Science.gov

Sample records for arsenic promotes progressive

  1. Differential Methylation of the Arsenic (III) Methyltransferase Promoter According to Arsenic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Matthew O.; Tang, Wan-yee; Shang, Yan; Pollak, Jonathan; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Guallar, Eliseo; Cole, Shelley A.; Fallin, M. Daniele; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is methylated in the body by arsenic (III) methyltransferase. Arsenic methylation is thought to play a role in arsenic-related epigenetic phenomena including aberrant DNA and histone methylation. However, it is unclear whether the promoter of the AS3MT gene, which codes for arsenic (III) methyltransferase, is differentially methylated as a function of arsenic exposure. In this study we evaluated AS3MT promoter methylation according to exposure, assessed by urinary arsenic excretion in a stratified random sample of 48 participants from the Strong Heart Study who had urine arsenic measured at baseline and DNA available from 1989–1991 and 1998–1999. For this study, all data are from the 1989–1991 visit. We measured AS3MT promoter methylation at its 48 CpG loci by bisulphite sequencing. We compared mean % methylation at each CpG locus by arsenic exposure group using linear regression adjusted for study centre, age and sex. A hypomethylated region in the AS3MT promoter was associated with higher arsenic exposure. In vitro, arsenic induced AS3MT promoter hypomethylation and it increased AS3MT expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These findings may suggest that arsenic exposure influences the epigenetic regulation of a major arsenic metabolism gene. PMID:24154821

  2. Arsenic | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    ... and minerals. Arsenic compounds are used to preserve wood, as pesticides, and in some industries. Arsenic can ... Breathing sawdust or burning smoke from arsenic-treated wood Living in an area with high levels of ...

  4. Arsenic and human health: epidemiologic progress and public health implications.

    PubMed

    Argos, Maria; Ahsan, Habibul; Graziano, Joseph H

    2012-09-10

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic in groundwater pose a public health threat to millions of people worldwide, including severely affected populations in South and Southeast Asia. Although arsenic is an established human carcinogen and has been associated with a multitude of health outcomes in epidemiologic studies, a mode of action has yet to be determined for some aspects of arsenic toxicity. Herein, we emphasize the role of recent genetic and molecular epidemiologic investigations of arsenic toxicity. Additionally, we discuss considerations for the public health impacts of arsenic exposure through drinking water with respect to primary and secondary prevention efforts.

  5. Arsenic Biotransformation as a Cancer Promoting Factor by Inducing DNA Damage and Disruption of Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Victor D.; Vucic, Emily A.; Adonis, Marta; Gil, Lionel; Lam, Wan L.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water poses a major global health concern. Populations exposed to high concentrations of arsenic-contaminated drinking water suffer serious health consequences, including alarming cancer incidence and death rates. Arsenic is biotransformed through sequential addition of methyl groups, acquired from s-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Metabolism of arsenic generates a variety of genotoxic and cytotoxic species, damaging DNA directly and indirectly, through the generation of reactive oxidative species and induction of DNA adducts, strand breaks and cross links, and inhibition of the DNA repair process itself. Since SAM is the methyl group donor used by DNA methyltransferases to maintain normal epigenetic patterns in all human cells, arsenic is also postulated to affect maintenance of normal DNA methylation patterns, chromatin structure, and genomic stability. The biological processes underlying the cancer promoting factors of arsenic metabolism, related to DNA damage and repair, will be discussed here. PMID:22091411

  6. Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    ... basis for regulation and standard setting worldwide. The current recommended limit of arsenic in drinking-water is 10 μg/litre, although this guideline value is designated as provisional because of measurement difficulties and the practical difficulties in removing arsenic ...

  7. Arsenicals Produce Stable Progressive Changes in DNA Methylation Patterns that are Linked to Malignant Transformation of Immortalized Urothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Taylor J.; Novak, Petr; Wnek, Shawn M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation participates in carcinogenesis and is a molecular hallmark of a tumor cell. Tumor cells generally exhibit a redistribution of DNA methylation resulting in global hypomethylation with regional hypermethylation; however, the speed in which these changes emerge has not been fully elucidated and may depend on the temporal location of the cell in the path from normal, finite lifespan to malignant transformation. We used a model of arsenical-induced malignant transformation of immortalized human urothelial cells and DNA methylation microarrays to examine the extent and temporal nature of changes in DNA methylation that occur during the transition from immortal to malignantly transformed. Our data presented herein suggest that during arsenical-induced malignant transformation, aberrant DNA methylation occurs non-randomly, progresses gradually at hundreds of gene promoters, alters expression of the associated gene, and these changes are coincident with the acquisition of malignant properties, such as anchorage independent growth and tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. The DNA methylation changes appear stable, since malignantly transformed cells removed from the transforming arsenical exhibited no reversion in DNA methylation levels, associated gene expression, or malignant phenotype. These data suggest that arsenicals act as epimutagens and directly link their ability to induce malignant transformation to their actions on the epigenome. PMID:19716837

  8. Arsenic induces structural and compositional colonic microbiome change and promotes host nitrogen and amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dheer, Rishu; Patterson, Jena; Dudash, Mark; Stachler, Elyse N; Bibby, Kyle J; Stolz, Donna B; Shiva, Sruti; Wang, Zeneng; Hazen, Stanley L; Barchowsky, Aaron; Stolz, John F

    2015-12-15

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer and non-cancer diseases. However, mechanisms for chronic arsenic-induced pathogenesis, especially in response to lower exposure levels, are unclear. In addition, the importance of health impacts from xeniobiotic-promoted microbiome changes is just being realized and effects of arsenic on the microbiome with relation to disease promotion are unknown. To investigate impact of arsenic exposure on both microbiome and host metabolism, the stucture and composition of colonic microbiota, their metabolic phenotype, and host tissue and plasma metabolite levels were compared in mice exposed for 2, 5, or 10weeks to 0, 10 (low) or 250 (high) ppb arsenite (As(III)). Genotyping of colonic bacteria revealed time and arsenic concentration dependent shifts in community composition, particularly the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, relative to those seen in the time-matched controls. Arsenic-induced erosion of bacterial biofilms adjacent to the mucosal lining and changes in the diversity and abundance of morphologically distinct species indicated changes in microbial community structure. Bacterical spores increased in abundance and intracellular inclusions decreased with high dose arsenic. Interestingly, expression of arsenate reductase (arsA) and the As(III) exporter arsB, remained unchanged, while the dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nrfA) gene expression increased. In keeping with the change in nitrogen metabolism, colonic and liver nitrite and nitrate levels and ratios changed with time. In addition, there was a concomitant increase in pathogenic arginine metabolites in the mouse circulation. These data suggest that arsenic exposure impacts the microbiome and microbiome/host nitrogen metabolism to support disease enhancing pathogenic phenotypes.

  9. Arsenic induces structural and compositional colonic microbiome change and promotes host nitrogen and amino acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dheer, Rishu; Patterson, Jena; Dudash, Mark; Stachler, Elyse N.; Bibby, Kyle J.; Stolz, Donna B.; Shiva, Sruti; Wang, Zeneng; Hazen, Stanley L.; Barchowsky, Aaron; Stolz, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer and non-cancer diseases. However, mechanisms for chronic arsenic-induced pathogeneis, especially in response to lower exposure levels, are unclear. In addition, the importance of health impacts from xeniobiotic-promoted microbiome changes is just being realized and effects of arsenic on the microbiome with relation to disease promotion are unknown. To investigate impact of arsenic exposure on both microbiome and host metabolism, the stucture and composition of colonic microbiota, their metabolic phenotype, and host tissue and plasma metabolite levels were compared in mice exposed for 2, 5, or 10 weeks to 0, 10 (low) or 250 (high) ppb arsenite (As(III)). Genotyping of colonic bacteria revealed time and arsenic concentration dependent shifts in community composition, particularly the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, relative to those seen in the time-matched controls. Arsenic-induced erosion of bacterial biofilms adjacent to the mucosal lining and changes in the diversity and abundance of morphologically distinct species indicated changes in microbial community structure. Bacterical spores increased in abundance and intracellular inclusions decreased with high dose arsenic. Interestingly, expression of arsenate reductase (arsA) and the As(III) exporter arsB, remained unchanged, while the dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nrfA) gene expression increased. In keeping with the change in nitrogen metabolism, colonic and liver nitrite and nitrate levels and ratios changed with time. In addition, there was a concomitant increase in pathogenic arginine metabolites in the mouse circulation. These data suggest that arsenic exposure impacts the microbiome and microbiome/host nitrogen metabolism to support disease enhancing pathogenic phenotypes. PMID:26529668

  10. Stimulatory Effects of Arsenic-Tolerant Soil Fungi on Plant Growth Promotion and Soil Properties

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Gupta, Manjul; Vaish, Aradhana; Mannan, Shivee; Singh, Nandita; Tewari, Shri Krishna; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen fungi were obtained from arsenic-contaminated agricultural fields in West Bengal, India and examined for their arsenic tolerance and removal ability in our previous study. Of these, the four best arsenic-remediating isolates were tested for plant growth promotion effects on rice and pea in the present study. A greenhouse-based pot experiment was conducted using soil inocula of individual fungi. The results indicated a significant (P<0.05) increase in plant growth and improvement of soil properties in inoculated soils compared to the control. A significant increase in plant growth was recorded in treated soils and varied from 16–293%. Soil chemical and enzymatic properties varied from 20–222% and 34–760%, respectively, in inoculated soil. Plants inoculated with inocula of Westerdykella and Trichoderma showed better stimulatory effects on plant growth and soil nutrient availability than Rhizopus and Lasiodiplodia. These fungi improved soil nutrient content and enhanced plant growth. These fungi may be used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and improved soil properties in arsenic-contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:23047145

  11. A patient with progressive multiple myeloma treated successfully with arsenic trioxide after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, B; Shapira, M Y; Ackerstein, A; Resnik, I B; Bitan, M; Or, R

    2007-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable progressive disease. Many therapeutic options are available to delay progression, including autologous and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. At advanced stages, MM is often refractory to treatment. We report a heavily pretreated patient with graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantations, treated at a terminal stage with a modified protocol for arsenic trioxide (ATO). This patient with poor clinical status tolerated the treatment very well. He had a remarkable clinical response and achieved complete remission. The mechanisms of ATO are presented and the potential role of ATO for MM is discussed.

  12. Arsenic Promotes NF-Kb-Mediated Fibroblast Dysfunction and Matrix Remodeling to Impair Muscle Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Changqing; Ferrari, Ricardo; Beezhold, Kevin; Stearns-Reider, Kristen; D’Amore, Antonio; Haschak, Martin; Stolz, Donna; Robbins, Paul D.; Barchowsky, Aaron; Ambrosio, Fabrisia

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is a global health hazard that impacts over 140 million individuals worldwide. Epidemiological studies reveal prominent muscle dysfunction and mobility declines following arsenic exposure; yet, mechanisms underlying such declines are unknown. The objective of this study was to test the novel hypothesis that arsenic drives a maladaptive fibroblast phenotype to promote pathogenic myomatrix remodeling and compromise the muscle stem (satellite) cell (MuSC) niche. Mice were exposed to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic in drinking water before receiving a local muscle injury. Arsenic-exposed muscles displayed pathogenic matrix remodeling, defective myofiber regeneration and impaired functional recovery, relative to controls. When naïve human MuSCs were seeded onto three-dimensional decellularized muscle constructs derived from arsenic-exposed muscles, cells displayed an increased fibrogenic conversion and decreased myogenicity, compared with cells seeded onto control constructs. Consistent with myomatrix alterations, fibroblasts isolated from arsenic-exposed muscle displayed sustained expression of matrix remodeling genes, the majority of which were mediated by NF-κB. Inhibition of NF-κB during arsenic exposure preserved normal myofiber structure and functional recovery after injury, suggesting that NF-κB signaling serves as an important mechanism of action for the deleterious effects of arsenic on tissue healing. Taken together, the results from this study implicate myomatrix biophysical and/or biochemical characteristics as culprits in arsenic-induced MuSC dysfunction and impaired muscle regeneration. It is anticipated that these findings may aid in the development of strategies to prevent or revert the effects of arsenic on tissue healing and, more broadly, provide insight into the influence of the native myomatrix on stem cell behavior. PMID:26537186

  13. Arsenic promotes angiogenesis in vitro via a heme oxygenase-1-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Dan; Wang Xin; Chang Qingshan; Hitron, Andrew; Zhang Zhuo; Xu Mei; Chen Gang; Luo Jia; Jiang Binghua; Fang Jing; Shi Xianglin

    2010-05-01

    Angiogenesis and vessel remodeling are fundamental to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases caused by environmental arsenic exposure, including tumorigenesis and cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic (AsIII) has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis and vascular remodeling in vivo. However, the exact molecular mechanisms accounting for arsenic-induced angiogenesis are not clear. The present study investigates the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in sodium arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro. Transwell assay, three-dimensional Matrigel assay, RT-PCR, ELISA and immunoblotting were used to determine cell migration, vascular tube formation, mRNA and protein expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assay were applied to examine the DNA binding with protein and HO-1 transcriptional activity. Here, we report that low concentrations of arsenite (0.1-1 muM) stimulated cell migration and vascular tube formation in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC). Arsenite induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Knock down of HO-1 expression decreased arsenite-induced VEGF expression, cell migration, and tube formation. We showed that arsenite promoted dissociation of Bach1 (a transcriptional repressor) from the HO-1 enhancers and increased Nrf2 binding to these elements. Site directed mutagenesis assay identified that Bach1 cysteine residues 557 and 574 were essential for the induction of HO-1 gene in response to arsenite. These findings demonstrate a role for HO-1 in arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro.

  14. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  15. Brevundimonas diminuta mediated alleviation of arsenic toxicity and plant growth promotion in Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Marwa, Naina; Mishra, Shashank K; Mishra, Jyoti; Verma, Praveen C; Rathaur, Sushma; Singh, Nandita

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As), a toxic metalloid adversely affects plant growth in polluted areas. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of improving phytostablization of arsenic through application of new isolated strain Brevundimonas diminuta (NBRI012) in rice plant [Oryza sativa (L.) Var. Sarju 52] at two different concentrations [10ppm (low toxic) and 50ppm (high toxic)] of As. The plant growth promoting traits of bacterial strains revealed the inherent ability of siderophores, phosphate solubilisation, indole acetic acid (IAA), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase production which may be associated with increased biomass, chlorophyll and MDA content of rice and thereby promoting plant growth. The study also revealed the As accumulation property of NBRI012 strain which could play an important role in As removal from contaminated soil. Furthermore, NBRI012 inoculation significantly restored the hampered root epidermal and cortical cell growth of rice plant and root hair elimination. Altogether our study highlights the multifarious role of B. diminuta in mediating stress tolerance and modulating translocation of As in edible part of rice plant.

  16. A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic Progress Report May, 2005 Richard B. Meagher Principal Investigator Arsenic pollution affects the health of several hundred millions of people world wide, and an estimated 10 million Americans have unsafe levels of arsenic in their drinking water. However, few environmentally sound remedies for cleaning up arsenic contaminated soil and water have been proposed. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to extract and sequester environmental pollutants, is one new technology that offers an ecologically sound solution to a devastating problem. We propose that it is less disruptive to the environment to harvest and dispose of several thousand pounds per acre of contaminated aboveground plant material, than to excavate and dispose of 1 to 5 million pounds of contaminated soil per acre (assumes contamination runs 3 ft deep). Our objective is to develop a genetics-based phytoremediation strategy for arsenic removal that can be used in any plant species. This strategy requires the enhanced expression of several transgenes from diverse sources. Our working hypothesis is that organ-specific expression of several genes controlling the transport, electrochemical state, and binding of arsenic will result in the efficient extraction and hyperaccumulation of arsenic into aboveground plant tissues. This hypothesis is supported by theoretical arguments and strong preliminary data. We proposed six Specific Aims focused on testing and developing this arsenic phytoremediation strategy. During the first 18 months of the grant we made significant progress on five Specific Aims and began work on the sixth as summarized below. Specific Aim 1: Enhance plant arsenic resistance and greatly expand sinks for arsenite by expressing elevated levels of thiol-rich, arsenic-binding peptides. Hyperaccumulation of arsenic depends upon making plants that are both highly tolerant to arsenic and that have the capacity to store large amounts of arsenic aboveground

  17. Arsenic Mobilization from Contaminated Sediments: A Full-scale Experiment in Progress

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, P A; Campbell, K; Dixit, S; Hering, J G

    2004-02-03

    The mobilization of arsenic was examined in a system where the deposition of iron and arsenic have been substantially modified by large-scale manipulations. This engineering practice was designed to decrease arsenic concentrations in water supplied to the City of Los Angeles. Accomplishing this objective, however, has resulted in significant accumulation of arsenic and iron in the sediments of a reservoir on the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Arsenic and iron are released into the porewater at depth in the sediment, consistent with reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxyhydroxides. Factors influencing the possible re-sorption of arsenic onto residual iron(III) oxyhydroxides solids have been examined. Reduction of As(V) to As(III) alone cannot account for arsenic mobilization since arsenic occurs in the solid phase as As(III) well above the depth at which it is released into the porewater. Competition from other porewater constituents could suppress re-sorption of arsenic released by reductive dissolution.

  18. Evidence of arsenic release promoted by disinfection by-products within drinking-water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Botsaris, George; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Kalyvas, Harris; Costa, Costas N

    2014-02-15

    Changes in disinfectant type could trigger a cascade of reactions releasing pipe-anchored metals/metalloids into finished water. However, the effect of pre-formed disinfection by-products on the release of sorbed contaminants (arsenic-As in particular) from drinking water distribution system pipe scales remains unexplored. A bench-scale study using a factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the independent and interaction effects of trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids (HAA) on arsenic (As) release from either scales-only or scale-biofilm conglomerates (SBC) both anchored on asbestos/cement pipe coupons. A model biofilm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was allowed to grow on select pipe coupons prior experimentation. Either TTHM or HAA individual dosing did not promote As release from either scales only or SBC, detecting <6 μg AsL(-1) in finished water. In the case of scales-only coupons, the combination of the highest spike level of TTHM and HAA significantly (p<0.001) increased dissolved and total As concentrations to levels up to 16 and 95 μg L(-1), respectively. Similar treatments in the presence of biofilm (SBC) resulted in significant (p<0.001) increase in dissolved and total recoverable As up to 20 and 47 μg L(-1), respectively, exceeding the regulatory As limit. Whether or not, our laboratory-based results truly represent mechanisms operating in disinfected finished water in pipe networks remains to be investigated in the field.

  19. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition in arsenic-transformed cells promotes angiogenesis through activating β-catenin–vascular endothelial growth factor pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhishan; Humphries, Brock; Xiao, Hua; Jiang, Yiguo; Yang, Chengfeng

    2013-08-15

    Arsenic exposure represents a major health concern increasing cancer risks, yet the mechanism of arsenic carcinogenesis has not been elucidated. We and others recently reported that cell malignant transformation by arsenic is accompanied by epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the role of EMT in arsenic carcinogenesis is not well understood. Although previous studies showed that short term exposure of endothelial cells to arsenic stimulated angiogenesis, it remains to be determined whether cells that were malignantly transformed by long term arsenic exposure have a pro-angiogenic effect. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of arsenic-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells that underwent EMT on angiogenesis and the underlying mechanism. It was found that the conditioned medium from arsenic-transformed cells strongly stimulated tube formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Moreover, enhanced angiogenesis was detected in mouse xenograft tumor tissues resulting from inoculation of arsenic-transformed cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that β-catenin was activated in arsenic-transformed cells up-regulating its target gene expression including angiogenic-stimulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Stably expressing microRNA-200b in arsenic-transformed cells that reversed EMT inhibited β-catenin activation, decreased VEGF expression and reduced tube formation by HUVECs. SiRNA knockdown β-catenin decreased VEGF expression. Adding a VEGF neutralizing antibody into the conditioned medium from arsenic-transformed cells impaired tube formation by HUVECs. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that the mRNA levels of canonical Wnt ligands were not increased in arsenic-transformed cells. These findings suggest that EMT in arsenic-transformed cells promotes angiogenesis through activating β-catenin–VEGF pathway. - Highlights: • Arsenic-transformed cells that underwent EMT displayed a pro

  20. Sustainable engineered processes to mitigate the global arsenic crisis in drinking water: challenges and progress.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sudipta; Greenleaf, John E; Gupta, Anirban; Uy, Davin; Sengupta, Arup K

    2012-01-01

    Millions of people around the world are currently living under the threat of developing serious health problems owing to ingestion of dangerous concentrations of arsenic through their drinking water. In many places, treatment of arsenic-contaminated water is an urgent necessity owing to a lack of safe alternative sources. Sustainable production of arsenic-safe water from an arsenic-contaminated raw water source is currently a challenge. Despite the successful development in the laboratory of technologies for arsenic remediation, few have been successful in the field. A sustainable arsenic-remediation technology should be robust, composed of local resources, and user-friendly as well as must attach special consideration to the social, economic, cultural, traditional, and environmental aspects of the target community. One such technology is in operation on the Indian subcontinent. Wide-scale replication of this technology with adequate improvisation can solve the arsenic crisis prevalent in the developing world.

  1. Environmental Health Promotion: Progress and Future Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Shobha; Dearry, Allen

    2004-01-01

    Health promotion seeks to provide practitioners of medicine and public health as well as members of the public with the information, resources, and tools that they can use to improve health and well-being. This goal is consonant with that of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), namely, to improve public health outcomes via research,…

  2. Arsenic in private well water part 2 of 3: Who benefits the most from traditional testing promotion?

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Sara V; Spayd, Steven E; Procopio, Nicholas A; Chillrud, Steven N; Ross, James; Braman, Stuart; Zheng, Yan

    2016-08-15

    Arsenic, a toxic element naturally found in groundwater, is a public health concern for households drinking from wells. Private well water is not regulated to meet the federal drinking water arsenic Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10μg/L, or the more protective 5μg/L New Jersey (NJ) state MCL. In the absence of consistent private well regulation, public health efforts have relied on promoting testing in affected communities to various degrees of success. Few interventions publish results, and more often focus on the outcome of tested wells rather than who completed a test, and more importantly, who did not. Through our survey of randomly selected addresses (n=670) in 17 NJ towns we find higher rates of arsenic testing in areas with a history of testing promotion. However, we also see a stronger correlation of testing behavior with income and education in high promotion areas, suggesting that community engagement activities may be exacerbating socioeconomic status (SES) testing disparities. Well owners with a bachelor's degree had ten times greater odds of participating in our direct mail testing intervention than those with less education when tests cost $40. After all households (n=255) were offered free tests to overcome many of the usual testing barriers - awareness, convenience, and cost - only 47% participated and those who chose to return water samples were of higher income and education than those who did not. Our findings highlight that while efforts to promote and provide arsenic testing succeed in testing more wells, community testing interventions risk increasing SES disparities if those with more education and resources are more likely to take advantage of testing programs. Therefore, testing interventions can benefit by better targeting socially vulnerable populations in an effort to overcome SES-patterned self-selection when individuals are left alone with the responsibility of managing their drinking water quality.

  3. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  4. Promotion of well-switching to mitigate the current arsenic crisis in Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Van Geen, Alexander; Ahsan, Habibul; Horneman, Allan H.; Dhar, Ratan K.; Zheng, Yan; Hussain, Iftikhhar; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Gelman, Andrew; Stute, Martin; Simpson, H. James; Wallace, Sean; Small, Christopher; Parvez, Faruque; Slavkovich, Vesna; Loiacono, Nancy J.; Becker, Marck; Cheng, Zhongqi; Momotaj, Hassina; Shahnewaz, Mohammad; Seddique, Ashraf Ali; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To survey tube wells and households in Araihazar upazila, Bangladesh, to set the stage for a long-term epidemiological study of the consequences of chronic arsenic exposure. METHODS: Water samples and household data were collected over a period of 4 months in 2000 from 4997 contiguous tube wells serving a population of 55000, the position of each well being determined to within +/- 30 m using Global Positioning System receivers. Arsenic concentrations were determined by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry. In addition, groundwater samples collected every 2 weeks for an entire year from six tube wells were analysed for arsenic by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. FINDINGS: Half of the wells surveyed in Araihazar had been installed in the previous 5 years; 94% were privately owned. Only about 48% of the surveyed wells supplied water with an arsenic content below 50 micro g/l, the current Bangladesh standard for drinking-water. Similar to other regions of Bangladesh and West Bengal, India, the distribution of arsenic in Araihazar is spatially highly variable (range: 5-860 micro g/l) and therefore difficult to predict. Because of this variability, however, close to 90% of the inhabitants live within 100 m of a safe well. Monitoring of six tube wells currently meeting the 50 micro g/l standard showed no indication of a seasonal cycle in arsenic concentrations coupled to the hydrological cycle. This suggests that well-switching is a viable option in Araihazar, at least for the short term. CONCLUSIONS: Well-switching should be more systematically encouraged in Araihazar and many other parts of Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. Social barriers to well-switching need to be better understood and, if possible, overcome. PMID:12378292

  5. Chk1 promotes replication fork progression by controlling replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Woodcock, Mick; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-09-14

    DNA replication starts at initiation sites termed replication origins. Metazoan cells contain many more potential origins than are activated (fired) during each S phase. Origin activation is controlled by the ATR checkpoint kinase and its downstream effector kinase Chk1, which suppresses origin firing in response to replication blocks and during normal S phase by inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk2. In addition to increased origin activation, cells deficient in Chk1 activity display reduced rates of replication fork progression. Here we investigate the causal relationship between increased origin firing and reduced replication fork progression. We use the Cdk inhibitor roscovitine or RNAi depletion of Cdc7 to inhibit origin firing in Chk1-inhibited or RNAi-depleted cells. We report that Cdk inhibition and depletion of Cdc7 can alleviate the slow replication fork speeds in Chk1-deficient cells. Our data suggest that increased replication initiation leads to slow replication fork progression and that Chk1 promotes replication fork progression during normal S phase by controlling replication origin activity.

  6. Sharpin promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression via transactivation of Versican expression

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Y; Tateishi, K; Nakatsuka, T; Kudo, Y; Takahashi, R; Miyabayashi, K; Yamamoto, K; Asaoka, Y; Ijichi, H; Tateishi, R; Shibahara, J; Fukayama, M; Ishizawa, T; Hasegawa, K; Kokudo, N; Koike, K

    2016-01-01

    Sharpin (Shank-associated RH domain-interacting protein, also known as SIPL1) is a multifunctional molecule that participates in various biological settings, including nuclear factor-κB signaling activation and tumor suppressor gene inhibition. Sharpin is upregulated in various types of cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and is implicated in tumor progression. However, the exact roles of Sharpin in tumorigenesis and tumor progression remain largely unknown. Here we report novel mechanisms of HCC progression through Sharpin overexpression. In our study, Sharpin was upregulated in human HCC tissues. Increased Sharpin expression enhanced hepatoma cell invasion, whereas decrease in Sharpin expression by RNA interference inhibited invasion. Microarray analysis identified that Versican, a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that plays crucial roles in tumor progression and invasion, was also upregulated in Sharpin-expressing stable cells. Versican expression increased in the majority of HCC tissues and knocking down of Versican greatly attenuated hepatoma cell invasion. Sharpin expression resulted in a significant induction of Versican transcription synergistically with Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation. Furthermore, Sharpin-overexpressing cells had high tumorigenic properties in vivo. These results demonstrate that Sharpin promotes Versican expression synergistically with the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, potentially contributing to HCC development. A Sharpin/Versican axis could be an attractive therapeutic target for this currently untreatable cancer. PMID:27941932

  7. Progress in protecting, promoting, and supporting breastfeeding: 1984-2009.

    PubMed

    Grummer-Strawn, Laurence M; Shealy, Katherine R

    2009-10-01

    The 1984 Surgeon General's Workshop on Breastfeeding delineated six priority areas for action to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding. In this article, we examine trends in breastfeeding behaviors and recall key events and actions that shaped these behaviors over the past 25 years. We examine progress in breastfeeding support through workplaces, public education, professional education, health system changes, support services, and research. Rates of initiation of breastfeeding more than doubled from a nadir of only 26.5% in 1970 to 61.9% in 1982. Initiation fell to 51.5% in 1990, but has risen almost monotonically since then to 74.2% in 2005. Trends in breastfeeding at 6 months have paralleled initiation trends. Black-white disparities have narrowed for breastfeeding initiation but not for continuation to 6 months. Considerable progress in breastfeeding support has been seen over the past 25 years, with more employers allowing women time and space to express milk at work, more states enacting legislation to ensure that accommodations are made for employed women and protect the right to breastfeed in public, more opportunities for physician education on breastfeeding, expansion of professional lactation services, and substantial increases in the amount of research on breastfeeding. However, only 21.4% of babies are breastfed for a year, and only 11.9% exclusively breastfeed for 6 months. Only 2% of babies are born in facilities that meet international standards of care, and 74% of employers do not offer lactation rooms or accommodations for breastfeeding. Thus, in spite of considerable progress, significant gaps remain in protecting, promoting, and supporting breastfeeding.

  8. Cyr61 promotes breast tumorigenesis and cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Bogart, Daphne F.; Castaneda, Jessica M.; Li, Patricia; Lupu, Ruth

    2002-01-16

    Cyr61, a member of the CCN family of genes, is an angiogenic factor. We have shown that it is overexpressed in invasive and metastatic human breast cancer cells and tissues. Here, we investigated whether Cyr61 is necessary and/or sufficient to bypass the ''normal'' estrogen (E2) requirements for breast cancer cell growth. Our results demonstrate that under E2-depleted condition, Cyr61 is sufficient to induce MCF-7 cells grow in the absence of E2. MCF-7 cells transfected with Cyr61 (MCF-7/Cyr61) became E2-independent but still E2-responsive. On the other hand, MCF-7/vector cells remain E2-dependent. MCF-7/Cyr61 cells acquire an antiestrogen-resistant phenotype, one of the most common clinical occurrences during breast cancer progression. MCF-7/Cyr61 cells are anchorage-independent and capable of forming Matrigel outgrowth patterns in the absence of E2. ERa expression in MCF-7/Cyr61 cells is decreased although still functional. Additionally, MCF-7/Cyr61 cells are tumorigenic in ovariectomized athymic nude mice. The tumors resemble human invasive carcinomas with increased vascularization and overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our results demonstrate that Cyr61 is a tumor-promoting factor and a key regulator of breast cancer progression. This study provides evidence that Cyr61 is sufficient to induce E2-independence and anti-E2 resistance, and to promote invasiveness in vitro, and to induce tumorigenesis in vivo, all of which are characteristics of an aggressive breast cancer phenotype.

  9. Arsenic promotes ubiquitinylation and lysosomal degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Stanton, Bruce A

    2012-05-18

    Arsenic exposure significantly increases respiratory bacterial infections and reduces the ability of the innate immune system to eliminate bacterial infections. Recently, we observed in the gill of killifish, an environmental model organism, that arsenic exposure induced the ubiquitinylation and degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that is essential for the mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens in humans. Accordingly, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that low dose arsenic exposure reduces the abundance and function of CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Arsenic induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in multiubiquitinylated CFTR, which led to its lysosomal degradation, and a decrease in CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Although arsenic had no effect on the abundance or activity of USP10, a deubiquitinylating enzyme, siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, abolished the arsenic-stimulated degradation of CFTR. Arsenic enhanced the degradation of CFTR by increasing phosphorylated c-Cbl, which increased its interaction with CFTR, and subsequent ubiquitinylation of CFTR. Because epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic increases the incidence of respiratory infections, this study suggests that one potential mechanism of this effect involves arsenic-induced ubiquitinylation and degradation of CFTR, which decreases chloride secretion and airway surface liquid volume, effects that would be proposed to reduce mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens.

  10. Extracellular acidity strengthens mesenchymal stem cells to promote melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Peppicelli, Silvia; Bianchini, Francesca; Toti, Alessandra; Laurenzana, Anna; Fibbi, Gabriella; Calorini, Lido

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) participate to tumor stroma development and several evidence suggests that they play a role in facilitating cancer progression. Because melanoma often shows extracellular pH low enough to influence host cell as tumor cell behavior, the aim of this study is to elucidate whether acidity affects cross talk between MSC and melanoma cells to disclose new liaisons promoting melanoma progression, and to offer new therapeutic opportunities. We found that MSC grown in a low pH medium (LpH-MSC) stimulate melanoma xenografts more than MSC grown in a standard pH medium. LpH-MSC express a higher level of TGFβ that is instrumental of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like phenotype induction in melanoma cells. LpH-MSC profile also shows a switching to an oxidative phosphorylation metabolism that was accompanied by a forced glycolytic pathway of melanoma cells grown in LpH-MSC-conditioned medium. Metformin, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiratory chain was able to reconvert oxidative metabolism and abrogate TGFβ expression in LpH-MSC. In addition, esomeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor activated in acidosis, blocked TGFβ expression in LpH-MSC through the downregulation of IkB. Both agents, metformin and esomeprazole, inhibited EMT profile in melanoma cells grown in LpH-MSC medium, and reduced glycolytic markers. Thus, acidosis of tumor microenvironment potentiates the pro-tumoral activity of MSC and orchestrates for a new potential symbiosis, which could be target to limit melanoma progression. PMID:26496168

  11. SPINK1 promotes colorectal cancer progression by downregulating Metallothioneins expression

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, R; Pandey, S K; Goel, S; Bhatia, V; Shukla, S; Jing, X; Dhanasekaran, S M; Ateeq, B

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world, and second leading cause of cancer deaths in the US. Although, anti-EGFR therapy is commonly prescribed for CRC, patients harboring mutations in KRAS or BRAF show poor treatment response, indicating an ardent demand for new therapeutic targets discovery. SPINK1 (serine peptidase inhibitor, Kazal type 1) overexpression has been identified in many cancers including the colon, lung, breast and prostate. Our study demonstrates the functional significance of SPINK1 in CRC progression and metastases. Stable knockdown of SPINK1 significantly decreases cell proliferation, invasion and soft agar colony formation in the colon adenocarcinoma WiDr cells. Conversely, an increase in these oncogenic phenotypes was observed on stimulation with SPINK1-enriched conditioned media (CM) in multiple benign models such as murine colonic epithelial cell lines, MSIE and YAMC (SPINK3-negative). Mechanistically, SPINK1 promotes tumorigenic phenotype by activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathways, and the SPINK1-positive WiDr cells are sensitive to AKT and MEK inhibitors. Importantly, SPINK1 silencing mediated upregulation of various Metallothionein isoforms, considered as tumor suppressors in CRC, confer sensitivity to doxorubicin, which strengthens the rationale for using the combinatorial treatment approach for the SPINK1-positive CRC patients. Furthermore, in vivo studies using chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay, murine xenograft studies and metastasis models further suggest a pivotal role of SPINK1 in CRC progression and metastasis. Taken together, our study demonstrates an important role for the overexpressed SPINK1 in CRC disease progression, a phenomenon that needs careful evaluation towards effective therapeutic target development. PMID:26258891

  12. RESEARCH TOWARD THE DEVELOPMENT OF A BIOLOGICALLY BASED DOSE RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR INORGANIC ARSENIC CARCINOGENICITY: A PROGRESS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer risk assessments for inorganic arsenic have been based on human epidemiological data, assuming a linear dose-response below the range of observation of tumors. Part of the reason for the continued use of the linear approach in arsenic risk assessments is the lack of an ad...

  13. Recent progress of arsenic adsorption on TiO2 in the presence of coexisting ions: A review.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Hu, Shan; Jing, Chuanyong

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic (As)-contaminated wastewater and groundwater pose a pressing environmental issue and worldwide concern. Adsorption of As using TiO2 materials, in combination with filtration, introduces a promising technology for the treatment of As-contaminated water. This review presents an overview on the recent progress of the application of TiO2 for removal of As from wastewater and groundwater. The main focus is on the following three pressing issues that limit the field applications of TiO2 for As removal: coexisting ions, simulation of breakthrough curves, and regeneration and reuse of spent TiO2 materials. We first examined how the coexisting ions in water, especially high concentrations of cations in industrial wastewater, affect the efficacy of As removal using the TiO2 materials. We then discussed As breakthrough curves and the effect of compounded ions on the breakthrough curves. We successfully simulated the breakthrough curves by PHREEQC after integrating the CD-MUSIC model. We further discussed challenges facing the regeneration and reuse of TiO2 media for practical applications. We offer our perspectives on remaining issues and future research needs.

  14. Endocrine fibroblast growth factor FGF19 promotes prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu; Dakhova, Olga; Creighton, Chad J; Ittmann, Michael

    2013-04-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common visceral malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in US men. There is broad evidence that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors are important in prostate cancer initiation and progression, but the contribution of particular FGFs in this disease is not fully understood. The FGF family members FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23 comprise a distinct subfamily that circulate in serum and act in an endocrine manner. These endocrine FGFs require α-Klotho (KL) and/or β-Klotho (KLB), two related single-pass transmembrane proteins restricted in their tissue distribution, to act as coreceptors along with classic FGF receptors (FGFR) to mediate potent biologic activity. Here we show that FGF19 is expressed in primary and metastatic prostate cancer tissues, where it functions as an autocrine growth factor. Exogenous FGF19 promoted the growth, invasion, adhesion, and colony formation of prostate cancer cells at low ligand concentrations. FGF19 silencing in prostate cancer cells expressing autocrine FGF19 decreased invasion and proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Consistent with these observations, KL and/or KLB were expressed in prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, raising the possibility that additional endocrine FGFs may also exert biologic effects in prostate cancer. Our findings support the concept that therapies targeting FGFR signaling may have efficacy in prostate cancer and highlight FGF19 as a relevant endocrine FGF in this setting.

  15. Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on Minor Progressive High-Grade Osteosarcoma of the Extremities Metastatic to the Lung: Results of 39 Patients Treated in a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lu; Guo, Wei; Tang, Xiaodong; Yang, Yi; Xu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Patients who mildly progressed after first-line chemotherapy were administered arsenic trioxide (ATO) 5–10 mg intravenously daily. Thirty-nine patients were finally enrolled in the study, of whom 19 patients received first-line chemotherapy with ATO infusion while 20 patients did not. Progression-free survival at 4 months was 89.2 and 62.7% (p = 0.043) for the ATO group and the control group, respectively, while the 2-year overall survival was 61 and 16.4% (p = 0.032). PMID:27920692

  16. Effect of arsenic on tolerance mechanisms of two plant growth-promoting bacteria used as biological inoculants.

    PubMed

    Armendariz, Ana L; Talano, Melina A; Wevar Oller, Ana L; Medina, María I; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial ability to colonize the rhizosphere of plants in arsenic (As) contaminated soils is highly important for symbiotic and free-living plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) used as inoculants, since they can contribute to enhance plant As tolerance and limit metalloid uptake by plants. The aim of this work was to study the effect of As on growth, exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, biofilm formation and motility of two strains used as soybean inoculants, Bradyrhizobium japonicum E109 and Azospirillum brasilense Az39. The metabolism of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) and their removal and/or possible accumulation were also evaluated. The behavior of both bacteria under As treatment was compared and discussed in relation to their potential for colonizing plant rhizosphere with high content of the metalloid. B. japonicum E109 growth was reduced with As(III) concentration from 10 μM while A. brasilense Az39 showed a reduction of growth with As(III) from 500 μM. EPS and biofilm production increased significantly under 25 μM As(III) for both strains. Moreover, this was more notorious for Azospirillum under 500 μM As(III), where motility was seriously affected. Both bacterial strains showed a similar ability to reduce As(V). However, Azospirillum was able to oxidize more As(III) (around 53%) than Bradyrhizobium (17%). In addition, both strains accumulated As in cell biomass. The behavior of Azospirillum under As treatments suggests that this strain would be able to colonize efficiently As contaminated soils. In this way, inoculation with A. brasilense Az39 would positively contribute to promoting growth of different plant species under As treatment.

  17. Promotion of arsenic phytoextraction efficiency in the fern Pteris vittata by the inoculation of As-resistant bacteria: a soil bioremediation perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lampis, Silvia; Santi, Chiara; Ciurli, Adriana; Andreolli, Marco; Vallini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was carried out to evaluate the efficiency of arsenic phytoextraction by the fern Pteris vittata growing in arsenic-contaminated soil, with or without the addition of selected rhizobacteria isolated from the polluted site. The bacterial strains were selected for arsenic resistance, the ability to reduce arsenate to arsenite, and the ability to promote plant growth. P. vittata plants were cultivated for 4 months in a contaminated substrate consisting of arsenopyrite cinders and mature compost. Four different experimental conditions were tested: (i) non-inoculated plants; (ii) plants inoculated with the siderophore-producing and arsenate-reducing bacteria Pseudomonas sp. P1III2 and Delftia sp. P2III5 (A); (iii) plants inoculated with the siderophore and indoleacetic acid-producing bacteria Bacillus sp. MPV12, Variovorax sp. P4III4, and Pseudoxanthomonas sp. P4V6 (B), and (iv) plants inoculated with all five bacterial strains (AB). The presence of growth-promoting rhizobacteria increased plant biomass by up to 45% and increased As removal efficiency from 13% without bacteria to 35% in the presence of the mixed inoculum. Molecular analysis confirmed the persistence of the introduced bacterial strains in the soil and resulted in a significant impact on the structure of the bacterial community. PMID:25741356

  18. GRK6 deficiency promotes angiogenesis, tumor progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K.; Smith, Nikia; Rivers, Elizabeth, J.; Thomas, Ariel J.; Sutton, Natalie; Hu, Yuhui; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath; Chen, Xiaoxin L.; Leung, TinChung; Richardson, Ricardo M.

    2013-01-01

    G protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate the activated form of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) leading to receptor desensitization and down-regulation. We have recently shown that the chemokine receptor, CXCR2, couples to GRK6 to regulate cellular responses including chemotaxis, angiogenesis and wound healing. In this study, we investigate the role of GRK6 in tumorigenesis using murine models of human lung cancer. Mice deficient in GRK6 (GRK6−/−) exhibited a significant increase in Lewis lung cancer (LLC) growth and metastasis relative to control littermates (GRK6+/+). GRK6 deletion had no effect on the expression of proangiogenic chemokine or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but up-regulated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 release, tumor-infiltrating PMNs and microvessel density. Since βarr2−/− mice exhibited increase LLC growth and metastasis similar to that of GRK6−/−we developed a double GRK6−/−/βarr2−/− mouse model. Surprisingly, GRK6−/−/βarr2−/− mice exhibited faster tumor growth relative to GRK6−/− or βarr2−/− mice. Treatment of the mice with anti-CXCR2 antibody inhibited tumor growth in both GRK6−/− and GRK6−/−/βarr2−/− animals. Altogether, the results indicate that CXCR2 couples to GRK6 to regulate angiogenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. Deletion of GRK6 increases the activity of the host CXCR2, resulting in greater PMN infiltration and MMP release in the tumor microenvironment thereby promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Since GRK6−/−/βarr2−/− showed greater tumor growth relative to GRK6−/− or βarr2−/− mice, the data further suggest that CXCR2 couples to different mechanisms to mediate tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:23589623

  19. GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with cardiovascular mortality risk in an arsenic-exposed population in northeastern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meei-Maan; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chi-Ling; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Lee, Te-Chang; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic has been associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease and mortality in humans. A functional GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene promoter is inversely correlated with the development of coronary artery disease and restenosis after clinical angioplasty. The relationship of HO-1 genotype with arsenic-associated cardiovascular disease has not been studied. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the HO-1 GT-repeat polymorphism and cardiovascular mortality in an arsenic-exposed population. A total of 504 study participants were followed up for a median of 10.7 years for occurrence of cardiovascular deaths (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Cardiovascular risk factors and DNA samples for determination of HO-1 GT repeats were obtained at recruitment. GT repeats variants were grouped into the S (< 27 repeats) or L allele ({>=} 27 repeats). Relative mortality risk was estimated using Cox regression analysis, adjusted for competing risk of cancer and other causes. For the L/L, L/S, and S/S genotype groups, the crude mortalities for cardiovascular disease were 8.42, 3.10, and 2.85 cases/1000 person-years, respectively. After adjusting for conventional cardiovascular risk factors and competing risk of cancer and other causes, carriers with class S allele (L/S or S/S genotypes) had a significantly reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality compared to non-carriers (L/L genotype) [OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.16-0.90]. In contrast, no significant association was observed between HO-1 genotype and cancer mortality or mortality from other causes. Shorter (GT)n repeats in the HO-1 gene promoter may confer protective effects against cardiovascular mortality related to arsenic exposure.

  20. Arsenic Methyltransferase

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metalloid arsenic enters the environment by natural processes (volcanic activity, weathering of rocks) and by human activity (mining, smelting, herbicides and pesticides). Although arsenic has been exploited for homicidal and suicidal purposes since antiquity, its significan...

  1. Recent Progress in Promoting Gender Equality for Japanese Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Setsuko; Nishitani-Gamo, Mikka

    2009-04-01

    The last three years have been an epoch-making period in promoting gender equality in the Japanese science community. Motivated by recommendations we made on the basis of a large-scale survey, the Japanese government started several projects in 2006 for supporting women scientists and attracting girls to science and technology. In spite of these efforts, we see only very slow increase in the number of women researchers in professional positions.

  2. Hypermutation of DPYD Deregulates Pyrimidine Metabolism and Promotes Malignant Progression

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lauren; Gupta, Rohit; Filipp, Fabian V.

    2016-01-01

    New strategies are needed to diagnose and target human melanoma. To this end, genomic analyses was performed to assess somatic mutations and gene expression signatures using a large cohort of human skin cutaneous melanoma (SKCM) patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project to identify critical differences between primary and metastatic tumors. Interestingly, pyrimidine metabolism is one of the major pathways to be significantly enriched and deregulated at the transcriptional level in melanoma progression. In addition, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) and other important pyrimidine-related genes: DPYS, AK9, CAD, CANT1, ENTPD1, NME6, NT5C1A, POLE, POLQ, POLR3B, PRIM2, REV3L, and UPP2 are significantly enriched in somatic mutations relative to the background mutation rate. Structural analysis of the DPYD protein dimer reveals a potential hotspot of recurring somatic mutations in the ligand binding sites as well as the interfaces of protein domains that mediated electron transfer. Somatic mutations of DPYD are associated with upregulation of pyrimidine degradation, nucleotide synthesis, and nucleic acid processing while salvage and nucleotide conversion is downregulated in TCGA SKCM. PMID:26609109

  3. Activation of the Notch1/STAT3/Twist signaling axis promotes gastric cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kai-Wen; Hsieh, Rong-Hong; Huang, Kuo-Hung; Fen-Yau Li, Anna; Chi, Chin-Wen; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Tseng, Min-Jen; Wu, Kou-Juey; Yeh, Tien-Shun

    2012-08-01

    Gastric carcinoma is one of the most common malignancies and a lethal cancer in the world. Notch signaling and transcription factors STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) and Twist regulate tumor development and are critical regulators of gastric cancer progression. Herein, the relationship among Notch, STAT3 and Twist pathways in the control of gastric cancer progression was studied. We found that Twist and phosphorylated STAT3 levels were promoted by the activated Notch1 receptor in human stomach adenocarcinoma SC-M1, embryonic kidney HEK293 and erythroleukemia K562 cells. Notch1 signaling dramatically induced Twist promoter activity through a C promoter binding factor-1-independent manner and STAT3 phosphorylation. Overexpression of Notch1 receptor intracellular domain (N1IC) enhanced the interaction between nuclear STAT3 and Twist promoter in cells. Gastric cancer progression of SC-M1 cells was promoted by N1IC through STAT3 phosphorylation and Twist expression including colony formation, migration and invasion. STAT3 regulated gastric cancer progression of SC-M1 cells via Twist. N1IC also elevated the progression of other gastric cancer cells such as AGS and KATO III cells through STAT3 and Twist. The N1IC-promoted tumor growth and lung metastasis of SC-M1 cells in mice were suppressed by the STAT3 inhibitor JSI-124 and Twist knockdown. Furthermore, Notch1 and Notch ligand Jagged1 expressions were significantly associated with phosphorylated STAT3 and Twist levels in gastric cancer tissues of patients. Taken together, these results suggest that Notch1/STAT3/Twist signaling axis is involved in progression of human gastric cancer and modulation of this cascade has potential for the targeted combination therapy.

  4. Speciation and detection of arsenic in aqueous samples: a review of recent progress in non-atomic spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Sengupta, Mrinal K; Yuan, Dongxing; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-06-11

    Inorganic arsenic (As) displays extreme toxicity and is a class A human carcinogen. It is of interest to both analytical chemists and environmental scientists. Facile and sensitive determination of As and knowledge of the speciation of forms of As in aqueous samples are vitally important. Nearly every nation has relevant official regulations on permissible limits of drinking water As content. The size of the literature on As is therefore formidable. The heart of this review consists of two tables: one is a compilation of principal official documents and major review articles, including the toxicology and chemistry of As. This includes comprehensive official compendia on As speciation, sample treatment, recommended procedures for the determination of As in specific sample matrices with specific analytical instrument(s), procedures for multi-element (including As) speciation and analysis, and prior comprehensive reviews on arsenic analysis. The second table focuses on the recent literature (2005-2013, the coverage for 2013 is incomplete) on As measurement in aqueous matrices. Recent As speciation and analysis methods based on spectrometric and electrochemical methods, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis and biosensors are summarized. We have deliberately excluded atomic optical spectrometric techniques (atomic absorption, atomic fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry) not because they are not important (in fact the majority of arsenic determinations are possibly carried out by one of these techniques) but because these methods are sufficiently mature and little meaningful innovation has been made beyond what is in the officially prescribed compendia (which are included) and recent reviews are available.

  5. Linking Microbial Activity with Arsenic Fate during Cow Dung Disposal of Arsenic-Bearing Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, T. M.; Reddy, R.; Tan, J.; Hayes, K. F.; Raskin, L.

    2014-12-01

    To address widespread arsenic contamination of drinking water sources numerous technologies have been developed to remove arsenic. All technologies result in the production of an arsenic-bearing waste that must be evaluated and disposed in a manner to limit the potential for environmental release and human exposure. One disposal option that is commonly recommended for areas without access to landfills is the mixing of arsenic-bearing wastes with cow dung. These recommendations are made based on the ability of microorganisms to create volatile arsenic species (including mono-, di-, and tri-methylarsine gases) to be diluted in the atmosphere. However, most studies of environmental microbial communities have found only a small fraction (<0.1 %) of the total arsenic present in soils or rice paddies is released via volatilization. Additionally, past studies often have not monitored arsenic release in the aqueous phase. Two main pathways for microbial arsenic volatilization are known and include methylation of arsenic during methanogenesis and methylation by arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase. In this study, we compare the roles of these two pathways in arsenic volatilization and aqueous mobilization through mesocosm experiments with cow dung and arsenic-bearing wastes produced during drinking water treatment in West Bengal, India. Arsenic in gaseous, aqueous, and solid phases was measured. Consistent with previous reports, less than 0.02% of the total arsenic present was volatilized. A much higher amount (~5%) of the total arsenic was mobilized into the liquid phase. Through the application of molecular tools, including 16S rRNA sequencing and quantification of gene transcripts involved in methanogenesis, this study links microbial community activity with arsenic fate in potential disposal environments. These results illustrate that disposal of arsenic-bearing wastes by mixing with cow dung does not achieve its end goal of promoting arsenic volatilization

  6. Hippo transducer TAZ promotes epithelial mesenchymal transition and supports pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dacheng; Cui, Jiujie; Xia, Tian; Jia, Zhiliang; Wang, Liang; Wei, Wenfei; Zhu, Anna; Gao, Yong; Xie, Keping; Quan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional co-activator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ) is a transducer of the Hippo pathway and promotes cancer development and progression. In the present study, we sought to determine the roles and underlying mechanisms of elevated expression and activation of TAZ in pancreatic cancer development and progression. The mechanistic role of TAZ and Hippo signaling in promotion of pancreatic cancer development and progression was examined using cell culture, molecular biology, and mouse models. The relevance of our experimental and mechanistic findings was validated using human pancreatic tumor specimens. We found that TAZ expression was markedly higher in pancreatic tumors than in normal pancreatic tissue. Further analysis of the correlation of TAZ expression with tissue microarray clinicopathologic parameters revealed that this expression was positively associated with tumor differentiation. Also, TAZ expression was higher in pancreatic cancer cell lines than in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. TAZ activation in pancreatic cancer cells promoted their proliferation, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that aberrant expression and activation of TAZ in pancreatic cancer cells resulted from suppression of the expression of Merlin, a positive regulator upstream of the Hippo pathway, and that the oncogenic function of TAZ in pancreatic cancer cells was mediated by TEA/ATTS domain transcription factors. Therefore, TAZ functioned as an oncogene and promoted pancreatic cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression. TAZ thus may be a target for effective therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26416426

  7. Macrophages promote the progression of premalignant mammary lesions to invasive cancer.

    PubMed

    Carron, Emily C; Homra, Samuel; Rosenberg, Jillian; Coffelt, Seth B; Kittrell, Frances; Zhang, Yiqun; Creighton, Chad J; Fuqua, Suzanne A; Medina, Daniel; Machado, Heather L

    2017-01-31

    Breast cancer initiation, progression and metastasis rely on a complex interplay between tumor cells and their surrounding microenvironment. Infiltrating immune cells, including macrophages, promote mammary tumor progression and metastasis; however, less is known about the role of macrophages in early stage lesions. In this study, we utilized a transplantable p53-null model of early progression to characterize the immune cell components of early stage lesions. We show that macrophages are recruited to ductal hyperplasias with a high tumor-forming potential where they are differentiated and polarized toward a tumor-promoting phenotype. These macrophages are a unique subset of macrophages, characterized by pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive factors. Macrophage ablation studies showed that macrophages are required for both early stage progression and primary tumor formation. These studies suggest that therapeutic targeting of tumor-promoting macrophages may not only be an effective strategy to block tumor progression and metastasis, but may also have critical implications for breast cancer prevention.

  8. Arsenic sulfide promotes apoptosis in retinoid acid resistant human acute promyelocytic leukemic NB4-R1 cells through downregulation of SET protein.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuwang; Liu, Yanfeng; He, Pengcheng; Liu, Feng; Zhou, Naicen; Cheng, Xiaoyan; Shi, Lili; Zhu, Huachao; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Tetra-arsenic tetra-sulfide (As4S4) is an arsenic compound with anti-tumor activity, especially in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) that are resistant to retinoic acid (RA). Although recent studies revealed that the therapeutic action of As4S4 is closely associated with the induction of cellular apoptosis, the exact molecular mechanism of action of As4S4 in RA-resistant APL remains to be clarified. In this study, we found that As4S4-induced apoptosis was accompanied by reduced mRNA and protein expression of SET gene in RA-resistant NB4-R1 cells. Moreover, RNAi knockdown of SET gene further promoted As4S4-induced apoptosis, while SET over-expression inhibited it, suggesting that As4S4 induces apoptosis through the reduction of SET protein in NB4-R1 cells. We also demonstrated that the knockdown of SET gene resulted in the upregulation of protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) expression and the downregulation of promyelocytic leukemia and retinoic acid receptor α fusion gene (PML-RARα) expression, which were enhanced by As4S4 treatments. By contrast, over-expression of SET gene resulted in PP2A downregulation and PML-RARα upregulation, which were abolished by As4S4 pretreatment. Since PP2A is a pro-apoptotic factor and PMLRARα is an anti-apoptotic factor, our results suggest that As4S4-induced apoptosis in NB4-R1 cells is through the downregulation of SET protein expression, which in turn increases PP2A and reduces PML-RARα expressions to lead to cell apoptosis.

  9. In pursuit of progress: promotion motivation and risk preference in the domain of gains.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xi; Scholer, Abigail A; Higgins, E Tory

    2014-02-01

    This article examines the role of promotion motivation in decision making in the domain of gains. Using a stock investment paradigm in which individuals believed that they were making decisions that were real and consequential, we found that promotion motivation, and not prevention motivation, predicted the likelihood of switching between risky and conservative choices in the domain of gains. Promotion-focused participants chose a relatively risky option when their stock portfolio remained unchanged (stuck at 0, the status quo) but switched to a relatively conservative option when they had just experienced a large gain (Studies 1-4), both when regulatory focus was measured (Study 1) and manipulated (Studies 2-4). Studies in which progress was manipulated (Study 3) and measured (Study 4) provided evidence that it is perceptions of progress that underlie this tactical switch in risk preferences within the promotion system. We discuss the implications of these findings for decision making and the role of progress in self-regulation.

  10. Arsenic Trioxide Activate Transcription of Heme Oxygenase-1 by Promoting Nuclear Translocation of NFE2L2.

    PubMed

    Yue, Zhen; Zhong, Lingzhi; Mou, Yan; Wang, Xiaotong; Zhang, Haiying; Wang, Yang; Xia, Jianxin; Li, Ronggui; Wang, Zonggui

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that induced expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO). The present study was aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of HO-1 that occurs after exposure of MG63 cells to ATO. First, using RT-QPCT and Western-blot, we found that ATO strongly induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in these human osteosarcoma cells. Then by analyzing HO-1 mRNA of MG63 cells exposed to ATO in the presence and absence of a transcription inhibitor Actinomycin-D (Act-D), we demonstrated that ATO activates HO-1 expression in MG63 cells by regulating the transcription of the gene. Finally, through the analysis of the NFE2L2 protein levels among the total cellular and nuclear proteins by Western-blot and Immunocytochemical staning, we determined that ATO enhanced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), also known as Nrf2. From these results we have concluded that transcription activation of HO-1 resulting from the nuclear translocation of NFE2L2 is the underlying molecular mechanism for its high induction, which, in turn, is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma cells to ATO treatment.

  11. Enhanced carcinogenicity by coexposure to arsenic and iron and a novel remediation system for the elements in well drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Yamanoshita, Osamu; Shimizu, Shingo; Ohnuma, Shoko; Furuta, Akio; Yajima, Ichiro; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    Various carcinomas including skin cancer are explosively increasing in arsenicosis patients who drink arsenic-polluted well water, especially in Bangladesh. Although well drinking water in the cancer-prone areas contains various elements, very little is known about the effects of elements except arsenic on carcinogenicity. In order to clarify the carcinogenic effects of coexposure to arsenic and iron, anchorage-independent growth and invasion in human untransformed HaCaT and transformed A431 keratinocytes were examined. Since the mean ratio of arsenic and iron in well water was 1:10 in cancer-prone areas of Bangladesh, effects of 1 μM arsenic and 10 μM iron were investigated. Iron synergistically promoted arsenic-mediated anchorage-independent growth in untransformed and transformed keratinocytes. Iron additionally increased invasion in both types of keratinocytes. Activities of c-SRC and ERK that regulate anchorage-independent growth and invasion were synergistically enhanced in both types of keratinocytes. Our results suggest that iron promotes arsenic-mediated transformation of untransformed keratinocytes and progression of transformed keratinocytes. We then developed a low-cost and high-performance adsorbent composed of a hydrotalcite-like compound for arsenic and iron. The adsorbent rapidly reduced concentrations of both elements from well drinking water in cancer-prone areas of Bangladesh to levels less than those in WHO health-based guidelines for drinking water. Thus, we not only demonstrated for the first time increased carcinogenicity by coexposure to arsenic and iron but also proposed a novel remediation system for well drinking water.

  12. Biochar in Co-Contaminated Soil Manipulates Arsenic Solubility and Microbiological Community Structure, and Promotes Organochlorine Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Samuel J.; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Camps-Arbestain, Marta; Biggs, Patrick J.; Ganley, Austen R. D.; O’Sullivan, Justin M.; McManus, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of biochar on the water-soluble arsenic (As) concentration and the extent of organochlorine degradation in a co-contaminated historic sheep-dip soil during a 180-d glasshouse incubation experiment. Soil microbial activity, bacterial community and structure diversity were also investigated. Biochar made from willow feedstock (Salix sp) was pyrolysed at 350 or 550°C and added to soil at rates of 10 g kg-1 and 20 g kg-1 (representing 30 t ha-1 and 60 t ha-1). The isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) alpha-HCH and gamma-HCH (lindane), underwent 10-fold and 4-fold reductions in concentration as a function of biochar treatment. Biochar also resulted in a significant reduction in soil DDT levels (P < 0.01), and increased the DDE:DDT ratio. Soil microbial activity was significantly increased (P < 0.01) under all biochar treatments after 60 days of treatment compared to the control. 16S amplicon sequencing revealed that biochar-amended soil contained more members of the Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Dyadobacter and Pseudomonadaceae which are known bioremediators of hydrocarbons. We hypothesise that a recorded short-term reduction in the soluble As concentration due to biochar amendment allowed native soil microbial communities to overcome As-related stress. We propose that increased microbiological activity (dehydrogenase activity) due to biochar amendment was responsible for enhanced degradation of organochlorines in the soil. Biochar therefore partially overcame the co-contaminant effect of As, allowing for enhanced natural attenuation of organochlorines in soil. PMID:25923541

  13. Mutant p53 promotes tumor progression and metastasis by the endoplasmic reticulum UDPase ENTPD5

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzi, Fotini; Brandt, Dominique T.; Schneikert, Jean; Fuchs, Jeannette; Grikscheit, Katharina; Wanzel, Michael; Pavlakis, Evangelos; Charles, Joël P.; Timofeev, Oleg; Nist, Andrea; Mernberger, Marco; Kantelhardt, Eva J.; Siebolts, Udo; Bartel, Frank; Jacob, Ralf; Rath, Ariane; Moll, Roland; Grosse, Robert; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in cancer and are often associated with progression from benign to invasive stages with metastatic potential. Mutations inactivate tumor suppression by p53, and some endow the protein with novel gain of function (GOF) properties that actively promote tumor progression and metastasis. By comparative gene expression profiling of p53-mutated and p53-depleted cancer cells, we identified ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5 (ENTPD5) as a mutant p53 target gene, which functions as a uridine 5′-diphosphatase (UDPase) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to promote the folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins. A comprehensive pan-cancer analysis revealed a highly significant correlation between p53 GOF mutations and ENTPD5 expression. Mechanistically, mutp53 is recruited by Sp1 to the ENTPD5 core promoter to induce its expression. We show ENTPD5 to be a mediator of mutant p53 GOF activity in clonogenic growth, architectural tissue remodeling, migration, invasion, and lung colonization in an experimental metastasis mouse model. Our study reveals folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins in the ER as a mechanism underlying the metastatic progression of tumors with mutp53 that could provide new possibilities for cancer treatment. PMID:27956623

  14. Mutant p53 promotes tumor progression and metastasis by the endoplasmic reticulum UDPase ENTPD5.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzi, Fotini; Brandt, Dominique T; Schneikert, Jean; Fuchs, Jeannette; Grikscheit, Katharina; Wanzel, Michael; Pavlakis, Evangelos; Charles, Joël P; Timofeev, Oleg; Nist, Andrea; Mernberger, Marco; Kantelhardt, Eva J; Siebolts, Udo; Bartel, Frank; Jacob, Ralf; Rath, Ariane; Moll, Roland; Grosse, Robert; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2016-12-27

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in cancer and are often associated with progression from benign to invasive stages with metastatic potential. Mutations inactivate tumor suppression by p53, and some endow the protein with novel gain of function (GOF) properties that actively promote tumor progression and metastasis. By comparative gene expression profiling of p53-mutated and p53-depleted cancer cells, we identified ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5 (ENTPD5) as a mutant p53 target gene, which functions as a uridine 5'-diphosphatase (UDPase) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to promote the folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins. A comprehensive pan-cancer analysis revealed a highly significant correlation between p53 GOF mutations and ENTPD5 expression. Mechanistically, mutp53 is recruited by Sp1 to the ENTPD5 core promoter to induce its expression. We show ENTPD5 to be a mediator of mutant p53 GOF activity in clonogenic growth, architectural tissue remodeling, migration, invasion, and lung colonization in an experimental metastasis mouse model. Our study reveals folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins in the ER as a mechanism underlying the metastatic progression of tumors with mutp53 that could provide new possibilities for cancer treatment.

