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Sample records for arsenic-based antineoplastic drugs

  1. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  2. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  3. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  4. Tumor targeting using liposomal antineoplastic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Huwyler, Jörg; Drewe, Jürgen; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    During the last years, liposomes (microparticulate phospholipid vesicles) have been used with growing success as pharmaceutical carriers for antineoplastic drugs. Fields of application include lipid-based formulations to enhance the solubility of poorly soluble antitumor drugs, the use of pegylated liposomes for passive targeting of solid tumors as well as vector-conjugated liposomal carriers for active targeting of tumor tissue. Such formulation and drug targeting strategies enhance the effectiveness of anticancer chemotherapy and reduce at the same time the risk of toxic side-effects. The present article reviews the principles of different liposomal technologies and discusses current trends in this field of research. PMID:18488413

  5. Liposomes as delivery systems for antineoplastic drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Luis Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Liposome drug formulations are defined as pharmaceutical products containing active drug substances encapsulated within the lipid bilayer or in the interior aqueous space of the liposomes. The main importance of this drug delivery system is based on its drastic reduction in systemic dose and concomitant systemic toxicity that in comparison with the free drug, results in an improvement of patient compliance and in a more effective treatment. There are several therapeutic drugs that are potential candidates to be encapsulated into liposomes; particular interest has been focused in therapeutic and antineoplastic drugs, which are characterized for its low therapeutic index and high systemic toxicity. The use of liposomes as drug carriers has been extensively justified and the importance of the development of different formulations or techniques to encapsulate therapeutic drugs has an enormous value in benefit of patients affected by neoplastic diseases.

  6. Quantifying the carcinogenicity of antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kaldor, J M; Day, N E; Hemminki, K

    1988-04-01

    It has been well established that many of the drugs used in cancer therapy are themselves potentially carcinogenic. It is therefore important to quantify the carcinogenic risk associated with specific agents, and to investigate ways of predicting their risk from animal and in vitro studies. In this paper, an index of carcinogenic potency is defined, and applied to published data on acute non-lymphocytic leukemia following therapy with cytotoxic drugs used as single agents. Carcinogenic potency estimates for rats and mice are also obtained for 15 antineoplastic drugs, and the potency correlation between humans and rodents is examined for the five agents for which there are data in common. The broader implications for quantitative cancer risk prediction are discussed.

  7. Preventing occupational exposures to antineoplastic drugs in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Connor, Thomas H; McDiarmid, Melissa A

    2006-01-01

    The toxicity of antineoplastic drugs has been well known since they were introduced in the 1940s. Because most antineoplastic drugs are nonselective in their mechanism of action, they affect noncancerous as well as cancerous cells, resulting in well-documented side effects. During the 1970s, evidence came to light indicating health care workers may be at risk of harmful effects from antineoplastic drugs as a result of occupational exposure. Since that time, reports from several countries have documented drug contamination of the workplace, identified drugs in the urine of health care workers, and measured genotoxic responses in workers. Evidence also exists of teratogenic and adverse reproductive outcomes and increased cancers in health care workers. During the past 30 years, professional organizations and government agencies have developed guidelines to protect health care workers from adverse effects from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs. Although many safety provisions were advanced to reduce worker exposure in the 1980s, recent studies have shown that workers continue to be exposed to these drugs despite safety policy improvements. In 2004, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) published an alert reviewing the most recent information available and promoting a program of safe handling during their use.

  8. Vitamin C antagonizes the cytotoxic effects of antineoplastic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Heaney, Mark L.; Gardner, Jeffrey R.; Karasavvas, Nicos; Golde, David W.; Scheinberg, David A.; Smith, Emily A.; O’Connor, Owen A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Vitamin C is an antioxidant vitamin that has been hypothesized to antagonize the effects of reactive oxygen species-generating antineoplastic drugs. Experimental Design The therapeutic efficacy of the widely-used antineoplastic drugs, doxorubicin, cisplatin, vincristine, methotrexate and imatinib were compared in leukemia (K562) and lymphoma (RL) cell lines with and without pre-treatment with dehydroascorbic acid, the commonly transported form of vitamin C. The impact of vitamin C on viability, clonogenicity, apoptosis, P-glycoprotein, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential was determined. Results Pre-treatment with vitamin C caused a dose-dependent attenuation of cytotoxicity as measured by trypan blue exclusion and colony formation after treatment with all anti-neoplastic agents tested. Vitamin C administered prior to doxorubicin treatment led to a substantial reduction of therapeutic efficacy in mice with RL cell-derived xenogeneic tumors. Vitamin C treatment led to a dose-dependent decrease in apoptosis in cells treated with the antineoplastic agents that was not due to up-regulation of P-glycoprotein or vitamin C retention modulated by anti-neoplastics. Vitamin C had only modest effects on intracellular ROS and a more general cytoprotective profile than N-acetylcysteine; suggesting a mechanism of action that is not mediated by ROS. All antineoplastic agents tested caused mitochondrial membrane depolarization that was inhibited by vitamin C. Conclusions These findings indicate that vitamin C administered prior to mechanistically dissimilar antineoplastic agents antagonizes therapeutic efficacy in a model of human hematopoietic cancers by preserving mitochondrial membrane potential. These results support the hypothesis that vitamin C supplementation during cancer treatment may detrimentally affect therapeutic response. PMID:18829561

  9. 75 FR 57044 - NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... following document entitled ``NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings... Alert: Preventing Occupational Exposures to Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Health Care... Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2010. Web address for this document: http://www...

  10. 77 FR 38297 - Revised Document Posted: NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2012 AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational... Preventing Occupational Exposures to Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Health Care Settings in... Prevention (CDC) announces the publication of the following document entitled ``NIOSH List of Antineoplastic...

  11. Antineoplastic drugs contamination of workplace surfaces in two Portuguese hospitals.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Susana; Pádua, Mário; Veiga, Ana Costa; Carolino, Elisabete; Gomes, Mário

    2014-11-01

    Despite the classification as known or suspected human carcinogens, by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the antineoplastic drugs are extensively used in cancer treatment due to their specificity and efficacy. As human carcinogens, these drugs represent a serious threat to the healthcare workers involved in their preparation and administration. This work aims to contribute to better characterize the occupational exposure of healthcare professionals to antineoplastic drugs, by assessing workplace surfaces contamination of pharmacy and administration units of two Portuguese hospitals. Surface contamination was assessed by the determination of cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel. These three drugs were used as surrogate markers for surfaces contamination by cytotoxic drugs. Wipe samples were taken and analyzed by HPLC-DAD. From the total of 327 analyzed samples, in 121 (37 %) was possible to detect and quantify at least one drug. Additionally, 28 samples (8.6 %) indicate contamination by more than one antineoplastic drug, mainly in the administration unit, in both hospitals. Considering the findings in both hospitals, specific measures should be taken, particularly those related with the promotion of good practices and safety procedures and also routine monitoring of surfaces contamination in order to guarantee the appliance of safety measures.

  12. Antineoplastic drug contamination in the urine of Canadian healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Teschke, Kay; Shen, Hui; Demers, Paul A; Venners, Scott

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the urine concentration of non-metabolized cyclophosphamide (CP), a commonly administered antineoplastic drug, among potentially exposed Canadian healthcare workers and to identify factors associated with the drug concentration levels. Participants were asked to provide two sets of 24-h urine samples (at two different sampling events), and the level of CP was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In addition to demographic information, participants were surveyed regarding their frequency of handling of antineoplastic drugs, safe drug handling training, and known contact with CP on their work shift. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed. A backward stepwise linear mixed effect model was conducted to identify the factors associated with urine concentration levels. We collected 201 urine samples, and 55 % (n = 111) had levels greater than the LOD of 0.05 ng/mL. The mean urinary CP concentration was 0.156 ng/mL, the geometric mean was 0.067 ng/mL, the geometric standard deviation was 3.18, the 75th percentile was 0.129 ng/mL, and the range was drug administration unit, but were not responsible for administering the drugs to patients, i.e., volunteers, oncologists, ward aides, and dieticians, had the largest proportion of samples exceeding the LOD. We did not find any correlation between the urinary concentration levels and known contact with CP during the work shift. Two factors were found to be significantly associated with urinary CP concentration: (1) Workers who had a duty to handle antineoplastic drugs had higher concentration levels, and (2) workers who had not received safe drug handling training had higher levels of CP in their urine compared with those who had. The

  13. [Genotoxic risk assessment of nurses handling antineoplastic drugs].

    PubMed

    Boughattas, Aïcha Brahem; Bouraoui, Sana; Debbabi, Faten; El Ghazel, Hatem; Saad, Ali; Mrizak, Néjib

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the genotoxic effect of occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs on oncology nurses in order to propose a strategy for adequate safety. The study included 20 oncology nurses from the Farhat Hached university hospital-Sousse (Tunisia) exposed to antineoplastic drugs compared to 20 controls. The two groups were paired according to sex, age, and smoking habits. The genotoxic risk assessment was carried out by the micronucleus test and chromosomal abnormalities. The search for the clinical effects of cytostatic drugs was based on a questionnaire. Determination of the level of the exposure to cytostatic was performed by calculation of the index of the exposure to these drugs. The median age of nurses was 36 years. A female prevalence (80%) was noted. The exposed period to cytostatic was 6.1 years. The middle index of cytostatic contact calculated for the whole of the nurses, was of 1.5. However this index becomes higher (>3) in nurses working at day care. A significant increase in frequencies rates for both micronucleus (9.40‰ vs 4.35‰) and chromosome abnormalities (1.85% vs 0.30%) were noted in exposed group more than controls. In conclusion, application of genotoxic tests may be useful to detect cytogenetic damage related to occupational exposure to a potentially cancerogenic environment. Results of the present biomonitoring study emphasize the need for developing safety programs.

  14. 78 FR 33097 - NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2014: Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Alert: Preventing Occupational Exposures to Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Health Care... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2014: Proposed Additions and Deletions to the NIOSH Hazardous Drug...

  15. 76 FR 46299 - NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2012: Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ...: Preventing Occupational Exposures to Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Health Care Settings was... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2012: Proposed Additions and Deletions to the NIOSH Hazardous Drug...

  16. The handling of antineoplastic drugs in a major cancer center.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D M

    1980-06-01

    It has long been known that many commonly used antineoplastic agents are carcinogenic. Yet most health care professionals take few precautions, if any, when handling these drugs. Recent findings suggest a possible hazard to personnel as evidenced by increased mutagenicity of urine of nurses exposed to anticancer drugs during preparation and administration of doses. Although more study is needed to determine the significance of these data, it would seem prudent to take measures to prevent any unnecessary exposure to these drugs by those preparing and administering them. The policies and procedures at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center require that chemotherapeutic drugs be prepared in a vertical laminar flow containment hood by personnel wearing sterile disposable gloves. Chemotherapeutic agents are specially labeled to ensure segregated disposal of waste, which is subsequently incinerated.

  17. Stereocomplex micelle from nonlinear enantiomeric copolymers efficiently transports antineoplastic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jixue; Shen, Kexin; Xu, Weiguo; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Tongjun; Wang, Chunxi; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-05-01

    Nanoscale polymeric micelles have attracted more and more attention as a promising nanocarrier for controlled delivery of antineoplastic drugs. Herein, the doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(D-lactide)-based micelle (PDM/DOX), poly(L-lactide)-based micelle (PLM/DOX), and stereocomplex micelle (SCM/DOX) from the equimolar mixture of the enantiomeric four-armed poly(ethylene glycol)-polylactide (PEG-PLA) copolymers were successfully fabricated. In phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.4, SCM/DOX exhibited the smallest hydrodynamic diameter ( D h) of 90 ± 4.2 nm and the slowest DOX release compared with PDM/DOX and PLM/DOX. Moreover, PDM/DOX, PLM/DOX, and SCM/DOX exhibited almost stable D hs of around 115, 105, and 90 nm at above normal physiological condition, respectively, which endowed them with great potential in controlled drug delivery. The intracellular DOX fluorescence intensity after the incubation with the laden micelles was different degrees weaker than that incubated with free DOX · HCl within 12 h, probably due to the slow DOX release from micelles. As the incubation time reached to 24 h, all the cells incubated with the laden micelles, especially SCM/DOX, demonstrated a stronger intracellular DOX fluorescence intensity than free DOX · HCl-cultured ones. More importantly, all the DOX-loaded micelles, especially SCM/DOX, exhibited potent antineoplastic efficacy in vitro, excellent serum albumin-tolerance stability, and satisfactory hemocompatibility. These encouraging data indicated that the loading micelles from nonlinear enantiomeric copolymers, especially SCM/DOX, might be promising in clinical systemic chemotherapy through intravenous injection.

  18. Effect of solcoseryl on antitumour action and acute toxicity of some antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Danysz, A; Sołtysiak-Pawluczuk, D; Czyzewska-Szafran, H; Jedrych, A; Jastrzebski, Z

    1991-01-01

    The in vivo effect of Solcoseryl on the antitumour activity and acute toxicity of some antineoplastic drugs was examined. It was found that Solcoseryl does not inhibit the antineoplastic effectiveness of the drugs against transplantable P 388 leukaemia in mice. Studies of the effect of Solcoseryl on acute toxicity of selected antineoplastic drugs in mice revealed that the biostimulator could exert a modifying influence. The prior administration of Solcoseryl significantly decreases the acute toxicity of methotrexate but has no effect on acute toxicity of 5-fluorouracil, increases the acute toxicity of bleomycin and vinblastine and has no effect on acute toxicity of methotrexate and mitoxantron. On the other hand, Solcoseryl administered simultaneously with the antineoplastic drugs increases acute toxicity of 5-fluorouracil, bleomycin and mitoxantron. The protective effect of the biostimulator noted exclusively against acute toxicity of 5-fluorouracil was also observed after multiple administration of this anticancer drug.

  19. Unexploited Antineoplastic Effects of Commercially Available Anti-Diabetic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Papanagnou, Panagiota; Stivarou, Theodora; Tsironi, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The development of efficacious antitumor compounds with minimal toxicity is a hot research topic. Numerous cancer cell targeted agents are evaluated daily in laboratories for their antitumorigenicity at the pre-clinical level, but the process of their introduction into the market is costly and time-consuming. More importantly, even if these new antitumor agents manage to gain approval, clinicians have no former experience with them. Accruing evidence supports the idea that several medications already used to treat pathologies other than cancer display pleiotropic effects, exhibiting multi-level anti-cancer activity and chemosensitizing properties. This review aims to present the anticancer properties of marketed drugs (i.e., metformin and pioglitazone) used for the management of diabetes mellitus (DM) type II. Mode of action, pre-clinical in vitro and in vivo or clinical data as well as clinical applicability are discussed here. Given the precious multi-year clinical experience with these non-antineoplastic drugs their repurposing in oncology is a challenging alternative that would aid towards the development of therapeutic schemes with less toxicity than those of conventional chemotherapeutic agents. More importantly, harnessing the antitumor function of these agents would save precious time from bench to bedside to aid the fight in the arena of cancer. PMID:27164115

  20. Health Care Workers' Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors Regarding Antineoplastic Drugs: Survey From British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Teschke, Kay; Shen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Although nurses are knowledgeable regarding the risk of exposure to antineoplastic drugs, they often do not adhere with safe work practices. However, the knowledge, perceptions, and behavior of other health care job categories at risk of exposure has yet to be determined. This study aimed to survey a range of health care workers from British Columbia, Canada about their knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors regarding antineoplastic drugs. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to participants querying the degree of contact with antineoplastics, knowledge of risks associated with antineoplastics, perceptions of personal risk, previous training with respect to antineoplastics, and safe work practices. Subjects were recruited from health care facilities in and around Vancouver. Fisher's exact tests were performed to ascertain whether there were differences in responses between job categories. We received responses from 120 participants representing seven different job categories. Pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and nurses were more knowledgeable regarding risks than other job categories examined (statistically significant difference). Although 80% of respondents were not afraid of working with or near antineoplastics, there were concerns about the suitability of current control measures and practices employed by co-workers. Only half of respondents felt confident that they could handle all situations where there was a potential for exposure. Only one of the perception questions, self-perceived risk of exposure to antineoplastic drugs, differed significantly between job categories. Not all respondents always wore gloves when directly handling antineoplastic drugs. Further, hand hygiene was not regularly practiced after glove usage or after being in an area where antineoplastic drugs are handled. The majority of responses to questions related to safe work practices differed significantly between job categories. Our results suggest that knowledge regarding risks

  1. Rational drug design of antineoplastic agents using 3D-QSAR, cheminformatic, and virtual screening approaches.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Jelica; Nikolic, Katarina; Mitchell, John B O

    2017-07-12

    Computer-Aided Drug Design has strongly accelerated the development of novel antineoplastic agents by helping in the hit identification, optimization, and evaluation. Computational approaches such as cheminformatic search, virtual screening, pharmacophore modeling, molecular docking and dynamics have been developed and applied to explain the activity of bioactive molecules, design novel agents, increase the success rate of drug research, and decrease the total costs of drug discovery. Similarity searches and virtual screening are used to identify molecules with an increased probability to interact with drug targets of interest, while the other computational approaches are applied for the design and evaluation of molecules with enhanced activity and improved safety profile. In this review are described the main in silico techniques used in rational drug design of antineoplastic agents and presented optimal combinations of computational methods for design of more efficient antineoplastic drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Hygienic guidance values for wipe sampling of antineoplastic drugs in Swedish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hedmer, Maria; Wohlfart, Gertrud

    2012-07-01

    The use of antineoplastic drugs in health care steadily increases. Health care workers can be occupationally exposed to antineoplastic drugs classified as carcinogenic or teratogenic. Monitoring of surface contamination is a common way to assess occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, since wipe sampling is used as a surrogate measure of dermal exposure. Since no occupational limits for antineoplastic drugs in work environments exist, 'hygienic guidance values' (HGVs) should be used instead. HGVs are practicable, achievable levels, not health based, and can be calculated from exposure data from representative workplaces with good occupational hygiene practices. So far, guidance values for surface monitoring of antineoplastic drugs only exist for pharmacies where antineoplastic drugs are prepared. The objective was to propose HGVs for surface monitoring of cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) in Swedish hospitals where antineoplastic drugs are administered to patients. In total, 17 workplaces located at six hospitals in Sweden were surveyed by wipe sampling. Wipe samples were collected, worked up and then analyzed with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Surface contamination of CP and IF was found on 80% and 73% of the sampled surfaces, thus indicating that there is potential for health care workers to be exposed to CP and IF via the skin. The median surface load of CP was 3.3 pg cm(-2) (range <0.05-10,800 pg cm(-2)). The corresponding value for IF was 4.2 pg cm(-2) (range <0.13-95,000 pg cm(-2)). The highest surface loads were found on the floors. The proposed HGVs were set at 90th percentile values, and can be applicable to hospital workplaces where patients are treated with CP or IF. Surface monitoring combined with HGVs is a useful tool for health care workers to regularly benchmark their own surface loads which could control and reduce the occupational exposure to CP and IF in hospital workplaces. Thus, the occupational safety of the

  3. Association between occupational exposure levels of antineoplastic drugs and work environment in five hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Jin; Koda, Shigeki; Nishida, Shozo; Yoshida, Toshiaki; Miyajima, Keiko; Kumagai, Shinji

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the measurement of contamination by antineoplastic drugs for safer handling of such drugs by medical workers. We investigated the relationship between the contamination level of antineoplastic drugs and the conditions of their handling. Air samples and wipe samples were collected from equipment in the preparation rooms of five hospitals (hospitals A-E). These samples were subjected to measurement of the amounts of cyclophosphamide (CPA), fluorouracil (5FU), gemcitabine (GEM), and platinum-containing drugs (Pt). Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected from the pharmacists who handled or audited, the antineoplastic drugs were analyzed for CPA and Pt. Pt was detected from air samples inside BSC in hospital B. Antineoplastic drugs were detected from wipe samples of the BSC in hospitals A, B, D, and E and of other equipment in the preparation rooms in hospitals A, B, C, and D. Cyclophosphamide and 5FU were detected from wipe samples of the air-conditioner filter in hospital A, and CPA was detected from that in hospital D. Cyclophosphamide was detected from urine samples of workers in hospitals B, D, and E. The contamination level of antineoplastic drugs was suggested to be related with the amount of drugs handled, cleaning methods of the equipment, and the skill level of the technique of maintaining negative pressure inside a vial. In order to reduce the contamination and exposure to antineoplastic drugs in the hospital work environment very close to zero, comprehensive safety precautions, including adequate mixing and cleaning methods was required in addition to BSC and closed system device.

  4. Assessment of primary, oxidative and excision repaired DNA damage in hospital personnel handling antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Villarini, Milena; Dominici, Luca; Piccinini, Renza; Fatigoni, Cristina; Ambrogi, Maura; Curti, Gianluca; Morucci, Piero; Muzi, Giacomo; Monarca, Silvano; Moretti, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified several antineoplastic drugs in Group 1 (human carcinogens), among which chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide (CP) and tamoxifen, Group 2A (probable human carcinogens), among which cisplatin, etoposide, N-ethyl- and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and Group 2B (possible human carcinogens), among which bleomycins, merphalan and mitomycin C. The widespread use of these mutagenic/carcinogenic drugs in the treatment of cancer has led to anxiety about possible genotoxic hazards to medical personnel handling these drugs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate work environment contamination by antineoplastic drugs in a hospital in Central Italy and to assess the genotoxic risks associated with antineoplastic drug handling. The study group comprised 52 exposed subjects and 52 controls. Environmental contamination was assessed by taking wipe samples from different surfaces in preparation and administration rooms and nonwoven swabs were used as pads for the surrogate evaluation of dermal exposure, 5-fluorouracil and cytarabine were chosen as markers of exposure to antineoplastic drugs in the working environment. The actual exposure to antineoplastic drugs was evaluated by determining the urinary excretion of CP. The extent of primary, oxidative and excision repaired DNA damage was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes with the alkaline comet assay. To evaluate the role, if any, of genetic variants in the extent of genotoxic effects related to antineoplastic drug occupational exposure, the study subjects were genotyped for GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 and TP53 polymorphisms. Primary DNA damage significantly increased in leukocytes of exposed nurses compared to controls. The use of personal protective equipment (i.e. gloves and/mask) was associated with a decrease in the extent of primary DNA damage.

  5. [Carcinogenicity of antineoplastic drugs: classification, protection and prevention, use and evidence].

    PubMed

    Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona; Bergonzi, Roberto; Galloni, Carla; Minguzzi, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Many antineoplastic agents have been shown to be mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic in experimental studies and secondary malignant neoplasms are known to be associated with several specific therapeutic treatments. However, the occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs in health care workers has different routes of exposure, dose and duration compared to patients undergoing treatment protocols. The aims of this review are to analyze and to update the National and International Classification, and deepening the topics of occupational exposure, current operating conditions, the technical and operational progress to reducing the exposure, the epidemiological evidence and exposure measurement data available. Finally, we illustrate the dispersion in the environment as a real risk for the general population.

  6. 77 FR 41190 - Revised Document Posted: NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Revised Document Posted: NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2012, Correction AGENCY: National Institute...

  7. Permeability of nitrile rubber, latex, polyurethane, and neoprene gloves to 18 antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Connor, T H

    1999-12-01

    The permeability of four glove materials to various antineoplastic drugs was studied. Eighteen antineoplastic drugs posing potential health hazards to handlers were prepared at the highest concentrations normally encountered by hospital personnel. Four glove materials-nitrile rubber, latex, polyurethane, and neoprene-were exposed to the drugs for 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Glove thickness was measured with an electronic digital caliper. Random samples of material were selected from the glove fingertips, and triplicate samples were tested for each drug at each interval. For a majority of the drugs, a bacterial mutagenicity assay was used to measure the amount of drug (if any) that permeated the material. High-performance liquid chromatography was used for drugs not tested with the bacterial assay. The nitrile gloves were the thinnest (0.12 mm), and the latex gloves were the thickest (0.18 mm). The four materials were generally impermeable to each drug. One sample of the nitrile gloves appeared to have a defect, allowing >5% of the drug solution to pass through at 30 minutes. One sample each of the latex, polyurethane, and neoprene gloves demonstrated minimal permeability (< or =1%): One latex glove sample was permeated by carmustine, and paclitaxel permeated one sample each of the polyurethane and neoprene materials. Nitrile rubber, latex, polyurethane, and neoprene gloves were impermeable to 18 antineoplastic drugs in most, but not all, cases.

  8. Adherence to safe handling guidelines by health care workers who administer antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L; Sweeney, Marie H

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of antineoplastic drugs is well documented. Many are known or suspected human carcinogens where no safe exposure level exists. Authoritative guidelines developed by professional practice organizations and federal agencies for the safe handling of these hazardous drugs have been available for nearly three decades. As a means of evaluating the extent of use of primary prevention practices such as engineering, administrative and work practice controls, personal protective equipment (PPE), and barriers to using PPE, the National Institute for Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a web survey of health care workers in 2011. The study population primarily included members of professional practice organizations representing health care occupations which routinely use or come in contact with selected chemical agents. All respondents who indicated that they administered antineoplastic drugs in the past week were eligible to complete a hazard module addressing self-reported health and safety practices on this topic. Most (98%) of the 2069 respondents of this module were nurses. Working primarily in hospitals, outpatient care centers, and physician offices, respondents reported that they had collectively administered over 90 specific antineoplastic drugs in the past week, with carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel the most common. Examples of activities which increase exposure risk, expressed as percent of respondents, included: failure to wear nonabsorbent gown with closed front and tight cuffs (42%); intravenous (I.V.) tubing primed with antineoplastic drug by respondent (6%) or by pharmacy (12%); potentially contaminated clothing taken home (12%); spill or leak of antineoplastic drug during administration (12%); failure to wear chemotherapy gloves (12%); and lack of hazard awareness training (4%). The most common reason for not wearing gloves or gowns was "skin exposure was minimal"; 4% of respondents, however, reported skin contact during handling and

  9. Adherence to Precautionary Guidelines for Compounding Antineoplastic Drugs: A Survey of Nurses and Pharmacy Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L; Sweeney, Marie H

    2015-01-01

    Precautionary guidelines detailing standards of practice and equipment to eliminate or minimize exposure to antineoplastic drugs during handling activities have been available for nearly three decades. To evaluate practices for compounding antineoplastic drugs, the NIOSH Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers was conducted among members of professional practice organizations representing primarily oncology nurses, pharmacists, and pharmacy technicians. This national survey is the first in over 20 years to examine self-reported use of engineering, administrative, and work practice controls and PPE by pharmacy practitioners for minimizing exposure to antineoplastic drugs. The survey was completed by 241 nurses and 183 pharmacy practitioners who compounded antineoplastic drugs in the seven days prior to the survey. They reported: not always wearing two pairs of chemotherapy gloves (85%, 47%, respectively) or even a single pair (8%, 10%); not always using closed system drug-transfer devices (75%, 53%); not always wearing recommended gown (38%, 20%); I.V. lines sometimes/always primed with antineoplastic drug (19%, 30%); and not always using either a biological safety cabinet or isolator (9%, 15%). They also reported lack of: hazard awareness training (9%, 13%); safe handling procedures (20%, 11%); and medical surveillance programs (61%, 45%). Both employers and healthcare workers share responsibility for adhering to precautionary guidelines and other best practices. Employers can ensure that: workers are trained regularly; facility safe-handling procedures reflecting national guidelines are in place and support for their implementation is understood; engineering controls and PPE are available and workers know how to use them; and medical surveillance, exposure monitoring, and other administrative controls are in place. Workers can seek out training, understand and follow facility procedures, be role models for junior staff, ask questions, and report

  10. Adherence to Safe Handling Guidelines by Health Care Workers Who Administer Antineoplastic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Boiano, James M.; Steege, Andrea L.; Sweeney, Marie H.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of antineoplastic drugs is well documented. Many are known or suspected human carcinogens where no safe exposure level exists. Authoritative guidelines developed by professional practice organizations and federal agencies for the safe handling of these hazardous drugs have been available for nearly three decades. As a means of evaluating the extent of use of primary prevention practices such as engineering, administrative and work practice controls, personal protective equipment (PPE), and barriers to using PPE, the National Institute for Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a web survey of health care workers in 2011. The study population primarily included members of professional practice organizations representing health care occupations which routinely use or come in contact with selected chemical agents. All respondents who indicated that they administered antineoplastic drugs in the past week were eligible to complete a hazard module addressing self-reported health and safety practices on this topic. Most (98%) of the 2069 respondents of this module were nurses. Working primarily in hospitals, outpatient care centers, and physician offices, respondents reported that they had collectively administered over 90 specific antineoplastic drugs in the past week, with carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel the most common. Examples of activities which increase exposure risk, expressed as percent of respondents, included: failure to wear nonabsorbent gown with closed front and tight cuffs (42%); intravenous (I.V.) tubing primed with antineoplastic drug by respondent (6%) or by pharmacy (12%); potentially contaminated clothing taken home (12%); spill or leak of antineoplastic drug during administration (12%); failure to wear chemotherapy gloves (12%); and lack of hazard awareness training (4%). The most common reason for not wearing gloves or gowns was “skin exposure was minimal”; 4% of respondents, however, reported skin contact during handling

  11. Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by exposure to antineoplastic drugs in lymphocytes of oncology nurses and pharmacists.

    PubMed

    El-Ebiary, Ahmad A; Abuelfadl, Arwa A; Sarhan, Naglaa I

    2013-03-01

    The hazards of handling antineoplastic drugs have been raised and discussed in several studies. Introduction of new antineoplastics together with abuse of safety standards have contributed to the exposure risk for personnel who handle these substances. Interactions of antineoplastic drugs with biological structures vary according to the drug(s) and the individual's genetic susceptibility. This study was carried out to evaluate the genome damage induced by exposure to antineoplastic drugs in nurses (n = 20) and pharmacists (n = 18) working in the Oncology Department of Tanta Cancer Center. Thirty subjects matched in age, gender and smoking habit were selected as controls. Both chromosomal aberration analysis and micronucleus assay were used to evaluate genome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of the study subjects. The numbers of aberrant lymphocytes, as well as chromosomal aberration and micronuclei frequencies, were significantly increased in exposed personnel in comparison to matched controls. Compared with pharmacists, nurses showed notably higher level of chromosome damage. On the other hand, no significant difference in micronuclei frequency was observed between nurses and pharmacists. Correlation analyses pointed to the influence of age and duration of occupational exposure on the level of chromosome damage among exposed subjects. The results of this study confirmed that handling antineoplastic drugs without appropriate precautions imposed a genotoxic risk for exposed healthcare workers. These results address the need for regular biomonitoring of exposed personnel. In addition, they call attention to the need for proper implementation of intervention measures aiming to eliminate or significantly reduce worker exposure and prevent untoward biological effects. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Causes of Health Care Workers’ Exposure to Antineoplastic Drugs: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Abusitta, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Background: The exposure of health care workers to antineoplastic drugs is associated with several adverse health effects, including reproductive toxicities and mutagenic effects. Recent studies have confirmed that Canadian health care workers are at risk of exposure to these agents. However, the causes leading to occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs are unknown. Objective: To perform an exploratory study to ascertain the immediate and contributing causes of health care workers’ exposure to antineoplastic drugs. Methods: Participants were recruited from 6 acute care facilities in Vancouver, British Columbia. Those agreeing to participate were asked to complete a questionnaire about previous exposure to antineoplastic drugs while at work and to describe the circumstances of each exposure incident. Responses were qualitatively analyzed, and the causes of each incident were classified as immediate (unsafe work acts and/or unsafe working conditions) or contributing (related to the management of the organization, the environment, and/or the physical and mental status of the worker). Results: Completed questionnaires were received from 120 participants, 18 (15.0%) of whom reported having had previous occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs. Qualitative analysis of the responses showed 4 categories of immediate causes (needlestick injury, spill, direct contact, and other unintended exposure) and 3 categories of contributing causes (poor communication, inadequate controls, and lack of training). Some incidents had multiple immediate and/or contributing causes. Conclusions: According to a review of the immediate and contributing causes identified in this study, many of the exposure incidents were deemed preventable. A “hierarchy of controls” should be implemented, including (in the following order) engineering controls, administrative controls, and personal protective equipment. The findings of this study can be used to develop job safety analyses

  13. Cardiotoxicity of copper-based antineoplastic drugs casiopeinas is related to inhibition of energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Esquivel, Luz; Marin-Hernandez, Alvaro; Pavon, Natalia; Carvajal, Karla; Moreno-Sanchez, Rafael . E-mail: rafael.moreno@cardiologia.org.mx

    2006-04-01

    Isolated rat hearts were perfused with glucose, octanoate or glucose + octanoate and different concentrations of the copper-based antineoplastic drugs casiopeina II-gly (CSII) or casiopeina III-i-a (CSIII). In isolated perfused hearts with glucose + octanoate, both casiopeinas induced diminution in cardiac work and O{sub 2} consumption with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 5}) of 4 (CSII) and 4.6 (CSIII) {mu}M, after 1 h of perfusion. Strong inhibition of the pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenases as well as total creatine kinase by casiopeinas suggested that ATP generation by oxidative phosphorylation and its transfer towards myofibrils were targets for these drugs. In consequence, the cellular contents of ATP and phosphocreatine were also lowered by casiopeinas. Remarkably, casiopeinas were less toxic than adriamycin (IC{sub 5} = 2.6 {mu}M), a well-known potent cardiotoxic and antineoplastic drug, which has a wide clinical use. In an open-chest animal, which is a more physiological model than the isolated heart, femoral administration of 1 {mu}M drug revealed that CSII was innocuous very likely due to strong binding to serum albumin, whereas adriamycin induced again a potent cardiotoxic effect (diminution in heart rate and severe depression of systolic blood pressure). Thus, it seems that casiopeinas are a group of new antineoplastic drugs with milder secondary toxic effects than proven drugs such as adriamycin.

