Science.gov

Sample records for arrest defective-1 controls

  1. The analysis on nonlinear control of the aircraft arresting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinchun; Du, Tianrong

    2005-12-01

    The aircraft arresting system is a complicated nonlinear system. This paper analyzes the mechanical-hydraulic structure of aircraft arresting system composed of electro hydraulic valve and establishes the dynamic equation of the aircraft arresting system. Based on the state-feedback linearization of nonlinear system, a PD-based controller is synthesized. Simulation studies indicate, while arresting the different type aircraft, the proposed controller has fast response, good tracking performance and strong robustness. By tuning the parameters of the PD controller, a satisfactory control performance can be guaranteed.

  2. To Grow or Not to Grow: Nutritional Control of Development During Caenorhabditis elegans L1 Arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is widely appreciated that larvae of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans arrest development by forming dauer larvae in response to multiple unfavorable environmental conditions. C. elegans larvae can also reversibly arrest development earlier, during the first larval stage (L1), in response to starvation. “L1 arrest” (also known as “L1 diapause”) occurs without morphological modification but is accompanied by increased stress resistance. Caloric restriction and periodic fasting can extend adult lifespan, and developmental models are critical to understanding how the animal is buffered from fluctuations in nutrient availability, impacting lifespan. L1 arrest provides an opportunity to study nutritional control of development. Given its relevance to aging, diabetes, obesity and cancer, interest in L1 arrest is increasing, and signaling pathways and gene regulatory mechanisms controlling arrest and recovery have been characterized. Insulin-like signaling is a critical regulator, and it is modified by and acts through microRNAs. DAF-18/PTEN, AMP-activated kinase and fatty acid biosynthesis are also involved. The nervous system, epidermis, and intestine contribute systemically to regulation of arrest, but cell-autonomous signaling likely contributes to regulation in the germline. A relatively small number of genes affecting starvation survival during L1 arrest are known, and many of them also affect adult lifespan, reflecting a common genetic basis ripe for exploration. mRNA expression is well characterized during arrest, recovery, and normal L1 development, providing a metazoan model for nutritional control of gene expression. In particular, post-recruitment regulation of RNA polymerase II is under nutritional control, potentially contributing to a rapid and coordinated response to feeding. The phenomenology of L1 arrest will be reviewed, as well as regulation of developmental arrest and starvation survival by various signaling pathways and gene regulatory

  3. Controlling size and patchiness of soft nanoparticles via kinetically arrested co-assembly of block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Jose; Herrera-Alonso, Margarita

    2013-03-01

    Engineering patchy particles from block copolymers provides an effective route for the preparation of nanoparticles with surface heterogeneity and unique properties. In the current work, co-assembly of block copolymers amphiphiles with distinct macromolecular architectures under kinetically arrested conditions was used to control the size and patchiness of polymeric nanoparticles. The block copolymer mixture is composed of linear and linear-dendritic polymeric amphiphiles, the later of which provides pre-assembled ``patches'' with well-controlled dimensions and chemical functionality. Parameters including but not limited to the molecular diffusity of the amphiphiles and the kinetics of self-assembly were found to play an important role on the control of the particle size and formation of the patches. The patchy particles are stable for several months and its stability against protein/blood plasma solutions can be tuned. We will also discuss the use of these constructs to probe nanoparticle-cell interactions.

  4. A comparison between intravascular and traditional cooling for inducing and maintaining temperature control in patients following cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Jérémy; Hentzien, Maxime; Dramé, Moustapha; Roussel, Vincent; Just, Bernard; Jolly, Damien; Mateu, Philippe

    2016-11-29

    Therapeutic temperature control has been widely used during the last decade to improve clinical outcomes. We conducted this retrospective observational study to compare traditional cooling with endovascular cooling in post-cardiac arrest comatose survivors and to compare results with current guidelines.

  5. p53 controls CDC7 levels to reinforce G1 cell cycle arrest upon genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tudzarova, Slavica; Dey, Ayona; Stoeber, Kai; Okorokov, Andrei L.; Williams, Gareth H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA replication initiation is a key event in the cell cycle, which is dependent on 2 kinases - CDK2 and CDC7. Here we report a novel mechanism in which p53 induces G1 checkpoint and cell cycle arrest by downregulating CDC7 kinase in response to genotoxic stress. We demonstrate that p53 controls CDC7 stability post-transcriptionally via miR-192/215 and post-translationally via Fbxw7β E3 ubiquitin ligase. The p53-dependent pathway of CDC7 downregulation is interlinked with the p53-p21-CDK2 pathway, as p21-mediated inhibition of CDK2-dependent phosphorylation of CDC7 on Thr376 is required for GSK3ß-phosphorylation and Fbxw7ß-dependent degradation of CDC7. Notably, sustained oncogenic high levels of active CDC7 exert a negative feedback onto p53, leading to unrestrained S-phase progression and accumulation of DNA damage. Thus, p53-dependent control of CDC7 levels is essential for blocking G1/S cell-cycle transition upon genotoxic stress, thereby safeguarding the genome from instability and thus representing a novel general stress response. PMID:27611229

  6. Social control correlates of arrest behavior among homeless youth in five U.S. cities.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Kristin M; Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J; Maccio, Elaine M; Xie, Bin; Pollio, David

    2011-01-01

    This study identified homelessness, substance use, employment, and mental health correlates of homeless youths' arrest activity in 5 cities. Two hundred thirty-eight street youth from Los Angeles, Austin, Denver, New Orleans, and St. Louis were recruited using comparable sampling strategies. Ordinary least squares (OLS) regression results reveal that being arrested for criminal activity is associated with length of homelessness, history of juvenile detention and incarceration, receiving income from theft, substance abuse, and mental illness. Arrests are also associated with interactions between lack of formal employment income and receiving income from theft and between drug and alcohol abuse/ dependency. Understanding the health and situational factors associated with homeless youths' delinquent activity has implications for providing more comprehensive health, mental health, and substance abuse services.

  7. Novel approach for independent control of brain hypothermia and systemic normothermia: cerebral selective deep hypothermia for refractory cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chou, Heng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Chih; Hwang, Joey-Jen; Gilbert, John R; Chen, Yih-Sharng

    2017-01-01

    A 38-year-old man was found unconscious, alone in the driver's seat of his car. The emergency medical team identified his condition as pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Defibrillation was attempted but failed. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was started in the emergency room 52 min after the estimated arrest following the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) protocol in our center. The initial prognosis under the standard protocol was <25% chance of survival. A novel adjunctive to our ECPR protocol, cerebral selective deep (<30°C) hypothermia (CSDH), was applied. CSDH adds a second independent femoral access extracorporeal circuit, perfusing cold blood into the patient's common carotid artery. The ECMO and CSDH circuits demonstrated independent control of cerebral and core temperatures. Nasal temperature was lowered to below 30°C for 12 hours while core was maintained at normothermia. The patient was discharged without significant neurological deficit 32 days after the initial arrest. PMID:28108436

  8. Novel approach for independent control of brain hypothermia and systemic normothermia: cerebral selective deep hypothermia for refractory cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chou, Heng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Chih; Hwang, Joey-Jen; Gilbert, John R; Chen, Yih-Sharng

    2017-01-20

    A 38-year-old man was found unconscious, alone in the driver's seat of his car. The emergency medical team identified his condition as pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Defibrillation was attempted but failed. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was started in the emergency room 52 min after the estimated arrest following the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) protocol in our center. The initial prognosis under the standard protocol was <25% chance of survival. A novel adjunctive to our ECPR protocol, cerebral selective deep (<30°C) hypothermia (CSDH), was applied. CSDH adds a second independent femoral access extracorporeal circuit, perfusing cold blood into the patient's common carotid artery. The ECMO and CSDH circuits demonstrated independent control of cerebral and core temperatures. Nasal temperature was lowered to below 30°C for 12 hours while core was maintained at normothermia. The patient was discharged without significant neurological deficit 32 days after the initial arrest.

  9. Novel approach for independent control of brain hypothermia and systemic normothermia: cerebral selective deep hypothermia for refractory cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chou, Heng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Chih; Hwang, Joey-Jen; Gilbert, John R; Chen, Yih-Sharng

    2017-01-25

    A 38-year-old man was found unconscious, alone in the driver's seat of his car. The emergency medical team identified his condition as pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Defibrillation was attempted but failed. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was started in the emergency room 52 min after the estimated arrest following the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) protocol in our center. The initial prognosis under the standard protocol was <25% chance of survival. A novel adjunctive to our ECPR protocol, cerebral selective deep (<30°C) hypothermia (CSDH), was applied. CSDH adds a second independent femoral access extracorporeal circuit, perfusing cold blood into the patient's common carotid artery. The ECMO and CSDH circuits demonstrated independent control of cerebral and core temperatures. Nasal temperature was lowered to below 30°C for 12 hours while core was maintained at normothermia. The patient was discharged without significant neurological deficit 32 days after the initial arrest.

  10. Bcl-xL controls a switch between cell death modes during mitotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bah, N; Maillet, L; Ryan, J; Dubreil, S; Gautier, F; Letai, A; Juin, P; Barillé-Nion, S

    2014-01-01

    Antimitotic agents such as microtubule inhibitors (paclitaxel) are widely used in cancer therapy while new agents blocking mitosis onset are currently in development. All these agents impose a prolonged mitotic arrest in cancer cells that relies on sustained activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint and may lead to subsequent cell death by incompletely understood molecular events. We have investigated the role played by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members in the fate of mitotically arrested mammary tumor cells treated with paclitaxel, or depleted in Cdc20, the activator of the anaphase promoting complex. Under these conditions, a weak and delayed mitotic cell death occurs that is caspase- and Bax/Bak-independent. Moreover, BH3 profiling assays indicate that viable cells during mitotic arrest are primed to die by apoptosis and that Bcl-xL is required to maintain mitochondrial integrity. Consistently, Bcl-xL depletion, or treatment with its inhibitor ABT-737 (but not with the specific Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199), during mitotic arrest converts cell response to antimitotics to efficient caspase and Bax-dependent apoptosis. Apoptotic priming under conditions of mitotic arrest relies, at least in part, on the phosphorylation on serine 62 of Bcl-xL, which modulates its interaction with Bax and its sensitivity to ABT-737. The phospho-mimetic S62D-Bcl-xL mutant is indeed less efficient than the corresponding phospho-deficient S62A-Bcl-xL mutant in sequestrating Bax and in protecting cancer cells from mitotic cell death or yeast cells from Bax-induced growth inhibition. Our results provide a rationale for combining Bcl-xL targeting to antimitotic agents to improve clinical efficacy of antimitotic strategy in cancer therapy. PMID:24922075

  11. Nutritional control of mRNA isoform expression during developmental arrest and recovery in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Colin S; Antoshechkin, Igor; Kurhanewicz, Nicole; Belsky, Jason A; Baugh, L Ryan

    2012-10-01

    Nutrient availability profoundly influences gene expression. Many animal genes encode multiple transcript isoforms, yet the effect of nutrient availability on transcript isoform expression has not been studied in genome-wide fashion. When Caenorhabditis elegans larvae hatch without food, they arrest development in the first larval stage (L1 arrest). Starved larvae can survive L1 arrest for weeks, but growth and post-embryonic development are rapidly initiated in response to feeding. We used RNA-seq to characterize the transcriptome during L1 arrest and over time after feeding. Twenty-seven percent of detectable protein-coding genes were differentially expressed during recovery from L1 arrest, with the majority of changes initiating within the first hour, demonstrating widespread, acute effects of nutrient availability on gene expression. We used two independent approaches to track expression of individual exons and mRNA isoforms, and we connected changes in expression to functional consequences by mining a variety of databases. These two approaches identified an overlapping set of genes with alternative isoform expression, and they converged on common functional patterns. Genes affecting mRNA splicing and translation are regulated by alternative isoform expression, revealing post-transcriptional consequences of nutrient availability on gene regulation. We also found that phosphorylation sites are often alternatively expressed, revealing a common mode by which alternative isoform expression modifies protein function and signal transduction. Our results detail rich changes in C. elegans gene expression as larvae initiate growth and post-embryonic development, and they provide an excellent resource for ongoing investigation of transcriptional regulation and developmental physiology.

  12. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. 154.822 Section 154.822 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.822 Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. (a)...

  13. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. 154.822 Section 154.822 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.822 Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. (a)...

  14. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik; Daub, Carsten O; Balwierz, Piotr J; Irvine, Katharine M; Lassmann, Timo; Ravasi, Timothy; Hasegawa, Yuki; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Katayama, Shintaro; Schroder, Kate; Carninci, Piero; Tomaru, Yasuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Akalin, Altuna; Ando, Yoshinari; Arner, Erik; Asada, Maki; Asahara, Hiroshi; Bailey, Timothy; Bajic, Vladimir B; Bauer, Denis; Beckhouse, Anthony G; Bertin, Nicolas; Björkegren, Johan; Brombacher, Frank; Bulger, Erika; Chalk, Alistair M; Chiba, Joe; Cloonan, Nicole; Dawe, Adam; Dostie, Josee; Engström, Pär G; Essack, Magbubah; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Fink, J Lynn; Fredman, David; Fujimori, Ko; Furuno, Masaaki; Gojobori, Takashi; Gough, Julian; Grimmond, Sean M; Gustafsson, Mika; Hashimoto, Megumi; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Hatakeyama, Mariko; Heinzel, Susanne; Hide, Winston; Hofmann, Oliver; Hörnquist, Michael; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Ikeo, Kazuho; Imamoto, Naoko; Inoue, Satoshi; Inoue, Yusuke; Ishihara, Ryoko; Iwayanagi, Takao; Jacobsen, Anders; Kaur, Mandeep; Kawaji, Hideya; Kerr, Markus C; Kimura, Ryuichiro; Kimura, Syuhei; Kimura, Yasumasa; Kitano, Hiroaki; Koga, Hisashi; Kojima, Toshio; Kondo, Shinji; Konno, Takeshi; Krogh, Anders; Kruger, Adele; Kumar, Ajit; Lenhard, Boris; Lennartsson, Andreas; Lindow, Morten; Lizio, Marina; Macpherson, Cameron; Maeda, Norihiro; Maher, Christopher A; Maqungo, Monique; Mar, Jessica; Matigian, Nicholas A; Matsuda, Hideo; Mattick, John S; Meier, Stuart; Miyamoto, Sei; Miyamoto-Sato, Etsuko; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakano, Mika; Nygaard, Sanne; Okayama, Toshitsugu; Okazaki, Yasushi; Okuda-Yabukami, Haruka; Orlando, Valerio; Otomo, Jun; Pachkov, Mikhail; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Plessy, Charles; Quackenbush, John; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Rehli, Michael; Saito, Rintaro; Sandelin, Albin; Schmeier, Sebastian; Schönbach, Christian; Schwartz, Ariel S; Semple, Colin A; Sera, Miho; Severin, Jessica; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Simons, Cas; St Laurent, George; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Takahiro; Sweet, Matthew J; Taft, Ryan J; Takeda, Shizu; Takenaka, Yoichi; Tan, Kai; Taylor, Martin S; Teasdale, Rohan D; Tegnér, Jesper; Teichmann, Sarah; Valen, Eivind; Wahlestedt, Claes; Waki, Kazunori; Waterhouse, Andrew; Wells, Christine A; Winther, Ole; Wu, Linda; Yamaguchi, Kazumi; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Jun; Zavolan, Mihaela; Hume, David A; Arakawa, Takahiro; Fukuda, Shiro; Imamura, Kengo; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kaiho, Ai; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kawazu, Chika; Kitazume, Yayoi; Kojima, Miki; Miura, Hisashi; Murakami, Kayoko; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Ogawa, Chihiro; Sano, Takuma; Simon, Christophe; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Yukari; Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2009-05-01

    Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites, we identified the key transcription regulators, their time-dependent activities and target genes. Systematic siRNA knockdown of 52 transcription factors confirmed the roles of individual factors in the regulatory network. Our results indicate that cellular states are constrained by complex networks involving both positive and negative regulatory interactions among substantial numbers of transcription factors and that no single transcription factor is both necessary and sufficient to drive the differentiation process.

  15. Sensory Cortical Control of a Visually Induced Arrest Behavior via Corticotectal Projections

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Feixue; Xiong, Xiaorui R.; Zingg, Brian; Ji, Xu-ying; Zhang, Li I.; Tao, Huizhong W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Innate defense behaviors (IDBs) evoked by threatening sensory stimuli are essential for animal survival. Although subcortical circuits are implicated in IDBs, it remains largely unclear whether sensory cortex modulates IDBs and what are the underlying neural pathways. Here, we show that optogenetic silencing of corticotectal projections from layer 5 (L5) of the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) to the superior colliculus (SC) significantly reduces a SC-dependent innate behavior, i.e. temporary suspension of locomotion upon a sudden flash of light as short as milliseconds. Surprisingly, optogenetic activation of SC-projecting neurons in V1 or their axon terminals in SC sufficiently elicits the behavior, in contrast to other major L5 corticofugal projections. Thus, via the same corticofugal projection, visual cortex not only modulates the light-induced arrest behavior, but also can directly drive the behavior. Our results suggest that sensory cortex may play a previously unrecognized role in the top-down initiation of sensory-motor behaviors. PMID:25913860

  16. Faulting arrested by control of ground-water withdrawal in Houston, Texas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.; Gabrysch, R.K.; Verbeek, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    More than 86 historically active faults with an aggregate length of 150 miles have been identified within and adjacent to the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area. Although scarps of these faults grow gradually and without causing damaging earthquakes, historical fault offset has cost millions of dollars in damage to houses and other buildings, utilities, and highways that were built on or across the faults. The historical fault activity results from renewed movement along preexisting faults and appears to be caused principally by withdrawal of ground water for municipal, industrial, and agricultural uses in the Houston area. Approximately one-half of the area's water supply is obtained from local ground water. Monitoring by the US Geological Survey of heights of fault scarps indicates that many of the scarps have recently stopped increasing in height. The area where faulting has ceased coincides with the area where ground-water pumping was cut back in the mid-1970s to slow the damage caused by land subsidence along Galveston Bay and the Houston Ship Channel. Thus, it appears that efforts to halt land subsidence in the coastal area have provided the additional benefit of arresting damaging surface faulting. -from Authors

  17. Sensory Cortical Control of a Visually Induced Arrest Behavior via Corticotectal Projections.

    PubMed

    Liang, Feixue; Xiong, Xiaorui R; Zingg, Brian; Ji, Xu-ying; Zhang, Li I; Tao, Huizhong W

    2015-05-06

    Innate defense behaviors (IDBs) evoked by threatening sensory stimuli are essential for animal survival. Although subcortical circuits are implicated in IDBs, it remains largely unclear whether sensory cortex modulates IDBs and what the underlying neural pathways are. Here, we show that optogenetic silencing of corticotectal projections from layer 5 (L5) of the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) to the superior colliculus (SC) significantly reduces an SC-dependent innate behavior (i.e., temporary suspension of locomotion upon a sudden flash of light as short as milliseconds). Surprisingly, optogenetic activation of SC-projecting neurons in V1 or their axon terminals in SC sufficiently elicits the behavior, in contrast to other major L5 corticofugal projections. Thus, via the same corticofugal projection, visual cortex not only modulates the light-induced arrest behavior, but also can directly drive the behavior. Our results suggest that sensory cortex may play a previously unrecognized role in the top-down initiation of sensory-motor behaviors.

  18. Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest (ALASCA) and the effectiveness of an early intervention service: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Moulaert, Véronique RMP; Verbunt, Jeanine A; van Heugten, Caroline M; Bakx, Wilbert GM; Gorgels, Anton PM; Bekkers, Sebastiaan CAM; de Krom, Marc CFTM; Wade, Derick T

    2007-01-01

    Background Cardiac arrest survivors may experience hypoxic brain injury that results in cognitive impairments which frequently remain unrecognised. This may lead to limitations in daily activities and participation in society, a decreased quality of life for the patient, and a high strain for the caregiver. Publications about interventions directed at improving quality of life after survival of a cardiac arrest are scarce. Therefore, evidence about effective rehabilitation programmes for cardiac arrest survivors is urgently needed. This paper presents the design of the ALASCA (Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest) trial, a randomised, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effects of a new early intervention service for survivors of a cardiac arrest and their caregivers. Methods/design The study population comprises all people who survive two weeks after a cardiac arrest and are admitted to one of the participating hospitals in the Southern part of the Netherlands. In a two-group randomised, controlled clinical trial, half of the participants will receive an early intervention service. The early intervention service consists of several consultations with a specialised nurse for the patient and their caregiver during the first three months after the cardiac arrest. The intervention is directed at screening for cognitive problems, provision of informational, emotional and practical support, and stimulating self-management. If necessary, referral to specialised care can take place. Persons in the control group will receive the care as usual. The primary outcome measures are the extent of participation in society and quality of life of the patient one year after a cardiac arrest. Secondary outcome measures are the level of cognitive, emotional and cardiovascular impairment and daily functioning of the patient, as well as the strain for and quality of life of the caregiver. Participants and their caregivers will be followed for twelve months after the

  19. About Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cardiac Arrest Updated:Mar 10,2017 What is cardiac arrest? Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart ...

  20. Defective in Mitotic Arrest 1 (Dma1) Ubiquitin Ligase Controls G1 Cyclin Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ortega, Sara; Bru, Samuel; Ricco, Natalia; Ramírez, Sara; Casals, Núria; Jiménez, Javier; Isasa, Marta; Crosas, Bernat; Clotet, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle is controlled by diverse cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that might be associated to numerous cyclin isoforms. Given such complexity, regulation of cyclin degradation should be crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SCF is the only E3 ligase known to date to be involved in G1 cyclin degradation. Here, we report the design of a genetic screening that uncovered Dma1 as another E3 ligase that targets G1 cyclins in yeast. We show that the cyclin Pcl1 is ubiquitinated in vitro and in vivo by Dma1, and accordingly, is stabilized in dma1 mutants. We demonstrate that Pcl1 must be phosphorylated by its own CDK to efficiently interact with Dma1 and undergo degradation. A nonphosphorylatable version of Pcl1 accumulates throughout the cell cycle, demonstrating the physiological relevance of the proposed mechanism. Finally, we present evidence that the levels of Pcl1 and Cln2 are independently controlled in response to nutrient availability. This new previously unknown mechanism for G1 cyclin degradation that we report here could help elucidate the specific roles of the redundant CDK-cyclin complexes in G1. PMID:23264631

  1. Glycolytic controls in estivation and anoxia: a comparison of metabolic arrest in land and marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S P; Storey, K B

    1997-12-01

    Facultative metabolic rate depression is the common adaptive strategy underlying various animal mechanisms for surviving harsh environmental conditions. This strategy is common among molluscs, enabling animals to survive over days or even months in the absence of oxygen or under extremely dry conditions. The large reductions in metabolic rate during estivation and anoxia can translate into considerable energy savings when dormant animals are compared to active animals. A complex metabolic coordination is required during the transition into the dormant state to maintain cellular homeostasis and involves both energy-consuming and energy-producing pathways. With regard to energy-producing pathways, several different mechanisms have been identified that participate in controlling flux. One such mechanism, enzyme phosphorylation, can have a wide-ranging effect. For example, phosphorylated enzymes exhibit altered substrate, activator, and inhibitor affinities. This effect may be magnified by changes in the concentrations of allosteric effectors, such as fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, that occur during hypometabolic states. Changes in fructose 2,6-bisphosphate are related to changes in enzyme phosphorylation through changes in the relative activity of phosphofructokinase-2. Alterations in glycolytic enzyme binding can also be brought about through changes in enzyme phosphorylation. The present review focuses on identifying hypometabolism-related changes in enzyme phosphorylation as well as characterizing the mechanisms involved in mediating these phosphorylation events.

  2. Effects of humeral intraosseous versus intravenous epinephrine on pharmacokinetics and return of spontaneous circulation in a porcine cardiac arrest model: A randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Don; Garcia-Blanco, Jose; Burgert, James; Fulton, Lawrence; Kadilak, Patrick; Perry, Katherine; Burke, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), defibrillation, and epinephrine administration are pillars of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). Intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for epinephrine administration when intravenous (IV) access is unobtainable. Previous studies indicate the pharmacokinetics of epinephrine administration via IO and IV routes differ, but it is not known if the difference influences return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The purpose of this prospective, experimental study was to determine the effects of humeral IO (HIO) and IV epinephrine administration during cardiac arrest on pharmacokinetics, ROSC, and odds of survival. Swine (N = 21) were randomized into 3 groups: humeral IO (HIO), peripheral IV (IV) and CPR/defibrillation control. Cardiac arrest was induced under general anesthesia. The swine remained in arrest for 2 min without intervention. Chest compressions were initiated and continued for 2 min. Epinephrine was administered and serial blood samples collected for pharmacokinetic analysis over 4 min. Defibrillation and epinephrine administration proceeded according to ACLS guidelines continuing for 20 min or until ROSC. Seven HIO swine, 4 IV swine, and no control swine had ROSC. There were no significant differences in ROSC, maximum concentration; except at 30 s, and time-to-concentration-maximum between the HIO and IV groups. Significant differences existed between the experimental groups and the control. The HIO delivers a higher concentration of epinephrine than the IV route at 30 s which may be a survival advantage. Clinicians may consider using the IO route to administer epinephrine during CA when there is no preexisting IV access or when IV access is unobtainable. PMID:26468375

  3. Effects of humeral intraosseous versus intravenous epinephrine on pharmacokinetics and return of spontaneous circulation in a porcine cardiac arrest model: A randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Don; Garcia-Blanco, Jose; Burgert, James; Fulton, Lawrence; Kadilak, Patrick; Perry, Katherine; Burke, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), defibrillation, and epinephrine administration are pillars of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). Intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for epinephrine administration when intravenous (IV) access is unobtainable. Previous studies indicate the pharmacokinetics of epinephrine administration via IO and IV routes differ, but it is not known if the difference influences return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The purpose of this prospective, experimental study was to determine the effects of humeral IO (HIO) and IV epinephrine administration during cardiac arrest on pharmacokinetics, ROSC, and odds of survival. Swine (N = 21) were randomized into 3 groups: humeral IO (HIO), peripheral IV (IV) and CPR/defibrillation control. Cardiac arrest was induced under general anesthesia. The swine remained in arrest for 2 min without intervention. Chest compressions were initiated and continued for 2 min. Epinephrine was administered and serial blood samples collected for pharmacokinetic analysis over 4 min. Defibrillation and epinephrine administration proceeded according to ACLS guidelines continuing for 20 min or until ROSC. Seven HIO swine, 4 IV swine, and no control swine had ROSC. There were no significant differences in ROSC, maximum concentration; except at 30 s, and time-to-concentration-maximum between the HIO and IV groups. Significant differences existed between the experimental groups and the control. The HIO delivers a higher concentration of epinephrine than the IV route at 30 s which may be a survival advantage. Clinicians may consider using the IO route to administer epinephrine during CA when there is no preexisting IV access or when IV access is unobtainable.

  4. TEAD4-YAP interaction regulates tumoral growth by controlling cell-cycle arrest at the G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shin; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Nakashima, Dai; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Koide, Nao; Takahara, Toshikazu; Shimizu, Toshihiro; Iyoda, Manabu; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2017-04-29

    TEA domain transcription factor 4 (TEAD4), which has critical functions in the process of embryonic development, is expressed in various cancers. However, the important role of TEAD4 in human oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) remain unclear. Here we investigated the TEAD4 expression level and the functional mechanism in OSCC using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, TEAD4 knockdown model was used to evaluate cellular proliferation, cell-cycle analysis, and the interaction between TEAD4 and Yes-associated protein (YAP) which was reported to be a transcription coactivator of cellular proliferation. In the current study, we found that TEAD4 expression increased significantly in vitro and in vivo and correlated with tumoral size in OSCC patients. TEAD4 knockdown OSCC cells showed decreased cellular proliferation resulting from cell-cycle arrest in the G1 phase by down-regulation of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and up-regulation of CDK inhibitors. We also found that the TEAD4-YAP complex in the nuclei may be related closely to transcriptions of G1 arrest-related genes. Taken together, we concluded that TEAD4 might play an important role in tumoral growth and have potential to be a therapeutic target in OSCCs.

  5. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in cardiac arrest following trauma].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kanz, K-G

    2016-11-01

    For decades, survival rates of cardiac arrest following trauma were reported between 0 and 2 %. Since 2005, survival rates have increased with a wide range up to 39 % and good neurological recovery in every second person injured for unknown reasons. Especially in children, high survival rates with good neurologic outcomes are published. Resuscitation following traumatic cardiac arrest differs significantly from nontraumatic causes. Paramount is treatment of reversible causes, which include massive bleeding, hypoxia, tension pneumothorax, and pericardial tamponade. Treatment of reversible causes should be simultaneous. Chest compression is inferior following traumatic cardiac arrest and should never delay treatment of reversible causes of the traumatic cardiac arrest. In massive bleeding, bleeding control has priority. Damage control resuscitation with permissive hypotension, aggressive coagulation therapy, and damage control surgery represent the pillars of initial treatment. Cardiac arrest due to hypoxia should be resolved by airway management and ventilation. Tension pneumothorax should be decompressed by finger thoracostomy, pericardial tamponade by resuscitative thoracotomy. In addition, resuscitative thoracotomy allows direct and indirect bleeding control. Untreated impact brain apnea may rapidly lead to cardiac arrest and requires quick opening of the airway and effective oxygenation. Established algorithms for treatment of cardiac arrest following trauma enable a safe, structured, and effective management.

  6. Alcohol, drug and other prior crimes and risk of arrest in handgun purchasers: protocol for a controlled observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wintemute, Garen J; Kass, Philip H; Stewart, Susan L; Cerdá, Magdalena; Gruenewald, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Alcohol abuse is common in the USA and is a well-established risk factor for violence. Other drug use and criminal activity are risk factors as well and frequently occur together with alcohol abuse. Firearm ownership is also common; there are >50 million firearm owners in the USA. This study assesses the relationships between alcohol and drug abuse and future violence among firearm owners, which no prior research has done. Design and study population This records-based retrospective cohort study will involve all persons who legally purchased handguns in California in 2001—approximately 116 000 individuals—with follow-up through the end of 2013. Methods The principal exposures include prior convictions for alcohol-related and drug-related offenses. The primary outcome measure is an arrest following handgun purchase for a violent Crime Index offense: homicide, rape, robbery or aggravated assault. Subjects will be considered at risk for outcome events for only as long as their residence in California can be established independently of outcome events. Covariates include individual characteristics (eg, age, sex, criminal history, firearm purchase history) and community characteristics (eg, demographics, socioeconomic measures, firearm ownership and alcohol outlet density). We will employ survival analytic methods, expressing effects as HRs. Discussion The results of this large-scale study are likely to be generalisable and to have important implications for violence prevention policies and programmes. PMID:26498316

  7. Cardiac arrest: resuscitation and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kaustubha D; Halperin, Henry R; Becker, Lance B

    2015-06-05

    The modern treatment of cardiac arrest is an increasingly complex medical procedure with a rapidly changing array of therapeutic approaches designed to restore life to victims of sudden death. The 2 primary goals of providing artificial circulation and defibrillation to halt ventricular fibrillation remain of paramount importance for saving lives. They have undergone significant improvements in technology and dissemination into the community subsequent to their establishment 60 years ago. The evolution of artificial circulation includes efforts to optimize manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation, external mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices designed to augment circulation, and may soon advance further into the rapid deployment of specially designed internal emergency cardiopulmonary bypass devices. The development of defibrillation technologies has progressed from bulky internal defibrillators paddles applied directly to the heart, to manually controlled external defibrillators, to automatic external defibrillators that can now be obtained over-the-counter for widespread use in the community or home. But the modern treatment of cardiac arrest now involves more than merely providing circulation and defibrillation. As suggested by a 3-phase model of treatment, newer approaches targeting patients who have had a more prolonged cardiac arrest include treatment of the metabolic phase of cardiac arrest with therapeutic hypothermia, agents to treat or prevent reperfusion injury, new strategies specifically focused on pulseless electric activity, which is the presenting rhythm in at least one third of cardiac arrests, and aggressive post resuscitation care. There are discoveries at the cellular and molecular level about ischemia and reperfusion pathobiology that may be translated into future new therapies. On the near horizon is the combination of advanced cardiopulmonary bypass plus a cocktail of multiple agents targeted at restoration of normal metabolism and

  8. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Refractory Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Steven A; Rycus, Peter T

    2017-01-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) is the use of rapid deployment venoarterial (VA) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to support systemic circulation and vital organ perfusion in patients in refractory cardiac arrest not responding to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although prospective controlled studies are lacking, observational studies suggest improved outcomes compared with conventional CPR when ECPR is instituted within 30–60 min following cardiac arrest. Adult and pediatric patients with witnessed in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and good quality CPR, failure of at least 15 min of conventional resuscitation, and a potentially reversible cause for arrest are candidates. Percutaneous cannulation where feasible is rapid and can be performed by nonsurgeons (emergency physicians, intensivists, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists). Modern extracorporeal systems are easy to prime and manage and are technically easy to manage with proper training and experience. ECPR can be deployed in the emergency department for out-of-hospital arrest or in various inpatient units for in-hospital arrest. ECPR should be considered for patients with refractory cardiac arrest in hospitals with an existing extracorporeal life support program, able to provide rapid deployment of support, and with resources to provide postresuscitation evaluation and management. PMID:28074817

  9. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for refractory cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Steven A; Rycus, Peter T

    2017-01-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) is the use of rapid deployment venoarterial (VA) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to support systemic circulation and vital organ perfusion in patients in refractory cardiac arrest not responding to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although prospective controlled studies are lacking, observational studies suggest improved outcomes compared with conventional CPR when ECPR is instituted within 30-60 min following cardiac arrest. Adult and pediatric patients with witnessed in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and good quality CPR, failure of at least 15 min of conventional resuscitation, and a potentially reversible cause for arrest are candidates. Percutaneous cannulation where feasible is rapid and can be performed by nonsurgeons (emergency physicians, intensivists, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists). Modern extracorporeal systems are easy to prime and manage and are technically easy to manage with proper training and experience. ECPR can be deployed in the emergency department for out-of-hospital arrest or in various inpatient units for in-hospital arrest. ECPR should be considered for patients with refractory cardiac arrest in hospitals with an existing extracorporeal life support program, able to provide rapid deployment of support, and with resources to provide postresuscitation evaluation and management.

  10. Fast Track intervention effects on youth arrests and delinquency

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of the Fast Track preventive intervention on youth arrests and self-reported delinquent behavior through age 19. High-risk youth randomly assigned to receive a long-term, comprehensive preventive intervention from 1st grade through 10th grade at four sites were compared to high-risk control youth. Findings indicated that random assignment to Fast Track reduced court-recorded juvenile arrest activity based on a severity weighted sum of juvenile arrests. Supplementary analyses revealed an intervention effect on the reduction in the number of court-recorded moderate-severity juvenile arrests, relative to control children. In addition, among youth with higher initial behavioral risk, the intervention reduced the number of high-severity adult arrests relative to the control youth. Survival analyses examining the onset of arrests and delinquent behavior revealed a similar pattern of findings. Intervention decreased the probability of any juvenile arrest among intervention youth not previously arrested. In addition, intervention decreased the probability of a self-reported high-severity offense among youth with no previous self-reported high-severity offense. Intervention effects were also evident on the onset of high-severity court-recorded adult arrests among participants, but these effects varied by site. The current findings suggest that comprehensive preventive intervention can prevent juvenile arrest rates, although the presence and nature of intervention effects differs by outcome. PMID:20577576

  11. Effectiveness of feedback with a smartwatch for high-quality chest compressions during adult cardiac arrest: A randomized controlled simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yeongtak; Chee, Youngjoon; Lim, Tae Ho; Kang, Hyunggoo; Shin, Hyungoo

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for using smartwatches with a built-in accelerometer as feedback devices for high-quality chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, to the best of our knowledge, no previous study has reported the effects of this feedback on chest compressions in action. A randomized, parallel controlled study of 40 senior medical students was conducted to examine the effect of chest compression feedback via a smartwatch during cardiopulmonary resuscitation of manikins. A feedback application was developed for the smartwatch, in which visual feedback was provided for chest compression depth and rate. Vibrations from smartwatch were used to indicate the chest compression rate. The participants were randomly allocated to the intervention and control groups, and they performed chest compressions on manikins for 2 min continuously with or without feedback, respectively. The proportion of accurate chest compression depth (≥5 cm and ≤6 cm) was assessed as the primary outcome, and the chest compression depth, chest compression rate, and the proportion of complete chest decompression (≤1 cm of residual leaning) were recorded as secondary outcomes. The proportion of accurate chest compression depth in the intervention group was significantly higher than that in the control group (64.6±7.8% versus 43.1±28.3%; p = 0.02). The mean compression depth and rate and the proportion of complete chest decompressions did not differ significantly between the two groups (all p>0.05). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation-related feedback via a smartwatch could provide assistance with respect to the ideal range of chest compression depth, and this can easily be applied to patients with out-of-hospital arrest by rescuers who wear smartwatches. PMID:28369055

  12. Effectiveness of feedback with a smartwatch for high-quality chest compressions during adult cardiac arrest: A randomized controlled simulation study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chiwon; Lee, Juncheol; Oh, Jaehoon; Song, Yeongtak; Chee, Youngjoon; Lim, Tae Ho; Kang, Hyunggoo; Shin, Hyungoo

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for using smartwatches with a built-in accelerometer as feedback devices for high-quality chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, to the best of our knowledge, no previous study has reported the effects of this feedback on chest compressions in action. A randomized, parallel controlled study of 40 senior medical students was conducted to examine the effect of chest compression feedback via a smartwatch during cardiopulmonary resuscitation of manikins. A feedback application was developed for the smartwatch, in which visual feedback was provided for chest compression depth and rate. Vibrations from smartwatch were used to indicate the chest compression rate. The participants were randomly allocated to the intervention and control groups, and they performed chest compressions on manikins for 2 min continuously with or without feedback, respectively. The proportion of accurate chest compression depth (≥5 cm and ≤6 cm) was assessed as the primary outcome, and the chest compression depth, chest compression rate, and the proportion of complete chest decompression (≤1 cm of residual leaning) were recorded as secondary outcomes. The proportion of accurate chest compression depth in the intervention group was significantly higher than that in the control group (64.6±7.8% versus 43.1±28.3%; p = 0.02). The mean compression depth and rate and the proportion of complete chest decompressions did not differ significantly between the two groups (all p>0.05). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation-related feedback via a smartwatch could provide assistance with respect to the ideal range of chest compression depth, and this can easily be applied to patients with out-of-hospital arrest by rescuers who wear smartwatches.

  13. 41. #1 ARRESTING GEAR ENGINE AFT LOOKING FORWARD PORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. #1 ARRESTING GEAR ENGINE - AFT LOOKING FORWARD PORT TO STARBOARD SHOWING ARRESTING GEAR ENGINE ACCUMULATOR, AIR FLASK, CONTROL VALVE, WITH CONTROL RAM, SHEAVES AND WIRES UNDERNEATH ENGINE STAND. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  14. Adjunctive rifampicin to reduce early mortality from Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (ARREST): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia is a common and serious infection, with an associated mortality of ~25%. Once in the blood, S. aureus can disseminate to infect almost any organ, but bones, joints and heart valves are most frequently affected. Despite the infection’s severity, the evidence guiding optimal antibiotic therapy is weak: fewer than 1,500 patients have been included in 16 randomised controlled trials investigating S. aureus bacteraemia treatment. It is uncertain which antibiotics are most effective, their route of administration and duration, and whether antibiotic combinations are better than single agents. We hypothesise that adjunctive rifampicin, given in combination with a standard first-line antibiotic, will enhance killing of S. aureus early in the treatment course, sterilise infected foci and blood faster, and thereby reduce the risk of dissemination, metastatic infection and death. Our aim is to determine whether adjunctive rifampicin reduces all-cause mortality within 14 days and bacteriological failure or death within 12 weeks from randomisation. Methods We will perform a parallel group, randomised (1:1), blinded, placebo-controlled trial in NHS hospitals across the UK. Adults (≥18 years) with S. aureus (meticillin-susceptible or resistant) grown from at least one blood culture who have received ≤96 h of active antibiotic therapy for the current infection and do not have contraindications to the use of rifampicin will be eligible for inclusion. Participants will be randomised to adjunctive rifampicin (600-900mg/day; orally or intravenously) or placebo for the first 14 days of therapy in combination with standard single-agent antibiotic therapy. The co-primary outcome measures will be all-cause mortality up to 14 days from randomisation and bacteriological failure/death (all-cause) up to 12 weeks from randomisation. 940 patients will be recruited, providing >80% power to detect 45% and 30% reductions in the two co

  15. 43 CFR 4770.4 - Arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Arrest. 4770.4 Section 4770.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND...

  16. Cognitive impairment after sudden cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jaszke-Psonka, Magdalena; Piegza, Magdalena; Pudlo, Robert; Piegza, Jacek; Badura-Brzoza, Karina; Leksowska, Aleksandra; Hese, Robert T.; Gorczyca, Piotr W.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the incidence and severity of the impairment of selected cognitive functions in patients after sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in comparison to patients after myocardial infarction without SCA and healthy subjects and to analyze the influence of sociodemographic and clinical parameters and the duration of cardiac arrest on the presence and severity of the described disorders. Material and methods The study group comprised 30 cardiac arrest survivors, the reference group comprised 31 survivors of myocardial infarction without cardiac arrest, and the control group comprised 30 healthy subjects. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Digit Span test from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Lauretta Bender’s Visual-Motor Gestalt Test, and the Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT) were used to assess the presence of cognitive impairment. An original questionnaire developed by the author was used for overall mental state assessment. Results The Bender test demonstrated a significant difference in the presence and severity of visual-motor skills between the study group and the control group, while BVRT and MMSE revealed increased incidence of cognitive impairment in the study group. The Bender and BVRT (D/D)/SS (version D, method D, scaled score) scales indicated cognitive impairment in 53.3% of these patients, while the BVRT (C/A)/SS test indicated cognitive impairment in 40%. For the reference group, the values were 32.3% and 12.9%, respectively. No correlation was found between the severity of cognitive impairment and the duration of cardiac arrest. Conclusions Impairment of visual-motor skills, short-term visual memory, concentration, and visual-motor coordination occurs much more frequently and is more severe in individuals after SCA than in healthy individuals. Impairment of memory trace storage and recall after delay occurs more frequently in patients after SCA than in patients after myocardial infarction without cardiac arrest and in healthy

  17. Registry of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Cardiac Arrest; Long QT Syndrome; Brugada Syndrome; Catecholaminergi Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia; Idiopathic VentricularFibrillation; Early Repolarization Syndrome; Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

  18. ECPR for Refractory Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-22

    Cardiac Arrest; Heart Arrest; Sudden Cardiac Arrest; Cardiopulmonary Arrest; Death, Sudden, Cardiac; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; CPR; Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

  19. Distal ulnar growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Nelson, O A; Buchanan, J R; Harrison, C S

    1984-03-01

    Four cases of arrest of distal ulnar physeal growth occurring in children ages 7 to 13 years had follow-up for 2 to 10 years. Each patient developed bowing of the radial diaphysis, ulnar translation of the distal radial epiphysis, and increased ulnar angulation of the distal radiocarpal joint surface. Growth discrepancies were documented in both the ulna (range 2.2 to 3.9 cm) and to a lesser extent the radius (range 0.2 to 1.6 cm) when compared to the opposite forearm in each patient. The progression of deformity appeared to be greatest during adolescence. Radial deviation and pronation were limited to varying degrees in each case. No patient had significant pain or functional impairment, but the cosmetic appearance was always displeasing. Indications for surgical treatment include increasing ulnar angulation of the distal radial articular surface, progressive loss of motion, and displeasing cosmetic appearance.

  20. [Thrombolysis in cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Bailén, M; Rucabado Aguilar, L; Morante Valle, A; Castillo Rivera, A

    2006-03-01

    Both acute myocardial infarction and pulmonary thromboembolism are responsible for a great number of cardiac arrests. Both present high rates of mortality. Thrombolysis has proved to be an effective treatment for acute myocardial infarction and pulmonary thromboembolism with shock. It would be worth considering whether thrombolysis could be effective and safe during or after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Unfortunately, too few clinical studies presenting sufficient scientific data exist in order to respond adequately to this question. However, most studies they show that thrombolysis applied during and after CPR is a therapeutic option that is not associated with greater risk of serious hemorrhaging and could possibly have beneficial effects. On the other hand, experimental data exists which show that thrombolytics can attenuate neurological damage produced after CPR. Nevertheless, clinical trials would be necessary in order to adequately establish the effectiveness and safety of thrombolysis in patients who require CPR.

  1. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Ziganshin, Bulat A.

    2013-01-01

    Effective cerebral protection remains the principle concern during aortic arch surgery. Hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) is entrenched as the primary neuroprotection mechanism since the 70s, as it slows injury-inducing pathways by limiting cerebral metabolism. However, increases in HCA duration has been associated with poorer neurological outcomes, necessitating the adjunctive use of antegrade (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). ACP has superseded RCP as the preferred perfusion strategy as it most closely mimic physiological perfusion, although there exists uncertainty regarding several technical details, such as unilateral versus bilateral perfusion, flow rate and temperature, perfusion site, undue trauma to head vessels, and risks of embolization. Nevertheless, we believe that the convenience, simplicity and effectiveness of straight DHCA justifies its use in the majority of elective and emergency cases. The following perspective offers a historical and clinical comparison of the DHCA with other techniques of cerebral protection. PMID:23977599

  2. The TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 S-acyl transferase regulates plant cell growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A; Kemp, Alison C; Grierson, Claire S

    2005-09-01

    TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 (TIP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana affects cell growth throughout the plant and has a particularly strong effect on root hair growth. We have identified TIP1 by map-based cloning and complementation of the mutant phenotype. TIP1 encodes an ankyrin repeat protein with a DHHC Cys-rich domain that is expressed in roots, leaves, inflorescence stems, and floral tissue. Two homologues of TIP1 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human (Homo sapiens) have been shown to have S-acyl transferase (also known as palmitoyl transferase) activity. S-acylation is a reversible hydrophobic protein modification that offers swift, flexible control of protein hydrophobicity and affects protein association with membranes, signal transduction, and vesicle trafficking within cells. We show that TIP1 binds the acyl group palmitate, that it can rescue the morphological, temperature sensitivity, and yeast casein kinase2 localization defects of the yeast S-acyl transferase mutant akr1Delta, and that inhibition of acylation in wild-type Arabidopsis roots reproduces the Tip1- mutant phenotype. Our results demonstrate that S-acylation is essential for normal plant cell growth and identify a plant S-acyl transferase, an essential research tool if we are to understand how this important, reversible lipid modification operates in plant cells.

  3. Acquired Upper Extremity Growth Arrest.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Erich M; Casnovsky, Lauren L; Gauger, Erica J; Bohn, Deborah C; Van Heest, Ann E

    2016-09-29

    This study reviewed the clinical history and management of acquired growth arrest in the upper extremity in pediatric patients. The records of all patients presenting from 1996 to 2012 with radiographically proven acquired growth arrest were reviewed. Records were examined to determine the etiology and site of growth arrest, management, and complications. Patients with tumors or hereditary etiology were excluded. A total of 44 patients (24 boys and 20 girls) with 51 physeal arrests who presented at a mean age of 10.6 years (range, 0.8-18.2 years) were included in the study. The distal radius was the most common site (n=24), followed by the distal humerus (n=8), metacarpal (n=6), distal ulna (n=5), proximal humerus (n=4), radial head (n=3), and olecranon (n=1). Growth arrest was secondary to trauma (n=22), infection (n=11), idiopathy (n=6), inflammation (n=2), compartment syndrome (n=2), and avascular necrosis (n=1). Twenty-six patients (59%) underwent surgical intervention to address deformity caused by the physeal arrest. Operative procedures included ipsilateral unaffected bone epiphysiodesis (n=21), shortening osteotomy (n=10), lengthening osteotomy (n=8), excision of physeal bar or bone fragment (n=2), angular correction osteotomy (n=1), and creation of single bone forearm (n=1). Four complications occurred; 3 of these required additional procedures. Acquired upper extremity growth arrest usually is caused by trauma or infection, and the most frequent site is the distal radius. Growth disturbances due to premature arrest can be treated effectively with epiphysiodesis or osteotomy. In this series, the specific site of anatomic growth arrest was the primary factor in determining treatment. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  4. [Arrest of maturation in spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Francavilla, S; Bellocci, M; Martini, M; Bruno, B; Moscardelli, S; Fabbrini, A; Properzi, G

    1982-07-30

    The ultrastructural aspects of the germinal epithelium of 10 infertile men affected by maturative arrest of spermatogenesis were studied. We noted an increased number of malformed germinal cells. Marginal nuclear vescicles were present in spermatogonia of patients affected by spermatogonial arrest. The few spermatid present in the germinal epithelium of the patients affected by a spermatidic arrest presented changes of the nuclear condensation, the acrosome, and the tail. The Sertoli cells presented an immature aspect of the nucleus and changes of the "mantle". A possible correlation between the Sertoli cells changes and the altered spermatogenesis was proposed.

  5. Juvenile Arrests, 1998. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This report provides a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data in the United States. In 1998, law enforcement agencies made an estimated 2.6 million arrests of persons under age 18. Federal Bureau of Investigations statistics indicate that juveniles account for 18% of all arrests, and 17% of all violent crime arrests in…

  6. Statistical correlations of crime with arrests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuelling, Albert C.

    1997-01-01

    Regression analysis shows that the overall crime rate correlates with the overall arrest rate. Violent crime only weakly correlates with the violent arrest rate, but strongly correlates with the property arrest rate. Contrary to common impressions, increasing arrest rates do not significantly increase loading on incarceration facilities.

