based XNAV Augmentation Method Using X-ray Detectors.

    PubMed

    Song, Shibin; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua; Bai, Yuanjie

    2015-01-01

    The further development of X-ray pulsar-based NAVigation (XNAV) is hindered by its lack of accuracy, so accuracy improvement has become a critical issue for XNAV. In this paper, an XNAV augmentation method which utilizes both pulsar observation and X-ray ranging observation for navigation filtering is proposed to deal with this issue. As a newly emerged concept, X-ray communication (XCOM) shows great potential in space exploration. X-ray ranging, derived from XCOM, could achieve high accuracy in range measurement, which could provide accurate information for XNAV. For the proposed method, the measurement models of pulsar observation and range measurement observation are established, and a Kalman filtering algorithm based on the observations and orbit dynamics is proposed to estimate the position and velocity of a spacecraft. A performance comparison of the proposed method with the traditional pulsar observation method is conducted by numerical experiments. Besides, the parameters that influence the performance of the proposed method, such as the pulsar observation time, the SNR of the ranging signal, etc., are analyzed and evaluated by numerical experiments. PMID:26404295

  6. Novel X-ray Communication Based XNAV Augmentation Method Using X-ray Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shibin; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua; Bai, Yuanjie

    2015-01-01

    The further development of X-ray pulsar-based NAVigation (XNAV) is hindered by its lack of accuracy, so accuracy improvement has become a critical issue for XNAV. In this paper, an XNAV augmentation method which utilizes both pulsar observation and X-ray ranging observation for navigation filtering is proposed to deal with this issue. As a newly emerged concept, X-ray communication (XCOM) shows great potential in space exploration. X-ray ranging, derived from XCOM, could achieve high accuracy in range measurement, which could provide accurate information for XNAV. For the proposed method, the measurement models of pulsar observation and range measurement observation are established, and a Kalman filtering algorithm based on the observations and orbit dynamics is proposed to estimate the position and velocity of a spacecraft. A performance comparison of the proposed method with the traditional pulsar observation method is conducted by numerical experiments. Besides, the parameters that influence the performance of the proposed method, such as the pulsar observation time, the SNR of the ranging signal, etc., are analyzed and evaluated by numerical experiments. PMID:26404295

  7. Real-time compression of streaming X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy area-detector data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, T.; Jemian, P.; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A. R.; Sikorski, M.; Sprung, M.; Weizeorick, J.

    2011-09-01

    We present a data acquisition system to perform on-the-fly background subtraction and lower-level discrimination compression of streaming X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) data from a fast charge-coupled device area detector. The system is built using a commercial frame grabber with an on-board field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The system is capable of continuously processing 60 CCD frames per second each consisting of 1024×1024 pixels with up to 64 512 photon hits per frame.

  8. Achromatically filtered diamond photoconductive detectors for high power soft x-ray flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.E.; Landen, O.L.; Bell, P.; Costa, R.; Hargrove, D.

    1999-01-01

    A 1-mm-square diamond photoconductive detector (PCD) has been installed on the LLNL Nova laser system, for use as a broadband soft x-ray power diagnostic. The PCD is installed behind an array of pinholes, which cast multiple, overlapping images of the source onto the diamond. This allows reduction of the x-ray intensity, to avoid saturation problems, while avoiding the spectral dependency of thin film filters. The diode current is read out on a 5 GHz bandwidth scope. The system is calibrated by comparison to an absolutely calibrated array of filtered vacuum x-ray photodiodes ({open_quotes}dante{close_quotes}). The time response of the PCD and its bias electronics have been characterized using the 5th harmonic (210 nm) of a short pulse ({lt}1 ps) Ti: sapphire laser. The data show a fast rise, limited by the 5 GHz scope bandwidth, and a slower fall off, characterized by an RC time of order 200 ps. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Modeling CZT/CdTe x-ray photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, Andrey; Rodrigues, Miesher; Wang, Gin-Chung; Glick, Stephen J.

    2015-03-01

    Software for modeling x-ray signals, as detected by a semiconductor radiation detector, has been developed. We model a generic signal generation/collection/processing sequence using Monte Carlo and finite-element analysis software. The suggested framework will allow one to simulate x-ray pulse-height spectrum, various triggering schemes, and can be used for detector optimization.

  10. Stationary chest tomosynthesis using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jing; Tucker, Andrew W.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heath, Michael D.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Chest tomosynthesis is a low-dose, quasi-3D imaging modality that has been demonstrated to improve the detection sensitivity for small lung nodules, compared to 2D chest radiography. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility and system requirements of stationary chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a spatially distributed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, where the projection images are collected by electronically activating individual x-ray focal spots in the source array without mechanical motion of the x-ray source, detector, or the patient. A bench-top system was constructed using an existing CNT field emission source array and a flat panel detector. The tube output, beam quality, focal spot size, system in-plane and in-depth resolution were characterized. Tomosynthesis slices of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were reconstructed for image quality assessment. All 75 CNT sources in the source array were shown to operate reliably at 80 kVp and 5 mA tube current. Source-to-source consistency in the tube current and focal spot size was observed. The incident air kerma reading per mAs was measured as 74.47 uGy mAs-1 at 100 cm. The first half value layer of the beam was 3 mm aluminum. An average focal spot size of 2.5  ×  0.5 mm was measured. The system MTF was measured to be 1.7 cycles mm-1 along the scanning direction, and 3.4 cycles mm-1 perpendicular to the scanning direction. As the angular coverage of 11.6°-34°, the full width at half maximum of the artifact spread function improved greatly from 9.5 to 5.2 mm. The reconstructed tomosynthesis slices clearly show airways and pulmonary vascular structures in the anthropomorphic lung phantom. The results show the CNT source array is capable of generating sufficient dose for chest tomosynthesis imaging. The results obtained so far suggest an s-DCT using a distributed CNT x-ray source array is feasible.

  11. Stationary chest tomosynthesis using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jing; Tucker, Andrew W; Lee, Yueh Z; Heath, Michael D; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Chest tomosynthesis is a low-dose, quasi-3D imaging modality that has been demonstrated to improve the detection sensitivity for small lung nodules, compared to 2D chest radiography. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility and system requirements of stationary chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a spatially distributed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, where the projection images are collected by electronically activating individual x-ray focal spots in the source array without mechanical motion of the x-ray source, detector, or the patient. A bench-top system was constructed using an existing CNT field emission source array and a flat panel detector. The tube output, beam quality, focal spot size, system in-plane and in-depth resolution were characterized. Tomosynthesis slices of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were reconstructed for image quality assessment. All 75 CNT sources in the source array were shown to operate reliably at 80 kVp and 5 mA tube current. Source-to-source consistency in the tube current and focal spot size was observed. The incident air kerma reading per mAs was measured as 74.47 uGy mAs(-1) at 100 cm. The first half value layer of the beam was 3 mm aluminum. An average focal spot size of 2.5  ×  0.5 mm was measured. The system MTF was measured to be 1.7 cycles mm(-1) along the scanning direction, and 3.4 cycles mm(-1) perpendicular to the scanning direction. As the angular coverage of 11.6°-34°, the full width at half maximum of the artifact spread function improved greatly from 9.5 to 5.2 mm. The reconstructed tomosynthesis slices clearly show airways and pulmonary vascular structures in the anthropomorphic lung phantom. The results show the CNT source array is capable of generating sufficient dose for chest tomosynthesis imaging. The results obtained so far suggest an s-DCT using a distributed CNT x-ray source array is feasible. PMID:25478786

  12. Automated Absorber Attachment for X-ray Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S.; Allen, Christine; Kilbourne, Caroline; Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Schulte, Eric; Moseley, Samuel J.

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a method for the automated attachment of large numbers of absorber tiles to large format detector arrays. This development includes the fabrication of high quality, closely spaced HgTe absorber tiles that are properly positioned for pick-and-place by our FC150 flip chip bonder. The FC150 also transfers the appropriate minute amount of epoxy to the detectors for permanent attachment of the absorbers. The success of this development will replace an arduous, risky and highly manual task with a reliable, high-precision automated process.

  13. Total x-ray power improvement on recent wire array experiments on the Z machine.

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Savage, Mark Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Lopez, Mike R.; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments on the refurbished Z-machine were conducted using large diameter stainless steel arrays which produced x-ray powers of 260 TW. Follow-up experiments were then conducted utilizing tungsten wires with approximately the same total mass with the hypothesis that the total x-ray power would increase. On the large diameter tungsten experiments, the x-ray power averaged over 300 TW and the total x-ray energy was greater than 2MJ. Different analysis techniques for inferring the x-ray power will be described in detail.

  14. A multi-channel monolithic Ge detector system for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, J.J.; Allen, P.G.; Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Madden, N.W.; Cork, C.; Luke, P.; Pehl, D.; Malone, D.

    1995-03-01

    Construction and performance of a monolithic quad-pixel Ge detector for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at synchrotron radiation sources are described. The detector semiconductor element has an active surface area of 4.0 cm{sup 2} which is electrically separated into four 1.0 cm{sup 2} pixels, with little interfacial dead volume. Spatial response of the array shows that cross-talk between adjacent pixels is < 10% for 5.9 keV photons that fall within 0.5 mm of the pixel boundaries. The detector electronics system uses pre-amplifiers built at LBNL with commercial Tennelec Model TC 244 amplifiers. Using an {sup 55}Fe test source (MnK{sub {alpha}}, 5.9 keV), energy resolution of better than 200 eV is achieved with a 4 {mu}sec peaking time. At 0.5 {mu}sec peaking time, pulse pileup results in a 75% throughput efficiency for an incoming count rate of 100 kHz. Initial XAS fluoresncece measurements at the beamline 4 wiggler end stations at SSRL show that the detector system has several advantages over commercial x-ray spectrometers for low-concentration counting.

  15. X-ray detector physics and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 23, 24, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1993-02-01

    Recent developments in X-ray and hard X-ray imaging detector, high-intensity sources, hard X-ray imaging optics, calibration, and detection technologies are discussed. Particular attention is given to a high-MTF X-ray image intensifier, application of monolithic CdZnTe linear solid state ionization detectors for X-ray imaging, magnetic response of high-Tc superconductors to X-ray radiation and detection of X-rays, laboratory soft X-ray source with foil target, detection of explosive materials using nuclear radiation, energy response of astronomical CCD X-ray detectors, calibration techniques for high-flux X-ray detectors, fabrication of grazing-incidence optics using flow-polishing techniques, and numerical simulations for capillary-based X-ray optics. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  16. X-ray detector physics and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 23, 24, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in X-ray and hard X-ray imaging detector, high-intensity sources, hard X-ray imaging optics, calibration, and detection technologies are discussed. Particular attention is given to a high-MTF X-ray image intensifier, application of monolithic CdZnTe linear solid state ionization detectors for X-ray imaging, magnetic response of high-Tc superconductors to X-ray radiation and detection of X-rays, laboratory soft X-ray source with foil target, detection of explosive materials using nuclear radiation, energy response of astronomical CCD X-ray detectors, calibration techniques for high-flux X-ray detectors, fabrication of grazing-incidence optics using flow-polishing techniques, and numerical simulations for capillary-based X-ray optics. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  17. Measurement of the characteristic X ray of oxygen and other ultrasoft X rays using mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Economou, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    This letter reports the detection and resolution of the characteristic X-ray of oxygen at 523 eV and other ultrasoft X-rays (photons energy less than 1 keV) using radiation detectors fabricated from the compound semi-insulator mercuric iodide (HgI2). These detectors are capable of operation at room ambient but in these experiments were slightly cooled using a Peltier element to 0 C. A pulsed light feedback preamplifier with a Peltier element cooled (to -30 deg) first stage field-effect transistor was used to amplify signals from the detector. Overall system noise level was 185 eV (full width at half-maximum) limited by the temperature of the first stage field-effect transistor. With optimal cooling of this element the characteristic X-ray of carbon at 282 eV should be measurable. These results would seem to be important in measurement of biological samples in electron column instruments.

  18. Evaluation of a photon counting Medipix3RX CZT spectral x-ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Rundle, David S.; Butler, Philip H.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the performance of a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based Medipix3RX x-ray detector as a candidate for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging. This technology was developed at CERN for the Large Hadron Collider. It features an array of 128 by 128, 110 micrometer square pixels, each with eight simultaneous threshold counters, five of which utilize real-time charge summing, significantly reducing the charge sharing between contiguous pixels. Pixel response curves were created by imaging a range of x-ray intensities by varying x-ray tube current and by varying the exposure time with fixed x-ray current. Photon energy-related assessments were made by flooding the detector with the tin foil filtered emission of an I-125 radioisotope brachytherapy seed and sweeping the energy threshold of each of the four charge-summed counters of each pixel in 1 keV steps. Long term stability assessments were made by repeating exposures over the course of one hour. The high properly-functioning pixel yield (99%), long term stability (linear regression of whole-chip response over one hour of acquisitions: y = −0.0038x + 2284; standard deviation: 3.7 counts) and energy resolution (2.5 keV FWHM (single pixel), 3.7 keV FWHM across the full image) make this device suitable for spectral micro-CT. The charge summing performance effectively reduced the measurement corruption caused by charge sharing which, when unaccounted for, shifts the photon energy assignment to lower energies, degrading both count and energy accuracy. Effective charge summing greatly improves the potential for calibrated, energy-specific material decomposition and K edge difference imaging approaches. PMID:27795606

  19. Dosimetric properties of high energy current (HEC) detector in keV x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Shrestha, Suman; Elshahat, Bassem; Karellas, Andrew; Sajo, Erno

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a new x-ray radiation detector. The detector employs high-energy current (HEC) formed by secondary electrons consisting predominantly of photoelectrons and Auger electrons, to directly convert x-ray energy to detector signal without externally applied power and without amplification. The HEC detector is a multilayer structure composed of thin conducting layers separated by dielectric layers with an overall thickness of less than a millimeter. It can be cut to any size and shape, formed into curvilinear surfaces, and thus can be designed for a variety of QA applications. We present basic dosimetric properties of the detector as function of x-ray energy, depth in the medium, area and aspect ratio of the detector, as well as other parameters. The prototype detectors show similar dosimetric properties to those of a thimble ionization chamber, which operates at high voltage. The initial results obtained for kilovoltage x-rays merit further research and development towards specific medical applications.

  20. Aerogel Cherenkov detector for characterizing the intense flash x-ray source, Cygnus, spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; McEvoy, A. M.; Young, C. S.; Hamilton, C.; Schwellenbach, D. D.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.; Smith, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    An aerogel Cherenkov detector is proposed to measure the X-ray energy spectrum from the Cygnus—intense flash X-ray source operated at the Nevada National Security Site. An array of aerogels set at a variety of thresholds between 1 and 3 MeV will be adequate to map out the bremsstrahlung X-ray production of the Cygnus, where the maximum energy of the spectrum is normally around 2.5 MeV. In addition to the Cherenkov radiation from aerogels, one possible competing light-production mechanism is optical transition radiation (OTR), which may be significant in aerogels due to the large number of transitions from SiO2 clusters to vacuum voids. To examine whether OTR is a problem, four aerogel samples were tested using a mono-energetic electron beam (varied in the range of 1-3 MeV) at NSTec Los Alamos Operations. It was demonstrated that aerogels can be used as a Cherenkov medium, where the rate of the light production is about two orders magnitude higher when the electron beam energy is above threshold.

  1. Diagnosing x-ray power and energy of tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun-lun; Ren, Xiao-dong; Huang, Xian-bin; Zhang, Si-qun; Zhou, Shao-tong; Dan, Jia-kun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Ouyang, Kai; Cai, Hong-chun; Wei, Bing; Ji, Ce; Feng, Shu-ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-ping; Deng, Jian-jun

    2015-11-01

    Fast z-pinch is a very efficient way of converting electromagnetic energy to radiation. With an 8-10 MA current on primary test stand facility, about 1 MJ electromagnetic energy is delivered to vacuum chamber, which heats z-pinch plasma to radiate soft x-ray. To develop a pulsed high power x-ray source, we studied the applicability of diagnosing x-ray power from tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode (FSR-XRD). The detector was originally developed to diagnose radiation of a hohlraum in SG-III prototype laser facility. It utilized a gold cathode XRD and a specially configured compound gold filter to yield a nearly flat spectral response in photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV. In practice, it was critical to avoid surface contamination of gold cathode. It is illustrated that an exposure of an XRD to multiple shots caused a significant change of response. Thus, in diagnosing x-ray power and energy, we used each XRD in only one shot after calibration. In a shot serial, output of FSR-XRD was compared with output of a nickel bolometer. In these shots, the outputs agreed with each other within their uncertainties which were about 12% for FSR-XRD and about 15% for bolometer. Moreover, the ratios between the FSR-XRD and the bolometer among different shots were explored. In 8 shots, the standard deviation of the ratio was 6%. It is comparable to XRD response change of 7%. PMID:26628136

  2. Diagnosing x-ray power and energy of tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kun-lun; Ren, Xiao-dong; Huang, Xian-bin Zhang, Si-qun; Zhou, Shao-tong; Dan, Jia-kun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Ouyang, Kai; Cai, Hong-chun; Wei, Bing; Ji, Ce; Feng, Shu-ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-ping; Deng, Jian-jun

    2015-11-15

    Fast z-pinch is a very efficient way of converting electromagnetic energy to radiation. With an 8-10 MA current on primary test stand facility, about 1 MJ electromagnetic energy is delivered to vacuum chamber, which heats z-pinch plasma to radiate soft x-ray. To develop a pulsed high power x-ray source, we studied the applicability of diagnosing x-ray power from tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode (FSR-XRD). The detector was originally developed to diagnose radiation of a hohlraum in SG-III prototype laser facility. It utilized a gold cathode XRD and a specially configured compound gold filter to yield a nearly flat spectral response in photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV. In practice, it was critical to avoid surface contamination of gold cathode. It is illustrated that an exposure of an XRD to multiple shots caused a significant change of response. Thus, in diagnosing x-ray power and energy, we used each XRD in only one shot after calibration. In a shot serial, output of FSR-XRD was compared with output of a nickel bolometer. In these shots, the outputs agreed with each other within their uncertainties which were about 12% for FSR-XRD and about 15% for bolometer. Moreover, the ratios between the FSR-XRD and the bolometer among different shots were explored. In 8 shots, the standard deviation of the ratio was 6%. It is comparable to XRD response change of 7%.

  3. CdZnTe Image Detectors for Hard-X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. M. Hubert; Cook, Walter R.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Lin, Jiao Y. Y.; Mao, Peter H.; Schindler, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    Arrays of CdZnTe photodetectors and associated electronic circuitry have been built and tested in a continuing effort to develop focal-plane image sensor systems for hard-x-ray telescopes. Each array contains 24 by 44 pixels at a pitch of 498 m. The detector designs are optimized to obtain low power demand with high spectral resolution in the photon- energy range of 5 to 100 keV. More precisely, each detector array is a hybrid of a CdZnTe photodetector array and an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) containing an array of amplifiers in the same pixel pattern as that of the detectors. The array is fabricated on a single crystal of CdZnTe having dimensions of 23.6 by 12.9 by 2 mm. The detector-array cathode is a monolithic platinum contact. On the anode plane, the contact metal is patterned into the aforementioned pixel array, surrounded by a guard ring that is 1 mm wide on three sides and is 0.1 mm wide on the fourth side so that two such detector arrays can be placed side-by-side to form a roughly square sensor area with minimal dead area between them. Figure 1 shows two anode patterns. One pattern features larger pixel anode contacts, with a 30-m gap between them. The other pattern features smaller pixel anode contacts plus a contact for a shaping electrode in the form of a grid that separates all the pixels. In operation, the grid is held at a potential intermediate between the cathode and anode potentials to steer electric charges toward the anode in order to reduce the loss of charges in the inter-anode gaps. The CdZnTe photodetector array is mechanically and electrically connected to the ASIC (see Figure 2), either by use of indium bump bonds or by use of conductive epoxy bumps on the CdZnTe array joined to gold bumps on the ASIC. Hence, the output of each pixel detector is fed to its own amplifier chain.

  4. In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, David M.; Gibson, Walter M.; Huang, Huapeng

    2007-06-26

    An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

  5. Timepix detector at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bakel, N. A.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; Ford, C.; van Beveren, V.; van der Heijden, B.; van Beuzekom, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Timepix detector can be operated in Time-over-Threshold mode to allow for charge integration measurements as required by short (< 50 fs) x-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Initial commissioning activities have started at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy (XCS) instrument at LCLS, where speckle patterns have been measured.

  6. Development of an X-ray HARP-FEA detector system for high-throughput protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Yamada, Yusuke; Hirano, Keiichi; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Egami, Norifumi; Namba, Masakazu; Kubota, Misao; Kawai, Teruo; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2008-05-01

    A new detector system for protein crystallography is now being developed based on an X-ray HARP-FEA (high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor-field emitter array), which consists of an amorphous selenium membrane and a matrix field emitter array. The combination of the membrane avalanche effect with a single driven FEA has several advantages over currently available area detectors, including higher sensitivity, higher spatial resolution and a higher frame rate. Preliminary evaluation of the detector has been carried out and its effectiveness has been confirmed. Next, diffraction images were measured with continuous rotation of a protein crystal, and the images were compared with those measured by the existing CCD detector; the system successfully obtained high-spatial-resolution images. Using shutterless measurement, the total measurement time can be reduced significantly, making the method appropriate for high-throughput protein crystallography. The X-ray HARP-FEA detector is an attractive candidate for the next generation of X-ray area detectors.

  7. Wire array z-pinch insights for high x-ray power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mock, R.C.; Nash, T.J.

    1998-08-01

    The discovery that the use of very large numbers of wires enables high x-ray power to be generated from wire-array z-pinches represents a breakthrough in load design for large pulsed power generators, and has permitted high temperatures to be generated in radiation cavities on Saturn. In this paper, changes in x-ray emission characteristics as a function of wire number, array mass, and load radius, for 20-mm-long aluminum arrays on Saturn that led to these breakthrough hohlraum results, are discussed and compared with a few related emission characteristics of high-wire-number aluminum and tungsten arrays on Z. X=ray measurement comparisons with analytic models and 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHC) code simulations in the x-y and r-z planes provide confidence in the ability of the models and codes to predict future x-ray performance with very-large-number wire arrays.

  8. A VXI-based high speed X-ray CCD detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiang; Hopf, Ron; Rodricks, Brian

    1994-09-01

    For time-resolved X-ray scattering, one ideally wants a high speed detector that also is capable of giving position sensitive information. Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) have been used successfully as X-ray detectors. Unfortunately, they are inherently slow because of the serial readout. EEV has developed a CCD that has eight channels of parallel readout, thus increasing the speed eightfold. Using state-of-the-art VXI electronics, we have developed a readout system that could read the entire array in 2.5 ms using a 20-MHz readout clock. For testing and characterization, the device was clocked at a significantly slower speed of 30 kHz. The data are preamplified, and all eight channels of output are simultaneously digitized to 12 bits and stored in buffer memory. The system is controlled by a 486-based PC through an MXI bus and VXI controller using commercially available software. The system is also capable of real-time image display and manipulation.

  9. Large angle solid state position sensitive x-ray detector system

    DOEpatents

    Kurtz, David S.; Ruud, Clay O.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for x-ray measurement of certain properties of a solid material. In distinction to known methods and apparatus, this invention employs a specific fiber-optic bundle configuration, termed a reorganizer, itself known for other uses, for coherently transmitting visible light originating from the scintillation of diffracted x-radiation from the solid material gathered along a substantially one dimensional linear arc, to a two-dimensional photo-sensor array. The two-dimensional photodetector array, with its many closely packed light sensitive pixels, is employed to process the information contained in the diffracted radiation and present the information in the form of a conventional x-ray diffraction spectrum. By this arrangement, the angular range of the combined detector faces may be increased without loss of angular resolution. Further, the prohibitively expensive coupling together of a large number of individual linear diode photodetectors, which would be required to process signals generated by the diffracted radiation, is avoided.

  10. Development of Position-sensitive Transition-edge Sensor X-ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckard, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. s.; Sad (eor. K/ E/); Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of position-sensitive transition-edge sensors (PoST's) for future x-ray astronomy missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), currently under study by NASA and ESA. PoST's consist of multiple absorbers each with a different thermal coupling to one or more transition-edge sensor (TES). This differential thermal coupling between absorbers and TES's results in different characteristic pulse shapes and allows position discrimination between the different pixels. The development of PoST's is motivated by a desire to achieve maximum focal-plane area with the least number of readout channels and as such. PoST's are ideally suited to provide a focal-plane extension to the Constellation-X microcalorimeter array. We report the first experimental results of our latest one and two channel PoST's, which utilize fast thermalizing electroplated Au/Bi absorbers coupled to low noise Mo/Au TES's - a technology already successfully implemented in our arrays of single pixel TES's. We demonstrate 6 eV energy resolution coupled with spatial sensitivity in the keV energy range. We also report on the development of signal processing algorithms to optimize energy and position sensitivity of our detectors.

  11. Large angle solid state position sensitive x-ray detector system

    DOEpatents

    Kurtz, D.S.; Ruud, C.O.

    1998-07-21

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for x-ray measurement of certain properties of a solid material. In distinction to known methods and apparatus, this invention employs a specific fiber-optic bundle configuration, termed a reorganizer, itself known for other uses, for coherently transmitting visible light originating from the scintillation of diffracted x-radiation from the solid material gathered along a substantially one dimensional linear arc, to a two-dimensional photo-sensor array. The two-dimensional photodetector array, with its many closely packed light sensitive pixels, is employed to process the information contained in the diffracted radiation and present the information in the form of a conventional x-ray diffraction spectrum. By this arrangement, the angular range of the combined detector faces may be increased without loss of angular resolution. Further, the prohibitively expensive coupling together of a large number of individual linear diode photodetectors, which would be required to process signals generated by the diffracted radiation, is avoided. 7 figs.

  12. Large angle solid state position sensitive x-ray detector system

    DOEpatents

    Kurtz, D.S.; Ruud, C.O.

    1998-03-03

    A method and apparatus for x-ray measurement of certain properties of a solid material are disclosed. In distinction to known methods and apparatus, this invention employs a specific fiber-optic bundle configuration, termed a reorganizer, itself known for other uses, for coherently transmitting visible light originating from the scintillation of diffracted x-radiation from the solid material gathered along a substantially one dimensional linear arc, to a two-dimensional photo-sensor array. The two-dimensional photodetector array, with its many closely packed light sensitive pixels, is employed to process the information contained in the diffracted radiation and present the information in the form of a conventional x-ray diffraction spectrum. By this arrangement, the angular range of the combined detector faces may be increased without loss of angular resolution. Further, the prohibitively expensive coupling together of a large number of individual linear diode photodetectors, which would be required to process signals generated by the diffracted radiation, is avoided. 7 figs.

  13. Photographic film as a detector for solar X-ray/XUV astronomical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of several films as detectors for solar soft X-ray (3-100 A) and XUV (100-600 A) radiation are discussed. The properties of soft-X-ray-sensitive films like the SO-212 make them useful for the glancing-incidence X-ray telescopes. Used for the MSFC X-Ray Telescope during the Skylab mission (at the wavelengths of 8.34 and 15.4 A), the SO-212 film functioned as a photon detector, achieving spatial resolution of 2.2 arc sec. Other high-resolution soft-X-ray-sensitive films include SO-242 and 101-07. For XUV detection, the SC-5, SC-7, 104-07, and 101-07 films are recommended.

  14. Introduction to a calibration facility for hard X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xu; Li, XinQiao; Xie, YaNing; Liu, CongZhan; Zhang, Shu; Wu, JinJie; Zhang, Jian; Li, XuFang; Zhang, YiFei; Li, Bing; Hu, HongLiang; Chen, YuPeng; Jiang, Wei; Li, ZeShu

    2014-12-01

    This paper introduces the current configuration of the Hard X-ray Calibration Facility (HXCF) in 2014, which is used to calibrate the high energy X-ray detectors that will be onboard the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) satellite, China's first astronomy satellite. The HXCF consists of an X-ray tube, a skid platform system, a double crystal monochromator, a "T" structure mechanism, a collimator, an adjustable beam, a background shielding box, as well as the box of the control system. The HXCF covers 15-100 keV energy band and has a high fraction of monochromatic light (exceeding 92 % at 15-100 keV) and good monochromaticity (1‰ level). The flux of the monochromatic light is around 104 photons cm-2 s-1. This HXCF could be used to calibrate the energy linearities, the energy resolutions and detection efficiencies of hard X-ray detectors.

  15. Prospective gated chest tomosynthesis using CNT X-ray source array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jing; Burk, Laurel; Wu, Gongting; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heath, Michael D.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Chest tomosynthesis is a low-dose 3-D imaging modality that has been shown to have comparable sensitivity as CT in detecting lung nodules and other lung pathologies. We have recently demonstrated the feasibility of stationary chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a distributed CNT X-ray source array. The technology allows acquisition of tomographic projections without moving the X-ray source. The electronically controlled CNT x-ray source also enables physiologically gated imaging, which will minimize image blur due to the patient's respiration motion. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of prospective gated chest tomosynthesis using a bench-top s-DCT system with a CNT source array, a high- speed at panel detector and realistic patient respiratory signals captured using a pressure sensor. Tomosynthesis images of inflated pig lungs placed inside an anthropomorphic chest phantom were acquired at different respiration rate, with and without gating for image quality comparison. Metal beads of 2 mm diameter were placed on the pig lung for quantitative measure of the image quality. Without gating, the beads were blurred to 3:75 mm during a 3 s tomosynthesis acquisition. When gated to the end of the inhalation and exhalation phase the detected bead size reduced to 2:25 mm, much closer to the actual bead size. With gating the observed airway edges are sharper and there are more visible structural details in the lung. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of prospective gating in the s-DCT, which substantially reduces image blur associated with lung motion.

  16. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  17. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, B P; Molloi, S

    2014-12-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for x-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm(2) in detection area. The angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded x-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of x-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic x-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the x-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory.

  18. X-ray imaging with ``edge-on'' microchannel plate detector: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Molloi, Sabee

    2003-09-01

    A novel scanning slit X-ray imaging system based on an "edge-on" microchannel plate detector was developed and tested. Images were acquired at 50 kV(p) X-ray tube voltage with a limiting spatial resolution of 7 lp/mm. The pixel noise was measured to be 0.3 count/pixel/s for a 50×70 μm 2 pixel size. This photon counting detector can be considered to be virtually noise free.

  19. Background simulation of the X-ray detectors using Geant4 toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, R.; Mandal, S.; Nandi, A.; Debnath, D.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Rao, A. R.

    We have studied the background noise of X-ray detectors using the Geant4 simulation toolkit. The main source of background noise for the X-ray detectors of low earth orbit is due to cosmic diffused background photons. We have calculated the background spectrum for the CZT of ASTROSAT as well as the phoswich detector of RT-2. Also we have studied the importance of the veto detector to reduce the Compton induced background photons. In this simulation ess we also have optimized the passive shielding to minimize the detector weight within the allowed limit of background counts.

  20. X-ray and gamma ray detector readout system

    DOEpatents

    Tumer, Tumay O; Clajus, Martin; Visser, Gerard

    2010-10-19

    A readout electronics scheme is under development for high resolution, compact PET (positron emission tomography) imagers based on LSO (lutetium ortho-oxysilicate, Lu.sub.2SiO.sub.5) scintillator and avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays. The key is to obtain sufficient timing and energy resolution at a low power level, less than about 30 mW per channel, including all required functions. To this end, a simple leading edge level crossing discriminator is used, in combination with a transimpedance preamplifier. The APD used has a gain of order 1,000, and an output noise current of several pA/ Hz, allowing bipolar technology to be used instead of CMOS, for increased speed and power efficiency. A prototype of the preamplifier and discriminator has been constructed, achieving timing resolution of 1.5 ns FWHM, 2.7 ns full width at one tenth maximum, relative to an LSO/PMT detector, and an energy resolution of 13.6% FWHM at 511 keV, while operating at a power level of 22 mW per channel. Work is in progress towards integration of this preamplifier and discriminator with appropriate coincidence logic and amplitude measurement circuits in an ASIC suitable for a high resolution compact PET instrument. The detector system and/or ASIC can also be used for many other applications for medical to industrial imaging.

  1. Soft x-ray measurements using photoconductive type-IIa and single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Bentley, C. D.; Foster, J. M.; Goedhart, G.; Graham, P.; Taylor, M. J.; Hellewell, E.

    2008-10-15

    Photoconductive detectors (PCDs) are routinely used alongside vacuum x-ray diodes (XRDs) to provide an alternative x-ray flux measurement at laser facilities such as HELEN at AWE Aldermaston, UK, and Omega at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. To evaluate diamond PCDs as an alternative to XRD arrays, calibration measurements made at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory are used to accurately calculate the x-ray flux from a laser-heated target. This is compared to a flux measurement using the Dante XRD diagnostic. Estimates indicate that the photoinduced conductivity from measurements made at Omega are too large, and calculations using the radiometric calibrations made at the NSLS agree with this hypothesis. High-purity, single-crystal, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond samples are compared to natural type-IIa PCDs and show promising high resistivity effects, the corollary of which preliminary results show is a slower response time.

  2. Calibration of a time-resolved hard-x-ray detector using radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Regan, S. P.; Romanofsky, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    A four-channel, time-resolved, hard x-ray detector (HXRD) has been operating at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics for more than a decade. The slope temperature of the hot-electron population in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments is inferred by recording the hard x-ray radiation generated in the interaction of the electrons with the target. Measuring the energy deposited by hot electrons requires an absolute calibration of the hard x-ray detector. A novel method to obtain an absolute calibration of the HXRD using single photons from radioactive sources was developed, which uses a thermoelectrically cooled, low-noise, charge-sensitive amplifier.

  3. A Sealed, UHV Compatible, Soft X-ray Detector Utilizing Gas Electron Multipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.

    2009-10-25

    An advanced soft X-ray detector has been designed and fabricated for use in synchrotron experiments that utilize X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the study a wide range of materials properties. Fluorescence X-rays, in particular C{sub K} at 277eV, are converted in a low pressure gas medium, and charge multiplication occurs in two gas electron multipliers, fabricated in-house from glass reinforced laminate, to enable single photon counting. The detector satisfies a number of demanding characteristics often required in synchrotron environments, such as UHV compatibility compactness, long-term stability, and energy resolving capability.

  4. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy∕min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result. PMID:21691440

  5. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-05-23

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5x10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  6. Novel detector design for reducing intercell x-ray cross-talk in the variable resolution x-ray CT scanner: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Arabi, Hosein; Asl, Ali Reza Kamali; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Zaidi, Habib

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The variable resolution x-ray (VRX) CT scanner provides substantial improvement in the spatial resolution by matching the scanner's field of view (FOV) to the size of the object being imaged. Intercell x-ray cross-talk is one of the most important factors limiting the spatial resolution of the VRX detector. In this work, a new cell arrangement in the VRX detector is suggested to decrease the intercell x-ray cross-talk. The idea is to orient the detector cells toward the opening end of the detector. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were used for performance assessment of the oriented cell detector design. Previously published design parameters and simulation results of x-ray cross-talk for the VRX detector were used for model validation using the GATE Monte Carlo package. In the first step, the intercell x-ray cross-talk of the actual VRX detector model was calculated as a function of the FOV. The obtained results indicated an optimum cell orientation angle of 28 deg. to minimize the x-ray cross-talk in the VRX detector. Thereafter, the intercell x-ray cross-talk in the oriented cell detector was modeled and quantified. Results: The intercell x-ray cross-talk in the actual detector model was considerably high, reaching up to 12% at FOVs from 24 to 38 cm. The x-ray cross-talk in the oriented cell detector was less than 5% for all possible FOVs, except 40 cm (maximum FOV). The oriented cell detector could provide considerable decrease in the intercell x-ray cross-talk for the VRX detector, thus leading to significant improvement in the spatial resolution and reduction in the spatial resolution nonuniformity across the detector length. Conclusions: The proposed oriented cell detector is the first dedicated detector design for the VRX CT scanners. Application of this concept to multislice and flat-panel VRX detectors would also result in higher spatial resolution.

  7. Superconducting Detector System for High-Resolution Energy-Dispersive Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Niedermayr, T; Drury, O; Funk, T; Frank, M; Labov, S E; Cramer, S

    2001-02-21

    Synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy is often limited by detector performance. Grating spectrometers have the resolution, but lack the efficiency for the analysis of dilute samples. Semiconducting Si(Li) or Ge detectors are efficient, but often lack the resolution to separate weak signals from strong nearby lines in multi-element samples. Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) operated at temperatures below 1 K can be used as high-resolution high-efficiency x-ray detectors. They combine high energy resolution around 10 eV FWHM with the broad band efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors. We have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate STJ detectors in x-ray fluorescence measurements at beam line 4 of the ALS. We demonstrate the capabilities of such a detector system for fluorescence analysis of dilute metal sites in proteins and inorganic model compounds.

  8. Design considerations for soft X-ray television imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalata, Kenneth; Golub, Leon

    1988-01-01

    Television sensors for X-rays can be coupled to converters and image intensifiers to obtain active areas, high flux capabilities, quantum efficiency, high time resolution, or ease of construction and operation that may not be obtained with a directly illuminated sensor. A general purpose system which makes use of these capabilities for a number of applications is decribed. Some of the performance characteristics of this type of system are examined, and the expected future developments for such systems are briefly addressed.

  9. Advanced X-Ray Timing Array Mission: Conceptual Spacecraft Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. C.; Johnson, L.; Thomas, H. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Baysinger, M.; Maples, C. D.; Fabisinski, L.L.; Hornsby, L.; Thompson, K. S.; Miernik, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced X-Ray Timing Array (AXTAR) is a mission concept for submillisecond timing of bright galactic x-ray sources. The two science instruments are the Large Area Timing Array (LATA) (a collimated instrument with 2-50-keV coverage and over 3 square meters of effective area) and a Sky Monitor (SM), which acts as a trigger for pointed observations of x-ray transients. The spacecraft conceptual design team developed two spacecraft concepts that will enable the AXTAR mission: A minimal configuration to be launched on a Taurus II and a larger configuration to be launched on a Falcon 9 or similar vehicle.

  10. CCD-based X-ray area detector for time-resolved diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Naoto; Inoue, Katsuaki; Oka, Toshihiko

    2004-11-01

    A fast X-ray area detector for diffraction, scattering and imaging experiments at microsecond to millisecond time resolution has been developed. The key element of the detector is a fast (291 frames s(-1)) framing camera with three CCDs. A prism forms identical images on the CCDs and the frame rate is increased three times by reading them alternately. In order to convert X-rays into visible light that is detectable with the CCDs, an X-ray image intensifier is used. The camera can also be used with a high-resolution X-ray detector. In both cases it was found to be important to use a phosphor with a short decay time to fully make use of the high-speed framing capability of the camera. Preliminary results of a fibre diffraction experiment on a skeletal muscle and coronary angiography are presented.

  11. Ultrafast secondary emission X-ray imaging detectors: A possible application to TRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkerman, A.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Elkind, V.; Gibrekhterman, A.; Majewski, S.

    1992-05-01

    Fist high accuracy, X-ray imaging at high photon flux can be achieved when coupling thin solid convertors to gaseous electron multipliers, operating at low gas pressures. Secondary electrons emitted from the convertor foil are multiplied in several successive amplification elements. The obvious advantages of solid X-ray convertors, as compared to gaseous conversion, are the production of parallax-free images and the fast (subnanosecond) response. These X-ray detectors have many potential applications in basic and applied research. Of particular interest is the possibility of an efficient and ultrafast high resolution imaging of transition radiation (TR), with a reduced d E/d x background. We present experimental results on the operation of secondary emission X-ray (SEX) detectors, their detection efficiency, localization and time resolution. The experimental work is accompanied by mathematical modelling and computer simulation of transition radiation detectors (TRDs) based on CsI TR convertors.

  12. Three-dimensional X-ray observation of atmospheric biological samples by linear-array scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope system.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed a soft X-ray microscope called the scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM), which consists of a simple X-ray detection system that detects X-rays emitted from the interaction between a scanning electron beam (EB) and the thin film of the sample mount. We present herein a three-dimensional (3D) X-ray detection system that is based on the SGXM technology and designed for studying atmospheric biological samples. This 3D X-ray detection system contains a linear X-ray photodiode (PD) array. The specimens are placed under a CuZn-coated Si₃N₄ thin film, which is attached to an atmospheric sample holder. Multiple tilt X-ray images of the samples are detected simultaneously by the linear array of X-ray PDs, and the 3D structure is calculated by a new 3D reconstruction method that uses a simulated-annealing algorithm. The resulting 3D models clearly reveal the inner structure of the bacterium. In addition, the proposed method can easily be used for diverse samples in a broad range of scientific fields.