  14. Use of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to simulate drug-drug interactions between antineoplastic and antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Moltó, José; Rajoli, Rajith; Back, David; Valle, Marta; Miranda, Cristina; Owen, Andrew; Clotet, Bonaventura; Siccardi, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Co-administration of antineoplastics with ART is challenging due to potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, trials specifically assessing such DDIs are lacking. Our objective was to simulate DDIs between the antineoplastics erlotinib and gefitinib with key antiretroviral drugs and to predict dose adjustments using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. In vitro data describing chemical properties and pharmacokinetic processes of each drug and their effect on cytochrome P450 isoforms were obtained from the literature. Plasma drug-concentration profiles were simulated in a virtual population of 50 individuals receiving erlotinib or gefitinib alone or with darunavir/ritonavir, efavirenz or etravirine. Simulated pharmacokinetic parameters and the magnitude of DDIs with probe drugs (midazolam, maraviroc) were compared with literature values. Erlotinib and gefitinib pharmacokinetics with and without antiretrovirals were compared and dose-adjustment strategies were evaluated. Simulated parameters of each drug and the magnitude of DDIs with probe drugs were in agreement with reference values. Darunavir/ritonavir increased erlotinib and gefitinib exposure, while efavirenz and etravirine decreased erlotinib and gefitinib concentrations. Based on our predictions, dose-adjustment strategies may consist of once-daily dosing erlotinib at 25 mg and gefitinib at 125 mg with darunavir/ritonavir; or erlotinib at 200 mg and gefitinib at 375 mg with etravirine. The interaction with efavirenz was not overcome even after doubling erlotinib or gefitinib doses. PBPK models predicted the in vivo pharmacokinetics of erlotinib, gefitinib and the antiretrovirals darunavir/ritonavir, efavirenz and etravirine, and the DDIs between them. The simulated dose-adjustments may represent valuable strategies to optimize antineoplastic therapy in HIV-infected patients.

  15. A Novel Insight into the Cardiotoxicity of Antineoplastic Drug Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Heger, Zbynek; Cernei, Natalia; Kudr, Jiri; Gumulec, Jaromir; Blazkova, Iva; Zitka, Ondrej; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a commonly used antineoplastic agent in the treatment of many types of cancer. Little is known about the interactions of doxorubicin with cardiac biomolecules. Serious cardiotoxicity including dilated cardiomyopathy often resulting in a fatal congestive heart failure may occur as a consequence of chemotherapy with doxorubicin. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of exposure to doxorubicin on the changes in major amino acids in tissue of cardiac muscle (proline, taurine, glutamic acid, arginine, aspartic acid, leucine, glycine, valine, alanine, isoleucine, threonine, lysine and serine). An in vitro interaction study was performed as a comparison of amino acid profiles in heart tissue before and after application of doxorubicin. We found that doxorubicin directly influences myocardial amino acid representation even at low concentrations. In addition, we performed an interaction study that resulted in the determination of breaking points for each of analyzed amino acids. Lysine, arginine, β-alanine, valine and serine were determined as the most sensitive amino acids. Additionally we compared amino acid profiles of myocardium before and after exposure to doxorubicin. The amount of amino acids after interaction with doxorubicin was significantly reduced (p = 0.05). This fact points at an ability of doxorubicin to induce changes in quantitative composition of amino acids in myocardium. Moreover, this confirms that the interactions between doxorubicin and amino acids may act as another factor most likely responsible for adverse effects of doxorubicin on myocardium. PMID:24185911

  16. [Applying dose banding to the production of antineoplastic drugs: a narrative review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pérez Huertas, Pablo; Cueto Sola, Margarita; Escobar Cava, Paloma; Borrell García, Carmela; Albert Marí, Asunción; López Briz, Eduardo; Poveda Andrés, José Luis

    2015-07-01

    The dosage of antineoplastic drugs has historically been based on individualized prescription and preparation according to body surface area or patient´s weight. Lack of resources and increased assistance workload in the areas where chemotherapy is made, are leading to the development of new systems to optimize the processing without reducing safety. One of the strategies that has been proposed is the elaboration by dose banding. This new approach standardizes the antineoplastic agents doses by making ranges or bands accepting a percentage of maximum variation. It aims to reduce processing time with the consequent reduction in waiting time for patients; to reduce errors in the manufacturing process and to promote the rational drug use. In conclusion, dose banding is a suitable method for optimizing the development of anticancer drugs, obtaining reductions in oncologic patients waiting time but without actually causing a favorable impact on direct or indirect costs.

  17. Comparison of three assays for genetic effects of antineoplastic drugs on cancer patients and their nurses

    SciTech Connect

    Krepinsky, A. ); Bryant, D.W.; Davison, L.; McCalla, D.R. ); Young, B. ); Heddle, J. ); Douglas, G. ); Michalko, K. )

    1990-01-01

    Three assays have been compared for their ability to detect genetic damage caused by antineoplastic drugs in cancer patients and possible damage in the nurses who administered these drugs. The assays were sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and the Salmonella/mammalian microsome assay on urine. Three comparisons were made: (1) patients before versus after treatment; (2) the administering nurses immediately after their work period versus after a few days off that followed (work and off-work); (3) the exposed nurses versus other nurses who did not administer antineoplastic drugs (controls). The SCE assay did not distinguish between the work and off-work samples in either the exposed or control nurses. Chromosomal aberration was the only assay which showed significant difference between the two samples of the exposed nurses and, consequently, between the exposed and control nurses. There is no evidence that the increase was connected to occupational exposure.

  18. Reproductive Health Risks Associated with Occupational Exposures to Antineoplastic Drugs in Health Care Settings: A Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Thomas H.; Lawson, Christina C.; Polovich, Martha; McDiarmid, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Antineoplastic drugs are known reproductive and developmental toxicants. Our objective was to review the existing literature of reproductive health risks to workers who handle antineoplastic drugs. Methods A structured literature review of 18 peer-reviewed, English language publications of occupational exposure and reproductive outcomes was performed. Results While effect sizes varied with study size and population, occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs appears to raise the risk of both congenital malformations and miscarriage. Studies of infertility and time-to-pregnancy also suggested an increased risk for sub-fertility. Conclusions Antineoplastic drugs are highly toxic in patients receiving treatment and adverse reproductive effects have been well documented in these patients. Healthcare workers with chronic, low level occupational exposure to these drugs also appear to have an increased risk of adverse reproductive outcomes. Additional precautions to prevent exposure should be considered. PMID:25153300

  19. Reproductive health risks associated with occupational exposures to antineoplastic drugs in health care settings: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Connor, Thomas H; Lawson, Christina C; Polovich, Martha; McDiarmid, Melissa A

    2014-09-01

    Antineoplastic drugs are known reproductive and developmental toxicants. Our objective was to review the existing literature of reproductive health risks to workers who handle antineoplastic drugs. A structured literature review of 18 peer-reviewed, English language publications of occupational exposure and reproductive outcomes was performed. Although effect sizes varied with study size and population, occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs seems to raise the risk of both congenital malformations and miscarriage. Studies of infertility and time to pregnancy also suggested an increased risk for subfertility. Antineoplastic drugs are highly toxic in patients receiving treatment, and adverse reproductive effects have been well documented in these patients. Health care workers with long-term, low-level occupational exposure to these drugs also seem to have an increased risk of adverse reproductive outcomes. Additional precautions to prevent exposure should be considered.

  20. Sampling and mass spectrometric analytical methods for five antineoplastic drugs in the healthcare environment

    PubMed Central

    Pretty, Jack R; Connor, Thomas H; Spasojevic, Ivan; Kurtz, Kristine S; McLaurin, Jeffrey L; B’Hymer, Clayton; Debord, D Gayle

    2015-01-01

    Context Healthcare worker exposure to antineoplastic drugs continues to be reported despite safe handling guidelines published by several groups. Sensitive sampling and analytical methods are needed so that occupational safety and health professionals may accurately assess environmental and biological exposure to these drugs in the workplace. Objective To develop liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analytical methods for measuring five antineoplastic drugs in samples from the work environment, and to apply these methods in validating sampling methodology. A single method for quantifying several widely used agents would decrease the number of samples required for method development, lower cost, and time of analysis. Methods for measuring these drugs in workers’ urine would also be useful in monitoring personal exposure levels. Results LC-MS/MS methods were developed for individual analysis of five antineoplastic drugs in wipe and air sample media projected for use in field sampling: cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, paclitaxel, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil. Cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and paclitaxel were also measured simultaneously in some stages of the work. Extraction methods for air and wipe samples were developed and tested using the aforementioned analytical methods. Good recoveries from the candidate air and wipe sample media for most of the compounds, and variable recoveries for test wipe samples depending on the surface under study, were observed. Alternate LC-MS/MS methods were also developed to detect cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel in urine samples. Conclusions The sampling and analytical methods were suitable for determining worker exposure to antineoplastics via surface and breathing zone contamination in projected surveys of healthcare settings. PMID:21183556

  1. Sampling and mass spectrometric analytical methods for five antineoplastic drugs in the healthcare environment.

    PubMed

    Pretty, Jack R; Connor, Thomas H; Spasojevic, Ivan; Kurtz, Kristine S; McLaurin, Jeffrey L; B'Hymer, Clayton; Debord, D Gayle

    2012-03-01

    Healthcare worker exposure to antineoplastic drugs continues to be reported despite safe handling guidelines published by several groups. Sensitive sampling and analytical methods are needed so that occupational safety and health professionals may accurately assess environmental and biological exposure to these drugs in the workplace. To develop liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analytical methods for measuring five antineoplastic drugs in samples from the work environment, and to apply these methods in validating sampling methodology. A single method for quantifying several widely used agents would decrease the number of samples required for method development, lower cost, and time of analysis. for measuring these drugs in workers' urine would also be useful in monitoring personal exposure levels. LC-MS/MS methods were developed for individual analysis of five antineoplastic drugs in wipe and air sample media projected for use in field sampling: cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, paclitaxel, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil. Cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and paclitaxel were also measured simultaneously in some stages of the work. Extraction methods for air and wipe samples were developed and tested using the aforementioned analytical methods. Good recoveries from the candidate air and wipe sample media for most of the compounds, and variable recoveries for test wipe samples depending on the surface under study, were observed. Alternate LC-MS/MS methods were also developed to detect cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel in urine samples. The sampling and analytical methods were suitable for determining worker exposure to antineoplastics via surface and breathing zone contamination in projected surveys of healthcare settings.

  2. New approaches to wipe sampling methods for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Connor, Thomas H; Smith, Jerome P

    2016-09-01

    At the present time, the method of choice to determine surface contamination of the workplace with antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs is surface wipe sampling and subsequent sample analysis with a variety of analytical techniques. The purpose of this article is to review current methodology for determining the level of surface contamination with hazardous drugs in healthcare settings and to discuss recent advances in this area. In addition it will provide some guidance for conducting surface wipe sampling and sample analysis for these drugs in healthcare settings. Published studies on the use of wipe sampling to measure hazardous drugs on surfaces in healthcare settings drugs were reviewed. These studies include the use of well-documented chromatographic techniques for sample analysis in addition to newly evolving technology that provides rapid analysis of specific antineoplastic. Methodology for the analysis of surface wipe samples for hazardous drugs are reviewed, including the purposes, technical factors, sampling strategy, materials required, and limitations. The use of lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) and fluorescence covalent microbead immunosorbent assay (FCMIA) for surface wipe sample evaluation is also discussed. Current recommendations are that all healthcare settings where antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs are handled include surface wipe sampling as part of a comprehensive hazardous drug-safe handling program. Surface wipe sampling may be used as a method to characterize potential occupational dermal exposure risk and to evaluate the effectiveness of implemented controls and the overall safety program. New technology, although currently limited in scope, may make wipe sampling for hazardous drugs more routine, less costly, and provide a shorter response time than classical analytical techniques now in use.

  3. New approaches to wipe sampling methods for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in healthcare settings

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Thomas H.; Smith, Jerome P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose At the present time, the method of choice to determine surface contamination of the workplace with antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs is surface wipe sampling and subsequent sample analysis with a variety of analytical techniques. The purpose of this article is to review current methodology for determining the level of surface contamination with hazardous drugs in healthcare settings and to discuss recent advances in this area. In addition it will provide some guidance for conducting surface wipe sampling and sample analysis for these drugs in healthcare settings. Methods Published studies on the use of wipe sampling to measure hazardous drugs on surfaces in healthcare settings drugs were reviewed. These studies include the use of well-documented chromatographic techniques for sample analysis in addition to newly evolving technology that provides rapid analysis of specific antineoplastic Results Methodology for the analysis of surface wipe samples for hazardous drugs are reviewed, including the purposes, technical factors, sampling strategy, materials required, and limitations. The use of lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) and fluorescence covalent microbead immunosorbent assay (FCMIA) for surface wipe sample evaluation is also discussed. Conclusions Current recommendations are that all healthcare settings where antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs are handled include surface wipe sampling as part of a comprehensive hazardous drug-safe handling program. Surface wipe sampling may be used as a method to characterize potential occupational dermal exposure risk and to evaluate the effectiveness of implemented controls and the overall safety program. New technology, although currently limited in scope, may make wipe sampling for hazardous drugs more routine, less costly, and provide a shorter response time than classical analytical techniques now in use. PMID:28459100

  4. Clinical development of fenretinide as an antineoplastic drug: Pharmacology perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason P; Reynolds, C Patrick; Cho, Hwangeui; Kang, Min H

    2017-06-01

    Fenretinide (4-HPR) is a synthetic retinoid that has cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. Despite substantial in vitro cytotoxicity, response rates in early clinical trials with 4-HPR have been less than anticipated, likely due to the low bioavailability of the initial oral capsule formulation. Several clinical studies have shown that the oral capsule formulation at maximum tolerated dose (MTD) achieved <10 µmol/L concentrations in patients. To improve bioavailability of 4-HPR, new oral powder (LYM-X-SORB®, LXS) and intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) formulations are being tested in early-phase clinical trials. ILE 4-HPR administered as five-day continuous infusion achieved over 50 µmol/L at MTD with minimal systemic toxicities; multiple complete and partial responses were observed in peripheral T cell lymphomas. The LXS oral powder 4-HPR formulation increased plasma levels approximately two-fold at MTD in children without dose-limiting toxicities and demonstrated multiple complete responses in recurrent neuroblastoma. The clinical activity observed with new 4-HPR formulations is attributed to increased bioavailability. Phase I and II clinical trials of both LXS 4-HPR and ILE 4-HPR are in progress as a single agent or in combination with other drugs. Impact statement One of the critical components in drug development is understanding pharmacology (especially pharmacokinetics) of the drugs being developed. Often the pharmacokinetic properties, such as poor solubility leading to poor bioavailability, of the drug can limit further development of the drug. The development of numerous drugs has often halted at clinical testing stages, and several of them were due to the pharmacological properties of the agents, resulting in increased drug development cost. The current review provides an example of how improved clinical activity can be achieved by changing the formulations of a drug with poor bioavailability. Thus, it emphasizes the importance of understanding

  5. Pilot Evaluation of Dermal Contamination by Antineoplastic Drugs among Hospital Pharmacy Personnel.

    PubMed

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Astrakianakis, George; Danyluk, Quinn; Chu, Winnie

    2011-09-01

    It is believed that health care workers are exposed to antineoplastic drugs primarily via dermal contact. However, levels of occupational dermal contamination in Canada have not been formally investigated. To determine the potential dermal exposure to antineoplastic drugs among hospital pharmacy personnel in a metropolitan area in British Columbia. Six hospital pharmacies in the Vancouver area participated in this pilot study. Three pharmacy workers (a technician responsible for preparing drugs, a pharmacist responsible for checking drugs before administration, and a technician not responsible for preparing drugs but working in the pharmacy department) were selected from each site, for a total of 18 participants. Each worker's hands were wiped with a premoistened tissue (one wipe per person), and the wipes were subsequently analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to determine levels of both cyclophosphamide and methotrexate (total of 36 analyses). At 3 of the 6 sites, at least one hand-wipe sample was above the analytical detection limit. Of the 18 analyses from the 3 "positive" sites, 5 (28%) had measurable levels of cyclophosphamide and methotrexate. Cyclophosphamide was detected in 3 samples (geometric mean 0.98 ng, geometric standard deviation 2.72 ng, range from below limit of detection to 3.96 ng) and methotrexate in 2 samples (geometric mean 0.27 ng, geometric standard deviation 2.57 ng, range from below limit of detection to 0.27 ng). The results of this pilot study suggest that hospital pharmacy workers in Metro Vancouver are probably exposed to antineoplastic drugs, given that detectable levels of drug were found on the hands of some personnel. Further studies are recommended to confirm these findings.

  6. Permeability of latex and polyvinyl chloride gloves to 20 antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, J L; Connor, T H; Theiss, J C; Anderson, R W; Matney, T S

    1984-12-01

    Permeability of latex and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) gloves to 20 injectable antineoplastic drugs was studied. Four types of gloves were evaluated: latex surgical gloves, latex examination gloves, and PVC gloves in two thicknesses. Each glove material was exposed to each drug for 90 minutes, and permeation was tested using a mutagenicity assay. Individual fingertips of thin PVC gloves and latex surgical gloves were tested for permeability at five time points (2-30 minutes) using a doxorubicin coloration assay. All drugs permeated the thin PVC gloves. Latex surgical gloves were definitely permeable to two drugs (carmustine and thiotepa) and exhibited borderline permeability to mechlorethamine hydrochloride. The thick PVC gloves were definitely permeable to four drugs (carmustine, thiotepa, mechlorethamine hydrochloride, and daunorubicin hydrochloride) and exhibited borderline permeability to two drugs (doxorubicin and mercaptopurine). The latex examination gloves were permeable to carmustine, thiotepa, mechlorethamine hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide. Doxorubicin permeation of individual fingertips of thin PVC gloves varied in time and amount. Doxorubicin did not permeate the latex surgical glove material, but testing with thiotepa showed that individual fingertips of this material also varied in permeability. Glove thickness was a major determinant of permeability; latex surgical gloves were the least permeable and thin PVC gloves the most permeable to the antineoplastic drugs tested. Within individual gloves and glove types, time and amount of permeation were not uniform.

  7. Adverse drug reaction profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs: A focused pharmacovigilance study in India.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Hasitha Diana; Adiga, Shalini; Thomas, Joseph; Sharma, Ajitha

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs (taxanes and vinca alkaloids) and to look for unexpected ADRs among the local population. Focused study on these drugs, rampantly used in oncology department for a wide variety of tumors including early and advanced malignancies, would enable better treatment care by physicians. Data on ADRs were collected from the cancer patients belonging to both gender and of all ages, on taxanes- or vinca-based cancer chemotherapy and reported in the Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission form. Causality was assessed using the WHO criteria and Naranjo's Algorithm. Preventability and severity of ADRs were also assessed. A total of 97 ADRs were reported among 488 patients on microtubule-damaging anticancer drugs admitted over a period of 1 year. The incidence rate was 19.87%. Gastrointestinal system (40.2%) was the most affected followed by bone marrow (33%) and skin (8.2%). The highest incidence of ADRs was reported among paclitaxel (54.6%), and vincristine (39.2%). Most of the reported ADRs were of milder nature and preventable. The WHO causality assessment scale indicated 71.1% possible reactions. This study showed that most ADRs are preventable with effective ADR monitoring. There is a great need to create awareness among healthcare professionals regarding the importance of the pharmacovigilance system. Judicious use of the preventive measures will lead to a reduction in the incidence of ADRs due to the drug armamentarium, thereby enabling additional economic benefit to the patient and society.

  8. Adverse drug reaction profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs: A focused pharmacovigilance study in India

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Hasitha Diana; Adiga, Shalini; Thomas, Joseph; Sharma, Ajitha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to analyze the adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs (taxanes and vinca alkaloids) and to look for unexpected ADRs among the local population. Focused study on these drugs, rampantly used in oncology department for a wide variety of tumors including early and advanced malignancies, would enable better treatment care by physicians. Materials and Methods: Data on ADRs were collected from the cancer patients belonging to both gender and of all ages, on taxanes- or vinca-based cancer chemotherapy and reported in the Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission form. Causality was assessed using the WHO criteria and Naranjo's Algorithm. Preventability and severity of ADRs were also assessed. Results: A total of 97 ADRs were reported among 488 patients on microtubule-damaging anticancer drugs admitted over a period of 1 year. The incidence rate was 19.87%. Gastrointestinal system (40.2%) was the most affected followed by bone marrow (33%) and skin (8.2%). The highest incidence of ADRs was reported among paclitaxel (54.6%), and vincristine (39.2%). Most of the reported ADRs were of milder nature and preventable. The WHO causality assessment scale indicated 71.1% possible reactions. Conclusions: This study showed that most ADRs are preventable with effective ADR monitoring. There is a great need to create awareness among healthcare professionals regarding the importance of the pharmacovigilance system. Judicious use of the preventive measures will lead to a reduction in the incidence of ADRs due to the drug armamentarium, thereby enabling additional economic benefit to the patient and society. PMID:27721535

  9. Exposure of family members to antineoplastic drugs via excreta of treated cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Michiko; Sekine, Satoko; Takase, Kanae; Ishida, Takashi; Sessink, Paul J M

    2013-09-01

    (a) To measure the urinary excretion of antineoplastic drugs of three patients during 48 h after the administration of cyclophosphamide (two patients) and 5-fluorouracil (one patient). (b) To evaluate environmental contamination with antineoplastic drugs via excreta of patients in the home setting. (c) To evaluate exposure of family members to antineoplastic drugs by measuring the drugs in their urine during the 48 h after completion of the chemotherapy by the patients. Two patients were administered cyclophosphamide by i.v. bolus injection. One patient was administered 5-fluorouracil by i.v. bolus injection and thereafter immediately administered the same drug by continuous infusion for 46 h. Urine samples from the patients administered cyclophosphamide and their family members, and wipe samples from their home environment, were analysed for the unchanged form of cyclophosphamide. For 5-fluorouracil, the urine samples from the patient and the family member were analysed for the 5-fluorouracil metabolite α-fluoro-β-alanine. Wipe samples were analysed for 5-fluorouracil. Drugs were detected and quantified with gas chromatography in tandem with mass spectroscopy-mass spectroscopy or by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-light detection. A total of 35 and 16 urine samples were collected from the three patients and their family members, respectively. The drugs were detected in all samples. Cyclophosphamide was detected at levels of 0.03-7.34 ng/cm(2) in 8 of the 12 wipe samples obtained from the homes of the patients administered cyclophosphamide. For the patient administered 5-fluorouracil, drug levels in his home environment were below the limit of detection. We demonstrated contamination of the home setting and exposure of family members to cyclophosphamide via the excreta of outpatient receiving chemotherapy. Exposure of the family member of the patient administered 5-fluorouracil was also demonstrated. These findings indicate the

  10. Detection and measurement of surface contamination by multiple antineoplastic drugs using multiplex bead assay.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jerome P; Sammons, Deborah L; Robertson, Shirley A; Pretty, Jack R; DeBord, D Gayle; Connor, Thomas H; Snawder, John E

    2016-02-01

    Contamination of workplace surfaces by antineoplastic drugs presents an exposure risk for healthcare workers. Traditional instrumental methods to detect contamination such as liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are sensitive and accurate but expensive. Since immunochemical methods may be cheaper and faster than instrumental methods, we wanted to explore their use for routine drug residue detection for preventing worker exposure. In this study we examined the feasibility of using fluorescence covalent microbead immunosorbent assay (FCMIA) for simultaneous detection and semi-quantitative measurement of three antineoplastic drugs (5-fluorouracil, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin). The concentration ranges for the assay were 0-1000 ng/ml for 5-fluorouracil, 0-100 ng/ml for paclitaxel, and 0-2 ng/ml for doxorubicin. The surface sampling technique involved wiping a loaded surface with a swab wetted with wash buffer, extracting the swab in storage/blocking buffer, and measuring drugs in the extract using FCMIA. There was no significant cross-reactivity between these drugs at the ranges studied indicated by a lack of response in the assay to cross analytes. The limit of detection (LOD) for 5-fluorouracil on the surface studied was 0.93 ng/cm(2) with a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 2.8 ng/cm(2), the LOD for paclitaxel was 0.57 ng/cm(2) with an LOQ of 2.06 ng/cm(2), and the LOD for doxorubicin was 0.0036 ng/cm(2) with an LOQ of 0.013 ng/cm(2). The use of FCMIA with a simple sampling technique has potential for low cost simultaneous detection and semi-quantitative measurement of surface contamination from multiple antineoplastic drugs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs in four Italian health care settings.

    PubMed

    Sottani, Cristina; Porro, Benedetta; Imbriani, Marcello; Minoia, Claudio

    2012-08-13

    Exposure assessment of health care workers to antineoplastic drugs (ADs) is still an open issue since new, critical, and emerging factors may put pharmacists who prepare hazardous drugs or nurses who administer anti cancer agents to an increased risk of developing adverse health effects. Overall, eight pharmacies and nine patient areas have been surveyed in this study. Wipe and pad samples were experienced during the surveillance program in four Italian health care settings. Urine samples were collected from workers handling ADs. Cyclophosphamide (CP), ifosfamide (IF), and gemcitabine (GEM) were detected in all the work environments by using a LC-MS/MS method-based capable of analysing all the three drugs simultaneously. In total, 54% of wipe samples were positive for at least one drug and 19% of pad samples were shown to be contaminated by cyclophosphamide. Pharmacies were generally more contaminated than patient areas with the exception of one site where a nurse had an acute exposure during the cleaning-up of an hazardous drug solution spill. In total, 22 urine samples collected from pharmacists and 78 urine samples from nurses had no detectable concentrations of any antineoplastic drugs. Despite the adherence to the recommended safety practices residue contamination on surfaces and floors has continued to be assessed in all the investigated sites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Permeability of four disposable protective-clothing materials to seven antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, J L; Connor, T H; Theiss, J C; Anderson, R W; Matney, T S

    1985-11-01

    The permeability of four types of protective-clothing material to seven injectable antineoplastic drugs was studied. The protective materials tested were Saranex-laminated Tyvek, polyethylene-coated Tyvek, nonporous Tyvek, and Kaycel. Circles 6 cm in diameter were cut from a single garment of each material and exposed to each drug. Permeation of cisplatin, etoposide, mitomycin, cyclophosphamide, carmustine, and thiotepa was assessed by the Salmonella mutagenicity test after four hours of exposure. Doxorubicin permeation was assessed qualitatively over an eight-hour exposure period using a coloration assay. Saranex-laminated Tyvek was not permeable under the test conditions. Polyethylene-coated Tyvek was slightly permeable to thiotepa and carmustine. Nonporous Tyvek was permeable to all seven drugs, and the Kaycel garment was permeable to all of the drugs except etoposide. In no instance did permeation exceed 3.3% of the applied drug dose. Saranex-laminated Tyvek was the most protective of the barrier garments, followed closely in effectiveness by the polyethylene-coated Tyvek. Clothing made from these two Tyvek composites would allow less air flow and, therefore, would be less comfortable to wear for extended periods. Garments made of nonporous Tyvek or Kaycel would be more comfortable, but their use should be accompanied by an awareness of their potential permeability to certain antineoplastic drugs.

  13. Evaluation of working practices and surface contamination with antineoplastic drugs in outpatient oncology health care settings.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Bettina; Schierl, Rudolf; Nowak, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Many antineoplastic drugs are classified as carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic for humans. Therefore, minimization of exposure is required to reduce health risks to employees. The aim of this study was to evaluate working practices and safety measures during drug administration and to assess workplace contamination in outpatient oncology health care settings. Questionnaires about working procedures were sent to 137 day hospitals and private practices. Workplace contamination with 5-fluorouracil, platinum, gemcitabine, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, methotrexate, docetaxel and paclitaxel was assessed using wipe samples. Forty institutions participated in the study, and in 28 departments, wipe samples were taken. Depending on the kind of activity, working procedures often (5-80%) were not confirmed with recommendations for safe handling of antineoplastic drugs. Altogether, 60.9% of the sampling results were above the limit of detection (LOD). Most frequent loads were detected with 5-FU (93.5%) and platinum (88.4%). Contamination was detected on all surfaces and the results ranged between drugs handled and the extent of surface contamination. However, specific working practices resulting in a lower number of positive wipe samples could be identified (e.g., use of closed infusion systems). Workplace contamination with antineoplastic drugs is still present. As patients have to be considered as a potential source of contamination, surface contamination is difficult to avoid. However, our study revealed that it is possible to administer a large number of preparations without causing high workplace contamination.

  14. Association between occupational exposure and control measures for antineoplastic drugs in a pharmacy of a hospital.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Jin; Koda, Shigeki; Nishida, Shozo; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Tei, Genshin; Kumagai, Shinji

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the association between occupational contamination and exposure levels to antineoplastic drugs and the application of control measures in a hospital work environment. Wipe samples of equipments were collected at a hospital in Osaka Prefecture, Japan, from 2007 to 2011. These samples were subjected to measurements of cyclophosphamide (CP), gemcitabine (GEM), platinum-containing drugs (Pt), and fluorouracil (5FU). Additionally, 24-h urine samples were collected from pharmacists who handled antineoplastic drugs, which were analyzed for CP and alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (AFBA). The application of control measures was scored according to a checklist, which consisted of the following five items: safety equipment and maintenance, training and documentation, devices for safe handling, personal protective equipment, and emergency care. The aim was to obtain a score of 80%. The median CP, GEM, and 5FU concentrations of all wipe samples were significantly lower during the period when the mean score was >80% (attainment period) versus when the mean score was ≤80% (nonattainment period; all P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney's U-test). Additionally, the median urinary CP and AFBA concentrations of pharmacists during the attainment period tended to be lower than that of those during the nonattainment period (P = 0.061 and 0.061, respectively, using Mann-Whitney's U-test). Contamination and levels of exposure to antineoplastic drugs decreased with a score higher than 80%. The scores of the items on the checklist appeared to adequately reflect the condition of the control measures, as increases in all five items were associated with reductions in the contamination by and levels of exposure to all drugs.