  7. Structure–Biological Function Relationship Extended to Mitotic Arrest-Deficient 2-Like Protein Mad2 Native and Mutants-New Opportunity for Genetic Disorder Control

    PubMed Central

    Avram, Speranta; Milac, Adina; Mernea, Maria; Mihailescu, Dan; Putz, Mihai V.; Buiu, Catalin

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of mitotic arrest-deficient proteins Mad1 and Mad2, two components of spindle assembly checkpoint, is a risk factor for chromosomal instability (CIN) and a trigger of many genetic disorders. Mad2 transition from inactive open (O-Mad2) to active closed (C-Mad2) conformations or Mad2 binding to specific partners (cell-division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20) or Mad1) were targets of previous pharmacogenomics studies. Here, Mad2 binding to Cdc20 and the interconversion rate from open to closed Mad2 were predicted and the molecular features with a critical contribution to these processes were determined by extending the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method to large-size proteins such as Mad2. QSAR models were built based on available published data on 23 Mad2 mutants inducing CIN-related functional changes. The most relevant descriptors identified for predicting Mad2 native and mutants action mechanism and their involvement in genetic disorders are the steric (van der Waals area and solvent accessible area and their subdivided) and energetic van der Waals energy descriptors. The reliability of our QSAR models is indicated by significant values of statistical coefficients: Cross-validated correlation q2 (0.53–0.65) and fitted correlation r2 (0.82–0.90). Moreover, based on established QSAR equations, we rationally design and analyze nine de novo Mad2 mutants as possible promoters of CIN. PMID:25411801

  8. Xenopus laevis zygote arrest 2 (zar2) encodes a zinc finger RNA-binding protein that binds to the translational control sequence in the maternal Wee1 mRNA and regulates translation.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Amanda; Yamamoto, Tomomi M; Cook, Jonathan M; Silva, Kevin D; Kotter, Cassandra V; Carter, Gwendolyn S; Holt, Justin W; Lavender, Heather F; MacNicol, Angus M; Ying Wang, Yi; Wilczynska, Anna

    2012-09-15

    Zygote arrest (Zar) proteins are crucial for early embryonic development, but their molecular mechanism of action is unknown. The Translational Control Sequence (TCS) in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the maternal mRNA, Wee1, mediates translational repression in immature Xenopus oocytes and translational activation in mature oocytes, but the protein that binds to the TCS and mediates translational control is not known. Here we show that Xenopus laevis Zar2 (encoded by zar2) binds to the TCS in maternal Wee1 mRNA and represses translation in immature oocytes. Using yeast 3 hybrid assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, Zar2 was shown to bind specifically to the TCS in the Wee1 3'UTR. RNA binding required the presence of Zn(2+) and conserved cysteines in the C-terminal domain, suggesting that Zar2 contains a zinc finger. Consistent with regulating maternal mRNAs, Zar2 was present throughout oogenesis, and endogenous Zar2 co-immunoprecipitated endogenous Wee1 mRNA from immature oocytes, demonstrating the physiological significance of the protein-RNA interaction. Interestingly, Zar2 levels decreased during oocyte maturation. Dual luciferase reporter tethered assays showed that Zar2 repressed translation in immature oocytes. Translational repression was relieved during oocyte maturation and this coincided with degradation of Zar2 during maturation. This is the first report of a molecular function of zygote arrest proteins. These data show that Zar2 contains a zinc finger and is a trans-acting factor for the TCS in maternal mRNAs in immature Xenopus oocytes.

  9. THE CHEMOTHERAPY OF CARDIAC ARREST.

    PubMed

    MINUCK, M

    1965-01-02

    Direct-air ventilation, external cardiac compression, and external defibrillation are established techniques for patients who unexpectedly develop cardiac arrest. The proper use of drugs can increase the incidence of successful resuscitation. Intracardiac adrenaline (epinephrine) acts as a powerful stimulant during cardiac standstill and, in addition, converts fine ventricular fibrillation to a coarser type, more responsive to electrical defibrillation. Routine use of intravenous sodium bicarbonate is recommended to combat the severe metabolic acidosis accompanying cardiac arrest. Lidocaine is particularly useful when ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia tends to recur. Analeptics are contraindicated, since they invariably increase oxygen requirements of already hypoxic cerebral tissues. The following acrostic is a useful mnemonic for recalling the details of the management of cardiac arrest in their proper order: A (Airway), B (Breathing), C (Circulation), D (Diagnosis of underlying cause), E (Epinephrine), F (Fibrillation), G (Glucose intravenously), pH (Sodium bicarbonate), I (Intensive care).

  10. Analysis of Crack Arrest Toughness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-15

    vload(m) vp tn(m) Vertical Source Load (kN) on wedge HY80 Finite Element 0.0122 0.0099 3.81x10 -4 144 Steel Calculations Experiment 0.0122 --- 3.74x10-4...curve, are bona fide measures of the fracture arrest capability of tough ductile steels . The second is that the J-values represent the crack driving...fibrous mode of crack extension. (b) A new test method for studying fast fracture and arrest in tough steels . (c) Measurements of fast fracture and crack

  11. Cardiac arrest during dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.; McCauley, C.S.

    1988-05-01

    A case of cardiac arrest and subsequent acute myocardial infarction occurring during thallium-201 imaging with oral dipyridamole augmentation is presented. Previous reports emphasizing the safety of this procedure are briefly reviewed and a recommendation for close hemodynamic and arrhythmia monitoring during the study is made. Large doses of oral dipyridamole may be contraindicated in patients with unstable angina.

  12. DUI Arrests and Academic Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Kevin M.; Richardson, Katie

    2008-01-01

    A sobering 2002 study reported that over 2 million college students drove under the influence of alcohol (DUI) in 1999. Among those driving while intoxicated, approximately 1.7% or roughly 34,000 students reported being arrested on DUI charges. Regrettably, a significant proportion of the 1,400 college student deaths and 500,000 injuries are…

  13. Gentle arrester for moving bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Wire cable absorbs energy at constant rate with reduced shock and rebounding. Cable typically elongates to 90 percent of its potential, but is surrounded by braided sheath to absorb remaining energy should it break prematurely. Applications of arrester include passenger restraint in air and land vehicles, parachute risers, and ground snatch by aircraft. Possible cable material is type 302 stainless steel.

  14. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... HRS Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... people of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  15. Cardiac Arrest: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... dying from a second SCA. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here About Cardiac Arrest (American Heart ... Society) What Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest? (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Latest News How Devices in Public Places ...

  16. 14 CFR 1203b.103 - Arrest authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arrest authority. 1203b.103 Section 1203b.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.103 Arrest authority. (a) NASA...

  17. 25 CFR 11.301 - Arrests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arrests. 11.301 Section 11.301 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Procedure § 11.301 Arrests. (a) Arrest is the taking of a person into police custody in order...

  18. 10 CFR 1049.4 - Arrest authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Arrest authority. 1049.4 Section 1049.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.4 Arrest authority. (a) Under the Act, the authority of...

  19. 10 CFR 1049.4 - Arrest authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arrest authority. 1049.4 Section 1049.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.4 Arrest authority. (a) Under the Act, the authority of...

  20. Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) Biomarkers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-07

    Neurological Outcome; Cardiac Arrest; Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest; Brain Anoxia Ischemia; Hypoxia, Brain; Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain; Cardiac Arrest With Successful Resuscitation; Cardiac Arrest, Out-Of-Hospital; Brain Injuries

  1. Dually Diagnosed Patients with Arrests for Violent and Nonviolent Offenses: Two-Year Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Timko, Christine; Finlay, Andrea; Schultz, Nicole R.; Blonigen, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the history of arrests among dually diagnosed patients entering treatment, compare groups with different histories on use of treatment and mutual-help groups and functioning, at intake to treatment and six-month, one-year, and two-year follow-ups, and examine correlates and predictors of legal functioning at the study endpoint. At treatment intake, 9.2% of patients had no arrest history, 56.3% had been arrested for nonviolent offenses only, and 34.5% had been arrested for violent offenses. At baseline, the violent group had used the most outpatient psychiatric treatment and reported poorer functioning (psychiatric, alcohol, drug, employment, and family/social). Both arrest groups had used more inpatient/residential treatment and had more mutual-help group participation than the no-arrest group. The arrest groups had higher likelihood of substance use disorder treatment or mutual-help group participation at follow-ups. Generally, all groups were comparable on functioning at follow-ups (with baseline functioning controlled). With baseline arrest status controlled, earlier predictors of more severe legal problems at the two-year follow-up were more severe psychological, family/social, and drug problems. Findings suggest that dually diagnosed patients with a history of arrests for violent offenses may achieve comparable treatment outcomes to those of patients with milder criminal histories. PMID:27119040

  2. Enforcement following 0.08% BAC law change: Sex-specific consequences of changing arrest practices?

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer; Davaran, Ardavan

    2013-01-01

    This research evaluated effects of stricter 0.08% BAC drunken driving law on changes in sex-specific DUI arrest rates, controlling for increased law enforcement resources and shifts in DUI-related behaviors. Another main purpose, the study assessed female/male differences in arrest increases due to broader enforcement standards and efforts. Panel data was assembled for 24 states over 1990–2007 on DUI arrests, alcohol policy, law enforcement resources, drinking and drunken driving prevalence. Two-way fixed-effects seemingly unrelated regression models predicted female versus male changes in DUI arrests following implementation of lower legal limits of intoxication, net controls. Findings suggest, first, a broader legal definition of drunken driving intending to officially sanction less serious offenders (0.08% vs. 0.10% BAC) was associated with increased DUI arrests for both sexes. Second, growth in specialized DUI-enforcement units also was related to increased arrests. Whereas male and female arrest trends were equally affected by the direct net-widening effects of 0.08% BAC alcohol-policy, specialized DUI-enforcement efforts to dig deeper into the offender-pool had stronger arrest-producing effects on females, particularly prior to law change. Specifying how changes in law and enforcement resources affect arrest outcomes is an important precursor to alcohol-policy analyses of effectiveness. A potential unintended consequence, effects of law and enforcement may differ across population segments. PMID:23773958

  3. Hydroxylated PBDEs induce developmental arrest in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Usenko, Crystal Y. Hopkins, David C.; Trumble, Stephen J. Bruce, Erica D.

    2012-07-01

    The ubiquitous spread of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) has led to concerns regarding the metabolites of these congeners, in particular hydroxylated PBDEs. There are limited studies regarding the biological interactions of these chemicals, yet there is some concern they may be more toxic than their parent compounds. In this study three hydroxylated PBDEs were assessed for toxicity in embryonic zebrafish: 3-OH-BDE 47, 5-OH-BDE 47, and 6-OH-BDE 47. All three congeners induced developmental arrest in a concentration-dependent manner; however, 6-OH-BDE 47 induced adverse effects at lower concentrations than the other congeners. Furthermore, all three induced cell death; however apoptosis was not observed. In short-term exposures (24–28 hours post fertilization), all hydroxylated PBDEs generated oxidative stress in the region corresponding to the cell death at 5 and 10 ppm. To further investigate the short-term effects that may be responsible for the developmental arrest observed in this study, gene regulation was assessed for embryos exposed to 0.625 ppm 6-OH-BDE 47 from 24 to 28 hpf. Genes involved in stress response, thyroid hormone regulation, and neurodevelopment were significantly upregulated compared to controls; however, genes related to oxidative stress were either unaffected or downregulated. This study suggests that hydroxylated PBDEs disrupt development, and may induce oxidative stress and potentially disrupt the cholinergic system and thyroid hormone homeostasis. -- Highlights: ► OH-PBDEs induce developmental arrest in a concentration-dependent manner. ► Hydroxyl group location influences biological interaction. ► OH-PBDEs induce oxidative stress. ► Thyroid hormone gene regulation was disrupted following exposure. ► To our knowledge, this is the first whole organism study of OH-PBDE toxicity.

  4. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes.

  5. Optimal Protective Hypothermia in Arrested Mammalian Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Villet, Outi M.; Ge, Ming; Sekhar, Laigam N.; Corson, Marshall A.; Tylee, Tracy S.; Fan, Lu-Ping; Yao, Lin; Zhu, Chun; Olson, Aaron K.; Buroker, Norman E.; Xu, Cheng-Su; Anderson, David L.; Soh, Yong-Kian; Wang, Elise; Chen, Shi-Han; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic hypothermia recommendations have been reported, but the information supporting them is sparse, and reveals a need for the data of target therapeutic hypothermia (TTH) from well-controlled experiments. The core temperature ≤35°C is considered as hypothermia, and 29°C is a cooling injury threshold in pig heart in vivo. Thus, an optimal protective hypothermia (OPH) should be in the range 29–35°C. This study was conducted with a pig cardiopulmonary bypass preparation to decrease the core temperature to 29–35°C range at 20 minutes before and 60 minutes during heart arrest. The left ventricular (LV) developed pressure, maximum of the first derivative of LV (dP/dtmax), cardiac power, heart rate, cardiac output, and myocardial velocity (Vmax) were recorded continuously via an LV pressure catheter and an aortic flow probe. At 20 minutes of off-pump during reperfusion after 60 minutes arrest, 17 hypothermic hearts showed that the recovery of Vmax and dP/dtmax established sigmoid curves that consisted of two plateaus: a good recovery plateau at 29–30.5°C, the function recovered to baseline level (BL) (Vmax=118.4%±3.9% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=120.7%±3.1% of BL, n=6); another poor recovery plateau at 34–35°C (Vmax=60.2%±2.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=28.0%±5.9% of BL, p<0.05, n=6; ), which are similar to the four normothermia arrest (37°C) hearts (Vmax=55.9%±4.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=24.5%±2.1% of BL, n=4). The 32–32.5°C arrest hearts showed moderate recovery (n=5). A point of inflection (around 30.5–31°C) existed at the edge of a good recovery plateau followed by a steep slope. The point presented an OPH that should be the TTH. The results are concordant with data in the mammalian hearts, suggesting that the TTH should be initiated to cool core temperature at 31°C. PMID:25514569

  6. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  7. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  8. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  9. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  10. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  11. Hydroxylated PBDEs induce developmental arrest in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Usenko, Crystal Y; Hopkins, David C; Trumble, Stephen J; Bruce, Erica D

    2012-07-01

    The ubiquitous spread of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) has led to concerns regarding the metabolites of these congeners, in particular hydroxylated PBDEs. There are limited studies regarding the biological interactions of these chemicals, yet there is some concern they may be more toxic than their parent compounds. In this study three hydroxylated PBDEs were assessed for toxicity in embryonic zebrafish: 3-OH-BDE 47, 5-OH-BDE 47, and 6-OH-BDE 47. All three congeners induced developmental arrest in a concentration-dependent manner; however, 6-OH-BDE 47 induced adverse effects at lower concentrations than the other congeners. Furthermore, all three induced cell death; however apoptosis was not observed. In short-term exposures (24-28 hours post fertilization), all hydroxylated PBDEs generated oxidative stress in the region corresponding to the cell death at 5 and 10 ppm. To further investigate the short-term effects that may be responsible for the developmental arrest observed in this study, gene regulation was assessed for embryos exposed to 0.625 ppm 6-OH-BDE 47 from 24 to 28 hpf. Genes involved in stress response, thyroid hormone regulation, and neurodevelopment were significantly upregulated compared to controls; however, genes related to oxidative stress were either unaffected or downregulated. This study suggests that hydroxylated PBDEs disrupt development, and may induce oxidative stress and potentially disrupt the cholinergic system and thyroid hormone homeostasis.

  12. GAMETOPHYTE DEFECTIVE 1, a putative subunit of RNases P/MRP, is essential for female gametogenesis and male competence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si-Qi; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Long, Yan-Ping; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2012-01-01

    RNA biogenesis, including biosynthesis and maturation of rRNA, tRNA and mRNA, is a fundamental process that is critical for cell growth, division and differentiation. Previous studies showed that mutations in components involved in RNA biogenesis resulted in abnormalities in gametophyte and leaf development in Arabidopsis. In eukaryotes, RNases P/MRP (RNase mitochondrial RNA processing) are important ribonucleases that are responsible for processing of tRNA, and transcription of small non-coding RNAs. Here we report that Gametophyte Defective 1 (GAF1), a gene encoding a predicted protein subunit of RNases P/MRP, AtRPP30, plays a role in female gametophyte development and male competence. Embryo sacs were arrested at stages ranging from FG1 to FG7 in gaf1 mutant, suggesting that the progression of the gametophytic division during female gametogenesis was impaired in gaf1 mutant. In contrast, pollen development was not affected in gaf1. However, the fitness of the mutant pollen tube was weaker than that of the wild-type, leading to reduced transmission through the male gametes. GAF1 is featured as a typical RPP30 domain protein and interacts physically with AtPOP5, a homologue of RNases P/MRP subunit POP5 of yeast. Together, our data suggest that components of the RNases P/MRP family, such as RPP30, play important roles in gametophyte development and function in plants.

  13. Pyruvate enhances neurological recovery following cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arti B.; Barlow, Matthew A.; Yang, Shao-Hua; Simpkins, James W.; Mallet, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Cerebral oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction impede neurological recovery from cardiac arrest-resuscitation. Pyruvate, a potent antioxidant and energy-yielding fuel, has been shown to protect against oxidant- and ischemia-induced neuronal damage. This study tested whether acute pyruvate treatment during cardiopulmonary resuscitation can prevent neurological dysfunction and cerebral injury following cardiac arrest. Methods Anesthetized, open-chest mongrel dogs underwent 5 min cardiac arrest, 5 min open chest cardiac compression (OCCC), defibrillation and 3 day recovery. Pyruvate (n = 9) or NaCl volume control (n = 8) were administered (0.125 mmol/kg/min iv) throughout OCCC and the first 55 min recovery. Sham dogs (n = 6) underwent surgery and recovery without cardiac arrest-resuscitation. Results Neurological deficit score (NDS), evaluated at 2 day recovery, was sharply increased in NaCl-treated dogs (10.3 ± 3.5) vs. shams (1.2 ± 0.4), but pyruvate treatment mitigated neurological deficit (NDS = 3.3 ± 1.2; P < 0.05 vs. NaCl). Brain samples were taken for histological examination and evaluation of inflammation and cell death at 3 d recovery. Loss of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 subregion was greater in the NaCl controls than in pyruvate treated dogs (11.7 ± 2.3% vs. 4.3 ± 1.2%; P < 0.05). Cardiac arrest increased caspase 3 activity, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and DNA fragmentation in the CA1 subregion; pyruvate prevented caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation, and suppressed matrix metalloproteinase activity. Conclusion Intravenous pyruvate therapy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation prevents initial oxidative stress and neuronal injury and enhances neurological recovery from cardiac arrest. PMID:17618729

  14. β-Arrestin1/miR-326 Transcription Unit Is Epigenetically Regulated in Neural Stem Cells Where It Controls Stemness and Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Begalli, Federica; Abballe, Luana; Catanzaro, Giuseppina; Vacca, Alessandra; Napolitano, Maddalena; Tafani, Marco; Giangaspero, Felice; Locatelli, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Cell development is regulated by a complex network of mRNA-encoded proteins and microRNAs, all funnelling onto the modulation of self-renewal or differentiation genes. How intragenic microRNAs and their host genes are transcriptionally coregulated and their functional relationships for the control of neural stem cells (NSCs) are poorly understood. We propose here the intragenic miR-326 and its host gene β-arrestin1 as novel players whose epigenetic silencing maintains stemness in normal cerebellar stem cells. Such a regulation is mediated by CpG islands methylation of the common promoter. Epigenetic derepression of β-arrestin1/miR-326 by differentiation signals or demethylating agents leads to suppression of stemness features and cell growth and promotes cell differentiation. β-Arrestin1 inhibits cell proliferation by enhancing the nuclear expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27. Therefore, we propose a new mechanism for the control of cerebellar NSCs where a coordinated epigenetic mechanism finely regulates β-arrestin1/miR-326 expression and consequently NSCs stemness and cell growth. PMID:28298929

  15. Evidence for arrested bone formation during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Bobyn, J. D.; Duvall, P.; Morey, E. R.; Baylink, D. J.; Spector, M.

    1982-01-01

    Addressing the question of whether the bone formed in space is unusual, the morphology of bone made at the tibial diaphysis of rats before, during, and after spaceflight is studied. Evidence of arrest lines in the bone formed in space is reported suggesting that bone formation ceases along portions of the periosteum during spaceflight. Visualized by microradiography, the arrest lines are shown to be less mineralized than the surrounding bone matrix. When viewed by scanning electron microscopy, it is seen that bone fractures more readily at the site of an arrest line. These observations are seen as suggesting that arrest lines are a zone of weakness and that their formation may result in decreased bone strength in spite of normalization of bone formation after flight. The occurrence, location, and morphology of arrest lines are seen as suggesting that they are a visible result of the phenomenon of arrested bone formation.

  16. Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrests in a Hospital Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishkin, Barbara H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simulated interdisciplinary role rehearsal for cardiopulmonary arrest to prepare nurses to function effectively. Includes needs analysis, program components, and responses of program participants. (Author)

  17. Application of lightning arrester on transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, K.

    1990-05-01

    A lightning arrester on transmission lines is expected to reduce lightning incidents; however, the problems of the application guide to be established such as the method of application, the treating capacity for lightning energy, and the coordination to an arc horn remain as they are. The method of application for a lightning arrester on transmission lines and its effect are examined from the viewpoint of the generating incident on transmission lines by lightning and the operating viewpoint of a lightning arrester for a 77kV system. The double circuit setup of an arrester is the best method to reduce the lightning incidents and the single circuit setup can reduce the incident rate by 40 percent preventing the flashover of the circuit on which the arrester is not set up. For installing an arrester on a short section, the flashover point can transfer to the next steel tower where the arrester is not set up, only when lightning strikes the last steel tower. Inflowing current into an arrester from a direct lightning strike is considerably large and the energy at that time becomes large but this energy can be reduced by the operation of the arrester set up on another steel tower.

  18. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  19. Children exposed to the arrest of a family member: Associations with mental health

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Frank J.; Kaufman, Joy S.; Finley, Meghan K.; Griffin, Amy; Anderson, Janet; Marshall, Tim; Radway, Susan; Stack, Virginia; Crusto, Cindy A.

    2013-01-01

    The arrest of a parent or other family member can be detrimental to children’s health. To study the impact of exposure to the arrest of a family member on children’s mental health and how said association may change across developmental periods, we examined baseline data for children (birth through 11 years) entering family-based systems of care (SOC). Children exposed to the arrest of a family member had experienced significantly more 5.38 (SD = 2.59) different types of potentially traumatic events (PTE) than children not exposed to arrest 2.84 (SD = 2.56). Multiple regression model results showed that arrest exposure was significantly associated with greater behavioral and emotional challenges after controlling for children’s age, gender, race/ethnicity, household income, caregiver’s education, parenting factors, and other PTE exposure. Further analyses revealed differences in internalizing and externalizing behaviors associated with arrest exposure across developmental levels. This study highlights some of the mental health challenges for children exposed to the arrest of a family member, while adding to our knowledge of how such an event affects children across different developmental periods. More trauma-informed, developmentally appropriate systems need to be in place at all levels to assist children and families experiencing arrest. PMID:24829537

  20. Juvenile Arrests, 2000. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin examines the national and state juvenile arrest rate in 2000 using data reported annually by local law enforcement agencies nationwide to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting program. Results indicate that the murder rate in 2000 was the lowest since 1965; juvenile arrests for violence in 2000 were the lowest since 1988; few juveniles…

  1. Juvenile Arrests 1996. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    In 1996, law enforcement agencies in the United States made an estimated 2.9 million arrests of persons under the age of 18. According to Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) figures, juveniles accounted for 19% of all arrests and 19% of all violent crime in 1996. The substantial growth in juvenile crime that began in the late 1980s peaked in…

  2. The Arrest Records of Rosa Parks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredhoff, Stacey; Schamel, Wynell; Potter, Lee Ann

    1999-01-01

    Provides background information on the arrest of Rosa Parks and the effects this event had on the Civil Rights Movement. Offers a collection of teaching activities in which the students examine the arrest records of Rosa Parks and explains that these activities are designed to accompany a unit on racial segregation. (CMK)

  3. 10 CFR 1047.4 - Arrest authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Arrest authority. 1047.4 Section 1047.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS... of the Atomic Energy Act: (i) Felonies: (A) Section 222. Violation of Specific Sections—42...

  4. 10 CFR 1047.4 - Arrest authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Arrest authority. 1047.4 Section 1047.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS... of the Atomic Energy Act: (i) Felonies: (A) Section 222. Violation of Specific Sections—42...

  5. 10 CFR 1047.4 - Arrest authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arrest authority. 1047.4 Section 1047.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS... of the Atomic Energy Act: (i) Felonies: (A) Section 222. Violation of Specific Sections—42...

  6. 36 CFR 222.76 - Arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arrest. 222.76 Section 222.76 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.76 Arrest. Any employee designated by the...

  7. 36 CFR 222.36 - Arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arrest. 222.36 Section 222.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.36 Arrest. Any employee designated by the...

  8. 36 CFR 222.36 - Arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arrest. 222.36 Section 222.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.36 Arrest. Any employee designated by the...

  9. 36 CFR 222.36 - Arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arrest. 222.36 Section 222.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.36 Arrest. Any employee designated by the...

  10. 36 CFR 222.76 - Arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arrest. 222.76 Section 222.76 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.76 Arrest. Any employee designated by the...

  11. Psychopathology in Women Arrested for Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Gregory L.; Moore, Todd M.; Gordon, Kristina Coop; Ramsey, Susan E.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of psychopathology among women arrested for violence and whether the experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) was associated with Axis I psychopathology. Women who were arrested for domestic violence perpetration and court referred to violence intervention programs (N=103) completed measures of IPV…

  12. Physeal arrest of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; Little, Kevin; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-06-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are among the most common pediatric fractures. Although most of these fractures heal without complication, some result in partial or complete physeal arrest. The risk of physeal arrest can be reduced by avoiding known risk factors during fracture management, including multiple attempts at fracture reduction. Athletes may place substantial compressive and shear forces across the distal radial physes, making them prone to growth arrest. Timely recognition of physeal arrest can allow for more predictable procedures to be performed, such as distal ulnar epiphysiodesis. In cases of partial arrest, physeal bar excision with interposition grafting can be performed. Once ulnar abutment is present, more invasive procedures may be required, including ulnar shortening osteotomy or radial lengthening.

  13. Crack arrest in thick section steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E.

    1983-03-01

    Crack arrest in thick section steel plate is considered in relation to the conditions for crack arrest in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, when this is subjected to thermal stresses resulting from a hypothetical loss of coolant accident. The results of a theoretical analysis, based primarily on recent developments in quasi-static crack propagation theory, provide further support for the view that the arrest toughness KIa is essentially a material property. However, since the theoretical results also suggest that KIa is reduced by neutron irradiation, and because there is, as yet, no conclusive experimental data on the effect of neutron irradiation on KIa, it is proposed that with highly irradiated steel, instead of using a KIa crack arrest criterion, it is better to use a more conservative criterion, based on the concept that arrest occurs within the vessel at a position where the temperature exceeds that temperature above which the cleavage fracture mode is unable to operate.

  14. Cardiac Arrest during Gamete Release in Chum Salmon Regulated by the Parasympathetic Nerve System

    PubMed Central

    Makiguchi, Yuya; Nagata, Shinya; Kojima, Takahito; Ichimura, Masaki; Konno, Yoshifumi; Murata, Hideki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG) data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) at the moment of gamete release for 7.39±1.61 s in females and for 5.20±0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a β-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release. PMID:19543389

  15. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    PubMed

    Makiguchi, Yuya; Nagata, Shinya; Kojima, Takahito; Ichimura, Masaki; Konno, Yoshifumi; Murata, Hideki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2009-06-19

    Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG) data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  16. Theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez-Maldonado, R.; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2008-05-01

    We present a first-principles theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures based on the multicomponent self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of colloid dynamics [M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 72, 031107 (2005); M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E76, 039902 (2007)]. We illustrate its application with a description of dynamic arrest in two simple model colloidal mixtures: namely, hard-sphere and repulsive Yukawa binary mixtures. Our results include observation of the two patterns of dynamic arrest, one in which both species become simultaneously arrested and the other involving the sequential arrest of the two species. The latter case gives rise to mixed states in which one species is arrested while the other species remains mobile. We also derive the (”bifurcation” or fixed-point”) equations for the nonergodic parameters of the system, which takes the surprisingly simple form of a system of coupled equations for the localization length of the particles of each species. The solution of this system of equations indicates unambiguously which species is arrested (finite localization length) and which species remains ergodic (infinite localization length). As a result, we are able to draw the entire ergodic-nonergodic phase diagram of the binary hard-sphere mixture.

  17. Irreversible translation arrest in the reperfused brain

    PubMed Central

    DeGracia, Donald J; Hu, Bingren R

    2012-01-01

    Irreversible translation arrest occurs in reperfused neurons that will die by delayed neuronal death. It is now recognized that suppression of protein synthesis is a general response of eukaryotic cells to exogenous stressors. Indeed, stress-induced translation arrest can be viewed as a component of cell stress responses, and consists of initiation, maintenance, and termination phases that work in concert with stress-induced transcriptional mechanisms. Within this framework, we review translation arrest in reperfused neurons. This framework provides a basis to recognize that phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 is the initiator of translation arrest, and a key marker indicating activation of neuronal stress responses. However, eIF2 alpha phosphorylation is reversible. Other phases of stress-induced translation arrest appear to contribute to irreversible translation arrest specifically in ischemic vulnerable neuron populations. We detail two lines of evidence supporting this view. First, ischemia, as a stress stimulus, induces irreversible co-translational protein misfolding and aggregation after 4 to 6 h of reperfusion, trapping protein synthesis machinery into functionally inactive protein aggregates. Second, ischemia and reperfusion leads to modifications of stress granules (SGs) that sequester functionally inactive 48S preinitiation complexes to maintain translation arrest. At later reperfusion durations, these mechanisms may converge such that SGs become sequestered in protein aggregates. These mechanisms result in elimination of functionally active ribosomes and preclude recovery of protein synthesis in selectively vulnerable neurons. Thus, recognizing translation arrest as a component of endogenous cellular stress response pathways will aid in making sense of the complexities of postischemic translation arrest. PMID:16926841

  18. Sudden death during arrest and phencyclidine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Pestaner, Joseph P; Southall, Pamela E

    2003-06-01

    Deaths of individuals being arrested are important and complex medicolegal cases. Conclusions regarding the cause and manner of death for such cases must take into account multiple factors that may have played a role, as well as anticipate the forensic issues that will arise. In this article, we review the deaths of 2 individuals in which phencyclidine intoxication was a factor that contributed to death during arrest. Most cases of sudden death during arrest have involved cocaine intoxication; because phencyclidine's pharmacologic properties are quite different from those of cocaine, these cases allow for comparisons to those factors that may have greater importance.

  19. Cardiac Arrest: Obstetric CPR/ACLS.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Benjamin; Lipman, Steven

    2017-01-10

    In contrast with other high-resource countries, maternal mortality has seen an increase in the United States. Caring for pregnant women in cardiac arrest may prove uniquely challenging given the rarity of the event coupled by the physiological changes of pregnancy. Optimization of resuscitative efforts warrants special attention as described in the 2015 American Heart Association's "Scientific Statement on Maternal Cardiac Arrest." Current recommendations address a variety of topics ranging from the basic components of chest compressions and airway management to some of the logistical complexities and operational challenges involved in maternal cardiac arrest.

  20. Innovations in polymer arrester moisture sealing testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.A.; Mackevich, J.P.; Mosso, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    The vast majority of porcelain distribution arrester failures are the result of moisture ingress. Standards lag technology and do not currently address the unique design aspects of polymer arresters. Traditional sealing test methods cannot be run on polymer arresters because of lack of internal air space. A novel design test is proposed which involves sensitive interfacial leakage current measurements as the diagnostic. Samples are thermally cycled in water to produce thermal excursions and aging, while encouraging water ingress, should the sealing system be compromised. The proposed test is a modification of a protocol established for polymer insulators, which has been correlated to field service.

  1. Innovation in polymer arrester moisture sealing testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.A.; Mackevich, J.P.; Mosso, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The vast majority of porcelain distribution arrester failures are the result of moisture ingress. Standards lag technology and do not currently address the unique design aspects of polymer arresters. Traditional sealing test methods cannot be run on polymer arresters because of lack of internal air space. A novel design test is proposed which involves sensitive interfacial leakage current measurements as the diagnostic. Samples are thermally cycled in water to produce thermal excursions and aging, while encouraging water ingress, should the sealing system be compromised. The proposed test is a modification of a protocol established for polymer insulators, which has been correlated to field service.

  2. Novel functions of Stomatal Cytokinesis-Defective 1 (SCD1) in innate immune responses against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Korasick, David A; McMichael, Colleen; Walker, Katie A; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Heese, Antje

    2010-07-23

    Eukaryotes employ complex immune mechanisms for protection against microbial pathogens. Here, we identified SCD1 (Stomatal Cytokinesis-Defective 1), previously implicated in growth and development through its role in cytokinesis and polarized cell expansion (Falbel, T. G., Koch, L. M., Nadeau, J. A., Segui-Simarro, J. M., Sack, F. D., and Bednarek, S. Y. (2003) Development 130, 4011-4024) as a novel component of innate immunity. In Arabidopsis, SCD1 is a unique gene encoding for the only protein containing a complete DENN (Differentially Expressed in Normal and Neoplastic cells) domain. The DENN domain is a largely uncharacterized tripartite protein motif conserved among eukaryotic proteins. We show that conditional scd1-1 plants containing a point mutation in a conserved DENN residue affected a subset of signaling responses to some bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Consistent with increased transcript accumulation of Pathogen-related (PR) genes, scd1-1 plants were more resistant to Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pst) DC3000 infection implicating SCD1 as a negative regulator of basal resistance against bacteria. scd1-1 plants were different from known mutants exhibiting constitutive expressor of PR (cpr)-like phenotypes, in that growth impairment of scd1-1 plants was genetically independent of constitutive immune response activation. For scd1-1, shift to elevated temperature or introduction of a mutant allele in Salicylic acid Induction-Deficient 2 (SID2) suppressed constitutive defense response activation. sid2-2 also repressed the resistance phenotype of scd1-1. Temperature shift and sid2-2, however, did not rescue conditional growth and sterility defects of scd1-1. These results implicate SCD1 in multiple cellular pathways, possibly by affecting different proteins. Overall, our studies identified a novel role for eukaryotic DENN proteins in immunity against bacteria.

  3. Preventing and arresting coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W C

    1995-09-01

    The good news about coronary atherosclerosis is that it takes an awful lot of plaque before symptoms of myocardial ischemia occur. The bad news is that despite the need for large quantities of plaque for symptoms to occur, nevertheless nearly half of us in the United States eventually have the necessary quantity. Atherosclerosis is infrequently hereditary in origin. Most of us get atherosclerosis because we consume too much fat, cholesterol, and calories. The consequence is an elevated ( > 150 mg/dl) serum total cholesterol level, and the higher the number is above 150, the greater is the quantity of plaque deposited in our arteries. If the serum total cholesterol level can be prevented from rising to more than 150 mg/dl, plaques are not laid down; if elevated levels are lowered to 150 mg/dl, further plaque does not form, and parts of those present may vanish. A fruit-vegetarian-starch diet is necessary as a rule to achieve the 150 mg/dl level in most adults. Lipid-lowering drugs are required in the patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and in most patients with atherosclerotic events. The best news about atherosclerosis is that it can be prevented in those without the hereditary form, and it can be arrested by lowering elevated serum total (and LDL) cholesterol to the 150 mg/dl level.

  4. Improving Survival after Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Bjørshol, Conrad Arnfinn; Søreide, Eldar

    2017-02-01

    Each year, approximately half a million people suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) in Europe: The majority die. Survival after CA varies greatly between regions and countries. The authors give an overview of the important elements necessary to promote improved survival after CA as a function of the chain of survival and formula for survival concepts. The chain of survival incorporates bystanders (who identify warning symptoms, call the emergency dispatch center, initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR]), dispatchers (who identify CA, and instruct and reassure the caller), first responders (who provide high-quality CPR, early defibrillation), paramedics and other prehospital care providers (who continue high-quality CPR, and provide timely defibrillation and advanced life support, transport to CA center), and hospitals (targeted temperature management, percutaneous coronary intervention, delayed prognostication). The formula for survival concept consists of (1) medical science (international guidelines), (2) educational efficiency (e.g., low-dose, high-frequency training for lay people, first responders, and professionals; and (3) local implementation of all factors in the chain of survival and formula for survival. Survival rates after CA can be advanced through the improvement of the different factors in both the chain of survival and the formula for survival. Importantly, the neurologic outcome in the majority of CA survivors has continued to improve.

  5. Asc1, Hel2, and Slh1 couple translation arrest to nascent chain degradation.

    PubMed

    Sitron, Cole Stone; Park, Joseph Hun; Brandman, Onn

    2017-02-21

    Premature arrest of protein synthesis within the open reading frame elicits a protective response that degrades the incomplete nascent chain. In this response, arrested 80S ribosomes are split into their large and small subunits, allowing assembly of the Ribosome Quality control Complex (RQC), which targets nascent chains for degradation. How the cell recognizes arrested nascent chains among the vast pool of actively translating polypeptides is poorly understood. We systematically examined translation arrest and modification of nascent chains in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to characterize the steps that couple arrest to RQC targeting. We focused our analysis on two poorly understood 80S ribosome-binding proteins previously implicated in the response to failed translation, Asc1 and Hel2, as well as a new component of the pathway, Slh1, that we identified here. We found that premature arrest at ribosome stalling sequences still occurred robustly in the absence of Asc1, Hel2, and Slh1. However, these three factors were required for the RQC to modify the nascent chain. We propose that Asc1, Hel2, and Slh1 target arresting ribosomes and that this targeting event is a precondition for the RQC to engage the incomplete nascent chain and facilitate its degradation.

  6. Crack-Arrest Techniques in Reinforced Concrete Structural Elements. Report 1. Laboratory Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    Control Charac-teristics of Various Types of Bar in Reinforced Concrete Beams," Research Report 18, Part 1, Dec 1966, Cement and Concrete Associa- tion...AD/A-002 661 CRACK-ARREST TECHNIQUES IN REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS. REPORT 1. LABORATORY TESTS Frank B. Cox Army Engineer Waterways...ACCESSION NO. 3. FECIPI§NT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT &-PERIOD COVERED CRACK-ARREST TECHNIQUES IN REINFORCED CONCRETE

  7. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  8. Arrested of coalescence of emulsion droplets of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Burke, Christopher; Blair, Donald W.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    With applications ranging from food products to cosmetics via targeted drug delivery systems, structured anisotropic colloids provide an efficient way to control the structure, properties and functions of emulsions. When two fluid emulsion droplets are brought in contact, a reduction of the interfacial tension drives their coalescence into a larger droplet of the same total volume and reduced exposed area. This coalescence can be partially or totally hindered by the presence of nano or micron-size particles that coat the interface as in Pickering emulsions. We investigate numerically the dependance of the mechanical stability of these arrested shapes on the particles size, their shape anisotropy, their polydispersity, their interaction with the solvent, and the particle-particle interactions. We discuss structural shape changes that can be induced by tuning the particles interactions after arrest occurs, and provide design parameters for the relevant experiments.

  9. Distribution Surge Arrester Failures due to Winter Lightning and Measurement of Energy Absorption Capability of Arresters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Hitoshi; Shimasaki, Katsuhiko; Kado, Hiroyuki

    Surge arresters and distribution equipments with zinc-oxide elements are used for lightning protection of overhead power distribution lines in Japan. However, these surge arresters are sometimes damaged by direct lightning strokes, especially in winter. Increasing of surge arrester failures in winter is attributed to a very large electric charge of winter lightning than that of summer lightning. For improvement of surge arresters, we have measured the energy absorption capability of surge arresters using a half cycle of alternating current with a frequency of 50Hz for simulating a winter lightning current. The mean values of arrester failure energy increased in proportion to the volume of zinc-oxide element, however the values of arrester failure energy were quite uneven. We also have observed the aspects of damaged zinc-oxide elements, and have investigated the relationship between the arrester failure energy and the failure types of zinc-oxide elements. From these results, we suggest the improvement of the energy absorption capability of distribution surge arresters, especially for the uniform energy absorption capability.

  10. Predicting Cardiac Arrest on the Wards

    PubMed Central

    Churpek, Matthew M.; Yuen, Trevor C.; Huber, Michael T.; Park, Seo Young; Hall, Jesse B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Current rapid response team activation criteria were not statistically derived using ward vital signs, and the best vital sign predictors of cardiac arrest (CA) have not been determined. In addition, it is unknown when vital signs begin to accurately detect this event prior to CA. Methods: We conducted a nested case-control study of 88 patients experiencing CA on the wards of a university hospital between November 2008 and January 2011, matched 1:4 to 352 control subjects residing on the same ward at the same time as the case CA. Vital signs and Modified Early Warning Scores (MEWS) were compared on admission and during the 48 h preceding CA. Results: Case patients were older (64 ± 16 years vs 58 ± 18 years; P = .002) and more likely to have had a prior ICU admission than control subjects (41% vs 24%; P = .001), but had similar admission MEWS (2.2 ± 1.3 vs 2.0 ± 1.3; P = .28). In the 48 h preceding CA, maximum MEWS was the best predictor (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] 0.77; 95% CI, 0.71-0.82), followed by maximum respiratory rate (AUC 0.72; 95% CI, 0.65-0.78), maximum heart rate (AUC 0.68; 95% CI, 0.61-0.74), maximum pulse pressure index (AUC 0.61; 95% CI, 0.54-0.68), and minimum diastolic BP (AUC 0.60; 95% CI, 0.53-0.67). By 48 h prior to CA, the MEWS was higher in cases (P = .005), with increasing disparity leading up to the event. Conclusions: The MEWS was significantly different between patients experiencing CA and control patients by 48 h prior to the event, but includes poor predictors of CA such as temperature and omits significant predictors such as diastolic BP and pulse pressure index. PMID:22052772

  11. Surface Electrocardiogram Predictors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghani, Samy A.; Rosenthal, Todd M.; Morin, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is a major cause of death in industrialized nations, with approximately 50% of these deaths attributable to sudden cardiac arrest. If patients at high risk for sudden cardiac arrest can be identified, their odds of surviving fatal arrhythmias can be significantly improved through prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement. This review summarizes the current knowledge pertaining to surface electrocardiogram (ECG) predictors of sudden cardiac arrest. Methods: We conducted a literature review focused on methods of predicting sudden cardiac arrest through noninvasive electrocardiographic testing. Results: Several electrocardiographic-based methods of risk stratification of sudden cardiac arrest have been studied, including QT prolongation, QRS duration, fragmented QRS complexes, early repolarization, Holter monitoring, heart rate variability, heart rate turbulence, signal-averaged ECG, T wave alternans, and T-peak to T-end. These ECG findings have shown variable effectiveness as screening tools. Conclusion: At this time, no individual ECG finding has been found to be able to adequately stratify patients with regard to risk for sudden cardiac arrest. However, one or more of these candidate surface ECG parameters may become useful components of future multifactorial risk stratification calculators. PMID:27660578

  12. Sex Disparities in Arrest Outcomes for Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Melissa; Worthen, Meredith G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence arrests have been historically focused on protecting women and children from abusive men. Arrest patterns continue to reflect this bias with more men arrested for domestic violence compared to women. Such potential gender variations in arrest patterns pave the way to the investigation of disparities by sex of the offender in…

  13. Explaining lifetime criminal arrests among clients of a psychiatric probation and parole service.

    PubMed

    Solomon, P; Draine, J

    1999-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which sociodemographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, substance abuse problems, and the array of lifetime criminal behavior may explain lifetime arrests among offenders supervised by the psychiatric probation and parole service. Three hundred twenty-five clients with new cases at a psychiatric probation and parole service in a large urban center were screened for major psychiatric disorders. They were also interviewed for socio-demographic characteristics, mental health treatment history, criminal behavior, and arrest history. Hierarchical block multiple regression analysis tested a model explaining lifetime arrests. After controlling for age and other demographic variables, the number of lifetime psychiatric hospitalizations and lifetime occurrences of mania diagnosis significantly explained lifetime arrests. The total model explained about 10 percent of the variance in lifetime arrests after controlling for opportunity variables, which explained 45 percent. The explanatory power of lifetime hospitalizations and mania support the contention that symptoms, rather than diagnosis, may be the most important clinical factor in explaining criminal arrest among persons with mental illness. Implications for psychiatric services include the development of effective jail diversion programs.

  14. THE RACE/ETHNICITY DISPARITY IN MISDEMEANOR MARIJUANA ARRESTS IN NEW YORK CITY*

    PubMed Central

    GOLUB, ANDREW; JOHNSON, BRUCE D.; DUNLAP, ELOISE

    2008-01-01

    Research Summary This article examines the growth in marijuana misdemeanor arrests in New York City (NYC) from 1980 to 2003 and its differential impact on blacks and Hispanics. Since 1980, the New York City Police Department (NYPD) expanded its use of arrest and detention for minor offenses under its quality-of-life (QOL) policing initiative. Arrest data indicate that during the 1990s the primary focus of QOL policing became smoking marijuana in public view (MPV). By 2000, MPV had become the most common misdemeanor arrest, accounting for 15% of all NYC adult arrests and rivaling controlled substance arrests as the primary focus of drug abuse control. Of note, most MPV arrestees have been black or Hispanic. Furthermore, black and Hispanic MPV arrestees have been more likely to be detained prior to arraignment, convicted, and sentenced to jail than their white counterparts. Policy Implications In light of the disparities, we recommend that the NYPD consider scaling back on MPV enforcement and reducing the harshness of treatment by routinely issuing Desk Appearance Tickets when the person is not wanted on other charges, so that most MPV arrestees would not be detained. Furthermore, we recommend that legislators should consider making smoking marijuana in public a violation and not a misdemeanor. Lastly, we suggest ways that NYC could monitor the effectiveness of these policy modifications to assure that the city continues to meet its goals for order maintenance. PMID:18841246

  15. Physiology and pathophysiology of respiratory arrest by cyanide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Klimmek, R.

    1993-05-13

    Respiratory arrest, preceded by hyperventilation, is the primary cause of death in acute cyanide poisoning. Hyperventilation followed by apnea is also observed without intoxication. Hyperventilation and apnea in untoxicated subjects and animals are analyzed for the underlying physiological and biochemical changes and compared with those found during cyanide poisoning. The study reveals that the respiratory autoregulation appears to be the same under both conditions. Respiratory arrest is controlled by cerebral PCO2 and can occur without hypoxia or inhibition of cytochrome oxidase. It is postulated that respiratory arrest is a 'desperate act' thrust on the respiratory neurons by a critical exhaustion of their energy store (ATP) due to the rapid firing in the period of hyperventilation. The point of no return may be reached when anoxia and/or partial inhibition of cytochrome oxidase prevent the neurons from replenishing the ATP store. The formation of Fe3+ cyanide complexes. exemplified by the metHb producer DMAP, appears to give the best results with regard to the restoration of spontaneous respiration. The study of respiratory autoregulation may also be helpful in developing and understanding other therapeutic approaches.

  16. Alcohol Arrests on Campuses Jumped 10% in 1996; Drug Arrests Increased by 5%.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lively, Kit

    1998-01-01

    Campus police and other college officials believe the 16,237 alcohol arrests and 7,060 drug arrests on college campuses in 1996 reflect tougher enforcement, not increased usage among students. This is particularly true in states such as Michigan, where state law concerning underage drinking has changed, and in communities where enforcement is…

  17. A pharmacologic review of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bradley J; Yunker, Nancy S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is manifested by arrhythmias (ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, pulseless electrical activity, or asystole) resulting in minimal to no forward blood flow to the body's oxygen-dependent tissues. Defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should be initiated immediately as they have been shown to increase return of spontaneous circulation and survival to discharge rates. Cardiac arrest in the surgical patient population has devastating consequences. Data specific to the surgical patient found that 1 in 203 surgical patients experienced cardiac arrest requiring CPR within 30 days after surgery. A subgroup analysis found that 1 in 1,020 plastic surgery patients required CPR in this same time frame. Thirty-day mortality in the general surgery patient population was 72%. The American Heart Association updates the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines every 5 years. Their latest publication in 2010 recommended that the resuscitative protocol be transitioned from its basic life support sequence of airway-breathing-chest compressions to chest compressions-airway-breathing. All health care professionals should have an understanding of the clinical presentation and medical management of cardiac arrest. Maintaining biannual basic life support and ACLS certification ensures that health care professionals remain current with American Heart Association guideline recommendations. Guideline-directed management of cardiac arrest should include timely implementation of the ACLS algorithm to maximize patient outcomes.

  18. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Athletic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, James M.; Ellis, James M.; Cantwell, John; Courson, Ron; Medlin, Ron

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To emphasize the importance of decreasing the response time by a trained target responder to increase the survival rate among athletes experiencing sudden cardiac arrest at an athletic event. Background: Death due to sudden cardiac arrest that is witnessed is preventable in many cases. However, most people who experience this condition die because of a prolonged response time from onset of the fatal arrhythmia to defibrillation by trained treatment providers. If athletic trainers or other members of the athletic care medical team are trained as target responders and equipped with automated electronic defibrillators, they can immediately treat an athlete who experiences a sudden, life-threatening tachyarrhythmia. This prompt response to the life-threatening emergency should result in a higher survival rate. Description: We review the causes of sudden cardiac arrest during athletic events, note some unusual clinical presentations, discuss improved methods of response and new equipment for treatment, and define the athletic trainer's role as a target responder trained to treat people experiencing sudden cardiac arrest at an athletic event. Clinical Advantages: An athletic care team willing to become part of an emergency response team can help improve the survival rate of athletes experiencing sudden cardiac arrest at an athletic event. PMID:12937464

  19. Contact line arrest in solidifying spreading drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Rielle; Colinet, Pierre; Snoeijer, Jacco; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2016-11-01

    When does a drop, deposited on a cold substrate, stop spreading? Despite the practical relevance of this question, for example in airplane icing and 3D metal printing, the exact mechanism of arrest in solidifying spreading drops has not yet been unraveled. Here, we consider the spreading and arrest of hexadecane drops of constant volume on two smooth wettable substrates; copper with a high thermal conductivity and glass with a low thermal conductivity. We record the spreading radius and contact angle in time for a range of substrate temperatures. We show that our measurements on both copper and glass are well explained by a contact line arrest condition based on crystallization kinetics, which takes into account the effect of kinetic undercooling and the thermal conductivity of the substrate.