  13. Three-Dimensional X-ray Observation of Atmospheric Biological Samples by Linear-Array Scanning-Electron Generation X-ray Microscope System

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed a soft X-ray microscope called the scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM), which consists of a simple X-ray detection system that detects X-rays emitted from the interaction between a scanning electron beam (EB) and the thin film of the sample mount. We present herein a three-dimensional (3D) X-ray detection system that is based on the SGXM technology and designed for studying atmospheric biological samples. This 3D X-ray detection system contains a linear X-ray photodiode (PD) array. The specimens are placed under a CuZn-coated Si3N4 thin film, which is attached to an atmospheric sample holder. Multiple tilt X-ray images of the samples are detected simultaneously by the linear array of X-ray PDs, and the 3D structure is calculated by a new 3D reconstruction method that uses a simulated-annealing algorithm. The resulting 3D models clearly reveal the inner structure of the bacterium. In addition, the proposed method can easily be used for diverse samples in a broad range of scientific fields. PMID:21731770

  14. Area x-ray detector based on a lens-coupled charge-coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, Mark W.; Chamberlain, Darol; Gruner, Sol M.

    2005-08-15

    An area x-ray detector constructed using commercially available 'off-the-shelf' parts is described and its performance is characterized. The detector consists of a 1024x1024 pixel charge-coupled device (CCD) camera optically coupled to x-ray sensitive phosphor screen using a standard 35 mm camera lens. The conversion efficiency, spatial nonuniformity, spatial resolution and the detective quantum efficiency of the detector have been measured. Also shown is an example of data taken with the detector. The detector is a relatively low-cost device suitable for a wide variety of quantitative x-ray experiments where the input area need not be larger than about 70 mm across.

  15. Calorimetric Low Temperature Detectors for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy on Stored Highly Stripped Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bleile, A.; Egelhof, P.; Kluge, H.J.; Liebisch, U.; McCammon, D.; Meier, H.J.; Sebastian, O.; Stahle, C.K.; Stoehlker, T.; Weber, M.

    2000-12-31

    The precise determination of the Lamb shift in heavy hydrogen-like ions provides a sensitive test of QED in very strong Coulomb fields, not accessible otherwise, and has also the potential to deduce nuclear charge radii. A brief overview on the present status of such experiments, performed at the storage ring ESR at GSI Darmstadt, is given. For the investigation of the Lyman-{alpha} transitions in Au{sup 78+} or U{sup 91+} ions with improved accuracy, a high-resolution calorimetric low-temperature detector for hard x-rays (E {le} 100 keV) has been recently developed. The detector modules consist of arrays of silicon thermistors and of x-ray absorbers made of high-Z material to optimize the absorption efficiency. The detectors are housed in a specially designed {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He dilution refrigerator which fits to the geometry of the ESR target. The detector performance presently achieved is already close to fulfilling the demands of the Lamb shift experiment. For a prototype detector an energy resolution of {Delta}E{sub FWHM} = 75 eV is obtained for 60-keV x-rays.

  16. CdZnTe x-ray detector for 30 {endash} 100 keV energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, S.-S.; Rodricks, B.; Shastri, S.D.; Montano, P.A.

    1996-07-01

    High-pressure-Bridgman (HPB) grown CdZnTe x-ray detectors 1.25-1.7 mm thick were tested using monochromatic x-rays of 30 to 100 keV generated by a high energy x-ray generator. The results were compared with a commercially available 5 cm thick NaI detector. A linear dependence of the counting rate versus the x-ray generator tube current was observed at 58.9 keV. The measured pulse height of the photopeaks shows a linear dependence on energy. Electron and hole mobility-lifetime products ({mu}{tau}) were deduced by fitting bias dependent photopeak channel numbers at 30 keV x-ray energy. Values of 2 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V and 2 x 10{sup -4}cm{sup 2}/V were obtained for {mu}{tau}{sub e} and {mu}{tau}{sub p}, respectively. The detector efficiency of CdZnTe at a 100 V bias was as high as, or higher than 90 % compared to a NaI detector. At x-ray energies higher than 70 keV, the detection efficiency becomes a dominant factor and decreases to 75 % at 100 keV.

  17. Kilopixel X-Ray Microcalorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics: Device Performance and Uniformity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckart, M. E.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Porst, J.-P.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing kilopixel arrays of TES microcalorimeters to enable high-resolution x-ray imaging spectrometers for future x-ray observatories and laboratory astrophysics experiments. Our current array design was targeted as a prototype for the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer proposed for the International X-ray Observatory, which calls for a 40×40-pixel core array of 300 micron devices with 2.5 eV energy resolution (at 6 keV). Here we present device characterization of our 32×32 arrays, including x-ray spectral performance of individual pixels within the array. We present our results in light of the understanding that our Mo/Au TESs act as weak superconducting links, causing the TES critical current (I(sub c)) and transition shape to oscillate with applied magnetic field (B). We show I(sub c)(B) measurements and discuss the uniformity of these measurements across the array, as well as implications regarding the uniformity of device noise and response. In addition, we are working to reduce pixel-to-pixel electrical and thermal crosstalk; we present recent test results from an array that has microstrip wiring and an angle-evaporated copper backside heatsinking layer, which provides copper coverage on the four sidewalls of the silicon wells beneath each pixel.

  18. Kilopixel X-Ray Microcalorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics: Device Performance and Uniformity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckart, M. E.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, F. M.

    2011-01-01

    We are developing kilo-pixel arrays of TES microcalorimeters to enable high-resolution X-ray imaging spectrometers for future X-ray observatories and laboratory astrophysics experiments. Our current array design was targeted as a prototype for the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer proposed for the International X-ray Observatory, which calls for a 40x40-pixel core array of 300 micron devices with 2.5 e V energy resolution (at 6 keV). Here we present device characterization of our 32x32 arrays, including X-ray spectral performance of individual pixels within the array. We present our results in light of the understanding that our Mo/Au TESs act as weak superconducting links, causing the TES critical current (Ic) and transition shape to oscillate with applied magnetic field (B). We show Ic(B) measurements and discuss the uniformity of these measurements across the array, as well as implications regarding the uniformity of device noise and response. In addition, we are working to reduce pixel-to-pixel electrical and thermal crosstalk; we present recent test results from an array that has microstrip wiring and an angle-evaporated Cu backside heatsinking layer, which provides Cu coverage on the four sidewalls of the silicon wells beneath each pixel.

  19. Compensational scintillation detector with a flat energy response for flash X-ray measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Liang; Quan Lin; Zhang Zhongbing; Ouyang Xiaoping; Liu Bin; Liu Jinliang

    2013-01-15

    To measure the intensity of flash X-ray sources directly, a novel scintillation detector with a fast time response and flat energy response is developed by combining film scintillators of doped ZnO crystal and fast organic scintillator together. Through compensation design, the dual-scintillator detector (DSD) achieved a flat energy response to X-rays from tens of keV to several MeV, and sub-nanosecond time response by coupling to ultrafast photo-electronic devices. A prototype detector was fabricated according to the theoretical design; it employed ZnO:In and EJ228 with thicknesses of 0.3 mm and 0.1 mm, respectively. The energy response of this detector was tested on monoenergetic X-ray and {gamma}-ray sources. The detector performs very well with a sensitivity fluctuation below 5% for 8 discrete energy points within the 40-250 keV energy region and for other energies of 662 keV and 1.25 MeV as well, showing good accordance with the theoretical design. Additionally, the detector works properly for the application to the flash X-ray radiation field absolute intensity measurement. This DSD may be very useful for the diagnosis of time-resolved dynamic physical processes of flash X-ray sources without knowing the exact energy spectrum.

  20. Compensational scintillation detector with a flat energy response for flash X-ray measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jinliang; Quan, Lin; Zhang, Zhongbing

    2013-01-01

    To measure the intensity of flash X-ray sources directly, a novel scintillation detector with a fast time response and flat energy response is developed by combining film scintillators of doped ZnO crystal and fast organic scintillator together. Through compensation design, the dual-scintillator detector (DSD) achieved a flat energy response to X-rays from tens of keV to several MeV, and sub-nanosecond time response by coupling to ultrafast photo-electronic devices. A prototype detector was fabricated according to the theoretical design; it employed ZnO:In and EJ228 with thicknesses of 0.3 mm and 0.1 mm, respectively. The energy response of this detector was tested on monoenergetic X-ray and γ-ray sources. The detector performs very well with a sensitivity fluctuation below 5% for 8 discrete energy points within the 40-250 keV energy region and for other energies of 662 keV and 1.25 MeV as well, showing good accordance with the theoretical design. Additionally, the detector works properly for the application to the flash X-ray radiation field absolute intensity measurement. This DSD may be very useful for the diagnosis of time-resolved dynamic physical processes of flash X-ray sources without knowing the exact energy spectrum.

  1. Compensational scintillation detector with a flat energy response for flash X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jinliang; Quan, Lin; Zhang, Zhongbing

    2013-01-01

    To measure the intensity of flash X-ray sources directly, a novel scintillation detector with a fast time response and flat energy response is developed by combining film scintillators of doped ZnO crystal and fast organic scintillator together. Through compensation design, the dual-scintillator detector (DSD) achieved a flat energy response to X-rays from tens of keV to several MeV, and sub-nanosecond time response by coupling to ultrafast photo-electronic devices. A prototype detector was fabricated according to the theoretical design; it employed ZnO:In and EJ228 with thicknesses of 0.3 mm and 0.1 mm, respectively. The energy response of this detector was tested on monoenergetic X-ray and γ-ray sources. The detector performs very well with a sensitivity fluctuation below 5% for 8 discrete energy points within the 40-250 keV energy region and for other energies of 662 keV and 1.25 MeV as well, showing good accordance with the theoretical design. Additionally, the detector works properly for the application to the flash X-ray radiation field absolute intensity measurement. This DSD may be very useful for the diagnosis of time-resolved dynamic physical processes of flash X-ray sources without knowing the exact energy spectrum.

  2. A new miniature microchannel plate X-ray detector for synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosemeier, Ronald G.; Green, Robert E.

    A state-of-the-art microchannel plate detector has been developed which allows real time X-ray imagin of X-ray diffraction as well as a radiographic phenomenon. Advantages of the device include a 50 mm X-ray input, length less than 4″, and a weight of less than 1 lb. Since the use of synchrotron radiation is greatly facilitated by the capability of remote viewing of X-ray diffraction or radiographic images in real time, a prototype electro-optical system has been designed which couples the X-ray microchannel plate detector with a solid state television camera. Advantages of the miniature, lightweight, X-ray synchroton camera include a large 50 mm X-ray input window, an output signal that is available in both analog format for display on a television monitor and in digital format for computer processing, and a completely modular design which allows all the components to be exchanged for other components optimally suited for the desired applications.

  3. Methods for characterizing x-ray detectors for use at the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Hargrove, D. R.; Glenn, S. M.; Simanovskaia, N.; Holder, J. P.; Barrios, M. A.; Hahn, D.; Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.

    2012-10-01

    Gated and streaked x-ray detectors generally require corrections in order to counteract instrumental effects in the data. The method of correcting for gain variations in gated cameras fielded at National Ignition Facility (NIF) is described. Four techniques for characterizing the gated x-ray detectors are described. The current principal method of characterizing x-ray instruments is the production of controlled x-ray emission by laser-generated plasmas as a dedicated shot at the NIF. A recently commissioned pulsed x-ray source has the potential to replace the other characterization systems. This x-ray source features a pulsed power source consisting of a Marx generator, capacitor bank that is charged in series and discharged in parallel, producing up to 300 kV. The pulsed x-ray source initially suffered from a large jitter (˜60 ns), but the recent addition of a pulsed laser to trigger the spark gap has reduced the jitter to ˜5 ns. Initial results show that this tool is a promising alternative to the other flat fielding techniques.

  4. Methods for characterizing x-ray detectors for use at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Khan, S F; Benedetti, L R; Hargrove, D R; Glenn, S M; Simanovskaia, N; Holder, J P; Barrios, M A; Hahn, D; Nagel, S R; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K

    2012-10-01

    Gated and streaked x-ray detectors generally require corrections in order to counteract instrumental effects in the data. The method of correcting for gain variations in gated cameras fielded at National Ignition Facility (NIF) is described. Four techniques for characterizing the gated x-ray detectors are described. The current principal method of characterizing x-ray instruments is the production of controlled x-ray emission by laser-generated plasmas as a dedicated shot at the NIF. A recently commissioned pulsed x-ray source has the potential to replace the other characterization systems. This x-ray source features a pulsed power source consisting of a Marx generator, capacitor bank that is charged in series and discharged in parallel, producing up to 300 kV. The pulsed x-ray source initially suffered from a large jitter (∼60 ns), but the recent addition of a pulsed laser to trigger the spark gap has reduced the jitter to ∼5 ns. Initial results show that this tool is a promising alternative to the other flat fielding techniques. PMID:23126940

  5. X-ray position detector and implementation in a mirror pointing servo system

    DOEpatents

    Rabedeau, Thomas A.; Van Campen, Douglas G.; Stefan, Peter M.

    2016-04-05

    An X-ray beam position and stability detector is provided having a first metal blade collinear with a second metal blade, where an edge of the first metal blade is opposite an edge of the second metal blade, where the first metal blade edge and the second metal blade edge are disposed along a centerline with respect to each other, where the metal blades are capable of photoelectron emission when exposed to an x-ray beam, a metal coating on the metal blades that is capable of enhancing the photoelectron emission, or suppressing energy-resonant contaminants, or enhancing the photoelectron emission and suppressing energy-resonant contaminants, a background shielding element having an electrode capable of suppressing photoelectron emission from spurious x-rays not contained in an x-ray beam of interest, and a photoelectron emission detector having an amplifier capable of detecting the photoelectron emission as a current signal.

  6. Hard X-ray Detector Calibrations for the FOXSI Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, A.; Glesener, L.; Buitrago Casas, J. C.; Han, R.; Ishikawa, S. N.; Christe, S.; Krucker, S.

    2015-12-01

    In the study of high-energy solar flares, detailed X-ray images and spectra of the Sun are required. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket experiment is used to test direct-focusing X-ray telescopes and Double-sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSD) for solar flare study and to further understand coronal heating. The measurement of active region differential emission measures, flare temperatures, and possible quiet-Sun emission requires a precisely calibrated spectral response. This poster describes recent updates in the calibration of FOXSI's DSSDs based on new calibration tests that were performed after the second flight. The gain for each strip was recalculated using additional radioactive sources. Additionally, the varying strip sensitivity across the detectors was investigated and based on these measurements, the flight images were flatfielded. These improvements lead to more precise X-ray data for future FOXSI flights and show promise for these new technologies in imaging the Sun.

  7. Ground calibrations of the X-ray detector system of the Solar Intensity X-ray Spectrometer (SIXS) on board BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huovelin, Juhani; Lehtolainen, Arto; Genzer, Maria; Korpela, Seppo; Esko, Eero; Andersson, Hans

    2014-05-01

    SIXS includes X-ray and particle detector systems for the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). Its task is to monitor the direct solar X-rays and energetic particles in a wide field of view in the energy range of 1-20 keV (X-rays), 0.1-3 MeV (electrons) and 1-30 MeV (protons). The main purpose of these measurements is to provide quantitative information on the high energy radiation incident on Mercury's surface which causes the X-ray glow of the planet measured by the MIXS instrument. The X-ray and particle measurements of SIXS are also useful for investigations of the solar corona and the magnetosphere of Mercury. The ground calibrations of the X-ray detectors of the SIXS flight model were carried out in the X-ray laboratory of the Helsinki University during May and June 2012. The aim of the ground calibrations was to characterize the performance of the SIXS instrument's three High-Purity Silicon PIN X-ray detectors and verify that they fulfil their scientific performance requirements. The calibrations included the determination of the beginning of life energy resolution at different operational temperatures, determination of the detector's sensitivity within the field of view as a function of the off-axis and roll angles, pile-up tests for determining the speed of the read out electronics, measurements of the low energy threshold of the energy scale, a cross-calibration with the SMART-1 XSM flight spare detector, and the determination of the temperature dependence of the energy scale. An X-ray tube and the detectors' internal Ti coated 55Fe calibration sources were used as primary X-ray sources. In addition, two external fluorescence sources were used as secondary X-ray sources in the determination of the energy resolutions and in the comparison calibration with the SMART-1 XSM. The calibration results show that the detectors fulfill all of the scientific performance requirements. The ground calibration data combined with the instrument house-keeping data

  8. Characterization and development of an event-driven hybrid CMOS x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Hybrid CMOS detectors (HCD) have provided great benefit to the infrared and optical fields of astronomy, and they are poised to do the same for X-ray astronomy. Infrared HCDs have already flown on the Hubble Space Telescope and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission and are slated to fly on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Hybrid CMOS X-ray detectors offer low susceptibility to radiation damage, low power consumption, and fast readout time to avoid pile-up. The fast readout time is necessary for future high throughput X-ray missions. The Speedster-EXD X-ray HCD presented in this dissertation offers new in-pixel features and reduces known noise sources seen on previous generation HCDs. The Speedster-EXD detector makes a great step forward in the development of these detectors for future space missions. This dissertation begins with an overview of future X-ray space mission concepts and their detector requirements. The background on the physics of semiconductor devices and an explanation of the detection of X-rays with these devices will be discussed followed by a discussion on CCDs and CMOS detectors. Next, hybrid CMOS X-ray detectors will be explained including their advantages and disadvantages. The Speedster-EXD detector and its new features will be outlined including its ability to only read out pixels which contain X-ray events. Test stand design and construction for the Speedster-EXD detector is outlined and the characterization of each parameter on two Speedster-EXD detectors is detailed including read noise, dark current, interpixel capacitance crosstalk (IPC), and energy resolution. Gain variation is also characterized, and a Monte Carlo simulation of its impact on energy resolution is described. This analysis shows that its effect can be successfully nullified with proper calibration, which would be important for a flight mission. Appendix B contains a study of the extreme tidal disruption event, Swift J1644+57, to search for

  9. Soft-x-ray damage to p-terphenyl coatings for detectors.

    PubMed

    Benitez, E L; Dark, M L; Husk, D E; Schnatterly, S E; Tarrio, C

    1994-04-01

    The organic phosphor p-terphenyl is used as a wavelength-converter coating in some soft-x-ray detectors. We have measured the absolute photoluminescent efficiency of p-terphenyl as a function of incident photon energy from 36 to 191 eV. We have also measured changes in the efficiency caused by soft-x-ray fluence (total photons absorbed per unit area) at several photon energies in this range. We find that efficiency drops rapidly as a function of fluence, with the rate of decrease increasing with higher soft x-ray energies.

  10. Semiconductor detector performance for low-energy x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jaklevic, J.M.; Walton, J.T.; McMurray, R.E. Jr.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1987-06-01

    Factors that limit the capabilities of semiconductor detectors at photon energies below 5 keV include energy resolution, detector efficiency, and detector-related continuum background. These properties can be controlled to a certain extent by optimal detector design and fabrication techniques. We describe measurements on the low-energy response of Si(Li) detectors obtained using a tunable, low-energy monochromatic source. Window thicknesses have been measured for a number of devices using different materials for the entry contact. The interpretation of these results in terms of existing detector window models is discussed. Results obtained using a new contact structure demonstrate that a dramatic reduction in window-related absorption in Si(Li) detectors can be achieved.

  11. Design and Performance of a TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Array for Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Haruka; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeter array for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The TES X-ray microcalorimeter has better energy resolution compared to conventional silicon drift detector and STEM-EDS utilizing a TES detector makes it possible to map the distribution of elements on a specimen in addition to analyze the composition. The requirement for a TES detector is a high counting rate (>20 kcps), wide energy band (0.5-15 keV) and good energy resolution (<10 eV) full width at half maximum. The major improvement of this development is to increase the maximum counting rate. In order to accommodate the high counting rate, we adopted an 8 × 8 format, 64-pixel array and common biasing scheme for the readout method. We did all design and fabrication of the device in house. With the device we have fabricated most recently, the pulse decay time is 40 \\upmu s which is expected to achieve 50 kcps. For a single pixel, the measured energy resolution was 7.8 eV at 5.9 keV. This device satisfies the requirements of counting rate and energy resolution, although several issues remain where the performance must be confirmed.

  12. DQE simulation of a-Se x-ray detectors using ARTEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuan; Badano, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) is one of the most important image quality metrics for evaluating the spatial resolution performance of flat-panel x-ray detectors. In this work, we simulate the DQE of amorphous selenium (a-Se) xray detectors with a detailed Monte Carlo transport code (ARTEMIS) for modeling semiconductor-based direct x-ray detectors. The transport of electron-hole pairs is achieved with a spatiotemporal model that accounts for recombination and trapping of carriers and Coulombic effects of space charge and external applied electric field. A range of x-ray energies has been simulated from 10 to 100 keV. The DQE results can be used to study the spatial resolution characteristics of detectors at different energies.

  13. Low energy x-ray response of Ge detectors with amorphous Ge entrance contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, P.N.; Rossington, C.S.; Wesela, M.F.

    1993-10-01

    The low energy x-ray response of GI detectors with amorphous GI entrance contacts has been evaluated. The spectral background due to near contact incomplete charge collection was found to consist of two components: a low level component which is insensitive to applied voltage and a high level step-like component which is voltage dependent. At high operating voltages, the high level component can be completely suppressed, resulting in background levels which are much lower than those previously observed using GI detectors with Pd surface barrier or B ion implanted contacts, and which also compare favorably to those obtained with Si(Li) x-ray detectors. The response of these detectors to {sup 55}Fe and 1.77 keV x-rays is shown. A qualitative explanation of the origins of the observed background components is presented.

  14. A robot-based detector manipulator system for a hard x-ray nanoprobe instrument.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D., Maser, J., Holt, M. , Winarski, R., Preissner, C.,Lai, B., Vogt, S., Stephenson, G.B.

    2007-11-11

    This paper presents the design of a robot-based detector manipulator for microdiffraction applications with a hard X-ray nanoprobe instrument system being constructed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) for the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) being constructed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Applications for detectors weighing from 1.5 to 100 kg were discussed in three configurations.

  15. Low-energy X-ray detection with an in-vacuum PILATUS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, Julien; Luethi, Benjamin; Ursachi, Catalin; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin

    2011-11-01

    The feasibility of using PILATUS single-X-ray-photon counting detectors for long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography was investigated by carrying out a series of experiments at Diamond Light Source. A water-cooled PILATUS 100k detector was tested in vacuum with monochromatic 3 keV X-rays on the Diamond test beamline B16. Effects of detector cooling on noise performance, energy calibration and threshold trimming were investigated. When detecting 3 keV X-rays, the electronic noise of the analogue output of pixel preamplifiers forces the threshold to be set at a higher level than the 50% energy level recommended to minimize charge-sharing effects. The influence of threshold settings at low X-ray energy was studied by characterizing the detector response to a collimated beam of 3 keV X-rays scanned across several pixels. The relationship between maximum count rate and minimum energy threshold was investigated separately for various detector gain settings.

  16. CdZnTe detector in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Satoshi; Imagawa, Kotaro

    2002-11-21

    A CdZnTe (CZT) detector was utilized in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy under clinical conditions. First, the detector response was investigated using y-rays from 241Am. The escape of secondary (Compton scattered and K fluorescent) x-rays and tailing due to carrier trapping were minor in the mammographic energy range. In addition, the transmission of primary x-rays was minimal from the results calculated using the mass attenuation coefficients of CZT. Therefore, spectral distortion in this energy range was expected to be negligible. Secondly, x-ray spectroscopy was carried out with the CZT detector. The measured spectra were in good agreement with the spectra obtained with the Compton-scatter method with a high-purity germanium detector. Moreover, the half-value layers (HVLs) calculated from the CZT spectra were consistent with the HVLs measured with an ionization chamber. The results indicate that a CZT detector can be utilized in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy without any corrections.

  17. CdZnTe detector in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Satoshi; Imagawa, Kotaro

    2002-11-01

    A CdZnTe (CZT) detector was utilized in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy under clinical conditions. First, the detector response was investigated using γ-rays from 241Am. The escape of secondary (Compton scattered and K fluorescent) x-rays and tailing due to carrier trapping were minor in the mammographic energy range. In addition, the transmission of primary x-rays was minimal from the results calculated using the mass attenuation coefficients of CZT. Therefore, spectral distortion in this energy range was expected to be negligible. Secondly, x-ray spectroscopy was carried out with the CZT detector. The measured spectra were in good agreement with the spectra obtained with the Compton-scatter method with a high-purity germanium detector. Moreover, the half-value layers (HVLs) calculated from the CZT spectra were consistent with the HVLs measured with an ionization chamber. The results indicate that a CZT detector can be utilized in mammographic x-ray spectroscopy without any corrections.

  18. A semiempirical linear model of indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shih-Ying; Yang Kai; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: It is important to understand signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector when developing and optimizing imaging systems. For optimization where simulating images is necessary, this study introduces a semiempirical model to simulate projection images with user-defined x-ray fluence interaction. Methods: The signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors is characterized by statistics consistent with energy-integration of x-ray photons. For an incident x-ray spectrum, x-ray photons are attenuated and absorbed in the x-ray scintillator to produce light photons, which are coupled to photodiodes for signal readout. The signal mean and variance are linearly related to the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum by empirically determined factors. With the known first- and second-order statistics, images can be simulated by incorporating multipixel signal statistics and the modulation transfer function of the imaging system. To estimate the semiempirical input to this model, 500 projection images (using an indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector in the breast CT system) were acquired with 50-100 kilovolt (kV) x-ray spectra filtered with 0.1-mm tin (Sn), 0.2-mm copper (Cu), 1.5-mm aluminum (Al), or 0.05-mm silver (Ag). The signal mean and variance of each detector element and the noise power spectra (NPS) were calculated and incorporated into this model for accuracy. Additionally, the modulation transfer function of the detector system was physically measured and incorporated in the image simulation steps. For validation purposes, simulated and measured projection images of air scans were compared using 40 kV/0.1-mm Sn, 65 kV/0.2-mm Cu, 85 kV/1.5-mm Al, and 95 kV/0.05-mm Ag. Results: The linear relationship between the measured signal statistics and the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum was confirmed and incorporated into the model. The signal mean and variance factors were linearly related to kV for each filter material (r

  19. A Novel Integrating Solid State Detector With Segmentation For Scanning Transmission Soft X-ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feser, Michael; Jacobsen, Chris; Degeronimo, Gianluigi; Rehak, Pavel; Holl, Peter; Strueder, Lothar

    2003-03-01

    Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) with soft x-rays has unique detector requirements, which are not readily met by commercially available detectors. For implementation of dark-field and phase contrast imaging modes a segmented detector is needed with the high signal to noise ratio of a counting detector and a high detective quantum efficiency. Since the market for STXM is very small, the development of specialized detector systems relies on the collaboration with detector specialists at research facilities. We report on the successful development of a segmented silicon detector for STXM, which has been carried out in collaboration between the x-ray microscopy research group at SUNY Stony Brook, the instrumentation division at Brookhaven National Laboratory and silicon x-ray detector specialists in Germany. This project illustrates the effectiveness of such arrangements and justifies the support of future efforts in developing dedicated detectors for synchrotron radiation experiments bringing together detector experts and experimenters. The developed detector features eight separate circular segments matched to the STXM geometry. Fast charge integrating electronics have been developed to match the short pixel dwell times in a synchrotron based scanning microscope (in the ms range for the NSLS). The noise level of 5 photons RMS per integration per channel (at 520 eV photon energy) and a 1500 photon capacity (corresponding to the well depth in a CCD detector) is well matched to the characteristics of the experiment. Combining the detector signals in an appropriate way, different imaging modes (i.e. bright field, dark field or phase contrast) can be selected. We discuss recent developments on simultaneous quantitative phase and amplitude contrast imaging using this segmented detector in conjunction with a Fourier filter reconstruction technique.

  20. Two-dimensional imaging detectors for structural biology with X-ray lasers.

    PubMed

    Denes, Peter

    2014-07-17

    Our ability to harness the advances in microelectronics over the past decade(s) for X-ray detection has resulted in significant improvements in the state of the art. Biology with X-ray free-electron lasers present daunting detector challenges: all of the photons arrive at the same time, and individual high peak power pulses must be read out shot-by-shot. Direct X-ray detection in silicon pixel detectors--monolithic or hybrid--are the standard for XFELs today. For structural biology, improvements are needed for today's 10-100 Hz XFELs, and further improvements are required for tomorrow's 10+ kHz XFELs. This article will discuss detector challenges, why they arise and ways to overcome them, along with the current state of the art.

  1. Improvements in the Low Energy Collection Efficiency of Si(Li) X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox,C.; Fischer, D.; Schwartz, W.; Song, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Soft X-ray beam-line applications are of fundamental importance to material research, and commonly employ high-resolution Si(Li) detectors for energy dispersive spectroscopy. However, the measurement of X-rays below 1 keV is compromised by absorption in the material layers in front of the active crystal and a dead layer at the crystal surface. Various Schottky barrier type contacts were investigated resulting in a 40% reduction of the dead-layer thickness and a factor of two increased sensitivity at carbon K{sub {alpha}} compared to the standard Si(Li) detector. Si(Li) detectors were tested on the U7A soft X-ray beam-line at the National Synchrotron Light Source and on a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  2. Two-dimensional imaging detectors for structural biology with X-ray lasers.

    PubMed

    Denes, Peter

    2014-07-17

    Our ability to harness the advances in microelectronics over the past decade(s) for X-ray detection has resulted in significant improvements in the state of the art. Biology with X-ray free-electron lasers present daunting detector challenges: all of the photons arrive at the same time, and individual high peak power pulses must be read out shot-by-shot. Direct X-ray detection in silicon pixel detectors--monolithic or hybrid--are the standard for XFELs today. For structural biology, improvements are needed for today's 10-100 Hz XFELs, and further improvements are required for tomorrow's 10+ kHz XFELs. This article will discuss detector challenges, why they arise and ways to overcome them, along with the current state of the art. PMID:24914161

  3. Development of an X-ray pixel detector with multi-port charge-coupled device for X-ray free-electron laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kameshima, Takashi; Ono, Shun; Kudo, Togo; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Kirihara, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Hatsui, Takaki; Horigome, Toshio; Holland, Andrew; Holland, Karen; Burt, David; Murao, Hajime

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents development of an X-ray pixel detector with a multi-port charge-coupled device (MPCCD) for X-ray Free-Electron laser experiments. The fabrication process of the CCD was selected based on the X-ray radiation hardness against the estimated annual dose of 1.6 × 10{sup 14} photon/mm{sup 2}. The sensor device was optimized by maximizing the full well capacity as high as 5 Me- within 50 μm square pixels while keeping the single photon detection capability for X-ray photons higher than 6 keV and a readout speed of 60 frames/s. The system development also included a detector system for the MPCCD sensor. This paper summarizes the performance, calibration methods, and operation status.

  4. Development of an X-ray pixel detector with multi-port charge-coupled device for X-ray free-electron laser experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameshima, Takashi; Ono, Shun; Kudo, Togo; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Kirihara, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Horigome, Toshio; Holland, Andrew; Holland, Karen; Burt, David; Murao, Hajime; Hatsui, Takaki

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents development of an X-ray pixel detector with a multi-port charge-coupled device (MPCCD) for X-ray Free-Electron laser experiments. The fabrication process of the CCD was selected based on the X-ray radiation hardness against the estimated annual dose of 1.6 × 1014 photon/mm2. The sensor device was optimized by maximizing the full well capacity as high as 5 Me- within 50 μm square pixels while keeping the single photon detection capability for X-ray photons higher than 6 keV and a readout speed of 60 frames/s. The system development also included a detector system for the MPCCD sensor. This paper summarizes the performance, calibration methods, and operation status.

  5. Geant4 simulation of zinc oxide nanowires in anodized aluminum oxide template as a low energy X-ray scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Ali; Saramad, Shahyar; Setayeshi, Saeed

    2013-02-01

    In this work, ZnO nanowires in anodized aluminum oxide nanoporous template are proposed as an architecture for development of new generation of scintillator based X-ray imagers. The optical response of crystalline ordered ZnO nanowire arrays in porous anodized aluminum oxide template under 20 keV X-ray illumination is simulated using the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. The results show that anodized aluminum oxide template has a special impact as a light guide to conduct the optical photons induced by X-ray toward the detector thickness and to decrease the light scattering in detector volume. This inexpensive and effective method can significantly improve the spatial resolution in scintillator based X-ray imagers, especially in medical applications.

  6. Measurement of 238U muonic x-rays with a germanium detector setup

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, Ernst I; Jason, Andrew; Miyadera, Haruo; Hoteling, Nathan J; Heffner, Robert H; Adelmann, Andreas; Stocki, Trevor; Mitchell, Lee

    2009-01-01

    In the field of nuclear non-proliferation muon interactions with materials are of great interest. This paper describes an experiment conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland where a muon beam is stopped in a uranium target. The muons produce characteristic muonic x-rays. Muons will penetrate shielding easily and the produced characteristic x-rays can be used for positive isotope identification. Furthermore, the x-rays for uranium isotopes lie in the energy range of 6-7 MeV, which allows them to have an almost optimal mean free path in heavy shielding such as lead or steel. A measurement was conducted at PSI to prove the feasibility of detecting muonic x-rays from a large sample of depleted uranium (several kilograms) with a germanium detector. In this paper, the experimental setup and analysis of the measurement itself is presented.

  7. Fast response amplitude scintillation detector for X-ray synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementyev, E. N.; Sheromov, M. A.; Sokolov, A. S.

    1986-05-01

    The present paper describes a scintillation detector for X-ray synchrotron radiation. This detector has been created on the basis of a scintillator and a photoelectron multiplier (FEU-130) and its construction allows one to use the specific features of the time characteristics of synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring. In a given range of amplitudes, the detector electronics makes a 64-channel amplitude analysis of the FEU-130 signal strobed by the revolution frequency of an electron bunch in the storage ring ( f0 = 818 kHz). There is the possibility of operating the detector at high intensities of the monochromatic radiation incident on the scintillator. Such a possibility is directly provided by the time structure of SR and is not realizable with the use of other X-ray sources. The detector will find wide application in studies on X-ray structural analysis, transmission and fluorescent EXAFS- and XANES-spectroscopy, transmission scanning microscopy and microtomography, calibration of X-ray detectors and as a monitor on SR beams from the storage ring VEPP-4.

  8. Development of a fast multi-line x-ray CT detector for NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, T.; Nachtrab, F.; Schlechter, T.; Neubauer, H.; Mühlbauer, J.; Schröpfer, S.; Ernst, J.; Firsching, M.; Schweiger, T.; Oberst, M.; Meyer, A.; Uhlmann, N.

    2015-04-01

    Typical X-ray detectors for non-destructive testing (NDT) are line detectors or area detectors, like e.g. flat panel detectors. Multi-line detectors are currently only available in medical Computed Tomography (CT) scanners. Compared to flat panel detectors, line and multi-line detectors can achieve much higher frame rates. This allows time-resolved 3D CT scans of an object under investigation. Also, an improved image quality can be achieved due to reduced scattered radiation from object and detector themselves. Another benefit of line and multi-line detectors is that very wide detectors can be assembled easily, while flat panel detectors are usually limited to an imaging field with a size of approx. 40 × 40 cm2 at maximum. The big disadvantage of line detectors is the limited number of object slices that can be scanned simultaneously. This leads to long scan times for large objects. Volume scans with a multi-line detector are much faster, but with almost similar image quality. Due to the promising properties of multi-line detectors their application outside of medical CT would also be very interesting for NDT. However, medical CT multi-line detectors are optimized for the scanning of human bodies. Many non-medical applications require higher spatial resolutions and/or higher X-ray energies. For those non-medical applications we are developing a fast multi-line X-ray detector.In the scope of this work, we present the current state of the development of the novel detector, which includes several outstanding properties like an adjustable curved design for variable focus-detector-distances, conserving nearly uniform perpendicular irradiation over the entire detector width. Basis of the detector is a specifically designed, radiation hard CMOS imaging sensor with a pixel pitch of 200 μ m. Each pixel has an automatic in-pixel gain adjustment, which allows for both: a very high sensitivity and a wide dynamic range. The final detector is planned to have 256 lines of

  9. The high energy X-ray detector on the Ariel-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, A. R.; Coe, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Imperial College hard X-ray detector which is used to make spectral measurements in the 26 keV to 1.2 MeV energy range on celestial X-ray sources from the Ariel-5 satellite is described. Details are given of the design, calibration and in-orbit performance of the detector. A modulation process is used to detect weak signals against a background and we give details of the spectrum unfolding techniques used to convert the measured spectra into corrected incident spectra.

  10. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: Spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hajdok, G.; Battista, J. J.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2008-07-15

    The practice of diagnostic x-ray imaging has been transformed with the emergence of digital detector technology. Although digital systems offer many practical advantages over conventional film-based systems, their spatial resolution performance can be a limitation. The authors present a Monte Carlo study to determine fundamental resolution limits caused by x-ray interactions in four converter materials: Amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium, cesium iodide, and lead iodide. The ''x-ray interaction'' modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined for each material and compared in terms of the 50% MTF spatial frequency and Wagner's effective aperture for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. Several conclusions can be drawn from their Monte Carlo study. (i) In low-Z (a-Si) converters, reabsorption of Compton scatter x rays limits spatial resolution with a sharp MTF drop at very low spatial frequencies (<0.3 cycles/mm), especially above 60 keV; while in high-Z materials, reabsorption of characteristic x rays plays a dominant role, resulting in a mid-frequency (1-5 cycles/mm) MTF drop. (ii) Coherent scatter plays a minor role in the x-ray interaction MTF. (iii) The spread of energy due to secondary electron (e.g., photoelectrons) transport is significant only at very high spatial frequencies. (iv) Unlike the spread of optical light in phosphors, the spread of absorbed energy from x-ray interactions does not significantly degrade spatial resolution as converter thickness is increased. (v) The effective aperture results reported here represent fundamental spatial resolution limits of the materials tested and serve as target benchmarks for the design and development of future digital x-ray detectors.

  11. Optimizing detector geometry for trace element mapping by X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yue; Gleber, Sophie -Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Vogt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We report that trace metals play critical roles in a variety of systems, ranging from cells to photovoltaics. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy using X-ray excitation provides one of the highest sensitivities available for imaging the distribution of trace metals at sub-100 nm resolution. With the growing availability and increasing performance of synchrotron light source based instruments and X-ray nanofocusing optics, and with improvements in energy-dispersive XRF detectors, what are the factors that limit trace element detectability? To address this question, we describe an analytical model for the total signal incident on XRF detectors with various geometries, including the spectral response of energy dispersive detectors. This model agrees well with experimentally recorded X-ray fluorescence spectra, and involves much shorter calculation times than with Monte Carlo simulations. With such a model, one can estimate the signal when a trace element is illuminated with an X-ray beam, and when just the surrounding non-fluorescent material is illuminated. From this signal difference, a contrast parameter can be calculated and this can in turn be used to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for detecting a certain elemental concentration. We apply this model to the detection of trace amounts of zinc in biological materials, and to the detection of small quantities of arsenic in semiconductors. In conclusion, we conclude that increased detector collection solid angle is (nearly) always advantageous even when considering the scattered signal. However, given the choice between a smaller detector at 90° to the beam versus a larger detector at 180° (in a backscatter-like geometry), the 90° detector is better for trace element detection in thick samples, while the larger detector in 180° geometry is better suited to trace element detection in thin samples.