  15. Exposure of pharmacy personnel to mutagenic antineoplastic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.V.; Theiss, J.C.; Matney, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Salmonella reversion test was used to measure the mutagenic activities of urine concentrates from individuals preparing cancer chemotherapy agents for intravenous administration. Longitudinal studies were performed in which the total urine produced in 24 hour periods was collected, starting on a Sunday at 7:00 p.m. after a duty-free weekend and extending over an eight day period. There was no detectable increase in mutagenic activity in the urine concentrates of three pharmacy administrators who had no contact with these drugs. All six individuals admixing drugs in open-faced, horizontal laminar flow hoods displayed a two-fold increase in mutagenesis by the fourth day with peak values of 2.7 to 24-fold occurring on days five and six, reduced values by day seven with a return to the spontaneous level by day eight. When four of the six positive individuals in the preceding experiment admixed comparable amounts of chemotherapeutic drugs in a closed-faced, vertical laminar flow hood, no increase in mutagenic activity was detected in their urine concentrates over the eight day period.

  16. Exposure of pharmacy personnel to mutagenic antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T V; Theiss, J C; Matney, T S

    1982-11-01

    The Salmonella reversion test was used to measure the mutagenic activities of urine concentrates from individuals preparing cancer chemotherapy agents for i.v. administration. Longitudinal studies were performed in which the total urine produced in 24-hr periods was collected, starting on a Sunday at 7 p.m. after a duty-free weekend and extending over an 8-day period. There was no detectable increase in mutagenic activity in the urine concentrates of three pharmacy administrators who had no contact with these drugs. All six individuals admixing drugs in open-faced, horizontal laminar flow hoods displayed a 2-fold increase in mutagenesis by the fourth day with peak values of 2.7- to 24-fold occurring on Days 5 and 6, reduced values by Day 7, and a return to the spontaneous level by Day 8. When four of the six positive individuals in the preceding experiment admixed comparable amounts of chemotherapeutic drugs in a closed-face, vertical laminar flow hood, no increase in mutagenic activity was detected in their urine concentrates over the 8-day period.

  17. Arsenic-Based Drugs: From Fowler's Solution to Modern Anticancer Chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibaud, Stéphane; Jaouen, Gérard

    Although arsenic is a poison and has a predominantly unfavorable reputation, it has been used as pharmaceutical agent since the first century BC. In 1786, Thomas Fowler reported the effects of arsenic in the cure of agues, remittent fevers, and periodic headaches. From this time on and despite abusive use, some interesting indications began to appear for trypanosomiasis, syphilis, and blood diseases. The first significant organoarsenical drug (atoxyl) was synthesized by Pierre Antoine Béchamp in 1859 by chemically reacting arsenic acid with aniline but additional experimentations on the properties of arsenic led Paul Ehrlich, the founder of chemotherapy, to the discovery of salvarsan in 1910. From the Second World War, Ernst A.H. Friedheim greatly improved the treatment of trypanosomiasis by melaminophenyl arsenicals. Until the 1990s some organoarsenicals were used for intestinal parasite infections but carcinogenic effects were displayed and all the drugs have been withdrawn in USA, in Europe, and elsewhere. In 2003, arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) was re-introduced for the treatment of very specific hematological malignancies.

  18. Examining factors that influence the effectiveness of cleaning antineoplastic drugs from drug preparation surfaces: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Chua, Prescillia Ps; Danyluk, Quinn; Astrakianakis, George

    2014-06-01

    Occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs has been documented to result in various adverse health effects. Despite the implementation of control measures to minimize exposure, detectable levels of drug residual are still found on hospital work surfaces. Cleaning these surfaces is considered as one means to minimize the exposure potential. However, there are no consistent guiding principles related to cleaning of contaminated surfaces resulting in hospitals to adopt varying practices. As such, this pilot study sought to evaluate current cleaning protocols and identify those factors that were most effective in reducing contamination on drug preparation surfaces. Three cleaning variables were examined: (1) type of cleaning agent (CaviCide®, Phenokil II™, bleach and chlorhexidine), (2) application method of cleaning agent (directly onto surface or indirectly onto a wipe) and (3) use of isopropyl alcohol after cleaning agent application. Known concentrations of antineoplastic drugs (either methotrexate or cyclophosphamide) were placed on a stainless steel swatch and then, systematically, each of the three cleaning variables was tested. Surface wipes were collected and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to determine the percent residual of drug remaining (with 100% being complete elimination of the drug). No one single cleaning agent proved to be effective in completely eliminating all drug contamination. The method of application had minimal effect on the amount of drug residual. In general, application of isopropyl alcohol after the use of cleaning agent further reduced the level of drug contamination although measureable levels of drug were still found in some cases.

  19. Economic impact of prescribing error prevention with computerized physician order entry of injectable antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Nerich, V; Borg, C; Villanueva, C; Thiery-Vuillemin, A; Helias, P; Rohrlich, P-S; Demarchi, M; Pivot, X; Limat, S

    2013-03-01

    A cost-benefit analysis was carried out to determine the potential economic costs and benefits of pharmaceutical analysis in preventing prescribing errors for full standardized injectable antineoplastic drugs computerized physician order entry, in a pharmaceutical unit (University teaching hospital), compared with theoretical setting with no pharmaceutical analysis. The viewpoint is that of the payer or the French national Public Health Insurance system, and is limited to hospital cost (only direct medical costs related to net cost and net benefit. A decision analysis model was performed to compare two strategies: with pharmaceutical analysis (± pharmacy intervention) and without pharmaceutical analysis. are expressed in terms of benefit-to-cost ratio and total benefit. The robustness of the results was assessed through a series of one-way sensitivity analyses. Over 1 year, prescribing error incidence was estimated at 1.5% [1.3-1.7], i.e. 218 avoided prescribing errors. Potential avoidance of hospital stay was estimated at 419 days or 1.9 ± 0.3 days per prescribing error. Cost-benefit analysis could estimate a net benefit-to-cost ratio of 33.3 (€17.34/€0.52) and a total benefit at €16.82 per pharmaceutical analysis or €249,844 per year. The sensitivity analysis showed robustness of results. Our study shows a substantial economic benefit of pharmaceutical analysis and intervention in the prevention of prescribing errors. The clinical pharmacist adds both value and economic benefit, making it possible to avoid additional use of expensive antineoplastic drugs and hospitalization. Computerized physician order entry of antineoplastic drugs improves the relevance of clinical pharmacist interventions, expanding pharmaceutical analysis and also the role of the pharmacist.

  20. Low Concentration of Quercetin Antagonizes the Cytotoxic Effects of Anti-Neoplastic Drugs in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo; Xing, Hui; Ma, Ding; Chen, Gang; Weng, Danhui

    2014-01-01

    Objective The role of Quercetin in ovarian cancer treatment remains controversial, and the mechanism is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of Quercetin in combination with Cisplatin and other anti-neoplastic drugs in ovarian cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, along with the molecular mechanism of action. Methods Quercetin treatment at various concentrations was examined in combination with Cisplatin, taxol, Pirarubicin and 5-Fu in human epithelial ovarian cancer C13* and SKOV3 cells. CCK8 assay and Annexin V assay were for cell viability and apoptosis analysis, immunofluorescence assay, DCFDA staining and realtime PCR were used for reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced injury detection and endogenous antioxidant enzymes expression. Athymic BALB/c-nu nude mice were injected with C13*cells to obtain a xenograft model for in vivo studies. Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out to evaluate the ROS-induced injury and SOD1 activity of xenograft tumors. Results Contrary to the pro-apoptotic effect of high concentration (40 µM–100 µM) of Quercetin, low concentrations (5 µM–30 µM) of Quercetin resulted in varying degrees of attenuation of cytotoxicity of Cisplatin treatment when combined with Cisplatin. Similar anti-apoptotic effects were observed when Quercetin was combined with other anti-neoplastic agents: Taxol, Pirarubicin and 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu). Low concentrations of Quercetin were observed to suppress ROS-induced injury, reduce intracellular ROS level and increase the expression of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, suggesting a ROS-mediated mechanism of attenuating anti-neoplastic drugs. In xenogeneic model, Quercetin led to a substantial reduction of therapeutic efficacy of Cisplatin along with enhancing the endogenous antioxidant enzyme expression and reducing ROS-induced damage in xenograft tumor tissue. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that Quercetin at low concentrations attenuate the

  1. Are the true impacts of adverse events considered in economic models of antineoplastic drugs? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Alison; Haas, Marion; Viney, Rosalie

    2013-12-01

    Antineoplastic drugs for cancer are often associated with adverse events, which influence patients' physical health, quality of life and survival. However, the modelling of adverse events in cost-effectiveness analyses of antineoplastic drugs has not been examined. This article reviews published economic evaluations that include a calculated cost for adverse events of antineoplastic drugs. The aim is to identify how existing models manage four issues specific to antineoplastic drug adverse events: the selection of adverse events for inclusion in models, the influence of dose modifications on drug quantity and survival outcomes, the influence of adverse events on quality of life and the consideration of multiple simultaneous or recurring adverse events. A systematic literature search was conducted using MESH headings and key words in multiple electronic databases, covering the years 1999-2009. Inclusion criteria for eligibility were papers covering a population of adults with solid tumour cancers, the inclusion of at least one adverse event and the resource use and/or costs of adverse event treatment. From 4,985 citations, 26 eligible articles were identified. Studies were generally of moderate quality and addressed a range of cancers and treatment types. While the four issues specific to antineoplastic drug adverse events were addressed by some studies, no study addressed all of the issues in the same model. This review indicates that current modelling assumptions may restrict our understanding of the true impact of adverse events on cost effectiveness of antineoplastic drugs. This understanding could be improved through consideration of the selection of adverse events, dose modifications, multiple events and quality of life in cost-effectiveness studies.

  2. Surface wipe sampling for antineoplastic (chemotherapy) and other hazardous drug residue in healthcare settings: Methodology and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Connor, Thomas H; Zock, Matthew D; Snow, Amy H

    2016-09-01

    Surface wipe sampling for various hazardous agents has been employed in many occupational settings over the years for various reasons such as evaluation of potential dermal exposure and health risk, source determination, quality or cleanliness, compliance, and others. Wipe sampling for surface residue of antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in healthcare settings is currently the method of choice to determine surface contamination of the workplace with these drugs. The purpose of this article is to review published studies of wipe sampling for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs, to summarize the methods in use by various organizations and researchers, and to provide some basic guidance for conducting surface wipe sampling for these drugs in healthcare settings.  Recommendations on wipe sampling methodology from several government agencies and organizations were reviewed. Published reports on wipe sampling for hazardous drugs in numerous studies were also examined. The critical elements of a wipe sampling program and related limitations were reviewed and summarized.  Recommendations and guidance are presented concerning the purposes of wipe sampling for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in the healthcare setting, technical factors and variables, sampling strategy, materials required, and limitations. The reporting and interpretation of wipe sample results is also discussed.  It is recommended that all healthcare settings where antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs are handled consider wipe sampling as part of a comprehensive hazardous drug "safe handling" program. Although no standards exist for acceptable or allowable surface concentrations for these drugs in the healthcare setting, wipe sampling may be used as a method to characterize potential occupational dermal exposure risk and to evaluate the effectiveness of implemented controls and the overall safety program. A comprehensive safe-handling program for antineoplastic drugs may

  3. Surface Wipe Sampling for Antineoplastic (Chemotherapy) and Other Hazardous Drug Residue in Healthcare Settings: Methodology and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Thomas H.; Zock, Matthew D.; Snow, Amy H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Surface wipe sampling for various hazardous agents has been employed in many occupational settings over the years for various reasons such as evaluation of potential dermal exposure and health risk, source determination, quality or cleanliness, compliance, and others. Wipe sampling for surface residue of antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in healthcare settings is currently the method of choice to determine surface contamination of the workplace with these drugs. The purpose of this article is to review published studies of wipe sampling for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs, to summarize the methods in use by various organizations and researchers, and to provide some basic guidance for conducting surface wipe sampling for these drugs in healthcare settings. Methods Recommendations on wipe sampling methodology from several government agencies and organizations were reviewed. Published reports on wipe sampling for hazardous drugs in numerous studies were also examined. The critical elements of a wipe sampling program and related limitations were reviewed and summarized. Results Recommendations and guidance are presented concerning the purposes of wipe sampling for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in the healthcare setting, technical factors and variables, sampling strategy, materials required, and limitations. The reporting and interpretation of wipe sample results is also discussed. Conclusions It is recommended that all healthcare settings where antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs are handled consider wipe sampling as part of a comprehensive hazardous drug ‘safe handling’ program. Although no standards exist for acceptable or allowable surface concentrations for these drugs in the healthcare setting, wipe sampling may be used as a method to characterize potential occupational dermal exposure risk and to evaluate the effectiveness of implemented controls and the overall the safety program. A comprehensive safe-handling program

  4. Toxicity of the mixture of selected antineoplastic drugs against aquatic primary producers.

    PubMed

    Elersek, Tina; Milavec, Sara; Korošec, Maša; Brezovsek, Polona; Negreira, Noelia; Zonja, Bozo; de Alda, Miren López; Barceló, Damià; Heath, Ester; Ščančar, Janez; Filipič, Metka

    2016-08-01

    The residues of antineoplastic drugs are considered as new and emerging pollutants in aquatic environments. Recent experiments showed relatively high toxicity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), imatinib mesylate (IM), etoposide (ET) and cisplatin (CP) that are currently among most widely used antineoplastic drugs, against phytoplankton species. In this study, we investigated the toxic potential of the mixture of 5-FU + IM + ET against green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis, and the stability and sorption of these drugs to algal cells. Toxic potential of the mixture was predicted by the concepts of 'concentration addition' and 'independent action' and compared to the experimentally determined toxicity. In both test species, the measured toxicity of the mixture was at effects concentrations EC10-EC50 higher than the predicted, whereas at higher effect concentration (EC90), it was lower. In general, P. subcapitata was more sensitive than S. leopoliensis. The stability studies of the tested drugs during the experiment showed that 5-FU, IM and CP are relatively stable, whereas in the cultures exposed to ET, two transformation products with the same mass as ET but different retention time were detected. The measurements of the cell-linked concentrations of the tested compounds after 72 h exposure indicated that except for CP (1.9 % of the initial concentration), these drugs are not adsorbed or absorbed by algal cells. The results of this study showed that in alga and cyanobacteria exposure to the mixture of 5-FU + ET + IM, in particular at low effect concentration range, caused additive or synergistic effect on growth inhibition, and they suggest that single compound toxicity data are not sufficient for the proper toxicity prediction for aquatic primary producers.

  5. Robotic system for i.v. antineoplastic drug preparation: description and preliminary evaluation under simulated conditions.

    PubMed

    Cote, D D; Torchia, M G

    1989-11-01

    A robotic system for preparing doses of i.v. antineoplastic drugs is described, and measurements made with the system are compared for accuracy and reproducibility with those made by pharmacists and technicians. System hardware consists of a robotic arm, a 16-bit microcomputer, a bar-code reader, a voice synthesizer, and an electronic balance. The software includes a menu-driven main program, executable files for each robotic activity, and an interface to allow control to pass between the program and the files. The program has routines for matching the software to the hardware; for entering information about the patient, the name of the drug ordered, and the dose; for checking the dose; for selecting the number and size of the vials to be used; for specifying the manipulations of the robotic arm; for printing labels; and for maintaining records. The robot fills an order by getting and placing a vial, inserting a needle into it and withdrawing the drug, weighing the vial, agitating the container to dissolve its contents, reading a bar code, placing a syringe in a syringe manipulator, and getting an i.v. container and injecting the drug into it. Detection of any errors by a series of self-checks arrests execution of an order. No significant differences in accuracy and precision were found between the robotic system and humans performing the same tasks under simulated conditions. The robotic system required less time than humans and eliminated the possibility of direct human contact with the i.v. admixture. Under simulated conditions, a robotic system developed to assist in the preparation of i.v. antineoplastic drugs was as accurate as a manual system and was more time efficient.

  6. Measuring extent of surface contamination produced by the handling of antineoplastic drugs in low- to middle-income country oncology health care settings.

    PubMed

    Müller-Ramírez, Claudio; Squibb, Katherine; McDiarmid, Melissa

    2017-09-03

    Antineoplastic drugs are known to cause detrimental effects to health care workers who are exposed through work tasks. Environmental monitoring studies are an excellent approach to measure the extent of surface contamination produced by the handling of antineoplastic drugs in the workplace and to assess the potential for occupational exposures in oncology health care settings. The main aim of the study was to establish the extent of surface contamination produced by the handling of antineoplastic drugs in a limited-resource oncology health care facility in Colombia by conducting an environmental monitoring study using affordable analytical instrumentation. Contamination with antineoplastic drugs was widespread in the health care facility under evaluation, which could result in health care worker exposure to antineoplastic drugs. A comprehensive review of current safety guidelines and protocols including assessment of adherence in the health care facility should be done.

  7. Human effect monitoring in cases of occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs: a method comparison

    PubMed Central

    Kevekordes, S.; Gebel, T. W.; Hellwig, M.; Dames, W.; Dunkelberg, H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether DNA damage increased in subjects possibly exposed to high amounts of antineoplastic agents. METHODS: The level of genetic damage was determined in peripheral mononuclear blood cells with the sister chromatid exchange test, the alkaline elution technique, and the cytokinesis block micronucleus test. RESULTS: The supposed increased exposure of the study subjects was caused by a malfunction of a safety hood resulting in leakage of air during preparation of an infusion of an antineoplastic drug. Two months after a new safety hood was installed, the frequencies of micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges of exposed nurses (n = 10) were still significantly increased when compared with a matched control group (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, one sided Wilcoxon test, respectively). In a second examination seven months later, the frequency of micronuclei had significantly decreased to control values (p < 0.05, one sided Wilcoxon test, n = 6). Moreover, the study subjects who smoked (n = 8) had significantly increased frequencies of micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, one sided U test, respectively). No differences in the rate of DNA damage could be detected with the alkaline elution technique. CONCLUSIONS: Control measures on the level of biological effect should be performed regularly to ensure maximum safety precautions for workers potentially exposed to genotoxic agents.   PMID:9624264

  8. Multicentre study for the evaluation of mutagenic/carcinogenic risk in nurses exposed to antineoplastic drugs: assessment of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Buschini, Annamaria; Villarini, Milena; Feretti, Donatella; Mussi, Francesca; Dominici, Luca; Zerbini, Ilaria; Moretti, Massimo; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Carrieri, Mariella; Gelatti, Umberto; Rossi, Carlo; Monarca, Silvano; Poli, Paola

    2013-11-01

    People who handle antineoplastic drugs, many of which classified as human carcinogens by International Agency for Research on Cancer, are exposed to low doses in comparison with patients; however, the long duration of exposure could lead to health effects. The aim of this work was to evaluate DNA damage in white blood cells from 63 nurses who handle antineoplastic drugs in five Italian hospitals and 74 control participants, using different versions of the Comet assay. Primary DNA damage was assessed by using the alkaline version of the assay on leucocytes, whereas to detect DNA oxidative damage and cryptic lesions specifically, the Comet/ENDO III assay and the Comet/araC assay were performed on leucocytes and lymphocytes, respectively. In the present study, no significant DNA damage was correlated with the work shift. The exposed population did not differ significantly from the reference group with respect to DNA primary and oxidative damage in leucocytes. Strikingly, in isolated lymphocytes treated with araC, lower data dispersion as well as a significantly lower mean value for the percentage of DNA in the comet tail was observed in exposed participants as compared with the control group (p<0.05), suggesting a potential chronic exposure to crosslinking antineoplastic drugs. Although stringent rules were adopted at national and international levels to prevent occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, data reported in this study support the idea that a more efficient survey on long-lasting exposures at very low concentrations is needed.

  9. Recent Advances on Pathophysiology, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Insights in Cardiac Dysfunction Induced by Antineoplastic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Molinaro, Marilisa; Ameri, Pietro; Marone, Giancarlo; Petretta, Mario; Abete, Pasquale; Di Lisa, Fabio; De Placido, Sabino; Bonaduce, Domenico; Tocchetti, Carlo G.

    2015-01-01

    Along with the improvement of survival after cancer, cardiotoxicity due to antineoplastic treatments has emerged as a clinically relevant problem. Potential cardiovascular toxicities due to anticancer agents include QT prolongation and arrhythmias, myocardial ischemia and infarction, hypertension and/or thromboembolism, left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and heart failure (HF). The latter is variable in severity, may be reversible or irreversible, and can occur soon after or as a delayed consequence of anticancer treatments. In the last decade recent advances have emerged in clinical and pathophysiological aspects of LV dysfunction induced by the most widely used anticancer drugs. In particular, early, sensitive markers of cardiac dysfunction that can predict this form of cardiomyopathy before ejection fraction (EF) is reduced are becoming increasingly important, along with novel therapeutic and cardioprotective strategies, in the attempt of protecting cardiooncologic patients from the development of congestive heart failure. PMID:26583088

  10. Selectivity screening and subsequent data evaluation strategies in liquid chromatography: the example of 12 antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hetzel, Terence; Teutenberg, Thorsten; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2015-11-01

    Optimization of the chromatographic selectivity is the most important parameter if a separation is needed for the hyphenation of liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. In mass spectrometry, this is necessary if the investigated analytes have identical mass transitions, like isomers or epimers. For the separation of the 12 most important antineoplastic drugs, a selectivity screening was performed using 20 columns and two organic modifiers and temperatures to find a suitable phase system in order to separate critical peak pairs. Therefore, an evaluation strategy was applied in form of a principal component analysis (PCA), selectivity factor, and overall selectivity comparison to find a suitable phase system. Some boundary conditions were defined to consider the specific requirements of tandem mass spectrometry. The results clearly indicated that the selectivity factor of the critical peak pairs increased using methanol at higher temperature.

  11. Multicenter study of environmental contamination with antineoplastic drugs in 33 Canadian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Merger, Delphine; Tanguay, Cynthia; Langlois, Eric; Lefebvre, Michel; Bussières, Jean-François

    2014-04-01

    No occupational exposure limit exists for antineoplastic drugs. The main objective of this study was to describe environmental contamination with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and methotrexate in pharmacy and patient care areas of Canadian hospitals in 2012. The secondary objective was to compare the 2012 environmental monitoring results with the 2008-2010 results. Six standardized sites in the pharmacy and six sites on patient care areas were sampled in each participating center. Samples were analyzed for the presence of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and methotrexate by UPLC-MS-MS. The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.8 pg/cm² for cyclophosphamide, 2.2 pg/cm² for ifosfamide and 8.0 pg/cm² for methotrexate. The comparison of surface contamination between the 2008-2010 and 2012 studies was made with the 75th percentile of cyclophosphamide concentration. A total of 33 hospitals participated in the study and 363 samples were collected. Overall, 40 % (147/363) of the samples were positive for cyclophosphamide, 18 % (68/363) were positive for ifosfamide and 5 % (17/363) were positive for methotrexate. In 2012, the 75th percentile value of cyclophosphamide surface concentration was of 9.4 pg/cm², which is four times lower than the 2008-2010 75th percentile of 40 pg/cm². In both studies, the 75th percentile for ifosfamide and methotrexate concentration was lower than the LOD. Surface contamination by cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and methotrexate in Canadian hospitals is improving both in terms of the proportions of positive samples and in terms of the surface concentration of antineoplastic drugs. A local 75th percentile value should be use to assess local contamination and interpret local results.

  12. Anti-inflammatory drugs and uterine cervical cancer cells: Antineoplastic effect of meclofenamic acid

    PubMed Central

    SORIANO-HERNANDEZ, ALEJANDRO D.; MADRIGAL-PÉREZ, DANIELA; GALVAN-SALAZAR, HECTOR R.; MARTINEZ-FIERRO, MARGARITA L.; VALDEZ-VELAZQUEZ, LAURA L.; ESPINOZA-GÓMEZ, FRANCISCO; VAZQUEZ-VUELVAS, OSCAR F.; OLMEDO-BUENROSTRO, BERTHA A.; GUZMAN-ESQUIVEL, JOSE; RODRIGUEZ-SANCHEZ, IRAM P.; LARA-ESQUEDA, AGUSTIN; MONTES-GALINDO, DANIEL A.; DELGADO-ENCISO, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer (UCC) is one of the main causes of cancer-associated mortality in women. Inflammation has been identified as an important component of this neoplasia; in this context, anti-inflammatory drugs represent possible prophylactic and/or therapeutic alternatives that require further investigation. Anti-inflammatory drugs are common and each one may exhibit a different antineoplastic effect. As a result, the present study investigated different anti-inflammatory models of UCC in vitro and in vivo. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, dexamethasone, meclofenamic acid, flufenamic acid and mefenamic acid were tested in UCC HeLa, VIPA, INBL and SiHa cell lines. The cytotoxicity of the drugs was evaluated in vitro. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, mefenamic acid and flufenamic acid presented with slight to moderate toxicity (10–40% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM) in certain cell lines, while meclofenamic acid exhibited significant cytotoxicity in all essayed cell lines (50–90% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM). The meclofenamic acid was tested in murine models (immunodeficient and immunocompetent) of UCC, which manifested a significant reduction in tumor growth and increased mouse survival. It was demonstrated that of the evaluated anti-inflammatory drugs, meclofenamic acid was the most cytotoxic, with a significant antitumor effect in murine models. Subsequent studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical utility of this drug. PMID:26622892

  13. French Health Technology Assessment of Antineoplastic Drugs Indicated in the Treatment of Solid Tumours: Perspective for Future Trends.

    PubMed

    Chouaid, Christos; Borget, Isabelle; Braun, Eric; Bazil, Marie-Laure; Schaetz, Dominique; Rémuzat, Cécile; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-08-01

    France is one of the European countries that spend the most on oncology drugs. To keep pharmaceutical expenditure under control, Health Authorities highly scrutinize market access of costly medicines. To assess current and future trends in French health technology assessment (HTA) of antineoplastic drugs indicated in the treatment of solid tumours. A review of the SMR and ASMR drivers of the Transparency Committee (CT) opinions issued for antineoplastic drugs indicated in the treatment of solid tumours and approved between 2009 and 2014 was performed to assess current trends in French health technology assessment (HTA), complemented by an expert board consultation to capture the critical issues on the future of antineoplastic drugs HTA. Thirty-one drugs indicated for the treatment of solid tumours were identified (77 % targeted therapies). Initial CT assessments were available for 26 drugs. Four key items in the CT assessment were identified: 1) Clinical trial methodology; 2) Acceptance of progression-free survival (PFS) as a valuable endpoint; 3) Transferability of clinical trials in clinical practice; 4) Unpredictability of CT decisions. Experts raised the important development of personalised medicines in oncology and key challenges for oncology products to generate information expected from HTA perspective. The French system remains committed to its values and philosophy (access of all innovations for everybody) which are threatened by the increasing launch of innovative therapies and budget constraint. Both HTA decision framework evolution and revision of the current pricing process should be considered in France to cope with these new challenges.

  14. A polymer-based drug delivery system for the antineoplastic agent bis(maltolato)oxovanadium in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J. K.; Min, W.; Cruz, T. F.; Cindric, S.; Arsenault, L.; Von Hoff, D. D.; Degan, D.; Hunter, W. L.; Burt, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    Using vanadyl sulphate, sodium orthovanadate or bis(maltolato)oxovanadium (BMOV), Cruz TF, Morgan A, Min W (1995, Mol Cell Biochem 153: 161-166) have recently demonstrated the antineoplastic effects of vanadium in mice. In this study, the antineoplastic effects of BMOV against human tumour cell lines was confirmed, and this effect was shown to depend on the prolonged exposure of the cells to the drug. We have investigated a polymeric drug delivery system for the sustained delivery of BMOV as an antineoplastic agent in mice. The objective was to design and evaluate an injectable polymer-BMOV paste that would act as a drug implant for the slow but sustained release of BMOV in the mice. In vitro studies showed that the biodegradable polymer poly (Ghlr epsilon epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) released BMOV in a sustained manner with rates of drug release increasing with increased loading of the drug in the polymer. In vivo studies showed that PCL-BMOV paste implants produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of MDAY-D2 tumour growth via systemic drug delivery. Further in vivo studies showed that 5% BMOV-loaded PCL (containing 20% methoxypolyethylene glycol) was effective in preventing tumour regrowth of resected RIF tumour masses in mice when the PCL-BMOV paste was applied to the resected site for localized drug delivery. The results confirm the potential of vanadium as an antineoplastic agent and show that the injectable PCL-BMOV formulation releases a chemotherapeutic dose of vanadium for the systemic treatment of whole tumours as well as the localized treatment of resected RIF tumours. Images Figure 3 PMID:9083337

  15. Review of Experience of a Statewide Poison Control Center With Pediatric Exposures to Oral Antineoplastic Drugs in the Nonmedical Setting.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Stephen L; Liu, Jehnan; Soleymani, Kamyar; Romasco, Rebecca L; Farid, Hanieh; Clark, Richard F; Cantrell, F Lee

    2016-01-01

    The use of oral antineoplastic agents in nonmedical settings continues to increase. There are limited data available on pediatric exposures to these agents. We sought to identify characteristics of such exposures. We performed a retrospective review of database of a statewide poison system from 2000 to 2009 for all cases of pediatric exposures to oral antineoplastic agents, which took place in a nonmedical setting. Data collected include gender, age, agent of exposure, dose, drug concentration, reason for exposure, symptoms, outcomes, interventions, and length of hospital stay. There were a total of 328 patients. The mean average age was 4.1 years. Eighty-nine percentage (n = 293) was unintentional. Exposures to 21 different antineoplastic agents were identified. Methotrexate (n = 91) and 6-mercaptopurine (n = 47) were the most common agents encountered. Two hundred ninety-nine (91%) cases had no symptoms reported. When reported, gastrointestinal symptoms (n = 17) and central nervous system sedation (n = 6) were most common. One case of pancytopenia was reported. No deaths were reported in this series. Sixty-seven percent (n = 220) were managed at home, whereas 19 (6%) were admitted to a health care facility. Cases were followed by the poison control center for 0.34 days (SD = 1.40). In this study, exposures to oral antineoplastics were primarily unintentional, asymptomatic, and managed at home. Study limitations include possible reporting bias, inability to objectively confirm exposures, and limited duration of monitoring by the poison control center. In this retrospective review, no significant morbidity or mortality was reported from pediatric exposures to oral antineoplastic drugs in the nonmedical setting.

  16. Antifungal Activities of Antineoplastic Agents: Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a Model System To Study Drug Action

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Maria E.; Cruz, M. Cristina; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Chung, Namjin; Perfect, John R.; Heitman, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    Recent evolutionary studies reveal that microorganisms including yeasts and fungi are more closely related to mammals than was previously appreciated. Possibly as a consequence, many natural-product toxins that have antimicrobial activity are also toxic to mammalian cells. While this makes it difficult to discover antifungal agents without toxic side effects, it also has enabled detailed studies of drug action in simple genetic model systems. We review here studies on the antifungal actions of antineoplasmic agents. Topics covered include the mechanisms of action of inhibitors of topoisomerases I and II; the immunosuppressants rapamycin, cyclosporin A, and FK506; the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin; the angiogenesis inhibitors fumagillin and ovalicin; the HSP90 inhibitor geldanamycin; and agents that inhibit sphingolipid metabolism. In general, these natural products inhibit target proteins conserved from microorganisms to humans. These studies highlight the potential of microorganisms as screening tools to elucidate the mechanisms of action of novel pharmacological agents with unique effects against specific mammalian cell types, including neoplastic cells. In addition, this analysis suggests that antineoplastic agents and derivatives might find novel indications in the treatment of fungal infections, for which few agents are presently available, toxicity remains a serious concern, and drug resistance is emerging. PMID:10515904

  17. Investigations on nanoconfinement of low-molecular antineoplastic agents into biocompatible magnetic matrices for drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Tomoiaga, Alina Maria; Cioroiu, Bogdan Ionel; Nica, Valentin; Vasile, Aurelia

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles are employed as biocompatible matrices to host low-molecular antineoplastic drugs. 5-Fluorouracil is a well-known antimetabolite drug used to treat many malignancies: colon, rectal, breast, head and neck, pancreatic, gastric, esophageal, liver and G-U (bladder, penile, vulva, prostate), skin cancers (basal cell and keratosis). Unfortunately severe gastrointestinal, hematological, neural, cardiac and dermatological toxic effects are often registered due to its cytotoxicity. Thus, this work focuses on development of a magnetic silica nanosystem, capable of hosting high amounts of 5-fluorouracil and delivers it in a targeted manner, under the influence of external magnetic field. There are few reports on nanoconfinement of this particular small molecule antimetabolite on mesoporous silica hosts. Therefore we have investigated different ways to confine high amounts of 5-FU within amino-modified and non-modified mesopores of the silica shell, from water and ethanol, under magnetic stirring and ultrasound irradiation. Also, we have studied the adsorption process from water as a function of pH in order to rationalize drug-support interactions. It is shown that nature of the solvent has great influence on diffusion of small molecules into mesopores, which is slower from alcoholic solutions. More importantly, sonication is proven as an excellent alternative to long adsorption tests, since the time necessary to reach equilibrium is drastically reduced to 1h and higher amounts of drug may be immobilized within the mesopores of amino-modified magnetic silica nanoparticles. These results are highly important for optimization of drug immobilization process in order to attain desired release profile. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Examination of the kinetics of degradation of the antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil by chlorine and bromine.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tanumihardja, Jessica; Masuyama, Takaaki; Korshin, Gregory

    2015-01-23

    This study examined the degradation of the widely used antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU) by chlorine and bromine. 5FU was determined to interact readily with free chlorine and bromine but was stable in the presence of chloramine. The removal of 5FU followed a second-order kinetic pattern. Apparent rates (kapp) of 5FU removal by chlorine and bromine were strongly pH dependent and had maximum 14.8M(-1)s(-1) and 1.9×10(3)M(-1)s(-1)kapp values, respectively at pH 7. Modeling of the dependence of the kapp values vs. pH indicated the presence of a relatively acidic (pK 6.4 vs. 8.5 of 5FU per se) 5FU intermediate generated in the presence of halogen species. Spectrophotometric measurements confirmed the increased acidity of 5FU chlorination products and allowed proposing a degradation pathway of 5FU by chlorine. This pathway suggests that 5FU chlorination proceeds via chlorine incorporation at the 6th carbon in the heterocyclic ring of 5FU.