  20. Studies of Shuttle orbiter arrestment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela A.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1993-01-01

    Scale model studies of the Shuttle Orbiter Arrestment System (AS) were completed with a 1/27.5-scale model at the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of these studies was to determine the proper configuration for a net arrestment system to bring the orbiter to a safe stop with minimal damage in the event of a runway overrun. Tests were conducted for runway on-centerline and off-centerline engagements at simulated speeds up to approximately 100 knots (full scale). The results of these tests defined the interaction of the net and the orbiter, the dynamics of off-centerline engagements, and the maximum number of vertical net straps that may become entangled with the nose gear. In addition to these tests, a test program with a 1/8-scale model was conducted by the arrestment system contractor, and the results are presented in the appendix.

  1. Juvenile Arrest and Collateral Educational Damage in the Transition to Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, David S.; Sampson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Official sanctioning of students by the criminal justice system is a long-hypothesized source of educational disadvantage, but its explanatory status remains unresolved. Few studies of the educational consequences of a criminal record account for alternative explanations such as low self-control, lack of parental supervision, deviant peers, and neighborhood disadvantage. Moreover, virtually no research on the effect of a criminal record has examined the “black box” of mediating mechanisms or the consequence of arrest for postsecondary educational attainment. Analyzing longitudinal data with multiple and independent assessments of theoretically relevant domains, this paper estimates the direct effect of arrest on later high school dropout and college enrollment for adolescents with otherwise equivalent neighborhood, school, family, peer, and individual characteristics as well as similar frequency of criminal offending. We present evidence that arrest has a substantively large and robust impact on dropping out of high school among Chicago public school students. We also find a significant gap in four-year college enrollment between arrested and otherwise similar youth without a criminal record. We assess intervening mechanisms hypothesized to explain the process by which arrest disrupts the schooling process, and, in turn, produces collateral educational damage. The results imply that institutional responses and disruptions in students’ educational trajectories, rather than social psychological factors, are responsible for the arrest-education link. PMID:25309003

  2. An Analysis of Alternatives to New York City's Current Marijuana Arrest and Detention Policy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bruce D.; Golub, Andrew; Dunlap, Eloise; Sifaneck, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    During the 1990s, the New York Police Department (NYPD) instituted a policy of arresting and detaining people for minor offenses that occur in public as part of their quality-of-life (hereafter QOL) policing initiative. The number of NYPD arrests for smoking marijuana in public view (MPV) increased from 3,000 in 1994 to over 50,000 in 2000, and have been about 30,000 in the mid 2000s. Most of these arrestees (84%) have been minority; blacks have been 2.7 more likely and Hispanics 1.8 times more likely to be detained than whites for an MPV arrest. Minorities have been most likely to receive more severe dispositions, even controlling for demographics and prior arrest histories. This paper examines the pros and cons of the current policy; this is compared with possible alternatives including the following: arrest and issue a desk appearance ticket (DAT); issue a non-criminal citation (violation); street warnings; and tolerate public marijuana smoking. The authors recommend that the NYPD change to issuing DATs on a routine basis. Drug policy reformers might wish to further pursue changing statutes regarding smoking marijuana in public view into a violation (noncriminal) or encourage the wider use of street warnings. Any of these policy changes would help reduce the disproportionate burden on minorities associated with the current arrest and detention policy. These policies could help maintain civic norms against smoking marijuana in public. PMID:18726007

  3. An Analysis of Alternatives to New York City's Current Marijuana Arrest and Detention Policy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bruce D; Golub, Andrew; Dunlap, Eloise; Sifaneck, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    During the 1990s, the New York Police Department (NYPD) instituted a policy of arresting and detaining people for minor offenses that occur in public as part of their quality-of-life (hereafter QOL) policing initiative. The number of NYPD arrests for smoking marijuana in public view (MPV) increased from 3,000 in 1994 to over 50,000 in 2000, and have been about 30,000 in the mid 2000s. Most of these arrestees (84%) have been minority; blacks have been 2.7 more likely and Hispanics 1.8 times more likely to be detained than whites for an MPV arrest. Minorities have been most likely to receive more severe dispositions, even controlling for demographics and prior arrest histories.This paper examines the pros and cons of the current policy; this is compared with possible alternatives including the following: arrest and issue a desk appearance ticket (DAT); issue a non-criminal citation (violation); street warnings; and tolerate public marijuana smoking. The authors recommend that the NYPD change to issuing DATs on a routine basis. Drug policy reformers might wish to further pursue changing statutes regarding smoking marijuana in public view into a violation (noncriminal) or encourage the wider use of street warnings. Any of these policy changes would help reduce the disproportionate burden on minorities associated with the current arrest and detention policy. These policies could help maintain civic norms against smoking marijuana in public.

  4. Using Time Series Analysis to Predict Cardiac Arrest in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Curtis E; Aoki, Noriaki; Mariscalco, Michele; Turley, James P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To build and test cardiac arrest prediction models in a pediatric intensive care unit, using time series analysis as input, and to measure changes in prediction accuracy attributable to different classes of time series data. Methods A retrospective cohort study of pediatric intensive care patients over a 30 month study period. All subjects identified by code documentation sheets with matches in hospital physiologic and laboratory data repositories and who underwent chest compressions for two minutes were included as arrest cases. Controls were randomly selected from patients that did not experience arrest and who survived to discharge. Modeling data was based on twelve hours of data preceding the arrest (reference time for controls). Measurements and Main Results 103 cases of cardiac arrest and 109 control cases were used to prepare a baseline data set that consisted of 1025 variables in four data classes: multivariate, raw time series, clinical calculations, and time series trend analysis. We trained 20 arrest prediction models using a matrix of five feature sets (combinations of data classes) with four modeling algorithms: linear regression, decision tree, neural network and support vector machine. The reference model (multivariate data with regression algorithm) had an accuracy of 78% and 87% area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). The best model (multivariate + trend analysis data with support vector machine algorithm) had an accuracy of 94% and 98% AUROC. Conclusions Cardiac arrest predictions based on a traditional model built with multivariate data and a regression algorithm misclassified cases 3.7 times more frequently than predictions that included time series trend analysis and built with a support vector machine algorithm. Although the final model lacks the specificity necessary for clinical application, we have demonstrated how information from time series data can be used to increase the accuracy of clinical

  5. ADULTHOOD ANIMAL ABUSE AMONG MEN ARRESTED FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

    PubMed Central

    Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Shorey, Ryan C.; Elmquist, Joanna; Ninnemann, Andrew; Schonbrun, Yael C.; Temple, Jeff R.; Recupero, Patricia R.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Learning more about intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators could aid the development of more effective treatments. The prevalence of adulthood animal abuse (AAA) perpetration and its association with IPV perpetration, antisociality, and alcohol use in 307 men arrested for domestic violence was examined. 41% (n = 125) of the men committed at least one act of animal abuse since the age of 18, in contrast to the 3.0% prevalence rate reported by men in the general population. Controlling for antisociality and alcohol use, AAA showed a trend towards a significant association with physical and severe psychological IPV perpetration. PMID:25324474

  6. Adulthood animal abuse among men arrested for domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Shorey, Ryan C; Elmquist, Joanna; Ninnemann, Andrew; Schonbrun, Yael C; Temple, Jeff R; Recupero, Patricia R; Stuart, Gregory L

    2014-09-01

    Learning more about intimate partner violence (IPV), perpetrators could aid the development of more effective treatments. The prevalence of adulthood animal abuse (AAA) perpetration and its association with IPV perpetration, antisociality, and alcohol use in 307 men arrested for domestic violence were examined. Forty-one percent (n = 125) of the men committed at least one act of animal abuse since the age of 18, in contrast to the 1.5% prevalence rate reported by men in the general population. Controlling for antisociality and alcohol use, AAA showed a trend toward a significant association with physical and severe psychological IPV perpetration.

  7. [Cardiac arrest in newborn of mother treated with labetalol].

    PubMed

    Sala, X; Monsalve, C; Comas, C; Botet, F; Nalda, M A

    1993-01-01

    The use of beta-adrenergic antagonists for the control of high blood pressure associated to pregnancy is frequent. Their use is related with the appearance of undesirable effects of the fetus. The case of neonatal cardiac arrest attributed, to the administration of labetalol to the mother is presented. The high transplacentary passage, the different pharmacokinetics of the drug in the newborn and the clinical evolution of the patient suggests its involvement. It is concluded that labetalol may cause severe undesirable effects in newborns and fetal heart rate of the mother and neonate should be monitored upon use of this drug.

  8. Juvenile Arrests, 2007. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puzzanchera, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This Bulletin summarizes 2007 juvenile crime and arrest data reported by local law enforcement agencies across the country and cited in the FBI report, "Crime in the United States 2007." The Bulletin describes the extent and nature of juvenile crime that comes to the attention of the justice system. It serves as a baseline for comparison for…

  9. Juvenile Arrests, 1999. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin presents a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data for 1999. Data come from the FBI's annual "Crime in the United States" report, which offers the estimated number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies. The 1999 murder rate was the lowest since 1966. Of the nearly 1,800 juveniles murdered in…

  10. Arrest History among Men and Sexual Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Dennis G.; Milroy, Michael E.; Reynolds, Grace L.; Klahn, Jennifer A.; Wood, Michele M.

    2004-01-01

    This study explored associations between ever having been arrested and other variables among 490 male drug users. Participants were classified into three groups based on recent sexual history: men who had not had sex (NOSEX), men who had had sex with women (HETERO), and men who had had sex with men (MSM). We found that MSM who had been arrested…

  11. Drug and Alcohol Arrests Increased in 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklin, Julie L.

    2001-01-01

    U.S. Department of Education (DOE) data showed a 1999 increase in drug and alcohol arrests on college campuses. Also, the number of reported sex offenses rose by 6 percent from 1998-99. Some experts question the validity of the year-to-year comparisons and the DOE data. Presents statistics on sex offenses, drug use, and drinking and football. (SM)

  12. The Organizational Determinants of Police Arrest Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Allison T.; MacDonald, John M.; Manz, Patrick W.

    2006-01-01

    A limited amount of research has examined the relationship between characteristics of police organizations and policing styles. In particular, few studies have examined the link between organizational structures and police officer arrest decisions. Wilson's (1968) pioneering case study of police organizations suggested that individual police…

  13. 32 CFR 935.122 - Arrests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS... an arrest, a peace officer may use only the degree of force needed to effect submission, and may... verbal warning. (f) A peace officer may force an entry into any building, vehicle, or aircraft...

  14. 32 CFR 935.122 - Arrests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS... an arrest, a peace officer may use only the degree of force needed to effect submission, and may... verbal warning. (f) A peace officer may force an entry into any building, vehicle, or aircraft...

  15. 32 CFR 935.122 - Arrests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS... an arrest, a peace officer may use only the degree of force needed to effect submission, and may... verbal warning. (f) A peace officer may force an entry into any building, vehicle, or aircraft...

  16. 32 CFR 935.122 - Arrests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS... an arrest, a peace officer may use only the degree of force needed to effect submission, and may... verbal warning. (f) A peace officer may force an entry into any building, vehicle, or aircraft...

  17. 32 CFR 935.122 - Arrests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS... an arrest, a peace officer may use only the degree of force needed to effect submission, and may... verbal warning. (f) A peace officer may force an entry into any building, vehicle, or aircraft...

  18. Perinatal cardiac arrest. Quality of the survivors.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, H; Neligan, G

    1975-01-01

    Steiner, H., and Neligan, G. (1975). Archives of Disease in Childhood, 50, 696. Perinatal cardiac arrest: quality of the survivors. Twenty-two consecutive survivors of perinatal cardiac arrest have been followed to a mean age of 4 1/4 years, using methods of neurological and developmental assessment appropriate to their ages. 4 showed evidence of gross, diffuse brain-damage (2 of these died before the age of 3 years). These were the only 4 survivors of the first month of life who took more than 30 minutes to establish regular, active respiration after their heartbeat had been restored. The arrest in these cases had occurred during or within 15 minutes of delivery, and followed antepartum haemorrhage, breech delivery, or prolapsed cord. The remaining 18 were free of any evidence of brain damage. In the majority of these the arrest had occurred during shoulder dystocia or exchange transfusion, or was unexplained; the heartbeat had been restored within 5 minutes in most cases, and regular, active respiration had been established within 30 minutes thereafter in all cases. PMID:1190819

  19. Maternal cardiac arrest: a practical and comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Jeejeebhoy, Farida M; Morrison, Laurie J

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a dedicated chapter in the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care; however, a robust maternal cardiac arrest knowledge translation strategy and emergency response plan is not usually the focus of institutional emergency preparedness programs. Although maternal cardiac arrest is rare, the emergency department is a high-risk area for receiving pregnant women in either prearrest or full cardiac arrest. It is imperative that institutions review and update emergency response plans for a maternal arrest. This review highlights the most recent science, guidelines, and recommended implementation strategies related to a maternal arrest. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the important physiological differences of, and management strategies for, a maternal cardiac arrest, as well as provide institutions with the most up-to-date literature on which they can build emergency preparedness programs for a maternal arrest.

  20. 33 CFR 154.2106 - Detonation arresters installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... arrester, line size expansions must be in a straight pipe run and must be no closer than 120 times the pipe's diameter from the detonation arrester unless the manufacturer has test data to show the...

  1. Early Versus Late Maturation Arrest: Reproductive Outcomes of Testicular Failure

    PubMed Central

    Weedin, John W.; Bennett, Richard C.; Fenig, David M.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There is a paucity of data characterizing infertile men with maturation arrest. We hypothesized that men with early stage maturation arrest could be clinically distinguished from men with late maturation arrest and would have worse reproductive outcomes. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients with nonobstructive azoospermia and cryptozoospermia who underwent testis mapping and sperm extraction from 2002 to 2009 and for whom histopathological findings were available. Patients had uniform maturation arrest if multiple biopsies revealed maturation arrest at the spermatogonia/spermatocyte (early maturation arrest) or the spermatid (late maturation arrest) stage. Clinical parameters and pregnancy outcomes of in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection were examined. Statistical analysis consisted of univariate and multivariate analysis. Results Uniform maturation arrest was identified in 49 of 219 men (22.3%) undergoing testicular sperm extraction. On multivariate analysis men with maturation arrest had significantly larger testes (p = 0.01), decreased follicle-stimulating hormone (p = 0.05) and more detectable genetic abnormalities (p = 0.01) than men with other histopathological conditions. Men with late maturation arrest had decreased follicle-stimulating hormone (p = 0.02), increased testosterone (p = 0.03) and a higher sperm retrieval rate at testicular sperm extraction (p = 0.01) than men with early maturation arrest. Predictors of successful sperm retrieval were larger testes, cryptozoospermia, late maturation arrest and hypospermatogenesis (each p ≤0.05). Pregnancy outcomes for men with maturation arrest were not significantly different from those for men with other histopathological conditions. Conclusions Maturation arrest is a common, diverse histopathological subtype of severe male infertility. Compared to men with late maturation arrest those with early maturation arrest have increased follicle

  2. Abnormal mitosis triggers p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in human tetraploid cells.

    PubMed

    Kuffer, Christian; Kuznetsova, Anastasia Yurievna; Storchová, Zuzana

    2013-08-01

    Erroneously arising tetraploid mammalian cells are chromosomally instable and may facilitate cell transformation. An increasing body of evidence shows that the propagation of mammalian tetraploid cells is limited by a p53-dependent arrest. The trigger of this arrest has not been identified so far. Here we show by live cell imaging of tetraploid cells generated by an induced cytokinesis failure that most tetraploids arrest and die in a p53-dependent manner after the first tetraploid mitosis. Furthermore, we found that the main trigger is a mitotic defect, in particular, chromosome missegregation during bipolar mitosis or spindle multipolarity. Both a transient multipolar spindle followed by efficient clustering in anaphase as well as a multipolar spindle followed by multipolar mitosis inhibited subsequent proliferation to a similar degree. We found that the tetraploid cells did not accumulate double-strand breaks that could cause the cell cycle arrest after tetraploid mitosis. In contrast, tetraploid cells showed increased levels of oxidative DNA damage coinciding with the p53 activation. To further elucidate the pathways involved in the proliferation control of tetraploid cells, we knocked down specific kinases that had been previously linked to the cell cycle arrest and p53 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the checkpoint kinase ATM phosphorylates p53 in tetraploid cells after abnormal mitosis and thus contributes to proliferation control of human aberrantly arising tetraploids.

  3. Gender-Sensitive Substance Abuse Treatment and Arrest Outcomes for Women

    PubMed Central

    Kissin, Wendy B.; Tang, Zhiqun; Campbell, Kevin M.; Claus, Ronald E.; Orwin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    The present study links an empirically-developed quantitative measure of gender-sensitive (GS) substance abuse treatment to arrest outcomes among 5,109 substance abusing women in mixed-gender short-term residential programs in Washington State. Frailty models of survival analysis and 3-level hierarchical linear models were conducted to test the beneficial effects of GS treatment on decreasing criminal justice involvement. Propensity scores were used to control for the pre-existing differences among women due to the quasi-experimental nature of the study. Men's arrest outcomes were used to control for confounding at the program level. Results show that women in more GS treatment programs had a lower risk of drug-related arrests, and women in more GS treatment programs who also completed treatment had a significant reduction in overall arrests from two years before- to two years after treatment, above and beyond the reduction in arrests due to treatment alone. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:24209383

  4. Arrests for Major Crimes: Trends and Patterns for Elderly Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapp, Allen D.

    1989-01-01

    Examined data from the Uniform Crime Reports of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for 1972 through 1981. Findings indicated that the percentage of all arrests that were arrests of the elderly was declining while the elderly population itself was rapidly increasing; and the percentage of elderly arrests for index (major) crimes was increasing…

  5. 29 CFR 1915.159 - Personal fall arrest systems (PFAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personal fall arrest systems (PFAS). 1915.159 Section 1915... Protective Equipment (PPE) § 1915.159 Personal fall arrest systems (PFAS). The criteria of this section apply... acceptable as part of a personal fall arrest system. (a) Criteria for connectors and anchorages....

  6. Early Lactate Elevations Following Resuscitation From Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Are Associated With Increased Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Clark, Amy E.; Casper, T. Charles; Berger, John T.; Schleien, Charles L.; Dean, J. Michael; Moler, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the association of lactate levels within the first 12 hours after successful resuscitation from pediatric cardiopulmonary arrest with hospital mortality. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Fifteen children’s hospital associated with the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network. Patients Patients between 1 day and 18 years old who had a cardiopulmonary arrest, received chest compressions more than 1 minute, had a return of spontaneous circulation more than 20 minutes, and had lactate measurements within 6 hours of arrest. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Two hundred sixty-four patients had a lactate sampled between 0 and 6 hours (lactate0–6) and were evaluable. Of those, 153 patients had a lactate sampled between 7 and 12 hours (lactate7–12). One hundred thirty-eight patients (52%) died. After controlling for arrest location, total number of epinephrine doses, initial rhythm, and other potential confounders, the odds of death per 1 mmol/L increase in lactate 0–6 was 1.14 (1.08, 1.19) (p < 0.001) and the odds of death per 1 mmol/L increase in lactate7–12 was 1.20 (1.11, 1.30) (p < 0.0001). Area under the curve for in-hospital arrest mortality for lactate0–6 was 0.72 and for lactate7–12 was 0.76. Area under the curve for out-of-hospital arrest mortality for lactate0–6 was 0.8 and for lactate7–12 was 0.75. Conclusions Elevated lactate levels in the first 12 hours after successful resuscitation from pediatric cardiac arrest are associated with increased mortality. Lactate levels alone are not able to predict outcomes accurately enough for definitive prognostication but may approximate mortality observed in this large cohort of children’s hospitals. PMID:23925146

  7. Inducing Therapeutic Hypothermia in Cardiac Arrest Caused by Lightning Strike.

    PubMed

    Scantling, Dane; Frank, Brian; Pontell, Mathew E; Medinilla, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    Only limited clinical scenarios are grounds for induction of therapeutic hypothermia. Its use in traumatic cardiac arrests, including those from lightning strikes, is not well studied. Nonshockable cardiac arrest rhythms have only recently been included in resuscitation guidelines. We report a case of full neurological recovery with therapeutic hypothermia after a lightning-induced pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest in an 18-year-old woman. We also review the important pathophysiology of lightning-induced cardiac arrest and neurologic sequelae, elaborate upon the mechanism of therapeutic hypothermia, and add case-based evidence in favor of the use of targeted temperature management in lightning-induced cardiac arrest.

  8. Crack propagation and arrest in pressurized containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Delale, F.; Owczarek, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of crack propagation and arrest in a finite volume cylindrical container filled with pressurized gas is considered. It is assumed that the cylinder contains a symmetrically located longitudinal part-through crack with a relatively small net ligament. The net ligament suddenly ruptures initiating the process of fracture propagation and depressurization in the cylinder. Thus the problem is a coupled gas dynamics and solid mechanics problem the exact formulation of which does not seem to be possible. The problem is reduced to a proper initial value problem by introducing a dynamic fracture criterion which relates the crack acceleration to the difference between a load factor and the corresponding strength parameter. The results indicate that generally in gas filled cylinders fracture arrest is not possible unless the material behaves in a ductile manner and the container is relatively long.

  9. Psychopathology in women arrested for domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Gregory L; Moore, Todd M; Gordon, Kristina Coop; Ramsey, Susan E; Kahler, Christopher W

    2006-03-01

    This study examined the prevalence of psychopathology among women arrested for violence and whether the experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) was associated with Axis I psychopathology. Women who were arrested for domestic violence perpetration and court referred to violence intervention programs (N= 103) completed measures of IPV victimization, perpetration, and psychopathology. Results revealed high rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, substance use disorders, borderline personality disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Violence victimization was significantly associated with symptoms of psychopathology. Logistic regression analyses showed that sexual and psychological abuse by partners were associated with the presence of PTSD, depression, and GAD diagnoses. Results highlight the potential importance of the role of violence victimization in psychopathology. Results suggest that Axis I and Axis II psychopathology should routinely be assessed as part of violence intervention programs for women and that intervention programs could be improved by offering adjunct or integrated mental health treatment.

  10. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-li; Liu, Yuan-shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-dong; Chang, Rui-ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-gen; Fang, Xiang-shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-yuan; Huang, Zi-tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  11. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  12. Nuclear reactor melt arrest and coolability device

    DOEpatents

    Theofanous, Theo G.; Dinh, Nam Truc; Wachowiak, Richard M.

    2016-06-14

    Example embodiments provide a Basemat-Internal Melt Arrest and Coolability device (BiMAC) that offers improved spatial and mechanical characteristics for use in damage prevention and risk mitigation in accident scenarios. Example embodiments may include a BiMAC having an inclination of less than 10-degrees from the basemat floor and/or coolant channels of less than 4 inches in diameter, while maintaining minimum safety margins required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  13. Sulfur dioxide converter and pollution arrester system

    SciTech Connect

    Montalvo, V.H.

    1983-12-06

    A sulphur dioxide converter and pollution arrester system are disclosed which involves the treatment of smoke and/or contaminated air emanating from a combustion area by passage through a zone achieving turbulence into a water spray contained first treating chamber. The turbulence zone, into which an atomized catalyst is introduced, serves to create a longer path for cooling as well as increased centrifugal motion to the solid particles in the contaminated air and also the formation of sulphur trioxide. In other words, the arrangement is such that pollution arresting action is provided in the form of ''slinging'' resulting from tangential directional movement and, when combining with the water spray in the first treating chamber, the ultimate formation of sulphuric acid. Subsequently, the contaminated air, containing amounts of sulphurous and sulphuric acids, passes through a second treating chamber, where airflow throughout the system is occasioned by action at the outlet end, such as the vacuum created by a flue and not by independent mechanical means. The arrangement serves to a twofold purpose, i.e. to minimize or arrest pollution and to convert sulphur dioxide, a component of high sulphur coal, into commercially valuable sulphuric acid.

  14. Detonation-flame arrester devices for gasoline cargo vapor recovery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.; Ryason, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    Empirical data on the deflagration-to-detonation run-up distance for flowing mixtures of gasoline and air in 15.2-cm- (6.0-in.-) diameter piping simulating a vapor recovery system are presented. The quenching capability of eight selected flame control devices subjected to repeated stable detonations was evaluated. The successful detonation-flame arresters were: (1) spiral-wound, crimped aluminum ribbon, (2) foamed nickel-chrome metal, (3) vertically packed bed of aluminum Ballast rings, and (4) water-trap or hydraulic back-pressure valve. Installation configurations for two of the more applicable arresters, the spiral-wound, crimped stainless-steel ribbon and the vertically packed bed of aluminum Ballast rings, were further optimized by a series of parametric tests. The final configuration of these two arresters was demonstrated with repeated detonation tests at conditions that simulated vapor recovery system operation. On these tests, the combustible mixture of gasoline and air continued to flow through the piping for periods up to 120 seconds after the initial detonation had been arrested. There was no indication of continuous burning or reignition occurring on either side of the test arresters.

  15. Radiation-induced senescence-like terminal growth arrest in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Podtcheko, Alexei; Namba, Hiroyuki; Saenko, Vladimir; Ohtsuru, Akira; Starenki, Dmitriy; Meirmanov, Serik; Polona, Iryna; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2005-04-01

    Premature senescence may play an important role as an acute, drug-, or ionizing radiation (IR)-inducible growth arrest program along with interphase apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether IR can induce senescence-like phenotype (SLP) associated with terminal growth arrest in the thyroid cells, and if so, to evaluate impact of terminal growth arrest associated with SLP in intrinsic radiosensitivity of various thyroid carcinomas. The induction of SLP in thyroid cells were identified by: (1) senescence associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) staining method, (2) dual-flow cytometric analysis of cell proliferation and side light scatter using vital staining with PKH-2 fluorescent dye, (3) double labeling for 5-bromodeoxyuridine and SA- beta-Gal, (4) Staining for SA-beta-Gal with consequent antithyroglobulin immunohistochemistry. IR induced SLP associated with terminal growth arrest in four thyroid cancer cells lines and in primary thyrocytes in time- and dose-dependent manner. Analysis of relationship between induction of SLP and radiosensitivity revealed a trend in which more radioresistant cell lines strongly tended to show lower specific SLP yields (r = -0.93, p = 0.068). We find out that SA-beta-Gal staining is detectable in irradiated ARO xenotransplants, but not in control tumors. We, therefore, conclude that induction of SLP with terminal growth arrest contribute to the elimination of clonogenic populations after IR.

  16. Intracellular pH in Gastric and Rectal Tissue Post Cardiac Arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Steiner, Richard P.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    We directly measured pHi using the pH sensitive dye, neutral red. We defined pHi for rectal and gastric tissue in whole tissue and by layer under control and arrest conditions. Fifteen minutes of arrest was not sufficient time to alter the pHi at the rectal or gastric site. On initial inspection, the stomach may be more sensitive to ischemic changes than the rectum. Understanding the mechanism by which PCO2 generation is used to track clinical changes is vital to the early detection of tissue dysoxia in order to effectively treat and manage critically ill patients.

  17. Romantic Partners’ Influence on Men’s Likelihood of Arrest in Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Capaldi, Deborah M.; Kim, Hyoun K.; Owen, Lee D.

    2008-01-01

    Female romantic partners’ influence on official crime occurrence for men across a 12-year period in early adulthood was examined within a comprehensive dynamic prediction model including both social learning and social control predictors. We hypothesized that relationship stability, rather than attachment to partner, would be associated with reduced likelihood of crime, whereas women’s antisocial behavior would be a risk factor, along with deviant peer association. Models were tested on a sample of at-risk men [the Oregon Youth Study (OYS)] using zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) modeling predicting to 1) arrest persistence (class and count) and 2) arrest onset class. Findings indicated that women’s antisocial behavior was predictive of both onset and persistence of arrests for men, and deviant peer association was predictive of persistence. Relationship stability was protective against persistence. PMID:19079751

  18. Arrest History and Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration in a Sample of Men and Women Arrested for Domestic Violence

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Ninnemann, Andrew; Elmquist, Joanna; Labrecque, Lindsay; Zucosky, Heather; Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Temple, Jeff R.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious and prevalent problem throughout the United States. Currently, individuals arrested for domestic violence are often court mandated to batterer intervention programs (BIPs). However, little is known about the arrest histories of these individuals, especially women. The current study examined the arrest histories of men (n = 303) and women (n = 82) arrested for domestic violence and court-referred to BIPs. Results demonstrated that over 30% of the entire sample had been previously arrested for a non-violent offense, and over 25% of the participants had been previously arrested for a violent offense other than domestic violence. Moreover, men were arrested significantly more frequently for violence-related and non-violent offenses than their female counterparts. In addition, men were more likely than women to have consumed binge-levels of alcohol prior to the offense that led to their most recent arrest and court-referral to a BIP. Lastly, arrest history was positively associated with physical and psychological aggression perpetration against an intimate partner for men only, such that more previous arrests were associated with more frequent aggression. These results provide evidence that many men and women arrested for domestic violence have engaged in a number of diverse criminal acts during their lifetimes, suggesting that BIPs may need to address general criminal behavior. PMID:25379068

  19. Arrest History and Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration in a Sample of Men and Women Arrested for Domestic Violence.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Ryan C; Ninnemann, Andrew; Elmquist, Joanna; Labrecque, Lindsay; Zucosky, Heather; Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Temple, Jeff R; Stuart, Gregory L

    2012-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious and prevalent problem throughout the United States. Currently, individuals arrested for domestic violence are often court mandated to batterer intervention programs (BIPs). However, little is known about the arrest histories of these individuals, especially women. The current study examined the arrest histories of men (n = 303) and women (n = 82) arrested for domestic violence and court-referred to BIPs. Results demonstrated that over 30% of the entire sample had been previously arrested for a non-violent offense, and over 25% of the participants had been previously arrested for a violent offense other than domestic violence. Moreover, men were arrested significantly more frequently for violence-related and non-violent offenses than their female counterparts. In addition, men were more likely than women to have consumed binge-levels of alcohol prior to the offense that led to their most recent arrest and court-referral to a BIP. Lastly, arrest history was positively associated with physical and psychological aggression perpetration against an intimate partner for men only, such that more previous arrests were associated with more frequent aggression. These results provide evidence that many men and women arrested for domestic violence have engaged in a number of diverse criminal acts during their lifetimes, suggesting that BIPs may need to address general criminal behavior.

  20. Teenagers' High Arrest Rates: Features of Young Age or Youth Poverty?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Males, Mike A.; Brown, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    The association of more crime with youthful age is widely accepted in social science. However, a literature search revealed no studies of the age-crime relationship that controlled for young ages' economic disadvantage. This research gap is addressed using the California Criminal Justice Statistics Center's arrest detail and Census poverty…

  1. Childhood Victimization and Risk for Alcohol and Drug Arrests. Research Preview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireland, Timothy; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    Using data from a large project on child abuse and neglect as predictors of violent criminal behavior, researchers investigated the connection between childhood maltreatment and later arrest for alcohol and drug-related offenses. After controlling for age, gender, and race, child maltreatment was found to be a significant predictor of delinquency.…

  2. Foucault and Colonial Strategy in Douglas C. Jones' "Arrest Sitting Bull"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    "Arrest Sitting Bull," a novel written by Douglas C. Jones that relates the personal stories of individuals involved in the military and the political domination of the Sioux Indian during the period leading to the Sitting Bull killing is described. The incessant quest to establish and maintain control and the integral roles played by fear and…

  3. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  4. Temporal and spatial profile of brain diffusion-weighted MRI after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Mlynash, M.; Campbell, D.M.; Leproust, E.M.; Fischbein, N.J.; Bammer, R.; Eyngorn, I.; Hsia, A.W.; Moseley, M.; Wijman, C.A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) of the brain is a promising technique to help predict functional outcome in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. We aimed to evaluate prospectively the temporal-spatial profile of brain apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes in comatose survivors during the first 8 days after cardiac arrest. Methods ADC values were measured by two independent and blinded investigators in predefined brain regions in 18 good and 15 poor outcome patients with 38 brain MRIs, and compared with 14 normal controls. The same brain regions were also assessed qualitatively by two other independent and blinded investigators. Results In poor outcome patients, cortical structures, in particular the occipital and temporal lobes, and the putamen exhibited the most profound ADC reductions, which were noted as early as 1.5 days and reached nadir between 3 to 5 days after the arrest. Conversely, when compared to normal controls, good outcome patients exhibited increased diffusivity, in particular in the hippocampus, temporal and occipital lobes, and corona radiata. By the qualitative MRI readings, one or more cortical gray matter structures were read as moderately-to-severely abnormal in all poor outcome patients imaged beyond 54 hours after the arrest, but not in the three patients imaged earlier. Conclusions Brain DWI changes in comatose post-cardiac arrest survivors in the first week after the arrest are region- and time-dependent and differ between good and poor outcome patients. With the increasing use of MRI in this context, it is important to be aware of these relationships. PMID:20595666

  5. NUCLEAR FUSION DEFECTIVE1 encodes the Arabidopsis RPL21M protein and is required for karyogamy during female gametophyte development and fertilization.

    PubMed

    Portereiko, Michael F; Sandaklie-Nikolova, Linda; Lloyd, Alan; Dever, Chad A; Otsuga, Denichiro; Drews, Gary N

    2006-07-01

    Karyogamy, or nuclear fusion, is essential for sexual reproduction. In angiosperms, karyogamy occurs three times: twice during double fertilization of the egg cell and the central cell and once during female gametophyte development when the two polar nuclei fuse to form the diploid central cell nucleus. The molecular mechanisms controlling karyogamy are poorly understood. We have identified nine female gametophyte mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), nuclear fusion defective1 (nfd1) to nfd9, that are defective in fusion of the polar nuclei. In the nfd1 to nfd6 mutants, failure of fusion of the polar nuclei is the only defect detected during megagametogenesis. nfd1 is also affected in karyogamy during double fertilization. Using transmission electron microscopy, we showed that nfd1 nuclei fail to undergo fusion of the outer nuclear membranes. nfd1 contains a T-DNA insertion in RPL21M that is predicted to encode the mitochondrial 50S ribosomal subunit L21, and a wild-type copy of this gene rescues the mutant phenotype. Consistent with the predicted function of this gene, an NFD1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localizes to mitochondria and the NFD1/RPL21M gene is expressed throughout the plant. The nfd3, nfd4, nfd5, and nfd6 mutants also contain T-DNA insertions in genes predicted to encode proteins that localize to mitochondria, suggesting a role for this organelle in nuclear fusion.

  6. Arresting developments: trends in female arrests for domestic violence and proposed explanations.

    PubMed

    Deleon-Granados, William; Wells, William; Binsbacher, Ruddyard

    2006-04-01

    This article represents an effort to generate more systematic and specified discussion on the topic of unintended consequences in the movement to decrease violence against women. In this case, the consequence is increases in female arrests for domestic violence. This article builds on recent discussions by first using a sample of data to examine felony domestic violence arrest rates for men and women. The data support the conclusion that domestic violence arrests of women have increased. Second, the article presents six explanations that are derived from existing literature. Although the authors do not offer empirical tests of these explanations, this presentation can play an important part in better understanding the outcomes of criminal justice policies that are aimed at increasing victim safety.

  7. Modeling cardiac arrest and resuscitation in the domestic pig

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Brandon H; Nguyen, Anh Q; Hollrah, Roger A; Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Mallet, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest remains a leading cause of death and permanent disability worldwide. Although many victims are initially resuscitated, they often succumb to the extensive ischemia-reperfusion injury inflicted on the internal organs, especially the brain. Cardiac arrest initiates a complex cellular injury cascade encompassing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, Ca2+ overload, ATP depletion, pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction, and neuronal glutamate excitotoxity, which injures and kills cells, compromises function of internal organs and ignites a destructive systemic inflammatory response. The sheer complexity and scope of this cascade challenges the development of experimental models of and effective treatments for cardiac arrest. Many experimental animal preparations have been developed to decipher the mechanisms of damage to vital internal organs following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and to develop treatments to interrupt the lethal injury cascades. Porcine models of cardiac arrest and resuscitation offer several important advantages over other species, and outcomes in this large animal are readily translated to the clinical setting. This review summarizes porcine cardiac arrest-CPR models reported in the literature, describes clinically relevant phenomena observed during cardiac arrest and resuscitation in pigs, and discusses numerous methodological considerations in modeling cardiac arrest/CPR. Collectively, published reports show the domestic pig to be a suitable large animal model of cardiac arrest which is responsive to CPR, defibrillatory countershocks and medications, and yields extensive information to foster advances in clinical treatment of cardiac arrest. PMID:25685718

  8. Arrests of women for driving under the influence.

    PubMed

    Shore, E R; McCoy, M L; Toonen, L A; Kuntz, E J

    1988-01-01

    Police records of arrests of women in Wichita, Kansas for driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol for a 5-year period (1980-1984) were studied. The proportion of arrests of women increased from 10.6 to 14.5% of total arrested. Women in their 20s comprised the largest age group; single women were greatly overrepresented. More than one-half of the arrested women were employed outside the home; a substantial proportion (30.8%) were unemployed at the time of arrest. The average blood alcohol level of those tested was 183 mg/dl. Characteristics of arrestees are discussed in terms of changes in the social roles and expectations of women. Although time of arrest was similar to that of men (i.e., night), arrests of women were more evenly spread across the days of the week. Within the 5-year period, the rate of recidivism for DUI was 7.43%. The implications of arrest and recidivism patterns are discussed. A change in legal and arrest procedures was found to have the same effect on arrests of women as it had on those of men, suggesting that the changes did not produce differential treatment by police.

  9. Coupling growth arrest and adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Ailhaud, G; Dani, C; Amri, E Z; Djian, P; Vannier, C; Doglio, A; Forest, C; Gaillard, D; Négrel, R; Grimaldi, P

    1989-01-01

    The complete differentiation program of preadipose cells can be divided into early and late events. The expression of early markers takes place at growth arrest (G1/S boundary), whereas that of late markers, leading to terminal differentiation, takes place after a limited number of mitoses of early marker-containing cells. Only terminal differentiation requires the presence of growth hormone and triiodothyronine and results in the formation of triacylglycerol-filled, nondividing cells. The events of adipose cell differentiation which take place in vitro allow a better understanding of the development of adipose tissue in vivo. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 5. PMID:2647477

  10. [Identifying children at risk for cardiorespiratory arrest].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Alvarez, A; Martínez Gutiérrez, A; Salvat Germán, F

    2004-08-01

    Cardiorespiratory arrest in children with severe disease does not usually present suddenly or unexpectedly but is often the result of a progressive deterioration of respiratory and/or circulatory function. Before failure of these functions occurs, there is a series of clinical signs that serve as a warning. Health professionals should not only evaluate clinical signs of respiratory and/or circulatory insufficiency but should also be able to identify these warning signs as early as possible, preferably in the compensation phase, given that the possibility that this process can be reversed by therapeutic measures decreases as the process progresses.

  11. The Impact of Legalizing Syringe Exchange Programs on Arrests Among Injection Drug Users in California

    PubMed Central

    Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Anderson, Rachel; Flynn, Neil; Kral, Alex H.

    2007-01-01

    Legislation passed in 2000 allowed syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in California to operate legally if local jurisdictions declare a local HIV public health emergency. Nonetheless, even in locales where SEPs are legal, the possession of drug paraphernalia, including syringes, remained illegal. The objective of this paper is to examine the association between the legal status of SEPs and individual arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia among injection drug users (IDUs) in California from 2001 to 2003. Using data from three annual cross-sections (2001-03) of IDUs attending 24 SEPs in 16 California counties (N = 1,578), we found that overall, 14% of IDUs in our sample reported arrest or citation for paraphernalia in the 6 months before the interview. Further analysis found that 17% of IDUs attending a legal SEP (defined at the county level) reported arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia compared to 10% of IDUs attending an illegal SEP (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the adjusted odds ratio of arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia was 1.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2, 2.3] for IDUs attending legal SEPs compared to IDUs attending illegal SEPs, after controlling for race/ethnicity, age, homelessness, illegal income, injection of amphetamines, years of injection drug use, frequency of SEP use, and number of needles received at last visit. IDUs attending SEPs with legal status may be more visible to police, and hence, more subject to arrest or citation for paraphernalia. These findings suggest that legislative efforts to decriminalize the operation of SEPs without concurrent decriminalization of syringe possession may result in higher odds of arrest among SEP clients, with potentially deleterious implications for the health and well-being of IDUs. More comprehensive approaches to removing barriers to accessing sterile syringes are needed if our public health goals for reducing new HIV/HCV infections are to be obtained. PMID:17265133

  12. Post-cardiac arrest brain injury: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2012-04-15

    Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death that affects more than a million individuals worldwide every year. Despite the recent advancement in the field of cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the management and prognosis of post-cardiac arrest brain injury remain suboptimal. The pathophysiology of post-cardiac arrest brain injury involves a complex cascade of molecular events, most of which remain unknown. Considering that a potentially broad therapeutic window for neuroprotective drug therapy is offered in most successfully resuscitated patient after cardiac arrest, the need for further research is imperative. The aim of this article is to present the major pathophysiological disturbances leading to post-cardiac arrest brain injury, as well as to review the available pharmacological therapies.

  13. The psychological and legal aftermath of false arrest and imprisonment.

    PubMed

    Simon, R I

    1993-01-01

    False arrest and imprisonment can be an extraordinarily stressful psychological trauma. This is clearly demonstrated in the evaluation of forensic cases alleging false arrest and imprisonment, a review of the recent forensic psychiatric literature and reported legal cases. A clinical vignette is presented that illustrates the psychological trauma and sequelae associated with false arrest and imprisonment. Psychiatric treatment of these individuals is discussed. A number of these cases are litigated.

  14. Modes of induced cardiac arrest: hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia - Literature review

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Cortez, José Luis Lasso; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The entry of sodium and calcium play a key effect on myocyte subjected to cardiac arrest by hyperkalemia. They cause cell swelling, acidosis, consumption of adenosine triphosphate and trigger programmed cell death. Cardiac arrest caused by hypocalcemia maintains intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels, improves diastolic performance and reduces oxygen consumption, which can be translated into better protection to myocyte injury induced by cardiac arrest. PMID:25372919

  15. Grain setting defect1, Encoding a Remorin Protein, Affects the Grain Setting in Rice through Regulating Plasmodesmatal Conductance1[W

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Jinshan; Liu, Chang; Shen, Junhui; Li, Laigeng

    2014-01-01

    Effective grain filling is one of the key determinants of grain setting in rice (Oryza sativa). Grain setting defect1 (GSD1), which encodes a putative remorin protein, was found to affect grain setting in rice. Investigation of the phenotype of a transfer DNA insertion mutant (gsd1-Dominant) with enhanced GSD1 expression revealed abnormalities including a reduced grain setting rate, accumulation of carbohydrates in leaves, and lower soluble sugar content in the phloem exudates. GSD1 was found to be specifically expressed in the plasma membrane and plasmodesmata (PD) of phloem companion cells. Experimental evidence suggests that the phenotype of the gsd1-Dominant mutant is caused by defects in the grain-filling process as a result of the impaired transport of carbohydrates from the photosynthetic site to the phloem. GSD1 functioned in affecting PD conductance by interacting with rice ACTIN1 in association with the PD callose binding protein1. Together, our results suggest that GSD1 may play a role in regulating photoassimilate translocation through the symplastic pathway to impact grain setting in rice. PMID:25253885

  16. TCP transcription factor, BRANCH ANGLE DEFECTIVE 1 (BAD1), is required for normal tassel branch angle formation in maize

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fang; Reinheimer, Renata; Durantini, Diego; Kellogg, Elizabeth A.; Schmidt, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    In grass inflorescences, a structure called the “pulvinus” is found between the inflorescence main stem and lateral branches. The size of the pulvinus affects the angle of the lateral branches that emerge from the main axis and therefore has a large impact on inflorescence architecture. Through EMS mutagenesis we have identified three complementation groups of recessive mutants in maize having defects in pulvinus formation. All mutants showed extremely acute tassel branch angles accompanied by a significant reduction in the size of the pulvinus compared with normal plants. Two of the complementation groups correspond to mutations in the previously identified genes, RAMOSA2 (RA2) and LIGULELESS1 (LG1). Mutants corresponding to a third group were cloned using mapped-based approaches and found to encode a new member of the plant-specific TCP (TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN FACTOR) family of DNA-binding proteins, BRANCH ANGLE DEFECTIVE 1 (BAD1). BAD1 is expressed in the developing pulvinus as well as in other developing tissues, including the tassels and juvenile leaves. Both molecular and genetics studies show that RA2 is upstream of BAD1, whereas LG1 may function in a separate pathway. Our findings demonstrate that BAD1 is a TCP class II gene that functions to promote cell proliferation in a lateral organ, the pulvinus, and influences inflorescence architecture by impacting the angle of lateral branch emergence. PMID:22773815

  17. Interaction between RNA helicase ROOT INITIATION DEFECTIVE 1 and GAMETOPHYTIC FACTOR 1 is involved in female gametophyte development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dong Zi; Zhao, Xue Fang; Liu, Chang Zhen; Ma, Fang Fang; Wang, Fang; Gao, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2016-01-01

    ROOT INITIATION DEFECTIVE 1 (RID1) is an Arabidopsis DEAH/RHA RNA helicase. It functions in hypocotyl de-differentiation, de novo meristem formation, and cell specification of the mature female gametophyte (FG). However, it is unclear how RID1 regulates FG development. In this study, we observed that mutations to RID1 disrupted the developmental synchrony and retarded the progression of FG development. RID1 exhibited RNA helicase activity, with a preference for unwinding double-stranded RNA in the 3′ to 5′ direction. Furthermore, we found that RID1 interacts with GAMETOPHYTIC FACTOR 1 (GFA1), which is an integral protein of the spliceosome component U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particle. Substitution of specific RID1 amino acids (Y266F and T267I) inhibited the interaction with GFA1. In addition, the mutated RID1 could not complement the seed-abortion phenotype of the rid1 mutant. The rid1 and gfa1 mutants exhibited similar abnormalities in pre-mRNA splicing and down-regulated expression of some genes involved in FG development. Our results suggest that an interaction between RID1 and the U5 snRNP complex regulates essential pre-mRNA splicing of the genes required for FG development. This study provides new information regarding the mechanism underlying the FG developmental process. PMID:27683728

  18. Long-term increase in coherence between the basal ganglia and motor cortex after asphyxial cardiac arrest and resuscitation in developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R.; Shoykhet, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The basal ganglia are vulnerable to injury during cardiac arrest. Movement disorders are a common morbidity in survivors. Yet, neuronal motor network changes post-arrest remain poorly understood. METHODS We compared function of the motor network in adult rats that, during postnatal week 3, underwent 9.5 min of asphyxial cardiac arrest (n = 9) or sham intervention (n = 8). Six months after injury, we simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFP) from the primary motor cortex (MCx) and single neuron firing and LFP from the rat entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), which corresponds to the primate globus pallidus pars interna. Data were analyzed for firing rates, power, and coherence between MCx and EPN spike and LFP activity. RESULTS Cardiac arrest survivors display chronic motor deficits. EPN firing rate is lower in cardiac arrest survivors (19.5 ± 2.4 Hz) compared with controls (27.4 ± 2.7 Hz; P < 0.05). Cardiac arrest survivors also demonstrate greater coherence between EPN single neurons and MCx LFP (3—100 Hz; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS This increased coherence indicates abnormal synchrony in the neuronal motor network after cardiac arrest. Increased motor network synchrony is thought to be antikinetic in primary movement disorders. Characterization of motor network synchrony after cardiac arrest may help guide management of post-hypoxic movement disorders. PMID:26083760

  19. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun; Zheng, Lemin; Zhou, Boda; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  20. Sex Differences in Urban Arrest Patterns, 1934-79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffensmeier, Darrell J.; Cobb, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    Federal Bureau of Investigation statistics show that women have made large gains in arrests for petty property crimes and smaller gains for other offenses. However, alternate sources of data as well as changes in reporting and statistical coverage suggest that female arrest gains are more apparent than real. (Author/GC)

  1. A remote tester for surge arresters: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.H.

    1986-12-01

    Laboratory studies show that the most probable indication that a surge arrester is failing is electromagnetic energy emission. In field trials by eight utilities, a tester designed to detect radiofrequency emissions located defective arresters, but stray emissions in the environment limited its performance.

  2. Colleges Report Increases in Arrests for Drug and Alcohol Violations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklin, Julie L.

    1999-01-01

    Arrests for violations of drug/alcohol laws at colleges and universities rose 7.2 and 3.6%, respectively, from 1996 to 1997. Campus police attribute the increases not to increased drug and alcohol use but to more aggressive enforcement. However, some health researchers feel usage has risen. Campus weapons violations and forcible rape arrests have…

  3. Nitrite therapy is neuroprotective and safe in cardiac arrest survivors.

    PubMed

    Dezfulian, Cameron; Alekseyenko, Aleksey; Dave, Kunjan R; Raval, Ami P; Do, Rose; Kim, Francis; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2012-05-15

    Cardiac arrest results in significant mortality after initial resuscitation due in most cases to ischemia-reperfusion induced brain injury and to a lesser degree myocardial dysfunction. Nitrite has previously been shown to protect against reperfusion injury in animal models of focal cerebral and heart ischemia. Nitrite therapy after murine cardiac arrest improved 22 h survival through improvements in myocardial contractility. These improvements accompanied transient mitochondrial inhibition which reduced oxidative injury to the heart. Based on preliminary evidence that nitrite may also protect against ischemic brain injury, we sought to test this hypothesis in a rat model of asphyxia cardiac arrest with prolonged survival (7d). Cardiac arrest resulted in hippocampal CA1 delayed neuronal death well characterized in this and other cardiac arrest models. Nitrite therapy did not alter post-arrest hemodynamics but did result in significant (75%) increases in CA1 neuron survival. This was associated with increases in hippocampal nitrite and S-nitrosothiol levels but not cGMP shortly after therapy. Mitochondrial function 1h after resuscitation trended towards improvement with nitrite therapy. Based on promising preclinical data, the first ever phase I trial of nitrite infusions in human cardiac arrest survivors has been undertaken. We present preliminary data showing low dose nitrite infusion did not result in hypotension or cause methemoglobinemia. Nitrite thus appears safe and effective for clinical translation as a promising therapy against cardiac arrest mediated heart and brain injury.