  15. Myeloma cell–derived Runx2 promotes myeloma progression in bone

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Timothy N.; Li, Mei; Pan, Qianying; Peker, Deniz; Rowan, Patrick D.; Li, Juan; Zhan, Fenghuang; Suva, Larry J.; Javed, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    The progression of multiple myeloma (MM) is governed by a network of molecular signals, the majority of which remain to be identified. Recent studies suggest that Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), a well-known bone-specific transcription factor, is also expressed in solid tumors, where expression promotes both bone metastasis and osteolysis. However, the function of Runx2 in MM remains unknown. The current study demonstrated that (1) Runx2 expression in primary human MM cells is significantly greater than in plasma cells from healthy donors and patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance; (2) high levels of Runx2 expression in MM cells are associated with a high-risk population of MM patients; and (3) overexpression of Runx2 in MM cells enhanced tumor growth and disease progression in vivo. Additional studies demonstrated that MM cell–derived Runx2 promotes tumor progression through a mechanism involving the upregulation of Akt/β-catenin/Survivin signaling and enhanced expression of multiple metastatic genes/proteins, as well as the induction of a bone-resident cell-like phenotype in MM cells. Thus, Runx2 expression supports the aggressive phenotype of MM and is correlated with poor prognosis. These data implicate Runx2 expression as a major regulator of MM progression in bone and myeloma bone disease. PMID:25862559

  16. Smoc2 potentiates proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells via promotion of cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jing-Ran; Kuai, Jing-Hua; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the influence of Smoc2 on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell proliferation and to find a possible new therapeutic target for preventing HCC progression. METHODS We detected expression of Smoc2 in HCC tissues and corresponding non-tumor liver (CNL) tissues using PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemistry methods. Subsequently, we down-regulated and up-regulated Smoc2 expression using siRNA and lentivirus transfection assay, respectively. Then, we identified the effect of Smoc2 on cell proliferation and cell cycle using CCK-8 and flow cytometry, respectively. The common cell growth signaling influenced by Smoc2 was detected by western blot assay. RESULTS The expression of Smoc2 was significantly higher in HCC tissues compared with CNL tissues. Overexpression of Smoc2 promoted HCC cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Down-regulation of Smoc2 led to inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Smoc2 had positive effect on ERK and AKT signaling. CONCLUSION Smoc2 promotes the proliferation of HCC cells through accelerating cell cycle progression and might act as an anti-cancer therapeutic target in the future. PMID:28018113

  17. TNF-α augments CXCR2 and CXCR3 to promote progression of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kuang-Hui; Sun, Guang-Huan; Wu, Yi-Ching; Ko, Bai-Jiun; Hsu, Hui-Tzu; Wu, Sheng-Tang

    2016-11-01

    Within the tumour microenvironment, a complex network of chemokines and their receptors affects the initiation and progression of tumours. The higher levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are associated with tumour progression and an anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody has been used successfully to treat patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the role of chemokines and their receptors in the TNF-α-promoted progression of RCC remains unclear. In this study, TNF-α was found to enhance the migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of RCC cells. To further investigate the molecular mechanism of TNF-α on the progression of RCC, reverse transcription and quantitative PCR was used to screen chemokines and chemokine receptors that were associated with tumorigenesis. The results showed that TNF-α significantly increased the expressions of CXCR2 and CXCR3 and their related ligands in RCC cells. Subsequently, we used a lentiviral shRNA system to knockdown the expression of CXCR2 and/or CXCR3 in RCC cells. CXCR2 and CXCR3 silencing inhibited the induction of Slug and ZEB-1 with TNF-α treatment of RCC cells. In addition, the knockdown of both CXCR2 and CXCR3 resulted in a greater decrease in cell migration, invasion and clonogenic ability compared with either CXCR2 or CXCR3 knockdown alone. Moreover, CXCR2 and CXCR3 silencing significantly reduced the sphere-forming ability of RCC cells. High expression levels of CXCR2 and CXCR3 in cancer tissues correlated with tumour progression of renal cell carcinoma. These findings suggest that TNF-α augments CXCR2 and CXCR3 to promote the progression of renal cell carcinoma leading to a poor prognosis.

  18. TMED3 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression via IL-11/STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hao; Yang, Yuan; Han, Jun; Jiang, Wei-hua; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Meng-chao; Gao, Rong; Li, Shuai; Tian, Tao; Wang, Jian; Ma, Li-jun; Ren, Hao; Zhou, Wei-ping

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane p24 trafficking protein 3(TMED3) is a metastatic suppressor in colon cancer, but its function in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unknown. Here, we report that TMED3 was up-regulated in HCC and portal vein tumor thrombus. TMED3 up-regulation in HCC was significantly correlated with aggressive characteristics and predicted poor prognosis in HCC patients. TMED3 overexpression in HCC cell lines promoted cell migration and invasion. In contrast, TMED3 knockdown suppressed HCC metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. Gene microarray analysis revealed decreased IL-11 expression in TMED3-knockdown cells. We propose that TMED3 promotes HCC metastasis through IL-11/STAT3 signaling. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that TMED3 promotes HCC metastasis and is a potential prognostic biomarker in HCC. PMID:27901021

  19. Patched1 functions as a gatekeeper by promoting cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Adolphe, Christelle; Hetherington, Rehan; Ellis, Tammy; Wainwright, Brandon

    2006-02-15

    Mutations in the Hedgehog receptor, Patched 1 (Ptch1), have been linked to both familial and sporadic forms of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), leading to the hypothesis that loss of Ptch1 function is sufficient for tumor progression. By combining conditional knockout technology with the inducible activity of the Keratin6 promoter, we provide in vivo evidence that loss of Ptch1 function from the basal cell population of mouse skin is sufficient to induce rapid skin tumor formation, reminiscent of human BCC. Elimination of Ptch1 does not promote the nuclear translocation of beta-catenin and does not induce ectopic activation or expression of Notch pathway constituents. In the absence of Ptch1, however, a large proportion of basal cells exhibit nuclear accumulation of the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and B1. Collectively, our data suggest that Ptch1 likely functions as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting G1-S phase and G2-M phase cell cycle progression, and the rapid onset of tumor progression clearly indicates Ptch1 functions as a "gatekeeper." In addition, we note the high frequency and rapid onset of tumors in this mouse model makes it an ideal system for testing therapeutic strategies, such as Patched pathway inhibitors.

  20. Snail and serpinA1 promote tumor progression and predict prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Hwa; Lee, Ja Rang; Kim, Hye Kyung; Jo, Hong-jae; Kim, Hyun Sung; Oh, Nahmgun; Song, Geun Am; Park, Do Youn

    2015-01-01

    The role of Snail and serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 (serpinA1) in tumorigenesis has been previously identified. However, the exact role and mechanism of these proteins in progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) are controversial. In this study, we investigated the role of Snail and serpinA1 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and examined the mechanisms through which these proteins mediate CRC progression. Immunohistochemical analysis of 528 samples from patients with CRC showed that elevated expression of Snail or serpinA1 was correlated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor prognosis. Moreover, we detected a correlation between Snail and serpinA1 expression. Functional studies performed using the CRC cell lines DLD-1 and SW-480 showed that overexpression of Snail or serpinA1 significantly increased CRC cell invasion and migration. Conversely, knockdown of Snail or serpinA1 expression suppressed CRC cell invasion and migration. ChIP analysis revealed that Snail regulated serpinA1 by binding to its promoter. In addition, fibronectin mediated Snail and serpinA1 signaling was involved in CRC cell invasion and migration. Taken together, our data showed that Snail and serpinA1 promoted CRC progression through fibronectin. These findings suggested that Snail and serpinA1 were novel prognostic biomarkers and candidate therapeutic targets in CRC. PMID:26015410

  1. Association Study between Promoter Polymorphism of TPH1 and Progression of Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Yablanski, Vasil; Nikolova, Svetla; Vlaev, Evgeni; Savov, Alexey; Kremensky, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    The concept of disease-modifier genes as an element of genetic heterogeneity has been widely accepted and reported. The aim of the current study is to investigate the association between the promoter polymorphism TPH1 (rs10488682) and progression of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) in Eastern European population sample. A total of 105 patients and 210 healthy gender-matched controls were enrolled in this study. The TPH1 promoter polymorphism was genotyped by amplification followed by restriction. The statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's Exact Test. The results indicated that the genotypes and alleles of TPH1 (rs10488682) are not correlated with curve severity, curve pattern, or bracing. Therefore, the examined polymorphic variant could not be considered as a genetic factor with modifying effect of IS. In conclusion, this case-control study revealed no statistically significant association between TPH1 (rs10488682) and progression of IS in Eastern European population sample. These preliminary results should be replicated in extended population studies including larger sample sizes. The identification of molecular markers for IS could be useful for a more accurate prognosis of the risk for a rapid progression of the curve. That would permit early stage treatment of the patient with the least invasive procedures. PMID:27293961

  2. TOO MANY MOUTHS promotes cell fate progression in stomatal development of Arabidopsis stems.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Neela S; Veley, Kira M; Nadeau, Jeanette A; Lucas, Jessica R; Bhave, Sanjay L; Sack, Fred D

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM), which encodes a receptor-like protein, cause stomatal patterning defects in Arabidopsis leaves but eliminate stomatal formation in stems. Stomatal development in wild-type and tmm stems was analyzed to define TMM function. Epidermal cells in young tmm stems underwent many asymmetric divisions characteristic of entry into the stomatal pathway. The resulting precursor cells, meristemoids, appropriately expressed cell fate markers such as pTMM:GFP. However, instead of progressing developmentally by forming a guard mother cell, the meristemoids arrested, dedifferentiated, and enlarged. Thus asymmetric divisions are necessary but not sufficient for stomatal formation in stems, and TMM promotes the fate and developmental progression of early precursor cells. Comparable developmental and mature stomatal phenotypes were also found in tmm hypocotyls and in the proximal flower stalk. TMM is also a positive regulator of meristemoid division in leaves suggesting that TMM generally promotes meristemoid activity. Our results are consistent with a model in which TMM interacts with other proteins to modulate precursor cell fate and progression in an organ and domain-specific manner. Finally, the consistent presence of a small number of dedifferentiated meristemoids in mature wild-type stems suggests that precursor cell arrest is a normal feature of Arabidopsis stem development.

  3. PIAS1-FAK Interaction Promotes the Survival and Progression of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Constanzo, Jerfiz D; Tang, Ke-Jing; Rindhe, Smita; Melegari, Margherita; Liu, Hui; Tang, Ximing; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Wistuba, Ignacio; Scaglioni, Pier Paolo

    2016-05-01

    The sequence of genomic alterations acquired by cancer cells during tumor progression and metastasis is poorly understood. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that integrates cytoskeleton remodeling, mitogenic signaling and cell survival. FAK has previously been reported to undergo nuclear localization during cell migration, cell differentiation and apoptosis. However, the mechanism behind FAK nuclear accumulation and its contribution to tumor progression has remained elusive. We report that amplification of FAK and the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS1 gene loci frequently co-occur in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, and that both gene products are enriched in a subset of primary NSCLCs. We demonstrate that endogenous FAK and PIAS1 proteins interact in the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus of NSCLC cells. Ectopic expression of PIAS1 promotes proteolytic cleavage of the FAK C-terminus, focal adhesion maturation and FAK nuclear localization. Silencing of PIAS1 deregulates focal adhesion turnover, increases susceptibility to apoptosis in vitro and impairs tumor xenograft formation in vivo. Nuclear FAK in turn stimulates gene transcription favoring DNA repair, cell metabolism and cytoskeleton regulation. Consistently, ablation of FAK by CRISPR/Cas9 editing, results in basal DNA damage, susceptibility to ionizing radiation and impaired oxidative phosphorylation. Our findings provide insight into a mechanism regulating FAK cytoplasm-nuclear distribution and demonstrate that FAK activity in the nucleus promotes NSCLC survival and progression by increasing cell-ECM interaction and DNA repair regulation.

  4. Cell cycle-coupled expansion of AR activity promotes cancer progression.

    PubMed

    McNair, C; Urbanucci, A; Comstock, C E S; Augello, M A; Goodwin, J F; Launchbury, R; Zhao, S G; Schiewer, M J; Ertel, A; Karnes, J; Davicioni, E; Wang, L; Wang, Q; Mills, I G; Feng, F Y; Li, W; Carroll, J S; Knudsen, K E

    2017-03-23

    The androgen receptor (AR) is required for prostate cancer (PCa) survival and progression, and ablation of AR activity is the first line of therapeutic intervention for disseminated disease. While initially effective, recurrent tumors ultimately arise for which there is no durable cure. Despite the dependence of PCa on AR activity throughout the course of disease, delineation of the AR-dependent transcriptional network that governs disease progression remains elusive, and the function of AR in mitotically active cells is not well understood. Analyzing AR activity as a function of cell cycle revealed an unexpected and highly expanded repertoire of AR-regulated gene networks in actively cycling cells. New AR functions segregated into two major clusters: those that are specific to cycling cells and retained throughout the mitotic cell cycle ('Cell Cycle Common'), versus those that were specifically enriched in a subset of cell cycle phases ('Phase Restricted'). Further analyses identified previously unrecognized AR functions in major pathways associated with clinical PCa progression. Illustrating the impact of these unmasked AR-driven pathways, dihydroceramide desaturase 1 was identified as an AR-regulated gene in mitotically active cells that promoted pro-metastatic phenotypes, and in advanced PCa proved to be highly associated with development of metastases, recurrence after therapeutic intervention and reduced overall survival. Taken together, these findings delineate AR function in mitotically active tumor cells, thus providing critical insight into the molecular basis by which AR promotes development of lethal PCa and nominate new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Role of CDH13 promoter methylation in the carcinogenesis, progression, and prognosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Meng; Huang, Tao; Li, Jinyun; Zhou, Chongchang; Yang, Ping; Ni, Chao; Chen, Si

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: H-cadherin (CDH13) is commonly downregulated through promoter methylation in various cancers. However, the role of CDH13 promoter methylation status in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) remains to be clarified. Methods: Eligible articles were identified from online electronic database based on the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement criteria. The pooled odds ratio (OR) and the corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated and analyzed. Results: Eventually, a total of nine studies were included in this meta-analysis, including 488 CRC, 298 adjacent, 144 normal, 68 premalignant tissues. The results demonstrated that CDH13 promoter methylation was notably higher in CRC than in normal, adjacent, and premalignant tissues (cancer tissues vs normal tissues: OR = 16.94, P < 0.001; cancer tissues vs adjacent tissues: OR = 20.06, P < 0.001; cancer tissues vs premalignant tissues: OR = 2.23, P = 0.038). CDH13 promoter methylation had a significantly increased risk for poorly differentiated CRC (OR = 4.07, P = 0.001). CDH13 promoter methylation was not associated with sex status, tumor stage, and lymph node status (all P > 0.05). One study with 85 CRC patients reported that CDH13 promoter methylation was correlated with poor prognosis in overall survival (OS). Conclusions: CDH13 promoter methylation may play an important role in the initiation and progression of CRC, and may be correlated with OS of patients with CRC. Additional studies with large sample sizes are needed to further confirm our findings in the future. PMID:28121942

  6. Arsenic transformation and plant growth promotion characteristics of As-resistant endophytic bacteria from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Yi; Han, Yong-He; Chen, Yanshan; Zhu, Ling-Jia; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-02-01

    The ability of As-resistant endophytic bacteria in As transformation and plant growth promotion was determined. The endophytes were isolated from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) after growing for 60 d in a soil containing 200 mg kg(-1) arsenate (AsV). They were isolated in presence of 10 mM AsV from PV roots, stems, and leaflets, representing 4 phyla and 17 genera. All endophytes showed at least one plant growth promoting characteristics including IAA synthesis, siderophore production and P solubilization. The root endophytes had higher P solubilization ability than the leaflet (60.0 vs. 18.3 mg L(-1)). In presence of 10 mM AsV, 6 endophytes had greater growth than the control, suggesting As-stimulated growth. Furthermore, root endophytes were more resistant to AsV while the leaflet endophytes were more tolerant to arsenite (AsIII), which corresponded to the dominant As species in PV tissues. Bacterial As resistance was positively correlated to their ability in AsV reduction but not AsIII oxidation. The roles of those endophytes in promoting plant growth and As resistance in P. vittata warrant further investigation.

  7. Epithelial derived CTGF promotes breast tumor progression via inducing EMT and collagen I fibers deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Sheng, Jianting; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Jiyong; Cui, Kemi; Chang, Jenny; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Interactions among tumor cells, stromal cells, and extracellular matrix compositions are mediated through cytokines during tumor progression. Our analysis of 132 known cytokines and growth factors in published clinical breast cohorts and our 84 patient-derived xenograft models revealed that the elevated connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in tumor epithelial cells significantly correlated with poor clinical prognosis and outcomes. CTGF was able to induce tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and promote stroma deposition of collagen I fibers to stimulate tumor growth and metastasis. This process was mediated through CTGF-tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1)-IκB autocrine signaling. Drug treatments targeting CTGF, TNFR1, and IκB signaling each prohibited the EMT and tumor progression. PMID:26318291

  8. Smad3 promotes cancer progression by inhibiting E4BP4-mediated NK cell development

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Patrick Ming-Kuen; Zhou, Shuang; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Qing-Ming; Li, Chun-Jie; Lian, Guang-Yu; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Tang, Yong-Jiang; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Yan, Bryan Ping-Yen; To, Ka-Fai; Lan, Hui-Yao

    2017-01-01

    TGF-β is known to influence tumour progression. Here we report an additional role of Smad3 in the tumour microenvironment regulating cancer progression. Deletion or inhibition of Smad3 in the tumour microenvironment suppresses tumour growth, invasion and metastasis in two syngeneic mouse tumour models. Smad3−/− bone marrow gives rise to an expanded NK cell population with enhanced tumour-suppressive activities in vivo, and promotes differentiation of NK cells ex vivo. We identify E4BP4/NFIL3 as a direct Smad3 target gene critical for NK cell differentiation. Smad3 suppresses transcription of IFN-γ via E4BP4 in a T-bet independent manner. Therefore disruption of Smad3 enhances both the E4BP4-mediated NK cell differentiation and anti-cancer effector functions in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, systemic treatment with a Smad3 inhibitor SIS3 effectively suppresses cancer progression. In summary, suppression of NK cell-mediated immunosurveillance via the Smad3-E4BP4 axis contributes to cancer progression. We propose targeting Smad3-dependent tumour microenvironment may represent an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:28262747

  9. Interleukin-6 promotes tumor progression in colitis-associated colorectal cancer through HIF-1α regulation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun; Xi, Qiulei; Meng, Qingyang; Liu, Jingzheng; Zhang, Yongxian; Han, Yusong; Zhuang, Qiulin; Jiang, Yi; Ding, Qiurong; Wu, Guohao

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a well-known etiological factor of colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) and has a significant role in CAC progression. In addition, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) serves a primary role in the progression of CAC. However, the association between IL-6 and HIF-1α during the progression of CAC remains unclear. To investigate this association, the present study induced CAC in a mouse model using azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium. In addition, an anti-IL-6 receptor antibody was used to inhibit IL-6. In this model, anti-IL-6 receptor antibody treatment significantly inhibited the development of CAC and the expression of HIF-1α, in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas. In patients with CAC, the HIF-1α gene was demonstrated to be overexpressed in tumor tissue compared with adjacent non-malignant tissue. Furthermore, HIF-1α mRNA expression was positively correlated with serum IL-6 concentration. The results of the present study suggest that IL-6 promotes CAC progression, in the early stage of the disease, through HIF-1α regulation. PMID:28105173

  10. Smad3 promotes cancer progression by inhibiting E4BP4-mediated NK cell development.

    PubMed

    Tang, Patrick Ming-Kuen; Zhou, Shuang; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Qing-Ming; Li, Chun-Jie; Lian, Guang-Yu; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Tang, Yong-Jiang; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Yan, Bryan Ping-Yen; To, Ka-Fai; Lan, Hui-Yao

    2017-03-06

    TGF-β is known to influence tumour progression. Here we report an additional role of Smad3 in the tumour microenvironment regulating cancer progression. Deletion or inhibition of Smad3 in the tumour microenvironment suppresses tumour growth, invasion and metastasis in two syngeneic mouse tumour models. Smad3(-/-) bone marrow gives rise to an expanded NK cell population with enhanced tumour-suppressive activities in vivo, and promotes differentiation of NK cells ex vivo. We identify E4BP4/NFIL3 as a direct Smad3 target gene critical for NK cell differentiation. Smad3 suppresses transcription of IFN-γ via E4BP4 in a T-bet independent manner. Therefore disruption of Smad3 enhances both the E4BP4-mediated NK cell differentiation and anti-cancer effector functions in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, systemic treatment with a Smad3 inhibitor SIS3 effectively suppresses cancer progression. In summary, suppression of NK cell-mediated immunosurveillance via the Smad3-E4BP4 axis contributes to cancer progression. We propose targeting Smad3-dependent tumour microenvironment may represent an effective anti-cancer strategy.

  11. Phosphate May Promote CKD Progression and Attenuate Renoprotective Effect of ACE Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ruggenenti, Piero; Perna, Annalisa; Leonardis, Daniela; Tripepi, Rocco; Tripepi, Giovanni; Mallamaci, Francesca; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Phosphate may promote the onset and progression of chronic nephropathies. Here we evaluated the relationships between baseline serum phosphate levels, disease progression, and response to ACE inhibition in 331 patients with proteinuric nephropathies in the prospective Ramipril Efficacy In Nephropathy (REIN) trial. Independent of treatment, patients with phosphate levels in the highest two quartiles progressed significantly faster either to ESRD or to a composite endpoint of doubling of serum creatinine or ESRD compared with patients with phosphate levels below the median (P < 0.001). Results were similar when we analyzed phosphate as a continuous variable (P ≤ 0.004). The renoprotective effect of ramipril decreased as serum phosphate increased (P ≤ 0.008 for interaction); this modification of the treatment effect by phosphate persisted despite adjusting for potential confounders such as GFR and urinary protein. In summary, these data suggest that phosphate is an independent risk factor for progression of renal disease among patients with proteinuric CKD, and high levels of phosphate may even attenuate the renoprotective effect of ACE inhibitors. Future trials should test whether reducing serum phosphate improves renal outcomes and optimizes the renoprotective effect of ACE inhibition. PMID:21852581

  12. ZEB1 promotes the progression and metastasis of cervical squamous cell carcinoma via the promotion of epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yihui; Zheng, Xiangyu; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Kuisheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) clearly contributes to cancer metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of the EMT-related transcription repressor ZEB1 and the expression of EMT-associated markers (E-cadherin, β-catenin and N-cadherin) in cervical squamous cell carcinoma. In addition, the role of ZEB1 and these EMT-associated markers in the progression and metastasis of cervical squamous cell carcinoma was explored. Methods: The expression of ZEB1, E-cadherin, β-catenin and N-cadherin was evaluated in 81 specimens of cervical squamous cell carcinoma by immunohistochemistry; the clinicopathological significance of these markers was then analyzed. Results: 1) Of the 81 samples, 37 cases (45.7%) were positive for ZEB1, and nuclear expression of ZEB1 in tumor cells was positively associated with the differentiation status of the tumor tissue (P < 0.05), vascular invasion (P < 0.05) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). 2) The loss of E-cadherin and β-catenin expression in tumor cells and the acquisition of N-cadherin expression were positively associated with the differentiation status of the tumor tissue (P < 0.05) and with the occurrence of vascular invasion (P < 0.05). 3) A significant negative correlation was observed between ZEB1 and E-cadherin expression (Spearman = -0.636, P < 0.05) and between ZEB1 and β-catenin expression (Spearman = -0.417, P < 0.05). Moreover, a significant positive correlation was observed between ZEB1 and N-cadherin expression (Spearman = 0.557, P < 0.05). Conclusions: These results emphasize the role of EMT in cervical squamous cell carcinoma. The upregulation of ZEB1 is associated with the abnormal expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin and N-cadherin, which might promote the progression and metastasis of cervical squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26617850

  13. Arsenic-Redox Transformation and Plant Growth Promotion by Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris CS2 and Rhodopseudomonas faecalis SS5

    PubMed Central

    Batool, Kanza; tuz Zahra, Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a well-known toxic metalloid found naturally and released by different industries, especially in developing countries. Purple nonsulfur bacteria (PNSB) are known for wastewater treatment and plant growth promoting abilities. As-resistant PNSB were isolated from a fish pond. Based on As-resistance and plant growth promoting attributes, 2 isolates CS2 and SS5 were selected and identified as Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Rhodopseudomonas faecalis, respectively, through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Maximum As(V) resistance shown by R. faecalis SS5 and R. palustris CS2 was up to 150 and 100 mM, respectively. R. palustris CS2 showed highest As(V) reduction up to 62.9% (6.29 ± 0.24 mM), while R. faecalis SS5 showed maximum As(III) oxidation up to 96% (4.8 ± 0.32 mM), respectively. Highest auxin production was observed by R. palustris CS2 and R. faecalis SS, up to 77.18 ± 3.7 and 76.67 ± 2.8 μg mL−1, respectively. Effects of these PNSB were tested on the growth of Vigna mungo plants. A statistically significant increase in growth was observed in plants inoculated with isolates compared to uninoculated plants, both in presence and in absence of As. R. palustris CS2 treated plants showed 17% (28.1 ± 0.87 cm) increase in shoot length and 21.7% (7.07 ± 0.42 cm) increase in root length, whereas R. faecalis SS5 treated plants showed 12.8% (27.09 ± 0.81 cm) increase in shoot length and 18.8% (6.9 ± 0.34 cm) increase in root length as compared to the control plants. In presence of As, R. palustris CS2 increased shoot length up to 26.3% (21.0 ± 1.1 cm), while root length increased up to 31.3% (5.3 ± 0.4 cm), whereas R. faecalis SS5 inoculated plants showed 25% (20.7 ± 1.4 cm) increase in shoot length and 33.3% (5.4 ± 0.65 cm) increase in root length as compared to the control plants. Bacteria with such diverse abilities could be ideal for plant growth promotion in As-contaminated sites. PMID:28386559

  14. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 promotes angiogenesis and drives malignant progression in glioma.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Tiffany A; Kong, Ling-Yuan; Yang, Yuhui; Ferguson, Sherise D; Yang, Jinbo; Wei, Jun; Qiao, Wei; Fuller, Gregory N; Bhat, Krishna P; Aldape, Kenneth; Priebe, Waldemar; Bögler, Oliver; Heimberger, Amy B; Rao, Ganesh

    2012-09-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 has been described as a "master regulator" of signaling pathways involved in the transition from low-grade glioma (LGG) to high-grade glioma (HGG). Although STAT3 is overexpressed in HGGs, it remains unclear whether its overexpression is sufficient to induce or promote the malignant progression of glioma. To characterize the effect of STAT3 expression on tumor progression in vivo, we expressed the STAT3 gene in glioneuronal progenitor cells in mice. STAT3 was expressed alone or concurrently with platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB), a well-described initiator of LGG. STAT3 alone was insufficient to induce tumor formation; however, coexpression of STAT3 with PDGFB in mice resulted in a significantly higher incidence of HGGs than PDGFB alone. The median symptomatic tumor latency in mice coexpressing STAT3 and PDGFB was significantly shorter, and mice that developed symptomatic tumors demonstrated significantly higher expression of phosphorylated STAT3 intratumorally. In HGGs, expression of STAT3 was associated with suppression of apoptosis and an increase in tumor cell proliferation. HGGs induced by STAT3 and PDGFB also displayed frequent foci of necrosis and microvascular proliferation. The expression of CD31 (a marker of endothelial proliferation) was significantly higher in tumors induced by coexpression of STAT3 and PDGFB. When mice injected with PDGFB and STAT3 were treated with a STAT3 inhibitor, median survival increased and the incidence of HGG and CD31 expression decreased significantly. These results demonstrate that STAT3 promotes the malignant progression of glioma. Inhibiting STAT3 expression mitigates tumor progression and improves survival, validating it as a therapeutic target.

  15. Bcl-2 promotes malignant progression in a PDGF-B-dependent murine model of oligodendroglioma

    PubMed Central

    Doucette, Tiffany; Fuller, Gregory N.; Yang, Yuhui; Suki, Dima; Zhang, Wei; Fults, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    A significant subset of gliomas arises after activation of the pro-proliferative platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) pathway. The progression of low-grade gliomas to more malignant tumors may be due to oncogenic cellular programs combining with those suppressing apoptosis. Anti-apoptotic genes are overexpressed in a variety of cancers and the anti-apoptotic gene, BCL2, is associated with treatment resistance and tumor recurrence in gliomas. However, the impact of anti-apoptotic gene expression to tumor formation and progression is unclear. We overexpressed Bcl-2 in a PDGFB-dependent mouse model of oligodendroglioma, a common glioma subtype, to assess its effect in vivo. We hypothesized that the anti-apoptotic effect would complement the pro-proliferative effect of PDGFB to promote tumor formation and progression to anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO). Here, we show that co-expression of PDGFB and Bcl-2 results in a higher overall tumor formation rate compared to PDGFB alone. Co-expression of PDGFB and Bcl-2 promotes progression to AO with prominent foci of necrosis, a feature of high-grade gliomas. Median tumor latency was shorter in mice injected with PDGFB and Bcl-2 compared to those injected with PDGFB alone. Although independent expression of Bcl-2 was insufficient to induce tumors, suppression of apoptosis (detected by cleaved caspase-3 expression) was more pronounced in AOs induced by PDGFB and Bcl-2 compared to those induced by PDGFB alone. Tumor cell proliferation (detected by phosphohistone H3 activity) was also more robust in high-grade tumors induced by PDGFB and Bcl-2. Our results indicate that suppressed apoptosis enhances oligodendroglioma formation and engenders a more malignant phenotype. PMID:21171016

  16. CD147 reinforces [Ca2+]i oscillations and promotes oncogenic progression in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juan; Guo, Yun-Shan; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Huang, Wan; Zheng, Ming; Zhou, Ying-Hui; Nan, Gang; Wang, Jian-Chao; Yang, Hai-Jiao; Yu, Jing-Min; Jiang, Jian-Li; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2015-10-27

    Oscillations in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) mediate various cellular function. Although it is known that [Ca2+]i oscillations are susceptible to dysregulation in tumors, the tumor-specific regulators of [Ca2+]i oscillations are poorly characterized. We discovered that CD147 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis and proliferation by enhancing the amplitude and frequency of [Ca2+]i oscillations in HCC cells. CD147 activates two distinct signaling pathways to regulate [Ca2+]i oscillations. By activating FAK-Src-IP3R1 signaling pathway, CD147 promotes Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and enhances the amplitude of [Ca2+]i oscillations. Furthermore, CD147 accelerates ER Ca2+refilling and enhances the frequency of [Ca2+]i oscillations through activating CaMKP-PAK1-PP2A-PLB-SERCA signaling pathway. Besides, CD147-promoted ER Ca2+ release and refilling are tightly regulated by changing [Ca2+]i. CD147 may activate IP3R1 channel under low [Ca2+]i conditions and CD147 may activate SERCA pump under high [Ca2+]i conditions. CD147 deletion suppresses HCC tumorigenesis and increases the survival rate of liver-specific CD147 knockout mice by regulating [Ca2+]i oscillations in vivo. Together, these results reveal that CD147 functions as a critical regulator of ER-dependent [Ca2+]i oscillations to promote oncogenic progression in HCC.

  17. Inorganic Arsenic and Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We critically evaluated the etiologic role of inorganic arsenic in human prostate cancer. Data sources We assessed data from relevant epidemiologic studies concerning environmental inorganic arsenic exposure. Whole animal studies were evaluated as were in vitro model systems of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis in the prostate. Data synthesis Multiple studies in humans reveal an association between environmental inorganic arsenic exposure and prostate cancer mortality or incidence. Many of these human studies provide clear evidence of a dose–response relationship. Relevant whole animal models showing a relationship between inorganic arsenic and prostate cancer are not available. However, cellular model systems indicate arsenic can induce malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in vitro. Arsenic also appears to impact prostate cancer cell progression by precipitating events leading to androgen independence in vitro. Conclusion Available evidence in human populations and human cells in vitro indicates that the prostate is a target for inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis. A role for this common environmental contaminant in human prostate cancer initiation and/or progression would be very important. PMID:18288312

  18. Metabolic interrelationships between arsenic and selenium

    PubMed Central

    Levander, Orville A.

    1977-01-01

    In 1938, Moxon discovered that arsenic protected against selenium toxicity. Since that time it has been shown that this protective effect of arsenic against selenium poisoning can be demonstrated in many different animal species under a wide variety of conditions. Antagonistic effects between arsenic and selenium have also been noted in teratologic experiments. Early metabolic studies showed that arsenic inhibited the expiration of volatile selenium compounds by rats injected with acutely toxic doses of both elements. This was puzzling since pulmonary excretion had long been regarded as a means by which animals could rid themselves of excess selenium. However, later work demonstrated that arsenic increased the biliary excretion of selenium. Not only did arsenic stimulate the excretion of selenium in the bile, but selenium also stimulated the excretion of arsenic in the bile. This increased biliary excretion of selenium caused by arsenic provides a reasonable rationale for the ability of arsenic to counteract the toxicity of selenium, although the chemical mechanism by which arsenic does this is not certain. The most satisfactory explanation is that these two elements react in the liver to form a detoxication conjugate which is then excreted into the bile. This is consistent with the fact that both arsenic and selenium each increase the biliary excretion of the other. Several other metabolic interactions between arsenic and selenium have been demonstrated in vitro, but their physiological significance is not clear. Although arsenic decreased selenium toxicity under most conditions, there is a pronounced synergistic toxicity between arsenic and two methylated selenium metabolites, trimethylselenonium ion or dimethyl selenide. The ecological consequences of these synergisms are largely unexplored, although it is likely that selenium methylation occurs in the environment. All attempts to promote or prevent selenium deficiency diseases in animals by feeding arsenic have

  19. [Initiation, promotion, initiation experiments with radon and cigarette smoke: Lung tumors in rats]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Moolgavkar, S.H.

    1994-10-01

    During the past several years, the authors have made considerable progress in modeling carcinogenesis in general, and in modeling radiation carcinogenesis, in particular. They present an overview of their progress in developing stochastic carcinogenesis models and applying them to experimental and epidemiologic data sets. Traditionally, cancer models have been used for the analysis of incidence (or prevalence) data in epidemiology and time to tumor data in experimental studies. The relevant quantities for the analysis of these data are the hazard function and the probability of tumor. The derivation of these quantities is briefly described here. More recently, the authors began to use these models for the analysis of data on intermediate lesions on the pathway to cancer. Such data are available in experimental carcinogenesis studies, in particular in initiation and promotion studies on the mouse skin and the rat liver. If however, quantitative information on intermediate lesions on the pathway to lung cancer were to be come available at some future date, the methods that they have developed for the analysis of initiation-promotion experiments could easily be applied to the analysis of these lesions. The mathematical derivations here are couched in terms of a particular two-mutation model of carcinogenesis. Extension to models postulating more than two mutations is not always straightforward.

  20. Histone demethylase PHF8 promotes progression and metastasis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuyan; Sun, Ao; Liang, Xiuming; Ma, Lin; Shen, Li; Li, Tongyu; Zheng, Lixin; Shang, Wenjing; Zhao, Wei; Jia, Jihui

    2017-01-01

    Histone demethylase plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein 8 (PHF8) has been implicated in tumor development and malignant progression in various types of cancers. However, its potential roles in gastric cancer (GC) have not been explored. In this report, we show that PHF8 expression is upregulated in GC tissues, and the enhanced PHF8 level indicates a poor prognosis of GC patients. PHF8 knockdown reduces proliferation and metastasis of GC cells, while PHF8 overexpression has the opposite effects. Mechanistically, PHF8 interacts with β-catenin, and binds to the promoter region of vimentin, leading to the promotion of vimentin transcription. In addition, we show that H. pylori, the single most important risk factor for GC, markedly induce PHF8 expression. Our results suggest that H. pylori-induced PHF8-β-catenin-vimentin axis activation is a novel mechanism for GC malignant progression. Thus, we identify PHF8 as an oncogenic factor of GC, and suggest PHF8 might be a potential molecular target for therapeutic approaches for GC.

  1. Nuclear localization of TEF3-1 promotes cell cycle progression and angiogenesis in cancer.

    PubMed

    Teng, Kaixuan; Deng, Cuilan; Xu, Jie; Men, Qiuxu; Lei, Tao; Di, Da; Liu, Ting; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Xin

    2016-03-22

    TEF3-1 (transcriptional enhancer factor 3 isoform 1), also known as TEAD4 (TEA domain family member 4), was recently revealed as an oncogenic character in cancer development. However, the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms remain undefined. In this paper, we investigated nuclear TEF3-1 could promote G1/S transition in HUVECs, and the expression levels of cyclins and CDKs were upregulated. Additionally, if TEF3-1 was knocked down, the expression of cyclins and CDKs was downregulated while the expression of P21, a negative regulator of the cell cycle, was upregulated. A microarray analysis also confirmed that TEF3-1 overexpression upregulates genes that are related to cell cycle progression and the promotion of angiogenesis. Moreover, we observed that nuclear TEF3-1 was highly expressed during the formation of vascular structures in gastric cancer (GC). Finally, tumor xenograft experiments indicated that, when TEF3-1 was knocked down, tumor growth and angiogenesis were also suppressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that TEF3-1 localization to the nucleus stimulates the cell cycle progression in HUVECs and specifically contributes to tumor angiogenesis. Nuclear TEF3-1 in HUVECs may serve as an oncogenic biomarker, and the suppression of TEF3-1 may be a potential target in anti-tumor therapy.

  2. SALL4 promotes gastric cancer progression through activating CD44 expression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X; Zhang, X; Zhang, W; Liang, W; Zhang, P; Shi, H; Zhang, B; Shao, M; Yan, Y; Qian, H; Xu, W

    2016-11-07

    The stem cell factor SALL4 (Sal-like protein 4) plays important roles in the development and progression of cancer. SALL4 is critically involved in tumour growth, metastasis and therapy resistance. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the oncogenic roles of SALL4 have not been well characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that SALL4 knockdown by short hairpin RNA greatly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. We further confirmed the inhibitory effects of SALL4 knockdown on gastric cancer cells by using a tetracycline-inducible system. Mechanistically, SALL4 knockdown downregulated the expression of CD44. The results of luciferase assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation study showed that SALL4 bound to CD44 promoter region and transcriptionally activated CD44. The results of rescue study revealed that CD44 overexpression antagonized SALL4 knockdown-mediated inhibition of gastric cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and gastric cancer growth in vivo. Collectively, our findings indicate that SALL4 promotes gastric cancer progression through directly activating CD44 expression, which suggests a novel mechanism for the oncogenic roles of SALL4 in gastric cancer and represents a new target for gastric cancer therapy.

  3. SALL4 promotes gastric cancer progression through activating CD44 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, X; Zhang, X; Zhang, W; Liang, W; Zhang, P; Shi, H; Zhang, B; Shao, M; Yan, Y; Qian, H; Xu, W

    2016-01-01

    The stem cell factor SALL4 (Sal-like protein 4) plays important roles in the development and progression of cancer. SALL4 is critically involved in tumour growth, metastasis and therapy resistance. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the oncogenic roles of SALL4 have not been well characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that SALL4 knockdown by short hairpin RNA greatly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. We further confirmed the inhibitory effects of SALL4 knockdown on gastric cancer cells by using a tetracycline-inducible system. Mechanistically, SALL4 knockdown downregulated the expression of CD44. The results of luciferase assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation study showed that SALL4 bound to CD44 promoter region and transcriptionally activated CD44. The results of rescue study revealed that CD44 overexpression antagonized SALL4 knockdown-mediated inhibition of gastric cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and gastric cancer growth in vivo. Collectively, our findings indicate that SALL4 promotes gastric cancer progression through directly activating CD44 expression, which suggests a novel mechanism for the oncogenic roles of SALL4 in gastric cancer and represents a new target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27819668

  4. Arsenic, inorganic

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Arsenic , inorganic ; CASRN 7440 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  5. Cell-cycle coupled expansion of AR activity promotes cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    McNair, Christopher; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Comstock, Clay E.S.; Augello, Michael A.; Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Launchbury, Rosalind; Zhao, Shuang; Schiewer, Mathew J.; Ertel, Adam; Karnes, Jeffrey; Davicioni, Elai; Wang, Liguo; Wang, Qianben; Mills, Ian G.; Feng, Felix Y.; Li, Wei; Carroll, Jason S.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is required for prostate cancer (PCa) survival and progression, and ablation of AR activity is the first line of therapeutic intervention for disseminated disease. While initially effective, recurrent tumors ultimately arise for which there is no durable cure. Despite the dependence of PCa on AR activity throughout the course of disease, delineation of the AR-dependent transcriptional network that governs disease progression remains elusive, and the function of AR in mitotically active cells is not well understood. Analyzing AR activity as a function of cell cycle revealed an unexpected and highly expanded repertoire of AR-regulated gene networks in actively cycling cells. New AR functions segregated into two major clusters: those that are specific to cycling cells and retained throughout the mitotic cell cycle (“Cell Cycle Common”), versus those that were specifically enriched in a subset of cell cycle phases (“Phase Restricted”). Further analyses identified previously unrecognized AR functions in major pathways associated with clinical PCa progression. Illustrating the impact of these unmasked AR-driven pathways, dihydroceramide-desaturase 1 (DEGS1) was identified as an AR regulated gene in mitotically active cells that promoted pro-metastatic phenotypes, and in advanced PCa proved to be highly associated with development of metastases, recurrence after therapeutic intervention, and reduced overall survival. Taken together, these findings delineate AR function in mitotically active tumor cells, thus providing critical insight into the molecular basis by which AR promotes development of lethal PCa and nominate new avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27669432

  6. Replication licensing promotes cyclin D1 expression and G1 progression in untransformed human cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peijun; Slater, Damien M.; Lenburg, Marc; Nevis, Kathleen; Cook, Jeanette Gowen; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2011-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication are implicated as early and causal events in malignancy. However, the immediate effects of impaired DNA replication licensing on cell cycle progression of non-malignant human cells are unknown. Therefore, we have investigated the acute effects of Mcm7 ablation using synchronized cultures of untransformed Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDF). Mcm7 ablation elicited a G1 delay associated with impaired activation of CDK4 and CDK2 and reduced Rb phosphorylation. The cell cycle delay of Mcm7-ablated cells was not associated with a DNA damage response. However, levels of cyclin D1 mRNA were specifically reduced and binding of RNA Polymerase II to the CYCD1 promoter was decreased in Mcm7-depleted cells. Similar to Mcm7-deficiency, Mcm2- or Cdc6-depletion led to impaired cyclin D expression. Ectopic overexpression of Cdc6 in quiescent cells promoted cyclin D1 expression, CDK4 activation and G1 progression. Therefore timely and efficient expression of cyclin D1 during G1 phase requires replication licensing. Reconstitution of cyclin D1 expression was insufficient to correct the G1 delay of Mcm7-depleted cells, indicating that additional cell cycle events during G1 are dependent on replication licensing. However, ectopic expression of the HPV-E7 oncoprotein, and the resulting bypass of the requirement for cyclin D1-Rb signaling enabled Mcm7-depleted cells to enter S-phase. HPV-E7-induced S-phase entry of Mcm7-depleted cells led to a DNA damage response, a hallmark of pre-malignancy. Taken together, our results suggest the existence of a ‘replication licensing restriction point’ that couples pre-RC assembly with G1 progression in normal cells to minimize replication stress, DNA damage and tumorigenesis. PMID:19106611

  7. DNAJC6 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression through induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tao; Li, Xiao-Na; Li, Xing-Guang; Li, Ming; Gao, Peng-Zhi

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • DNAJC6 is up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. • DNAJC6 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion. • DNAJC6 induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition by activating transforming growth factor β signaling. - Abstract: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental program, which is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development and progression. DNAJC6 (DNA/HSP40 homolog subfamily C member 6) encodes auxilin, which is responsible for juvenile Parkinsonism with phenotypic variability. However, the role of DNAJC6 in HCC development and progression is limited. Here, we report that DNAJC6 is up-regulated in HCC tissues and up-regulation of DNAJC6 expression predicts poor outcome in patients with HCC. Furthermore, overexpression of DNAJC6 enhances the ability for acquisition of mesenchymal traits, enhanced cell proliferation and invasion. DNAJC6 positively regulated expression of EMT-related transcription factor, also activating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathway to contribute to EMT. Our findings demonstrated an important function of DNAJC6 in the progression of HCC by induction of EMT, and they implicate DNAJC6 as a marker of poor outcome in HCC.

  8. Cadherin-12 enhances proliferation in colorectal cancer cells and increases progression by promoting EMT.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junjun; Zhao, Jingkun; Lu, Jun; Wang, Puxiongzhi; Feng, Hao; Zong, Yaping; Ou, Baochi; Zheng, Minhua; Lu, Aiguo

    2016-07-01

    Cadherin-12 (CDH12) is a subtype of N-cadherin family. In this study, we investigated the expression of CDH12 and the role of CDH12 in prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. In addition, we observed the influence of CDH12 on proliferation and progression of CRC cell lines. By using immunohistochemical staining, we analyzed CRC samples and adjacent non-tumor tissues collected from 78 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery in Shanghai Minimally Invasive Center, China. Statistical analyses were used to analyze relationship between CDH12 and tumor features. Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze patients' survival. Proliferation ability of CRC cells was tested by CCK-8 assay, and transwell assays were performed to detect migration and invasion ability. Western blot assay was performed to investigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) variants. We found that expression of CDH12 in tumor tissue was higher than in adjacent normal tissue. High expression of CDH12 was associated with tumor invasion depth and predicts poor prognosis of CRC patients. Ectopic/repressing expression of CDH12 increased/decreased the proliferation and migration ability of CRC cells. CDH12 is able to increase cancer cell migration and invasion via promoting EMT by targeting transcriptional factor Snail. These findings may conclude that CDH12 may act as a predictor in CRC patients' prognosis and an oncogene in CRC cell proliferation and migration. CDH12 may influence CRC cell progression through promoting EMT by targeting Snail. In addition, CDH12 is promoted by MCP1 through induction of MCPIP.

  9. Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Promoted Glioblastoma Progression and Stemness by Modulating IL-6 Expression in Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongze; Huang, Qiming; Chen, Heping; Lin, Zhiqin; Zhao, Meng; Jiang, Zhongli

    2017-01-01

    Background: Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 (IRF7) is associated with chronic inflammation initiated by the activation of microglia. However it remains poorly defined how IRF7 activates microglia to initiate inflammatory microenvironment, and thus promotes the growth and malignancy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This study investigated the role of IRF7 expression in microglia which increases GBM progression. Methods: We established stable human microglia (HMs) over-expressing IRF-7 or empty vector by lentiviral transduction and stable selection. These HM-IRF-7 cells were co-cultured with U87-MG to examine their influence on GBM, in terms of cell proliferation, apoptosis and stemness of U87-MG. By qRT-PCR and ELISA assays, the expression of key genes and secretion of inflammatory factors were identified in inflammatory signal pathway respectively. We also analyzed whether the expression of IRF7 and its target gene IL-6 correlated with PFS (progression-free survival) and OS (overall survival) in clinical samples by Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Results: HMs can be engineered to stably express high level of IFR7 with IRF7 lentivirus, and was found to promote U87-MG growth and inhibit its apoptosis in co-culture. Meanwhile, U87-MG seemed to show stem cell character with ALDH1 expression. These results may be related to IRF7 initiating IL-6 expression and secretion in both HM and U87-MG cells. The IRF7 and IL-6 were highly expressed in GBM tissues, and IL-6 secretion was high in GBM serums, both of which were significantly correlated with PFS and OS. Conclusions: The immune function of HMs was changed while it expressed IRF7 genes. The results demonstrated for the first time that IRF7 of microglia promoted GBM growth and stemness by mediating IL-6 expression, and revealed that IRF-7 and IL-6 were independent factors affecting the overall survival probability. PMID:28243325

  10. CD147 promotes melanoma progression through hypoxia-induced MMP2 activation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, W; Su, J; Wu, L; Yang, D; Long, T; Li, D; Kuang, Y; Li, J; Qi, M; Zhang, J; Chen, X

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia enhances MMP2 expression and the invasion and metastatic potential of melanoma cells. CD147 has been shown to induce MMP2 in multiple cancers. To investigate the role of CD147 in hypoxiainduced MMP2 activation, we performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining in 206 normal and melanoma tissue samples, and analyzed the correlation between HIF1α and CD147. ChIP (chromosome Immunoprecipitation) in melanoma cell lines supports that HIF1α directly binds to CD147 promoter. Moreover, we made a series of deletion mutants of CD147 promoter, and identified a conserved HIF1α binding site. Point mutation in this site significantly decreased CD147 response to hypoxia. Importantly, knocking down CD147 attenuates MMP2 response to hypoxia in melanoma cell lines. MMP2 could not be efficiently activated by hypoxia in CD147 depletion cells. ELISA data showed that MMP2 secretion was reduced in CD147 depletion cells than control under hypoxia condition. To verify the data from cell culture model, we performed in vivo mouse xenograft experiment. IHC staining showed reduced MMP2 level in CD147 depleted xenografts compared to the control group, with the HIF1α level being comparable. Our study demonstrates a novel pathway mediated by CD147 to promote the MMP2 activation induced by hypoxia, and helps to understand the interplay between hypoxia and melanoma progression.

  11. CD97 amplifies LPA receptor signaling and promotes thyroid cancer progression in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ward, Y; Lake, R; Martin, P L; Killian, K; Salerno, P; Wang, T; Meltzer, P; Merino, M; Cheng, S-y; Santoro, M; Garcia-Rostan, G; Kelly, K

    2013-05-30

    CD97, a member of the adhesion family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), complexes with and potentiates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor signaling to the downstream effector RHOA. We show here that CD97 was expressed in a majority of thyroid cancers but not normal thyroid epithelium and that the level of CD97 expression was further elevated with progression to poorly differentiated and undifferentiated carcinoma. Intratumoral progression also showed that CD97 expression correlates with invasiveness and dedifferentiation. To determine the functional role of CD97, we produced a transgenic model of thyroglobulin promoter-driven CD97 expression. Transgenic CD97 in combination with Thrb(PV), an established mouse model of thyroid follicular cell carcinogenesis, significantly increased the occurrence of vascular invasion and lung metastasis. Expression of transgenic CD97 in thyroid epithelium led to elevated ERK phosphorylation and increased numbers of Ki67+ cells in developing tumors. In addition, tumor cell cultures derived from CD97 transgenic as compared with non-transgenic mice demonstrated enhanced, constitutive and LPA-stimulated ERK activation. In human thyroid cancer cell lines, CD97 depletion reduced RHO-GTP and decreased LPA-stimulated invasion but not EGF-stimulated invasion, further suggesting that CD97 influences an LPA-associated mechanism of progression. Consistent with the above, CD97 expression in human thyroid cancers correlated with LPA receptor and markers of aggressiveness including Ki67 and pAKT. This study shows an autonomous effect of CD97 on thyroid cancer progression and supports the investigation of this GPCR as a therapeutic target for these cancers.

  12. Worldwide occurrences of arsenic in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D Kirk

    2002-01-01

    Numerous aquifers worldwide carry soluble arsenic at concentrations greater than the World Health Organization--and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency--recommended drinking water standard of 10 mg per liter. Sources include both natural (black shales, young sediments with low flushing rates, gold mineralization, and geothermal environments) and anthropogenic (mining activities, livestock feed additives, pesticides, and arsenic trioxide wastes and stockpiles). Increased solubility and mobility of arsenic is promoted by high pH (>8.5), competing oxyanions, and reducing conditions. In this Policy Forum, Nordstrom argues that human health risks from arsenic in ground water can be minimized by incorporating hydrogeochemical knowledge into water management decisions and by more careful monitoring for arsenic in geologically high-risk areas.

  13. Impact of early developmental arsenic exposure on promotor CpG-island methylation of genes involved in neuronal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Liborio; Jiménez, Verónica; García-Sepúlveda, Christian; Ceballos, Fátima; Delgado, Juan Manuel; Niño-Moreno, Perla; Doniz, Lesly; Saavedra-Alanís, Víctor; Castillo, Claudia G; Santoyo, Martha E; González-Amaro, Roberto; Jiménez-Capdeville, María E

    2011-04-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are crucial to regulate the expression of different genes required for neuronal plasticity. Neurotoxic substances such as arsenic, which induces cognitive deficits in exposed children before any other manifestation of toxicity, could interfere with the epigenetic modulation of neuronal gene expression required for learning and memory. This study assessed in Wistar rats the effects that developmental arsenic exposure had on DNA methylation patterns in hippocampus and frontal cortex. Animals were exposed to arsenic in drinking water (3 and 36ppm) from gestation until 4 months of age, and DNA methylation in brain cells was determined by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the promoter regions of reelin (RELN) and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) at 1, 2, 3 and 4 months of age. Immunoreactivity to 5 methyl-cytosine was significantly higher in the cortex and hippocampus of exposed animals compared to controls at 1 month, and DNA hypomethylation was observed the following months in the cortex at high arsenic exposure. Furthermore, we observed a significant increase in the non-methylated form of PP1 gene promoter at 2 and 3 months of age, either in cortex or hippocampus. In order to determine whether this exposure level is associated with memory deficits, a behavioral test was performed at the same age points, revealing progressive and dose-dependent deficits of fear memory. Our results demonstrate alterations of the methylation pattern of genes involved in neuronal plasticity in an animal model of memory deficit associated with arsenic exposure.

  14. FGF19 Contributes to Tumor Progression in Gastric Cancer by Promoting Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Daqi; Tian, Ruihua; Shi, Hailong; Chen, Xiangming; Liu, Wenzhi; Wei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Since patients are often diagnosed at a late stage, very few effective therapies are left in the arsenal. FGF19, as a hormone, has been reported to promote tumor growth in various types of cancer; however, its function in gastric cancer remains unknown. In the current study, we showed that FGF19 is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is associated with depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, and TNM stage. In addition, in vitro experiments demonstrated that FGF19 is able to enhance migration and invasion abilities of gastric cancer cells. Given its great potency in gastric cancer progression, FGF19 may be an effective target of treatment for advanced gastric cancer patients.

  15. Volcano collapse promoted by progressive strength reduction: New data from Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Keith, Terry E.C.; Kayen, Robert; Iverson, Neal R.; Iverson, Richard M.; Brien, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    Rock shear strength plays a fundamental role in volcano flank collapse, yet pertinent data from modern collapse surfaces are rare. Using samples collected from the inferred failure surface of the massive 1980 collapse of Mount St. Helens (MSH), we determined rock shear strength via laboratory tests designed to mimic conditions in the pre-collapse edifice. We observed that the 1980 failure shear surfaces formed primarily in pervasively shattered older dome rocks; failure was not localized in sloping volcanic strata or in weak, hydrothermally altered rocks. Our test results show that rock shear strength under large confining stresses is reduced ∼20% as a result of large quasi-static shear strain, as preceded the 1980 collapse of MSH. Using quasi-3D slope-stability modeling, we demonstrate that this mechanical weakening could have provoked edifice collapse, even in the absence of transiently elevated pore-fluid pressures or earthquake ground shaking. Progressive strength reduction could promote collapses at other volcanic edifices.

  16. Challenges and opportunities for promoting booster seat use: progressive dissemination of a high-threat message.

    PubMed

    Will, Kelli England; Dunaway, Krystall E; Kokorelis, Diane A; Sabo, Cynthia Shier; Lorek, Edward J

    2012-11-01

    Motivating parents to take certain safety precautions when traveling with their children remains challenging for advocates. Caregivers of booster-aged children are particularly difficult to reach because they do not consider their children to be of "safety-seat" age and have inherently low perceptions of vulnerability to crash injury. Unfortunately, most booster seat programs fail to adequately motivate their intended population because they are primarily informational in nature and rely on caregivers to seek out and attend to the information. In this article, interventions using threat appeal tactics and progressive dissemination methods are recommended to effectively target participation and perceptions of vulnerability among this population. Recent research on risk communication indicates that threat appeals are supported when they contain high threat and high efficacy components. Threat appeal tactics are particularly desirable when perception of vulnerability is low, as is the case with parents of booster-aged children. In addition to theoretical arguments for more aggressive intervention approaches, a case example is presented wherein such techniques were used to promote booster seat use. The intervention resulted in significant increases in knowledge, risk-reduction attitudes, sense of efficacy, and observed booster seat use. Through use of progressive dissemination methods, the intervention has reached an audience of 431,600 people and counting.

  17. AMOTL1 Promotes Breast Cancer Progression and Is Antagonized by Merlin1

    PubMed Central

    Couderc, Christophe; Boin, Alizée; Fuhrmann, Laetitia; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Mandati, Vinay; Kieffer, Yann; Mechta-Grigoriou, Fatima; Del Maestro, Laurence; Chavrier, Philippe; Vallerand, David; Brito, Isabelle; Dubois, Thierry; De Koning, Leanne; Bouvard, Daniel; Louvard, Daniel; Gautreau, Alexis; Lallemand, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo signaling network is a key regulator of cell fate. In the recent years, it was shown that its implication in cancer goes well beyond the sole role of YAP transcriptional activity and its regulation by the canonical MST/LATS kinase cascade. Here we show that the motin family member AMOTL1 is an important effector of Hippo signaling in breast cancer. AMOTL1 connects Hippo signaling to tumor cell aggressiveness. We show that both canonical and noncanonical Hippo signaling modulates AMOTL1 levels. The tumor suppressor Merlin triggers AMOTL1 proteasomal degradation mediated by the NEDD family of ubiquitin ligases through direct interaction. In parallel, YAP stimulates AMOTL1 expression. The loss of Merlin expression and the induction of Yap activity that are frequently observed in breast cancers thus result in elevated AMOTL1 levels. AMOTL1 expression is sufficient to trigger tumor cell migration and stimulates proliferation by activating c-Src. In a large cohort of human breast tumors, we show that AMOTL1 protein levels are upregulated during cancer progression and that, importantly, the expression of AMOTL1 in lymph node metastasis appears predictive of the risk of relapse. Hence we uncover an important mechanism by which Hippo signaling promotes breast cancer progression by modulating the expression of AMOTL1. PMID:26806348

  18. MVP-mediated exosomal sorting of miR-193a promotes colon cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yun; Ren, Yi; Hu, Xin; Mu, Jingyao; Samykutty, Abhilash; Zhuang, Xiaoying; Deng, Zhongbin; Kumar, Anil; Zhang, Lifeng; Merchant, Michael L.; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald M.; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are emerging mediators of intercellular communication; whether the release of exosomes has an effect on the exosome donor cells in addition to the recipient cells has not been investigated to any extent. Here, we examine different exosomal miRNA expression profiles in primary mouse colon tumour, liver metastasis of colon cancer and naive colon tissues. In more advanced disease, higher levels of tumour suppressor miRNAs are encapsulated in the exosomes. miR-193a interacts with major vault protein (MVP). Knockout of MVP leads to miR-193a accumulation in the exosomal donor cells instead of exosomes, inhibiting tumour progression. Furthermore, miR-193a causes cell cycle G1 arrest and cell proliferation repression through targeting of Caprin1, which upregulates Ccnd2 and c-Myc. Human colon cancer patients with more advanced disease show higher levels of circulating exosomal miR-193a. In summary, our data demonstrate that MVP-mediated selective sorting of tumour suppressor miRNA into exosomes promotes tumour progression. PMID:28211508

  19. Promoter methylation of PCDH10 by HOTAIR regulates the progression of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Kim, Won Kyu; Yun, Seongju; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Chan Hyuk; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Hogeun; Lee, Sang Kil

    2016-01-01

    HOTAIR, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), plays a crucial role in tumor initiation and metastasis by interacting with the PRC2 complex and the modulation of its target genes. The role of HOTAIR in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) is remains unclear. Herein we investigate the mechanism of HOTAIR in the genesis and promotion of GISTs. The expression of HOTAIR was found to be higher in surgically resected high-risk GISTs than that in low- and intermediate-risk GISTs. Using GIST-T1 and GIST882 cells, we demonstrated that HOTAIR repressed apoptosis, was associated with cell cycle progression, and controlled the invasion and migration of GIST cells. Using a gene expression microarray and lists of HOTAIR-associated candidate genes, we suggested that protocadherin 10 (PCDH10) is a key molecule. PCDH10 expression was significantly decreased in GIST-T1 and GIST882 cells, possibly as a consequence of hypermethylation. We observed that HOTAIR induced PCDH10 methylation in a SUZ12-dependent manner. In this study, we found that the malignant character of GISTs was initiated and amplified by PCDH10 in a process regulated by HOTAIR. In summary, our findings imply that PCDH10 and HOTAIR may be useful markers of disease progression and therapeutic targets. PMID:27659532

  20. Neural protein gamma-synuclein interacting with androgen receptor promotes human prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gamma-synuclein (SNCG) has previously been demonstrated to be significantly correlated with metastatic malignancies; however, in-depth investigation of SNCG in prostate cancer is still lacking. In the present study, we evaluated the role of SNCG in prostate cancer progression and explored the underlying mechanisms. Methods First, alteration of SNCG expression in LNCaP cell line to test the ability of SNCG on cellular properties in vitro and vivo whenever exposing with androgen or not. Subsequently, the Dual-luciferase reporter assays were performed to evaluate whether the role of SNCG in LNCaP is through AR signaling. Last, the association between SNCG and prostate cancer progression was assessed immunohistochemically using a series of human prostate tissues. Results Silencing SNCG by siRNA in LNCaP cells contributes to the inhibition of cellular proliferation, the induction of cell-cycle arrest at the G1 phase, the suppression of cellular migration and invasion in vitro, as well as the decrease of tumor growth in vivo with the notable exception of castrated mice. Subsequently, mechanistic studies indicated that SNCG is a novel androgen receptor (AR) coactivator. It interacts with AR and promotes prostate cancer cellular growth and proliferation by activating AR transcription in an androgen-dependent manner. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that SNCG was almost undetectable in benign or androgen-independent tissues prostate lesions. The high expression of SNCG is correlated with peripheral and lymph node invasion. Conclusions Our data suggest that SNCG may serve as a biomarker for predicting human prostate cancer progression and metastasis. It also may become as a novel target for biomedical therapy in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23231703

  1. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    PubMed

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer.