  19. A review of surface wipe sampling compared to biologic monitoring for occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Kibby, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The potential for adverse health effects from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs (AD) is well known. Control measures recommended by the NIOSH Alert ([3]) include medical and biologic monitoring, and environmental monitoring where available. At present no guidelines or published best practices exist to guide EHS managers on how to carry out this biologic or environmental monitoring. Studies investigating surface wipe sampling for AD have been numerous in the past decade, but very limited research exists to correlate surface contamination with actual absorption by pharmacists and nurses. This article reviews the studies with concurrent surface wipe sampling and urine monitoring for the same AD, and tests their correlation. Methodologic limitations are reviewed. Twenty-one studies were identified that concurrently measured surface contamination by AD by wipe sampling and AD absorption by urine monitoring. Two studies directly evaluated the AD by wipe sampling and urine levels and neither found a statistically significant correlation. Six studies reported a decrease in both surface and urine levels following interventions to reduce contamination or exposure. Only one study directly evaluated the personal protective equipment and handling techniques employed by the studied workers, which can be viewed as a major confounder of absorption. While no statistically significant correlation was found between wipe sampling and urine monitoring for AD, decreases in urine and wipe levels following interventions to reduce exposure were noted. Limitations in the data and recommendations for future research are reviewed.

  20. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Laura; Barbieri, Anna; Lodi, V; Violante, F S

    2012-01-01

    In view of the evidence of cytotoxicity of chemotherapic antineoplastic drugs (AD), current guidelines recommend the evaluation of the health risks of hospital personnel exposed to these compounds. Biological monitoring is the main tool to evaluate all possible drug intake and measure workers' real risk. The aim of this study was to assess occupational exposure toAD in a large hospital in Northern Italy in order to verify the effectiveness of the structural and procedural improvements carried out over the last decade. Three biological monitoring campaigns were performed using LC-MS/MS analysis of cyclophosphamide (CP) and metotrexate (MTX) as biomarkers of internal dose in the urine of hospital workers. In the first two campaigns, 50 and 81 workers respectively were monitored during AD preparation operations. The last campaign, concerning AD administration activity, was performed after a centralized preparation unit had been set up. Two environmental monitoring campaigns were carried out as well, to complete AD exposure assessment. During the first monitoring campaign we found positive urinary samples in all the wards studied (total positivity 36%), whereas in the second campaign 11% of the samples were positive and four departments showed negative results in all urine samples. The last campaign showed all urinary CP and MTX levels below the detection limit of the analytical method Exposure of oncology ward nurses considerably decreased due to the centralization of AD preparation operations together with training and education of workers. The last biological monitoring results were reassuring; nevertheless, surface contamination still occurred and safety measures should be further improved in order to achieve the lowest reasonably possible contamination levels.

  1. Predictors of adherence to safe handling practices for antineoplastic drugs: A survey of hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Silver, Sharon R; Steege, Andrea L; Boiano, James M

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing awareness of the hazards of exposure to antineoplastic drugs (ADs), surveys continue to find incomplete adherence to recommended safe handling guidelines. A 2011 survey of healthcare workers presents an opportunity to examine factors associated with adherence among 1094 hospital nurses who administered ADs. Data for these hypothesis-generating analyses were taken from an anonymous, web-based survey of healthcare workers. Regression modeling was used to examine associations between a number of predictors (engineering controls, work practices, nurse perceptions, and nurse and hospital characteristics) and three outcomes reported by nurses: use of personal protective equipment (PPE); activities performed with gloves previously worn to administer ADs; and spills of ADs. Adherence to safe handling guidelines was not universal, and AD spills were reported by 9.5% of nurses during the week prior to the survey. Familiarity with safe handling guidelines and training in safe handling were associated with more reported PPE use. Nurse-perceived availability of PPE was associated with more reported PPE use and lower odds of reported spills. Use of closed system drug-transfer devices and luer-lock fittings also decreased the odds of self-reported AD spills, while more frequent AD administration increased the risk. AD administration frequency was also associated with performing more activities with gloves previously worn to administer ADs, and nurse perception of having adequate time for taking safety precautions with fewer such activities. The results suggest that training and familiarity with guidelines for safe handling of ADs, adequate time to adhere to guidelines, and availability of PPE and certain engineering controls are key to ensuring adherence to safe handling practices. Further assessment of training components and engineering controls would be useful for tailoring interventions targeting these areas.

  2. Antineoplastic drugs determination by HPLC-HRMS(n) to monitor occupational exposure.

    PubMed

    Dal Bello, Federica; Santoro, Valentina; Scarpino, Valentina; Martano, Chiara; Aigotti, Riccardo; Chiappa, Alberta; Davoli, Enrico; Medana, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a simple, direct, multiresidue highly specific procedure to evaluate the possible surface contamination of selected antineoplastic drugs in several hospital environment sites by using wipe test sampling. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), carboplatin (C-Pt), cyclophosphamide (CYC), cytarabine (CYT), doxorubicin (DOX), gemcitabine (GEM), ifosfamide (IFO), methotrexate (MET), and mitomycin C (MIT) belong to very different chemical classes but show good ionization properties under electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions (negative ion mode for 5-FU and positive ion mode in all other cases). HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) coupled with HRMS (high resolution mass spectrometry) appears to be the best technique for direct analysis of these analytes, because neither derivatization nor complex extraction procedure for polar compounds in samples is requested prior the analysis. Sample preparation was limited to washing wipes with appropriate solvents. Chromatographic separation was achieved on C18 reversed phase columns. The HPLC-HRMS/MS method was validated in order to obtain robustness, sensitivity and selectivity. LLOQ (lower limit of quantitation) values provided a sensitivity good enough to evidence the presence of the drugs in a very low concentration range (<1 pg/cm(2) ). The method was applied for a study of real wipe tests coming from many areas from a hospital showing some positive samples. The low quantitation limits and the high specificity due to the high resolution approach of the developed method allowed an accurate description of the working environment that can be used to define procedural rules to limit working place contamination to a minimum. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Medicinal electronomics bricolage design of hypoxia-targeting antineoplastic drugs and invention of boron tracedrugs as innovative future-architectural drugs.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hitoshi; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Eiji

    2010-09-01

    We describe herein for the first time our medicinal electronomics bricolage design of hypoxia-targeting antineoplastic drugs and boron tracedrugs as newly emerging drug classes. A new area of antineoplastic drugs and treatments has recently focused on neoplastic cells of the tumor environment/microenvironment involving accessory cells. This tumor hypoxic environment is now considered as a major factor that influences not only the response to antineoplastic therapies but also the potential for malignant progression and metastasis. We review our medicinal electronomics bricolage design of hypoxia-targeting drugs, antiangiogenic hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, sugar-hybrid hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, and hypoxia-targeting 10B delivery agents, in which we design drug candidates based on their electronic structures obtained by molecular orbital calculations, not based solely on pharmacophore development. These drugs include an antiangiogenic hypoxic cell radiosensitizer TX-2036, a sugar-hybrid hypoxic cell radiosensitizer TX-2244, new hypoxia-targeting indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitors, and a hypoxia-targeting BNCT agent, BSH (sodium borocaptate-10B)-hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine (TPZ) hybrid drug TX-2100. We then discuss the concept of boron tracedrugs as a new drug class having broad potential in many areas.

  4. Effects of organizational safety practices and perceived safety climate on PPE usage, engineering controls, and adverse events involving liquid antineoplastic drugs among nurses.

    PubMed

    DeJoy, David M; Smith, Todd D; Woldu, Henok; Dyal, Mari-Amanda; Steege, Andrea L; Boiano, James M

    2017-07-01

    Antineoplastic drugs pose risks to the healthcare workers who handle them. This fact notwithstanding, adherence to safe handling guidelines remains inconsistent and often poor. This study examined the effects of pertinent organizational safety practices and perceived safety climate on the use of personal protective equipment, engineering controls, and adverse events (spill/leak or skin contact) involving liquid antineoplastic drugs. Data for this study came from the 2011 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers which included a sample of approximately 1,800 nurses who had administered liquid antineoplastic drugs during the past seven days. Regression modeling was used to examine predictors of personal protective equipment use, engineering controls, and adverse events involving antineoplastic drugs. Approximately 14% of nurses reported experiencing an adverse event while administering antineoplastic drugs during the previous week. Usage of recommended engineering controls and personal protective equipment was quite variable. Usage of both was better in non-profit and government settings, when workers were more familiar with safe handling guidelines, and when perceived management commitment to safety was higher. Usage was poorer in the absence of specific safety handling procedures. The odds of adverse events increased with number of antineoplastic drugs treatments and when antineoplastic drugs were administered more days of the week. The odds of such events were significantly lower when the use of engineering controls and personal protective equipment was greater and when more precautionary measures were in place. Greater levels of management commitment to safety and perceived risk were also related to lower odds of adverse events. These results point to the value of implementing a comprehensive health and safety program that utilizes available hazard controls and effectively communicates

  5. Micronuclei and chromosome aberrations in subjects occupationally exposed to antineoplastic drugs: a multicentric approach.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Massimo; Grollino, Maria Giuseppa; Pavanello, Sofia; Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Villarini, Milena; Appolloni, Massimo; Carrieri, Mariella; Sabatini, Laura; Dominici, Luca; Stronati, Laura; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Anna; Fatigoni, Cristina; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Mussi, Francesca; Monarca, Silvano

    2015-08-01

    Recently published works showed that occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs (ANPD) is still frequent in hospital settings, despite significant safety policy improvements. The aim of this study was to assess the current level of occupational exposure to ANPD and any potentially associated cytogenetic damages in hospital nurses routinely handling ANPD. Occupationally ANPD-exposed (n = 71) and ANPD-unexposed (n = 77; control) nurses were recruited on a voluntary basis from five hospitals in Northern and Central Italy. Evaluation of surface contamination and dermal exposure to ANPD was assessed by determining cyclophosphamide (CP) on selected surfaces (wipes) and on exposed nurses' clothes (pads). The concentration of unmetabolized CP—as a biomarker of internal dose—was measured in end-shift urine samples. Biomonitoring of genotoxic effects (i.e., biological effect monitoring) was conducted by analyzing micronuclei (MN) and chromosome aberrations (CA) in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Genetic polymorphisms for enzymes involved in metabolic detoxification (i.e., glutathione S-transferases) were analyzed as well. We observed a significant increase in MN frequency (5.30 ± 2.99 and 3.29 ± 1.97; mean values ± standard deviation; p < 0.0001) in exposed nurses versus controls, as well as in CA detection (3.30 ± 2.05 and 1.84 ± 1.67; p < 0.0001), exposed subjects versus controls. Our results provide evidence that, despite safety controlled conditions, ANPD handling still represents a considerable genotoxic risk for occupationally exposed personnel. Because both MN and CA have been described as being predictive of group-increased cancer risk, our findings point to a need for improving specific safety procedures in handling and administering ANPD.

  6. Compliance with safe handling guidelines of antineoplastic drugs in Jordanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Awawdeh, Banan T; Alzoubi, Karem H; Khader, Yousef S; Alkafajei, Ahmed M

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the compliance of healthcare workers with standard safety guidelines during the preparation and administrations of antineoplastic medications. A cross-sectional survey study. All hospitals in Jordan where healthcare workers are involved in preparation and administration of antineoplastic medications. All healthcare workers who are involved in preparation and administration of antineoplastic medications in Jordanian hospitals. A questionnaire that covered information about work place, healthcare workers, and use of personal protective equipments during handling of antineoplastic medications was self-filled by each participant. Compliance rates with workplace requirements, healthcare workers, and use of personnel protective equipments. Majority of participants (74.2%), representing nine out of 15 (60%) hospitals, reported full compliance of workplace with all requirements of the guidelines. Items with full compliance in all hospitals were availability of policies and procedures for safe handling of antineoplastic agents, availability of reporting system, and availability of sharp containers. Concerning healthcare workers' guidelines, worker with full compliance were 46.4% of participants. Items with least compliance rate were working inside biological safety cabinet (65.1%) and having training program on handling chemotherapy medications (66.7%). Finally, concerning items-related personal protective equipments, only 10.7% of participants reported full compliance. Items with least compliance rates were wearing goggles (eye protection), shoe cover, and hair cover. Results of this study showed the levels of compliance with guidelines pertaining to work place and workers who prepare and administer antineoplastic medications. Among other points, compliance with guidelines pertaining to wearing personnel protective equipments was limited and required further improvement. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. High mobility group A1 protein expression reduces the sensitivity of colon and thyroid cancer cells to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Daniela; Mussnich, Paula; Rosa, Roberta; Bianco, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Fusco, Alfredo

    2014-11-20

    Development of resistance to conventional drugs and novel biological agents often impair long-term chemotherapy. HMGA gene overexpression is often associated with antineoplastic drug resistance and reduced survival. Inhibition of HMGA expression in thyroid cancer cells reduces levels of ATM protein, the main cellular sensor of DNA damage, and enhances cellular sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. HMGA1 overexpression promotes chemoresistance to gemcitabine in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through an Akt-dependent mechanism. To elucidate the role of HMGA1 proteins in chemoresistance we analyzed resistance to conventional drugs and targeted therapies of human colon carcinoma cells (GEO) that are sensitive to the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor cetuximab, and express minimal levels of HMGA1 and cetuximab-resistant (GEO CR) cells expressing high HMGA1 protein levels. GEO CR cells were less sensitive than GEO cells to cetuximab and 5-fluorouracil. GEO CR cells silenced for HMGA1 expression were more susceptible than empty vector-transfected cells to the drugs' cytotoxicity. Similar results were obtained with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells expressing or not HMGA1 proteins, treated with doxorubicin or the HDAC inhibitor LBH589. Finally, HMGA1 overexpression promoted the DNA-damage response and stimulated Akt phosphorylation and prosurvival signaling. Our findings suggest that the blockage of HMGA1 expression is a promising approach to enhance cancer cell chemosensitivity, since it could increase the sensitivity of cancer cells to antineoplastic drugs by inhibiting the survival signal and DNA damage repair pathways.

  8. Highly sensitive LC-MS/MS methods for urinary biological monitoring of occupational exposure to cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and methotrexate antineoplastic drugs and routine application.

    PubMed

    Canal-Raffin, Mireille; Khennoufa, Karim; Martinez, Béatrice; Goujon, Yves; Folch, Celia; Ducint, Dominique; Titier, Karine; Brochard, Patrick; Verdun-Esquer, Catherine; Molimard, Mathieu

    2016-10-21

    Highly sensitive ESI-LC-MS/MS methods were developed for urinary biological monitoring of occupational exposure to cyclophosphamide (CP), ifosfamide (IF), and methotrexate (MTX), which are hazardous antineoplastic drugs frequently handled by healthcare professionals. Extraction methods consisted of liquid/liquid extraction for simultaneous urinary CP and IF assays, and of solid phase extraction for the urinary MTX assay. A good linearity (r2>0.997), precision (CV<14.6%), and accuracy (bias<9.9%) were achieved for all compounds. The limit of detection (LOD) was 10pg/ml and the lower limit of quantification (LOQ) was 20pg/ml for all three drugs. Applying these methods in routine, more than 116 healthcare professionals occupationally exposed to antineoplastic drugs were monitored and 635 urines were analysed. Eleven healthcare professionals (9.5%) were found to be contaminated to at least one of the three antineoplastic drugs. Among analysed urines, 22 samples were found positives. The measured concentrations ranged from 20.1 to 1850pg/ml and, for six samples, concentrations were at CP trace level, between the LOD and LOQ values (10-20pg/ml). Such efficient analytical tools combining high specificity with high sensitivity are essential for reliable detection and routine biological monitoring of healthcare professionals occupationally exposed to these widely used antineoplastic drugs. These methods allow to monitor the healthcare professionals exposure to antineoplastic drugs in the aim to assess the effectiveness of collective and individual protective measures.

  9. Interaction of human organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2) and sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) with antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Marada, Venkata V V R; Flörl, Saskia; Kühne, Annett; Müller, Judith; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Hagos, Yohannes

    2015-01-01

    The ability of an antineoplastic drug to exert its cytostatic effect depends largely on the balance between its uptake into and extrusion from the cancer cells. ATP driven efflux transporter proteins drive the export of antineoplastic drugs and play a pivotal role in the development of chemoresistance. As regards uptake transporters, comparably less is known on their impact in drug action. In the current study, we characterized the interactions of two uptake transporter proteins, expressed mainly in the liver; the organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2, encoded by the SLC22A7 gene) and the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP, encoded by the SLC10A1 gene), stably transfected in human embryonic kidney cells, with some antineoplastic agents that are routinely being used in cancer chemotherapy. Whereas NTCP did not show any strong interactions with the cytostatics tested, we observed a very strong inhibition of OAT2 mediated [(3)H] cGMP uptake in the presence of bendamustine, irinotecan and paclitaxel. The Ki values of OAT2 for bendamustine, irinotecan and paclitaxel were determined to be 43.3±4.33μM, 26.4±2.34μM and 10.4±0.45μM, respectively. Incubation of bendamustine with OAT2 expressing cells increased the caspase-3 activity, and this increase was inhibited by simultaneous incubation with bendamustine and probenecid, a well-known inhibitor of OATs, suggesting that bendamustine is a substrate of OAT2. A higher accumulation of irinotecan was observed in OAT2 expressing cells compared to control pcDNA cells by HPLC analysis of cell lysates. The accumulation was diminished in the presence of cGMP, the substrate we used to functionally characterize OAT2, suggesting specificity of this uptake and the fact that OAT2 mediates uptake of irinotecan. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Antineoplastic agents and thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gwenalyn; Atallah, Jean Paul

    2017-03-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy is an uncommon but reported adverse effect of a variety of antineoplastic drugs, including chemotherapy agents such as mitomycin C and gemcitabine, and newer targeted agents such as the vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors. We present a review of thrombotic microangiopathy associated with antineoplastic agents and its implications in current cancer therapy.

  11. A surface wipe sampling and LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous detection of six antineoplastic drugs commonly handled by healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Jeronimo, Matthew; Colombo, Manuel; Astrakianakis, George; Hon, Chun-Yip

    2015-09-01

    An effective wipe sampling and LC-MS/MS method was developed to simultaneously analyze six commonly administered antineoplastic drugs in stainless steel surface. The analyzed drugs were methotrexate, paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, vincristine, and oxaliplatin, a frequently prepared antineoplastic drug that has not been included among any of the published simultaneous detection methods. The established method was used to evaluate the recoveries of antineoplastic drugs on brand new and worn stainless steel surfaces by wiping the plates with a Whatman filter paper wetted with 0.5 mL of water/methanol (20:80) with 0.1% formic acid followed by LC-MS/MS before desorbing the filter with a water/methanol (50:50) solution. A significant decrease in the recovery of all evaluated drugs was found when worn plates were used. Additionally, the inter-personnel variability on drug recoveries during wiping procedures was evaluated. Significantly higher recoveries were achieved by the personnel with more training and experience versus personnel without prior experience. Finally, a laboratory stability test was developed to assess the degradation of the antineoplastic drugs during replicated shipping conditions. With the exception of vincristine sulfate which exhibited a significant (p < 0.05) degradation after 48 h, all evaluated drugs were stable during the first 24-48 h. However, after 144 h, an increase in the degradation of all evaluated drugs was observed, with oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil exhibiting the most degradation.

  12. Effects of outside air temperature on the preparation of antineoplastic drug solutions in biological safety cabinets.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Masayuki; Itoh, Akio; Ando, Yuichi; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Wakiya, Yoshifumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2015-08-01

    In Japan, biological safety cabinets are commonly used by medical staff to prepare antineoplastic agents. At the Division of Chemotherapy for Outpatients, Nagoya University Hospital, a class II B2 biological safety cabinet is used. The temperature inside this biological safety cabinet decreases in winter. In this study, we investigated the effect of low outside air temperature on the biological safety cabinet temperature, time required to admix antineoplastic agents, and accuracy of epirubicin weight measurement. Studies were conducted from 1 January to 31 March 2008 (winter). The outside air temperature near the biological safety cabinet intake nozzle was compared with the biological safety cabinet temperature. The correlation between the outside air temperature and the biological safety cabinet temperature, time for cyclophosphamide and gemcitabine solubilization, and accuracy of epirubicin weight measurement were investigated at low and high biological safety cabinet temperatures. The biological safety cabinet temperature correlated with the outside air temperature of 5-20℃ (p < 0.0001). Compared to cyclophosphamide and gemcitabine solubilization in the biological safety cabinet at 25℃, solubilization at 10℃ was significantly delayed (p < 0.01 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Measurement of epirubicin weight by using a syringe lacked accuracy because of epirubicin's high viscosity at low temperatures (p < 0.01). These results suggest that the biological safety cabinet temperature decreases when cool winter air is drawn into the biological safety cabinet, affecting the solubilization of antineoplastic agents. We suggest that a decrease in biological safety cabinet temperature may increase the time required to admix antineoplastic agents, thereby increasing the time for which outpatients must wait for chemotherapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Evaluation of the efficacy of additional measures introduced for the protection of healthcare personnel handling antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Odraska, Pavel; Dolezalova, Lenka; Kuta, Jan; Oravec, Michal; Piler, Pavel; Blaha, Ludek

    2013-03-01

    Due to their adverse effects, antineoplastic drugs are considered as a potential health risk to healthcare personnel. The objective of the study was to compare the surface contamination level of the conventional preparation room and outpatient clinic before and after the implementation of a set of additional protective measures. The measures were targeted at eliminating potential sources of environmental contamination, and modification of the cleaning procedure. The measures introduced into the preparation room consisted of (i) the introduction of manual cleaning of drug vials before they enter the preparation room, (ii) the modification of the routine cleaning procedure performed at the end of each working day (i.e. shifting the cleaning of the isolators as the most contaminated objects from the beginning of the cleaning process to the end), and (iii) the introduction of regular cleaning of the work table every 2 h. The measures introduced into the outpatient clinic consisted of (i) replacement of the standard infusion sets with multichannel sets for safe drug administration, (ii) the introduction of self-cleaning seats to the patient lavatories supporting hygienic and contamination-free seated urination, and (iii) replacement of standard infusion stands with wall-mounted stands, supporting the regular and proper cleaning of the floor beneath. To determine the surface contamination level with antineoplastic drugs, cyclophosphamide and platinum were determined in wipe samples with high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In the preparation room, depending on the sampling spot and analyte, median concentrations ranged from 5 to 267 pg cm(-2) and from 2 to 368 pg cm(-2) before and after implementation of the measures, respectively. In the outpatient clinic, median concentrations ranged from 5 to 5310 pg cm(-2) and from <0.2 to 574 pg cm(-2) before and after implementation of the measures

  14. Antineoplastic DNA-binding compounds: intercalating and minor groove binding drugs.

    PubMed

    Mišković, Katarina; Bujak, Maro; Baus Lončar, Mirela; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica

    2013-12-01

    DNA intercalating and minor groove binding compounds are new weapons in the battle against malignant diseases. These antineoplastic agents target the DNA molecule and interfere with the cell cycle leading to rapidly proliferating cell death. They are mainly derivates of a naturally occurring organic compound derived from a microorganism or plant. Intercalators usually act as topoisomerase I and/or II poisons, while the mechanisms of DNA minor groove binders are a combination of several steps including topoisomerase poisoning. This paper gives an overview of some of the developed DNA intercalating and minor groove binding compounds, as well as an explanation of their chemical structures, origins, and application in chemotherapy.

  15. A Comprehensive Spectroscopic and Computational Investigation to Probe the Interaction of Antineoplastic Drug Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid with Serum Albumins

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, Saima; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Zaman, Masihuz; Zaidi, Nida; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Alam, Parvez; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous drugs that are used as antidote against chemotheray, inflammation or viral infection, gets absorbed and interacts reversibly to the major serum transport protein i.e. albumins, upon entering the circulatory system. To have a structural guideline in the rational drug designing and in the synthesis of drugs with greater efficacy, the binding mechanism of an antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory drug Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) with human and bovine serum albumins (HSA & BSA) were examined by spectroscopic and computational methods. NDGA binds to site II of HSA with binding constant (Kb) ~105 M-1 and free energy (ΔG) ~ -7.5 kcal.mol-1. It also binds at site II of BSA but with lesser binding affinity (Kb) ~105 M-1 and ΔG ~ -6.5 kcal.mol-1. The negative value of ΔG, ΔH and ΔS for both the albumins at three different temperatures confirmed that the complex formation process between albumins and NDGA is spontaneous and exothermic. Furthermore, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions are the main forces involved in complex formation of NDGA with both the albumins as evaluated from fluorescence and molecular docking results. Binding of NDGA to both the albumins alter the conformation and causes minor change in the secondary structure of proteins as indicated by the CD spectra. PMID:27391941

  16. A Comprehensive Spectroscopic and Computational Investigation to Probe the Interaction of Antineoplastic Drug Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid with Serum Albumins.

    PubMed

    Nusrat, Saima; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Zaman, Masihuz; Zaidi, Nida; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Alam, Parvez; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous drugs that are used as antidote against chemotheray, inflammation or viral infection, gets absorbed and interacts reversibly to the major serum transport protein i.e. albumins, upon entering the circulatory system. To have a structural guideline in the rational drug designing and in the synthesis of drugs with greater efficacy, the binding mechanism of an antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory drug Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) with human and bovine serum albumins (HSA & BSA) were examined by spectroscopic and computational methods. NDGA binds to site II of HSA with binding constant (Kb) ~105 M-1 and free energy (ΔG) ~ -7.5 kcal.mol-1. It also binds at site II of BSA but with lesser binding affinity (Kb) ~105 M-1 and ΔG ~ -6.5 kcal.mol-1. The negative value of ΔG, ΔH and ΔS for both the albumins at three different temperatures confirmed that the complex formation process between albumins and NDGA is spontaneous and exothermic. Furthermore, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions are the main forces involved in complex formation of NDGA with both the albumins as evaluated from fluorescence and molecular docking results. Binding of NDGA to both the albumins alter the conformation and causes minor change in the secondary structure of proteins as indicated by the CD spectra.

  17. Synthesis and Anchoring of Antineoplastic Ferrocene and Phthalocyanine Derivatives on Water-Soluble Polymeric Drug Carriers Derived from Lysine and Aspartic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Maree, M. David; Neuse, Eberhard W.; Erasmus, Elizabeth; Swarts, Jannie C.

    2008-01-01

    The general synthetic strategy towards water-soluble biodegradable drug carriers and the properties that they must have are discussed. The syntheses of water-soluble biodegradable copolymers of lysine and aspartic acid as potential drug-delivering devices, having amine-functionalised side chains are then described. Covalent anchoring of carboxylic acid derivatives of the antineoplastic ferrocene and photodynamically active phthalocyanine moieties to the amine-containing drug carrier copolymers under mild coupling conditions has been achieved utilising the coupling reagent O-benzotriazolyl-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate to promote formation of the biodegradable amide bond. Even though the parent antineoplastic ferrocene and phthalocyanine derivatives are themselves insoluble in water at pH < 7, the new carrier-drug conjugates that were obtained are well water-soluble. PMID:18288243

  18. The antineoplastic drug flavopiridol reverses memory impairment induced by Amyloid-ß1-42 oligomers in mice.

    PubMed

    Leggio, Gian Marco; Catania, Maria Vincenza; Puzzo, Daniela; Spatuzza, Michela; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Gulisano, Walter; Torrisi, Sebastiano Alfio; Giurdanella, Giovanni; Piazza, Cateno; Impellizzeri, Agata Rita; Gozzo, Lucia; Navarria, Andrea; Bucolo, Claudio; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Palmeri, Agostino; Salomone, Salvatore; Copani, Agata; Caraci, Filippo; Drago, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    The ectopic re-activation of cell cycle in neurons is an early event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which could lead to synaptic failure and ensuing cognitive deficits before frank neuronal death. Cytostatic drugs that act as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors have been poorly investigated in animal models of AD. In the present study, we examined the effects of flavopiridol, an inhibitor of CDKs currently used as antineoplastic drug, against cell cycle reactivation and memory loss induced by intracerebroventricular injection of Aß1-42 oligomers in CD1 mice. Cycling neurons, scored as NeuN-positive cells expressing cyclin A, were found both in the frontal cortex and in the hippocampus of Aβ-injected mice, paralleling memory deficits. Starting from three days after Aβ injection, flavopiridol (0.5, 1 and 3mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected daily, for eleven days. Here we show that a treatment with flavopiridol (0.5 and 1mg/kg) was able to rescue the loss of memory induced by Aβ1-42, and to prevent the occurrence of ectopic cell-cycle events in the mouse frontal cortex and hippocampus. This is the first evidence that a cytostatic drug can prevent cognitive deficits in a non-transgenic animal model of AD.

  19. Toxicity of exposure to binary mixtures of four anti-neoplastic drugs in Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Alfredo; Kundi, Michael; Lavorgna, Margherita; Criscuolo, Emma; Russo, Chiara; Isidori, Marina

    2014-12-01

    Anticancer drugs, interfering with DNA in every living organism, may pose a threat to aquatic environment, even more when they occur as complex mixtures. We investigated the combined long term toxic potential of four anti-neoplastic drugs (5-fluorouracil [5-FU], cisplatin [CDDP], etoposide [ET] and imatinib mesylate [IM]) testing their binary mixtures on two primary consumers of the freshwater aquatic chain with close phylogenetic relationship: Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia. The combined toxicities were assessed using two distinct effect sizes that should be observed if Bliss independence holds. Direct statistical comparison by analysis of variance of single and combined toxicities under the assumption of Bliss independence allowed to accept or reject the independency hypothesis. Independency was confirmed for all mixtures both in D. magna and in C. dubia, except for IM+ ET and IM+CDDP in D. magna and for ET+CDDP and ET+5-FU in C. dubia which at the highest concentrations showed an antagonistic interaction. A synergic tendency was found testing IM+CDDP on C. dubia at the lowest concentration selected. Thus, the chronic ecotoxicological data evaluated in this study show not only a potential environmental risk of anticancer drugs, especially considering their potential synergistic effects, but also the necessity to integrate statistical models with experimental data to establish the real environmental impact of such compounds.