  4. Evolution of the dragonfly head-arresting system

    PubMed Central

    Gorb, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The arrester or fixation system of the head in adult Odonata is unique among arthropods. This system involves the organs of two body segments: the head and the neck. It consists of a skeleton–muscle apparatus that sets the arrester parts in motion. The parts comprise formations covered with complicated microstructures: fields of microtrichia on the rear surface of the head and post-cervical sclerites of the neck. The arrester immobilizes the head during feeding or when the dragonfly is in tandem flight. Thus, it may serve as an adaptation to save the head from violent mechanical disturbance and to stabilize gaze in a variety of behavioural situations. This study shows the evolutionary trend of the arrester in the order Odonata by using scanning electron microscopy and measurements of arrester structures in 227 species from 26 odonate families. The arrester design occurring in the Epiophlebiidae, Gomphidae, Neopetaliidae, Petaluridae and Chlorogomphinae is suggested to be the basic one. Two convergent pathways of head-arrester evolution among Zygoptera and Anisoptera are proposed. The possible functional significance of the arrester system is discussed.

  5. 32 CFR 935.125 - Citation in place of arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....125 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Peace Officers § 935.125 Citation in place of arrest. In any case in which a peace officer may make an arrest without a warrant, he may issue and serve a citation if...

  6. 32 CFR 935.125 - Citation in place of arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....125 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Peace Officers § 935.125 Citation in place of arrest. In any case in which a peace officer may make an arrest without a warrant, he may issue and serve a citation if...

  7. 32 CFR 935.125 - Citation in place of arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....125 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Peace Officers § 935.125 Citation in place of arrest. In any case in which a peace officer may make an arrest without a warrant, he may issue and serve a citation if...

  8. 32 CFR 935.125 - Citation in place of arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....125 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Peace Officers § 935.125 Citation in place of arrest. In any case in which a peace officer may make an arrest without a warrant, he may issue and serve a citation if...

  9. 32 CFR 935.125 - Citation in place of arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....125 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Peace Officers § 935.125 Citation in place of arrest. In any case in which a peace officer may make an arrest without a warrant, he may issue and serve a citation if...

  10. The arrest of Agulhas retroflection during glaciations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, V.; Nof, D.; Ortiz, J. D.; Paldor, N.; Chassignet, E.

    2011-12-01

    Paleoceanographic proxy data indicate that the Agulhas leakage into the South Atlantic was dramatically reduced during glacial times, thus probably resulting in the collapse of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. In our former papers, we hypothesized that this was due to a northward shift of the zero wind stress curl that, in turn, forced the retroflection to occur farther north, where the slant of the coastline relative to the north is steep. Here we propose that strong westerlies (0.4 Pa implying a wind speed of ~ 12 m/s at zero degrees centigrade), which were supposedly common during glaciations, also could have arrested the leakage. This arrest occurs because the wind stress opposes the momentum flux associated with the retroflection and, therefore, the retroflection does not shift in latitude. We use a simple, nonlinear, "reduced gravity" model to show analytically and numerically that, under the above conditions, the eastward wind stress compensates for the zonal westward flow-force associated with the retroflection, thus avoiding the development and shedding of rings. For a nearly zonal wall, westerly winds, and small upper layer thickness along the wall, the arresting wind stress is found, theoretically, to be, τx~0.042α3/2ρf[(2fQ)3/g']1/4 where α is twice the retroflection eddy vorticity, ρ the water density, and Q the Agulhas Current volume flux; the remaining notation is conventional. According to this formula, wind typical for the Agulhas region during glacial times (0.4Pa) significantly affects the moderately strong Agulhas rings of large PV (α=0.1) but, with increasing α, the influence of wind quickly decreases, and becomes negligible for α>0.2. This theoretical result is in agreement with the results of the numerical simulations that we conducted. The numerics show that the wind tends to destroy the detached rings by squeezing them onto the wall, a result that is valid in both the straight and the kinked coast cases. In the

  11. Growth arrest lines and recurrent patellar dislocation: a new sign.

    PubMed

    Abraham, A; Macnicol, M F

    2001-06-01

    The phenomenon of growth arrest lines has been widely described in the medical literature. They are usually found at the metaphysis of growing long bones and are the result of short periods of partial growth arrest. Recurrent dislocation of the patella is a well-recognised problem, particularly in adolescents. Several radiological features have been reported in association with patellar dislocation or instability. We have reported a hitherto undescribed radiological sign of patellar growth arrest lines on the skyline radiographs of two patients with this condition. The shape of the patella when symptoms were at their worst corresponded remarkably closely to the outline of the subsequent growth arrest line. We postulated that repeated dislocations adversely affect the process of normal maturation of the patella. With the resolution of symptoms, patella ossification resumes, leaving the telltale sign of previous injury in the form of a growth arrest line and an improvement in bone density once the patella has been stabilised and tracks normally.

  12. Substance Use Disorders, Comorbidity, and Arrest among Indigenous Adolescents*

    PubMed Central

    Hartshorn, Kelley J. Sittner; Whitbeck, Les B.; Prentice, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Indigenous adolescents are overrepresented at multiple stages of the justice system, but we know very little about the role that mental health, particularly substance use disorder, plays in Indigenous pathways to arrest. This study examined the association between substance use disorder, its comorbidity with other disorders, and arrest using a longitudinal sample of Indigenous youth from the Northern Midwest and Canada. Of the 16% of youth who reported at least one arrest at Wave 5, half met criteria for substance abuse/dependence, and slightly more for conduct disorder. Substance abuse/dependence and conduct disorder were each associated with an increased risk of arrest, although co-occurring disorders were not. The reciprocal effects of arrest and mental disorder are discussed. PMID:26759503

  13. Flashback flame arrester devices for fuel cargo tank vapor vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.; Kushida, R. O.

    1981-03-01

    The flame quenching capability of four types of flame arresting devices suitable for installation on fuel cargo tank vents of marine transport vessels is evaluated. A single 30 mesh screen, a dual 20 mesh screen, a spiral wound crimped metal ribbon, and a packed bed of ballast rings were tested. Flame speed and flame penetration of the test arresters were determined. Eight fuels representative of bulk cargoes were tested. The test arresters quenched a minimum of three flashback flames from all eight fuels, with one exception: high speed ethylene flames penetrated the dual 20 mesh screen on three tests. The arresters withstood the sustained flame from a propane/air mixture for 30 minutes. None of the arresters withstood the sustained flame from an ethylene/air mixture for more than 7 minutes.

  14. Flashback flame arrester devices for fuel cargo tank vapor vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.; Kushida, R. O.

    1981-01-01

    The flame quenching capability of four types of flame arresting devices suitable for installation on fuel cargo tank vents of marine transport vessels is evaluated. A single 30 mesh screen, a dual 20 mesh screen, a spiral wound crimped metal ribbon, and a packed bed of ballast rings were tested. Flame speed and flame penetration of the test arresters were determined. Eight fuels representative of bulk cargoes were tested. The test arresters quenched a minimum of three flashback flames from all eight fuels, with one exception: high speed ethylene flames penetrated the dual 20 mesh screen on three tests. The arresters withstood the sustained flame from a propane/air mixture for 30 minutes. None of the arresters withstood the sustained flame from an ethylene/air mixture for more than 7 minutes.

  15. Acute hemodynamic effects of angiotensin- converting enzyme inhibition after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider's solution.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Alexandro; Kempfert, Jörg; Pritzwald-Stegmann, Patrick; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Dhein, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Evidence as to how ACE inhibitors attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury (IR) after cardioplegic arrest remains scarce. Twenty-four rabbit hearts were perfused on a Langendorff apparatus. Control hearts (n = 6) were arrested with pure histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK)-Bretschneider. Treatment groups received added to the cardioplegic solution (n = 6) captopril (100 μmol/l) and losartan (100 μmol/l) for selective AT1-receptor antagonism or BQ123 (100 nmol/l) for selective ETA-receptor antagonism. Pre-ischemic equilibration of 45 min was followed by 90 min of cardioplegic arrest and 30 min of reperfusion. Indices of myocardial contractility (LVP, dp/dt max, dp/dt min), coronary flow, heart rate, and O2 consumption were recorded before and after ischemic arrest. Tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were measured to evaluate energy content and oxidative stress, respectively. After selective cardiac arrest with Bretschneider, captopril-treated hearts showed improved hemodynamics compared to control and the other treatment groups. Oxygen consumption was significantly decreased during early reperfusion in captopril-treated hearts (34 ± 3 μmol/min/g/mmHg) compared to controls and losartan- and BQ123-treated hearts (controls: 77 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.003; losartan: 54 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.015; BQ123: 64 ± 13 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.046). The ATP content of the reperfused tissue was significantly elevated after captopril treatment compared to control group (24 ± 2 vs. 16 ± 2 μmol/g, p = 0.033), whereas the level of MDA was substantially decreased (0.58 ± 0.163 vs. 1.5 ± 0.28 μmol/g, p = 0.009). ACE inhibition leads to a significantly greater and faster recovery of myocardial contractility after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider solution. Due to decreased oxygen consumption, myocardial protection is enhanced. The association between ACE and ischemia cannot be clarified by selective blockade of

  16. Effects of reflex-based self-defence training on police performance in simulated high-pressure arrest situations.

    PubMed

    Renden, Peter G; Savelsbergh, Geert J P; Oudejans, Raôul R D

    2016-07-19

    We investigated the effects of reflex-based self-defence training on police performance in simulated high-pressure arrest situations. Police officers received this training as well as a regular police arrest and self-defence skills training (control training) in a crossover design. Officers' performance was tested on several variables in six reality-based scenarios before and after each training intervention. Results showed improved performance after the reflex-based training, while there was no such effect of the regular police training. Improved performance could be attributed to better communication, situational awareness (scanning area, alertness), assertiveness, resolution, proportionality, control and converting primary responses into tactical movements. As officers trained complete violent situations (and not just physical skills), they learned to use their actions before physical contact for de-escalation but also for anticipation on possible attacks. Furthermore, they learned to respond against attacks with skills based on their primary reflexes. The results of this study seem to suggest that reflex-based self-defence training better prepares officers for performing in high-pressure arrest situations than the current form of police arrest and self-defence skills training. Practitioner Summary: Police officers' performance in high-pressure arrest situations improved after a reflex-based self-defence training, while there was no such effect of a regular police training. As officers learned to anticipate on possible attacks and to respond with skills based on their primary reflexes, they were better able to perform effectively.

  17. Soluble hyaluronan receptor RHAMM induces mitotic arrest by suppressing Cdc2 and cyclin B1 expression

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The hyaluronan (HA) receptor RHAMM is an important regulator of cell growth. Overexpression of RHAMM is transforming and is required for H- ras transformation. The molecular mechanism underlying growth control by RHAMM and other extracellular matrix receptors remains largely unknown. We report that soluble RHAMM induces G2/M arrest by suppressing the expression of Cdc2/Cyclin B1, a protein kinase complex essential for mitosis. Down-regulation of RHAMM by use of dominant negative mutants or antisense of mRNA also decreases Cdc2 protein levels. Suppression of Cdc2 occurs as a result of an increased rate of cdc2 mRNA degradation. Moreover, tumor cells treated with soluble RHAMM are unable to form lung metastases. Thus, we show that mitosis is directly linked to RHAMM through control of Cdc2 and Cyclin B1 expression. Failure to sustain levels of Cdc2 and Cyclin B1 proteins leads to cell cycle arrest. PMID:8666924

  18. A closer look at arrested spinodal decomposition in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Gibaud, Thomas; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2009-08-12

    Concentrated aqueous solutions of the protein lysozyme undergo a liquid-solid transition upon a temperature quench into the unstable spinodal region below a characteristic arrest temperature of T(f) = 15 °C. We use video microscopy and ultra-small angle light scattering in order to investigate the arrested structures as a function of initial concentration, quench temperature and rate of the temperature quench. We find that the solid-like samples show all the features of a bicontinuous network that is formed through an arrested spinodal decomposition process. We determine the correlation length ξ and demonstrate that ξ exhibits a temperature dependence that closely follows the critical scaling expected for density fluctuations during the early stages of spinodal decomposition. These findings are in agreement with an arrest scenario based on a state diagram where the arrest or gel line extends far into the unstable region below the spinodal line. Arrest then occurs when during the early stage of spinodal decomposition the volume fraction φ(2) of the dense phase intersects the dynamical arrest threshold φ(2,Glass), upon which phase separation gets pinned into a space-spanning gel network with a characteristic length ξ.

  19. [Prevalence of supraventricular tachycardia and tachyarrhythmias in resuscitated cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Brembilla-Perrot, B; Marcon, O; Blangy, H; Terrier de la Chaise, A; Louis, P; Sadoul, N; Claudon, O; Nippert, M; Popovic, B; Belhakem, H

    2006-01-01

    Supraventricular arrhythmias are considered to be benign when the ventricular rate is slowed and treated by anticoagulants. The aim of this study was to determine the possible influence of these arrhythmias in resuscitated cardiac arrest. Between 1980 and 2002, 151 patients were admitted after a cardiac arrest. Supraventricular arrhythrmias were identified as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest in 21 patients. They underwent echocardiography, exercise stress test, Holter ECG monitoring , coronary angiography and electrophysiological investigation. After these investigations, three patients had a malignant form of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, two were asymptomatic and, in the third patient, ventricular fibrillation was induced by treatment with diltiazem. In 8 patients, a rapid supraventricular arrhythmia was considered to be the cause of cardiac arrest by cardiogenic shock; 2 patients had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 5 had severe dilated cardiomyopathy which regressed in one patient. In ten patients, cardiac arrest due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation was provoked by a rapid (> 220 beats/min) supraventricular arrhythmia; two patients had no apparent underlying cardiac pathology. In the others, myocardial ischaemia or acute cardiac failure were considered to be the cause of the cardiac arrest. The authors conclude that rapid supraventricular arrhythmias may cause cardiac arrest either by cardiogenic shock or degenerescence to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Usually, this event occurs in patients with severe cardiac disease but it may occur in subjects without cardiac disease or by an arrhythmia-induced cardiomyopathy.

  20. Computer simulation on disease vector population replacement driven by the maternal effect dominant embryonic arrest.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Souza, Mauricio; Vallejo, Edgar E

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a series of computer simulations on the genetic modification of disease vectors. We compared the effectiveness of two techniques of genetic modification, transposable elements and maternal effect dominant embryonic arrest (MEDEA). A gene drive mechanism based on MEDEA is introduced in the population to confer immunity to individuals. Experimental results suggested that the genetic maternal effects could be necessary for the effectiveness of a disease control strategy based on the genetic modification of vectors.

  1. Epidemiology and management of cardiac arrest: what registries are revealing.

    PubMed

    Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Bossaert, Leo

    2013-09-01

    Major European institutions report cardiovascular disease (CVD) as the first cause of death in adults, with cardiac arrest and sudden death due to coronary ischaemia as the primary single cause. Global incidence of CVD is decreasing in most European countries, due to prevention, lifestyle and treatment. Mortality of acute coronary events inside the hospital decreases more rapidly than outside the hospital. To improve the mortality of cardiac arrest outside the hospital, reliable epidemiological and process figures are essential: "we can only manage what we can measure". Europe is a patchwork of 47 countries (total population of 830 million), with a 10-fold difference in incidence of coronary heart disease between North and South, East and West, and a 5-fold difference in number of EMS-treated cardiac arrest (range 17-53/1000,000/year). Epidemiology of cardiac arrest should not be calculated as a European average, but it is appropriate to describe the incidence of cardiac arrest, the resuscitation process, and the outcome in each of the European regions, for benchmarking and quality management. Epidemiological reports of cardiac arrest should specify definitions, nominator (number of cases) and denominator (study population). Recently some regional registries in North America, Japan and Europe fulfilled these conditions. The European Registry of Cardiac Arrest (EuReCa) has the potential to achieve these objectives on a pan-European scale. For operational applications, the Utstein definition of "Cardiac arrest" is used which includes the potential of survival. For application in community health, the WHO definition of "sudden death" is frequently used, describing the mode of death. There is considerable overlap between both definitions. But this explains that no single method can provide all information. Integrating data from multiple sources (local, national, multinational registries and surveys, death certificates, post-mortem reports, community statistics, medical

  2. Modulation of Medium pH by Caulobacter crescentus Facilitates Recovery from Uranium-Induced Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidized form of uranium [U(VI)] predominates in oxic environments and poses a major threat to ecosystems. Due to its ability to mineralize U(VI), the oligotroph Caulobacter crescentus is an attractive candidate for U(VI) bioremediation. However, the physiological basis for U(VI) tolerance is unclear. Here we demonstrated that U(VI) caused a temporary growth arrest in C. crescentus and three other bacterial species, although the duration of growth arrest was significantly shorter for C. crescentus. During the majority of the growth arrest period, cell morphology was unaltered and DNA replication initiation was inhibited. However, during the transition from growth arrest to exponential phase, cells with shorter stalks were observed, suggesting a decoupling between stalk development and the cell cycle. Upon recovery from growth arrest, C. crescentus proliferated with a growth rate comparable to that of a control without U(VI), although a fraction of these cells appeared filamentous with multiple replication start sites. Normal cell morphology was restored by the end of exponential phase. Cells did not accumulate U(VI) resistance mutations during the prolonged growth arrest, but rather, a reduction in U(VI) toxicity occurred concomitantly with an increase in medium pH. Together, these data suggest that C. crescentus recovers from U(VI)-induced growth arrest by reducing U(VI) toxicity through pH modulation. Our finding represents a unique U(VI) detoxification strategy and provides insight into how microbes cope with U(VI) under nongrowing conditions, a metabolic state that is prevalent in natural environments. PMID:25002429

  3. Modulation of medium pH by Caulobacter crescentus facilitates recovery from uranium-induced growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Park, Dan M; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-09-01

    The oxidized form of uranium [U(VI)] predominates in oxic environments and poses a major threat to ecosystems. Due to its ability to mineralize U(VI), the oligotroph Caulobacter crescentus is an attractive candidate for U(VI) bioremediation. However, the physiological basis for U(VI) tolerance is unclear. Here we demonstrated that U(VI) caused a temporary growth arrest in C. crescentus and three other bacterial species, although the duration of growth arrest was significantly shorter for C. crescentus. During the majority of the growth arrest period, cell morphology was unaltered and DNA replication initiation was inhibited. However, during the transition from growth arrest to exponential phase, cells with shorter stalks were observed, suggesting a decoupling between stalk development and the cell cycle. Upon recovery from growth arrest, C. crescentus proliferated with a growth rate comparable to that of a control without U(VI), although a fraction of these cells appeared filamentous with multiple replication start sites. Normal cell morphology was restored by the end of exponential phase. Cells did not accumulate U(VI) resistance mutations during the prolonged growth arrest, but rather, a reduction in U(VI) toxicity occurred concomitantly with an increase in medium pH. Together, these data suggest that C. crescentus recovers from U(VI)-induced growth arrest by reducing U(VI) toxicity through pH modulation. Our finding represents a unique U(VI) detoxification strategy and provides insight into how microbes cope with U(VI) under nongrowing conditions, a metabolic state that is prevalent in natural environments.

  4. "Aren't I a victim?": Notes on identity challenges relating to police action in a mandatory arrest jurisdiction.

    PubMed

    Rajah, Valli; Frye, Victoria; Haviland, Mary

    2006-10-01

    The mandated arrest of domestic violence perpetrators is a policy response to the problem of partner violence. Mandatory arrest can result, however, in unintended and sometimes undesirable arrest outcomes, including dual arrests (when both parties are arrested), retaliatory arrests (when the perpetrator has his or her partner wrongfully arrested), and failures to make an arrest (when one is warranted by law). Using an interactionist perspective, this research focuses on one negative effect of mandatory arrest: the identity challenge faced by female victims of domestic violence who experience undesirable arrest outcomes. The authors discuss policy implications, focusing on the potential empowerment effects of mandatory arrest.

  5. Pollution performance of 110 kV metal oxide arresters

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzan, K.; Pohl, Z.; Grzybowski, S.; Koehler, W.

    1997-04-01

    Pollution test results of single unit 110 kV metal oxide surge arresters with porcelain housing according to the solid layer and salt fog methods are presented. During 6 hours of testing, the internal and external charge and maximum temperature along the varistor column were measured. The formation of single stable dry bands on the housing was often observed, especially during salt fog tests. In such cases, the varistor temperature can reach about 70 C. The simple electrical model of the arrester enabling calculations of voltages and currents as a function of arrester and pollution parameters is shown.

  6. Behavior of zinc oxide surge arresters under pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Feser, F.; Kohler, W.; Qiu, D. ); Chrzan, K. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents results of pollution tests with AC voltages which were carried out with a multi-unit zinc oxide arrester. The interaction between the polluted porcelain housing and the inner varistor column due to capacitive coupling has been found to be responsible for the temperature rise of varistor elements. The different voltage distribution between inside and outside of the arrester also causes a high radial electric field which can lead to internal discharges if the radial insulation system is not properly designed. These internal discharges may damage varistor elements which are not adequately coated and may cause a total destruction of the arrester.

  7. Neuroprotective strategies and neuroprognostication after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Dell'Anna, Antonio Maria; Scolletta, Sabino

    2015-12-01

    Neurocognitive disturbances are common among survivors of cardiac arrest (CA). Although initial management of CA, including bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, optimal chest compression, and early defibrillation, has been implemented continuously over the last years, few therapeutic interventions are available to minimize or attenuate the extent of brain injury occurring after the return of spontaneous circulation. In this review, we discuss several promising drugs that could provide some potential benefits for neurological recovery after CA. Most of these drugs have been investigated exclusively in experimental CA models and only limited clinical data are available. Further research, which also considers combined neuroprotective strategies that target multiple pathways involved in the pathophysiology of postanoxic brain injury, is certainly needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of these interventions in this setting. Moreover, the evaluation of neurological prognosis of comatose patients after CA remains an important challenge that requires the accurate use of several tools. As most patients with CA are currently treated with targeted temperature management (TTM), combined with sedative drug therapy, especially during the hypothermic phase, the reliability of neurological examination in evaluating these patients is delayed to 72-96 h after admission. Thus, additional tests, including electrophysiological examinations, brain imaging and biomarkers, have been largely implemented to evaluate earlier the extent of brain damage in these patients.

  8. 157. Detail of lightning arresters; looking west. Photo by Jet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    157. Detail of lightning arresters; looking west. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  9. 156. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    156. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking west. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  10. 154. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    154. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking north. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  11. 53. NEW BCB AND LIGHTNING ARRESTER ARRANGEMENT, SANTA ANA RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. NEW BCB AND LIGHTNING ARRESTER ARRANGEMENT, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, JAN. 24, 1977. SCE drawing no. 455670-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  12. 155. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    155. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking north. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  13. [Effect of phenibut on the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin].

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, I A; Tarasova, N N; Belova, E A; Safonov, V A

    2006-01-01

    The role of the GABAergic system in mechanisms of the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin administration was studied in anaesthetized rats. Under normal conditions, the systemic administration of serotonin (20-60 mg/kg, i.v.) resulted in drastic changes of the respiratory pattern, whereby the initial phase of increased respiratory rate was followed by the respiratory arrest. The preliminary injection of phenibut (400 mg/kg, i.p.) abolished or sharply reduced the duration of the respiratory arrest phase induced by serotonin. Bilateral vagotomy following the phenibut injection potentiated the anti-apnoesic effect of phenibut, which was evidence of the additive action of vagotomy and phenibut administration. The mechanism of apnea caused by serotonin administration is suggested to include a central GABAergic element, which is activated by phenibut so as to counteract the respiratory arrest.

  14. 32 CFR 553.9 - Power of arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... are authorized to arrest any person who willfully destroys, cuts, breaks, injures, or removes any tree, shrub, or plant within the limits of the cemetery and to bring that person before any United...

  15. Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke and Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Heart Attack WARNING SIGNS OF HEART ATTACK, STROKE & CARDIAC ARREST HEART ATTACK WARNING SIGNS CHEST DISCOMFORT ... nausea or lightheadedness. Learn more about heart attack STROKE WARNING SIGNS Spot a stroke F.A.S.T.: - ...

  16. How Can Death Due to Sudden Cardiac Arrest Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Automated External Defibrillator Coronary Heart Disease Heart Failure Long QT Syndrome Send a link ... First Sudden Cardiac Arrest If you have severe coronary heart disease (CHD), you're at increased risk for SCA. ...

  17. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different? ... to heart disease and stroke. Start exploring today ! Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) ...

  18. 3. DETAIL, LIGHTNING ARRESTER ON SAR TRANSMISSION LINE. EEC print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL, LIGHTNING ARRESTER ON SAR TRANSMISSION LINE. EEC print no. S-C-01-00478, no date. Photographer unknown. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Transmission Lines, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  19. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services.

  20. The impact of offenders leaving the scene on the police decision to arrest in cases of intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Hirschel, David; Buzawa, Eve S

    2013-09-01

    In this article, the authors examine an issue that has not been studied in depth by prior research: the impact that fleeing the scene has on the likelihood of arrest in intimate partner violence cases. Using police data obtained from 25 police departments in four states, and controlling for a variety of incident, offender, victim, and jurisdictional characteristics, the authors find that an offender who flees the scene of the incident is more than 5 times less likely to be arrested than one who remains at the scene. The policy implications of the findings are discussed.

  1. Extension of time until cardiac arrest after injection of a lethal dose of pentobarbital in the hibernating Syrian hamster.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Seiji; Shiina, Takahiko; Takewaki, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether entry of peripherally injected drugs into the central nervous system is reduced during hibernation. When a lethal dose of pentobarbital was injected intraperitoneally, the time until cardiac arrest was significantly longer in hibernating hamsters than in active controls. The time difference was not a consequence of low body temperature or diminished circulation, because mimicking these parameters in artificial hypothermia did not prolong the time. In contrast, there was no difference in the time until cardiac arrest after intracerebroventricular injection of the anesthetic. These results indicate that entry of peripherally injected anesthetics into the central nervous system may be suppressed during hibernation.

  2. Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest in an Adult Burn Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-07

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation Burn patients Thermal injury a b s t r a c t Objective: Adult burn patients who experience in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) and...undergo cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) represent a unique patient population. We believe that they tend to be younger and have the added burden of the...Support; BICU, burn intensive care unit; BOR, burn operating room; CA, cardiac arrest; CPR, cardiopulmonary resuscitation; DNR, do not resuscitate; EG

  3. New-type steel plate with ultra high crack-arrestability

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, T.; Nomiyama, Y.; Hagiwara, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Oshita, S.; Mabuchi, H.

    1995-12-31

    A new-type steel plate has been developed by controlling the microstructure of the surface layers. The surface layer consists of ultra fine grain ferrite microstructure, which provides excellent fracture toughness even at cryogenic temperature. When an unstable brittle crack propagates in the developed steel plate, shear-lips can be easily formed due to the surface layers with ultra fine grain microstructure. Since unstable running crack behavior is strongly affected by side-ligaments (shear-lips), which are associated with extensive plastic deformation, enhanced formation of the shear-lips can improve crack arrestability. This paper describes the developed steel plates of HT500MPa tensile strength class for shipbuilding use. Fracture mechanics investigations using large-scale fracture testings (including ultrawide duplex ESSO tests) clarified that the developed steel plates have ultra high crack-arrestability. It was also confirmed that the plates possess sufficient properties, including weldability and workability, for ship building use.

  4. Early Adult Outcomes of Male Arrest Trajectories: Propensity versus Causation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Margit; Capaldi, Deborah M.; Kim, Hyoun K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined early adult outcomes of differing arrest trajectories across childhood through early adulthood that were identified in prior work for 197 at-risk young men. Early adult outcomes were assessed at ages 27-28 to 29-30 years. Predictive effects of arrest trajectory membership on outcomes were examined after controlling for various factors, including prior levels and early antisocial propensity. As early adults, both chronic offender groups showed poorer adjustment in terms of deviant peer affiliation, education, and work domains than did the Rare Offenders; High-Level Chronic Offenders stood out from all other groups in terms of mental health problems and physical aggression toward a partner. These effects represent plausible causal effects of developmental pathways of offending on the outcomes. Evidence for propensity effects on the outcomes was more limited. Theoretical and prevention implications are discussed. PMID:23730147

  5. Early Administration of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes from Post-Cardiac Arrest Acidosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan-Ren; Li, Chao-Jui; Syu, Shih-Han; Wen, Cheng-Hao; Buddhakosai, Waradee; Wu, Han-Ping; Hsu Chen, Cheng; Lu, Huai-En; Chen, Wen-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Postcardiac arrest acidosis can decrease survival. Effective medications without adverse side effects are still not well characterized. We aimed to analyze whether early administration of glutamine could improve survival and protect cardiomyocytes from postcardiac arrest acidosis using animal and cell models. Forty Wistar rats with postcardiac arrest acidosis (blood pH < 7.2) were included. They were divided into study (500 mg/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, n = 20) and control (normal saline, n = 20) groups. Each of the rats received resuscitation. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. In addition, cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells were exposed to HBSS with different pH levels (7.3 or 6.5) or to culture medium (control). Apoptosis-related markers and beating function were analyzed. We found that the duration of survival was significantly longer in the study group (p < 0.05). In addition, in pH 6.5 or pH 7.3 HBSS buffer, the expression levels of cell stress (p53) and apoptosis (caspase-3, Bcl-xL) markers were significantly lower in cardiomyocytes treated with 50 mM L-glutamine than those without L-glutamine (RT-PCR). L-glutamine also increased the beating function of cardiomyocytes, especially at the lower pH level (6.5). More importantly, glutamine decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased these cells' beating function at a low pH level.

  6. An energy analysis of crack-initiation and arrest in epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kim, A.; Bosnyak, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study fracture processes such as crack initiation and arrest in epoxy. A compact tension specimen with displacement-controlled loading is employed to observe multiple crack initiations and arrests. The energy release rate at crack initiation is significantly higher than that at crack arrest, as has been observed elsewhere. In this study, the difference between these energy release rates is found to depend on specimen size (scale effect), and is quantitatively related to the fracture surface morphology. The scale effect, similar to that in strength theory, is conventionally attributed to the statistics of defects which control the fracture process. Triangular shaped ripples, deltoids, are formed on the fracture surface of the epoxy during the slow sub-critical crack growth, prior to the smooth mirrorlike surface characteristic of fast cracks. The deltoids are complimentary on the two crack faces which excludes any inelastic deformation from consideration. The deltoids are analogous to the ripples created on a river surface downstream from a small obstacle. However, in spite of the expectation based on this analogy and the observed scale effect, there are no 'defects' at the apex of the deltoids detectable down to the 0.1 micron level. This suggests that the formation of deltoids during the slow process of subcritical crack growth is an intrinsic feature of the fracture process itself, triggered by inhomogeneity of material on a submicron scale. This inhomogeneity may be related to a fluctuation in the cross-link density of the epoxy.

  7. Early Administration of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes from Post-Cardiac Arrest Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Syu, Shih-Han; Wen, Cheng-Hao; Buddhakosai, Waradee; Hsu Chen, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Postcardiac arrest acidosis can decrease survival. Effective medications without adverse side effects are still not well characterized. We aimed to analyze whether early administration of glutamine could improve survival and protect cardiomyocytes from postcardiac arrest acidosis using animal and cell models. Forty Wistar rats with postcardiac arrest acidosis (blood pH < 7.2) were included. They were divided into study (500 mg/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, n = 20) and control (normal saline, n = 20) groups. Each of the rats received resuscitation. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. In addition, cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells were exposed to HBSS with different pH levels (7.3 or 6.5) or to culture medium (control). Apoptosis-related markers and beating function were analyzed. We found that the duration of survival was significantly longer in the study group (p < 0.05). In addition, in pH 6.5 or pH 7.3 HBSS buffer, the expression levels of cell stress (p53) and apoptosis (caspase-3, Bcl-xL) markers were significantly lower in cardiomyocytes treated with 50 mM L-glutamine than those without L-glutamine (RT-PCR). L-glutamine also increased the beating function of cardiomyocytes, especially at the lower pH level (6.5). More importantly, glutamine decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased these cells' beating function at a low pH level. PMID:28058255

  8. Akt activation suppresses Chk2-mediated, methylating agent-induced G2 arrest and protects from temozolomide-induced mitotic catastrophe and cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yuchi; Katayama, Makoto; Mirzoeva, Olga K; Berger, Mitchel S; Pieper, Russell O

    2005-06-01

    Pharmacologic inhibition of the DNA signal transducers Chk1 and p38 blocks G2 arrest and sensitizes glioblastoma cells to chemotherapeutic methylating agent-induced cytotoxicity. Because Akt pathway activation has been suggested to also block G2 arrest induced by DNA-damaging agents and because glioma cells frequently have high levels of Akt activation, we examined the contribution of the Akt pathway to methylating agent-induced G2 arrest and toxicity. U87MG human glioma cells containing an inducible Akt expression construct were incubated with inducing agent or vehicle, after which the cells were exposed to temozolomide and assayed for activation of the components of the G2 arrest pathway and survival. Temozolomide-treated control cells activated the DNA damage signal transducers Chk1, Chk2, and p38, leading to Cdc25C and Cdc2 inactivation, prolonged G2 arrest, and loss of clonagenicity by a combination of senescence and mitotic catastrophe. Temozolomide-treated cells induced to overexpress Akt, however, exhibited significantly less drug-induced Cdc25C/Cdc2 inactivation and less G2 arrest. Akt-mediated suppression of G2 arrest was associated not with alterations in Chk1 or p38 activation but rather with suppression of Chk2 activation and reduced recruitment of Chk2 to sites of damage in chromatin. Unlike bypass of the G2 checkpoint induced by pharmacologic inhibitors of Chk1 or p38, however, Akt-induced bypass of G2 arrest suppressed, rather than enhanced, temozolomide-induced senescence and mitotic catastrophe. These results show that whereas Akt activation suppresses temozolomide-induced Chk2 activation and G2 arrest, the overriding effect is protection from temozolomide-induced cytotoxicity. The Akt pathway therefore represents a new target for the sensitization of gliomas to chemotherapeutic methylating agents such as temozolomide.

  9. The neighborhood context of racial and ethnic disparities in arrest.

    PubMed

    Kirk, David S

    2008-02-01

    This study assesses the role of social context in explaining racial and ethnic disparities in arrest, with afocus on how distinct neighborhood contexts in which different racial and ethnic groups reside explain variations in criminal outcomes. To do so, I utilize a multilevel, longitudinal research design, combining individual-level data with contextual data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN). Findings reveal that black youths face multiple layers of disadvantage relative to other racial and ethnic groups, and these layers work to create differences in arrest. At the family level, results show that disadvantages in the form of unstable family structures explain much of the disparities in arrest across race and ethnicity. At the neighborhood level, black youths tend to reside in areas with both significantly higher levels of concentrated poverty than other youths as well as lower levels of collective efficacy than white youths. Variations in neighborhood tolerance of deviance across groups explain little of the arrest disparities, yet tolerance of deviance does influence the frequency with which a crime ultimately ends in an arrest. Even after accounting for relevant demographic, family, and neighborhood-level predictors, substantial residual arrest differences remain between black youths and youths of other racial and ethnic groups.

  10. Exploration of the arrest peptide sequence space reveals arrest-enhanced variants.

    PubMed

    Cymer, Florian; Hedman, Rickard; Ismail, Nurzian; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2015-04-17

    Translational arrest peptides (APs) are short stretches of polypeptides that induce translational stalling when synthesized on a ribosome. Mechanical pulling forces acting on the nascent chain can weaken or even abolish stalling. APs can therefore be used as in vivo force sensors, making it possible to measure the forces that act on a nascent chain during translation with single-residue resolution. It is also possible to score the relative strengths of APs by subjecting them to a given pulling force and ranking them according to stalling efficiency. Using the latter approach, we now report an extensive mutagenesis scan of a strong mutant variant of the Mannheimia succiniciproducens SecM AP and identify mutations that further increase the stalling efficiency. Combining three such mutations, we designed an AP that withstands the strongest pulling force we are able to generate at present. We further show that diproline stretches in a nascent protein act as very strong APs when translation is carried out in the absence of elongation factor P. Our findings highlight critical residues in APs, show that certain amino acid sequences induce very strong translational arrest and provide a toolbox of APs of varying strengths that can be used for in vivo force measurements.

  11. Effect of epinephrine on survival after cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Patanwala, A E; Slack, M K; Martin, J R; Basken, R L; Nolan, P E

    2014-07-01

    The use of epinephrine is currently recommended as a treatment option for patients with cardiac arrest. The primary objective of this systematic review was to determine if epinephrine use during cardiac arrest is associated with improved survival to hospital discharge. MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Web of Science, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and Biological Abstracts (BIOSIS Previews), and bibliographies of previous systematic reviews. Studies involving patients with cardiac arrest that compared epinephrine to no epinephrine (or placebo) with regard to survival to hospital discharge or 30-day survival. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies were included. The results were stratified into three groups: 1) RCTs, 2) observational studies with unadjusted data (observational-U), and 3) observational studies with adjusted data using multivariate analysis (observational-A). There were a total of 10 studies included in the systematic review and nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. The association between epinephrine use and survival to hospital discharge, grouped by study type was not significant for RCTs (OR 2.33, 95% CI 0.85 to 6.40; p=0.10; I2=0.00%) or observational-U studies (OR 1.17, 95% CI 0.67 to 2.07; p=0.58; I2=76.68%). But epinephrine was associated with decreased survival in observational-A studies (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.48; P<0.01; I2=0.00%). Epinephrine use during cardiac arrest is not associated with improved survival to hospital discharge. Observational studies with a lower-risk for bias suggest that it may be associated with decreased survival.

  12. Critical Care Management Focused on Optimizing Brain Function After Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ryuta; Hifumi, Toru; Kawakita, Kenya; Okazaki, Tomoya; Egawa, Satoshi; Inoue, Akihiko; Seo, Ryutaro; Inagaki, Nobuhiro; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    2017-03-24

    The discussion of neurocritical care management in post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) has generally focused on target values used for targeted temperature management (TTM). There has been less attention paid to target values for systemic and cerebral parameters to minimize secondary brain damage in PCAS. And the neurologic indications for TTM to produce a favorable neurologic outcome remain to be determined. Critical care management of PCAS patients is fundamental and essential for both cardiologists and general intensivists to improve neurologic outcome, because definitive therapy of PCAS includes both special management of the cause of cardiac arrest, such as coronary intervention to ischemic heart disease, and intensive management of the results of cardiac arrest, such as ventilation strategies to avoid brain ischemia. We reviewed the literature and the latest research about the following issues and propose practical care recommendations. Issues are (1) prediction of TTM candidate on admission, (2) cerebral blood flow and metabolism and target value of them, (3) seizure management using continuous electroencephalography, (4) target value of hemodynamic stabilization and its method, (5) management and analysis of respiration, (6) sedation and its monitoring, (7) shivering control and its monitoring, and (8) glucose management. We hope to establish standards of neurocritical care to optimize brain function and produce a favorable neurologic outcome.

  13. Dimethyl sulfoxide can initiate cell divisions of arrested callus protoplasts by promoting cortical microtuble assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hahne, G.; Hoffmann, F.

    1984-09-01

    A serious problem in the technology of plant cell culture is that isolated protoplasts from many species are reluctant to divide. We have succeeded in inducing consecutive divisions in a naturally arrested system i.e., protoplasts from a hibiscus cell line, which do not divide under standard conditions and in an artificially arrested system i.e., colchicine-inhibited callus protoplasts of Nicotiana glutinosa, which do readily divide in the absence of colchicine. In both cases, the reinstallation of a net of cortical microtubules, which had been affected either by colchicine or by the protoplast isolation procedure, resulted in continuous divisions of the formerly arrested protoplasts. Several compounds known to support microtubule assembly in vitro were tested for their ability to promote microtubule assembly in vivo. Best results were obtained by addition of dimethyl sulfoxide to the culture medium. Unlimited amounts of callus could be produced with the dimethyl sulfoxide method from protoplasts which never developed a single callus in control experiments. 30 references, 3 figures.

  14. Desacetyluvaricin induces S phase arrest in SW480 colorectal cancer cells through superoxide overproduction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jun-Yi; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Chen, Tianfeng; Gao, Si; Choi, Mei-Yuk; Wong, Yum-Shing

    2014-03-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins (ACGs) are a group of fatty acid-derivatives with potent anticancer effects. In the present study, we found desacetyluvaricin (Dau) exhibited notable in vitro antiproliferative effect on SW480 human colorectal carcinoma cells with IC50 value of 14 nM. The studies on the underlying mechanisms revealed that Dau inhibited the cancer cell growth through induction of S phase cell cycle arrest from 11.3% (control) to 33.2% (160 nM Dau), which was evidenced by the decreased protein expression of cyclin A Overproduction of superoxide, intracellular DNA damage, and inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling pathway, were also found involved in cells exposed to Dau. Moreover, pre-treatment of the cells with ascorbic acid significantly prevented the Dau-induced overproduction of superoxide, DNA damage and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, our results suggest that Dau induces S phase arrest in cancer cells by firstly superoxide overproduction and subsequently the involvement of various signaling pathways.

  15. Variation in developmental arrest among male orangutans: a comparison between a Sumatran and a Bornean population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The presence of two sexually active male morphs with different reproductive tactics in a single species is rare among mammals. The most striking case of bimaturism among primates is exhibited by the orangutan (Pongo spp), in which one adult morph, the unflanged male, irreversibly develops into another one, the flanged form, but may remain arrested in the unflanged state for many years. However, it has been suggested that such arrest is less common among Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) compared to Sumatrans (Pongo abelii). To investigate this possible inter-specific difference we compared both the number of developing males and the ratios of the two male morphs at two long-term study sites, Suaq Balimbing on Sumatra and Tuanan on Borneo. Results First, we observed a significantly greater number of flanged than unflanged males per month in the Tuanan study area, whereas the opposite pattern held at Suaq. Second, the same contrast held for the total number of identified individuals over the study, with more flanged than unflanged males at Tuanan and the opposite at Suaq. These differences were mainly due to transient males. For Tuanan, the identification results were confirmed by detailed genetic analyses. Finally, we recorded a higher proportion of unflanged males that became flanged during any given year at Tuanan than at Suaq. Conclusion These results show that developmental arrest is far more common at Suaq than at Tuanan. Preliminary comparisons suggest that this is a general contrast between the island taxa of orangutans and should help efforts to identify the function and proximate control of developmental arrest in orangutan males. PMID:23510027

  16. Parkin induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Ho; Cho, Yoonjung; Jung, Byung Chul; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kang, Yeo Wool; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Kim, Yoon Suk

    2015-08-14

    Parkin is a known tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism by which parkin acts as a tumor suppressor remains to be fully elucidated. Previously, we reported that parkin expression induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. However, at that time, we did not consider the involvement of parkin in cell cycle control. In the current study, we investigated whether parkin is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppression of cancer cell growth. In our cell cycle analyses, parkin expression induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in TNF-α-treated HeLa cells. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which parkin induces this G2/M arrest, we analyzed cell cycle regulatory molecules involved in the G2/M transition. Parkin expression induced CDC2 phosphorylation which is known to inhibit CDC2 activity and cause G2/M arrest. Cyclin B1, which is degraded during the mitotic transition, accumulated in response to parkin expression, thereby indicating parkin-induced G2/M arrest. Next, we established that Myt1, which is known to phosphorylate and inhibit CDC2, increased following parkin expression. In addition, we found that parkin also induces increased Myt1 expression, G2/M arrest, and reduced cell viability in TNF-α-treated HCT15 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of parkin expression by parkin-specific siRNA decreased Myt1 expression and phosphorylation of CDC2 and resulted in recovered cell viability. These results suggest that parkin acts as a crucial molecule causing cell cycle arrest in G2/M, thereby suppressing tumor cell growth.

  17. Powder Cocaine and Crack Use in the United States: An Examination of Risk for Arrest and Socioeconomic Disparities in Use

    PubMed Central

    Palamar, Joseph J.; Davies, Shelby; Ompad, Danielle C.; Cleland, Charles M.; Weitzman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background In light of the current sentencing disparity (18:1) between crack and powder cocaine possession in the United States, we examined socioeconomic correlates of use of each, and relations between use and arrest, to determine who may be at highest risk for arrest and imprisonment. Methods We conducted secondary data analyses on the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2009–2012. Data were analyzed for adults age ≥18 to determine associations between use and arrest. Socioeconomic correlates of lifetime and annual use of powder cocaine and of crack were delineated using multivariable logistic regression and correlates of frequency of recent use were examined using generalized negative binomial regression. Results Crack users were at higher risk than powder cocaine users for reporting a lifetime arrest or multiple recent arrests. Racial minorities were at low risk for powder cocaine use and Hispanics were at low risk for crack use. Blacks were at increased risk for lifetime and recent crack use, but not when controlling for other socioeconomic variables. However, blacks who did use either powder cocaine or crack tended to use at higher frequencies. Higher education and higher family income were negatively associated with crack use although these factors were sometimes risk factors for powder cocaine use. Conclusions Crack users are at higher risk of arrest and tend to be of lower socioeconomic status compared to powder cocaine users. These findings can inform US Congress as they review the proposed Smarter Sentencing Act of 2014, which would help eliminate cocaine-related sentencing disparities. PMID:25702933

  18. Modifications of myofilament protein phosphorylation and function in response to cardiac arrest induced in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Mike; Previs, Michael J.; Mader, Timothy J.; Debold, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is a prevalent condition with a poor prognosis, attributable in part to persistent myocardial dysfunction following resuscitation. The molecular basis of this dysfunction remains unclear. We induced cardiac arrest in a porcine model of acute sudden death and assessed the impact of ischemia and reperfusion on the molecular function of isolated cardiac contractile proteins. Cardiac arrest was electrically induced, left untreated for 12 min, and followed by a resuscitation protocol. With successful resuscitations, the heart was reperfused for 2 h (IR2) and the muscle harvested. In failed resuscitations, tissue samples were taken following the failed efforts (IDNR). Actin filament velocity, using myosin isolated from IR2 or IDNR cardiac tissue, was nearly identical to myosin from the control tissue in a motility assay. However, both maximal velocity (25% faster than control) and calcium sensitivity (pCa50 6.57 ± 0.04 IDNR vs. 6.34 ± 0.07 control) were significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced using native thin filaments (actin+troponin+tropomyosin) from IDNR samples, suggesting that the enhanced velocity is mediated through an alteration in muscle regulatory proteins (troponin+tropomyosin). Mass spectrometry analysis showed that only samples from the IR2 had an increase in total phosphorylation levels of troponin (Tn) and tropomyosin (Tm), but both IR2 and IDNR samples demonstrated a significant shift from mono-phosphorylated to bis-phosphorylated forms of the inhibitory subunit of Tn (TnI) compared to control. This suggests that the shift to bis-phosphorylation of TnI is associated with the enhanced function in IDNR, but this effect may be attenuated when phosphorylation of Tm is increased in tandem, as observed for IR2. There are likely many other molecular changes induced following cardiac arrest, but to our knowledge, these data provide the first evidence that this form cardiac arrest can alter the in vitro function of the cardiac contractile proteins

  19. Sculpting Pickering Emulsion Droplets by Arrest and Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher; Wei, Zengyi; Caggioni, Marco; Spicer, Patrick; Atherton, Tim

    Pickering emulsion droplets can be arrested into non-spherical shapes--useful for applications such as active delivery--through a general mechanism of deformation followed by absorption of additional colloidal particles onto the interface, relaxation of the droplet caused by surface tension and arrest at some point due to crowding of the particles. We perform simulations of the arrest process to clarify the relative importance of diffusive rearrangement of particles and collective forcing due to surface evolution. Experiment and theory are compared, giving insight into the stability of the resulting capsules and the robustness of the production process for higher-throughput production in, for example, microfluidic systems. We adapt theoretical tools from the jamming literature to better understand the arrested configurations and long timescale evolution of the system: using linear programming and a penalty function approach, we identify unjamming motions in kinetically arrested states. We propose a paradigm of ``metric jamming'' to describe the limiting behavior of this class of system: a structure is metric-jammed if it is stable with respect to collective motion of the particles as well as evolution of the hypersurface on which the packing is embedded. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  20. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  1. Capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest: Possible Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kido, Kazuhiko; Adams, Val R; Morehead, Richard S; Flannery, Alexander H

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest, possibly secondary to type I Kounis syndrome. A 47-year-old man with a history of T3N1 moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon, status-post sigmoid resection, was started on adjuvant capecitabine approximately five months prior to presentation of cardiac arrest secondary to ventricular fibrillation. An electrocardiogram (EKG) revealed ST segment elevation on the lateral leads and the patient was taken emergently to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The catheterization revealed no angiographically significant stenosis and coronary artery disease was ruled out. After ruling out other causes of cardiac arrest, the working diagnosis was capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest. As such, an inflammatory work up was sent to evaluate for the possibility of a capecitabine hypersensitivity, or Kounis syndrome, and is the first documented report in the literature to do so when evaluating Kounis syndrome. Immunoglobulin E (IgE), tryptase, and C-reactive protein were normal but histamine, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 were elevated. Histamine elevation supports the suspicion that our patient had type I Kounis syndrome. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicates a probable adverse effect due to capecitabine with seven points. A case of capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest is reported, with a potential for type 1 Kounis syndrome as an underlying pathology supported by immunologic work up.

  2. Identification and Characterization of a Mutation Affecting the Division Arrest Signaling of the Pheromone Response Pathway in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, H. A.