  2. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers and the general public. WHO has developed global and regional oral health databanks for surveillance, and international projects have designed oral health indicators for use in oral health information systems for assessing the quality of oral health care and surveillance systems. Modern oral health information systems are being developed within the framework of the WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of noncommunicable, chronic disease, and data stored in the WHO Global InfoBase may allow advanced health systems research. Sound knowledge about progress made in prevention of oral and chronic disease and in health promotion may assist countries to implement effective public health programmes to the benefit of the poor and disadvantaged population groups worldwide. PMID:16211160

  3. O-GlcNAcylation of histone deacetylases 1 in hepatocellular carcinoma promotes cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guizhou; Tao, Tao; Zhang, Dongmei; Liu, Xiaojuan; Qiu, Huiyuan; Han, LiJian; Xu, Zhiwei; Xiao, Ying; Cheng, Chun; Shen, Aiguo

    2016-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignant tumor originating in the liver. Previous studies have indicated that O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1) play important roles in the pathogenesis of HCC. In the present study, we investigated the physical link between OGT and HDAC1. The O-GlcNAcylation of HDAC1 is overexpressed in HCC. We found that HDAC1 has two major sites of O-GlcNAcylation in its histone deacetylase domain. HDAC1 O-GlcNAcylation increases the activated phosphorylation of HDAC1, which enhances its enzyme activity. HDAC1 O-GlcNAc mutants promote the p21 transcription regulation through affecting the acetylation levels of histones from chromosome, and then influence the proliferation of HCC cells. We also found that mutants of O-GlcNAcylation site of HDAC1 affect invasion and migration of HepG2 cells. E-cadherin level is highly up-regulated in HDAC1 O-GlcNAc mutant-treated liver cancer cells, which inhibit the occurrence and development of HCC. Our findings suggest that OGT promotes the O-GlcNAc modification of HDAC1in the development of HCC. Therefore, inhibiting O-GlcNAcylation of HDAC1 may repress the progression of HCC.

  4. α-Catulin downregulates E-cadherin and promotes melanoma progression and invasion.

    PubMed

    Kreiseder, Birgit; Orel, Lukas; Bujnow, Constantin; Buschek, Stefan; Pflueger, Maren; Schuett, Wolfgang; Hundsberger, Harald; de Martin, Rainer; Wiesner, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Metastasis is associated with poor prognosis for melanoma responsible for about 90% of skin cancer-related mortality. To metastasize, melanoma cells must escape keratinocyte control, invade across the basement membrane and survive in the dermis by resisting apoptosis before they can intravasate into the circulation. α-Catulin (CTNNAL1) is a cytoplasmic molecule that integrates the crosstalk between nuclear factor-kappa B and Rho signaling pathways, binds to β-catenin and increases the level of both α-catenin and β-catenin and therefore has potential effects on inflammation, apoptosis and cytoskeletal reorganization. Here, we show that α-catulin is highly expressed in melanoma cells. Expression of α-catulin promoted melanoma progression and occurred concomitantly with the downregulation of E-cadherin and the upregulation of expression of mesenchymal genes such as N-cadherin, Snail/Slug and the matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. Knockdown of α-catulin promoted adhesion to and inhibited migration away from keratinocytes in an E-cadherin-dependent manner and decreased the transmigration through a keratinocyte monolayer, as well as in Transwell assays using collagens, laminin and fibronectin coating. Moreover, knockdown promoted homotypic spheroid formation and concomitantly increased E-cadherin expression along with downregulation of transcription factors implicated in its repression (Snail/Slug, Twist and ZEB). Consistent with the molecular changes, α-catulin provoked invasion of melanoma cells in a three-dimensional culture assay by the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 and the activation of ROCK/Rho. As such, α-catulin may represent a key driver of the metastatic process, implicating potential for therapeutic interference.

  5. Arsenic surveillance program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background information about arsenic is presented including forms, common sources, and clinical symptoms of arsenic exposure. The purpose of the Arsenic Surveillance Program and LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Arsenic Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  6. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology is described. The article provides a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms of arsenic redox and methylation cycles as well as other arsenic biotransformations. It also discusses the implications of arsenic biotransformation in environmental remediation and food safety, with particular emphasis on groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenic accumulation in rice. PMID:26778863

  7. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology is described. The article provides a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms of arsenic redox and methylation cycles as well as other arsenic biotransformations. It also discusses the implications of arsenic biotransformation in environmental remediation and food safety, with particular emphasis on groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenic accumulation in rice.

  8. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology is described. The article provides a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms of arsenic redox and methylation cycles as well as other arsenic biotransformations. It also discusses the implications of arsenic biotransformation in environmental remediation and food safety, with particular emphasis on groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenic accumulation in rice.

  9. Transplacental arsenic carcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, Michael P. Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2007-08-01

    Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show that a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from days 8 to 18 of gestation, and the offspring were observed for up to 2 years. The doses used in all these studies were well tolerated by both the dam and offspring. In C3H mice, two separate studies show male offspring exposed to arsenic in utero developed liver carcinoma and adrenal cortical adenoma in a dose-related fashion during adulthood. Prenatally exposed female C3H offspring show dose-related increases in ovarian tumors and lung carcinoma and in proliferative lesions (tumors plus preneoplastic hyperplasia) of the uterus and oviduct. In addition, prenatal arsenic plus postnatal exposure to the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in C3H mice produces excess lung tumors in both sexes and liver tumors in females. Male CD1 mice treated with arsenic in utero develop tumors of the liver and adrenal and renal hyperplasia while females develop tumors of urogenital system, ovary, uterus and adrenal and hyperplasia of the oviduct. Additional postnatal treatment with diethylstilbestrol or tamoxifen after prenatal arsenic in CD1 mice induces urinary bladder transitional cell proliferative lesions, including carcinoma and papilloma, and enhances the carcinogenic response in the liver of both sexes. Overall this model has provided convincing evidence that arsenic is a transplacental carcinogen in mice with the ability to target tissues of potential human relevance, such as the urinary bladder, lung and liver. Transplacental carcinogenesis clearly occurs with other agents in humans

  10. THE CELLUAR METABOLISM OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the methylation of arsenic produces intermediates and terminal products that exceed inorganic arsenic in potency as enzyme inhibitors, cytotoxins, and genotoxins, the methylation of arsenic is properly regarded as an activation process. The methylation of arsenic is an e...

  11. Heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter microsatellite polymorphism is associated with progressive atherosclerosis and incident cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Pechlaner, Raimund; Willeit, Peter; Summerer, Monika; Santer, Peter; Egger, Georg; Kronenberg, Florian; Demetz, Egon; Weiss, Günter; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Witztum, Joseph L.; Willeit, Karin; Iglseder, Bernhard; Paulweber, Bernhard; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Haun, Margot; Meisinger, Christa; Gieger, Christian; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Peters, Annette; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts cytoprotective effects in response to various cellular stressors. A variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter region has previously been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD). We examined this association prospectively in the general population. Approach and Results Incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death was registered between 1995 and 2010 in 812 participants of the Bruneck Study aged 45 to 84 years (49.4% males). Carotid atherosclerosis progression was quantified by high-resolution ultrasound. HO-1 VNTR length was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Subjects with ≥32 tandem repeats on both HO-1 alleles compared to the rest of the population (recessive trait) featured substantially increased CVD risk (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 5.45 (2.39, 12.42); P<0.0001), enhanced atherosclerosis progression (median difference in atherosclerosis score [interquartile range], 2.1 [0.8, 5.6] vs. 0.0 [0.0, 2.2] mm; P=0.0012), and a trend towards higher levels of oxidised phospholipids on apoB-100 (median OxPL/apoB level [interquartile range], 11364 [4160, 18330] vs. 4844 [3174, 12284] relative light units; P=0.0554). Increased CVD risk in those homozygous for ≥32 repeats was also detected in a pooled analysis of 7848 participants of the Bruneck, SAPHIR, and KORA prospective studies (HR [95% CI], 3.26 [1.50, 7.33]; P=0.0043). Conclusions This study found a strong association between the HO-1 VNTR polymorphism and CVD risk confined to subjects with a high number of repeats on both HO-1 alleles, and provides evidence for accelerated atherogenesis and decreased anti-oxidant defence in this vascular high-risk group. PMID:25359861

  12. Enhanced heme function and mitochondrial respiration promote the progression of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Cadinu, Daniela; Alam, Md Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M; Sullivan, Laura A; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair of cell lines representing normal and NSCLC cells developed from the same patient. We found that the rates of oxygen consumption and heme biosynthesis were intensified in NSCLC cells. Additionally, the NSCLC cells exhibited substantially increased levels in an array of proteins promoting heme synthesis, uptake and function. These proteins include the rate-limiting heme biosynthetic enzyme ALAS, transporter proteins HRG1 and HCP1 that are involved in heme uptake, and various types of oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins such as cytoglobin and cytochromes. Several types of human tumor xenografts also displayed increased levels of such proteins. Furthermore, we found that lowering heme biosynthesis and uptake, like lowering mitochondrial respiration, effectively reduced oxygen consumption, cancer cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. In contrast, lowering heme degradation does not have an effect on lung cancer cells. These results show that increased heme flux and function are a key feature of NSCLC cells. Further, increased generation and supply of heme and oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins in cancer cells will lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy production by mitochondrial respiration, which would fuel cancer cell proliferation and progression. The results show that inhibiting heme and respiratory function can effectively arrest the progression of lung cancer cells. Hence, understanding heme function can positively impact on research in lung cancer

  13. SOX4 Promotes Progression in OLP-Associated Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Cui, Li; Huang, Junwei; Ji, Eoon Hye; Chen, Wei; Messadi, Diana; Hu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a multistep process that involves in both genetic alterations and epigenetic modifications. Previous studies suggest SOX4 might function as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor in different types of cancers. However, whether SOX4 involves in promoting the progression of oral precancer to cancer is unknown. Methods: Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to identify the proteins that may be differentially expressed between oral lichen planus (OLP) and OLP-associated OSCC (OLP-OSCC) formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting were performed to evaluate SOX4 expression between OLP and OLP-OSCC tissues and among oral cancer cell lines and normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOKs). SOX4 siRNA was used to knock down the expression of SOX4 in UM1 oral cancer cells. MTT, cell counting, migration and Matrigel invasion assays were utilized to examine the effect of SOX4 down-regulation on proliferation, migration and invasion capacity of UM1 cells. Results: LC-MS/MS analysis showed that 88 proteins including SOX4 were only identified in OLP-OSCC FFPE tissues when compared to OLP FFPE tissues. IHC confirmed that SOX4 expression was significantly higher in OLP-OSCC than OLP and Western blot analysis indicated that SOX4 was over-expressed in UM1/UM2 cells when compared to NHOKs. Knockdown of SOX4 significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of UM1 cells (P<0.01). Conclusions: Our study indicated that SOX4 is significantly upregulated in OLP-OSCC versus OLP tissues. In addition, down-regulation of SOX4 led to significantly reduced proliferation, migration and invasion capability of oral cancer cells. These findings suggest that SOX4 might be actively involved in the progression of OLP to OSCC. PMID:27471569

  14. Promoter-Targeted Histone Acetylation of Chromatinized Parvoviral Genome Is Essential for the Progress of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mäntylä, Elina; Salokas, Kari; Oittinen, Mikko; Aho, Vesa; Mäntysaari, Pekka; Palmujoki, Lassi; Kalliolinna, Olli; Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Niskanen, Einari A.; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The association of host histones with parvoviral DNA is poorly understood. We analyzed the chromatinization and histone acetylation of canine parvovirus DNA during infection by confocal imaging and in situ proximity ligation assay combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing. We found that during late infection, parvovirus replication bodies were rich in histones bearing modifications characteristic of transcriptionally active chromatin, i.e., histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac). H3K27ac, in particular, was located in close proximity to the viral DNA-binding protein NS1. Importantly, our results show for the first time that in the chromatinized parvoviral genome, the two viral promoters in particular were rich in H3K27ac. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors efficiently interfered with the expression of viral proteins and infection progress. Altogether, our data suggest that the acetylation of histones on parvoviral DNA is essential for viral gene expression and the completion of the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Viral DNA introduced into cell nuclei is exposed to cellular responses to foreign DNA, including chromatinization and epigenetic silencing, both of which determine the outcome of infection. How the incoming parvovirus resists cellular epigenetic downregulation of its genes is not understood. Here, the critical role of epigenetic modifications in the regulation of parvovirus infection was demonstrated. We showed for the first time that a successful parvovirus infection is characterized by the deposition of nucleosomes with active histone acetylation on the viral promoter areas. The results provide new insights into the regulation of parvoviral gene expression, which is an important aspect of the development of parvovirus-based virotherapy. PMID:26842481

  15. G beta gamma signaling reduces intracellular cAMP to promote meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gill, Arvind; Hammes, Stephen R

    2007-02-01

    In nearly every vertebrate species, elevated intracellular cAMP maintains oocytes in prophase I of meiosis. Prior to ovulation, gonadotropins trigger various intra-ovarian processes, including the breakdown of gap junctions, the activation of EGF receptors, and the secretion of steroids. These events in turn decrease intracellular cAMP levels in select oocytes to allow meiotic progression, or maturation, to resume. Studies suggest that cAMP levels are kept elevated in resting oocytes by constitutive G protein signaling, and that the drop in intracellular cAMP that accompanies maturation may be due in part to attenuation of this inhibitory G protein-mediated signaling. Interestingly, one of these G protein regulators of meiotic arrest is the Galpha(s) protein, which stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise intracellular cAMP in two important animal models of oocyte development: Xenopus leavis frogs and mice. In addition to G(alpha)(s), constitutive Gbetagamma activity similarly stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise cAMP and prevent maturation in Xenopus oocytes; however, the role of Gbetagamma in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes has not been examined. Here we show that Gbetagamma does not contribute to the maintenance of murine oocyte meiotic arrest. In fact, contrary to observations in frog oocytes, Gbetagamma signaling in mouse oocytes reduces cAMP and promotes oocyte maturation, suggesting that Gbetagamma might in fact play a positive role in promoting oocyte maturation. These observations emphasize that, while many general concepts and components of meiotic regulation are conserved from frogs to mice, specific differences exist that may lead to important insights regarding ovarian development in vertebrates.

  16. Chem I Supplement: Arsenic and Old Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarquis, Mickey

    1979-01-01

    Describes the history of arsenic, the properties of arsenic, production and uses of arsenicals, arsenic in the environment; toxic levels of arsenic, arsenic in the human body, and the Marsh Test. (BT)

  17. Activity of the AtMRP3 promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum plants is increased by cadmium, nickel, arsenic, cobalt and lead but not by zinc and iron.

    PubMed

    Zientara, Katarzyna; Wawrzyńska, Anna; Lukomska, Jolanta; López-Moya, José Rafael; Liszewska, Frantz; Assunção, Ana G L; Aarts, Mark G M; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2009-02-05

    Characterization of the function, regulation and metal-specificity of metal transporters is one of the basic steps needed for the understanding of transport and accumulation of toxic metals and metalloids by plants. In this work GUS was used as a reporter for monitoring the activity of the promoter of the AtMRP3 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana, a gene encoding an ABC-transporter, expression of which is induced by heavy metals. The AtMRP3 promoter-GUS fusion expression cassette was introduced into the genome of two model plants, A. thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. The promoter induces GUS activity in the roots as well as in the shoots upon metal exposure. Similar responses of the AtMRP3 promoter to the presence of the selected metals was observed in both plant species. Cadmium, nickel, arsenic, cobalt and lead strongly activated the transcription of the reporter gene, while zinc and iron had no impact. The AtMRP3 promoter thus seems to be a useful new tool in designing plants that can be used for biomonitoring of environmental contaminations.

  18. FoxD3 deficiency promotes breast cancer progression by induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tian-Li; Zhao, Hong-Meng; Li, Yue; Chen, Ao-Xiang; Sun, Xuan; Ge, Jie

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • FOXD3 is down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. • FOXD3 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. • FoxD3 deficiency induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition. - Abstract: The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3) plays an important role in the development of neural crest and gastric cancer cells. However, the function and mechanisms of FOXD3 in the breast tumorigenesis and progression is still limited. Here, we report that FOXD3 is a tumor suppressor of breast cancer tumorigenicity and aggressiveness. We found that FOXD3 is down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. Patients with low FOXD3 expression have a poor outcome. Depletion of FOXD3 expression promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, whereas overexpression of FOXD3 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, depletion of FOXD3 is linked to epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like phenotype. Our results indicate FOXD3 exhibits tumor suppressive activity and may be useful for breast therapy.

  19. Tuberatolide B Suppresses Cancer Progression by Promoting ROS-Mediated Inhibition of STAT3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youn Kyung; Kim, Junseong; Lee, Kang Min; Choi, Yu-Jeong; Ye, Bo-Ram; Kim, Min-Sun; Ko, Seong-Gyu; Lee, Seung-Hong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Heo, Soo-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Tuberatolide B (TTB, C27H34O4) is a diastereomeric meroterpenoid isolated from the Korean marine algae Sargassum macrocarpum. However, the anticancer effects of TTB remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that TTB inhibits tumor growth in breast, lung, colon, prostate, and cervical cancer cells. To examine the mechanism by which TTB suppresses cell growth, we determined the effect of TTB on apoptosis, ROS generation, DNA damage, and signal transduction. TTB induced ROS production in MDA-MB-231, A549, and HCT116 cells. Moreover, TTB enhanced DNA damage by inducing γH2AX foci formation and the phosphorylation of DNA damage-related proteins such as Chk2 and H2AX. Furthermore, TTB selectively inhibited STAT3 activation, which resulted in a reduction in cyclin D1, MMP-9, survivin, VEGF, and IL-6. In addition, TTB-induced ROS generation caused STAT3 inhibition, DNA damage, and apoptotic cell death. Therefore, TTB suppresses cancer progression by promoting ROS-mediated inhibition of STAT3 signaling, suggesting that TTB is useful for the treatment of cancer. PMID:28245605

  20. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression through a MYCN independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mandriota, Stefano J; Valentijn, Linda J; Lesne, Laurence; Betts, David R; Marino, Denis; Boudal-Khoshbeen, Mary; London, Wendy B; Rougemont, Anne-Laure; Attiyeh, Edward F; Maris, John M; Hogarty, Michael D; Koster, Jan; Molenaar, Jan J; Versteeg, Rogier; Ansari, Marc; Gumy-Pause, Fabienne

    2015-07-30

    Neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer with highly heterogeneous biology and clinical behavior, is characterized by genomic aberrations including amplification of MYCN. Hemizygous deletion of chromosome 11q is a well-established, independent marker of poor prognosis. While 11q22-q23 is the most frequently deleted region, the neuroblastoma tumor suppressor in this region remains to be identified. Chromosome bands 11q22-q23 contain ATM, a cell cycle checkpoint kinase and tumor suppressor playing a pivotal role in the DNA damage response. Here, we report that haploinsufficiency of ATM in neuroblastoma correlates with lower ATM expression, event-free survival, and overall survival. ATM loss occurs in high stage neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification. In SK-N-SH, CLB-Ga and GI-ME-N human neuroblastoma cells, stable ATM silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression in soft agar assays, and in subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. This effect is dependent on the extent of ATM silencing and does not appear to involve MYCN. Our findings identify ATM as a potential haploinsufficient neuroblastoma tumor suppressor, whose inactivation mirrors the increased aggressiveness associated with 11q deletion in neuroblastoma.

  1. Interleukin-17 Could Promote Breast Cancer Progression at Several Stages of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Welte, Thomas; Zhang, Xiang H.-F.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic disease accounts for more than 90% of deaths from breast cancer. Yet the factors that trigger metastasis, often years after primary tumor removal, are not understood well. Recently the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin- (IL-) 17 family has been associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Here we review current literature on the pathogenic mechanisms driven by IL-17 during breast cancer progression and connect these findings to metastasis. These include (1) direct effects of IL-17 on tumor cells promoting tumor cell survival and invasiveness, (2) regulation of tumor angiogenesis, and (3) interaction with myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to inhibit antitumor immune response and collaborate at the distant metastatic site. Furthermore, IL-17 might also be a culprit in bone destruction caused by late stage bone metastasis. Interestingly, in addition to these potential prometastasis functions, there is also evidence for an opposite, antitumor role of IL-17 during cancer therapies. We hypothesize that these contradictory roles may be due to chronic, imbalanced versus acute transient nature of the immune reactions, as well as differences in the cells that interact with IL-17+ cells under different circumstances. PMID:26783383

  2. Kindlin-2 in pancreatic stellate cells promotes the progression of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naoki; Masamune, Atsushi; Hamada, Shin; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrosis associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Kindlin-2 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates the activation of integrins. This study aimed to clarify the role of kindlin-2 in PSCs in pancreatic cancer. Kindlin-2 expression in 79 resected pancreatic cancer tissues was examined by immunohistochemical staining. Kindlin-2-knockdown immortalized human PSCs were established using small interfering RNA. Pancreatic cancer cells were treated with conditioned media of PSCs, and the cell proliferation and migration were examined. SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into nude mice alone or with PSCs and the size of the tumors was monitored. Kindlin-2 expression was observed in PDAC and the peritumoral stroma. Stromal kindlin-2 expression was associated with shorter recurrence-free survival time after R0 resection. Knockdown of kindlin-2 resulted in decreased proliferation, migration, and cytokine expression in PSCs. The PSC-induced proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells were suppressed by kindlin-2 knockdown in PSCs. In vivo, co-injection of PSCs increased the size of the tumors, but this effect was abolished by kindlin-2 knockdown in PSCs. In conclusion, kindlin-2 in PSCs promoted the progression of pancreatic cancer.

  3. The HIF/PHF8/AR axis promotes prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Tong, D; Liu, Q; Liu, G; Yuan, W; Wang, L; Guo, Y; Lan, W; Zhang, D; Dong, S; Wang, Y; Xiao, H; Mu, J; Mao, C; Wong, J; Jiang, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies provide strong evidence that the androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway remains active in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate that plant homeo domain finger protein 8 (PHF8 )interacts with and functions as an essential histone demethylase activity-dependent AR coactivator. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the expression of PHF8 is induced by hypoxia in various prostate cancer cell lines. Knockdown of either hypoxia-inducible factor HIF2α or HIF1α almost completely abolished hypoxia-induced PHF8 expression. Importantly, we observed that PHF8 is highly expressed in clinical androgen deprived prostate cancer samples and expression of PHF8 correlates with increased levels of HIF1α and HIF2α. Moreover, elevated PHF8 is associated with higher grade prostate cancers and unfavorable outcomes. Our findings support a working model in which hypoxia in castrated prostate cancer activates HIF transcription factors which then induces PHF8 expression. The elevated PHF8 in turn promotes the AR signaling pathway and prostate cancer progression. Therefore, the HIF/PHF8/AR axis could serve as a potential biomarker for CRPC and is also a promising therapeutic target in combating CRPC. PMID:27991916

  4. Long Noncoding RNA PVT1 Promotes Melanoma Progression Via Endogenous Sponging MiR-26b.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Juan; Ding, Hong-Wei; Ma, Guo-An

    2017-04-12

    Melanoma is an extremely aggressive and high mortality skin malignant tumor, and various long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs)have been reported to be associated with the oncogenesis of melanoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential roles of lncRNA PVT1 in melanoma progression and to explore the possible mechanisms. A total of 35 patients who were diagnosed as malignant melanoma were enrolled in this study. Expression of PVT1 was significantly up-regulated in melanoma tissue and associated with poor prognosis. Loss-of-function experiments showed that PVT1 knock-down markedly suppressed the proliferation activity, induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, and enhanced the apoptosis of melanoma cell lines. Bioinformatics analysis and dual-luciferase reporter assay revealed that PVT1 directly bound to miR-26b, which had been verified as a tumor suppressor in melanoma. Moreover, further functional rescue experiments revealed that PVT1 knock-down could observably reverse the tumor-promoting role of miR-26b inhibitor. Overall, our study demonstrates the oncogenic role of PVT1 as a miR-26b sponge, possibly providing a novel therapeutic target for melanoma.

  5. MiR-217 promotes cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma progression by targeting PTRF

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ming; Zhang, Mingzi; Long, Fei; Yu, Nanze; Zeng, Ang; Wang, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidences have suggested that microRNAs (miRNAs) act a critical role in tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. Deregulated expression of miR-217 has been identified in various tumors. However, the expression and role of miR-217 in the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) remain unclear. In our study, we showed that miR-217 expression was upregulated in the cSCC tissues compared to adjacent non-tumor samples. We also demonstrated that miR-217 expression was upregualted in the cSCCcSCC cell lines. Overexpression of miR-217 promoted cSCCcSCC cell growth, cell cycle and invasion. We identified Polymerase I and Transcript Release Factor (PTRF) as a direct target gene of miR-217 in the SCC13 cell. In addition, PTRF expression was downregulated in the cSCCcSCC tissues. Moreover, we demonstrated that there was a significant inverse correlation between miR-217 and PTRF expression in the cSCCcSCC. Furthermore, overexpression of PTRF could rescue miR-217’s oncogenic effect on cSCC. Therefore, these results suggested that upregulation of miR-217 could contribute to development of cSCCcSCC through targeting PTRF. PMID:28337292

  6. Prostaglandin E2 promotes tumor progression by inducing myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K; Fulton, Amy M; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2007-05-01

    A causative relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer has been postulated for many years, and clinical observations and laboratory experiments support the hypothesis that inflammation contributes to tumor onset and progression. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the relationship are not known. We recently reported that the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1beta, induces the accumulation and retention of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which are commonly found in many patients and experimental animals with cancer and are potent suppressors of adaptive and innate immunity. This finding led us to hypothesize that inflammation leads to cancer through the induction of MDSC, which inhibit immunosurveillance and thereby allow the unchecked persistence and proliferation of premalignant and malignant cells. We now report that host MDSC have receptors for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and that E-prostanoid receptor agonists, including PGE2, induce the differentiation of Gr1(+)CD11b(+) MDSC from bone marrow stem cells, whereas receptor antagonists block differentiation. BALB/c EP2 knockout mice inoculated with the spontaneously metastatic BALB/c-derived 4T1 mammary carcinoma have delayed tumor growth and reduced numbers of MDSC relative to wild-type mice, suggesting that PGE2 partially mediates MDSC induction through the EP2 receptor. Treatment of 4T1-tumor-bearing wild-type mice with the cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor, SC58236, delays primary tumor growth and reduces MDSC accumulation, further showing that PGE2 induces MDSC and providing a therapeutic approach for reducing this tumor-promoting cell population.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells promote colorectal cancer progression through AMPK/mTOR-mediated NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Bing; Liu, Yang; Wang, Gui-Hua; Xu, Xiao; Cai, Yang; Wang, Hong-Yi; Li, Yan-Qi; Meng, Hong-Fang; Dai, Fu; Jin, Ji-De

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exert a tumor-promoting effect in a variety of human cancers. This study was designed to identify the molecular mechanisms related to the tumor-promoting effect of MSCs in colorectal cancer. In vitro analysis of colorectal cancer cell lines cultured in MSC conditioned media (MSC-CM) showed that MSC-CM significantly promoted the progression of the cancer cells by enhancing cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. The tumorigenic effect of MSC-CM was attributed to altered expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and inhibition of apoptosis. Furthermore, MSC-CM induced high level expression of a number of pluripotency factors in the cancer cells. ELISAs revealed MSC-CM contained higher levels of IL-6 and IL-8, which are associated with the progression of cancer. Moreover, MSC-CM downregulated AMPK mRNA and protein phosphorylation, but upregulated mTOR mRNA and protein phosphorylation. The NF-κB pathway was activated after addition of MSC-CM. An in vivo model in Balb/C mice confirmed the ability of MSC-CM to promote the invasion and proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. This study indicates that MSCs promote the progression of colorectal cancer via AMPK/mTOR-mediated NF-κB activation. PMID:26892992

  8. The ecology of arsenic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid whose name conjures up images of murder. Nonetheless, certain prokaryotes use arsenic oxyanions for energy generation, either by oxidizing arsenite or by respiring arsenate. These microbes are phylogenetically diverse and occur in a wide range of habitats. Arsenic cycling may take place in the absence of oxygen and can contribute to organic matter oxidation. In aquifers, these microbial reactions may mobilize arsenic from the solid to the aqueous phase, resulting in contaminated drinking water. Here we review what is known about arsenic-metabolizing bacteria and their potential impact on speciation and mobilization of arsenic in nature.

  9. CB-08KIF3A IS ESSENTIAL FOR CILIOGENESIS, CILIA FUNCTION AND PROMOTES GLIOBLASTOMA PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Hoang-Minh, Lan; Deleyrolle, Loic; Ugartemendia, George; Breunig, Joshua; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Reynolds, Brent; Sarkisian, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent findings that cilia transduce diverse signaling pathways affecting cell proliferation, migration and survival, little is known about the influence of cilia or cilia-associated proteins in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We recently showed that primary cilia project from subsets of cells in GBM patient biopsies and derived cell lines. To determine if cilia contribute to GBM growth, we blocked ciliogenesis using a lentivirus expressing a dominant negative form of KIF3A, an essential ciliogenesis protein. We generated stable GBM cell lines (L0 and S3; representing different molecular subclasses) whereby dnKIF3A+ cells exhibited virtual complete loss of cilia compared to controls (confirmed by immunostaining and EM). Canonically, secreted Sonic hedgehog (SHH) ligand binds and activates receptor signaling cascades (e.g., smoothened (SMO)) within cilia to promote normal cell proliferation and tumor cell growth in specific developmental and pathological contexts, respectively. To examine the role of SHH in GBM proliferation, we exposed control and dnKIF3A+ L0 and S3 cells to saline or recombinant SHH. We found the number of L0 control cells significantly increased after SHH compared to saline, an effect blocked by pretreatment with cyclopamine (SMO inhibitor). However, SHH did not increase the number of L0 dnKIF3A+ cells. Interestingly, SHH exposure had no effect on S3 control cell numbers, despite observations that SHH signaling components (SMO and Gli3) were recruited to their cilia in response to SHH. This suggests GBM cilia are SHH-responsive but the downstream consequences of ciliary signaling may differ between cell lines. Notably, mice intracranially xenografted with L0 cells expressing dnKIF3A survived significantly longer than mice receiving control cells, and retained the loss of cilia phenotype in the tumors. Collectively, these data suggest KIF3A promotes GBM tumor progression, but the extent to which the effects are mediated by cilia and the

  10. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  11. A novel biomarker C6orf106 promotes the malignant progression of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Xiupeng; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Liang; Fan, Chuifeng; Xu, Hongtao; Miao, Yuan; Wang, Enhua

    2015-09-01

    C6orf106 (chromosome 6 open reading frame 106) is a recently discovered protein encoded by the 6th chromosome. Though many proteins encoded by chromosome 6 are reportedly related to cancer, schizophrenia, autoimmunity and many other diseases, the function of C6orf106 was not well demonstrated so far. As measured by immunohistochemical staining, C6orf106 was positive in normal breast duct myoepithelial cells (92.31 %, 72/78), but negative in normal breast duct glandular epithelial cells (3.85 %, 3/78). In breast ductal carcinoma in situ, C6orf106 showed weakly or moderately positive (77.97 %, 46/59), but it was significantly strongly positive in invasive ductal carcinoma (79.57 %, 148/186). The expression intensity of C6orf106 seemed increased significantly along with the malignancy of breast cancer (p < 0.001). Additionally, C6orf106 expression was significantly correlated with TNM stage (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004) and lymph node metastasis (p = 0.018 and p = 0.025) of the overall and the triple-negative breast cancer, respectively. Consistently, we found that the interference of C6orf106 was able to inhibit cell proliferation and invasion of two triple-negative breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and BT-549, accompanied by the decrease of cyclin A2, cyclin B1, c-myc, and N-cadherin and the increase of E-cadherin. Collectively, these results indicate that C6orf106 may promote tumor progression in the invasive breast cancer, particularly in triple-negative breast cancer, and C6orf106 might serve as a novel therapeutic target of breast cancer, especially for triple-negative breast cancer.

  12. Arsenic in Food

    MedlinePlus

    ... been measuring total arsenic concentrations in foods, including rice and juices, through its Total Diet Study program ... found in certain food and beverage products, including rice, fruit juices and juice concentrates. How does arsenic ...

  13. Arsenic Treatment Technology Demonstrations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s research for the new Arsenic Rule focused on the development and evaluation of innovative methods and cost-effective technologies for improving the assessment and control of arsenic contamination.

  14. Arsenic Trioxide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Arsenic trioxide is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL; a type of cancer in which there ... worsened following treatment with other types of chemotherapy. Arsenic trioxide is in a class of medications called ...

  15. Fact Sheet on Arsenic

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring element that is found in combination with either inorganic or organic substances to form many different compounds. Inorganic arsenic compounds are found in soils, sediments, and groundwater.

  16. ARSENIC TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the state-of-the-art technology for removal of arsenic from drinking water. Presentation also includes results of several EPA field studies on removal of arsenic from existing arsenic removal plants and key results from several EPA sponsored research st...

  17. ARSENIC REMOVAL TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the state-of-art technology for removal of arsenic from drinking water. Presentation includes results of several EPA field studies on removal of arsenic from existing arsenic removal plants and key results from several EPA sponsored research studies. T...

  18. ARSENIC SOURCES AND ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research has identified a number of potential and current links between environmental arsenic releases and the management of operational and abandoned landfills. Many landfills will receive an increasing arsenic load due to the disposal of arsenic-bearing solid residuals ...

  19. The arsenic-based cure of acute promyelocytic leukemia promotes cytoplasmic sequestration of PML and PML/RARA through inhibition of PML body recycling.

    PubMed

    Lång, Emma; Grudic, Amra; Pankiv, Serhiy; Bruserud, Oystein; Simonsen, Anne; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Bjørås, Magnar; Bøe, Stig Ove

    2012-07-26

    Arsenic in the form of arsenic trioxide (ATO) is used as a therapeutic drug for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The mechanism by which this agent cures this disease was previously shown to involve direct interactions between ATO and the promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML), as well as accelerated degradation of the APL-associated fusion oncoprotein PML/retinoic acid receptor α (RARA). Here we investigated the fate of PML-generated nuclear structures called PML bodies in ATO-treated cells. We found that ATO inhibits formation of progeny PML bodies while it stabilizes cytoplasmic precursor compartments, referred to as cytoplasmic assemblies of PML and nucleoporins (CyPNs), after cell division. This block in PML body recycling is readily detected at pharmacologic relevant ATO concentrations (0.02-0.5μM) that do not cause detectable cell-cycle defects, and it does not require modification of PML by SUMOylation. In addition, PML and PML/RARA carrying mutations previously identified in ATO-resistant APL patients are impeded in their ability to become sequestered within CyPNs. Thus, ATO may inhibit nuclear activities of PML and PML/RARA in postmitotic cells through CyPN-dependent cytoplasmic sequestration.

  20. Characterization of the cystatin B gene promoter harboring the dodecamer repeat expanded in progressive myoclonus epilepsy, EPM1.

    PubMed

    Alakurtti, K; Virtaneva, K; Joensuu, T; Palvimo, J J; Lehesjoki, A E

    2000-01-25

    Mutations in the gene encoding cystatin B (CSTB) are responsible for the primary defect in progressive myoclonus epilepsy of Unverricht-Lundborg type (EPM1). A novel and unique type of disease-causing mutation, an unstable dodecamer repeat expansion, accounts for the majority of EPM1 patients world-wide. This minisatellite repeat expansion, located in the putative promoter of CSTB 175 bp upstream from the translation initiation codon, appears to downregulate CSTB gene expression in vivo. We report here the characterization of the CSTB promoter using different promoter-luciferase gene constructs. Transient transfections of cultured mammalian cells suggest that the region from -670 to -1 bp from the translation initiation codon functions as the CSTB promoter. Active binding to five Sp1 and four AP1 sites as well as weak binding to an androgen response element (ARE) half site was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The effect of the minisatellite expansion on the promoter activity was evaluated by comparing the activity of constructs containing wild-type and expanded alleles. An increase in the number of dodecamer units from three to 19 repeats lowered transcription in vitro by 10-fold. Northern analysis of lymphoblastoid RNA from individuals with 'premutation' length dodecamer repeat (12-17 copies) expansions showed decreased levels of CSTB mRNA expression. These data indicate that expansion of the dodecamer repeat located in the proximal promoter of CSTB severely disrupts the function of the promoter and thereby reduces transcription of CSTB.

  1. Case studies--arsenic.

    PubMed

    Chou, C H Selene J; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2003-08-01

    Arsenic is found naturally in the environment. People may be exposed to arsenic by eating food, drinking water, breathing air, or by skin contact with soil or water that contains arsenic. In the U.S., the diet is a predominant source of exposure for the general population with smaller amounts coming from drinking water and air. Children may also be exposed to arsenic because of hand to mouth contact or eating dirt. In addition to the normal levels of arsenic in air, water, soil, and food, people could by exposed to higher levels in several ways such as in areas containing unusually high natural levels of arsenic in rocks which can lead to unusually high levels of arsenic in soil or water. People living in an area like this could take in elevated amounts of arsenic in drinking water. Workers in an occupation that involves arsenic production or use (for example, copper or lead smelting, wood treatment, pesticide application) could be exposed to elevated levels of arsenic at work. People who saw or sand arsenic-treated wood could inhale/ingest some of the sawdust which contains high levels of arsenic. Similarly, when pressure-treated wood is burned, high levels of arsenic could be released in the smoke. In agricultural areas where arsenic pesticides were used on crops the soil could contain high levels of arsenic. Some hazardous waste sites contain large quantities of arsenic. Arsenic ranks #1 on the ATSDR/EPA priority list of hazardous substances. Arsenic has been found in at least 1,014 current or former NPL sites. At the hazardous waster sites evaluated by ATSDR, exposure to arsenic in soil predominated over exposure to water, and no exposure to air had been recorded. However, there is no information on morbidity or mortality from exposure to arsenic in soil at hazardous waste sites. Exposure assessment, community and tribal involvement, and evaluation and surveillance of health effects are among the ATSDR future Superfund research program priority focus areas

  2. Arsenic pollution sources.

    PubMed

    Garelick, Hemda; Jones, Huw; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic is a widely dispersed element in the Earth's crust and exists at an average concentration of approximately 5 mg/kg. There are many possible routes of human exposure to arsenic from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic occurs as a constituent in more than 200 minerals, although it primarily exists as arsenopyrite and as a constituent in several other sulfide minerals. The introduction of arsenic into drinking water can occur as a result of its natural geological presence in local bedrock. Arsenic-containing bedrock formations of this sort are known in Bangladesh, West Bengal (India), and regions of China, and many cases of endemic contamination by arsenic with serious consequences to human health are known from these areas. Significant natural contamination of surface waters and soil can arise when arsenic-rich geothermal fluids come into contact with surface waters. When humans are implicated in causing or exacerbating arsenic pollution, the cause can almost always be traced to mining or mining-related activities. Arsenic exists in many oxidation states, with arsenic (III) and (V) being the most common forms. Similar to many metalloids, the prevalence of particular species of arsenic depends greatly on the pH and redox conditions of the matrix in which it exists. Speciation is also important in determining the toxicity of arsenic. Arsenic minerals exist in the environment principally as sulfides, oxides, and phosphates. In igneous rocks, only those of volcanic origin are implicated in high aqueous arsenic concentrations. Sedimentary rocks tend not to bear high arsenic loads, and common matrices such as sands and sandstones contain lower concentrations owing to the dominance of quartz and feldspars. Groundwater contamination by arsenic arises from sources of arsenopyrite, base metal sulfides, realgar and orpiment, arsenic-rich pyrite, and iron oxyhydroxide. Mechanisms by which arsenic is released from minerals are varied and are accounted for by

  3. Force engages vinculin and promotes tumor progression by enhancing PI3-kinase activation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Rubashkin, MG; Cassereau, L; Bainer, R; DuFort, CC; Yui, Y; Ou, G; Paszek, MJ; Davidson, MW; Chen, YY; Weaver, VM

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix stiffness induces focal adhesion assembly to drive malignant transformation and tumor metastasis. Nevertheless, how force alters focal adhesions to promote tumor progression remains unclear. Here, we explored the role of the focal adhesion protein vinculin, a force-activated mechano-transducer, in mammary epithelial tissue transformation and invasion. We found that extracellular matrix stiffness stabilizes the assembly of a vinculin-talin-actin scaffolding complex that facilitates PI3-kinase mediated phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate phosphorylation. Using defined two and three dimensional matrices, a mouse model of mammary tumorigenesis with vinculin mutants and a novel super resolution imaging approach, we established that ECM stiffness, per se, promotes the malignant progression of a mammary epithelium by activating and stabilizing vinculin and enhancing Akt signaling at focal adhesions. Our studies also revealed that vinculin strongly co-localizes with activated Akt at the invasive border of human breast tumors, where the ECM is stiffest and we detected elevated mechano-signaling. Thus, extracellular matrix stiffness could induce tumor progression by promoting the assembly of signaling scaffolds; a conclusion underscored by the significant association we observed between highly expressed focal adhesion plaque proteins and malignant transformation across multiple types of solid cancer. PMID:25183785

  4. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  5. MGMT promoter methylation is associated with temozolomide response and prolonged progression-free survival in disseminated cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Rainer; Jewell, Rosalyn; van den Oord, Joost J; Wolter, Pascal; Stierner, Ulrika; Lindholm, Christer; Hertzman Johansson, Carolina; Lindén, Diana; Johansson, Hemming; Frostvik Stolt, Marianne; Walker, Christy; Snowden, Helen; Newton-Bishop, Julia; Hansson, Johan; Egyházi Brage, Suzanne

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the predictive and prognostic value of O(6) -methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) inactivation by analyses of promoter methylation in pretreatment tumor biopsies from patients with cutaneous melanoma treated with dacarbazine (DTIC) or temozolomide (TMZ) were performed. The patient cohorts consisted of Belgian and Swedish disseminated melanoma patients. Patients were subdivided into those receiving single-agent treatment with DTIC/TMZ (cohort S, n = 74) and those treated with combination chemotherapy including DTIC/TMZ (cohort C, n = 79). Median follow-up was 248 and 336 days for cohort S and cohort C, respectively. MGMT promoter methylation was assessed by three methods. The methylation-related transcriptional silencing of MGMT mRNA expression was assessed by real-time RT-PCR. Response to chemotherapy and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were correlated to MGMT promoter methylation status. MGMT promoter methylation was detected in tumor biopsies from 21.5 % of the patients. MGMT mRNA was found to be significantly lower in tumors positive for MGMT promoter methylation compared to tumors without methylation in both treatment cohorts (p < 0.005). DTIC/TMZ therapy response rate was found to be significantly associated with MGMT promoter methylation in cohort S (p = 0.0005), but did not reach significance in cohort C (p = 0.16). Significantly longer PFS was observed among patients with MGMT promoter-methylated tumors (p = 0.002). Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified presence of MGMT promoter methylation as an independent variable associated with longer PFS. Together, this implies that MGMT promoter methylation is associated with response to single-agent DTIC/TMZ and longer PFS in disseminated cutaneous melanoma.

  6. ARSENIC MINERALS AS INDICATORS OF CONDITIONS OF GOLD DEPOSITION IN CARLIN-TYPE GOLD DEPOSITS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.

    1984-01-01

    Arsenic minerals commonly occurring in Carlin-type gold deposits include orpiment and realgar and, more rarely, native arsenic and arsenopyrite. Other arsenic-bearing phases present include arsenian pyrite and stibnite and a number of thallium and mercury sulfides. Under conditions of constant temperature and pressure, the relative stability of arsenic minerals is a function of sulfur activity. At high sulfur activity, orpiment is the stable phase. As sulfur activity is decreased, more sulfur-deficient arsenic phases become stable with the progressive formation of realgar, native arsenic, arsenopyrite, and finally, loellingite at very low sulfur activity. Three univariant equilibrium assemblages: orpiment plus realgar, realgar plus native arsenic and native arsenic plus arsenopyrite are useful indicators of sulfur activity and commonly occur in the epithermal environment.

  7. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O’Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T.; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5–treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing. PMID:27382602

  8. Arsenic: homicidal intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, E.W.; Wold, D.; Heyman, A.

    1984-07-01

    Arsenic-induced deaths have been known to occur from accidental poisoning, as a result of medical therapy, and from intentional poisonings in homicide and suicide. Twenty-eight arsenic deaths in North Carolina from 1972 to 1982 included 14 homicides and seven suicides. In addition, 56 hospitalized victims of arsenic poisoning were identified at Duke Medical Center from 1970 to 1980. Four case histories of arsenic poisoning in North Carolina are presented and clinical manifestations are discussed. In view of the continued widespread use of arsenic in industry and agriculture, and its ubiquity in the environment, arsenic poisoning will continue to occur. A need for knowledge of its toxicity and of the clinical manifestations of acute and chronic arsenic poisoning will also continue.

  9. Arsenic geochemistry and health.

    PubMed

    Duker, Alfred A; Carranza, E J M; Hale, Martin

    2005-07-01

    Arsenic occurs naturally in the earth's crust and is widely distributed in the environment. Natural mineralization and activities of microorganisms enhance arsenic mobilization in the environment but human intervention has exacerbated arsenic contamination. Although arsenic is useful for industrial, agricultural, medicinal and other purposes, it exerts a toxic effect in a variety of organisms, including humans. Arsenic exposure may not only affect and disable organs of the body, especially the skin, but may also interfere with the proper functioning of the immune system. This paper, therefore, generally highlights the toxic effects of arsenic as well as its mobilization in the natural environment and possible controls. It also briefly attempts to outline the impact of arsenic on the immune system, whose alteration could lead to viral/bacterial infections.

  10. Arsenic removal from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  11. Ageing and recurrent episodes of neuroinflammation promote progressive experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Biozzi ABH mice.

    PubMed

    Peferoen, Laura A N; Breur, Marjolein; van de Berg, Sarah; Peferoen-Baert, Regina; Boddeke, Erik H W G M; van der Valk, Paul; Pryce, Gareth; van Noort, Johannes M; Baker, David; Amor, Sandra

    2016-10-01

    Current therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) reduce the frequency of relapses by modulating adaptive immune responses but fail to limit the irreversible neurodegeneration driving progressive disability. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Biozzi ABH mice recapitulates clinical features of MS including relapsing-remitting episodes and secondary-progressive disability. To address the contribution of recurrent inflammatory events and ageing as factors that amplify progressive neurological disease, we examined EAE in 8- to 12-week-old and 12-month-old ABH mice. Compared with the relapsing-remitting (RREAE) and secondary progressive (SPEAE) EAE observed in young mice, old mice developed progressive disease from onset (PEAE) associated with pronounced axonal damage and increased numbers of CD3(+) T cells and microglia/macrophages, but not B cells. Whereas the clinical neurological features of PEAE and SPEAE were comparable, the pathology was distinct. SPEAE was associated with significantly reduced perivascular infiltrates and T-cell numbers in the central nervous system (CNS) compared with PEAE and the acute phase of RREAE. In contrast to perivascular infiltrates that declined during progression from RREAE into SPEAE, the numbers of microglia clusters remained constant. Similar to what is observed during MS, the microglia clusters emerging during EAE were associated with axonal damage and oligodendrocytes expressing heat-shock protein B5, but not lymphocytes. Taken together, our data reveal that the course of EAE is dependent on the age of the mice. Younger mice show a relapsing-remitting phase followed by progressive disease, whereas old mice immediately show progression. This indicates that recurrent episodes of inflammation in the CNS, as well as age, contribute to progressive neurological disease.

  12. Tetra-arsenic tetra-sulfide (As4S 4) promotes apoptosis in retinoid acid -resistant human acute promyelocytic leukemic NB4-R1 cells through downregulation of SET protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfeng; He, Pengcheng; Liu, Feng; Zhou, Naicen; Cheng, Xiaoyan; Shi, Lili; Zhu, Huachao; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Mei

    2014-04-01

    Tetra-arsenic tetra-sulfide (As4S4) is an arsenic compound with antitumor activity, especially in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) that are resistant to retinoic acid (RA). Although recent studies have revealed that the therapeutic action of As4S4 is closely associated with the induction of cellular apoptosis, the exact molecular mechanism underlying this action in RA-resistant APL remains to be clarified. In this study, we found that As4S4-induced apoptosis was accompanied by reduced mRNA and protein expression of SET gene in RA-resistant NB4-R1 cells. Moreover, RNAi knockdown of SET gene further promoted As4S4-induced apoptosis, while SET overexpression recovered the cell viability, suggesting that As4S4 induces apoptosis through the reduction of SET protein in NB4-R1 cells. We also observed that the knockdown of SET gene resulted in the upregulation of protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) expression and the downregulation of promyelocytic leukemia and retinoic acid receptor α fusion gene (PML-RARα) expression, which were enhanced by As4S4 treatments. By contrast, overexpression of SET gene resulted in PP2A downregulation and PML-RARα upregulation, which were abolished by As4S4 pretreatment. Since PP2A is a proapoptotic factor and PML-RARα is an antiapoptotic factor, our results suggest that As4S4-induced apoptosis in RA-resistant NB4-R1 cells is through the downregulation of SET protein expression, which, in turn, increases PP2A and reduces PML-RARα expressions to lead to cell apoptosis.

  13. ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE AND THE METHYLATION OF ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolic conversion of inorganic arsenic into methylated products is a multistep process that yields mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. In recent years, it has become apparent that formation of methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenic is not necessarily a detoxification...

  14. Promoting Lifelong Ocean Education-2 Years Later: Charting Progress and Adjusting Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeson, Blanche; McDougall, Carrie; Simms, Eric; Walker, Sharon; Keener-Chavis, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Session participants will identify how their regional or national efforts contribute to the overall progress on the education recommendations in the USCOP and the work that remains. They will examine progress, identify shortcomings, and suggest course corrections in current and planned efforts. This session will build upon VADM Lautenbacher's keynote presentation on ocean education. Examples, such as ocean literacy efforts at regional and national levels, will be highlighted to stimulate discussion on progress, challenges, and solutions. Working in small groups, participants will consider actions that they, their organizations, or NMEA might take to further the ocean and aquatic education agenda.

  15. Androgen receptor (AR) suppresses miRNA-145 to promote renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression independent of VHL status

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Sun, Yin; Rao, Qun; Xu, Hua; Li, Lei; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of the VHL tumor suppressor plays key roles in the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and mutated VHL-mediated VEGF induction has become the main target for the current RCC therapy. Here we identified a signal pathway of VEGF induction by androgen receptor (AR)/miRNA-145 as a new target to suppress RCC progression. Mechanism dissection revealed that AR might function through binding to the androgen receptor element (ARE) located on the promoter region of miRNA-145 to suppress p53's ability to induce expression of miRNA-145 that normally suppresses expression of HIF2α/VEGF/MMP9/CCND1. Suppressing AR with AR-shRNA or introducing exogenous miRNA-145 mimic can attenuate RCC progression independent of VHL status. MiR-145 mimic in preclinical RCC orthotopic xenograft mouse model revealed its efficacy in suppression of RCC progression. These results together identified signals by AR-suppressed miRNA-145 as a key player in the RCC progression via regulating HIF2α/VEGF/MMP9/CCND1 expression levels. Blockade of the newly identified signal by AR inhibition or miRNA-145 mimics has promising therapeutic benefit to suppress RCC progression. PMID:26304926

  16. Androgen receptor (AR) suppresses miRNA-145 to promote renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression independent of VHL status.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Sun, Yin; Rao, Qun; Xu, Hua; Li, Lei; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-10-13

    Mutational inactivation of the VHL tumor suppressor plays key roles in the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and mutated VHL-mediated VEGF induction has become the main target for the current RCC therapy. Here we identified a signal pathway of VEGF induction by androgen receptor (AR)/miRNA-145 as a new target to suppress RCC progression. Mechanism dissection revealed that AR might function through binding to the androgen receptor element (ARE) located on the promoter region of miRNA-145 to suppress p53's ability to induce expression of miRNA-145 that normally suppresses expression of HIF2α/VEGF/MMP9/CCND1. Suppressing AR with AR-shRNA or introducing exogenous miRNA-145 mimic can attenuate RCC progression independent of VHL status. MiR-145 mimic in preclinical RCC orthotopic xenograft mouse model revealed its efficacy in suppression of RCC progression. These results together identified signals by AR-suppressed miRNA-145 as a key player in the RCC progression via regulating HIF2α/VEGF/MMP9/CCND1 expression levels. Blockade of the newly identified signal by AR inhibition or miRNA-145 mimics has promising therapeutic benefit to suppress RCC progression.

  17. PRL-3 Promotes the Malignant Progression of Melanoma via Triggering Dephosphorylation and Cytoplasmic Localization of NHERF1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xian-Ying; Song, Ran; Chen, Wei; Yang, Yuan-Yuan; Gu, Yan-Hong; Shu, Yong-Qian; Wu, Xu-Dong; Wu, Xue-Feng; Sun, Yang; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3) has been reported to have a critical role in metastatic progression of cancers. Here, we investigate how PRL-3 increases the malignant degree of melanoma cells. The expression of PRL-3 increased gradually during the malignant progression of melanoma. The phosphorylation of Akt was elevated in highly malignant melanoma cells, which was accompanied by a decrease in nuclear phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). The phosphorylation of NHERF1 in the serine site was regulated by PRL-3 and showed cytoplasmic translocation upon dephosphorylation, which resulted in a decrease in nuclear PTEN. The co-translocation of NHERF1 and PTEN from the nucleus to the cytoplasm was observed during the malignant progression of melanoma cells. Tumor growth was inhibited significantly, and the survival was prolonged upon knockdown of cytoplasmic NHERF1 in B16BL6 cells prior to the inoculation into mice. Taken together, to our knowledge previously unreported, we have identified NHERF1 as a potential substrate of PRL-3. Its phosphorylation status as well as its change in cellular localization and association with PTEN correlated with the malignant progression of melanoma. Our data provide an explanation for how PRL-3 promotes the malignant progression of melanoma, as well as a diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for malignant melanoma.

  18. Reduction and Coordination of Arsenic in Indian Mustard1

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Ingrid J.; Prince, Roger C.; George, Martin J.; Smith, Robert D.; George, Graham N.; Salt, David E.

    2000-01-01

    The bioaccumulation of arsenic by plants may provide a means of removing this element from contaminated soils and waters. However, to optimize this process it is important to understand the biological mechanisms involved. Using a combination of techniques, including x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have established the biochemical fate of arsenic taken up by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea). After arsenate uptake by the roots, possibly via the phosphate transport mechanism, a small fraction is exported to the shoot via the xylem as the oxyanions arsenate and arsenite. Once in the shoot, the arsenic is stored as an AsIII-tris-thiolate complex. The majority of the arsenic remains in the roots as an AsIII-tris-thiolate complex, which is indistinguishable from that found in the shoots and from AsIII-tris-glutathione. The thiolate donors are thus probably either glutathione or phytochelatins. The addition of the dithiol arsenic chelator dimercaptosuccinate to the hydroponic culture medium caused a 5-fold-increased arsenic level in the leaves, although the total arsenic accumulation was only marginally increased. This suggests that the addition of dimercaptosuccinate to arsenic-contaminated soils may provide a way to promote arsenic bioaccumulation in plant shoots, a process that will be essential for the development of an efficient phytoremediation strategy for this element. PMID:10759512

  19. Estrogen related receptor alpha in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells promotes tumor progression in bone

    PubMed Central

    Delliaux, Carine; Gervais, Manon; Kan, Casina; Benetollo, Claire; Pantano, Francesco; Vargas, Geoffrey; Bouazza, Lamia; Croset, Martine; Bala, Yohann; Leroy, Xavier; Rosol, Thomas J; Rieusset, Jennifer; Bellahcène, Akeila; Castronovo, Vincent; Aubin, Jane E; Clézardin, Philippe; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Bonnelye, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastases are one of the main complications of prostate cancer and they are incurable. We investigated whether and how estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha (ERRα) is involved in bone tumor progression associated with advanced prostate cancer. By meta-analysis, we first found that ERRα expression is correlated with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), the hallmark of progressive disease. We then analyzed tumor cell progression and the associated signaling pathways in gain-of-function/loss-of-function CRPC models in vivo and in vitro. Increased levels of ERRα in tumor cells led to rapid tumor progression, with both bone destruction and formation, and direct impacts on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. VEGF-A, WNT5A and TGFβ1 were upregulated by ERRα in tumor cells and all of these factors also significantly and positively correlated with ERRα expression in CRPC patient specimens. Finally, high levels of ERRα in tumor cells stimulated the pro-metastatic factor periostin expression in the stroma, suggesting that ERRα regulates the tumor stromal cell microenvironment to enhance tumor progression. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ERRα is a regulator of CRPC cell progression in bone. Therefore, inhibiting ERRα may constitute a new therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer skeletal-related events. PMID:27776343

  20. PUMA promotes apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitors driving leukemic progression in a mouse model of myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Guirguis, A A; Slape, C I; Failla, L M; Saw, J; Tremblay, C S; Powell, D R; Rossello, F; Wei, A; Strasser, A; Curtis, D J

    2016-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis with resultant cytopenias. Increased apoptosis and aberrantly functioning progenitors are thought to contribute to this phenotype. As is the case for other malignancies, overcoming apoptosis is believed to be important in progression toward acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using the NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) transgenic mouse model of MDS, we previously reported that overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2, blocked apoptosis and improved cytopenias, paradoxically, delaying leukemic progression. To further understand this surprising result, we examined the role of p53 and its pro-apoptotic effectors, PUMA and NOXA in NHD13 mice. The absence of p53 or PUMA but not NOXA reduced apoptosis and expanded the numbers of MDS-repopulating cells. Despite a similar effect on apoptosis and cell numbers, the absence of p53 and PUMA had diametrically opposed effects on progression to AML: absence of p53 accelerated leukemic progression, while absence of PUMA significantly delayed progression. This may be explained in part by differences in cellular responses to DNA damage. The absence of p53 led to higher levels of γ-H2AX (indicative of persistent DNA lesions) while PUMA-deficient NHD13 progenitors resolved DNA lesions in a manner comparable to wild-type cells. These results suggest that targeting PUMA may improve the cytopenias of MDS without a detrimental effect on leukemic progression thus warranting further investigation.

  1. Identification of an arsenic resistance and arsenic-sensing system in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Jeon, Byeonghwa; Sahin, Orhan; Zhang, Qijing

    2009-08-01

    Arsenic is commonly present in the natural environment and is also used as a feed additive for animal production. Poultry is a major reservoir for Campylobacter jejuni, a major food-borne human pathogen causing gastroenteritis. It has been shown that Campylobacter isolates from poultry are highly resistant to arsenic compounds, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for the resistance have not been determined, and it is unclear if the acquired arsenic resistance affects the susceptibility of Campylobacter spp. to other antimicrobials. In this study, we identified a four-gene operon that contributes to arsenic resistance in Campylobacter. This operon encodes a putative membrane permease (ArsP), a transcriptional repressor (ArsR), an arsenate reductase (ArsC), and an efflux protein (Acr3). PCR analysis of various clinical C. jejuni isolates indicated a significant association of this operon with elevated resistance to arsenite and arsenate. Gene-specific mutagenesis confirmed the role of the ars operon in conferring arsenic resistance. It was further shown that this operon is subject to regulation by ArsR, which directly binds to the ars promoter and inhibits the transcription of the operon. Arsenite inhibits the binding of ArsR to the ars promoter DNA and induces the expression of the ars genes. Mutation of the ars genes did not affect the susceptibility of C. jejuni to commonly used antibiotics. These results identify the ars operon as an important mechanism for arsenic resistance and sensing in Campylobacter.

  2. Epigenetic silencing of HIC1 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and drives progression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei; Liu, Xiang; Dong, Zi-Ming; Ling, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Downregulation of the novel tumor suppressor gene HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) occurs frequently in various tumors where it causes tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we investigated a role of HIC1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and the underlying mechanisms. Downregulation of HIC1 occurred in approximately 70% of primary ESCCs at both mRNA and protein level where it was associated significantly with vascular invasion, advanced clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor disease free survival (DFS). The promoter methylation analyses suggested that loss of HIC1 expression was mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Functional studies established that ectopic re-expression of HIC1 in ESCC cells inhibited cell proliferation, clonogenicity, cell motility, tumor formation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our results decipher the mechanism through which HIC1 deficiency induce ESCC cells to undergo EMT and promote tumor progression and metastasis through activation of EphA2 signaling pathway. Together, loss of the regulation of EphA2 pathway through HIC1 epigenetic silencing could be an important mechanism in the ESCC progression. We identify a novel pathway that linking HIC1 downregulation to EphA2-inducing EMT in ESCC cells and may shed light on the development of novel anti-tumor therapeutics. PMID:26510908

  3. Tissue damage-associated "danger signals" influence T-cell responses that promote the progression of preneoplasia to cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Zha, Jikun; Wang, Yamin; Liu, Wenhua; Yang, Xuanming; Yu, Ping

    2013-01-15

    T-cell responses may be shaped by sterile "danger signals" that are constituted by damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP). However, whether and what type of adaptive immune responses are triggered in vivo by DAMPs induced by tumor progression are not well characterized. In this study, we report that the production of HMGB1, an established DAMP released by dying cells, was critical for tumor progression in an established mouse model of prostate cancer. HMGB1 was required for the activation and intratumoral accumulation of T cells that expressed cytokine lymphotoxinα(1)β(2) (LT) on their surface. Intriguingly, these tumor-activated T cells recruited macrophages to the lesion and were essential to promote the preneoplasia to invasive carcinoma in an LTβ receptor (LTβR)-dependent manner. Taken together, our findings suggest that the release of HMGB1 as an endogenous danger signal is important for priming an adaptive immune response that promotes malignant progression, with implications for cancer prevention and therapy.

  4. Long noncoding RNA PVT1 promotes cervical cancer progression through epigenetically silencing miR-200b.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaorong; Zhang, Guanli; Liu, Jingying

    2016-08-01

    Long noncoding RNA PVT1 has been reported to be dysregulated and play vital roles in a variety of cancers. However, the functions and molecular mechanisms of PVT1 in cervical cancer remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression, clinical significance, biological roles, and underlying functional mechanisms of PVT1 in cervical cancer. Our results revealed that PVT1 is upregulated in cervical cancer tissues. Enhanced expression of PVT1 is associated with larger tumor size, advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, and poor prognosis of cervical cancer patients. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, we demonstrated that overexpression of PVT1 promotes cervical cancer cells proliferation, cell cycle progression and migration, and depletion of PVT1 inhibits cervical cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and migration. Mechanistically, we verified that PVT1 binds to EZH2, recruits EZH2 to the miR-200b promoter, increases histone H3K27 trimethylation level on the miR-200b promoter, and inhibits miR-200b expression. Furthermore, the effects of PVT1 on cervical cell proliferation and migration depend upon silencing of miR-200b. Taken together, our findings confirmed that PVT1 functions as an oncogene in cervical cancer and indicated that PVT1 is not only an important prognostic marker, but also a potential therapy target for cervical cancer.

  5. Exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells activate NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lijun; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Hui; Yuan, Xiao; Sun, Yaoxiang; Pan, Zhaoji; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2016-09-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized membrane vesicles secreted by both normal and cancer cells. Emerging evidence indicates that cancer cells derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression through the modulation of tumor microenvironment. However, the effects of exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells on macrophages are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the biological role of gastric cancer cells derived exosomes in the activation of macrophages. We demonstrated that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes activated macrophages to express increased levels of proinflammatory factors, which in turn promoted tumor cell proliferation and migration. In addition, gastric cancer cells derived exosomes remarkably upregulated the phosphorylation of NF-κB in macrophages. Inhibiting the activation of NF-κB reversed the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in macrophages and blocked their promoting effects on gastric cancer cells. Moreover, we found that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes could also activate macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes through the activation of NF-κB. In conclusion, our results suggest that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes stimulate the activation of NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression, which provides a potential therapeutic approach for gastric cancer by interfering with the interaction between exosomes and macrophages in tumor microenvironment.

  6. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Sung-Keum; Kim, Jae-Hee; Choi, Ha-Na; Choe, Tae-Boo; Hong, Seok-Il; Yi, Jae-Youn; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Hyun-Gyu; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells.