  20. A study protocol for the evaluation of occupational mutagenic/carcinogenic risks in subjects exposed to antineoplastic drugs: a multicentric project.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Massimo; Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Feretti, Donatella; Pavanello, Sofia; Mussi, Francesca; Grollino, Maria G; Villarini, Milena; Barbieri, Anna; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Carrieri, Mariella; Buschini, Annamaria; Appolloni, Massimo; Dominici, Luca; Sabatini, Laura; Gelatti, Umberto; Bartolucci, Giovanni B; Poli, Paola; Stronati, Laura; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Monarca, Silvano

    2011-03-30

    Some industrial hygiene studies have assessed occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs; other epidemiological investigations have detected various toxicological effects in exposure groups labeled with the job title. In no research has the same population been studied both environmentally and epidemiologically. The protocol of the epidemiological study presented here uses an integrated environmental and biological monitoring approach. The aim is to assess in hospital nurses preparing and/or administering therapy to cancer patients the current level of occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, DNA and chromosome damage as cancer predictive effects, and the association between the two. About 80 healthy non-smoking female nurses, who job it is to prepare or handle antineoplastic drugs, and a reference group of about 80 healthy non-smoking female nurses not occupationally exposed to chemicals will be examined simultaneously in a cross-sectional study. All the workers will be recruited from five hospitals in northern and central Italy after their informed consent has been obtained.Evaluation of surface contamination and dermal exposure to antineoplastic drugs will be assessed by determining cyclophosphamide on selected surfaces (wipes) and on the exposed nurses' clothes (pads). The concentration of unmetabolized cyclophosphamide as a biomarker of internal dose will be measured in end-shift urine samples from exposed nurses. Biomarkers of effect and susceptibility will be assessed in exposed and unexposed nurses: urinary concentration of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine; DNA damage detected using the single-cell microgel electrophoresis (comet) assay in peripheral white blood cells; micronuclei and chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Genetic polymorphisms for enzymes involved in metabolic detoxification (i.e. glutathione S-transferases) will also be analysed.Using standardized questionnaires, occupational exposure will be determined in exposed

  1. A study protocol for the evaluation of occupational mutagenic/carcinogenic risks in subjects exposed to antineoplastic drugs: a multicentric project

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some industrial hygiene studies have assessed occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs; other epidemiological investigations have detected various toxicological effects in exposure groups labeled with the job title. In no research has the same population been studied both environmentally and epidemiologically. The protocol of the epidemiological study presented here uses an integrated environmental and biological monitoring approach. The aim is to assess in hospital nurses preparing and/or administering therapy to cancer patients the current level of occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, DNA and chromosome damage as cancer predictive effects, and the association between the two. Methods/Design About 80 healthy non-smoking female nurses, who job it is to prepare or handle antineoplastic drugs, and a reference group of about 80 healthy non-smoking female nurses not occupationally exposed to chemicals will be examined simultaneously in a cross-sectional study. All the workers will be recruited from five hospitals in northern and central Italy after their informed consent has been obtained. Evaluation of surface contamination and dermal exposure to antineoplastic drugs will be assessed by determining cyclophosphamide on selected surfaces (wipes) and on the exposed nurses' clothes (pads). The concentration of unmetabolized cyclophosphamide as a biomarker of internal dose will be measured in end-shift urine samples from exposed nurses. Biomarkers of effect and susceptibility will be assessed in exposed and unexposed nurses: urinary concentration of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine; DNA damage detected using the single-cell microgel electrophoresis (comet) assay in peripheral white blood cells; micronuclei and chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Genetic polymorphisms for enzymes involved in metabolic detoxification (i.e. glutathione S-transferases) will also be analysed. Using standardized questionnaires, occupational exposure will

  2. Occupational Exposure to Antineoplastic Agents.

    PubMed

    Graeve, Catherine Utecht; McGovern, Patricia Marie; Alexander, Bruce; Church, Timothy; Ryan, Andrew; Polovich, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 8 million health care workers are unnecessarily exposed to highly toxic drugs used to treat cancer; antineoplastic drugs can contribute to negative health effects for these workers. The drugs have been detected in the urine of workers and on the floors and counters of worksites. Safety precautions that could reduce the risk of exposure are underutilized. This cross-sectional study of 163 oncology health care workers used a survey to measure workplace and individual factors, and environmental sampling to measure surface contamination. The study objective was to identify potential exposures to antineoplastic drugs and factors influencing safety behavior. Personal protective equipment (PPE) use was lower than recommended; unit of employment was significantly associated with PPE use. Chemical residue from antineoplastic drugs was found, revealing potential exposures. Workplace safety must be a higher organizational priority. The contamination of common work areas where PPE use is not expected was of utmost concern.

  3. Application and assessment of a regular environmental monitoring of the antineoplastic drug contamination level in pharmacies - the MEWIP project.

    PubMed

    Kiffmeyer, Thekla K; Tuerk, Jochen; Hahn, Moritz; Stuetzer, Hartmut; Hadtstein, Claudia; Heinemann, André; Eickmann, Udo

    2013-05-01

    A large-scale study was carried out in order to determine the contamination level of antineoplastic drugs in pharmacies and to investigate the suitability and effects of wipe sample monitoring at regular intervals. A specific study design was developed. The 130 participating pharmacies were divided into a study and a control group, carrying out five and two wipe sampling cycles, respectively. The work practice was analyzed using questionnaires to identify factors that influence the contamination level. From 1269 wipe samples, 774 (61%) were contaminated with at least one of the analyzed cytotoxic drugs: cyclophosphamide, docetaxel, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine, ifosfamide, methotrexate, and paclitaxel. A significant decrease of the contamination with cyclophosphamide and 5-fluorouracil was observed in the study group. The Monitoring-Effect Study of Wipe Sampling in Pharmacies method has proven to be a reliable and affordable tool for contamination control. Based on the 90th percentile of the contamination values, a substance-independent performance-based guidance value of 0.1ng cm(-2) has been derived.

  4. [Interest of studying the in vitro genotoxicity of an antineoplastic drug on healthy human cells: paclitaxel example].

    PubMed

    Digue, Laurence; Orsière, Thierry; Baciuchka-Palmaro, Marjorie; Duffaud, Florence; Pompili, Jocelyne; Favre, Roger; Botta, Alain

    2002-10-01

    Paclitaxel is often used as an adjuvant antineoplastic agent. However, very little data is available in literature on its potential genotoxicity on healthy human cells. Our objective is to study the potential in vitro genotoxicity of paclitaxel, by using the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay in combination with fluorescent in situ hybridization of nonspecific centromeric probes on human T-lymphocytes. Paclitaxel was found to significantly increase the micronucleated lymphocyte rates with a concentration-dependant manner. This increase is observed as early as with the weakest concentration tested (2,5 nM). Over 85% of those micronuclei contained one or more whole chromosomes, indicating that paclitaxel is a strong aneugenic drug. Paclitaxel induces the formation of aneuploid daughter cells, as a consequence of abnormalities in the distribution of chromosomes during the cell division. However, aneuploidy is probably one of the first events in the oncogenesis process, and it often seems to be linked to a dysfunction of the centrosome. An interaction between paclitaxel and centrosome could explain a considerable amount of the centromere-positive micronuclei due to multipolar mitosis. Paclitaxel, whose influence is being questioned in clinical practice in the occurrence of secondary acute myeloid leukemia, is therefore an in vitro aneugenic drug, which could be carcinogenic.

  5. Oxidative Stress Induced in Nurses by Exposure to Preparation and Handling of Antineoplastic Drugs in Mexican Hospitals: A Multicentric Study

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Miranda-Mendoza, Gerardo Daniel; Cabrera-Galeana, Paula Anel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely; Neri-Cruz, Nadia; García-Medina, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The impact of involuntary exposure to antineoplastic drugs (AD) was studied in a group of nurses in diverse hospitals in Mexico. The results were compared with a group of unexposed nurses. Anthropometric characteristics and the biochemical analysis were analyzed in both groups. Also, lipid peroxidation level (LPX), protein carbonyl content (PCC), and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were evaluated in blood of study participants as oxidative stress (OS) biomarkers. The group of occupationally exposed (OE) nurses consisted of 30 individuals ranging in age from 25 to 35 years. The control group included 30 nurses who were not occupationally exposed to the preparation and handling of AD and whose anthropometric and biochemical characteristics were similar to those of the OE group. All biomarkers evaluated were significantly increased (P < 0.5) in OE nurses compared to the control group. Results show that the assessment of OS biomarkers is advisable in order to evaluate exposure to AD in nurses. PMID:24719678

  6. Oxidative stress induced in nurses by exposure to preparation and handling of antineoplastic drugs in Mexican hospitals: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Miranda-Mendoza, Gerardo Daniel; Cabrera-Galeana, Paula Anel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; Sanjuan-Reyes, Nely; Neri-Cruz, Nadia; García-Medina, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The impact of involuntary exposure to antineoplastic drugs (AD) was studied in a group of nurses in diverse hospitals in Mexico. The results were compared with a group of unexposed nurses. Anthropometric characteristics and the biochemical analysis were analyzed in both groups. Also, lipid peroxidation level (LPX), protein carbonyl content (PCC), and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were evaluated in blood of study participants as oxidative stress (OS) biomarkers. The group of occupationally exposed (OE) nurses consisted of 30 individuals ranging in age from 25 to 35 years. The control group included 30 nurses who were not occupationally exposed to the preparation and handling of AD and whose anthropometric and biochemical characteristics were similar to those of the OE group. All biomarkers evaluated were significantly increased (P < 0.5) in OE nurses compared to the control group. Results show that the assessment of OS biomarkers is advisable in order to evaluate exposure to AD in nurses.

  7. Cell-based evaluation of changes in coagulation activity induced by antineoplastic drugs for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tsunaka, Misae; Shinki, Haruka; Koyama, Takatoshi

    2017-01-01

    Idarubicin (IDR), cytarabine (AraC), and tamibarotene (Am80) are effective for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In acute leukemia, the incidence of venous thromboembolism or disseminated intravascular coagulation is associated with induction chemotherapy. Procoagulant effects of IDR, AraC, and Am80 were investigated in a vascular endothelial cell line EAhy926 and AML cell lines HL60 (AML M2), NB4 (AML M3, APL), and U937 (AML M5), focusing on tissue factor (TF), phosphatidylserine (PS), and thrombomodulin (TM). IDR induced procoagulant activity on the surface of vascular endothelial and AML cell lines. Expression of TF antigen, TM antigen, and PS were induced by IDR on the surface of each cell line, whereas expression of TF and TM mRNAs were unchanged. Conversely, Am80 decreased TF exposure and procoagulant activity, and increased TM exposure on NB4 cells. In NB4 cells, we observed downregulation of TF mRNA and upregulation of TM mRNA. These data suggest IDR may induce procoagulant activity in vessels by apoptosis through PS exposure and/or TF expression on vascular endothelial and AML cell lines. Am80 may suppress blood coagulation through downregulation of TF expression and induction of TM expression. Our methods could be useful to investigate changes in procoagulant activity induced by antineoplastic drugs.

  8. Removal of polycyclic synthetic musks and antineoplastic drugs in ozonated wastewater: Quantitation based on the data of differential spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Nanaboina, Venkateswarlu; Chen, Fang; Korshin, Gregory V

    2016-03-05

    This study examined the degradation behavior of polycyclic musks (PMs) and antineoplastic drugs (ADs) and the absorbance spectra of effluent organic matter (EfOM) in municipal wastewater by ozone. Specific ozone doses used in the experiments ranged from 0 to 1mg O3/mg dissolved organic matter (DOC). The examined PMs included galaxolide, tonalide, celestolide, traseolide and phantolide. ADs included busulfan, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, flutamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen and methotrexate. Strong monotonic albeit nonlinear correlations were found to exist between relative changes of EfOM absorbance at 254 nm (i.e. ΔA254/A(0)254) and the degradation of the selected PMs and ADs. This result was interpreted based on the concept of the simultaneous oxidation of EfOM and, on the other hand, PMs and ADs. This interpretation showed that PMs were degraded primarily via OH radical attack, with tonalide and phantolide being less reactive compared with the other PMs. ADs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and busulfan were also determined to undergo oxidation by OH radicals. Comparison of the behavior of the radical probe para-chlorobenzoic acid and the examined ADs and PMs allowed evaluating corresponding reaction rate constants for reactions between these species and OH radicals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of latex-antineoplastic drug complexes by differential scanning calorimetry and microphotography.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, V; Ruiz, M A; Morales, E; Zouaki, J; Campos, J; Conejo-García, A; Gallo, M A; Espinosa, A

    2006-12-01

    Choline kinase inhibitors have recently been identified as potentially useful antitumoral agents. Here we determine the best conditions for obtaining drug-polymer complexes with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and JCR791B, a new drug representing a significant advance in the development of new molecules to inhibit tumour proliferation. As polymers we used the cellulose derivatives Aquacoat and Aquateric. The variables in the adsorption process measured were time to adsorbent-adsorbate equilibrium, pH and concentration. The drug-polymer complexes were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and microphotography. Our results show that adsorption of 5-FU and JCR was similar with both polymers although slightly greater with Aquacoat. The chemical structure of the drug and its solubility in water and oil are fundamental characteristics that determine the performance of polymers as drug carriers able to provide controlled release.

  10. Oncogenic targets, magnitude of benefit, and market pricing of antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Amir, Eitan; Seruga, Bostjan; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Kwong, Ryan; Pandiella, Atanasio; Tannock, Ian F; Ocaña, Alberto

    2011-06-20

    The relationship between market pricing of new anticancer drugs and the magnitude of clinical benefit caused by them has not been reported. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated approved new agents for solid tumors by the U.S. Food and Drug administration since the year 2000 were assessed. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were extracted for time-to-event end points described for each RCT. HRs were pooled for three groups: agents directed against a specific molecular target, for which the target population is selected by a biomarker (group A); less specific biologic targeted agents (group B); and chemotherapeutic agents (group C). Monthly market prices of these different drugs were compared. For overall survival (OS), the pooled HR was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.59 to 0.81) for group A (six drugs, six trials); it was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.74 to 0.83) for group B (seven drugs, 14 trials); and it was 0.84 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.90) for group C (eight drugs, 12 trials). For progression-free survival (PFS), the pooled HR was 0.42 (95% CI, 0.36 to 0.49) for group A (six drugs, seven trials); it was 0.57 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.64) for group B (seven drugs, 14 trials); and it was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.85) for group C (six drugs, 10 trials). Tests for heterogeneity between subgroups were highly significant for PFS (P < .001) and OS (P = .02). The median monthly prices for standard doses of drugs were $5375 for group A, $5644 for group B, and $6584 for group C (P = .87). New agents with specific molecular targets are clinically the most beneficial, but their monthly market prices are not significantly different from those of other anticancer agents.

  11. List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... five hazardous drugs in various locations such as biological safety cabinet (BSC) surfaces, floors, counter tops, stor- ... Worker exposures have been assessed by studies of biological markers of exposure. No single biological marker has ...

  12. Cell-based laboratory evaluation of coagulation activation by antineoplastic drugs for the treatment of lymphoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tsunaka, Misae; Arai, Reina; Ohashi, Ayaka; Koyama, Takatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Combining vorinostat, L-asparaginase, and doxorubicin (Dox) led to improved response rates in the treatment of lymphoid tumors. However, deep-vein thrombosis has been noted as one of the most serious side effects with these drugs, and how these regimens cause deep-vein thrombosis is unclear. Methods: We investigated the procoagulant effects of vorinostat, L-asparaginase, and doxorubicin in lymphoid tumors, focusing on tissue factor, phosphatidylserine, and antithrombin. The human vascular endothelial cell line EAhy926 as well as the lymphoid neoplastic cell lines HUT78 (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma), Molt4 (acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia), and Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) were employed to investigate these procoagulant effects. Results: Vorinostat, L-asparaginase, and doxorubicin induced exposure of phosphatidylserine and procoagulant activity on the surface of lymphoid tumor cells. Vorinostat and doxorubicin also induced phosphatidylserine exposure and increased procoagulant activity on EAhy926 cells. Expression of tissue factor antigen was induced by doxorubicin on the surface of each type of cells, whereas expression of tissue factor mRNA was unchanged. Secretion of antithrombin from HepG2 cells was reduced only by L-asparaginase. Conclusion: These data suggest that vorinostat and doxorubicin may induce procoagulant activity in vessels through apoptosis of tumor cells and through phosphatidylserine exposure and/or tissue factor expression on vascular endothelial cells. L-asparaginase may induce a thrombophilic state by reducing the secretion of anticoagulant proteins such as antithrombin. The laboratory methods described here could be useful to evaluate the procoagulant effects of antineoplastic drugs. PMID:27504186

  13. [Antineoplastic oral agents and drug-nutrient interactions: a sistematic review].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Torres, N V; Romero Crespo, I; Ballester Solaz, M; Albert Marí, A; Jiménez Arenas, V

    2009-01-01

    Studies on bioavailability are part of the clinical development of drugs for oral use in order to identify potential drug-food interactions. For oral antitumor drugs, their clinical importance is currently recognized although regrettably the information available presents variability concerning the scientific evidence. To review the available scientific evidence about oral anti-tumor medications and establish the recommendations for their administration with foods. We carried out a bibliographic search in Medline and The Cochrane Library for the period January of 1966 to March of 2008, focused on identifying those publications about drug-food interactions with oral antitumor medications. The bibliographical analysis was made in two steps. During the first phase, we excluded those articles in which the title or their content did not correspond with the objective settled; during the second phase, we deleted all the references duplicated in both databases. The inclusion criteria to select the articles were: design (systematic reviews, meta-analysis, Phase I and Phase II randomized clinical trials), population (adult patients; >19 years of age), intervention evaluated (administration of oral anti-tumor drugs under fasting conditions or with food) and measurement of the iFA results (calculation of the 90% CI of the odds ratio between the geometric mean of the values under the curve of the plasma concentrations (ABC) or the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) with and without foods). We excluded those publications that did not make reference to the bioequivalence dictamen established by the Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) in their outcomes measurement. A critical appraisal of the selected articles was done according to the recommendations that the FDA established to be met by these studies. At the initial search we obtained 850 references (98.5% Medline + and 1.4% Cochrane). During the first phase, we excluded 87.7% (746) of the articles, 100% of them corresponding

  14. Interactions of ozone and antineoplastic drugs on rat lung fibroblasts and Walker rat carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, D.G.; Morgan, D.L.

    1983-05-01

    Cultured rat lung fibroblasts (F-cells) and Walker rat carcinoma cells (WRC-cells) labeled with /sup 51/Cr were exposed to the following antitumor drugs alone or with O/sub 3/: carmustine (BCNU), doxorubicin (Dox), cisplatin (CPt), mitomycin C (Mit C) or vitamin K/sub 3/ (Vit K). Release of /sup 51/Cr (cell injury) was greater for F-cells than WRC-cells with any single treatment. Pretreatment with any drug (400 microM), except for Vit K with WRC-cells, did not significantly increase O/sub 3/-induced loss of /sup 51/Cr. Co-exposure of F-cells to drugs and O/sub 3/ resulted in a marked potentiation of O/sub 3/-induced injury with Vit K, and an inhibition with Dox.

  15. Cost Analysis of Using a Closed-System Transfer Device (CSTD) for Antineoplastic Drug preparation in a Malaysian Government-Funded Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Huan Keat; Lim, Yik Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Apart from reducing occupational exposure to cytotoxic hazards, the PhaSeal® closed-system transfer device (CSTD) can extend the beyond-use dates (BUDs) of unfinished vials of antineoplastic drugs for up to 168 hours (seven days). In this study, the total material cost incurred by its use in a Malaysian government-funded hospital was calculated. Methods: A list of vial stability following initial needle punctures of 29 commonly-used antineoplastic drugs was compiled. The amount of the materials used, including drugs, infusion bottles, the PhaSeal® CSTD and other consumables, was recorded on a daily basis for three months in 2015. The total cost was calculated based on the actual acquisition costs, and was compared with that of a hypothetical scenario, whereby conventional syringe-needle sets were used for the same amounts of preparations. Results: The use of the PhaSeal® CSTD incurred a cost of MYR 383,634.52 (USD 92,072.28) in three months, representing an average of MYR 170.5 (USD 40.92) per preparation or an estimated annual cost of MYR 1,534,538.08 (USD 368,289.14). Compared with conventional syringe-needle approach, it is estimated to lead to an additional spending of MYR 148,627.68 (USD 35,670.64) yearly. Conclusion: Although there was a reduction of drug wastage achieved by extending BUDs of unfinished vials using the PhaSeal® CSTD, cost saving was not observed, likely attributable to the wide use of lower-priced generic drugs in Malaysia. Future studies should further evaluate the possibility of cost saving, especially in health settings where branded and high-cost antineoplastic drugs are more commonly used. PMID:28032722

  16. Cost Analysis of Using a Closed-System Transfer Device (CSTD) for Antineoplastic Drug preparation in a Malaysian Government-Funded Hospital

    PubMed

    Chan, Huan Keat; Lim, Yik Ming

    2016-11-01

    Background: Apart from reducing occupational exposure to cytotoxic hazards, the PhaSeal® closed-system transfer device (CSTD) can extend the beyond-use dates (BUDs) of unfinished vials of antineoplastic drugs for up to 168 hours (seven days). In this study, the total material cost incurred by its use in a Malaysian government-funded hospital was calculated. Methods: A list of vial stability following initial needle punctures of 29 commonly-used antineoplastic drugs was compiled. The amount of the materials used, including drugs, infusion bottles, the PhaSeal® CSTD and other consumables, was recorded on a daily basis for three months in 2015. The total cost was calculated based on the actual acquisition costs, and was compared with that of a hypothetical scenario, whereby conventional syringe-needle sets were used for the same amounts of preparations. Results: The use of the PhaSeal® CSTD incurred a cost of MYR 383,634.52 (USD 92,072.28) in three months, representing an average of MYR 170.5 (USD 40.92) per preparation or an estimated annual cost of MYR 1,534,538.08 (USD 368,289.14). Compared with conventional syringe-needle approach, it is estimated to lead to an additional spending of MYR 148,627.68 (USD 35,670.64) yearly. Conclusion: Although there was a reduction of drug wastage achieved by extending BUDs of unfinished vials using the PhaSeal® CSTD, cost saving was not observed, likely attributable to the wide use of lower-priced generic drugs in Malaysia. Future studies should further evaluate the possibility of cost saving, especially in health settings where branded and high-cost antineoplastic drugs are more commonly used. Creative Commons Attribution License

  17. Structural and functional evaluation of interaction between mammalian ribosomal RNA with platinum-containing antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Theile, Dirk; Kos, Martin

    2016-02-03

    Cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin primarily target DNA, but also alter RNA functionality, albeit to different extent. This study determined the in vitro cytotoxicity (IC50 values) of platinum drugs in LS180 cells and compared the rRNA platination patterns following IC50 exposure. Relevance of particular secondary RNA structures for platination susceptibility was evaluated by primer extension methodology using 18S rRNA as a model RNA. Consequences of rRNA platination for translation efficiency were evaluated by monitoring fluorescence of a destabilised green fluorescent protein variant through flow cytometry. Oxaliplatin and cisplatin were most cytotoxic with IC50 values of 1.7 μM±0.8 and 4.1 μM±0.1, respectively. Carboplatin was significantly less efficient (IC50 147.1 μM±19.4). When exposed to equitoxic concentrations (respective IC50), all three compounds caused similar stop signal incidence or intensity. Moreover, the same rRNA sites were targeted without selectivity for particular secondary structures but with a slight preference for guanine-rich regions. Compared to cycloheximide, none of the drugs diminished translation efficiency at typical in vivo concentrations. In conclusion, equitoxic concentrations of platinum drugs target the same sites in cellular rRNA and cause similar platination intensities. At pharmacokinetically relevant concentrations, cisplatin, oxaliplatin or carboplatin do not inhibit translation efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction and assessment of ecogenotoxicity of antineoplastic drugs in binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kundi, Michael; Parrella, Alfredo; Lavorgna, Margherita; Criscuolo, Emma; Russo, Chiara; Isidori, Marina

    2016-08-01

    The combined genotoxic effects of four anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil [5-FU], cisplatin [CDDP], etoposide [ET], and imatinib mesylate [IM]) were studied testing their binary mixtures in two crustaceans that are part of the freshwater food chain, namely Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia. Genotoxicity was assessed using the in vivo comet assay. Assessment was based on two distinct effect sizes determined from dose-response experiments. Doses for single and combined exposures expected to result in these effect sizes were computed based on Bliss independence as reference model. Statistical comparison by analysis of variance of single and combined toxicities allowed accepting or rejecting the independency hypothesis. The results obtained for D. magna showed independent action for all mixtures except for IM+5-FU that showed an antagonistic interaction. In C. dubia, most mixtures had antagonist interactions except IM+5-FU and IM+CDDP that showed Bliss independence. Despite the antagonistic interactions, our results demonstrated that combinations of anticancer drugs could be of environmental concern because effects occur at very low concentrations that are in the range of concentrations encountered in aquatic systems.

  19. Nuclear Targeting with an Auger Electron Emitter Potentiates the Action of a Widely Used Antineoplastic Drug.

    PubMed

    Imstepf, Sebastian; Pierroz, Vanessa; Raposinho, Paula; Bauwens, Matthias; Felber, Michael; Fox, Thomas; Shapiro, Adam B; Freudenberg, Robert; Fernandes, Célia; Gama, Sofia; Gasser, Gilles; Motthagy, Felix; Santos, Isabel R; Alberto, Roger

    2015-12-16

    We present the combination of the clinically well-proven chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, and (99m)Tc, an Auger and internal conversion electron emitter, into a dual-action agent for therapy. Chemical conjugation of Doxorubicin to (99m)Tc afforded a construct which autonomously ferries a radioactive payload into the cell nucleus. At this site, damage is exerted by dose deposition from Auger radiation. The (99m)Tc-conjugate exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of survival in a selected panel of cancer cells and an in vivo study in healthy mice evidenced a biodistribution which is comparable to that of the parent drug. The homologous Rhenium conjugate was found to effectively bind to DNA, inhibited human Topoisomerase II, and exhibited cytotoxicity in vitro. The collective in vitro and in vivo data demonstrate that the presented metallo-conjugates closely mimic native Doxorubicin.

  20. The pharmacokinetics of JS-38, a novel antineoplastic drug, in rats.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hong Zha; Fang, Yu; Li, Ying; Fan, Ting-Ting; Qin, Yan; Liu, Quan-Hai

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the pre-clinical pharmacokinetics of JS-38(C22H1404N2S2F6, MW: 548), a study was conducted in Wistar rats (3 female, 2 male: 200-250 g about 6 or 7 months). The concentration-time curve of JS-38 in rats demonstrated the pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics of a two-compartmental model. The area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) for the low, middle and high dosage (i.e., 20, 50 and 125 mg x kg(-1)) amounted to 46.850 +/- 19.946, 161.101 +/- 58.877 and 312.565 +/- 187.273 mg/L x h respectively; a positive correlation was demonstrated between the AUC(0-infinity). and the dosages in question (r = 0.99). The average time to reach maximum concentration (Tmax) was 3.( RSD: 20.4% and the half-life (t(1/2)) was 11.4 h( RSD: 8.8% P > 0.05. For the low, middle and high dosage, the maximum concentration (Cmax) was 4.882, 11.248, and 13.431 microg x mL(-1) respectively. After the administration of JS-38, except for the brain and spinal marrow, the drug distribution in the different body tissues varied, in particular in the liver, intestine and thyroid gland. A significant distribution of JS-38 was detected in cancerous tissues, and its concentrations demonstrated a tendency increase over time. There was a certain degree of distribution in the bone marrow. The urine samples showed that JS-38 nearly was practically not eliminated in its original form. The amount eliminated after 72h via the bile was only 1.03 +/- 0.1% of the administered dose. In the rat model, most of the JS-38 in its original form (53.58 +/- 22.28%) was excreted via the feces. When the intragastric administration of doses of 20, 50 and 125 mg x kg(-1) was compared with i.v. administered JS-38 (1 mg x kg(-1)), the absolute bioavailability amounted to 22.2 +/- 9.5%, 30.4 +/- 14.5% and 23.6 +/- 11.3% respectively. It was found that this compound is well absorbed in to the system and that it shows favorable PK properties. The outcome of this early pre

  1. Selumetinib, an Oral Anti-Neoplastic Drug, May Attenuate Cardiac Hypertrophy via Targeting the ERK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Chen, Zhongxiu; Yang, Hao; Luo, Fangbo; Chen, Lihong; Cai, Huawei; Li, Yajiao; You, Guiying; Long, Dan; Li, Shengfu; Zhang, Qiuping; Rao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Although extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) are a well-known central mediator in cardiac hypertrophy, no clinically available ERK antagonist has been tested for preventing cardiac hypertrophy. Selumetinib is a novel oral MEK inhibitor that is currently under Phase II and Phase III clinical investigation for advanced solid tumors. In this study, we investigated whether Selumetinib could inhibit the aberrant ERK activation of the heart in response to stress as well as prevent cardiac hypertrophy. In an in vitro model of PE-induced cardiac hypertrophy, Selumetinib significantly inhibited the ERK activation and prevented enlargement of cardiomyocytes or reactivation of certain fetal genes. In the pathologic cardiac hypertrophy model of ascending aortic constriction, Selumetinib provided significant ERK inhibition in the stressed heart but not in the other organs. This selective ERK inhibition prevented left ventricular (LV) wall thickening, LV mass increase, fetal gene reactivation and cardiac fibrosis. In another distinct physiologic cardiac hypertrophy model of a swimming rat, Selumetinib provided a similar anti-hypertrophy effect, except that no significant fetal gene reactivation or cardiac fibrosis was observed. Selumetinib, a novel oral anti-cancer drug with good safety records in a number of Phase II clinical trials, can inhibit ERK activity in the heart and prevent cardiac hypertrophy. These promising results indicate that Selumetinib could potentially be used to treat cardiac hypertrophy. However, this hypothesis needs to be validated in human clinical trials.

  2. Selumetinib, an Oral Anti-Neoplastic Drug, May Attenuate Cardiac Hypertrophy via Targeting the ERK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao; Luo, Fangbo; Chen, Lihong; Cai, Huawei; Li, Yajiao; You, Guiying; Long, Dan; Li, Shengfu; Zhang, Qiuping; Rao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Aims Although extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) are a well-known central mediator in cardiac hypertrophy, no clinically available ERK antagonist has been tested for preventing cardiac hypertrophy. Selumetinib is a novel oral MEK inhibitor that is currently under Phase II and Phase III clinical investigation for advanced solid tumors. In this study, we investigated whether Selumetinib could inhibit the aberrant ERK activation of the heart in response to stress as well as prevent cardiac hypertrophy. Methods and Results In an in vitro model of PE-induced cardiac hypertrophy, Selumetinib significantly inhibited the ERK activation and prevented enlargement of cardiomyocytes or reactivation of certain fetal genes. In the pathologic cardiac hypertrophy model of ascending aortic constriction, Selumetinib provided significant ERK inhibition in the stressed heart but not in the other organs. This selective ERK inhibition prevented left ventricular (LV) wall thickening, LV mass increase, fetal gene reactivation and cardiac fibrosis. In another distinct physiologic cardiac hypertrophy model of a swimming rat, Selumetinib provided a similar anti-hypertrophy effect, except that no significant fetal gene reactivation or cardiac fibrosis was observed. Conclusions Selumetinib, a novel oral anti-cancer drug with good safety records in a number of Phase II clinical trials, can inhibit ERK activity in the heart and prevent cardiac hypertrophy. These promising results indicate that Selumetinib could potentially be used to treat cardiac hypertrophy. However, this hypothesis needs to be validated in human clinical trials. PMID:27438013

  3. Antibacterial activities of antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Bodet, C A; Jorgensen, J H; Drutz, D J

    1985-01-01

    Fourteen antineoplastic agents were examined for in vitro antibacterial activity against 101 aerobic and anaerobic bacterial isolates representing indigenous human microflora and selected opportunistic pathogens. Only 5-fluorouracil, mitomycin, and etoposide demonstrated inhibitory effects at achievable plasma concentrations, while the remaining drugs lacked appreciable antibacterial activities. PMID:2416271

  4. Environmental contamination, product contamination and workers exposure using a robotic system for antineoplastic drug preparation.