    1990-01-01

    Mating pheromones, a- and α-factors, arrest the division of cells of opposite mating types, α and a cells, respectively. I have isolated a sterile mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is defective in division arrest in response to α-factor but not defective in morphological changes and agglutinin induction. The mutation was designated dac2 for division arrest control by mating pheromones. The dac2 mutation was closely linked to gal1 and was different from the previously identified cell type nonspecific sterile mutations (ste4, ste5, ste7, ste11, ste12, ste18 and dac1). Although dac2 cells had no phenotype in the absence of pheromones, they showed morphological alterations and divided continuously in the presence of pheromones. As a result, dac2 cells had a mating defect. The dac2 mutation could suppress the lethality caused by the disruption of the GPA1 gene (previously shown to encode a protein with similarity to the α subunit of mammalian G proteins). In addition, dac2 cells formed prezygotes with wild-type cells of opposite mating types, although they could not undergo cell fusion. These results suggest that the DAC2 product may control the signal for G-protein-mediated cell-cycle arrest and indicate that the synchronization of haploid yeast cell cycles by mating pheromones is essential for cell fusion during conjugation. PMID:2407613

  3. Cardiac arrest due to a missed diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jennifer; Spitzer, David; Phylactou, Maria; Glasser, Martin

    2016-05-06

    A 91-year-old presented with a rare cause of cardiac arrest. He was initially admitted with severe back pain following vomiting and diagnosed with probable aspiration pneumonia. On day 3 of admission, he was discovered in cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. On intubation, a left-sided pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema were noted. Needle decompression showed gastric fluid leaking from the cannula. The patient regained a cardiac output, and a subsequent CT scan confirmed a large pneumomediastinum with air tracking to the neck and chest, and bilateral pneumothoraces. A diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was made. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit but did not survive. This case demonstrates the importance of looking for and treating the rarer reversible causes of cardiac arrest, and of maintaining a high index of suspicion for Boerhaave's syndrome. Despite its rarity, Boerhaave's syndrome is often misdiagnosed on initial presentation, leading to delayed treatment and poor outcomes.

  4. Alphaherpesvirus Subversion of Stress-Induced Translational Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Finnen, Renée L.; Banfield, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of translational arrest in eukaryotic cells in response to stress and the tactics used specifically by alphaherpesviruses to overcome translational arrest. One consequence of translational arrest is the formation of cytoplasmic compartments called stress granules (SGs). Many viruses target SGs for disruption and/or modification, including the alphaherpesvirus herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Recently, it was discovered that HSV-2 disrupts SG formation early after infection via virion host shutoff protein (vhs), an endoribonuclease that is packaged within the HSV-2 virion. We review this discovery and discuss the insights it has provided into SG biology as well as its potential significance in HSV-2 infection. A model for vhs-mediated disruption of SG formation is presented. PMID:26999187

  5. The optimal hemodynamics management of post-cardiac arrest shock.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Tommaso; Sanfilippo, Filippo; Ristagno, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest develop a pathophysiological state named "post-cardiac arrest syndrome." Post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction is a common feature of this syndrome, and many patients eventually die from cardiovascular failure. Cardiogenic shock accounts for most deaths in the first 3 days, when post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction peaks. Thus, identification and treatment of cardiovascular failure is one of the key therapeutic goals during hospitalization of post-cardiac arrest patients. Patients with hemodynamic instability may require advanced cardiac output monitoring. Inotropes and vasopressors should be considered if hemodynamic goals are not achieved despite optimized preload. If these measures fail to restore adequate organ perfusion, a mechanical circulatory assistance device may be considered. Adequate organ perfusion should be ensured in the absence of definitive data on the optimal target pressure goals. Hemodynamic goals should also take into account targeted temperature management and its effect on the cardiovascular function.

  6. Traumatic ulnar physeal arrest after distal forearm fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Ray, T D; Tessler, R H; Dell, P C

    1996-01-01

    A review of the orthopaedic literature suggests that traumatic ulnar physeal arrest associated with radial fracture is a rare occurrence. Twenty-three cases of traumatic ulnar physeal arrest have been reported in patients with distal radius fractures, and we report five additional cases. A classification system for the distal ulnar growth deformities is proposed, and the compensatory radial changes are reviewed. Surgical indications for treatment include cosmetic deformity, progressive carpal subluxation, and decreased range of motion. Surgical options for treatment are discussed and include epiphysiodesis, ulnar lengthening, radial osteotomy, and the Suave-Kapandji procedure.

  7. Fronts under arrest: Nonlocal boundary dynamics in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCalla, Scott G.; von Brecht, James H.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a minimal geometric partial differential equation framework to understand pattern formation from interacting, counterpropagating fronts. Our approach concentrates on the interfaces between different states in a system, and relies on both nonlocal interactions and mean-curvature flow to track their evolution. As an illustration, we use this approach to describe a phenomenon in bacterial colony formation wherein sibling colonies can arrest each other's growth. This arrested motion leads to static separations between healthy, growing colonies. As our minimal model faithfully recovers the geometry of these competing colonies, it captures and elucidates the key leading-order mechanisms responsible for such patterned growth.

  8. Fronts under arrest: Nonlocal boundary dynamics in biology.

    PubMed

    McCalla, Scott G; von Brecht, James H

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a minimal geometric partial differential equation framework to understand pattern formation from interacting, counterpropagating fronts. Our approach concentrates on the interfaces between different states in a system, and relies on both nonlocal interactions and mean-curvature flow to track their evolution. As an illustration, we use this approach to describe a phenomenon in bacterial colony formation wherein sibling colonies can arrest each other's growth. This arrested motion leads to static separations between healthy, growing colonies. As our minimal model faithfully recovers the geometry of these competing colonies, it captures and elucidates the key leading-order mechanisms responsible for such patterned growth.

  9. Cardiac arrest during a twin birth caesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Pampín-Huerta, F R; Moreira-Gómez, D; Lozano-Requelme, M L; Molina-Nieto, F; Fontán-García-Boente, L; Moreira-Pacheco, M

    2016-04-01

    The case of a 35 year-old pregnant woman with a right ovarian vein thrombosis complicated with a floating thrombus in the inferior vena cava reaching the right atrium, is presented. The patient had a cardiac arrest due to a pulmonary embolism during a twin-birth caesarean delivery. Discussion includes the pathophysiology of this condition and management options in a cardiac arrest secondary to this aetiology, recovered with stable blood pressure, highlighting the role of thrombolytic therapy in the Postoperative Care Unit in this situation.

  10. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  11. Management of partial growth arrest: physis, fat, or silastic?

    PubMed

    Lee, E H; Gao, G X; Bose, K

    1993-01-01

    A rabbit model was developed for the study of partial growth arrest and its correction by epiphysiolysis and transfer of physis, free fat, or silastic. Growth arrest involved half of the proximal tibial physis. Clinical, radiologic, and histologic studies showed that a physeal graft (from iliac apophysis) was superior to silastic in terms of correction of angular deformity as well as contribution to longitudinal growth of the tibia after resection of a large peripherally situated bone bridge. Interposition of fat yielded the poorest results.

  12. Delamination Arrestment in Bonded-Bolted Composite Structures by Fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Chi Ho Eric

    Laminated composites have exceptional in-plane strengths and fatigue properties. However, they are susceptible to the interlaminar mode of failure, namely disbond and delamination. This failure mode challenges the edges of structural interface, such as the skin-stringer flange and run-out, where interlaminar tension, shear, and opening moment are concentrated. The fasteners provide a substantiation path for the FAA damage tolerance requirement for composite bonded joints (FAR 23.573). A comprehensive understanding of delamination arrestment by fasteners was developed. The fastener provides crack arrest capability by three main mechanisms: 1) mode I suppression, 2) crack-face friction, and 3) fastener joint shear stiffness. The fastener mechanically closes the crack tip, suppressing mode I fracture and forcing the crack to propagate in pure mode II with higher fracture toughness. Fastener preload generates significant friction force on the cracked surfaces which reduces crack-tip forces and moments. The fastener shear joint provides an alternate load path around the crack tip that becomes more effective as crack length increases. The three mechanisms work in concert to provide various degrees of crack arrestment and retardation capability. A novel test technique was developed to quantify the delamination arrestment capability by fasteners under in-plane dominated loading, i.e. mode II propagation. The test results show that the fastener is highly capable of delamination arrestment and retardation. The test also demonstrates that fastener installation preload, which is directly related to crack-face friction, is an important factor in delamination arrestment. A computationally efficient analytical method was developed to capture the behavior and efficacy of delamination arrestment by fasteners. The solution method is based on the principle of minimum potential energy and beam-column modeling of the delaminating structure. The fastener flexibility approach is used to

  13. Is moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion superior to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in elective aortic arch surgery?

    PubMed

    Poon, Shi Sum; Estrera, Anthony; Oo, Aung; Field, Mark

    2016-09-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether moderate hypothermia circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) is more beneficial than deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in elective aortic arch surgery. Altogether, 1028 papers were found using the reported search, of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. There were four retrospective observational studies, one prospective randomized controlled trial and one meta-analysis study. There were no local or neuromuscular complications related to axillary arterial cannulation reported. In the elective setting, four studies showed that the in-hospital mortality for moderate hypothermia is consistently low, ranging from 1.0 to 4.3%. In a large series of hemiarch replacement comparing 682 cases of deep hypothermia with 94 cases of moderate hypothermia with SACP, 20 cases (2.8%) of permanent neurological deficit were reported, compared to 3 cases (3.2%) in moderate hypothermia. Three observational studies and a meta-analysis study did not identify an increased risk of postoperative renal failure and dialysis following either deep or moderate hypothermia although a higher incidence of stroke was reported in the meta-analysis study with deep hypothermia (12.7 vs 7.3%). Longer cardiopulmonary bypass time and circulatory arrest time were reported in four studies for deep hypothermia, suggesting an increased time required for systemic cooling and rewarming in that group. Overall, these findings suggested that in elective aortic arch surgery, moderate hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion adapted to the duration of circulatory arrest can be performed safely with acceptable mortality and morbidity outcomes. The risk of spinal cord

  14. Contemporary approach to neurologic prognostication of coma after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ben-Hamouda, Nawfel; Taccone, Fabio S; Rossetti, Andrea O; Oddo, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Coma after cardiac arrest (CA) is an important cause of admission to the ICU. Prognosis of post-CA coma has significantly improved over the past decade, particularly because of aggressive postresuscitation care and the use of therapeutic targeted temperature management (TTM). TTM and sedatives used to maintain controlled cooling might delay neurologic reflexes and reduce the accuracy of clinical examination. In the early ICU phase, patients' good recovery may often be indistinguishable (based on neurologic examination alone) from patients who eventually will have a poor prognosis. Prognostication of post-CA coma, therefore, has evolved toward a multimodal approach that combines neurologic examination with EEG and evoked potentials. Blood biomarkers (eg, neuron-specific enolase [NSE] and soluble 100-β protein) are useful complements for coma prognostication; however, results vary among commercial laboratory assays, and applying one single cutoff level (eg, > 33 μg/L for NSE) for poor prognostication is not recommended. Neuroimaging, mainly diffusion MRI, is emerging as a promising tool for prognostication, but its precise role needs further study before it can be widely used. This multimodal approach might reduce false-positive rates of poor prognosis, thereby providing optimal prognostication of comatose CA survivors. The aim of this review is to summarize studies and the principal tools presently available for outcome prediction and to describe a practical approach to the multimodal prognostication of coma after CA, with a particular focus on neuromonitoring tools. We also propose an algorithm for the optimal use of such multimodal tools during the early ICU phase of post-CA coma.

  15. Evaluation of polymer-housed distribution arresters for use on rural electric power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mackevich, J. P.

    1994-03-01

    Users have converted to polymer-housed distribution surge arresters because of concerns over violent porcelain arrester failure. There is a false perception in the industry that polymer arresters are intrinsically fail-safe. It is proposed that there is a lack of understanding of the differences in failure mechanisms between porcelain and polymer arresters. Polymer arresters have unique design requirements to provide the desired reliability improvements. This paper suggests criteria for rural electric power system user evaluation of polymer arrester design and performance. Users are encouraged to participate in the standards writing process to facilitate changes beneficial to the industry.

  16. Cardiac arrest with coronary artery spasm: does the use of epinephrine during cardiopulmonary arrest exacerbate the spasm?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Su, Xi; Yang, Yu-Chun; Wu, Ming-Xiang; Liu, Bo; Liu, Chen-Wei

    2015-03-01

    Coronary artery spasm can lead to sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias or heart block. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines recommend the use of epinephrine during cardiopulmonary arrest. However, in the event of cardiac arrest caused by coronary artery spasm, the use of epinephrine may be harmful. We report 2 cases who had witnessed cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation and complete heart block. Intravenous epinephrine was administered during resuscitation.Their hemodynamics did not improve. Emergent coronary angiography revealed that the entire right and left coronary artery systems diffuse spasm. One patient's coronary artery spasm was successfully reversed immediately with administration of intracoronary boluses of nitroglycerin. The other patient's hemodynamic instability persisted,requiring temporary mechanical circulatory support with an intra aortic balloon pump. His hemodynamics finally improved with administration of intravenous diltiazem and nitroglycerin under the intraaortic balloon pump support. They both were discharged from the hospital without any other complications.

  17. Time course of the meiotic arrest in sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes treated with roscovitine.

    PubMed

    Crocomo, Letícia Ferrari; Marques Filho, Wolff Camargo; Ackermann, Camila Louise; Paschoal, Daniela Martins; Guastali, Midyan Daroz; Dias Maziero, Rosiára Rosária; Sudano, Mateus José; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda da Cruz; Bicudo, Sony Dimas

    2016-04-01

    Temporary meiosis arrest with cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors has been proposed in order to improve the quality of in vitro matured oocytes. In sheep, however, this phenomenon has been rarely investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of different incubation times with roscovitine on nuclear maturation and cumulus cell expansion of sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). For this, COCs were cultured for 0, 6, 12 or 20 h in basic maturation medium (Control) containing 75 μM roscovitine (Rosco). After, they were in vitro matured (IVM) for 18 h in the presence of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). At the end of each treatment, cumulus cell expansion and nuclear maturation were assessed under a stereomicroscope and by Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. In the Control and Rosco groups, the absence of cumulus cell expansion prevailed at 0, 6, 12 and 20 h. After IVM for 18 h, total cumulus cell expansion in the Rosco treatments was dependent on the exposure time to roscovitine. A significantly high percentage of oocytes treated with roscovitine for 6 h (87%), 12 h or 20 h (65%) were arrested at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. In contrast, 23% GVBD, 54% metaphase I (MI) and 61% MII oocytes were observed in the Control groups at 6, 12 and 20 h, respectively. In all treatments, a significant percentage of oocytes reached MII after IVM for 18 h. Therefore, roscovitine reversibly arrested the meiosis of sheep oocytes during different culture times with the maximal efficiency of meiotic inhibition reached at 6 h. In addition, reversibility of its inhibitory action on cumulus cells was exposure-time dependent.

  18. Arrested blood flow during false aneurysm formation in the carotid arteries of cattle slaughtered with and without stunning.

    PubMed

    Gregory, N G; Schuster, P; Mirabito, L; Kolesar, R; McManus, T

    2012-02-01

    The time to onset of arrested blood flow and the size of false aneurysms in the severed carotid arteries were assessed in 126 cattle during halal slaughter without stunning. Thirty six cattle (29%) showed early arrest of blood flow. In 6%, both the left and right carotid arteries in the same animal stopped bleeding before 60s had elapsed following the neck cut. The time to early arrested blood flow was on average 21s, and this was accompanied by enlargement with false aneurysms which occluded the arteries. In the arteries which were still bleeding at 60s after the neck was cut the artery size was normal. Based on comparative data from different slaughter premises it appeared that making the cut in the neck at the first cervical vertebra instead of the second to fourth cervical vertebrae reduced the frequency of false aneurysm formation and early arrested blood flow. This was confirmed in a separate controlled trial where 100 cattle were stunned with a captive bolt and the arteries were examined following neck cutting at either the C1 or C3 positions.

  19. [Cell cycle arrest at M phase induced by vinblastine in MOLT-4 cells].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yi-Sheng; Pan, Chang-Chuan; Jin, Chang-Nan; Li, Jian-Jun; Xiong, Gong-Peng; Zhang, Jian-Xi; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2009-04-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the biological effect of vinblastine (VLS), usually known as inductor of mitotic arrest, on MOLT-4 of ALL cells and to evaluate its significance. The cell arrest in M phase and/or cell apoptosis were induced by treatment of MOLT-4 cells with 0.05 microg/ml VLS for 0 - 12 hours; the DNA histogram was detected by flow cytometry; the morphological changes of cells were observed by confocal microscopy; the cell cycle distribution, cell apoptosis and morphological changes of cells before and after arrest were analyzed by using arrest increasing rate (AIR), arrest efficiency (AE), apoptosis rate (AR) and morphologic parameters respectively. The results indicated that the cell arrest did not accompanied by significant increase of apoptosis rate; the DNA histogram of cell arrest showed dynamic change of cell cycle in time-dependent manner; the arrest efficiency could be quantified. The cell arrest at M phase was accompanied by cell stack in S phase, the cell proliferation rate dropped after cell arrest occurred. The cells arrested at M phase possessed of characteristic morphologic features in cell mitosis. It is concluded that the vinblastine can solely induce arrest of MOLT-4 cells at M phase. This study provides experimental basis for further investigating the relation of cell cycle arrest to apoptosis, mechanism of checkpoint and development of new anticancer drugs.

  20. Impact of Early Vasopressor Administration on Neurological Outcomes after Prolonged Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Michael W; Tyson, Clark

    2017-02-22

    Introduction Vasopressors are associated with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), but no long-term benefit has been demonstrated in randomized trials. However, these trials did not control for the timing of vasopressor administration which may influence outcomes. Consequently, the objective of this study was to develop a model describing the likelihood of favorable neurological outcome (cerebral performance category [CPC] 1 or 2) as a function of the public safety answering point call receipt (PSAP)-to-pressor-interval (PPI) in prolonged out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Hypothesis The likelihood of favorable neurological outcome declines with increasing PPI.

  1. Estimating plane strain fracture toughness of high strength aluminum alloys from crack arrest toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorward, R. C.; Hasse, K. R.

    1977-01-01

    A comparison is made between fracture toughness KIc as measured by recommended ASTM procedures and crack arrest toughness KIa as measured on more than 100 bolt-loaded double-cantilever beam (DCB) specimens from 7075, 7050, and 7049 alloy plates. Close agreement was found between the two values, KIa being on the average less than KIc over a specified range. This indicates that a simplified test based on a bolt-loaded DCB specimen could be used for quality control, lot release, and screening purposes. Measurements of crack length and specimen deflection are all that are required. The specimens do not have to be fatigue precracked, nor is a tensile machine needed.

  2. Sequential steps for developmental arrest in Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Raz, V; Bergervoet, J H; Koornneef, M

    2001-01-01

    The continuous growth of the plant embryo is interrupted during the seed maturation processes which results in a dormant seed. The embryo continues development after germination when it grows into a seedling. The embryo growth phase starts after morphogenesis and ends when the embryo fills the seed sac. Very little is known about the processes regulating this phase. We describe mutants that affect embryo growth in two sequential developmental stages. Firstly, embryo growth arrest is regulated by the FUS3/LEC type genes, as mutations in these genes cause a continuation of growth in immature embryos. Secondly, a later stage of embryo dormancy is regulated by ABI3 and abscisic acid; abi3 and aba1 mutants exhibit premature germination only after embryos mature. Mutations affecting both developmental stages result in an additive phenotype and double mutants are highly viviparous. Embryo growth arrest is regulated by cell division activities in both the embryo and the endosperm, which are gradually switched off at the mature embryo stage. In the fus3/lec mutants, however, cell division in both the embryo and endosperm is not arrested, but rather is prolonged throughout seed maturation. Furthermore ectopic cell division occurs in seedlings. Our results indicate that seed dormancy is secured via at least two sequential developmental processes: embryo growth arrest, which is regulated by cell division and embryo dormancy.

  3. 153. View of lightning arrester houses on the hillside above ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    153. View of lightning arrester houses on the hillside above powerhouse (similar view as WA-64-152). Looking southeast. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  4. 152. View of lightning arrester houses on the hillside above ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    152. View of lightning arrester houses on the hillside above powerhouse. To the right is surge tank for penstock no. 1. Looking southeast. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  5. The gas production rate of periodic comet d'Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Festou, Michel C.; Feldman, Paul D.; Ahearn, Michael F.

    1992-01-01

    Comet P/d'Arrest is a potential target for a rendezvous mission to a short period comet. Its light curve is rather peculiar, the comet being active only after perihelion passage. One apparition out of two is easy to observe from the ground. The 1995 apparition of the comet will offer a unique opportunity to characterize the outgassing properties of its nucleus.

  6. An evaluation of the narrowing gender gap in DUI arrests.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Angela A; Liew, Hui; Gardner, Sheena

    2011-07-01

    Although males account for the vast majority of those convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs (DUI), female DUI convictions have increased over the past two decades. In this study, we examined the ratio of males-to-females who were court-mandated between the years 1992 and 2008 to attend the Mississippi Alcohol Safety Education Program (MASEP), a DUI intervention program in Mississippi. The data for this study came from MASEP records; the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS); the Uniform Crime Reports (UCR); the Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS); the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS); and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), an agency within the US Department of Transportation. Augmented Dickey-Fuller (ADF) tests were used to assess the nature (i.e., convergence, divergence, or stability) of this trend and to identify predictors. The results showed that, over the 17-year period, the gender gap in DUI convictions, self-reported history of prior arrest, official drug arrests, and substance abuse treatment admissions has narrowed considerably. Results from the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models show that three factors account for increases in the proportion of women mandated to attend MASEP: self-reported arrest prior to the DUI conviction, female admissions to substance abuse treatment, and annual miles driven. Changes in both women's behavior and law enforcement practices have increased female exposure to DUI arrests and narrowed the gender gap in DUI convictions.

  7. Speech arrest after sleeping on the left body side.

    PubMed

    Wojtecki, Lars; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2011-06-01

    Stroke like episodes can occur by cortical compression due to changes in intracranial pressure. We report a patient after left hemicraniectomy who presented transient speech arrest after sleeping on the left side. We propose that mechanical compression of the left inferior or superior frontal gyrus led to this episode similar to a major mass effect due to an unprotected brain surface after hemicraniectomy.

  8. Cardiac Arrest after Local Anaesthetic Toxicity in a Paediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Diego Grimaldi; Simas, Ana Amélia Souza

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a paediatric patient undergoing urological procedure in which a possible inadvertent intravascular or intraosseous injection of bupivacaine with adrenaline in usual doses caused subsequent cardiac arrest, completely reversed after administration of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion. Early diagnosis of local anaesthetics toxicity and adequate cardiovascular resuscitation manoeuvres contribute to the favourable outcome. PMID:27872765

  9. Race as a Factor in Juvenile Arrests. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Carl E.; Snyder, Howard E.

    This bulletin examines the effect of race on police decisions to take juvenile offenders into custody. Analysis of 1997 and 1998 data on 17 states from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Incident-Based Reporting System indicates that there is no evidence to support the hypothesis that police are more likely to arrest nonwhite juvenile…

  10. [Cerebral oximetry in pulmonary thromboendarterectomy with circulatory arrest].

    PubMed

    Catalán Escudero, P; González Román, A; Serra Ruiz, C N; Barbero Mielgo, M; García Fernández, J

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy is an uncommon procedure and should be performed with circulatory arrest. One of the major concerns is the postoperative central neurological injuries. Perioperative brain oxygen monitoring is advisable in this surgical procedure for the early detection of brain hypoperfusion episodes and their intensity as well as any other postoperative episodes that can deteriorate the neurological outcome.

  11. Flashback Flame Arrester Devices for Fuel Cargo Tank Vapor Vents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    I. EXEAUST- BURN STACK------------------------------------- 3-6 S. SUSTAINED BURNING TEST FACILITY------------------------ b TV. INSTRUMENTATION AND... BURNING TESTS -------- 1 vi IX. SUSTAINED BURNING ARRESTER TESTS --------------------------- A. PROFANE/AIR MIXTURE TESTS ---------------------------- 1...D-I E. TABULAR SUMMARY OF TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS FOR SUSTAINED BURNING TESTS ----------- E-i vii - I _ _ _ .. .. . FIGURES 1-1. B-Stand

  12. Development of a nonfragmenting distribution surge arrester. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.E.

    1984-08-01

    This report describes the investigation and testing carried out in the development of a nonfragmenting distribution surge arrester. It is commonly assumed that pressure buildup in a failing surge arrester will cause the porcelain to burst unless the pressure is rapidly relieved. Even after pressure relief, however, the porcelain can shatter from the thermal shock produced by the internal arc. There is little published information on the sequence of events during failure and the relative importance of pressure and thermal stress. A prerequisite for the design of a nonfragmenting arrester is a thorough knowledge of the failure mechanism. Extensive testing was performed to determine the contribution of both pressure and heat to porcelain breakage. This research demonstrated the importance of thermal shock and led to the design of an ablative thermal shield for the porcelain housing. This was combined with pressure relief provided by end-cap venting and a retaining system to prevent ejection of internal parts. The final result was the design and production of nonfragmenting distribution arresters rated 9 kV through 27 kV.

  13. Physeal bar resections after growth arrest about the knee.

    PubMed

    Kasser, J R

    1990-06-01

    Localized growth arrest about the knee can be treated with excision when less than 50% of the physis is involved and when at least 2.5 cm of growth remains. Simultaneous corrective osteotomy should be performed when the angular deformity exceeds 20 degrees. The superiority of the various interposition materials remains controversial, but the alternatives are fat, cartilage, elastomer, and methylmethacrylate.

  14. Ketogenic diet prevents cardiac arrest-induced cerebral ischemic neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Tai, K-K; Nguyen, N; Pham, L; Truong, D D

    2008-07-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for intractable epilepsies. We recently found that KD can prevent seizure and myoclonic jerk in a rat model of post-hypoxic myoclonus. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that KD can prevent the cerebral ischemic neurodegeneration in this animal model. Rats fed a standard diet or KD for 25 days were being subjected to mechanically induced cardiac arrest brain ischemia for 8 min 30 s. Nine days after cardiac arrest, frozen rat brains were sectioned for evaluation of ischemia-induced neurodegeneration using fluoro-jade (FJ) staining. The FJ positive degenerating neurons were counted manually. Cardiac arrest-induced cerebral ischemia in rats fed the standard diet exhibited extensive neurodegeneration in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, the number of FJ positive neurons was 822+/-80 (n=4). They also showed signs of neurodegeneration in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in the thalamic reticular nucleus, the number of FJ positive neurons in the cerebellum was 55+/-27 (n=4), the number of FJ positive neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus was 22+/-5 (n=4). In contrast, rats fed KD showed no evidence of neurodegeneration, the number of FJ positive neurons in these areas were zero. The results demonstrate that KD can prevent cardiac arrest-induced cerebral ischemic neurodegeneration in selected brain regions.

  15. Parenting and Women Arrested for Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Catherine A.; Lehmann, Peter; Dia, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the relationship between parenting and women's use of violence the current study surveyed 106 mothers arrested for intimate partner violence (IPV) related crimes on parenting styles and attitudes toward when using violence against their partner is justified. Findings indicate parenting styles indicative of low belief in using physical…

  16. Recurrent sinus arrest in association with neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parry, A K; Ormerod, L P; Hamlin, G W; Saleem, P T

    1994-05-01

    We report a case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome where the catatonia clearly followed the administration of neuroleptics and where the neurovegetative disturbance was remarkably severe, including episodes of tracheal spasm, apnoea and episodes of bradycardia, and sinus arrest requiring insertion of a temporary external pacing wire. To our knowledge, such severe disturbance has not previously been reported.

  17. Offenders' Perceptions of House Arrest and Electronic Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jamie S.; Hanrahan, Kate; Bowers, James H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a study designed to examine the perceptions of house arrest (HA) and electronic monitoring (EM) among offenders who have recently experienced this criminal sentence. Data were gathered via a self-administered questionnaire and follow-up interviews with a sample of offenders. Our primary areas of interest were to assess (a)…

  18. Inhibition of REV3 Expression Induces Persistent DNA Damage and Growth Arrest in Cancer Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Knobel, Philip A; Kotov, Ilya N; Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; Stahel, Rolf A; Marti, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    REV3 is the catalytic subunit of DNA translesion synthesis polymerase ζ. Inhibition of REV3 expression increases the sensitivity of human cells to a variety of DNA-damaging agents and reduces the formation of resistant cells. Surprisingly, we found that short hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of REV3 per se suppresses colony formation of lung (A549, Calu-3), breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231), mesothelioma (IL45 and ZL55), and colon (HCT116 +/-p53) tumor cell lines, whereas control cell lines (AD293, LP9-hTERT) and the normal mesothelial primary culture (SDM104) are less affected. Inhibition of REV3 expression in cancer cells leads to an accumulation of persistent DNA damage as indicated by an increase in phospho-ATM, 53BP1, and phospho-H2AX foci formation, subsequently leading to the activation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage response cascade. REV3 depletion in p53-proficient cancer cell lines results in a G1 arrest and induction of senescence as indicated by the accumulation of p21 and an increase in senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. In contrast, inhibition of REV3 expression in p53-deficient cells results in growth inhibition and a G2/M arrest. A small fraction of the p53-deficient cancer cells can overcome the G2/M arrest, which results in mitotic slippage and aneuploidy. Our findings reveal that REV3 depletion per se suppresses growth of cancer cell lines from different origin, whereas control cell lines and a mesothelial primary culture were less affected. Thus, our findings indicate that depletion of REV3 not only can amend cisplatin-based cancer therapy but also can be applied for susceptible cancers as a potential monotherapy. PMID:22028621

  19. Rosuvastatin improves myocardial and neurological outcomes after asphyxial cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in rats.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yun; Wu, Yichen; Meng, Min; Luo, Man; Zhao, Hongmei; Sun, Hong; Gao, Sumin

    2017-03-01

    Rosuvastatin, a potent HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, is cholesterol-lowering drugs and reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. This study is to explore whether rosuvastatin improves outcomes after cardiac arrest in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 8min of cardiac arrest (CA) by asphyxia and randomly assigned to three experimental groups immediately following successful resuscitation: Sham; Control; and Rosuvastatin. The survival, hemodynamics, myocardial function, neurological outcomes and apoptosis were assessed. The 7-d survival rate was greater in the rosuvastatin treated group compared to the Control group (P=0.019 by log-rank test). Myocardial function, as measured by cardiac output and ejection fraction, was significantly impaired after CA and notably improved in the animals treated with rosuvastatin beginning at 60min after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (P<0.05). Moreover, rosuvastatin treatment significantly ameliorated brain injury after ROSC, which was characterized by the increase of neurological function scores, and reduction of brain edema in cortex and hippocampus (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the levels of cardiac troponin T and neuron-specific enolase and the caspase-3 activity were significantly decreased in the Rosuvastatin group when compared with the Control group (P<0.05). In conclusion, rosuvastatin treatment substantially improves the 7-d survival rate as well as myocardial function and neurological outcomes after ROSC.

  20. Girls with Emotional Disturbance and a History of Arrest: Characteristics and School-Based Predictors of Arrest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Josephs, Nikki L.; Lunde, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that girls receiving special education services for Emotional Disturbance (ED) may have unique characteristics and needs. Similarly, juvenile justice research has identified unique characteristics of court-involved girls. This study examined characteristics of girls with ED and a history of arrest. Additionally, classroom-based…

  1. 14 CFR § 1203b.104 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. § 1203b.104 Section § 1203b.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... Exercise of arrest authority—general guidelines. (a) In making an arrest, the security force...

  2. 10 CFR 1049.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines. 1049.5 Section 1049.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.5 Exercise of arrest...

  3. 10 CFR 1049.6 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force. 1049... OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.6 Exercise of arrest... for additional guidance on the use of non-deadly force in the exercise of arrest authority,...

  4. 10 CFR 1049.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines. 1049.5 Section 1049.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.5 Exercise of arrest...

  5. 10 CFR 1049.6 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force. 1049... OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.6 Exercise of arrest... for additional guidance on the use of non-deadly force in the exercise of arrest authority,...

  6. 10 CFR 1047.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1047.5 Section 1047.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.5 Exercise of arrest...

  7. 10 CFR 1047.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1047.5 Section 1047.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.5 Exercise of arrest...

  8. 10 CFR 1049.7 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force. 1049.7 Section 1049.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.7 Exercise of arrest...

  9. 10 CFR 1049.7 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force. 1049.7 Section 1049.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.7 Exercise of arrest...

  10. 10 CFR 1049.6 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force. 1049... OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.6 Exercise of arrest... for additional guidance on the use of non-deadly force in the exercise of arrest authority,...

  11. 10 CFR 1049.7 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force. 1049.7 Section 1049.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.7 Exercise of arrest...

  12. 10 CFR 1047.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1047.5 Section 1047.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.5 Exercise of arrest...

  13. 10 CFR 1049.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines. 1049.5 Section 1049.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.5 Exercise of arrest...

  14. 30 CFR 77.508-1 - Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508-1 Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings. Lightning arresters protecting exposed telephone wires entering buildings shall be provided...

  15. 30 CFR 77.508-1 - Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508-1 Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings. Lightning arresters protecting exposed telephone wires entering buildings shall be provided...

  16. 30 CFR 77.508-1 - Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508-1 Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings. Lightning arresters protecting exposed telephone wires entering buildings shall be provided...

  17. 30 CFR 77.508-1 - Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508-1 Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings. Lightning arresters protecting exposed telephone wires entering buildings shall be provided...

  18. 30 CFR 77.508-1 - Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508-1 Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings. Lightning arresters protecting exposed telephone wires entering buildings shall be provided...

  19. Gender and Relational-Distance Effects in Arrests for Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lally, William; DeMaris, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    This study tests two hypotheses regarding factors affecting arrest of the perpetrator in domestic violence incidents. Black's relational-distance thesis is that the probability of arrest increases with increasing relational distance between perpetrator and victim. Klinger's leniency principle suggests that the probability of arrest is lower for…

  20. 10 CFR 1049.6 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force. 1049... OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.6 Exercise of arrest authority—Use of non-deadly force. (a) When a Protective Force Officer is authorized to make an arrest...

  1. 10 CFR 1049.7 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force. 1049.7 Section 1049.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.7 Exercise of arrest...

  2. 10 CFR 1049.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines. 1049.5 Section 1049.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.5 Exercise of arrest...

  3. 10 CFR 1047.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1047.5 Section 1047.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.5 Exercise of arrest...

  4. Explaining Discrepancies in Arrest Rates between Black and White Male Juveniles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fite, Paula J.; Wynn, Porche'; Pardini, Dustin A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated discrepancies in arrest rates between Black and White male juveniles by examining the role of early risk factors for arrest. Two hypotheses were evaluated: (a) Disproportionate minority arrest is due to increased exposure to early risk factors, and (b) a differential sensitivity to early risk factors contributes to…

  5. Modes of induced cardiac arrest: hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia--literature review.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza de; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; Santos, Carlos Alberto dos; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Cortez, José Luis Lasso; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The entry of sodium and calcium play a key effect on myocyte subjected to cardiac arrest by hyperkalemia. They cause cell swelling, acidosis, consumption of adenosine triphosphate and trigger programmed cell death. Cardiac arrest caused by hypocalcemia maintains intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels, improves diastolic performance and reduces oxygen consumption, which can be translated into better protection to myocyte injury induced by cardiac arrest.

  6. 10 CFR 1049.6 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force. 1049... OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.6 Exercise of arrest... for additional guidance on the use of non-deadly force in the exercise of arrest authority,...

  7. 10 CFR 1047.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1047.5 Section 1047.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.5 Exercise of arrest...

  8. 10 CFR 1049.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines. 1049.5 Section 1049.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.5 Exercise of arrest...

  9. 10 CFR 1049.7 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force. 1049.7 Section 1049.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.7 Exercise of arrest...

  10. What Happens After Arrest? A Court Perspective of Police Operations in the District of Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forst, Brian; And Others

    The problem of arrests not ending in conviction is described in terms of its magnitude and costs. Three major aspects of the role of the police in influencing what happens after arrest are studied. Factors such as tangible evidence and witnesses are influenced by the time between the offense and the arrest. The characteristics of the officers…

  11. U.S. Juvenile Arrests: Gang Membership, Social Class, and Labeling Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the link between gang membership and arrest frequency, exploring the Gang x Socioeconomic status interaction on those arrests. Notoriously poor, delinquent, and often well-known to police, America's gang youth should have very high odds of arrest. Yet it is unclear whether mere membership in a gang increases the risk of arrest…

  12. 33 CFR 150.619 - What are the fall arrest system requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the fall arrest system... SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Workplace Safety and Health Fall Arrest § 150.619 What are the fall arrest system requirements? (a) The deepwater port operator must ensure...

  13. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... flame arresters protecting systems containing vapors of flammable or combustible liquids where vapor... detonation flame arresters protect systems handling vapors with a maximum experimental safe gap (MESG) below 0.9 millimeters. Detonation flame arresters protecting such systems must be tested with...

  14. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... flame arresters protecting systems containing vapors of flammable or combustible liquids where vapor... detonation flame arresters protect systems handling vapors with a maximum experimental safe gap (MESG) below 0.9 millimeters. Detonation flame arresters protecting such systems must be tested with...

  15. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... flame arresters protecting systems containing vapors of flammable or combustible liquids where vapor... detonation flame arresters protect systems handling vapors with a maximum experimental safe gap (MESG) below 0.9 millimeters. Detonation flame arresters protecting such systems must be tested with...

  16. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... flame arresters protecting systems containing vapors of flammable or combustible liquids where vapor... detonation flame arresters protect systems handling vapors with a maximum experimental safe gap (MESG) below 0.9 millimeters. Detonation flame arresters protecting such systems must be tested with...

  17. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 154 - Guidelines for Detonation Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flame arresters protecting systems containing vapors of flammable or combustible liquids where vapor... detonation flame arresters protect systems handling vapors with a maximum experimental safe gap (MESG) below 0.9 millimeters. Detonation flame arresters protecting such systems must be tested with...

  18. Pediatric defibrillation after cardiac arrest: initial response and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Cristina; Domínguez, Pedro; Carrillo, Angel; Bellón, Jose María

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shockable rhythms are rare in pediatric cardiac arrest and the results of defibrillation are uncertain. The objective of this study was to analyze the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation that included defibrillation in children. Methods Forty-four out of 241 children (18.2%) who were resuscitated from inhospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest had been treated with manual defibrillation. Data were recorded according to the Utstein style. Outcome variables were a sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and one-year survival. Characteristics of patients and of resuscitation were evaluated. Results Cardiac disease was the major cause of arrest in this group. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (PVT) was the first documented electrocardiogram rhythm in 19 patients (43.2%). A shockable rhythm developed during resuscitation in 25 patients (56.8%). The first shock (dose, 2 J/kg) terminated VF or PVT in eight patients (18.1%). Seventeen children (38.6%) needed more than three shocks to solve VF or PVT. ROSC was achieved in 28 cases (63.6%) and it was sustained in 19 patients (43.2%). Only three patients (6.8%), however, survived at 1-year follow-up. Children with VF or PVT as the first documented rhythm had better ROSC, better initial survival and better final survival than children with subsequent VF or PVT. Children who survived were older than the finally dead patients. No significant differences in response rate were observed when first and second shocks were compared. The survival rate was higher in patients treated with a second shock dose of 2 J/kg than in those who received higher doses. Outcome was not related to the cause or the location of arrest. The survival rate was inversely related to the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusion Defibrillation is necessary in 18% of children who suffer cardiac arrest. Termination of VF or PVT after the first defibrillation dose is achieved in a low

  19. Community involvement in out of hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Ali; Raad, Mohamad; Chams, Nour; Chams, Sana; Bachir, Rana; El Sayed, Mazen J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Developing countries including Lebanon report low survival rates and poor neurologic outcomes in affected victims. Community involvement through early recognition and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can improve OHCA survival. This study assesses knowledge and attitude of university students in Lebanon and identifies potential barriers and facilitators to learning and performing CPR. A cross-sectional survey was administered to university students. The questionnaire included questions regarding the following data elements: demographics, knowledge, and awareness about sudden cardiac arrest, CPR, automated external defibrillator (AED) use, prior CPR and AED training, ability to perform CPR or use AED, barriers to performing/learning CPR/AED, and preferred location for attending CPR/AED courses. Descriptive analysis followed by multivariate analysis was carried out to identify predictors and barriers to learning and performing CPR. A total of 948 students completed the survey. Participants’ mean age was 20.1 (±2.1) years with 53.1% women. Less than half of participants (42.9%) were able to identify all the presenting signs of cardiac arrest. Only 33.7% of participants felt able to perform CPR when witnessing a cardiac arrest. Fewer participants (20.3%) reported receiving previous CPR training. Several perceived barriers to learning and performing CPR were also reported. Significant predictors of willingness to perform CPR when faced with a cardiac arrest were: earning higher income, previous CPR training and feeling confident in one's ability to apply an AED, or perform CPR. Lacking enough expertise in performing CPR was a significant barrier to willingness to perform CPR. University students in Lebanon are familiar with the symptoms of cardiac arrest, however, they are not well trained in CPR and lack confidence to perform it. The attitude towards the importance of

  20. What is the proper target temperature for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?

    PubMed

    Vargas, Maria; Sutherasan, Yuda; Servillo, Giuseppe; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The implementation of target temperature management (TTM) or therapeutic hypothermia has been demonstrated in several major studies to be an effective neuroprotective strategy in postresuscitation care after cardiac arrest. Although several landmark studies found the promising results of lower targeted temperature (32-34 °C) in terms of survival and neurological outcomes, recent evidence showed no difference in either survival or long-term neurological outcome when compared with higher targeted temperature (36 °C). Thus, recent data suggest that avoiding hyperpyrexia, rather than cooling "per se," may be considered the main therapeutic target to avoid secondary brain damage after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Many questions are still debated about the exact protocol of TTM to be used, including whether temperature control is more beneficial than standard of care without active temperature control, the optimal cooling temperature, patient selection, and duration of cooling. The aim of this review article was to discuss the physiology of hypothermia, available cooling methods, and current evidence about the optimal target temperature and timing of hypothermia.

  1. Use of therapeutic hypothermia in cocaine-induced cardiac arrest: further evidence.

    PubMed

    Scantling, Dane; Klonoski, Emily; Valentino, Dominic J

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is an important and successful treatment that has been endorsed only in specific clinical settings of cardiac arrest. Inclusion criteria thus far have not embraced drug-induced cardiac arrest, but clinical evidence has been mounting that therapeutic hypothermia may be beneficial in such cases. A 59-year-old man who experienced a cocaine-induced cardiac arrest had a full neurological recovery after use of therapeutic hypothermia. The relevant pathophysiology of cocaine-induced cardiac arrest is reviewed, the mechanism and history of therapeutic hypothermia are discussed, and the clinical evidence recommending the use of therapeutic hypothermia in cocaine-induced cardiac arrest is reinforced.

  2. Morphogenesis beyond Cytokinetic Arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Javier; Cid, Víctor J.; Cenamor, Rosa; Yuste, María; Molero, Gloria; Nombela, César; Sánchez, Miguel

    1998-01-01

    The budding yeast lyt1 mutation causes cell lysis. We report here that lyt1 is an allele of cdc15, a gene which encodes a protein kinase that functions late in the cell cycle. Neither cdc15-1 nor cdc15-lyt1 strains are able to septate at 37°C, even though they may manage to rebud. Cells lyse after a shmoo-like projection appears at the distal pole of the daughter cell. Actin polarizes towards the distal pole but the septins remain at the mother–daughter neck. This morphogenetic response reflects entry into a new round of the cell cycle: the preference for polarization from the distal pole was lost in bud1 cdc15 double mutants; double cdc15-lyt1 cdc28-4 mutants, defective for START, did not develop apical projections and apical polarization was accompanied by DNA replication. The same phenomena were caused by mutations in the genes CDC14, DBF2, and TEM1, which are functionally related to CDC15. Apical polarization was delayed in cdc15 mutants as compared with budding in control cells and this delay was abolished in a septin mutant. Our results suggest that the delayed M/G1 transition in cdc15 mutants is due to a septin-dependent checkpoint that couples initiation of the cell cycle to the completion of cytokinesis. PMID:9852155

  3. Criticality in dynamic arrest: correspondence between glasses and traffic.

    PubMed

    de Wijn, A S; Miedema, D M; Nienhuis, B; Schall, P

    2012-11-30

    Dynamic arrest is a general phenomenon across a wide range of dynamic systems including glasses, traffic flow, and dynamics in cells, but the universality of dynamic arrest phenomena remains unclear. We connect the emergence of traffic jams in a simple traffic flow model directly to the dynamic slowing down in kinetically constrained models for glasses. In kinetically constrained models, the formation of glass becomes a true (singular) phase transition in the limit T→0. Similarly, using the Nagel-Schreckenberg model to simulate traffic flow, we show that the emergence of jammed traffic acquires the signature of a sharp transition in the deterministic limit p→1, corresponding to overcautious driving. We identify a true dynamic critical point marking the onset of coexistence between free flowing and jammed traffic, and demonstrate its analogy to the kinetically constrained glass models. We find diverging correlations analogous to those at a critical point of thermodynamic phase transitions.

  4. Cellular Growth Arrest and Persistence from Enzyme Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Ray, J. Christian J.; Wickersheim, Michelle L.; Jalihal, Ameya P.; Adeshina, Yusuf O.; Cooper, Tim F.; Balázsi, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic efficiency depends on the balance between supply and demand of metabolites, which is sensitive to environmental and physiological fluctuations, or noise, causing shortages or surpluses in the metabolic pipeline. How cells can reliably optimize biomass production in the presence of metabolic fluctuations is a fundamental question that has not been fully answered. Here we use mathematical models to predict that enzyme saturation creates distinct regimes of cellular growth, including a phase of growth arrest resulting from toxicity of the metabolic process. Noise can drive entry of single cells into growth arrest while a fast-growing majority sustains the population. We confirmed these predictions by measuring the growth dynamics of Escherichia coli utilizing lactose as a sole carbon source. The predicted heterogeneous growth emerged at high lactose concentrations, and was associated with cell death and production of antibiotic-tolerant persister cells. These results suggest how metabolic networks may balance costs and benefits, with important implications for drug tolerance. PMID:27010473

  5. Mechanisms of sulindac-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Barbara; Barbier, Valerie; Brickner, Howard; Welsh, John; Fotedar, Arun; McClelland, Michael

    2005-02-28

    The mechanism underlying the chemopreventive effects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac remains unclear. Its active metabolite, sulindac sulfide, induces cell cycle arrest as well as apoptosis in mammalian cell lines. We now show that in murine thymocytes, sulindac sulfide-induced cell death is p53, bax, Fas, and FasL independent. In contrast, bcl2 transgenic thymocytes are resistant to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that sulindac sulfide-induced cell cycle arrest in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) is partly mediated by the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) and the cyclin kinase inhibitor p21waf1/cip1. Furthermore, MEFs deficient in p21 or Rb are more susceptible to sulindac sulfide-induced cell death. These results suggest that sulindac may selectively target premalignant cells with cell cycle checkpoint deficits.

  6. Elbow dislocation secondary to fall during police arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R J; Clark, K; Kelliher, T

    2014-02-01

    A case of total elbow dislocation with significant swelling and loss of distal pulses during police arrest is described. To date, this specific injury in relation to police arrest has not been described in the literature. Whilst attempting to remove the detainee from a public transport vehicle, the patient and the officers involved fell to the ground with his arm slightly flexed. He was handcuffed to the rear and taken to the police office. Whilst there, it was noted that his left elbow was swelling dramatically and he complained of pain. The detainee and officers attended the emergency room and he was found to have a total dislocation of the left elbow and vascular compromise of the limb. The elbow was promptly reduced with sedation and a post reduction angiogram demonstrated injury to the tissues surrounding the brachial artery.

  7. Cardiac arrest following cannabis use: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cannabis, or Marijuana, remains one of the most universally used recreational drugs. Over the last four decades, its popularity has risen considerably as it became easily accessible and relatively affordable. Peak use is amongst the young aged 18 to 25 years, although these figures are now shifting towards earlier teens. A strongly installed culture still regards cannabis a harmless drug, yet as more reports have shown there are considerable adverse cardiovascular events linked with its use. Case Presentation In this paper, we present the case of a 15-year-old male who suffered a cardiac arrest following cannabis use and survived the episode. Conclusion Cardiac arrest is a rare and possibly fatal consequence of cannabis use. Public awareness should be raised by extensively promoting all potential complications associated with its use. PMID:19946452

  8. The role of local structure in dynamical arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royall, C. Patrick; Williams, Stephen R.

    2015-02-01

    Amorphous solids, or glasses, are distinguished from crystalline solids by their lack of long-range structural order. At the level of two-body structural correlations, glassformers show no qualitative change upon vitrifying from a supercooled liquid. Nonetheless the dynamical properties of a glass are so much slower that it appears to take on the properties of a solid. While many theories of the glass transition focus on dynamical quantities, a solid's resistance to flow is often viewed as a consequence of its structure. Here we address the viewpoint that this remains the case for a glass. Recent developments using higher-order measures show a clear emergence of structure upon dynamical arrest in a variety of glass formers and offer the tantalising hope of a structural mechanism for arrest. However a rigorous fundamental identification of such a causal link between structure and arrest remains elusive. We undertake a critical survey of this work in experiments, computer simulation and theory and discuss what might strengthen the link between structure and dynamical arrest. We move on to highlight the relationship between crystallisation and glass-forming ability made possible by this deeper understanding of the structure of the liquid state, and emphasise the potential to design materials with optimal glassforming and crystallisation ability, for applications such as phase-change memory. We then consider aspects of the phenomenology of glassy systems where structural measures have yet to make a large impact, such as polyamorphism (the existence of multiple liquid states), ageing (the time-evolution of non-equilibrium materials below their glass transition) and the response of glassy materials to external fields such as shear.

  9. Tissue adhesive arrests stromal melting in the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Fogle, J A; Kenyon, K R; Foster, C S

    1980-06-01

    The direct early application of cyanoacrylate adhesive to a prepared ulcer bed and adjacent basement membrane, followed by placement of a bandage lens, gave good results in ten patients with corneal ulceration. The patients had ulceration with keratitis sicca, herpes keratitis, and other surface diseases. Progressive melting was arrested in all cases, and concurrent adjunctive therapies were used as indicated. The technique is quick and simple.