  12. Optimizing detector geometry for trace element mapping by X-ray fluorescence

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Yue; Gleber, Sophie -Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Vogt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We report that trace metals play critical roles in a variety of systems, ranging from cells to photovoltaics. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy using X-ray excitation provides one of the highest sensitivities available for imaging the distribution of trace metals at sub-100 nm resolution. With the growing availability and increasing performance of synchrotron light source based instruments and X-ray nanofocusing optics, and with improvements in energy-dispersive XRF detectors, what are the factors that limit trace element detectability? To address this question, we describe an analytical model for the total signal incident on XRF detectors with various geometries, including the spectral responsemore » of energy dispersive detectors. This model agrees well with experimentally recorded X-ray fluorescence spectra, and involves much shorter calculation times than with Monte Carlo simulations. With such a model, one can estimate the signal when a trace element is illuminated with an X-ray beam, and when just the surrounding non-fluorescent material is illuminated. From this signal difference, a contrast parameter can be calculated and this can in turn be used to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for detecting a certain elemental concentration. We apply this model to the detection of trace amounts of zinc in biological materials, and to the detection of small quantities of arsenic in semiconductors. In conclusion, we conclude that increased detector collection solid angle is (nearly) always advantageous even when considering the scattered signal. However, given the choice between a smaller detector at 90° to the beam versus a larger detector at 180° (in a backscatter-like geometry), the 90° detector is better for trace element detection in thick samples, while the larger detector in 180° geometry is better suited to trace element detection in thin samples.« less

  13. Optimizing detector geometry for trace element mapping by X-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Vogt, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals play critical roles in a variety of systems, ranging from cells to photovoltaics. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy using X-ray excitation provides one of the highest sensitivities available for imaging the distribution of trace metals at sub-100 nm resolution. With the growing availability and increasing performance of synchrotron light source based instruments and X-ray nanofocusing optics, and with improvements in energy-dispersive XRF detectors, what are the factors that limit trace element detectability? To address this question, we describe an analytical model for the total signal incident on XRF detectors with various geometries, including the spectral response of energy dispersive detectors. This model agrees well with experimentally recorded X-ray fluorescence spectra, and involves much shorter calculation times than with Monte Carlo simulations. With such a model, one can estimate the signal when a trace element is illuminated with an X-ray beam, and when just the surrounding non-fluorescent material is illuminated. From this signal difference, a contrast parameter can be calculated and this can in turn be used to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for detecting a certain elemental concentration. We apply this model to the detection of trace amounts of zinc in biological materials, and to the detection of small quantities of arsenic in semiconductors. We conclude that increased detector collection solid angle is (nearly) always advantageous even when considering the scattered signal. However, given the choice between a smaller detector at 90° to the beam versus a larger detector at 180° (in a backscatter-like geometry), the 90° detector is better for trace element detection in thick samples, while the larger detector in 180° geometry is better suited to trace element detection in thin samples. PMID:25600825

  14. Implosion dynamics and x-ray generation in small-diameter wire-array Z pinches.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Sotnikov, V I; Kindel, J M; Hakel, P; Mancini, R C; Astanovitskiy, A L; Haboub, A; Altemara, S D; Shevelko, A P; Kazakov, E D; Sasorov, P V

    2009-05-01

    It is known from experiments that the radiated x-ray energy appears to exceed the calculated implosion kinetic energy and Spitzer resistive heating [C. Deeney, Phys. Rev. A 44, 6762 (1991)] but possible mechanisms of the enhanced x-ray production are still being discussed. Enhanced plasma heating in small-diameter wire arrays with decreased calculated kinetic energy was investigated, and a review of experiments with cylindrical arrays of 1-16 mm in diameter on the 1 MA Zebra generator is presented in this paper. The implosion and x-ray generation in cylindrical wire arrays with different diameters were compared to find a transition from a regime where thermalization of the kinetic energy is the prevailing heating mechanism to regimes with other dominant mechanisms of plasma heating. Loads of 3-8 mm in diameter generate the highest x-ray power at the Zebra generator. The x-ray power falls in 1-2 mm loads which can be linked to the lower efficiency of plasma heating with the lack of kinetic energy. The electron temperature and density of the pinches also depend on the array diameter. In small-diameter arrays, 1-3 mm in diameter, ablating plasma accumulates in the inner volume much faster than in loads of 12-16 mm in diameter. Correlated bubblelike implosions were observed with multiframe shadowgraphy. Investigation of energy balance provides evidence for mechanisms of nonkinetic plasma heating in Z pinches. Formation and evolution of bright spots in Z pinches were studied with a time-gated pinhole camera. A comparison of x-ray images with shadowgrams shows that implosion bubbles can initiate bright spots in the pinch. Features of the implosions in small-diameter wire arrays are discussed to identify mechanisms of energy dissipation.

  15. Influence of optical gaps on signal and noise properties of luminescent screen x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas

    2004-05-01

    X-ray detection with luminescent screens requires optical signal transfer as an intermediate step between x-ray detection and conversion to an electronic signal. Luminescent screens may be granular (phosphor screens), structured (e.g. CsI) or transparent (scintillators). The optical signal is imaged with lenses, fibre optics, electron optics or by proximity focussing to an electronic detector. Poor focussing or poor optical contact may degrade the signal and noise transfer characteristics, i.e. modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The case when x-rays are detected with granular luminescent screens, imaged onto flat panel electronic detectors is considered here. The detector assembly often requires layers of glue or protective thin films creating optical gaps, in which light is spread, hence spatial resolution is degraded. The noise spectrum is not necessarily changed the same way. Its exact shape depends on the dominant noise sources in a given detector configuration under the specific operating conditions: The noise of the primary x-ray quanta, noise aliasing and direct x-ray detection by the electronic detection layer are the main contributions in this investigation. Especially at high spatial frequencies small optical gaps in conjunction with white quantum noise from direct x-ray absorption of the electronic imager degrade DQE: A gap of 40 μm between luminescent screen and detector reduces the DQE by 33% at the Nyquist frequency. This was demonstrated with an a-Si imager of 143-μm pixel size and a Lanex Fine luminescent screen operated at 100 kV.

  16. Bismuth Passivation Technique for High-Resolution X-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, James; Hess, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Athena-plus team requires X-ray sensors with energy resolution of better than one part in 3,000 at 6 keV X-rays. While bismuth is an excellent material for high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity (for large signal when an X-ray is stopped by the absorber), oxidation of the bismuth surface can lead to electron traps and other effects that degrade the energy resolution. Bismuth oxide reduction and nitride passivation techniques analogous to those used in indium passivation are being applied in a new technique. The technique will enable improved energy resolution and resistance to aging in bismuth-absorber-coupled X-ray sensors. Elemental bismuth is lithographically integrated into X-ray detector circuits. It encounters several steps where the Bi oxidizes. The technology discussed here will remove oxide from the surface of the Bi and replace it with nitridized surface. Removal of the native oxide and passivating to prevent the growth of the oxide will improve detector performance and insulate the detector against future degradation from oxide growth. Placing the Bi coated sensor in a vacuum system, a reduction chemistry in a plasma (nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) + argon) is used to remove the oxide and promote nitridization of the cleaned Bi surface. Once passivated, the Bi will perform as a better X-ray thermalizer since energy will not be trapped in the bismuth oxides on the surface. A simple additional step, which can be added at various stages of the current fabrication process, can then be applied to encapsulate the Bi film. After plasma passivation, the Bi can be capped with a non-diffusive layer of metal or dielectric. A non-superconducting layer is required such as tungsten or tungsten nitride (WNx).

  17. Digital performance improvements of a CdTe pixel detector for high flux energy-resolved X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbene, L.; Gerardi, G.; Principato, F.

    2015-03-01

    Photon counting detectors with energy resolving capabilities are desired for high flux X-ray imaging. In this work, we present the performance of a pixelated Schottky Al/p-CdTe/Pt detector (4×4) coupled to a custom-designed digital readout electronics for high flux measurements. The detector (4×4×2 mm3) has an anode layout based on an array of 16 pixels with a geometric pitch of 1 mm (pixel size of 0.6 mm). The 4-channel readout electronics is able to continuously digitize and process the signals from each pixel, performing multi-parameter analysis (event arrival time, pulse shape, pulse height, pulse time width, etc.) even at high fluxes and at different throughput and energy resolution conditions. The spectroscopic response of the system to monochromatic X-ray sources, at both low and high rates, is presented with particular attention to the mitigation of some typical spectral distortions (pile-up, baseline shifts and charge sharing). At a photon counting rate of 520 kcps/pixel, the system exhibits an energy resolution (FWHM at 59.5 keV) of 4.6%, 7.1% and 9% at throughputs of 0.9%, 16% and 82%, respectively. Measurements of Ag-target X-ray spectra also show the ability of the system to perform accurate estimation of the input counting rate up to 1.1 Mcps/pixel. The aim of this work is to point out, beside the appealing properties of CdTe detectors, the benefits of the digital approach in the development of high-performance energy resolved photon counting (ERPC) systems for high flux X-ray imaging.

  18. Cascaded-systems analyses of photon-counting x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2013-03-01

    Single-photon counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable new advanced energy-dependent methods. Recently, cascaded systems analysis (CSA) has been extended to the description of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of SPC detectors. In this article we apply the new CSA approach to the description of the DQE of hypothetical direct-conversion selenium (Sc) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTc) detectors including the effects of poly-energetic x-ray spectra, stochastic conversion of x-ray energy to electron­ hole (c-h) pairs, depth-dependent collection of e-h pairs using the Hecht relation, additive electronic noise, and thresholding. Comparisons arc made to an energy-integrating model. For this simple model, with the exception of thick (1- 10 mm) Sc-bascd convertors, we found that the SPC DQE was 5-20 %greater than that of the energy­ integrating model. This trend was tnw even when additive noise was included in the SPC model and excluded from the energy-integrating model. However, the DQE of SPC detectors with poor collection efficiency (such as thick (<1 mm) Sc detectors) and high levels of additive noise can be degraded by 40-90 % for all energies and x-ray spectra considered. vVhile photon-counting approaches arc not yet ready for routine diagnostic imaging, the available DQE is equal to or higher than that of conventional energy-integrating detectors under a wide range of x-ray energies and convertor thickness. However, like energy-integrating detectors, the DQE of SPC detectors will be degraded by the combination of poor collection efficiency and high levels of additive noise.

  19. Comparing performances of a CdTe X-ray spectroscopic detector and an X-ray dual-energy sandwich detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorecki, A.; Brambilla, A.; Moulin, V.; Gaborieau, E.; Radisson, P.; Verger, L.

    2013-11-01

    Multi-energy (ME) detectors are becoming a serious alternative to classical dual-energy sandwich (DE-S) detectors for X-ray applications such as medical imaging or explosive detection. They can use the full X-ray spectrum of irradiated materials, rather than disposing only of low and high energy measurements, which may be mixed. In this article, we intend to compare both simulated and real industrial detection systems, operating at a high count rate, independently of the dimensions of the measurements and independently of any signal processing methods. Simulations or prototypes of similar detectors have already been compared (see [1] for instance), but never independently of estimation methods and never with real detectors. We have simulated both an ME detector made of CdTe - based on the characteristics of the MultiX ME100 and - a DE-S detector - based on the characteristics of the Detection Technology's X-Card 1.5-64DE model. These detectors were compared to a perfect spectroscopic detector and an optimal DE-S detector. For comparison purposes, two approaches were investigated. The first approach addresses how to distinguise signals, while the second relates to identifying materials. Performance criteria were defined and comparisons were made over a range of material thicknesses and with different photon statistics. Experimental measurements in a specific configuration were acquired to checks simulations. Results showed good agreement between the ME simulation and the ME100 detector. Both criteria seem to be equivalent, and the ME detector performs 3.5 times better than the DE-S detector with same photon statistics based on simulations and experimental measurements. Regardless of the photon statistics ME detectors appeared more efficient than DE-S detectors for all material thicknesses between 1 and 9 cm when measuring plastics with an attenuation signature close that of explosive materials. This translates into an improved false detection rate (FDR): DE

  20. Dark field X-ray microscopy: the effects of condenser/detector aperture.

    PubMed

    Vogt, S; Chapman, H N; Jacobsen, C; Medenwaldt, R

    2001-03-01

    In order to visualize the functionality of a biological cell, it is often desirable to label specific proteins. In this work we concentrate on the optical theory of visualizing colloidal gold labels with soft X-ray microscopes, where scattering from small gold spheres used as labels dominates the image. Using numerical simulations of bright and dark field imaging, we compare different configurations of condenser and objective lenses in transmission X-ray microscopes, and configurations of detector and objective lens in scanning transmission X-ray microscopes. It is verified that the contrast of small, closely spaced features is strongly affected by changes in these configurations; the optimum situation is to have the condenser aperture (in TXM) or detector aperture (in STXM) equal to 3/2 that of the objective numerical aperture. PMID:11310539

  1. Two-dimensional imaging detectors for structural biology with X-ray lasers

    PubMed Central

    Denes, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to harness the advances in microelectronics over the past decade(s) for X-ray detection has resulted in significant improvements in the state of the art. Biology with X-ray free-electron lasers present daunting detector challenges: all of the photons arrive at the same time, and individual high peak power pulses must be read out shot-by-shot. Direct X-ray detection in silicon pixel detectors—monolithic or hybrid—are the standard for XFELs today. For structural biology, improvements are needed for today's 10–100 Hz XFELs, and further improvements are required for tomorrow's 10+ kHz XFELs. This article will discuss detector challenges, why they arise and ways to overcome them, along with the current state of the art. PMID:24914161

  2. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: frequency-dependent Swank noise.

    PubMed

    Hajdok, G; Battista, J J; Cunningham, I A

    2008-07-01

    A frequency-dependent x-ray Swank factor based on the "x-ray interaction" modulation transfer function and normalized noise power spectrum is determined from a Monte Carlo analysis. This factor was calculated in four converter materials: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se), cesium iodide (CsI), and lead iodide (PbI2) for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. When scaled by the quantum efficiency, the x-ray Swank factor describes the best possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE) a detector can have. As such, this x-ray interaction DQE provides a target performance benchmark. It is expressed as a function of (Fourier-based) spatial frequency and takes into consideration signal and noise correlations introduced by reabsorption of Compton scatter and photoelectric characteristic emissions. It is shown that the x-ray Swank factor is largely insensitive to converter thickness for quantum efficiency values greater than 0.5. Thus, while most of the tabulated values correspond to thick converters with a quantum efficiency of 0.99, they are appropriate to use for many detectors in current use. A simple expression for the x-ray interaction DQE of digital detectors (including noise aliasing) is derived in terms of the quantum efficiency, x-ray Swank factor, detector element size, and fill factor. Good agreement is shown with DQE curves published by other investigators for each converter material, and the conditions required to achieve this ideal performance are discussed. For high-resolution imaging applications, the x-ray Swank factor indicates: (i) a-Si should only be used at low-energy (e.g., mammography); (ii) a-Se has the most promise for any application below 100 keV; and (iii) while quantum efficiency may be increased at energies just above the K edge in CsI and PbI2, this benefit is offset by a substantial drop in the x-ray Swank factor, particularly at high spatial frequencies.

  3. Possibility of gated silicon drift detector detecting hard x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hideharu; Fukushima, Shinya; Sakurai, Shungo; Ishikawa, Shohei; Takeshita, Akinobu; Hidaka, Atsuki

    2015-08-01

    One of the authors has proposed a simple-structure silicon X-ray detector (gated silicon drift detector: GSDD), whose structure is much simpler than commercial silicon drift detectors (SDDs). SDDs contain multiple built-in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) or implanted resistors, whose fabrication processes lower the yield rate of detectors, and also require at least two high-voltage sources. On the other hand, GSDDs do not contain built-in MOSFETs or implanted resistors. Moreover, GSDDs require only one high-voltage source. Therefore, GSDDs greatly reduce the cost of the X-ray detection system. We fabricated prototype GSDDs that contained 0.625-mm-thick Si substrates with an active area of 18 mm2, operated by Peltier cooling and a single voltage source. Its energy resolution at 5.9 keV from an 55Fe source was 145 eV at -38°C and -90°V. Thicker Si substrates are required to enhance its absorption of X-rays. To detect X-ray photons with energies up to 77 keV for X-ray absorbance higher than 15%, we simulate the electric potential distribution in GSDDs with Si thicknesses from 0.625 to 3.0 mm. We obtain an adequate electric potential distribution in the thicknesses of up to 3.0 mm, and the capacitance of the GSDD remains small and its X-ray count rate remain high. The high reverse bias required in the 3-mm-thick GSDD was a third of that in a 3-mm-thick pin diode.

  4. Counting x-ray line detector with monolithically integrated readout circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, T.; Krüger, P.; Heuer, H.; Oppermann, M.; Torlee, H.; Meyendorf, N.

    2013-05-01

    The developed direct converting X-ray line detectors offer a number of advantages in comparison to other X-ray sensor concepts. Direct converting X-ray detectors are based on absorption of X-rays in semiconductor material, which leads to a generation of charge carriers. By applying high bias voltage charge carriers can be separated and with this the arising current pulse can be assessed by suitable readout integrated circuits (ICs) subsequently. The X-ray absorber itself is implemented as a diode based on GaAs to use it in the reverse direction. It exhibits low dark currents and can therefore be used at room temperatures. The GaAs absorber has a structured top electrode designed on variable bonding and high breakdown voltages. The implemented GaAs absorber exhibits a pixel size of 100 μm while the readout IC features fast dead-time-free readout, energy discrimination by two individually adjustable thresholds with 20 bit deep counters and radiation-hard design on chip level. These properties guarantee the application as fast and thus sensitive line detector for imaging processes. Another advantage of the imaging line detector is the cascadability of several sensor modules with 1024 pixels each. This property ensures that the 102.4 mm long sensor modules can be concatenated virtually with arbitrary length gaplessly. The readout ICs hitting radiation dose can be further minimized by implementing constructive steps to ensure longer lifetime of the sensor module. Furthermore, first results using the introduced sensor module for solid state X-ray detection are discussed.

  5. Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ejima, Takeo; Ogasawara, Shodo; Hatano, Tadashi; Yanagihara, Mihiro; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    A new two-dimensional (2D) detector for detecting soft X-ray (SX) images was developed. The detector has a scintillator plate to convert a SX image into a visible (VI) one, and a relay optics to magnify and detect the converted VI image. In advance of the fabrication of the detector, quantum efficiencies of scintillators were investigated. As a result, a Ce:LYSO single crystal on which Zr thin film was deposited was used as an image conversion plate. The spatial resolution of fabricated detector is 3.0 {mu}m, and the wavelength range which the detector has sensitivity is 30-6 nm region.

  6. New configuration of photoconductive-type diamond detector head for X-ray beam position monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Hideki; Kudo, Togo; Tanida, Hajime; Kitamura, Hideo

    2004-05-01

    We designed and fabricated new diamond detector head for an X-ray beam position monitor (XBPM). This monitor operates in photoconductive mode, and is shaped into a blade in order to reduce heat load. A pair of aluminum electrodes is formed on both sides of the diamond blade. The profile of the detection efficiency inside the diamond detector head was measured. The signal current is generated only between the pair of electrodes. The bias voltage dependence of signal current along a section of the detector head is also measured. The results show that the detector head operates in photoconductive mode. We demonstrated that this detector head is feasible for the XBPM.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aluminum z-pinch plasma with tungsten backlighter planar wire array source.

    PubMed

    Osborne, G C; Kantsyrev, V L; Safronova, A S; Esaulov, A A; Weller, M E; Shrestha, I; Shlyaptseva, V V; Ouart, N D

    2012-10-01

    Absorption features from K-shell aluminum z-pinch plasmas have recently been studied on Zebra, the 1.7 MA pulse power generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. In particular, tungsten plasma has been used as a semi-backlighter source in the generation of aluminum K-shell absorption spectra by placing a single Al wire at or near the end of a single planar W array. All spectroscopic experimental results were recorded using a time-integrated, spatially resolved convex potassium hydrogen phthalate (KAP) crystal spectrometer. Other diagnostics used to study these plasmas included x-ray detectors, optical imaging, laser shadowgraphy, and time-gated and time-integrated x-ray pinhole imagers. Through comparisons with previous publications, Al K-shell absorption lines are shown to be from much lower electron temperature (∼10-40 eV) plasmas than emission spectra (∼350-500 eV).

  8. Alternative Optimizations of X-ray TES Arrays: Soft X-rays, High Count Rates, and Mixed-Pixel Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Smith, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) for imaging spectroscopy telescopes such as the XMS on Constellation-X. While our primary focus has been on arrays that meet the XMS requirements (of which, foremost, is an energy resolution of 2.5 eV at 6 keV and a bandpass from approx. 0.3 keV to 12 keV), we have also investigated other optimizations that might be used to extend the XMS capabilities. In one of these optimizations, improved resolution below 1 keV is achieved by reducing the heat capacity. Such pixels can be based on our XMS-style TES's with the separate absorbers omitted. These pixels can added to an array with broadband response either as a separate array or interspersed, depending on other factors that include telescope design and science requirements. In one version of this approach, we have designed and fabricated a composite array of low-energy and broad-band pixels to provide high spectral resolving power over a broader energy bandpass than could be obtained with a single TES design. The array consists of alternating pixels with and without overhanging absorbers. To explore optimizations for higher count rates, we are also optimizing the design and operating temperature of pixels that are coupled to a solid substrate. We will present the performance of these variations and discuss other optimizations that could be used to enhance the XMS or enable other astrophysics experiments.

  9. Development of edgeless TSV X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarajlić, M.; Zhang, J.; Pennicard, D.; Smoljanin, S.; Fritzsch, T.; Wilke, M.; Zoschke, K.; Graafsma, H.

    2016-02-01

    We report about the activity and progress on the development of TSV edgeless detectors at DESY. One part of the development is Through Silicon Via (TSV) technology for the Medipix3RX readout chip (ROC). TSV technology is a concept of connecting readout chips to readout electronics. Instead of wire-bonding which introduces a large dead area, TSV enables connection through the ROC itself. By replacing wire-bonding with TSV, the dead space between detector modules will be reduced from around 7 mm to only 1.6 mm. The thickness of the wafer will be 200 μ m, with a via diameter of 60 μ m. Inside of the via, a 5 μ m thick copper layer will be used as a conducting layer. On the back side of the chip a Redistribution Layer (RDL) will be deposited. For the RDL structure, 5 μ m thick copper with 40 μ m wide conductive lines will be used. Bump bonding of the sensor plus ROC assembly to ceramic readout board will be optimized in terms of material and bonding temperature. The second part of the project is the development of the edgeless sensor units using active edge sensor technology. Active edge sensors have been simulated with Synopsys TCAD for different polarities including p-on-n, p-on-p, n-on-p and n-on-n with p-spray or p-stop for different thicknesses from 150 μ m to 500 μ m. Results show that the bending of the electric field close to the active edge is leading to image distortion on the sensor edge. In addition, the current design of active-edge sensors shows very poor radiation hardness. We are currently working on the development of a radiation hard active-edge sensor with optimized imaging quality. The final goal of this development is to make Large Area Medipix Detector (LAMBDA) with TSV edgeless units.

  10. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  11. Sensitive X-ray detectors made of methylammonium lead tribromide perovskite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Haotong; Fang, Yanjun; Mulligan, Padhraic; Chuirazzi, William; Fang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Congcong; Ecker, Benjamin R.; Gao, Yongli; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Cao, Lei; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-05-01

    The large mobilities and carrier lifetimes of hybrid perovskite single crystals and the high atomic numbers of Pb, I and Br make them ideal for X-ray and gamma-ray detection. Here, we report a sensitive X-ray detector made of methylammonium lead bromide perovskite single crystals. A record-high mobility-lifetime product of 1.2 × 10-2 cm2 V-1 and an extremely small surface charge recombination velocity of 64 cm s-1 are realized by reducing the bulk defects and passivating surface traps. Single-crystal devices with a thickness of 2-3 mm show 16.4% detection efficiency at near zero bias under irradiation with continuum X-ray energy up to 50 keV. The lowest detectable X-ray dose rate is 0.5 μGyair s-1 with a sensitivity of 80 μC Gy-1air cm-2, which is four times higher than the sensitivity achieved with α-Se X-ray detectors. This allows the radiation dose applied to a human body to be reduced for many medical and security check applications.

  12. X-ray light valve (XLV): a novel detectors' technology for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcovici, Sorin; Sukhovatkin, Vlad; Oakham, Peter

    2014-03-01

    A novel method, based on X-ray Light Valve (XLV) technology, is proposed for making good image quality yet inexpensive flat panel detectors for digital mammography. The digital mammography markets, particularly in the developing countries, demand quality machines at substantially lower prices than the ones available today. Continuous pressure is applied on x-ray detectors' manufacturers to reduce the flat panel detectors' prices. XLV presents a unique opportunity to achieve the needed price - performance characteristics for direct conversion, x-ray detectors. The XLV based detectors combine the proven, superior, spatial resolution of a-Se with the simplicity and low cost of liquid crystals and optical scanning. The x-ray quanta absorbed by a 200 μm a-Se produce electron - hole pairs that move under an electric field to the top and bottom of a-Se layer. This 2D charge distribution creates at the interface with the liquid crystals a continuous (analog) charge image corresponding to the impinging radiation's information. Under the influence of local electrical charges next to them, the liquid crystals twist proportionally to the charges and vary their light reflectivity. A scanning light source illuminates the liquid crystals while an associated, pixilated photo-detector, having a 42 μm pixel size, captures the light reflected by the liquid crystals and converts it in16 bit words that are transmitted to the machine for image processing and display. The paper will describe a novel XLV, 25 cm x 30 cm, flat panel detector structure and its underlying physics as well as its preliminary performance measured on several engineering prototypes. In particular, the paper will present the results of measuring XLV detectors' DQE, MTF, dynamic range, low contrast resolution and dynamic behavior. Finally, the paper will introduce the new, low cost, XLV detector based, digital mammography machine under development at XLV Diagnostics Inc.

  13. Hard X-ray and γ-ray detectors for the NeXT mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tadayuki; Makishima, Kazuo; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kokubun, Motohide; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nomachi, Masaharu; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Tashiro, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu

    2004-02-01

    When compared with X-ray astronomy, the γ-ray astronomy, especially in the energy band from 10 keV to several MeV, is still immature and significant improvements should be done to obtain sensitivity comparable to that achieved in the energy band below 10 keV. In order to fill this "sensitivity gap", the NeXT (New X-ray Telescope) mission has been proposed as a successor of the Astro-E2 mission. The high-energy response of the super mirror will enable us to perform first sensitive imaging observation up to 80 keV. One idea for the focal plane detector is to combine a fully depleted X-ray imaging device (soft X-ray detector) and a pixelated CdTe (cadmium telluride) detector. In the soft γ-ray band upto ˜1 MeV, a narrow field-of-view Compton γ-ray telescope utilizing several tens of layers of thin Si or CdTe detector has been proposed to obtain much higher sensitivity than present instruments.

  14. Component Level Modular Design of a Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier for an M×N Array

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Qu, Bin; Sharma, Prateek; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Wang, Weiyuan; Titus, Albert H.; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The Solid-State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is a novel dynamic x-ray imager, based on an array of electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs), that can significantly improve performance compared to conventional x-ray image intensifiers (XIIs) and flat panel detectors (FPDs). To expand the field-of-view (FOV) of the SSXII detectors while maintaining high resolution, a scalable component level modular design is presented. Each module can be fit together with minimum dead-space and optically coupled to one contiguous x-ray converter plate. The electronics of each of the modules consists of a detachable head-board, on which is mounted the EMCCD, and a driver board. The size of the head-boards is minimized to ensure that the modules fit together properly. The driver boards connect with the head-boards via flat cables and are designed to be plugged into the main mother-board that contains an FPGA chip that generates the driving clock signals for the EMCCDs and analog-to-digital converter (ADC). At the front-end, a high speed ADC on each of the driver boards samples and digitizes the EMCCD analog output signal and an extensible modular digital multiplexer back-end is used to acquire and combine image data from multiple modules. The combined digital data is then transmitted to a PC via a standard Camera Link interface. Eventually, this modular design will be extended to a 3×3 or larger array to accomplish full clinical FOVs and enable the SSXII to replace conventional lower-resolution XIIs or FPDs. PMID:23505331

  15. Use of mercuric iodide X-ray detectors with alpha backscattering spectrometers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Wang, Y. J.; Dorri, N.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Economou, T. E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra of different extraterrestrial samples taken with a mercuric iodide (HgI2) spectrometer inserted into an alpha backscattering instrument identical to that used in the Soviet Phobos mission. The results obtained with the HgI2 ambient temperature detector are compared with those obtained using an Si(Li) cryogenically cooled detector. Efforts to design an optimized instrument for space application are also described. The results presented indicate that the energy resolution and sensitivity of HgI2 detectors are adequate to meet the performance needs of a number of proposed space applications, particularly those in which cooled silicon X-ray detectors are impractical or even not usable, such as for the target science programs on geoscience opportunities for lunar surface, Mars surface, and other comet and planetary missions being planned by NASA and ESA.

  16. Development of Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detector with High Absorption Yields Utilizing Silicon Pixel Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiki, Shigetomo; Fujii, Go; Ukibe, Masahiro; Kitajima, Yoshinori; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2016-07-01

    A superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) array detector along with silicon pixel absorbers (STJ-SPA) is fabricated to achieve high detection efficiency at X-ray energies below 10 keV. The STJ pixels have dimensions of 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and are composed of Nb-Al/AlOX/Al-Nb thin layers. The SPAs are also 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and have a depth of 400 \\upmu m, and are isolated from each other by a deep trench with a depth of 350 \\upmu m. The detection efficiency of the STJ-SPA exceeds 95 % at X-ray energies below 10 keV, and its energy resolution is 82 eV FWHM, as measured at the Si K\\upalpha line at 1740 eV. By means of the STJ-SPA detector, the X-ray absorption spectrum of the light element sulfur with a concentration of less than 0.1 wt% in a soda-lime glass sample was successfully acquired.

  17. Unique X-ray emission characteristics from volumetrically heated nanowire array plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, J. J.; Bargsten, C.; Hollinger, R.; Shlyaptsev, V.; Pukhov, A.; Kaymak, V.; Capeluto, G.; Keiss, D.; Townsend, A.; Rockwood, A.; Wang, Y.; Wang, S.

    2015-11-01

    Highly anisotropic emission of hard X-ray radiation (h ν >10 keV) is observed when arrays of ordered nanowires (50 nm diameter wires of Au or Ni) are volumetrically heated by normal incidence irradiation with high contrast 50-60 fs laser pulses of relativistic intensity. The annular emission is in contrast with angular distribution of softer X-rays (h ν >1 KeV) from these targets and with the X-ray radiation emitted by polished flat targets, both of which are nearly isotropic. Model computations that make use the electron energy distribution computed by particle-in-cell simulations show that the unexpected annular distribution of the hard x-rays is the result of bremsstrahlung from fast electrons. Volumetric heating of Au nanowire arrays irradiated with an intensity of 2 x 10 19 W cm-2 is measured to convert laser energy into h ν>1KeV photons with a record efficiency of >8 percent into 2 π, creating a bright picosecond X-ray source for applications. Work supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science of the U.S Department of Energy, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. A.P was supported by DFG project TR18.

  18. Fabrication of an x-ray detector based on molecular plastic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paez-Sierra, Beynor A.; Rodríguez, Hernán.; Sánchez, Juan M.; Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Pérez, Leon D.

    2014-10-01

    We present an organic X-ray detector with an active layer deposited from a novel semiconducting ink formulation. The precursor ink consists of blended poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT), phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and the organometallic nanostructure copper(II) 2,2'-bipyridine (Cu(II)BPY). The use of ligands like 2,2' byripidine with cationic species such as Cu(II) improves their solubility in organic solvents. The purpose of the organometallic complex Cu(II)BPY is twofold: to achieve a homogeneous semiconducting ink with P3HT:PCBM blends and to enhance the X-ray interaction with the organic layer through the Cu(II) cation. Our X-ray displays consist of several pixels, each with vertical structures comprising a bendable PET/ITO substrate with a spin-coated semiconducting ink of P3HT:PCBM:Cu(II)BPY (60 nm), followed by thermal evaporation of Al (100 nm) contacts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example where an organic X-ray detector includes the organometallic complex Cu(II)BPY in P3HT:PCBM blends, and the electrical characterization of the detector is carried out by impedance spectroscopy (IS). In order to test the devices, each pixel is exposed to X-ray energies ranging from 0 keV to 35 keV and characterized by impedance spectroscopy (IS). Impedance spectra were recorded at frequencies between 20 Hz and 20 kHz and at a modulating signal of 50 mV. Analysis of IS measurements revealed a linear dependence between impedance and X-ray energy. IS analysis is more sensitive compared with standard photocurrent-voltage characteristics.

  19. Firmware lower-level discrimination and compression applied to streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy area-detector data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, T.; Fernandez, P.; Jemian, P.; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A. R.; Sikorski, M.; Sprung, M.; Weizeorick, J.

    2011-07-01

    We present a data acquisition system to perform on-the-fly background subtraction and lower-level discrimination compression of streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data from a fast charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector. The system is built using a commercial frame grabber with an on-board field-programmable gate array. The system is capable of continuously processing at least 60 CCD frames per second each consisting of 1024 × 1024 16-bit pixels with ≲ 15 000 photon hits per frame at a maximum compression factor of ≈95%.

  20. Firmware lower-level discrimination and compression applied to streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy area-detector data.

    PubMed

    Madden, T; Fernandez, P; Jemian, P; Narayanan, S; Sandy, A R; Sikorski, M; Sprung, M; Weizeorick, J

    2011-07-01

    We present a data acquisition system to perform on-the-fly background subtraction and lower-level discrimination compression of streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data from a fast charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector. The system is built using a commercial frame grabber with an on-board field-programmable gate array. The system is capable of continuously processing at least 60 CCD frames per second each consisting of 1024 × 1024 16-bit pixels with ≲ 15,000 photon hits per frame at a maximum compression factor of ≈95%.

  1. Firmware lower-level discrimination and compression applied to streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy area-detector data

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, T.; Fernandez, P.; Jemian, P.; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A. R.; Sikorski, M.; Sprung, M.; Weizeorick, J.

    2011-07-15

    We present a data acquisition system to perform on-the-fly background subtraction and lower-level discrimination compression of streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data from a fast charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector. The system is built using a commercial frame grabber with an on-board field-programmable gate array. The system is capable of continuously processing at least 60 CCD frames per second each consisting of 1024 x 1024 16-bit pixels with < or approx. 15 000 photon hits per frame at a maximum compression factor of {approx_equal}95%.

  2. CdTe X-ray detectors under strong optical irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cola, Adriano; Farella, Isabella

    2014-11-17

    The perturbation behaviour of Ohmic and Schottky CdTe detectors under strong optical pulses is investigated. To this scope, the electric field profiles and the induced charge transients are measured, thus simultaneously addressing fixed and free charges properties, interrelated by one-carrier trapping. The results elucidate the different roles of the contacts and deep levels, both under dark and strong irradiation conditions, and pave the way for the improvement of detector performance control under high X-ray fluxes.

  3. Use of mercuric iodide x-ray detectors with alpha backscattering spectrometers for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Wang, Y.J.; Dorri, N.; Dabrowski, A.J. ); Economou, T.E.; Turkevich, A.L. . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra of different extraterrestrial samples taken with a mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) spectrometer inserted into an Alpha Backscattering Instrument identical to that used in the Soviet Phobos Mission. The results obtained with the HgI{sub 2} ambient temperature detector are compared with those obtained using a Si(Li) cryogenically cooled detector. The authors' efforts to design an optimized instrument for space application are described.

  4. X-ray inspection of composite materials for aircraft structures using detectors of Medipix type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandejsek, I.; Jakubek, J.; Jakubek, M.; Prucha, P.; Krejci, F.; Soukup, P.; Turecek, D.; Vavrik, D.; Zemlicka, J.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents an overview of promising X-ray imaging techniques employed for non-destructive defectoscopy inspections of composite materials intended for the Aircraft industry. The major emphasis is placed on non-tomographic imaging techniques which do not require demanding spatial and time measurement conditions. Imaging methods for defects visualisation, delamination detection and porosity measurement of various composite materials such as carbon fibre reinforced polymers and honeycomb sendwiches are proposed. We make use of the new large area WidePix X-ray imaging camera assembled from up to 100 edgeless Medipix type detectors which is highly suitable for this type of measurements.

  5. An X-ray imaging device based on a GEM detector with delay-line readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Li, Cheng; Sun, Yong-Jie; Shao, Ming

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray imaging device based on a triple-GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) detector, a fast delay-line circuit with 700 MHz cut-off frequency and two dimensional readout strips with 150 μm width on the top and 250 μm width on the bottom, is designed and tested. The localization information is derived from the propagation time of the induced signals on the readout strips. This device has a good spatial resolution of 150 μm and works stably at an intensity of 105 Hz/mm2 with 8 keV X-rays.

  6. An automatic attenuator device for x-ray detectors at high counting rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, J.; Paiser, E.; Capitan, M. J.

    2002-07-01

    In this article we describe an attenuator device for reducing/controlling the pulse detector counting losses at a high counting rate. The electronics are based on a direct measure of the detector dead time from the analog output signal at the end of the detection chain. Taking into account this parameter the attenuator device decides to reduce/enhance the number of photons that arrive at the detector by inserting/extracting the necessary number of attenuation foils in the x-ray beam path. In that way the number of events in the incoming signal are reduced and the "apparent dynamic range" of the detector is increased.

  7. A new detector system for low energy X-ray fluorescence coupled with soft X-ray microscopy: First tests and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Bufon, Jernej; Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Altissimo, Matteo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Borghes, Roberto; Carrato, Sergio; Cautero, Giuseppe; Fabiani, Sergio; Giacomini, Gabriele; Giuressi, Dario; Kourousias, George; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Picciotto, Antonino; Piemonte, Claudio; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rashevskaya, Irina; Stolfa, Andrea; Vacchi, Andrea; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Zorzi, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The last decades have witnessed substantial efforts in the development of several detector technologies for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) applications. In spite of the increasing trend towards performing, cost-effective and reliable XRF systems, detectors for soft X-ray spectroscopy still remain a challenge, requiring further study, engineering and customization in order to yield effective and efficient systems. In this paper we report on the development, first characterization and tests of a novel multielement detector system based on low leakage current silicon drift detectors (SDD) coupled to ultra low noise custom CMOS preamplifiers for synchrotron-based low energy XRF. This new system exhibits the potential for improving the count rate by at least an order of magnitude resulting in ten-fold shorter dwell time at an energy resolution similar to that of single element silicon drift detectors.

  8. A High-Speed Detector System for X-ray Fluorescence Microprobes.

    SciTech Connect

    Siddons,P.D.; Dragone, A.; De Geronimo, g.; Kuczewski, A.; Kuczewski, J.; O

    2006-10-29

    We have developed a high-speed system for collecting x-ray fluorescence microprobe data, based on ASICs developed at BNL and high-speed processors developed by CSIRO. The system can collect fluorescence data in a continuous raster scan mode, and present elemental images in real time using Ryan's Dynamic Analysis algorithm. We will present results from a 32-element prototype array illustrating the concept. The final instrument will have 384 elements arranged in a square array around a central hole.

  9. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  10. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  11. Development of a stationary chest tomosynthesis system using carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jing

    X-ray imaging system has shown its usefulness for providing quick and easy access of imaging in both clinic settings and emergency situations. It greatly improves the workflow in hospitals. However, the conventional radiography systems, lacks 3D information in the images. The tissue overlapping issue in the 2D projection image result in low sensitivity and specificity. Both computed tomography and digital tomosynthesis, the two conventional 3D imaging modalities, requires a complex gantry to mechanically translate the x-ray source to various positions. Over the past decade, our research group has developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) based x-ray source technology. The CNT x-ray sources allows compacting multiple x-ray sources into a single x-ray tube. Each individual x-ray source in the source array can be electronically switched. This technology allows development of stationary tomographic imaging modalities without any complex mechanical gantries. The goal of this work is to develop a stationary digital chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) system, and implement it for a clinical trial. The feasibility of s-DCT was investigated. It is found that the CNT source array can provide sufficient x-ray output for chest imaging. Phantom images have shown comparable image qualities as conventional DCT. The s-DBT system was then used to study the effects of source array configurations and tomosynthesis image quality, and the feasibility of a physiological gated s-DCT. Using physical measures for spatial resolution, the 2D source configuration was shown to have improved depth resolution and comparable in-plane resolution. The prospective gated tomosynthesis images have shown substantially reduction of image blur associated with lung motions. The system was also used to investigate the feasibility of using s-DCT as a diagnosis and monitoring tools for cystic fibrosis patients. A new scatter reduction methods for s-DCT was also studied. Finally, a s-DCT system was constructed by

  12. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Alexander; Kronast, Florian; Papp, Christian; Yang, See-Hun; Cramm, Stefan; Krug, Ingo P.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Hilken, Dawn L.; Anderson, Erik H.; Fischer, Peter; Durr, Hermann A.; Schneider, Claus M.; Fadley, Charles S.

    2010-10-29

    We demonstrate the addition of depth resolution to the usual two-dimensional images in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), with application to a square array of circular magnetic Co microdots. The method is based on excitation with soft x-ray standing-waves generated by Bragg reflection from a multilayer mirror substrate. Standing wave is moved vertically through sample simply by varying the photon energy around the Bragg condition. Depth-resolved PEEM images were obtained for all of the observed elements. Photoemission intensities as functions of photon energy were compared to x-ray optical calculations in order to quantitatively derive the depth-resolved film structure of the sample.