  7. Development and Use of a Tool to Guide Junior Faculty in Their Progression Toward Promotion and Tenure

    PubMed Central

    Garand, Linda; Matthews, Judith T.; Courtney, Karen L.; Davies, Marilyn; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Schlenk, Elizabeth A.; Yang, Kyeongra; Bender, Catherine M.; Burke, Lora E.

    2011-01-01

    Junior faculty have multiple roles and need to participate in a variety of activities that increase their likelihood of achieving promotion and tenure. Yet, these faculty often struggle when deciding how and when to expend effort along their career trajectory. In response to the need for structured guidance when setting priorities and making decisions about time management, faculty from a school of nursing at a research university have developed and begun to use a faculty progression tool. Introduced during orientation, this tool helps junior faculty weigh the relative importance of engaging in specific activities by offering a time frame and suggestions for prioritizing and pacing efforts to accomplish critical milestones. Although primarily aimed at tenure stream faculty in a research-intensive environment, this faculty progression tool serves as a model that may be modified for environments with less focus on research. Likewise, it may provide a foundation for development of a similar tool for nontenure stream faculty. PMID:20637442

  8. Integrated genomic analysis of colorectal cancer progression reveals activation of EGFR through demethylation of the EREG promoter

    PubMed Central

    Qu, X; Sandmann, T; Frierson, H; Fu, L; Fuentes, E; Walter, K; Okrah, K; Rumpel, C; Moskaluk, C; Lu, S; Wang, Y; Bourgon, R; Penuel, E; Pirzkall, A; Amler, L; Lackner, M R; Tabernero, J; Hampton, G M; Kabbarah, O

    2016-01-01

    Key molecular drivers that underlie transformation of colonic epithelium into colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) are well described. However, the mechanisms through which clinically targeted pathways are activated during CRC progression have yet to be elucidated. Here, we used an integrative genomics approach to examine CRC progression. We used laser capture microdissection to isolate colonic crypt cells, differentiated surface epithelium, adenomas, carcinomas and metastases, and used gene expression profiling to identify pathways that were differentially expressed between the different cell types. We identified a number of potentially important transcriptional changes in developmental and oncogenic pathways, and noted a marked upregulation of EREG in primary and metastatic cancer cells. We confirmed this pattern of gene expression by in situ hybridization and observed staining consistent with autocrine expression in the tumor cells. Upregulation of EREG during the adenoma–carcinoma transition was associated with demethylation of two key sites within its promoter, and this was accompanied by an increase in the levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, as assessed by reverse-phase protein analysis. In CRC cell lines, we demonstrated that EREG demethylation led to its transcriptional upregulation, higher levels of EGFR phosphorylation, and sensitization to EGFR inhibitors. Low levels of EREG methylation in patients who received cetuximab as part of a phase II study were associated with high expression of the ligand and a favorable response to therapy. Conversely, high levels of promoter methylation and low levels of EREG expression were observed in tumors that progressed after treatment. We also noted an inverse correlation between EREG methylation and expression levels in several other cancers, including those of the head and neck, lung and bladder. Therefore, we propose that upregulation of EREG expression through promoter demethylation

  9. USP39, a direct target of microRNA-133a, promotes progression of pancreatic cancer via the AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Liu, Tiande; Huang, Peng; Yan, Wei; Guo, Changkuo; Xiong, Le; Liu, Anwen

    2017-04-22

    Ubiquitin specific protease 39 (USP39) is one of the deubiquitinating enzymes without ubiquitin protease activity, which has been implicated in the progression of several cancers. However, the role of USP39 in pancreatic cancer (PC) is largely unknown. In present study, we found that USP39 expression was elevated in PC tissues than adjacent non-tumor tissues. Importantly, we demonstrated that overexpression of USP39 is closely correlated with tumor progression and poor survival in PC patients. Furthermore, high USP39 expression was observed in PC cell lines and ectopic expression of USP39 significantly enhanced in vitro cell proliferation and promoted in vivo tumor growth, whereas silencing USP39 suppressed growth of PC cells. Besides, our experimental data revealed that knockdown of USP39 induced cell apoptosis through inhibition of AKT signaling pathway in PC cells. Moreover, USP39 was a direct target of miR-133a, a microRNA that has been reported to be involved in progression of PC. Taken together, our data provide a novel PC regulatory axis that is miR-133a/USP39, the dysfunction of which drives diverse aspects of the progression of PC.

  10. Arsenic-Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Sean; Zancosky, Krysia; Farah, Katie

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide has brought about tremendous advancement in the treatment of acute promyelocytic myelogenous leukemia (APML). In most instances, the benefits of these treatments outweigh the risks associated with their respective safety profiles. Although acute pancreatitis is not commonly associated with arsenic toxicity, it should be considered as a possible side effect. We report a case of arsenic-induced pancreatitis in a patient with APML. PMID:22606427

  11. Factors that Promote Progression in Schools Functioning as Professional Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leclerc, Martine; Moreau, Andre C.; Dumouchel, Catherine; Sallafranque-St-Louis, Francois

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify factors that influence the functioning of a school working as a Professional Learning Community (PLC) and to analyze the links between these factors and the school's progression. This research was developed within the context of an interpretative research paradigm. The primary data collection tool…

  12. Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K.; Saito, Hiroshi; Pulliam, Joseph F.; Lee, Eun Y.; Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze; Li, Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Evers, B. Mark; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-07-01

    Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alone or in combination, together with AOM/DSS pretreatment has a promotion effect, increasing the colorectal tumor incidence, multiplicity, size, and grade, as well as cell inflammatory response. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that As(III) or Cr(VI) treatment alone significantly changed the density of proteins. The expression of β-catenin and phospho-GSK was increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Concomitantly, the expression of NADPH oxidase1 (NOX1) and the level of 8-OHdG were also increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were decreased. Similarly, in an in vitro system, exposure of CRL-1807 to carcinogenic metals increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the expression of β-catenin, phospho-GSK, and NOX1. Inhibition of ROS generation by addition of SOD or catalase inhibited β-catenin expression and activity. Our study provides a new animal model to study the carcinogenicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) and suggests that As(III) and Cr(VI) promote colorectal cancer tumorigenesis, at least partly, through ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Carcinogenic metals in drinking water promote colorectal tumor formation in vivo. ► Carcinogenic metals induce β-catenin activation in vivo and in vitro. ► ROS generation induced by carcinogenic metals mediated β-catenin activation.

  13. Inhibitory mechanism of dimercaptopropanesulfonic acid (DMPS) in the cellular biomethylation of arsenic.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuping; Shi, Nan; Geng, Zhirong; Li, Xiangli; Hu, Xin; Wang, Zhilin

    2014-11-01

    Dimercaptopropanesulfonic acid (DMPS) has been approved for the treatment of arsenic poisoning through promoting arsenic excretion and modulating arsenic species. To clarify how DMPS regulates the excretion of arsenic species, we investigated the effects of DMPS on the biomethylation of arsenite (As(3+)) in HepG2 cells. In the experiments, we found that DMPS at low concentrations dramatically decreased the content of arsenic in HepG2 cells and inhibited the cellular methylation of As(3+). Three aspects, the expression of human arsenic (III) methyltransferase (hAS3MT), the accumulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the in vitro enzymatic methylation of arsenic, were considered to explain the reasons for the inhibition of DMPS in arsenic metabolism. The results suggested that DMPS competitively coordinated with As(3+) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(3+)) to inhibit the up-regulation of arsenic on the expression of hAS3MT and block arsenic involving in the enzymatic methylation. Moreover, DMPS eliminated arsenic-induced accumulation of ROS, which might contribute to the antidotal effects of DMPS on arsenic posing.

  14. Chronic arsenic toxicity: studies in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Guha Mazumder, Debendranath; Dasgupta, U B

    2011-09-01

    Chronic arsenic toxicity (arsenicosis) as a result of drinking arsenic-contaminated groundwater is a major environmental health hazard throughout the world, including India. A lot of research on health effects, including genotoxic effect of chronic arsenic toxicity in humans, have been carried out in West Bengal during the last 2 decades. A review of literature including information available from West Bengal has been made to characterize the problem. Scientific journals, monographs, and proceedings of conferences with regard to human health effects, including genotoxicity, of chronic arsenic toxicity have been reviewed. Pigmentation and keratosis are the specific skin diseases characteristic of chronic arsenic toxicity. However, in West Bengal, it was found to produce various systemic manifestations, such as chronic lung disease, characterized by chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive and/or restrictive pulmonary disease, and bronchiectasis; liver diseases, such as non cirrhotic portal fibrosis; polyneuropathy; peripheral vascular disease; hypertension; nonpitting edema of feet/hands; conjunctival congestion; weakness; and anemia. High concentrations of arsenic, greater than or equal to 200 μg/L, during pregnancy were found to be associated with a sixfold increased risk for stillbirth. Cancers of skin, lung, and urinary bladder are the important cancers associated with this toxicity. Of the various genotoxic effects of arsenic in humans, chromosomal aberration and increased frequency of micronuclei in different cell types have been found to be significant. Various probable mechanisms have been incriminated to cause DNA damage because of chronic arsenic toxicity. The results of the study in West Bengal suggest that deficiency in DNA repair capacity, perturbation of methylation of promoter region of p53 and p16 genes, and genomic methylation alteration may be involved in arsenic-induced disease manifestation in humans. P53 polymorphism has been found to be

  15. Dissolution of Arsenic Minerals Mediated by Dissimilatory Arsenate Reducing Bacteria: Estimation of the Physiological Potential for Arsenic Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Lukasz, Drewniak; Liwia, Rajpert; Aleksandra, Mantur; Aleksandra, Sklodowska

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was characterization of the isolated dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the context of their potential for arsenic removal from primary arsenic minerals through reductive dissolution. Four strains, Shewanella sp. OM1, Pseudomonas sp. OM2, Aeromonas sp. OM4, and Serratia sp. OM17, capable of anaerobic growth with As (V) reduction, were isolated from microbial mats from an ancient gold mine. All of the isolated strains: (i) produced siderophores that promote dissolution of minerals, (ii) were resistant to dissolved arsenic compounds, (iii) were able to use the dissolved arsenates as the terminal electron acceptor, and (iii) were able to use copper minerals containing arsenic minerals (e.g., enargite) as a respiratory substrate. Based on the results obtained in this study, we postulate that arsenic can be released from some As-bearing polymetallic minerals (such as copper ore concentrates or middlings) under reductive conditions by dissimilatory arsenate reducers in indirect processes. PMID:24724102

  16. Dissolution of arsenic minerals mediated by dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria: estimation of the physiological potential for arsenic mobilization.

    PubMed

    Lukasz, Drewniak; Liwia, Rajpert; Aleksandra, Mantur; Aleksandra, Sklodowska

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was characterization of the isolated dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the context of their potential for arsenic removal from primary arsenic minerals through reductive dissolution. Four strains, Shewanella sp. OM1, Pseudomonas sp. OM2, Aeromonas sp. OM4, and Serratia sp. OM17, capable of anaerobic growth with As (V) reduction, were isolated from microbial mats from an ancient gold mine. All of the isolated strains: (i) produced siderophores that promote dissolution of minerals, (ii) were resistant to dissolved arsenic compounds, (iii) were able to use the dissolved arsenates as the terminal electron acceptor, and (iii) were able to use copper minerals containing arsenic minerals (e.g., enargite) as a respiratory substrate. Based on the results obtained in this study, we postulate that arsenic can be released from some As-bearing polymetallic minerals (such as copper ore concentrates or middlings) under reductive conditions by dissimilatory arsenate reducers in indirect processes.

  17. Downregulation of HSP60 disrupts mitochondrial proteostasis to promote tumorigenesis and progression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haiping; Chen, Yuling; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Shiyu; Lv, Yang; Wu, Di; Wang, Qingtao; Luo, Minkui; Deng, Haiteng

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate that HSP60 is unequivocally downregulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissues compared to pericarcinous tissues. Overexpression of HSP60 in ccRCC cancer cells suppresses cell growth. HSP60 knockdown increases cell growth and proliferation in both cell culture and nude mice xenografts, and drives cells to undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our results propose that HSP60 silencing disrupts the integrity of the respiratory complex I and triggers the excessive ROS production, which promotes tumor progression in the following aspects: (1) ROS activates the AMPK pathway that promotes acquisition of the Warburg phenotype in HSP60-KN cells; (2) ROS generated by HSP60 knockdown or by rotenone inhibition drives cells to undergo EMT; and (3) the high level of ROS may also fragment the Fe-S clusters that up regulates ADHFe1 expression and the 2-hydroxygluterate (2-HG) production leading to changes in DNA methylation. These results suggest that the high level of ROS is needed for tumorigenesis and progression in tumors with the low HSP60 expression and HSP60 is a potential diagnostic biomarker as well as a therapeutic target in ccRCC. PMID:27246978

  18. Aberrant hypomethylation-mediated CD147 overexpression promotes aggressive tumor progression in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu-Xiang; Mo, Ru-Jun; He, Hui-Chan; Chen, Jia-Hong; Zou, Jun; Han, Zhao-Dong; Lu, Jian-Ming; Cai, Chao; Zeng, Yan-Ru; Zhong, Wei-De; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2015-05-01

    Our previous study revealed the potential role of CD147 in human prostate cancer (PCa). Here, we investigated the CD147 promoter methylation status and the correlation with tumorigenicity in human PCa. CD147 mRNA and protein expression levels were both significantly higher in the 4 PCa cell lines, than in the 2 non-tumorigenic benign human prostatic epithelial cell lines (all P<0.01). We showed hypomethylation of promoter regions of CD147 in PCa cell lines with significant CD147 expression as compared to non-tumorigenic benign human prostatic epithelial cell lines slowly expressing CD147. Additionally, the treatment of methylated cell lines with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine increased CD147 expression significantly in low-expressing cell lines and also activated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, which may be one of the most important downstream targets of CD147. Furthermore, PCa tissues displayed decreased DNA methylation in the promoter region of CD147 compared to the corresponding non-cancerous prostate tissues, and methylation intensity correlated inversely with the CD147 mRNA levels. There was a significant negative correlation between CD147 mRNA levels and the number of methylated sites in PCa tissues (r=-0.467, P<0.01). In conclusion, our data offer convincing evidence for the first time that the DNA promoter hypomethylation of CD147 may be one of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the cancer-related overexpression of CD147 and may play a crucial role in the tumorigenesis of PCa.

  19. HnRNP-L promotes prostate cancer progression by enhancing cell cycling and inhibiting apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xumin; Li, Qi; He, Jincan; Zhong, Liren; Shu, Fangpeng; Xing, Rongwei; Lv, Daojun; Lei, Bin; Wan, Bo; Yang, Yu; Wu, Huayan; Mao, Xiangming; Zou, Yaguang

    2016-12-27

    Expression of the RNA-binding protein HnRNP-L was previously shown to associate with tumorigenesis in liver and lung cancer. In this study, we examined the role of HnRNP-L in prostate cancer (Pca). We found that HnRNP-L is overexpressed in prostate tissue samples from 160 PC patients compared with tissue samples from 32 donors with cancers other than Pca. Moreover, HnRNP-L positively correlated with aggressive tumor characteristics. HnRNP-L knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis of Pca cell lines in vitro, and suppressed tumor growth when the cells were subcutaneously implanted in an athymic mouse model. Conversely, overexpression of HnRNP-L promoted cell proliferation and tumor growth while prohibiting cell apoptosis. HnRNP-L promoted cell proliferation and tumor growth in Pca in part by interacting with endogenous p53 mRNA, which was closely associated with cyclin p21. In addition, HnRNP-L affected cell apoptosis by directly binding the classical apoptosis protein BCL-2. These observations suggest HnRNP-L is an important regulatory factor that exerts pro-proliferation and anti-apoptosis effects in Pca through actions affecting the cell cycle and intrinsic apoptotic signaling. Thus HnRNP-L could potentially serve as a valuable molecular biomarker or therapeutic target in the treatment of Pca.

  20. Dynein axonemal heavy chain 8 promotes androgen receptor activity and associates with prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Ledet, Russell J.; Imberg-Kazdan, Keren; Logan, Susan K.; Garabedian, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    To gain insight into cellular factors regulating AR action that could promote castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen for factors that promote ligand-independent AR transcriptional activity and integrated clinical databases for candidate genes that are positively associated with prostate cancer metastasis and recurrence. From this analysis, we identified Dynein Axonemal Heavy Chain 8 (DNAH8) as an AR regulator that displayed higher mRNA expression in metastatic than in primary tumors, and showed high expression in patients with poor prognosis. Axonemal dyneins function in cellular motility, but the function of DNAH8 in prostate cancer or other cell types has not been reported. DNAH8 is on chromosome 6q21.2, a cancer-associated amplicon, and is primarily expressed in prostate and testis. Its expression is higher in primary tumors compared to normal prostate, and is further increased in metastatic prostate cancers. Patients expressing high levels of DNAH8 have a greater risk of relapse and a poor prognosis after prostatectomy. Depletion of DNAH8 in prostate cancer cells suppressed AR transcriptional activity and proliferation. Androgen treatment increased DNAH8 mRNA expression, and AR bound the DNAH8 promoter sequence indicating DNAH8 is an AR target gene. Thus, DNAH8 is a new regulator of AR associated with metastatic tumors and poor prognosis. PMID:27363033

  1. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation by an arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT), yielding methyl arsenic (MA), dimethyl arsenic (DMA), and trimethylarsenic (TMA). To identify molecular mechanisms that coordinate arsenic biotra...

  2. Overexpression of paxillin induced by miR-137 suppression promotes tumor progression and metastasis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The deregulation of paxillin (PXN) has been involved in the progression and metastasis of different malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC). miR-137 is frequently suppressed in CRC. PXN is predicted to be a direct target of miR-137 in CRC cells. On this basis, we hypothesized that overexpression of PXN induced by suppression of miR-137 may promote tumor progression and metastasis and predicts poor prognosis. We detected the expression of PXN and miR-137 in clinical tumor tissues by immunohistochemical analysis and real-time PCR, positive PXN staining was observed in 198 of the 247 (80.1%) cases, whereas no or weak PXN staining was observed in the adjacent non-cancerous area. Higher level of PXN messenger RNA (mRNA) and lower level of miR-137 was observed in cancer tissues than adjacent non-cancerous tissues. High expression of PXN and low expression of miR-137 was associated with aggressive tumor phenotype and adverse prognosis. Moreover, the expression of PXN was negatively correlated with miR-137 expression. A dual-luciferase reporter gene assay validated that PXN was a direct target of miR-137. The use of miR-137 mimics or inhibitor could decrease or increase PXN mRNA and protein levels in CRC cell lines. Knockdown of PXN or ectopic expression of miR-137 could markedly inhibit cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro and repress tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Taken together, these results demonstrated that overexpression of PXN induced by suppression of miR-137 promotes tumor progression and metastasis and could serve as an independent prognostic indicator in CRC patients. PMID:23275153

  3. Arsenic Concentrations and Speciation in Shellfishes from Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, C.; Yoon, H.

    2005-12-01

    Speciation of arsenic has received significant attention over the past 20 years in both mechanistic and exposure assessment research. Because the toxicity of arsenic is related to its oxidation state and its chemical forms, the determination of the total arsenic contents in a sample is not adequate to allow its impact on living organisms to be estimated. The inorganic arsenic species, arsenite (As3+) and arsenate (As5+), have been classified as carcinogenic and the methylated forms, monomethyl arsonic acid (MMA) and dimethyl arsinic acid (DMA) have recently been identified as cancer promoters. The highly methylated compounds like as arsenobetaine (AsB) and arsenocholine (AsC) are considered to be nontoxic. Although organisms in marine environment contain high amounts of total arsenic (ppm level), it is not usually present as inorganic arsenic or simple methylated forms well known as one of the toxic species. Arsenobetaine is the dominant species in marine animals and arsenosugars are most abundant in marine algae. This study aims to clarify those arsenic species present in the whole body of eleven different shellfishes from Korea. And those arsenic species were separated and measured by characterization using high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) coupled system. The separation of arsenic species was achieved on anion exchange column and cation exchange column using phosphate and pyridine eluent, respectively. The ultrasonic extraction was employed for extraction of arsenic from whole body of shellfishes. The method was validated by analyzing three certified reference materials (DORM-2, TORT-2, 1566b). Total arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.1 mg/kg dry mass to 21.7 mg/kg dry mass. Most marine shellfishes contained higher arsenobetaine and arsenocholine with the exception of two shellfishes living in river. The lower amounts of inorganic arsenic species were also found in the some sample extracts

  4. Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression through suppressing E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yaqin; Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    It is generally regarded that E-cadherin is downregulated during tumorigenesis via Snail/Slug-mediated E-cadherin transcriptional reduction. However, this transcriptional suppressive mechanism cannot explain the failure of producing E-cadherin protein in metastatic breast cancer cells after overexpressing E-cadherin mRNA. Here we reveal a novel mechanism that E-cadherin is post-transcriptionally regulated by Slug-promoted miR-221, which serves as an additional blocker for E-cadherin expression in metastatic tumor cells. Profiling the predicted E-cadherin-targeting miRNAs in breast cancer tissues and cells showed that miR-221 was abundantly expressed in breast tumor and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and its level was significantly higher in breast tumor or MDA-MB-231 cells than in distal non-tumor tissue and low-metastatic MCF-7 cells, respectively. MiR-221, which level inversely correlated with E-cadherin level in breast cancer cells, targeted E-cadherin mRNA open reading frame (ORF) and suppressed E-cadherin protein expression. Depleting or increasing miR-221 level in breast cancer cells induced or decreased E-cadherin protein level, leading to suppressing or promoting tumor cell progression, respectively. Moreover, miR-221 was specifically upregulated by Slug but not Snail. TGF-β treatment enhanced Slug activity and thus increased miR-221 level in MCF-7 cells. In summary, our results provide the first evidence that Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression via reducing E-cadherin expression. PMID:27174021

  5. MFHAS1 promotes colorectal cancer progress by regulating polarization of tumor-associated macrophages via STAT6 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jing; Wang, Huihui; Weng, Meilin; Cheng, Qian; Wu, Qichao; Sun, Zhirong; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Minmin; Ren, Yu; Xu, Pingbo; Chen, Jiawei; Miao, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma amplified sequence 1 (MFHAS1) is a predicted oncoprotein that demonstrates tumorigenic activity in vivo; however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Macrophages are divided into the pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory/protumoral M2 subtypes. Tumor cells can induce M2 polarization of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) to promote metastasis; but the underlying pathways require to be elucidated. In this study, we detected a positive association between MFHAS1 expression in TAMs and human colorectal cancer (CRC) TNM stage. Supernatant of CT26 murine CRC cells induced MFHAS1 expression in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. Additionally, CT26 supernatant induced the M2 marker CD206 and activated the pro-M2 STAT6 and KLF4 signaling in control but not MFHAS1-silenced RAW264.7 macrophages. Moreover, supernatant of control, but not MFHAS1-silenced macrophages promoted CT26 cell proliferation, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Compared with control macrophages, MFHAS1-silenced macrophages showed significantly reduced protumoral effects in vivo. Together, these results suggested that CRC cells induce M2 polarization of TAMs through MFHAS1 induction and subsequent STAT6 and KLF4 activation to promote CRC progress. Finally, similar to CT26 supernatant stimulation, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activation by rosiglitazone induced M2 polarization of RAW264.7 macrophages through MFHAS1-dependent pathway. Our results highlight the role of MFHAS1 as a regulator of macrophages polarization and CRC progress. PMID:27783989

  6. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  7. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  8. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling promotes RCC progression via increased endothelial cell proliferation and recruitment by modulating AKT → NF-κB → CXCL5 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhenfeng; Li, Chong; Fan, Jinhai; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling may promote renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression via altered HIF-2α/VEGF signaling. However, it remains unclear whether AR signaling also promotes RCC progression by recruiting vascular endothelial cells (ECs), key players in the development of blood vessels. In our study, AR increased EC proliferation and recruitment to the tumor microenvironment and promoted RCC progression. Mechanistically, AR modulated cytokine CXCL5 expression by altering AKT → NF-κB signaling, and interruption of AKT → NF-κB → CXCL5 signaling using either specific inhibitors or siRNA suppressed AR-enhanced EC recruitment and AR-EC-promoted RCC progression. The results obtained using an in vivo mouse model and a human clinical sample survey confirmed the role of AR in promoting RCC progression through enhancement of EC proliferation and/or recruitment via altered AKT → NF-κB → CXCL5 signaling. Targeting this newly identified AR-induced AKT → NF-κB → CXCL5 pathway may facilitate the development of new therapies for slowing RCC progression. PMID:27848972

  9. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling promotes RCC progression via increased endothelial cell proliferation and recruitment by modulating AKT → NF-κB → CXCL5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhenfeng; Li, Chong; Fan, Jinhai; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2016-11-16

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling may promote renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression via altered HIF-2α/VEGF signaling. However, it remains unclear whether AR signaling also promotes RCC progression by recruiting vascular endothelial cells (ECs), key players in the development of blood vessels. In our study, AR increased EC proliferation and recruitment to the tumor microenvironment and promoted RCC progression. Mechanistically, AR modulated cytokine CXCL5 expression by altering AKT → NF-κB signaling, and interruption of AKT → NF-κB → CXCL5 signaling using either specific inhibitors or siRNA suppressed AR-enhanced EC recruitment and AR-EC-promoted RCC progression. The results obtained using an in vivo mouse model and a human clinical sample survey confirmed the role of AR in promoting RCC progression through enhancement of EC proliferation and/or recruitment via altered AKT → NF-κB → CXCL5 signaling. Targeting this newly identified AR-induced AKT → NF-κB → CXCL5 pathway may facilitate the development of new therapies for slowing RCC progression.

  10. CB2 cannabinoid receptor activation promotes colon cancer progression via AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Esther; Martín-Ruiz, Asunción; Martín, Paloma; Calvo, Virginia; Provencio, Mariano; García, José M.

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacological activation of the cannabinoid receptor type 2, CB2, has been shown to elicit anti-tumoral mechanisms in different cancer types. However, little is known about its endogenous role in tumor pathophysiology, and different studies have attributed pro-tumorigenic properties to this receptor. In a previous work, we showed that CB2 expression is a poor prognostic factor in colon cancer patients. Here we report that activation of CB2 with low doses of specific agonists induce cell proliferation and favor the acquisition of aggressive molecular features in colon cancer cells. We show that sub-micromolar concentrations of CB2-specific agonists, JWH-133 and HU-308, promote an increase in cell proliferation rate through the activation of AKT/PKB pathway in colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. AKT activation promotes GSK3β inhibition and thus, a more aggressive cell phenotype with the subsequent elevation of SNAIL levels, E-cadherin degradation and β-catenin delocalization from cell membrane. Taken together, our data show that CB2 activation with sub-micromolar doses of agonists, which could be more similar to endogenous levels of cannabinoids, promote colon cancer progression, implicating that CB2 could have a pro-tumorigenic endogenous role in colon cancer. PMID:27634891

  11. Nuclear vasohibin-2 promotes cell proliferation by inducing G0/G1 to S phase progression.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qianqian; Zhou, Jia; Tu, Min; Xue, Xiaofeng; Li, Zhanjun; Lu, Zipeng; Wei, Jishu; Song, Guoxin; Chen, Jianmin; Guo, Feng; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi; Gao, Wentao

    2015-09-01

    As a member of the vasohibin (VASH2) family, VASH2 is localized intracellularly as a nuclear and cytoplasmic type. Cytoplasmic VASH2 is associated with carcinoma angiogenesis and malignant transformation and promotes cancer growth. However, the function of nuclear VASH2 has yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to detect the nuclear VASH2 expression profile in human organs and tissues by protein microarray technique. To examine the function of nuclear VASH2, we analyzed the relationship between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, and stably constructed VASH2 overexpression and knockdown in LO2 and HepG2 cell lines, based on a previous study in hepatic cells. The study was conducted using bromodeoxyuridine, immunofluorescent staining, western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Nuclear VASH2 was highly expressed in actively dividing cells in normal and cancer tissues. There was a significant positive correlation between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, indicating that nuclear VASH2 positively correlated with cell proliferation in normal and cancer tissues. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation test showed that nuclear VASH2 increased the S-phase population and promoted cell proliferation, while VASH2 knockdown reduced BrdU absorbance. Cell cycle analysis revealed that nuclear VASH2 overexpression increased the S-phase population in LO2 and HepG2 cells, while nuclear VASH2 knockdown reduced the S-phase population and increased the G0/G1 population. The findings of this study challenge the classic view of VASH2, which was previously reported as an angiogenesis factor. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, these results are the first clinical data indicating that nuclear VASH2, but not cytoplasmic VASH2, promotes cell proliferation by driving the cell cycle from the G0/G1 to S phase.

  12. Developing sense of coherence in educational contexts: making progress in promoting mental health in children.

    PubMed

    Krause, Christina

    2011-12-01

    The notion of salutogenesis was developed by Aaron Antonovsky to achieve a fundamental innovative approach to promoting mental health. Within the concept of salutogenesis, the author defined the sense of coherence (SOC) as a global life orientation, and he suggests that it emerges in the early years of childhood. In order to develop coherence and its components it is necessary to explore certain health resources. In this paper the following questions will be discussed: (1) which are the individual and social resources to keep healthy, and (2) how can these resources be activated? Selected empirical findings will be presented to respond to these research questions. The results show that resources such as self-worth and a sense of belonging are fundamental health factors. They can be developed most effectively in the early years of childhood and through the formal educational system, e.g. in kindergartens and primary schools. However, the findings show that professionals need to be trained to be able to deliver educational programmes in terms of salutogenesis. At the same time, experience shows that promoting health resources in children successfully depends on the participation of the parents and their support by the professional educators. This paper aims to present new ideas and experiences in the area of a practical realization of the concept of salutogenesis in educational systems. Particularly, health promotion programmes, for example 'The I am I programme' ( Krause, 2009 ), could be implemented successfully in kindergartens with a high quota of children with an immigrant background, due to the fact that this programme includes the reflection and experience of cultural traditions, food, songs, dancing, and family rituals.

  13. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Debra L.; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4Cdt2) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression. PMID:26771714

  14. Deletion of Interstitial Genes between TMPRSS2 and ERG Promotes Prostate Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Linn, Douglas E; Penney, Kathryn L; Bronson, Roderick T; Mucci, Lorelei A; Li, Zhe

    2016-04-01

    TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions that occur frequently in human prostate cancers can be generated either through insertional chromosomal rearrangement or by intrachromosomal deletion. Genetically, a key difference between these two mechanisms is that the latter results in deletion of a ∼3-Mb interstitial region containing genes with unexplored roles in prostate cancer. In this study, we characterized two mouse models recapitulating TMPRSS2-ERG insertion or deletion events in the background of prostate-specific PTEN deficiency. We found that only the mice that lacked the interstitial region developed prostate adenocarcinomas marked by poor differentiation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Mechanistic investigations identified several interstitial genes, including Ets2 and Bace2, whose reduced expression correlated in the gene homologs in human prostate cancer with biochemical relapse and lethal disease. Accordingly, PTEN-deficient mice with prostate-specific knockout of Ets2 exhibited marked progression of prostate adenocarcinomas that was partly attributed to activation of MAPK signaling. Collectively, our findings established that Ets2 is a tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer, and its loss along with other genes within the TMPRSS2-ERG interstitial region contributes to disease progression. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1869-81. ©2016 AACR.

  15. Radiation Promotes Colorectal Cancer Initiation and Progression by Inducing Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Bozeman, Ronald; Kaisani, Aadil; Kim, Wanil; Zhang, Lu; Richardson, James A.; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common since protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared to conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIR) which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence associated gene (P19Arf) are markedly increased. Following these changes loss of Casein kinase Iα (CKIα) and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared to x-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, CDDO-EA, reduces proton irradiation associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus, exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA. PMID:26477319

  16. High KRT8 expression promotes tumor progression and metastasis of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian; Wang, Hao; Liu, Yun; Ding, Fangfang; Ni, Ying; Shao, Shihe

    2017-02-01

    Keratin8 (KRT8) is the major component of the intermediate filament cytoskeleton and predominantly expressed in simple epithelial tissues. Aberrant expression of KRT8 is associated with multiple tumor progression and metastasis. However, the role of KRT8 in gastric cancer (GC) remains unclear. In this study, KRT8 expression was investigated and it was found to be upregulated along with human GC progression and metastasis at both mRNA and protein levels in human gastric cancer tissues. In addition, KRT8 overexpression enhanced the proliferation and migration of human gastric cancer cells, whereas the knock-down of KRT8 by siRNA only inhibited migration of human gastric cancer cells. Integrinβ1-FAK-induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) only existed in the high KRT8 cells. Furthermore, KRT8 overexpression led to increase in p-smad2/3 levels and TGFβ dependent signaling events. KRT8 expression in GC was related to tumor clinical stage and worse survival. Kaplan-Meier analysis proved that KRT8 was associated with overall survival of patients with GC that patients with high KRT8 expression tend to have unfavorable outcome. Moreover, Cox's proportional hazards analysis showed that high KRT8 expression was a prognostic marker of poor outcome. These results provided that KRT8 expression may therefore be a biomarker or potential therapeutic target to identify patients with worse survival.

  17. microRNA-17 family promotes polycystic kidney disease progression through modulation of mitochondrial metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hajarnis, Sachin; Lakhia, Ronak; Yheskel, Matanel; Williams, Darren; Sorourian, Mehran; Liu, Xueqing; Aboudehen, Karam; Zhang, Shanrong; Kersjes, Kara; Galasso, Ryan; Li, Jian; Kaimal, Vivek; Lockton, Steven; Davis, Scott; Flaten, Andrea; Johnson, Joshua A.; Holland, William L.; Kusminski, Christine M.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Harris, Peter C.; Trudel, Marie; Wallace, Darren P.; Igarashi, Peter; Lee, Edmund C.; Androsavich, John R.; Patel, Vishal

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic cause of renal failure. Here we identify miR-17 as a target for the treatment of ADPKD. We report that miR-17 is induced in kidney cysts of mouse and human ADPKD. Genetic deletion of the miR-17∼92 cluster inhibits cyst proliferation and PKD progression in four orthologous, including two long-lived, mouse models of ADPKD. Anti-miR-17 treatment attenuates cyst growth in short-term and long-term PKD mouse models. miR-17 inhibition also suppresses proliferation and cyst growth of primary ADPKD cysts cultures derived from multiple human donors. Mechanistically, c-Myc upregulates miR-17∼92 in cystic kidneys, which in turn aggravates cyst growth by inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation and stimulating proliferation through direct repression of Pparα. Thus, miR-17 family is a promising drug target for ADPKD, and miR-17-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism represents a potential new mechanism for ADPKD progression. PMID:28205547

  18. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  19. Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K; Saito, Hiroshi; Pulliam, Joseph F; Lee, Eun Y; Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze; Li, Li; Shelton, Brent J; Tucker, Thomas; Evers, B Mark; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-07-01

    Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alone or in combination, together with AOM/DSS pretreatment has a promotion effect, increasing the colorectal tumor incidence, multiplicity, size, and grade, as well as cell inflammatory response. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that As(III) or Cr(VI) treatment alone significantly changed the density of proteins. The expression of β-catenin and phospho-GSK was increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Concomitantly, the expression of NADPH oxidase1 (NOX1) and the level of 8-OHdG were also increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were decreased. Similarly, in an in vitro system, exposure of CRL-1807 to carcinogenic metals increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the expression of β-catenin, phospho-GSK, and NOX1. Inhibition of ROS generation by addition of SOD or catalase inhibited β-catenin expression and activity. Our study provides a new animal model to study the carcinogenicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) and suggests that As(III) and Cr(VI) promote colorectal cancer tumorigenesis, at least partly, through ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  20. IL-8 promotes HNSCC progression on CXCR1/2-meidated NOD1/RIP2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Leong-Perng; Wang, Ling-Feng; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Lee, Ka-Wo; Kuo, Po-Lin; Liang, Chia-Hua

    2016-01-01

    NOD1 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1) is overexpressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells, as is IL-8 in cancer cells. However, the mechanism of the IL-8-mediated overexpression of NOD in HNSCC not been identified. This study determines whether IL-8 promotes tumor progression via the NOD signaling pathway in HNSCC. Higher IL-8, NOD1 and receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP2) expressions were observed in HNSCC tissue than in non-cancerous matched tissue (NCMT), whereas NOD2 was weakly expressed. Furthermore, IL-8 stimulated the proliferation of HNSCC cells (SCC4, SCC9 and SCC25) but not dysplastic oral mucosa DOK cells. Exposure to IL-8 increased the clonogenicity of HNSCC cells. IL-8 siRNA inhibited cell proliferation and cell colony formation, suggesting that IL-8 is involved in HNSCC cancer progression. The expressions of CXCR1 and CXCR2 were higher in HNSCC tissue than in NCMT. HNSCC cells that were exposed to IL-8 exhibited higher expression of CXCR1/2 than did controls. The blocking of IL-8 by siRNA reduced CXCR1/2 expression in HNSCC cells, suggesting that the cancer progression of HNSCC cells that is induced by IL-8 depends on CXCR1/2. Additionally, IL-8 is associated with increased NOD1 and RIP2 expression and reduced NOD2 expression in three types of HNSCC cells. The blocking of IL-8 by siRNA reduces IL-8, NOD1 and RIP2 expressions in HNSCC cells, but not the level of NOD2. These results suggest that IL-8 has an important role in HNSCC progression via a CXCR1/2-meidated NOD1/RIP2 signaling pathway. PMID:27557518

  1. Semaphorin 4D cooperates with VEGF to promote angiogenesis and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Binmadi, Nada O.; Yang, Ying-Hua; Proia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    The semaphorins and plexins comprise a family of cysteine-rich proteins implicated in control of nerve growth and development and regulation of the immune response. Our group and others have found that Semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D) and its receptor, Plexin-B1, play an important role in tumor-induced angiogenesis, with some neoplasms producing SEMA4D in a manner analogous to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in order to attract Plexin-B1-expressing endothelial cells into the tumor for the purpose of promoting growth and vascularity. While anti-VEGF strategies have been the focus of most angiogenesis inhibition research, such treatment can lead to upregulation of pro-angiogenic factors that can compensate for the loss of VEGF, eventually leading to failure of therapy. Here, we demonstrate that SEMA4D cooperates with VEGF to promote angiogenesis in malignancies and can perform the same function in a setting of VEGF blockade. We also show the potential value of inhibiting SEMA4D/Plexin-B1 signaling as a complementary mechanism to anti-VEGF treatment, particularly in VEGF inhibitor–resistant tumors, suggesting that this may represent a novel treatment for some cancers. PMID:22476930

  2. Prevention and health promotion: decades of progress, new challenges, and an emerging agenda.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy W; Orleans, C Tracy; Jenkins, C David

    2004-03-01

    Daily habits (e.g., smoking, diet, and exercise) and their immediate consequences (e.g., obesity) confer risk for most of the major health problems in industrialized nations. Hence, determinants of these behaviors and their modifications have been central topics in health psychology. Considerable scientific and applied progress has been made, but the field faces important challenges and opportunities in the future. These challenges and opportunities include changes in demographics and patterns of health, the need for a more comprehensive model of the domain of health behavior and prevention, the need to integrate behavioral and psychosocial risk and resilience, the incorporation of new technologies, and addressing a variety of professional and economic barriers to the implementation of prevention in health care.

  3. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this research is to develop a methodology for analyzing the reactivity of cyclic olefins in situ in a high temperature and high pressure infrared cell. Cyclic olefins, such as 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene (isotetralin) and 1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracene (HHA), are highly reactive donor compounds that readily donate their hydrogen to coal and model acceptors when heated to temperatures of 200{degrees}C and above. These donors are active donors in the low severity liquefaction of coal at 350{degrees}C as shown in the research performed in this project. The infrared studies are being performed in a high temperature infrared cell that was obtained from AABSPEC. Modifications to that cell have been made and have been reported in previous progress reports.

  4. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bajenova, Olga; Chaika, Nina; Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander; Gapon, Svetlana; Thomas, Peter; O’Brien, Stephen

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  5. Interleukin-33 promotes disease progression in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongqiang; Zhang, Ji-Yuan; Lv, Sa; Wang, Huan; Gong, Man; Du, Ning; Liu, Honghong; Zhang, Ning; Jing, Jing; Zhou, Chao; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Zongren

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a progressive autoimmune liver disease that can cause a series of complications, including cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is expressed in various non-hematopoietic cells and a certain population of immune cells, and exerts its biological effects by binding to the specific receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2). A soluble form of ST2 (sST2) has been postulated to act as a decoy receptor for IL-33. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of IL-33 in the pathogenesis of PBC. The study included 20 healthy controls and 68 patients with PBC. We thus found the increased serum IL-33 levels in PBC patients. Its elevated levels were positively correlated with serum alkaline phosphatase levels (a key parameter for the definition of PBC) and with Child-Pugh scores, which were used to determine the prognosis of liver cirrhosis. Moreover, the serum concentrations of sST2 were significantly higher in PBC patients compared with healthy subjects, irrespective of the disease severity. Importantly, the cells that express IL-33 and/or myeloperoxidase (a marker for neutrophils) were accumulated in the livers of PBC patients, and their number increased with the severity of liver lesions. Lastly, in vitro chemotaxis assays revealed that IL-33 enhanced the migration of neutrophils. These data suggest that IL-33 may affect the progress of PBC by recruiting neutrophils to the liver. This expanded knowledge of IL-33 in PBC patients is important for developing therapeutic strategies (e.g., neutralization of IL-33), selecting optimal clinical management, and predicting prognosis.

  6. ANGPTL4 deficiency in haematopoietic cells promotes monocyte expansion and atherosclerosis progression

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Binod; Rotllan, Noemi; Araldi, Elisa; Ramírez, Cristina M.; He, Shun; Chousterman, Benjamin G.; Fenn, Ashley M.; Wanschel, Amarylis; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Warrier, Nikhil; Martín-Ventura, Jose L.; Swirski, Filip K.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages has profound effects on macrophage gene expression and contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we report that angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is the most highly upregulated gene in foamy macrophages and it's absence in haematopoietic cells results in larger atherosclerotic plaques, characterized by bigger necrotic core areas and increased macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, hyperlipidemic mice deficient in haematopoietic ANGPTL4 have higher blood leukocyte counts, which is associated with an increase in the common myeloid progenitor (CMP) population. ANGPTL4-deficient CMPs have higher lipid raft content, are more proliferative and less apoptotic compared with the wild-type (WT) CMPs. Finally, we observe that ANGPTL4 deficiency in macrophages promotes foam cell formation by enhancing CD36 expression and reducing ABCA1 localization in the cell surface. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that haematopoietic ANGPTL4 deficiency increases atherogenesis through regulating myeloid progenitor cell expansion and differentiation, foam cell formation and vascular inflammation. PMID:27460411

  7. Z‐Scheme Photocatalytic Systems for Promoting Photocatalytic Performance: Recent Progress and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haijin; Tu, Wenguang

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor photocatalysts have attracted increased attention due to their great potential for solving energy and environmental problems. The formation of Z‐scheme photocatalytic systems that mimic natural photosynthesis is a promising strategy to improve photocatalytic activity that is superior to single component photocatalysts. The connection between photosystem I (PS I) and photosystem II (PS II) are crucial for constructing efficient Z‐scheme photocatalytic systems using two photocatalysts (PS I and PS II). The present review concisely summarizes and highlights recent state‐of‐the‐art accomplishments of Z‐scheme photocatalytic systems with diverse connection modes, including i) with shuttle redox mediators, ii) without electron mediators, and iii) with solid‐state electron mediators, which effectively increase visible‐light absorption, promote the separation and transportation of photoinduced charge carriers, and thus enhance the photocatalytic efficiency. The challenges and prospects for future development of Z‐scheme photocatalytic systems are also presented. PMID:27980982

  8. ANGPTL4 deficiency in haematopoietic cells promotes monocyte expansion and atherosclerosis progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Binod; Rotllan, Noemi; Araldi, Elisa; Ramírez, Cristina M.; He, Shun; Chousterman, Benjamin G.; Fenn, Ashley M.; Wanschel, Amarylis; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Warrier, Nikhil; Martín-Ventura, Jose L.; Swirski, Filip K.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages has profound effects on macrophage gene expression and contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we report that angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is the most highly upregulated gene in foamy macrophages and it's absence in haematopoietic cells results in larger atherosclerotic plaques, characterized by bigger necrotic core areas and increased macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, hyperlipidemic mice deficient in haematopoietic ANGPTL4 have higher blood leukocyte counts, which is associated with an increase in the common myeloid progenitor (CMP) population. ANGPTL4-deficient CMPs have higher lipid raft content, are more proliferative and less apoptotic compared with the wild-type (WT) CMPs. Finally, we observe that ANGPTL4 deficiency in macrophages promotes foam cell formation by enhancing CD36 expression and reducing ABCA1 localization in the cell surface. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that haematopoietic ANGPTL4 deficiency increases atherogenesis through regulating myeloid progenitor cell expansion and differentiation, foam cell formation and vascular inflammation.

  9. Innovative business approaches for incenting health promotion in sub-Saharan Africa: progress and persisting challenges.

    PubMed

    Patel, Deepak N; Nossel, Craig; Alexander, Eleanore; Yach, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable chronic diseases related to behaviors such as tobacco use, overeating, excess alcohol intake and physical inactivity account for increasing morbidity and mortality in South Africa. Over the last 15 years, Discovery Health, the largest private health plan in South Africa, has developed a voluntary health promotion program called Vitality with over 1.5 million members. Vitality was designed with many applications drawn from the growing field of behavioral economics, including the use of incentives and rewards. Incentives offered on the program are aimed at lowering the financial barriers to activities such as visiting the gym, buying healthy food or receiving preventive screening. Members accrue points for engagement which translate into discounts on a range of goods and services. Although the full impact of the program cannot yet be quantified, engagement with the program is continually increasing and there is compelling evidence that this translates into better health and cost outcomes.

  10. Macrophage migratory inhibitory factor promotes bladder cancer progression via increasing proliferation and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage migratory inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine shown to promote tumorigenesis. Using the N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine (BBN) model of bladder cancer, we previously showed that MIF knockout mice display decreased angiogenesis and invasion compared with wild-type. This study examines the role of MIF in bladder cancer via use of oral inhibitors of MIF. In vitro, high-grade bladder cancer cells were treated with recombinant human MIF +/− (rhMIF+/−) inhibitor. Measurements included cell counts, proliferation by 3H-thymidine incorporation (TdR), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation by western blot analysis, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by quantitative PCR and protein secretion by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with rhMIF increased ERK phosphorylation, cell counts, TdR and mRNA expression and protein secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor, which were blocked by specific inhibitors of ERK and MIF. In vivo, 3-month-old male C57Bl/6 mice were given BBN for 22 and 16 weeks in study 1 and study 2, respectively. Mice (n = 8–10 per group) were gavaged with vehicle or doses of MIF inhibitors daily from weeks 16–22 in both studies. Average bladder weights, reflecting tumor mass, tumor stage/burden, mitotic rate and proliferation indices, and microvessel densities were reduced in inhibitor groups versus controls. In summary, MIF promotes bladder cancer via increasing cell proliferation and angiogenesis and oral inhibitors of MIF may prove useful in treatment of this disease. PMID:23825153

  11. XRCC2 Promotes Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth, Regulates Cell Cycle Progression, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kaiwu; Song, Xinming; Chen, Zhihui; Qin, Changjiang; He, Yulong; Zhan, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    Abstract X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese hamster cells 2 (XRCC2) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) both play important roles in homologous recombination DNA repair. According to the theory of synthetic lethality, XRCC2-deficient cells are more sensitive to PARP1 inhibitors compared to XRCC2-expressing cells. We investigated XRCC2 expression and function in colorectal cancer (CRC), and the characteristics of sensitivity to PARP1 inhibitor in CRC cells with different XRCC2 levels. We enrolled 153 patients with CRC who had undergone surgery in this study. XRCC2 expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Stable CRC SW480 cell lines with low or high XRCC2 expression were constructed. Following treatment with the PARP1 inhibitor olaparib, the viability of cells with different XRCC2 levels was determined; cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed using flow cytometry. B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein expression was measured by Western blotting. The positive rates of XRCC2 in primary CRC tissue were significantly higher than that in the matched adjacent noncancerous tissue, and XRCC2 expression status in primary CRC was related to tumor site, Dukes’ stage, and tumor-nodes-metastasis (TNM) stage. XRCC2 overexpression inhibited CRC cell apoptosis and promoted proliferation by enriching cells in the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, olaparib suppressed proliferation, and olaparib sensitivity in CRC cells with high XRCC2 expression was greater. High XRCC2 expression promotes CRC cell proliferation and enriches cells in the G0/G1 phase but inhibits apoptosis. High XRCC2 expression cells are more sensitive to olaparib, which inhibits their viability. PMID:25526472

  12. Altered Arsenic Disposition in Experimental Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Canet, Mark J.; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Lake, April D.; Kopplin, Michael J.; Scheffer, George L.; Klimecki, Walter T.; Gandolfi, A. Jay

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is represented by a spectrum of liver pathologies ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Liver damage sustained in the progressive stages of NAFLD may alter the ability of the liver to properly metabolize and eliminate xenobiotics. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether NAFLD alters the disposition of the environmental toxicant arsenic. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a high-fat or a methionine-choline-deficient diet to model simple steatosis and NASH, respectively. At the conclusion of the dietary regimen, all mice were given a single oral dose of either sodium arsenate or arsenic trioxide. Mice with NASH excreted significantly higher levels of total arsenic in urine (24 h) compared with controls. Total arsenic in the liver and kidneys of NASH mice was not altered; however, NASH liver retained significantly higher levels of the monomethyl arsenic metabolite, whereas dimethyl arsenic was retained significantly less in the kidneys of NASH mice. NASH mice had significantly higher levels of the more toxic trivalent form in their urine, whereas the pentavalent form was preferentially retained in the liver of NASH mice. Moreover, hepatic protein expression of the arsenic biotransformation enzyme arsenic (3+ oxidation state) methyltransferase was not altered in NASH animals, whereas protein expression of the membrane transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 was increased, implicating cellular transport rather than biotransformation as a possible mechanism. These results suggest that NASH alters the disposition of arsenical species, which may have significant implications on the overall toxicity associated with arsenic in NASH. PMID:22699396

  13. Binational arsenic exposure survey: methodology and estimated arsenic intake from drinking water and urinary arsenic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Jason; O'Rourke, Mary Kay; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Gutiérrez-Millán, Luis Enrique; Burgess, Jefferey L; Harris, Robin B

    2012-04-01

    The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES) was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Adults responded to questionnaires and provided dietary information. A first morning urine void and water from all household drinking sources were collected. Associations between urinary arsenic concentration (total, organic, inorganic) and estimated level of arsenic consumed from water and other beverages were evaluated through crude associations and by random effects models. Median estimated total arsenic intake from beverages among participants from Arizona communities ranged from 1.7 to 14.1 µg/day compared to 0.6 to 3.4 µg/day among those from Mexico communities. In contrast, median urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations were greatest among participants from Hermosillo, Mexico (6.2 µg/L) whereas a high of 2.0 µg/L was found among participants from Ajo, Arizona. Estimated arsenic intake from drinking water was associated with urinary total arsenic concentration (p < 0.001), urinary inorganic arsenic concentration (p < 0.001), and urinary sum of species (p < 0.001). Urinary arsenic concentrations increased between 7% and 12% for each one percent increase in arsenic consumed from drinking water. Variability in arsenic intake from beverages and urinary arsenic output yielded counter intuitive results. Estimated intake of arsenic from all beverages was greatest among Arizonans yet participants in Mexico had higher urinary total and inorganic arsenic concentrations. Other contributors to urinary arsenic concentrations should be evaluated.

  14. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-01

    Several scale model mixing systems have been built and are being utilized to study the gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal. Numerous batch agglomeration tests have been conducted with these systems. During an individual test the progress of agglomeration has been monitored by observing either changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated particle suspensions or changes in turbidity in the case of dilute suspensions. A mathematical model has been developed for relating the rate of agglomeration of coal particles to the rate of change of turbidity of a dilute particle suspension undergoing agglomeration. The model has been utilized for analyzing and interpreting the results of a number of oil agglomeration tests in which several different system parameters were varied.

  15. HBV core promoter mutations and AKT upregulate S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 to promote postoperative hepatocellular carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lubiao; Gu, Lin; Gu, Yurong; Wang, Hongbo; Deng, Meihai; Stamataki, Zania; Oo, Ye Htun; Huang, Yuehua

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core promoter (CP) have been shown to be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The CP region overlaps HBV X gene, which activates AKT to regulate hepatocyte survival. However, the cooperation between these two cascades in HCC progression remains poorly understood. Here, we assayed virological factors and AKT expression in liver tissues from 56 HCC patients with better prognoses (BHCC, ≥5-year survival) and 58 with poor prognoses (PHCC, <5-year survival) after partial liver resection. Results showed double mutation A1762T/G1764A (TA) combined with other mutation(s) (TACO) in HBV genome and phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) were more common in PHCC than BHCC. TACO and pAKT levels correlated with proliferation and microvascularization but inversely correlated with apoptosis in HCC samples. These were more pronounced when TACO and pAKT co-expressed. Levels of p21 and p27 were decreased in TACO or pAKT overexpressing HCC due to SKP2 upregulation. Levels of E2F1 and both mRNA and protein of SKP2 were increased in TACO expressing HCC. Levels of 4EBP1/2 decreased and SKP2 mRNA level remained constant in pAKT-overexpressing HCC. Therefore, TACO and AKT are two independent predictors of postoperative survival in HCC. Their co-target, SKP2 may be a diagnostic or therapeutic marker. PMID:27779207

  16. Ran GTPase promotes cancer progression via Met receptor-mediated downstream signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Hiu-Fung; Chan, Ka-Kui; Platt-Higgins, Angela; Dakir, El-Habib; Matchett, Kyle B.; Haggag, Yusuf Ahmed; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Habib, Tanwir; Faheem, Ahmed; Dean, Fennell A.; Morgan, Richard; Rudland, Philip S.; El-Tanani, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown previously that cancer cells with an activated oncogenic pathway, including Met activation, require Ran for growth and survival. Here, we show that knockdown of Ran leads to a reduction of Met receptor expression in several breast and lung cancer cell lines. This, in turn suppressed HGF expression and the Met-mediated activation of the Akt pathway, as well as cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. In a cell line model where Met amplification has previously been shown to contribute to gefitinib resistance, Ran knockdown sensitized cells to gefitinib-mediated inhibition of Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and consequently reduced cell proliferation. We further demonstrate that Met reduction-mediated by knockdown of Ran, occurs at the post-transcriptional level, probably via a matrix metalloproteinase. Moreover, the level of immunoreactive Ran and Met are positively associated in human breast cancer specimens, suggesting that a high level of Ran may be a pre-requisite for Met overexpression. Interestingly, a high level of immunoreactive Ran dictates the prognostic significance of Met, indicating that the co-overexpression of Met and Ran may be associated with cancer progression and could be used in combination as a prognostic indicator. PMID:27716616

  17. NDRG1 overexpression promotes the progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma through modulating Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ai, Runna; Sun, Yulin; Guo, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Lanping; Liu, Fang; Hendricks, Denver T; Xu, Yang; Zhao, Xiaohang

    2016-09-01

    N-myc down-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been shown to regulate tumor growth and metastasis in various malignant tumors and also to be dysregulated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Here, we show that NDRG1 overexpression (91.9%, 79/86) in ESCC tumor tissues is associated with poor overall survival of esophageal cancer patients. When placed in stable transfectants of the KYSE 30 ESCC cell line generated by lentiviral transduction with the ectopic overexpression of NDRG1, the expression of transducin-like enhancer of Split 2 (TLE2) was decreased sharply, however β-catenin was increased. Mechanistically, NDRG1 physically associates with TLE2 and β-catenin to affect the Wnt pathway. RNA interference and TLE2 overexpression studies demonstrate that NDRG1 fails to active Wnt pathway compared with isogenic wild-type controls. Strikingly, NDRG1 overexpression induces the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) through activating the Wnt signaling pathway in ESCC cells, decreased the expression of E-cadherin and enhanced the expression of Snail. Our study elucidates a mechanism of NDRG1-regulated Wnt pathway activation and EMT via affecting TLE2 and  β-catenin expression in esophageal cancer cells. This indicates a pro-oncogenic role for NDRG1 in esophageal cancer cells whereby it modulates tumor progression.

  18. CSE1L interaction with MSH6 promotes osteosarcoma progression and predicts poor patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dong-dong; Lin, He-chun; Li, Shi-jie; Yao, Ming; Yang, Qing-cheng; Fan, Cun-yi

    2017-01-01

    To discover tumor-associated proteins in osteosarcoma, a quantitative proteomic analysis was performed to identify proteins that were differentially expressed between osteosarcoma and human osteoblastic cells. Through clinical screening and a functional evaluation, chromosome segregation 1-like (CSE1L) protein was found to be related to the growth of osteosarcoma cells. To date, little is known about the function and underlying mechanism of CSE1L in osteosarcoma. In the present study, we show that knockdown of CSE1L inhibits osteosarcoma growth in vitro and in vivo. By co-immunoprecipitation and RNA-seq analysis, CSE1L was found to interact with mutS homolog 6 (MSH6) and function as a positive regulator of MSH6 protein in osteosarcoma cells. A rescue study showed that decreased growth of osteosarcoma cells by CSE1L knockdown was reversed by MSH6 overexpression, indicating that the activity of CSE1L was an MSH6-dependent function. In addition, depletion of MSH6 hindered cellular proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Notably, CSE1L expression was correlated with MSH6 expression in tumor samples and was associated with poor prognosis in patients with osteosarcoma. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the CSE1L-MSH6 axis has an important role in osteosarcoma progression. PMID:28387323

  19. Inflammatory monocytes promote progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and can be therapeutically targeted via CCR2.

    PubMed

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Liang, Feng; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Danialou, Gawiyou; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Bourdon, Johanne; Rafei, Moutih; Galipeau, Jacques; Divangahi, Maziar; Petrof, Basil J

    2014-11-01

    Myofiber necrosis and fibrosis are hallmarks of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), leading to lethal weakness of the diaphragm. Macrophages (MPs) are required for successful muscle regeneration, but the role of inflammatory monocyte (MO)-derived MPs in either promoting or mitigating DMD is unclear. We show that DMD (mdx) mouse diaphragms exhibit greatly increased expression of CCR2 and its chemokine ligands, along with inflammatory (Ly6C(high)) MO recruitment and accumulation of CD11b(high) MO-derived MPs. Loss-of-function of CCR2 preferentially reduced this CD11b(high) MP population by impeding the release of Ly6C(high) MOs from the bone marrow but not the splenic reservoir. CCR2 deficiency also helped restore the MP polarization balance by preventing excessive skewing of MPs toward a proinflammatory phenotype. These effects were linked to amelioration of histopathological features and increased muscle strength in the diaphragm. Chronic inhibition of CCR2 signaling by mutated CCL2 secreted from implanted mesenchymal stem cells resulted in similar improvements. These data uncover a previously unrecognized role of inflammatory MOs in DMD pathogenesis and indicate that CCR2 inhibition could offer a novel strategy for DMD management.

  20. OTX1 promotes colorectal cancer progression through epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kun; Cai, Xin-Yi; Li, Qiang; Yang, Zhi-Bin; Xiong, Wei; Shen, Tao; Wang, Wei-Ya; Li, Yun-Feng

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • OTX1 is overexpression in colorectal cancer tissues. • Overexpression of OTX1 promotes colorectal cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. • Depletion of OTX1 inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. • Overexpression of OTX1 is linked to the EMT-like phenotype. - Abstract: Orthodenticle homeobox 1 (OTX1), a transcription factor containing a bicoid-like homeodomain, plays a role in brain and sensory organ development. In this study, we report that OTX1 is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer (CRC) and OTX1 overexpression is associated with higher stage. Functional analyses reveal that overexpression of OTX1 results in accumulation of CRC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, whereas ablation of OTX1 expression significantly inhibits the proliferative and invasive capability of CRC cells in vitro. Together, our results indicate that OTX1 is involved in human colon carcinogenesis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human colorectal cancer.

  1. MiR-449a promotes breast cancer progression by targeting CRIP2.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Bruce, Jeff; Lee, Matthew; Yue, Shijun; Rowe, Matthew; Pintilie, Melania; Kogo, Ryunosuke; Bissey, Pierre-Antoine; Fyles, Anthony; Yip, Kenneth W; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-04-05

    The identification of prognostic biomarkers and their underlying mechanisms of action remain of great interest in breast cancer biology. Using global miRNA profiling of 71 lymph node-negative invasive ductal breast cancers and 5 normal mammary epithelial tissues, we identified miR-449a to be highly overexpressed in the malignant breast tissue. Its expression was significantly associated with increased incidence of patient relapse, decreased overall survival, and decreased disease-free survival. In vitro, miR-449a promoted breast cancer cell proliferation, clonogenic survival, migration, and invasion. By utilizing a tri-modal in silico approach for target identification, Cysteine-Rich Protein 2 (CRIP2; a transcription factor) was identified as a direct target of miR-449a, corroborated using qRT-PCR, Western blot, and luciferase reporter assays. MDA-MB-231 cells stably transfected with CRIP2 demonstrated a significant reduction in cell viability, migration, and invasion, as well as decreased tumor growth and angiogenesis in mouse xenograft models. Our data revealed that overexpression of miR-449a suppresses CRIP2, which then affects the tumor vasculature, likely via NF-κB/p65 complex-mediated transcription of VEGF. These finding define an oncogenic function of miR-449a in human breast cancer, and highlight the importance of this pathway in driving aggressive behaviour.