  10. Targeted temperature management in survivors of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Da Silva, Ivan Rocha; Frontera, Jennifer Ann

    2013-11-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) results in a significant decrease in mortality and improvement of neurologic outcomes in cardiac arrest (CA) survivors. Cardiologists and intensivists must be acquainted with the indications and technique because MTH is the only proven neuroprotective therapy for CA survivors. CA involves reinstituting meaningful cardiac activity and minimizing secondary neurologic injuries. This article focuses on MTH as the main strategy for post-CA care.

  11. Arresting Tailhook: The Prosecution of Sexual Harassment in the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    140 Mil. L. Rev. 1 (1993) ARRESTING TAILHOOK: THE PROSECUTION OF SEXUAL HARRASSMENT IN THE MILITARY by Lieutenant Commander J. Richard Chema ABSTRACT...Against Women ..... 62 C. Abusing Positions of Authority To Commit Sexual . 65 Harrassment D. Miscellaneous Provisions ....... ............. 67 VI. THE...the victim fails to acquiesce to the superior’s sexual demands, quid pro quo harassers may retaliate with some form of workplace punishment.9 The

  12. Resuscitation review to improve nursing performance during cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Carpico, Bronwynne; Jenkins, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Resuscitation Review Simulation Education (RRSE) on improving adherence to hospital protocols and American Heart Association (AHA) resuscitation standards. Prior to implementing the RRSE on two nursing units, performance was evaluated during a simulated cardiac arrest using a mannequin and comparing performance against AHA algorithms. Performance was measured at two separate periods: preintervention and 3 months after the intervention. Both units improved overall scores after the RRSE.

  13. Adverse drug reactions in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Witcher, Robert; Dzierba, Amy L.; Kim, Catherine; Smithburger, Pamela L.; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves survival and neurologic function in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Many medications used to support TH have altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during this treatment. It is unknown if or at what frequency the medications used during TH cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) after cardiac arrest and treated with TH from January 2009 to June 2012 at two urban, university-affiliated, tertiary-care medical centres. Medications commonly used during TH were screened for association with significant ADRs (grade 3 or greater per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) using three published ADR detection instruments. Results: A total of 229 patients were included, the majority being males with median age of 62 presenting with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pulseless electrical activity or asystole. The most common comorbidities were hypertension, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. There were 670 possible ADRs and 69 probable ADRs identified. Of the 670 possible ADRs, propofol, fentanyl, and acetaminophen were the most common drugs associated with ADRs. Whereas fentanyl, insulin, and propofol were the most common drugs associated with a probable ADR. Patients were managed with TH for a median of 22 hours, with 38% of patients surviving to hospital discharge. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TH after cardiac arrest frequently experience possible adverse reactions associated with medications and the corresponding laboratory abnormalities are significant. There is a need for judicious use and close monitoring of drugs in the setting of TH until recommendations for dose adjustments are available to help prevent ADRs.

  14. Prognostic Value of Brain Diffusion Weighted Imaging After Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Wijman, Christine A.C.; Mlynash, Michael; Caulfield, Anna Finley; Hsia, Amie W.; Eyngorn, Irina; Bammer, Roland; Fischbein, Nancy; Albers, Gregory W.; Moseley, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objective Outcome prediction is challenging in comatose post-cardiac arrest survivors. We assessed the feasibility and prognostic utility of brain diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) during the first week. Methods Consecutive comatose post-cardiac arrest patients were prospectively enrolled. MRI data of patients who met predefined specific prognostic criteria were used to determine distinguishing ADC thresholds. Group 1: death at 6 months and absent motor response or absent pupillary reflexes or bilateral absent cortical responses at 72 hours, or vegetative at 1 month. Group 2A: Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score of 4 or 5 at 6 months. Group 2B: GOS of 3 at 6 months. The percentage of voxels below different apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) thresholds was calculated at 50 × 10−6 mm2/sec intervals. Results Overall, 86% of patients underwent MR imaging. Fifty-one patients with 62 brain MRIs were included in the analyses. Forty patients met the specific prognostic criteria. The percentage of brain volume with an ADC value below 650–700 × 10−6 mm2/sec best differentiated between group 1 and groups 2A and 2B combined (p<0.001), while the 400–450 × 10−6 mm2/sec threshold best differentiated between groups 2A and 2B (p=0.003). The ideal time window for prognostication using DWI was between 49 to 108 hours after the arrest. When comparing MRI in this time window with the 72 hour neurological examination MRI improved the sensitivity for predicting poor outcome by 38% while maintaining 100% specificity (p=0.021). Interpretation Quantitative DWI in comatose post-cardiac arrest survivors holds great promise as a prognostic adjunct. PMID:19399889

  15. A Large Specific Deterrent Effect of Arrest for Patronizing a Prostitute

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Devon D.; Potterat, John J.; Muth, Stephen Q.; Roberts, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Background Prior research suggests that arrest, compared with no police detection, of some types of offenders does not decrease the chances they will reoffend. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the specific deterrent effect of arrest for patronizing a street prostitute in Colorado Springs by comparing the incidence of arrest for clients of prostitutes first detected through public health surveillance with the incidence of rearrest for clients first detected by police arrest. Although these sets of clients were demographically and behaviorally similar, arrest reduced the likelihood of a subsequent arrest by approximately 70%. In other areas of the United States, arrest did not appear to displace a client's patronizing. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that apprehending clients decreases their patronizing behavior substantially. PMID:17183691

  16. Crack propagation, arrest and statistics in heterogeneous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kierfeld, J.; Vinokur, V.; Materials Science Division; Dortmund Univ. of Technology

    2008-04-01

    We investigate theoretically statistics and thermally activated dynamics of crack nucleation and propagation in a two-dimensional heterogeneous material containing quenched randomly distributed defects. We consider a crack tip dynamics accounting for dissipation, thermal noise and the random forces arising from the elastic interactions of the crack opening with the defects. The equation of motion is based on the generalized Griffith criterion and the dynamic energy release rate and gives rise to Langevin-type stochastic dynamics in a quenched disordered potential. For different types of quenched random forces, which are characterized (a) by the range of elastic interactions with the crack tip and (b) the range of correlations between defects, we derive a number of static and dynamic quantities characterizing crack propagation in heterogeneous materials both at zero temperature and in the presence of thermal activation. In the absence of thermal fluctuations we obtain the nucleation and propagation probabilities, typical arrest lengths, the distribution of crack lengths and of critical forces. For thermally activated crack propagation we calculate the mean time to fracture. Depending on the range of elastic interactions between crack tip and frozen defects, heterogeneous material exhibits brittle or ductile fracture. We find that aggregations of defects generating long-range interaction forces (e.g. clouds of dislocations) lead to anomalously slow creep of the crack tip or even to its complete arrest. We demonstrate that heterogeneous materials with frozen defects contain a large number of arrested microcracks and that their fracture toughness is enhanced to the experimentally accessible timescales.

  17. Sodium alterations in isolated rat heart during cardioplegic arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Schepkin, V.D.; Choy, I.O.; Budinger, T.F.

    1996-12-01

    Triple-quantum-filtered (TQF) Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) without chemical shift reagent is used to investigate Na derangement in isolated crystalloid perfused rat hearts during St. Thomas cardioplegic (CP) arrest. The extracellular Na contribution to the NMR TQF signal of a rat heart is found to be 73 {+-} 5%, as determined by wash-out experiments at different moments of ischemia and reperfusion. With the use of this contribution factor, the estimated intracellular Na ([Na{sup +}]{sub i}) TQF signal is 222 {+-} 13% of preischemic level after 40 min of CP arrest and 30 min of reperfusion, and the heart rate pressure product recovery is 71 {+-} 8%. These parameters are significantly better than for stop-flow ischemia: 340 {+-} 20% and 6 {+-} 3%, respectively. At 37{degrees}C, the initial delay of 15 min in [Na{sup +}]{sub i} growth occurs during CP arrest along with reduced growth later ({approximately}4.0%/min) in comparison with stop-flow ischemia ({approximately}6.7%/min). The hypothermia (21{degrees}C, 40 min) for the stop-flow ischemia and CP dramatically decreases the [Na{sup +}]{sub i} gain with the highest heart recovery for CP ({approximately}100%). These studies confirm the enhanced sensitivity of TQF NMR to [Na{sup +}]{sub i} and demonstrate the potential of NMR without chemical shift reagent to monitor [Na{sup +}]{sub i} derangements. 48 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Pulsatile reperfusion after cardiac arrest improves neurologic outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Anstadt, M P; Stonnington, M J; Tedder, M; Crain, B J; Brothers, M F; Hilleren, D J; Rahija, R J; Menius, J A; Lowe, J E

    1991-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) using nonpulsatile flow (NPF) is advocated for refractory cardiac arrest. This study examined cerebral outcome after resuscitation with pulsatile flow (PF) versus NPF. Dogs arrested for 12.5 minute were reperfused with NPF (n = 11) using roller pump CPB or PF (n = 11) using mechanical biventricular cardiac massage. Pump flows were similar between groups; however early arterial pressures were greater during PF versus NPF, *p less than 0.05. Circulatory support was weaned at 60 minutes' reperfusion. Neurologic recovery of survivors (n = 16) was significantly better after PF versus NPF, *p = 0.01. The presence of brain lesions on magnetic resonance images did not significantly differ between groups at 7 days. Brain then were removed and regions examined for ischemic changes. Loss of CA1 pyramidal neurons was more severe after NPF versus PF, +p = 0.009. Ischemic changes were more frequent after NPF in the caudate nucleus (+p = 0.009) and watershed regions of the cerebral cortex (+p = 0.062), compared with PF. These results demonstrate that PF improves cerebral resuscitation when treating cardiac arrest with mechanical circulatory support (* = MANOVA with repeated measures, + = categorical data analysis. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:1953100

  19. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari, S. H.; Brinkmann, M.; Vollmer, J.

    2015-06-01

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation, etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state which corresponds to dynamic yield stress of the system. Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, ν , follows a nontrivial dependence on the packing fraction, ϕ , and the capillary energy, ɛ . Most noticeably, we show that ν is a generic and universal quantity which does not depend on the driving protocol. Using this universal quantity, we calculate the arrest stress, σa, analytically based on a balance of the energy injection rate due to the external force driving the flow and the dissipation rate accounting for the rupture of capillary bridges. The resulting prediction of σa is a nonlinear function of the packing fraction, ϕ , and the capillary energy, ɛ . This formula provides an excellent, parameter-free prediction of the numerical data. Corrections to the theory for small and large packing fractions are connected to the emergence of shear bands and of contributions to the stress from repulsive particle interactions, respectively.

  20. Growth disturbances without growth arrest after ACL reconstruction in children.

    PubMed

    Chotel, Franck; Henry, Julien; Seil, Romain; Chouteau, Julien; Moyen, Bernard; Bérard, Jérôme

    2010-11-01

    Growth arrest is a major concern after ACL reconstruction in children. It usually occurs in patients near to closure of the growth plates. Growth disturbances without growth arrest are also possible and more vicious; the authors analyse the mechanism of two patients with growth disturbance due to overgrowth following ACL reconstruction. One was a symmetrical overgrowth process with 15 mm limb length discrepancy treated with percutaneous epiphysiodesis. Full correction at the time of skeletal maturity was achieved. The second patient developed an asymmetrical overgrowth with progressive tibial valgus deformity. This mechanism was similar to a posttraumatic tibial valgus deformity. After nonoperative treatment, a spontaneous correction of the deformity was noticed. Both children were young (7 and 10 years old) at the time of ACL reconstruction with an autologous iliotibial band graft. The clinical relevance of overgrowth disturbance is usually limited when compared to growth arrest but could require a second surgical procedure as reported in this study. Parents must be informed that even in experienced hands, and despite the use of a physeal sparing technique, this specific risk of growth disturbance is still present.

  1. [Importance of mechanical assist devices in acute circulatory arrest].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Markus Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical assist devices are indicated for hemodynamic stabilization in acute circulatory arrest if conventional means of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are unable to re-establish adequate organ perfusion. Their temporary use facilitates further diagnostic and therapeutic options in selected patients, e.g. coronary angiography followed by revascularization.External thorax compression devices allow sufficient cardiac massage in case of preclinical or in-hospital circulatory arrest, especially under complex transfer conditions. These devices perform standardized thorax compressions at a rate of 80-100 per minute. Invasive mechanical support devices are used in the catheter laboratory or in the intensive care unit. Axial turbine pumps, e.g. the Impella, continuously pump blood from the left ventricle into the aortic root. The Impella can also provide right ventricle support by pumping blood from the vena cava into the pulmonary artery. So-called emergency systems or ECMO devices consist of a centrifugal pump and a membrane oxygenator allowing complete takeover of cardiac and pulmonary functions. Withdrawing blood from the right atrium and vena cava, oxygenated blood is returned to the abdominal aorta. Isolated centrifugal pumps provide left heart support without an oxygenator after transseptal insertion of a venous cannula into the left atrium.Mechanical assist devices are indicated for acute organ protection and hemodynamic stabilization for diagnostic and therapeutic measures as well as bridge to myocardial recovery. Future technical developments and better insights into the pathophysiology of mechanical circulatory support will broaden the spectrum of indications of such devices in acute circulatory arrest.

  2. Cardiac Arrest Alters Regional Ubiquitin Levels in Association with the Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and Neuronal Damages in the Porcine Brain.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari S; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna; Lafuente, José Vicente; Miclescu, Adriana; Wiklund, Lars

    2015-10-01

    The possibility that ubiquitin expression is altered in cardiac arrest-associated neuropathology was examined in a porcine model using immunohistochemical and biochemical methods. Our observations show that cardiac arrest induces progressive increase in ubiquitin expression in the cortex and hippocampus in a selective and specific manner as compared to corresponding control brains using enzyme-linked immunoassay technique (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)). Furthermore, immunohistochemical studies showed ubiquitin expression in the neurons exhibiting immunoreaction in the cytoplasm and karyoplasm of distorted or damaged cells. Separate Nissl and ubiquitin staining showed damaged and distorted neurons and in the same cortical region ubiquitin expression indicating that ubiquitin expression after cardiac arrest represents dying neurons. The finding that methylene blue treatment markedly induced neuroprotection following identical cardiac arrest and reduced ubiquitin expression strengthens this view. Taken together, our observations are the first to show that cardiac arrest enhanced ubiquitin expression in the brain that is related to the magnitude of neuronal injury and the finding that methylene blue reduced ubiquitin expression points to its role in cell damage, not reported earlier.

  3. Involvement of miR-15a in G0/G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Rong; Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Cao, Yongchang; Xue, Chunyi; Yan, Xu; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit the host cell division cycle to favour their own growth. Here we demonstrated that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which is a major causative agent of an emerging and important swine disease complex, PCV2-associated diseases, caused G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through degradation of cyclin D1 and E followed by reduction of retinoblastoma phosphorylation in synchronized PCV2-infected cells dependent upon virus replication. This induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest promoted PCV2 replication as evidenced by increased viral protein expression and progeny virus production in the synchronized PCV2-infected cells. To delineate a mechanism of miRNAs in regulating PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, we determined expression levels of some relevant miRNAs and found that only miR-15a but not miR-16, miR-21, and miR-34a was significantly changed in the PCV2-infected cells. We further demonstrated that upregulation of miR-15a promoted PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via mediating cyclins D1 and E degradation, in which involves PCV2 growth. These results reveal that G0/G1 cell cycle arrest induced by PCV2 may provide favourable conditions for viral protein expression and progeny production and that miR-15a is implicated in PCV2-induced cell cycle control, thereby contributing to efficient viral replication. PMID:27302568

  4. Descriptive Analysis of Medication Administration During Inpatient Cardiopulmonary Arrest Resuscitation (from the Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest Study).

    PubMed

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Harris, Dana; Bosworth, Veronica; Clark, Brooke; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-05-15

    Advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines exist, yet there are variations in clinical practice. Our study aims to describe the utilization of medications during resuscitation from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of patients who suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest from May 2008 to June 2014 was performed. Clinical and resuscitation data, including timing and dose of medications used, were extracted from the electronic medical record and comparisons made. A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into different groups based on the medication combination used during resuscitation: (1) epinephrine; (2) epinephrine and bicarbonate; (3) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and calcium; (4) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and epinephrine drip; and (5) epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, and epinephrine drip. No difference in baseline demographics or clinical data was present, apart from history of dementia and the use of calcium channel blockers. The number of medications given was correlated with resuscitation duration (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.50, p <0.001). The proportion of patients who died during the arrest was 12.5% in those who received epinephrine alone, 30.0% in those who received only epinephrine and bicarbonate, and 46.7% to 57.9% in the remaining groups. Patients receiving only epinephrine had shorter resuscitation durations compared to that of the other groups (p <0.001) and improved survival (p = 0.003). In conclusion, providers frequently use nonguideline medications in resuscitation efforts for in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Increased duration and mortality rates were found in those resuscitations compared with epinephrine alone, likely due to the longer resuscitation duration in the former groups.

  5. Induction of cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells by the dietary compound isoliquiritigenin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeo Myeong; Lim, Do Young; Choi, Hyun Ju; Jung, Jae In; Chung, Won-Yoon; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-02-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a flavonoid chalcone that is present in licorice, shallot, and bean sprouts, is known to have antitumorigenic activities. The present study examined whether ISL alters prostate cancer cell cycle progression. DU145 human and MatLyLu (MLL) rat prostate cancer cells were cultured with various concentrations of ISL. In both DU145 and MLL cells treated with ISL, the percentage of cells in the G1 phase increased, and the incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine decreased. ISL decreased the protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, whereas cyclin A and CDK2 expressions were unaltered in cells treated with ISL. The expression of the CDK inhibitor p27(KIP1) was increased in cells treated with 20 micromol/L ISL. In addition, treatment of cells with 20 micromol/L ISL for 24 hours led to G2/M cell cycle arrest. Cell division control (CDC) 2 protein levels remained unchanged. The protein levels of phospho-CDC2 (Tyr15) and cyclin B1 were increased, and the CDC25C level was decreased by ISL dose-dependently. We demonstrate that ISL promotes cell cycle arrest in DU145 and MLL cells, thereby providing insights into the mechanisms underlying its antitumorigenic activities.

  6. Equilibrium Liquid Crystal Phase Diagrams and Detection of Kinetic Arrest in Cellulose Nanocrystal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorato Rios, Camila; Kuhnhold, Anja; Bruckner, Johanna; Dannert, Rick; Schilling, Tanja; Lagerwall, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The cholesteric liquid crystal self-assembly of water-suspended cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) into a helical arrangement was observed already more than 20 years ago and the phenomenon was used to produce iridescent solid films by evaporating the solvent or via sol-gel processing. Yet it remains challenging to produce optically uniform films and to control the pitch reproducibly, reflecting the complexity of the three-stage drying process that is followed in preparing the films. An equilibrium liquid crystal phase formation stage is followed by a non-equilibrium kinetic arrest, which in turn is followed by structural collapse as the remaining solvent is evaporated. Here we focus on the first of these stages, combining a set of systematic rheology and polarizing optics experiments with computer simulations to establish a detailed phase diagram of aqueous CNC suspensions with two different values of the surface charge, up to the concentration where kinetic arrest sets in. We also study the effect of varying ionic strength of the solvent. Within the cholesteric phase regime, we measure the equilibrium helical pitch as a function of the same parameters. We report a hitherto unnoticed change in character of the isotropic-cholesteric transition at increasing ionic strength, with a continuous weakening of the first-order character up to the point where phase coexistence is difficult to detect macroscopically due to substantial critical fluctuations.

  7. Ventricular fibrillation-induced cardiac arrest in the rat as a model of global cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Kunjan R.; Della-Morte, David; Saul, Isabel; Prado, Ricardo; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest remains one of the leading causes of death and disability in Western countries. Although ventricular fibrillation (VF) models in rodents mimic the “square wave” type of insult (rapid loss of pulse and pressure) commonly observed in adult humans at the onset of cardiac arrest (CA), they are not popular because of the complicated animal procedure, poor animal survival and thermal injury. Here we present a modified, simple, reliable, ventricular fibrillation-induced rat model of CA that will be useful in studying mechanisms of CA-induced delayed neuronal death as well as the efficacy of neuroprotective drugs. CA was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats using a modified method of von Planta et al. In brief, VF was induced in anesthetized, paralyzed, mechanically ventilated rats by an alternating current delivered to the entrance of the superior vena cava into the heart. Resuscitation was initiated by administering a bolus injection of epinephrine and sodium bicarbonate followed by mechanical ventilation and manual chest compressions and countershock with a 10-J DC current. Neurologic deficit score was higher in the CA group compared to the sham group during early reperfusion periods, suggesting brain damage. Significant damage in CA1 hippocampus (21% normal neurons compared to control animals) was observed following histopathological assessment at seven days of reperfusion. We propose that this method of VF-induced CA in rat provides a tool to study the mechanism of CA-induced neuronal death without compromising heart functions. PMID:24187598

  8. When a Cleared Rape Is Not Cleared: A Multilevel Study of Arrest and Exceptional Clearance.

    PubMed

    Walfield, Scott M

    2016-05-01

    As rape remains one of the most underreported and least likely to be cleared of the violent crimes, it is of paramount importance to understand the factors associated with the likelihood of a case being cleared by law enforcement. This study uses data from the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) and the Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS), and a multilevel modeling approach to examine the relationship between victim, offender, incident, and police department characteristics contrasting the two types of clearance: arrest and exceptional clearance. The latter occurs due to reasons outside of law enforcement's control and despite being considered cleared, the offender is not arrested, charged, nor turned over for prosecution. Of the 16,231 cleared rapes in 238 departments, nearly half (47%) results in exceptional clearance when the victim refuses to cooperate or when prosecution is declined. Incident-level variables have a greater effect on the likelihood of exceptional clearance than victim and offender variables. The department explained a nontrivial amount of variation in the dependent variable, as 37% of the variance in type of clearance was between-department variation. Implications for future research on exceptional clearance and NIBRS are discussed.

  9. Lithium in drinking water and the incidences of crimes, suicides, and arrests related to drug addictions.

    PubMed

    Schrauzer, G N; Shrestha, K P

    1990-05-01

    Using data for 27 Texas counties from 1978-1987, it is shown that the incidence rates of suicide, homicide, and rape are significantly higher in counties whose drinking water supplies contain little or no lithium than in counties with water lithium levels ranging from 70-170 micrograms/L; the differences remain statistically significant (p less than 0.01) after corrections for population density. The corresponding associations with the incidence rates of robbery, burglary, and theft were statistically significant with p less than 0.05. These results suggest that lithium has moderating effects on suicidal and violent criminal behavior at levels that may be encountered in municipal water supplies. Comparisons of drinking water lithium levels, in the respective Texas counties, with the incidences of arrests for possession of opium, cocaine, and their derivatives (morphine, heroin, and codeine) from 1981-1986 also produced statistically significant inverse associations, whereas no significant or consistent associations were observed with the reported arrest rates for possession of marijuana, driving under the influence of alcohol, and drunkenness. These results suggest that lithium at low dosage levels has a generally beneficial effect on human behavior, which may be associated with the functions of lithium as a nutritionally-essential trace element. Subject to confirmation by controlled experiments with high-risk populations, increasing the human lithium intakes by supplementation, or the lithiation of drinking water is suggested as a possible means of crime, suicide, and drug-dependency reduction at the individual and community level.

  10. Unattached kinetochores rather than intrakinetochore tension arrest mitosis in taxol-treated cells

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Valentin; He, Jie; Ault, Jeffrey G.; O’Connell, Christopher B.; Yang, Nachen; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetochores attach chromosomes to the spindle microtubules and signal the spindle assembly checkpoint to delay mitotic exit until all chromosomes are attached. Light microscopy approaches aimed to indirectly determine distances between various proteins within the kinetochore (termed Delta) suggest that kinetochores become stretched by spindle forces and compact elastically when the force is suppressed. Low Delta is believed to arrest mitotic progression in taxol-treated cells. However, the structural basis of Delta remains unknown. By integrating same-kinetochore light microscopy and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that the value of Delta is affected by the variability in the shape and size of outer kinetochore domains. The outer kinetochore compacts when spindle forces are maximal during metaphase. When the forces are weakened by taxol treatment, the outer kinetochore expands radially and some kinetochores completely lose microtubule attachment, a condition known to arrest mitotic progression. These observations offer an alternative interpretation of intrakinetochore tension and question whether Delta plays a direct role in the control of mitotic progression. PMID:26833787

  11. Final report on development of Pulse Arrested Spark Discharge (PASD) for aging aircraft wiring application

    SciTech Connect

    Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Howard, R. Kevin; Pena, Gary Edward; Schneider, Larry X.; Higgins, Matthew B.; Glover, Steven Frank

    2006-09-01

    Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge (PASD) is a Sandia National Laboratories Patented, non-destructive wiring system diagnostic that has been developed to detect defects in aging wiring systems in the commercial aircraft fleet. PASD was previously demonstrated on relatively controlled geometry wiring such as coaxial cables and shielded twisted-pair wiring through a contract with the U.S. navy and is discussed in a Sandia National Laboratories report, SAND2001-3225 ''Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge (PASD) Diagnostic Technique for the Location of Defects in Aging Wiring Systems''. This report describes an expansion of earlier work by applying the PASD technique to unshielded twisted-pair and discrete wire configurations commonly found in commercial aircraft. This wiring is characterized by higher impedances as well as relatively non-uniform impedance profiles that have been found to be challenging for existing aircraft wiring diagnostics. Under a three year contract let by the Federal Aviation Administration, Interagency Agreement DTFA-03-00X90019, this technology was further developed for application on aging commercial aircraft wiring systems. This report describes results of the FAA program with discussion of previous work conducted under U.S. Department of Defense funding.

  12. Reversal of growth arrest in adolescents with Crohn's disease after parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Layden, T; Rosenberg, F; Nemchausky, G; Elson, C; Rosenberg, I

    1976-06-01

    Growth arrest and delayed onset of puberty often complicate childhood onset Crohn's disease of the small bowel (granulomatous enteritis). Nutritional deficits arising from inadequate dietary intake, malabsorption, and increased caloric needs may contribute to growth retardation. To assess whether a sustained high caloric and nitrogen intake could reestablish growth, 4 children with extensive Crohn's disease of the small bowel were studied before and after parenteral alimentation which was instituted for symtomatic disease control. Weight gain, positive nitrogen balance, and improved nutritional status were achieved during parenteral alimentation in each patient. In 2 patients weight gain was sustained using oral nutritional supplements, and a substantial increase in linear skeletal growth continued in the ensuing months. One patient entered puberty within 4 months of parenteral alimentation and another had the onset of menarche and the development of secondary sex characteristics 4 months after parenteral alimentation and resection of diseased bowel. Growth may be reestablished in some growth-arrested children if intake is sufficient to establish a sustained positive caloric and nitrogen balance. Nutritional requirements imposed by the demands of growth and active disease and often compounded by the catabolic effects of corticosteroids may be excessive; growth may occur only if these needs are met orally and/or parenterally.

  13. Effect of preperfusion of ascending concentrations of lead on digoxin-induced cardiac arrest in isolated frog heart.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, M S; Muthu, P; Parthiban, N

    1992-09-01

    The present work investigated the effect of preperfusion of ascending concentrations of lead acetate (LA) (10(-9), 10(-7) and 10(-5) M) on digoxin (DGN) cardiotoxicity in isolated frog heart, in order to look for any consequent variations in its lead-induced potentiation. The DGN perfusion time(s) and DGN exposure (micrograms DGN/10 mg heart weight) for, and myocardial DGN level (ng DGN/g wet tissue) at, cardiac arrest were the parameters evaluated so as to assess cardiotoxicity. Both sodium acetate and LA (10(-7) M) preperfusion led to a diminution in cardiac rate at 10 min of DGN perfusion without altering the contractility compared to the DGN alone group. With regard to DGN perfusion time for cardiac arrest, preperfusion of ascending concentrations of LA induced a corresponding decrease which was statistically significant (P < 0.05). On the other hand, in the experimental group that received preperfusion of 10(-9) M LA, the DGN exposure for cardiac arrest was not significantly different from that of the control, whereas in the 10(-7) and 10(-5) M groups, it was significantly lower (P < 0.05). In the experimental group that received preperfusion of 10(-7) M LA, the significant reduction in DGN perfusion time and DGN exposure was well corroborated by a diminution in the myocardial DGN level (4.01 +/- 0.17 ng/g wet tissue in comparison with the control value of 5.72 +/- 0.4 ng/g wet tissue, P < 0.05) at cardiac arrest. Taken together, these data reveal that with the preperfusion of LA in ascending concentrations, there is a relative increase in LA-induced potentiation of DGN cardiotoxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Demographic Patterns of Cumulative Arrest Prevalence By Ages 18 and 23

    PubMed Central

    Brame, Robert; Bushway, Shawn D.; Paternoster, Ray; Turner, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examine race, sex, and self-reported arrest histories (excluding arrests for minor traffic violations) from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY; N = 7,335) for the period 1997 through 2008 covering cumulative arrest histories through ages 18 and 23. The analysis produces three key findings: (1) males have higher cumulative prevalence of arrest than females; and (2) there are important race differences in the probability of arrest for males but not for females. Assuming the missing cases are missing at random, about 30% of black males have experienced at least one arrest by age 18 (vs. about 22% for white males); by age 23 about 49% of black males have been arrested (vs. about 38% for white males). Earlier research using the NLSY showed that the risk of arrest by age 23 was 30%, with nonresponse bounds [25.3%, 41.4%]. This study indicates that the risk of arrest is not evenly distributed across the population. Future research should focus on the identification and management of collateral risks that often accompany arrest experiences. PMID:26023241

  15. Growth arrest lines and intra-epiphyseal silhouettes: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Growth arrest lines can develop within the skeleton after physiological stress or trauma. They are usually evident on radiographs as transverse lines in the metaphyses and have been used in fields from palaeontology to orthopaedics. This report consists of three cases, two of which describe growth arrest lines in an intra-epiphyseal site hitherto rarely documented, and a third demonstrating their clinical application. Case presentation Case 1 describes a 9-year-old who suffered a knee hyperflexion injury requiring anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament reattachments. She subsequently developed a marked distal femoral intra-epiphyseal arrest silhouette, as well as metaphyseal arrest lines in the femur, tibia and fibula. Case 2 describes an 8-year-old who sustained a tibial spine fracture and underwent open reduction and internal fixation. Subsequent imaging shows a further example of femoral intra-epiphyseal arrest silhouette as well as tibia and fibula metaphyseal arrest lines. Case 3 describes a 10-year-old who sustained a distal tibia fracture which was managed with open reduction and internal fixation. Subsequently the metaphyseal growth arrest line was parallel to the physis, suggesting no growth arrest (a danger with such a fracture). Conclusion This case series describes two examples of rarely described intra-epiphyseal growth arrest silhouettes and demonstrates the usefulness of arrest lines when assessing for growth plate damage. PMID:24410952

  16. Arabidopsis root initiation defective1, a DEAH-box RNA helicase involved in pre-mRNA splicing, is essential for plant development.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Misato; Demura, Taku; Sugiyama, Munetaka

    2013-06-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a critical process in gene expression in eukaryotic cells. A multitude of proteins are known to be involved in pre-mRNA splicing in plants; however, the physiological roles of only some of these have been examined. Here, we investigated the developmental roles of a pre-mRNA splicing factor by analyzing root initiation defective1-1 (rid1-1), an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant previously shown to have severe defects in hypocotyl dedifferentiation and de novo meristem formation in tissue culture under high-temperature conditions. Phenotypic analysis in planta indicated that RID1 is differentially required during development and has roles in processes such as meristem maintenance, leaf morphogenesis, and root morphogenesis. RID1 was identified as encoding a DEAH-box RNA helicase implicated in pre-mRNA splicing. Transient expression analysis using intron-containing reporter genes showed that pre-mRNA splicing efficiency was affected by the rid1 mutation, which supported the presumed function of RID1 in pre-mRNA splicing. Our results collectively suggest that robust levels of pre-mRNA splicing are critical for several specific aspects of plant development.

  17. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Yedjou, Clement G; Tchounwou, Hervey M; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO₃)₂] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO₃)₂ for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI) assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05) increase of necrotic cell death in Pb(NO₃)₂-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO₃)₂ compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p < 0.05) in comet tail-length and percentages of DNA cleavage. Data generated from the flow cytometry assessment indicated that Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure significantly (p < 0.05) increased the proportion of caspase-3 positive cells (apoptotic cells) compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO₃)₂ inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb

  18. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yedjou, Clement G.; Tchounwou, Hervey M.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO3)2] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO3)2 for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI) assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05) increase of necrotic cell death in Pb(NO3)2-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO3)2 compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p < 0.05) in comet tail-length and percentages of DNA cleavage. Data generated from the flow cytometry assessment indicated that Pb(NO3)2 exposure significantly (p < 0.05) increased the proportion of caspase-3 positive cells (apoptotic cells) compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO3)2 exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO3)2 inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb(NO3)2 exposure and its associated adverse health

  19. Thrombolytic-Enhanced Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation After Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Elena; Davis, Ryan P.; Ren, Xiaodan; Sheth, Parth S.; Tooley, Trevor R.; Iyengar, Amit; Sowell, Brandon; Owens, Gabe E.; Bocks, Martin L.; Jacobs, Teresa L.; Yang, Lynda J.; Stacey, William C.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Neumar, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of the combination of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) and thrombolytic therapy on the recovery of vital organ function after prolonged cardiac arrest. Design Laboratory investigation Setting University Laboratory Subjects Pigs Interventions Animals underwent 30-minute untreated ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest followed by extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) for 6 hours. Animals were allocated into two experimental groups: t-ECPR, which received Streptokinase 1 MU and c-ECPR which did not receive Streptokinase. In both groups the resuscitation protocol included the following physiologic targets: mean arterial pressure (MAP) > 70 mmHg, Cerebral perfusion pressure (CerPP) > 50 mmHg, PaO2 150 ± 50 mmHg, PaCO2 40 ± 5 mmHg and core temperature 33 ± 1 °C. Defibrillation was attempted after 30 minutes of ECPR. Measurements and Main Results A cardiac resuscitability score was assessed on the basis of: success of defibrillation; return of spontaneous heart beat; weanability form ECPR; and left ventricular systolic function after weaning. The addition of thrombolytic to ECPR significantly improved cardiac resuscitability (3.7 ± 1.6 in t-ECPR vs 1.0 ± 1.5 in c-ECPR). Arterial lactate clearance was higher in t-ECPR than in c-ECPR (40 ± 15% VS 18 ± 21 %). At the end of the experiment, the intracranial pressure was significantly higher in c-ECPR than in t-ECPR. Recovery of brain electrical activity, as assessed by quantitative analysis of EEG signal, and ischemic neuronal injury on histopathologic examination did not differ between groups. Animals in t-ECPR group did not have increased bleeding complications, including intracerebral hemorrhages. Conclusions In a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest, thrombolytic-enhanced ECPR improved cardiac resuscitability and reduced brain edema, without increasing bleeding complications. However, early EEG recovery and ischemic neuronal injury were

  20. Leukemia: stem cells, maturation arrest, and differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2005-01-01

    Human myeloid leukemias provide models of maturation arrest and differentiation therapy of cancer. The genetic lesions of leukemia result in a block of differentiation (maturation arrest) that allows myeloid leukemic cells to continue to proliferate and/or prevents the terminal differentiation and apoptosis seen in normal white blood cells. In chronic myeloid leukemia, the bcr-abl (t9/22) translocation produces a fusion product that is an activated tyrosine kinase resulting in constitutive activation cells at the myelocyte level. This activation may be inhibited by imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, STI-571), which blocks the binding of ATP to the activated tyrosine kinase, prevents phosphorylation, and allows the leukemic cells to differentiate and undergo apoptosis. In acute promyelocytic leukemia, fusion of the retinoic acid receptor-alpha with the gene coding for promyelocytic protein, the PML-RAR alpha (t15:17) translocation, produces a fusion product that blocks the activity of the promyelocytic protein, which is required for formation of the granules of promyelocytes and prevents further differentiation. Retinoic acids bind to the retinoic acid receptor (RAR alpha) component of the fusion product, resulting in degradation of the fusion protein by ubiquitinization. This allows normal PML to participate in granule formation and differentiation of the promyelocytes. In one common type of acute myeloid leukemia, which results in maturation arrest at the myeloid precursor level, there is a mutation of FLT3, a transmembrane tyrosine kinase, which results in constitutive activation of the IL-3 receptor. This may be blocked by agents that inhibit farnesyl transferase. In each of these examples, specific inhibition of the genetically altered activation molecules of the leukemic cells allows the leukemic cells to differentiate and die. Because acute myeloid leukemias usually have mutation of more than one gene, combinations of specific inhibitors that act on the effects of

  1. [Partial arrest of growth after intra partum physeal injury.].

    PubMed

    Havránek, P; Mrzena, V

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of the sequelae of the osseous connection between the metaphysis after damage of a part of the growth plate (bone bridge, partial arrest of growth) is still difficult. In addition to many symptomatic operations (repeated osteotomies, prolongation of the bones, epiphyseal distraction, epiphyseodesis etc.) also causal provisions can be made. Because transplantations of the physis are not yet very successful in clinical work, the only procedure which has an impact on the cause of restricted growth is resection of the bone bridge and interposition of inert material prevents a relapse of ossification at the site of the impaired physis. The position is particularly alarming when partial growth arrest develops in neonates and while only symptomatic treatment is used it is essential to perform many operations to achieve the correct length and axis of the affected bone. The authors present the case of a little girl where inter partum separation of the distal epiphysis of the femur occurred and already at the age of 10 months a central bridge caused shortening of the bone by 2 cm. At the age of 11 months the authors resected the bridge and interposed autogenous fat, as described by Langenskiold. After this intervention substantial, though incomplete restitution of the physis occurred. Therefore the authors resected at the age of 2 years and 4 months the remainder of the bridge and interposed autogenous adipose tissue. After this operation complete improvement of the shape of the epiphysis occurred and restoration of normal growth of the femur. Now at the age of five years the femur grows normally, the original shortening of the bone by 2 cm persists and the axis of the extremity is correct. The patient walks normally with a heel higher by 1 cm. Key words: physis, injury, partial arrest of growth, different length of extremities.

  2. Loss of p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis promotes genomic instability and premature aging.

    PubMed

    Li, Tongyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Jiang, Le; Manfredi, James; Zha, Shan; Gu, Wei

    2016-03-15

    Although p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis are well accepted as major tumor suppression mechanisms, the loss of these functions does not directly lead to tumorigenesis, suggesting that the precise roles of these canonical activities of p53 need to be redefined. Here, we report that the cells derived from the mutant mice expressing p533KR, an acetylation-defective mutant that fails to induce cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, exhibit high levels of aneuploidy upon DNA damage. Moreover, the embryonic lethality caused by the deficiency of XRCC4, a key DNA double strand break repair factor, can be fully rescued in the p533KR/3KR background. Notably, despite high levels of genomic instability, p533KR/3KRXRCC4-/- mice, unlike p53-/- XRCC4-/- mice, are not succumbed to pro-B-cell lymphomas. Nevertheless, p533KR/3KR XRCC4-/- mice display aging-like phenotypes including testicular atrophy, kyphosis, and premature death. Further analyses demonstrate that SLC7A11 is downregulated and that p53-mediated ferroptosis is significantly induced in spleens and testis of p533KR/3KRXRCC4-/- mice. These results demonstrate that the direct role of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis is to control genomic stability in vivo. Our study not only validates the importance of ferroptosis in p53-mediated tumor suppression in vivo but also reveals that the combination of genomic instability and activation of ferroptosis may promote aging-associated phenotypes.

  3. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) syndrome following cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Dheeraj; Singla, Deepak; Singh, Jasveer; Jindal, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) appears to be a unique syndrome following brain injury. It can echo many life-threatening conditions, making its early recognition and management a challenge for intensivists. A delay in early recognition and subsequent management may result in increased morbidity, which is preventable in affected patients. Herein, we report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with PAID syndrome following prolonged cardiac arrest, and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical presentation and management of this rare and under-recognised clinical entity. PMID:25189311

  4. Primary Combined Replacements for Treatment of Distal Radius Physeal Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of a 59-year-old female patient with a posttraumatic growth arrest of the distal radius, leading to radioscaphoid osteoarthritis, carpal instability, and a symptomatic ulnocarpal impaction syndrome that was successfully treated with combined total wrist arthroplasty and ulnar head implant. One year postoperatively, there was no change in position without any signs of loosening of both implants. Both subjectively and functionally, all clinical parameters—Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH), visual analog scale (VAS), grip strength—had improved. Level of Evidence: IV PMID:25097815

  5. Death by Disimpaction: A Bradycardic Arrest Secondary to Rectal Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Cory M.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal examination and fecal disimpaction are common procedures performed in the Emergency Department on a daily basis. Here, we report a rare case of a patient suffering a cardiac arrest and ultimately death likely due to rectal manipulation. A 66-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with a complaint of abdominal distention and constipation. A rectal exam was performed. During the examination the patient became apneic. On the cardiac monitor the patient was found to be in pulseless electrical activity with a bradycardic rate. Our recommendation would be to provide adequate analgesia and close patient monitoring of those undergoing this procedure especially patients with significant stool burdens. PMID:28116179

  6. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  7. Continuous cerebral hemodynamic measurement during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David R.; Rusin, Craig G.; Miller-Hance, Wanda; Kibler, Kathy; Baker, Wesley B.; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Fraser, Charles D.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Licht, Daniel J.; Brady, Kenneth M.

    2016-01-01

    While survival of children with complex congenital heart defects has improved in recent years, roughly half suffer neurological deficits suspected to be related to cerebral ischemia. Here we report the first demonstration of optical diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for continuous and non-invasive monitoring of cerebral microvascular blood flow during complex human neonatal or cardiac surgery. Comparison between DCS and Doppler ultrasound flow measurements during deep hypothermia, circulatory arrest, and rewarming were in good agreement. Looking forward, DCS instrumentation, alone and with NIRS, could provide access to flow and metabolic biomarkers needed by clinicians to adjust neuroprotective therapy during surgery. PMID:27699112

  8. Bleeding following deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Machado, Sandra; Apostolakis, John

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a technique of extracorporeal circulation commonly used in children with complex congenital heart defects undergoing surgical repairs. The use of profound cooling (20 degrees C) and complete cessation of circulation allow adequate exposure and correction of these complex lesions, with enhanced cerebral protection. However, the profound physiologic state of DHCA results in significant derangement of the coagulation system and a high incidence of postoperative bleeding. This review examines the impact of DHCA on bleeding and transfusion requirements in children and the pathophysiology of DHCA-induced platelet dysfunction. It also focuses on possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease bleeding following DHCA in children.

  9. Deoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber L. induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Miaoxian; Chung, Hau Yin; Li, Yaolan

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Deoxyelephantopin (ESD) inhibited cell proliferation in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. {yields} ESD induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases via modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. {yields} ESD triggered apoptosis by dysfunction of mitochondria and induction of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways. {yields} ESD also triggered Akt, ERK, and JNK signaling pathways. -- Abstract: Deoxyelephantopin (ESD), a naturally occurring sesquiterpene lactone present in the Chinese medicinal herb, Elephantopus scaber L. exerted anticancer effects on various cultured cancer cells. However, the cellular mechanisms by which it controls the development of the cancer cells are unavailable, particularly the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. In this study, we found that ESD inhibited the CNE cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases was also found. Western blotting analysis showed that modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins was responsible for the ESD-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, ESD also triggered apoptosis in CNE cells. Dysfunction in mitochondria was found to be associated with the ESD-induced apoptosis as evidenced by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{Psi}m), the translocation of cytochrome c, and the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. Despite the Western blotting analysis showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (cleavage of caspases-3, -7, -8, -9, and -10) were triggered in the ESD-induced apoptosis, additional analysis also showed that the induction of apoptosis could be achieved by the caspase-independent manner. Besides, Akt, ERK and JNK pathways were found to involve in ESD-induced cell death. Overall, our findings provided the first evidence that ESD induced cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in CNE cells. ESD could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC).

  10. Feasibility of cognitive functional assessment in cardiac arrest survivors using an abbreviated laptop-based neurocognitive battery.

    PubMed

    Iannacone, Stephen; Leary, Marion; Esposito, Emily C; Ruparel, Kosha; Savitt, Adam; Mott, Allison; Richard, Jan A; Gur, Ruben C; Abella, Benjamin S

    2014-09-01

    Cardiac arrest survivors exhibit varying degrees of neurological recovery even in the setting of targeted temperature management (TTM) use, ranging from severe impairments to making a seemingly full return to neurologic baseline function. We sought to explore the feasibility of utilizing a laptop-based neurocognitive battery to identify more subtle cognitive deficits in this population. In a convenience sample of cardiac arrest survivors discharged with a cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1, we evaluated the use of a computerized neurocognitive battery (CNB) in this group compared to a healthy control normative population. The CNB was designed to test 11 specific neurocognitive domains, including such areas as working memory and spatial processing. Testing was scored for both accuracy and speed. In a feasibility convenience sample of 29 cardiac arrest survivors, the mean age was 52.9±16.7 years; 12 patients received postarrest TTM and 17 did not receive TTM. Patients tolerated the battery well and performed at normative levels for both accuracy and speed on most of the 11 domains, but showed reduced accuracy of working memory and speed of spatial memory with large magnitudes (>1 SD), even among those receiving TTM. Across all domains, including those using speed and accuracy, 7 of the 29 subjects (24%) achieved statistically significant scores lower from the normative population in two or more domains. In this population of CPC 1 cardiac arrest survivors, a sensitive neurocognitive battery was feasible and suggests that specific cognitive deficits can be detected compared to a normative population, despite CPC 1 designation. Such testing might allow improved measurement of outcomes following TTM interventions in future trials.

  11. Protective effects of a magnesium magnetic isotope (Mg25)-exchanging nanoparticle (25MgPMC16 ) on mitochondrial functional disorders in esmolol-induced cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Adeli, S; Zarrindast, M R; Niknahad, H; Sarkar, S; Bidgoli, S A; Korani, M; Ghasemzadeh, P; Rezayat, S M

    2012-04-01

    In cardiac surgery, agents are needed to produce temporary cardiac arrest (cardioplegia). One of these agents is esmolol (ESM) which is a short-acting selective beta-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist and its overdose causes diastolic ventricular arrest. The (25) MgPMC(16) (porphyrin adducts of cyclohexil fullerene-C60) is known as a nanoparticle which has a cardioprotective effect when the heart is subjected to stressful conditions. In this study, we aimed to confirm the deleterious effects of ESM overdose on cardiac mitochondria and identify any protective effects of (25) MgPMC(16) in male Wistar rats. Esmolol 100 mg kg(-1) (LD50 = 71 mg kg(-1) ) was injected intravenously (i.v.) into tail vein to induce cardiac arrest. This dose was obtained from an ESM dose-response curve which induces at least 80% arrest in rats. (25) MgPMC(16) at three different doses (45, 90 and 224 mg kg(-1) ) was injected i.v. as pretreatment, eight hours before ESM injection. (25) MgCl(2) or (24) MgPMC(16) were used as controls. Following cardiac arrest, the heart was removed and the mitochondria extracted. Mitochondrial viability and the adenosine 5'-diphosphate sodium salt hydrate/Adenosine 5'-triphosphate disodium salt hydrate (ADP/ATP) ratio were measured as biomarkers of mitochondrial function. Results indicate that (25) MgPMC(16) caused a significant increase in mitochondrial viability and decrease in ADP/ATP ratio. No significant changes were seen with (24) MgPMC(16) or (25) MgCl(2) . It is concluded that cardiac arrest induced by ESM overdose leads to a significant decrease in mitochondrial viability and their ATP levels, whereas pretreatment by (25) MgPMC(16) can protect mitochondria by increasing ATP level through liberation of Mg into cells and the improvement of hypoxia.

  12. Joints and Mineral Veins in Limestone-Marl Alternations: Arrest and Fracture Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, S. L.; Reyer, D.