  13. Development of an X-ray imaging system with SOI pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Ryutaro; Arai, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Hirano, Keiichi; Kishimoto, Shunji; Hashimoto, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    An X-ray imaging system employing pixel sensors in silicon-on-insulator technology is currently under development. The system consists of an SOI pixel detector (INTPIX4) and a DAQ system based on a multi-purpose readout board (SEABAS2). To correct a bottleneck in the total throughput of the DAQ of the first prototype, parallel processing of the data taking and storing processes and a FIFO buffer were implemented for the new DAQ release. Due to these upgrades, the DAQ throughput was improved from 6 Hz (41 Mbps) to 90 Hz (613 Mbps). The first X-ray imaging system with the new DAQ software release was tested using 33.3 keV and 9.5 keV mono X-rays for three-dimensional computerized tomography. The results of these tests are presented.

  14. Study of Scintillator thickness optimization of lens-coupled X-ray imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, H.; Du, G.; Deng, B.; Chen, R.; Xiao, T.

    2016-03-01

    Lens-coupled X-ray in-direct imaging detectors are very popular for high-resolution X-ray imaging at the third generation synchrotron radiation facilities. This imaging system consists of a scintilator producing a visible-light image of X-ray beam, a microscope objective, a mirror reflecting at 90° and a CCD camera. When the thickness of the scintillator is matched with the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, the image quality of experimental results will be improved obviously. This paper used an imaging system at BL13W beamline of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) to study the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective with a real sample. By use of the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective, the optimal imaging results have been obtained.

  15. In-Orbit Performance of the Hard X-Ray Detector on Borad Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubun, Motohide; Makishima, Kazuo; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Murakami, Toshio; Tashiro, Makoto; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; M.Madejski, Greg; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Terada, Yukikatsu; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Watanabe, Shin; Tamagawa, Toru; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Kubota, Aya; Isobe, Naoki; Takahashi, Isao; Sato, Goro; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Hong, Soojing; /Tokyo U. /Wako, RIKEN /JAXA, Sagamihara /Kanazawa U. /Saitama U. /Hiroshima U. /Aoyama Gakuin U. /Nihon U., Narashino /SLAC

    2007-10-26

    The in-orbit performance and calibration of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board the X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku are described. Its basic performances, including a wide energy bandpass of 10-600 keV, energy resolutions of {approx}4 keV (FWHM) at 40 keV and {approx}11% at 511 keV, and a high background rejection efficiency, have been confirmed by extensive in-orbit calibrations. The long-term gains of PIN-Si diodes have been stable within 1% for half a year, and those of scintillators have decreased by 5-20%. The residual non-X-ray background of the HXD is the lowest among past non-imaging hard X-ray instruments in energy ranges of 15-70 and 150-500 keV. We provide accurate calibrations of energy responses, angular responses, timing accuracy of the HXD, and relative normalizations to the X-ray CCD cameras using multiple observations of the Crab Nebula.

  16. An ultra-fast superconducting Nb nanowire single-photon detector for soft x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Inderbitzin, K.; Engel, A.; Schilling, A.; Il'in, K.; Siegel, M.

    2012-10-15

    Although superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are well studied regarding the detection of infrared/optical photons and keV-molecules, no studies on continuous x-ray photon counting by thick-film detectors have been reported so far. We fabricated a 100 nm thick niobium x-ray SNSPD (an X-SNSPD) and studied its detection capability of photons with keV-energies in continuous mode. The detector is capable to detect photons even at reduced bias currents of 0.4%, which is in sharp contrast to optical thin-film SNSPDs. No dark counts were recorded in extended measurement periods. Strikingly, the signal amplitude distribution depends significantly on the photon energy spectrum.

  17. Discriminating cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time using a GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui-Yin; Zhao, Sheng-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Qi, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ke-Yan; Hu, Bi-Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors have been used in cosmic muon scattering tomography and neutron imaging over the last decade. In this work, a triple GEM device with an effective readout area of 10 cm × 10 cm is developed, and a method of discriminating between cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time is tested. The energy resolution of the GEM detector is tested by 55Fe ray source to prove the GEM detector has a good performance. Analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows us to get the rise time and pulse heights. The experiment result indicates that cosmic muons and X-rays can be discriminated with an appropriate rise time threshold. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275235, 11405077, 11575073)

  18. Vision 20/20: Single photon counting x-ray detectors in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-01-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) with energy discrimination capabilities have been developed for medical x-ray computed tomography (CT) and x-ray (XR) imaging. Using detection mechanisms that are completely different from the current energy integrating detectors and measuring the material information of the object to be imaged, these PCDs have the potential not only to improve the current CT and XR images, such as dose reduction, but also to open revolutionary novel applications such as molecular CT and XR imaging. The performance of PCDs is not flawless, however, and it seems extremely challenging to develop PCDs with close to ideal characteristics. In this paper, the authors offer our vision for the future of PCD-CT and PCD-XR with the review of the current status and the prediction of (1) detector technologies, (2) imaging technologies, (3) system technologies, and (4) potential clinical benefits with PCDs. PMID:24089889

  19. Capturing dynamics with Eiger, a fast-framing X-ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, I.; Bergamaschi, A.; Buitenhuis, J.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Henrich, B.; Ikonen, T.; Meier, G.; Menzel, A.; Mozzanica, A.; Radicci, V.; Satapathy, D. K.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.

    2012-01-01

    Eiger is the next-generation single-photon-counting pixel detector following the widely used Pilatus detector. Its smaller pixel size of 75 µm × 75 µm, higher frame rate of up to 22 kHz, and practically zero dead-time (∼4 µs) between exposures will further various measurement methods at synchrotron sources. In this article Eiger’s suitability for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is demonstrated. By exploiting its high frame rate, complementary small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and XPCS data are collected in parallel to determine both the structure factor and collective diffusion coefficient of a nano-colloid suspension. For the first time, correlation times on the submillisecond time scale are accessible with a large-area pixel detector. PMID:23093761

  20. Assembly and test of the gas pixel detector for X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Feng, H.; Muleri, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Minuti, M.; Soffitta, P.; Brez, A.; Spandre, G.; Pinchera, M.; Sgró, C.; Baldini, L.; She, R.; Costa, E.

    2015-12-01

    The gas pixel detector (GPD) dedicated for photoelectric X-ray polarimetry is selected as the focal plane detector for the ESA medium-class mission concept X-ray Imaging and Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE). Here we show the design, assembly, and preliminary test results of a small GPD for the purpose of gas mixture optimization needed for the phase A study of XIPE. The detector is assembled in house at Tsinghua University following a design by the INFN-Pisa group. The improved detector design results in a good uniformity for the electric field. Filled with pure dimethyl ether (DME) at 0.8 atm, the measured energy resolution is 18% at 6 keV and inversely scales with the square root of the X-ray energy. The measured modulation factor is well consistent with that from simulation, up to ~0.6 above 6 keV. The residual modulation is found to be 0.30 ± 0.15 % at 6 keV for the whole sensitive area, which can be translated into a systematic error of less than 1% for polarization measurement at a confidence level of 99%. The position resolution of the detector is about 80 μm in FWHM, consistent with previous studies and sufficient for XIPE requirements.

  1. Low-dose performance of wafer-scale CMOS-based X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Willem H.; Peters, Inge M.; Smit, Chiel; Kessener, Yves; Bosiers, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Compared to published amorphous-silicon (TFT) based X-ray detectors, crystalline silicon CMOS-based active-pixel detectors exploit the benefits of low noise, high speed, on-chip integration and featuring offered by CMOS technology. This presentation focuses on the specific advantage of high image quality at very low dose levels. The measurement of very low dose performance parameters like Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) and Noise Equivalent Dose (NED) is a challenge by itself. Second-order effects like defect pixel behavior, temporal and quantization noise effects, dose measurement accuracy and limitation of the x-ray source settings will influence the measurements at very low dose conditions. Using an analytical model to predict the low dose behavior of a detector from parameters extracted from shot-noise limited dose levels is presented. These models can also provide input for a simulation environment for optimizing the performance of future detectors. In this paper, models for predicting NED and the DQE at very low dose are compared to measurements on different CMOS detectors. Their validity for different sensor and optical stack combinations as well as for different x-ray beam conditions was validated.

  2. The Speedster-EXD - A New Event-Triggered Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher; Falcone, Abraham; Prieskorn, Zachary; Burrows, David N.

    2014-08-01

    We present the characterization of a new event driven x-ray hybrid CMOS detector developed by Teledyne imaging Sensors in collaboration with Penn State University. Hybrid CMOS detectors currently have many advantages over CCD’s including lower susceptibility to radiation damage, lower power consumption, and faster read-out time to avoid pile-up. The Speedster-EXD includes an in-pixel comparator that enables read out of only the pixels with signal from an x-ray event. The comparator threshold can be set by the user and only pixels with signal above this threshold are read out. This event-driven readout feature can increase effective frame rates by orders of magnitude, enabling future x-ray missions. The Speedster-EXD hybrid CMOS detector also has additional features that improve upon our previous generation of detectors including: (1) a low-noise, high-gain CTIA amplifier to eliminate interpixel capacitance crosstalk, (2) four different gain modes to optimize either full well capacity or energy resolution, and (3) in-pixel CDS subtraction to reduce read noise. We present the read noise, dark current, interpixel capacitance, energy resolution, and gain variation measurements of the Speedster-EXD detector.

  3. Direct measurement of mammographic x-ray spectra using a CdZnTe detector.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Yamamoto, A; Honda, I; Taniguchi, A; Kanamori, H

    2000-07-01

    Our purpose is to directly measure mammographic x-ray spectra with collimators and a low-efficiency CdZnTe detector developed recently and to find out the best fit response function of CdZnTe detector to correct the measured spectra. Photon spectra (target Mo or Rh) produced by a mammographic x-ray unit at 25-32 kV and 240 mAs (= 3 times of 80 mAs) and transmitted through 0.03 mm Mo or 0.025 mm Rh filter and object (0.1 mm Al to 0.8 mm Al phantoms) have been analyzed. Since detected spectra were distorted by the response of CdZnTe detector and did not present the true photon spectra, the correction was applied by the stripping procedure. The response function of detector used in this procedure has been determined by the evaluation of interactions (K-escape, coherent scattering, and Compton scattering processes) and incomplete charge collection calculated using the Monte Carlo method. We have used Kalpha1, Kalpha2, Kbeta1, Kbeta2 radiations of Cd, Zn, and Te, respectively and have used the weight function for the incomplete charge collection and have considered Compton scattering. The Monte Carlo simulations were continued by changing the important factors (mean path length of hole lambda(h), dead layer of the CZT crystal and weight factor Wq) of incomplete charge collection until the best fit response function was found out. Corrected photon spectra were compared with the mammographic x-ray spectral data of Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) measured using a Ge detector. Attenuation curves of aluminum for 25-32 kV were calculated from the corrected photon spectra and compared with the attenuation curves measured using an ionization chamber. These results obtained using the CdZnTe detector agreed with the mammographic x-ray spectral data of BRH and attenuation curves obtained by the ionization chamber.

  4. Apodized-aperture pixel design to increase high-frequency DQE and reduce noise aliasing in x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismailova, Elina; Karim, Karim; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2015-03-01

    The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of an x-ray detector, expressed as a function of spatial frequency, describes the ability to produce high-quality images relative to an ideal detector. While the DQE normally decreases substantially with increasing frequency, we describe an approach that can be used to improve the DQE response by increasing the DQE at high spatial frequencies. The approach makes use of an apodized-aperture pixel (AAP) design that requires use of a high-resolution x-ray converter such as selenium coupled to a sensor array with very small physical sensor elements, such as CMOS sensors. While sensors with elements of 10 - 25 μm are too small for most practical applications in medical radiography, we describe how larger image pixels of a practical size can be synthesized to provide a better DQE than simple binning or using physical pixels of the same size. A theoretical cascaded-systems analysis shows the DQE at the image sampling cut-off frequency can be improved by up to a factor of 2.5x. The AAP approach was validated experimentally using a CMOS/CsI-based detector having 0.05-mm sensor elements. Using AAP images with 0.2-mm pixels, the high-frequency DQE value was increased from 0.2 to 0.4 compared to simple 4x4 binning. It is concluded that ultra-high-resolution sensors can be used to optimize the high-frequency performance of x-ray detectors and make substantial improvements in image quality for visualization of small stuctures and fine image detail in comparison to current imaging systems.

  5. Use of a priori spectral information in the measurement of x-ray flux with filtered diode arrays.

    PubMed

    Marrs, R E; Widmann, K; Brown, G V; Heeter, R F; MacLaren, S A; May, M J; Moore, A S; Schneider, M B

    2015-10-01

    Filtered x-ray diode (XRD) arrays are often used to measure x-ray spectra vs. time from spectrally continuous x-ray sources such as hohlraums. A priori models of the incident x-ray spectrum enable a more accurate unfolding of the x-ray flux as compared to the standard technique of modifying a thermal Planckian with spectral peaks or dips at the response energy of each filtered XRD channel. A model x-ray spectrum consisting of a thermal Planckian, a Gaussian at higher energy, and (in some cases) a high energy background provides an excellent fit to XRD-array measurements of x-ray emission from laser heated hohlraums. If high-resolution measurements of part of the x-ray emission spectrum are available, that information can be included in the a priori model. In cases where the x-ray emission spectrum is not Planckian, candidate x-ray spectra can be allowed or excluded by fitting them to measured XRD voltages. Examples are presented from the filtered XRD arrays, named Dante, at the National Ignition Facility and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. PMID:26520959

  6. Use of a priori spectral information in the measurement of x-ray flux with filtered diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, R. E.; Widmann, K.; Brown, G. V.; Heeter, R. F.; MacLaren, S. A.; May, M. J.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    Filtered x-ray diode (XRD) arrays are often used to measure x-ray spectra vs. time from spectrally continuous x-ray sources such as hohlraums. A priori models of the incident x-ray spectrum enable a more accurate unfolding of the x-ray flux as compared to the standard technique of modifying a thermal Planckian with spectral peaks or dips at the response energy of each filtered XRD channel. A model x-ray spectrum consisting of a thermal Planckian, a Gaussian at higher energy, and (in some cases) a high energy background provides an excellent fit to XRD-array measurements of x-ray emission from laser heated hohlraums. If high-resolution measurements of part of the x-ray emission spectrum are available, that information can be included in the a priori model. In cases where the x-ray emission spectrum is not Planckian, candidate x-ray spectra can be allowed or excluded by fitting them to measured XRD voltages. Examples are presented from the filtered XRD arrays, named Dante, at the National Ignition Facility and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  7. Superconducting tunneling-junction detectors of X-ray radiation. Issues concerning the energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, V. A. Gor'kov, V. P. Koshelets, V. P. Filippenko, L. V.

    2007-02-15

    The effect of the recombination-and edge-related losses of nonequilibrium quasiparticles on the energy resolution of superconducting tunneling detectors is studied. The dependence of the signal on the energy of X-ray photons is measured and the shape of instrument-related lines is studied for the Ti/Nb/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al/Nb/NbN detectors with the Ti/Nb passive electrode. Experimental data are analyzed using the diffusion-based model of tunneling detectors.

  8. The UCSD high energy X-ray timing experiment cosmic ray particle anticoincidence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hink, P. L.; Rothschild, R. E.; Pelling, M. R.; Macdonald, D. R.; Gruber, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The HEXTE, part of the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), is designed to make high sensitivity temporal and spectral measurements of X-rays with energies between 15 and 250 keV using NaI/CsI phoswich scintillation counters. To achieve the required sensitivity it is necessary to provide anticoincidence of charged cosmic ray particles incident upon the instrument, some of which interact to produce background X-rays. The proposed cosmic ray particle anticoincidence shield detector for HEXTE uses a novel design based on plastic scintillators and wavelength-shifter bars. It consists of five segments, each with a 7 mm thick plastic scintillator, roughly 50 cm x 50 cm in size, coupled to two wavelength-shifter bars viewed by 1/2 inch photomultiplier tubes. These segments are configured into a five-sided, box-like structure around the main detector system. Results of laboratory testing of a model segment, and calculations of the expected performance of the flight segments and particle anticoincidence detector system are presented to demonstrate that the above anticoincidence detector system satisfies its scientific requirements.

  9. Optimized acquisition time for x-ray fluorescence imaging of gold nanoparticles: a preliminary study using photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Chen, Wei R.; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a promising spectroscopic technique to characterize imaging contrast agents with high atomic numbers (Z) such as gold nanoparticles (GNPs) inside small objects. Its utilization for biomedical applications, however, is greatly limited to experimental research due to longer data acquisition time. The objectives of this study are to apply a photon counting detector array for XRF imaging and to determine an optimized XRF data acquisition time, at which the acquired XRF image is of acceptable quality to allow the maximum level of radiation dose reduction. A prototype laboratory XRF imaging configuration consisting of a pencil-beam X-ray and a photon counting detector array (1 × 64 pixels) is employed to acquire the XRF image through exciting the prepared GNP/water solutions. In order to analyze the signal to noise ratio (SNR) improvement versus the increased exposure time, all the XRF photons within the energy range of 63 - 76KeV that include two Kα gold fluorescence peaks are collected for 1s, 2s, 3s, and so on all the way up to 200s. The optimized XRF data acquisition time for imaging different GNP solutions is determined as the moment when the acquired XRF image just reaches a quality with a SNR of 20dB which corresponds to an acceptable image quality.

  10. Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: This article describes a method to achieve near optimal performance with low energy resolution detectors. Tapiovaara and Wagner [Phys. Med. Biol. 30, 519-529 (1985)] showed that an energy selective x-ray system using a broad spectrum source can produce images with a larger signal to noise ratio (SNR) than conventional systems using energy integrating or photon counting detectors. They showed that there is an upper limit to the SNR and that it can be achieved by measuring full spectrum information and then using an optimal energy dependent weighting. Methods: A performance measure is derived by applying statistical detection theory to an abstract vector space of the line integrals of the basis set coefficients of the two function approximation to the x-ray attenuation coefficient. The approach produces optimal results that utilize all the available energy dependent data. The method can be used with any energy selective detector and is applied not only to detectors using pulse height analysis (PHA) but also to a detector that simultaneously measures the total photon number and integrated energy, as discussed by Roessl et al. [Med. Phys. 34, 959-966 (2007)]. A generalization of this detector that improves the performance is introduced. A method is described to compute images with the optimal SNR using projections in a ''whitened'' vector space transformed so the noise is uncorrelated and has unit variance in both coordinates. Material canceled images with optimal SNR can also be computed by projections in this space. Results: The performance measure is validated by showing that it provides the Tapiovaara-Wagner optimal results for a detector with full energy information and also a conventional detector. The performance with different types of detectors is compared to the ideal SNR as a function of x-ray tube voltage and subject thickness. A detector that combines two bin PHA with a simultaneous measurement of integrated photon energy provides near ideal

  11. Indirect-detection single-photon-counting x-ray detector for breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Kaercher, Joerg; Durst, Roger

    2016-03-01

    X-ray mammography is a crucial screening tool for early identification of breast cancer. However, the overlap of anatomical features present in projection images often complicates the task of correctly identifying suspicious masses. As a result, there has been increasing interest in acquisition of volumetric information through digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) which, compared to mammography, offers the advantage of depth information. Since DBT requires acquisition of many projection images, it is desirable that the noise in each projection image be dominated by the statistical noise of the incident x-ray quanta and not by the additive noise of the imaging system (referred to as quantum-limited imaging) and that the cumulative dose be as low as possible (e.g., no more than for a mammogram). Unfortunately, the electronic noise (~2000 electrons) present in current DBT systems based on active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) is still relatively high compared with modest x-ray gain of the a-Se and CsI:Tl x-ray converters often used. To overcome the modest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) limitations of current DBT systems, we have developed a large-area x-ray imaging detector with the combination of an extremely low noise (~20 electrons) active-pixel CMOS and a specially designed high resolution scintillator. The high sensitivity and low noise of such system provides better SNR by at least an order of magnitude than current state-of-art AMFPI systems and enables x-ray indirect-detection single photon counting (SPC) at mammographic energies with the potential of dose reduction.

  12. Performance characteristics needed for protein crystal diffraction x-ray detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, E. M.

    1999-09-21

    During the 1990's, macromolecular crystallography became progressively more dependent on synchrotrons X-ray sources for diffraction data collection. Detectors of this diffraction data at synchrotrons beamlines have evolved over the decade, from film to image phosphor plates, and then to CCD systems. These changes have been driven by the data quality and quantity improvements each newer detector technology provided. The improvements have been significant. It is likely that newer detector technologies will be adopted at synchrotron beamlines for crystallographic diffraction data collection in the future, but these technologies will have to compete with existing CCD detector systems which are already excellent and are getting incrementally better in terms of size, speed, efficiency, and resolving power. Detector development for this application at synchrotrons must concentrate on making systems which are bigger and faster than CCDs and which can capture weak data more efficiently. And there is a need for excellent detectors which are less expensive than CCD systems.

  13. A setup for soft proton irradiation of X-ray detectors for future astronomical space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Sebastian; Azzarello, Philipp; Del Monte, Ettore; Feroci, Marco; Jochum, Josef; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Perinati, Emanuele; Rachevski, Alexandre; Santangelo, Andrea; Tenzer, Christoph; Vacchi, Andrea; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola

    2013-09-01

    Protons that are trapped in the Earth's magnetic field are one of the main threats to astronomical X-ray observatories. Soft protons, in the range from tens of keV up to a few MeV, impinging on silicon X-ray detectors can lead to a significant degradation of the detector performance. Especially in low earth orbits an enhancement of the soft proton flux has been found. A setup to irradiate detectors with soft protons has been constructed at the Van-de-Graaff accelerator of the Physikalisches Institut of the University of Tübingen. Key advantages are a high flux uniformity over a large area, to enable irradiations of large detectors, and a monitoring system for the applied fluence, the beam uniformity, and the spectrum, that allows testing of detector prototypes in early development phases, when readout electronics are not yet available. Two irradiation campaigns have been performed so far with this setup. The irradiated detectors are silicon drift detectors, designated for the use on-board the LOFT space mission. This paper gives a description of the experimental setup and the associated monitoring system.

  14. Investigation of GEM-Micromegas detector on X-ray beam of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Lian; Qi, Hui-Rong; Hu, Bi-Tao; Fan, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Rong-Guang; Chang, Guang-Cai; Liu, Peng; Ouyang, Qun; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Yi, Fu-Ting

    2014-04-01

    To reduce the discharge of the standard bulk Micromegas and GEM detectors, a GEM-Micromegas detector was developed at the Institute of High Energy Physics. Taking into account the advantages of the two detectors, one GEM foil was set as a preamplifier on the mesh of Micromegas in the structure and the GEM preamplification decreased the working voltage of Micromegas to significantly reduce the effect of the discharge. At the same gain, the spark probability of the GEM-Micromegas detector can be reduced to a factor 0.01 compared to the standard Micromegas detector, and an even higher gain could be obtained. This paper describes the performance of the X-ray beam detector that was studied at 1W2B Laboratory of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Finally, the result of the energy resolution under various X-ray energies was given in different working gases. This indicates that the GEM-Micromegas detector has an energy response capability in an energy range from 6 keV to 20 keV and it could work better than the standard bulk-Micromegas.

  15. Characterization of Si hybrid CMOS detectors for use in the soft x-ray band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieskorn, Zachary R.; Griffith, Christopher V.; Bongiorno, Stephen D.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Burrows, David N.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the characterization of four HAWAII Hybrid Si CMOS detectors (HCD) developed for use as X-ray detectors as part of a joint program between Penn State University and Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS). Interpixel capacitive crosstalk (IPC) has been measured for standard H1RG detectors as well as a specially developed H2RG that uses a unique bonding structure. The H2RG shows significant reduction in IPC, as reported by Griffith et al. 2012. Energy resolution at 1.5 & 5.9 keV was measured as well as read noise for each detector. Dark current as a function of temperature is reported from 150 - 210 K and dark current figures of merit are estimated for each detector. We also discuss upcoming projects including testing of a new HCD called the Speedster-EXD. This prototype detector will have a low noise, high gain CTIA to reduce IPC and read noise as well as in-pixel CDS and event flagging. In the coming year PSU and TIS will begin work on a project to incorporate CTIA and CDS circuitry into the ROIC of a HAWAII HCD like detector to satisfy the small pixel and high rate needs of future X-ray observatories.

  16. Wire Array Z-pinch Insights for Intense X-ray Power Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, T. W. L.

    1998-11-01

    The discovery [1] that the use of very large numbers of wires enables high x- ray power to be generated from wire-array z-pinches represents a breakthrough in load design for large pulsed power generators, and has permitted high temperatures to be generated in radiation cavities [2] on Saturn [3] and Z [4]. In this paper, changes in x-ray emission characteristics as a function of wire number, array mass, and load radius, for 20-mm-long aluminum arrays on Saturn that led to these breakthrough hohlraum results, are discussed and compared with a few related emission characteristics of high-wire-number aluminum and tungsten arrays on Z. In this discussion, the detailed measurements made with bolometers, filtered XRDs and PCDs, time resolved filtered x-ray pinhole cameras and crystal spectrometers are given meaning by comparison with one, two, and three dimensional radiation-magnetohydrodynamic code simulations. [1] T. W. L. Sanford, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 5063 (1996). [2] M. K. Matzen, Phys. Plasmas 4, 1519 (1997). [3] D. D. Bloomquist, et al., Proc. 6th Int. IEEE Pulsed Power Conf., (1987), p. 310. [4] R. B. Spielman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998).

  17. Development of Silicon Strip Detector for the measurement of the {Xi}-atom X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimura, H.; Adachi, S.; Imai, K.; Sako, H.; Sato, S.; Tanida, K.; Kiuchi, R.; Joo, C. W.

    2011-10-21

    We have developed the Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) for the experiment to measure X-ray from {Xi}-atom. The feature of the SSD is to measure positions of particles and energy deposit. We have carried out the test experiment at J-PARC K1.8 beam line. The three SSDs were installed in front of the target and we tested by using kaon beam. In this paper, the results of the test experiment is presented.

  18. The particle background observed by the X-ray detectors onboard Copernicus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davison, P. J. N.

    1974-01-01

    The design and characteristics of low energy detectors on the Copernicus satellite are described. The functions of the sensors in obtaining data on the particle background. The procedure for processing the data obtained by the satellite is examined. The most significant positive deviations are caused by known weak X-ray sources in the field of view. In addition to small systemic effects, occasional random effects where the count rate increases suddenly and decreases within a few frames are analyzed.

  19. ALEXIS (Array of Low-Energy X-Ray Imaging Sensors): A narrow-band survey/monitor of the ultrasoft x-ray sky

    SciTech Connect

    Priedhorsky, W.C.; Bloch, J.J.; Cordova, F.; Smith, B.W.; Ulibarri, M.; Chavez, J.; Evans, E.; Seigmund, O.H.W.; Marshall, H.; Vallerga, J.

    1989-01-01

    Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories are building an ultrasoft X-ray monitor experiment. This experiment, called ALEXIS (Array of Low-Energy X-Ray Imaging Sensors), consists of six compact normal-incidence telescopes. ALEXIS will operate in the range 70--110 eV. The ultrasoft X-ray/EUV band is nearly uncharted territory for astrophysics. ALEXIS, with its wide fields-of-view and well-defined wavelength bands, will complement the upcoming NASA Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer and ROSAT EUV Wide Field Camera, which are sensitive broad-band survey experiments. The program objectives of ALEXIS are to (1) demonstrate the feasibility of a wide field-of-view, normal incidence ultrasoft X-ray telescope system and (2) to determine ultrasoft X-ray backgrounds in the space environment. As a dividend, ALEXIS will pursue the following scientific objectives: (1) to map the diffuse background, with unprecedented angular resolution, in several emission-line bands, (2) to perform a narrow-band survey of point sources, (3) to search for transient phenomena in the ultrasoft X-ray band, and (4) to provide synoptic monitoring of variable ultrasoft X-ray sources such as cataclysmic variables and flare stars. ALEXIS is designed to be flown on a small autonomous payload carrier (a minisat) that could be launched from any expendable launch vehicle. The experiment weighs 100 pounds, draws 40 watts, and produces 10 kbps of data. It can be flown in any low earth orbit. Onboard data storage allows operation and tracking from a single ground station at Los Alamos. 57 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Determination of the texture of arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes from the angular dependence of the X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Okotrub, A. V. Belavin, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Gusel'nikov, A. V.; Kudashov, A. G.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2008-09-15

    The properties of materials containing carbon nanotubes depend on the degree of alignment and the internal structure of nanotubes. It is shown that the degree of misorientation of carbon nanotubes in samples can be evaluated from the measurements of the angular dependences of the carbon X-ray emission and carbon X-ray absorption spectra. The CK{sub {alpha}} emission and CK X-ray absorption spectra of the array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic thermolysis of a mixture of fullerene and ferrocene are measured. A comparison of the calculated model dependences of the relative intensities of the {pi} and {sigma} bands in the spectra with the experimental results makes it possible to evaluate the degree of misorientation of nanotubes in the sample and their internal texture.

  1. SENSITIVITY OF STACKED IMAGING DETECTORS TO HARD X-RAY POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Muleri, Fabio; Campana, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    The development of multi-layer optics which allow to focus photons up to 100 keV and more promises an enormous jump in sensitivity in the hard X-ray energy band. This technology is already planned to be exploited by future missions dedicated to spectroscopy and imaging at energies >10 keV, e.g., Astro-H and NuSTAR. Nevertheless, our understanding of the hard X-ray sky would greatly benefit from carrying out contemporaneous polarimetric measurements, because the study of hard spectral tails and of polarized emission are often two complementary diagnostics of the same non-thermal and acceleration processes. At energies above a few tens of keV, the preferred technique to detect polarization involves the determination of photon directions after a Compton scattering. Many authors have asserted that stacked detectors with imaging capabilities can be exploited for this purpose. If it is possible to discriminate those events which initially interact in the first detector by Compton scattering and are subsequently absorbed by the second layer, then the direction of scattering is singled out from the hit pixels in the two detectors. In this paper, we give the first detailed discussion of the sensitivity of such a generic design to the X-ray polarization. The efficiency and the modulation factor are calculated analytically from the geometry of the instruments and then compared with the performance as derived by means of Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. First measurements with a frame store PN-CCD X-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Bonerz, Stefan; Eckhardt, Rouven; Englhauser, Jakob; Hartmann, Robert; Hasinger, Günther; Holl, Peter; Krause, Norbert; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, Rainer; Soltau, Heike; Strüder, Lothar; Trümper, Joachim

    2003-10-01

    The PN-CCD camera on the XMM-Newton X-ray astronomy satellite is the most advanced X-ray spectrometer combining high quantum efficiency, high-speed readout and excellent energy resolution. According to the fullframe concept, the whole 6×6cm2 large CCD-chip area is used as image area, i.e. is sensitive and exposed to X-rays. The camera operates since January 2000 successfully in space without performance degradation. Based on the concept and technology development of the XMM-Newton PN-CCD, the `frame store PN-CCD', a further development of the detector has been proposed. For the new detector a frame store area is added, adjacent to the image area, to allow in parallel photon exposure in the image area and signal readout of the previous image in the frame store area. The concept and the new features of the device will be described here. This comprises in particular a reduced probability of out-of-time event occurrence, the optimization of electronic noise and charge transfer losses as well as a method to obtain a cleaner low-energy response. The first measurements with the new frame store PN-CCD are presented with focus on the above addressed detector parameters. It is planned to apply the device as focal plane instrument for the ROSITA mission that has the aim to extend the ROSAT all-sky survey towards higher energies.

  3. An abuttable CCD imager for visible and X-ray focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Barry E.; Mountain, Robert W.; Harrison, David C.; Bautz, Marshall W.; Doty, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A frame-transfer silicon charge-coupled-device (CCD) imager has been developed that can be closely abutted to other imagers on three sides of the imaging array. It is intended for use in multichip arrays. The device has 420 x 420 pixels in the imaging and frame-store regions and is constructed using a three-phase triple-polysilicon process. Particular emphasis has been placed on achieving low-noise charge detection for low-light-level imaging in the visible and maximum energy resolution for X-ray spectroscopic applications. Noise levels of 6 electrons at 1-MHz and less than 3 electrons at 100-kHz data rates have been achieved. Imagers have been fabricated on 1000-Ohm-cm material to maximize quantum efficiency and minimize split events in the soft X-ray regime.

  4. Survey of two-dimensional electro-optical X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, Sol M.; Milch, James R.; Reynolds, Geo T.

    Electro-optical devices offer a flexible and modular approach to quantitative imaging X-ray detection. Such a detector typically consists of an energy converter coupled to a gain element which is followed by a readout device. This may, for example, be configured by coupling a scintillating screen to an image intensifier which is read by a TV camera. The large variety of commercially available energy converters, gain elements, and readout devices serve to limit the design problem to one of selecting the components, coupling them together and designing the appropriate electronics and software. The design criteria follow most directly from the nature of the particular X-ray detection problem being considered which, in turn, dictates which of two general modes the detector shall be operated in. In the photon counting mode, the gain element is of sufficient magnitude that each absorbed X-ray transmits a large and clearly recognizable signal to the readout device. This signal is real-time detected and allocated to memory. This has the advantages of high spatial resolution and high noise immunity; it has the disadvantage of a low maximum count rate. In another mode, termed the analog mode, the gain element is adjusted so that an individual x-ray makes a contribution comparable with the per-picture element readout noise on a readout device capable of integrating the signal from many X-rays. The magnitude of the integrated signal corresponds to the number of quanta incident. Since X-rays are not individually processed extremely high count rates can be accommodated. The primary disadvantages here is that the readout time lowers the device duty cycle. Hybrid modes are possible. The survey will emphasize the characteristics and principal limitations of the available components as applied toward synchrotron X-ray detection. Methods of coupling the components and modes of reading the final signal will be discussed. The literature pertaining to electro-optical devices that have

  5. Hohlraum Target Alignment from X-ray Detector Images using Starburst Design Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R R; Conder, A; Edwards, O; Kroll, J; Kozioziemski, B; Mapoles, E; McGuigan, D; Wilhelmsen, K

    2010-12-14

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to initiate a fusion reaction. The target container, or hohlraum, must be accurately aligned to an x-ray imaging system to allow careful monitoring of the frozen fuel layer in the target. To achieve alignment, x-ray images are acquired through starburst-shaped windows cut into opposite sides of the hohlraum. When the hohlraum is in alignment, the starburst pattern pairs match nearly exactly and allow a clear view of the ice layer formation on the edge of the target capsule. During the alignment process, x-ray image analysis is applied to determine the direction and magnitude of adjustment required. X-ray detector and source are moved in concert during the alignment process. The automated pointing alignment system described here is both accurate and efficient. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing that enables automation of the starburst pointing alignment.

  6. Cancer diagnosis using a conventional x-ray fluorescence camera with a cadmium-telluride detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Sato, Koetsu; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-10-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is useful for mapping various atoms in objects. Bremsstrahlung X-rays are selected using a 3.0 mm-thick aluminum filter, and these rays are absorbed by indium, cerium and gadolinium atoms in objects. Then XRF is produced from the objects, and photons are detected by a cadmium-telluride detector. The Kα photons are discriminated using a multichannel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted by a counter card. The objects are moved and scanned by an x-y stage in conjunction with a two-stage controller, and X-ray images obtained by atomic mapping are shown on a personal computer monitor. The scan steps of the x and y axes were both 2.5 mm, and the photon-counting time per mapping point was 0.5 s. We carried out atomic mapping using the X-ray camera, and Kα photons from cerium and gadolinium atoms were produced from cancerous regions in nude mice.

  7. A new generation of detectors for scanning x-ray beam imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rommel, J. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Scanning x-ray beam imaging systems were first developed by American Science and Engineering, Inc. (AS&E) in the early 1970s [1]. Since then, these systems have found a wide range of applications in security inspection and non-destructive testing. Large-area detectors are most frequently used to collect backscattered radiation but smaller transmission detectors are also employed for selected applications. Until recently, only two basic detector designs have been used: large scintillator blocks with attached photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or large-volume light-sealed boxes, lined with scintillating screens and port windows for PMTs. In both cases, the detectors have required considerable depth to provide acceptable light collection efficiency. A new design recently developed by AS&E relies on wavelength shifting fibres (WSF) for light collection. For the first time, this approach enables the construction of thin large-area detectors. Stacking layers of WSF ribbons and scintillating screens in varying combinations enables optimization of the detection efficiency for different applications. Taking separate readings from different layers provides an energy-sensitive signal combination. Energy sensitivity can be improved further by adding filtration between the signal channels. Several prototype configurations have been built and characterized for both backscatter and transmission imaging. A WSF-based detector has been commercialized for a transmission x-ray imaging application.

  8. Comparison of CCD, CMOS and Hybrid Pixel x-ray detectors: detection principle and data quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allé, P.; Wenger, E.; Dahaoui, S.; Schaniel, D.; Lecomte, C.

    2016-06-01

    We compare, from a crystallographic point of view, the data quality obtained using laboratory x-ray diffractometers equipped with a Molybdenum micro-source using different detector types: CCD, CMOS and XPAD hybrid pixel. First we give an overview of the working principle of these different detector types with a focus on their principal differences and their impact on the data quality. Then, using the example of an organic crystal, a comparison between the detector systems concerning the raw data statistics, the refinement agreement factors, the deformation electron density maps, and the residual density after multipolar refinement is presented. It is found that the data quality obtained with the XPAD detector is the best, even though the detection efficiency at the Mo energy (17.5 keV) is only 37% due to the Si-sensor layer thickness of 300 μm. Finally, we discuss the latest x-ray detector developments with an emphasis on the sensor material, where replacing Si by another material such as GaAs would yield detection efficiencies close to 100%, up to energies of 40 keV for hybrid pixel detectors.

  9. Si(Li) detectors with thin dead layers for low energy x-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rossington, C.S.; Walton, J.T.; Jaklevic, J.M.

    1990-10-01

    Regions of incomplete charge collection, or dead layers'', are compared for Si(Li) detectors fabricated with Au and Pd entrance window electrodes. The dead layers were measured by characterizing the detector spectral response to x-ray energies above and below the Si K{alpha} absorption edge. It was found that Si(Li) detectors with Pd electrodes exhibit consistently thinner effective Si dead layers than those with Au electrodes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the minimum thickness required for low resistivity Pd electrodes is thinner than that required for low resistivity Au electrodes, which further reduces the signal attenuation in Pd/Si(Li) detectors. A model, based on Pd compensation of oxygen vacancies in the SiO{sub 2} at the entrance window Si(Li) surface, is proposed to explain the observed differences in detector dead layer thickness. Electrode structures for optimum Si(Li) detector performance at low x-ray energies are discussed. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-01

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5-3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion in the

  11. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-14

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5–3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion in

  12. Dual-exposure technique for extending the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors.

    PubMed

    Sisniega, A; Abella, M; Desco, M; Vaquero, J J

    2014-01-20

    This work presents an approach to extend the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors by combining two acquisitions of the same sample taken with two different x-ray photon flux levels and the same beam spectral configuration. In order to combine both datasets, the response of detector pixels was modelled in terms of mean and variance using a linear model. The model was extended to take into account the effect of pixel saturation. We estimated a joint probability density function (j-pdf) of the pixel values by assuming that each dataset follows an independent Gaussian distribution. This j-pdf was used for estimating the final pixel value of the high-dynamic-range dataset using a maximum likelihood method. The suitability of the pixel model for the representation of the detector signal was assessed using experimental data from a small-animal cone-beam micro-CT scanner equipped with a flat panel detector. The potential extension in dynamic range offered by our method was investigated for generic flat panel detectors using analytical expressions and simulations. The performance of the proposed dual-exposure approach in realistic imaging environments was compared with that of a regular single-exposure technique using experimental data from two different phantoms. Image quality was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and analysis of profiles drawn on the images. The dynamic range, measured as the ratio between the exposure for saturation and the exposure equivalent to instrumentation noise, was increased from 76.9 to 166.7 when using our method. Dual-exposure results showed higher contrast-to-noise ratio and contrast resolution than the single-exposure acquisitions for the same x-ray dose. In addition, image artifacts were reduced in the combined dataset. This technique to extend the dynamic range of the detector without increasing the dose is particularly suited to image samples that contain both low and high attenuation regions.