  2. MicroRNA-424 impairs ubiquitination to activate STAT3 and promote prostate tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Dallavalle, Cecilia; Civenni, Gianluca; Merulla, Jessica; Ostano, Paola; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Rossi, Simona; Losa, Marco; D’Ambrosio, Gioacchino; Sessa, Fausto; Thalmann, George N.; Zitella, Andrea; Chiorino, Giovanna; Catapano, Carlo V.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations and deletions in components of ubiquitin ligase complexes that lead to alterations in protein turnover are important mechanisms in driving tumorigenesis. Here we describe an alternative mechanism involving upregulation of the microRNA miR-424 that leads to impaired ubiquitination and degradation of oncogenic transcription factors in prostate cancers. We found that miR-424 targets the E3 ubiquitin ligase COP1 and identified STAT3 as a key substrate of COP1 in promoting tumorigenic and cancer stem-like properties in prostate epithelial cells. Altered protein turnover due to impaired COP1 function led to accumulation and enhanced basal and cytokine-induced activity of STAT3. We further determined that loss of the ETS factor ESE3/EHF is the initial event that triggers the deregulation of the miR-424/COP1/STAT3 axis. COP1 silencing and STAT3 activation were effectively reverted by blocking of miR-424, suggesting a possible strategy to attack this key node of tumorigenesis in ESE3/EHF–deficient tumors. These results establish miR-424 as an oncogenic effector linked to noncanonical activation of STAT3 and as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27820701

  3. Prefoldin 1 promotes EMT and lung cancer progression by suppressing cyclin A expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, D; Shi, W; Tang, Y; Liu, Y; He, K; Hu, Y; Li, J; Yang, Y; Song, J

    2017-01-01

    Prefoldin (PFDN) is a co-chaperone protein that is primarily known for its classic cytoplasmic functions in the folding of actin and tubulin monomers during cytoskeletal assembly. Here, we report a marked increase in prefoldin subunit 1 (PFDN1) levels during the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and in human lung tumor tissues. Interestingly, the nuclear localization of PFDN1 was also detected. These observations suggest that PFDN1 may be essential for important novel functions. Overexpression of PFDN1 induced EMT and cell invasion. In sharp contrast, knockdown of PFDN1 generated the opposite effects. Overexpression of PFDN1 was also found to induce lung tumor growth and metastasis. Further experiments showed that PFDN1 overexpression inhibits the expression of cyclin A. PFDN1 suppressed cyclin A expression by directly interacting with the cyclin A promoter at the transcriptional start site. Strikingly, cyclin A overexpression abolished the above PFDN1-mediated effects on the behavior of lung cancer cells, whereas cyclin A knockdown alone induced EMT and increased cell migration and invasion ability. This study reveals that the TGF-β1/PFDN1/cyclin A axis is essential for EMT induction and metastasis of lung cancer cells. PMID:27694898

  4. Chemokines and chemokine receptors as promoters of prostate cancer growth and progression.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Nicole; Castellan, Miguel; Shirodkar, Samir S; Lokeshwar, Bal L

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is estimated to be first in incidence among cancers, with more than 240,000 new cases in 2012 in the United States. Chemokines and their receptors provide survival, proliferation, and invasion characteristics to CaP cells in both primary sites of cancer and metastatic locations. The emerging data demonstrate that many chemokines and their receptors are involved in the multistep process of CaP, leading to metastasis, and, further, that these factors act cooperatively to enhance other mechanisms of tumor cell survival, growth, and metastasis. Changes of chemokine receptor cohorts may be necessary to activate tumor-promoting signals. Chemokine receptors can activate downstream effectors, such as mitogen-activated protein kinases, by complex mechanisms of ligand-dependent activation of cryptic growth factors; guanosine triphosphate-binding, protein-coupled activation of survival kinases; or transactivation of other receptors such as ErbB family members. We describe vanguard research in which more than the classic view of chemokine receptor biology was clarified. Control of chemokines and inhibition of their receptor activation may add critical tools to reduce tumor growth, especially in chemo-hormonal refractory CaP that is both currently incurable and the most aggressive form of the disease, accounting for most of the more than 28,000 annual deaths.

  5. PFTK1 Promotes Gastric Cancer Progression by Regulating Proliferation, Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhu, Jia; Huang, Hua; Yang, Qichang; Cai, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Zhu, Junya; Shao, Mengting; Xiao, Jinzhang; Cao, Jie; Gu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Shusen; Wang, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    PFTK1, also known as PFTAIRE1, CDK14, is a novel member of Cdc2-related serine/threonine protein kinases. Recent studies show that PFTK1 is highly expressed in several malignant tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma, esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and involved in regulation of cell cycle, tumors proliferation, migration, and invasion that further influence the prognosis of tumors. However, the expression and physiological significance of PFTK1 in gastric cancer remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of PFTK1 by Western blot in 8 paired fresh gastric cancer tissues, nontumorous gastric mucosal tissues and immunohistochemistry on 161 paraffinembedded slices. High PFTK1 expression was correlated with the tumor grade, lymph node invasion as well as Ki-67. Through Cell Counting Kit (CCK)-8 assay, flow cytometry, colony formation, wound healing and transwell assays, the vitro studies demonstrated that PFTK1 overexpression promoted proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, while PFTK1 knockdown led to the opposite results. Our findings for the first time supported that PFTK1 might play an important role in the regulation of gastric cancer proliferation, migration and would provide a novel promising therapeutic strategy against human gastric cancer.

  6. Extracellular matrix protein Reelin promotes myeloma progression by facilitating tumor cell proliferation and glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaodan; Lin, Liang; Cao, Li; Zhang, Xinwei; Song, Xiao; Hao, Jie; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Risheng; Huang, Xiaojun; Lu, Jin; Ge, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein that is crucial for neuron migration, adhesion, and positioning. We examined the expression of Reelin in a large cohort of multiple myeloma patients recorded in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database and used over-expression and siRNA knockdown of Reelin to investigate the role of Reelin in myeloma cell growth. We find that Reelin expression is negatively associated with myeloma prognosis. Reelin promotes myeloma cell proliferation in vitro as well as in vivo. The Warburg effect, evidenced by increased glucose uptake and lactate production, is also enhanced in Reelin-expressing cells. The activation of FAK/Syk/Akt/mTOR and STAT3 pathways contributes to Reelin-induced cancer cell growth and metabolic reprogramming. Our findings further reveal that activated Akt and STAT3 pathways induce the upregulation of HIF1α and its downstream targets (LDHA and PDK1), leading to increased glycolysis in myeloma cells. Together, our results demonstrate the critical contributions of Reelin to myeloma growth and metabolism. It presents an opportunity for myeloma therapeutic intervention by inhibiting Reelin and its signaling pathways. PMID:28345605

  7. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 represses Notch1 expression in the skin to promote squamous cell carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alberto; Salvador, Fernando; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Floristán, Alfredo; Ruiz-Herguido, Cristina; Cuevas, Eva P; Morales, Saleta; Santos, Vanesa; Csiszar, Katalin; Dubus, Pierre; Haigh, Jody J; Bigas, Anna; Portillo, Francisco; Cano, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, including fibrosis and tumor progression, implicating intracellular and extracellular functions. To explore the specific in vivo role of LOXL2 in physiological and tumor contexts, we generated conditional gain- and loss-of-function mouse models. Germ-line deletion of Loxl2 promotes lethality in half of newborn mice mainly associated to congenital heart defects, while Loxl2 overexpression triggers male sterility due to epididymal dysfunction caused by epithelial disorganization, fibrosis and acute inflammation. Remarkably, when challenged to chemical skin carcinogenesis, Loxl2-overexpressing mice increased tumor burden and malignant progression, while Loxl2-deficient mice exhibit the opposite phenotypes. Loxl2 levels in premalignant tumors negatively correlate with expression of epidermal differentiation markers and components of the Notch1 pathway. We show that LOXL2 is a direct repressor of NOTCH1. Additionally, we identify an exclusive expression pattern between LOXL2 and members of the canonical NOTCH1 pathway in human HNSCC. Our data identify for the first time novel LOXL2 roles in tissue homeostasis and support it as a target for SCC therapy. PMID:25759215

  8. A DDB2 mutant protein unable to interact with PCNA promotes cell cycle progression of human transformed embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Paola; Sommatis, Sabrina; Mocchi, Roberto; Prosperi, Ennio; Stivala, Lucia Anna; Cazzalini, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage binding protein 2 (DDB2) is a protein involved in the early step of DNA damage recognition of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process. Recently, it has been suggested that DDB2 may play a role in DNA replication, based on its ability to promote cell proliferation. We have previously shown that DDB2 binds PCNA during NER, but also in the absence of DNA damage; however, whether and how this interaction influences cell proliferation is not known. In this study, we have addressed this question by using HEK293 cell clones stably expressing DDB2(Wt) protein, or a mutant form (DDB2(Mut)) unable to interact with PCNA. We report that overexpression of the DDB2(Mut) protein provides a proliferative advantage over the wild type form, by influencing cell cycle progression. In particular, an increase in the number of S-phase cells, together with a reduction in p21(CDKN1A) protein level, and a shorter cell cycle length, has been observed in the DDB2(Mut) cells. These results suggest that DDB2 influences cell cycle progression thanks to its interaction with PCNA.

  9. FBXO11 promotes ubiquitination of the Snail family of transcription factors in cancer progression and epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yue; Shenoy, Anitha K; Doernberg, Samuel; Chen, Hao; Luo, Huacheng; Shen, Huangxuan; Lin, Tong; Tarrash, Miriam; Cai, Qingsong; Hu, Xin; Fiske, Ryan; Chen, Ting; Wu, Lizi; Mohammed, Kamal A; Rottiers, Veerle; Lee, Siu Sylvia; Lu, Jianrong

    2015-06-28

    The Snail family of transcription factors are core inducers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we show that the F-box protein FBXO11 recognizes and promotes ubiquitin-mediated degradation of multiple Snail family members including Scratch. The association between FBXO11 and Snai1 in vitro is independent of Snai1 phosphorylation. Overexpression of FBXO11 in mesenchymal cells reduces Snail protein abundance and cellular invasiveness. Conversely, depletion of endogenous FBXO11 in epithelial cancer cells causes Snail protein accumulation, EMT, and tumor invasion, as well as loss of estrogen receptor expression in breast cancer cells. Expression of FBXO11 is downregulated by EMT-inducing signals TGFβ and nickel. In human cancer, high FBXO11 levels correlate with expression of epithelial markers and favorable prognosis. The results suggest that FBXO11 sustains the epithelial state and inhibits cancer progression. Inactivation of FBXO11 in mice leads to neonatal lethality, epidermal thickening, and increased Snail protein levels in epidermis, validating that FBXO11 is a physiological ubiquitin ligase of Snail. Moreover, in C. elegans, the FBXO11 mutant phenotype is attributed to the Snail factors as it is suppressed by inactivation/depletion of Snail homologs. Collectively, these findings suggest that the FBXO11-Snail regulatory axis is evolutionarily conserved and critically governs carcinoma progression and mammalian epidermal development.

  10. Water hyacinth removes arsenic from arsenic-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Misbahuddin, Mir; Fariduddin, Atm

    2002-01-01

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) removes arsenic from arsenic-contaminated drinking water. This effect depends on several factors, such as the amount of water hyacinth, amount of arsenic present in the water, duration of exposure, and presence of sunlight and air. On the basis of the present study, the authors suggest that water hyacinth is useful for making arsenic-contaminated drinking water totally arsenic free. Water hyacinth provides a natural means of removing arsenic from drinking water at the household level without monetary cost.

  11. Cyclic AMP can promote APL progression and protect myeloid leukemia cells against anthracycline-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Gausdal, G; Wergeland, A; Skavland, J; Nguyen, E; Pendino, F; Rouhee, N; McCormack, E; Herfindal, L; Kleppe, R; Havemann, U; Schwede, F; Bruserud, Ø; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Døskeland, S O

    2013-01-01

    We show that cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevating agents protect blasts from patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) against death induced by first-line anti-leukemic anthracyclines like daunorubicin (DNR). The cAMP effect was reproduced in NB4 APL cells, and shown to depend on activation of the generally cytoplasmic cAMP-kinase type I (PKA-I) rather than the perinuclear PKA-II. The protection of both NB4 cells and APL blasts was associated with (inactivating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser118 of pro-apoptotic Bad and (activating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser133 of the AML oncogene CREB. Either event would be expected to protect broadly against cell death, and we found cAMP elevation to protect also against 2-deoxyglucose, rotenone, proteasome inhibitor and a BH3-only mimetic. The in vitro findings were mirrored by the findings in NSG mice with orthotopic NB4 cell leukemia. The mice showed more rapid disease progression when given cAMP-increasing agents (prostaglandin E2 analog and theophylline), both with and without DNR chemotherapy. The all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced terminal APL cell differentiation is a cornerstone in current APL treatment and is enhanced by cAMP. We show also that ATRA-resistant APL cells, believed to be responsible for treatment failure with current ATRA-based treatment protocols, were protected by cAMP against death. This suggests that the beneficial pro-differentiating and non-beneficial pro-survival APL cell effects of cAMP should be weighed against each other. The results suggest also general awareness toward drugs that can affect bone marrow cAMP levels in leukemia patients. PMID:23449452

  12. Cyclic AMP can promote APL progression and protect myeloid leukemia cells against anthracycline-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gausdal, G; Wergeland, A; Skavland, J; Nguyen, E; Pendino, F; Rouhee, N; McCormack, E; Herfindal, L; Kleppe, R; Havemann, U; Schwede, F; Bruserud, O; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Døskeland, S O

    2013-02-28

    We show that cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevating agents protect blasts from patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) against death induced by first-line anti-leukemic anthracyclines like daunorubicin (DNR). The cAMP effect was reproduced in NB4 APL cells, and shown to depend on activation of the generally cytoplasmic cAMP-kinase type I (PKA-I) rather than the perinuclear PKA-II. The protection of both NB4 cells and APL blasts was associated with (inactivating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser118 of pro-apoptotic Bad and (activating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser133 of the AML oncogene CREB. Either event would be expected to protect broadly against cell death, and we found cAMP elevation to protect also against 2-deoxyglucose, rotenone, proteasome inhibitor and a BH3-only mimetic. The in vitro findings were mirrored by the findings in NSG mice with orthotopic NB4 cell leukemia. The mice showed more rapid disease progression when given cAMP-increasing agents (prostaglandin E2 analog and theophylline), both with and without DNR chemotherapy. The all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced terminal APL cell differentiation is a cornerstone in current APL treatment and is enhanced by cAMP. We show also that ATRA-resistant APL cells, believed to be responsible for treatment failure with current ATRA-based treatment protocols, were protected by cAMP against death. This suggests that the beneficial pro-differentiating and non-beneficial pro-survival APL cell effects of cAMP should be weighed against each other. The results suggest also general awareness toward drugs that can affect bone marrow cAMP levels in leukemia patients.

  13. Hsp72 is targeted to the mitotic spindle by Nek6 to promote K-fiber assembly and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Laura; Sampson, Josephina; Richards, Mark W; Knebel, Axel; Roth, Daniel; Hood, Fiona E; Straube, Anne; Royle, Stephen J; Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew M

    2015-05-11

    Hsp70 proteins represent a family of chaperones that regulate cellular homeostasis and are required for cancer cell survival. However, their function and regulation in mitosis remain unknown. In this paper, we show that the major inducible cytoplasmic Hsp70 isoform, Hsp72, is required for assembly of a robust bipolar spindle capable of efficient chromosome congression. Mechanistically, Hsp72 associates with the K-fiber-stabilizing proteins, ch-TOG and TACC3, and promotes their interaction with each other and recruitment to spindle microtubules (MTs). Targeting of Hsp72 to the mitotic spindle is dependent on phosphorylation at Thr-66 within its nucleotide-binding domain by the Nek6 kinase. Phosphorylated Hsp72 concentrates on spindle poles and sites of MT-kinetochore attachment. A phosphomimetic Hsp72 mutant rescued defects in K-fiber assembly, ch-TOG/TACC3 recruitment and mitotic progression that also resulted from Nek6 depletion. We therefore propose that Nek6 facilitates association of Hsp72 with the mitotic spindle, where it promotes stable K-fiber assembly through recruitment of the ch-TOG-TACC3 complex.

  14. Adrenergic receptor β2 activation by stress promotes breast cancer progression through macrophages M2 polarization in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jun-fang; Jin, Feng-jiao; Li, Ning; Guan, Hai-tao; Lan, Lan; Ni, Hong; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Stress and its related hormones epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) play a crucial role in tumor progression. Macrophages in the tumor microenvironment (TME) polarized to M2 is also a vital pathway for tumor deterioration. Here, we explore the underlying role of macrophages in the effect of stress and E promoting breast cancer growth. It was found that the weight and volume of tumor in tumor bearing mice were increased, and dramatically accompanied with the rising E level after chronic stress using social isolation. What is most noteworthy, the number of M2 macrophages inside tumor was up-regulated with it. The effects of E treatment appear to be directly related to the change of M2 phenotype is reproduced in vitro. Moreover, E receptor ADRβ2 involved in E promoting M2 polarization was comprehended simultaneously. Our results imply psychological stress is influential on specific immune system, more essential for the comprehensive treatment against tumors. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(5): 295-300] PMID:25748171

  15. Over-Expressed miR-224 Promotes the Progression of Cervical Cancer via Targeting RASSF8

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fen F.; Lv, WeiGuo; Xie, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women from developing countries. Identification of novel prognostic predictors or therapeutic targets may improve patient prognosis. In the current study, we demonstrated by real-time PCR that miR-224 expression was significantly upregulated (1.82-fold, P = 0.0025) in cervical cancer tissues (n = 126) compared with in normal cervical tissues (n = 64). Higher expression of miR-224 was significantly associated with poorer prognostic factors, including advanced FIGO stage, nodal metastasis, larger tumor size, vascular involvement and deep stromal invasion (all P < 0.05). Enforced expression of miR-224 promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion in SiHa and CaSki cancer cell lines. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that RASSF8 (RAS-association domain family 8) was a potential target of miR-224. Western blot analysis and luciferase reporter assay showed that overexpressed miR-224 inhibited RASSF8 protein expression and decreased the activity of a luciferase reporter containing the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of RASSF8, respectively. Further, RASSF8 knockdown by specific RNAi showed similar effects in cervical cancer cells transfected with miR-224 mimic. Our findings suggest that miR-224 directly targets RASSF8 and thereby acts as a tumor promoter in cervical cancer progression. PMID:27626930

  16. Chitosan promotes cancer progression and stem cell properties in association with Wnt signaling in colon and hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Po-Hsiang; Sekine, Keisuke; Chao, Hsiao-Mei; Hsu, Shan-hui; Chern, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small population of cancer cells, have been considered to be the origin of cancer initiation, recurrence, and metastasis. Tumor microenvironment provides crucial signals for CSCs to maintain stem cell properties and promotes tumorigenesis. Therefore, establishment of an appropriate cell culture system to mimic the microenvironment for CSC studies is an important issue. In this study, we grew colon and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells on chitosan membranes and evaluated the tumor progression and the CSC properties. Experimental results showed that culturing cancer cells on chitosan increased cell motility, drug resistance, quiescent population, self-renewal capacity, and the expression levels of stemness and CSC marker genes, such as OCT4, NANOG, CD133, CD44, and EpCAM. Furthermore, we demonstrated that chitosan might activate canonical Wnt/β-catenin-CD44 axis signaling in CD44positive colon cancer cells and noncanonical Wnt-STAT3 signaling in CD44negative HCC cells. In conclusion, chitosan as culture substrates activated the essential signaling of CSCs and promoted CSC properties. The chitosan culture system provides a convenient platform for the research of CSC biology and screening of anticancer drugs. PMID:28367998

  17. Selection, de-selection and progression in German football talent promotion.

    PubMed

    Güllich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This study explored to which extent the development of German professional football players is based on early talent identification (TID) and long-term nurture in talent promotion (TP) programmes or on their emergence in the course of repeated procedures of player selection and de-selection in these programmes through childhood and youth. The annual turnover of squad members in national junior teams (2001-2013) and youth elite academies was calculated; national U-team members were followed up with regard to nominations through subsequent seasons and to their success level eventually achieved at senior age; and all current Bundesliga players were analysed retrospectively regarding their earlier involvement in TID/TP programmes. Analyses revealed that the mean annual turnover of squad members was 24.5% (youth academies) and 41.0% (national U-teams), respectively. At any age, the probability of persisting in the programme three years later was <50%. Among current Bundesliga players, the age of recruitment into the TID/TP programme was widely evenly distributed across childhood and youth, respectively. Accordingly, the number of (future) Bundesliga players who were involved in TID/TP was built up continuously through all age categories. The observations suggest that the collective of professional players emerged from repeated procedures of selection and de-selection through childhood and youth rather than from early selection and long-term continuous nurture in TID/TP programmes. The findings are discussed with regard to the uncertainty of TID and of interventions applied to the selected players, and they are related to the individualistic and collectivistic approach in TP.

  18. The EP1 receptor for prostaglandin E2 promotes the development and progression of malignant murine skin tumors

    PubMed Central

    Surh, Inok; Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Pavone, Amy; Mikulec, Carol; Abel, Erika; Simper, Melissa; Fischer, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis resulting from the upregulation of COX-2 has been shown to be critical for the development of non-melanoma skin tumors. This effect of PGE2 is likely mediated by one or more of its 4 G-protein coupled membrane receptors, EP1–4. A previous study showed that BK5.EP1 transgenic mice produced more carcinomas than wild type (WT) mice using initiation/promotion protocols, although the tumor response was dependent on the type of tumor promoter used. In this study, a single topical application of either 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) or benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), alone, was found to elicit squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in the BK5.EP1 transgenic mice, but not in WT mice. While the epidermis of both WT and transgenic mice was hyperplastic several days after DMBA, this effect regressed in the WT mice while proliferation continued in the transgenic mice. Several parameters associated with carcinogen initiation were measured and were found to be similar between genotypes, including CYP1B1 and aromatase expression, B[a]P adduct formation, Ras activity and keratinocyte stem cell numbers. However, EP1 transgene expression elevated COX-2 levels in the epidermis and SCC could be completely prevented in DMBA-treated BK5.EP1 mice either by feeding the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib in their diet or by crossing them onto a COX-2 null background. These data suggest that the tumor promoting/progressing effects of EP1 require the PGE2 synthesized by COX-2. PMID:21739481

  19. Association of Promoter Methylation of VGF and PGP9.5 with Ovarian Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Noordhuis, Maartje; Begum, Shahnaz; Loyo, Myriam; Poeta, Maria Luana; Barbosa, Alvaro; Fazio, Vito M.; Angioli, Roberto; Rabitti, Carla; Marchionni, Luigi; de Graeff, Pauline; J. van der Zee, Ate G.; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Sidransky, David; Hoque, Mohammad O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the role of biological and clinical impact of aberrant promoter hypermethylation (PH) in ovarian cancer (OC). Experimental Design PH of PGP9.5, HIC1, AIM1, APC, PAK3, MGMT, KIF1A, CCNA1, ESR1, SSBP2, GSTP1, FKBP4 and VGF were assessed by quantitative methylation specific PCR (QMSP) in a training set. We selected two genes (VGF and PGP9.5) for further QMSP analysis in a larger independent validation (IV) set with available clinical data. Biologic relevance of VGF gene was also evaluated. Results PH frequency for PGP9.5 and VGF were 85% (316/372) and 43% (158/366) respectively in the IV set of samples while no PH was observed in controls. In 372 OC cases with available follow up, PGP9.5 and VGF PH were correlated with better patient survival [Hazard Ratios (HR) for overall survival (OS) were 0.59 (95% Confidence Intervals (CI)  = 0.42–0.84, p = 0.004), and 0.73 (95%CI = 0.55–0.97, p = 0.028) respectively, and for disease specific survival (DSS) were 0.57 (95%CI 0.39–0.82, p = 0.003) and 0.72 (95%CI 0.54–0.96, p = 0.027). In multivariate analysis, VGF PH remained an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR 0.61, 95%CI 0.43–0.86, p<0.005) and DSS (HR 0.58, 95%CI 0.41–0.83, p<0.003). Furthermore, PGP9.5 PH was significantly correlated with lower grade, early stage tumors, and with absence of residual disease. Forced expression of VGF in OC cell lines inhibited cell growth. Conclusions Our results indicate that VGF and PGP9.5 PH are potential biomarkers for ovarian carcinoma. Confirmatory cohorts with longitudinal follow-up are required in future studies to define the clinical impact of VGF and PGP9.5 PH before clinical application. PMID:24086249

  20. The die is cast - Arsenic exposure in early life and disease susceptibility

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Early life exposure to arsenic in humans and mice produces similar patterns of disease in later life. Given the long interval between exposure and effect, epigenetic effects of early life exposure to arsenic may account for development and progression of disease in bo...

  1. Chromated Arsenicals (CCA)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is a wood preservative pesticide containing chromium, copper, and arsenic that protects wood against termites, fungi, mites and other pests that can degrade or threaten the integrity of wood products.

  2. ENZYMOLOGY OF ARSENIC METHYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enzymology of Arsenic Methylation

    David J. Thomas, Pharmacokinetics Branch, Experimental Toxicology Division, National
    Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park...

  3. OXIDATIVE STRESS AS A POSSIBLE MODE OF ACTION FOR ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Many modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis have been proposed, but few theories have a substantial mass of supporting data. Three stronger theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are production of chromosomal abnormalities, promotion of carcinogenesis and oxidati...

  4. Spectral reflectance as an indicator of foliar concentrations of arsenic in common sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandy, Yuridia Patricia Peralta De

    Studies were conducted to investigate the use of spectral reflectance by foliage of common sunflower as a potential indicator of arsenic contamination of soil. Germination method was developed for sunflower seeds, and cohorts of sunflower seedlings in hydroponic tanks were established. The cohorts were exposed to 0 ppm, 5 ppm, 7.5 ppm, and 10 ppm treatments of As (V) and reflectance measurements of foliage were collected using a spectroradiometer during two experiments. Results demonstrated the feasibility of using spectral reflectance by foliage of common sunflower as a potential indicator of arsenic contamination. In both experiments, arsenic concentrations in leaf tissues were directly proportional to arsenic concentrations in hydroponic solutions in which such plants were grown. Although the effect(s) of arsenic accumulation had minimal impact on reflectance of visible wavelengths, the effects on NIR reflectance were substantial and resulted in a progressive decrease in reflectance as arsenic concentrations in foliage increased.

  5. Policy intervention for arsenic mitigation in drinking water in rural habitations in India: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Brajesh K

    2016-10-01

    This article provides updated status of the arsenic affected rural habitations in India, summarizes the policy initiatives of the Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation (Government of India), reviews the technologies for arsenic treatment and analyses the progress made by states in tackling arsenic problems in rural habitations. It also provides a list of constraints based on experiences and recommends suggested measures to tackle arsenic problems in an holistic manner. It is expected that the paper would be useful for policy formulators in states, non-government organizations, researchers of academic and scientific institutions and programme managers working in the area of arsenic mitigation in drinking water, especially in developing countries, as it provides better insights compared to other available information in India on mitigating arsenic problems in drinking water in rural areas.

  6. Oxidative stress indicated by elevated expression of Nrf2 and 8-OHdG promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Ma-On, Chakriwong; Sanpavat, Anapat; Whongsiri, Patcharawalai; Suwannasin, Surasit; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Boonla, Chanchai

    2017-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is excessively generated in tumors creating an oxidative stress in tumor microenvironment. We investigated hepatic expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, and asked if ROS epigenetically upregulated Nrf2 and enhanced aggressiveness in HCC cells. Expression of Nrf2 (n = 100) and 8-OHdG (n = 53) was remarkably increased in HCC tissues compared with the noncancerous hepatic tissues. Elevated expression of 8-OHdG was associated with poor survival in HCC patients. H2O2, as ROS representative, provoked oxidative stress in HepG2 cells, indicated by increased protein carbonyl content and decreased total antioxidant capacity. Nrf2 expression and 8-OHdG formation were markedly increased in the H2O2-treated cells compared with the untreated control. Co-treatment with antioxidants, tocopheryl acetate (TA) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) effectively attenuated expression of Nrf2 and 8-OHdG in H2O2-treated cells. HepG2 cells treated with H2O2 had significantly higher migration and invasion capabilities than the untreated control cells, and this aggressiveness was significantly inhibited by TA and SAM. Bisulfite sequencing revealed that CpG dinucleotides in Nrf2 promoter were unmethylated in the H2O2-treated cells similar to the untreated control. In conclusion, robust histological evidence of increased antioxidative response and oxidative DNA damage in human HCC tissues was demonstrated. Elevated oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG was associated with shorter survival. Experimentally, ROS enhanced Nrf2 expression, 8-OHdG formation and tumor progression in HCC cells. These effects were inhibited by antioxidants. Therefore, oxidative stress-reducing regimens might be beneficial to diminish the ROS-induced HCC progression.

  7. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  8. AKAP95 promotes cell cycle progression via interactions with cyclin E and low molecular weight cyclin E

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Deng-Cheng; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Hua, Su-Hang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yang-Yang; Feng, Li-Li; Huang, Qian; Teng, Bo-Gang; Yu, Xiu-Yi; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Xing

    2016-01-01

    AKAP95 in lung cancer tissues showed higher expression than in paracancerous tissues. AKAP95 can bind with cyclin D and cyclin E during G1/S cell cycle transition, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To identify the mechanism of AKAP95 in cell cycle progression, we performed AKAP95 transfection and silencing in A549 cells, examined AKAP95, cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 expression, and the interactions of AKAP95 with cyclins E1 and E2. Results showed that over-expression of AKAP95 promoted cell growth and AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and E2, low molecular weight cyclin E1 (LWM-E1) and LWM-E2. Additionally AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 in the nucleus during G1/S transition, bound LMW-E1 during G1, S and G2/M, and bound cyclin E2 mainly on the nuclear membrane during interphase. Cyclin E2 and LMW-E2 were also detected. AKAP95 over-expression increased cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 expression but decreased cyclin E2 levels. Unlike cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 that were nuclear located during the G1, S and G1/S phases, cyclin E2 and LMW-E1 were expressed in all cell cycle phases, with cyclin E2 present in the cytoplasm and nuclear membrane, with traces in the nucleus. LMW-E1 was present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The 20 kDa form of LMW-E1 showed only cytoplasmic expression, while the 40 kDa form was nuclear expressed. The expression of AKAP95, cyclin E1, LMW-E1 and -E2, might be regulated by cAMP. We conclude that AKAP95 might promote cell cycle progression by interacting with cyclin E1 and LMW-E2. LMW-E2, but not cyclin E2, might be involved in G1/S transition. The binding of AKAP95 and LMW-E1 was found throughout cell cycle. PMID:27158371

  9. AKAP95 promotes cell cycle progression via interactions with cyclin E and low molecular weight cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Deng-Cheng; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Hua, Su-Hang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yang-Yang; Feng, Li-Li; Huang, Qian; Teng, Bo-Gang; Yu, Xiu-Yi; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Xing

    2016-01-01

    AKAP95 in lung cancer tissues showed higher expression than in paracancerous tissues. AKAP95 can bind with cyclin D and cyclin E during G1/S cell cycle transition, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To identify the mechanism of AKAP95 in cell cycle progression, we performed AKAP95 transfection and silencing in A549 cells, examined AKAP95, cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 expression, and the interactions of AKAP95 with cyclins E1 and E2. Results showed that over-expression of AKAP95 promoted cell growth and AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and E2, low molecular weight cyclin E1 (LWM-E1) and LWM-E2. Additionally AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 in the nucleus during G1/S transition, bound LMW-E1 during G1, S and G2/M, and bound cyclin E2 mainly on the nuclear membrane during interphase. Cyclin E2 and LMW-E2 were also detected. AKAP95 over-expression increased cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 expression but decreased cyclin E2 levels. Unlike cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 that were nuclear located during the G1, S and G1/S phases, cyclin E2 and LMW-E1 were expressed in all cell cycle phases, with cyclin E2 present in the cytoplasm and nuclear membrane, with traces in the nucleus. LMW-E1 was present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The 20 kDa form of LMW-E1 showed only cytoplasmic expression, while the 40 kDa form was nuclear expressed. The expression of AKAP95, cyclin E1, LMW-E1 and -E2, might be regulated by cAMP. We conclude that AKAP95 might promote cell cycle progression by interacting with cyclin E1 and LMW-E2. LMW-E2, but not cyclin E2, might be involved in G1/S transition. The binding of AKAP95 and LMW-E1 was found throughout cell cycle.

  10. Arsenic (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Videos Games Experiments For Teachers Home ... Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Arsenic The Basics Arsenic is an ...

  11. Synergistic effects of the combination of oxalate and ascorbate on arsenic extraction from contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Cheol; Kim, Eun Jung; Baek, Kitae

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic is often associated with iron oxides in soils due to its high affinity with iron oxides and the abundance of iron oxides in the environment. Dissolution of iron oxides can subsequently release arsenic associated with them into the environment, which results in the increase of arsenic mobility in the soil environment. In this study, arsenic extraction from soils via the dissolution of iron oxides was investigated using oxalate, ascorbate, and their combination in order to effectively remediate arsenic-contaminated soils. Oxalate mainly extracted iron from soils via a ligand-promoted reaction, while ascorbate extracted iron mainly via a reductive reaction. Arsenic extractions from soils by oxalate and ascorbate were shown to behave similarly to iron extractions, indicating the concurrent release of arsenic adsorbed on iron oxides upon the dissolution of iron oxides. The combination of oxalate and ascorbate greatly increased arsenic extraction, indicating the synergistic effects of the combination of oxalate and ascorbate on iron and arsenic extraction from soils. Oxalate and ascorbate are naturally-occurring organic reagents that have chelating and reducing capacity. Therefore, the use of oxalate and ascorbate is environmentally friendly and effective for the remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils.

  12. An Emerging Role for Epigenetic Dysregulation in Arsenic Toxicity and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xuefeng; McHale, Cliona M.; Skibola, Christine F.; Smith, Allan H.; Smith, Martyn T.; Zhang, Luoping

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure to arsenic, an established human carcinogen, through consumption of highly contaminated drinking water is a worldwide public health concern. Several mechanisms by which arsenical compounds induce tumorigenesis have been proposed, including oxidative stress, genotoxic damage, and chromosomal abnormalities. Recent studies have suggested that epigenetic mechanisms may also mediate toxicity and carcinogenicity resulting from arsenic exposure. Objective We examined the evidence supporting the roles of the three major epigenetic mechanisms—DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNA (miRNA) expression—in arsenic toxicity and, in particular, carcinogenicity. We also investigated future research directions necessary to clarify epigenetic and other mechanisms in humans. Data sources and synthesis We conducted a PubMed search of arsenic exposure and epigenetic modification through April 2010 and summarized the in vitro and in vivo research findings, from both our group and others, on arsenic-associated epigenetic alteration and its potential role in toxicity and carcinogenicity. Conclusions Arsenic exposure has been shown to alter methylation levels of both global DNA and gene promoters; histone acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation; and miRNA expression, in studies analyzing mainly a limited number of epigenetic end points. Systematic epigenomic studies in human populations exposed to arsenic or in patients with arsenic-associated cancer have not yet been performed. Such studies would help to elucidate the relationship between arsenic exposure, epigenetic dysregulation, and carcinogenesis and are becoming feasible because of recent technological advancements. PMID:20682481

  13. ARSENIC REMOVAL COST ESTIMATING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Arsenic Removal Cost Estimating program (Excel) calculates the costs for using adsorptive media and anion exchange treatment systems to remove arsenic from drinking water. The program is an easy-to-use tool to estimate capital and operating costs for three types of arsenic re...

  14. PATHWAY OF INORGANIC ARSENIC METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A remarkable aspect of the metabolism of inorganic arsenic in humans is its conversion to methylated metabolites. These metabolites account for most of the arsenic found in urine after exposure to inorganic arsenic. At least some of the adverse health effects attributed to inor...

  15. PROPOSED CARCINOGENIC MECHANISMS FOR ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    PROPOSED CARCINOGENIC MECHANISMS FOR ARSENIC.

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen in skin, lung, liver, urinary bladder and kidney. In contrast,
    there is no accepted experimental animal model of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis.
    Proposed mechanisms/modes of action for a...

  16. Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B (GPNMB) promotes the progression of brain glioblastoma via Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yoko; Chiba, Shinsuke; Yano, Hirohito; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Saio, Masanao; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Iwama, Toru; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-12-02

    Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B (GPNMB), which is involved in invasion and metastasis, was found to be overexpressed in various cancers. High levels of GPNMB and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α subunits are associated with a poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. We showed that GPNMB interacts with Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α subunits to activate PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways. However, it remains unclear whether the interaction of GPNMB and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α subunits is involves in progression of glioma. The tumor size induced by the injection of glioma GL261 cells was larger in transgenic mice overexpressing GPNMB when compared with wild-type mice. Additionally, the interaction of GPNMB and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α subunits was identified in the murine glioma model and in the tumors of glioblastoma patients. Ouabain, a Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor, suppressed the glioma growth induced by the injection of glioma cells in the transgenic mice overexpressing GPNMB and blocked the GPNMB-induced migration of glioma cells. These findings indicate that GPNMB promotes glioma growth via Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α subunits. Thus, the interaction between GPNMB and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase α subunits represents a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of brain glioblastomas.

  17. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Zhang, F.

    1994-05-01

    The overall purpose of this research project is to carry out the preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal using model mixing systems. A model mixing system has been previously designed and constructed for conducting oil agglomeration tests in such a way that agitator speed and torque can be measured as well as agglomeration performance. Equipment is also provided for monitoring the progress of agglomeration during a batch test. This equipment includes a photometric dispersion analyzer for measuring the turbidity of the particle suspension. In order to measure the turbidity a small stream of material is withdrawn from the mixing tank and conducted through an optical cell associated with the photometric dispersion analyzer. The material is then returned to the mixing tank. A peristaltic pump located between the optical cell and the mixing tank is used for circulating the material. During the past quarter a series of shakedown test were carried out to calibrate the equipment and to determine some of its operating characteristics. The accuracy of the agitator speed and torque measuring instrument was checked. Also the gas dispersing effectiveness of the mixing system was investigated. In addition, the effects of agitator speed and solids concentration on agitator torque and power requirements were studied.

  18. Effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation therapy as a worksite health promotion program in the automobile assembly line

    PubMed Central

    SUNDRAM, Bala Murali; DAHLUI, Maznah; CHINNA, Karuthan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) as part of a Worksite Health Promotion Program on self-perceived stress, anxiety and depression among male automotive assembly-line workers through a quasi-experimental trial. Two assembly plants were chosen with one receiving PMR therapy and the other Pamphlets. Intention-to-treat analysis was conducted to test the effectiveness of the relaxation therapy. Stress, Depression and Anxiety levels were measured using the shortened DASS-21 questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Independent sample t test and Repeated-measures analysis of variance to test the significance of the effects of intervention (time * group) for the measures of Stress, Depression and Anxiety. Significant favourable intervention effects on stress were found in the PMR group (Effect size=0.6) as compared to the Pamphlet group (Effect size=0.2). There was a significant group *time interaction effect (p<0.001) on Stress levels. Depression and Anxiety levels were minimal at baseline in both the groups with mild or no reduction in levels. The improvement in stress levels showed the potential of PMR therapy as a coping strategy at the workplace. Further research in this field is necessary to examine the beneficial effects of coping strategies in the workplace. PMID:26726829

  19. Effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation therapy as a worksite health promotion program in the automobile assembly line.

    PubMed

    Sundram, Bala Murali; Dahlui, Maznah; Chinna, Karuthan

    2016-06-10

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) as part of a Worksite Health Promotion Program on self-perceived stress, anxiety and depression among male automotive assembly-line workers through a quasi-experimental trial. Two assembly plants were chosen with one receiving PMR therapy and the other Pamphlets. Intention-to-treat analysis was conducted to test the effectiveness of the relaxation therapy. Stress, Depression and Anxiety levels were measured using the shortened DASS-21 questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Independent sample t test and Repeated-measures analysis of variance to test the significance of the effects of intervention (time * group) for the measures of Stress, Depression and Anxiety. Significant favourable intervention effects on stress were found in the PMR group (Effect size=0.6) as compared to the Pamphlet group (Effect size=0.2). There was a significant group *time interaction effect (p<0.001) on Stress levels. Depression and Anxiety levels were minimal at baseline in both the groups with mild or no reduction in levels. The improvement in stress levels showed the potential of PMR therapy as a coping strategy at the workplace. Further research in this field is necessary to examine the beneficial effects of coping strategies in the workplace.

  20. Aberrant overexpression of ADAR1 promotes gastric cancer progression by activating mTOR/p70S6K signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Ning; Yu, Shijun; Ye, Xiaojuan; Yang, Dong; Li, Yandong; Gao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    ADAR1, one of adenosine deaminases acting on RNA, modulates RNA transcripts through converting adenosine (A) to inosine (I) by deamination. Emerging evidence has implicated that ADAR1 plays an important role in a few of human cancers, however, its expression and physiological significance in gastric cancer remain undefined. In the present study, we demonstrated that ADAR1 was frequently overexpressed in gastric cancer samples by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. In a gastric cancer tissue microarray, ADAR1 staining was closely correlated with tumor stage (P < 0.001) and N classification (P < 0.001). Functional analysis indicated that ADAR1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation and migration in vitro, whereas ADAR1 knockdown resulted in an opposite phenotypes. Furthermore, ADAR1 knockdown also inhibited tumorigenicity and lung metastasis potential of gastric cancer cells in nude mice models. Mechanistically, ADAR1 expression had a significant effect on phosphorylation level of mTOR, p70S kinase, and S6 ribosomal protein, implying its involvement in the regulation of mTOR signaling pathway. We conclude that ADAR1 contributes to gastric cancer development and progression via activating mTOR/p70S6K/S6 ribosomal protein signaling axis. Our findings suggest that ADAR1 may be a valuable biomarker for GC diagnosis and prognosis and may represent a new novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:27863387

  1. Gr-1+CD11b+ cells are responsible for tumor promoting effect of TGF-β in breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoyang; Pang, Yanli; Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Achyut, B R; Heger, Christopher; Goldsmith, Paul K; Lonning, Scott; Yang, Li

    2012-12-01

    One great challenge in our understanding of TGF-β cancer biology and the successful application of TGF-β-targeted therapy is that TGF-β works as both a tumor suppressor and a tumor promoter. The underlying mechanisms for its functional change remain to be elucidated. Using 4T1 mammary tumor model that shares many characteristics with human breast cancer, particularly its ability to spontaneously metastasize to the lungs, we demonstrate that Gr-1+CD11b+ cells or myeloid derived suppressor cells are important mediators in TGF-β regulation of mammary tumor progression. Depletion of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells diminished the antitumor effect of TGF-β neutralization. Two mechanisms were involved: first, treatment with TGF-β neutralization antibody (1D11) significantly decreased the number of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells in tumor tissues and premetastatic lung. This is mediated through increased Gr-1+CD11b+ cell apoptosis. In addition, 1D11 treatment significantly decreased the expression of Th2 cytokines and Arginase 1. Interestingly, the number and property of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells in peripheral blood/draining lymph nodes correlated with tumor size and metastases in response to 1D11 treatment. Our data suggest that the efficacy of TGF-β neutralization depends on the presence of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells, and these cells could be good biomarkers for TGF-β-targeted therapy.

  2. EZH2 promotes progression of small cell lung cancer by suppressing the TGF-β-Smad-ASCL1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Fumihiko; Koinuma, Daizo; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Fukayama, Masashi; Miyaozono, Kohei; Ehata, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induces apoptosis in many types of cancer cells and acts as a tumor suppressor. We performed a functional analysis of TGF-β signaling to identify a molecular mechanism that regulated survival in small cell lung cancer cells. Here, we found low expression of TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) in most small cell lung cancer cells and tissues compared to normal lung epithelial cells and normal lung tissues, respectively. When wild-type TβRII was overexpressed in small cell lung cancer cells, TGF-β suppressed cell growth in vitro and tumor formation in vivo through induction of apoptosis. Components of polycomb repressive complex 2, including enhancer of zeste 2 (EZH2), were highly expressed in small cell lung cancer cells; this led to epigenetic silencing of TβRII expression and suppression of TGF-β-mediated apoptosis. Achaete-scute family bHLH transcription factor 1 (ASCL1; also known as ASH1), a Smad-dependent target of TGF-β, was found to induce survival in small cell lung cancer cells. Thus, EZH2 promoted small cell lung cancer progression by suppressing the TGF-β-Smad-ASCL1 pathway. PMID:27462425

  3. Atherosclerosis induced by arsenic in drinking water in rats through altering lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Chuu, Jiunn-Jye; Chang, Chia-Yu; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Guo, How-Ran

    2011-10-15

    Arsenic in drinking water is a global environmental health problem, and the exposure may increase cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases mortalities, most likely through causing atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure is still unclear. To study the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure and explore the role of high cholesterol diet (HCD) in this process, we fed spontaneous hypertensive rats and Wistar Kyoto rats with basal diet or HCD and provided with them drinking water containing arsenic at different ages and orders for 20 consecutive weeks. We measured high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, triglycerides, heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70), and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) at predetermined intervals and determined expressions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein-1 (CETP-1) and liver X receptor {beta} (LXR{beta}) in the liver. Atherosclerosis was determined by examining the aorta with hematoxylin and eosin stain. After 20 weeks, we found arsenic, alone or combined with HCD, may promote atherosclerosis formation with transient increases in HSP 70 and hs-CRP. Early combination exposure decreased the HDL-C/LDL-C ratio without changing the levels of total cholesterol and triglyceride until 30 weeks old. Both CETP-1 and LXR{beta} activities were suppressed, most significantly in early combination exposure. In conclusion, arsenic exposure may induce atherosclerosis through modifying reverse cholesterol transport in cholesterol metabolism and suppressing LXR{beta} and CEPT-1 expressions. For decreasing atherosclerosis related mortality associated with arsenic, preventing exposure from environmental sources in early life is an important element. - Highlights: > Arsenic causes cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases through atherosclerosis. > Arsenic may promote atherosclerosis with transient increase in HSP

  4. Highly expressed long non-coding RNA FOXD2-AS1 promotes non-small cell lung cancer progression via Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Rong, Lin; Zhao, Ruixing; Lu, Jinxiu

    2017-03-11

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common and aggressive tumors around the world. Long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently shown to play important roles in regulating numerous biological processes including tumor progression. However, the role of lncRNA FOXD2-AS1 in NSCLC remains unclear. In this study, we found that lncRNA FOXD2-AS1 is significantly up-regulated in NSCLC tissues. Loss- and gain-function assays revealed that FOXD2-AS1 promotes NSCLC cell growth and NSCLC tumor progression. Furthermore, we also revealed that FOXD2-AS1 modulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in NSCLC cells. Taken together, we conclude that lncRNA FOXD2-AS1 promotes NSCLC progression though Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These results suggest that lncRNA FOXD2-AS1 might act as a novel therapeutic target for NSCLC treatment.

  5. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt), yielding mono- , di- , and trimethylated arsenicals. To investigate the evolution of molecular mechanisms that mediate arsenic biotransformation,...

  6. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  7. [Arsenic - Poison or medicine?].

    PubMed

    Kulik-Kupka, Karolina; Koszowska, Aneta; Brończyk-Puzoń, Anna; Nowak, Justyna; Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is commonly known as a poison. Only a few people know that As has also been widely used in medicine. In the past years As and its compounds were used as a medicine for the treatment of such diseases as diabetes, psoriasis, syphilis, skin ulcers and joint diseases. Nowadays As is also used especially in the treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has recognized arsenic as an element with carcinogenic effect evidenced by epidemiological studies, but as previously mentioned it is also used in the treatment of neoplastic diseases. This underlines the specificity of the arsenic effects. Arsenic occurs widely in the natural environment, for example, it is present in soil and water, which contributes to its migration to food products. Long exposure to this element may lead to liver damages and also to changes in myocardium. Bearing in mind that such serious health problems can occur, monitoring of the As presence in the environmental media plays a very important role. In addition, the occupational risk of As exposure in the workplace should be identified and checked. Also the standards for As presence in food should be established. This paper presents a review of the 2015 publications based on the Medical database like PubMed and Polish Medical Bibliography. It includes the most important information about arsenic in both forms, poison and medicine.

  8. Arsenic: The Silent Killer

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Andrea

    2006-02-28

    Andrea Foster uses x-rays to determine the forms of potentially toxic elements in environmentally-important matrices such as water, sediments, plants, and microorganisms. In this free public lecture, Foster will discuss her research on arsenic, which is called the silent killer because dissolved in water, it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, yet consumption of relatively small doses of this element in its most toxic forms can cause rapid and violent death. Arsenic is a well-known poison, and has been used as such since ancient times. Less well known is the fact that much lower doses of the element, consumed over years, can lead to a variety of skin and internal cancers that can also be fatal. Currently, what has been called the largest mass poisoning in history is occurring in Bangladesh, where most people are by necessity drinking ground water that is contaminated with arsenic far in excess of the maximum amounts determined to be safe by the World Health Organization. This presentation will review the long and complicated history with arsenic, describe how x-rays have helped explain the high yet spatially variable arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh, discuss the ways in which land use in Bangladesh may be exacerbating the problem, and summarize the impact of this silent killer on drinking water systems worldwide.

  9. Cardiac conduction block at multiple levels caused by arsenic trioxide therapy.

    PubMed

    Kathirgamanathan, Kala; Angaran, Paul; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro; Gula, Lorne J

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case of a woman aged 62 years with refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with arsenic trioxide leading to progressive, multilevel cardiac conduction block. After chelation treatment with dimercaprol, there was normalization of conduction.

  10. Metabolism and toxicity of arsenicals in mammals.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Adeel; Xie, Shuyu; Hafeez, Mian Abdul; Wang, Xu; Hussain, Hafiz Iftikhar; Iqbal, Zahid; Pan, Yuanhu; Iqbal, Mujahid; Shabbir, Muhammad Abubakr; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is a metalloid usually found in organic and inorganic forms with different oxidation states, while inorganic form (arsenite As-III and arsenate As-v) is considered to be more hazardous as compared to organic form (methylarsonate and dimethylarsinate), with mild or no toxicity in mammals. Due to an increasing trend to using arsenicals as growth promoters or for treatment purposes, the understanding of metabolism and toxicity of As gets vital importance. Its toxicity is mainly depends on oxi-reduction states (As-III or As-v) and the level of methylation during the metabolism process. Currently, the exact metabolic pathways of As have yet to be confirmed in humans and food producing animals. Oxidative methylation and glutathione conjugation is believed to be major pathways of As metabolism. Oxidative methylation is based on conversion of Arsenite in to mono-methylarsonic acid and di-methylarsenic acid in mammals. It has been confirmed that As is only methylated in the presence of glutathione or thiol compounds, suggesting that As is being methylated in trivalent states. Subsequently, non-conjugated trivalent arsenicals are highly reactive with thiol which converts the trivalent arsenicals in to less toxic pentavalent forms. The glutathione conjugate stability of As is the most important factor for determining the toxicity. It can lead to DNA damage by alerting enzyme profile and production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which causes the oxidative stress. Moreover, As causes immune-dysfunction by hindering cellular and humeral immune response. The present review discussed different metabolic pathways and toxic outcomes of arsenicals in mammals which will be helpful in health risk assessment and its impact on biological world.

  11. Arsenic Speciation of Terrestrial Invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, M.M.; Koch, I.; Gordon, R.A.; Reimer, K.J. ); )

    2009-07-01

    The distribution and chemical form (speciation) of arsenic in terrestrial food chains determines both the amount of arsenic available to higher organisms, and the toxicity of this metalloid in affected ecosystems. Invertebrates are part of complex terrestrial food webs. This paper provides arsenic concentrations and arsenic speciation profiles for eight orders of terrestrial invertebrates collected at three historical gold mine sites and one background site in Nova Scotia, Canada. Total arsenic concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were dependent upon the classification of invertebrate. Arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ICP-MS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Invertebrates were found by HPLC ICP-MS to contain predominantly arsenite and arsenate in methanol/water extracts, while XAS revealed that most arsenic is bound to sulfur in vivo. Examination of the spatial distribution of arsenic within an ant tissue highlighted the differences between exogenous and endogenous arsenic, as well as the extent to which arsenic is transformed upon ingestion. Similar arsenic speciation patterns for invertebrate groups were observed across sites. Trace amounts of arsenobetaine and arsenocholine were identified in slugs, ants, and spiders.

  12. Environmental source of arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-09-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a recent World Health Organization report, arsenic from contaminated water can be quickly and easily absorbed and depending on its metabolic form, may adversely affect human health. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration regulations for metals found in cosmetics to protect consumers against contaminations deemed deleterious to health; some cosmetics were found to contain a variety of chemicals including heavy metals, which are sometimes used as preservatives. Moreover, developing countries tend to have a growing number of industrial factories that unfortunately, harm the environment, especially in cities where industrial and vehicle emissions, as well as household activities, cause serious air pollution. Air is also an important source of arsenic exposure in areas with industrial activity. The presence of arsenic in airborne particulate matter is considered a risk for certain diseases. Taken together, various potential pathways of arsenic exposure seem to affect humans adversely, and future efforts to reduce arsenic exposure caused by environmental factors should be made.

  13. Environmental Source of Arsenic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a recent World Health Organization report, arsenic from contaminated water can be quickly and easily absorbed and depending on its metabolic form, may adversely affect human health. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration regulations for metals found in cosmetics to protect consumers against contaminations deemed deleterious to health; some cosmetics were found to contain a variety of chemicals including heavy metals, which are sometimes used as preservatives. Moreover, developing countries tend to have a growing number of industrial factories that unfortunately, harm the environment, especially in cities where industrial and vehicle emissions, as well as household activities, cause serious air pollution. Air is also an important source of arsenic exposure in areas with industrial activity. The presence of arsenic in airborne particulate matter is considered a risk for certain diseases. Taken together, various potential pathways of arsenic exposure seem to affect humans adversely, and future efforts to reduce arsenic exposure caused by environmental factors should be made. PMID:25284196

  14. Promoting universal financial protection: evidence from seven low- and middle-income countries on factors facilitating or hindering progress.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Di; Ranson, Michael K; Aulakh, Bhupinder K; Honda, Ayako

    2013-09-24

    problem in LMICs. The case studies also highlighted the critical role of high-level political leadership in pursuing UHC policies and citizen support in sustaining these policies.This series demonstrates the value of promoting greater sharing of experiences on UHC reforms across LMICs. It also identifies key areas of future research on health care financing in LMICs that would support progress towards UHC.

  15. Interplay between Cellular Methyl Metabolism and Adaptive Efflux during Oncogenic Transformation from Chronic Arsenic Exposure in Human Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Coppin, Jean-François; Qu, Wei; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    After protracted low level arsenic exposure, the normal human prostate epithelial cell line RWPE-1 acquires a malignant phenotype with DNA hypomethylation, indicative of disrupted methyl metabolism, and shows arsenic adaptation involving glutathione overproduction and enhanced arsenic efflux. Thus, the interplay between methyl and glutathione metabolism during this progressive arsenic adaptation was studied. Arsenic-treated cells showed a time-dependent increase in LC50 and a marked increase in homocysteine (Hcy) levels. A marked suppression of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) levels occurred with decreased methionine adenosyltransferase 2A (converts methionine to SAM) expression and increased negative regulator methionine adenosyltransferase B, suggesting reduced conversion of Hcy to SAM. Consistent with Hcy overproduction, activity and expression of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (converts S-adenosylhomocysteine to Hcy) were both increased. Expression of cystathionine β-synthase, a key gene in the transsulfuration pathway, and various glutathione production genes were increased, resulting in a 5-fold increase in glutathione. Arsenic efflux increased along with expression of ATP-binding cassette protein C1, which effluxes arsenic as a glutathione conjugate. Evidence of genomic DNA hypomethylation was observed during early arsenic exposure, indicating that the disruption in methyl metabolism had a potential impact related to oncogenesis. Thus, cellular arsenic adaptation is a dynamic, progressive process that involves decreased SAM recycling and concurrent accumulation of Hcy, which is channeled via transsulfuration to increase glutathione and enhance arsenic efflux but may also impact the carcinogenic process. PMID:18487201

  16. ELUCIDATING THE PATHWAY FOR ARSENIC METHYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enzymatically-catalyzed methylation of arsenic is part of a metabolic pathway that converts inorganic arsenic into methylated products. Hence, in humans chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic, methyl and dimethyl arsenic account for most of the arsenic that is excreted in the ...

  17. ARSENIC SPECIATION ANALYSIS IN HUMAN SALIVA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Determination of arsenic species in human saliva is potentially useful for biomonitoring of human exposure to arsenic and for studying arsenic metabolism. However, there is no report on the speciation analysis of arsenic in saliva. Methods: Arsenic species in saliva ...

  18. Arsenic doped zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Volbers, N.; Lautenschlaeger, S.; Leichtweiss, T.; Laufer, A.; Graubner, S.; Meyer, B. K.; Potzger, K.; Zhou Shengqiang

    2008-06-15

    As-doping of zinc oxide has been approached by ion implantation and chemical vapor deposition. The effect of thermal annealing on the implanted samples has been investigated by using secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering/channeling geometry. The crystal damage, the distribution of the arsenic, the diffusion of impurities, and the formation of secondary phases is discussed. For the thin films grown by vapor deposition, the composition has been determined with regard to the growth parameters. The bonding state of arsenic was investigated for both series of samples using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  19. HCMV-encoded miR-UL112-3p promotes glioblastoma progression via tumour suppressor candidate 3

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qing; Wang, Kejia; Wang, Bin; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and lethal type of primary malignant brain tumour. Recent studies suggest that the discovery of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) might play a role in the pathogenesis of diseases, including GBM. In this study, we aimed to analyse the expression and function of HCMV-encoded miRNAs in GBM. We found that miR-UL112-3p expression was significantly elevated in GBM, and its expression levels were highly associated with glioma size, differentiation, WHO stage and the overall and disease-free survival of patients. The overexpression of miR-UL112-3p in the GBM cells promoted cell proliferation, clone formation, migration and invasion. In contrast, the down-regulation of miR-UL112-3p exerted an inverse effects. Tumour suppressor candidate 3 (TUSC3), a potential target gene of miR-UL112-3p, was inversely correlated with miR-UL112-3p expression in GBM tissues and cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TUSC3 was directly regulated by miR-UL112-3p, and the ectopic expression of TUSC3 reversed the effects of miR-UL112-3p on GBM progression via the AKT signalling pathway. Taken together, these findings collectively demonstrate that miR-UL112-3p exerts its oncogene function by directly targeting TUSC3 in GBM, indicating a potential novel therapeutic target for GBM. PMID:28303930

  20. Tumor-promoting/progressing role of additional chromosome instability in hepatic carcinogenesis in Sgo1 (Shugoshin 1) haploinsufficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hiroshi Y.; Zhang, Yuting; Reddy, Arun; Mohammed, Altaf; Lightfoot, Stan; Dai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A major etiological risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is infection by Hepatitis viruses, especially hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus do not cause aggressive activation of an oncogenic pathway, but they transactivate a broad array of genes, cause chronic inflammation, and, through interference with mitotic processes, lead to mitotic error-induced chromosome instability (ME-CIN). However, how ME-CIN is involved in the development of HCC remains unclear. Delineating the effect of ME-CIN on HCC development should help in identifying measures to combat HCC. In this study, we used ME-CIN model mice haploinsufficient in Shugoshin 1 (Sgo1−/+) to assess the role of ME-CIN in HCC development. Treatment with the carcinogen azoxymethane caused Sgo1−/+ ME-CIN model mice to develop HCCs within 6 months, whereas control mice developed no HCC (P < 0.003). The HCC development was associated with expression of early HCC markers (glutamine synthetase, glypican 3, heat shock protein 70, and the serum marker alpha fetoprotein), although without fibrosis. ME-CIN preceded the expression of HCC markers, suggesting that ME-CIN is an important early event in HCC development. In 12-month-old untreated Sgo1 mice, persistent DNA damage, altered gene expression, and spontaneous HCCs were observed. Sgo1 protein accumulated in response to DNA damage in vitro. Overall, Sgo1−/+-mediated ME-CIN strongly promoted/progressed development of HCC in the presence of an initiator carcinogen, and it had a mild initiator effect by itself. Use of the ME-CIN model mice should help in identifying drugs to counteract the effects of ME-CIN and should accelerate anti-HCC drug development. PMID:25740822

  1. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1994-10-01

    During the first year of the project two model mixing systems, which differed in size but were similar in design, were constructed and tested. The systems were equipped for measuring agitator speed and torque and for measuring the turbidity of coal particle suspensions undergoing agglomeration. Preliminary measurements of aqueous suspensions of coal particles showed that the Beer-Lambert law applies to such suspensions at least for low concentrations. Therefore, the measured turbidity can be used as an indicator of particle concentration and a means for monitoring the progress of oil agglomeration. However, the method is not applicable for large particle concentrations so a different technique was tested for monitoring the agglomeration of large concentrations. This technique involves measuring agitator torque and observing changes in torque while agitator speed is held constant. The results of preliminary tests of the technique were encouraging. In these tests significant changes in agitator torque were observed when particle agglomeration took place as long as solids concentration of 25 w/v % or more were utilized. A number of agglomeration tests were conducted using either one or the other of the two monitoring techniques. Both methods showed that even very small amounts of air can promote the oil agglomeration of coal particles suspended in water. Even the amount of air dissolved in water at room temperature and pressure can affect the process providing the air is displaced from the solution by a slightly soluble agglomerant such as heptane. The apparent rate of agglomeration was observed to increase as more air was introduced and also as agitator speed was increased.

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells expand during breast cancer progression and promote tumor-induced bone destruction

    PubMed Central

    Danilin, Sabrina; Merkel, Alyssa R.; Johnson, Joshua R.; Johnson, Rachelle W.; Edwards, James R.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), identified as Gr1+CD11b+ cells in mice, expand during cancer and promote tumor growth, recurrence and burden. However, little is known about their role in bone metastases. We hypothesized that MDSCs may contribute to tumor-induced bone disease, and inoculated breast cancer cells into the left cardiac ventricle of nude mice. Disease progression was monitored weekly by X-ray and fluorescence imaging and MDSCs expansion by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. To explore the contribution of MDSCs to bone metastasis, we co-injected mice with tumor cells or PBS into the left cardiac ventricle and Gr1+CD11b+ cells isolated from healthy or tumor-bearing mice into the left tibia. MDSCs didn’t induce bone resorption in normal mice, but increased resorption and tumor burden significantly in tumor-bearing mice. In vitro experiments showed that Gr1+CD11b+ cells isolated from normal and tumor-bearing mice differentiate into osteoclasts when cultured with RANK ligand and macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and that MDSCs from tumor-bearing mice upregulate parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) mRNA levels in cancer cells. PTHrP upregulation is likely due to the 2-fold increase in transforming growth factor β expression that we observed in MDSCs isolated from tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, using MDSCs isolated from GFP-expressing animals, we found that MDSCs differentiate into osteoclast-like cells in tumor-bearing mice as evidenced by the presence of GFP+TRAP+ cells. These results demonstrate that MDSCs expand in breast cancer bone metastases and induce bone destruction. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that MDSCs are able to differentiate into osteoclasts in vivo and that this is stimulated in the presence of tumors. PMID:23264895

  3. Interleukin-34 promotes tumor progression and metastatic process in osteosarcoma through induction of angiogenesis and macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Ségaliny, Aude I; Mohamadi, Amel; Dizier, Blandine; Lokajczyk, Anna; Brion, Régis; Lanel, Rachel; Amiaud, Jérôme; Charrier, Céline; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine; Heymann, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) was recently characterized as the M-CSF "twin" cytokine, regulating the proliferation/differentiation/survival of myeloid cells. The implication of M-CSF in oncology was initially suspected by the reduced metastatic dissemination in knock-out mice, due to angiogenesis impairment. Based on this observation, our work studied the involvement of IL-34 in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. The in vivo effects of IL-34 were assessed on tissue vasculature and macrophage infiltration in a murine preclinical model based on a paratibial inoculation of human osteosarcoma cells overexpressing or not IL-34 or M-CSF. In vitro investigations using endothelial cell precursors and mature HUVEC cells were performed to analyse the involvement of IL-34 in angiogenesis and myeloid cell adhesion. The data revealed that IL-34 overexpression was associated with the progression of osteosarcoma (tumor growth, lung metastases) and an increase of neo-angiogenesis. In vitro analyses demonstrated that IL-34 stimulated endothelial cell proliferation and vascular cord formation. Pre-treatment of endothelial cells by chondroitinases/heparinases reduced the formation of vascular tubes and abolished the associated cell signalling. In addition, IL-34 increased the in vivo recruitment of M2 tumor-associated macrophages into the tumor tissue. IL-34 increased in vitro monocyte/CD34(+) cell adhesion to activated HUVEC monolayers under physiological shear stress conditions. This work also demonstrates that IL-34 is expressed by osteosarcoma cells, is regulated by TNF-α, IL-1β, and contributes to osteosarcoma growth by increasing the neo-angiogenesis and the recruitment of M2 macrophages. By promoting new vessel formation and extravasation of immune cells, IL-34 may play a key role in tumor development and inflammatory diseases.