    2009-05-01

    Layering is a common feature of many rock masses. In particular, many sedimentary rocks are layered because of depositional changes (stratification), and diagenetic processes. Mechanical layering, where the mechanical properties, particularly the Young's moduli (stiffness), change between layers, may coincide with changes in grain size, mineral content or facies. The mechanical layering of the rock is important because layering commonly results in abrupt changes in local stress fields that may lead to fracture arrest. However, if all the beds in a rock mass have essentially the same Young's modulus and their contacts are welded together (sealed or healed) the beds may function mechanically as a single layer. Here we explore how mechanical layers relate to sedimentary layers in limestone-marl alternations. This we do by investigating the effects of sedimentary layering of the host rock, on the emplacement and geometries of extension fractures such as joints and mineral veins. Detailed field studies were carried out at two localities of well-exposed limestone-marl alternations: (1) the Jurassic Blue Lias at the Glamorgan Coast of South Wales, UK, and (2) the Triassic Muschelkalk in the Kraichgau area, Southwest Germany. In both study areas, calcite veins occur almost exclusively in the cores and damage zones of faults, whereas jointing is pervasive. Fracture arrest, common in mechanically layered host rocks, is primarily controlled by local variations in the stress field, mainly due to three factors: discontinuities (fractures and contacts), changes in host rock mechanical properties, and stress barriers, where the local stress field is unfavorable to fracture propagation. These factors are related in that changes in stiffness and stress barriers are common at contacts between different rock types. A fourth mechanism, namely the material toughness (critical strain energy release rate) of the contact in relation to that of the adjacent layers has been much studied in

  13. Crack propagation and arrest in CFRP materials with strain softening regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilligan, Matthew Anthony

    Understanding the growth and arrest of cracks in composite materials is critical for their effective utilization in fatigue-sensitive and damage susceptible applications such as primary aircraft structures. Local tailoring of the laminate stack to provide crack arrest capacity intermediate to major structural components has been investigated and demonstrated since some of the earliest efforts in composite aerostructural design, but to date no rigorous model of the crack arrest mechanism has been developed to allow effective sizing of these features. To address this shortcoming, the previous work in the field is reviewed, with particular attention to the analysis methodologies proposed for similar arrest features. The damage and arrest processes active in such features are investigated, and various models of these processes are discussed and evaluated. Governing equations are derived based on a proposed mechanistic model of the crack arrest process. The derived governing equations are implemented in a numerical model, and a series of simulations are performed to ascertain the general characteristics of the proposed model and allow qualitative comparison to existing experimental results. The sensitivity of the model and the arrest process to various parameters is investigated, and preliminary conclusions regarding the optimal feature configuration are developed. To address deficiencies in the available material and experimental data, a series of coupon tests are developed and conducted covering a range of arrest zone configurations. Test results are discussed and analyzed, with a particular focus on identification of the proposed failure and arrest mechanisms. Utilizing the experimentally derived material properties, the tests are reproduced with both the developed numerical tool as well as a FEA-based implementation of the arrest model. Correlation between the simulated and experimental results is analyzed, and future avenues of investigation are identified

  14. UCSF Protocol for Caries Arrest Using Silver Diamine Fluoride: Rationale, Indications, and Consent

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Jeremy A; Ellenikiotis, Hellene; Milgrom, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration recently cleared silver diamine fluoride for reducing tooth sensitivity. Clinical trials document arrest and prevention of dental caries by silver diamine fluoride; this off-label use is now permissible and appropriate under U.S. law. A CDT code was approved for caries arresting medicaments for 2016 to facilitate documentation and billing. We present a systematic review, clinical indications, clinical protocol, and consent procedure to guide application for caries arrest treatment. PMID:26897901

  15. Applications of elastic-viscoplastic constitutive models in dynamic analyses of crack run-arrest events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, B. R.; Pugh, C. E.; Swindeman, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Applications of nonlinear techniques to the first series of six HSST wide-plate crack-arrest tests that were performed are described. The experiments include crack initiations at low temperatures and relatively long (20 cm) cleavage propagation phases which are terminated by arrest in high temperature regions. Crack arrest are then followed by ductile tearing events. Consequently, the crack front regions are exposed to wide ranges of strain rates and temperatures.

  16. Physeal growth arrest of the distal radius treated by the Ilizarov technique. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Aston, J W; Henley, M B

    1989-07-01

    Growth arrest of the distal radius may follow a severe injury to the growth plate. When the growth of the distal radius ceases in the child, continuing ulnar growth results in radial deviation of the hand and dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint. Treatment options in such a limb-length discrepancy are resection of the physeal bony bridge, lengthening of the shaft of the radius with bone graft using the principle of the Wagner technique, resection or epiphysiodesis of the distal ulna, and lengthening through a metaphyseal corticotomy without the use of bone graft. We report a case of metaphyseal lengthening of the radius employing the Ilizarov external fixator for controlled distraction osteogenesis.

  17. Natural Compounds as Modulators of Cell Cycle Arrest: Application for Anticancer Chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; Cevallos-Solorzano, Gabriela; Romero-Benavides, Juan Carlos; Orellana, Maria Isabel Ramirez

    2017-04-01

    Natural compounds from various plants, microorganisms and marine species play an important role in the discovery novel components that can be successfully used in numerous biomedical applications, including anticancer therapeutics. Since uncontrolled and rapid cell division is a hallmark of cancer, unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying mitosis is key to understanding how various natural compounds might function as inhibitors of cell cycle progression. A number of natural compounds that inhibit the cell cycle arrest have proven effective for killing cancer cells in vitro, in vivo and in clinical settings. Significant advances that have been recently made in the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the cell cycle regulation using the chemotherapeutic agents is of great importance for improving the efficacy of targeted therapeutics and overcoming resistance to anticancer drugs, especially of natural origin, which inhibit the activities of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, as well as other proteins and enzymes involved in proper regulation of cell cycle leading to controlled cell proliferation.

  18. Effects of Hormone Agonists on Sf9 Cells, Proliferation and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Giraudo, Maeva; Califano, Jérôme; Hilliou, Frédérique; Tran, Trang; Taquet, Nathalie; Feyereisen, René; Le Goff, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Methoxyfenozide and methoprene are two insecticides that mimic the action of the main hormones involved in the control of insect growth and development, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. We investigated their effect on the Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cell line. Methoxyfenozide was more toxic than methoprene in cell viability tests and more potent in the inhibition of cellular proliferation. Cell growth arrest occurred in the G2/M phase after a methoprene treatment and more modestly in G1 after methoxyfenozide treatment. Microarray experiments and real-time quantitative PCR to follow the expression of nuclear receptors ultraspiracle and ecdysone receptor were performed to understand the molecular action of these hormone agonists. Twenty-six genes were differentially expressed after methoxyfenozide treatment and 55 genes after methoprene treatment with no gene in common between the two treatments. Our results suggest two different signalling pathways in Sf9 cells. PMID:21991338

  19. Effects of hormone agonists on Sf9 cells, proliferation and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, Maeva; Califano, Jérôme; Hilliou, Frédérique; Tran, Trang; Taquet, Nathalie; Feyereisen, René; Le Goff, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Methoxyfenozide and methoprene are two insecticides that mimic the action of the main hormones involved in the control of insect growth and development, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. We investigated their effect on the Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cell line. Methoxyfenozide was more toxic than methoprene in cell viability tests and more potent in the inhibition of cellular proliferation. Cell growth arrest occurred in the G2/M phase after a methoprene treatment and more modestly in G1 after methoxyfenozide treatment. Microarray experiments and real-time quantitative PCR to follow the expression of nuclear receptors ultraspiracle and ecdysone receptor were performed to understand the molecular action of these hormone agonists. Twenty-six genes were differentially expressed after methoxyfenozide treatment and 55 genes after methoprene treatment with no gene in common between the two treatments. Our results suggest two different signalling pathways in Sf9 cells.

  20. [Current cooling methods for induction of mild hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors].

    PubMed

    Skulec, R; Truhlár, A; Ostádal, P; Telekes, P; Knor, J; Tichácek, M; Cerný, V; Seblová, J

    2009-11-01

    Induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia early after return of spontaneous circulation improves prognosis of cardiac arrest survivors. Rapid cooling of the patients and correct maintainance of the target therapeutic temperature followed by controlled slow rewarming can be achieved by several noninvasive and invasive methods of various efficacy. Elementary and the most frequently used methods are surface cooling via ice-packs and rapid intravenous administration of cold crystaloids. Mattress cooling systems and facilities for endovascular cathether-cooling are more sophisticated, manageable and ensure more precise titration of therapeutic temperature. Cooling caps and helmets leading to selective head cooling can be used as the complementary techniques. Several other methods are too instrumentation-intensive, too invasive or investigated in animal experiments only. Anyway, near future may bring a rapid development of new effective and safe cooling systems.

  1. Sequence requirements for transcriptional arrest in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi Chen; Kellems, R.E.; Innis, J.W. ); Sun, Minghua; Wright, D.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that a transcriptional arrest site exists in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene and that this site may play a role in ADA gene expression. Sequences involved in this process are not known precisely. To further define the template requirements for transcriptional arrest within exon 1 of the human ADA gene, various ADA templates were constructed and their abilities to confer transcriptional arrest were determined following injection into Xenopus oocytes. The exon 1 transcriptional arrest signal functioned downstream of several RNA polymerase II promoters and an RNA polymerase II promoter, implying that the transcriptional arrest site in exon 1 of the ADA gene is promoter independent. They identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal. Additional studies showed that the transcriptional arrest site functioned only in the naturally occurring orientation. Therefore, they have identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal in an orientation-dependent and promoter-independent manner. On the basis of the authors findings, they hypothesize that tissue-specific expression of the ADA gene is governed by factors that function as antiterminators to promote transcriptional readthrough of the exon 1 transcriptional arrest site.

  2. Pre-hospital Assessment of the Role of Adrenaline: Measuring the Effectiveness of Drug administration In Cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC-2): Trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Gavin D; Quinn, Tom; Deakin, Charles D; Nolan, Jerry P; Lall, Ranjit; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Cooke, Matthew; Lamb, Sarah E; Petrou, Stavros; Achana, Felix; Finn, Judith; Jacobs, Ian G; Carson, Andrew; Smyth, Mike; Han, Kyee; Byers, Sonia; Rees, Nigel; Whitfield, Richard; Moore, Fionna; Fothergill, Rachael; Stallard, Nigel; Long, John; Hennings, Susie; Horton, Jessica; Kaye, Charlotte; Gates, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Despite its use since the 1960s, the safety or effectiveness of adrenaline as a treatment for cardiac arrest has never been comprehensively evaluated in a clinical trial. Although most studies have found that adrenaline increases the chance of return of spontaneous circulation for short periods, many studies found harmful effects on the brain and raise concern that adrenaline may reduce overall survival and/or good neurological outcome. The PARAMEDIC-2 trial seeks to determine if adrenaline is safe and effective in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. This is a pragmatic, individually randomised, double blind, controlled trial with a parallel economic evaluation. Participants will be eligible if they are in cardiac arrest in the out-of-hospital environment and advanced life support is initiated. Exclusions are cardiac arrest as a result of anaphylaxis or life threatening asthma, and patient known or appearing to be under 16 or pregnant. 8000 participants treated by 5 UK ambulance services will be randomised between December 2014 and August 2017 to adrenaline (intervention) or placebo (control) through opening pre-randomised drug packs. Clinical outcomes are survival to 30 days (primary outcome), hospital discharge, 3, 6 and 12 months, health related quality of life, and neurological and cognitive outcomes (secondary outcomes). Trial registration (ISRCTN73485024).

  3. Higher order nuclear organization in growth arrest of humanmammary epithelial cells: A novel role for telomere-associated proteinTIN2

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminker, Patrick; Plachot, Cedric; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Chung, Peter; Crippen, Danielle; Petersen, Ole W.; Bissell, Mina J.; Campisi, Judith; Lelievre, Sophie A.

    2004-12-15

    Nuclear organization, such as the formation of specific nuclear subdomains, is generally thought to be involved in the control of cellular phenotype; however, there are relatively few specific examples of how mammalian nuclei organize during radical changes in phenotype, such as those which occur during differentiation and growth arrest. Using human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) in which growth arrest is essential for morphological differentiation, we show that the arrest of cell proliferation is accompanied by a reorganization of the telomere-associated protein, TIN2, into one to three large nuclear subdomains. The large TIN2 domains do not contain telomeres and occur concomitant with the continued presence of TIN2 at telomeres. The TIN2 domains were sensitive to DNAse, but not RNAse, occurred frequently, but not exclusively near nucleoli, and overlapped often with dense domains containing heterochromatin protein l{gamma}. Expression of truncated forms of TIN2 simultaneously prevented the formation of TIN2 domains and relaxed the stringent morphogenesis-induced growth arrest in HMECs. Our findings reveal a novel extra-telomeric organization of TIN2 associated with the control of cell proliferation and identify TIN2 as an important regulator of mammary epithelial differentiation.

  4. 11th Yahya Cohen Memorial Lecture: An in vivo comparative study of the ability of derived mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of partial growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Hui, James H P; Li, Li; Ouyang, Hong-Wei; Teo, Yee-Hong; Lee, Eng-Hin

    2009-01-01

    Few in vivo studies had previously been attempted in reaffirming the in vitro data in current literature. This study evaluated the ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow, periosteum and fat to treat partial growth arrest in immature New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits. A physeal arrest model in an immature rabbit was created. The bony bridge was excised 3 weeks later, and MSCs from various sources were transferred into the physeal defect of different rabbits. Group I consisted of bone marrow-derived MSCs, Group II: periosteumderived MSCs, Group III: fat-derived MSCs. Contra-lateral tibiae, without undergoing operation, served as self-control. The animals were subsequently sacrificed, with radiological and histological analyses performed. All MSCs demonstrated chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation potentials in vitro. In correction of varus angulation groups I and II exhibited superior results when compared to group III (P <0.05). The length discrepancies between operated and normal tibiae in groups I, II and III were significantly corrected when compared to the control group (P <0.01). In conclusion, bone marrow and periosteum derived stem cells provided better correction of physeal arrest in rabbits. The source of MSCs itself could influence the success in the treatment of growth arrest.

  5. The rice GERMINATION DEFECTIVE 1, encoding a B3 domain transcriptional repressor, regulates seed germination and seedling development by integrating GA and carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoli; Hou, Xiaomei; Fang, Jun; Wei, Piwei; Xu, Bo; Chen, Mingluan; Feng, Yuqi; Chu, Chengcai

    2013-08-01

    It has been shown that seed development is regulated by a network of transcription factors in Arabidopsis including LEC1 (LEAFY COTYLEDON1), L1L (LEC1-like) and the B3 domain factors LEC2, FUS3 (FUSCA3) and ABI3 (ABA-INSENSITIVE3); however, molecular and genetic regulation of seed development in cereals is poorly understood. To understand seed development and seed germination in cereals, a large-scale screen was performed using our T-DNA mutant population, and a mutant germination-defective1 (gd1) was identified. In addition to the severe germination defect, the gd1 mutant also shows a dwarf phenotype and abnormal flower development. Molecular and biochemical analyses revealed that GD1 encodes a B3 domain-containing transcription factor with repression activity. Consistent with the dwarf phenotype of gd1, expression of the gibberelic acid (GA) inactivation gene OsGA2ox3 is increased dramatically, accompanied by reduced expression of GA biosynthetic genes including OsGA20ox1, OsGA20ox2 and OsGA3ox2 in gd1, resulting in a decreased endogenous GA₄ level. Exogenous application of GA not only induced GD1 expression, but also partially rescued the dwarf phenotype of gd1. Furthermore, GD1 binds to the promoter of OsLFL1, a LEC2/FUS3-like gene of rice, via an RY element, leading to significant up-regulation of OsLFL1 and a large subset of seed maturation genes in the gd1 mutant. Plants over-expressing OsLFL1 partly mimic the gd1 mutant. In addition, expression of GD1 was induced under sugar treatment, and the contents of starch and soluble sugar are altered in the gd1 mutant. These data indicate that GD1 participates directly or indirectly in regulating GA and carbohydrate homeostasis, and further regulates rice seed germination and seedling development.

  6. Non-equilibrium theory of arrested spinodal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Olais-Govea, José Manuel; López-Flores, Leticia; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2015-11-07

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible relaxation [P. E. Ramŕez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010); 82, 061504 (2010)] is applied to the description of the non-equilibrium processes involved in the spinodal decomposition of suddenly and deeply quenched simple liquids. For model liquids with hard-sphere plus attractive (Yukawa or square well) pair potential, the theory predicts that the spinodal curve, besides being the threshold of the thermodynamic stability of homogeneous states, is also the borderline between the regions of ergodic and non-ergodic homogeneous states. It also predicts that the high-density liquid-glass transition line, whose high-temperature limit corresponds to the well-known hard-sphere glass transition, at lower temperature intersects the spinodal curve and continues inside the spinodal region as a glass-glass transition line. Within the region bounded from below by this low-temperature glass-glass transition and from above by the spinodal dynamic arrest line, we can recognize two distinct domains with qualitatively different temperature dependence of various physical properties. We interpret these two domains as corresponding to full gas-liquid phase separation conditions and to the formation of physical gels by arrested spinodal decomposition. The resulting theoretical scenario is consistent with the corresponding experimental observations in a specific colloidal model system.

  7. Non-equilibrium theory of arrested spinodal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olais-Govea, José Manuel; López-Flores, Leticia; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2015-11-01

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible relaxation [P. E. Ramŕez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010); 82, 061504 (2010)] is applied to the description of the non-equilibrium processes involved in the spinodal decomposition of suddenly and deeply quenched simple liquids. For model liquids with hard-sphere plus attractive (Yukawa or square well) pair potential, the theory predicts that the spinodal curve, besides being the threshold of the thermodynamic stability of homogeneous states, is also the borderline between the regions of ergodic and non-ergodic homogeneous states. It also predicts that the high-density liquid-glass transition line, whose high-temperature limit corresponds to the well-known hard-sphere glass transition, at lower temperature intersects the spinodal curve and continues inside the spinodal region as a glass-glass transition line. Within the region bounded from below by this low-temperature glass-glass transition and from above by the spinodal dynamic arrest line, we can recognize two distinct domains with qualitatively different temperature dependence of various physical properties. We interpret these two domains as corresponding to full gas-liquid phase separation conditions and to the formation of physical gels by arrested spinodal decomposition. The resulting theoretical scenario is consistent with the corresponding experimental observations in a specific colloidal model system.

  8. An unusual cause of cardiac arrest in a hospitalized patient.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ranjan K; Tumkur, Anil; Bhat, Krishnamurthy; Chacko, Biby

    2013-01-01

    We present an unusual case of 24 year old male who was hospitalized for dental procedure and developed cardiac arrest 2 days after the procedure. The patient presented with swelling of buccal cavity for which a biopsy was taken. Two days after the procedure, apparently normal patient suddenly presented at mid night with VT and VF, which were intractable requiring multiple DC shocks. During this period arterial blood gas analysis revealed severe acidosis. The circumstances led us to suspect poisoning as one of the cause for his medical condition. We looked for commonly available toxins. One of the commonly available toxins is hand sanitizer which contains Isopropyl alcohol, glycerin and perfume. Due to prolonged cardiac arrest and intractable arrhythmia patient had sustained hypoxic brain injury. Patient remained hemodynamically stable for next 9 days although his CNS status did not improve. Patient succumbed to sepsis on 9(th) day. Healthcare professionals should be aware of such possibilities and treat the patients at the earliest and put a check on the easy availability of IPA based hand sanitizers.

  9. Non-equilibrium theory of arrested spinodal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Olais-Govea, José Manuel; López-Flores, Leticia; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2015-11-07

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible relaxation [P. E. Ramŕez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010); 82, 061504 (2010)] is applied to the description of the non-equilibrium processes involved in the spinodal decomposition of suddenly and deeply quenched simple liquids. For model liquids with hard-sphere plus attractive (Yukawa or square well) pair potential, the theory predicts that the spinodal curve, besides being the threshold of the thermodynamic stability of homogeneous states, is also the borderline between the regions of ergodic and non-ergodic homogeneous states. It also predicts that the high-density liquid-glass transition line, whose high-temperature limit corresponds to the well-known hard-sphere glass transition, at lower temperature intersects the spinodal curve and continues inside the spinodal region as a glass-glass transition line. Within the region bounded from below by this low-temperature glass-glass transition and from above by the spinodal dynamic arrest line, we can recognize two distinct domains with qualitatively different temperature dependence of various physical properties. We interpret these two domains as corresponding to full gas-liquid phase separation conditions and to the formation of physical gels by arrested spinodal decomposition. The resulting theoretical scenario is consistent with the corresponding experimental observations in a specific colloidal model system.

  10. Altered brain energetics induces mitochondrial fission arrest in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A; Bachmeier, Benjamin V; Gateno, Benjamin; Schroeder, Andreas; Yao, Jia; Itoh, Kie; Sesaki, Hiromi; Poon, Wayne W; Gylys, Karen H; Patterson, Emily R; Parisi, Joseph E; Diaz Brinton, Roberta; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Trushina, Eugenia

    2016-01-05

    Altered brain metabolism is associated with progression of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Mitochondria respond to bioenergetic changes by continuous fission and fusion. To account for three dimensional architecture of the brain tissue and organelles, we applied 3-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) reconstruction to visualize mitochondrial structure in the brain tissue from patients and mouse models of AD. We identified a previously unknown mitochondrial fission arrest phenotype that results in elongated interconnected organelles, "mitochondria-on-a-string" (MOAS). Our data suggest that MOAS formation may occur at the final stages of fission process and was not associated with altered translocation of activated dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria but with reduced GTPase activity. Since MOAS formation was also observed in the brain tissue of wild-type mice in response to hypoxia or during chronological aging, fission arrest may represent fundamental compensatory adaptation to bioenergetic stress providing protection against mitophagy that may preserve residual mitochondrial function. The discovery of novel mitochondrial phenotype that occurs in the brain tissue in response to energetic stress accurately detected only using 3D EM reconstruction argues for a major role of mitochondrial dynamics in regulating neuronal survival.

  11. Immediate emergency department external cardiac pacing for prehospital bradyasystolic arrest.

    PubMed

    White, J M; Nowak, R M; Martin, G B; Best, R; Carden, D L; Tomlanovich, M C

    1985-04-01

    Approximately 25% of patients in prehospital cardiac arrest present in bradyasystolic rhythms, and their long-term prognosis is very poor. Our study was undertaken to determine the utility of immediate emergency department (ED) external cardiac pacing in this situation. Twenty patients presenting with bradyasystolic prehospital cardiac arrest were entered in the study. All received the usual advanced cardiac life support therapy, but also were externally paced immediately using an automated external defibrillator and pacemaker (AEDP). Only two of 20 patients showed evidence of electrical capture, and none developed pulses with pacing. Four of the 20 patients developed a sinus rhythm and blood pressure during resuscitation. Three survived to leave the ED, but none survived to leave the hospital. An increase in the rate of bradycardia and pulseless idioventricular rhythms that was independent of electrical capture or pharmacologic therapy was noted occasionally. Although survival was not enhanced using the AEDP, the device was reliable, easy to use, and free of complications. External cardiac pacing warrants further investigation in the prehospital setting.

  12. New Clothes for the Jasmonic Acid Receptor COI1: Delayed Abscission, Meristem Arrest and Apical Dominance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joonyup; Dotson, Bradley; Rey, Camila; Lindsey, Joshua; Bleecker, Anthony B.; Binder, Brad M.; Patterson, Sara E.

    2013-01-01

    In a screen for delayed floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis, we have identified a novel mutant of CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1), the F-box protein that has been shown to be the jasmonic acid (JA) co-receptor. While JA has been shown to have an important role in senescence, root development, pollen dehiscence and defense responses, there has been little focus on its critical role in floral organ abscission. Abscission, or the detachment of organs from the main body of a plant, is an essential process during plant development and a unique type of cell separation regulated by endogenous and exogenous signals. Previous studies have indicated that auxin and ethylene are major plant hormones regulating abscission; and here we show that regulation of floral organ abscission is also controlled by jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our characterization of coi1-1 and a novel allele (coi1-37) has also revealed an essential role in apical dominance and floral meristem arrest. In this study we provide genetic evidence indicating that delayed abscission 4 (dab4-1) is allelic to coi1-1 and that meristem arrest and apical dominance appear to be evolutionarily divergent functions for COI1 that are governed in an ecotype-dependent manner. Further characterizations of ethylene and JA responses of dab4-1/coi1-37 also provide new information suggesting separate pathways for ethylene and JA that control both floral organ abscission and hypocotyl growth in young seedlings. Our study opens the door revealing new roles for JA and its interaction with other hormones during plant development. PMID:23573263

  13. Derivation of a cardiac arrest prediction model using ward vital signs

    PubMed Central

    Churpek, Matthew M.; Yuen, Trevor C.; Park, Seo Young; Meltzer, David O.; Hall, Jesse B.; Edelson, Dana P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Rapid response team (RRT) activation criteria were created using expert opinion and have demonstrated variable accuracy in previous studies. We developed a cardiac arrest risk triage (CART) score to predict cardiac arrest (CA) and compared it to the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), a commonly cited RRT activation criterion. Design A retrospective cohort study. Setting An academic medical center in the United States. Patients All patients hospitalized from November 2008 to January 2011 who had documented ward vital signs were included in the study. These patients were divided into three cohorts: patients who suffered a CA on the wards, patients who had a ward to intensive care unit (ICU) transfer, and patients who had neither of these outcomes (controls). Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Ward vital signs from admission until discharge, ICU transfer, or ward CA were extracted from the medical record. Multivariate logistic regression was used to predict CA, and the CART score was calculated using the regression coefficients. The model was validated by comparing its accuracy for detecting ICU transfer to the MEWS. Each patient’s maximum score prior to CA, ICU transfer, or discharge was used to compare the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) between the two models. Eighty-eight CA patients, 2820 ICU transfers, and 44519 controls were included in the study. The CART score more accurately predicted CA than the MEWS (AUC 0.84 vs. 0.76;P=0.001). At a specificity of 89.9%, the CART score had a sensitivity of 53.4% compared to 47.7% for the MEWS. The CART score also predicted ICU transfer better than the MEWS (AUC 0.71 vs. 0.67;P<0.001). Conclusions The CART score is simpler and more accurately detected CA and ICU transfer than the MEWS. Implementation of this tool may decrease RRT resource utilization and provide a better opportunity to improve patient outcomes than the MEWS. PMID:22584764

  14. Hypothermic liquid ventilation prevents early hemodynamic dysfunction and cardiovascular mortality after coronary artery occlusion complicated by cardiac arrest in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Darbera, Lys; Chenoune, Mourad; Lidouren, Fanny; Kohlhauer, Matthias; Adam, Clovis; Bruneval, Patrick; Ghaleh, Bijan; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Carli, Pierre; Vivien, Benoit; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Berdeaux, Alain; Tissier, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    Objective Ultrafast and whole-body cooling can be induced by total liquid ventilation (TLV) with temperature-controlled perfluorocarbons. Our goal was to determine whether this can afford maximal cardio- and neuroprotections through cooling rapidity when coronary occlusion is complicated by cardiac arrest. Design Prospective, randomized animal study. Setting Academic research laboratory. Subjects Male New-Zealand rabbits. Interventions Chronically instrumented rabbits were submitted to coronary artery occlusion and ventricular fibrillation. After 8-min of cardiac arrest, animals were resuscitated and submitted to a normothermic follow-up (Control group) or to 3-h of mild hypothermia induced by TLV (TLV group) or by combination of cold saline infusion and cold blankets application (Saline group). Coronary reperfusion was permitted 40-min after the onset of occlusion. After awakening, rabbits were followed during 7 days. Measurements and main results Ten animals were resuscitated in each group. In the Control group, all animals secondarily died from cardiac/respiratory failure (8/10) or neurological dysfunction (2/10). In the Saline group, the target temperature of 32°C was achieved within 30–45 min after cooling initiation. This slightly reduced infarct size vs Control (41±16% vs 54±8% of risk zone, respectively; p<0.05) but failed to significantly improve cardiac output, neurological recovery and survival rate (3 survivors, 6 death from cardiac/respiratory failure and 1 from neurological dysfunction). Conversely, the 32°C temperature was achieved within 5–10 min in the TLV group. This led to a dramatic reduction in infarct size (13±4%; p<0.05 vs other groups) and improvements in cardiac output, neurological recovery and survival (8 survivors, 2 deaths from cardiac/respiratory failure). Conclusions Achieving hypothermia rapidly is critical to improve the cardiovascular outcome after cardiac arrest with underlying myocardial infarction. PMID:24126441

  15. DHA-supplemented diet increases the survival of rats following asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhwan; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Lampe, Joshua W.; Becker, Lance B.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence illustrates the beneficial effects of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on cardiovascular diseases. However, its effects on cardiac arrest (CA) remain controversial in epidemiological studies and have not been reported in controlled animal studies. Here, we examined whether dietary DHA can improve survival, the most important endpoint in CA. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups and received either a control diet or a DHA-supplemented diet for 7–8 weeks. Rats were then subjected to 20 min asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest followed by 30 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Rat survival was monitored for additional 3.5 h following resuscitation. In the control group, 1 of 9 rats survived for 4 h, whereas 6 of 9 rats survived in the DHA-treated group. Surviving rats in the DHA-treated group displayed moderately improved hemodynamics compared to rats in the control group 1 h after the start of resuscitation. Rats in the control group showed no sign of brain function whereas rats in the DHA-treated group had recurrent seizures and spontaneous respiration, suggesting dietary DHA also protects the brain. Overall, our study shows that dietary DHA significantly improves rat survival following 20 min of severe CA. PMID:27811958

  16. Quiescence in Artemia franciscana embryos: reversible arrest of metabolism and gene expression at low oxygen levels.

    PubMed

    Hand, S C

    1998-04-01

    Depression of the production and consumption of cellular energy appears to be a prerequisite for the survival of prolonged bouts of anoxia. A correlation exists between the degree of metabolic depression under anoxia and the duration of anoxia tolerance. In the case of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) embryos, oxygen deprivation induces a reversible quiescent state that can be tolerated for several years with substantial survivorship. A global arrest of cytoplasmic translation accompanies the transition into anoxia, and rates of protein synthesis in mitochondria from these embryos appears to be markedly reduced in response to anoxia. Previous evidence suggests that the acute acidification of intracellular pH (pHi) by over 1.0 unit during the transition into anoxia contributes to the depression of biosynthesis, but message limitation does not appear to play a role in the down-regulation in either cellular compartment. The ontogenetic increase in mRNA levels for a mitochondrial-encoded subunit of cytochrome c oxidase (COX I) and for nuclear-encoded actin is blocked by anoxia and aerobic acidosis (artificial quiescence imposed by intracellular acidification under aerobic conditions). Further, the levels of COX I and actin mRNA do not decline appreciably during 6 h bouts of quiescence, even though protein synthesis is acutely arrested across this same period. Thus, the constancy of mRNA levels during quiescence indicates that reduced protein synthesis is not caused by message limitation but, instead, is probably controlled at the translational level. This apparent stabilization of mRNA under anoxia is mirrored in an extension of protein half-life. The ubiquitin-dependent pathway for protein degradation is depressed under anoxia and aerobic acidosis, as judged by the acute drop in levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins. Mitochondrial protein synthesis is responsive to both acidification of pHi and removal of oxygen per se. Matrix pH declines in parallel with pHi, and

  17. Arterial hyperoxia and in-hospital mortality after resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hyperoxia has recently been reported as an independent risk factor for mortality in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest. We examined the independent relationship between hyperoxia and outcomes in such patients. Methods We divided patients resuscitated from nontraumatic cardiac arrest from 125 intensive care units (ICUs) into three groups according to worst PaO2 level or alveolar-arterial O2 gradient in the first 24 hours after admission. We defined 'hyperoxia' as PaO2 of 300 mmHg or greater, 'hypoxia/poor O2 transfer' as either PaO2 < 60 mmHg or ratio of PaO2 to fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2 ) < 300, 'normoxia' as any value between hypoxia and hyperoxia and 'isolated hypoxemia' as PaO2 < 60 mmHg regardless of FiO2. Mortality at hospital discharge was the main outcome measure. Results Of 12,108 total patients, 1,285 (10.6%) had hyperoxia, 8,904 (73.5%) had hypoxia/poor O2 transfer, 1,919 (15.9%) had normoxia and 1,168 (9.7%) had isolated hypoxemia (PaO2 < 60 mmHg). The hyperoxia group had higher mortality (754 (59%) of 1,285 patients; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 56% to 61%) than the normoxia group (911 (47%) of 1,919 patients; 95% CI, 45% to 50%) with a proportional difference of 11% (95% CI, 8% to 15%), but not higher than the hypoxia group (5,303 (60%) of 8,904 patients; 95% CI, 59% to 61%). In a multivariable model controlling for some potential confounders, including illness severity, hyperoxia had an odds ratio for hospital death of 1.2 (95% CI, 1.1 to 1.6). However, once we applied Cox proportional hazards modelling of survival, sensitivity analyses using deciles of hypoxemia, time period matching and hyperoxia defined as PaO2 > 400 mmHg, hyperoxia had no independent association with mortality. Importantly, after adjustment for FiO2 and the relevant covariates, PaO2 was no longer predictive of hospital mortality (P = 0.21). Conclusions Among patients admitted to the ICU after cardiac arrest, hyperoxia did not have a robust or

  18. Murder and assault arrests of White House cases: clinical and demographic correlates of violence subsequent to civil commitment.

    PubMed

    Shore, D; Filson, C R; Johnson, W E; Rae, D S; Muehrer, P; Kelley, D J; Davis, T S; Waldman, I N; Wyatt, R J

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied arrest records and clinical data on 217 persons formerly hospitalized as "White House Cases" because they were psychotically preoccupied with prominent political figures. Prior arrest for violent crime was the variable most strongly associated with arrest for violent crime after hospital discharge. Male gender and a history of weapons possession were also correlated with future violence. For those with prior violent crime arrests, hospital incidents requiring seclusion were also associated with later violence. For those without prior arrests, subsequent violence was associated with threats, living outside Washington, and command hallucinations. For those previously arrested for nonviolent crimes, only persecutory delusions were associated with later violence.

  19. Zinc supplementation enhances the effectiveness of St. Thomas' Hospital No. 2 cardioplegic solution in an in vitro model of hypothermic cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Powell, S R; Aiuto, L; Hall, D; Tortolani, A J

    1995-12-01

    The present study was done to assess the effectiveness of a zinc-supplemented cardioplegic solution in an in vitro model of hypothermic arrest. Isolated hearts were perfused in the nonworking mode. All hearts were subjected to 2 hours of hypothermic arrest, at 10 degrees C, followed by 60 minutes of recovery. In protocol 1, arrest was initiated with infusion of cardioplegic solution with or without 30 mumol/l zinc for 5 minutes, which was then reinfused for 5 minutes every 15 minutes during arrest. In protocol 2, arrest was initiated with infusion of cardioplegic solution with or without 40 mumol/L zinc for 10 minutes. Cardioplegic solution (without zinc) was then reinfused for 5 minutes before the hearts were rewarmed. In protocol 1 hearts, peak postischemic left ventricular developed systolic pressure was 106 +/- 5 mm Hg and 80 +/- 3 mm Hg in zinc-treated versus control hearts, respectively (p < 0.05 by repeated-measures analysis of variance). In protocol 2 hearts, recovery of postischemic left ventricular developed systolic pressure peaked at 74 +/- 4 mm Hg and 46 +/- 8 mm Hg in zinc-treated and control hearts, respectively (p 0.05, repeated-measures analysis of variance). Similar effects were observed for the left ventricular rate of relaxation (p < 0.05, repeated-measures analysis of variance). Except for some minor effects, lactate dehydrogenase release was not affected by zinc supplementation. The present study demonstrates that zinc supplementation further enhances the normally observed preservation of postarrest cardiac function and suggests possible clinical utility for this metal as an additive to standard crystalloid cardioplegic solutions.

  20. Characterization of RAD9 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and evidence that its function acts posttranslationally in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, T A; Hartwell, L H

    1990-01-01

    In eucaryotic cells, incompletely replicated or damaged chromosomes induce cell cycle arrest in G2 before mitosis, and in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the RAD9 gene is essential for the cell cycle arrest (T.A. Weinert and L. H. Hartwell, Science 241:317-322, 1988). In this report, we extend the analysis of RAD9-dependent cell cycle control. We found that both induction of RAD9-dependent arrest in G2 and recovery from arrest could occur in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, showing that the mechanism of RAD9-dependent control involves a posttranslational mechanism(s). We have isolated and determined the DNA sequence of the RAD9 gene, confirming the DNA sequence reported previously (R. H. Schiestl, P. Reynolds, S. Prakash, and L. Prakash, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:1882-1886, 1989). The predicted protein sequence for the Rad9 protein bears no similarity to sequences of known proteins. We also found that synthesis of the RAD9 transcript in the cell cycle was constitutive and not induced by X-irradiation. We constructed yeast cells containing a complete deletion of the RAD9 gene; the rad9 null mutants were viable, sensitive to X- and UV irradiation, and defective for cell cycle arrest after DNA damage. Although Rad+ and rad9 delta cells had similar growth rates and cell cycle kinetics in unirradiated cells, the spontaneous rate of chromosome loss (in unirradiated cells) was elevated 7- to 21-fold in rad9 delta cells. These studies show that in the presence of induced or endogenous DNA damage, RAD9 is a negative regulator that inhibits progression from G2 in order to preserve cell viability and to maintain the fidelity of chromosome transmission. Images PMID:2247073

  1. The rice GERMINATION DEFECTIVE 1, encoding a B3 domain transcriptional repressor, regulates seed germination and seedling development by integrating GA and carbohydrate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoli; Hou, Xiaomei; Fang, Jun; Wei, Piwei; Xu, Bo; Chen, Mingluan; Feng, Yuqi; Chu, Chengcai

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that seed development is regulated by a network of transcription factors in Arabidopsis including LEC1 (LEAFY COTYLEDON1), L1L (LEC1-like) and the B3 domain factors LEC2, FUS3 (FUSCA3) and ABI3 (ABA-INSENSITIVE3); however, molecular and genetic regulation of seed development in cereals is poorly understood. To understand seed development and seed germination in cereals, a large-scale screen was performed using our T–DNA mutant population, and a mutant germination-defective1 (gd1) was identified. In addition to the severe germination defect, the gd1 mutant also shows a dwarf phenotype and abnormal flower development. Molecular and biochemical analyses revealed that GD1 encodes a B3 domain-containing transcription factor with repression activity. Consistent with the dwarf phenotype of gd1, expression of the gibberelic acid (GA) inactivation gene OsGA2ox3 is increased dramatically, accompanied by reduced expression of GA biosynthetic genes including OsGA20ox1, OsGA20ox2 and OsGA3ox2 in gd1, resulting in a decreased endogenous GA4 level. Exogenous application of GA not only induced GD1 expression, but also partially rescued the dwarf phenotype of gd1. Furthermore, GD1 binds to the promoter of OsLFL1, a LEC2/FUS3-like gene of rice, via an RY element, leading to significant up-regulation of OsLFL1 and a large subset of seed maturation genes in the gd1 mutant. Plants over-expressing OsLFL1 partly mimic the gd1 mutant. In addition, expression of GD1 was induced under sugar treatment, and the contents of starch and soluble sugar are altered in the gd1 mutant. These data indicate that GD1 participates directly or indirectly in regulating GA and carbohydrate homeostasis, and further regulates rice seed germination and seedling development. PMID:23581288

  2. Inhibition of Drp1 by Mdivi-1 attenuates cerebral ischemic injury via inhibition of the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Wang, P; Wei, J; Fan, R; Zuo, Y; Shi, M; Wu, H; Zhou, M; Lin, J; Wu, M; Fang, X; Huang, Z

    2015-12-17

    Mitochondrial fission is predominantly controlled by the activity of dynamin-related protein1 (Drp1), which has been reported to be involved in mitochondria apoptosis pathways. However, the role of Drp1 in a rat model of cardiac arrest remains unknown. In this study, we found that activation of Drp1 in the mitochondria was increased after cardiac arrest and inhibition of Drp1 by 1.2 mg/kg of mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (Mdivi-1) administration after the restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) significantly protected against cerebral ischemic injury, shown by the increased 72-h survival rate and improved neurological function. Moreover, the increase of the vital neuron and the reduction of cytochrome c (CytC) release, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) translocation and caspase-3 activation in the brain indicate that this protection might result from the suppression of neuron apoptosis. Altogether, these results indicated that Drp1 is activated after cardiac arrest and the inhibition of Drp1 is protective against cerebral ischemic injury in a rat of cardiac arrest model via inhibition of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

  3. The production of reactive oxygen species and the mitochondrial membrane potential are modulated during onion oil-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-jiang; Stahl, Thorsten; Hu, Ying; Kassie, Fekadu; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2006-03-01

    Protective effects of Allium vegetables against cancers have been shown extensively in experimental animals and epidemiologic studies. We investigated cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis by onion oil extracted from Allium cepa, a widely consumed Allium vegetable, in human lung cancer A549 cells. GC/MS analysis suggested that propyl sulfides but not allyl sulfides are major sulfur-containing constituents of onion oil. Onion oil at 12.5 mg/L significantly induced apoptosis (13% increase of apoptotic cells) as indicated by sub-G1 DNA content. It also caused cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase; 25 mg/L onion oil increased the percentage of G2/M cells almost 6-fold compared with the dimethyl sulfoxide control. The action of onion oil may occur via a reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway because cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were blocked by the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and exogenous glutathione. Marked collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential suggested that dysfunction of the mitochondria may be involved in the oxidative burst and apoptosis induced by onion oil. Expression of phospho-cdc2 and phospho-cyclin B1 were downregulated by onion oil, perhaps accounting for the G2/M arrest. Overall, these results suggest that onion oil may exert chemopreventive action by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells.

  4. Reliability of Arrest and Incarceration Questions on the Risk Behavior Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Dennis G.; Reynolds, Grace L.; Wood, Michele M.; Johnson, Mark E.

    2004-01-01

    We examined 48-hour test-retest reliability of the arrest and incarceration questions on the Risk Behavior Assessment (RBA; National Institute on Drug Abuse, 1993). Participants were 229 street-drug users recruited in 11 cities throughout the United States. Results revealed that lifetime arrest and incarceration items demonstrated good to…

  5. 14 CFR 1203b.104 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1203b.104 Section 1203b.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.104...

  6. 14 CFR 1203b.104 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1203b.104 Section 1203b.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.104...

  7. Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest from Trauma (EPR-CAT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    TITLE: Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest from Trauma (EPR-CAT) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER From Trauma 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0682...an emergency department (ED) thoracotomy and open chest CPR, results in unacceptably low survival rates. Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation

  8. 30 CFR 77.508 - Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... power conductors and telephone wires. 77.508 Section 77.508 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires. All ungrounded, exposed power conductors and telephone wires shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters which are...

  9. 30 CFR 77.508 - Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... power conductors and telephone wires. 77.508 Section 77.508 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires. All ungrounded, exposed power conductors and telephone wires shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters which are...

  10. 30 CFR 77.508 - Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... power conductors and telephone wires. 77.508 Section 77.508 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires. All ungrounded, exposed power conductors and telephone wires shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters which are...

  11. 30 CFR 77.508 - Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... power conductors and telephone wires. 77.508 Section 77.508 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires. All ungrounded, exposed power conductors and telephone wires shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters which are...

  12. 30 CFR 77.508 - Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... power conductors and telephone wires. 77.508 Section 77.508 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires. All ungrounded, exposed power conductors and telephone wires shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters which are...

  13. 10 CFR 1047.6 - Use of physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of physical force when making an arrest. 1047.6 Section 1047.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.6 Use of physical force when making an...

  14. 14 CFR 1203b.105 - Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of non-deadly physical force when... ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.105 Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest. When a security force officer has the right...

  15. 14 CFR 1203b.105 - Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Use of non-deadly physical force when making... ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.105 Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest. When a security force officer has the right...

  16. 10 CFR 1047.6 - Use of physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of physical force when making an arrest. 1047.6 Section 1047.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.6 Use of physical force when making an...

  17. 46 CFR 30.10-23 - Flame arrester-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flame arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-23 Section 30.10-23...-23 Flame arrester—TB/ALL. The term flame arrester means any device or assembly of a cellular, tubular, pressure, or other type used for preventing the passage of flames into enclosed spaces....

  18. 46 CFR 30.10-23 - Flame arrester-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flame arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-23 Section 30.10-23...-23 Flame arrester—TB/ALL. The term flame arrester means any device or assembly of a cellular, tubular, pressure, or other type used for preventing the passage of flames into enclosed spaces....

  19. 46 CFR 32.20-10 - Flame arresters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flame arresters-TB/ALL. 32.20-10 Section 32.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Equipment Installations § 32.20-10 Flame arresters—TB/ALL. Flame arresters must be of a type...

  20. 46 CFR 30.10-23 - Flame arrester-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flame arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-23 Section 30.10-23...-23 Flame arrester—TB/ALL. The term flame arrester means any device or assembly of a cellular, tubular, pressure, or other type used for preventing the passage of flames into enclosed spaces....

  1. 46 CFR 32.20-10 - Flame arresters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flame arresters-TB/ALL. 32.20-10 Section 32.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Equipment Installations § 32.20-10 Flame arresters—TB/ALL. Flame arresters must be of a type...

  2. 46 CFR 32.20-10 - Flame arresters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flame arresters-TB/ALL. 32.20-10 Section 32.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Equipment Installations § 32.20-10 Flame arresters—TB/ALL. Flame arresters must be of a type...

  3. Cardiac aetiology of cardiac arrest: percutaneous coronary interventions during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Nikolaos I; Christou, Apostolos H

    2013-09-01

    Management and prevention of cardiac arrest in the setting of heart disease is a challenge for modern cardiology. After reviewing the aetiology of sudden cardiac death and discussing the way to identify candidates at risk, we emphasise the role of percutaneous coronary interventions during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the treatment of patients with return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest.

  4. [Evolution of the nurse's role in the management of a cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Loosli, Florian; Hutin, Alice; Lefort, Hugues; Carli, Pierre; Lamhaut, Lionel

    2016-11-01

    In France, there are 40 000 sudden deaths each year and the cardiac arrest survival rate is less than 10%. The arrival of extracorporeal cardio pulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) offers hope in the event of refractory cardiac arrest in prehospital care. Extending ECPR programmes requires more scientific evidence, training and an evolution of the role of paramedics.

  5. The science of reperfusion injury post cardiac arrest--Implications for emergency nurses.

    PubMed

    Baker, Edward; Lee, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Survival following cardiac arrest in the developed world remains below 10%. In those who survive the initial cardiac arrest, prognosis remains poor due to the onset of multi-organ failure with both significant cardiac and neurological dysfunction. Nurses have demonstrated good understanding of cardiac arrest/post arrest guidelines and have good technical skills but deficits remain in their understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in post cardiac arrest syndromes. This article aims to provide an overview of these pathophysiological processes involved in the post cardiac arrest phase, potential treatment options and the nursing interventions that may be required within the emergency department setting. This article will focus emergency nurses to become more involved in patient management at this critical phase of treatment and highlight potential early signs of deterioration. Although return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) is crucial in the process of recovery from cardiac arrest, it is only the first of many complex stages. Given the complexity of post cardiac arrest syndrome and its impact on the patient, healthcare professionals need to understand the cellular changes associated with reperfusion injuries in order to improve outcomes. It is only through effective nursing care and medical management that improved outcomes will become more common in the future.

  6. A Summary and Analysis of Warrantless Arrest Statutes for Domestic Violence in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeoli, April M.; Norris, Alexis; Brenner, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have enacted statutes that allow police officers to make warrantless arrests for domestic violence given probable cause; however, state laws differ from one another in multiple, important ways. Research on domestic violence warrantless arrest laws rarely describe them as anything…

  7. 14 CFR 1203b.104 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1203b.104 Section 1203b.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.104...

  8. Marijuana Treatment Entries Did Not Decrease After Aggressive Arrest Policies Were Implemented in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Kevin A.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    In the mid-late 1990s Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Police Chief William Bratton focused on arresting and detaining people for crimes that contributed to a lower “quality-of-life” in New York City. This aggressive arrest policy (AAP) resulted in a record growth in marijuana arrests. In 1992, the number of marijuana arrests was around 5,000. By 2000, the arrest rate hit an all-time high of about 60,000 (the large majority of which were for misdemeanor arrests in both years). Through a triangulation of data sources, including the Uniform Crime Reports and the Treatment Episode Data Set from 1992 to 2003, and other published accounts, this paper shows that entries into treatment for marijuana dramatically increased in New York City at the same time as misdemeanor and felony arrests for marijuana also rose. While it is unclear if these arrests caused the treatment increase (vis-à-vis criminal justice referral programs), the presence of these two phenomena show that policy regimes of increased treatment and increased law enforcement actions can co-exist. The oft-heard phrase “treatment versus law enforcement” may represent a false dichotomy in drug policy analysis. PMID:19129906

  9. Campus Drug Arrests Increased 18 Per Cent in 1995; Reports of Other Crimes Fell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lively, Kit

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 500 large colleges and universities shows campus drug arrests rose 18% in 1995, the fourth consecutive year with a double-digit increase. Alcohol arrests increased 1%, and forcible-sex offenses increased 2%. Other crimes dropped, in line with national trends. Colleges receiving federal funds are required to report crime statistics, but…

  10. Mental Disorders, Comorbidity, and Postrunaway Arrests among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiaojin; Thrane, Lisa; Whitbeck, Les B.; Johnson, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the associations between lifetime mental disorder, comorbidity, and self-reported postrunaway arrests among 428 (187 males, 241 females) homeless and runaway youth. The analysis examined the pattern of arrests across five lifetime mental disorders (alcohol abuse, drug abuse, conduct disorder, major depressive episode, and…

  11. 8 CFR 287.3 - Disposition of cases of aliens arrested without warrant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disposition of cases of aliens arrested without warrant. 287.3 Section 287.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS FIELD OFFICERS; POWERS AND DUTIES § 287.3 Disposition of cases of aliens arrested without...

  12. Digital Holographic Microscopy for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Cell Cycle Arrest in L929 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Falck Miniotis, Maria; Mukwaya, Anthonny; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has emerged as a powerful non-invasive tool for cell analysis. It has the capacity to analyse multiple parameters simultaneously, such as cell- number, confluence and phase volume. This is done while cells are still adhered and growing in their culture flask. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DHM was able to monitor drug-induced cell cycle arrest in cultured cells and thus provide a non-disruptive alternative to flow cytometry. DHM parameters from G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrested L929 mouse fibroblast cells were collected. Cell cycle arrest was verified with flow cytometry. This study shows that DHM is able to monitor phase volume changes corresponding to either a G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest. G1-phase arrest with staurosporine correlated with a decrease in the average cell phase volume and G2/M-phase arrest with colcemid and etoposide correlated with an increase in the average cell phase volume. Importantly, DHM analysis of average cell phase volume was of comparable accuracy to flow cytometric measurement of cell cycle phase distribution as recorded following dose-dependent treatment with etoposide. Average cell phase volume changes in response to treatment with cell cycle arresting compounds could therefore be used as a DHM marker for monitoring cell cycle arrest in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:25208094

  13. 14 CFR 1203b.104 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1203b.104 Section 1203b.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.104...

  14. 10 CFR 1047.6 - Use of physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of physical force when making an arrest. 1047.6 Section 1047.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.6 Use of physical force when making an...

  15. 10 CFR 1047.6 - Use of physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of physical force when making an arrest. 1047.6 Section 1047.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.6 Use of physical force when making an...

  16. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  17. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  18. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  19. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  20. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  1. Does the use of the Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System affect cardiac arrest detection?