  13. LOW SCATTER, HIGH KILOVOLT, A-SI FLAT PANEL X-RAY DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.; Keating, Scott C.; Phillips, David H.; Setoodeh, Shariar

    2009-03-03

    We have been using amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel detectors in high energy (>400 kV) cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications for a number of years. We have found that these detectors have a significant amount of internal scatter that degrades the accuracy of attenuation images. The scatter errors cause cupping and streaking artifacts that are practically indistinguishable from beam hardening artifacts. Residual artifacts remain after beam hardening correction and over correction increases noise in CT reconstructions. Another important limitation of existing detectors is that they have a high failure rate, especially when operating at megavolt x-ray energies even with a well collimated beam. Due to the limitations of the current detectors, we decided to design a detector specifically for high energies that has significantly reduced scatter. In collaboration with IMTEC, we have built a prototype amorphous silicon flat panel detector that has both improved imaging response and increased lifetime. LANL's contribution is the ''transparent panel concept''(patent pending), in which structures in the x-ray beam path are either eliminated or made as transparent to x-rays as practical (low atomic number and low areal density). This reduces scatter, makes attenuation measurements more accurate, improves the ability to make corrections for beam hardening, and increases signal to noise ratio in DR images and CT reconstructions. IMTEC's contribution is an improved shielding design that will increase the lifetime of the panel. Preliminary results showing the dramatic reduction in self scatter from the panel will be presented as well as the effect of this improvement on CT images.

  14. Low Scatter, High Kilovolt, A-Si Flat Panel X-Ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.; Keating, Scott C.; Phillips, David H.; Setoodeh, Shariar

    2009-03-01

    We have been using amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel detectors in high energy (>400 kV) cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications for a number of years. We have found that these detectors have a significant amount of internal scatter that degrades the accuracy of attenuation images. The scatter errors cause cupping and streaking artifacts that are practically indistinguishable from beam hardening artifacts. Residual artifacts remain after beam hardening correction and over correction increases noise in CT reconstructions. Another important limitation of existing detectors is that they have a high failure rate, especially when operating at megavolt x-ray energies even with a well collimated beam. Due to the limitations of the current detectors, we decided to design a detector specifically for high energies that has significantly reduced scatter. In collaboration with IMTEC, we have built a prototype amorphous silicon flat panel detector that has both improved imaging response and increased lifetime. LANL's contribution is the "transparent panel concept" (patent pending), in which structures in the x-ray beam path are either eliminated or made as transparent to x-rays as practical (low atomic number and low areal density). This reduces scatter, makes attenuation measurements more accurate, improves the ability to make corrections for beam hardening, and increases signal to noise ratio in DR images and CT reconstructions. IMTEC's contribution is an improved shielding design that will increase the lifetime of the panel. Preliminary results showing the dramatic reduction in self scatter from the panel will be presented as well as the effect of this improvement on CT images.

  15. Evaluating the Performance of a Commercial Silicon Drift Detector for X-ray Microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, Edward A

    2011-01-01

    Silicon drift detectors (SDDs) are rapidly becoming the energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) of choice, especially for scanning electron microscopy x-ray microanalysis. The complementary features of large active areas (i.e., high collection angle) and high count rate capability of these detector contribute to their popularity, as well as the absence of liquid nitrogen cooling and good energy resolution of these detectors. The performance of an EDAX Apollo 40 SDD on a JEOL 6500F SEM is discussed. The larger detector resulted in an significant increase (~3.5x) in geometric collection efficiency compared to the original 10mm2 Si(Li) detector that it replaced. The SEM can provide high beam currents (up to 200nA in some conditions) at small probe diameters. The high count rate capability of the SDD and the high current capability of the SEM compliment each other and provide excellent EDS analytical capabilities for both single point and spectrum imaging applications.

  16. Computer simulation of the CSPAD, ePix10k, and RayonixMX170HS X-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tina, Adrienne

    2015-08-21

    The invention of free-electron lasers (FELs) has opened a door to an entirely new level of scientific research. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is an X-ray FEL that houses several instruments, each with its own unique X-ray applications. This light source is revolutionary in that while its properties allow for a whole new range of scientific opportunities, it also poses numerous challenges. For example, the intensity of a focused X-ray beam is enough to damage a sample in one mere pulse; however, the pulse speed and extreme brightness of the source together are enough to obtain enough information about that sample, so that no further measurements are necessary. An important device in the radiation detection process, particularly for X-ray imaging, is the detector. The power of the LCLS X-rays has instigated a need for better performing detectors. The research conducted for this project consisted of the study of X-ray detectors to imitate their behaviors in a computer program. The analysis of the Rayonix MX170-HS, CSPAD, and ePix10k in particular helped to understand their properties. This program simulated the interaction of X-ray photons with these detectors to discern the patterns of their responses. A scientist’s selection process of a detector for a specific experiment is simplified from the characterization of the detectors in the program.

  17. Investigation of X-ray spectral response of D-T fusion produced neutron irradiated PIPS detectors for plasma X-ray diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneshwara Raja, P.; Narasimha Murty, N. V. L.; Rao, C. V. S.; Abhangi, Mitul

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the fusion-produced neutron irradiation induced changes in the X-ray spectral response of commercially available Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detectors using the accelerator based D-T generator. After 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation up to a fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, the energy resolution (i.e. FWHM) of the detectors at room temperature is found to degrade by about 3.8 times that of the pre-irradiated value. From the X-ray spectral characteristics, it has been observed that the room temperature spectral response of PIPS detectors is too poor even at low neutron fluences. Irradiation is also carried out with Am-Be neutron source for studying the effect of scattered neutrons from the reactor walls on the detector performance. Comparative studies of the damage caused by 14.1 MeV neutrons and Am-Be source produced neutrons at the same neutron fluence are carried out by analyzing the irradiated detector characteristics. The degradation in the energy resolution of the detectors is attributed to the radiation induced changes in the detector leakage current. No considerable changes in the full depletion voltage and the effective doping concentration up to the neutron fluence of 3.6× 1010 n/cm2, are observed from the measured C-V characteristics. Partial recovery of the neutron irradiated detector characteristics is discussed.

  18. A novel method of microneedle array fabrication using inclined deep x-ray exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Sang Jun; Jin, Chun Yan; Lee, Seung S.

    2006-04-01

    We report a novel fabrication method for the microneedle array with a 3-dimentional feature and its replication method; ''Hot-pressing'' process with bio-compatible material, PLLA (Poly L-LActide). Using inclined deep X-ray exposure technique, we fabricate a band type microneedle array with a single body on the same material basement. Since the single body feature does not make adhesion problem with the microneedle shank and basement during peel-off step of a mold, the PMMA (Poly-Methyl-MethAcrylate) microneedle array mold insert can be used for mold process which is used with the soft material mold, PDMS (Poly-Di- Methyl-Siloxane). The side inclined deep X-ray exposure also makes complex 3-dimentional features by the regions which are not exposed during twice successive exposure steps. In addition, the successive exposure does not need an additional mask alignment after the first side exposure. The fabricated band type microneedle array mold inserts are assembled for large area patch type out-of-plane microneedle array. The bio-compatible microneedle array can be fabricated to the laboratory scale mass production by the single body PMMA mold insert and ''Hot-pressing'' process.

  19. Modeling of photocurrent and lag signals in amorphous selenium x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiquee, Sinchita; Kabir, M. Z.

    2015-07-15

    A mathematical model for transient photocurrent and lag signal in x-ray imaging detectors has been developed by considering charge carrier trapping and detrapping in the energy distributed defect states under exponentially distributed carrier generation across the photoconductor. The model for the transient and steady-state carrier distributions and hence the photocurrent has been developed by solving the carrier continuity equation for both holes and electrons. The residual (commonly known as lag signal) current is modeled by solving the trapping rate equations considering the thermal release and trap filling effects. The model is applied to amorphous selenium (a-Se) detectors for both chest radiography and mammography. The authors analyze the dependence of the residual current on various factors, such as x-ray exposure, applied electric field, and temperature. The electron trapping and detrapping mostly determines the residual current in a-Se detectors. The lag signal is more prominent in chest radiographic detector than in mammographic detectors. The model calculations are compared with the published experimental data and show a very good agreement.

  20. FOXSI: Properties of optics and detectors for hard-X rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo Buitrago-Casas, Juan; Glesener, Lindsay; Christe, Steven; Krucker, Sam; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Foster, Natalie

    2015-04-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a state-of-the-art direct focusing X-ray telescope designed to observe the Sun. This experiment completed its second flight onboard a sounding rocket last December 11, 2014 from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The optics use a set of iridium-coated nickel/cobalt mirrors made using a replication technique based on an electroformed perfect polished surface. Since this technique creates full shells that no need to be co-aligned with other segments, an angular resolution of up to ~5 arcsec is gotten. The FOXSI focal plane consists of seven double-sided strip detectors. Five Silicon and 2 CdTe detectors were used during the second flight.We present on various properties of Wolter-I optics that are applicable to solar HXR observation, including ray-tracing simulations of the single-bounce (“ghost ray”) patterns from sources outside the field of view and angular resolution for different source angles and effective area measurements of the FOXSI optics. We also present the detectors calibration results, paying attention to energy resolution (~0.5 keV), energy thresholds (~4-15 keV for Silicon and ~4-20 keV for CdTe detectors), and spatial coherence of these values over the entire detector.

  1. Improvement of the detector resolution in X-ray spectrometry by using the maximum entropy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Giulio, Eugenio Di; Sabbatucci, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    In every X-ray spectroscopy measurement the influence of the detection system causes loss of information. Different mechanisms contribute to form the so-called detector response function (DRF): the detector efficiency, the escape of photons as a consequence of photoelectric or scattering interactions, the spectrum smearing due to the energy resolution, and, in solid states detectors (SSD), the charge collection artifacts. To recover the original spectrum, it is necessary to remove the detector influence by solving the so-called inverse problem. The maximum entropy unfolding technique solves this problem by imposing a set of constraints, taking advantage of the known a priori information and preserving the positive-defined character of the X-ray spectrum. This method has been included in the tool UMESTRAT (Unfolding Maximum Entropy STRATegy), which adopts a semi-automatic strategy to solve the unfolding problem based on a suitable combination of the codes MAXED and GRAVEL, developed at PTB. In the past UMESTRAT proved the capability to resolve characteristic peaks which were revealed as overlapped by a Si SSD, giving good qualitative results. In order to obtain quantitative results, UMESTRAT has been modified to include the additional constraint of the total number of photons of the spectrum, which can be easily determined by inverting the diagonal efficiency matrix. The features of the improved code are illustrated with some examples of unfolding from three commonly used SSD like Si, Ge, and CdTe. The quantitative unfolding can be considered as a software improvement of the detector resolution.

  2. The Speedster-EXD - A New Event-Triggered Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher; Falcone, Abe; Prieskorn, Zach; Burrows, David

    2015-04-01

    We present the characterization of a new event driven x-ray hybrid CMOS detector developed by Penn State University in collaboration with Teledyne Imaging Sensors. Hybrid CMOS detectors currently have many advantages over CCDs including lower susceptibility to radiation damage, lower power consumption, and faster read-out time to avoid pile-up. The Speedster-EXD hybrid CMOS detector has many new features that improve upon the previous generation of detectors including two new in-pixel features that reduce noise from known noise sources: (1) a low-noise, high-gain CTIA amplifier to eliminate interpixel capacitance crosstalk and (2) in-pixel CDS subtraction to reduce kTC noise. The most exciting new feature of the Speedster-EXD is an in-pixel comparator that enables read out of only the pixels which contain signal from an x-ray event. The comparator threshold can be set by the user so that only pixels with signal above the set threshold are read out. This comparator feature can increase effective frame rate by orders of magnitude. We present the read noise, dark current, interpixel capacitance, energy resolution, and gain variation measurements of two Speedster-EXD detectors.

  3. Characterization of Si Hybrid CMOS Detectors for use in the Soft X-ray Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieskorn, Zachary; Griffith, C.; Bongiorno, S.; Falcone, A.; Burrows, D. N.

    2013-04-01

    We report on the characterization of four Teledyne Imaging Systems HAWAII Hybrid Si CMOS detectors designed for X-ray detection. Three H1RG detectors were studied along with a specially configured H2RG. Hybrid CMOS detectors will be ideal for future X-ray observatories due to their fast readout speeds, high resistance to radiation and micrometeoroid damage and reduced power consumption when compared with CCDs. Read noise, interpixel capacitive crosstalk (IPC), energy resolution, and dark current were all measured for these detectors. The best read noise measurement obtained was 7.1 e- RMS. Energy resolution is reported for two X-ray lines, 1.5 & 5.9 keV, at multiple temperatures between 150 - 210 K. The best resolution measured at 5.9 keV was 250 eV (4.2 %) at 150 K, with IPC contributing significantly to this measured energy distribution. IPC upper limits of 4.0 - 5.5 % (up & down pixels) and 8.7 - 9.7 % (left & right pixels) were calculated, indicating a clear asymmetry. The H2RG, with a unique configuration designed to decrease the capacitive coupling between ROIC pixels, had an IPC of 1.8 ± 1.0 % indicating a dramatic improvement in IPC with no measurable asymmetry. Dark current measurements were in the range of 0.020 ± 0.001- 0.280 ± 0.080 (e- sec-1 pix-1). We also find a consistent break in the fit to the dark current data for each detector. Above 180 K, all the data can be fit by the product of a power law in temperature and an exponential. Below 180 K the dark current decreases more slowly; a shallow power law or constant must be added to each fit, indicating a different form of dark current is dominant in this temperature regime.

  4. Fast Gated Detectors for Ballistic Imaging with Hard X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M D; Sefcik, J; Moran, M; Snavely, R

    1998-07-03

    Intense laser (>10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator Bremstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design for multiple axis views and have the potential for very high spatial (<0.1 mm) and temporal resolution (<10 psec). The temporal resolution can be converted into increased image contrast by gating out the scattered background radiation and detecting only the ballistic photons transmitted by the object of interest. Currently available hard x-ray (>0.1 MeV) imaging systems are limited to a time resolution greater than {approx}60 nsec. Here, we propose the investigation of new types of imaging x-ray detectors which offer the potential for gate times less than 100 psec at photons energies in the 0.1-8 MeV range. Such detectors would find use in a variety of advanced radiographic applications in DOE'S stockpile Stewardship Program.

  5. 3D Medipix2 detector characterization with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, E. N.; Maneuski, D.; Mac Raighne, A.; Parkes, C.; Bates, R.; O'Shea, V.; Fleta, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Alianelli, L.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Marchal, J.; Tartoni, N.

    2011-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) photodiode detectors offer advantages over standard planar photodiodes in a wide range of applications. The main advantage of these sensors for X-ray imaging is their reduced charge sharing between adjacent pixels, which could improve spatial and spectral resolution. However, a drawback of 3D sensors structures is the loss of detection efficiency due to the presence in the pixel structure of heavily doped electrode columns which are insensitive to X-ray. In this work two types of 3D silicon detectors: n-type wafer with hole collecting readout-columns (N-TYPE) and p-type wafer with electron collecting readout-columns (P-TYPE), bump-bounded to a Medipix2 read-out chip were characterized with a 14.5 keV micro-focused X-ray beam from a synchrotron. Measurements of the detection efficiency and the charge sharing were performed at different bias voltages and Medipix2 energy thresholds and compared with those of a standard planar silicon sensor.

  6. The use of small x-ray detectors for deep space relative navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Patrick T.; Gebre-Egziabher, Demoz; Sheikh, Suneel I.

    2012-10-01

    Currently, there is considerable interest in developing technologies that will allow the use of high-energy photon measurements from celestial X-ray sources for deep space relative navigation. The impetus for this is to reduce operational costs in the number of envisioned space missions that will require spacecraft to have autonomous, or semiautonomous, navigation capabilities. For missions close to Earth, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), such as the U.S. Global Positioning System (GPS), are readily available for use and provide high accuracy navigation solutions that can be used for autonomous vehicle operation. However, for missions far from Earth, currently only a few navigation options exist and most do not allow autonomous operation. While the radio telemetry based solutions with proven high performance such as NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) can be used for these class of missions, latencies associated with servicing a fleet of vehicles, such as a constellation of communication or science observation spacecraft, may not be compatible with autonomous operations which require timely updates of navigation solutions. Thus, new alternative solutions are sought with DSN-like accuracy. Because of their highly predictable pulsations, pulsars emitting X-radiation are ideal candidates for this task. These stars are ubiquitous celestial sources that can be used to provide time, attitude, range, and range-rate measurements — key parameters for navigation. Laboratory modeling of pulsar signals and operational aspects such as identifying pulsar-spacecraft geometry and performing cooperative observations with data communication are addressed in this paper. Algorithms and simulation tools that will enable designing and analyzing X-ray navigation concepts for a cis-lunar operational scenario are presented. In this situation, a space vehicle with a large-sized X-ray detector will work cooperatively with a number of smaller vehicles with smaller-sized detectors to

  7. Contrast cancellation technique applied to digital x-ray imaging using silicon strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, C.; Lopez, J.; Sanabria, J. C.; Baldazzi, G.; Bollini, D.; Gombia, M.; Cabal, A.E.; Ceballos, C.; Diaz Garcia, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Taibi, A.; Sarnelli, A.; Tuffanelli, A.; Giubellino, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Prino, F.; Tomassi, E.; Grybos, P.; Idzik, M.; Swientek, K.

    2005-12-15

    Dual-energy mammographic imaging experimental tests have been performed using a compact dichromatic imaging system based on a conventional x-ray tube, a mosaic crystal, and a 384-strip silicon detector equipped with full-custom electronics with single photon counting capability. For simulating mammal tissue, a three-component phantom, made of Plexiglass, polyethylene, and water, has been used. Images have been collected with three different pairs of x-ray energies: 16-32 keV, 18-36 keV, and 20-40 keV. A Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment has also been carried out using the MCNP-4C transport code. The Alvarez-Macovski algorithm has been applied both to experimental and simulated data to remove the contrast between two of the phantom materials so as to enhance the visibility of the third one.

  8. Characterizing X-ray detectors for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-s.; Park, H.-s.; Park, S.-J.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Lee, D.; Choi, Y.-W.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-03-01

    The digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system is a newly developed 3-D imaging technique that overcomes the tissue superposition problems of conventional mammography. Therefore, it produces fewer false positives. In DBT system, several parameters are involved in image acquisition, including geometric components. A series of projections should be acquired at low exposure. This makes the system strongly dependent on the detector's characteristic performance. This study compares two types of x-ray detectors developed by the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI). The first prototype DBT system has a CsI (Tl) scintillator/CMOS based flat panel digital detector (2923 MAM, Dexela Ltd.), with a pixel size of 0.0748 mm. The second uses a-Se based direct conversion full field detector (AXS 2430, analogic) with a pixel size of 0.085 mm. The geometry of both systems is same, with a focal spot 665.8 mm from the detector, and a center of rotation 33 mm above the detector surface. The systems were compared with regard to modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and a new metric, the relative object detectability (ROD). The ROD quantifies the relative performance of each detector at detecting specified objects. The system response function demonstrated excellent linearity (R2>0.99). The CMOS-based detector had a high sensitivity, while the Anrad detector had a large dynamic range. The higher MTF and noise power spectrum (NPS) values were measured using an Anrad detector. The maximum DQE value of the Dexela detector was higher than that of the Anrad detector with a low exposure level, considering one projection exposure for tomosynthesis. Overall, the Dexela detector performed better than did the Anrad detector with regard to the simulated Al wires, spheres, test objects of ROD with low exposure level. In this study, we compared the newly developed prototype DBT system with two different types of x-ray

  9. Large-aperture prism-array lens for high-energy X-ray focusing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Jing; Chang, Guangcai; Shi, Zhan; Li, Ming; Ren, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yi, Futing; Liu, Peng; Sheng, Weifan

    2016-09-01

    A new prism-array lens for high-energy X-ray focusing has been constructed using an array of different prisms obtained from different parabolic structures by removal of passive parts of material leading to a multiple of 2π phase variation. Under the thin-lens approximation the phase changes caused by this lens for a plane wave are exactly the same as those caused by a parabolic lens without any additional corrections when they have the same focal length, which will provide good focusing; at the same time, the total transmission and effective aperture of this lens are both larger than those of a compound kinoform lens with the same focal length, geometrical aperture and feature size. This geometry can have a large aperture that is not limited by the feature size of the lens. Prototype nickel lenses with an aperture of 1.77 mm and focal length of 3 m were fabricated by LIGA technology, and were tested using CCD camera and knife-edge scan method at the X-ray Imaging and Biomedical Application Beamline BL13W1 at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, and provided a focal width of 7.7 µm and a photon flux gain of 14 at an X-ray energy of 50 keV. PMID:27577761

  10. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, W. Rick; Forster, Karl; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Craig, William W.; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Mori, Kaya; Zhang, William W.; Boggs, Steven E.; Stern, Daniel; Kim, Yunjin; Giommi, Paolo; Perri, Matteo; and others

    2013-06-20

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the {approx}10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X-ray satellites. The inherently low background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than 100-fold improvement in sensitivity over the collimated or coded mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. Using its unprecedented combination of sensitivity and spatial and spectral resolution, NuSTAR will pursue five primary scientific objectives: (1) probe obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity out to the peak epoch of galaxy assembly in the universe (at z {approx}< 2) by surveying selected regions of the sky; (2) study the population of hard X-ray-emitting compact objects in the Galaxy by mapping the central regions of the Milky Way; (3) study the non-thermal radiation in young supernova remnants, both the hard X-ray continuum and the emission from the radioactive element {sup 44}Ti; (4) observe blazars contemporaneously with ground-based radio, optical, and TeV telescopes, as well as with Fermi and Swift, to constrain the structure of AGN jets; and (5) observe line and continuum emission from core-collapse supernovae in the Local Group, and from nearby Type Ia events, to constrain explosion models. During its baseline two-year mission, NuSTAR will also undertake a broad program of targeted observations. The observatory consists of two co-aligned grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes pointed at celestial targets by a three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Deployed into a 600 km, near-circular, 6 Degree-Sign inclination orbit, the observatory has now completed commissioning, and is performing consistent with pre-launch expectations. NuSTAR is now executing its primary science mission, and with an

  11. Neutron Radiation Shielding For The NIF Streaked X-Ray Detector (SXD) Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P; Holder, J; Young, B; Kalantar, D; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2006-11-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is preparing for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) scheduled in 2010. The NIC is comprised of several ''tuning'' physics subcampaigns leading up to a demonstration of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. In some of these experiments, time-resolved x-ray imaging of the imploding capsule may be required to measure capsule trajectory (shock timing) or x-ray ''bang-time''. A capsule fueled with pure tritium (T) instead of a deutriun-tritium (DT) mixture is thought to offer useful physics surrogacy, with reduced yields of up to 5e14 neutrons. These measurements will require the use of the NIF streak x-ray detector (SXD). The resulting prompt neutron fluence at the planned SXD location ({approx}1.7 m from the target) would be {approx}1.4e9/cm{sup 2}. Previous measurements suggest the onset of significant background at a neutron fluence of {approx} 1e8/cm{sup 2}. The radiation damage and operational upsets which starts at {approx}1e8 rad-Si/sec must be factored into an integrated experimental campaign plan. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to predict the neutron and gamma/x-ray fluences and radiation doses for the proposed diagnostic configuration. A possible shielding configuration is proposed to mitigate radiation effects. The primary component of this shielding is an 80 cm thickness of Polyethylene (PE) between target chamber center (TCC) and the SXD diagnostic. Additionally, 6-8 cm of PE around the detector provide from the large number of neutrons that scatter off the inside of the target chamber. This proposed shielding configuration reduces the high-energy neutron fluence at the SXD by approximately a factor {approx}50.

  12. Possible use of CdTe detectors in kVp monitoring of diagnostic x-ray tubes

    PubMed Central

    Krmar, M.; Bucalović, N.; Baucal, M.; Jovančević, N.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that kVp of diagnostic X-ray devices (or maximal energy of x-ray photon spectra) should be monitored routinely; however a standardized noninvasive technique has yet to be developed and proposed. It is well known that the integral number of Compton scattered photons and the intensities of fluorescent x-ray lines registered after irradiation of some material by an x-ray beam are a function of the maximal beam energy. CdTe detectors have sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual x-ray fluorescence lines and high efficiency for the photon energies in the diagnostic region. Our initial measurements have demonstrated that the different ratios of the integral number of Compton scattered photons and intensities of K and L fluorescent lines detected by CdTe detector are sensitive function of maximal photon energy and could be successfully applied for kVp monitoring. PMID:21037976

  13. Review of hybrid pixel detector readout ASICs for spectroscopic X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabriga, R.; Alozy, J.; Campbell, M.; Frojdh, E.; Heijne, E. H. M.; Koenig, T.; Llopart, X.; Marchal, J.; Pennicard, D.; Poikela, T.; Tlustos, L.; Valerio, P.; Wong, W.; Zuber, M.

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor detector readout chips with pulse processing electronics have made possible spectroscopic X-ray imaging, bringing an improvement in the overall image quality and, in the case of medical imaging, a reduction in the X-ray dose delivered to the patient. In this contribution we review the state of the art in semiconductor-detector readout ASICs for spectroscopic X-ray imaging with emphasis on hybrid pixel detector technology. We discuss how some of the key challenges of the technology (such as dealing with high fluxes, maintaining spectral fidelity, power consumption density) are addressed by the various ASICs. In order to understand the fundamental limits of the technology, the physics of the interaction of radiation with the semiconductor detector and the process of signal induction in the input electrodes of the readout circuit are described. Simulations of the process of signal induction are presented that reveal the importance of making use of the small pixel effect to minimize the impact of the slow motion of holes and hole trapping in the induced signal in high-Z sensor materials. This can contribute to preserve fidelity in the measured spectrum with relatively short values of the shaper peaking time. Simulations also show, on the other hand, the distortion in the energy spectrum due to charge sharing and fluorescence photons when the pixel pitch is decreased. However, using recent measurements from the Medipix3 ASIC, we demonstrate that the spectroscopic information contained in the incoming photon beam can be recovered by the implementation in hardware of an algorithm whereby the signal from a single photon is reconstructed and allocated to the pixel with the largest deposition.

  14. Detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon-counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable novel energy-dependent imaging methods. Similar to conventional detectors, optimizing image SPC quality will require systems that produce the highest possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE). This paper builds on the cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) framework to develop a comprehensive description of the DQE of SPC detectors that implement adaptive binning. Methods: The DQE of SPC systems can be described using the CSA approach by propagating the probability density function (PDF) of the number of image-forming quanta through simple quantum processes. New relationships are developed to describe PDF transfer through serial and parallel cascades to accommodate scatter reabsorption. Results are applied to hypothetical silicon and selenium-based flat-panel SPC detectors including the effects of reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons from photoelectric and Compton interactions, stochastic conversion of x-ray energy to secondary quanta, depth-dependent charge collection, and electronic noise. Results are compared with a Monte Carlo study. Results: Depth-dependent collection efficiency can result in substantial broadening of photopeaks that in turn may result in reduced DQE at lower x-ray energies (20–45 keV). Double-counting interaction events caused by reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons may result in falsely inflated image signal-to-noise ratio and potential overestimation of the DQE. Conclusions: The CSA approach is extended to describe signal and noise propagation through photoelectric and Compton interactions in SPC detectors, including the effects of escape and reabsorption of emission/scatter photons. High-performance SPC systems can be achieved but only for certain combinations of secondary conversion gain, depth-dependent collection efficiency, electronic noise, and reabsorption characteristics.

  15. Characterization of Si Hybrid CMOS Detectors for use in the Soft X-ray Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieskorn, Zachary; Griffith, C.; Bongiorno, S.; Falcone, A.; Burrows, D. N.

    2014-01-01

    In a joint program between Penn State University and Teledyne Imaging Sensors a soft X-ray detector based on the HAWAII Hybrid Si CMOS detector (HCD) has been developed. HCDs could potentially be the optimum detectors for the next generation of X-ray missions, especially those with focused optics and/or large effective area. These innovative detectors are active pixel sensors (APS) which allow a pixel to be read through individual in-pixel electronics, without the need to transfer charge across many pixels, in contrast to a CCD. They are made by bonding a Si absorbing layer to a pixelated CMOS readout, allowing the two layers to be optimized independently. The advantages of this design compared to CCDs are high speed timing 100 μs in full imaging mode), a flexible windowed readout to reduce pile-up, dramatically improved radiation hardness and resistance to micrometeoroid damage, and reduced power requirements. We present recent measurements of energy resolution, read noise, inter-pixel crosstalk, quantum efficiency, and dark current for four of these devices.

  16. On-orbit calibration status of the hard x-ray detector (HXD) onboard Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Mizuno, T.; Takahashi, H.; Hayashi, K.; Hiragi, K.; Mizuno, M.; Yamada, S.; Kawaharada, M.; Kokubun, M.; Nakazawa, K.; Watanabe, S.; Tanaka, T.; Terada, Y.

    2010-07-01

    Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) onboard Suzaku, the Japanese 5th X-ray observatory, consists of 64 PIN photo diodes with 2 mm thickness (10-70 keV) and 16 phoswich detectors using 5 mm-thick GSO scintillators and BGO active collimators (40-600 keV), and these are surrounded by 20 units of BGO Active shields. All the detector units have been working well with no significant troubles in four and a half years since the launch on July 2005, and given many important scientific results. In this paper, we report the recent status of on-orbit calibrations for PIN/GSO detectors. For the PIN, analog/digital threshold levels of both in-orbit and on-ground are raised up to avoid the increasing noise events due to in-orbit radiation damage. For the GSO, the accuracy of the energy scale and modeling of gain variations are improved, and newly calibrated data set including background files and response matrices are released on April 2010.

  17. Development of EXITE2: a large-area imaging phoswich detector/telescope for hard x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, Raj P.; Lum, Kenneth S.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Krockenberger, Martin; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1993-11-01

    We review design considerations and present preliminary details of the performance of a new imaging system for hard X-ray astronomy in the 20 - 600 keV energy range. The detector is a 40 cm X 40 cm NaI(Tl)/CsI(Na) phoswich module, read out by a 7 X 7 array of square PMTs. The detector comprises the main part of the next generation Energetic X-ray Imaging Telescope Experiment (EXITE2), which had its first flight on 13 June 1993 from Palestine, Texas. Imaging is accomplished via the coded-aperture mask technique. The mask consists of 16 mm square lead/tin/copper pixels arranged in a cyclically repeated 13 X 11 uniformly redundant array pattern at a focal length of 2.5 m, giving 22 arcmin resolution. The field of view, determined by the lead/brass collimator (16 mm pitch) is 4.65 degrees FWHM. We anticipate a 3 sigma sensitivity of 1 X 10(superscript -5) photons cm(superscript -2) s(superscript -1) keV(superscript -1) at 100 keV in a 10(superscript 4) sec balloon observation. The electronics incorporate two on-board computers, providing a future capability to record the full data stream and telemeter compressed data. The design of the current detector and electronics allows an upgrade to EXITE3, which adds a proportional counter front-end to achieve lower background and better spatial and spectral resolution below approximately 100 keV.

  18. Fast 2-D soft X-ray imaging device based on micro pattern gas detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacella, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Pizzicaroli, G.

    2003-09-01

    An innovative fast system for X-ray imaging has been developed at ENEA Frascati (Italy) to be used as diagnostic of magnetic plasmas for thermonuclear fusion. It is based on a pinhole camera coupled to a Micro Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) having a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) as amplifying stage. This detector (2.5 cm × 2.5 cm active area) is equipped with a 2-D read-out printed circuit board with 144 pixels (12 × 12), with an electronic channel for each pixel (charge conversion, shaping, discrimination and counting). Working in photon counting mode, in proportional regime, it is able to get X-ray images of the plasma in a selectable X-ray energy range, at very high photon fluxes (106 ph s-̊1mm-2 all over the detector) and high framing rate (up to 100 kHz). It has very high dynamic range, high signal to noise ratio (statistical) and large flexibility in the optical configurations (magnification and views on the plasma). The system has been tested successfully on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU), having central electron temperature of a few keV and density of 1020 m-3, during the summer 2001, with a one-dimensional perpendicular view of the plasma. In collaboration with ENEA, the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and Princeton Plasma Physics (PPPL), this system has been set up and calibrated in the X-ray energy range 2-8 keV and it has been installed, with a two-dimensional tangential view, on the spherical tokamak NSTX at Princeton. Time resolved X-ray images of the NSTX plasma core have been obtained. Fast acquisitions, performed up to 50 kHz of framing rate, allow the study of the plasma evolution and its magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities, while with a slower sampling (a few kHz) the curvature of the magnetic surfaces can be measured. All these results reveal the good imaging properties of this device at high time resolution, despite of the low number of pixels, and the effectiveness of the fine controlled energy discrimination.

  19. Signal and noise transfer properties of photoelectric interactions in diagnostic x-ray imaging detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hajdok, G.; Yao, J.; Battista, J. J.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2006-10-15

    Image quality in diagnostic x-ray imaging is ultimately limited by the statistical properties governing how, and where, x-ray energy is deposited in a detector. This in turn depends on the physics of the underlying x-ray interactions. In the diagnostic energy range (10-100 keV), most of the energy deposited in a detector is through photoelectric interactions. We present a theoretical model of the photoelectric effect that specifically addresses the statistical nature of energy absorption by photoelectrons, K and L characteristic x rays, and Auger electrons. A cascaded-systems approach is used that employs a complex structure of parallel cascades to describe signal and noise transfer through the photoelectric effect in terms of the modulation transfer function, Wiener noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The model was evaluated by comparing results with Monte Carlo calculations for x-ray converters based on amorphous selenium (a-Se) and lead (Pb), representing both low and high-Z materials. When electron transport considerations can be neglected, excellent agreement (within 3%) is obtained for each metric over the entire diagnostic energy range in both a-Se and Pb detectors up to 30 cycles/mm, the highest frequency tested. The cascaded model overstates the DQE when the electron range cannot be ignored. This occurs at approximately two cycles/mm in a-Se at an incident photon energy of 80 keV, whereas in Pb, excellent agreement is obtained for the DQE over the entire diagnostic energy range. However, within the context of mammography (20 keV) and micro-computed tomography (40 keV), the effects of electron transport on the DQE are negligible compared to fluorescence reabsorption, which can lead to decreases of up to 30% and 20% in a-Se and Pb, respectively, at 20 keV; and 10% and 5%, respectively, at 40 keV. It is shown that when Swank noise is identified in a Fourier model, the Swank factor must be frequency dependent. This factor decreases

  20. Signal and noise transfer properties of photoelectric interactions in diagnostic x-ray imaging detectors.

    PubMed

    Hajdok, G; Yao, J; Battista, J J; Cunningham, I A

    2006-10-01

    Image quality in diagnostic x-ray imaging is ultimately limited by the statistical properties governing how, and where, x-ray energy is deposited in a detector. This in turn depends on the physics of the underlying x-ray interactions. In the diagnostic energy range (10-100 keV), most of the energy deposited in a detector is through photoelectric interactions. We present a theoretical model of the photoelectric effect that specifically addresses the statistical nature of energy absorption by photoelectrons, K and L characteristic x rays, and Auger electrons. A cascaded-systems approach is used that employs a complex structure of parallel cascades to describe signal and noise transfer through the photoelectric effect in terms of the modulation transfer function, Wiener noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The model was evaluated by comparing results with Monte Carlo calculations for x-ray converters based on amorphous selenium (a-Se) and lead (Pb), representing both low and high-Z materials. When electron transport considerations can be neglected, excellent agreement (within 3%) is obtained for each metric over the entire diagnostic energy range in both a-Se and Pb detectors up to 30 cycles/mm, the highest frequency tested. The cascaded model overstates the DQE when the electron range cannot be ignored. This occurs at approximately two cycles/mm in a-Se at an incident photon energy of 80 keV, whereas in Pb, excellent agreement is obtained for the DQE over the entire diagnostic energy range. However, within the context of mammography (20 keV) and micro-computed tomography (40 keV), the effects of electron transport on the DQE are negligible compared to fluorescence reabsorption, which can lead to decreases of up to 30% and 20% in a-Se and Pb, respectively, at 20 keV; and 10% and 5%, respectively, at 40 keV. It is shown that when Swank noise is identified in a Fourier model, the Swank factor must be frequency dependent. This factor decreases

  1. Application of GaAs and CdTe photoconductor detectors to X-ray flash radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathy, F.; Cuzin, M.; Gagelin, J. J.; Mermet, R.; Piaget, B.; Rustique, J.; Verger, L.; Hauducoeur, A.; Nicolas, P.; Le Dain, L.; Hyvernage, M.

    1992-11-01

    Some insulating GaAs and CdTe:Cl photoconductor probes were qualified on high energy X-ray single-shot flash generators. The estimated minimum detected dose per flash corresponding to a 230 mrad direct beam attenuated by 200 mm lead was 20 μ rad. The dynamic range was about 4 decades in amplitude or charge, with a good linearity. Such detectors, by locating the origin of the parasitic scattered beam, could be used to eliminate this parasitic beam in X-ray flash radiography in detonics experiments. Imaging possibilities are mentioned, as well as X-ray generator monitoring with such detectors or with neutron preirradiated photoconductors.

  2. Usefulness of an energy-binned photon-counting x-ray detector for dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Tatsumasa; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Ogawa, Koichi; Fujiwara, Shuu

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed dental panoramic radiography system is equipped with a photon-counting semiconductor detector. This photon-counting detector acquires transparent X-ray beams by dividing them into several energy bands. We developed a method to identify dental materials in the patient's teeth by means of the X-ray energy analysis of panoramic radiographs. We tested various dental materials including gold alloy, dental amalgam, dental cement, and titanium. The results of this study suggest that X-ray energy scattergram analysis could be used to identify a range of dental materials in a patient's panoramic radiograph.

  3. Close-packed arrays of transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters with high spectral resolution at 5.9 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-07

    We present measurements of high fill-factor arrays of superconducting transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters designed to provide rapid thermalization of the x-ray energy. We designed an x-ray absorber that is cantilevered over the sensitive part of the thermometer itself, making contact only at normal-metal features. With absorbers made of electroplated gold, we have demonstrated an energy resolution between 2.4 and 3.1 eV at 5.9 keV on 13 separate pixels. We have determined the thermal and electrical parameters of the devices throughout the superconducting transition and, using these parameters, have modeled all aspects of the detector performance.

  4. Close-packed Arrays of Transition-edge X-ray Microcalorimeters with High Spectral Resolution at 5.9 keV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of high fill-factor arrays of superconducting transition-edge x-ray microcalorimeters designed to provide rapid thermalization of the x-ray energy. We designed an x-ray absorber that is cantilevered over the sensitive part of the thermometer itself, making contact only at normal metal-features. With absorbers made of electroplated gold, we have demonstrated an energy resolution between 2.4 and 3.1 eV at 5.9 keV on 13 separate pixels. We have determined the thermal and electrical parameters of the devices throughout the superconducting transition, and, using these parameters, have modeled all aspects of the detector performance.