    PubMed

    Sessink, Paul J M; Leclercq, Gisèle M; Wouters, Dominique-Marie; Halbardier, Loïc; Hammad, Chaïma; Kassoul, Nassima

    2015-04-01

    Environmental contamination, product contamination and technicians exposure were measured following preparation of iv bags with cyclophosphamide using the robotic system CytoCare. Wipe samples were taken inside CytoCare, in the clean room environment, from vials, and prepared iv bags including ports and analysed for contamination with cyclophosphamide. Contamination with cyclophosphamide was also measured in environmental air and on the technicians hands and gloves used for handling the drugs. Exposure of the technicians to cyclophosphamide was measured by analysis of cyclophosphamide in urine. Contamination with cyclophosphamide was mainly observed inside CytoCare, before preparation, after preparation and after daily routine cleaning. Contamination outside CytoCare was incidentally found. All vials with reconstituted cyclophosphamide entering CytoCare were contaminated on the outside but vials with powdered cyclophosphamide were not contaminated on the outside. Contaminated bags entering CytoCare were also contaminated after preparation but non-contaminated bags were not contaminated after preparation. Cyclophosphamide was detected on the ports of all prepared bags. Almost all outer pairs of gloves used for preparation and daily routine cleaning were contaminated with cyclophosphamide. Cyclophosphamide was not found on the inner pairs of gloves and on the hands of the technicians. Cyclophosphamide was not detected in the stationary and personal air samples and in the urine samples of the technicians. CytoCare enables the preparation of cyclophosphamide with low levels of environmental contamination and product contamination and no measurable exposure of the technicians. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Occupational exposures to antineoplastic drugs and ionizing radiation in Canadian veterinary settings: findings from a national surveillance project.

    PubMed

    Hall, Amy L; Davies, Hugh W; Demers, Paul A; Nicol, Anne-Marie; Peters, Cheryl E

    2013-11-01

    Although veterinary workers may encounter various occupational health hazards, a national characterization of exposures is lacking in Canada. This study used secondary data sources to identify veterinary exposure prevalence for ionizing radiation and antineoplastic agents, as part of a national surveillance project. For ionizing radiation, data from the Radiation Protection Bureau of Health Canada were used to identify veterinarians and veterinary technicians monitored in 2006. This was combined with Census statistics to estimate a prevalence range and dose levels. For antineoplastic agents, exposure prevalence was estimated using statistics on employment by practice type and antineoplastic agent usage rates, obtained from veterinary licensing bodies and peer-reviewed literature. In 2006, 7,013 (37% of all) Canadian veterinary workers were monitored for ionizing radiation exposure. An estimated 3.3% to 8.2% of all veterinarians and 2.4% to 7.2% of veterinary technicians were exposed to an annual ionizing radiation dose above 0.1 mSv, representing a total of between 536 and 1,450 workers. All monitored doses were below regulatory limits. For antineoplastic agents, exposure was predicted in up to 5,300 (23%) of all veterinary workers, with an estimated prevalence range of 22% to 24% of veterinarians and 20% to 21% of veterinary technicians. This is the first national-level assessment of exposure to ionizing radiation and antineoplastic agents in Canadian veterinary settings. These hazards may pose considerable health risks. Exposures appeared to be low, however our estimates should be validated with comprehensive exposure monitoring and examination of determinants across practice areas, occupations, and tasks.

  6. Prediction of drug distribution in subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines and healthy tissues in mouse: application of the tissue composition-based model to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Gould, Stephen E; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Messick, Kirsten; Oeh, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M

    2015-04-01

    Advanced tissue composition-based models can predict the tissue-plasma partition coefficient (Kp ) values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on healthy tissues and do not incorporate data from tumors. The objective of this study was to apply a tissue composition-based model to six marketed antineoplastic drugs (docetaxel, DOC; doxorubicin, DOX; gemcitabine, GEM; methotrexate, MTX; topotecan, TOP; and fluorouracil, 5-FU) to predict their Kp values in three human tumor xenografts (HCT-116, H2122, and PC3) as well as in healthy tissues (brain, muscle, lung, and liver) under steady-state in vivo conditions in female NCR nude mice. The mechanisms considered in the tissue/tumor composition-based model are the binding to lipids and to plasma proteins, but the transporter effect was also investigated. The method consisted of analyzing tissue composition, performing the pharmacokinetics studies in mice, and calculating the corresponding in vivo Kp values. Analyses of tumor composition indicated that the tumor xenografts contained no or low amounts of common transporters by contrast to lipids. The predicted Kp values were within twofold and threefold of the measured values in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively. However, predictions for brain for each drug, for liver for MTX, and for each tumor xenograft for GEM were disparate from the observed values, and, therefore, not well served by the model. Overall, this study is the first step toward the mechanism-based prediction of Kp values of small molecules in healthy and tumor tissues in mouse when no transporter and permeation limitation effect is evident. This approach will be useful in selecting compounds based on their abilities to penetrate human cancer xenografts with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, thereby increasing therapeutic index for chemotherapy in oncology study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American

  7. Handling of injectable antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, R S; Virden, J E

    1980-01-01

    Although the clinical toxicity of antineoplastic drugs has been well documented there is little or no information on the problems that may arise on the handling and mishandling of such agents. This paper attempts to highlight the importance of taking precautions to prevent adverse effects resulting from contact with cytotoxic drugs during handling and to suggest a practical guide for the handling of such agents. PMID:7427382

  8. Quantitative Analysis of the Anti-Proliferative Activity of Combinations of Selected Iron-Chelating Agents and Clinically Used Anti-Neoplastic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Potuckova, Eliska; Jansova, Hana; Machacek, Miloslav; Vavrova, Anna; Haskova, Pavlina; Tichotova, Lucie; Richardson, Vera; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Richardson, Des R.; Simunek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that several chelators possess marked potential as potent anti-neoplastic drugs and as agents that can ameliorate some of the adverse effects associated with standard chemotherapy. Anti-cancer treatment employs combinations of several drugs that have different mechanisms of action. However, data regarding the potential interactions between iron chelators and established chemotherapeutics are lacking. Using estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we explored the combined anti-proliferative potential of four iron chelators, namely: desferrioxamine (DFO), salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH), (E)-N′-[1-(2-hydroxy-5-nitrophenyl)ethyliden] isonicotinoyl hydrazone (NHAPI), and di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), plus six selected anti-neoplastic drugs. These six agents are used for breast cancer treatment and include: paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, methotrexate, tamoxifen and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (an active metabolite of cyclophosphamide). Our quantitative chelator-drug analyses were designed according to the Chou-Talalay method for drug combination assessment. All combinations of these agents yielded concentration-dependent, anti-proliferative effects. The hydrophilic siderophore, DFO, imposed antagonism when used in combination with all six anti-tumor agents and this antagonistic effect increased with increasing dose. Conversely, synergistic interactions were observed with combinations of the lipophilic chelators, NHAPI or Dp44mT, with doxorubicin and also the combinations of SIH, NHAPI or Dp44mT with tamoxifen. The combination of Dp44mT with anti-neoplastic agents was further enhanced following formation of its redox-active iron and especially copper complexes. The most potent combinations of Dp44mT and NHAPI with tamoxifen were confirmed as synergistic using another estrogen receptor-expressing breast cancer cell line, T47D, but not estrogen receptor-negative MDA

  9. Minimizing Occupational Exposure to Antineoplastic Agents.

    PubMed

    Polovich, Martha

    2016-01-01

    The inherent toxicity of antineoplastic drugs used for the treatment of cancer makes them harmful to healthy cells as well as to cancer cells. Nurses who prepare and/or administer the agents potentially are exposed to the drugs and their negative effects. Knowledge about these drugs and the precautions aimed at reducing exposure are essential aspects of infusion nursing practice. This article briefly reviews the mechanisms of action of common antineoplastic drugs, the adverse outcomes associated with exposure, the potential for occupational exposure from preparation and administration, and recommended strategies for minimizing occupational exposure.

  10. Pharmacology of antineoplastic agents in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, V J; Sipila, P E

    1994-04-01

    The use of antineoplastic agents in pregnant women poses obvious risks to both the patient and the developing fetus, particularly during organogenesis. While the use of antineoplastics during pregnancy is often unavoidable, the physician may limit the risks by having a clear knowledge of the pharmacology and teratogenic potential of individual agents. Specific physiologic changes in the pregnant patient, such as enhanced renal excretion of drugs, increased or decreased hepatic function, altered gastrointestinal absorption and enterohepatic circulation, altered plasma protein binding, an increase in plasma volume (50%), and creation of a fluid filled 3rd compartment (amniotic fluid) for water soluble drugs may all significantly influence the pharmacology of antineoplastic agents. These physiological changes may effect the pregnant patients ability to absorb orally administered drugs, metabolize drugs to either active or inactive metabolites, and eliminate cytotoxically active drugs. A resulting reduction in concentration x time (C x T) for drug exposure to the maternal system may reduce the efficacy of the antineoplastic agents, while an increase in C x T may expose the patient and her fetus to undue toxicity. The timing of drug administration to gestational age is also a critical factor for some drugs. While many drugs result in adverse effects on the fetus regardless of gestational age, others appear to pose less of a threat if administered beyond the first trimester. This review addresses the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and the teratogenic potential of individual antineoplastic agents that are commonly used in pregnant patients. The aim of this review is to help the physician select, on a patient specific basis, antineoplastic agents that avoid at least some of the fetal risk involved while maintaining efficacy in the treatment of the patient.

  11. Mycelial antineoplastic activity of Agaricus blazei.

    PubMed

    Bertéli, Míria Benetati Delgado; Umeo, Suzana Harue; Bertéli, André; do Valle, Juliana Silveira; Linde, Giani Andrea; Colauto, Nelson Barros

    2014-08-01

    Basidiocarp of Agaricus blazei (=Agaricus brasiliensis; =Agaricus subrufescens) is used as teas or capsules due to its antineoplastic effect but there are few reports of using mycelium for this purpose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antineoplastic activity on sarcoma 180 cells implanted in mice of two forms of preparation of the mycelium from two A. blazei strains grown in culture medium with different concentrations of isolated soy protein. Mycelia were grown in Pontecorvo medium with different concentrations of isolated soybean protein (ISP). Mycelial hot water extract, moistened mycelial powder, hot water extract of green tea, Ifosfamida(®) (ifosfamide drug), and saline solution were administered daily by gavage in mice with sarcoma 180 cells to evaluate antineoplastic activity. It was concluded that antineoplastic activity was the same for both strains, except when used as moistened mycelial powder, which rules out the use of mycelial powder in capsules. Mycelial hot water extract had high antineoplastic activity with lower metabolic demand on the spleen and maintenance of normal blood parameters. Mycelial growth in different ISP concentrations had the same antineoplastic activity. Also the vegetative mycelium was as effective as the basidiocarp for sarcoma 180 tumor inhibition. Green tea was as effective as mycelial hot water extract.

  12. Effectiveness of a Closed-System Transfer Device in Reducing Surface Contamination in a New Antineoplastic Drug-Compounding Unit: A Prospective, Controlled, Parallel Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinturaud, Marine; Soichot, Marion; Richeval, Camille; Humbert, Luc; Lebecque, Michèle; Sidikou, Ousseini; Barthelemy, Christine; Bonnabry, Pascal; Allorge, Delphine; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this randomized, prospective and controlled study was to investigate the ability of a closed-system transfer device (CSTD; BD-Phaseal) to reduce the occupational exposure of two isolators to 10 cytotoxic drugs and compare to standard compounding devices. Methods and Findings The 6-month study started with the opening of a new compounding unit. Two isolators were set up with 2 workstations each, one to compound with standard devices (needles and spikes) and the other using the Phaseal system. Drugs were alternatively compounded in each isolator. Sampling involved wiping three surfaces (gloves, window, worktop), before and after a cleaning process. Exposure to ten antineoplastic drugs (cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, dacarbazine, 5-FU, methotrexate, gemcitabine, cytarabine, irinotecan, doxorubicine and ganciclovir) was assessed on wipes by LC-MS/MS analysis. Contamination rates were compared using a Chi2 test and drug amounts by a Mann-Whitney test. Significance was defined for p<0.05. Overall contamination was lower in the “Phaseal” isolator than in the “Standard” isolator (12.24% vs. 26.39%; p < 0.0001) although it differed according to drug. Indeed, the contamination rates of gemcitabine were 49.3 and 43.4% (NS) for the Standard and Phaseal isolators, respectively, whereas for ganciclovir, they were 54.2 and 2.8% (p<0.0001). Gemcitabine amounts were 220.6 and 283.6 ng for the Standard and Phaseal isolators (NS), and ganciclovir amounts were 179.9 and 2.4 ng (p<0.0001). Conclusion This study confirms that using a CSTD may significantly decrease the chemical contamination of barrier isolators compared to standard devices for some drugs, although it does not eliminate contamination totally. PMID:27391697

  13. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  14. [Preparation of antineoplastic agents].

    PubMed

    Descoutures, J-M

    2006-01-01

    In the last fifteen years, the preparation of antineoplastic agents has tended to be centralized in the hospital pharmacy for two main reasons: to enable better protection for the staff, to enable better safety for the patient. The consequences of this organization have led to standardization of techniques, implementation of a quality system and also a better use of antineoplastic agents. After protocols have been standardized by the physician and validated by the pharmacist, four main steps are necessary: phamaceutical validation of the prescription, preparation of IV admixtures according to a production file, control of the final product, dispatching of the preparation to the patient. Computer-controlled processes guarantee the safety of these different steps. The centralized preparations are made either with a vertical laminar flow hood or with an isolator. With the implementation of the National Cancer Plan, antineoplastic agents for patients on home treatments will also be prepared in centralized hospital pharmacies.

  15. Procedures for handling antineoplastic injections in comprehensive cancer centers.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, M L; Roberts, M J; Theisen, J A

    1983-04-01

    The procedures for handling injectable antineoplastic drugs in comprehensive cancer centers in the U.S. are summarized. In May 1982, a survey was sent to directors of pharmacy at 27 institutions designated as comprehensive cancer centers. Some questions duplicated a 1979 survey, while others addressed points in recently published guidelines on handling antineoplastic medications. Representatives of 21 institutions responded. These institutions represented 13,638 beds, 1,848 of which were oncology beds. Seventeen institutions had written policies for the preparation of antineoplastics, but only nine had a training program. The pharmacist or pharmacy technician prepared these medications in 12 institutions. Ten institutions prepared antineoplastics in a vertical laminar-flow hood. Gloves and masks were worn by employees in 20 and 13 of the institutions, respectively. Six institutions in some way assessed the health of employees handling antineoplastics. Eleven institutions had written policies on disposal of antineoplastics; 13 institutions disposed of this waste separately. Ten institutions had a training program for administration of antineoplastics. Compared with 1979, the trend is toward increased protection of persons handling injectable antineoplastic agents, but the procedures used at comprehensive cancer centers are not uniform.

  16. Frequencies of 23 Functionally Significant Variant Alleles Related with Metabolism of Antineoplastic Drugs in the Chilean Population: Comparison with Caucasian and Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Roco, Ángela; Quiñones, Luis; Agúndez, José A. G.; García-Martín, Elena; Squicciarini, Valentina; Miranda, Carla; Garay, Joselyn; Farfán, Nancy; Saavedra, Iván; Cáceres, Dante; Ibarra, Carol; Varela, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. The cancer incidence rate in Chile is 133.7/100,000 inhabitants and it is the second cause of death, after cardiovascular diseases. Most of the antineoplastic drugs are metabolized to be detoxified, and some of them to be activated. Genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes can induce deep changes in enzyme activity, leading to individual variability in drug efficacy and/or toxicity. The present research describes the presence of genetic polymorphisms in the Chilean population, which might be useful in public health programs for personalized treatment of cancer, and compares these frequencies with those reported for Asian and Caucasian populations, as a contribution to the evaluation of ethnic differences in the response to chemotherapy. We analyzed 23 polymorphisms in a group of 253 unrelated Chilean volunteers from the general population. The results showed that CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*3, CYP2D6*3, CYP2C19*3, and CYP3A4*17 variant alleles are virtually absent in Chileans. CYP1A1*2A allele frequency (0.37) is similar to that of Caucasians and higher than that reported for Japanese people. Allele frequencies for CYP3A5*3(0.76) and CYP2C9*3(0.04) are similar to those observed in Japanese people. CYP1A1*2C(0.32), CYP1A2*1F(0.77), CYP3A4*1B(0.06), CYP2D6*2(0.41), and MTHFR T(0.52) allele frequencies are higher than the observed either in Caucasian or in Japanese populations. Conversely, CYP2C19*2 allelic frequency (0.12), and genotype frequencies for GSTT1 null (0.11) and GSTM1 null (0.36) are lower than those observed in both populations. Finally, allele frequencies for CYP2A6*4(0.04), CYP2C8*3(0.06), CYP2C9*2(0.06), CYP2D6*4(0.12), CYP2E1*5B(0.14), CYP2E1*6(0.19), and UGT2B7*2(0.40) are intermediate in relation to those described in Caucasian and in Japanese populations, as expected according to the ethnic origin of the Chilean population. In conclusion, our findings support the idea that ethnic variability must be

  17. Applicability of the comet assay in evaluation of DNA damage in healthcare providers' working with antineoplastic drugs: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zare Sakhvidi, Mohammad Javad; Hajaghazadeh, Mohammad; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Zare Sakhvidi, Fariba; Naghshineh, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Unintended occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs (ANDs) may occur in medical personnel. Some ANDs are known human carcinogens and exposure can be monitored by genotoxic biomarkers. To evaluate the obstacles to obtaining conclusive results from a comet assay test to determine DNA damage among AND exposed healthcare workers. We systematically reviewed studies that used alkaline comet assay to determine the magnitude and significance of DNA damage among health care workers with potential AND exposure. Fifteen studies were eligible for review and 14 studies were used in the meta-analysis. Under random effect assumption, the estimated standardized mean difference (SMD) in the DNA damage of health care workers was 1.93 (95% CI: 1.15-2.71, p < 0.0001). The resulting SMD was reduced to 1.756 (95% CI: 0.992-2.52, p < 0.0001) when the analysis only included nurses. In subgroup analyses based on gender and smoking, heterogeneity was observed. Only for studies reporting comet moment, I2 test results, as a measure of heterogeneity, dropped to zero. Heterogeneity analysis showed that date of study publication was a possible source of heterogeneity (B = -0.14; p < 0.0001). A mixture of personal parameters, comet assay methodological variables, and exposure characteristics may be responsible for heterogenic data from comet assay studies and interfere with obtaining conclusive results. Lack of quantitative environmental exposure measures and variation in comet assay protocols across studies are important obstacles in generalization of results.

  18. Applicability of the comet assay in evaluation of DNA damage in healthcare providers’ working with antineoplastic drugs: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zare Sakhvidi, Mohammad Javad; Hajaghazadeh, Mohammad; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Mehrparvar, Amir houshang; Zare Sakhvidi, Fariba; Naghshineh, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Unintended occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs (ANDs) may occur in medical personnel. Some ANDs are known human carcinogens and exposure can be monitored by genotoxic biomarkers. Objective To evaluate the obstacles to obtaining conclusive results from a comet assay test to determine DNA damage among AND exposed healthcare workers. Methods We systematically reviewed studies that used alkaline comet assay to determine the magnitude and significance of DNA damage among health care workers with potential AND exposure. Fifteen studies were eligible for review and 14 studies were used in the meta-analysis. Results Under random effect assumption, the estimated standardized mean difference (SMD) in the DNA damage of health care workers was 1.93 (95% CI: 1.15–2.71, p < 0.0001). The resulting SMD was reduced to 1.756 (95% CI: 0.992–2.52, p < 0.0001) when the analysis only included nurses. In subgroup analyses based on gender and smoking, heterogeneity was observed. Only for studies reporting comet moment, I2 test results, as a measure of heterogeneity, dropped to zero. Heterogeneity analysis showed that date of study publication was a possible source of heterogeneity (B = −0.14; p < 0.0001). Conclusions A mixture of personal parameters, comet assay methodological variables, and exposure characteristics may be responsible for heterogenic data from comet assay studies and interfere with obtaining conclusive results. Lack of quantitative environmental exposure measures and variation in comet assay protocols across studies are important obstacles in generalization of results. PMID:27110842

  19. Thrombotic microangiopathies and antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Grangé, Steven; Coppo, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy is a well-described complication of cancer treatment. Its incidence has increased these last decades, as a result of a better awareness of this complication in cancer patients in one hand, but also of a larger array of therapeutic compounds including anti-vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) drugs. It is therefore mandatory to recognize these conditions since they have a significant impact in thrombotic microangiopathies management and prognosis. Practitioners should be aware of the more classical antineoplastic agents associated with thrombotic microangiopathies, the mechanisms by which they induce them, and the resulting management and prognosis. Since malignancy itself can induce thrombotic microangiopathies, it is also mandatory to know how to distinguish rapidly those caused by antineoplastic agents from those associated with cancer, for an adapted management. Thrombotic microangiopathies associated with chemotherapy remain of dismal prognosis. A better understanding of pathophysiology in these forms of thrombotic microangiopathies, in association with a more empirical approach through the use of new therapeutic agents that can also help in the understanding on new mechanisms a posteriori, should improve their prognosis. The preliminary encouraging results reported with complement blockers in this field could represent a convincing example. Copyright © 2017 Société francophone de néphrologie, dialyse et transplantation. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Vitamin B12-mediated transport: a potential tool for tumor targeting of antineoplastic drugs and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yashwant; Kohli, Dharm Veer; Jain, Sanjay K

    2008-01-01

    The uptake of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin, Cbl/VB12) in mammalian cells is mediated by specific, high-affinity receptors for the vitamin B12-binding protein, transcobalamin II, which is expressed on the plasma membrane. The receptor for vitamin B12 is overexpressed on a number of human tumors, including cancers of the ovary, kidney, uterus, testis, brain, colon, lung, and myelocytic blood cells. Furthermore, the affinity of cyanocobalamin conjugates for cell surface transcobalamin II receptors seems to be high enough so that vitamin B12 derivatization with the cytotoxic agent or carriers bearing cytotoxic drugs allows the selective delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to cancer cells. Thus, conjugates of vitamin B12 enter receptor-expressing cancer cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis, and targeting may be accomplished by multiple mechanisms, depending on the drug-delivery strategy. This review summarizes the applications of vitamin B12 as a targeting ligand and highlights the various methods being developed for delivery of therapeutic and imaging agents to cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This review reflects the potentiality of vitamin B12 for tumor targeting of chemotherapeutic and diagnostic agents.

  1. Assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Spoelstra, Sandra L; Given, Charles W

    2011-05-01

    The increase in oral anticancer medications with complex regimens creates a need to assure that patients are taking therapeutic dosages as prescribed. This article reviews the assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents. Research and journal articles from CINAHL and PubMed. Assessing and measuring adherence to oral antineoplastics should include three dimensions: the percentage of medications taken, the duration, and the timing of taking the medication. Clinicians need to conduct ongoing assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents. This includes eliciting patient report of adherence, pill counts, drug diaries, and pharmacy or medical record audits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Gonadal disorder as a result of adverse reaction to antineoplastic drugs--diagnosis, symptoms, prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Kowalska, A

    The past three decades have shown the increasing success of chemotherapy as the treatment of malignancies. This therapeutic success has focused attention on the associated gonadal toxicity. Cytotoxic agents may induce infertility and endocrine disfunction. Data for analysis were provided by studies on gonadal function after chemotherapy for: Hodgkin's disease, acute lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, breast cancer; renal disease, bone-marrow transplantation. The likelihood of developing chemotherapy-induced damage depended on the chemotherapeutic regimen and prescribed dose, illness, sex and degree of gonadal activity at the time of treatment. Despite of the high frequency of chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage its prevention has received a little attention. LH-RHA and oral contraceptive therapy and testosterone have been tested to a limited extent of gonadal toxicity. Usually in male endocrine disfunction of testis does not need to be treated because it is moderate and does not cause any clinical symptoms. In female hormonal substitution seems to be necessary to decrease unpleasant feelings connected with menopause induced by chemotherapy. Further investigations should considered use of new cytotoxic agents without gonadal toxicity or use of new drugs which can better protect gonadal function.

  3. Antineoplastic compounds in the environment-substances of special concern.

    PubMed

    Kümmerer, Klaus; Haiß, Annette; Schuster, Armin; Hein, Arne; Ebert, Ina

    2016-08-01

    Antineoplastic drugs are important in the treatment of cancer. Some interact directly with the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and are of utmost importance in terms of risk. As highly active compounds, antineoplastics and their metabolites are largely excreted into wastewater and are found in the aquatic environment up to the lower μg/L range. Their predicted environmental concentrations are often below the action limit set in the European Medicines Agency (EMA) guideline. An in-depth risk assessment regarding their presence and effects in the aquatic environment is often not performed, and there is a lack of knowledge. This study considered whether there is an underestimation of possible risks associated with the presence of antineoplastic drugs with regard to trigger value stated in the EMA and FDA guidelines. In a balance, we identified a total of 102 active pharmaceutical ingredients of the ATC-group L01 (antineoplastic agents), which are environmentally relevant. In Germany, 20.7 t of antineoplastic agents was consumed in 2012. The share of drugs with DNA-damaging properties increased within the last 6 years from 24 up to 67 %. Solely, capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil amount together 8 t-which corresponds to 39 % of the total antineoplastic consumption. Around 80 % of the total mass consumed could be attributed to prescriptions issued by office-based practitioners and is mostly excreted at home. Based on the different mode of actions, a case-by-case evaluation of the risk connected to their presence in the environment is recommended. DNA-damaging drugs should be assessed independently as no action limit can be assumed.

  4. Occupational exposure to cytostatic/antineoplastic drugs and cytogenetic damage measured using the lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay: A systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Villarini, M; Gianfredi, V; Levorato, S; Vannini, S; Salvatori, T; Moretti, M

    Many studies have reported the occurrence of work-environment contamination by antineoplastic drugs (ANPD), with significant incorporation of trace amounts of these hazardous drugs in hospital personnel. Given the ability of most ANPD to actively bind DNA, thus inducing genotoxic effects, it is of pivotal importance to assess the degree of genotoxic damage (i.e., residual genotoxic risk) in occupationally exposed subjects. The lymphocyte cytokinesis-block micronucleus (L-CBMN) assay is largely used for biological effect monitoring in subjects occupationally exposed to ANPD. In this study, we identified and analyzed the studies published reporting the use of the L-CBMN assay as biomarker of genotoxic risk in health care workers exposed to ANPD with the aim of performing meta-analysis and providing a meta-estimate of the genotoxic effect of exposure. We retrieved 24 studies, published from 1988 to 2015, measuring MN in peripheral blood lymphocytes in health care workers occupationally exposed to ANPD. In 15 out of the 24 studies (62.5%), increased MN frequencies were recognized in exposed subjects as compared to controls. The meta-analysis of MN frequency of the combined studies confirmed an association between occupational exposure to ANPD and cytogenetic effects with an overall meta-estimate of 1.67 [95% CI: 1.41-1.98]. In 16 out of the 24 studies (66.6%) at least one other genotoxicity biomarker, besides L-CBMN assay, was employed for biological effect monitoring. In several studies the effect of exposure to ANPD was evaluated also in terms of MN in exfoliated buccal cells. Other studies focused on genotoxicity endpoints, such as sister chromatid exchanges (3 studies), chromosome aberrations (6 studies), or primary DNA damage investigated by comet assay (7 studies). Overall, there was good agreement between other genotoxicity tests employed and L-CBMN assay outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs.

  6. Analysis of anti-neoplastic drug in bacterial ghost matrix, w/o/w double nanoemulsion and w/o nanoemulsion by a validated 'green' liquid chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Youssof, Abdullah M E; Salem-Bekhit, Mounir M; Shakeel, Faiyaz; Alanazi, Fars K; Haq, Nazrul

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to develop and validate a 'green' reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for rapid analysis of a cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in bulk drug, marketed injection, water-in-oil (w/o) nanoemulsion, double water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) nanoemulsion and bacterial ghost (BG) matrix. The chromatography study was carried out at room temperature (25±1°C) using an HPLC system with the help of ultraviolet (UV)-visible detector. The chromatographic performance was achieved with a Nucleodur 150mm×4.6mm RP C8 column filled with 5µm filler as a static phase. The mobile phase consisted of ethyl acetate: methanol (7:3% v/v) which was delivered at a flow rate of 1.0mLmin(-1) and the drug was detected in UV mode at 254nm. The developed method was validated in terms of linearity (r(2)=0.998), accuracy (98.19-102.09%), precision (% RSD=0.58-1.17), robustness (% RSD=0.12-0.53) and sensitivity with satisfactory results. The efficiency of the method was demonstrated by the assay of the drug in marketed injection, w/o nanoemulsion, w/o/w nanoemulsion and BG with satisfactory results. The successful resolution of the drug along with its degradation products clearly established the stability-indicating nature of the proposed method. Overall, these results suggested that the proposed analytical method could be effectively applied to the routine analysis of 5-FU in bulk drug, various pharmaceutical dosage forms and BG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Coping with arsenic-based pesticides on Dine (Navajo) textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jae R.

    Arsenic-based pesticide residues have been detected on Arizona State Museum's (ASM) Dine (Navajo) textile collection using a handheld portable X-ray (pXRF) spectrometer. The removal of this toxic pesticide from historic textiles in museums collections is necessary to reduce potential health risks to Native American communities, museum professionals, and visitors. The research objective was divided into three interconnected stages: (1) empirically calibrate the pXRF instrument for arsenic contaminated cotton and wool textiles; (2) engineer an aqueous washing treatment exploring the effects of time, temperature, agitation, and pH conditions to efficiently remove arsenic from wool textiles while minimizing damage to the structure and properties of the textile; (3) demonstrate the devised aqueous washing treatment method on three historic Navajo textiles known to have arsenic-based pesticide residues. The preliminary results removed 96% of arsenic from a high arsenic concentration (~1000 ppm) textile opposed to minimal change for low arsenic concentration textiles (<100 ppm).

  8. Radiation survival parameters of antineoplastic drug-sensitive and -resistant human ovarian cancer cell lines and their modification by buthionine sulfoximine

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, K.G.; Behrens, B.C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Hamilton, T.C.; Grotzinger, K.R.; McKoy, W.M.; Winker, M.A.; Ozols, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    The optimum integration of chemotherapy and irradiation is of potential clinical significance in the treatment of ovarian cancer. A series of human ovarian cancer cell lines have been developed in which dose-response relationships to standard anticancer drugs have been determined, and the patterns of cross-resistance between these drugs and irradiation have been established. By stepwise incubation with drugs, sublines of A2780, a drug-sensitive cell line, have been made 100-fold, 10-fold, and 10-fold more resistant to Adriamycin (2780AD), melphalan (2780ME), and cisplatin (2780CP). Two additional cell lines, NIH:OVCAR-3nu(Ag+) and NIH:OVCAR-4(Ag+), were established from drug-refractory patients. 2780ME, 2780CP, OVCAR-3nu(Ag+), and OVCAR-4(Ag+) are all cross-resistant to irradiation, with DOS of 146, 187, 143, and 203, respectively. However, 2780AD remains sensitive to radiation, with a DO of 111, which is similar to that of A2780 (101). Glutathione (GSH) levels are elevated in 2780ME, 2780CP, OVCAR-3nu(Ag+), and OVCAR-4(Ag+) to 4.58, 6.13, 12.10, and 15.14 nmol/10(6) cells as compared to A2780, with 1.89 nmol/10(6) cells. However, the GSH level in 2780AD is only minimally higher than that in A2780 (2.94 nmol/10(6) cells). Buthionine sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH synthesis, significantly increases the radiation sensitivity of 2780ME (changing the DO from 143 to 95) and 2780CP to a lesser extent, suggesting that intracellular GSH levels may play an important role in the radiation response of certain neoplastic cells.