  4. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 methylation changes promote the occurrence and progression of Kazakh ESCC.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Ming; Li, Ling; Chen, Yun Zhao; Liu, Chunxia; Cui, Xiaobin; Yin, Liang; Yang, Lan; Zou, Hong; Pang, Lijuan; Zhao, Jin; Qi, Yan; Cao, Yuwen; Jiang, Jinfang; Liang, Weihua; Li, Feng

    2014-10-01

    Human leukocyte antigen II (HLA-II) plays an important role in host immune responses to cancer cells. Changes in gene methylation may result in aberrant expression of HLA-II, serving a key role in the pathogenesis of Kazakh esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We analyzed the expression level of HLA-II (HLA-DP, -DQ, and -DR) by immunohistochemistry, as well as the methylation status of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 by MassARRAY spectrometry in Xinjiang Kazakh ESCC. Expression of HLA-II in ESCC was significantly higher than that in cancer adjacent normal (ACN) samples (P < 0.05). Decreased HLA-II expression was closely associated with later clinical stages of ESCC (P < 0.05). Hypomethylation of HLA-DRB1 and hypermethylation of HLA-DQB1 was significantly correlated with occurrence of Kazakh ESCC (P < 0.01), and mainly manifested as hypomethylation of CpG9, CpG10-11, and CpG16 in HLA-DRB1 and hypermethylation of CpG6-7 and CpG16-17 in HLA-DQB1 (P < 0.01). Moreover, hypomethylation of HLA-DQB1 CpG6-7 correlated with poor differentiation in ESCCs, whereas hypermethylation of HLA-DRB1 CpG16 and hypomethylation of HLA-DQB1 CpG16-17 were significantly associated with later stages of ESCC (P < 0.05). A significant inverse association between HLA-DRB1 CpG9 methylation and HLA-II expression was found in ESCC (P < 0.05). These findings suggest aberrant HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 methylation contributes to the aberrant expression of HLA-II. These molecular changes may influence the immune response to specific tumor epitopes, promoting the occurrence and progression of Kazakh ESCC.

  5. ARSENIC REMOVAL TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on POU and POE arsenic removal drinking water treatment systems. The presentation provides information on the arsenic rule, arsenic chemistry and arsenic treatment. The arsenic treatment options proposed for POU and POE treatment consist prim...

  6. Efficacy of arsenic filtration by Kanchan arsenic filter in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anjana; Smith, Linda S; Shrestha, Shreekrishna; Maden, Narendra

    2014-09-01

    Groundwater arsenic contamination has caused a significant public health burden in lowland regions of Nepal. For arsenic mitigation purposes, the Kanchan Arsenic Filter (KAF) was developed and validated for use in 2003 after pilot studies showed its effectiveness in removing arsenic. However, its efficacy in field conditions operating for a long period has been scarcely observed. In this study, we observe the efficacy of KAFs running over 6 months in highly arsenic-affected households in Nawalparasi district. We assessed pair-wise arsenic concentrations of 62 randomly selected household tubewells before filtration and after filtration via KAFs. Of 62 tubewells, 41 had influent arsenic concentration exceeding the Nepal drinking water quality standard value (50 μg/L). Of the 41 tubewells having unsafe arsenic levels, KAFs reduced arsenic concentration to the safe level for only 22 tubewells, an efficacy of 54%. In conclusion, we did not find significantly high efficacy of KAFs in reducing unsafe influent arsenic level to the safe level under the in situ field conditions.

  7. [Effect of the interaction of microorganisms and iron oxides on arsenic releasing into groundwater in Chinese Loess].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yun-Yun; Chen, Tian-Hu; Zhou, Yue-Fei; Xie, Qiao-Qin

    2013-10-01

    A large part of groundwater in the Chinese Loess Plateau area is characterized by high arsenic concentration. Anaerobic bacteria have been considered to play key roles in promoting arsenic releasing from loess to groundwater. However, this hypothesis remains unconfirmed. Based on modeling experiments, this study investigated the speciation of arsenic in loess, and then determined the release rates and quantities of arsenic with the mediation of anaerobic bacteria. The results showed that arsenic contents in loess were between 23 mg.kg-1 and 30 mg.kg-1. No obvious arsenic content difference among loess samples was observed. The ratios for specific adsorbed, iron oxides co-precipitated and silicate co-precipitated arsenic were 37.76% , 36. 15% and 25. 69% , respectively. Indigenous microorganisms, dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) could all promote the release of arsenic from loess. Organic matters highly affected the release rates. More than 100 mg.L-1 sodium lactate was required for all bacterial experiments to facilitate obvious arsenic release. Considering the redox condition in loess, the contribution of SRB to arsenic release in loess area was less feasible than that of DIRB and indigenous microorganisms.

  8. DDA1 promotes stage IIB–IIC colon cancer progression by activating NFκB/CSN2/GSK-3β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongcheng; Wen, Yugang; Yu, Fudong; Cui, Feifei; Zhang, Dongyuan; Xue, Yingming; Liu, Chenchen; Yue, Ben; Chen, Jian; Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yang; Jiang, Weiliang; Liu, Xisheng; Mi, Yushuai; Zhou, Zongguang; Qin, Xuebin; Peng, Zhihai

    2016-01-01

    Conventional high-recurrence risk factors are not sufficient to predict post-operative risk of tumor recurrence or sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer. DDA1, an evolutionarily conserved gene located at 19p13.11, may be involved in the activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NFκB). This study aimed to investigate whether DDA1 contributes to tumorigenesis and progression of stage II colon cancer via activation of the NFκB pathway. We found that positive expression of DDA1 alone or in combination with p65 nuclear translocation correlated with increased risk of tumor recurrence in patients with stage IIB–IIC colon cancer. DDA1 overexpression in colon cancer lines promoted cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle progression, inhibited 5-FU-induced apoptosis, enhanced invasion, and induced the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Suppression of DDA1 inhibited tumor progression, and reduced tumor growth in vivo. We also demonstrated that DDA1-mediated tumor progression is associated with the activation of the NFκB/COP9 signalosome 2(CSN2)/glycogen synthase kinase3β (GSK3β) pathway. These results indicate that DDA1 promotes colon cancer progression through activation of NFκB/CSN2/GSK3β signaling. DDA1, together with NFκB activation status, may serve as a sensitive biomarker for tumor recurrence risk and prognosis in patients with stage IIB–IIC colon cancers. PMID:26942699

  9. Role of Aspergillus niger acrA in Arsenic Resistance and Its Use as the Basis for an Arsenic Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Se-In; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Al Abdallah, Qusai; Lee, Mark J.; Gibbs, Bernard F.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater sources is a major issue worldwide, since exposure to high levels of arsenic has been linked to a variety of health problems. Effective methods of detection are thus greatly needed as preventive measures. In an effort to develop a fungal biosensor for arsenic, we first identified seven putative arsenic metabolism and transport genes in Aspergillus niger, a widely used industrial organism that is generally regarded as safe (GRAS). Among the genes tested for RNA expression in response to arsenate, acrA, encoding a putative plasma membrane arsenite efflux pump, displayed an over 200-fold increase in gene expression in response to arsenate. We characterized the function of this A. niger protein in arsenic efflux by gene knockout and confirmed that AcrA was located at the cell membrane using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion construct. Based on our observations, we developed a putative biosensor strain containing a construct of the native promoter of acrA fused with egfp. We analyzed the fluorescence of this biosensor strain in the presence of arsenic using confocal microscopy and spectrofluorimetry. The biosensor strain reliably detected both arsenite and arsenate in the range of 1.8 to 180 μg/liter, which encompasses the threshold concentrations for drinking water set by the World Health Organization (10 and 50 μg/liter). PMID:22467499

  10. Role of Aspergillus niger acrA in arsenic resistance and its use as the basis for an arsenic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Choe, Se-In; Gravelat, Fabrice N; Al Abdallah, Qusai; Lee, Mark J; Gibbs, Bernard F; Sheppard, Donald C

    2012-06-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater sources is a major issue worldwide, since exposure to high levels of arsenic has been linked to a variety of health problems. Effective methods of detection are thus greatly needed as preventive measures. In an effort to develop a fungal biosensor for arsenic, we first identified seven putative arsenic metabolism and transport genes in Aspergillus niger, a widely used industrial organism that is generally regarded as safe (GRAS). Among the genes tested for RNA expression in response to arsenate, acrA, encoding a putative plasma membrane arsenite efflux pump, displayed an over 200-fold increase in gene expression in response to arsenate. We characterized the function of this A. niger protein in arsenic efflux by gene knockout and confirmed that AcrA was located at the cell membrane using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion construct. Based on our observations, we developed a putative biosensor strain containing a construct of the native promoter of acrA fused with egfp. We analyzed the fluorescence of this biosensor strain in the presence of arsenic using confocal microscopy and spectrofluorimetry. The biosensor strain reliably detected both arsenite and arsenate in the range of 1.8 to 180 μg/liter, which encompasses the threshold concentrations for drinking water set by the World Health Organization (10 and 50 μg/liter).

  11. Arsenic in ground-water under oxidizing conditions, south-west United States.

    PubMed

    Robertson, F N

    1989-12-01

    Concentrations of dissolved arsenic in ground-water in alluvial basins of Arizona commonly exceed 50 μg L(-1) and reach values as large as 1,300 μg L(-1). Arsenic speciation analyses show that arsenic occurs in the fully oxidized state of plus 5 (As+5), most likely in the form of HAsO4(∼2), under existing oxidizing and pH conditions. Arsenic in source areas presumably is oxidized to soluble As before transport into the basin or, if after transport, before burial. Probable sources of arsenic are the sulphide and arsenide deposits in the mineralized areas of the mountains surrounding the basins. Arsenic content of alluvial material ranged from 2 to 88 ppm. Occurrence and removal of arsenic in ground-water are related to the pH and the redox condition of the ground-water, the oxidation state of arsenic, and sorption or exchange. Within basins, dissolved arsenic correlates (P<0.01) with dissolved molybdenum, selenium, vanadium, and fluoride and with pH, suggesting sorption of negative ions. The sorption hypothesis is further supported by enrichment of teachable arsenic in the basin-fill sediments by about tenfold relative to the crustal abundance and by as much as a thousandfold relative to concentrations found in ground-water. Silicate hydrolysis reactions, as defined within the alluvial basins, under closed conditions cause increases in pH basinward and would promote desorption. Within the region, large concentrations of arsenic are commonly associated with the central parts of basins whose chemistries evolve under closed conditions. Arsenic does not correlate with dissolved iron (r = 0.09) but may be partly controlled by iron in the solid phase. High solid-phase arsenic contents were found in red clay beds. Large concentrations of arsenic also were found in water associated with red clay beds. Basins that contain the larger concentrations are bounded primarily by basalt and andesite, suggesting that the iron content as well as the arsenic content of the basin

  12. Arsenic in ground-water under oxidizing conditions, south-west United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, F.N.

    1989-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved arsenic in ground-water in alluvial basins of Arizona commonly exceed 50 ??g L-1 and reach values as large as 1,300 ??g L-1. Arsenic speciation analyses show that arsenic occurs in the fully oxidized state of plus 5 (As+5), most likely in the form of HAsO4???2, under existing oxidizing and pH conditions. Arsenic in source areas presumably is oxidized to soluble As before transport into the basin or, if after transport, before burial. Probable sources of arsenic are the sulphide and arsenide deposits in the mineralized areas of the mountains surrounding the basins. Arsenic content of alluvial material ranged from 2 to 88 ppm. Occurrence and removal of arsenic in ground-water are related to the pH and the redox condition of the ground-water, the oxidation state of arsenic, and sorption or exchange. Within basins, dissolved arsenic correlates (P<0.01) with dissolved molybdenum, selenium, vanadium, and fluoride and with pH, suggesting sorption of negative ions. The sorption hypothesis is further supported by enrichment of teachable arsenic in the basin-fill sediments by about tenfold relative to the crustal abundance and by as much as a thousandfold relative to concentrations found in ground-water. Silicate hydrolysis reactions, as defined within the alluvial basins, under closed conditions cause increases in pH basinward and would promote desorption. Within the region, large concentrations of arsenic are commonly associated with the central parts of basins whose chemistries evolve under closed conditions. Arsenic does not correlate with dissolved iron (r = 0.09) but may be partly controlled by iron in the solid phase. High solid-phase arsenic contents were found in red clay beds. Large concentrations of arsenic also were found in water associated with red clay beds. Basins that contain the larger concentrations are bounded primarily by basalt and andesite, suggesting that the iron content as well as the arsenic content of the basin fill may

  13. Biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Sun, Samio; Li, Chen-Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rosen, Barry P

    2014-01-21

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoarsenicals are degraded to inorganic arsenic. The toxicological effects of arsenicals depend on their oxidation state, chemical composition, and bioavailability. Here we report that the active forms are the trivalent arsenic-containing species. We constructed a whole-cell biosensor utilizing a modified ArsR repressor that is highly selective toward trivalent methyl and aromatic arsenicals, with essentially no response to inorganic arsenic. The biosensor was adapted for in vitro detection of organoarsenicals using fluorescence anisotropy of ArsR-DNA interactions. It detects bacterial biomethylation of inorganic arsenite both in vivo and in vitro with detection limits of 10(-7) M and linearity to 10(-6) M for phenylarsenite and 5 × 10(-6) M for methylarsenite. The biosensor detects reduced forms of MSMA and roxarsone and offers a practical, low cost method for detecting activate forms and breakdown products of organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

  14. Arsenic release by indigenous bacteria Bacillus cereus from aquifer sediments at Datong Basin, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zuoming; Wang, Yanxin; Duan, Mengyu; Xie, Xianjun; Su, Chunli

    2011-03-01

    Endemic arsenic poisoning due to long-term drinking of high arsenic groundwater has been reported in Datong Basin, northern China. To investigate the effects of microbial activities on arsenic mobilization in contaminated aquifers, Bacillus cereus ( B. cereus) isolated from high arsenic aquifer sediments of the basin was used in our microcosm experiments. The arsenic concentration in the treatment with both bacteria and sodium citrate or glucose had a rapid increase in the first 18 d, and then, it declined. Supplemented with bacteria only, the concentration could increase on the second day. By contrast, the arsenic concentration in the treatment supplemented with sodium citrate or glucose was kept very low. These results indicate that bacterial activities promoted the release of arsenic in the sediments. Bacterial activities also influenced other geochemical parameters of the aqueous phase, such as pH, Eh, and the concentrations of dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al that are important controls on arsenic release. The removal of Fe, Mn, and Al from sediment samples was observed with the presence of B. cereus. The effects of microbial activities on Fe, Mn, and Al release were nearly the same as those on As mobilization. The pH values of the treatments inoculated with bacteria were lower than those without bacteria, still at alkaline levels. With the decrease of Eh values in treatments inoculated with bacteria, the microcosms became more reducing and are thus favorable for arsenic release.

  15. Arsenic and diabetes: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun Fa; Chen, Ya Wen; Yang, Ching Yao; Tsai, Keh Sung; Yang, Rong Sen; Liu, Shing Hwa

    2011-09-01

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring toxic metalloid of global concern. Many studies have indicated a dose-response relationship between accumulative arsenic exposure and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan and Bangladesh, where arsenic exposure occurs through drinking water. Epidemiological researches have suggested that the characteristics of arsenic-induced DM observed in arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan and Mexico are similar to those of non-insulin-dependent DM (Type 2 DM). These studies analyzed the association between high and chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water and the development of DM, but the effect of exposure to low to moderate levels of inorganic arsenic on the risk of DM is unclear. Navas-Acien et al. recently proposed that a positive association existed between total urine arsenic and the prevalence of Type 2 DM in people exposed to low to moderate levels of arsenic. However, the diabetogenic role played by arsenic is still debated upon. An increase in the prevalence of DM has been observed among residents of highly arsenic-contaminated areas, whereas the findings from community-based and occupational studies in low-arsenic-exposure areas have been inconsistent. Recently, a population-based cross-sectional study showed that the current findings did not support an association between arsenic exposure from drinking water at levels less than 300 μg/L and a significantly increased risk of DM. Moreover, although the precise mechanisms for the arsenic-induced diabetogenic effect are still largely undefined, recent in vitro experimental studies indicated that inorganic arsenic or its metabolites impair insulin-dependent glucose uptake or glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Nevertheless, the dose, the form of arsenic used, and the experimental duration in the in vivo studies varied greatly, leading to conflicting results and ambiguous interpretation of these data with respect to human exposure

  16. Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok; Yao Hua; Li Wenqi; Budhraja, Amit; Li Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shi Xianglin

    2011-10-15

    Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

  17. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ratnaike, R

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption occurs from skin contact and inhalation. Arsenic exerts its toxicity by inactivating up to 200 enzymes, especially those involved in cellular energy pathways and DNA synthesis and repair. Acute arsenic poisoning is associated initially with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and severe diarrhoea. Encephalopathy and peripheral neuropathy are reported. Chronic arsenic toxicity results in multisystem disease. Arsenic is a well documented human carcinogen affecting numerous organs. There are no evidence based treatment regimens to treat chronic arsenic poisoning but antioxidants have been advocated, though benefit is not proven. The focus of management is to reduce arsenic ingestion from drinking water and there is increasing emphasis on using alternative supplies of water. PMID:12897217

  18. Arsenic in shrimp from Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Olayan, A.H.; Al-Yakoob, S.; Al-Hossaini, M.

    1995-04-01

    Arsenic is ubiquitous in the environment and can accumulate in food via contaminated soil, water or air. It enters the food chain through dry and wet atmospheric deposition. Combustion of oil and coal, use of arsenical fertilizers and pesticides and smelting of ores contributes significantly to the natural background of arsenic in soils and sediments. The metal can be transferred from soil to man through plants. In spite of variation in acute, subacute, and chronic toxic effects to plants and animals, evidence of nutritional essentiality of arsenic for rats, goats, and guinea pigs has been suggested, but has not been confirmed for humans. Adverse toxic effects of arsenic as well as its widespread distribution in the environment raises concern about levels of arsenic in man`s diet. Higher levels of arsenic in the diet can result in a higher accumulation rate. Arsenic levels in marine organisms are influenced by species differences, size of organism, and human activities. Bottom dwellers such as shrimp, crab, and lobster accumulate more arsenic than fish due to their frequent contact with bottom sediments. Shrimp constitute approximately 30% of mean total seafood consumption in Kuwait. This study was designed to determine the accumulation of arsenic in the commercially important jinga shrimp (Metapenaeus affinis) and grooved tiger prawn (Penaeus semisulcatus). 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Arsenic poisoning in dairy cattle from naturally occurring arsenic pyrites.

    PubMed

    Hopkirk, R G

    1987-10-01

    An outbreak of arsenic poisoning occurred in which most of a 200 cow dairy herd were affected and six died. The source of the arsenic was naturally occurring arsenic pyrites from the Waiotapu Stream, near Rotorua. Arsenic levels in the nearby soil were as high as 6618 ppm. There was little evidence to suggest that treatment affected the course of the disease. Haematology was of little use in diagnosis, post-mortem signs were not always consistent and persistence of the element in the liver appeared short. Control of further outbreaks have been based on practical measures to minimise the intake of contaminated soil and free laying water by the stock.

  20. Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase enhances the capacity of tumorigenesis associated with the promotion of cell cycle progression in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinyou; Yu, Haitao; Wang, Yanzhong; Zhou, Yanwen; Li, Guiling; Ruan, Zhi; Li, Fengying; Wang, Xiuhong; Liu, Huixing; Zhang, Jun

    2014-12-15

    Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT), an enzyme involved in the biotransformation and detoxification of many drugs and xenobiotic compounds, has been found to be overexpressed in several malignancies, including colorectal cancer. However, the biological function of NNMT and the related mechanisms in colorectal cancer have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of NNMT on tumorigenesis by overexpressing NNMT in the human colorectal cancer cells line SW480 which lacks constitutive NNMT expression, and downregulating NNMT expression in HT-29 cells, which exhibit high endogenous expression of NNMT. We found that NNMT significantly accelerates cell proliferation, enhances colony formation in vitro and tumorigenicity in mice; it also inhibits apoptosis, promotes cell cycle progression, increases ATP and 1-methylnicotinamide level and decreases ROS level. We also showed that 1-methylnicotinamide accelerates cell growth, inhibits apoptosis, promotes cell cycle progression, attenuates ROS production and increases ATP level. Our results indicate that NNMT enhances the capacity of tumorigenesis associated with the inhibition of cell apoptosis and the promotion of cell cycle progression in human colorectal cancer cells and the 1-methylnicotinamide increased by NNMT mediates the cellular effects of NNMT in cells. NNMT may play a vital role in energy balance and ROS induction.

  1. Arsenic Exposure and Toxicology: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael F.; Beck, Barbara D.; Chen, Yu; Lewis, Ari S.; Thomas, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed in food, water, air, and soil. Arsenic has a long history of use as a homicidal agent, but in the past 100 years arsenic, has been used as a pesticide, a chemotherapeutic agent and a constituent of consumer products. In some areas of the world, high levels of arsenic are naturally present in drinking water and are a toxicological concern. There are several structural forms and oxidation states of arsenic because it forms alloys with metals and covalent bonds with hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, and other elements. Environmentally relevant forms of arsenic are inorganic and organic existing in the trivalent or pentavalent state. Metabolism of arsenic, catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase, is a sequential process of reduction from pentavalency to trivalency followed by oxidative methylation back to pentavalency. Trivalent arsenic is generally more toxicologically potent than pentavalent arsenic. Acute effects of arsenic range from gastrointestinal distress to death. Depending on the dose, chronic arsenic exposure may affect several major organ systems. A major concern of ingested arsenic is cancer, primarily of skin, bladder, and lung. The mode of action of arsenic for its disease endpoints is currently under study. Two key areas are the interaction of trivalent arsenicals with sulfur in proteins and the ability of arsenic to generate oxidative stress. With advances in technology and the recent development of animal models for arsenic carcinogenicity, understanding of the toxicology of arsenic will continue to improve. PMID:21750349

  2. Allelic variants of human beta-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) promoter: evolutionary relationships and predictable associations with HIV-1 disease progression.

    PubMed

    Tang, J; Rivers, C; Karita, E; Costello, C; Allen, S; Fultz, P N; Schoenbaum, E E; Kaslow, R A

    1999-09-01

    Variability in the natural history of HIV-1 infection has been repeatedly associated with genetic variants in the beta-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) locus. While CCR5 coding sequences have demonstrated relatively limited variation, sequences of its promoter appear polymorphic in all major populations. Our studies revealed five major CCR5 promoter alleles with distributions that differed widely among the four distinct ethnic groups from Kigali, Rwanda and Bronx, New York. In particular, promoter allele P*0103 (G59029-T59353-T59356-A59402-C59653) was largely restricted to black subjects. The promoter allele P*0202 (A59029-C59353-C59356-A59402-T59653) was tightly linked to the slightly less frequent CCR2b-641, a variant of the CCR2b gene, which is about 12.7 kbp upstream from the promoter region. Another closely related promoter allele P*0201 (A59029-C59353-C59356-A59402-C59653) exclusively carried the far less common CCR5-delta 32, a 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 coding sequence 2 kbp downstream from the promoter. The homozygous P*0201/*0201 genotype can be predicted as a risk factor for more rapid disease progression. Among human, chimpanzee, pig-tailed macaque, and sooty mangabey promoter allelic sequences, the apparent ancestral lineage of the promoter sequence (G59029-T59353-C59356-A59402-C59653 = human P*0102) was highly conserved across the primate species analyzed here while P*0201 and P*0202 arose more recently than the other three major alleles. Further effort to establish the mechanism by which CCR chemokine receptor polymorphisms govern the initiation and pathogenesis of primate lentivirus infection apparently requires fully detailed genotypic characterization of the affected populations.

  3. Arsenic-induced Aurora-A activation contributes to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Han; Tseng, Ya-Shih; Yang, Chao-Chun; Kao, Yu-Ting; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic may cause serious environmental pollution and is a serious industrial problem. Depending on the dosage, arsenic may trigger the cells undergoing either proliferation or apoptosis-related cell death. Because of lack of the proper animal model to study arsenic induced tumorigenesis, the accurate risk level of arsenic exposure has not been determined. Arsenic shows genotoxic effect on human beings who uptake water contaminated by arsenic. Chromosome aberration is frequently detected in arsenic exposure-related diseases and is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased DNA repairing activity, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase, over-expression of Aurora-A leads to centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We revealed that Aurora-A is over-expressed in the skin and bladder cancer patients from blackfoot-disease endemic areas. Our cell line studies reveal that arsenic exposure between 0.5 μM and 1 μM for 2-7 days are able to induce Aurora-A expression and activation based on promoter activity, RNA and protein analysis. Aurora-A overexpression further increases the frequency of unsymmetrical chromosome segregation through centrosome amplification followed by cell population accumulated at S phase in immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) and uroepithelial cells (E7). Furthermore, Aurora-A over-expression was sustained for 1-4 weeks by chronic treatment of immortalized bladder and skin cells with NaAsO2. Aurora-A promoter methylation and gene amplification was not detected in the long-term arsenic treated E7 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of E2F1 transcription factor (E2F1) is increased in the presence of arsenic, and arsenic-related Aurora-A over-expression is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. We further demonstrated that overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ha-ras or Aurora-A and mutant p53 may act additively to trigger arsenic-related bladder and skin cancer

  4. CCR5 promoter activity correlates with HIV disease progression by regulating CCR5 cell surface expression and CD4 T cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anjali; Punke, Erin B; Sedano, Melina; Beauchamp, Bethany; Patel, Rima; Hossenlopp, Cassady; Alozie, Ogechika K; Gupta, Jayanta; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Garg, Himanshu

    2017-03-22

    CCR5 is the major co-receptor for HIV and polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene as well as promoter region that alter cell surface expression have been associated with disease progression. We determined the relationship between CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CD4 decline and other immunopathological features like immune activation and CD4+ T cell apoptosis in HIV patients. CCR5 promoter haplotype HHC was significantly associated with higher CD4 counts in patients. The relative promoter activity (RPA) of each haplotype was determined in vitro and combined promoter activity based on both alleles (CRPA) was assigned to each patients. Interestingly, CCR5 CRPA correlated inversely with CD4 counts and CD4:CD8 ratio specifically in viremic patients. In normal individuals, the CRPA correlated with the number of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood suggesting an effect on CCR5 expression. In a subset of high viremic patients harboring R5 tropic HIV, there was a strong correlation between CCR5 CRPA and both CD4 counts and CD4 T cell apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that, CCR5 promoter polymorphisms correlate with CD4 T cell loss possibly by regulating CD4 T cell apoptosis in HIV patients. Furthermore, assigning CRPAs to each patient is a new method of translating genotype to phenotype.

  5. Arsenic, microbes and contaminated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John F.

    2005-01-01

    The health of tens of millions of people world-wide is at risk from drinking arsenic-contaminated well water. In most cases this arsenic occurs naturally within the sub-surface aquifers, rather than being derived from identifiable point sources of pollution. The mobilization of arsenic into the aqueous phase is the first crucial step in a process that eventually leads to human arsenicosis. Increasing evidence suggests that this is a microbiological phenomenon.

  6. K63-polyubiquitinated HAUSP deubiquitinates HIF-1α and dictates H3K56 acetylation promoting hypoxia-induced tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han-Tsang; Kuo, Yi-Chih; Hung, Jung-Jyh; Huang, Chi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Yi; Chou, Teh-Ying; Chen, Yeh; Chen, Yi-Ju; Chen, Yu-Ju; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Teng, Shu-Chun; Wu, Kou-Juey

    2016-01-01

    Intratumoural hypoxia induces HIF-1α and promotes tumour progression, metastasis and treatment resistance. HIF-1α stability is regulated by VHL-E3 ligase-mediated ubiquitin-dependent degradation; however, the hypoxia-regulated deubiquitinase that stabilizes HIF-1α has not been identified. Here we report that HAUSP (USP7) deubiquitinase deubiquitinates HIF-1α to increase its stability, induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition and promote metastasis. Hypoxia induces K63-linked polyubiquitinated HAUSP at lysine 443 to enhance its functions. Knockdown of HAUSP decreases acetylation of histone 3 lysine 56 (H3K56Ac). K63-polyubiquitinated HAUSP interacts with a ubiquitin receptor CBP to specifically mediate H3K56 acetylation. ChIP-seq analysis of HAUSP and HIF-1α binding reveals two motifs responsive to hypoxia. HectH9 is the E3 ligase for HAUSP and a prognostic marker together with HIF-1α. This report demonstrates that hypoxia-induced K63-polyubiquitinated HAUSP deubiquitinates HIF-1α and causes CBP-mediated H3K56 acetylation on HIF-1α target gene promoters to promote EMT/metastasis, further defining HAUSP as a therapeutic target in hypoxia-induced tumour progression. PMID:27934968

  7. Estrogen-induced SDF-1α production promotes the progression of ER-negative breast cancer via the accumulation of MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Liquan; Chang, Weilong; Fang, Bin; Qin, Jieting; Qu, Xincai; Cheng, Fanjun

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen plays a role in the processes of tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer (BC). Whether estrogen contributes to ER-negative BC is unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate whether estrogen could stimulate the secretion of stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1α) by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) to promote the progression of ER-negative BC. We transplanted ER-negative BC cells into ovariectomized mice, which was followed by continuous injection of estrogen, and found that estrogen promoted the tumorigenesis of BC. Furthermore, High levels of SDF-1α and tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were detected in the estrogen treatment group. Estrogen stimulates secretion of SDF-1α by CAFs extracted from BC patients. Recombinant SDF-1α could recruit MDSCs isolated from bone marrow cells of mice. In addition, the co-culture of CAFs and MDSCs demonstrated that the recruitment of MDSCs was increased when CAFs were exposed to estrogen. Using AMD3100 to block the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis or gemcitabine to delete MDSCs, we observed that both of these agents could neutralize the effect of estrogen on tumorigenesis. Together, these results suggest that estrogen may promote the progression of ER-negative BC by stimulating CAFs to secrete SDF-1α, which can recruit MDSCs to the tumor microenvironment to exert tumor-promoting effects. PMID:27996037

  8. Estrogen-induced SDF-1α production promotes the progression of ER-negative breast cancer via the accumulation of MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Liquan; Chang, Weilong; Fang, Bin; Qin, Jieting; Qu, Xincai; Cheng, Fanjun

    2016-12-20

    Estrogen plays a role in the processes of tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer (BC). Whether estrogen contributes to ER-negative BC is unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate whether estrogen could stimulate the secretion of stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1α) by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) to promote the progression of ER-negative BC. We transplanted ER-negative BC cells into ovariectomized mice, which was followed by continuous injection of estrogen, and found that estrogen promoted the tumorigenesis of BC. Furthermore, High levels of SDF-1α and tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were detected in the estrogen treatment group. Estrogen stimulates secretion of SDF-1α by CAFs extracted from BC patients. Recombinant SDF-1α could recruit MDSCs isolated from bone marrow cells of mice. In addition, the co-culture of CAFs and MDSCs demonstrated that the recruitment of MDSCs was increased when CAFs were exposed to estrogen. Using AMD3100 to block the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis or gemcitabine to delete MDSCs, we observed that both of these agents could neutralize the effect of estrogen on tumorigenesis. Together, these results suggest that estrogen may promote the progression of ER-negative BC by stimulating CAFs to secrete SDF-1α, which can recruit MDSCs to the tumor microenvironment to exert tumor-promoting effects.

  9. Monitoring and evaluation of plant and hydrological controls on arsenic transport across the water sediment interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; MacDonald, L. H.; Paull, J.

    2009-12-01

    Plants and hydrology influence the transport of arsenic in wetlands by changing the dominant redox chemistry in the subsurface, and different plant and hydrological regimes can serve as effective barriers or promoters of metal transport. Inorganic arsenic, especially arsenate, binds to iron oxides in wetlands. In flooded wetland sediments, organic carbon from plants consumes oxygen and promotes reductive iron dissolution, which leads to arsenic release, while plants simultaneously create microoxic regimes around root hairs that oxidize and precipitate iron, promoting arsenic capture. Hydrology influences arsenic mobility by promoting wetting and drying cycles. Such cycles can lead to rapid shifts from anaerobic to aerobic conditions, and vice versa, with lasting impact on the oxidation state of iron and, by extension, the mobility of arsenic. Remediation strategies should take these competing conditions into account, and to help inform these strategies this study examines the chemistry of an industrially contaminated wetland when the above mechanisms aggregate. The study tests whether, in bulk, plants promote iron reduction or oxidation in intermittently flooded or consistently flooded sediments, and how this impacts arsenic mobility. This research uses a novel dialysis-based monitoring technique to examine the macro-properties of arsenic transport at the sediment water interface and at depth. Dialysis-based monitoring allows long-term seasonal trends in anaerobic porewater and allows active hypothesis testing on the influence of plants on redox chemistry. This study finds that plants promote iron reduction and that iron-reducing zones tend to correlate with zones with mobile arsenic. However, one newly reported and important finding of this study is that a brief summer drought that dried and oxidized sediments with a long history of iron-reduction zone served to effectively halt iron reduction for many months, and this corresponded to a lasting decline in

  10. Progress in Teachers' Readiness to Promote Positive Youth Development among Students during the Lions Quest Teaching Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talvio, Markus; Berg, Minna; Ketonen, Elina; Komulainen, Erkki; Lonka, Kirsti

    2015-01-01

    Modern learning psychology places an emphasis on the ability of teachers to promote their students' social and emotional learning (SEL) and living a good life. Research on precisely how teachers promote SEL and well-being among their students, however, remains scarce. This study focused on evaluating the Lions Quest teaching workshop (LQ), which…

  11. Decontamination of spent iron-oxide coated sand from filters used in arsenic removal.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ismail M M; Begum, Zinnat A; Sawai, Hikaru; Maki, Teruya; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Sand filters devised with iron-rich adsorbents are extensively promoted and deployed in the arsenic-prone south and south-east Asian countries (e.g., Bangladesh). The approach offers superior performance in removing arsenic while the spent sludge from the sand filters is an issue of concern due to the possibility of toxic releases after being discarded. In this work, a new technique is proposed for the treatment of spent iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS) from filters used in arsenic removal. Chelant-washing of the arsenic-loaded IOCS is combined with the solid phase extraction treatment to accomplish the objective. The unique point of the proposed process is the cost-effective scheme, which includes the option of recycling of the washing solvent beside the decontamination of the spent arsenic-rich sludge.

  12. Arsenic-induced plant growth of arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata: Impact of arsenic and phosphate rock.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong-He; Yang, Guang-Mei; Fu, Jing-Wei; Guan, Dong-Xing; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-04-01

    Phosphate rock (PR) has been shown to promote plant growth and arsenic (As) uptake by As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV). However, little is known about its behaviors in agricultural soils. In this study, impact of 50 mg kg(-1) As and/or 1.5% PR amendment on plant As accumulation and growth was investigated by growing PV for 90 d in three agricultural soils. While As amendment significantly increased plant As uptake and substantially promoted PV growth, the opposite was observed with PR amendment. Arsenic amendment increased plant frond As from 16.9-265 to 961-6017 mg kg(-1),whereas PR amendment lowered frond As to 10.2-216 mg kg(-1). The As-induced plant growth stimulation was 69-71%. While PR amendment increased plant Ca and P uptake, As amendment showed opposite results. The PV biomass was highly correlated with plant As at r = 0.82, but with weak correlations with plant Ca or P at r < 0.30. This study confirmed that 1) As significantly promoted PV growth, probably independent of Ca or P uptake, 2) PR amendment didn't enhance plant growth or As uptake by PV in agricultural soils with adequate available P, and 3) PV effluxed arsenite (AsIII) growing in agricultural soils.

  13. Arsenic release during managed aquifer recharge (MAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, T.; Lazareva, O.; Druschel, G.

    2013-12-01

    The mobilization and addition of geogenic trace metals to groundwater is typically caused by anthropogenic perturbations of the physicochemical conditions in the aquifer. This can add dangerously high levels of toxins to groundwater, thus compromising its use as a source of drinking water. In several regions world-wide, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), a form of managed aquifer recharge (MAR), faces the problem of arsenic release due to the injection of oxygenated storage water. To better understand this process we coupled geochemical reactive transport modeling to bench-scale leaching experiments to investigate and verify the mobilization of geogenic arsenic (As) under a range of redox conditions from an arsenic-rich pyrite bearing limestone aquifer in Central Florida. Modeling and experimental observations showed similar results and confirmed the following: (1) native groundwater and aquifer matrix, including pyrite, were in chemical equilibrium, thus preventing the release of As due to pyrite dissolution under ambient conditions; (2) mixing of oxygen-rich surface water with oxygen-depleted native groundwater changed the redox conditions and promoted the dissolution of pyrite, and (3) the behavior of As along a flow path was controlled by a complex series of interconnected reactions. This included the oxidative dissolution of pyrite and simultaneous sorption of As onto neo-formed hydrous ferric oxides (HFO), followed by the reductive dissolution of HFO and secondary release of adsorbed As under reducing conditions. Arsenic contamination of drinking water in these systems is thus controlled by the re-equilibration of the system to more reducing conditions rather than a purely oxidative process.

  14. Proteomic analysis as a tool for investigating arsenic stress in Pteris vittata roots colonized or not by arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Bona, Elisa; Marsano, Francesco; Massa, Nadia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Cesaro, Patrizia; Argese, Emanuele; Sanità di Toppi, Luigi; Cavaletto, Maria; Berta, Graziella

    2011-08-12

    Pteris vittata can tolerate very high soil arsenic concentration and rapidly accumulates the metalloid in its fronds. However, its tolerance to arsenic has not been completely explored. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonize the root of most terrestrial plants, including ferns. Mycorrhizae are known to affect plant responses in many ways: improving plant nutrition, promoting plant tolerance or resistance to pathogens, drought, salinity and heavy metal stresses. It has been observed that plants growing on arsenic polluted soils are usually mycorrhizal and that AM fungi enhance arsenic tolerance in a number of plant species. The aim of the present work was to study the effects of the AM fungus Glomus mosseae on P. vittata plants treated with arsenic using a proteomic approach. Image analysis showed that 37 spots were differently affected (21 identified). Arsenic treatment affected the expression of 14 spots (12 up-regulated and 2 down-regulated), while in presence of G. mosseae modulated 3 spots (1 up-regulated and 2 down-regulated). G. mosseae, in absence of arsenic, modulated 17 spots (13 up-regulated and 4 down-regulated). Arsenic stress was observed even in an arsenic tolerant plant as P. vittata and a protective effect of AM symbiosis toward arsenic stress was observed.

  15. Thiolated arsenicals in arsenic metabolism: Occurrence, formation, and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuzhen; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic (As) is a notoriously toxic pollutant of health concern worldwide with potential risk of cancer induction, but meanwhile it is used as medicines for the treatment of different conditions including hematological cancers. Arsenic can undergo extensive metabolism in biological systems, and both toxicological and therapeutic effects of arsenic compounds are closely related to their metabolism. Recent studies have identified methylated thioarsenicals as a new class of arsenic metabolites in biological systems after exposure of inorganic and organic arsenicals, including arsenite, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), dimethylarsinous glutathione (DMA(III)GS), and arsenosugars. The increasing detection of thiolated arsenicals, including monomethylmonothioarsonic acid (MMMTA(V)), dimethylmonothioarsinic acid (DMMTA(V)) and its glutathione conjugate (DMMTA(V)GS), and dimethyldithioarsinic acid (DMDTA(V)) suggests that thioarsenicals may be important metabolites and play important roles in arsenic toxicity and therapeutic effects. Here we summarized the reported occurrence of thioarsenicals in biological systems, the possible formation pathways of thioarsenicals, and their toxicity, and discussed the biological implications of thioarsenicals on arsenic metabolism, toxicity, and therapeutic effects.

  16. INFLUENCE OF DIETARY ARSENIC ON URINARY ARSENIC METABOLITE EXCRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Dietary Arsenic on Urinary Arsenic Metabolite Excretion

    Cara L. Carty, M.S., Edward E. Hudgens, B.Sc., Rebecca L. Calderon, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., Richard Kwok, M.S.P.H., Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch/HSD, NHEERL/US EPA; David J. Thomas, Ph.D., Pharmacokinetics...

  17. Photooxidation of arsenic(III) to arsenic(V) on the surface of kaolinite clay.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Wang, Yajie; Yu, Yingtan; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Li, Jinjun; Wu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    As one of the most toxic heavy metals, the oxidation of inorganic arsenic has drawn great attention among environmental scientists. However, little has been reported on the solar photochemical behavior of arsenic species on top-soil. In the present work, the influencing factors (pH, relative humidity (RH), humic acid (HA), trisodium citrate, and additional iron ions) and the contributions of reactive oxygen species (ROS, mainly HO and HO2/O2(-)) to photooxidation of As(III) to As(V) on kaolinite surfaces under UV irradiation (λ=365nm) were investigated. Results showed that lower pH facilitated photooxidation, and the photooxidation efficiency increased with the increase of RH and trisodium citrate. Promotion or inhibition of As(III) photooxidation by HA was observed at low or high dosages, respectively. Additional iron ions greatly promoted the photooxidation, but excessive amounts of Fe(2+) competed with As(III) for oxidation by ROS. Experiments on scavengers indicated that the HO radical was the predominant oxidant in this system. Experiments on actual soil surfaces proved the occurrence of As(III) photooxidation in real topsoil. This work demonstrates that the photooxidation process of As(III) on the soil surface should be taken into account when studying the fate of arsenic in natural soil newly polluted with acidic wastewater containing As(III).

  18. Arsenic speciation in edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Nearing, Michelle M; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2014-12-16

    The fruiting bodies, or mushrooms, of terrestrial fungi have been found to contain a high proportion of the nontoxic arsenic compound arsenobetaine (AB), but data gaps include a limited phylogenetic diversity of the fungi for which arsenic speciation is available, a focus on mushrooms with higher total arsenic concentrations, and the unknown formation and role of AB in mushrooms. To address these, the mushrooms of 46 different fungus species (73 samples) over a diverse range of phylogenetic groups were collected from Canadian grocery stores and background and arsenic-contaminated areas. Total arsenic was determined using ICP-MS, and arsenic speciation was determined using HPLC-ICP-MS and complementary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The major arsenic compounds in mushrooms were found to be similar among phylogenetic groups, and AB was found to be the major compound in the Lycoperdaceae and Agaricaceae families but generally absent in log-growing mushrooms, suggesting the microbial community may influence arsenic speciation in mushrooms. The high proportion of AB in mushrooms with puffball or gilled morphologies may suggest that AB acts as an osmolyte in certain mushrooms to help maintain fruiting body structure. The presence of an As(III)-sulfur compound, for the first time in mushrooms, was identified in the XAS analysis. Except for Agaricus sp. (with predominantly AB), inorganic arsenic predominated in most of the store-bought mushrooms (albeit with low total arsenic concentrations). Should inorganic arsenic predominate in these mushrooms from contaminated areas, the risk to consumers under these circumstances should be considered.

  19. Subhepatotoxic exposure to arsenic enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Arteel, Gavin E. Guo, Luping; Schlierf, Thomas; Beier, Juliane I.; Kaiser, J. Phillip; Chen, Theresa S.; Liu, Marsha; Conklin, Daniel J.; Miller, Heather L.; Montfort, Claudia von; States, J. Christopher

    2008-01-15

    Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is a serious health concern in the US. Whereas studies have identified arsenic alone as an independent risk factor for liver disease, concentrations of arsenic required to damage this organ are generally higher than found in the US water supply. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that arsenic (at subhepatotoxic doses) may also sensitize the liver to a second hepatotoxin. To test this hypothesis, the effect of chronic exposure to arsenic on liver damage caused by acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was determined in mice. Male C57Bl/6J mice (4-6 weeks) were exposed to arsenic (49 ppm as sodium arsenite in drinking water). After 7 months of exposure, animals were injected with LPS (10 mg/kg i.p.) and sacrificed 24 h later. Arsenic alone caused no overt hepatotoxicity, as determined by plasma enzymes and histology. In contrast, arsenic exposure dramatically enhanced liver damage caused by LPS, increasing the number and size of necroinflammatory foci. This effect of arsenic was coupled with increases in indices of oxidative stress (4-HNE adducts, depletion of GSH and methionine pools). The number of apoptotic (TUNEL) hepatocytes was similar in the LPS and arsenic/LPS groups. In contrast, arsenic pre-exposure blunted the increase in proliferating (PCNA) hepatocytes caused by LPS; this change in the balance between cell death and proliferation was coupled with a robust loss of liver weight in the arsenic/LPS compared to the LPS alone group. The impairment of proliferation after LPS caused by arsenic was also coupled with alterations in the expression of key mediators of cell cycle progression (p27, p21, CDK6 and Cyclin D1). Taken together, these results suggest that arsenic, at doses that are not overtly hepatotoxic per se, significantly enhances LPS-induced liver injury. These results further suggest that arsenic levels in the drinking water may be a risk modifier for the development of chronic liver diseases.

  20. Gankyrin sustains PI3K/GSK-3β/β-catenin signal activation and promotes colorectal cancer aggressiveness and progression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianlong; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Chengxing; Wei, Jianchang; Chen, Zhuanpeng; Hu, He; Li, Wanglin; Cao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    High levels of angiogenesis, metastasis and chemoresistance are major clinical features of colorectal cancer (CRC), a lethal disease with a high incidence worldwide. Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway contributes to CRC progression. However, little is known about regulatory mechanisms of the β-catenin activity in cancer progression. Here we report that Gankyrin was markedly upregulated in primary tumor tissues from CRC patients and was associated with poor survival. Moreover, we demonstrated that overexpressing Gankyrin promoted, while knockdown of Gankyrin impaired, the aggressive phenotype of proliferation, angiogenesis, chemoresistance and metastasis of CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, we found a unique molecular mechanism of Gankyrin in CRC cells signaling transduction, that regulated the cross-talk between PI3K/Akt and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways, sustaining PI3K/GSK-3β/β-catenin signal activation in CRC. Therefore, these findings not only reveal a mechanism that promotes aggressiveness and progression in CRC, but also provide insight into novel molecular targets for antitumor therapy in CRCs. PMID:27835604

  1. CLASP1, astrin and Kif2b form a molecular switch that regulates kinetochore-microtubule dynamics to promote mitotic progression and fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Amity L; Bakhoum, Samuel F; Maffini, Stefano; Correia-Melo, Clara; Maiato, Helder; Compton, Duane A

    2010-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis requires precise coordination of various processes, such as chromosome alignment, maturation of proper kinetochore–microtubule (kMT) attachments, correction of erroneous attachments, and silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). How these fundamental aspects of mitosis are coordinately and temporally regulated is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the temporal regulation of kMT attachments by CLASP1, astrin and Kif2b is central to mitotic progression and chromosome segregation fidelity. In early mitosis, a Kif2b–CLASP1 complex is recruited to kinetochores to promote chromosome movement, kMT turnover, correction of attachment errors, and maintenance of SAC signalling. However, during metaphase, this complex is replaced by an astrin–CLASP1 complex, which promotes kMT stability, chromosome alignment, and silencing of the SAC. We show that these two complexes are differentially recruited to kinetochores and are mutually exclusive. We also show that other kinetochore proteins, such as Kif18a, affect kMT attachments and chromosome movement through these proteins. Thus, CLASP1–astrin–Kif2b complex act as a central switch at kinetochores that defines mitotic progression and promotes fidelity by temporally regulating kMT attachments. PMID:20852589

  2. The long non-coding RNA ANRIL promotes proliferation and cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis and senescence in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jun-jun; Wang, Yan; Liu, Ying-lei; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Jing-xin; Hua, Ke-qin

    2016-01-01

    Antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL) has been implicated in a variety of cancers. In the present study, we evaluated ANRIL expression in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and defined its clinical implications and biological functions. ANRIL was overexpressed in EOC tissues relative to normal controls. Overexpression correlated with advanced International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians stage and high histological grade. Multivariate analysis indicated that ANRIL is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in EOC. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that ANRIL promotes EOC cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. The proliferative effect was linked to the promotion of cell cycle progression and inhibition of apoptosis and senescence. Down-regulation of P15INK4B and up-regulation of Bcl-2 by ANRIL may partially explain ANRIL-induced EOC cell proliferation. This study is the first to establish that ANRIL promotes EOC progression and is a potential prognostic biomarker. PMID:27095571

  3. ARSENIC - SUSCEPTIBILITY & IN UTERO EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic remains a serious public health problem at many locations worldwide. If has often been noted that prevalences of signs and symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning differ among various populations. For example, skin lesions or peripheral vascular dis...

  4. Drinking Water Arsenic Rule History

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA published the final arsenic rule on January 22, 2001. In response to the national debate surrounding the arsenic rule related to science and costs, the EPA announced on March 20, 2001 that the agency would reassess the science and cost issues.

  5. Arsenic Is A Genotoxic Carcinogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen; however, there is controversy over whether or not it should be considered a genotoxic carcinogen. Many possible modes of action have been proposed on how arsenic induces cancer, including inhibiting DNA repair, altering methylation patter...

  6. TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR ARSENIC REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) recently reduced the arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) from 0.050 mg/L to 0.010 mg/L. In order to increase arsenic outreach efforts, a summary of the new rule, related health risks, treatment technologies, and desig...

  7. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Web cast presentation covered six topics: 1), Arsenic Chemistry, 2), Technology Selection/Arsenic Demonstration Program, 3), Case Study 1, 4), Case Study 2,5), Case Study 3, and 6), Media Regeneration Project. The presentation consists of material presented at other training sess...

  8. Rhizosphere colonization and arsenic translocation in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by arsenate reducing Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L.

    PubMed

    Cavalca, Lucia; Corsini, Anna; Bachate, Sachin Prabhakar; Andreoni, Vincenza

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, six arsenic-resistant strains previously isolated were tested for their plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, in order to choose one model strain as an inoculum for sunflower plants in pot experiments. The aim was to investigate the effect of arsenic-resistant strain on sunflower growth and on arsenic uptake from arsenic contaminated soil. Based on plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L was chosen as an inoculum. Beside the ability to reduce arsenate to arsenite via an Ars operon, the strain exhibited 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity and it was also able to produce siderophore and indole acetic acid. Pot experiments were conducted with an agricultural soil contaminated with arsenic (214 mg kg⁻¹). A real time PCR method was set up based on the quantification of ACR3(2) type of arsenite efflux pump carried by Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L, in order to monitor presence and colonisation of the strain in the bulk and rhizospheric soil. As a result of strain inoculation, arsenic uptake by plants was increased by 53 %, whereas ACR3(2) gene copy number in rhizospheric soil was 100 times higher in inoculated than in control pots, indicating the colonisation of strain. The results indicated that the presence of arsenate reducing strains in the rhizosphere of sunflower influences arsenic mobilization and promotes arsenic uptake by plant.

  9. p38α MAPK is required for arsenic-induced cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Gyum; Shi, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic exposure has been reported to cause neoplastic transformation through the activation of PcG proteins. In the present study, we show that activation of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is required for arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation. Exposure of cells to 0.5 μM arsenic increased CRE and c-Fos promoter activities that were accompanied by increases in p38α MAPK and CREB phosphorylation and expression levels concurrently with AP-1 activation. Introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNA-p38α into BALB/c 3T3 cells markedly suppressed arsenic-induced colony formation compared with wildtype cells. CREB phosphorylation and AP-1 activation were decreased in p38α knockdown cells after arsenic treatment. Arsenic-induced AP-1 activation, measured as c-Fos and CRE promoter activities, and CREB phosphorylation were attenuated by p38 inhibition in BALB/c 3T3 cells. Thus, p38α MAPK activation is required for arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation mediated through CREB phosphorylation and AP-1 activation.

  10. Decreased TSPAN1 promotes prostate cancer progression and is a marker for early biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Jianjun; Shao, Xiaoguang; Kang, Xunlei; Qin, Jun; You, M. James; Huang, Yiran; Dong, Baijun; Xue, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Patients with prostate cancer (PCa) have a variable prognosis. It is challenging to recognize the progressive disease. In this study, we focused on TSPAN1, a new member of the tetraspanin family. Its expression was decreased in progressive PCa and was an independent prognosis factor of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. In vitro, knockdown and overexpression of TSPAN1 in PCa cell lines showed that TSPAN1 could inhibit cell proliferation and migration. TSPAN1 was positive related to PTEN in both clinical specimen and mouse models. The combination of these two markers could increase their prognosis value especially in low risk patients. In vitro TSPAN1 knockdown resulted in increased Akt phosphorylation and caused evident cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. Our data suggests that TSPAN1 is a valuable marker to recognize more progressive PCa. PMID:27556508

  11. Technologies for Arsenic Removal from Water: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Nicomel, Nina Ricci; Leus, Karen; Folens, Karel; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Du Laing, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    This review paper presents an overview of the available technologies used nowadays for the removal of arsenic species from water. Conventionally applied techniques to remove arsenic species include oxidation, coagulation-flocculation, and membrane techniques. Besides, progress has recently been made on the utility of various nanoparticles for the remediation of contaminated water. A critical analysis of the most widely investigated nanoparticles is presented and promising future research on novel porous materials, such as metal organic frameworks, is suggested. PMID:26703687

  12. Arsenic concentrations in Chinese coals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingshi; Zheng, Baoshan; Wang, Binbin; Li, Shehong; Wu, Daishe; Hu, Jun

    2006-03-15

    The arsenic concentrations in 297 coal samples were collected from the main coal-mines of 26 provinces in China were determined by molybdenum blue coloration method. These samples were collected from coals that vary widely in coal rank and coal-forming periods from the five main coal-bearing regions in China. Arsenic content in Chinese coals range between 0.24 to 71 mg/kg. The mean of the concentration of Arsenic is 6.4+/-0.5 mg/kg and the geometric mean is 4.0+/-8.5 mg/kg. The level of arsenic in China is higher in northeastern and southern provinces, but lower in northwestern provinces. The relationship between arsenic content and coal-forming period, coal rank is studied. It was observed that the arsenic contents decreases with coal rank in the order: Tertiary>Early Jurassic>Late Triassic>Late Jurassic>Middle Jurassic>Late Permian>Early Carboniferous>Middle Carboniferous>Late Carboniferous>Early Permian; It was also noted that the arsenic contents decrease in the order: Subbituminous>Anthracite>Bituminous. However, compared with the geological characteristics of coal forming region, coal rank and coal-forming period have little effect on the concentration of arsenic in Chinese coal. The average arsenic concentration of Chinese coal is lower than that of the whole world. The health problems in China derived from in coal (arsenism) are due largely to poor local life-style practices in cooking and home heating with coal rather than to high arsenic contents in the coal.

  13. OSD1 promotes meiotic progression via APC/C inhibition and forms a regulatory network with TDM and CYCA1;2/TAM.

    PubMed

    Cromer, Laurence; Heyman, Jefri; Touati, Sandra; Harashima, Hirofumi; Araou, Emilie; Girard, Chloe; Horlow, Christine; Wassmann, Katja; Schnittger, Arp; De Veylder, Lieven; Mercier, Raphael

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle control is modified at meiosis compared to mitosis, because two divisions follow a single DNA replication event. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) promote progression through both meiosis and mitosis, and a central regulator of their activity is the APC/C (Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome) that is especially required for exit from mitosis. We have shown previously that OSD1 is involved in entry into both meiosis I and meiosis II in Arabidopsis thaliana; however, the molecular mechanism by which OSD1 controls these transitions has remained unclear. Here we show that OSD1 promotes meiotic progression through APC/C inhibition. Next, we explored the functional relationships between OSD1 and the genes known to control meiotic cell cycle transitions in Arabidopsis. Like osd1, cyca1;2/tam mutation leads to a premature exit from meiosis after the first division, while tdm mutants perform an aberrant third meiotic division after normal meiosis I and II. Remarkably, while tdm is epistatic to tam, osd1 is epistatic to tdm. We further show that the expression of a non-destructible CYCA1;2/TAM provokes, like tdm, the entry into a third meiotic division. Finally, we show that CYCA1;2/TAM forms an active complex with CDKA;1 that can phosphorylate OSD1 in vitro. We thus propose that a functional network composed of OSD1, CYCA1;2/TAM, and TDM controls three key steps of meiotic progression, in which OSD1 is a meiotic APC/C inhibitor.

  14. CCL20 and CXCL8 synergize to promote progression and poor survival outcome in patients with colorectal cancer by collaborative induction of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xian-Shuo; Li, Yun-Feng; Tan, Jing; Sun, Bin; Xiao, You-Chuan; Fang, Xing-Bao; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Qiang; Dong, Jian-Hua; Li, Ming; Qian, Hai-hua; Yin, Zheng-Feng; Yang, Zhi-Bin

    2014-06-28

    Liver metastases represent the major cause of death in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Recent studies have suggested that the chemotactic responses of tumor cells are necessary for metastatic spread to the liver, and CCL20 and CXCL8 have a strong association with CRC metastasis. The aim of our study was to identify the mechanisms by which CCL20 and CXCL8 synergize to promote metastatic progression and evaluated their potential as prognostic markers for CRC patients. The abilities of CCL20 and CXCL8 to promote CRC cell progression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition(EMT)phenotype were analyzed in vitro. Possible signaling pathways were investigated with specific pathway inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA). 213 Patients with CRC who underwent surgery were enrolled for analysis of CCL20, CXCL8 and E-cadherin expressions in tumor tissues. Prognostic factors were then identified. CCL20 or CXCL8 alone was not sufficient to induce complete EMT in CRC cells, but both of them could coordinately induce EMT-like phenotype that was required to maintain CRC cell proliferation, migration and invasion. PI3K/AKT-ERK1/2 pathway crosstalk was demonstrated to be responsible for this process. Coexpression of CCL20 and CXCL8 was negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression in human CRC tissues. CRC patients with coexpression of CCL20 and CXCL8 were more likely to develop liver metastases and both coexpression was an independent high-risk factor for a most poor prognosis. CCL20 and CXCL8 synergize to promote CRC metastatic progression by coordinated induction of EMT via PI3K/AKT-ERK1/2 signaling axis. Detection of both coexpressions can be used to predict clinical outcomes in CRC patients.

  15. The -94Ins/DelATTG polymorphism in NFκB1 promoter modulates chronic hepatitis C and liver disease progression.

    PubMed

    Fakhir, Fatima-Zohra; Lkhider, Mustapha; Badre, Wafaa; Alaoui, Rhimou; Pineau, Pascal; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Benjelloun, Soumaya

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is one of the most important risk factor of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCV is suspected to induce HCC primarily through chronic inflammation and promotion of cirrhosis, a well-known pre-neoplastic condition. The NF-κB pathway is a key regulator of immune and inflammatory processes and plays a pivotal role in oncogenesis. Genetic variations affecting the pathway may alter NF-κB activity in response to HCV infection and contribute to liver tumorigenesis. The present study aims to evaluate the association between -94Ins/DelATTG (rs28362491) polymorphism in NF-κB1 gene promoter region and 2758G>A (rs696) single nucleotide polymorphism in the 3'UTR region of NFκBIA and the outcomes of HCV infection. In this case-control study, 559 subjects (343 patients with HCV infection including 237 mild chronic hepatitis patients and 106 patients with Advanced Liver Disease (AdLD), 78 individuals who naturally cleared HCV and 138 healthy subjects) were genotyped for the NFκB1 and NFκBIA SNPs using PCR-RFLP. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between polymorphisms and the outcome and progression of the infection. Variation at rs696 was not associated with HCV resolution or progression (P>0.05). By contrast, the Ins/Ins genotype was associated with a 4-fold increase of AdLD risk when compared to mild chronic hepatitis C (OR=4.69; 95% CI, 2.15-10.19; P=0.0001) and the risk was more pronounced when compared to healthy controls (OR=5.02; 95% CI, 2.30-10.98; P=0.00005). Furthermore, carriage of Ins allele at rs28362491 was significantly associated with higher viral loads (P=0.003). Our results suggest that variation in NFκB1 gene promoter modulates the progression of chronic hepatitis C toward advanced liver disease.

  16. Using Formal Embedded Formative Assessments Aligned with a Short-Term Learning Progression to Promote Conceptual Change and Achievement in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yue; Tomita, Miki K.; Shavelson, Richard J.

    2014-03-01

    This study examined the effect of learning progression-aligned formal embedded formative assessment on conceptual change and achievement in middle-school science. Fifty-two sixth graders were randomly assigned to either an experimental group or a control group. Both groups were taught about sinking and floating by the same teacher with identical curriculum materials and activities. The experimental group received, in addition, three sets of formal embedded formative assessments with qualitative feedback as to how to improve their understandings aligned with an expected learning progression during instruction. The control group spent the corresponding time between new curriculum activities conducting curriculum-specific extension activities. Overall, the experimental group experienced on average greater conceptual change than the control group. The experimental group also scored higher on average than the control group on general achievement tests, especially the performance assessment. This study supported the contention, then, that embedding formal formative assessments within a curricular sequence built around an expected learning progression is a useful way to promote conceptual change along that learning progression in science classrooms.

  17. SDF-1/CXCR4 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression of colorectal cancer by activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting-Hua; Yao, Yu; Yu, Shuo; Han, Li-Li; Wang, Wen-Juan; Guo, Hui; Tian, Tao; Ruan, Zhi-Pin; Kang, Xiao-Min; Wang, Jing; Wang, Shu-Hong; Nan, Ke-Jun

    2014-11-28

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor, CXCR4, play an important role in angiogenesis and are associated with tumor progression. This study aimed to investigate the role of SDF-1/CXCR4-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as the underlying mechanisms. The data showed that expression of CXCR4 and β-catenin mRNA and protein was significantly higher in CRC tissues than in distant normal tissues. CXCR4 expression was associated with β-catenin expression in CRC tissues, whereas high CXCR4 expression was strongly associated with low E-cadherin, high N-cadherin, and high vimentin expression, suggesting a cross talk between the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in CRC. In vitro, SDF-1 induced CXCR4-positive colorectal cancer cell invasion and EMT by activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In contrast, SDF-1/CXCR4 axis activation-induced colorectal cancer invasion and EMT was effectively inhibited by the Wnt signaling pathway inhibitor Dickkopf-1. In conclusion, CXCR4-promoted CRC progression and EMT were regulated by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Thus, targeting of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis could have clinical applications in suppressing CRC progression.

  18. THE ROLE OF PROTEIN BINDING OF TRIVALENT ARSENICALS IN ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS AND TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three of the most plausible biological theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are protein binding, oxidative stress and altered DNA methylation. This review presents the role of trivalent arsenicals binding to proteins in arsenic carcinogenesis. Using vacuum filtration based receptor...

  19. *Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) , yielding mono-, di-, and trimethylated arsenicals. A comparative genomic approach focused on Ciona intestinaJis, an invertebrate chordate, was u...

  20. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.

    1994-12-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short. 2 figures.

  1. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short.

  2. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short.

  3. MiR-21 and MiR-155 promote non-small cell lung cancer progression by downregulating SOCS1, SOCS6, and PTEN.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xinying; Liu, Yuxia; Wang, Yong; Meng, Mingming; Wang, Kaifei; Zang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Sheng; Sun, Xiaohua; Cui, Lei; Pan, Lei; Liu, Sanhong

    2016-12-20

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. MiR-21 and miR-155 are the most amplified miRNAs in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), and are critical promoters of NSCLC progression. However, it remains unclear how miR-21 and miR-155 induce cancer progression, and whether these miRNAs share common targets, such as tumor suppressor genes required to prevent NSCLC. Here we report that miR-21 and miR-155 levels are elevated in NSCLC and are proportional to the progression of the disease. In addition, miR-21 and miR-155 share nearly 30% of their predicted target genes, including SOCS1, SOCS6, and PTEN, three tumor suppressor genes often silenced in NSCLC. Consequently, antagonizing miR-21, miR-155 or both potently inhibited tumor progression in xenografted animal models of NSCLC. Treatment with miR-21 and miR-155 inhibitors in combination was always more effective against NSCLC than treatment with a single inhibitor. Furthermore, levels of miR-21 and miR-155 expression correlated inversely with overall and disease-free survival of NSCLC patients. Our findings reveal that miR-21 and miR-155 promote the development of NSCLC, in part by downregulating SOCS1, SOCS6, and PTEN. Combined inhibition of miR-21 and miR-155 could improve the treatment of NSCLC.