  5. Towards hybrid pixel detectors for energy-dispersive or soft X-ray photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Huthwelker, T; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2016-03-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications at free-electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. The JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype presented here is specifically geared towards low-noise performance and hence soft X-ray detection. The design, geometry and readout architecture of JUNGFRAU 0.4 correspond to those of other JUNGFRAU pixel detectors, which are charge-integrating detectors with 75 µm × 75 µm pixels. Main characteristics of JUNGFRAU 0.4 are its fixed gain and r.m.s. noise of as low as 27 e(-) electronic noise charge (<100 eV) with no active cooling. The 48 × 48 pixels JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype can be combined with a charge-sharing suppression mask directly placed on the sensor, which keeps photons from hitting the charge-sharing regions of the pixels. The mask consists of a 150 µm tungsten sheet, in which 28 µm-diameter holes are laser-drilled. The mask is aligned with the pixels. The noise and gain characterization, and single-photon detection as low as 1.2 keV are shown. The performance of JUNGFRAU 0.4 without the mask and also in the charge-sharing suppression configuration (with the mask, with a `software mask' or a `cluster finding' algorithm) is tested, compared and evaluated, in particular with respect to the removal of the charge-sharing contribution in the spectra, the detection efficiency and the photon rate capability. Energy-dispersive and imaging experiments with fluorescence X-ray irradiation from an X-ray tube and a synchrotron light source are successfully demonstrated with an r.m.s. energy resolution of 20% (no mask) and 14% (with the mask) at 1.2 keV and of 5% at 13.3 keV. The performance evaluation of the JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype suggests that this detection system could be the starting point for a future detector development effort for either applications in the soft X-ray energy regime or for an energy

  6. Towards hybrid pixel detectors for energy-dispersive or soft X-ray photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Huthwelker, T; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2016-03-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications at free-electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. The JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype presented here is specifically geared towards low-noise performance and hence soft X-ray detection. The design, geometry and readout architecture of JUNGFRAU 0.4 correspond to those of other JUNGFRAU pixel detectors, which are charge-integrating detectors with 75 µm × 75 µm pixels. Main characteristics of JUNGFRAU 0.4 are its fixed gain and r.m.s. noise of as low as 27 e(-) electronic noise charge (<100 eV) with no active cooling. The 48 × 48 pixels JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype can be combined with a charge-sharing suppression mask directly placed on the sensor, which keeps photons from hitting the charge-sharing regions of the pixels. The mask consists of a 150 µm tungsten sheet, in which 28 µm-diameter holes are laser-drilled. The mask is aligned with the pixels. The noise and gain characterization, and single-photon detection as low as 1.2 keV are shown. The performance of JUNGFRAU 0.4 without the mask and also in the charge-sharing suppression configuration (with the mask, with a `software mask' or a `cluster finding' algorithm) is tested, compared and evaluated, in particular with respect to the removal of the charge-sharing contribution in the spectra, the detection efficiency and the photon rate capability. Energy-dispersive and imaging experiments with fluorescence X-ray irradiation from an X-ray tube and a synchrotron light source are successfully demonstrated with an r.m.s. energy resolution of 20% (no mask) and 14% (with the mask) at 1.2 keV and of 5% at 13.3 keV. The performance evaluation of the JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype suggests that this detection system could be the starting point for a future detector development effort for either applications in the soft X-ray energy regime or for an energy

  7. Development and Operation of Arrays of TES x-ray Microcalorimeters Suitable for Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Brown, A. D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Smith, S. J.; Irwin, K. D.

    2008-01-01

    Having already developed a transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeter design that enables uniform and reproducible high spectral resolution (routinely better than 3 eV resolution at 6 keV) and is compatible with high fill-factor arrays, we are now working towards demonstrating this performance at high count rates and with the multiplexed read-out needed for instrumenting the Constellation-X X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) focal plane array. Design changes that increase the speed of the individual XMS pixels, such as lowering the heat capacity or increasing the thermal conductance of the link to the 50-mK heatsink, result in larger, faster signals, thus the coupling to the multiplexer and the overall bandwidth of the electronics must accommodate this increase in slew rate. In order to operate the array with high incident x-ray flux without unacceptable degradation of the spectral resolution, the magnitude of thermal and electrical crosstalk must be controlled. We will discuss recent progress in the thermal and electrical designs of our close-packed TES arrays, and we will present spectra acquired through the read-out chain from the multiplexer electronics, through the demultiplexer software, to real-time signal processing.

  8. Development of the superconducting detectors and read-out for the X-IFU instrument on board of the X-ray observatory Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardi, L.; Akamatsu, H.; Bruijn, M. P.; den Hartog, R.; den Herder, J.-W.; Jackson, B.; Kiviranta, M.; van der Kuur, J.; van Weers, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High-Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected by ESA as its second large-class mission. The future European X-ray observatory will study the hot and energetic Universe with its launch foreseen in 2028. Microcalorimeters based on superconducting Transition-edge sensor (TES) are the chosen technology for the detectors array of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board of Athena. The X-IFU is a 2-D imaging integral-field spectrometer operating in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV). The detector consists of an array of 3840 TESs coupled to X-ray absorbers and read out in the MHz bandwidth using Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). The proposed design calls for devices with a high filling-factor, high quantum efficiency, relatively high count-rate capability and an energy resolution of 2.5 eV at 5.9 keV. The paper will review the basic principle and the physics of the TES-based microcalorimeters and present the state-of-the art of the FDM read-out.

  9. A diamond detector for inertial confinement fusion X-ray bang-time measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee, A G; Brown, C; Burns, S; Celeste, J; Glenzer, S H; Hey, D; Jones, O S; Landen, O; Mackinnon, A J; Meezan, N; Parker, J; Edgell, D; Glebov, V Y; Kilkenny, J; Kimbrough, J

    2010-11-09

    An instrument has been developed to measure X-ray bang-time for inertial confinement fusion capsules; the time interval between the start of the laser pulse and peak X-ray emission from the fuel core. The instrument comprises chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline diamond photoconductive X-ray detectors with highly ordered pyrolytic graphite X-ray monochromator crystals at the input. Capsule bang-time can be measured in the presence of relatively high thermal and hard X-ray background components due to the selective band pass of the crystals combined with direct and indirect X-ray shielding of the detector elements. A five channel system is being commissioned at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for implosion optimization measurements as part of the National Ignition Campaign. Characteristics of the instrument have been measured demonstrating that X-ray bang-time can be measured with {+-} 30ps precision, characterizing the soft X-ray drive to +/- 1eV or 1.5%.

  10. Observed On-Orbit Background of the ACIS Detector on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plucinsky, P. P.; Virani, S. N.

    2000-01-01

    We have analyzed calibration data acquired during the Orbital Activation and Checkout (OAC) phase of the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) mission in order to characterize the background of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) produced by charged particles and non-cosmic X-rays. The ACIS instrument contains 8 Front-Illuminated (FI) CCDs and 2 Back-Illuminated (BI) CCDs. The FI and BI CCD)s exhibit dramatically different responses to enhancements in the particle flux. The F1 CCDs show relatively little increase in the overall count rate, typical increases are 1 - 3 counts/s; the BI CCDs show large excursions to as high as 100 counts/s. The duration of these intervals of enhanced background are highly variable ranging from 100 s to 5000 s. The spatial distribution of these background events is relatively flat across the power-law. The events produce morphologies which are similar to cosmic X-ray events, so that morphology alone cannot be used as a rejection criterion. We explore the correlation of these times of high background with the data from Chandra's on-board radiation monitor, the EPHIN (Electron, Proton, Helium Instrument particle detector) instrument and archival data from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite. We discuss strategies for observers to identify and exclude times of high background and to model and subtract the background events from their data.

  11. Data Flow Design for Event Detection and Qualification in TES X-Ray Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, M. T.; Cobo, B.; Fraga-Encinas, R.; van der Kuur, J.; Schuurmans, J.; Gottardi, L.

    2013-10-01

    The current and forthcoming research lines in X-ray astronomy will require unprecedented spectral resolution with imaging capabilities. The most promising detectors able to provide these capabilities are the calorimeters based on Transition Edge Sensor (TES) technologies, like the one that has been under development for the proposed ATHENA x-ray space mission. We present here the Data Flow designed for one of such instruments covering the detection algorithms to extract the x-ray events (photons) from the noisy signal (as well as to cope with a possible pile-up), the event qualification (event grade) according to the event arrival time and proximity to other events, and finally the filtering process applied to these pulses to get their energy content, and thus the astronomical source spectrum. This development is currently part of a collaboration between IFCA (Spain) and SRON (NL) institutes, as part of a larger project initiated in 2005 and named EURECA (de Korte et al. 2009) involving many other institutes in Europe and the USA. This project was created to design the TES prototype proposed for the XEUS/IXO/ATHENA ESA missions.

  12. Collecting data in the home laboratory: evolution of X-ray sources, detectors and working practices

    SciTech Connect

    Skarzynski, Tadeusz

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in X-ray crystallographic hardware related to structural biology research are presented and discussed. While the majority of macromolecular X-ray data are currently collected using highly efficient beamlines at an ever-increasing number of synchrotrons, there is still a need for high-performance reliable systems for in-house experiments. In addition to crystal screening and optimization of data-collection parameters before a synchrotron trip, the home system allows the collection of data as soon as the crystals are produced to obtain the solution of novel structures, especially by the molecular-replacement method, and is invaluable in achieving the quick turnover that is often required for ligand-binding studies in the pharmaceutical industry. There has been a continuous evolution of X-ray sources, detectors and software developed for in-house use in recent years and a diverse range of tools for structural biology laboratories are available. An overview of the main directions of these developments and examples of specific solutions available to the macromolecular crystallography community are presented in this paper, showing that data collection ‘at home’ is still an attractive proposition complementing the use of synchrotron beamlines.

  13. EMCCD-Based High Resolution Dynamic X-Ray Detector for Neurovascular Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P.; Vasan, S.N. Swetadri; Jain, A.; Panse, A.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic detector for neurovascular interventions. The heart of the detector is a 1024 × 1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2, bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a 3.3:1 fiber optic taper (FOT). The detector provides x-ray images of 9 cycles/mm resolution at 15 frames/sec and real time live video at 30 frames/sec with binning at a lower resolution, both independent of gain applied to EMCCD, as needed for region-of-interest (ROI) image guidance during neurovascular interventions. PMID:22256144

  14. Quasiparticle Self-Recombination in Double STJs Strip X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, V. A.; Gorkov, V. P.

    2009-12-16

    The quasiparticle self-recombination was considered in the frame of 2D diffusion model of the strip X-ray detectors. The detector consists of a long superconducting strip, which is ended by the trapping layers and superconducting tunnel junctions at each end. The model takes into account the 2D-diffusion of the excess quasiparticles, quasiparticle trapping at the tunnel junctions and quasiparticle losses in the volume of the strip and at the strip boundaries. Self-recombination was described by a quadratic term. As the analytical solution is absent, the numeric calculations were carried out. It has been shown that the self-recombination as well as quasiparticle losses at the strip boundaries caused the dependence of the signals on the photon absorption site in transverse direction. The latter worsens the energy resolution and transforms the spectral line of the detector to nongaussian shape.

  15. Focal spot deblurring for high resolution direct conversion x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Rana, R.; Russ, M.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    Small pixel high resolution direct x-ray detectors have the advantage of higher spatial sampling and decreased blurring characteristic. The limiting factors for such systems becomes the degradation due to the focal spot size. One solution is a smaller focal spot; however, this can limit the output of the x-ray tube. Here a software solution of deconvolving with an estimated focal spot blur is presented. To simulate images from a direct detector affected with focal-spot blur, first a set of high-resolution stent images (FRED from Microvention, Inc., Tustin, CA) were acquired using a 75μm pixel size Dexela-Perkin-Elmer detector and frame averaged to reduce quantum noise. Then the averaged image was blurred with a known Gaussian blur. To add noise to the blurred image a flat-field image was multiplied with the blurred image. Both the ideal and the noisy-blurred images were then deconvolved with the known Gaussian function using either threshold-based inverse filtering or Weiner deconvolution. The blur in the ideal image was removed and the details were recovered successfully. However, the inverse filtering deconvolution process is extremely susceptible to noise. The Weiner deconvolution process was able to recover more of the details of the stent from the noisy-blurred image, but for noisier images, stent details are still lost in the recovery process.

  16. POLARIZATION STUDIES OF CdZnTe DETECTORS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMARDA,G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-07-01

    New results on the effects of small-scale defects on the charge-carrier transport in single-crystal CdZnTe (CZT) material were produced. We conducted detailed studies of the role of Te inclusions in CZT by employing a highly collimated synchrotron x-ray radiation source available at Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We were able to induce polarization effects by irradiating specific areas with the detector. These measurements allowed the first quantitative comparison between areas that are free of Te inclusions and those with a relatively high concentration of inclusions. The results of these polaration studies will be reported.

  17. X-ray detectors based on GaN Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Duboz, Jean-Yves; Frayssinet, Eric; Chenot, Sebastien; Reverchon, Jean-Luc; Idir, Mourad

    2010-10-18

    GaN Schottky diodes have been fabricated and tested as x-ray detectors in the range from 6 to 21 keV. The spectral response has been measured and is compared to its theoretical value. The study of the response and its temporal dynamics as a function of the bias allows to identify a photovoltaic behavior at low bias and a photoconductive one at larger reverse biases. The GaN diode turned out to be linear as a function of the incident power. The noise and detectivity are given and discussed.

  18. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  19. A Versatile Hemispherical Great Area X-ray Detector for Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Rodolfo; Belmar, Felipe

    2009-01-29

    This work presents an X-ray detector with fullerene C60 semi spherical geometry constituted by a set of small cylindrical proportional counter units with needles anodes, which are located in the surface of an hemispherical plastic support. The sample to be analyzed is placed on the center of the hemisphere base. The radiation may enter by one of its flanks or through the hemisphere top. The hemispherical zone that exists between the holder sample base and the proportional counters can be vacuumed, aired or filled with counter gas.

  20. Characterization of Si hybrid CMOS detectors for use in the soft X-ray band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieskorn, Zachary; Griffith, Christopher V.; Bongiorno, Stephen D.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Burrows, David N.

    2013-07-01

    We report on the characterization of four Teledyne Imaging Systems HAWAII Hybrid Si CMOS detectors designed for X-ray detection. Three H1RG detectors were studied along with a specially configured H2RG. Read noise measurements were performed, with the lowest result being 7.1 e- RMS. Interpixel capacitive crosstalk (IPC) was measured for the three H1RGs and for the H2RG. The H1RGs had IPC upper limits of 4.0-5.5% (up & down pixels) and 8.7-9.7% (left & right pixels), indicating a clear asymmetry. Energy resolution is reported for two X-ray lines, 1.5 & 5.9 keV, at multiple temperatures between 150 and 210 K. The best resolution measured at 5.9 keV was 250 eV (4.2%) at 150 K, with IPC contributing significantly to this measured energy distribution. The H2RG, with a unique configuration designed to decrease the capacitive coupling between ROIC pixels, had an IPC of 1.8±1.0% indicating a dramatic improvement in IPC with no measurable asymmetry. We also measured dark current as a function of temperature for each detector. For the detector with the lowest dark current, at 150 K, we measured a dark current of 0.020±0.001 (e- s-1 pixel-1). There is also a consistent break in the fit to the dark current data for each detector. Above 180 K, all the data can be fit by the product of a power law in temperature and an exponential. Below 180 K the dark current decreases more slowly; a shallow power law or constant must be added to each fit, indicating a different form of dark current is dominant in this temperature regime. Dark current figures of merit at 293 K are estimated from the fit for each detector.

  1. Statistical reconstruction for x-ray computed tomography using energy-integrating detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasio, Giovanni M.; Whiting, Bruce R.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2007-04-01

    Statistical image reconstruction (SR) algorithms have the potential to significantly reduce x-ray CT image artefacts because they use a more accurate model than conventional filtered backprojection and can incorporate effects such as noise, incomplete data and nonlinear detector response. Most SR algorithms assume that the CT detectors are photon-counting devices and generate Poisson-distributed signals. However, actual CT detectors integrate energy from the x-ray beam and exhibit compound Poisson-distributed signal statistics. This study presents the first assessment of the impact on image quality of the resultant mismatch between the detector and signal statistics models assumed by the sinogram data model and the reconstruction algorithm. A 2D CT projection simulator was created to generate synthetic polyenergetic transmission data assuming (i) photon-counting with simple Poisson-distributed signals and (ii) energy-weighted detection with compound Poisson-distributed signals. An alternating minimization (AM) algorithm was used to reconstruct images from the data models (i) and (ii) for a typical abdominal scan protocol with incident particle fluence levels ranging from 105 to 1.6 × 106 photons/detector. The images reconstructed from data models (i) and (ii) were compared by visual inspection and image-quality figures of merit. The reconstructed image quality degraded significantly when the means were mismatched from the assumed model. However, if the signal means are appropriately modified, images from data models (i) and (ii) did not differ significantly even when SNR is very low. While data-mean mismatches characteristic of the difference between particle-fluence and energy-fluence transmission can cause significant streaking and cupping artefacts, the mismatch between the actual and assumed CT detector signal statistics did not significantly degrade image quality once systematic data means mismatches were corrected.

  2. Development of Tiled Imaging CZT Detectors for Sensitive Wide-Field Hard X-Ray Surveys to EXIST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the proposed EXIST mission, a "medium-class" space observatory to survey black holes and the Early Universe proposed to the 2010 NAS/NRC Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, we have developed the first "large" area 256 sq cm close-tiled (0.6 mm gaps) hard X-ray (20-600 keV) imaging detector employing pixelated (2.5 mm) CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, each 2 x 2 x 0.5 cubic cm. We summarize the design, development and operation of this detector array (8 x 8 CZTs) and its performance as the imager for a coded aperture telescope on a high altitude (40 km) balloon flight in October. 2009, as the ProtoEX1STl payload. We then outline our current development of a second-generation imager, ProtcEXIST2. with 0.6 mm pixels on a 32 x 32 array on each CZT, and how it will lead to the ultimate imaging system needed for EXIST. Other applications of this technology will also be mentioned.

  3. Heel effect adaptive flat field correction of digital x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yongjian; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Anode heel effect renders large-scale background nonuniformities in digital radiographs. Conventional offset/gain calibration is performed at mono source-to-image distance (SID), and disregards the SID-dependent characteristic of heel effect. It results in a residual nonuniform background in the corrected radiographs when the SID settings for calibration and correction differ. In this work, the authors develop a robust and efficient computational method for digital x-ray detector gain correction adapted to SID-variant heel effect, without resorting to physical filters, phantoms, complicated heel effect models, or multiple-SID calibration and interpolation.Methods: The authors present the Duo-SID projection correction method. In our approach, conventional offset/gain calibrations are performed only twice, at the minimum and maximum SIDs of the system in typical clinical use. A fast iterative separation algorithm is devised to extract the detector gain and basis heel patterns from the min/max SID calibrations. The resultant detector gain is independent of SID, while the basis heel patterns are parameterized by the min- and max-SID. The heel pattern at any SID is obtained from the min-SID basis heel pattern via projection imaging principles. The system gain desired at a specific acquisition SID is then constructed using the projected heel pattern and detector gain map.Results: The method was evaluated for flat field and anatomical phantom image corrections. It demonstrated promising improvements over interpolation and conventional gain calibration/correction methods, lowering their correction errors by approximately 70% and 80%, respectively. The separation algorithm was able to extract the detector gain and heel patterns with less than 2% error, and the Duo-SID corrected images showed perceptually appealing uniform background across the detector.Conclusions: The Duo-SID correction method has substantially improved on conventional offset/gain corrections for

  4. 10 cm x 10 cm Single Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) X-ray Fluorescence Detector for Dilute Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaban, E. H.; Siddons, D. P.; Seifu, D.

    2014-03-01

    We have built and tested a 10 cm × 10 cm single Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) X-ray detector to probe dilute amounts of Fe in a prepared sample. The detector uses Argon/Carbon Dioxide (75/25) gas mixture flowing at a slow rate through a leak proof Plexi-glass enclosure held together by O-rings and screws. The Fluorescence X-ray emitted by the element under test is directed through a Mylar window into the drift region of the detector where abundant gas is flowing. The ionized electrons are separated, drifted into the high electric field of the GEM, and multiplied by impact ionization. The amplified negatively charged electrons are collected and further amplified by a Keithley amplifier to probe the absorption edge of the element under test using X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique. The results show that the GEM detector provided good results with less noise as compared with a Silicon drift detector (SDD).

  5. Investigating radial wire array Z pinches as a compact x-ray source on the Saturn generator

    DOE PAGES

    Ampleford, David J.; Bland, S. N.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P.; Cuneo, Michael E.; McBride, Ryan D.; Jones, Brent Manley; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; et al

    2015-08-27

    Radial wire array z pinches, where wires are positioned radially outward from a central cathode to a concentric anode, can act as a compact bright x-ray source that could potentially be used to drive a hohlraum. Experiments were performed on the 7-MA Saturn generator using radial wire arrays. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1-MA level, where they have been shown to be a promising compact X-ray source. Data indicates that at 7 MA, radial wire arrays can radiate ~9 TW with 10-ns full-width at half-maximum from a compact pinch.

  6. Design and Characterization of a Novel Near Field Detector for Three Dimensional X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annett, Scott; Margulies, Lawrence; Dale, Darren; Kycia, Stefan

    Three dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy (3DXRD) is a powerful technique that provides crystallographic and spatial information of a large number of grains in a sample simultaneously. A key component of a 3DXRD experiment is the near field detector which provides high resolution spatial information of the sample. A novel design for a near field detector was developed and characterized. This design, called the Quad Near Field Detector, utilizes four quadrants, each with a dedicated scintillating phosphor and optical microscope. A novel translation stage for focusing the microscopes was developed, tested, and implemented. The near field detector was calibrated and characterized at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. A flood field correction was developed for the detector to correct for variations in intensity response. Diffraction data of all four quadrants was able to reproduce the crystal orientation of the ruby calibrant. In conclusion, the design and implementation of the Quad Near Field Detector was a success and will be a useful tool for future 3DXRD experiments.

  7. Characterization of X-ray polycapillary optics by LiF crystal radiation detectors through confocal fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfigli, Francesca; Hampai, Dariush; Dabagov, Sultan B.; Montereali, Rosa Maria

    2016-08-01

    Solid-state radiation imaging detectors based on photoluminescent colour centres in lithium fluoride (LiF) crystals have been successfully tested for both advanced 2D and 3D characterizations of X-ray polycapillary optics by a table-top laboratory system. Polycapillary optics can control X-ray beams propagation and allows obtaining quasi-parallel beam (half-lens) or focused beams (full-lens). The combination of a fine-focused micro X-ray tube and a polycapillary lens can provide the high intensity radiation fluxes that are necessary for high resolution X-ray imaging. In this paper we present novel results about advanced characterization of these complex optics by 2D as well as 3D confocal laser fluorescence microscopy of X-ray irradiated LiF crystal detectors. Two dimensional high spatial resolution images on a wide field of view of transmitted X-rays through a semi-lens and 3D direct inspection of the coloured volumes produced in LiF crystals by both focused and parallel X-ray beam transmitted by a full and a semi-lens, respectively, as well as their 3D reconstructions were obtained. The results show that the photoluminescent colour centres volume in LiF crystals combined with an optical sectioning reading system provide information about tomography of transmitted X-ray beams by policapillary optics in a single exposure process. For the first time, the use of LiF crystal plates as versatile radiation imaging luminescent detectors have been used to characterize the operation of polycapillary optics as X-ray lens, in focusing and parallel mode.

  8. Comprehensive simulation of the response of a silicon strip detector for position-sensitive measurements of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2005-10-01

    The paper describes a comprehensive simulation method to evaluate X-ray imaging response of a silicon strip detector with particular emphasis on the charge-sharing effects. The simulation steps include: generation of the initial charge distribution in the detector volume, transport of generated charge in the detector volume, calculation of charges induced in the readout strips, discrimination of noisy electronic signals, and finally determination of the count efficiency vs. photon position as a function of the discrimination threshold. The developed simulation tools are useful for optimising the designs and operating parameters of silicon strip detectors used as 1-D position sensitive devices in experimental techniques like X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray high-resolution diffraction and small angle X-ray scattering, using laboratory X-ray sources. The response of the detector as a function of the detector bias and discrimination threshold has been investigated for two measurement configurations: irradiation from the strip-side and from the back-side.

  9. Data processing for soft X-ray diagnostics based on GEM detector measurements for fusion plasma imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, T.; Chernyshova, M.; Pozniak, K. T.; Kasprowicz, G.; Byszuk, A.; Juszczyk, B.; Wojenski, A.; Zabolotny, W.; Zienkiewicz, P.

    2015-12-01

    The measurement system based on GEM - Gas Electron Multiplier detector is developed for X-ray diagnostics of magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. The Triple Gas Electron Multiplier (T-GEM) is presented as soft X-ray (SXR) energy and position sensitive detector. The paper is focused on the measurement subject and describes the fundamental data processing to obtain reliable characteristics (histograms) useful for physicists. So, it is the software part of the project between the electronic hardware and physics applications. The project is original and it was developed by the paper authors. Multi-channel measurement system and essential data processing for X-ray energy and position recognition are considered. Several modes of data acquisition determined by hardware and software processing are introduced. Typical measuring issues are deliberated for the enhancement of data quality. The primary version based on 1-D GEM detector was applied for the high-resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer KX1 in the JET tokamak. The current version considers 2-D detector structures initially for the investigation purpose. Two detector structures with single-pixel sensors and multi-pixel (directional) sensors are considered for two-dimensional X-ray imaging. Fundamental output characteristics are presented for one and two dimensional detector structure. Representative results for reference source and tokamak plasma are demonstrated.

  10. A New Gated X-Ray Detector for the Orion Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, David D.; Aragonez, Robert J.; Archuleta, Thomas N.; Fatherley, Valerie E.; Hsu, Albert H.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Mares, Danielle; Oertel, John A.; Oades, Kevin; Kemshall, Paul; Thomas, Philip; Young, Trevor; Pederson, Neal

    2012-08-08

    Gated X-Ray Detectors (GXD) are considered the work-horse target diagnostic of the laser based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has constructed three new GXDs for the Orion laser facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom. What sets these three new instruments apart from the what has previously been constructed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is: improvements in detector head microwave transmission lines, solid state embedded hard drive and updated control software, and lighter air box design and other incremental mechanical improvements. In this paper we will present the latest GXD design enhancements and sample calibration data taken on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the newly constructed instruments.

  11. A new gated x-ray detector for the Orion laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David D.; Aragonez, Robert; Archuleta, Thomas; Fatherley, Valerie; Hsu, Albert; Jorgenson, Justin; Mares, Danielle; Oertel, John; Oades, Kevin; Kemshall, Paul; Thomas, Phillip; Young, Trevor; Pederson, Neal

    2012-10-01

    Gated X-Ray Detectors (GXD) are considered the work-horse target diagnostic of the laser based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has constructed three new GXDs for the Orion laser facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom. What sets these three new instruments apart from what has previously been constructed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is: improvements in detector head microwave transmission lines, solid state embedded hard drive and updated control software, and lighter air box design and other incremental mechanical improvements. In this paper we will present the latest GXD design enhancements and sample calibration data taken on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the newly constructed instruments.

  12. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Meier, Dirk; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Frey, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to demonstrate that, in x-ray computed tomography (CT), more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with the use of an energy resolved photon-counting detector and classification methodology. Specifically, this applies to the case when contrast agents that contain K-absorption edges in the energy range of interest are present in the object. This separation is enabled via the use of recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detectors with multiple thresholds, which allow simultaneous measurements of the x-ray attenuation at multiple energies. Methods: To demonstrate this capability, we performed simulations and physical experiments using a six-threshold energy resolved photon-counting detector. We imaged mouse-sized cylindrical phantoms filled with several soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials and with iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The linear attenuation coefficients were reconstructed for each material in each energy window and were visualized as scatter plots between pairs of energy windows. For comparison, a dual-kVp CT was also simulated using the same phantom materials. In this case, the linear attenuation coefficients at the lower kVp were plotted against those at the higher kVp. Results: In both the simulations and the physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials, thanks to the availability of the attenuation coefficient measurements at more than two energies provided by the energy resolved photon-counting detector. In the simulations, the amount of separation was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the contrast agents; however, this was not observed in the physical experiments due to limitations of the real detector system. We used the angle between pairs of attenuation coefficient vectors in either the 5-D space (for non-contrast-agent materials using energy resolved photon

  13. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  14. Flat panel X-ray detector with reduced internal scattering for improved attenuation accuracy and dynamic range

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.

    2010-10-12

    An x-ray detector is disclosed that has had all unnecessary material removed from the x-ray beam path, and all of the remaining material in the beam path made as light and as low in atomic number as possible. The resulting detector is essentially transparent to x-rays and, thus, has greatly reduced internal scatter. The result of this is that x-ray attenuation data measured for the object under examination are much more accurate and have an increased dynamic range. The benefits of this improvement are that beam hardening corrections can be made accurately, that computed tomography reconstructions can be used for quantitative determination of material properties including density and atomic number, and that lower exposures may be possible as a result of the increased dynamic range.

  15. Improvement of density resolution in short-pulse hard x-ray radiographic imaging using detector stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borm, B.; Gärtner, F.; Khaghani, D.; Neumayer, P.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that stacking several imaging plates (IPs) constitutes an easy method to increase hard x-ray detection efficiency. Used to record x-ray radiographic images produced by an intense-laser driven hard x-ray backlighter source, the IP stacks resulted in a significant improvement of the radiograph density resolution. We attribute this to the higher quantum efficiency of the combined detectors, leading to a reduced photon noise. Electron-photon transport simulations of the interaction processes in the detector reproduce the observed contrast improvement. Increasing the detection efficiency to enhance radiographic imaging capabilities is equally effective as increasing the x-ray source yield, e.g., by a larger drive laser energy.

  16. Lithographically-fabricated channel arrays for confocal x-ray fluorescence microscopy and XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woll, Arthur R.; Agyeman-Budu, David; Choudhury, Sanjukta; Coulthard, Ian; Finnefrock, Adam C.; Gordon, Robert; Hallin, Emil; Mass, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    Confocal X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy (CXRF) employs overlapping focal regions of two x-ray optics—a condenser and collector—to directly probe a 3D volume. The minimum-achievable size of this probe volume is limited by the collector, for which polycapillaries are generally the optic of choice. Recently, we demonstrated an alternative collection optic for CXRF, consisting of an array of micron-scale collimating channels, etched in silicon, and arranged like spokes of a wheel directed towards a single source position. The optic, while successful, had a working distance of only 0.2 mm and exhibited relatively low total collection efficiency, limiting its practical application. Here, we describe a new design in which the collimating channels are formed by a staggered array of pillars whose side-walls taper away from the channel axis. This approach improves both collection efficiency and working distance, while maintaining excellent spatial resolution. We illustrate these improvements with confocal XRF data obtained at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline 20-ID-B.

  17. Progress on the development of active micro-structured optical arrays for x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Zhang, Dou; Button, Tim; Atkins, Carolyn; Doel, Peter; Wang, Hongchang; Brooks, David; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Michette, Alan; Pfauntsch, Slawka; Sahraei, Shahin; Shand, Matthew; James, Ady; Dunare, Camelia; Stevenson, Tom; Parkes, William; Smith, Andy

    2009-08-01

    The Smart X-Ray Optics (SXO) project comprises a U.K.-based consortium developing active/adaptive micro-structured optical arrays (MOAs). These devices are designed to focus X-rays using grazing incidence reflection through consecutive aligned arrays of microscopic channels etched in silicon. The silicon channels have been produced both by dry and wet etching, the latter providing smoother channel walls. Adaptability is achieved using piezoelectric actuators, which bend the device and therefore change its focal distance. We aim to achieve a 5 cm radius of curvature which can provide a suitable focal length using a tandem pair MOA configuration. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modelling has been carried out for the optimization of the MOA device design, consider different types of actuators (unimorph, bimorph and active fibre composites), and different Si/piezoelectric absolute and relative thicknesses. Prototype devices have been manufactured using a Viscous Plastic Processing Process for the piezoelectric actuators and dry etched silicon channels, bonded together using a low shrinkage adhesive. Characterisation techniques have been developed in order to evaluate the device performance in terms of the bending of the MOA channels produced by the actuators. This paper evaluates the progress to date on the actuation of the MOAs, comparing FEA modelling with the results obtained for different prototype structures.

  18. Physiologically gated microbeam radiation using a field emission x-ray source array

    SciTech Connect

    Chtcheprov, Pavel E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu; Burk, Laurel; Inscoe, Christina; Ger, Rachel; Hadsell, Michael; Lu, Jianping; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto E-mail: zhou@email.unc.edu

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses narrow planes of high dose radiation beams to treat cancerous tumors. This experimental therapy method based on synchrotron radiation has been shown to spare normal tissue at up to 1000 Gy of peak entrance dose while still being effective in tumor eradication and extending the lifetime of tumor-bearing small animal models. Motion during treatment can lead to significant movement of microbeam positions resulting in broader beam width and lower peak to valley dose ratio (PVDR), which reduces the effectiveness of MRT. Recently, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of generating microbeam radiation for small animal treatment using a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array. The purpose of this study is to incorporate physiological gating to the CNT microbeam irradiator to minimize motion-induced microbeam blurring. Methods: The CNT field emission x-ray source array with a narrow line focal track was operated at 160 kVp. The x-ray radiation was collimated to a single 280 μm wide microbeam at entrance. The microbeam beam pattern was recorded using EBT2 Gafchromic{sup ©} films. For the feasibility study, a strip of EBT2 film was attached to an oscillating mechanical phantom mimicking mouse chest respiratory motion. The servo arm was put against a pressure sensor to monitor the motion. The film was irradiated with three microbeams under gated and nongated conditions and the full width at half maximums and PVDRs were compared. An in vivo study was also performed with adult male athymic mice. The liver was chosen as the target organ for proof of concept due to its large motion during respiration compared to other organs. The mouse was immobilized in a specialized mouse bed and anesthetized using isoflurane. A pressure sensor was attached to a mouse's chest to monitor its respiration. The output signal triggered the electron extraction voltage of the field emission source such that x-ray was generated only during a

  19. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, A.; Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 μm, respectively.

  20. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, A. Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S.

    2014-01-15

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 μm, respectively.

  1. XPAD X-ray hybrid pixel detector for charge density quality diffracted intensities on laboratory equipment.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Emmanuel; Dahaoui, Slimane; Alle, Paul; Parois, Pascal; Palin, Cyril; Lecomte, Claude; Schaniel, Dominik

    2014-10-01

    The new generation of X-ray detectors, the hybrid pixel area detectors or `pixel detectors', is based on direct detection and single-photon counting processes. A large linearity range, high dynamic and extremely low noise leading to an unprecedented high signal-to-noise ratio, fast readout time (high frame rates) and an electronic shutter are among their intrinsic characteristics which render them very attractive. First used on synchrotron beamlines, these detectors are also promising in the laboratory, in particular for pump-probe or quasi-static experiments and accurate electron density measurements, as explained in this paper. An original laboratory diffractometer made from a Nonius Mach3 goniometer equipped with an Incoatec Mo microsource and an XPAD pixel area detector has been developed at the CRM2 laboratory. Mo Kα accurate charge density quality data up to 1.21 Å(-1) resolution have been collected on a sodium nitroprusside crystal using this home-made diffractometer. Data quality for charge density analysis based on multipolar modelling are discussed in this paper. Deformation electron densities are compared to those already published (based on data collected with CCD APEXII and CAD4 diffractometers). PMID:25274511

  2. Wire Array Z-Pinch Insights for Enhanced X-Ray Production

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J.P.; Chittenden, J.P.; Greenly, J.B.; Haines, M.G.; Mock, R.C.; Mosher, D.; Peterson, D.L.; Reisman, D.B.; Sanford, T.W.L.; Sinars, D.B.; Spielman, R.B.; Whitnery, K.G.

    1999-01-04

    Comparisons of measured total radiated x-ray power from annular wire-array z-pinches with a variety of models as a function of wire number, array mass, and load radius are reviewed. The data, which are comprehensive, have provided important insights into the features of wire-array dynamics that are critical for high x-ray power generation. Collectively, the comparisons of the data with the model calculations suggest that a number of underlying dynamical mechanisms involving cylindrical asymmetries and plasma instabilities contribute to the measured characteristics. For example, under the general assumption that the measured risetime of the total-radiated-power pulse is related to the thickness of the plasma shell formed on axis, the Heuristic Model [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., 26, 1275 (1998)] agrees with the measured risetime under a number of specific assumptions about the way the breakdown of the wires, the wire-plasma expansion, and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the r-z plane, interact. Likewise, in the high wire-number regime (where the wires are calculated to form a plasma shell prior to significant radial motion of the shell) the comparisons show that the variation in the power of the radiation generated as a function of load mass and array radius can be simulated by the 2-D Eulerian-radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code (E-RMHC) [Phys. Plasmas 3, 368 (1996)], using a single random-density perturbation that seeds the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the r-z plane. For a given pulse-power generator, the comparisons suggest that (1) the smallest interwire gaps compatible with practical load construction and (2) the minimum implosion time consistent with the optimum required energy coupling of the generator to the load should produce the highest total-radiated-power levels.

  3. Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B.; Allen, Maxwell J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Multispectral Solar Telescope Array is a rocket-borne observatory which encompasses seven compact soft X-ray/EUV, multilayer-coated, and two compact far-UV, interference film-coated, Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes. Extensive measurements are presented on the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the X-ray/EUV telescopes. Attention is given to systematic errors and measurement errors.

  4. Evaluation of a CMOS image detector for low-cost and power medical x-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Scott T.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Wobschall, Darold C.; Jeong, Myoungki; Kim, Hyunkeun; Rudin, Stephen

    1999-05-01

    Recent developments in CMOS image detectors are changing the way digital imaging is performed for many applications. The replacement of charge coupled devices (CCDs), with CMOS detectors is a desirable paradigm shift that will depend on the ability to match the high performance characteristics of CCDs. Digital X-ray imaging applications (chest X-ray, mammography) would benefit greatly from this shift because CMOS detectors have the following inherent characteristics: (1) Low operating power (5 - 10 times lower than CCD/processing electronics). (2) Standard CMOS manufacturing process (CCD requires special manufacturing). (3) On-chip integration of analog/digital processing functions (difficult with CCD). (4) Low Cost (5 - 10 times lower cost than CCD). The achievement of both low cost and low power is highly desirable for portable applications as well as situations where large, expensive X-ray imaging machines are not feasible (small hospitals and clinics, emergency medical vehicles, remote sites). Achieving this goal using commercially available components would allow rapid development of such digital X-ray systems as compared with the development difficulties incurred through specialized direct detectors and systems. The focus of this paper is to evaluate a CMOS image detector for medical X-ray applications and to demonstrate the results obtained from a prototype CMOS digital X-ray camera. Results from the images collected from this optically-coupled camera are presented for a particular lens, X-ray conversion screen, and demagnification factor. Further, an overview of the overall power consumption and cost of a multi-sensor CMOS mosaic compared to its CCD counterpart are also reported.

  5. New BNL 3D-Trench Electrode Si Detectors for Radiation Hard Detectors for sLHC and for X-ray Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li Z.

    2011-05-11

    . Since the large electrode spacing (up to 500 {micro}m) can be realized in the 3D-Trench electrode detector due to their advantage of greatly reduced full depletion voltage, detectors with large pixel cells (therefore small dead volume) can be made for applications in photon science (e.g. X-ray).

  6. New BNL 3D-Trench electrode Si detectors for radiation hard detectors for sLHC and for X-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng

    2011-12-01

    . Since the large electrode spacing (up to 500 μm) can be realized in the 3D-Trench electrode detector due to their advantage of greatly reduced full depletion voltage, detectors with large pixel cells (therefore small dead volume) can be made for applications in photon science (e.g. X-ray).

  7. A novel solution to the gated x-ray detector gain droop problem

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, J. A. Archuleta, T. N.

    2014-11-15

    Microchannel plate (MCP), microstrip transmission line based, gated x-ray detectors used at the premier ICF laser facilities have a drop in gain as a function of mircostrip length that can be greater than 50% over 40 mm. These losses are due to ohmic losses in a microstrip coating that is less than the optimum electrical skin depth. The electrical skin depth for a copper transmission line at 3 GHz is 1.2 μm while the standard microstrip coating thickness is roughly half a single skin depth. Simply increasing the copper coating thickness would begin filling the MCP pores and limit the number of secondary electrons created in the MCP. The current coating thickness represents a compromise between gain and ohmic loss. We suggest a novel solution to the loss problem by overcoating the copper transmission line with five electrical skin depths (∼6 μm) of Beryllium. Beryllium is reasonably transparent to x-rays above 800 eV and would improve the carrier current on the transmission line. The net result should be an optically flat photocathode response with almost no measurable loss in voltage along the transmission line.

  8. Advances in Small Pixel TES-Based X-Ray Microcalorimeter Arrays for Solar Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, S. R.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing small-pixel transition-edge-sensor (TES) for solar physics and astrophysics applications. These large format close-packed arrays are fabricated on solid silicon substrates and are designed to accommodate count-rates of up to a few hundred counts/pixel/second at a FWHM energy resolution approximately 2 eV at 6 keV. We have fabricated versions that utilize narrow-line planar and stripline wiring. We present measurements of the performance and uniformity of kilo-pixel arrays, incorporating TESs with single 65-micron absorbers on a 7s-micron pitch, as well as versions with more than one absorber attached to the TES, 4-absorber and 9-absorber "Hydras". We have also fabricated a version of this detector optimized for lower energies and lower count-rate applications. These devices have a lower superconducting transition temperature and are operated just above the 40mK heat sink temperature. This results in a lower heat capacity and low thermal conductance to the heat sink. With individual single pixels of this type we have achieved a FWHM energy resolution of 0.9 eV with 1.5 keV Al K x-rays, to our knowledge the first x-ray microcalorimeter with sub-eV energy resolution. The 4-absorber and 9-absorber versions of this type achieved FWHM energy resolutions of 1.4 eV and 2.1 eV at 1.5 keV respectively. We will discuss the application of these devices for new astrophysics mission concepts.