    PubMed Central

    Heward, A; Damiani, M; Hartley-Sharpe, C

    2004-01-01

    Methods: A two stage study was undertaken. The first, compared cases coded as "cardiac arrest" and found by the responding ambulance to be in cardiac arrest before the implementation of AMPDS. This was compared with cases triaged as "cardiac arrest" and found to be in cardiac arrest across three years after AMPDS implementation. The second stage compared AMPDS compliance, over a 32 month period against the percentage of cardiac arrest calls that were found to be cardiac arrest upon the ambulance arrival. The correlation coefficient was calculated and analysed for statistical significance. Findings: AMPDS resulted in a 200% rise in the number of patients accurately identified as suffering from cardiac arrest. A relation was identified between identification and AMPDS compliance (r2 = 0.65, p = 0.001). Discussion: The implementation of AMPDS increased accurate identification of patients in cardiac arrest. Additionally, the relation between factors identified suggests compliance with protocol is an important factor in the accurate recognition of patient conditions. PMID:14734398

  2. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart M of... - Personal Fall Arrest Systems

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personal Fall Arrest Systems C Appendix C to Subpart M of..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Fall Protection Pt. 1926, Subpt. M, App. C Appendix C to Subpart M of Part 1926—Personal Fall Arrest Systems...

  3. History of Juvenile Arrests and Vocational Career Outcomes for At-Risk Young Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiesner, Margit; Kim, Hyoun K.; Capaldi, Deborah M.

    2010-01-01

    This study uses longitudinal data from the Oregon Youth Study (OYS) to examine prospective effects of juvenile arrests and of early versus late onset of juvenile offending on two labor market outcomes by age 29 or 30 years. It was expected that those with more juvenile arrests and those with an early onset of offending would show poorer outcomes…

  4. Program Completion and Re-Arrest in a Batterer Intervention System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Larry W.; Stoops, Charles; Call, Christine; Flett, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine the effects of batterer intervention program (BIP) completion on domestic violence re-arrest in an urban system of 30 BIPs with a common set of state standards, common program completion criteria, and centralized criminal justice supervision. Method: 899 men arrested for domestic violence were assessed and completed…

  5. Same-Sex and Race-Based Disparities in Statutory Rape Arrests.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Mark; Chenoweth, Stephanie; Letourneau, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    This study tests a liberation hypothesis for statutory rape incidents, specifically that there may be same-sex and race/ethnicity arrest disparities among statutory rape incidents and that these will be greater among statutory rape than among forcible sex crime incidents. 26,726 reported incidents of statutory rape as defined under state statutes and 96,474 forcible sex crime incidents were extracted from National Incident-Based Reporting System data sets. Arrest outcomes were tested using multilevel modeling. Same-sex statutory rape pairings were rare but had much higher arrest odds. A victim-offender romantic relationship amplified arrest odds for same-sex pairings, but damped arrest odds for male-on-female pairings. Same-sex disparities were larger among statutory than among forcible incidents. Female-on-male incidents had uniformly lower arrest odds. Race/ethnicity effects were smaller than gender effects and more complexly patterned. The findings support the liberation hypothesis for same-sex statutory rape arrest disparities, particularly among same-sex romantic pairings. Support for race/ethnicity-based arrest disparities was limited and mixed.

  6. 46 CFR 32.20-10 - Flame arresters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flame arresters-TB/ALL. 32.20-10 Section 32.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Equipment Installations § 32.20-10 Flame arresters—TB/ALL. Flame arresters must be of a type...

  7. 46 CFR 32.20-10 - Flame arresters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flame arresters-TB/ALL. 32.20-10 Section 32.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Equipment Installations § 32.20-10 Flame arresters—TB/ALL. Flame arresters must be of a type...

  8. 46 CFR 30.10-23 - Flame arrester-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flame arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-23 Section 30.10-23 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-23 Flame arrester—TB/ALL. The term flame arrester means any device or assembly of a cellular,...

  9. 46 CFR 30.10-23 - Flame arrester-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flame arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-23 Section 30.10-23 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-23 Flame arrester—TB/ALL. The term flame arrester means any device or assembly of a cellular,...

  10. 46 CFR 30.10-63 - Spark arrester-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spark arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-63 Section 30.10-63 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-63 Spark arrester—TB/ALL. The term spark arrester means any device, assembly, or method of...

  11. 46 CFR 30.10-63 - Spark arrester-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spark arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-63 Section 30.10-63 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-63 Spark arrester—TB/ALL. The term spark arrester means any device, assembly, or method of...

  12. 33 CFR Appendix B to Part 154 - Standard Specification for Tank Vent Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... without removal of the entire device from the system. 8.8Flame arresters shall allow for efficient... systems containing vapors of flammable or combustible liquids with a flashpoint that does not exceed 60 °C. The test media defined in 14.1.1 can be used except where arresters protect systems handling...

  13. 33 CFR Appendix B to Part 154 - Standard Specification for Tank Vent Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... without removal of the entire device from the system. 8.8Flame arresters shall allow for efficient... systems containing vapors of flammable or combustible liquids with a flashpoint that does not exceed 60 °C. The test media defined in 14.1.1 can be used except where arresters protect systems handling...

  14. 33 CFR Appendix B to Part 154 - Standard Specification for Tank Vent Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... without removal of the entire device from the system. 8.8Flame arresters shall allow for efficient... systems containing vapors of flammable or combustible liquids with a flashpoint that does not exceed 60 °C. The test media defined in 14.1.1 can be used except where arresters protect systems handling...

  15. 33 CFR Appendix B to Part 154 - Standard Specification for Tank Vent Flame Arresters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... without removal of the entire device from the system. 8.8Flame arresters shall allow for efficient... systems containing vapors of flammable or combustible liquids with a flashpoint that does not exceed 60 °C. The test media defined in 14.1.1 can be used except where arresters protect systems handling...

  16. Gender Differences in Drug Use, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Risky Sexual Behavior among Arrested Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Belenko, Steven; Childs, Kristina; Greenbaum, Paul E.; Wareham, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Data was collected on arrested youths processed at a centralized intake facility, including youths released back to the community and those placed in secure detention. This article reports the results of a test of a structural model involving newly arrested male and female youths' sexually transmitted diseases (STD) test results, urine analysis…

  17. California's Youth and Young Adult Arrest Rates Continue a Historic Decline. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Males, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice (CJCJ) fact sheet shows that, in 2015, arrests of young people under age 25 dropped below 2014 levels and continue a decades-long trend of decline. While the causes of these declines are unknown, falling youth arrests rates coupled with decreased youth incarceration suggest that high rates of…

  18. 43 CFR 3.15 - Persons who may apprehend or cause to be arrested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES § 3.15 Persons who may apprehend or cause to be arrested. All persons duly authorized by the Secretaries of Agriculture, Army and Interior may apprehend or cause to be arrested, as... under the supervision of the Secretaries of Agriculture, Army, and Interior, respectively....

  19. 28 CFR 50.5 - Notification of Consular Officers upon the arrest of foreign nationals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the arrest of foreign nationals. 50.5 Section 50.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... nationals of foreign countries are arrested by officers of this Department on charges of criminal violations... criminal provisions of the immigration laws, the U.S. Marshal, upon delivery of the foreign national...

  20. 28 CFR 50.5 - Notification of Consular Officers upon the arrest of foreign nationals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the arrest of foreign nationals. 50.5 Section 50.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... nationals of foreign countries are arrested by officers of this Department on charges of criminal violations... criminal provisions of the immigration laws, the U.S. Marshal, upon delivery of the foreign national...

  1. 28 CFR 50.5 - Notification of Consular Officers upon the arrest of foreign nationals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the arrest of foreign nationals. 50.5 Section 50.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... nationals of foreign countries are arrested by officers of this Department on charges of criminal violations... criminal provisions of the immigration laws, the U.S. Marshal, upon delivery of the foreign national...

  2. 28 CFR 50.5 - Notification of Consular Officers upon the arrest of foreign nationals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the arrest of foreign nationals. 50.5 Section 50.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... nationals of foreign countries are arrested by officers of this Department on charges of criminal violations... criminal provisions of the immigration laws, the U.S. Marshal, upon delivery of the foreign national...

  3. 28 CFR 50.5 - Notification of Consular Officers upon the arrest of foreign nationals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the arrest of foreign nationals. 50.5 Section 50.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... nationals of foreign countries are arrested by officers of this Department on charges of criminal violations... criminal provisions of the immigration laws, the U.S. Marshal, upon delivery of the foreign national...

  4. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest: real-life suspended animation.

    PubMed

    Chau, Katherine H; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2013-01-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a cerebral protection technique that was developed in the 1950s and popularized in the 1970s. It has become one of the three most common cerebral protection techniques currently used in aortic arch surgeries, with the other two being antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). At our institution, DHCA has been the cerebral protection technique of choice for over a quarter century. Our clinical experience with DHCA has been very positive, and our clinical studies have shown DHCA to have outcomes equal to (and sometimes better than) those of ACP and RCP, and DHCA to be very effective at preserving neurocognitive function. Other institutions, however, prefer ACP or RCP to DHCA. Each technique has its own set of pros and cons, and the question regarding which technique is the superior method for cerebral protection is hotly debated.

  5. Anaphylaxis with Latrodectus antivenin resulting in cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Christine M; Hong, Jeannie J; Beuhler, Michael C

    2011-12-01

    Latrodectus mactans antivenin is a safe and effective therapy for severe black widow spider envenomations when given to most patients. We report a case of a 37-year-old male with a history of asthma that was given L. mactans antivenin for symptoms related to a black widow envenomation and developed a severe anaphylactic reaction resulting in cardiac arrest. When traditional therapies failed, the patient was given methylene blue for anaphylactic shock resulting in a 30-h period of hemodynamic stability. Despite initial resuscitation, the patient ultimately died 40 h after presentation. Under the right circumstances, L. mactans antivenin remains a safe and effective therapy for severe black widow envenomations. However, anaphylaxis is a risk for those receiving this therapy, even when the antivenin is diluted and given as an infusion. We report the first death related to diluted L. mactans antivenin given as an infusion.

  6. Dynamical Arrest, Structural Disorder, and Optimization of Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Ian; Dmitry, Matyushov

    2014-09-11

    This project describes fundamental experimental and theoretical work that relates to charge separation and migration in the solid, heterogeneous or aggregated state. Marcus theory assumes a system in equilibrium with all possible solvent (dipolar) configurations, with rapid interconversion among these on the ET timescale. This project has addressed the more general situation where the medium is at least partially frozen on the ET timescale, i.e. under conditions of dynamical arrest. The approach combined theory and experiment and includes: (1) Computer simulations of model systems, (2) Development of analytical procedures consistent with computer experiment and (3) Experimental studies and testing of the formal theories on this data. Electron transfer processes are unique as a consequence of the close connection between kinetics, spectroscopy and theory, which is an essential component of this work.

  7. Developmental arrest in grass shrimp embryos exposed to selected toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.E.H.

    1998-12-31

    Excised embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to single pulse concentrations of selected pollutants for 4 days. The following toxicity endpoints were monitored: rate of embryonic development, embryo mortality, and types of embryo malformation. Each endpoint exhibited concentration--response relationships which were modified by the embryonic age at which exposure commenced. Developmental retardation of up to 3 days was effected by phenol at 0.01% (V/V) and complete developmental arrest occurred at 0.05% and 0.1% (V/V). Similarly for methylene chloride, developmental retardation of 1003 days were observed at 0.1% (V/V) depending on the age of the embryos at the start of the tests. The morphological abnormalities of the embryos are described. The ecological significance of these findings and implications for the development of short-term toxicity tests using grass shrimp embryos are discussed.

  8. Arrest of Langmuir wave collapse by quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, G.; Sulem, C.; Sulem, P. L.

    2009-11-01

    The arrest of Langmuir wave collapse by quantum effects, first addressed by Haas and Shukla [Phys. Rev. E 79, 066402 (2009)] using a Rayleigh-Ritz trial function method is revisited, using rigorous estimates and systematic asymptotic expansions. The absence of blow up for the so-called quantum Zakharov equations is proved in two and three dimensions, whatever the strength of the quantum effects. The time-periodic behavior of the solution for initial conditions slightly in excess of the singularity threshold for the classical problem is established for various settings in two space dimensions. The difficulty of developing a consistent perturbative approach in three dimensions is also discussed and a semiphenomenological model is suggested for this case.

  9. First permanent molar root development arrest associated with compound odontoma.

    PubMed

    Gunda, Sachin A; Patil, Anil; Varekar, Aniruddha

    2013-07-04

    Trauma or infection to the primary tooth may have deleterious effects on the underlying developing tooth buds. Anatomically the root apices of primary teeth are in close proximity to the developing permanent tooth buds; hence spread of infection originating from pulp necrosis of primary tooth may not only affect the underlying tooth bud but may also affect the adjacent tooth buds. The extent of malformation depends on the developmental stage of tooth or the age of patient. Presented here is a rare case of complete arrest of maxillary first permanent molar root growth due to spread of periapical infection originating from second primary molar leading to failure of its eruption and finally extraction. Histopathlogical analysis revealed compound odontoma associated with maxillary first permanent molar.

  10. Dynamic arrest of nematic liquid-crystal colloid networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Lu; Hwang, Jeoung-Yeon; Kim, Chanjoong

    2013-10-01

    We report interesting self-assembly structures of nematic liquid-crystal colloid (NLCC) networks, which are arrested during cooling from the isotropic temperature to room temperature. The NLCC is composed of sterically stabilized colloidal particles and a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) with nematic-isotropic transition temperature (TNI) that is much higher than those of previously studied 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl and N-(4-Methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline. We find that the structure of NLCCs depends on TNI, cooling rates, and boundary conditions, varying from cellular network to hierarchical fern structures in different length scales. Our time-lapse study shows that the transition from the cellular network to the fern structure directly corresponds to the transition from a spinodal demixing to a nucleation-and-growth mechanism.

  11. The Outcomes of Targeted Temperature Management After Cardiac Arrest at Emergency Department: A Real-World Experience in a Developing Country.

    PubMed

    Srivilaithon, Winchana; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat

    2017-03-01

    Targeted temperature management (TTM) is indicated for comatose survivors of cardiac arrest to improve outcomes. However, the benefit of TTM was verified by rigid controlled clinical trials. This study aimed at evaluating its effects in real-world practices. A prospective observational study was done at the emergency department of tertiary care, Thammasat Hospital, from March 2012 until October 2015. We included all who did not obey verbal commands after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest regardless of initial cardiac rhythm. We excluded patients with traumatic arrest, uncontrolled bleeding, younger than 15 years old, and of poor neurological status (Glasgow coma scale below 14) before cardiac arrest. Primary and secondary outcomes were survival to hospital discharge and favorable neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Categories 1 or 2 within 30 days). We used the logistic regression model to estimate the propensity score (PS) that will be used as a weight in the analysis. To analyze outcomes, the PS was introduced as a factor in the final logistic regression model in conjunction with other factors. A total of 192 cases, 61 and 131 patients, were enrolled in TTM and non-TTM groups, respectively. Characteristics believed to be related to initiation of TTM: gender, age, cardiac etiology, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, witness arrest, collapse time, initial rhythm, received defibrillation, and advanced airway insertion, were included in multivariable analysis and estimated PS. After adjusted regression analysis with PS, the TTM group had a better result in survival to hospital discharge (34.43% vs. 12.21%; adjusted incidence risk ratio (IRR), 2.95; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.49-5.84; p = 0.002). For neurological outcome, the TTM group had a higher number of favorable neurological outcomes (24.59% vs. 6.87%; IRR, 3.96; 95% CI, 1.67-9.36; p = 0.002). In real-world practices without a strictly controlled environment, TTM can improve survival and

  12. Early Effects of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest and Ischemic Postconditioning during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on Cardiac and Brain Mitochondrial Function in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Timothy R; Bartos, Jason A; Tsangaris, Adamantios; Shekar, Kadambari Chandra; Olson, Matthew D; Riess, Matthias L; Bienengraeber, Martin; Aufderheide, Tom P; Neumar, Robert W; Rees, Jennifer N; McKnite, Scott H; Dikalova, Anna E; Dikalov, Sergey I; Douglas, Hunter F; Yannopoulos, Demetris

    2017-04-10

    Background Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) is a prevalent medical crisis resulting in severe injury to the heart and brain and an overall survival of less than 10 percent. Mitochondrial dysfunction is predicted to be a key determinant of poor outcomes following prolonged CA. However, the onset and severity of mitochondrial dysfunction during CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not fully understood. Ischemic postconditioning (IPC), controlled pauses during the initiation of CPR, has been shown to improve cardiac function and neurologically favorable outcomes after fifteen minutes of CA. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction develops during prolonged CA and can be rescued with IPC during CPR (IPC-CPR).

  13. The UK Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcome (OHCAO) project

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Gavin D; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reducing premature death is a key priority for the UK National Health Service (NHS). NHS Ambulance services treat approximately 30 000 cases of suspected cardiac arrest each year but survival rates vary. The British Heart Foundation and Resuscitation Council (UK) have funded a structured research programme—the Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcomes (OHCAO) programme. The aim of the project is to establish the epidemiology and outcome of OHCA, explore sources of variation in outcome and establish the feasibility of setting up a national OHCA registry. Methods and analysis This is a prospective observational study set in UK NHS Ambulance Services. The target population will be adults and children sustaining an OHCA who are attended by an NHS ambulance emergency response and where resuscitation is attempted. The data collected will be characterised broadly as system characteristics, emergency medical services (EMS) dispatch characteristics, patient characteristics and EMS process variables. The main outcome variables of interest will be return of spontaneous circulation and medium—long-term survival (30 days to 10-year survival). Ethics and dissemination Ethics committee permissions were gained and the study also has received approval from the Confidentiality Advisory Group Ethics and Confidentiality committee which provides authorisation to lawfully hold identifiable data on patients without their consent. To identify the key characteristics contributing to better outcomes in some ambulance services, reliable and reproducible systems need to be established for collecting data on OHCA in the UK. Reports generated from the registry will focus on data completeness, timeliness and quality. Subsequent reports will summarise demographic, patient, process and outcome variables with aim of improving patient care through focus quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26428332

  14. Adaptive responses of cell hydration to a low temperature arrest

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Jens; Azer, Lale; Dörr, Daniel; Fuhr, Günter R.; Bastiaens, Philippe I. H.

    2015-01-01

    Key points Na+ conducting cation channels are key players in the volume restoration of osmotically shrunken cells. Accordingly, they are potential candidates for the compensation of water loss during slow‐freezing procedures.Cells were subjected to different levels of hypertonic stress, aiming to disturb cell water content and to define the energy demands of water channels and Na+ channels in the process of rehydration.Activation of Na+ channels was clearly the rate‐limiting step in the restoration of cell volume post‐cryo, whereas water channels merely played a permissive role.Low temperatures increased cell viscosity with a remarkable hysteresis; furthermore, increasing cell viscosity experimentally was shown to stimulate Na+ channels.The peptide hormone vasopressin was a further activator of Na+ channels and increased the viability of post‐cryo cells considerably. This opens the path for a new class of cryo‐protectants with an intrinsic biological activity. Abstract Slow cooling leads to a passive dehydration of cells, whereas rehydration during warming reflects the active regain of functionality. The ability to modulate such an energy demanding process could be instrumental in optimizing the cryo‐arrest of living systems. In the present study, various levels of hypertonic stress were used to disturb the water content of cells and to define the energy profiles of aquaporins and (Na+ conducting) cation channels during rehydration. Na+ import was found to be the rate‐limiting step in water restoration, whereas aquaporins merely played a permissive role. Indeed, regulated Na+ import was increased 2‐fold following cryo‐arrests, thus facilitating the osmotic rehydration of cells. Freezing temperatures increased cell viscosity with a remarkable hysteresis and viscosity was a trigger of cation channels. The peptide hormone vasopressin was a further activator of channels, increasing the viability of post‐cryo cells considerably. Hence, the hormone

  15. Lithium causes G2 arrest of renal principal cells.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Theun; Alsady, Mohammad; Jaklofsky, Marcel; Otte-Höller, Irene; Baumgarten, Ruben; Giles, Rachel H; Deen, Peter M T

    2014-03-01

    Vasopressin-regulated expression and insertion of aquaporin-2 channels in the luminal membrane of renal principal cells is essential for urine concentration. Lithium affects urine concentrating ability, and approximately 20% of patients treated with lithium develop nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a disorder characterized by polyuria and polydipsia. Lithium-induced NDI is caused by aquaporin-2 downregulation and a reduced ratio of principal/intercalated cells, yet lithium induces principal cell proliferation. Here, we studied how lithium-induced principal cell proliferation can lead to a reduced ratio of principal/intercalated cells using two-dimensional and three-dimensional polarized cultures of mouse renal collecting duct cells and mice treated with clinically relevant lithium concentrations. DNA image cytometry and immunoblotting revealed that lithium initiated proliferation of mouse renal collecting duct cells but also increased the G2/S ratio, indicating G2/M phase arrest. In mice, treatment with lithium for 4, 7, 10, or 13 days led to features of NDI and an increase in the number of principal cells expressing PCNA in the papilla. Remarkably, 30%-40% of the PCNA-positive principal cells also expressed pHistone-H3, a late G2/M phase marker detected in approximately 20% of cells during undisturbed proliferation. Our data reveal that lithium treatment initiates proliferation of renal principal cells but that a significant percentage of these cells are arrested in the late G2 phase, which explains the reduced principal/intercalated cell ratio and may identify the molecular pathway underlying the development of lithium-induced renal fibrosis.

  16. Dentifrices, mouthwashes, and remineralization/caries arrestment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zero, Domenick T

    2006-01-01

    While our knowledge of the dental caries process and its prevention has greatly advanced over the past fifty years, it is fair to state that the management of this disease at the level of the individual patient remains largely empirical. Recommendations for fluoride use by patients at different levels of caries risk are mainly based on the adage that more is better. There is a general understanding that the fluoride compound, concentration, frequency of use, duration of exposure, and method of delivery can influence fluoride efficacy. Two important factors are (1) the initial interaction of relatively high concentrations of fluoride with the tooth surface and plaque during application and (2) the retention of fluoride in oral fluids after application. Fluoride dentifrices remain the most widely used method of delivering topical fluoride. The efficacy of this approach in preventing dental caries is beyond dispute. However, the vast majority of currently marketed dentifrice products have not been clinically tested and have met only the minimal requirements of the FDA monograph using mainly laboratory testing and animal caries testing. Daily use of fluoride dental rinses as an adjunct to fluoride dentifrice has been shown to be clinically effective as has biweekly use of higher concentration fluoride rinses. The use of remineralizing agents (other than fluoride), directed at reversing or arresting non-cavitated lesions, remains a promising yet largely unproven strategy. High fluoride concentration compounds, e.g., AgF, Ag(NH3)2F, to arrest more advanced carious lesions with and without prior removal of carious tissue are being used in several countries as part of the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach. Most of the recent innovations in oral care products have been directed toward making cosmetic marketing claims. There continues to be a need for innovation and collaboration with other scientific disciplines to fully understand and prevent dental caries

  17. Acanthamoeba induces cell-cycle arrest in host cells.

    PubMed

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Jayasekera, Samantha; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2004-08-01

    Acanthamoeba can cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and eye keratitis. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of these emerging diseases remain unclear. In this study, the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) were determined. Two isolates of Acanthamoeba belonging to the T1 genotype (GAE isolate) and T4 genotype (keratitis isolate) were used, which showed severe cytotoxicity on HBMEC and HCEC, respectively. No tissue specificity was observed in their ability to exhibit binding to the host cells. To determine the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle, a cell-cycle-specific gene array was used. This screened for 96 genes specific for host cell-cycle regulation. It was observed that Acanthamoeba inhibited expression of genes encoding cyclins F and G1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6, which are proteins important for cell-cycle progression. Moreover, upregulation was observed of the expression of genes such as GADD45A and p130 Rb, associated with cell-cycle arrest, indicating cell-cycle inhibition. Next, the effect of Acanthamoeba on retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation was determined. pRb is a potent inhibitor of G1-to-S cell-cycle progression; however, its function is inhibited upon phosphorylation, allowing progression into S phase. Western blotting revealed that Acanthamoeba abolished pRb phosphorylation leading to cell-cycle arrest at the G1-to-S transition. Taken together, these studies demonstrated for the first time that Acanthamoeba inhibits the host cell cycle at the transcriptional level, as well as by modulating pRb phosphorylation using host cell-signalling mechanisms. A complete understanding of Acanthamoeba-host cell interactions may help in developing novel strategies to treat Acanthamoeba infections.

  18. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. Methods: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3–5 until 180 days. Results: Eight TTM sites randomized 202 patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present specificity increased to 96% (p < 0.001). Specificity and sensitivity were not significantly affected by targeted temperature or sedation. A benign EEG was found in 1% of the patients with a poor outcome. Conclusions: Highly malignant EEG after rewarming reliably predicted poor outcome in half of patients without false predictions. An isolated finding of a single malignant feature did not predict poor outcome whereas a benign EEG was highly predictive of a good outcome. PMID:26865516

  19. The effect of length of hospitalization on re-arrest among insanity plea acquittees.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Richard; Hall, Donna

    2011-01-01

    State psychiatric hospitals are increasingly populated by forensic patients. In New York State, the growth in the forensic population is largely attributable to increased lengths of stay of patients deemed not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI). This research was conducted to determine whether longer periods of hospitalization are associated with better outcomes in the community, as measured by re-arrest for any offense and re-arrest for violence. The sample included 386 NGRI patients released into the community in New York State. A Cox regression proportional hazards model was used to assess the unique effects of length of hospitalization on re-arrest. The results showed that the length of treatment had little effect on either measure of re-arrest. Re-arrest was largely explained by demographics and prior criminal histories.

  20. Cardiac arrest secondary to type 2 Kounis syndrome resulting from urticaria and angioedema.

    PubMed

    Connor, Suzy; Child, Nick; Burdon-Jones, David; Connor, Andrew

    2010-07-01

    A 43-year-old man with no cardiac history presented with chest pain followed by cardiac arrest. He was successfully defibrillated and underwent primary percutaneous coronary angioplasty to a culprit coronary artery lesion. He later re-presented with a diffuse urticarial rash and lip swelling, reporting that these symptoms had been present for 4 weeks before his cardiac arrest and voicing concern that a further cardiac arrest may be imminent. A diagnosis of post-viral or idiopathic autoimmune urticaria and angioedema was made. Given the absence of cardiac symptoms before the development of the rash, it was hypothesised that coronary artery spasm precipitated by histamine release due to his dermatological condition contributed to his myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest. The final diagnosis was therefore cardiac arrest secondary to type II Kounis syndrome, resulting from idiopathic autoimmune or post-viral urticaria and angioedema.

  1. Reversible cryo-arrest for imaging molecules in living cells at high spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Ola; Wehner, Frank; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Fuhr, Günther R.; Bastiaens, Philippe I. H.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of molecules in living cells hamper precise imaging of molecular patterns by functional and super resolution microscopy. Circumventing lethal chemical fixation, an on-stage cryo-arrest was developed for consecutive imaging of molecular patterns within the same living, but arrested cells. The reversibility of consecutive cryo-arrests was demonstrated by the high survival rate of different cell lines and intact growth factor signaling that was not perturbed by stress response. Reversible cryo-arrest was applied to study the evolution of ligand-induced receptor tyrosine kinase activation at different scales. The nanoscale clustering of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the plasma membrane was assessed by single molecule localization microscopy and endosomal microscale activity patterns of ephrin receptor type-A (EphA2) by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. We thereby demonstrate that reversible cryo-arrest allows the precise determination of molecular patterns while conserving the dynamic capabilities of living cells. PMID:27400419

  2. Gender differences and risk of arrest among offenders with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Becker, Marion A; Andel, Ross; Boaz, Timothy; Constantine, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increasing number of men and women with serious mental illness (SMI) incarcerated in America's jails, little research exists on the role gender may play in arrest among persons with SMI. This study examined correlates of arrests among offenders with SMI, specifically the role of gender. County criminal justice records, as well as county and statewide social service archival databases, were used to identify jail inmates with SMI in a large urban county in Florida. Of the 3,769 inmates identified, 41% were female. This study identified three distinct classes of male and female offenders within which persons had similar trajectories of arrests over the 4-year study period representing those with minimal, low, and high arrest rates. Findings suggest some important differences between women and men in risk factors for re-arrests. Attention to these factors may improve the ability to prevent future recidivism among men and women with SMI.

  3. A novel nucleolar protein, PAPA-1, induces growth arrest as a result of cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Taruho S; Maita, Hiroshi; Tabata, Takanori; Taira, Takahiro; Kitaura, Hirotake; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2004-09-29

    We have identified a novel nucleolar protein, PAP-1-associated protein-1 (PAPA-1), after screening the interacting proteins with Pim-1-associated protein-1 (PAP-1), a protein that is a phosphorylation target of Pim-1 kinase. PAPA-1 comprises 345 amino acids with a basic amino-acid cluster. PAPA-1 was found to be localized in the nucleolus in transfected HeLa cells, and the lysine/histidine cluster was essential for nucleolar localization of PAPA-1. PAPA-1 protein and mRNA expression decreased upon serum restimulation of starvation-synchronized cells, which displayed maximum level of PAPA-1 expression at G0 and early G1 phase of the cell cycle. Ectopic expression of PAPA-1 induced growth suppression of cells, and the effect was dependent on its nucleolar localization in established HeLa cell lines that inducibly express PAPA-1 or its deletion mutant under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter. Furthermore, when PAPA-1-inducible HeLa cells were synchronized by thymidine, colcemid or mimosine, and then PAPA-1 was expressed, the proportion of cells at the G1 phase was obviously increased. These results suggest that PAPA-1 induces growth and cell cycle arrests at the G1 phase of the cell cycle.

  4. Differential arrest and adhesion of tumor cells and microbeads in the microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng; Cai, Bin; Lei, Ming; Liu, Yang; Fu, Bingmei M

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the mechanical mechanisms behind tumor cell arrest in the microvasculature, we injected fluorescently labeled human breast carcinoma cells or similarly sized rigid beads into the systemic circulation of a rat. Their arrest patterns in the microvasculature of mesentery were recorded and quantified. We found that 93% of rigid beads were arrested either at arteriole-capillary intersections or in capillaries. Only 3% were at the capillary-postcapillary venule intersections and in postcapillary venules. In contrast, most of the flexible tumor cells were either entrapped in capillaries or arrested at capillary or postcapillary venule-postcapillary venule intersections and in postcapillary venules. Only 12% of tumor cells were arrested at the arteriole-capillary intersections. The differential arrest and adhesion of tumor cells and microbeads in the microvasculature was confirmed by a χ(2) test (p < 0.001). These results demonstrate that mechanical trapping was responsible for almost all the arrest of beads and half the arrest of tumor cells. Based on the measured geometry and blood flow velocities at the intersections, we also performed a numerical simulation using commercial software (ANSYS CFX 12.01) to depict the detailed distribution profiles of the velocity, shear rate, and vorticity at the intersections where tumor cells preferred to arrest and adhere. Simulation results reveal the presence of localized vorticity and shear rate regions at the turning points of the microvessel intersections, implying that hemodynamic factors play an important role in tumor cell arrest in the microcirculation. Our study helps elucidate long-debated issues related to the dominant factors in early-stage tumor hematogenous metastasis.

  5. Post-resuscitation care following out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Girotra, Saket; Chan, Paul S; Bradley, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in developed countries. Although a majority of cardiac arrest patients die during the acute event, a substantial proportion of cardiac arrest deaths occur in patients following successful resuscitation and can be attributed to the development of post-cardiac arrest syndrome. There is growing recognition that integrated post-resuscitation care, which encompasses targeted temperature management (TTM), early coronary angiography and comprehensive critical care, can improve patient outcomes. TTM has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome in patients who remain comatose especially following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias. Early coronary angiography and revascularisation if needed may also be beneficial during the post-resuscitation phase, based on data from observational studies. In addition, resuscitated patients usually require intensive care, which includes mechanical ventilator, haemodynamic support and close monitoring of blood gases, glucose, electrolytes, seizures and other disease-specific intervention. Efforts should be taken to avoid premature withdrawal of life-supporting treatment, especially in patients treated with TTM. Given that resources and personnel needed to provide high-quality post-resuscitation care may not exist at all hospitals, professional societies have recommended regionalisation of post-resuscitation care in specialised ‘cardiac arrest centres’ as a strategy to improve cardiac arrest outcomes. Finally, evidence for post-resuscitation care following in-hospital cardiac arrest is largely extrapolated from studies in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Future studies need to examine the effectiveness of different post-resuscitation strategies, such as TTM, in patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:26385451

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1 preserves coronary microvascular endothelial function after cardiac arrest and resuscitation: potential antioxidant effects.

    PubMed

    Dokken, Betsy B; Piermarini, Charles V; Teachey, Mary K; Gura, Michael T; Dameff, Christian J; Heller, Brian D; Krate, Jonida; Ashgar, Aeen M; Querin, Lauren; Mitchell, Jennifer L; Hilwig, Ronald W; Kern, Karl B

    2013-02-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has protective effects in the heart. We hypothesized that GLP-1 would mitigate coronary microvascular and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction if administered after cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR). Eighteen swine were subjected to ventricular fibrillation followed by resuscitation. Swine surviving to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were randomized to receive an intravenous infusion of either human rGLP-1 (10 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1); n = 8) or 0.9% saline (n = 8) for 4 h, beginning 1 min after ROSC. CAR caused a decline in coronary flow reserve (CFR) in control animals (pre-arrest, 1.86 ± 0.20; 1 h post-ROSC, 1.3 ± 0.05; 4 h post-ROSC, 1.25 ± 0.06; P < 0.05). GLP-1 preserved CFR for up to 4 h after ROSC (pre-arrest, 1.31 ± 0.17; 1 h post-ROSC, 1.5 ± 0.01; 4 h post-ROSC, 1.55 ± 0.22). Although there was a trend toward improvement in LV relaxation in the GLP-1-treated animals, overall LV function was not consistently different between groups. 8-iso-PGF(2α), a measure of reactive oxygen species load, was decreased in post-ROSC GLP-1-treated animals [placebo, control (NS): 38.1 ± 1.54 pg/ml; GLP-1: 26.59 ± 1.56 pg/ml; P < 0.05]. Infusion of GLP-1 after CAR preserved coronary microvascular and LV diastolic function. These effects may be mediated through a reduction in oxidative stress.

  7. Is extracorporeal rewarming indicated in avalanche victims with unwitnessed hypothermic cardiorespiratory arrest?

    PubMed

    Mair, Peter; Brugger, Hermann; Mair, Birgit; Moroder, Luca; Ruttmann, Elfriede

    2014-12-01

    International guidelines recommend using extracorporeal rewarming in all hypothermic avalanche victims with prolonged cardiac arrest if they have patent airways and a plasma potassium level≤12 mmol/L. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome data to determine if available experience with extracorporeal rewarming of avalanche victims supports this recommendation. At Innsbruck Medical University Hospital, 28 patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest following an avalanche accident were resuscitated using extracorporeal circulation. Of these patients, 25 were extricated from the snow masses with no vital signs and did not survive to hospital discharge. Three patients had witnessed cardiac arrest after extrication and a core temperature of 21.7°C, 22°C, and 24.0°C, two of whom survived long-term with full neurological recovery. A search of the literature revealed only one asystolic avalanche victim with unwitnessed hypothermic cardiac arrest (core temperature 19°C) surviving long-term. All other avalanche victims in the medical literature surviving prolonged hypothermic cardiac arrest suffered witnessed arrest after extrication with a core temperature below 24°C. Our results suggest that prognosis of hypothermic avalanche victims with unwitnessed asystolic cardiac arrest and a core temperature>24°C is extremely poor. Available outcome data do not support the use of extracorporeal rewarming in these patients.

  8. Gender as a Moderator in Predicting Re-arrest Among Treated Drug-Involved Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Knight, K.; Joe, G.W.; Rowan, G.A.; Lehman, W. E.K.; Flynn, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of the current study is to explore gender differences on the relationships of pre-treatment risk factors (i.e., substance use severity and criminal history) and psychosocial functioning (i.e., decision making, risk taking, self-esteem, social support, and peer support) with time to re-arrest following termination from prison. With gender as a moderator variable, survival analysis was used to model time to re-arrest in terms of pre-treatment risk factors and psychosocial functioning. The sample consisted of 697 participants (384 males and 313 females) who were admitted to four prison-based substance abuse treatment programs. Female inmates experienced a longer time to re-arrest than male inmates. Better decision making and more peer support were associated with lower levels of re-arrest for males. Males with higher self-esteem were more likely to be re-arrested than their counterparts. Females with more self-reported criminal involvements had a higher rate of re-arrest than those with less criminal involvement. In contrast to males, females with relatively high self-reported self-esteem had a lower rate of re-arrest than their counterparts. Clinical implications include the importance of enhancing decision-making ability and peer support for males and self-esteem for females. PMID:25216813

  9. Discrimination, arrest history, and major depressive disorder in the U.S. Black population.

    PubMed

    Anglin, Deidre M; Lighty, Quenesha; Yang, Lawrence H; Greenspoon, Michelle; Miles, Rashun J; Slonim, Tzachi; Isaac, Kathleen; Brown, Monique J

    2014-09-30

    Everyday discrimination contributes negatively to depressive symptomatology among Blacks in the US and being arrested could add to this depression. Using data from the National Survey on American Life, the present study determined the association between an arrest history and major depressive disorder (MDD), while accounting for discrimination among African Americans, US-born Afro-Caribbeans and first-generation Black immigrants. Findings from logistic regression analyses adjusted for discrimination suggested an arrest history is associated with 12-month MDD (Adjusted OR=1.47; 95% CI=1.02-2.10) and lifetime MDD (Adjusted OR=1.56 CI=1.17-2.09). Accounting for drug and alcohol dependence attenuated the association between arrest history and 12-month MDD, but not lifetime MDD. The associations between arrest history and both 12-month and lifetime MDD, and discrimination and lifetime MDD varied by ethnic/immigrant group. Specifically, while the association between arrest history and MDD (both 12-month and lifetime) was strongest among US-born Afro-Caribbeans, evidence consistent with the immigrant paradox, the association between discrimination and lifetime MDD was particularly relevant for first-generation Black immigrants, suggesting discrimination may hinder the protection of first-generation status. Mental health prevention and treatment programs should target the stress associated with being arrested and experiencing discrimination among US Blacks.

  10. Cell cycle arrest and activation of development in marine invertebrate deuterostomes.

    PubMed

    Costache, Vlad; McDougall, Alex; Dumollard, Rémi

    2014-08-01

    Like most metazoans, eggs of echinoderms and tunicates (marine deuterostomes, there is no data for the cephalochordates) arrest awaiting fertilization due to the activity of the Mos/MEK/MAPK cascade and are released from this cell cycle arrest by sperm-triggered Ca2+ signals. Invertebrate deuterostome eggs display mainly three distinct types of cell cycle arrest before fertilization mediated by potentially different cytostatic factors (CSF): one CSF causes arrest during meiotic metaphase I (MI-CSF in tunicates and some starfishes), another CSF likely causes arrest during meiotic metaphase II (amphioxus), and yet another form of CSF causes arrest to occur after meiotic exit during G1 of the first mitotic cycle (G1-CSF). In tunicates and echinoderms these different CSF activities have been shown to rely on the Mos//MAPK pathway for establishment and on Ca2+ signals for their inactivation. Despite these molecular similarities, release of MI-CSF arrest is caused by APC/C activation (to destroy cyclin B) whereas release from G1-CSF is caused by stimulating S phase and the synthesis of cyclins. Further research is needed to understand how both the Mos//MAPK cascade and Ca2+ achieve these tasks in different marine invertebrate deuterostomes. Another conserved feature of eggs is that protein synthesis of specific mRNAs is necessary to proceed through oocyte maturation and to maintain CSF-induced cell cycle arrest. Then activation of development at fertilization is accompanied by an increase in the rate of protein synthesis but the mechanisms involved are still largely unknown in most of the marine deuterostomes. How the sperm-triggered Ca2+ signals cause an increase in protein synthesis has been studied mainly in sea urchin eggs. Here we review these conserved features of eggs (arrest, activation and protein synthesis) focusing on the non-vertebrate deuterostomes.

  11. Contrasting roles of checkpoint proteins as recombination modulators at Fob1-Ter complexes with or without fork arrest.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bidyut K; Bairwa, Narendra K; Bastia, Deepak

    2009-04-01

    The replication terminator protein Fob1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae specifically interacts with two tandem Ter sites (replication fork barriers) located in the nontranscribed spacer of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) to cause polar fork arrest. The Fob1-Ter complex is multifunctional and controls other DNA transactions such as recombination by multiple mechanisms. Here, we report on the regulatory roles of the checkpoint proteins in the initiation and progression of recombination at Fob1-Ter complexes. The checkpoint adapter proteins Tof1 and Csm3 either positively or negatively controlled recombination depending on whether it was provoked by polar fork arrest or by transcription, respectively. The absolute requirements for these proteins for inducing recombination at an active replication terminus most likely masked their negative modulatory role at a later step of the process. Other checkpoint proteins of the checkpoint adapter/mediator class such as Mrc1 and Rad9, which channel signals from the sensor to the effector kinase, tended to suppress recombination at Fob1-Ter complexes regardless of how it was initiated. We have also discovered that the checkpoint sensor kinase Mec1 and the effector Rad53 were positive modulators of recombination initiated by transcription but had little effect on recombination at Ter. The work also showed that the two pathways were Rad52 dependent but Rad51 independent. Since Ter sites occur in the intergenic spacer of rDNA from yeast to humans, the mechanism is likely to be of widespread occurrence.

  12. Acute Ulnar Shortening for Delayed Presentation of Distal Radius Growth Arrest in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Ellanti, Prasad; Harrington, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Distal radius physeal fractures are common in children and adolescents. However, posttraumatic growth arrest is uncommon. The management of posttraumatic growth arrest is dependent on the severity of the deformity and the remaining growth potential of the patient. Various treatment options exist. We present a 17-year-old male with distal radius growth arrest who presented four years after the initial injury. He had a symptomatic 15 mm positive ulnar variance managed with an ulnar shortening osteotomy with the use of the AO mini distractor intraoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, an acute ulnar shortening of 15 mm is the largest reported. PMID:23227397

  13. Acute ulnar shortening for delayed presentation of distal radius growth arrest in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, Prasad; Harrington, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Distal radius physeal fractures are common in children and adolescents. However, posttraumatic growth arrest is uncommon. The management of posttraumatic growth arrest is dependent on the severity of the deformity and the remaining growth potential of the patient. Various treatment options exist. We present a 17-year-old male with distal radius growth arrest who presented four years after the initial injury. He had a symptomatic 15 mm positive ulnar variance managed with an ulnar shortening osteotomy with the use of the AO mini distractor intraoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, an acute ulnar shortening of 15 mm is the largest reported.

  14. The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study: rationale and methodology for cardiac arrest patients.

    PubMed

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Spaite, D W; Lyver, M B; Munkley, D P; Field, B J; Dagnone, E; Maloney, J P; Jones, G R; Luinstra, L G; Jermyn, B D; Ward, R; DeMaio, V J

    1998-08-01

    The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support Study represents the largest prehospital study yet conducted, worldwide. This study will involve more than 25,000 cardiac arrest, trauma, and critically ill patients over an 8-year period. The study will evaluate the incremental benefit of rapid defibrillation and prehospital Advanced Cardiac Life Support measures for cardiac arrest survival and the benefit of Advanced Life Support for patients with traumatic injuries and other critically ill prehospital patients. This article describes the OPALS study with regard to the rationale and methodology for cardiac arrest patients.

  15. Pulseless electrical activity in cardiac arrest: electrocardiographic presentations and management considerations based on the electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Chris; Brady, William

    2012-01-01

    Pulseless electrical activity (PEA), a cardiac arrest rhythm scenario with an associated poor prognosis, is defined as cardiac electrical activity without a palpable pulse. Considering both outpatient and inpatient cardiac arrest presentations, PEA as a rhythm group has been increasing over the past 10 to 20 years with a corresponding decrease in the "shockable" rhythms, such as pulseless ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. This review focuses on electrocardiographic findings encountered in PEA cardiac arrest presentations with an emphasis on recognition of patients with a potential opportunity for successful resuscitation.

  16. Treatment of growth arrest by transfer of cultured chondrocytes into physeal defects.

    PubMed

    Lee, E H; Chen, F; Chan, J; Bose, K

    1998-01-01

    Chondrocytes were cultured from cartilage harvested from the iliac apophysis and knee joints of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. An experimental model for growth arrest was created by excising the medial half of the proximal growth plate of the tibia of 6-week-old NZW rabbits. The cultured chondrocytes were embedded in agarose and transferred into the growth-plate defect after excision of the physis. Transfer also was performed after excision of the bony bridge in established growth arrest. In both cases, growth arrest with angular deformation of the tibia was prevented. Histologic studies confirmed the viability of the chondrocytes in the new host physis.

  17. Coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest in patients who had neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    DiFazio, Rachel L; Kocher, Minider S; Berven, Sigurd; Kasser, James

    2003-01-01

    This is a retrospective review of four patients in whom a pattern of coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest and metaphyseal irregularities developed. These patients were all treated with neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and presented with a progressive gait disturbance and pain, leg-length discrepancy, and limited abduction. Imaging revealed coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest. Two patients (three hips) underwent proximal femoral valgus osteotomy, one patient underwent fixation of a femoral neck fracture with subsequent greater trochanter transfer, and one patient is being observed. This case series suggests an association between neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and this unusual pattern of coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest.

  18. Transformation abrogates an early G1-phase arrest point required for specification of the Chinese hamster DHFR replication origin.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J R; Keezer, S M; Gilbert, D M

    1998-01-01

    The origin decision point (ODP) was originally identified as a distinct point during G1-phase when Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell nuclei experience a transition that is required for specific recognition of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) origin locus by Xenopus egg extracts. Passage of cells through the ODP requires a mitogen-independent protein kinase that is activated prior to restriction point control. Here we show that inhibition of an early G1-phase protein kinase pathway by the addition of 2-aminopurine (2-AP) prior to the ODP arrests CHO cells in G1-phase. Transformation with simian virus 40 (SV40) abrogated this arrest point, resulting in the entry of cultured cells into S-phase in the presence of 2-AP and a disruption of the normal pattern of initiation sites at the DHFR locus. Cells treated with 2-AP after the ODP initiated replication specifically within the DHFR origin locus. Transient exposure of transformed cells to 2-AP during the ODP transition also disrupted origin choice, whereas non-transformed cells arrested in G1-phase and then passed through a delayed ODP after removal of 2-AP from the medium. We conclude that mammalian cells have many potential sites at which they can initiate replication. Normally, events occurring during the early G1-phase ODP transition determine which of these sites will be the preferred initiation site. However, if chromatin is exposed to S-phase-promoting factors prior to this transition, mammalian cells, like Xenopus and Drosophila embryos, can initiate replication without origin specification. PMID:9501102

  19. Developing new predictive alarms based on ECG metrics for bradyasystolic cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ding, Quan; Bai, Yong; Tinoco, Adelita; Mortara, David; Do, Duc; Boyle, Noel G; Pelter, Michele M; Hu, Xiao

    2015-12-01

    We investigated 17 metrics derived from four leads of electrocardiographic (ECG) signals from hospital patient monitors to develop new ECG alarms for predicting adult bradyasystolic cardiac arrest events.A retrospective case-control study was designed to analyze 17 ECG metrics from 27 adult bradyasystolic and 304 control patients. The 17 metrics consisted of PR interval (PR), P-wave duration (Pdur), QRS duration (QRSdur), RR interval (RR), QT interval (QT), estimate of serum K  +  using only frontal leads (SerumK2), T-wave complexity (T Complex), ST segment levels for leads I, II, V (ST I, ST II, ST V), and 7 heart rate variability (HRV) metrics. These 7 HRV metrics were standard deviation of normal to normal intervals (SDNN), total power, very low frequency power, low frequency power, high frequency power, normalized low frequency power, and normalized high frequency power. Controls were matched by gender, age (±5 years), admission to the same hospital unit within the same month, and the same major diagnostic category. A research ECG analysis software program developed by co-author D M was used to automatically extract the metrics. The absolute value for each ECG metric, and the duration, terminal value, and slope of the dominant trend for each ECG metric, were derived and tested as the alarm conditions. The maximal true positive rate (TPR) of detecting cardiac arrest at a prescribed maximal false positive rate (FPR) based on the trending conditions was reported. Lead time was also recorded as the time between the first time alarm condition was triggered and the event of cardiac arrest.While conditions based on the absolute values of ECG metrics do not provide discriminative information to predict bradyasystolic cardiac arrest, the trending conditions can be useful. For example, with a max FPR  =  5.0%, some derived alarms conditions are: trend duration of PR  >  2.8 h (TPR  =  48.2%, lead time  =  10.0  ±  6.6

  20. Successful Management of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning Resulting in Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Hakimoğlu, Sedat; Dikey, İsmail; Sarı, Ali; Kekeç, Leyla; Tuzcu, Kasım; Karcıoğlu, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide has high toxicity when it is ingested, and in case of contact with moisture, phosphine gas is released. Aluminum phosphide poisoning causes metabolic acidosis, arrhythmia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and shock, and there is no specific antidote. A 17-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital because of aluminum phosphide poisoning with 1500 mg of aluminum phosphide tablets. The patient’s consciousness was clear but he was somnolent. Vital parameters were as follows: blood pressure: 85/56 mmHg, pulse: 88 beats/min, SpO2: 94%, temperature: 36.4°C. Because of hypotension, noradrenaline and dopamine infusions were started. The patient was intubated because of respiratory distress and loss of consciousness. Severe metabolic acidosis was determined in the arterial blood gas, and metabolic acidosis was corrected by sodium bicarbonate treatment. In addition to supportive therapy of the poisoning, haemodialysis was performed. Cardiac arrest occurred during follow-ups in the intensive care unit, and sinus rhythm was achieved after 10 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The patient was discharged after three sessions of haemodialysis on the ninth day. As a result, haemodialysis contributed to symptomatic treatment of aluminum phosphide poisoning in this case report. PMID:27366514