  4. Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor (PEDF) Expression Induced by EGFRvIII Promotes Self-renewal and Tumor Progression of Glioma Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jinlong; Park, Gunwoo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Hong, Jun Hee; Kim, Youn-Jae; Jin, Xiong; Kang, Sangjo; Jung, Ji-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Yub; Yun, Hyeongsun; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Minkyung; Chung, Junho; Kim, Hyunggee; Nakano, Ichiro; Gwak, Ho-Shin; Yoo, Heon; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Jong Heon; Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Jeongwu; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Myung-Jin; Park, Jong Bae

    2015-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been associated with glioma stemness, but the direct molecular mechanism linking the two is largely unknown. Here, we show that EGFRvIII induces the expression and secretion of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), thereby promoting self-renewal and tumor progression of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Mechanistically, PEDF sustained GSC self-renewal by Notch1 cleavage, and the generated intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD) induced the expression of Sox2 through interaction with its promoter region. Furthermore, a subpopulation with high levels of PEDF was capable of infiltration along corpus callosum. Inhibition of PEDF diminished GSC self-renewal and increased survival of orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Together, these data indicate the novel role of PEDF as a key regulator of GSC and suggest clinical implications.

  5. UGT2B17 Expedites Progression of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancers by Promoting Ligand-Independent AR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Haolong; Xie, Ning; Chen, Ruiqi; Verreault, Mélanie; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin E; Barbier, Olivier; Dong, Xuesen

    2016-11-15

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is characterized by a shift in androgen receptor (AR) signaling from androgen-dependent to androgen (ligand)-independent. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B17 (UGT2B17) is a key enzyme that maintains androgen homeostasis by catabolizing AR agonists into inactive forms. Although enhanced UGT2B17 expression by antiandrogens has been reported in androgen-dependent prostate cancer, its roles in regulating AR signaling transformation and CRPC progression remain unknown. In this study, we show that higher UGT2B17 protein expression in prostate tumors is associated with higher Gleason score, metastasis, and CRPC progression. UGT2B17 expression and activity were higher in androgen-independent compared to androgen-dependent cell lines. UGT2B17 stimulated cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and xenograft progression to CRPC after prolonged androgen deprivation. Gene microarray analysis indicated that UGT2B17 suppressed androgen-dependent AR transcriptional activity and enhanced of ligand-independent transcriptional activity at genes associated with cell mitosis. These UGT2B17 actions were mainly mediated by activation of the c-Src kinase. In CRPC tumors, UGT2B17 expression was associated positively with c-Src activation. These results indicate that UGT2B17 expedites CRPC progression by enhancing ligand-independent AR signaling to activate cell mitosis in cancer cells. Cancer Res; 76(22); 6701-11. ©2016 AACR.

  6. Enhanced mammary progesterone receptor-A isoform activity in the promotion of mammary tumor progression by dietary soy in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary contribution to breast cancer risk, recurrence, and progression remains incompletely understood. Increased consumption of soy and soy isoflavones is associated with reduced mammary cancer susceptibility in women and in rodent models of carcinogenesis. In rats treated with N-Methyl-N-Nitrosou...

  7. c-Abl and Arg are activated in human primary melanomas, promote melanoma cell invasion via distinct pathways, and drive metastatic progression.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, S S; Fiore, L S; Sims, J T; Friend, J W; Srinivasan, D; Thacker, M A; Cibull, M L; Wang, C; Novak, M; Kaetzel, D M; Plattner, R

    2012-04-05

    Despite 35 years of clinical trials, there is little improvement in 1-year survival rates for patients with metastatic melanoma, and the disease is essentially untreatable if not cured surgically. The paucity of chemotherapeutic agents that are effective for treating metastatic melanoma indicates a dire need to develop new therapies. Here, we found a previously unrecognized role for c-Abl and Arg in melanoma progression. We demonstrate that the kinase activities of c-Abl and Arg are elevated in primary melanomas (60%), in a subset of benign nevi (33%) and in some human melanoma cell lines. Using siRNA and pharmacological approaches, we show that c-Abl/Arg activation is functionally relevant because it is requiredfor melanoma cell proliferation, survival and invasion. Significantly, we identify the mechanism by which activated c-Abl promotes melanoma invasion by showing that it transcriptionally upregulates matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), and using rescue approaches we demonstrate that c-Abl promotes invasion through a STAT3 → MMP-1 pathway. Additionally, we show that c-Abl and Arg are not merely redundant, as active Arg drives invasion in a STAT3-independent manner, and upregulates MMP-3 and MT1-MMP, in addition to MMP-1. Most importantly, c-Abl and Arg not only promote in vitro processes important for melanoma progression, but also promote metastasis in vivo, as inhibition of c-Abl/Arg kinase activity with the c-Abl/Arg inhibitor, nilotinib, dramatically inhibits metastasis in a mouse model. Taken together, these data identify c-Abl and Arg as critical, novel, drug targets in metastatic melanoma, and indicate that nilotinib may be useful in preventing metastasis in patients with melanomas harboring active c-Abl and Arg.

  8. Galectin-1 mediates TGF-β-induced transformation from normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and promotes tumor progression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lingyan; Xu, Cong; Guan, Zhonghai; Su, Xingyun; Xu, Zhenzhen; Cao, Jiang; Teng, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    Rcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major constituent of the tumor microenvironment. Cancer cells can induce the transformation from normal fibroblasts (NFs) into CAFs, reciprocally, CAFs promote tumor invasion and proliferation. TGF-β has been the mostly accepted factor to fuel NFs transformation into CAFs. Galectin-1 (Gal1) is highly upregulated in CAFs of multiple human cancers, and overexpression of Gal1 in CAFs promotes tumor progression. The effect of Gal1 on TGF-β-induced CAFs activation has not yet been established in gastric cancer (GC). In this study, we show that Gal1 expression in stroma is positively related to TGF-β in epithelial cells by retrospective analysis of GC patient samples. Meanwhile, conditioned media (CMs) from gastric cancer cells induce expression of both Gal1 and the CAFs marker alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in NFs via TGF-β secretion. Knockdown of Gal1 prevents TGF-β-induced the conversion of NFs to CAFs. CMs from fibroblasts overexpressing Gal1 inhibits cancer cells apoptosis, promotes migration and invasion in vitro. Thus, Gal1 is significantly involved in the development of tumor-promoting microenvironment by enhancing TGF-β signaling in a positive feedback loop. Targeting Gal1 in tumor stroma should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for GC. PMID:27186290

  9. Elevated Human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene expression in blood cells associated with chronic and arsenic exposure in Inner Mongolia, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Arsenic exposure is associated with human cancer. Telomerase containing the catalytic subunit, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of chromosomes, delay senescence and promoting cell proliferation leading to tumorigenesis. OBJECTIVE:...

  10. Chromatin inactivation precedes de novo dna methylation during the progressive epigenetic silencing of the rassf1a promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Strunnikova Maria; Schagdarsurengin, Undraga; Kehlen, Astrid; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Dammann, Reinhard

    2005-02-23

    Epigenetic inactivation of the RASSF1A tumor suppressor by CpG island methylation was frequently detected in cancer. However, the mechanisms of this aberrant DNA methylation are unknown. In the RASSF1A promoter, we characterized four Sp1 sites, which are frequently methylated in cancer. We examined the functional relationship between DNA methylation, histone modification, Sp1 binding, and RASSF1A expression in proliferating human mammary epithelial cells. With increasing passages, the transcription of RASSF1A was dramatically silenced. This inactivation was associated with deacetylation and lysine 9 trimethylation of histone H3 and an impaired binding of Sp1 at the RASSF1A promoter. In mammary epithelial cells that had overcome a stress-associated senescence barrier, a spreading of DNA methylation in the CpG island promoter was observed. When the RASSF1A-silenced cells were treated with inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase, binding of Sp1 and expression of RASSF1 A reoccurred. In summary, we observed that histone H3 deacetylation and H3 lysine 9 trimethylation occur in the same time window as gene inactivation and precede DNA methylation. Our data suggest that in epithelial cells, histone inactivation may trigger de novo DNA methylation of the RASSF1A promoter and this system may serve as a model for CpG island inactivation of tumor suppressor genes.

  11. Arsenic retention and transport behavior in the presence of typical anionic and nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chuan; Wang, Xianliang; Peng, Xianjia

    2016-01-01

    The massive production and wide use of surfactants have resulted in a large amount of surfactant residuals being discharged into the environment, which could have an impact on arsenic behavior. In the present study, the influence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) and nonionic surfactant polyethylene glycol octylphenyl ether (Triton X-100) on arsenic behavior was investigated in batch and column tests. The presence of SDBS and Triton X-100 reduced arsenic retention onto ferrihydrite (FH), enhanced arsenic transport through FH coated sand (FH-sand) columns and promoted arsenic release from the FH surface. With coexisting surfactants in solution, the equilibrium adsorbed amount of arsenic on FH decreased by up to 29.7% and the adsorption rate decreased by up to 52.3%. Pre-coating with surfactants caused a decrease in the adsorbed amount and adsorption rate of arsenic by up to 15.1% and 58.3%, respectively. Because of the adsorption attenuation caused by surfactants, breakthrough of As(V) and As(III) with SDBS in columns packed with FH-sand was 23.8% and 14.3% faster than that in those without SDBS, respectively. In columns packed with SDBS-coated FH-sand, transport of arsenic was enhanced to a greater extent. Breakthrough of As(V) and As(III) was 52.4% and 43.8% faster and the cumulative retention amount was 44.5% and 57.3% less than that in pure FH-sand column systems, respectively. Mobilization of arsenic by surfactants increased with the increase of the initial adsorbed amount of arsenic. The cumulative release amount of As(V) and As(III) from the packed column reached 10.8% and 36.0%, respectively.

  12. MicroRNA-124 slows down the progression of Huntington's disease by promoting neurogenesis in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Im, Wooseok; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Kim, Manho

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNA-124 contributes to neurogenesis through regulating its targets, but its expression both in the brain of Huntington's disease mouse models and patients is decreased. However, the effects of microRNA-124 on the progression of Huntington's disease have not been reported. Results from this study showed that microRNA-124 increased the latency to fall for each R6/2 Huntington's disease transgenic mouse in the rotarod test. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) staining of the striatum shows an increase in neurogenesis. In addition, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha protein levels in the striatum were increased and SRY-related HMG box transcription factor 9 protein level was decreased. These findings suggest that microRNA-124 slows down the progression of Huntington's disease possibly through its important role in neuronal differentiation and survival.

  13. ROCK inhibition with Y27632 promotes the proliferation and cell cycle progression of cultured astrocyte from spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Liu, Miao; Fu, Peicai; Xie, Minjie; Wang, Wei; Luo, Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Rho-associated Kinase (ROCK) has been identified as an important regulator of proliferation and cell cycle progression in a number of cell types. Although its effects on astrocyte proliferation have not been well characterized, ROCK has been reported to play important roles in gap junction formation, morphology, and migration of astrocytes. In the present study, our aim was to investigate the effect of ROCK inhibition by [(+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl) cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride] (Y27632) on proliferation and DNA synthesis in cultured astrocytes from rat spinal cord and the possible mechanism involved. Western blots showed that treatment of astrocytes with Y27632 increased their expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, and cyclin E, thereby causing cell cycle progression. Furthermore, Y27632-induced astrocyte proliferation was mediated through the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase signaling cascade. These results indicate the importance of ROCK in astrocyte proliferation.

  14. The chromatin-remodeling enzyme BRG1 promotes colon cancer progression via positive regulation of WNT3A

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shengtao; Jiang, Tao; Ye, Ling; Han, Zhongbo; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Chenchen; Yuan, Chenwei; Zhao, Senlin; Chen, Jian; Wang, Jingtao; Tang, Huamei; Lu, Su; Yang, Liguang; Wang, Xiaoliang; Yan, Dongwang; Peng, Zhihai; Fan, Junwei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to elucidate the clinical significance and underlying mechanisms of BRG1 in colon cancer. In the clinical analysis, overexpression of BRG1 correlates with colon cancer progression in two cohorts (n = 191 and n = 75). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that BRG1 is a prognosis predictor for overall survival (P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (P = 0.001). Knocking down BRG1 expression significantly suppressed the proliferation and invasion in colon cancer cells. The expression pattern of WNT3A is consistent with BRG1 in colon cancer tissues and WNT3A expression was inhibited in BRG1 knockdown cells. In addition, restoring WNT3A expression rescues the inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion induced by BRG1. In this study, we demonstrate that BRG1 may contribute to colon cancer progression through upregulating WNT3A expression. PMID:27852072

  15. Deletion of 5-Lipoxygenase in the Tumor Microenvironment Promotes Lung Cancer Progression and Metastasis through Regulating T Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Poczobutt, Joanna M.; Nguyen, Teresa T.; Hanson, Dwight; Li, Howard; Sippel, Trisha R.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C. M.; Gijon, Miguel; Murphy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids, including PGs, produced by cyclooxygenases (COX), and leukotrienes, produced by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) have been implicated in cancer progression. These molecules are produced by both cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME). We previously reported that both COX and 5-LO metabolites increase during progression in an orthotopic immunocompetent model of lung cancer. Although PGs in the TME have been well studied, less is known regarding 5-LO products produced by the TME. We examined the role of 5-LO in the TME using a model in which Lewis lung carcinoma cells are directly implanted into the lungs of syngeneic WT mice or mice globally deficient in 5-LO (5-LO-KO). Unexpectedly, primary tumor volume and liver metastases were increased in 5-LO-KO mice. This was associated with an ablation of leukotriene (LT) production, consistent with production mainly mediated by the microenvironment. Increased tumor progression was partially reproduced in global LTC4 synthase KO or mice transplanted with LTA4 hydrolase-deficient bone marrow. Tumor-bearing lungs of 5-LO-KO had decreased numbers of CD4 and CD8 T cells compared with WT controls, as well as fewer dendritic cells. This was associated with lower levels of CCL20 and CXL9, which have been implicated in dendritic and T cell recruitment. Depletion of CD8 cells increased tumor growth and eliminated the differences between WT and 5-LO mice. These data reveal an antitumorigenic role for 5-LO products in the microenvironment during lung cancer progression through regulation of T cells and suggest that caution should be used in targeting this pathway in lung cancer. PMID:26663781

  16. Gastrin stimulates a cholecystokinin-2-receptor-expressing cardia progenitor cell and promotes progression of Barrett's-like esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Wang, Hongshan; Au, Andrew S.; Luna, Aesis M.; Chang, Wenju; Jin, Guangchun; Bhagat, Govind; Abrams, Julian A.; Friedman, Richard A.; Varro, Andrea; Wang, Kenneth K.; Boyce, Malcolm; Rustgi, Anil K.; Sepulveda, Antonia R.; Quante, Michael; Wang, Timothy C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is increasing, but factors contributing to malignant progression of its precursor lesion, Barrett's esophagus (BE), have not been defined. Hypergastrinemia caused by long-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), has been suggested as one possible risk factor. The gastrin receptor, CCK2R, is expressed in the cardia and upregulated in BE, suggesting the involvement of the gastrin-CCK2R pathway in progression. In the L2-IL-1β mouse model, Barrett's-like esophagus arises from the gastric cardia. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the effect of hypergastrinemia on CCK2R+ progenitor cells in L2-IL-1β mice. Design L2-IL-1β mice were mated with hypergastrinemic (INS-GAS) mice or treated with PPIs to examine the effect of hypergastrinemia in BE progression. CCK2R-CreERT crossed with L2-IL-1β mice were used to analyze the lineage progenitor potential of CCK2R+ cells. Cardia glands were cultured in vitro, and the effect of gastrin treatment analyzed. L2-IL-1β mice were treated with a CCK2R antagonist YF476 as a potential chemopreventive drug. Results Hypergastrinemia resulted in increased proliferation and expansion of Barrett's-like esophagus. Lineage tracing experiments revealed that CCK2R+ cells are long-lived progenitors that can give rise to such lesions under chronic inflammation. Gastrin stimulated organoid growth in cardia culture, while CCK2R inhibition prevented Barrett's-like esophagus and dysplasia. Conclusions Our data suggest a progression model for BE to EAC in which CCK2R+ progenitor cells, stimulated by hypergastrinemia, proliferate to give rise to metaplasia and dysplasia. Hypergastrinemia can result from PPI use, and the effects of hypergastrinemia in human BE should be studied further. PMID:27448962

  17. Mouse arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotype affects metabolism and tissue dosimetry of arsenicals after arsenite administration in drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic producing a number of methylated arsenic metabolites. Although methylation has been commonly considered a pathway for detoxification of arsenic, some highly reactive methylated ars...

  18. A polymorphism in the EAAT2 promoter is associated with higher glutamate concentrations and higher frequency of progressing stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mallolas, Judith; Hurtado, Olivia; Castellanos, Mar; Blanco, Miguel; Sobrino, Tomás; Serena, Joaquín; Vivancos, José; Castillo, José; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Moro, María A.; Dávalos, Antoni

    2006-01-01

    It remains unclear why some individuals are susceptible to excitotoxicity after stroke. A possible explanation is impaired glutamate uptake. We have found a highly prevalent polymorphism in the promoter of the glutamate transporter EAAT2 gene that abolishes a putative regulatory site for activator protein–2 (AP-2) and creates a new consensus binding site for the repressor transcription factor GC-binding factor 2 (GCF2). The mutant genotype is associated with increased plasma glutamate concentrations and with a higher frequency of early neurological worsening in human stroke. After transfection into astrocytes, the mutant promoter was not activated by AP-2 and was effectively repressed by GCF2, and its activity in the presence of GCF2 was reduced when compared with the AP-2–cotransfected wild-type promoter. We also show that GCF2 is expressed in ischemic rat brain, suggesting that decreased glutamate uptake occurs in individuals carrying the mutation after stroke. These findings may explain individual susceptibility to excitotoxic damage after stroke as well as the failure of glutamate antagonists in those patients without this polymorphism. PMID:16520390

  19. Arsenic in water treatment.

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Malcolm Dean

    2004-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is collaborating with the Awwa Research Foundation (AwwaRF) and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development) in a program for the development and testing of innovative technologies that have the potential to substantially reduce the costs associated with arsenic removal from drinking water. Sandia National Laboratories will administer contracts placed with AwwaRF and WERC to carry out bench scale studies and economic analyses/outreach activities, respectively. The elements of the AwwaRF program include (1) identification of new technologies, (2) proof-of-concept laboratory studies and, (3) a research program that will meet the other needs of small utilities by providing solutions to small utilities so that they may successfully meet the new arsenic MCL. WERC's activities will include development of an economic analysis tool for Pilot Scale Demonstrations and development of educational training and technical assistance tools. The objective of the Sandia Program is the field demonstration testing of innovative technologies. The primary deliverables of the Sandia program will be engineering analyses of candidate technologies; these will be contained in preliminary reports and final analysis reports. Projected scale-up costs will be generated using a cost model provided by WERC or another suitable model.

  20. Arsenic behavior in newly drilled wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, M.-J.; Nriagu, J.; Haack, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the present paper, inorganic arsenic species and chemical parameters in groundwater were determined to investigate the factors related to the distribution of arsenic species and their dissolution from rock into groundwater. For the study, groundwater and core samples were taken at different depths of two newly drilled wells in Huron and Lapeer Counties, Michigan. Results show that total arsenic concentrations in the core samples varied, ranging from 0.8 to 70.7 mg/kg. Iron concentration in rock was about 1800 times higher than that of arsenic, and there was no correlation between arsenic and iron occurrences in the rock samples. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater ranged from <1 to 171 ??g/l. The arsenic concentration in groundwater depended on the amount of arsenic in aquifer rocks, and as well decreased with increasing depth. Over 90% of arsenic existed in the form of As(III), implying that the groundwater systems were in the reduced condition. The results such as high ferrous ion, low redox potential and low dissolved oxygen supported the observed arsenic species distribution. There was no noticeable difference in the total arsenic concentration and arsenic species ratio between unfiltered and filtered (0.45 ??m) waters, indicating that the particulate form of arsenic was negligible in the groundwater samples. There were correlations between water sampling depth and chemical parameters, and between arsenic concentration and chemical parameters, however, the trends were not always consistent in both wells. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P.; Falls, Kelly; Reed, Sara M.; Taghiyev, Agshin F.; Quelle, Frederick W.; Gourronc, Francoise; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Major, Heather J.; Askeland, Ryan; Sherman, Scott K.; O'Dorisio, Thomas M.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Howe, James R.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs(PNETs) that correlated with high level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A knockdown cells although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients. PMID:25273089

  2. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P; Falls, Kelly C; Reed, Sara M; Taghiyev, Agshin F; Quelle, Frederick W; Gourronc, Francoise A; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Major, Heather J; Askeland, Ryan W; Sherman, Scott K; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Howe, James R; Darbro, Benjamin W; Quelle, Dawn E

    2014-11-15

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood, and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs (PNET) that correlated with high-level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor-suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating that RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A-knockdown cells, although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients.

  3. Cip2a promotes cell cycle progression in triple-negative breast cancer cells by regulating the expression and nuclear export of p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Qiu, H; Song, Y; Liu, Y; Wang, H; Lu, M; Deng, M; Gu, Y; Yin, J; Luo, K; Zhang, Z; Jia, X; Zheng, G; He, Z

    2016-10-03

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is very aggressive and currently has no specific therapeutic targets; as a consequence, TNBC exhibits poor clinical outcome. In this study, we showed that cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (Cip2a) represents a promising target in TNBC because Cip2a was highly expressed in TNBC cells and tumor tissues, and its expression showed an inverse correlation with overall survival in patients with TNBC. We found that inhibition of Cip2a in TNBC cells induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, inhibited cell proliferation and delayed tumor growth in the xenograft model. Moreover, Cip2a markedly decreased the expression and nuclear localization of p27Kip1 and this is critical for the ability of Cip2a to promote TNBC progression. Mechanistically, our studies showed that Cip2a promoted p27Kip1 phosphoration at Ser10 via inhibiting Akt-associated PP2A activity, which seems to relocalize p27Kip1 to the cytoplasm in TNBC cells. On the other hand, Cip2a also recruited c-myc to mediate the transcriptional inhibition of p27Kip1. Notably, we observed negative correlation between Cip2a and p27Kip1 expression in TNBC specimens. In addition, our data showed that Cip2a depletion could sensitize TNBC to PARP inhibition. Collectively, these data suggested that Cip2a effectively promotes TNBC cell cycle progression and tumor growth via regulation of PP2A/c-myc/p27Kip1 signaling, which could serve as a potential therapeutic target for TNBC patients.Oncogene advance online publication, 3 October 2016; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.355.

  4. A Novel Androgen Receptor Splice Variant Is Upregulated during Prostate Cancer Progression and Promotes Androgen-depletion-resistant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiyong; Yang, Xi; Sun, Feng; Jiang, Richeng; Linn, Douglas E.; Chen, Hege; Chen, Hegang; Kong, Xiangtian; Melamed, Jonathan; Tepper, Clifford G.; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Brodie, Angela M. H.; Edwards, Joanne; Qiu, Yun

    2009-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a key role in progression to incurable androgen-ablation resistant prostate cancer (PCA). We have identified three novel AR splice variants lacking the ligand binding domain (designated as AR3, AR4 and AR5) in hormone insensitive PCA cells. AR3, one of the major splice variants expressed in human prostate tissues, is constitutively active and its transcriptional activity is not regulated by androgens or antiandrogens. Immunohistochemistry analysis on tissue microarrays containing 429 human prostate tissue samples shows that AR3 is significantly upregulated during PCA progression and AR3 expression level is correlated with the risk of tumor recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Overexpression of AR3 confers ablation-independent growth of PCA cells while specific knock-down of AR3 expression (without altering AR level) in hormone resistant PCA cells attenuates their growth under androgen-depleted conditions in both cell culture and xenograft models, suggesting an indispensable role of AR3 in ablation-independent growth of PCA cells. Furthermore, AR3 may play a distinct yet essential role in ablation-independent growth through regulating a unique set of genes including AKT1, which are not regulated by the prototype AR. Our data suggest that aberrant expression of AR splice variants may be a novel mechanism underlying ablation-independence during PCA progression and AR3 may serve as a prognostic marker to predict patient outcome in response to hormonal therapy. Given that these novel AR splice variants are not inhibited by currently available anti-androgen drugs, development of new drugs targeting these AR isoforms may potentially be effective for treatment of ablation-resistant PCA. PMID:19244107

  5. Arsenic compounds: revived ancient remedies in the fight against human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Xiang; Zhou, Guang-Biao; Chen, Sai-Juan; Chen, Zhu

    2012-04-01

    Arsenic, the 20th most abundant element in the earth crust, is one of the oldest drugs in the world. It was used in the 18th century in treating hematopoietic malignancies, discarded in 1950s in favor of chemotherapeutic agents (busulphan and others), and was revived in the 1970s due to its dramatic efficacy on acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) driven by the t(15;17) translocation-generated PML-RARα fusion. Arsenic represents the most potent single agent for APL, and achieves a five-year overall survival of 90% in APL patients when combined with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy (daunorubicin and cytarabine), turning this disease from highly fatal to highly curable. Arsenic triggers sumoylation/ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of PML-RARα via directly binding to the C3HC4 zinc finger motif in the RBCC domain of the PML moiety and induction of its homodimerization/multimerization and interaction with the SUMO E2 conjugase Ubc9. Because of its multiplicity of targets and complex mechanisms of action, arsenic is widely tested in combination with other agents in a variety of malignancies. Other arsenic containing recipes including oral formulations and organic arsenicals are being developed and tested, and progress in these areas will definitely expand the use of arsenicals in other malignant diseases.

  6. Association of oxidative stress with arsenic methylation in chronic arsenic-exposed children and adults

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yuanyuan; Wang Yi; Zheng Quanmei; Li Xin; Li Bing; Jin Yaping; Sun Xiance; Sun Guifan

    2008-10-01

    Though oxidative stress is recognized as an important pathogenic mechanism of arsenic, and arsenic methylation capacity is suggested to be highly involved in arsenic-related diseases, the association of arsenic methylation capacity with arsenic-induced oxidative stress remains unclear. To explore oxidative stress and its association with arsenic methylation, cross-sectional studies were conducted among 208 high and 59 low arsenic-exposed subjects. Levels of urinary arsenic species [inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylated arsenic (MMA) and dimethylated arsenic (DMA)] were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Proportions of urinary arsenic species, the first methylation ratio (FMR) and the secondary methylation ratio (SMR) were used as indicators for arsenic methylation capacity. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in whole blood were determined to reflect anti-oxidative status. The high arsenic-exposed children and adults were significantly increased in urinary 8-OHdG concentrations but decreased in blood GSH levels compared with the low exposed children and adults. In multiple linear regression models, blood GSH levels and urinary 8-OHdG concentrations of arsenic-exposed children and adults showed strong associations with the levels of urinary arsenic species. Arsenic-exposed subjects in the lower and the upper quartiles of proportions of urinary arsenic species, FMR or SMR were significantly different in urinary 8-OHdG, blood GSH and SOD. The associations of arsenic methylation capacity with 8-OHdG, GSH and SOD were also observed in multivariate regression analyses. These results may provide linkage between arsenic methylation capacity and oxidative stress in humans and suggest that adverse health effects induced by arsenic are related to arsenic methylation through oxidative stress.

  7. PUF-8 Functions Redundantly with GLD-1 to Promote the Meiotic Progression of Spermatocytes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Priti, Agarwal; Subramaniam, Kuppuswamy

    2015-01-01

    Successful meiotic progression of germ cells is crucial for gametogenesis. Defects in this process affect proper genetic transmission and sometimes lead to tumor formation in the germline. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the RNA-binding protein GLD-1 is essential for the meiotic development of oocytes. However, its role during spermatogenesis has not been understood. Here, we show that GLD-1 functions redundantly with the PUF family protein PUF-8 to ensure proper meiotic development of spermatocytes. When grown at 20°—the standard laboratory temperature for C. elegans growth—primary spermatocytes in both gld-1 and puf-8 single-mutant males and hermaphrodites complete the meiotic divisions normally. By contrast, some of the gld-1; puf-8 double-mutant spermatocytes exit meiosis and form germ cell tumors in both sexes. During larval development, gld-1; puf-8 double-mutant germ cells begin to express the meiotic marker HIM-3, lose P granules, and form the sperm-specific membranous organelle, which are characteristics of developing spermatocytes. However, some of these cells quickly lose HIM-3 and form germ cell tumors that lack membranous organelle but contain P granules. Mutations that block meiotic progression at late pachytene or diakinetic stage fail to arrest the tumorigenesis, suggesting that the gld-1; puf-8 double-mutant spermatocytes exit meiosis prior to the completion of pachytene. Together, results presented here uncover a novel function for gld-1 in the meiotic development of spermatocytes in both hermaphrodites and males. PMID:26068572

  8. PUF-8 Functions Redundantly with GLD-1 to Promote the Meiotic Progression of Spermatocytes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Priti, Agarwal; Subramaniam, Kuppuswamy

    2015-06-10

    Successful meiotic progression of germ cells is crucial for gametogenesis. Defects in this process affect proper genetic transmission and sometimes lead to tumor formation in the germline. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the RNA-binding protein GLD-1 is essential for the meiotic development of oocytes. However, its role during spermatogenesis has not been understood. Here, we show that GLD-1 functions redundantly with the PUF family protein PUF-8 to ensure proper meiotic development of spermatocytes. When grown at 20°-the standard laboratory temperature for C. elegans growth-primary spermatocytes in both gld-1 and puf-8 single-mutant males and hermaphrodites complete the meiotic divisions normally. By contrast, some of the gld-1; puf-8 double-mutant spermatocytes exit meiosis and form germ cell tumors in both sexes. During larval development, gld-1; puf-8 double-mutant germ cells begin to express the meiotic marker HIM-3, lose P granules, and form the sperm-specific membranous organelle, which are characteristics of developing spermatocytes. However, some of these cells quickly lose HIM-3 and form germ cell tumors that lack membranous organelle but contain P granules. Mutations that block meiotic progression at late pachytene or diakinetic stage fail to arrest the tumorigenesis, suggesting that the gld-1; puf-8 double-mutant spermatocytes exit meiosis prior to the completion of pachytene. Together, results presented here uncover a novel function for gld-1 in the meiotic development of spermatocytes in both hermaphrodites and males.

  9. Up-regulation of ribosome biogenesis by MIR196A2 genetic variation promotes endometriosis development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Wen; Chang, Hui-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chan, Carmen; Chung, Ching; Tseng, Chun-Cheng; Hwang, Tritium; Sheu, Jim Jinn-Chyuan; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression has been reported in endometriosis and miRNA gene polymorphisms have been linked to cancer. Because certain ovarian cancers arise from endometriosis, we genotyped seven cancer-related miRNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (MiRSNPs) to investigate their possible roles in endometriosis. Genetic variants in MIR196A2 (rs11614913) and MIR100 (rs1834306) were found to be associated with endometriosis development and related clinical phenotypes, such as infertility and pain. Downstream analysis of the MIR196A2 risk allele revealed upregulation of rRNA editing and protein synthesis genes, suggesting hyper-activation of ribosome biogenesis as a driving force for endometriosis progression. Clinical studies confirmed higher levels of small nucleolar RNAs and ribosomal proteins in atypical endometriosis lesions, and this was more pronounced in the associated ovarian clear cell carcinomas. Treating ovarian clear cells with CX5461, an RNA polymerase I inhibitor, suppressed cell growth and mobility followed by cell cycle arrest at G2/M stage and apoptosis. Our study thus uncovered a novel tumorigenesis pathway triggered by the cancer-related MIR196A2 risk allele during endometriosis development and progression. We suggest that anti-RNA polymerase I therapy may be efficacious for treating endometriosis and associated malignancies. PMID:27741504

  10. Cytoskeletal protein flightless I inhibits apoptosis, enhances tumor cell invasion and promotes cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Yang, Gink N.; Jackson, Jessica E.; Melville, Elizabeth L.; Cal1ey, Matthew P.; Murrell, Dedee F.; Darby, Ian A.; O'Toole, Edel A.; Samuel, Michael S.; Cowin, Allison J.

    2015-01-01

    Flightless I (Flii) is an actin remodeling protein that affects cellular processes including adhesion, proliferation and migration. In order to determine the role of Flii during carcinogenesis, squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were induced in Flii heterozygous (Flii+/−), wild-type and Flii overexpressing (FliiTg/Tg) mice by intradermal injection of 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). Flii levels were further assessed in biopsies from human SCCs and the human SCC cell line (MET-1) was used to determine the effect of Flii on cellular invasion. Flii was highly expressed in human SCC biopsies particularly by the invading cells at the tumor edge. FliiTg/Tg mice developed large, aggressive SCCs in response to MCA. In contrast Flii+/− mice had significantly smaller tumors that were less invasive. Intradermal injection of Flii neutralizing antibodies during SCC initiation and progression significantly reduced the size of the tumors and, in vitro, decreased cellular sphere formation and invasion. Analysis of the tumors from the Flii overexpressing mice showed reduced caspase I and annexin V expression suggesting Flii may negatively regulate apoptosis within these tumors. These studies therefore suggest that Flii enhances SCC tumor progression by decreasing apoptosis and enhancing tumor cell invasion. Targeting Flii may be a potential strategy for reducing the severity of SCCs. PMID:26497552

  11. Cancer cell-secreted IGF2 instigates fibroblasts and bone marrow-derived vascular progenitor cells to promote cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen Wen; Li, Bin; Guan, Xin Yuan; Chung, Sookja K.; Wang, Yang; Yip, Yim Ling; Law, Simon Y. K.; Chan, Kin Tak; Lee, Nikki P. Y.; Chan, Kwok Wah; Xu, Li Yan; Li, En Min; Tsao, Sai Wah; He, Qing-Yu; Cheung, Annie L. M.

    2017-01-01

    Local interactions between cancer cells and stroma can produce systemic effects on distant organs to govern cancer progression. Here we show that IGF2 secreted by inhibitor of differentiation (Id1)-overexpressing oesophageal cancer cells instigates VEGFR1-positive bone marrow cells in the tumour macroenvironment to form pre-metastatic niches at distant sites by increasing VEGF secretion from cancer-associated fibroblasts. Cancer cells are then attracted to the metastatic site via the CXCL5/CXCR2 axis. Bone marrow cells transplanted from nude mice bearing Id1-overexpressing oesophageal tumours enhance tumour growth and metastasis in recipient mice, whereas systemic administration of VEGFR1 antibody abrogates these effects. Mechanistically, IGF2 regulates VEGF in fibroblasts via miR-29c in a p53-dependent manner. Analysis of patient serum samples showed that concurrent elevation of IGF2 and VEGF levels may serve as a prognostic biomarker for oesophageal cancer. These findings suggest that the Id1/IGF2/VEGF/VEGFR1 cascade plays a critical role in tumour-driven pathophysiological processes underlying cancer progression. PMID:28186102

  12. Lifestyle habits and obesity progression in overweight and obese American young adults: Lessons for promoting cardiometabolic health.

    PubMed

    Cha, EunSeok; Akazawa, Margeaux K; Kim, Kevin H; Dawkins, Colleen R; Lerner, Hannah M; Umpierrez, Guillermo; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2015-12-01

    Obesity among young adults is a growing problem in the United States and is related to unhealthy lifestyle habits, such as high caloric intake and inadequate exercise. Accurate assessment of lifestyle habits across obesity stages is important for informing age-specific intervention strategies to prevent and reduce obesity progression. Using a modified version of the Edmonton Obesity Staging System (mEOSS), a new scale for defining obesity risk and predicting obesity morbidity and mortality, this cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence of overweight/obese conditions in 105 young adults and compared their lifestyle habits across the mEOSS stages. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, and one-way analyses of variance were performed. Eighty percent of participants (n = 83) fell into the mEOSS-2 group and had obesity-related chronic disorders, such as diabetes, hypertension, and/or dyslipidemia. There were significant differences in dietary quality and patterns across the mEOSS stages. Findings highlighted the significance of prevention and early treatment for overweight and obese young adults to prevent and cease obesity progression.

  13. Pro-inflammatory-Related Loss of CXCL12 Niche Promotes Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemic Progression at the Expense of Normal Lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Balandrán, Juan Carlos; Purizaca, Jessica; Enciso, Jennifer; Dozal, David; Sandoval, Antonio; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Alemán-Lazarini, Leticia; Perez-Koldenkova, Vadim; Quintela-Núñez Del Prado, Henry; Rios de Los Ríos, Jussara; Mayani, Héctor; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Guzman, Monica L; Pelayo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric oncology, notably childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), is currently one of the health-leading concerns worldwide and a biomedical priority. Decreasing overall leukemia mortality in children requires a comprehensive understanding of its pathobiology. It is becoming clear that malignant cell-to-niche intercommunication and microenvironmental signals that control early cell fate decisions are critical for tumor progression. We show here that the mesenchymal stromal cell component of ALL bone marrow (BM) differ from its normal counterpart in a number of functional properties and may have a key role during leukemic development. A decreased proliferation potential, contrasting with the strong ability of producing pro-inflammatory cytokines and an aberrantly loss of CXCL12 and SCF, suggest that leukemic lymphoid niches in ALL BM are unique and may exclude normal hematopoiesis. Cell competence ex vivo assays within tridimensional coculture structures indicated a growth advantage of leukemic precursor cells and their niche remodeling ability by CXCL12 reduction, resulting in leukemic cell progression at the expense of normal niche-associated lymphopoiesis.

  14. Pro-inflammatory-Related Loss of CXCL12 Niche Promotes Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemic Progression at the Expense of Normal Lymphopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Balandrán, Juan Carlos; Purizaca, Jessica; Enciso, Jennifer; Dozal, David; Sandoval, Antonio; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Alemán-Lazarini, Leticia; Perez-Koldenkova, Vadim; Quintela-Núñez del Prado, Henry; Rios de los Ríos, Jussara; Mayani, Héctor; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Guzman, Monica L.; Pelayo, Rosana

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric oncology, notably childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), is currently one of the health-leading concerns worldwide and a biomedical priority. Decreasing overall leukemia mortality in children requires a comprehensive understanding of its pathobiology. It is becoming clear that malignant cell-to-niche intercommunication and microenvironmental signals that control early cell fate decisions are critical for tumor progression. We show here that the mesenchymal stromal cell component of ALL bone marrow (BM) differ from its normal counterpart in a number of functional properties and may have a key role during leukemic development. A decreased proliferation potential, contrasting with the strong ability of producing pro-inflammatory cytokines and an aberrantly loss of CXCL12 and SCF, suggest that leukemic lymphoid niches in ALL BM are unique and may exclude normal hematopoiesis. Cell competence ex vivo assays within tridimensional coculture structures indicated a growth advantage of leukemic precursor cells and their niche remodeling ability by CXCL12 reduction, resulting in leukemic cell progression at the expense of normal niche-associated lymphopoiesis. PMID:28111575

  15. [Arsenic as an environmental problem].

    PubMed

    Jensen, K

    2000-12-04

    Chronic exposure to arsenic through drinking water is known in different continents. Arsenic compounds from disintegrating rock may be solubilized after reduction by organic material, and harmful concentrations of arsenic may be found in surface water as well as in water from drilled wells. Because of well drilling since the sixties in the Ganges delta numerous millions of people have been exposed to toxic amounts, and hundreds of thousands demonstrate signs of chronic poisoning. A changed water technology and chemical precipitation of arsenic in the drinking water can reduce the size of the problem, but the late sequelae i.e. malignant disease are incalculable. Indications for antidotal treatment of exposed individuals have not yet been outlined.

  16. New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko

    2015-03-04

    This report presents calculations for the new arsenic cross section. Cross sections for 73,74,75 As above the resonance range were calculated with a newly developed Hauser-Feshbach code, CoH3.

  17. THE PATHWAY OF ARSENIC METABLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pathway of Arsenic Methylation

    David J. Thomas, Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Understanding ...

  18. Melanocytes and keratinocytes have distinct and shared responses to ultraviolet radiation and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Cooper, K L; Yager, J W; Hudson, L G

    2014-01-30

    The rise of melanoma incidence in the United States is a growing public health concern. A limited number of epidemiology studies suggest an association between arsenic levels and melanoma risk. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet radiation (UVR) for the development of squamous cell carcinoma and proposed mechanisms include generation of oxidative stress by arsenic and UVR and inhibition of UVR-induced DNA repair by arsenic. In this study, we investigate similarities and differences in response to arsenic and UVR in keratinocytes and melanocytes. Normal melanocytes are markedly more resistant to UVR-induced cytotoxicity than normal keratinocytes, but both cell types are equally sensitive to arsenite. Melanocytes were more resistant to arsenite and UVR stimulation of superoxide production than keratinocytes, but the concentration of arsenite necessary to inhibit the activity of the DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase and enhance retention of UVR-induced DNA damage was essentially equivalent in both cell types. These findings suggest that although melanocytes are less sensitive than keratinocytes to initial UVR-mediated DNA damage, both of these important target cells in the skin share a mechanism related to arsenic inhibition of DNA repair. These findings suggest that concurrent chronic arsenic exposure could promote retention of unrepaired DNA damage in melanocytes and act as a co-carcinogen in melanoma.

  19. A biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Sun, Samio; Li, Chen-Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoarsenicals are degraded to inorganic arsenic. The toxicological effects of arsenicals depend on their oxidation state, chemical composition, and bioavailability. Here we report that the active forms are the trivalent arsenic-containing species. We constructed a whole-cell biosensor utilizing a modified ArsR repressor that is highly selective toward trivalent methyl and aromatic arsenicals, with essentially no response to inorganic arsenic. The biosensor was adapted for in vitro detection of organoarsenicals using fluorescence anisotropy of ArsR-DNA interactions. It detects bacterial biomethylation of inorganic arsenite both in vivo and in vitro with detection limits of 10−7 M and linearity to 10−6 M for phenylarsenite and 5×10−6 M for methylarsenite. The biosensor detects reduced forms of MSMA and roxarsone and offers a practical, low cost method for detecting activate forms and breakdown products of organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters. PMID:24359149

  20. Nutrient-induced FNIP degradation by SCFβ-TRCP regulates FLCN complex localization and promotes renal cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Katsuyuki; Fukushima, Hidefumi; Shimizu, Kouhei; Yamada, Aya; Hidaka, Masumi; Hasumi, Hisashi; Ikebe, Tetsuro; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Okabe, Koji; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-07

    Folliculin-interacting protein 1 and 2 (FNIP1 and FNIP2) play critical roles in preventing renal malignancy through their association with the tumor suppressor FLCN. Mutations in FLCN are associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a rare disorder with increased risk of renal cancer. Recent studies indicated that FNIP1/FNIP2 double knockout mice display enlarged polycystic kidneys and renal carcinoma, which phenocopies FLCN knockout mice, suggesting that these two proteins function together to suppress renal cancer. However, the molecular mechanism functionally linking FNIP1/FNIP2 and FLCN remains largely elusive. Here, we demonstrated that FNIP2 protein is unstable and subjected to proteasome-dependent degradation via β-TRCP and Casein Kinase 1 (CK1)-directed ubiquitination in a nutrition-dependent manner. Degradation of FNIP2 leads to lysosomal dissociation of FLCN and subsequent lysosomal association of mTOR, which in turn promotes the proliferation of renal cancer cells. These results indicate that SCFβ-TRCP negatively regulates the FLCN complex by promoting FNIP degradation and provide molecular insight into the pathogenesis of BHD-associated renal cancer.

  1. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1996-07-01

    The overall purpose of this research project is to carry out the preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal using model mixing systems. Specific objectives include determining the nature of the gas promotion mechanism, the effects of hydrodynamic factors and key parameters on process performance, and a suitable basis for size scale-up of the mixing system. An investigation of the phenomena which occur during the oil agglomeration of coal particle suspensions showed that the process of agglomeration involves several step which can be identified by changes in agitator torque and by application of optical microscopy. During one of these steps, aggregation of hydrophobic particles and microflocs takes place on the surface of gas bubbles dispersed in the suspension with the result that large flocs or flakes are produced which subsequently evolve into agglomerates. The time required to produce spherical agglomerates appears to be a function of the power input per unit volume with the time decreasing as the power input increases.

  2. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Bin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  3. New Mechanisms of Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Promoting Tumor Progression: Recent Research Advances and Potential Targets for Tumor Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Shulin; Hou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The majority of basic and clinical studies have shown a protumor function of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which represent a large proportion of matrix cells. TAMs promote tumorigenesis, and their number is related to the malignancy degree and poor prognosis of many kinds of tumors. Macrophage plasticity makes it possible to change the tumor microenvironment and remodel antitumor immunity during cancer immunotherapy. Increasing numbers of studies have revealed the effects of TAMs on the tumor microenvironment, for example, via promotion of tumor growth and tumorigenesis and through an increase in the number of cancer stem cells or via facilitation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and metastasis. Investigators also proposed tumor-immunological treatments targeting TAMs by inhibiting TAM recruitment and differentiation, by regulating TAM polarization, and by blocking factors and pathways associated with the protumor function of TAMs. This comprehensive review presents recent research on TAMs in relation to prediction of poor outcomes, remodeling of the tumor immune microenvironment, and immunological targeted therapies. PMID:27975071

  4. Ly6E/K Signaling to TGFβ Promotes Breast Cancer Progression, Immune Escape, and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    AlHossiny, Midrar; Luo, Linlin; Frazier, William R; Steiner, Noriko; Gusev, Yuriy; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Glasgow, Eric; Creswell, Karen; Madhavan, Subha; Kumar, Rakesh; Upadhyay, Geeta

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell antigen Sca-1 is implicated in murine cancer stem cell biology and breast cancer models, but the role of its human homologs Ly6K and Ly6E in breast cancer are not established. Here we report increased expression of Ly6K/E in human breast cancer specimens correlates with poor overall survival, with an additional specific role for Ly6E in poor therapeutic outcomes. Increased expression of Ly6K/E also correlated with increased expression of the immune checkpoint molecules PDL1 and CTLA4, increased tumor-infiltrating T regulatory cells, and decreased natural killer (NK) cell activation. Mechanistically, Ly6K/E was required for TGFβ signaling and proliferation in breast cancer cells, where they contributed to phosphorylation of Smad1/5 and Smad2/3. Furthermore, Ly6K/E promoted cytokine-induced PDL1 expression and activation and binding of NK cells to cancer cells. Finally, we found that Ly6K/E promoted drug resistance and facilitated immune escape in this setting. Overall, our results establish a pivotal role for a Ly6K/E signaling axis involving TGFβ in breast cancer pathophysiology and drug response, and highlight this signaling axis as a compelling realm for therapeutic invention. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3376-86. ©2016 AACR.

  5. DRG1 is a potential oncogene in lung adenocarcinoma and promotes tumor progression via spindle checkpoint signaling regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Li; Lv, Yanrong; Dong, Ji; Hu, Shaohua; Peng, Ruiyun

    2016-01-01

    Developmentally regulated GTP binding protein 1 (DRG1), a member of the DRG family, plays important roles in regulating cell growth. However, the molecular basis of DRG1 in cell proliferation regulation and the relationship between DRG1 and tumor progression remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that DRG1 is elevated in lung adenocarcinomas while weakly expressed in adjacent lung tissues. DRG1 knockdown causes growth inhibition of tumor cells by significantly increasing the proportion of cells in M phase. Overexpression of DRG1 leads to chromosome missegregation which is an important index for tumorigenesis. Interestingly, ectopic of DRG1 reduces taxol induced apoptosis of lung adenocarcinoma cells. Mechanistic analyses confirm that DRG1 localizes at mitotic spindles in dividing cells and binds to spindle checkpoint signaling proteins in vivo. These studies highlight the expanding role of DRG1 in tumorigenesis and reveal a mechanism of DRG1 in taxol resistance. PMID:27626498

  6. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Marini, Frank C.; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; LaMarca, Heather L.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; zu Bentrup, Kerstin Honer; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Henkle, Sarah L.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells. PMID:19234121

  7. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Marini, Frank C; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Dembinski, Jennifer L; LaMarca, Heather L; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Honer zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Danka, Elizabeth S; Henkle, Sarah L; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-03-10

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells.

  8. Bidirectional functions of arsenic as a carcinogen and an anti-cancer agent in human squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Thang, Nguyen Dinh; Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Kato, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional cancer-promoting and anti-cancer effects of arsenic for cancer cells have been revealed in previous studies. However, each of these effects (cancer-promoting or anti-cancer) was found in different cells at different treated-concentration of arsenic. In this study, we for the first time indicated that arsenic at concentration of 3 µM, equal to average concentration in drinking water in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, simultaneously expressed its bidirectional effects on human squamous cell carcinoma HSC5 cells with distinct pathways. Treatment with 3 µM of arsenic promoted cell invasion via upregulation of expression of MT1-MMP and downregulation of expression of p14ARF and simultaneously induced cell apoptosis through inhibition of expression of N-cadherin and increase of expression of p21(WAF1/CIP1) at both transcript and protein levels in HSC5 cells. We also showed that inhibition of MT1-MMP expression by NSC405020 resulted in decrease of arsenic-mediated invasion of HSC5 cells involving decrease in phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (pERK). Taken together, our biological and biochemical findings suggested that arsenic expressed bidirectional effects as a carcinogen and an anti-cancer agent in human squamous cell carcinoma HSC5 cells with distinct pathways. Our results might play an important scientific evident for further studies to find out a better way in treatment of arsenic-induced cancers, especially in squamous cell carcinoma.

  9. Arsenic exposure disrupts epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Katharine J.; Holloway, Adele; Cook, Anthony L.; Chin, Suyin P.; Snow, Elizabeth T.

    2014-11-15

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin which increases skin cancer risk for exposed populations worldwide; however the underlying biomolecular mechanism for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis is complex and poorly defined. Recent investigations show that histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase activity is impaired, and epigenetic patterns of gene regulation are consistently altered in cancers associated with arsenic exposure. Expression of the histone deacetylase SIRT1 is altered in solid tumours and haematological malignancies; however its role in arsenic-induced pathology is unknown. In this study we investigated the effect of arsenic on epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 and its targeting microRNA, miR-34a in primary human keratinocytes. Acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16) increased in keratinocytes exposed to 0.5 μM arsenite [As(III)]; and this was associated with chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a promoter. Moreover, although SIRT1 protein initially increased in these As(III)-exposed cells, after 24 days expression was not significantly different from untreated controls. Extended exposure to low-dose As(III) (0.5 μM; > 5 weeks) compromised the pattern of CpG methylation at SIRT1 and miR-34a gene promoters, and this was associated with altered expression for both genes. We have found that arsenic alters epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 expression via structural reorganisation of chromatin at the miR-34a gene promoter in the initial 24 h of exposure; and over time, through shifts in miR-34a and SIRT1 gene methylation. Taken together, this investigation demonstrates that arsenic produces cumulative disruptions to epigenetic regulation of miR-34a expression, and this is associated with impaired coordination of SIRT1 functional activity. - Highlights: • Submicromolar arsenic concentrations disrupt SIRT1 activity and expression in human keratinocytes. • Arsenic-induced chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a gene promoter is associated with hyperacetylation

  10. Arsenic Toxicity to Juvenile Fish: Effects of Exposure Route, Arsenic Speciation, and Fish Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic toxicity to juvenile rainbow trout and fathead minnows was evaluated in 28-day tests using both dietborne and waterborne exposures, both inorganic and organic arsenic species, and both a live diet and an arsenic-spiked pellet diet. Effects of inorganic arsenic on rainbow...

  11. Approaches to Increase Arsenic Awareness in Bangladesh: An Evaluation of an Arsenic Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Christine Marie; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Khan, Khalid; Islam, Tariqul; Singha, Ashit; Moon-Howard, Joyce; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a household-level arsenic education and well water arsenic testing intervention to increase arsenic awareness in Bangladesh. The authors randomly selected 1,000 study respondents located in 20 villages in Singair, Bangladesh. The main outcome was the change in knowledge of arsenic from…

  12. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal advanced in three major research areas. One area of research resulted in the development of a method for measuring the rate of agglomeration of dilute particle suspensions and using the method to relate the rate of agglomeration of coal particles to various key parameters. A second area of research led to the development of a method for monitoring a batch agglomeration process by measuring changes in agitator torque. With this method it was possible to show that the agglomeration of a concentrated coal particle suspension is triggered by the introduction of a small amount of gas. The method was also used in conjunction with optical microscopy to study the mechanism of agglomeration. A third area of research led to the discovery that highly hydrophobic particles in an aqueous suspension can be agglomerated by air alone.

  13. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. [Quarterly] technical progress report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1993-12-31

    The overall purpose of this research project is to carry out the preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal using model mixing systems. Previous research showed that having a gas present in an agitated system used for the agglomeration of an aqueous suspension of coal particles with oil would reduce greatly the required mixing shear rate and power input. To take advantage of this discovery, the present research project was initiated. The project will involve building and testing two model mixing systems which differ in scale but are representative of standard industrial mixing systems used for mixing solid particles, liquid, and gas. These systems will be tested by conducting oil agglomeration tests under various conditions and measuring agitator torque and power as well as agglomeration performance. Special attention will be given to the effects produced by having gas present in the system.

  14. Progressive adult primary glioblastoma in the medulla oblongata with an unmethylated MGMT promoter and without an IDH mutation.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Akifumi; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Watanabe, Takuya; Hayashi, Yutaka; Sabit, Hemragul; Kato, Yukinari; Suzuki, Shioto; Ooi, Akishi; Sato, Hiroshi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with dizziness followed by gait disturbance and loss of appetite. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed that a lesion located in the medulla oblongata, appearing as hyperintense on T2-weighted image and with slight enhancement area, appeared in the ventral aspect of the mass on T1-weighted MR imaging with gadolinium. It was diagnosed as high-grade brain-stem glioma and the patient underwent chemoradiotherapy. However, she died 18 days after treatment, and autopsy was performed. The pathological diagnosis was glioblastoma (GBM) with unmethylated O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter and wild isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene. We report an extremely short clinical course of adult GBM in medulla oblongata with genetic analysis and present a review of the literature.

  15. CXCR3 deficiency enhances tumor progression by promoting macrophage M2 polarization in a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Oghumu, Steve; Varikuti, Sanjay; Terrazas, Cesar; Kotov, Dmitri; Nasser, Mohd W; Powell, Catherine A; Ganju, Ramesh K; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-09-01

    Tumor associated macrophages play a vital role in determining the outcome of breast cancer. We investigated the contribution of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 to antitumor immune responses using a cxcr3 deficient mouse orthotopically injected with a PyMT breast cancer cell line. We observed that cxcr3 deficient mice displayed increased IL-4 production and M2 polarization in the tumors and spleens compared to WT mice injected with PyMT cells. This was accompanied by larger tumor development in cxcr3(-/-) than in WT mice. Further, tumor-promoting myeloid derived immune cell populations accumulated in higher proportions in the spleens of cxcr3 deficient mice. Interestingly, cxcr3(-/-) macrophages displayed a deficiency in up-regulating inducible nitric oxide synthase after stimulation by either IFN-γ or PyMT supernatants. Stimulation of bone marrow derived macrophages by PyMT supernatants also resulted in greater induction of arginase-1 in cxcr3(-/-) than WT mice. Further, cxcr3(-/-) T cells activated with CD3/CD28 in vitro produced greater amounts of IL-4 and IL-10 than T cells from WT mice. Our data suggests that a greater predisposition of cxcr3 deficient macrophages towards M2 polarization contributes to an enhanced tumor promoting environment in cxcr3 deficient mice. Although CXCR3 is known to be expressed on some macrophages, this is the first report that demonstrates a role for CXCR3 in macrophage polarization and subsequent breast tumor outcomes. Targeting CXCR3 could be a potential therapeutic approach in the management of breast cancer tumors.

  16. Prostate tumor OVerexpressed-1 (PTOV1) down-regulates HES1 and HEY1 notch targets genes and promotes prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background PTOV1 is an adaptor protein with functions in diverse processes, including gene transcription and protein translation, whose overexpression is associated with a higher proliferation index and tumor grade in prostate cancer (PC) and other neoplasms. Here we report its interaction with the Notch pathway and its involvement in PC progression. Methods Stable PTOV1 knockdown or overexpression were performed by lentiviral transduction. Protein interactions were analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation, pull-down and/or immunofluorescence. Endogenous gene expression was analyzed by real time RT-PCR and/or Western blotting. Exogenous promoter activities were studied by luciferase assays. Gene promoter interactions were analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP). In vivo studies were performed in the Drosophila melanogaster wing, the SCID-Beige mouse model, and human prostate cancer tissues and metastasis. The Excel package was used for statistical analysis. Results Knockdown of PTOV1 in prostate epithelial cells and HaCaT skin keratinocytes caused the upregulation, and overexpression of PTOV1 the downregulation, of the Notch target genes HEY1 and HES1, suggesting that PTOV1 counteracts Notch signaling. Under conditions of inactive Notch signaling, endogenous PTOV1 associated with the HEY1 and HES1 promoters, together with components of the Notch repressor complex. Conversely, expression of active Notch1 provoked the dismissal of PTOV1 from these promoters. The antagonist role of PTOV1 on Notch activity was corroborated in the Drosophila melanogaster wing, where human PTOV1 exacerbated Notch deletion mutant phenotypes and suppressed the effects of constitutively active Notch. PTOV1 was required for optimal in vitro invasiveness and anchorage-independent growth of PC-3 cells, activities counteracted by Notch, and for their efficient growth and metastatic spread in vivo. In prostate tumors, the overexpression of PTOV1 was associated with decreased expression

  17. The need for congressional action to finance arsenic reductions in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Levine, Rebecca Leah

    2012-11-01

    Many public water systems in the U.S. are unsafe because the communities cannot afford to comply with the current 10 parts per billion (ppb) federal arsenic standard for drinking water. Communities unable to afford improvements remain vulnerable to adverse health effects associated with higher levels of arsenic exposure. Scientific and bipartisan political consensus exists that the arsenic standard should not be less stringent than 10 ppb, and new data suggest additional adverse health effects related to arsenic exposure through drinking water. Congress has failed to reauthorize the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund program to provide reliable funding to promote compliance and reduce the risk of adverse health effects. Congress's recent ad hoc appropriations do not allow long-term planning and ongoing monitoring and maintenance. Investing in water infrastructure will lower health care costs and create American jobs. Delaying necessary upgrades will only increase the costs of improvements over time.

  18. Regeneration of Commercial SCR Catalysts: Probing the Existing Forms of Arsenic Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Junhua; Peng, Yue; Si, Wenzhe; He, Xu; Hao, Jiming

    2015-08-18

    To investigate the poisoning and regeneration of SCR catalysts, fresh and arsenic-poisoned commercial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts are researched in the context of deactivation mechanisms and regeneration technology. The results indicate that the forms of arsenic oxide on the poisoned catalyst are related to the proportion of arsenic (As) on the catalyst. When the surface coverage of (V+W+As) is lower than 1, the trivalent arsenic species (As(III)) is the major component, and this species prefers to permeate into the bulk-phase channels. However, at high As concentrations, pentavalent arsenic species (As(IV)) cover the surface of the catalyst. Although both arsenic species lower the NOx conversion, they affect the formation of N2O differently. In particular, N2O production is limited when trivalent arsenic species predominate, which may be related to As2O3 clogging the pores of the catalyst. In contrast, the pentavalent arsenic oxide species (As2O5) possess several As-OH groups. These As-OH groups could not only enhance the ability of the catalyst to become reduced, but also provide several Brønsted acid sites with weak thermal stability that promote the formation of N2O. Finally, although our novel Ca(NO3)2-based regeneration method cannot completely remove As2O3 from the micropores of the catalyst, this approach can effectively wipe off surface arsenic oxides without a significant loss of the catalyst's active components.

  19. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.

    1993-04-20

    Methods are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72.

  20. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.

    1993-01-01

    Methods for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72.

  1. Arsenic Speciation in Groundwater: Role of Thioanions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavior of arsenic in groundwater environments is fundamentally linked to its speciation. Understanding arsenic speciation is important because chemical speciation impacts reactivity, bioavailability, toxicity, and transport and fate processes. In aerobic environments arsen...

  2. RAF kinase inhibitor-independent constitutive activation of Yes-associated protein 1 promotes tumor progression in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S E; Lee, J U; Lee, M H; Ryu, M J; Kim, S J; Kim, Y K; Choi, M J; Kim, K S; Kim, J M; Kim, J W; Koh, Y W; Lim, D-S; Jo, Y S; Shong, M

    2013-01-01

    The transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) is regulated by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. However, the role of YAP1 in thyroid cancer, which is frequently associated with the BRAFV600E mutation, remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the role of YAP1 in thyroid cancer. YAP1 was overexpressed in papillary (PTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer, and nuclear YAP1 was more frequently detected in BRAFV600E (+) PTC. In the thyroid cancer cell lines TPC-1 and HTH7, which do not have the BRAFV600E mutation, YAP1 was cytosolic and inactive at high cell densities. In contrast, YAP1 was retained in the nucleus and its target genes were expressed in the thyroid cancer cells 8505C and K1, which harbor the BRAFV600E mutation, regardless of cell density. Furthermore, the nuclear activation of YAP1 in 8505C was not inhibited by RAF or MEK inhibitor. In vitro experiments, YAP1 silencing or overexpression affected migratory capacities of 8505C and TPC-1 cells. YAP1 knockdown resulted in marked decrease of tumor volume, invasion and distant metastasis in orthotopic tumor xenograft mouse models using the 8505C thyroid cancer cell line. Taken together, YAP1 is involved in the tumor progression of thyroid cancer and YAP1-mediated effects might not be affected by the currently used RAF kinase inhibitors. PMID:23857250

  3. Up-regulated A20 promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and induces chemotherapy resistance of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Li, Shouyun; Yu, Jing; Li, Huan; Liu, Shuang; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang

    2015-09-01

    A20, also known as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), has been identified as a key regulator of cell survival in many solid tumors. However, little is known about the protein expression level and function of A20 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we found that A20 is up-regulated in ALL patients and several cell lines. Knockdown of A20 in Jurkat, Nalm-6, and Reh cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation, which was associated with cell cycle arrest. Phospho-ERK (p-ERK) was also down-regulated, while p53 and p21 were up-regulated in A20 knockdown cells. In addition, A20 knockdown induced apoptosis in Jurkat and Reh cells and enhanced the sensitivity of these cell lines to chemotherapeutic drugs. These results indicate that A20 may stimulate cell proliferation by regulating cell cycle progression. A20 inhibited apoptosis in some types of ALL cells, thereby enhancing their resistance to chemotherapy. This effect was abolished through A20 silencing. These findings suggest that A20 may contribute to the pathogenesis of ALL and that it may be used as a new therapeutic target for ALL treatment.