  9. Neutron Induced Backgrounds In the MIXE X-Ray Detector at Balloon Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Dietz, K. L.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    The MIXE detector developed at NASA/MSFC is designed for x-ray astronomy and consists of a multiwire proportional counter sensitive to photons less than 150 keV. The detector has been flown on several balloon flights with higher than expected background levels observed. Previous predictions of the detector background due to atmospheric gamma-ray and cosmic diffuse sources were much less (factor of 3) than flight background measurements. The work reported here was undertaken to determine if the additional contribution from gamma-rays generated by albedo and cosmic-ray induced neutrons in the detector and payload assembly could account for the background levels observed. Monte Carlo nuclear interaction and radiation transport simulations were made for the ambient cosmic-ray environment corresponding to a previous MEE balloon flight at 3 g/cm(exp 2) residual atmosphere and 42 N geomagnetic latitude. The omnidirectional albedo neutron spectrum and the GCR proton spectrum which were used as input to the calculations are shown. For the albedo angular distribution, the predicted up/down flux ratio of 2.5 was used together with the angular dependence measured by Preszler, et al.

  10. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-04-01

    A microfluidic platform has been developed for the capture and X-ray analysis of protein microcrystals, affording a means to improve the efficiency of XFEL and synchrotron experiments. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  11. Quantification of thin film crystallographic orientation using X-ray diffraction with an area detector

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Jessica L; Jimison, Leslie H; Mannsfeld, Stefan; Volkman, Steven; Yin, Shong; Subramanian, Vivek; Salleo, Alberto; Alivisatos, A Paul; Toney, Michael F

    2010-02-19

    As thin films become increasingly popular (for solar cells, LEDs, microelectronics, batteries), quantitative morphological information is needed to predict and optimize the film's electronic, optical and mechanical properties. This quantification can be obtained quickly and easily with X-ray diffraction using an area detector and synchrotron radiation in two simple geometries. In this paper, we describe a methodology for constructing complete pole figures for thin films with fiber texture (isotropic in-plane orientation). We demonstrate this technique on semicrystalline polymer films, self-assembled nanoparticle semiconductor films, and randomly-packed metallic nanoparticle films. This method can be immediately implemented to help understand the relationship between film processing and microstructure, enabling the development of better and less expensive electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  12. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors.

    PubMed

    Marrs, Michael A; Raupp, Gregory B

    2016-01-01

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm² and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate. PMID:27472329

  13. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, Michael A.; Raupp, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm2 and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate. PMID:27472329

  14. Resonant inelastic hard x-ray scattering with diced analyzer crystals and position-sensitive detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Huotari, S.; Albergamo, F.; Vanko, Gy.; Verbeni, R.; Monaco, G.

    2006-05-15

    A novel design of a high-resolution spectrometer is proposed for emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic hard x-ray scattering applications. The spectrometer is based on a Rowland circle geometry with a diced analyzer crystal and a position-sensitive detector. The individual flat crystallites of the diced analyzer introduce a well-defined linear position-energy relationship within the analyzer focus. This effect can be exploited to measure emission spectra with an unprecedented resolution. For demonstration, a spectrometer was constructed using a diced Si(553) analyzer working at the Cu K edge with an intrinsic resolution of 60 meV. With the proposed design, spectrometers operating at the K edges of 3d transition metals can have intrinsic resolutions below 100 meV even with analyzer crystals not working in Bragg-backscattering conditions.

  15. ISS-Lobster: a low-cost wide-field X-ray transient detector on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Robert; Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Racusin, Judith; Marshall, Frank; Ptak, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    ISS-Lobster is a wide-field X-ray transient detector proposed to be deployed on the International Space Station. Through its unique imaging X-ray optics that allow a 30 deg by 30 deg FoV, a 1 arc min position resolution and a 10-11 erg/(sec cm2) sensitivity in 2000 sec, ISS-Lobster will observe numerous events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including: tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts, and perhaps most exciting, X-ray counterparts of gravitational wave detections involving stellar mass and possibly supermassive black holes. The mission includes a 3-axis gimbal system that allows fast Target of Opportunity pointing, and a small gamma-ray burst monitor to be contributed by the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology).

  16. Dynamic Conformations of Nucleosome Arrays in Solution from Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steven C.

    Chromatin conformation and dynamics remains unsolved despite the critical role of the chromatin in fundamental genetic functions such as transcription, replication, and repair. At the molecular level, chromatin can be viewed as a linear array of nucleosomes, each consisting of 147 base pairs (bp) of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) wrapped around a protein core and connected by 10 to 90 bp of linker dsDNA. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we investigated how the conformations of model nucleosome arrays in solution are modulated by ionic condition as well as the effect of linker histone proteins. To facilitate ensemble modeling of these SAXS measurements, we developed a simulation method that treats coarse-grained DNA as a Markov chain, then explores possible DNA conformations using Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) sampling. This algorithm extends the functionality of SASSIE, a program used to model intrinsically disordered biological molecules, adding to the previous methods for simulating protein, carbohydrates, and single-stranded DNA. Our SAXS measurements of various nucleosome arrays together with the MC generated models provide valuable solution structure information identifying specific differences from the structure of crystallized arrays.

  17. Soft x ray window encapsulant for HgI2 detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entine, G.; Shah, K.; Squillante, M.

    1987-01-01

    HgI2 is an excellent semiconductor material for a low energy, room temperature x-ray spectrometer. The high values of the atomic numbers for its constituent elements gives high x-ray and gamma ray stopping power. The band gap of HgI2 is significantly higher than other commonly used semiconductors. Owing to the large value band gap, the leakage current for HgI2 devices is smaller, thus allowing low noise performance. Devices fabricated from HgI2 crystals have demonstrated energy resolution sufficient to distinguish the x-ray emission from the neighboring elements on the periodic table. Also the power requirements of HgI2 are very low. These characteristics make a HgI2 spectrometer an ideal component in a satellite based detection system. Unfortunately, HgI2 crystals tend to deteriorate with time, even if protected by standard semiconductor encapsulants. This degradation ruins the performance of the device in terms of its energy resolution and pulse amplitude. The degrading mechanism is believed to be material loss occurring from below the electrodes, due to high vapor pressure of HgI2 at room temperature. To address this major obstacle to rapid expansion of HgI2 technology, a research program aimed at improving device stability by encapsulation with inert polymeric materials was carried out. The program focused specifically on optimizing the encapsulant materials and their deposition techniques. The principal objectives for this program were device encapsulation, device testing, and accelerated testing to ensure very long term stability of these high resolution sensors. A variety of encapsulants were investigated with the selection criteria based on their chemical diffusion barrier properties, mechanical stability, reactivity, and morphology of encapsulant films. The investigation covered different classes of encapsulants including solvent based encapsulants, vapor deposited encapsulants, and plasma polymerized encapsulants. A variety of characterization techniques

  18. Soft x ray window encapsulant for HgI2 detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entine, G.; Shah, K.; Squillante, M.

    1987-06-01

    HgI2 is an excellent semiconductor material for a low energy, room temperature x-ray spectrometer. The high values of the atomic numbers for its constituent elements gives high x-ray and gamma ray stopping power. The band gap of HgI2 is significantly higher than other commonly used semiconductors. Owing to the large value band gap, the leakage current for HgI2 devices is smaller, thus allowing low noise performance. Devices fabricated from HgI2 crystals have demonstrated energy resolution sufficient to distinguish the x-ray emission from the neighboring elements on the periodic table. Also the power requirements of HgI2 are very low. These characteristics make a HgI2 spectrometer an ideal component in a satellite based detection system. Unfortunately, HgI2 crystals tend to deteriorate with time, even if protected by standard semiconductor encapsulants. This degradation ruins the performance of the device in terms of its energy resolution and pulse amplitude. The degrading mechanism is believed to be material loss occurring from below the electrodes, due to high vapor pressure of HgI2 at room temperature. To address this major obstacle to rapid expansion of HgI2 technology, a research program aimed at improving device stability by encapsulation with inert polymeric materials was carried out. The program focused specifically on optimizing the encapsulant materials and their deposition techniques. The principal objectives for this program were device encapsulation, device testing, and accelerated testing to ensure very long term stability of these high resolution sensors. A variety of encapsulants were investigated with the selection criteria based on their chemical diffusion barrier properties, mechanical stability, reactivity, and morphology of encapsulant films. The investigation covered different classes of encapsulants including solvent based encapsulants, vapor deposited encapsulants, and plasma polymerized encapsulants. A variety of characterization techniques

  19. High-rate x-ray spectroscopy in mammography with a CdTe detector: A digital pulse processing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Abbene, L.; Gerardi, G.; Principato, F.; Del Sordo, S.; Ienzi, R.; Raso, G.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose:Direct measurement of mammographic x-ray spectra under clinical conditions is a difficult task due to the high fluence rate of the x-ray beams as well as the limits in the development of high resolution detection systems in a high counting rate environment. In this work we present a detection system, based on a CdTe detector and an innovative digital pulse processing (DPP) system, for high-rate x-ray spectroscopy in mammography. Methods: The DPP system performs a digital pile-up inspection and a digital pulse height analysis of the detector signals, digitized through a 14-bit, 100 MHz digitizer, for x-ray spectroscopy even at high photon counting rates. We investigated on the response of the digital detection system both at low (150 cps) and at high photon counting rates (up to 500 kcps) by using monoenergetic x-ray sources and a nonclinical molybdenum anode x-ray tube. Clinical molybdenum x-ray spectrum measurements were also performed by using a pinhole collimator and a custom alignment device. Results: The detection system shows excellent performance up to 512 kcps with an energy resolution of 4.08% FWHM at 22.1 keV. Despite the high photon counting rate (up to 453 kcps), the molybdenum x-ray spectra, measured under clinical conditions, are characterized by a low number of pile-up events. The agreement between the attenuation curves and the half value layer values, obtained from the measured spectra, simulated spectra, and from the exposure values directly measured with an ionization chamber, also shows the accuracy of the measurements. Conclusions: These results make the proposed detection system a very attractive tool for both laboratory research and advanced quality controls in mammography.

  20. Study of soft X-ray emission during wire array implosion under plasma focus conditions at the PF-3 facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dan’ko, S. A.; Mitrofanov, K. N.; Krauz, V. I.; Myalton, V. V.; Zhuzhunashvili, A. I.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Kharrasov, A. M.; Anan’ev, S. S.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Kalinin, Yu. G.

    2015-11-15

    Results of measurements of soft X-ray emission with photon energies of <1 keV under conditions of a plasma focus (PF) experiment are presented. The experiments were carried out at the world’s largest PF device—the PF-3 Filippov-type facility (I ⩽ 3 MA, T/4 ≈ 15–20 µs, W{sub 0} ⩽ 3 MJ). X-ray emission from both a discharge in pure neon and with a tungsten wire array placed on the axis of the discharge chamber was detected. The wire array imploded under the action of the electric current intercepted from the plasma current sheath of the PF discharge in neon. The measured soft X-ray powers from a conventional PF discharge in gas and a PF discharge in the presence of a wire array were compared for the first time.

  1. Non-thermal x-ray emission from wire array z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Ampleford, David; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Webb, Timothy Jay; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Loisel, Guillaume Pascal; Flanagan, Timothy McGuire; Bell, Kate Suzanne; Jones, Brent M.; McPherson, Leroy A.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Chittenden, Jeremy P.; Sherlock, Mark; Appelbe, Brian; Giuliani, John; Ouart, Nicholas; Seely, John

    2015-12-01

    We report on experiments demonstrating the transition from thermally-dominated K-shell line emission to non-thermal, hot-electron-driven inner-shell emission for z pinch plasmas on the Z machine. While x-ray yields from thermal K-shell emission decrease rapidly with increasing atomic number Z, we find that non-thermal emission persists with favorable Z scaling, dominating over thermal emission for Z=42 and higher (hn ≥ 17keV). Initial experiments with Mo (Z=42) and Ag (Z=47) have produced kJ-level emission in the 17-keV and 22-keV Kα lines respectively. We will discuss the electron beam properties that could excite these non - thermal lines. We also report on experiments that have attempted to control non - thermal K - shell line emission by modifying the wire array or load hardware setup.

  2. Comparison of Non-Redundant Array and Double Pinhole Coherence Measurements with Soft X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, Gabriel; /Northwestern U. /SLAC

    2006-09-11

    Experiments on the future Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and other Free Electron Lasers will need to be performed on a single-shot basis. The double pinhole method of measuring spatial coherence requires a separate measurement, with a different pinhole separation distance, for each length scale sampled. This limits its utility for LCLS. A potential alternative uses a Non-Redundant Array (NRA) of apertures designed to probe the coherence over the range of length scales defined by their physical extent, in a single measurement. This approach was tested by comparing diffraction patterns from soft x-rays incident on double pinhole and NRA absorption mask structures. The double pinhole fringe visibility data serve as discrete reference points that verify the continuous spectrum of the NRA coherence data. The results present a quantitative analysis of the double pinhole coherence measurements and a qualitative comparison to the NRA images.

  3. The Speedster-EXD- A New Event-Driven Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher V.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Prieskorn, Zachary R.; Burrows, David N.

    2016-01-01

    The Speedster-EXD is a new 64×64 pixel, 40-μm pixel pitch, 100-μm depletion depth hybrid CMOS x-ray detector with the capability of reading out only those pixels containing event charge, thus enabling fast effective frame rates. A global charge threshold can be specified, and pixels containing charge above this threshold are flagged and read out. The Speedster detector has also been designed with other advanced in-pixel features to improve performance, including a low-noise, high-gain capacitive transimpedance amplifier that eliminates interpixel capacitance crosstalk (IPC), and in-pixel correlated double sampling subtraction to reduce reset noise. We measure the best energy resolution on the Speedster-EXD detector to be 206 eV (3.5%) at 5.89 keV and 172 eV (10.0%) at 1.49 keV. The average IPC to the four adjacent pixels is measured to be 0.25%±0.2% (i.e., consistent with zero). The pixel-to-pixel gain variation is measured to be 0.80%±0.03%, and a Monte Carlo simulation is applied to better characterize the contributions to the energy resolution.

  4. Internal Electric-Field-Lines Distribution in Cdznte Detectors Measured Using X-ray Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, C; Cui, Y; Hossain, A; Yang, G; Yao, H; James, R

    2009-01-01

    The ideal operation of CdZnTe devices entails having a uniformly distributed internal electric field. Such uniformity especially is critical for thick long-drift-length detectors, such as large-volume CPG and 3-D multi-pixel devices. Using a high-spatial resolution X-ray mapping technique, we investigated the distribution of the electric field in real devices. Our measurements demonstrate that in thin detectors, < 5 mm, the electric field-lines tend to bend away from the side surfaces (i.e., a focusing effect). In thick detectors, > 1 cm, with a large aspect ratio (thickness-to-width ratio), we observed two effects: the electric field lines bending away from or towards the side surfaces, which we called, respectively, the focusing field-line distribution and the defocusing field-line distribution. In addition to these large-scale variations, the field-line distributions were locally perturbed by the presence of extended defects and residual strains existing inside the crystals. We present our data clearly demonstrating the non-uniformity of the internal electric field.

  5. Energy resolved two-dimensional soft x-ray radiography with a micropattern gas detector

    SciTech Connect

    Pacella, Danilo; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Finkenthal, Michael

    2006-04-15

    This article discusses the use of energy resolved two-dimensional soft x-ray imaging (ERXI), in the range of 2-8 keV, to study and investigate composition and depth of different materials. This technique represents a new approach in which imaging is merged with multienergy analysis, performed with spectral scans in 25 energy subintervals. The detector used is a micropattern gas detector with gas electron multiplier as amplifying structure, pixel readout board with 144 pixels (12x12), and electronics for photon counting for each pixel. As the detector works in a proportional regime, images in adjustable energy windows (independently for each pixel) can be acquired. Energy resolution enhances the contrast and the imaging capability providing more information of the transparencies of the materials under investigations. Contact radiographies have been made with samples of four different materials: CaCl, organic fat matter, aluminum, and thin plastic tape. The resulting data transparency curves for these materials have been derived. These curves demonstrate the value of ERXI at high performances (high efficiency, high dynamics, and high contrast), potentially relevant for many future applications.

  6. Differential phase contrast with a segmented detector in a scanning X-ray microprobe

    PubMed Central

    Hornberger, B.; de Jonge, M. D.; Feser, M.; Holl, P.; Holzner, C.; Jacobsen, C.; Legnini, D.; Paterson, D.; Rehak, P.; Strüder, L.; Vogt, S.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning X-ray microprobes are unique tools for the nanoscale investigation of specimens from the life, environmental, materials and other fields of sciences. Typically they utilize absorption and fluorescence as contrast mechanisms. Phase contrast is a complementary technique that can provide strong contrast with reduced radiation dose for weakly absorbing structures in the multi-keV range. In this paper the development of a segmented charge-integrating silicon detector which provides simultaneous absorption and differential phase contrast is reported. The detector can be used together with a fluorescence detector for the simultaneous acquisition of transmission and fluorescence data. It can be used over a wide range of photon energies, photon rates and exposure times at third-generation synchrotron radiation sources, and is currently operating at two beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source. Images obtained at around 2 keV and 10 keV demonstrate the superiority of phase contrast over absorption for specimens composed of light elements. PMID:18552427

  7. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  8. Development of a CdTe pixel detector with a window comparator ASIC for high energy X-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirono, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Furukawa, Y.; Honma, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kawase, M.; Koganezawa, T.; Ohata, T.; Sato, M.; Sato, G.; Takagaki, M.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.

    2011-09-01

    We have developed a photon-counting-type CdTe pixel detector (SP8-01). SP8-01 was designed as a prototype of a high-energy X-ray imaging detector for experiments using synchrotron radiation. SP8-01 has a CdTe sensor of 500 μm thickness, which has an absorption efficiency of almost 100% up to 50 keV and 45% even at 100 keV. A full-custom application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was designed as a readout circuit of SP8-01, which is equipped with a window-type discriminator. The upper discriminator realizes a low-background measurement, because X-ray beams from the monochromator contain higher-order components beside the fundamental X-rays in general. ASIC chips were fabricated with a TSMC 0.25 μm CMOS process, and CdTe sensors were bump-bonded to the ASIC chips by a gold-stud bonding technique. Beam tests were performed at SPring-8. SP8-01 detected X-rays up to 120 keV. The capability of SP8-01 as an imaging detector for high-energy X-ray synchrotron radiation was evaluated with its performance characteristics.

  9. Impact of Improved Heat Sinking of an X-Ray Calorimeter Array on Crosstalk, Noise, and Background Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Adams, J. S.; Brekosky, R. P.; Chervenak, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Porter, F. S.

    2011-01-01

    The x-ray calorimeter array of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) of the Astro-H satellite will incorporate a silicon thermistor array produced during the development of the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) of the Suzaku satellite. On XRS, inadequate heat sinking of the array led to several non-ideal effects. The thermal crosstalk, while too small to be confused with x-ray signals, nonetheless contributed a noise term that could be seen as a degradation in energy resolution at high flux. When energy was deposited in the silicon frame around the active elements of the array, such as by a cosmic ray, the resulting pulse in the temperature of the frame resulted in coincident signal pulses on most of the pixels. In orbit, the resolution was found to depend on the particle background rate. In order to minimize these effects on SXS, heat-sinking gold was applied to areas on the front and back of the array die, which was thermally anchored to the gold of its fanout board via gold wire bonds. The thermal conductance from the silicon chip to the fanout board was improved over that of XRS by an order of magnitude. This change was sufficient for essentially eliminating frame events and allowing high-resolution to be attained at much higher counting rates. We will present the improved performance, the measured crosstalk, and the results of the thermal characterization of such arrays.

  10. Thin-film-based scintillators for hard x-ray microimaging detectors: the ScinTAX Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, A.; Cecilia, A.; Douissard, P.-A.; Dupré, K.; Wesemann, V.; Baumbach, T.; Couchaud, M.; Rochet, X.; Riesemeier, H.; Radtke, M.; Martin, T.

    2014-09-01

    The project ScinTAX developed novel thin scintillating films for the application in high performance X-ray imaging and subsequent introduced new X-ray detectors to the market. To achieve this aim lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) scintillators doped with different activators were grown successfully by liquid phase epitaxy. The high density of LSO (7.4 g/cm3), the effective atomic number (65.2) and the high light yield make this scintillator highly applicable for indirect X-ray detection in which the ionizing radiation is converted into visible light and then registered by a digital detector. A modular indirect detection system has been developed to fully exploit the potential of this thin film scintillator for radiographic and tomographic imaging. The system is compatible for high-resolution imaging with moderate dose as well as adaptable to intense high-dose applications where radiation hard microimaging detectors are required. This proceedings article shall review the achieved performances and technical details on this high-resolution detector system which is now available. A selected example application demonstrates the great potential of the optimized detector system for hard X-ray microimaging, i.e. either to improve image contrast due to the availability of efficient thin crystal films or to reduce the dose to the sample.

  11. A hybrid Monte Carlo model for the energy response functions of X-ray photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dufan; Xu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Sen

    2016-09-01

    In photon counting computed tomography (CT), it is vital to know the energy response functions of the detector for noise estimation and system optimization. Empirical methods lack flexibility and Monte Carlo simulations require too much knowledge of the detector. In this paper, we proposed a hybrid Monte Carlo model for the energy response functions of photon counting detectors in X-ray medical applications. GEANT4 was used to model the energy deposition of X-rays in the detector. Then numerical models were used to describe the process of charge sharing, anti-charge sharing and spectral broadening, which were too complicated to be included in the Monte Carlo model. Several free parameters were introduced in the numerical models, and they could be calibrated from experimental measurements such as X-ray fluorescence from metal elements. The method was used to model the energy response function of an XCounter Flite X1 photon counting detector. The parameters of the model were calibrated with fluorescence measurements. The model was further tested against measured spectrums of a VJ X-ray source to validate its feasibility and accuracy.

  12. Noise Budget for the X-Ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) Core Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline Anne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present and archive the noise budget for the XMS detector, in order, at this stage in mission planning, to learn the scale of the requirements placed on the other instrument subsystems. This document mainly concerns the core array, specifically the baseline version that emerged from the trade studies associated with the ESA Phase A study report. Qualitative extension to the Hydra approach to the outer array is included at the end.

  13. CCD(charge-coupled device)-based synchrotron x-ray detector for protein crystallography: Performance projected from an experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, M.G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I.S.; Kraimer, M.R.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The intense x radiation from a synchrotron source could, with a suitable detector, provide a complete set of diffraction images from a protein crystal before the crystal is damaged by radiation (2 to 3 min). An area detector consisting of a 40 mm dia. x-ray fluorescing phosphor, coupled with an image intensifier and lens to a CCD image sensor, was developed to determine the effectiveness of such a detector in protein crystallography. The detector was used in an experiment with a rotating anode x-ray generator. Diffraction patterns from a lysozyme crystal obtained with this detector are compared to those obtained with film. The two images appear to be virtually identical. The flux of 10/sup 4/ x-ray photons/s was observed on the detector at the rotating anode generator. At the 6-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, the flux on an 80 x 80 mm/sup 2/ detector is expected to be >10/sup 9/ photons/s. The projected design of such a synchrotron detector shows that a diffraction-peak count >10/sup 6/ could be obtained in approx.0.5 s. With an additional approx.0.5 s readout time of a 512 x 512 pixel CCD, the data acquisition time per frame would be approx.1 s so that ninety 1/sup 0/ diffraction images could be obtained, with approximately 1% precision, in less than 3 min.

  14. Hybrid deterministic and stochastic x-ray transport simulation for transmission computed tomography with advanced detector noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Lucretiu M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for simulation of noisy X-ray computed tomography data sets. The model is made of two main components, a photon transport simulation component that generates the noiseless photon field incident on the detector, and a detector response model that takes as input the incident photon field parameters and given the X-ray source intensity and exposure time can generate noisy data sets, accordingly. The photon transport simulation component combines direct ray-tracing of polychromatic X-rays for calculation of transmitted data, with Monte Carlo simulation for calculation of the scattered-photon data. The Monte Carlo scatter simulation is accelerated by implementing particle splitting and importance sampling variance reduction techniques. The detector-incident photon field data are stored as energy expansion coefficients on a refined grid that covers the detector area. From these data the detector response model is able to generate noisy detector data realizations, by reconstituting the main parameters that describe each detector element response in statistical terms, including spatial correlations. The model is able to generate very fast, on the fly, CT data sets corresponding to different radiation doses, as well as detector response characteristics, facilitating data management in extensive optimization studies by reducing the computation time and storage space demands.

  15. Gallium Arsenide detectors for X-ray and electron (beta particle) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioliou, G.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Results characterizing GaAs p+-i-n+ mesa photodiodes with a 10 μm i layer for their spectral response under illumination of X-rays and beta particles are presented. A total of 22 devices, having diameters of 200 μm and 400 μm, were electrically characterized at room temperature. All devices showed comparable characteristics with a measured leakage current ranging from 4 nA/cm2 to 67 nA/cm2 at an internal electric field of 50 kV/cm. Their unintentionally doped i layers were found to be almost fully depleted at 0 V due to their low doping density. 55Fe X-ray spectra were obtained using one 200 μm diameter device and one 400 μm diameter device. The best energy resolution (FWHM at 5.9 keV) achieved was 625 eV using the 200 μm and 740 eV using the 400 μm diameter device, respectively. Noise analysis showed that the limiting factor for the energy resolution of the system was the dielectric noise; if this noise was eliminated by better design of the front end of the readout electronics, the achievable resolution would be 250 eV. 63Ni beta particle spectra obtained using the 200 μm diameter device showed the potential utility of these detectors for electron and beta particle detection. The development of semiconductor electron spectrometers is important particularly for space plasma physics; such devices may find use in future space missions to study the plasma environment of Jupiter and Europa and the predicted electron impact excitation of water vapor plumes from Europa hypothesized as a result of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV observations.

  16. A uniformly redundant imaging array of penumbral apertures coupled with a heuristic reconstruction for hard x-ray and neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Tatsuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nozaki, Shinya; Azuma, Rumiko; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2010-07-15

    A coded imaging and decoding (image reconstruction) scheme was developed for diagnosing a hot and dense region emitting hard x-rays and neutrons in laser-fusion plasmas. Because the imager was a uniformly redundant array of penumbral aperture (URPA) arranged in an M-matrix, URPA leads to N times (N: the total number of apertures) enhancement of signal intensity in comparison with a single penumbral aperture. A recorded penumbral image was reconstructed by a computer-based heuristic method to reduce artifacts caused by noises contained in a penumbral image. Applicability of this technique was investigated by imaging x-rays emitted from laser-produced plasmas, demonstrating a spatial resolution of 16 {mu}m. Under the present conditions, the spatial resolution was determined dominantly by a detector resolution (10.5 {mu}m) and a signal-to-noise ratio of the obtained penumbral image.

  17. Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.; Johnson, L.C.; Liew, S.L.; McGuire, K.; Pare, V.

    1987-01-01

    Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/..delta..E is greater than 10/sup 4/ and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally.

  18. PASSIVATION OF SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES FOR IMPROVED RADIATION DETECTORS: X-RAY PHOTOEMISSION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A; Conway, A; Reinhardt, C; Ferreira, J; Nikolic, R; Payne, S

    2007-12-10

    Surface passivation of device-grade radiation detector materials was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with transport property measurements before and after various chemical treatments. Specifically Br-MeOH (2% Br), KOH with NH{sub 4}F/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and NH{sub 4}OH solutions were used to etch, reduce and oxidize the surface of Cd{sub (1-x)}Zn{sub x}Te semiconductor crystals. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the resultant microscopic surface morphology. Angle-resolved high-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and core lines were used to evaluate the surface chemistry of the chemically treated surfaces. Metal overlayers were then deposited on these chemically treated surfaces and the I-V characteristics measured. The measurements were correlated to understand the effect of interface chemistry on the electronic structure at these interfaces with the goal of optimizing the Schottky barrier height for improved radiation detector devices.

  19. High performance x-ray imaging detectors on foil using solution-processed organic photodiodes with extremely low dark leakage current (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Moet, Date; van der Steen, Jan Laurens; van Breemen, Albert; Shanmugam, Santhosh; Gilot, Jan; Andriessen, Ronn; Simon, Matthias; Ruetten, Walter; Douglas, Alexander; Raaijmakers, Rob; Malinowski, Pawel E.; Myny, Kris; Gelinck, Gerwin

    2015-10-01

    High performance X-ray imaging detectors on foil using solution-processed organic photodiodes with extremely low dark leakage current Abhishek Kumara, Date Moeta, Albert van Breemena, Santhosh Shanmugama, Jan-Laurens van der Steena, Jan Gilota, Ronn Andriessena, Matthias Simonb, Walter Ruettenb, Alexander U. Douglasb, Rob Raaijmakersc, Pawel E. Malinowskid, Kris Mynyd and Gerwin H. Gelincka,e a. Holst Centre/TNO, High Tech Campus 31, Eindhoven 5656 AE, The Netherlands b. Philips Research, High Tech Campus 34, 5656 AE Eindhoven, The Netherlands c. Philips Healthcare, Veenpluis 6-8, 5684 PC Best, The Netherlands d. Department of Large Area Electronics, imec vzw, Kapeldreef 75, Leuven B3001, Belgium e. Applied Physics Department, TU Eindhoven, Eindhoven, The Netherlands We demonstrate high performance X-ray imaging detectors on foil suitable for medical grade X-ray imaging applications. The detectors are based on solution-processed organic photodiodes forming bulk-heterojunctions from photovoltaic donor and acceptor blend. The organic photodiodes are deposited using an industrially compatible slot die coating technique with end of line processing temperature below 100°C. These photodiodes have extremely low dark leakage current density of 10-7 mA/cm2 at -2V bias with very high yield and have peak absorption around 550 nm wavelength. We combine these organic photodiodes with high mobility metal oxide semiconductor based thin film transistor arrays with high pixel resolution of 200ppi on thin plastic substrate. When combined with a typical CsI(TI) scintillator material on top, they are well suited for low dose X-ray imaging applications. The optical crosstalk is insignificant upto resolution of 200 ppi despite the fact that the photodiode layer is one continuous layer and is non-pixelated. Low processing temperatures are another key advantage since they can be fabricated on plastic substrate. This implies that we can make X-ray detectors on flexible foil. Those

  20. Method for measuring the focal spot size of an x-ray tube using a coded aperture mask and a digital detector

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Paolo; Mettivier, Giovanni

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study is to evaluate a new method based on a coded aperture mask combined with a digital x-ray imaging detector for measurements of the focal spot sizes of diagnostic x-ray tubes. Common techniques for focal spot size measurements employ a pinhole camera, a slit camera, or a star resolution pattern. The coded aperture mask is a radiation collimator consisting of a large number of apertures disposed on a predetermined grid in an array, through which the radiation source is imaged onto a digital x-ray detector. The method of the coded mask camera allows one to obtain a one-shot accurate and direct measurement of the two dimensions of the focal spot (like that for a pinhole camera) but at a low tube loading (like that for a slit camera). A large number of small apertures in the coded mask operate as a ''multipinhole'' with greater efficiency than a single pinhole, but keeping the resolution of a single pinhole. Methods: X-ray images result from the multiplexed output on the detector image plane of such a multiple aperture array, and the image of the source is digitally reconstructed with a deconvolution algorithm. Images of the focal spot of a laboratory x-ray tube (W anode: 35-80 kVp; focal spot size of 0.04 mm) were acquired at different geometrical magnifications with two different types of digital detector (a photon counting hybrid silicon pixel detector with 0.055 mm pitch and a flat panel CMOS digital detector with 0.05 mm pitch) using a high resolution coded mask (type no-two-holes-touching modified uniformly redundant array) with 480 0.07 mm apertures, designed for imaging at energies below 35 keV. Measurements with a slit camera were performed for comparison. A test with a pinhole camera and with the coded mask on a computed radiography mammography unit with 0.3 mm focal spot was also carried out. Results: The full width at half maximum focal spot sizes were obtained from the line profiles of the decoded images, showing a focal spot

  1. SQUID Multiplexers for Cryogenic Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Kent; Beall, James; Deiker, Steve; Doriese, Randy; Duncan, William; Hilton, Gene; Moseley, S. Harvey; Reintsema, Carl; Stahle, Caroline; Ullom, Joel; Vale, Leila

    2004-01-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of cryogenic detectors with a manageable number of readout channels. We are developing time-division SQUID multiplexers based on Nb trilayer SQUIDs to read arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors. Our first-generation, 8-channel SQUID multiplexer was used in FIBRE, a one-dimensional TES array for submillimeter astronomy. Our second-generation 32-pixel multiplexer, based on an improved architecture, has been developed for instruments including Constellation-X, SCUBA-2, and solar x-ray astronomy missions. SCUBA-2, which is being developed for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, will have more than 10,000 pixels. We are now developing a third-generation architecture based on superconducting hot-electron switches. The use of SQUID multiplexers in instruments operating at above 2 K will also be discussed.

  2. Recent progress of MPPC-based scintillation detectors in high precision X-ray and gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Fujita, T.; Nishiyama, T.; Kurei, Y.; Tsujikawa, T.; Oshima, T.; Taya, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Ogata, H.; Okochi, H.; Ohsuka, S.; Ikeda, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    2015-06-01

    The multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) is a promising light sensor for various applications, not only in physics experiments but also in nuclear medicine, industry, and even high-energy astrophysics. In this paper, we present the current status and most recent progress of the MPPC-based scintillation detectors, such as (1) a high-precision X-ray and gamma-ray spectral image sensor, (2) next-generation PET detectors with MRI, TOF, and DOI measurement capabilities, and (3) a compact gamma camera for environmental radiation surveys. We first present a new method of fabricating a Ce:GAGG scintillator plate (1 or 2 mm thick) with ultra-fine resolution (0.2 mm/pixel), cut using a dicing saw to create 50 μm wide micro-grooves. When the plate is optically coupled with a large-area MPPC array, excellent spatial resolution of 0.48 mm (FWHM) and energy resolution of 14% (FWHM) are obtained for 122 keV gamma rays. Hence, the detector can act as a convenient "multi-color" imaging device that can potentially be used for future SPECT and photon-counting CT. We then show a prototype system for a high-resolution MPPC-based PET scanner that can realize ≃1 mm (FWHM) spatial resolution, even under a strong magnetic field of 4.7 T. We develop a front-end ASIC intended for future TOF-PET scanner with a 16-channel readout that achieves a coincidence time resolution of 489 ps (FWHM). A novel design for a module with DOI-measurement capability for gamma rays is also presented by measuring the pulse height ratio of double-sided MPPCs coupled at both ends of scintillation crystal block. Finally, we present the concept of a two-plane Compton camera consisting of Ce:GAGG scintillator arrays coupled with thin MPPC arrays. As a result of the thin and compact features of the MPPC device, the camera not only achieves a small size (14×14×15 cm3) and light weight (1.9 kg) but also excellent sensitivity, compared to the conventional PMT-based pinhole camera used in Fukushima. Finally, we briefly

  3. Detector, collimator and real-time reconstructor for a new scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Michael A.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Raval, Amish N.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Slagowski, Jordan M.; Kahn, Paul; Ku, Jamie; Funk, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopy system for low dose cardiac imaging. The use of a narrow scanned x-ray beam in SBDX reduces detected x-ray scatter and improves dose efficiency, however the tight beam collimation also limits the maximum achievable x-ray fluence. To increase the fluence available for imaging, we have constructed a new SBDX prototype with a wider x-ray beam, larger-area detector, and new real-time image reconstructor. Imaging is performed with a scanning source that generates 40,328 narrow overlapping projections from 71 x 71 focal spot positions for every 1/15 s scan period. A high speed 2-mm thick CdTe photon counting detector was constructed with 320x160 elements and 10.6 cm x 5.3 cm area (full readout every 1.28 μs), providing an 86% increase in area over the previous SBDX prototype. A matching multihole collimator was fabricated from layers of tungsten, brass, and lead, and a multi-GPU reconstructor was assembled to reconstruct the stream of captured detector images into full field-of-view images in real time. Thirty-two tomosynthetic planes spaced by 5 mm plus a multiplane composite image are produced for each scan frame. Noise equivalent quanta on the new SBDX prototype measured 63%-71% higher than the previous prototype. X-ray scatter fraction was 3.9-7.8% when imaging 23.3-32.6 cm acrylic phantoms, versus 2.3- 4.2% with the previous prototype. Coronary angiographic imaging at 15 frame/s was successfully performed on the new SBDX prototype, with live display of either a multiplane composite or single plane image.

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopy for wire-array Z-pinches at the non-radiative stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Anderson, A.; Shevelko, A. P.; Wiewior, P.; Durmaz, T.; Altemara, S. D.; Papp, D.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Nalajala, V.; Chalyy, O.; Dmitriev, O.

    2011-12-01

    Absorption spectroscopy was applied to wire-array Z-pinches on the 1 MA pulsed-power Zebra generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF). The 50 TW Leopard laser was coupled with the Zebra generator for X-ray backlighting of wire arrays at the ablation stage. Broadband X-ray emission from a laser-produced Sm plasma was used to backlight Al star wire arrays in the range of 7-9 Å. Two time-integrated X-ray conical spectrometers recorded reference and absorption spectra. The spectrometers were shielded from the bright Z-pinch X-ray burst by collimators. The comparison of plasma-transmitted spectra with reference spectra indicates absorption lines in the range of 8.1-8.4 Å. Analysis of Al K-shell absorption spectra with detailed atomic kinetics models shows a distribution of electron temperature in the range of 10-30 eV that was fitted with an effective two-temperature model. Temperature and density distributions in wire-array plasma were simulated with a three-dimension magneto-hydrodynamic code. Post-processing of this code's output yields synthetic transmission spectrum which is in general agreement with the data.

  5. The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B. C., Jr.; Allen, Max J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed seven compact soft X-ray/EUV (XUV) multilayer coated and two compact FUV interference film coated Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes for a rocket borne observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. We report here on extensive measurements of the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the XUV telescopes carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory.

  6. Performance of room temperature mercuric iodide /HgI2/ detectors in the ultralow-energy X-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, A. J.; Barton, J. B.; Huth, G. C.; Whited, R.; Ortale, C.; Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.; Iwanczyk, J. S.

    1981-02-01

    Experiments have been done to study the performance of mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors in the ultralow-energy X-ray region. Energy resolution values of 245 eV (FWHM) for the Mg K-alpha X-ray line at 1.25 keV and 225 eV (FWHM) for the electronic noise linewidth have been obtained for an HgI2 detector with painted carbon contacts using a pulsed-light feedback preamplifier; the whole system was operated at room temperature. The resolution values in the ultralow-energy region are still limited by electronic noise of the system. In an attempt to minimize X-ray attenuation in the front contact, detectors were prepared with thin evaporated Pd contacts. These detectors show a pronounced low-energy tailing of the photopeak below a few keV, in contrast to the spectra obtained by detectors with carbon contact. An attempt has been made to explain the tailing effect starting with models wich have been proposed to describe similar effects in Ge detectors.

  7. Performance of room temperature mercuric iodide /HgI2/ detectors in the ultralow-energy X-ray region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabrowski, A. J.; Barton, J. B.; Huth, G. C.; Whited, R.; Ortale, C.; Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.; Iwanczyk, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments have been done to study the performance of mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors in the ultralow-energy X-ray region. Energy resolution values of 245 eV (FWHM) for the Mg K-alpha X-ray line at 1.25 keV and 225 eV (FWHM) for the electronic noise linewidth have been obtained for an HgI2 detector with painted carbon contacts using a pulsed-light feedback preamplifier; the whole system was operated at room temperature. The resolution values in the ultralow-energy region are still limited by electronic noise of the system. In an attempt to minimize X-ray attenuation in the front contact, detectors were prepared with thin evaporated Pd contacts. These detectors show a pronounced low-energy tailing of the photopeak below a few keV, in contrast to the spectra obtained by detectors with carbon contact. An attempt has been made to explain the tailing effect starting with models wich have been proposed to describe similar effects in Ge detectors.

  8. Development of a large-area CMOS-based detector for real-time x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Sung Kyn; Park, Sung Kyu; Hwang, Sung Ha; Im, Dong Ak; Kosonen, Jari; Kim, Tae Woo; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2010-04-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APSs) with high electrical and optical performances are now being attractive for digital radiography (DR) and dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In this study, we report our prototype CMOS-based detectors capable of real-time imaging. The field-of-view of the detector is 12 × 14.4 cm. The detector employs a CsI:Tl scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. The electrical performance of the CMOS APS, such as readout noise and full-well capacity, was evaluated. The x-ray imaging characteristics of the detector were evaluated in terms of characteristic curve, pre-sampling modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency, and image lag. The overall performance of the detector is demonstrated with phantom images obtained for DR and CBCT applications. The detailed development description and measurement results are addressed. With the results, we suggest that the prototype CMOS-based detector has the potential for CBCT and real-time x-ray imaging applications.