  9. Impact of robotic antineoplastic preparation on safety, workflow, and costs.

    PubMed

    Seger, Andrew C; Churchill, William W; Keohane, Carol A; Belisle, Caryn D; Wong, Stephanie T; Sylvester, Katelyn W; Chesnick, Megan A; Burdick, Elisabeth; Wien, Matt F; Cotugno, Michael C; Bates, David W; Rothschild, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-01

    Antineoplastic preparation presents unique safety concerns and consumes significant pharmacy staff time and costs. Robotic antineoplastic and adjuvant medication compounding may provide incremental safety and efficiency advantages compared with standard pharmacy practices. We conducted a direct observation trial in an academic medical center pharmacy to compare the effects of usual/manual antineoplastic and adjuvant drug preparation (baseline period) with robotic preparation (intervention period). The primary outcomes were serious medication errors and staff safety events with the potential for harm of patients and staff, respectively. Secondary outcomes included medication accuracy determined by gravimetric techniques, medication preparation time, and the costs of both ancillary materials used during drug preparation and personnel time. Among 1,421 and 972 observed medication preparations, we found nine (0.7%) and seven (0.7%) serious medication errors (P = .8) and 73 (5.1%) and 28 (2.9%) staff safety events (P = .007) in the baseline and intervention periods, respectively. Drugs failed accuracy measurements in 12.5% (23 of 184) and 0.9% (one of 110) of preparations in the baseline and intervention periods, respectively (P < .001). Mean drug preparation time increased by 47% when using the robot (P = .009). Labor costs were similar in both study periods, although the ancillary material costs decreased by 56% in the intervention period (P < .001). Although robotically prepared antineoplastic and adjuvant medications did not reduce serious medication errors, both staff safety and accuracy of medication preparation were improved significantly. Future studies are necessary to address the overall cost effectiveness of these robotic implementations.

  10. Impact of Robotic Antineoplastic Preparation on Safety, Workflow, and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Seger, Andrew C.; Churchill, William W.; Keohane, Carol A.; Belisle, Caryn D.; Wong, Stephanie T.; Sylvester, Katelyn W.; Chesnick, Megan A.; Burdick, Elisabeth; Wien, Matt F.; Cotugno, Michael C.; Bates, David W.; Rothschild, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Antineoplastic preparation presents unique safety concerns and consumes significant pharmacy staff time and costs. Robotic antineoplastic and adjuvant medication compounding may provide incremental safety and efficiency advantages compared with standard pharmacy practices. Methods: We conducted a direct observation trial in an academic medical center pharmacy to compare the effects of usual/manual antineoplastic and adjuvant drug preparation (baseline period) with robotic preparation (intervention period). The primary outcomes were serious medication errors and staff safety events with the potential for harm of patients and staff, respectively. Secondary outcomes included medication accuracy determined by gravimetric techniques, medication preparation time, and the costs of both ancillary materials used during drug preparation and personnel time. Results: Among 1,421 and 972 observed medication preparations, we found nine (0.7%) and seven (0.7%) serious medication errors (P = .8) and 73 (5.1%) and 28 (2.9%) staff safety events (P = .007) in the baseline and intervention periods, respectively. Drugs failed accuracy measurements in 12.5% (23 of 184) and 0.9% (one of 110) of preparations in the baseline and intervention periods, respectively (P < .001). Mean drug preparation time increased by 47% when using the robot (P = .009). Labor costs were similar in both study periods, although the ancillary material costs decreased by 56% in the intervention period (P < .001). Conclusion: Although robotically prepared antineoplastic and adjuvant medications did not reduce serious medication errors, both staff safety and accuracy of medication preparation were improved significantly. Future studies are necessary to address the overall cost effectiveness of these robotic implementations. PMID:23598843

  11. Antineoplastic agents, 99. Amaryllis belladonna.

    PubMed

    Pettit, G R; Gaddamidi, V; Goswami, A; Cragg, G M

    1984-01-01

    Amaryllis belladonna bulbs were examined for constituents inhibitory against the murine P-388 lymphocytic leukemia (PS system). Two in vitro active alkaloids, acetylcaranine (2; 9PS ED50 0.23 microgram/ml) and ambelline (3; 9PS ED50 1.6 micrograms/ml), were isolated accompanied by undulatine. However, the non-chiral anhydrolycorinium chloride (5) was found to be the principal antineoplastic (3 PS, 64-69% life extension at dose levels 10 to 20 mg/kg in vivo, ED50 1.4 micrograms/ml in vitro) component. Quaternary chloride 5 has not been located previously among plant or animal biosynthetic products.

  12. Induction of drug resistance and protein kinase C genes in A2780 ovarian cancer cells after incubation with antineoplastic agents at sublethal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Brügger, Dorothee; Brischwein, Klaus; Liu, Chao; Bader, Peter; Niethammer, Dietrich; Gekeler, Volker; Beck, James F

    2002-01-01

    We examined the inducibility of drug resistance (MDR1, MRP1, LRP) and protein kinase C (PKC) isozyme (alpha, epsilon, eta, theta, tau, zeta) corresponding genes in A2780 ovarian cancer cells after a 24-hour treatment with adriamycin (ADR), camptothecin (CAM), etoposide (ETO) or vincristine (VCR). Sublethal concentrations of drugs were used to exclude short-term effects caused by selection. Cell cycle analysis was performed to identify possible correlation between resistance factors, PKC isozymes and proliferation. We found a mostly combined induction of MDR1, LRP, PKC tau and PKC zeta by CAM, ETO and VCR. PKC alpha, epsilon, eta and theta gene expression altered variably. Cell cycle analysis showed that A2780 cells responded with a marked G2/M arrest after a 24-hour treatment with CAM, ETO and VCR but an association between the induction of PKC isozymes corresponding genes and proliferation was not seen. Our analysis points to a possible link between atypical PKC tau/PKC zeta and MDR1/LRP in cytostatic stress response of cancer cells.

  13. Synthesis of the vitamin E amino acid esters with an enhanced anticancer activity and in silico screening for new antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Gagic, Zarko; Ivkovic, Branka; Srdic-Rajic, Tatjana; Vucicevic, Jelica; Nikolic, Katarina; Agbaba, Danica

    2016-06-10

    Tocopherols and tocotrienols belong to the family of vitamin E (VE) with the well-known antioxidant properties. For certain α-tocopherol and γ-tocotrienol derivatives used as the lead compounds in this study, antitumor activities against various cancer cell types have been reported. In the course of the last decade, structural analogs of VE (esters, ethers and amides) with an enhanced antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity against various cancer cells were synthesized. Within the framework of this study, seven amino acid esters of α-tocopherol (4a-d) and γ-tocotrienol (6a-c) were prepared using the EDC/DMAP reaction conditions and their ability to inhibit proliferation of the MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and the A549 lung cancer cells was evaluated. Compound 6a showed an activity against all three cell lines (IC50: 20.6μM, 28.6μM and 19μM for the MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and A549 cells, respectively), while compound 4a inhibited proliferation of the MCF-7 (IC50=8.6μM) and A549 cells (IC50=8.6μM). Ester 4d exerted strong antiproliferative activity against the estrogen-unresponsive, multi-drug resistant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line, with IC50 value of 9.2μM. Compared with the strong activity of compounds 4a, 4d and 6a, commercial α-tocopheryl succinate and γ-tocotrienol showed only a limited activity against all three cell lines, with IC50 values >50μM. Investigation of the cell cycle phase distribution and the cell death induction confirmed an apoptosis of the MDA-MB-231 cells treated with 4d, as well as a synergistic effect of 4d with the known anticancer drug doxorubicin. This result suggests a possibility of a combined therapy of breast cancer in order to improve the therapeutic response and to lower the toxicity associated with a high dose of doxorubicin. The stability study of 4d in human plasma showed that ca. 83% initial concentration of this compound remains in plasma in the course of six hours incubation. The ligand based

  14. A uniform procedure for reimbursing the off-label use of antineoplastic drugs according to the value-for-money approach.

    PubMed

    Messori, A; Fadda, V; Trippoli, S

    2011-04-01

    National healthcare systems as well as local institutions generally reimburse numerous off-label uses of anticancer drugs, but an explicit framework for managing these payments is still lacking. As in the case of on-label uses, an optimal management of off-label uses should be aimed at a direct proportionality between cost and clinical benefit. Within this framework, assessing the incremental cost/effectiveness ratio becomes mandatory, and measuring the magnitude of the clinical benefit (e.g. gain in overall survival or progression-free survival) is essential.This paper discusses how the standard principles of cost-effectiveness and value-for-money can be applied to manage the reimbursement of off-label treatments in oncology. It also describes a detailed operational scheme to appropriately implement this aim. Two separate approaches are considered: a) a trial-based approach, which is designed for situations where enough information is available from clinical studies about the expected effectiveness of the off-label treatment; b) an individualized payment-by-results approach, which is designed for situations in which adequate information on effectiveness is lacking; this latter approach requires that each patient receiving off-label treatment is followed-up to determine individual outcomes and tailor the extent of payment to individual results.Some examples of application of both approaches are presented in detail, which have been extracted from a list of 184 off-label indications approved in 2010 by the Region of tuscany in italy. these examples support the feasibility of the two methods proposed.In conclusion, the scheme described in this paper represents an operational solution to an unsettled problem in the area of oncology drugs.

  15. Exposure of hospital workers to airborne antineoplastic agents

    SciTech Connect

    deWerk Neal, A.; Wadden, R.A.; Chiou, W.L.

    1983-04-01

    Practices for handling antineoplastic drugs were surveyed, and ambient-air sampling for four antineoplastic agents was conducted in outpatient oncology clinics. A questionnaire was administered in 1981 to the nurse or pharmacist in charge of drug preparation at 10 hospital oncology clinics. At three sites, air samples were collected during working hours in medication-preparation rooms and nearby offices. The air-sampling pumps contained filters at breathing-zone height; room air was drawn through each filter for 40 hours. Extracts from the filters were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for fluorouracil and cyclophosphamide in seven sets of samples and methotrexate and doxorubicin in five sets of samples. Mass spectrometry (MS) was used to confirm detection of fluorouracil. Total use of each monitored drug was recorded at each site. Nine clinics had no ventilation hood, and drugs were prepared by nurses in eight clinics. Routine use of gloves (three clinics) and masks (one clinic) was uncommon, and wastes were disposed of in uncovered receptacles in four of the clinics. Eating and drinking occurred in seven of the preparation rooms. At the main air-sampling site, fluorouracil (0.12-82.26 ng/cu m) was detected in air during 200 of the 320 hours monitored. Cyclophosphamide (370 ng/cu m) was present during 80 hours. In the two other sites, fluorouracil was detected by HPLC but not confirmed by MS, and no cyclophosphamide was detected. No detectable amounts of methotrexate and doxorubicin were present. Fluorouracil was the most frequently used drug, and cyclophosphamide was second. Results suggest that personnel handling antineoplastic drugs are subject to potential systemic absorption of these agents by inhalation.

  16. Interactive effects of antifungal and antineoplastic agents on yeasts commonly prevalent in cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ghannoum, M A; Motawy, M S; Abu Hatab, M A; Abu Elteen, K H; Criddle, R S

    1989-01-01

    The effects of combinations of antifungal and antineoplastic drugs on inhibition of the growth of yeasts which commonly infect cancer patients have been analyzed. It was shown that (i) inhibitory drug combinations could be selected in which all drugs were at levels far below their individual MICs; (ii) interactive effects among antineoplastic and antifungal drugs may be very large; (iii) optimum combinations of drugs for inhibition of yeast growth depended upon both the relative and absolute concentrations of the drugs in the mixture; (iv) drug combinations which were effective at low levels in inhibiting one test yeast were also generally effective against other species, but the levels of susceptibilities and, to a lesser extent, the best ratios of drugs in the test combinations varied with species; and (v) to quantitatively evaluate drug interactions, it is necessary to carefully define and control all experimental conditions, absolute and relative concentrations of drugs used, and the organisms tested. PMID:2751285

  17. Potential antineoplastic effects of Aloe-emodin: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruie; Zhang, Jinming; Hu, Yangyang; Wang, Shengpeng; Chen, Meiwan; Wang, Yitao

    2014-01-01

    Aloe-emodin (AE), a bioactive anthraquinone derived from both Aloe vera and Rheum officinale, has recently been demonstrated to have various pharmacological activities. With the widespread popularity of natural products, such as antineoplastic drugs, AE has attracted much attention due to its remarkable antineoplastic activity on multiple tumor cells involving multi-channel mechanisms, including the disruption of cell cycle, induction of apoptosis, anti-metastasis, antiangiogenic, and strengthening of immune function. Experimental data have revealed AE as a potentially potent anti-cancer candidate. Despite this, the pharmaceutical application of AE is still in a fledging period as most research has concentrated on the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of action of existing treatments, rather than the development of novel formulations. Therefore, the present review summarizes the potential toxicity, molecular mechanism, pharmacokinetic characteristics, and pharmaceutical development of AE as an antineoplastic agent. This is based on its physicochemical properties, in an attempt to encourage further research on AE as a potential anti-cancer agent.

  18. Antineoplastic agents and the associated myelosuppressive effects: a review.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Jason N; McCullough, Kristen B; Ice, Lauren L; Smith, Judith A

    2014-10-01

    Bone marrow is a complex organ responsible for the regulation of hematopoietic cell distribution throughout the human body. Patients receiving antineoplastic agents as a therapeutic intervention for hematologic malignancy often experience varying degrees of myelotoxicity. Antineoplastic agents cause hypocellularity in marrow resulting in a reduction in hematopoietic tissue activity and a corresponding decline in cell production. Quantifying the adverse effects on hematopoiesis is based on the properties of a single agent, the use of individual drugs within a combination chemotherapy regimen, and the course, or courses, of chemotherapy designed to treat cancer. The direct or indirect suppression of erythrocytes, granulocytes, and megakaryocytes has potential for multiple negative clinical consequences ranging from increased monitoring of blood counts to life-threatening infection and death. This review will provide an overview of the structure and function of competent adult bone marrow, describe the process of hematopoiesis, and characterize the myelotoxicities associated with common antineoplastic agents currently used in the treatment of cancer. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Intestinal and Liver Toxicity of Antineoplastic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, George B.; Tirumali, Nigendra

    1984-01-01

    This discussion was selected from the weekly Grand Rounds in the Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle. Taken from a transcription, it has been edited by Drs Paul G. Ramsey, Assistant Professor of Medicine, and Philip J. Fialkow, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine. PMID:6375139

  20. Antineoplastic activity of zoledronic acid and denosumab.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Pawel; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z

    2013-08-01

    Cancer patients suffer from cancer-induced bone pain, hypercalcemia, and reduced quality of life caused by pathological fractures. Many of these complications related to cancer can be treated, or at least controlled, using new anticancer agents. Recently, two agents used initially to treat osteoporosis demonstrated direct and indirect anticancer activity. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about direct and indirect anticancer activity of zoledronic acid (a third-generation bisphosphonate), and denosumab antibody against RANKL. Zoledronic acid influences the proliferation and viability of tumor cells in vitro, and effectively reduces tumor burden, tumor-induced pain, and tumor growth in vivo. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody preventing the binding of RANKL to its receptor on osteoclasts' membrane, and through this mechanism inhibits the resorption of the bone. Furthermore, this agent demonstrates direct anticancer activity through the RANKL signaling pathway. Because of these features both drugs may gain broader application for the treatment of cancer patients. However, further pre-clinical and clinical evaluation is needed for both agents to fully assess the antineoplastic mechanisms of activity of both agents.

  1. Antineoplastic agents, 120. Pancratium littorale.

    PubMed

    Pettit, G R; Gaddamidi, V; Herald, D L; Singh, S B; Cragg, G M; Schmidt, J M; Boettner, F E; Williams, M; Sagawa, Y

    1986-01-01

    The bulbs of Pancratium littorale collected in Hawaii were found to contain a new phenanthridone biosynthetic product designated pancratistatin (4a) that proved to be effective (38-106% life extension at 0.75-12.5 mg/kg dose levels) against the murine P-388 lymphocytic leukemia. Pancratistatin also markedly inhibited (ED50, 0.01 microgram/ml) growth of the P-388 in vitro cell line and in vivo murine M-5076 ovary sarcoma (53-84% life extension at 0.38-3.0 mg/kg). An X-ray crystal structure determination of pancratistatin monomethyl ether (4c) and a detailed high resolution (400 MHz) nmr study of pancratistatin and its pentaacetate (4b) completed assignment of structure 4a. Companion antineoplastic constituents of P. littorale were found to be narciclasine (2c) and its 7-deoxy derivative (2a). The structure of 7-deoxynarciclasine (2c) was also confirmed by an X-ray crystallographic analysis.

  2. 2016 Updated MASCC/ESMO consensus recommendations: Emetic risk classification and evaluation of the emetogenicity of antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Karin; Chan, Alexandre; Gralla, Richard J; Jahn, Franziska; Rapoport, Bernardo; Warr, David; Hesketh, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    Employing the same framework as in previous guideline updates, antineoplastic agents were classified into four emetic risk categories. The classification of the emetogenic level of new antineoplastic agents, especially for the oral drugs, represents an increasing challenge. Accurate reporting of emetogenicity of new antineoplastic agents in the absence of preventive antiemetic treatment is rarely available. A systematic search was conducted for drugs approved after 2009 until June 2015 using EMBASE and PubMed. The search term was "drug name." The restrictions were language (English records only), date (2009 to 2015), and level of evidence ("clinical trial"). From January 2009 to June 2015, 42 new antineoplastic agents were identified and a systematic search was conducted to identify relevant studies to help define emetic risk levels. The reported incidence of vomiting varied across studies for many agents, but there was adequate evidence to allow 41 of the 42 new antineoplastic agents to be classified according to emetogenic risk. No highly emetogenic agents were identified. Seven moderately emetogenic agents, 26 low emetogenic, agents and eight minimal emetogenic agents were identified and classified accordingly. The MASCC/ESMO update committee also recommended reclassification of the combination of an anthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC) as highly emetogenic. Despite several limitations, we have attempted to provide a reasonable approximation of the emetic risk associated with new antineoplastic agents through a comprehensive search of the available literature. Hopefully by the next update, more precise information on emetic risk will have been collected during new agent development process.

  3. Pharmacy program for improved handling of antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Scott, S A; Schrott, D B; Loesch, G A

    1983-07-01

    A pharmacy program to improve the handling of antineoplastic drug products in a pediatric hospital is described. To correct deficiencies in the preparation and administration of cancer chemotherapy, the pharmacy department in conjunction with pediatric hematology-oncology physicians prepared a cancer chemotherapy manual. Included in the manual were (1) policies and procedures for the ordering, preparation, delivery, administration, and disposal of chemotherapy; (2) a flow sheet to facilitate ordering of daily chemotherapy doses and allow pharmacists to double-check dosage calculations of physicians; (3) drug information monographs on various antineoplastic agents used in the hospital; and (4) a reference chart containing information about the reconstitution, dilution, stability, storage, administration, and special-handling precautions for chemotherapy. Upon the recommendation of the hematology-oncology staff and with the approval of the hospital administration, the pharmacy obtained a vertical laminar-airflow hood and expanded its services to include preparation of all cancer chemotherapy for inpatients. Procedures were implemented to document delivery of chemotherapy to the nursing unit and to ensure proper acquisition and charting of chemotherapy doses given by physicians. Pharmacy involvement has improved control of the handling and administration of cancer chemotherapy in the hospital and has increased the safety of patients and hospital personnel.

  4. The role of diet on the clinical pharmacology of oral antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Antonio; Cefalo, Maria G; Coccia, Paola; Mastrangelo, Stefano; Maurizi, Palma; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2012-02-01

    The number of oral anticancer agents has greatly increased in recent years. It is a well-known fact that food intake can induce significant variations in the bioavailability of these drugs. The aim of this review is to describe the interactions between diet and oral anticancer drugs in terms of the possible effects of such interactions on reducing the antineoplastic activity of the drug or increasing its side effects. This was an analytical study of the numerous mechanisms leading to changes in the bioavailability of oral antineoplastic agents due to diet. Food-drug interactions can induce a delay, decrease or increase in the absorption of the oral chemotherapeutic agent. The concomitant intake of food and antineoplastic drugs influence the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug processes depending on the composition of the food consumed and the specific interactions of the food with transport mechanisms (p-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance proteins) and intestinal enzymatic systems (cytochrome P450). In prescribing an oral anticancer agent, clinicians must consider the possibility that the consumption of specific food items has the potential to interfere with the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the prescribed drug.

  5. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Delitheos, A; Karavokyros, I; Tiligada, E

    1995-10-01

    The effect of several antineoplastic agents on Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains has been investigated. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum cytotoxic concentration (MCC) and median effective concentration (EC50) were determined to identify strains with inherent sensitivity to the agents tested. Several strains proved to be sensitive to the antimetabolites 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate as well as to doxorubicin and cis-platine. On the contrary m-amsacrine, procarbazine, vinca alcaloids, melphalan and hydroxyurea were inactive at concentrations up to 400 micrograms ml-1. The strain ATCC 2366, the most relatively sensitive to the agents tested, was used for studying the effect of treatment duration and of drug concentration on cell survival. Methotrexate and cis-platine, which according to MIC and MCC tests seemed ineffective for this strain, reduced survival significantly after 6 h of treatment. A correlation of the shape of the survival curves with MIC and MCC values was attempted.

  6. Evaluation of new antiemetic agents and definition of antineoplastic agent emetogenicity--state of the art.

    PubMed

    Grunberg, Steven M; Warr, David; Gralla, Richard J; Rapoport, Bernardo L; Hesketh, Paul J; Jordan, Karin; Espersen, Birgitte T

    2011-03-01

    Antiemetic drug development can follow the same logical path as antineoplastic drug development from appropriate preclinical models through Phase I, Phase II, and Phase III testing. However, due to the marked success of antiemetic therapy over the last 25 years, placebo antiemetic treatment against highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy is not acceptable. Promising antiemetic agents therefore rapidly reach Phase III testing, where they are substituted into or added to effective and accepted regimens. One challenge of antiemetic drug development is determining whether substitution is indeed acceptable or whether prior regimens must be maintained intact as a basis for further antiemetic drug development. An additional challenge is the classification of emetogenic level of new antineoplastic agents. Accurate reporting of emetogenicity of such antineoplastic agents in the absence of preventive antiemetic treatment may not be available. However, at the 2009 Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC)/European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Consensus Conference, an expert panel used best available data to establish rankings of emetogenicity. Oral chemotherapeutic agents are ranked separately from intravenous agents, recognizing intrinsic differences in emetogenicity as well as differing schedules of administration. Since oral chemotherapeutic agents are often administered in extended regimens, the distinction between acute and delayed emesis is less clear, and cumulative emesis must be considered. As control of vomiting has improved, attention has shifted to control of nausea, a related but distinct and equally important problem. Additional efforts will be necessary to understand mechanisms of nausea and to identify optimal remedies.

  7. Tissue concentration of systemically administered antineoplastic agents in human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Arati; Grossman, Stuart A.; Blakeley, Jaishri O.

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain-barrier (BBB) limits the penetration of many systemic antineoplastic therapies. Consequently, many agents may be used in clinical studies and clinical practice though they may not achieve therapeutic levels within the tumor. We sought to compile the currently available human data on antineoplastic drug concentrations in brain and tumor tissue according to BBB status. A review of the literature was conducted for human studies providing concentrations of antineoplastic agents in blood and metastatic brain tumors or high-grade gliomas. Studies were considered optimal if they reported simultaneous tissue and blood concentration, multiple sampling times and locations, MRI localization, BBB status at sampling site, tumor histology, and individual subject data. Twenty-Four studies of 19 compounds were included. These examined 18 agents in contrast-enhancing regions of high-grade gliomas, with optimal data for 2. For metastatic brain tumors, adequate data was found for 9 agents. Considerable heterogeneity was found in the measurement value, tumor type, measurement timing, and sampling location within and among studies, limiting the applicability of the results. Tissue to blood ratios ranged from 0.054 for carboplatin to 34 for mitoxantrone in high-grade gliomas, and were lowest for temozolomide (0.118) and etoposide (0.116), and highest for mitoxantrone (32.02) in metastatic tumors. The available data examining the concentration of antineoplastic agents in brain and tumor tissue is sparse and limited by considerable heterogeneity. More studies with careful quantification of antineoplastic agents in brain and tumor tissue is required for the rational development of therapeutic regimens. PMID:21400119

  8. Gastrointestinal and liver infections in children undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy in the years 2000

    PubMed Central

    Castagnola, Elio; Ruberto, Eliana; Guarino, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review gastrointestinal and liver infections in children undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy. To look at gut microflora features in oncology children. METHODS: We selected studies published after year 2000, excluding trials on transplanted pediatric patients. We searched English language publications in MEDLINE using the keywords: “gastrointestinal infection AND antineoplastic chemotherapy AND children”, “gastrointestinal infection AND oncology AND children”, “liver infection AND antineoplastic chemotherapy AND children”, “liver abscess AND chemotherapy AND child”, “neutropenic enterocolitis AND chemotherapy AND children”, “thyphlitis AND chemotherapy AND children”, “infectious diarrhea AND children AND oncology”, “abdominal pain AND infection AND children AND oncology”, “perianal sepsis AND children AND oncology”, “colonic pseudo-obstruction AND oncology AND child AND chemotherapy”, “microflora AND children AND malignancy”, “microbiota AND children AND malignancy”, “fungal flora AND children AND malignancy”. We also analysed evidence from several articles and book references. RESULTS: Gastrointestinal and liver infections represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy. Antineoplastic drugs cause immunosuppression in addition to direct toxicity, predisposing to infections, although the specific risk is variable according to disease and host features. Common pathogens potentially induce severe diseases whereas opportunistic microorganisms may attack vulnerable hosts. Clinical manifestations can be subtle and not specific. In addition, several conditions are rare and diagnostic process and treatments are not standardized. Diagnosis may be challenging, however early diagnosis is needed for quick and appropriate interventions. Interestingly, the source of infection in those children can be exogenous or endogenous. Indeed, mucosal damage may allow the

  9. Lanreotide Depot: An Antineoplastic Treatment of Carcinoid or Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wolin, Edward M; Manon, Amandine; Chassaing, Christophe; Lewis, Andy; Bertocchi, Laurent; Richard, Joel; Phan, Alexandria T

    2016-12-01

    Peptide drugs for antineoplastic therapies usually have low oral bioavailability and short in vivo half-lives, requiring less preferred delivery methods. Lanreotide depot is a sustained-release somatostatin analog (SSA) formulation produced via an innovative peptide self-assembly method. Lanreotide is approved in the USA and Europe to improve progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with unresectable gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) and also approved in Europe for symptom control in carcinoid syndrome associated with GEP-NETs. This review discusses how the distinct molecule and formulation of lanreotide depot provide advantages to patients and health care providers, as well as the most recent clinical evidence demonstrating the safety and efficacy of lanreotide depot in inhibiting tumor growth and controlling hormonal symptoms in GEP-NETs. The lanreotide depot formulation confers a remarkable pharmacokinetic profile with no excipients, comprised only of lanreotide acetate and water. Of note, lanreotide depot constitutes an example for peptide self-assembly based formulations, providing insights that could help future development of sustained-release formulations of other antineoplastic peptides. Most patients with GEP-NETs will present with inoperable or incurable disease; thus, medical management for symptoms and tumor control plays a crucial role. Recent long-term clinical studies have demonstrated that lanreotide depot is well tolerated, prolongs PFS in GEP-NET patients, and significantly reduces symptoms related to carcinoid syndrome. The unique depot formulation and delivery method of lanreotide confer advantages in the treatment of metastatic GEP-NETs, contributing to improvements in NET-related symptoms and PFS without reducing quality of life in this patient population.

  10. Application of electrolysis for detoxification of an antineoplastic in urine.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toyohide; Hirose, Jun; Sano, Kouichi; Kato, Ryuji; Ijiri, Yoshio; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Goto, Emi; Tamai, Hiroshi; Nakano, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Antineoplastics in excreta from patients have been considered to be one of the origins of cytotoxic, carcinogenic, teratogenic, and mutagenic contaminants in surface water. Recent studies have demonstrated that antineoplastics in clinical wastewater can be detoxified by electrolysis. In this study, to develop a method for the detoxification of antineoplastics in excreta, methotrexate solution in the presence of human urine was electrolyzed and evaluated. We found that urine inhibits detoxification by electrolysis; however, this inhibition decreased by diluting urine. In urine samples, the concentrations of active chlorine generated by anodic oxidation from 0.9% NaCl solution for inactivation of antineoplastics increased in dilution-dependent and time-dependent manner. These results indicate that electrolysis with platinum-based iridium oxide composite electrode is a possible method for the detoxification of a certain antineoplastic in urine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chloride intracellular channel 1 regulates the antineoplastic effects of metformin in gallbladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchen; Wang, Zheng; Li, Maolan; Ye, Yuanyuan; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Yichi; Yuan, Ruiyan; Jin, Yunpeng; Hao, Yajuan; Jiang, Lin; Hu, Yunping; Chen, Shili; Liu, Fatao; Zhang, Yijian; Wu, Wenguang; Liu, Yingbin

    2017-06-01

    Metformin is the most commonly used drug for type 2 diabetes and has potential benefit in treating and preventing cancer. Previous studies indicated that membrane proteins can affect the antineoplastic effects of metformin and may be crucial in the field of cancer research. However, the antineoplastic effects of metformin and its mechanism in gallbladder cancer (GBC) remain largely unknown. In this study, the effects of metformin on GBC cell proliferation and viability were evaluated using the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and an apoptosis assay. Western blotting was performed to investigate related signaling pathways. Of note, inhibition, knockdown and upregulation of the membrane protein Chloride intracellular channel 1 (CLIC1) can affect GBC resistance in the presence of metformin. Our data demonstrated that metformin apparently inhibits the proliferation and viability of GBC cells. Metformin promoted cell apoptosis and increased the number of early apoptotic cells. We found that metformin can exert growth-suppressive effects on these cell lines via inhibition of p-Akt activity and the Bcl-2 family. Notably, either dysfunction or downregulation of CLIC1 can partially decrease the antineoplastic effects of metformin while upregulation of CLIC1 can increase drug sensitivity. Our findings provide experimental evidence for using metformin as an antitumor treatment for gallbladder carcinoma. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  12. Calcium channel antagonist properties of the antineoplastic antiestrogen tamoxifen in the PC12 neurosecretory cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, D.A.; Carpenter, C.L.; Messing, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    In view of existing evidence that Ca2+ may be important for tumor cell growth and metastasis, we investigated the effects of three antineoplastic drugs on K+-stimulated /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels of the PC12 neurosecretory cell line. The agents chosen for study (vinblastine, doxorubicin, and tamoxifen) were those previously shown to inhibit Ca2+/calmodulin- or Ca2+/phospholipid-activated protein kinases. Neither vinblastine nor doxorubicin altered /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake at concentrations that inhibit these Ca2+-dependent enzymes. However, tamoxifen reduced uptake (50% inhibitory dose, 8.6 +/- 0.9 (SE) microM) and competed for Ca2+ channel antagonist binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)-(+)PN200-110 (ki = 2.2 +/- 0.3 microM). Ca2+ channel antagonist properties may contribute to the effects of antineoplastic agents such as tamoxifen.