  4. TUSC3 promotes colorectal cancer progression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through WNT/β-catenin and MAPK signalling.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ye; Wang, Qian; Guo, Kang; Qin, Weizhao; Liao, Wenting; Wang, Shuang; Ding, Yanqing; Lin, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer death in humans. Tumour suppressor candidate 3 (TUSC3) plays an important role in embryogenesis and metabolism. Deletion of TUSC3 often causes non-syndromic mental retardation. Even though TUSC3 deregulation is frequently observed in epithelial cancers, the function of TUSC3 in CRC has remained unknown. In this study, we observed greater expression of TUSC3 at the mRNA and protein level in clinical colorectal tumour samples compared with paired normal tissues. Gain- and loss-of-function analyses were performed to evaluate the functional significance of TUSC3 in CRC initiation and progression. Immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, and co-immunoprecipitation analyses were used to identify potential pathways with which TUSC3 might be involved. Overexpression of TUSC3 in CRC cells induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in CRC cells, accompanied by down-regulation of the epithelial marker, E-cadherin, and up-regulation of the mesenchymal marker, vimentin. Increased proliferation, migration, and invasion, as well as accelerated xenograft tumour growth, were observed in TUSC3-overexpressing CRC cells, while opposite effects were achieved in TUSC3-silenced cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrated the oncogenic role of TUSC3 in CRC and showed that TUSC3 may be responsible for alternations in the proliferation ability, aggressiveness, and invasive/metastatic potential of CRC through regulating the MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathways.

  5. Long non-coding RNA APTR promotes the activation of hepatic stellate cells and the progression of liver fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Fujun; Zheng, Jianjian; Mao, Yuqing; Dong, Peihong; Li, Guojun; Lu, Zhongqiu; Guo, Chuanyong; Liu, Zhanju; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-08-07

    In this study, we aimed at assessing a role of Alu-mediated p21 transcriptional regulator (APTR) in hepatofibrogenesis. APTR was upregulated in fibrotic liver samples and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Knockdown of APTR inhibited the activation of HSCs in vitro and mitigated the accumulation of collagen in vivo. Importantly, APTR silencing could abrogate TGF-β{sub 1}-induced upregulation of α-SMA in HSCs. In addition, inhibition of cell cycle and cell proliferation by APTR knockdown was attenuated by p21 siRNA1 in primary HSCs. Finally, serum APTR levels were increased in patients with liver cirrhosis, indicating a potential biomarker for liver cirrhosis. Collectively, evidence is proposed for a new biological role of APTR in hepatofibrogenesis. - Highlights: • APTR is upregulated in fibrotic liver tissues and activated HSCs. • APTR silencing inhibits HSC activation and the progression of liver fibrosis. • Antifibrotic effect of APTR silencing is achieved by increasing p21.

  6. Common promoter deletion is associated with 3.9-fold differential transcription of ovine CCR5 and reduced proviral level of ovine progressive pneumonia virus.

    PubMed

    White, S N; Mousel, M R; Reynolds, J O; Lewis, G S; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M

    2009-10-01

    Chemokine (C-C motif) Receptor 5 (CCR5) is a chemokine receptor that regulates immune cell recruitment in inflammation and serves as a coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A human CCR5 coding deletion (termed delta-32) results in strong resistance to HIV infection, and sequence variants in CCR5 regulatory regions have been implicated in delayed progression to acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Both ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV), also known as maedi-visna, and HIV are macrophage-tropic lentiviruses, have similar genomic structures, and cause lifelong persistent host infection, suggesting CCR5 may have a role in regulating OPPV provirus levels. Therefore, the ovine CCR5 genomic sequence was determined, and sequence variants were obtained from the open reading frame and surrounding regulatory sites. One CCR5 variant contained a 4-base deletion within a binding site for octamer transcription factors in the promoter region. A test for differential transcription from each allele in heterozygous animals showed a 3.9-fold transcription difference (P < 0.0001). OPPV proviral levels were also measured in 351 naturally exposed Rambouillet, Polypay and Columbia sheep. Deletion homozygotes showed reduced OPPV proviral levels among these animals (P < 0.01). The association of this CCR5 promoter deletion with OPPV levels will need to be validated in additional populations before the deletion can be recommended for widespread use in marker-assisted selection. However, because of the large impact on transcription and because CCR5 has roles in inflammation, recruitment of effector cells, and cell-mediated immunity, this deletion may play a role in the control of infections of many diverse pathogens of sheep.

  7. CD147 promotes liver fibrosis progression via VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signalling-mediated cross-talk between hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhaoyong; Qu, Kai; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Qichao; Qu, Ping; Xu, Xinsen; Yuan, Peng; Huang, Xiaojun; Shao, Yongping; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Hongxin; Xing, Jinliang

    2015-10-01

    Although previous evidence indicates close involvement of CD147 in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, the underlying molecular mechanisms and its therapeutic value remain largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the biological roles of CD147 in liver fibrosis and assessed its therapeutic value as a target molecule in the CCl4-induced liver fibrosis mouse model. We found that CD147 was highly expressed in both hepatocytes and SECs (sinusoidal endothelial cells) in fibrotic liver tissues. Additionally, it was significantly associated with the fibrosis stage. TGF-β1 (transforming growth factor β1) was found to be mainly responsible for the up-regulation of CD147. Bioinformatic and experimental data suggest a functional link between CD147 expression and VEGF-A (vascular endothelial growth factor A)/VEGR-2 (VEGF receptor 2) signalling-mediated angiogenesis in fibrotic liver tissues. Furthermore, we observed that the CD147-induced activation of the PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt signalling pathway promotes the production of VEGF-A in hepatocytes and expression of VEGFR-2 in SECs, which was found to enhance the angiogenic capability of SECs. Finally, our data indicate that blocking of CD147 using an mAb (monoclonal antibody) attenuated liver fibrosis progression via inhibition of VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 signalling and subsequent amelioration of microvascular abnormality in the CCl4-induced mouse model. Our findings suggest a novel functional mechanism that CD147 may promote liver fibrosis progression via inducing the VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 signalling pathway-mediated cross-talk between hepatocytes and SECs. New strategies based on the intervention of CD147 can be expected for prevention of liver fibrosis.

  8. Attenuation of arsenic in a karst subterranean stream and correlation with geochemical factors: a case study at Lihu, South China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liankai; Yang, Hui; Tang, Jiansheng; Qin, Xiaoqun; Yu, Au Yik

    2014-11-01

    Arsenic (As) pollutants generated by human activities in karst areas flow into subterranean streams and contaminate groundwater easily because of the unique hydrogeological characteristics of karst areas. To elucidate the reaction mechanisms of arsenic in karst subterranean streams, physical-chemical analysis was conducted by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer and an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. The results show that inorganic species account for most of the total arsenic, whereas organic arsenic is not detected or occurs in infinitesimal amounts. As(III) accounts for 51.0%±9.9% of the total inorganic arsenic. Arsenic attenuation occurs and the attenuation rates of total As, As(III) and As(V) in the Lihu subterranean stream are 51%, 36% and 59%, respectively. To fully explain the main geochemical factors influencing arsenic attenuation, SPSS 13.0 and CANOCO 4.5 bundled with CanoDraw for Windows were used for simple statistical analysis and redundancy analysis (RDA). Eight main factors, i.e., sediment iron (SFe), sediment aluminum (SAl), sediment calcium (SCa), sediment organic matter (SOM), sediment manganese (SMn), water calcium (WCa(2+)), water magnesium (WMg(2+)), and water bicarbonate ion (WHCO3(-)) were extracted from thirteen indicators. Their impacts on arsenic content rank as: SFe>SCa>WCa(2+)>SAl>WHCO3(-)>SMn>SOM>WMg(2+). Of these factors, SFe, SAl, SCa, SOM, SMn, WMg(2+) and WCa(2+) promote arsenic attenuation, whereas WHCO3(-) inhibits it. Further investigation revealed that the redox potential (Eh) and pH are adverse to arsenic removal. The dramatic distinction between karst and non-karst terrain is that calcium and bicarbonate are the primary factors influencing arsenic migration in karst areas due to the high calcium concentration and alkalinity of karst water.

  9. Arsenic bioavailability in soils before and after soil washing: the use of Escherichia coli whole-cell bioreporters.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Youngdae; Kang, Yerin; Chae, Yooeun; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Youngshim; Jeong, Seung-Woo; An, Youn-Joo

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the quantification of bioavailable arsenic in contaminated soils and evaluation of soil-washing processes in the aspect of bioavailability using a novel bacterial bioreporter developed in present study. The whole-cell bioreporter (WCB) was genetically engineered by fusing the promoter of nik operon from Escherichia coli and green fluorescent protein as a sensing domain and reporter domain. Among eight well-known hazardous heavy metals and metalloid, this system responded specifically to arsenic, thereby inferring association of As(III) with NikR inhibits the repression. Moreover, the response was proportional to the concentration of As(III), thereby it was capable to determine the amount of bioavailable arsenic quantitatively in contaminated soils. The bioavailable portion of arsenic was 5.9 (3.46-10.96) and 0.9 (0.27-1.74) % of total from amended and site soils, respectively, suggesting the bioavailability of arsenic in soils was related to the soil properties and duration of aging. On the other hand, only 1.37 (0.21-2.97) % of total arsenic was extracted into soil solutions and 19.88 (11.86-28.27) % of arsenic in soil solution was bioavailable. This result showed that the soluble arsenic is not all bioavailable and most of bioavailable arsenic in soils is water non-extractable. In addition, the bioavailable arsenic was increased after soil-washing while total amount was decreased, thereby suggesting the soil-washing processes release arsenic associated with soil materials to be bioavailable. Therefore, it would be valuable to have a tool to assess bioavailability and the bioavailability should be taken into consideration for soil remediation plans.

  10. Prenatal Arsenic Exposure and DNA Methylation in Maternal and Umbilical Cord Blood Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Baccarelli, Andrea; Hoffman, Elaine; Tarantini, Letizia; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mahiuddin, Golam; Mostofa, Golam; Hsueh, Yu-Mei; Wright, Robert O.; Christiani, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Arsenic is an epigenetic toxicant and could influence fetal developmental programming. Objectives: We evaluated the association between arsenic exposure and DNA methylation in maternal and umbilical cord leukocytes. Methods: Drinking-water and urine samples were collected when women were at ≤ 28 weeks gestation; the samples were analyzed for arsenic using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. DNA methylation at CpG sites in p16 (n = 7) and p53 (n = 4), and in LINE-1 and Alu repetitive elements (3 CpG sites in each), was quantified using pyrosequencing in 113 pairs of maternal and umbilical blood samples. We used general linear models to evaluate the relationship between DNA methylation and tertiles of arsenic exposure. Results: Mean (± SD) drinking-water arsenic concentration was 14.8 ± 36.2 μg/L (range: < 1–230 μg/L). Methylation in LINE-1 increased by 1.36% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.52, 2.21%] and 1.08% (95% CI: 0.07, 2.10%) in umbilical cord and maternal leukocytes, respectively, in association with the highest versus lowest tertile of total urinary arsenic per gram creatinine. Arsenic exposure was also associated with higher methylation of some of the tested CpG sites in the promoter region of p16 in umbilical cord and maternal leukocytes. No associations were observed for Alu or p53 methylation. Conclusions: Exposure to higher levels of arsenic was positively associated with DNA methylation in LINE-1 repeated elements, and to a lesser degree at CpG sites within the promoter region of the tumor suppressor gene p16. Associations were observed in both maternal and fetal leukocytes. Future research is needed to confirm these results and determine if these small increases in methylation are associated with any health effects. PMID:22466225

  11. Periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum promote tumor progression in an oral-specific chemical carcinogenesis model

    PubMed Central

    Gallimidi, Adi Binder; Fischman, Stuart; Revach, Brurya; Bulvik, Raanan; Maliutina, Alina; Rubinstein, Ariel M.

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a lethal disease whose incidence is increasing. Epidemiologic studies demonstrate an association between periodontitis and oral cancer, and periodontal pathogens are implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and gastrointestinal malignancies. Nevertheless, a causal role for periodontal pathogens in OSCC has not been shown, partly due to the lack of an appropriate animal model. Here, utilizing a newly-established murine model of periodontitis-associated oral tumorigenesis, we report that chronic bacterial infection promotes OSCC, and that augmented signaling along the IL-6-STAT3 axis underlies this effect. Our results indicate that periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum stimulate tumorigenesis via direct interaction with oral epithelial cells through Toll-like receptors. Furthermore, oral pathogens stimulate human OSCC proliferation and induce expression of key molecules implicated in tumorigenesis. To the best of our knowledge, these findings represent the first demonstration of a mechanistic role for oral bacteria in chemically induced OSCC tumorigenesis. These results are highly relevant for the design of effective prevention and treatment strategies for OSCC. PMID:26158901

  12. Activated platelets inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cell differentiation and promote tumor progression via platelet-tumor cell binding

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingchao; Li, Bing; Liu, Yue-Jian; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Chunyan; Zhao, Yongfu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lack of differentiation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with increased circulating platelet size. We measured platelet activation and plasma adenosine diphosphate (ADP) levels in HCC patients based on differentiation status. Local platelet accumulation and platelet-hepatoma cell binding were measured using immunohistochemistry (IHC) or flow cytometry. Using a xenograft assay in NON/SCID mice, we tested the effects of the anti-platelet drug clopidogrel on platelet activation, platelet infiltration, platelet-tumor cell binding and tumor cell differentiation. HCC patients with poor differentiation status displayed elevated platelet activation and higher ADP levels. Platelets accumulated within poorly differentiated tissues and localized at hepatoma cell membranes. Platelet-tumor cell binding was existed in carcinoma tissues, largely mediated by P-selectin on platelets. NOD/SCID mice with xenograft tumors also exhibited increased platelet activation and platelet-tumor cell binding. Clopidogrel therapy triggered hepatoma cell differentiation by attenuating platelet activation and platelet-tumor cell binding. TCF4 knockdown promoted HepG-2 cell differentiation and inhibited tumor formation, and TCF4 could be the potential downstream target for clopidogrel therapy. PMID:27542264

  13. Distinct effects of concomitant Jak2V617F expression and Tet2 loss in mice promote disease progression in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Edwin; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Breyfogle, Lawrence J.; Rosen, Emily A.; Poveromo, Luke; Elf, Shannon; Ko, Amy; Brumme, Kristina; Levine, Ross; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling mutations (eg, JAK2V617F) and mutations in genes involved in epigenetic regulation (eg, TET2) are the most common cooccurring classes of mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Clinical correlative studies have demonstrated that TET2 mutations are enriched in more advanced phases of MPNs such as myelofibrosis and leukemic transformation, suggesting that they may cooperate with JAK2V617F to promote disease progression. To dissect the effects of concomitant Jak2V617F expression and Tet2 loss within distinct hematopoietic compartments in vivo, we generated Jak2V617F/Tet2 compound mutant genetic mice. We found that the combination of Jak2V617F expression and Tet2 loss resulted in a more florid MPN phenotype than that seen with either allele alone. Concordant with this, we found that Tet2 deletion conferred a strong functional competitive advantage to Jak2V617F-mutant hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Transcriptional profiling revealed that both Jak2V617F expression and Tet2 loss were associated with distinct and nonoverlapping gene expression signatures within the HSC compartment. In aggregate, our findings indicate that Tet2 loss drives clonal dominance in HSCs, and Jak2V617F expression causes expansion of downstream precursor cell populations, resulting in disease progression through combinatorial effects. This work provides insight into the functional consequences of JAK2V617F-TET2 comutation in MPNs, particularly as it pertains to HSCs. PMID:25281607

  14. Association of Myxovirus Resistance Gene Promoter Polymorphism with Response to Combined Interferon Treatment and Progression of Liver Disease in Chronic HCV Egyptian Patients.

    PubMed

    Bader El Din, Noha Gamal; Salum, Ghada M; Anany, Mohamed A; Ibrahim, Marwa Khalil; Dawood, Reham Mohamed; Zayed, Naglaa; El Abd, Yasmine S; El-Shenawy, Reem; El Awady, Mostafa K

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency of single-nucleotide polymorphism at the -88 myxovirus resistance (MxA) gene promoter region in relation to the status of hepatitis C virus (HCV) progression and response to combined interferon (IFN) in chronic HCV Egyptian patients. One hundred ten subjects were enrolled in the study; 60 HCV genotype 4-infected patients who underwent combined IFN therapy and 50 healthy individuals. All subjects were genotyped for -88 MxA polymorphism by the restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. There was an increasing trend of response to combined IFN treatment as 34.9% of GG, 64.3% of GT, and 66.7% of TT genotypes were sustained responders (P=0.05). The T allele was significantly affecting the response rate more than G allele (P=0.032). Moreover, the hepatic fibrosis score and hepatitis activity were higher in GG genotypes compared with the GT and TT genotypes. The multivariate analysis showed that the MxA GG genotype was an independent factor increasing the no response to IFN therapy (P=0.04, odds ratio [OR] 3.822, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.056-11.092), also MxA G allele (P=0.0372, OR 2.905, 95% CI 1.066-7.919). MxA -88 polymorphism might be a potential biomarker to predict response to IFN and disease progression in chronic HCV-infected patients.

  15. FGF-1/-3/FGFR4 signaling in cancer-associated fibroblasts promotes tumor progression in colon cancer through Erk and MMP-7.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Pan; Shang, Kun; Chen, Huan; Ding, Fei; Wang, Zhen; Liang, Chen; Xu, Ye; Sun, Meng-Hong; Li, Ying-Yi

    2015-10-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), as the activated fibroblasts in the tumor stroma, are important modifiers of tumour progression. In the present study, we observed that azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate treatments induced increasingly severe colorectal mucosal inflammation and the intratumoural accumulation of CAFs. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-1 and FGF-3 were detected in infiltrating cells, and FGFR4, the specific receptor for FGF-1 and FGF-3, was detected in colon cancer tissues. The phosphorylation of FGFR4 enhanced the production of metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (Mek)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), which was accompanied by excessive vessel generation and cell proliferation. Moreover, we separated CAFs, pericarcinoma fibroblasts (PFs), and normal fibroblasts (NFs) from human colon tissue specimens to characterize the function of CAFs. We observed that CAFs secrete more FGF-1/-3 than NFs and PFs and promote cancer cell growth and angiogenesis through the activation of FGFR4, which is followed by the activation of Mek/Erk and the modulation of MMP-7 expression. The administration of FGF-1/-3-neutralizing antibodies or the treatment of cells with FGFR4 siRNA or the FGFR4 inhibitor PD173074 markedly suppressed colon cancer cell proliferation and neovascularization. These observations suggest a crucial role for CAFs and FGF signaling in the initiation and progression of colorectal cancer. The inhibition of the FGF signaling pathway may be a useful strategy for the treatment of colon cancer.

  16. miR-125b can enhance skin tumor initiation and promote malignant progression by repressing differentiation and prolonging cell survival.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Ge, Yejing; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-11-15

    Previously, we identified miR-125b as a key regulator of the undifferentiated state of hair follicle stem cells. Here, we show that in both mice and humans, miR-125b is abundantly expressed, particularly at early stages of malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the second most prevalent cancer worldwide. Moreover, when elevated in normal murine epidermis, miR-125b promotes tumor initiation and contributes to malignant progression. We further show that miR-125b can confer "oncomiR addiction" in early stage malignant progenitors by delaying their differentiation and favoring an SCC cancer stem cell (CSC)-like transcriptional program. To understand how, we systematically identified and validated miR125b targets that are specifically associated with tumors that are dependent on miR-125b. Through molecular and genetic analysis of these targets, we uncovered new insights underlying miR-125b's oncogenic function. Specifically, we show that, on the one hand, mir-125b directly represses stress-responsive MAP kinase genes and associated signaling. On the other hand, it indirectly prolongs activated (phosphorylated) EGFR signaling by repressing Vps4b (vacuolar protein-sorting 4 homolog B), encoding a protein implicated in negatively regulating the endosomal sorting complexes that are necessary for the recycling of active EGFR. Together, these findings illuminate miR-125b as an important microRNA regulator that is shared between normal skin progenitors and their early malignant counterparts.

  17. Poly (C)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) promotes the progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) through regulating cellular proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jinjun; Zhou, Guoren; Zhang, Zhi; Sun, Lei; He, Xia; Zhou, Jianwei

    2016-08-01

    PCBP2 (Poly(C)-binding protein 2) is a member of PCBP family, which has many functions including mRNA stabilization, translational silence and translational enhancement performed by their poly(C)-binding ability. The abnormal expression of PCBP2 was correlated with various carcinomas. However, the significance and mechanism of PCBP2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) progression remain unclear. In this study, Western Blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis revealed that PCBP2 was overexpressed in ESCC tissues and cell lines. Statistical results also indicated that PCBP2 expression level was significantly positively correlated with ESCC clinicopathological parameters such as tumor grade and tumor size. Furthermore, PCBP2 expression level could also be recognized as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients' overall survival. Serum starvation and refeeding assay along with PCBP2-shRNA transfection demonstrated that PCBP2 expression promoted proliferation of ESCC cells. The results above are partly due to growth arrest of cell cycle at G1/S phase. We also found that reduced PCBP2 expression might induce ESCC cell apoptosis with increased cleaved caspase3 expression. Overall, our findings indicated that PCBP2 might be involved in the ESCC progression and be considered as a new treatment target in ESCC.

  18. Intra- and Extra-Cellular Events Related to Altered Glycosylation of MUC1 Promote Chronic Inflammation, Tumor Progression, Invasion, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cascio, Sandra; Finn, Olivera J.

    2016-01-01

    Altered glycosylation of mucin 1 (MUC1) on tumor cells compared to normal epithelial cells was previously identified as an important antigenic modification recognized by the immune system in the process of tumor immunosurveillance. This tumor form of MUC1 is considered a viable target for cancer immunotherapy. The importance of altered MUC1 glycosylation extends also to its role as a promoter of chronic inflammatory conditions that lead to malignant transformation and cancer progression. We review here what is known about the role of specific cancer-associated glycans on MUC1 in protein-protein interactions and intracellular signaling in cancer cells and in their adhesion to each other and the tumor stroma. The tumor form of MUC1 also creates a different landscape of inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment by controlling the recruitment of inflammatory cells, establishing specific interactions with dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, and facilitating tumor escape from the immune system. Through multiple types of short glycans simultaneously present in tumors, MUC1 acquires multiple oncogenic properties that control tumor development, progression, and metastasis at different steps of the process of carcinogenesis. PMID:27754373

  19. High mobility group box 1/toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling promotes progression of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yanqiu; Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yanjing; Zhang, Zongli; Li, Li; Liu, Lin; Shi, Wenna; Su, Lihui; Cheng, Baoquan

    2017-03-01

    High mobility group box 1 and toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling pathway have been indicated to have oncogenic effects in many cancers. However, the role of high mobility group box 1/toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling pathway in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that high mobility group box 1, toll-like receptor 4, and myeloid differentiation factor 88 were overexpressed in gastric cancer tumors compared with the adjacent non-tumor tissues. The overexpression of high mobility group box 1, toll-like receptor 4, and myeloid differentiation factor 88 were correlated with tumor-node-metastasis stage (p = 0.0068, p = 0.0063, p = 0.0173) and lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0272, p = 0.0382, and p = 0.0495). Furthermore, we observed that knockdown of high mobility group box 1 by high mobility group box 1-small interfering RNA suppressed the expression of toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 88. Blockage of high mobility group box 1/toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling by high mobility group box 1-small interfering RNA resulted in elevation of apoptotic ratio and inhibition of cell growth, migration, and invasion by upregulating Bax expression and downregulating Bcl-2, matrix metalloproteinase-2, nuclear factor kappa B/p65 expression, and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B/p65 in gastric cancer cells. Our findings suggest that high mobility group box 1/toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling pathway may contribute to the development and progression of gastric cancer via the nuclear factor kappa B pathway and it also represents a novel potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  20. VNN1 promotes atherosclerosis progression in apoE−/− mice fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan-Wei; Wu, Shao-Guo; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Ma, Xin; Lu, Jing-Bo; Xiu, Jian-cheng; Zhang, Yuan; Huang, Chuan; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Sha, Yan-Hua; Gao, Ji-Juan; Wang, Yan-Chao; Li, Shu-Fen; Zhao, Jia-Yi; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence shows that vanin-1 (VNN1) plays a key part in glucose metabolism. We explored the effect of VNN1 on cholesterol metabolism, inflammation, apoptosis in vitro, and progression of atherosclerotic plaques in apoE−/− mice. Oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL) significantly induced VNN1 expression through an ERK1/2/cyclooxygenase-2/PPARα signaling pathway. VNN1 significantly increased cellular cholesterol content and decreased apoAI and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C)-mediated efflux by 25.16% and 23.13%, respectively, in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells (P < 0.05). In addition, VNN1 attenuated Ox-LDL-induced apoptosis through upregulation of expression of p53 by 59.15% and downregulation of expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 127.13% in THP-1 macrophage (P < 0.05). In vivo, apoE−/− mice were divided randomly into two groups and transduced with lentivirus (LV)-Mock or LV-VNN1 for 12 weeks. VNN1-treated mice showed increased liver lipid content and plasma levels of TG (124.48%), LDL-cholesterol (119.64%), TNF-α (148.74%), interleukin (IL)-1β (131.81%), and IL-6 (156.51%), whereas plasma levels of HDL-C (25.75%) were decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Consistent with these data, development of atherosclerotic lesions was increased significantly upon infection of apoE−/− mice with LV-VNN1. These observations suggest that VNN1 may be a promising therapeutic candidate against atherosclerosis. PMID:27281478

  1. Decorin is responsible for progression of non-small-cell lung cancer by promoting cell proliferation and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuefei; Liang, Wenjun; Yang, Wen; Xia, Rui; Song, Yong

    2015-05-01

    results indicated that decorin plays crucial roles in NSCLC against carcinogenesis and progression. Decorin might be a predictive factor and an attractive therapeutic target for NSCLC patients.

  2. The SMRT Coregulator Enhances Growth of Estrogen Receptor-α-Positive Breast Cancer Cells by Promotion of Cell Cycle Progression and Inhibition of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, Julia K.; Karmakar, Sudipan; Gu, Guowei; Chaubal, Vaishali; Wang, Liguo; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The SMRT coregulator functions as a dual coactivator and corepressor for estrogen receptor-α (ERα) in a gene-specific manner, and in several studies its elevated expression correlates with poor outcome for breast cancer patients. A specific role of SMRT in breast cancer progression has not been elucidated, but SMRT knock-down limits estradiol-dependent growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In this study, small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) approaches were used to determine the effects of SMRT depletion on growth of ERα-positive MCF-7 and ZR-75–1 breast cancer cells, as well as the ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer line. Depletion of SMRT inhibited growth of ERα-positive cells grown in monolayer but had no effect on growth of the ERα-negative cells. Reduced SMRT levels also negatively impacted the anchorage-independent growth of MCF-7 cells as assessed by soft agar colony formation assays. The observed growth inhibitions were due to a loss of estradiol-induced progression through the G1/S transition of the cell cycle and increased apoptosis in SMRT-depleted compared with control cells. Gene expression analyses indicated that SMRT inhibits apoptosis by a coordinated regulation of genes involved in apoptosis. Functioning as a dual coactivator for anti-apoptotic genes and corepressor for pro-apoptotic genes, SMRT can limit apoptosis. Together these data indicate that SMRT promotes breast cancer progression through multiple pathways leading to increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis. PMID:24971610

  3. Involvement of epigenetics and EMT-related miRNA in arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation and their potential clinical use.

    PubMed

    Michailidi, Christina; Hayashi, Masamichi; Datta, Sayantan; Sen, Tanusree; Zenner, Kaitlyn; Oladeru, Oluwadamilola; Brait, Mariana; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Baras, Alexander; VandenBussche, Christopher; Argos, Maria; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Ahsan, Habibul; Hahn, Noah M; Netto, George J; Sidransky, David; Hoque, Mohammad Obaidul

    2015-03-01

    Exposure to toxicants leads to cumulative molecular changes that overtime increase a subject's risk of developing urothelial carcinoma. To assess the impact of arsenic exposure at a time progressive manner, we developed and characterized a cell culture model and tested a panel of miRNAs in urine samples from arsenic-exposed subjects, urothelial carcinoma patients, and controls. To prepare an in vitro model, we chronically exposed an immortalized normal human bladder cell line (HUC1) to arsenic. Growth of the HUC1 cells was increased in a time-dependent manner after arsenic treatment and cellular morphology was changed. In a soft agar assay, colonies were observed only in arsenic-treated cells, and the number of colonies gradually increased with longer periods of treatment. Similarly, invaded cells in an invasion assay were observed only in arsenic-treated cells. Withdrawal of arsenic treatment for 2.5 months did not reverse the tumorigenic properties of arsenic-treated cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated decreased PTEN and increased AKT and mTOR in arsenic-treated HUC1 cells. Levels of miR-200a, miR-200b, and miR-200c were downregulated in arsenic-exposed HUC1 cells by quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, in human urine, miR-200c and miR-205 were inversely associated with arsenic exposure (P = 0.005 and 0.009, respectively). Expression of miR-205 discriminated cancer cases from controls with high sensitivity and specificity (AUC = 0.845). Our study suggests that exposure to arsenic rapidly induces a multifaceted dedifferentiation program and miR-205 has potential to be used as a marker of arsenic exposure as well as a maker of early urothelial carcinoma detection.

  4. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC IN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MATRICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciaton of arsenic in water, food and urine are analytical capabilities which are an essential part in arsenic risk assessment. The cancer risk associated with arsenic has been the driving force in generating the analytical research in each of these matrices. This presentat...

  5. ARSENIC SEPARATION FROM WATER USING ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is known to be a hazardous contaminant in drinking water. The presence of arsenic in water supplies has been linked to arsenical dermatosis and skin cancer . Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange capacities. In the present work, the potential use of a variety of ...

  6. Arsenic Exposure and Toxicology: A Historical Perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metalloid arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed in food, water, air and soil. Arsenic has a long history of use as a homicidal agent, but in the past 100 years arsenic, in various forms, has also been used as a pesticide and a ch...

  7. TYPES OF ARSENIC AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the state-of-the-art technology for removal of arsenic from drinking water. Presentation includes results of several EPA field studies on removal of arsenic from existing arsenic removal plants and key results from several EPA sponsored research studies...

  8. 21 CFR 556.60 - Arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arsenic. 556.60 Section 556.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND... New Animal Drugs § 556.60 Arsenic. Tolerances for total residues of combined arsenic (calculated as...

  9. 21 CFR 556.60 - Arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arsenic. 556.60 Section 556.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND... New Animal Drugs § 556.60 Arsenic. Tolerances for total residues of combined arsenic (calculated as...

  10. 21 CFR 556.60 - Arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arsenic. 556.60 Section 556.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND... New Animal Drugs § 556.60 Arsenic. Tolerances for total residues of combined arsenic (calculated as...

  11. Understanding Arsenic Dynamics in Agronomic Systems to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This review is on arsenic in agronomic systems, and covers processes that influence the entry of arsenic into the human food supply. The scope is from sources of arsenic (natural and anthropogenic) in soils, biogeochemical and rhizosphere processes that control arsenic speciation and availability, through to mechanisms of uptake by crop plants and potential mitigation strategies. This review makes a case for taking steps to prevent or limit crop uptake of arsenic, wherever possible, and to work toward a long-term solution to the presence of arsenic in agronomic systems. The past two decades have seen important advances in our understanding of how biogeochemical and physiological processes influence human exposure to soil arsenic, and thus must now prompt an informed reconsideration and unification of regulations to protect the quality of agricultural and residential soils. Consumption of staple foods such as rice, beverages such as apple juice, or vegetables grown in historically arsenic-contaminated soils is now recognized as a tangible route of arsenic exposure that, in many cases, is more significant than exposure from drinking water. Understanding the sources of arsenic to crop plants and the factors that influence them is key to reducing exposure now and preventing exposure in future. In addition to the abundant natural sources of arsenic, there are a large number of industrial and agricultural sources of arsenic to the soil; from mining wastes, coal fly

  12. Arsenic - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arsenic URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arsenic.html Other topics A-Z A B C ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Arsenic - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  13. 21 CFR 556.60 - Arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arsenic. 556.60 Section 556.60 Food and Drugs FOOD... New Animal Drugs § 556.60 Arsenic. (a) (b) Tolerances. The tolerances for total residue of combined arsenic (calculated as As) are: (1) Turkeys—(i) Muscle and eggs: 0.5 parts per million (ppm). (ii)...

  14. 21 CFR 556.60 - Arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arsenic. 556.60 Section 556.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND... New Animal Drugs § 556.60 Arsenic. Tolerances for total residues of combined arsenic (calculated as...

  15. Arsenic Metabolism and Distribution in Developing Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    A growing body of evidence suggests that exposure to inorganic arsenic during early life has long term adverse effects. The extent of exposure to inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites in utero is determined not only by the rates of formation and transfer of arsenicals...

  16. Linking Arsenic Metabolism and Toxic Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although arsenic has been long recognized as a toxicant and a carcinogen, the molecular basis for few of its adverse effects are well understood. Like other metalloids, arsenic undergoes extensive metabolism involving oxidation state changes and formation of methyl-arsenic bonds ...

  17. GROUND WATER TREATMENT PROCESSES FOR ARSENIC REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1975 EPA established a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for arsenic at 0.05 mg/L. In 1996, Congress amended the SDWA and these amendments required that EPA develop an arsenic research strategy and publish a proposal to revise the arsenic MCL by January 2000. The Agency proposed...

  18. Seasonal Variation in Arsenic Speciation in a Shallow Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illera, V.; O'Day, P. A.; Root, R. A.; Rivera, N.; Rafferty, M. T.; Vlassopoulos, D.

    2007-12-01

    Seasonal variation in arsenic speciation and concentration in sediments in a shallow aquifer were studied with respect to changes in water table elevation and rainfall. Sediment cores were collected at different times from 2004 to 2007 at a marsh site adjacent to San Francisco Bay (in East Palo Alto, CA), which experiences a strong wet winter/dry summer seasonality. The site is a former pesticide manufacturing plant that has undergone remediation and surface capping. Mobilization of post-remediation residual arsenic in sediments is inhibited by natural subsurface attenuation. This study examines the dynamics of seasonal changes on groundwater level and subsurface redox conditions, and its potential impact on arsenic mobilization. Cores (3-cm diameter) were collected from depths of 2.7-3.5 m, intersecting the range of seasonal elevation change in the water table. Groundwater level from a nearby well was monitored with continuous data logging. Sediment samples were analyzed for total and extractable element concentrations and characterized by arsenic and iron synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS). Three distinct redox zones are recognized spectroscopically within the shallow aquifer: a reduced zone in unsaturated sediments (~0.5-1.5 m depth) where arsenic is present as As-sulfide phases (orpiment or realgar); a transition zone between reduced and oxidized zones at the depth of water table (~1.5 m ±0.5 m) with mixed arsenic oxidation states; and an oxidized zone permeated with oxic groundwaters (~1.5-3 m depth) where only As(V) is present. Sediment samples from the reduced zone had arsenic concentrations from 50 to 150 mg kg-1. Arsenic concentrations decreased to a minimum in the transition zone to 20 mg kg-1, and reached a maximum in the oxidized zone (around 200 mg kg-1). Arsenic XANES spectra showed a progressive change from mostly arsenic sulfides in the upper reduced sediments (component sum ~100%\\) to a mixture of orpiment and As

  19. Snail promotes cell migration through PI3K/AKT-dependent Rac1 activation as well as PI3K/AKT-independent pathways during prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Veronica; Smith, Basil; Burton, Liza J; Randle, Diandra; Morris, Marisha; Odero-Marah, Valerie A

    2015-01-01

    Snail, a zinc-finger transcription factor, induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is associated with increased cell migration and metastasis in cancer cells. Rac1 is a small G-protein which upon activation results in formation of lamellipodia, the first protrusions formed by migrating cells. We have previously shown that Snail promotes cell migration through down-regulation of maspin tumor suppressor. We hypothesized that Snail's regulation of cell migration may also involve Rac1 signaling regulated by PI3K/AKT and/or MAPK pathways. We found that Snail overexpression in LNCaP and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells increased Rac1 activity associated with increased cell migration, and the Rac1 inhibitor, NSC23766, could inhibit Snail-mediated cell migration. Conversely, Snail downregulation using shRNA in the aggressive C4–2 prostate cancer cells decreased Rac1 activity and cell migration. Moreover, Snail overexpression increased ERK and PI3K/AKT activity in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells. Treatment of Snail-overexpressing 22Rv1 cells with LY294002, PI3K/AKT inhibitor or U0126, MEK inhibitor, decreased cell migration significantly, but only LY294002 significantly reduced Rac1 activity, suggesting that Snail promotes Rac1 activation via the PI3K/AKT pathway. Furthermore, 22Rv1 cells overexpressing Snail displayed decreased maspin levels, while inhibition of maspin expression in 22Rv1 cells with siRNA, led to increased PI3K/AKT, Rac1 activity and cell migration, without affecting ERK activity, suggesting that maspin is upstream of PI3K/AKT. Overall, we have dissected signaling pathways by which Snail may promote cell migration through MAPK signaling or alternatively through PI3K/AKT-Rac1 signaling that involves Snail inhibition of maspin tumor suppressor. This may contribute to prostate cancer progression. PMID:26207671

  20. Arsenic tolerant Trichoderma sp. reduces arsenic induced stress in chickpea (Cicer arietinum).

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pratibha; Singh, Poonam C; Mishra, Aradhana; Srivastava, Suchi; Chauhan, Reshu; Awasthi, Surabhi; Mishra, Seema; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Tripathi, Preeti; Kalra, Alok; Tripathi, Rudra D; Nautiyal, Chandra S

    2017-04-01

    Toxic metalloids including arsenic (As) can neither be eliminated nor destroyed from environment; however, they can be converted from toxic to less/non-toxic forms. The form of As species and their concentration determines its toxicity in plants. Therefore, the microbe mediated biotransformation of As is crucial for its plant uptake and toxicity. In the present study the role of As tolerant Trichoderma in modulating As toxicity in chickpea plants was explored. Chickpea plants grown in arsenate spiked soil under green house conditions were inoculated with two plant growth promoting Trichoderma strains, M-35 (As tolerant) and PPLF-28 (As sensitive). Total As concentration in chickpea tissue was comparable in both the Trichoderma treatments, however, differences in levels of organic and inorganic As (iAs) species were observed. The shift in iAs to organic As species ratio in tolerant Trichoderma treatment correlated with enhanced plant growth and nutrient content. Arsenic stress amelioration in tolerant Trichoderma treatment was also evident through rhizospheric microbial community and anatomical studies of the stem morphology. Down regulation of abiotic stress responsive genes (MIPS, PGIP, CGG) in tolerant Trichoderma + As treatment as compared to As alone and sensitive Trichoderma + As treatment also revealed that tolerant strain enhanced the plant's potential to cope with As stress as compared to sensitive one. Considering the bioremediation and plant growth promotion potential, the tolerant Trichoderma may appear promising for its utilization in As affected fields for enhancing agricultural productivity.

  1. Variability in the Precore and Core Promoter Regions of HBV Strains in Morocco: Characterization and Impact on Liver Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kitab, Bouchra; Essaid El Feydi, Abdellah; Afifi, Rajaa; Trepo, Christian; Benazzouz, Mustapha; Essamri, Wafaa; Zoulim, Fabien; Chemin, Isabelle; Alj, Hanane Salih; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Benjelloun, Soumaya

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most common human pathogens that cause aggressive hepatitis and advanced liver disease (AdLD), including liver cirrhosis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma. The persistence of active HBV replication and liver damage after the loss of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) has been frequently associated with mutations in the pre-core (pre-C) and core promoter (CP) regions of HBV genome that abolish or reduce HBeAg expression. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of pre-C and CP mutations and their impact on the subsequent course of liver disease in Morocco. Methods/Principal Findings A cohort of 186 patients with HBeAg-negative chronic HBV infection was studied (81 inactive carriers, 69 with active chronic hepatitis, 36 with AdLD). Pre-C and CP mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. The pre-C stop codon G1896A mutation was the most frequent (83.9%) and was associated with a lower risk of AdLD development (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.15–1.04; p = 0.04). HBV-DNA levels in patients with G1896A were not significantly different from the other patients carrying wild-type strains (p = 0.84). CP mutations C1653T, T1753V, A1762T/G1764A, and C1766T/T1768A were associated with higher HBV-DNA level and increased liver disease severity. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that older age (≥40 years), male sex, high viral load (>4.3 log10 IU/mL) and CP mutations C1653T, T1753V, A1762T/G1764A, and C1766T/T1768A were independent risk factors for AdLD development. Combination of these mutations was significantly associated with AdLD (OR, 7.52; 95% CI, 4.8–8; p<0.0001). Conclusions This study shows for the first time the association of HBV viral load and CP mutations with the severity of liver disease in Moroccan HBV chronic carriers. The examination of CP mutations alone or in combination could be helpful for prediction of the clinical outcome. PMID:22905181

  2. Magentite nanoparticle for arsenic remotion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viltres, H.; Odio, O. F.; Borja, R.; Aguilera, Y.; Reguera, E.

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic As (V) and As (III) species are commonly found in groundwater in many countries around the world. It is known that arsenic is highly toxic and carcinogenic, at present exist reports of diverse countries with arsenic concentrations in drinking water higher than those proposed by the World Health Organization (10 μg/L). It has been reported that adsorption strategies using magnetic nanoparticles as magnetite (<20 nm) proved to be very efficient for the removal of arsenic in drinking water. Magnetic nanoparticles (magnetite) were prepared using a co-precipitation method with FeCl3 and FeCl2 as metal source and NaOH aqueous solution as precipitating agent. Magnetite nanoparticles synthesized were put in contact with As2O3 and As2O5 solutions at room temperature to pH 4 and 7. The nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR, DRX, UV-vis, and XRF. The results showed that synthesized magnetite had an average diameter of 11 nm and a narrow size distribution. The presence of arsenic on magnetite nanoparticles surface was confirmed, which is more remarkable when As (V) is employed. Besides, it is possible to observe that no significant changes in the band gap values after adsorption of arsenic in the nanoparticles.

  3. Groundwater arsenic in Chimaltenango, Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Jason T; Lacey, Steven E; Lopez, Ramon; Socoy Set, Genaro; Khodadoust, Amid P; Erdal, Serap

    2014-09-01

    In the Municipality of Chimaltenango, Guatemala, we sampled groundwater for total inorganic arsenic. In total, 42 samples were collected from 27 (43.5%) of the 62 wells in the municipality, with sites chosen to achieve spatial representation throughout the municipality. Samples were collected from household faucets used for drinking water, and sent to the USA for analysis. The only site found to have a concentration above the 10 μg/L World Health Organization provisional guideline for arsenic in drinking water was Cerro Alto, where the average concentration was 47.5 μg/L. A health risk assessment based on the arsenic levels found in Cerro Alto showed an increase in noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic risks for residents as a result of consuming groundwater as their primary drinking water source. Using data from the US Geological Survey and our global positioning system data of the sample locations, we found Cerro Alto to be the only site sampled within the tertiary volcanic rock layer, a known source of naturally occurring arsenic. Recommendations were made to reduce the levels of arsenic found in the community's drinking water so that the health risks can be managed.

  4. Stress proteins induced by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Del Razo, L M; Quintanilla-Vega, B; Brambila-Colombres, E; Calderón-Aranda, E S; Manno, M; Albores, A

    2001-12-01

    The elevated expression of stress proteins is considered to be a universal response to adverse conditions, representing a potential mechanism of cellular defense against disease and a potential target for novel therapeutics. Exposure to arsenicals either in vitro or in vivo in a variety of model systems has been shown to cause the induction of a number of the major stress protein families such as heat shock proteins (Hsp). Among them are members with low molecular weight, such as metallotionein and ubiquitin, as well as ones with masses of 27, 32, 60, 70, 90, and 110 kDa. In most of the cases, the induction of stress proteins depends on the capacity of the arsenical to reach the target, its valence, and the type of exposure, arsenite being the biggest inducer of most Hsp in several organs and systems. Hsp induction is a rapid dose-dependent response (1-8 h) to the acute exposure to arsenite. Thus, the stress response appears to be useful to monitor the sublethal toxicity resulting from a single exposure to arsenite. The present paper offers a critical review of the capacity of arsenicals to modulate the expression and/or accumulation of stress proteins. The physiological consequences of the arsenic-induced stress and its usefulness in monitoring effects resulting from arsenic exposure in humans and other organisms are discussed.

  5. BREAST CANCER, DERMATOFIBROMAS AND ARSENIC

    PubMed Central

    Dantzig, Paul I

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dermatofibromas are common benign tumors in women, and breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. The aim of this study is to determine if there is any relationship between the two conditions. Materials and Methods: Five patients with dermatofibromas and 10 control patients (two groups) had their skin biopsies measured for arsenic by inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Fifty randomly selected patients with breast cancer and 50 control patients were examined for the presence of dermatofibromas. Results: The dermatofibromas were found to have an arsenic concentration of 0.171 micrograms/gram, compared with 0.06 and 0.07 micrograms/gram of the two control groups. Forty-three out of 50 patients with breast cancer had dermatofibromas and 32/50 patients with breast cancer had multiple dermatofibromas, compared to 10/50 control patients with dermatofibromas and only 1/50 with multiple dermatofibromas. Conclusions: Arsenic is important in the development of dermatofibromas and dermatofibromas represent a reservoir and important sign of chronic arsenic exposure. Dermatofibromas represent an important sign for women at risk for breast cancer, and arsenic may represent the cause of the majority of cases of breast cancer. PMID:20049264

  6. Arsenic in groundwaters in the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt: a review of patterns and processes.

    PubMed

    Peters, Stephen C

    2008-07-29

    Naturally occurring arsenic in the bedrock of the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt was first recognized in the late 19th century. The knowledge of the behavior of arsenic in groundwater in this region has lagged behind nearly a century, with the popular press reporting on local studies in the early 1980s, and most peer-reviewed research articles on regional patterns conducted and written in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Research reports have shown that within this high arsenic region, between 6% and 22% of households using private drinking water wells contain arsenic in excess of 10 microg/L, the United States Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level. In nearly all reports, arsenic in drinking water was derived from naturally occurring geologic sources, typically arsenopyrite, substituted sulfides such as arsenian pyrite, and nanoscale minerals such as westerveldite. In most studies, arsenic concentrations in groundwater were controlled by pH dependent adsorption to mineral surfaces, most commonly iron oxide minerals. In some cases, reductive dissolution of iron minerals has been shown to increase arsenic concentrations in groundwater, more commonly associated with anthropogenic activities such as landfills. Evidence of nitrate reduction promoting the presence of arsenic(V) and iron(III) minerals in anoxic environments has been shown to occur in surface waters, and in this manuscript we show this process perhaps applies to groundwater. The geologic explanation for the high arsenic region in the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt is most likely the crustal recycling of arsenic as an incompatible element during tectonic activity. Accretion of multiple terranes, in particular Avalonia and the Central Maine Terrane of New England appear to be connected to the presence of high concentrations of arsenic. Continued tectonic activity and recycling of these older terranes may also be responsible for the high arsenic observed in the Triassic rift

  7. Dysregulation of DNA methylation induced by past arsenic treatment causes persistent genomic instability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects.

  8. Dysregulation of DNA Methylation Induced by Past Arsenic Treatment Causes Persistent Genomic Instability in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects. PMID:26581878

  9. Mineral resource of the month: arsenic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic has a long and varied history: Although it was not isolated as an element until the 13th century, it was known to the ancient Chinese, Egyptians and Greeks in compound form in the minerals arsenopyrite, realgar and orpiment. In the 1400s, “Scheele’s Green” was first used as an arsenic pigment in wallpaper, and leached arsenic from wallpaper may have contributed to Napoleon’s death in 1821. The 1940s play and later movie, Arsenic and Old Lace, dramatizes the metal’s more sinister role. Arsenic continues to be an important mineral commodity with many modern applications.

  10. The studying of washing of arsenic and sulfur from coals having different ranges of arsenic contents

    SciTech Connect

    Mingshi Wang; Dangyu Song; Baoshan Zheng; R.B. Finkelman

    2008-10-15

    To study the effectiveness of washing in removal of arsenic and sulfur from coals with different ranges of arsenic concentration, coal was divided into three groups on the basis of arsenic content: 0-5.5 mg/kg, 5.5 mg/kg-8.00 mg/kg, and over 8.00 mg/kg. The result shows that the arsenic in coals with higher arsenic content occurs mainly in an inorganic state and can be relatively easily removed. Arsenic removal is very difficult and less complete when the arsenic content is lower than 5.5 mg/kg because most of this arsenic is in an organic state. There is no relationship between washing rate of total sulfur and arsenic content, but the relationship between the washing rate of total sulfur and percent of organic sulfur is very strong.

  11. The studying of washing of arsenic and sulfur from coals having different ranges of arsenic contents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, M.; Song, D.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R.B.; ,

    2008-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of washing in removal of arsenic and sulfur from coals with different ranges of arsenic concentration, coal was divided into three groups on the basis of arsenic content: 0-5.5 mg/kg, 5.5 mg/kg-8.00 mg/kg, and over 8.00 mg/kg. The result shows that the arsenic in coals with higher arsenic content occurs mainly in an inorganic state and can be relatively easily removed. Arsenic removal is very difficult and less complete when the arsenic content is lower than 5.5 mg/kg because most of this arsenic is in an organic state. There is no relationship between washing rate of total sulfur and arsenic content, but the relationship between the washing rate of total sulfur and percent of organic sulfur is very strong. ?? 2008 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Tissue distribution of arsenic after subcutaneous implantation of arsenic trioxide pellet in rats.

    PubMed

    ASO, T; Abiko, Y

    1978-05-01

    In control rats, the arsenic level in the spleen and blood cells was 1.59 and 10.79 microgram/g wet tissue, respectively. In the kidney, lung, heart, brain, and hair, the arsenic level was lower than 1.1 microgram/g wet tissue. In rats in which a pellet containing 2 mg of arsenic tsioxide was implanted subcutaneously, the arsenic level in the spleen and blood cells was markedly high for at least 2 months after implantation; after 67 days of implantation, the arsenic level in the spleen and blood cells was 16.79 and 66.34 microgram/g wet tissue, respectively. In the kidney, liver, lung, heart, brain, and hair, the increase in arsenic after implantation was smaller than that in the spleen. In the plasma, arsenic was not detected before and after arsenic implantation. It is concluded that arsenic implanted subcutaneously concentrates in the blood cells, possibly in the red cells, in rats.

  13. Downregulation of E-cadherin expression in breast cancer by promoter hypermethylation and its relation with progression and prognosis of tumor.

    PubMed

    Shargh, Shohreh Alizadeh; Sakizli, Meral; Khalaj, Vahid; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Hagigatjou, Elmira; Sayad, Aresou; Mansouri, Neda; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women around the world, and novel prognosis strategies is needed to control more accurate and effective of this malignant disease. Among the latest prognostic markers is E-cadherin, which mediates cell-cell adhesion by associating with catenins. Loss of E-cadherin gene (CDH1) function by genetic or epigenetic alteration leads to tumorigenesis. The aim of our study was to investigate E-cadherin gene promoter methylation in breast cancer, and its correlation with E-cadherin protein expression. Fifty primary breast cancers tissue with ductal type and 50 normal breast sample from the same patients that was located adjacent to tumor region as controls were provided by Imam Reza-based referral and teaching hospital affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. CDH1 promoter region CpG sites methylation and E-cadherin protein expression were determined by bisulfite-specific polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis, and the resulting products were sequenced on an ABI automated sequencer for firm conclusion. CDH1 hypermethylation in breast tumor specimen (ductal type) was observed in 94 % (47 of 50) comparing with normal samples methylation, and the significant difference was (p = 0.000). Protein expression in tumor samples tends to diminish with the CDH1 promoter region methylation. In the group of 50 ductal carcinomas cases, most of the cases showing CDH1 hypermethylation correlated inversely with the reduced levels of expression of E-cadherin proteins (95 % of full-methylated tumor samples had no protein expression, and 4.5 % of them had weak expression levels). Possible association was observed between CDH1 methylation and its protein expression (p = 0.000). The results of methylation analysis in promoter region in ten CpG sites (863, 865, 873, 879, 887, 892, 901, 918, 920, and 940) suggested that abnormal CDH1 methylation occurs in high frequencies in ductal breast tumors probably sounds the

  14. Introducing Simple Detection of Bioavailable Arsenic at Rafaela (Santa Fe Province, Argentina) Using the ARSOlux Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Siegfried, Konrad; Hahn-Tomer, Sonja; Koelsch, Andreas; Osterwalder, Eva; Mattusch, Juergen; Staerk, Hans-Joachim; Meichtry, Jorge M; De Seta, Graciela E; Reina, Fernando D; Panigatti, Cecilia; Litter, Marta I; Harms, Hauke

    2015-05-21

    Numerous articles have reported the occurrence of arsenic in drinking water in Argentina, and the resulting health effects in severely affected regions of the country. Arsenic in drinking water in Argentina is largely naturally occurring due to elevated background content of the metalloid in volcanic sediments, although, in some regions, mining can contribute. While the origin of arsenic release has been discussed extensively, the problem of drinking water contamination has not yet been solved. One key step in progress towards mitigation of problems related with the consumption of As-containing water is the availability of simple detection tools. A chemical test kit and the ARSOlux biosensor were evaluated as simple analytical tools for field measurements of arsenic in the groundwater of Rafaela (Santa Fe, Argentina), and the results were compared with ICP-MS and HPLC-ICP-MS measurements. A survey of the groundwater chemistry was performed to evaluate possible interferences with the field tests. The results showed that the ARSOlux biosensor performed better than the chemical field test, that the predominant species of arsenic in the study area was arsenate and that arsenic concentration in the studied samples had a positive correlation with fluoride and vanadium, and a negative one with calcium and iron.

  15. Introducing Simple Detection of Bioavailable Arsenic at Rafaela (Santa Fe Province, Argentina) Using the ARSOlux Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Siegfried, Konrad; Hahn-Tomer, Sonja; Koelsch, Andreas; Osterwalder, Eva; Mattusch, Juergen; Staerk, Hans-Joachim; Meichtry, Jorge M.; De Seta, Graciela E.; Reina, Fernando D.; Panigatti, Cecilia; Litter, Marta I.; Harms, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    Numerous articles have reported the occurrence of arsenic in drinking water in Argentina, and the resulting health effects in severely affected regions of the country. Arsenic in drinking water in Argentina is largely naturally occurring due to elevated background content of the metalloid in volcanic sediments, although, in some regions, mining can contribute. While the origin of arsenic release has been discussed extensively, the problem of drinking water contamination has not yet been solved. One key step in progress towards mitigation of problems related with the consumption of As-containing water is the availability of simple detection tools. A chemical test kit and the ARSOlux biosensor were evaluated as simple analytical tools for field measurements of arsenic in the groundwater of Rafaela (Santa Fe, Argentina), and the results were compared with ICP-MS and HPLC-ICP-MS measurements. A survey of the groundwater chemistry was performed to evaluate possible interferences with the field tests. The results showed that the ARSOlux biosensor performed better than the chemical field test, that the predominant species of arsenic in the study area was arsenate and that arsenic concentration in the studied samples had a positive correlation with fluoride and vanadium, and a negative one with calcium and iron. PMID:26006123

  16. Arsenic occurrence in New Hampshire drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, S.C.; Blum, J.D.; Klaue, B.; Karagas, M.R.

    1999-05-01

    Arsenic concentrations were measured in 992 drinking water samples collected from New Hampshire households using online hydride generation ICP-MS. These randomly selected household water samples contain much less arsenic than those voluntarily submitted for analysis to the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES). Extrapolation of the voluntarily submitted sample set to all New Hampshire residents significantly overestimates arsenic exposure. In randomly selected households, concentrations ranged from <0.0003 to 180 {micro}g/L, with water from domestic wells containing significantly more arsenic than water from municipal sources. Water samples from drilled bedrock wells had the highest arsenic concentrations, while samples from surficial wells had the lowest arsenic concentrations. The authors suggest that much of the groundwater arsenic in New Hampshire is derived from weathering of bedrock materials and not from anthropogenic contamination. The spatial distribution of elevated arsenic concentrations correlates with Late-Devonian Concord-type granitic bedrock. Field observations in the region exhibiting the highest groundwater arsenic concentrations revealed abundant pegmatite dikes associated with nearby granites. Analysis of rock digests indicates arsenic concentrations up to 60 mg/kg in pegmatites, with much lower values in surrounding schists and granites. Weak acid leaches show that approximately half of the total arsenic in the pegmatites is labile and therefore can be mobilized during rock-water interaction.

  17. Arsenic and bladder cancer: observations and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, Vladan; Jakovljević, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Arsenic from drinking water is a well-known risk factor for bladder cancer. The purpose of this paper is to systematize some important yet often overlooked facts considering the relationship between arsenic exposure and the occurrence of bladder cancer. Since the exposure to inorganic arsenic from food, inhaled air, and skin absorption as well as arsenic methylation ability are not fully investigated, our assumption is that the exposure of arsenic only from drinking water is underestimated and its role as a risk factor is highly overestimated. This paper proposes some qualitative and quantitative parameters of arsenic as a risk factor for bladder cancer. The recommended qualitative parameters of arsenic intake are first, pathways of exposure, and second, toxicity and metabolism. The suggested quantitative parameters of arsenic intake include amounts of arsenic absorbed in the body, duration of arsenic exposure, and duration of arsenic presence in the urinary bladder. This approach can be implemented in a systematic classification and explanation of various risk factors and their mutual interactions for other types of cancer or diseases in general.

  18. Removal processes for arsenic in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lizama A, Katherine; Fletcher, Tim D; Sun, Guangzhi

    2011-08-01

    Arsenic pollution in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its toxicity and chronic effects on human health. This concern has generated increasing interest in the use of different treatment technologies to remove arsenic from contaminated water. Constructed wetlands are a cost-effective natural system successfully used for removing various pollutants, and they have shown capability for removing arsenic. This paper reviews current understanding of the removal processes for arsenic, discusses implications for treatment wetlands, and identifies critical knowledge gaps and areas worthy of future research. The reactivity of arsenic means that different arsenic species may be found in wetlands, influenced by vegetation, supporting medium and microorganisms. Despite the fact that sorption, precipitation and coprecipitation are the principal processes responsible for the removal of arsenic, bacteria can mediate these processes and can play a significant role under favourable environmental conditions. The most important factors affecting the speciation of arsenic are pH, alkalinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, the presence of other chemical species--iron, sulphur, phosphate--,a source of carbon, and the wetland substrate. Studies of the microbial communities and the speciation of arsenic in the solid phase using advanced techniques could provide further insights on the removal of arsenic. Limited data and understanding of the interaction of the different processes involved in the removal of arsenic explain the rudimentary guidelines available for the design of wetlands systems.

  19. Diet and toenail arsenic concentrations in a New Hampshire population with arsenic-containing water

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited data exist on the contribution of dietary sources of arsenic to an individual’s total exposure, particularly in populations with exposure via drinking water. Here, the association between diet and toenail arsenic concentrations (a long-term biomarker of exposure) was evaluated for individuals with measured household tap water arsenic. Foods known to be high in arsenic, including rice and seafood, were of particular interest. Methods Associations between toenail arsenic and consumption of 120 individual diet items were quantified using general linear models that also accounted for household tap water arsenic and potentially confounding factors (e.g., age, caloric intake, sex, smoking) (n = 852). As part of the analysis, we assessed whether associations between log-transformed toenail arsenic and each diet item differed between subjects with household drinking water arsenic concentrations <1 μg/L versus ≥1 μg/L. Results As expected, toenail arsenic concentrations increased with household water arsenic concentrations. Among the foods known to be high in arsenic, no clear relationship between toenail arsenic and rice consumption was detected, but there was a positive association with consumption of dark meat fish, a category that includes tuna steaks, mackerel, salmon, sardines, bluefish, and swordfish. Positive associations between toenail arsenic and consumption of white wine, beer, and Brussels sprouts were also observed; these and most other associations were not modified by exposure via water. However, consumption of two foods cooked in water, beans/lentils and cooked oatmeal, was more strongly related to toenail arsenic among those with arsenic-containing drinking water (≥1 μg/L). Conclusions This study suggests that diet can be an important contributor to total arsenic exposure in U.S. populations regardless of arsenic concentrations in drinking water. Thus, dietary exposure to arsenic in the US warrants consideration as a potential

  20. Arsenic for the fool: an exponential connection.

    PubMed

    Dani, Sergio U

    2010-03-15

    Anthropogenic arsenic is insidiously building up together with natural arsenic to a level unprecedented in the history of mankind. Arsenopyrite (FeAsS) is the principal ore of arsenic and gold in hard rock mines; it is formed by a coupled substitution of sulphur by arsenic in the structure of pyrite (FeS(2)) - nicknamed "fool's gold". Other important sources of anthropogenic arsenic are fossil fuels such as coal and oil. Here I report on the first indication that the environmental concentration of total arsenic in topsoils - in the 7-18ppm range - is exponentially related to the prevalence and mortality of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias in European countries. This evidence defies the imputed absence of verified cases of human morbidity or mortality resulting from exposure to low-level arsenic in topsoils.

  1. Effects of arsenic deprivation in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Uthus, E O

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of arsenic deprivation in hamsters. Male weanling Golden Syrian hamsters were fed a casein-corn-based diet containing approximately 12 ng arsenic/g. Controls were fed 1 microgram arsenic/g of diet, as Na2HAsO4.7 H2O. After 6 weeks arsenic deprivation elevated heart weight/body weight ratio and the concentration of liver zinc and decreased the concentrations of the plasma amino acids alanine, glycine, phenylalanine and taurine. Although no biological role has been found for arsenic, the findings indicate that the hamster is a suitable animal for arsenic deprivation studies and support the hypothesis that arsenic may have a physiological role that influences methionine/methyl metabolism.

  2. System for removal of arsenic from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2004-11-23

    Systems for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical systems for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A system for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a system for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  3. Evaluation of the Association between Arsenic and Diabetes: A National Toxicology Program Workshop Review

    PubMed Central

    Maull, Elizabeth A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Edwards, Joshua; Longnecker, Matthew P.; Navas-Acien, Ana; Pi, Jingbo; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Styblo, Miroslav; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao; Thayer, Kristina A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diabetes affects an estimated 346 million persons globally, and total deaths from diabetes are projected to increase > 50% in the next decade. Understanding the role of environmental chemicals in the development or progression of diabetes is an emerging issue in environmental health. In 2011, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) organized a workshop to assess the literature for evidence of associations between certain chemicals, including inorganic arsenic, and diabetes and/or obesity to help develop a focused research agenda. This review is derived from discussions at that workshop. Objectives: Our objectives were to assess the consistency, strength/weaknesses, and biological plausibility of findings in the scientific literature regarding arsenic and diabetes and to identify data gaps and areas for future evaluation or research. The extent of the existing literature was insufficient to consider obesity as an outcome. Data Sources, Extraction, and Synthesis: Studies related to arsenic and diabetes or obesity were identified through PubMed and supplemented with relevant studies identified by reviewing the reference lists in the primary literature or review articles. Conclusions: Existing human data provide limited to sufficient support for an association between arsenic and diabetes in populations with relatively high exposure levels (≥ 150 µg arsenic/L in drinking water). The evidence is insufficient to conclude that arsenic is associated with diabetes in lower exposure (< 150 µg arsenic/L drinking water), although recent studies with better measures of outcome and exposure support an association. The animal literature as a whole was inconclusive; however, studies using better measures of diabetes-relevant end points support a link between arsenic and diabetes. PMID:22889723

  4. Oxidative stress and hepatic stellate cell activation are key events in arsenic induced liver fibrosis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Boyer, James L.; Santra, Amal

    2011-02-15

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant and carcinogen. Exposure to arsenic is associated with development of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension through ill defined mechanisms. We evaluated hepatic fibrogenesis after long term