  9. Image-based spectral distortion correction for photon-counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using an image-based method to correct for distortions induced by various artifacts in the x-ray spectrum recorded with photon-counting detectors for their application in breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: The polyenergetic incident spectrum was simulated with the tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) code and carefully calibrated to match the x-ray tube in this study. Experiments were performed on a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) photon-counting detector with five energy thresholds. Energy bins were adjusted to evenly distribute the recorded counts above the noise floor. BR12 phantoms of various thicknesses were used for calibration. A nonlinear function was selected to fit the count correlation between the simulated and the measured spectra in the calibration process. To evaluate the proposed spectral distortion correction method, an empirical fitting derived from the calibration process was applied on the raw images recorded for polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm. Both the corrected counts and the effective attenuation coefficient were compared to the simulated values for each of the five energy bins. The feasibility of applying the proposed method to quantitative material decomposition was tested using a dual-energy imaging technique with a three-material phantom that consisted of water, lipid, and protein. The performance of the spectral distortion correction method was quantified using the relative root-mean-square (RMS) error with respect to the expected values from simulations or areal analysis of the decomposition phantom. Results: The implementation of the proposed method reduced the relative RMS error of the output counts in the five energy bins with respect to the simulated incident counts from 23.0%, 33.0%, and 54.0% to 1.2%, 1.8%, and 7.7% for 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm PMMA phantoms, respectively. The accuracy of the effective attenuation

  10. Internal Electric Field Investigations of a Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detector Using Synchrotron X-ray Mapping and Pockels Effect Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A; Camarda, G; Cui, Y; Hossain, A; Yao, H; James, R

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) has remained a major focus of research due to its promising application as a room-temperature nuclear radiation detector material. Among the several parameters that substantially affect the detectors' performance, an important one is the distribution of the internal electric field. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) employed synchrotron x-ray microscale mapping and measurements of the Pockels effect to investigate the distribution of the internal electric field in a CZT strip detector. Direct evidence that dislocations can distort the internal electric field of the detector was obtained. Furthermore, it was found that 'star' defects in the CZT crystal, possibly ascribed to dislocation loop punching, cause charge trapping.

  11. Monte Carlo semi-empirical model for Si(Li) x-ray detector: Differences between nominal and fitted parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Pino, N.; Padilla-Cabal, F.; Garcia-Alvarez, J. A.; Vazquez, L.; D'Alessandro, K.; Correa-Alfonso, C. M.; Godoy, W.; Maidana, N. L.; Vanin, V. R.

    2013-05-06

    A detailed characterization of a X-ray Si(Li) detector was performed to obtain the energy dependence of efficiency in the photon energy range of 6.4 - 59.5 keV, which was measured and reproduced by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Significant discrepancies between MC and experimental values were found when the manufacturer parameters of the detector were used in the simulation. A complete Computerized Tomography (CT) detector scan allowed to find the correct crystal dimensions and position inside the capsule. The computed efficiencies with the resulting detector model differed with the measured values no more than 10% in most of the energy range.

  12. Analysis of the Response of CVD Diamond Detectors for UV and sX-Ray Plasma Diagnostics Installed at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiffi, B.; Coffey, I.; Pillon, M.; Osipenko, M.; Prestopino, G.; Ripani, M.; Taiuti, M.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    Diamond detectors are very promising candidates for plasma diagnostics in a harsh environment. In fact, they have several proprieties which make them suitable for magnetic fusion devices: radiation hardness, high thermal conductivity, high resistivity, high carrier mobility and a large bandgap (5.5 eV). The latter makes them insensitive to visible radiation and allows low noise measurements without any cooling. In 2008 two CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition) single crystal diamond (SCD) detectors were installed at the JET tokamak as extreme UV and soft X-Ray diagnostics [1]. In this work the neutron background in these detectors was measured shielding the UV and soft X-Ray radiation by closing a local vacuum valve. The UV detector was found to be insensitive to the neutron flux, while the soft X Ray detector signal exhibited spikes during the highest neutron rate pulse (neutron rate 1016n/s, which corresponds to a flux of φn ˜105n/cm2s in the detector location). These spikes were found to be due to the (n,p) reaction within the plastic filter in front of the soft X-Ray detector. The UV SCD was also used to perform time of flight (ToF) measurements in laser ablation experiments. ToFs were found to be an order of magnitude higher than expected if only the drift velocity is considered. This discrepancy could be due to a delay between the arrival time of the impurities in the plasma and their emission in an energy range which SCD is sensitive to (Eph >5.5 eV). The delay is found to be comparable with the expected ionization times for edge plasma conditions.

  13. Design and fabrication of a multi-purpose soft x-ray array diagnostic system for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Hun; Chai, Kil Byoung; Jang, Siwon; Choe, Wonho; Ko, Won-Ha; Kim, Junghee; Seo, Dongcheol; Lee, Jongha; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2012-10-15

    A multi-purpose soft x-ray array diagnostic system was developed for measuring two-dimensional x-ray emissivity profile, electron temperature, Ar impurity transport, and total radiation power. A remotely controlled filter wheel was designed with three different choices of filters. The electron temperature profile can be determined from the ratio of two channels having different thickness of Be layer, and the Ar impurity concentration transport can be determined from a pair of Ar Ross filters (CaF{sub 2} and NaCl thin films). Without any filters, this diagnostic system can also be used as a bolometer.

  14. Design and fabrication of a multi-purpose soft x-ray array diagnostic system for KSTAR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hun; Chai, Kil Byoung; Jang, Siwon; Ko, Won-Ha; Kim, Junghee; Seo, Dongcheol; Lee, Jongha; Bogatu, I N; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choe, Wonho

    2012-10-01

    A multi-purpose soft x-ray array diagnostic system was developed for measuring two-dimensional x-ray emissivity profile, electron temperature, Ar impurity transport, and total radiation power. A remotely controlled filter wheel was designed with three different choices of filters. The electron temperature profile can be determined from the ratio of two channels having different thickness of Be layer, and the Ar impurity concentration transport can be determined from a pair of Ar Ross filters (CaF(2) and NaCl thin films). Without any filters, this diagnostic system can also be used as a bolometer.

  15. High-accuracy X-ray detector calibration based on cryogenic radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Müller, P.

    2010-06-01

    Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs) are absolute thermal detectors, based on the equivalence of electrical power and radiant power. Their core piece is a cavity absorber, which is typically made of copper to achieve a short response time. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESRs due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard X-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4 was applied to optimize its absorptance for photon energies of up to 60 keV. The measurement of the radiant power of monochromatized synchrotron radiation was achieved with relative standard uncertainties of less than 0.2 %, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3 %. For some silicon photodiodes, the photocurrent is not linear with the incident radiant power.

  16. Using the Chandra ACIS x-ray imager as a background particle flux detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Peter G.; Grant, Catherine E.

    2012-09-01

    The ACIS instrument aboard the Chandra Observatory can be easily damaged by low-energy charged particles, principally protons that implant themselves in the X-ray sensitive CCDs, creating charge traps that degrade the energy resolution and detection efficiency. During periods of high background radiation, ACIS must be moved out of the focal plane of the Chandra telescope and, whenever possible, this action should be taken autonomously since the spacecraft only maintains ground contact for limited periods. The EPHIN detector has been monitoring the particle background since Chandra was launched in 1999, but it is no longer sufficiently sensitive, so the question arose whether ACIS could take over this task. Examining the ACIS data archive, a particular measured quantity—the rate of occurrence of CCD pixels found to contain electric charge that exceeded a predetermined threshold—was often correlated with particle background flux. An algorithm was developed to distinguish this behavior from random fluctuations in the above-threshold rate and the algorithm parameters were adjusted to find the maximum number of high radiation flux “triggers” from the data archive with the minimum number of false positives. The algorithm has been encoded as a patch to ACIS flight software and, after extensive ground testing, has been installed within the instrument.

  17. GaN detector development for particle and X-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alan; Barnes, A.; Farley, R. A.; Germain, M.; Sellin, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    We report on preliminary alpha particle and X-ray measurements on a number of prototype GaN PIN diodes. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential use of GAN based radiation detectors for radiation hard, high temperature, solar blind space applications. The devices have a planar structure consisting of a 2 μm epitaxial GaN layer grown on a highly doped n-type AlxGa1-xN nucleation layer, which in turn is deposited on a p-type 4H-SiC substrate. Au ohmic contacts were applied to the top of the GaN layer and the bottom of the substrate. A number of different sized devices were tested with contact diameters ranging from 0.4 mm to 0.7 mm. All devices showed good diode behaviour with reverse leakage currents in the tens to hundreds of micro-amp range. C-V measurements showed that the GaN layers were fully depleted for biases >20 V. When exposed to a 5.5 MeV alpha particle source, the devices showed a spectroscopic response with energy resolutions of ∼25% FWHM at room temperature (RT) and 10 V bias and 20% FWHM at -50 °C. These values are consistent with the previous measurements. No response to 60 keV photons could be measured.

  18. Cosmic Ray Induced Degradation in X-Ray Detectors On Board the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, S. R.; Trombka, J. I.; Goldsten, J. O.; Fiore, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    The Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission is the first in NASA's new Discovery Program to explore the solar system. Launched in February 1996, the NEAR spacecraft will take a long cruise flight arriving at the asteroid 433 Eros in January 1999 for a one year orbiting survey operation. This long exposure to the space environment has already proven to be an additional complication for the x-ray spectrometer. The asteroid pointing detectors for the x-ray spectrometer are three gas-filled proportional counters with resolving power in the range of 1 keV. Therefore, to resolve the important but closely spaced magnesium, aluminum and silicon k alpha lines( 1.255, 1.487, 1.739 keV respectively), magnesium and aluminum balanced filters are used on two of the detectors. The x-ray florescence from the surface of Eros is stimulated by solar x-rays. A proportional counter and a silicon PIN detector are used to monitor the solar incident x-ray flux. The proportional counters are single wire gas filled beryllium lined steel tubes operating at about 1100 volt. The 25 cm(exp 2) optical window is one mil. thick beryllium. To define the detector's active region, two boron nitride disks were incorporated in the tube just outside window area. It appears from the space flight data that the space environment is creating a charge on these boron nitride disks which ultimately distorts the tube gain and resolution. This broadening of the photo peak makes it more difficult to identify weak peaks and so degrades the statistical accuracy for some very important elements such as sulfur, calcium and iron (2.307, 3.690, 6.403 keV respectively). If the broadening is severe enough in the low energy region, counts will be lost as the photo peak spreads below the lower level discriminator (0.7 keV).

  19. A new x-ray scatter reduction method based on frequency division multiplexing x-ray imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Chang, S.; Lu, J. P.; Zhou, O.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray scatter may significantly degrade imaging performance in x-ray radiography applications, including flatpanel detector-based x-ray imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT (CBCT), primarily due to their large projection field sizes. It results in soft tissue contrast reduction, potentially severe image artifacts, and increased patient dose. Several different approaches have been developed to reject the scatter contributions, including analytical calculation, empirical algorithms, Monte-Carlo simulation, blocker based measurement, and slot scan technique. We recently developed a new x-ray scatter rejection method based on nanotechnology-enabled frequency division multiplexing x-ray (FDMX) imaging technique. The key enabling technology is the carbon nanotube (CNT)-based multi-beam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technology. The proposed FDMX imaging system has a MBFEX source with an array of x-ray tubes. The x-ray radiation from each individual x-ray tube is modulated at a certain given frequency. The collimated x-ray beams passed through the object and were captured by a high speed x-ray detector. A demultiplexing algorithm was applied to reject the scatter radiation from the primary radiation based on their different modulation frequencies. The x-ray images generated by the FDMX imaging technique clearly demonstrated improved imaging quality in terms of lower scatter-to-primary-ratio (SPR) and higher contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). It shows great potential of improving x-ray imaging performance and reducing patient dose.

  20. ISS-Lobster: a low-cost wide-field x-ray transient detector on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Petre, Rob; Gehrels, Neil; Marshall, Francis; Ptak, Andy; Racusin, Judith

    2015-05-01

    ISS-Lobster is a wide-field X-ray transient detector proposed to be deployed on the International Space Station. Through its unique imaging X-ray optics that allow a 30 deg by 30 deg FoV, a 1 arc min position resolution and a 1.6x10-11 erg/(sec cm2) sensitivity in 2000 sec, ISS-Lobster will observe numerous events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including: tidal disruptions of stars by supermassive black holes, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts, and perhaps most exciting, X-ray counterparts of gravitational wave detections involving stellar mass and possibly supermassive black holes. The mission includes a 3-axis gimbal system that allows fast Target of Opportunity pointing, and a small gamma-ray burst monitor. In this article we focus on ISS-Lobster measurements of X-ray counterparts of detections by the world-wide ground-based gravitational wave network.

  1. Investigation of high-resolution superconducting tunnel junction detectors for low-energy X-ray fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckhoff, B.; Fliegauf, R.; Ulm, G.

    2003-04-01

    The energy resolution of conventional semiconductor detectors is insufficient for simultaneously separating the leading fluorescence lines of low Z and medium Z materials in the soft X-ray regime. It is therefore important to investigate alternative detection instruments offering higher energy resolution and evaluate their applicability to soft X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. In this paper, various results of the characterization and evaluation of a cryogenic superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector, which was provided to the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, are given with respect to both detector response functions and XRF. For this investigation, monochromatized undulator radiation of high spectral purity, available to the PTB X-ray radiometry laboratory at the electron storage ring BESSY II, was employed, by which it was possible to record the STJ response functions at various photon energies of interest ranging from 180 to 1600 eV. By scanning the effective detector area and the adjacent substrate and leads, relevant artefacts of the detector response were identified.

  2. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    PubMed Central

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources. PMID:25849403

  3. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array.

    PubMed

    Lyubimov, Artem Y; Murray, Thomas D; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B; Cohen, Aina E; Soltis, S Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Brewster, Aaron S; Sauter, Nicholas K; Brunger, Axel T; Berger, James M

    2015-04-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  4. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  5. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    DOE PAGES

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; et al

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat formore » conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.« less

  6. Quantum-dot-array diffraction grating with single order diffraction property for soft x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang Longyu; Wang Chuanke; Wang Zhebin; Cao Leifeng; Liu Shenye; Ding Yongkun; Zhu Xiaoli; Xie Changqing

    2010-07-15

    A gold transmission grating is used routinely to disperse the x-ray spectrum at the Z soft x-ray facility to measure the spectrum and temporal history of the absolute soft x-ray power emitted from z-pinch and hohlraum radiation sources. A quantum-dot-array diffraction grating (QDADG) of 250 lines/mm for soft x-ray is designed and fabricated for the first time according to the principle of binary sinusoidal transmission grating. The diffraction efficiencies of the grating are measured in the 150-300 eV photon energy range on the Beamline 3W1B of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. This article describes the basic concept and calibration techniques and presents calibration results. It is shown that the 250 lines/mm QDADG can be used to disperse light without higher-order diffractions in soft x-ray range, and the diffraction efficiencies of this grating are nearly constant (about 25%), which is beneficial in the spectrum analysis.

  7. A comparative analysis of OTF, NPS, and DQE in energy integrating and photon counting digital x-ray detectors

    PubMed Central

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: One of the benefits of photon counting (PC) detectors over energy integrating (EI) detectors is the absence of many additive noise sources, such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that thresholding voltage gains to detect individual x rays actually generates an unexpected source of white noise in photon counters. Methods: To distinguish the two detector types, their point spread function (PSF) is interpreted differently. The PSF of the energy integrating detector is treated as a weighting function for counting x rays, while the PSF of the photon counting detector is interpreted as a probability. Although this model ignores some subtleties of real imaging systems, such as scatter and the energy-dependent amplification of secondary quanta in indirect-converting detectors, it is useful for demonstrating fundamental differences between the two detector types. From first principles, the optical transfer function (OTF) is calculated as the continuous Fourier transform of the PSF, the noise power spectra (NPS) is determined by the discrete space Fourier transform (DSFT) of the autocovariance of signal intensity, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is found from combined knowledge of the OTF and NPS. To illustrate the calculation of the transfer functions, the PSF is modeled as the convolution of a Gaussian with the product of rect functions. The Gaussian reflects the blurring of the x-ray converter, while the rect functions model the sampling of the detector. Results: The transfer functions are first calculated assuming outside noise sources such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise are negligible. It is demonstrated that while OTF is the same for two detector types possessing an equivalent PSF, a frequency-independent (i.e., “white”) difference in their NPS exists such that NPSPC≥NPSEI and hence DQEPC≤DQEEI. The necessary and sufficient condition for equality is that the PSF is a

  8. Array-scale performance of TES X-ray Calorimeters Suitable for Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Brown, A. D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Smith, S. J.; Doriese, W. B.; Irwin, K. D.

    2008-01-01

    Having developed a transition-edge-sensor (TES) calorimeter design that enables high spectral resolution in high fill-factor arrays, we now present array-scale results from 32-pixel arrays of identical closely packed TES pixels. Each pixel in such an array contains a Mo/Au bilayer with a transition temperature of 0.1 K and an electroplated Au or Au/Bi xray absorber. The pixels in an array have highly uniform physical characteristics and performance. The arrays are easy to operate due to the range of bias voltages and heatsink temperatures over which solution better than 3 eV at 6 keV can be obtained. Resolution better than 3 eV has also been obtained with 2x8 time-division SQUID multiplexing. We will present the detector characteristics and show spectra acquired through the read-out chain from the multiplexer electronics through the demultiplexer software to real-time signal processing. We are working towards demonstrating this performance over the range of count rates expected in the observing program of the Constellation-X observatory. We mill discuss the impact of increased counting rate on spectral resolution, including the effects of crosstalk and optimal-filtering dead time.

  9. Broadband X-ray edge-enhancement imaging of a boron fibre on lithium fluoride thin film detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichelatti, E.; Bonfigli, F.; Vincenti, M. A.; Cecilia, A.; Vagovič, P.; Baumbach, T.; Montereali, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    The white beam (∼6-80 keV) available at the TopoTomo X-ray beamline of the ANKA synchrotron facility (KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany) was used to perform edge-enhancement imaging tests on lithium fluoride radiation detectors. The diffracted X-ray image of a microscopic boron fibre, consisting of tungsten wire wrapped by boron cladding, was projected onto lithium fluoride thin films placed at several distances, from contact to 1 m . X-ray photons cause the local formation of primary and aggregate colour centres in lithium fluoride; these latter, once illuminated under blue light, luminesce forming visible-light patterns-acquired by a confocal laser scanning microscope-that reproduce the intensity of the X-ray diffracted images. The tests demonstrated the excellent performances of lithium fluoride films as radiation detectors at the investigated photon energies. The experimental results are here discussed and compared with those calculated with a model that takes into account all the processes that concern image formation, storing and readout.

  10. hybridMANTIS: a CPU-GPU Monte Carlo method for modeling indirect x-ray detectors with columnar scintillators.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Diksha; Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo

    2012-04-21

    The computational modeling of medical imaging systems often requires obtaining a large number of simulated images with low statistical uncertainty which translates into prohibitive computing times. We describe a novel hybrid approach for Monte Carlo simulations that maximizes utilization of CPUs and GPUs in modern workstations. We apply the method to the modeling of indirect x-ray detectors using a new and improved version of the code MANTIS, an open source software tool used for the Monte Carlo simulations of indirect x-ray imagers. We first describe a GPU implementation of the physics and geometry models in fastDETECT2 (the optical transport model) and a serial CPU version of the same code. We discuss its new features like on-the-fly column geometry and columnar crosstalk in relation to the MANTIS code, and point out areas where our model provides more flexibility for the modeling of realistic columnar structures in large area detectors. Second, we modify PENELOPE (the open source software package that handles the x-ray and electron transport in MANTIS) to allow direct output of location and energy deposited during x-ray and electron interactions occurring within the scintillator. This information is then handled by optical transport routines in fastDETECT2. A load balancer dynamically allocates optical transport showers to the GPU and CPU computing cores. Our hybridMANTIS approach achieves a significant speed-up factor of 627 when compared to MANTIS and of 35 when compared to the same code running only in a CPU instead of a GPU. Using hybridMANTIS, we successfully hide hours of optical transport time by running it in parallel with the x-ray and electron transport, thus shifting the computational bottleneck from optical tox-ray transport. The new code requires much less memory than MANTIS and, asa result, allows us to efficiently simulate large area detectors.

  11. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ~5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative to

  12. A numerical model for multiple detector energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Dycus, J H; Sang, X; LeBeau, J M

    2016-05-01

    Here we report a numerical approach to model a four quadrant energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer in the transmission electron microscope. The model includes detector geometries, specimen position and absorption, shadowing by the holder, and filtering by the Be carrier. We show that this comprehensive model accurately predicts absolute counts and intensity ratios as a function of specimen tilt and position. We directly compare the model to experimental results acquired with a FEI Super-X EDS four quadrant detector. The contribution from each detector to the sum is investigated. The program and source code can be downloaded from https://github.com/subangstrom/superAngle.

  13. Solid state neutron detector array

    DOEpatents

    Seidel, John G.; Ruddy, Frank H.; Brandt, Charles D.; Dulloo, Abdul R.; Lott, Randy G.; Sirianni, Ernest; Wilson, Randall O.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors.

  14. Solid state neutron detector array

    DOEpatents

    Seidel, J.G.; Ruddy, F.H.; Brandt, C.D.; Dulloo, A.R.; Lott, R.G.; Sirianni, E.; Wilson, R.O.

    1999-08-17

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors. 7 figs.

  15. Study of ablation and implosion stages in wire arrays using coupled ultraviolet and X-ray probing diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, A. A.; Ivanov, V. V.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Papp, D.; Wiewior, P. P.; Chalyy, O.

    2015-11-01

    Star and cylindrical wire arrays were studied using laser probing and X-ray radiography at the 1-MA Zebra pulse power generator at the University of Nevada, Reno. The Leopard laser provided backlighting, producing a laser plasma from a Si target which emitted an X-ray probing pulse at the wavelength of 6.65 Å. A spherically bent quartz crystal imaged the backlit wires onto X-ray film. Laser probing diagnostics at the wavelength of 266 nm included a 3-channel polarimeter for Faraday rotation diagnostic and two-frame laser interferometry with two shearing interferometers to study the evolution of the plasma electron density at the ablation and implosion stages. Dynamics of the plasma density profile in Al wire arrays at the ablation stage were directly studied with interferometry, and expansion of wire cores was measured with X-ray radiography. The magnetic field in the imploding plasma was measured with the Faraday rotation diagnostic, and current was reconstructed.

  16. Study of ablation and implosion stages in wire arrays using coupled ultraviolet and X-ray probing diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A. A.; Ivanov, V. V.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Wiewior, P. P.; Chalyy, O.; Papp, D.

    2015-11-15

    Star and cylindrical wire arrays were studied using laser probing and X-ray radiography at the 1-MA Zebra pulse power generator at the University of Nevada, Reno. The Leopard laser provided backlighting, producing a laser plasma from a Si target which emitted an X-ray probing pulse at the wavelength of 6.65 Å. A spherically bent quartz crystal imaged the backlit wires onto X-ray film. Laser probing diagnostics at the wavelength of 266 nm included a 3-channel polarimeter for Faraday rotation diagnostic and two-frame laser interferometry with two shearing interferometers to study the evolution of the plasma electron density at the ablation and implosion stages. Dynamics of the plasma density profile in Al wire arrays at the ablation stage were directly studied with interferometry, and expansion of wire cores was measured with X-ray radiography. The magnetic field in the imploding plasma was measured with the Faraday rotation diagnostic, and current was reconstructed.

  17. X-ray Polarimetry with a Micro-Pattern Gas Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Joe

    2005-01-01

    Topics covered include: Science drivers for X-ray polarimetry; Previous X-ray polarimetry designs; The photoelectric effect and imaging tracks; Micro-pattern gas polarimeter design concept. Further work includes: Verify results against simulator; Optimize pressure and characterize different gases for a given energy band; Optimize voltages for resolution and sensitivity; Test meshes with 80 micron pitch; Characterize ASIC operation; and Quantify quantum efficiency for optimum polarization sensitivity.

  18. Prototype high resolution multienergy soft x-ray array for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.

    2010-10-15

    A novel diagnostic design seeks to enhance the capability of multienergy soft x-ray (SXR) detection by using an image intensifier to amplify the signals from a larger set of filtered x-ray profiles. The increased number of profiles and simplified detection system provides a compact diagnostic device for measuring T{sub e} in addition to contributions from density and impurities. A single-energy prototype system has been implemented on NSTX, comprised of a filtered x-ray pinhole camera, which converts the x-rays to visible light using a CsI:Tl phosphor. SXR profiles have been measured in high performance plasmas at frame rates of up to 10 kHz, and comparisons to the toroidally displaced tangential multi-energy SXR have been made.

  19. Fully 3D-Integrated Pixel Detectors for X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Gabriella, Carini; Enquist, Paul; Grybos, Pawel; Holm, Scott; Lipton, Ronald; Maj, Piotr; Patti, Robert; Siddons, David Peter; Szczygiel, Robert; Yarema, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The vertically integrated photon imaging chip (VIPIC1) pixel detector is a stack consisting of a 500-μm-thick silicon sensor, a two-tier 34-μm-thick integrated circuit, and a host printed circuit board (PCB). The integrated circuit tiers were bonded using the direct bonding technology with copper, and each tier features 1-μm-diameter through-silicon vias that were used for connections to the sensor on one side, and to the host PCB on the other side. The 80-μm-pixel-pitch sensor was the direct bonding technology with nickel bonded to the integrated circuit. The stack was mounted on the board using Sn–Pb balls placed on a 320-μm pitch, yielding an entirely wire-bond-less structure. The analog front-end features a pulse response peaking at below 250 ns, and the power consumption per pixel is 25 μW. We successful completed the 3-D integration and have reported here. Additionally, all pixels in the matrix of 64 × 64 pixels were responding on well-bonded devices. Correct operation of the sparsified readout, allowing a single 153-ns bunch timing resolution, was confirmed in the tests on a synchrotron beam of 10-keV X-rays. An equivalent noise charge of 36.2 e- rms and a conversion gain of 69.5 μV/e- with 2.6 e- rms and 2.7 μV/e- rms pixel-to-pixel variations, respectively, were measured.

  20. A unified statistical framework for material decomposition using multienergy photon counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jiyoung; Kang, Dong-Goo; Kang, Sunghoon; Sung, Younghun; Ye, Jong Chul

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Material decomposition using multienergy photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXD) has been an active research area over the past few years. Even with some success, the problem of optimal energy selection and three material decomposition including malignant tissue is still on going research topic, and more systematic studies are required. This paper aims to address this in a unified statistical framework in a mammographic environment.Methods: A unified statistical framework for energy level optimization and decomposition of three materials is proposed. In particular, an energy level optimization algorithm is derived using the theory of the minimum variance unbiased estimator, and an iterative algorithm is proposed for material composition as well as system parameter estimation under the unified statistical estimation framework. To verify the performance of the proposed algorithm, the authors performed simulation studies as well as real experiments using physical breast phantom and ex vivo breast specimen. Quantitative comparisons using various performance measures were conducted, and qualitative performance evaluations for ex vivo breast specimen were also performed by comparing the ground-truth malignant tissue areas identified by radiologists.Results: Both simulation and real experiments confirmed that the optimized energy bins by the proposed method allow better material decomposition quality. Moreover, for the specimen thickness estimation errors up to 2 mm, the proposed method provides good reconstruction results in both simulation and real ex vivo breast phantom experiments compared to existing methods.Conclusions: The proposed statistical framework of PCXD has been successfully applied for the energy optimization and decomposition of three material in a mammographic environment. Experimental results using the physical breast phantom and ex vivo specimen support the practicality of the proposed algorithm.

  1. New room temperature high resolution solid-state detector (CdZnTe) for hard x rays and gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Amyelizabeth C.; Desai, Upendra D.

    1993-01-01

    The new CdZnTe high 'Z' material represents a significant improvement in detectors for high energy photons. With the thicknesses available, photons up to 100 keV can be efficiently detected. This material has a wide band gap of 1.5 - 2.2 eV which allows it to operate at room temperature while providing high spectral resolution. Results of resolution evaluations are presented. This detector can be used for high resolution spectral measurements of photons in x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, offering a significant reduction in the weight, power, and volume of the detector system compared to more conventional detector types such as scintillation counters. In addition, the detector will have the simplicity and reliability of solid-state construction. The CdZnTe detector, as a new development, has not yet been evaluated in space. The Get Away Special program can provide this opportunity.

  2. Mathematical Design Optimization of Wide-Field X-ray Telescopes: Mirror Nodal Positions and Detector Tilts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, Ronald; O'Dell, Stephen; Ramsey, Brian; Weisskopf, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mathematical formalism for determining the mirror shell nodal positions and detector tilts that optimize the spatial resolution averaged over a field-of-view for a nested x-ray telescope, assuming known mirror segment surface prescriptions and known detector focal surface. The results are expressed in terms of ensemble averages over variable combinations of the ray positions and wavevectors in the flat focal plane intersecting the optical axis at the nominal on-axis focus, which can be determined by Monte-Carlo ray traces of the individual mirror shells. This work is part of our continuing efforts to provide analytical tools to aid in the design process for wide-field survey x-ray astronomy missions.

  3. Performance of the micro-PIC gaseous area detector in small-angle X-ray scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Kaori; Tsuchiya, Ken'ichi; Ito, Kazuki; Okada, Yoko; Fujii, Kotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Takata, Masaki; Tanimori, Toru; Uekusa, Hidehiro

    2009-03-01

    The application of a two-dimensional photon-counting detector based on a micro-pixel gas chamber (micro-PIC) to high-resolution small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and its performance, are reported. The micro-PIC is a micro-pattern gaseous detector fabricated by printed circuit board technology. This article describes the performance of the micro-PIC in SAXS experiments at SPring-8. A dynamic range of >10(5) was obtained for X-ray scattering from a polystyrene sphere solution. A maximum counting rate of up to 5 MHz was observed with good linearity and without saturation. For a diffraction pattern of collagen, weak peaks were observed in the high-angle region in one accumulation of photons.

  4. Mathematical Design Optimization of Wide-Field X-ray Telescopes: Mirror Nodal Positions and Detector Tilts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mathematical formalism for determining the mirror shell nodal positions and detector tilts that optimize the spatial resolution averaged over a field-of-view for a nested x-ray telescope, assuming known mirror segment surface prescriptions and known detector focal surface. The results are expressed in terms of ensemble averages over variable combinations of the ray positions and wave vectors in the flat focal plane intersecting the optical axis at the nominal on-axis focus, which can be determined by Monte-Carlo ray traces of the individual mirror shells. This work is part of our continuing efforts to provide analytical tools to aid in the design process for wide-field survey x-ray astronomy missions.

  5. Integrated X-ray and charged particle active pixel CMOS sensor arrays using an epitaxial silicon sensitive region

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bichsel, Hans; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S.; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Weiman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-07-01

    Integrated CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) arrays have been fabricated and tested using X-ray and electron sources. The 128 by 128 pixel arrays, designed in a standard 0.25 micron process, use a {approx}10 micron epitaxial silicon layer as a deep detection region. The epitaxial layer has a much greater thickness than the surface features used by standard CMOS APS, leading to stronger signals and potentially better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). On the other hand, minority carriers confined within the epitaxial region may diffuse to neighboring pixels, blur images and reduce peak signal intensity. But for low-rate, sparse-event images, centroid analysis of this diffusion may be used to increase position resolution. Careful trade-offs involving pixel size and sense-node area verses capacitance must be made to optimize overall performance. The prototype sensor arrays, therefore, include a range of different pixel designs, including different APS circuits and a range of different epitaxial layer contact structures. The fabricated arrays were tested with 1.5 GeV electrons and Fe-55 X-ray sources, yielding a measured noise of 13 electrons RMS and an SNR for single Fe-55 X-rays of greater than 38.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of primary electron production inside an a-selenium detector for x-ray mammography: physics.

    PubMed

    Sakellaris, T; Spyrou, G; Tzanakos, G; Panayiotakis, G

    2005-08-21

    Selenium is among the materials under investigation that may form effective detectors and provide a major contribution to digital mammography. Till the final image formation, there is an intervention of the x-ray photons transformation to primary electrons and their subsequent ionizing drift towards the electrodes that collect them. The characteristics of the generated primary electrons inside a-Se material such as their angular, spatial and energy distribution affect the characteristics of the final image. A Monte Carlo based model has been developed that simulates the x-ray irradiation of an a-Se detector plate, including primary photon interactions (photoelectric absorption, coherent and incoherent scattering), as well as secondary ones, such as fluorescence (Kalpha, Kbeta) and emission of Auger electrons. The angular, spatial and energy distributions for the generated primary electrons inside a-Se have been produced for various mammographic x-ray spectra and their usefulness in designing and optimizing a detector made of a-Se for digital mammography is discussed.

  7. High-resolution hard x-ray spectroscopy of high-temperature plasmas using an array of quantum microcalorimeters.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Daniel B; Gu, Ming F; Brown, Greg V; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Porter, F Scott; Kilbourne, Caroline A; Kelley, Richard L

    2008-10-01

    Quantum microcalorimeters show promise in being able to fully resolve x-ray spectra from heavy highly charged ions, such as would be found in hot plasmas with temperatures in excess of 50 keV. Quantum microcalorimeter arrays are able to achieve this as they have a high-resolving power and good effective quantum efficiency for hard x-ray photons up to 60 keV. To demonstrate this, we present a measurement using an array of thin HgTe quantum microcalorimeters to measure the K-shell spectrum of hydrogenlike through carbonlike praseodymium (Z=57). With this device we are able to attain a resolving power, E/DeltaE, of 1000 at a photon energy of 37 keV.

  8. Ultrabright multikilovolt x-ray source: saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Charles K.; Boyer, Keith

    2004-02-17

    An apparatus and method for the generation of ultrabright multikilovolt x-rays from saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states is described. Conditions for x-ray amplification in this spectral region combine the production of cold, high-Z matter, with the direct, selective multiphoton excitation of hollow atoms from clusters using ultraviolet radiation and a nonlinear mode of confined, self-channeled propagation in plasmas. Data obtained is consistent with the presence of saturated amplification on several transition arrays of the hollow atom Xe(L) spectrum (.lambda..about.2.9 .ANG.). An estimate of the peak brightness achieved is .about.10.sup.29 .gamma..multidot.s.sup.-1.multidot.mm.sup.-2.multidot.mr.sup.-2 (0.1% Bandwidth).sup.-1, that is .about.10.sup.5 -fold higher than presently available synchotron technology.

  9. Titanium K-Shell X-Ray Production from High Velocity Wire Arrays Implosions on the 20-MA Z Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J.P.; Beg, F.N.; Clark, R.C.; Coverdale, C.A.; Davis, J.; Deeney, C.; Douglas, M.R.; Nash, T.J.; Ruiz-Comacho, J.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W.; Thornhill, J.W.; Whitney, K.G.

    1999-01-27

    The advent of the 20-MA Z accelerator [R.B. Spielman, C. Deeney, G.A. Chandler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105, (1997)] has enabled implosions of large diameter, high-wire-number arrays of titanium to begin testing Z-pinch K-shell scaling theories. The 2-cm long titanium arrays, which were mounted on a 40-mm diameter, produced between 75{+-}15 to 125{+-}20 kJ of K-shell x-rays. Mass scans indicate that, as predicted, higher velocity implosions in the series produced higher x-ray yields. Spectroscopic analyses indicate that these high velocity implosions achieved peak electron temperatures from 2.7{+-}0.1 to 3.2{+-}0.2 keV and obtained a K-shell emission mass participation of up to 12%.

  10. High-resolution hard x-ray spectroscopy of high-temperature plasmas using an array of quantum microcalorimeters.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Daniel B; Gu, Ming F; Brown, Greg V; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Porter, F Scott; Kilbourne, Caroline A; Kelley, Richard L

    2008-10-01

    Quantum microcalorimeters show promise in being able to fully resolve x-ray spectra from heavy highly charged ions, such as would be found in hot plasmas with temperatures in excess of 50 keV. Quantum microcalorimeter arrays are able to achieve this as they have a high-resolving power and good effective quantum efficiency for hard x-ray photons up to 60 keV. To demonstrate this, we present a measurement using an array of thin HgTe quantum microcalorimeters to measure the K-shell spectrum of hydrogenlike through carbonlike praseodymium (Z=57). With this device we are able to attain a resolving power, E/DeltaE, of 1000 at a photon energy of 37 keV. PMID:19044485

  11. A rapid, high sensitivity technique for measuring arsenic in skin phantoms using a portable x-ray tube and detector.

    PubMed

    Fleming, David E B; Gherase, Mihai Raul

    2007-10-01

    Using a portable x-ray tube and silicon PiN diode detector, an improved approach to the measurement of arsenic in skin phantoms was demonstrated. Skin phantoms of 8 mm thickness were made from polyester resin, with arsenic concentrations ranging from 0 to 30 microg g(-1). The excitation of characteristic arsenic x-rays was performed with the x-ray tube and K(alpha) x-rays were used as an indicator of arsenic concentration. From repeated phantom measurements, an instrumental minimum detection limit of 0.446 +/- 0.006 microg g(-1) was found, using an acquisition time of 120 s (real time). This compares with previously reported approaches having instrumental minimum detection limits of 3.5 +/- 0.2 microg g(-1) (1800 s real time), 2.3 +/- 0.1 microg g(-1) (1000 s live time) and 0.40 +/- 0.06 microg g(-1) (1000 s live time). PMID:17881796

  12. Review of medical imaging with emphasis on X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoheisel, Martin

    2006-07-01

    Medical imaging can be looked at from two different perspectives, the medical and the physical. The medical point of view is application-driven and involves finding the best way of tackling a medical problem through imaging, i.e. either to answer a diagnostic question, or to facilitate a therapy. For this purpose, industry offers a broad spectrum of radiographic, fluoroscopic, and angiographic equipment. The requirements depend on the medical problem: which organs have to be imaged, which details have to be made visible, how to deal with the problem of motion if any, and so forth. In radiography, for instance, large detector sizes of up to 43 cm×43 cm and relatively high energies are needed to image a whole chest. In mammography, pixel sizes between 25 and 70 μm are favorable for good spatial resolution, which is essential for detecting microcalcifications. In cardiology, 30-60 images per second are required to follow the heart's motion. In computed tomography, marginal contrast differences down to one Hounsfield unit have to be resolved. In all cases, but especially in pediatrics, the required radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. Moreover, three-dimensional(3D) reconstruction of image data allows much better orientation in the body, permitting a more accurate diagnosis, precise treatment planning, and image-guided therapy. Additional functional information from different modalities is very helpful, information such as perfusion, flow rate, diffusion, oxygen concentration, metabolism, and receptor affinity for specific molecules. To visualize, functional and anatomical information are fused into one combined image. The physical point of view is technology-driven. A choice of different energies from the electromagnetic spectrum is available for imaging; not only X-rays in the range of 10-150 keV, but also γ rays, which are used in nuclear medicine, X-rays in the MeV range, which are used in portal imaging to monitor radiation therapy

  13. Image plates as x-ray detectors in plasma physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S. G.; Bentley, C. D.

    2004-10-01

    The performance of image plates based on the photostimulable phosphor BaF(Br,l):Eu2+ has been investigated and compared with x-ray film. Evaluation of detective quantum efficiency (DQE), sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity was carried out for several types of commercially available image plate, using the Excalibur soft x-ray calibration facility at AWE. Image plate response was found to be linear over a dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. One type of image plate was found to have a number of advantages for soft x-ray detection, with a measured sensitivity 1 order of magnitude greater than that of Kodak Industrex CX and DEF-5 x-ray film. The DQE of this plate was found to be superior to that of film at low [less than 103 photons/(50 μm)2] and high fluxes [greater than 104 photons/(50 μm)2]. The spatial resolution of image plates, scanned with several models of commercial image plate readers, has been evaluated using a USAF resolution test target. The highest spatial resolution measured is 35 μm. Though this is significantly lower than the resolution possible with film, it is sufficient for many applications. Image plates were fielded in a refractive x-ray lens imaging diagnostic on the 1 TW Helen laser and these results are discussed.