  13. The antineoplastic effect of low-molecular-weight heparins – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Püsküllüoğlu, Mirosława; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    There is some evidence for the antitumor effect of heparins, especially the low-molecular-weight ones. The authors discuss the potential mechanism of this antineoplastic effect and present results from several in vitro and in vivo experiments. The clinical trials concerning the impact of low-molecular-weight heparins on the tumor and on the patients’ survival are described. The objective was to find out if heparins could be administered as an antitumor drug, independently of their anticoagulatory properties. The antitumor role of tissue factor, heparinase, chemokines, stromal proteins, cellular interactions as well as angiogenesis and immunology seems certain. The results of the available studies seem promising but large clinical trials are necessary in order to confirm the antineoplastic effect of the low-molecular-weight heparins and to approve them for standard anticancer treatment. It could be a breakthrough in modern oncology. PMID:23788954

  14. Antineoplastic Effects of Honokiol on Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Guillermo-Lagae, Ruth; Santha, Sreevidya; Thomas, Milton; Zoelle, Emily; Stevens, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Honokiol, a plant lignan has been shown to have antineoplastic effects against nonmelanoma skin cancer developments in mice. In this study, antineoplastic effects of honokiol were investigated in malignant melanoma models. In vitro effects of honokiol treatment on SKMEL-2 and UACC-62 melanoma cells were evaluated by measuring the cell viability, proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle analysis, and expressions of various proteins associated with cell cycle progression and apoptosis. For the in vivo study, male nude mice inoculated with SKMEL-2 or UACC-62 cells received injections of sesame oil or honokiol for two to seven weeks. In vitro honokiol treatment caused significant decrease in cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle arrest, increased apoptosis, and modulation of apoptotic and cell cycle regulatory proteins. Honokiol caused an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle in SKMEL-2 and G0/G1 phase in UACC-62 cells. An elevated level of caspases and PARP were observed in both cell lines treated with honokiol. A decrease in the expression of various cell cycle regulatory proteins was also observed in honokiol treated cells. Honokiol caused a significant reduction of tumor growth in SKMEL-2 and UACC-62 melanoma xenografts. These findings suggest that honokiol is a good candidate for further studies as a possible treatment for malignant melanoma. PMID:28194418

  15. Antineoplastic Effects of Honokiol on Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Guillermo-Lagae, Ruth; Santha, Sreevidya; Thomas, Milton; Zoelle, Emily; Stevens, Jonathan; Kaushik, Radhey S; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2017-01-01

    Honokiol, a plant lignan has been shown to have antineoplastic effects against nonmelanoma skin cancer developments in mice. In this study, antineoplastic effects of honokiol were investigated in malignant melanoma models. In vitro effects of honokiol treatment on SKMEL-2 and UACC-62 melanoma cells were evaluated by measuring the cell viability, proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle analysis, and expressions of various proteins associated with cell cycle progression and apoptosis. For the in vivo study, male nude mice inoculated with SKMEL-2 or UACC-62 cells received injections of sesame oil or honokiol for two to seven weeks. In vitro honokiol treatment caused significant decrease in cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle arrest, increased apoptosis, and modulation of apoptotic and cell cycle regulatory proteins. Honokiol caused an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle in SKMEL-2 and G0/G1 phase in UACC-62 cells. An elevated level of caspases and PARP were observed in both cell lines treated with honokiol. A decrease in the expression of various cell cycle regulatory proteins was also observed in honokiol treated cells. Honokiol caused a significant reduction of tumor growth in SKMEL-2 and UACC-62 melanoma xenografts. These findings suggest that honokiol is a good candidate for further studies as a possible treatment for malignant melanoma.

  16. Adherence to therapy with oral antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Ann H; Avorn, Jerry; Wang, Philip S; Winer, Eric P

    2002-05-01

    With the rise in availability and increasing use of oral anticancer agents, concerns about adherence to prescribed regimens will become an increasingly important issue in oncology. Few published studies have focused on adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy, in part because the vast majority of chemotherapy is delivered intravenously in physicians' offices or hospitals. In this article, we review current knowledge of adherence behavior with regard to oral medications in general, including factors associated with adherence and methods for measuring adherence. We also review published studies of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents in adult and pediatric populations and adherence issues in cancer prevention. The available evidence reveals that patient adherence to oral chemotherapy recommendations is variable and not easily predicted. Adherence rates ranging from less than 20% to 100% have been reported, and certain populations, such as adolescents, pose particular challenges. Future efforts should focus on improving measurement and prediction of adherence and on developing interventions to improve adherence for both patients in clinical trials and patients being treated outside of the research setting. Assessment of adherence among individuals with cancer and implementation of interventions in situations of poor adherence should improve clinical outcomes.

  17. Urinary cyclophosphamide excretion and micronuclei frequencies in peripheral lymphocytes and in exfoliated buccal epithelial cells of nurses handling antineoplastics.

    PubMed

    Burgaz, S; Karahalil, B; Bayrak, P; Taşkin, L; Yavuzaslan, F; Bökesoy, I; Anzion, R B; Bos, R P; Platin, N

    1999-02-02

    In this study, urinary cyclophosphamide (CP) excretion rate, as well as micronuclei (MN) in peripheral lymphocytes and in buccal epithelial cells were determined for 26 nurses handling antineoplastics and 14 referents matched for age and sex. In urine samples of 20 out of 25 exposed nurses CP excretion rate was found in a range of 0.02-9.14 microg CP/24 h. Our results of the analyses of CP in urine demonstrates that when the nurses were handling CP (and other antineoplastic drugs) this particular compound was observed in urine. The mean values (+/-SD) of MN frequencies (%) in peripheral lymphocytes from the nurses and controls were 0.61 (+/-0. 32) and 0.28 (+/-0.16), respectively (p<0.01). The mean value (+/-SD) of MN frequency (%) in buccal epithelial cells of nurses was 0.16 (+/-0.19) and also mean MN frequency in buccal epithelial cells for controls was found to be as 0.08 (+/-0.08), (p>0.05). Age, sex and smoking habits have not influenced the parameters analyzed in this study. Handling time of antineoplastics, use of protective equipment and handling frequency of drugs have no effect on urinary and cytogenetic parameters analyzed. No correlation was found between the urinary CP excretion and the cytogenetic findings in nurses. Neither could we find any relationship between two cytogenetic endpoints. Our results have identified the possible genotoxic damage of oncology nurses related to occupational exposure to at least one antineoplastic agent, which is used as a marker for drug handling. As a whole, there is concern that the present handling practices of antineoplastic drugs used in the several hospitals in Ankara will not be sufficient to prevent exposure.

  18. From bacteria to antineoplastic: epothilones a successful history.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Samuel; Muller, Joseane John; Froehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Baggio Gnoatto, Simone Cristina; Bergold, Ana Maria

    2013-09-01

    Malignancies are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Cancer is a cell disease, characterized by a deviation of the control mechanisms of proliferation and differentiation of cells. Among the treatments available, chemotherapy is often the first choice. Epothilones are a new class of anticancer drugs that act by interacting with cellular microtubules interrupting the proliferation of cancer cells. Many synthetic and semi-synthetic analogues of epothilones have been prepared aiming improvement in effectiveness and tolerability, based on QSAR studies. These analogues have been effective for treatment of tumors resistant to first-line treatments. Six new epothilones are being subjected to clinical trials. Ixabepilone (Ixempra®) was approved by FDA in 2007, patupilone is in phase III clinical trial for ovarian and peritoneum cancer. Sagopilone, desoxiepothilone and KOS-1584 are in phase II clinical trials, for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma and advanced metastatic breast cancer, metastasic breast cancer and metastatic pulmonary cancer, respectively. Desoxiepothilone reached only phase II trials and BMS-310705 reached phase III/IV trials, but were not approved for clinical use due to adverse effects such as neurotoxicity and severe diarrhea, which were dose-limiting. Furthermore, the low t1/2 (40h) in comparison with other class analogues, does not recommend the clinical use of this derivative. Some other synthetized epothilones presented antineoplastic activity in vitro, but are not yet submitted to clinical studies. Neuropathies and diarrhea are adverse effects presented by some substances of this class of anticancer drugs.

  19. Interaction of human organic anion transporter polypeptides 1B1 and 1B3 with antineoplastic compounds.

    PubMed

    Marada, Venkata V V R; Flörl, Saskia; Kühne, Annett; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Hagos, Yohannes

    2015-03-06

    Antineoplastic compounds are used in the treatment of a variety of cancers. The effectiveness of an antineoplastic compound to exert its activity is largely dependent on transport proteins involved in the entry of the compound into the cells, and those which drive it out of the cell. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3), belonging to the SLCO family of proteins, are specifically expressed in the sinusoidal membranes of the liver, and are known to interact with a variety of drugs. The present study deals with the interaction of these proteins with antineoplastic compounds routinely used in cancer chemotherapy. The proteins OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 were functionally characterized in stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells using [(3)H] labeled estrone 3-sulfate and [(3)H] labeled cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) as substrates, respectively. Substrate uptake experiments performed in the presence of antineoplastic compounds showed that vinblastine and paclitaxel strongly interacted with the OATP1B1 with Ki values of 10.2 μM and 0.84 μM, respectively. OATP1B3 showed highly significant interactions with a variety of antineoplastic compounds including chlorambucil, mitoxantrone, vinblastine, vincristine, paclitaxel and etoposide, with Ki values of 40.6 μM, 3.2 μM, 15.9 μM, 30.6 μM, 1.8 μM and 13.5 μM, respectively. We report several novel interactions of the transporter proteins OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 highlighting the need to investigate their role in drug-drug interactions and cancer chemotherapy.

  20. Redox-directed cancer therapeutics: Taurolidine and Piperlongumine as broadly effective antineoplastic agents (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MÖHLER, HANS; PFIRMAN, ROLF W.; FREI, KARL

    2014-01-01

    Targeting the oxygen stress response pathway is considered a promising strategy to exert antineoplastic activity in a broad spectrum of tumor types. Supporting this view, we summarize the mechanism of action of Taurolidine and Piperlongumine, two antineoplastic agents with strikingly broad tumor selectivity. Taurolidine enhances the oxidative stress (ROS) selectively in tumor cells. Its cytotoxicity for various tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, which includes tumor stem cells, is based on the induction of programmed cell death, largely via apoptosis but also necroptosis and autophagy. The redox-directed mechanism of action of Taurolidine is apparent from the finding that reducing agents e.g., N-acetylcysteine or glutathione impair its cytotoxicity, while its effectiveness is enhanced by agents which inhibit the cellular anti-oxidant capacity. A similar redox-directed antineoplastic action is shown by Piperlongumine, a recently described experimental drug of plant origin. Taurolidine is particularly advantageous in surgical oncology as this taurine-derivative can be applied perioperatively or systemically with good tolerability as shown in initial clinical applications. PMID:25175943

  1. Toxicity classification and evaluation of four pharmaceuticals classes: antibiotics, antineoplastics, cardiovascular, and sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Hans; Brain, Richard A; Johnson, David J; Wilson, Christian J; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-10-15

    Four different classes of environmental concern are quantitatively and qualitatively assessed for environmental hazards; antibiotics (n = 226), antineoplastics (n = 81), cardiovascular (n = 272), and sex hormones (n = 92). These along with an ECOSAR scan of all pharmaceuticals (n = 2848) were then classified according to the OECD aquatic toxicity classification system. The predicted species susceptibility is: daphnid > fish > algae, and the predicted rank order of relative toxicity: sex hormones > cardiovascular = antibiotics > antineoplastics (Table 1). Generally, a relatively large proportion (1/3) of all pharmaceuticals are potentially very toxic to aquatic organisms (Table 2). The qualitative risk assessment ranking relative to probability and potential severity for human and environmental health effects is: antibiotics > sex hormones > cardiovascular > antineoplastics. (Q)SARs and pharmacodynamic information should be used to prioritize and steer experimental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals, and potentially, also be used in new drug discovery optimizing efficacy and in minimising environmental hazards of new products. Nuclear receptors are relatively well conserved in evolution. Currently, antibacterial resistance represents the most significant human health hazard, and potentially the largest non-target organism hazard is sex hormones acting as endocrine modulators in wildlife. Data for the individual compounds are accessible via.

  2. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of Cypriot nurses on the handling of antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Kyprianou, Maro; Kapsou, Margarita; Raftopoulos, Vasilios; Soteriades, Elpidoforos S

    2010-09-01

    Antineoplastic agents have been associated with major concerns among health professionals. The objective of our study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of Cypriot nurses on their exposure to antineoplastic agents. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire was distributed among oncology nurses in three hospitals in Nicosia. The questionnaire was originally compiled by Turk et al., in order to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and safe behaviours of nurses' handling cytotoxic drugs and was translated from Turkish to Greek by two bilingual volunteers. A total of 88 nurses participated in the survey (20 male and 68 female). The mean age of the nurses was 33 years (age range 21-60). The majority of nurses were aware of the potential hazards associated with handling of chemotherapy. The mean score of the participants' knowledge was 79.43 out of 100. Most of the participants reported high levels of compliance with the use of personal protective equipment such as gloves and protective gown (95.4%, and 84.5%) during reconstitution of antineoplastic agents, respectively. Almost all nurses (98.8%) reported use of a safety cabinet during preparation, however only 53.4% reported that they have annual medical checkups and only 33% reported having received specialized training. While the level of knowledge about antineoplastic agents is high among nurses, along with the level of personal protective equipment use, medical surveillance and employee training seems to be lagging behind. Further research may help us identify the reasons for such discrepancy.

  3. Cleaning of Residues from Equipment Surfaces After Demilitarization of Arsenical-Based Munitions and Fill Materiels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    demilitarization process for the destruction of recovered arsenical-based munitions. Presently, this includes the use of PMNSCM’s Explosive Destruction...as the surfaces must be clean in order to achieve a good seal to prevent leaks during operations. A field-useable process for removing the residues was...data generated from the present study will be used to support operation of a non-stockpile demilitarization process for the destruction of recovered

  4. Hydrogen bonding and stacking pi-pi interactions in solid 6-thioguanine and 6-mercaptopurine (antileukemia and antineoplastic drugs) studied by NMR-NQR double resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, J N; Seliger, J; Zagar, V; Burchardt, D V

    2009-07-30

    A chemotherapeutic drug 6-thioguanine (2-amino-1,7-dihydro-6H-purine-6-thione, 6-TG) has been studied experimentally in the solid state by NMR-NQR double resonance and theoretically by the density functional theory. Fourteen resonance frequencies on (14)N have been detected and assigned to particular nitrogen sites in the 6-TG molecule. A valid assignment of NQR frequencies for 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) has been proposed. The effects of molecular aggregations, related to intermolecular hydrogen bonding and stacking pi-pi interactions on the NQR parameters have been analyzed within the DFT and AIM (atoms in molecules) formalism for 6-TG and 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP). The so-called global reactivity descriptors have been calculated to compare the properties of molecules of 6-TG and 6-MP, to check the effect of -NH(2) group as well as to identify the differences in crystal packing.

  5. A Systematic Review of Adherence to Oral Antineoplastic Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Amoyal, Nicole; Nisotel, Lauren; Fishbein, Joel N.; MacDonald, James; Stagl, Jamie; Lennes, Inga; Temel, Jennifer S.; Safren, Steven A.; Pirl, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oral antineoplastic therapies not only improve survival but also reduce the burden of care for patients. Yet patients and clinicians face new challenges in managing adherence to these oral therapies. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess rates and correlates of adherence to oral antineoplastic therapies and interventions aimed at improving adherence. Methods. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, we conducted a comprehensive literature search of the Ovid MEDLINE database from January 1, 2003 to June 30, 2015, using relevant terminology for oral antineoplastic agents. We included observational, database, and intervention studies. At least two researchers evaluated each paper to ensure accuracy of results and determine risk of bias. Results. We identified 927 records from the search and screened 214 abstracts. After conducting a full-text review of 167 papers, we included in the final sample 51 papers on rates/correlates of adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy and 12 papers on intervention studies to improve adherence. Rates of adherence varied widely, from 46% to 100%, depending on patient sample, medication type, follow-up period, assessment measure, and calculation of adherence. Of the intervention studies, only 1 of the randomized trials and 2 of the cohort studies showed benefit regarding adherence, with the majority suffering high risk of bias. Conclusions. Although no reliable estimate of adherence to oral antineoplastic therapies can be gleaned from the literature, a substantial proportion of patients struggle to adhere to these medications as prescribed. The few intervention studies for adherence have notable methodological concerns, thereby limiting the evidence to guide practice in promoting medication adherence among patients with cancer. Implications for Practice: Given the tremendous growth and development of oral antineoplastic therapies in the last decade, significant

  6. Stability of antineoplastic agents in use for home-based intravenous chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Benizri, Frédéric; Bonan, Brigitte; Ferrio, Anne-Laure; Brandely, Marie-Laure; Castagné, Vincent; Théou-Anton, Nathalie; Verlinde-Carvalho, Muriel; Havard, Laurent

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this work was first to define which antineoplastic agents with sufficiently long stability could be eligible in the circuit of home-based therapy (centralised preparation, transport to the patient's home and administration by nurses) and, second, to propose a standardisation of the stability data of anticancer drugs in use for home hospitalisation. A survey carried out in six hospital pharmacies of the Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP) hospitals, with important activity in oncology, listed the stability data used locally by each site. The final goal is to reach a consensus for the stability of cytotoxic drugs, which was the result of an original collaboration between the pharmacists of the compounding unit and the quality control unit. These results were compared to marketing authorisation data. The survey showed that eight antineoplastic agents of 34 were prepared under identical conditions (infusion diluent, concentration range, protection from light, temperature) by all hospitals (3 < or = n < or = 6): the stability was identical between each site for only two cytotoxic drug preparations (fotemustine and gemcitabine) and varied by up to 168 h or 7 days for the preparations of dacarbazine, epirubicine and cisplatin. Stability validated by pharmacists and those provided by marketing authorisation ranged respectively from "extemporaneously prepared" at 1,344 h (median = 168 h) to "extemporaneously prepared" at 720 h (median = 4 h). For 11 antineoplastic drugs, no information about the stability after compounding was specified in the marketing authorisation. Of all cytotoxic drugs used in the Hospital at Home of AP-HP, stability after compounding validated by pharmacists was less than 30 h for six of them, between 30 and 78 h for four and exceeding 78 h for the remaining 24. Considering the lack of data about cytotoxic drugs stability provided by the pharmaceutical companies and the difficulties in retrieving and interpreting the literature

  7. Methanol extract of the ethnopharmaceutical remedy Smilax spinosa exhibits anti-neoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Seelinger, Mareike; Popescu, Ruxandra; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan; Unger, Christine; Wallnöfer, Bruno; Fritzer-Szekeres, Monika; Szekeres, Thomas; Diaz, Rene; Jäger, Walter; Frisch, Richard; Kopp, Brigitte; Krupitza, Georg

    2012-09-01

    Plants have been the source of several effective drugs for the treatment of cancer and over 60% of anticancer drugs originate from natural sources. Therefore, extracts of the rhizome of Smilax spinosa, an ethnomedicinal plant from Guatemala which is used for the treatment of inflammatory conditions, were investigated regarding their anti-neoplastic activities. By using several solvents the methanol extract was by far the most potent against HL60 cell proliferation (50% inhibition at 60 µg/ml). Furthermore, fractionation of this extract yielded fraction F2, which exhibited enforced pro-apoptotic activity, and activated CYP1A1. Proteins that are relevant for cell cycle progression and apoptosis, as well as proto-oncogenes were investigated by western blotting. This revealed that the methanol extract increased the levels of p21 and this may have caused cell cycle attenuation. The derivative fraction F2 induced apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway, which correlated with the inhibition of Stat3 phosphorylation and concomitant induction of caspase 9, then caspase 8 and caspase 3. In summary, the methanol extract and the derivative fraction F2 of S. spinosa showed anti-neoplastic effects in HL-60 cells and CYP1A1 activation in estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells but not in estrogen-negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Based on our data Smilax spinosa may be a promising source for novel anticancer agents.

  8. Arsenic-based Life: An active learning assignment for teaching scientific discourse.

    PubMed

    Jeremy Johnson, R

    2017-01-02

    Among recent high profile scientific debates was the proposal that life could exist with arsenic in place of phosphorous in its nucleic acids and other biomolecules. Soon after its initial publication, scientists across diverse disciplines began to question this extraordinary claim. Using the original article, its claims, its scientific support, and the ensuing counterarguments, a two-day, active learning classroom exercise was developed focusing on the presentation, evaluation, and discussion of scientific argumentation and discourse. In this culminating assignment of a first semester biochemistry course, undergraduate students analyze the scientific support from the original research articles and then present and discuss multiple scientific rebuttals in a lively, civil classroom debate. Through this assignment, students develop a sense of skepticism, especially for the original arsenic-based life claims, and learn to clearly articulate their counterarguments with scientific support and critical reasoning. With its direct integration into first-semester biochemistry curriculum and the excitement surrounding arsenic based life, this assignment provides a robust, simple, and stimulating framework for introducing scientific discourse and active learning into the undergraduate molecular science curriculum. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):40-45, 2017.

  9. Interactions of beta-lactam antibiotics and antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Y; Saito, A; Fukuoka, Y; Yamashiro, Y; Ikeda, Y; Taki, H; Yasuda, T; Saikawa, I

    1983-01-01

    The in vitro interactions of four beta-lactam antibiotics and five antineoplastic agents were examined with 100 clinically isolated strains of four species of gram-negative bacilli. Generally, by the checkerboard dilution method, beta-lactam antibiotics, when tested in combination with mitomycin C, bleomycin, or 5-fluorouracil, showed synergistic action, whereas when tested in combination with carboquone, they showed antagonistic action. Almost no combinations of adriamycin showed the interactions. Among beta-lactam antibiotics, piperacillin was more frequently synergistic than cefoperazone, cefazolin, or carbenicillin when tested in combination with each antineoplastic agent against various species. PMID:6405686

  10. Interactions between oral antineoplastic agents and concomitant medication: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Carcelero, Esther; Anglada, Helena; Tuset, Montse; Creus, Natalia

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, the number of oral antitumoral agents has considerably increased. Oral administration increases the risk of interactions, because most oral anticancer drugs are taken on a daily basis. Interactions can increase exposure to antitumoral agents or cause treatment failure. Many antitumoral drugs undergo enzymatic metabolism by cytochrome P450. As some act as inducers or inhibitors of one or more isoenzymes, they can lead to decreases or increases in plasma concentrations of concomitant drugs. Hence, cytostatic drugs can act not only as victims but also as perpetrators. P-glycoprotein, an efflux transporter, can also be involved in pharmacokinetic interactions. A Medline search was performed to summarize the available evidence of the most clinically relevant interactions between oral chemotherapy agents and other drugs. The search covered the period from 1966 until August 2012 for each antitumoral drug using the medical subject headings 'Drug Interactions' OR 'Pharmacokinetics'. While the present review is not exhaustive, it aims to increase clinicians' awareness of potential drug-drug interactions. As cancer patients are often polymedicated and treated by different physicians, the risk of drug interactions between antitumoral agents and other medications is high. More clinical interaction studies are encouraged to ensure appropriate antineoplastic pharmacokinetics in clinical practice.

  11. Occupational exposure to antineoplastic agents induces a high level of chromosome damage. Lack of an effect of GST polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, Antonella Giachelia, Manuela; Palma, Selena; Appolloni, Massimo; Padua, Luca; Tranfo, Giovanna; Spagnoli, Mariangela; Tirindelli, Donatella; Cozzi, Renata

    2007-08-15

    The aim of our study was to investigate whether occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs (AND) resulted in genetic damage, possibly indicative of adverse health effects in the long term. We performed a chromosomal aberrations (CA) analysis in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of a group of 76 trained nurses occupationally exposed to AND. Furthermore, we analysed whether genetic polymorphisms in four metabolic genes of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) family involved in antineoplastic drugs detoxification (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1, GSTA1) had any effect on the yield of chromosomal aberrations in nurses exposed to antineoplastic agents. The exposed group showed a very significant increase of genetic damage (p < 0.0001) potentially indicative of an increased risk of cancer. Unexpectedly, besides the elevated level of chromatid-type aberrations usually related to exposure to chemical agents, we found also severe chromosome damages such as chromosome deletions and dicentric chromosomes, usually related to radiation exposure. No significant association was detected between all GSTs genotypes and chromosome damage. In conclusion, our data show how the occupational exposure to AND is associated to a potential cancer risk, suggesting that current prevention methods do not completely eliminate opportunities for exposure and supporting the need to improve the actual safety practices.

  12. Evaluation of real-time data obtained from gravimetric preparation of antineoplastic agents shows medication errors with possible critical therapeutic impact: Results of a large-scale, multicentre, multinational, retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Terkola, R; Czejka, M; Bérubé, J

    2017-08-01

    Medication errors are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality especially with antineoplastic drugs, owing to their narrow therapeutic index. Gravimetric workflow software systems have the potential to reduce volumetric errors during intravenous antineoplastic drug preparation which may occur when verification is reliant on visual inspection. Our aim was to detect medication errors with possible critical therapeutic impact as determined by the rate of prevented medication errors in chemotherapy compounding after implementation of gravimetric measurement. A large-scale, retrospective analysis of data was carried out, related to medication errors identified during preparation of antineoplastic drugs in 10 pharmacy services ("centres") in five European countries following the introduction of an intravenous workflow software gravimetric system. Errors were defined as errors in dose volumes outside tolerance levels, identified during weighing stages of preparation of chemotherapy solutions which would not otherwise have been detected by conventional visual inspection. The gravimetric system detected that 7.89% of the 759 060 doses of antineoplastic drugs prepared at participating centres between July 2011 and October 2015 had error levels outside the accepted tolerance range set by individual centres, and prevented these doses from reaching patients. The proportion of antineoplastic preparations with deviations >10% ranged from 0.49% to 5.04% across sites, with a mean of 2.25%. The proportion of preparations with deviations >20% ranged from 0.21% to 1.27% across sites, with a mean of 0.71%. There was considerable variation in error levels for different antineoplastic agents. Introduction of a gravimetric preparation system for antineoplastic agents detected and prevented dosing errors which would not have been recognized with traditional methods and could have resulted in toxicity or suboptimal therapeutic outcomes for patients undergoing anticancer treatment.

  13. Recent Advances in the Development of Antineoplastic Agents Derived from Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Trendowski, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Through years of evolutionary selection pressures, organisms have developed potent toxins that coincidentally have marked antineoplastic activity. These natural products have been vital for the development of multiagent treatment regimens currently employed in cancer chemotherapy, and are used in the treatment of a variety of malignancies. Therefore, this review catalogs recent advances in natural product-based drug discovery via the examination of mechanisms of action and available clinical data to highlight the utility of these novel compounds in the burgeoning age of precision medicine. The review also highlights the recent development of antibody-drug conjugates and other immunotoxins, which are capable of delivering highly cytotoxic agents previously deemed too toxic to elicit therapeutic benefit preferentially to neoplastic cells. Finally, the review examines natural products not currently used in the clinic that have novel mechanisms of action, and may serve to supplement current chemotherapeutic protocols.

  14. Bioactive substances with anti-neoplastic efficacy from marine invertebrates: Porifera and Coelenterata

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Peter; Vetvicka, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    An ever increasing demand for new lead compounds in the pharmaceutical industry has led scientists to search for natural bioactive products. Based on this extensive research, marine invertebrates now represent a rich source of novel substances with significant anti-neoplastic activities. As the current approach of synthesizing new and chemically modifying old drugs seems to have slowed down, and the identification of new anticancer drugs is not too promising, a new approach is clearly needed. The objective of this review is to present up-to-date data on these newer compounds. Based on the data summarized in this short review, it is clear that marine invertebrates represent an extremely important source of compounds with potential anti-cancer effects. Considering that we tested only a tiny number of Porifera and Coelenterata, the best is yet to come. PMID:22087433

  15. Carcinogenicity of antineoplastic agents in man.

    PubMed

    Rieche, K

    1984-03-01

    Review of the literature shows that: Anticancer drugs are in all probability mostly also carcinogenic. Alkylating agents such as melphalan, chlorambucil and cyclophosphamide seem to lead to the highest rate of second malignancies. Second malignancies after antitumour drugs are mostly acute leukaemias. Conditions which could influence the carcinogenicity of an antitumour drug are (a) its carcinogenic potency; (b) long-term administration; (c) the total dose used and (d) long-term survival of the patient. Irradiation and chemotherapy seem to have the greatest carcinogenic potential, e.g. in malignant lymphomas. The role of immunosuppression as a co-carcinogenic factor is difficult to estimate. Although transplant patients on anticancer drugs for immunosuppression have a higher risk of reticulosarcomas, but not of solid tumours, there is no evidence to suppose that in general immunosuppression and carcinogenicity are directly related. There is no reason to abandon intensive chemotherapy regimes if they lead to significant therapeutic results on the grounds of possible carcinogenicity of these drugs.

  16. Nursing diagnoses in adult/elderly patients undergoing outpatient antineoplastic chemotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Jomar, Rafael Tavares; Gomes, Rebeca Anselmo Furtado; Leite, Dayana Carvalho; Gomes, Helena Ferraz; Peres, Ellen Marcia; Junior, Eugenio Fuentes Perez

    2017-01-01

    To search in the scientific literature for nursing diagnoses identified in adult/elderly patients undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy in an outpatient setting. Review of studies published in Portuguese, English, or Spanish which were searched in five electronic databases in March 2016, using the descriptors nursing process, nursing diagnosis, neoplasms, drug therapy and hospital outpatient clinic. In the four studies selected for review, 40 nursing diagnoses were identified, namely unbalanced nutrition, less than body requirements, risk of deficient fluid volume, diarrhoea, fatigue, impaired home maintenance, deficient knowledge, disturbed body image, interrupted family processes, ineffective sexuality pattern, anxiety, powerlessness, fear, readiness for enhanced religiosity, risk of infection, impaired dentition, risk of impaired skin integrity, acute pain, and nausea. The nursing diagnoses identified can support the selection of interventions and the creation of nursing guidelines in outpatient oncology services.

  17. Nursing diagnoses in adult/elderly patients undergoing outpatient antineoplastic chemotherapy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Jomar, Rafael Tavares; Gomes, Rebeca Anselmo Furtado; Leite, Dayana Carvalho; Gomes, Helena Ferraz; Peres, Ellen Marcia; Junior, Eugenio Fuentes Perez

    2017-01-01

    Objective To search in the scientific literature for nursing diagnoses identified in adult/elderly patients undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy in an outpatient setting. Methods Review of studies published in Portuguese, English, or Spanish which were searched in five electronic databases in March 2016, using the descriptors nursing process, nursing diagnosis, neoplasms, drug therapy and hospital outpatient clinic. Results In the four studies selected for review, 40 nursing diagnoses were identified, namely unbalanced nutrition, less than body requirements, risk of deficient fluid volume, diarrhoea, fatigue, impaired home maintenance, deficient knowledge, disturbed body image, interrupted family processes, ineffective sexuality pattern, anxiety, powerlessness, fear, readiness for enhanced religiosity, risk of infection, impaired dentition, risk of impaired skin integrity, acute pain, and nausea. Conclusions The nursing diagnoses identified can support the selection of interventions and the creation of nursing guidelines in outpatient oncology services. PMID:28596802

  18. Measurement of the sequence specificity of covalent DNA modification by antineoplastic agents using Taq DNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Ponti, M; Forrow, S M; Souhami, R L; D'Incalci, M; Hartley, J A

    1991-01-01

    A polymerase stop assay has been developed to determine the DNA nucleotide sequence specificity of covalent modification by antineoplastic agents using the thermostable DNA polymerase from Thermus aquaticus and synthetic labelled primers. The products of linear amplification are run on sequencing gels to reveal the sites of covalent drug binding. The method has been studied in detail for a number of agents including nitrogen mustards, platinum analogues and mitomycin C, and the sequence specificities obtained accord with those obtained by other procedures. The assay is advantageous in that it is not limited to a single type of DNA lesion (as in the piperidine cleavage assay for guanine-N7 alkylation), does not require a strand breakage step, and is more sensitive than other primer extension procedures which have only one cycle of polymerization. In particular the method has considerable potential for examining the sequence selectivity of damage and repair in single copy gene sequences in genomic DNA from cells. Images PMID:2057351

  19. Effects of orally administered antioxidants on micronuclei and sister chromatid exchange frequency in workers professionally exposed to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Mrđanović, Jasminka; Jungić, Saša; Šolajić, Slavica; Bogdanović, Višnja; Jurišić, Vladimir

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of antineoplastic drugs in cancer treatment increased concern about possible hazard to workers involved in the preparation and administration of these drugs. In the present study, the effects of commercial antioxidative drug Oligogal Se on genome protection were analyzed in 15 nurses handling the antineoplastic drugs at the Oncology Department in comparison to twenty healthy volunteers. The nurses took antioxidant mixture Oligogal Se, consisting of vitamins C, E, A and selenium, one capsule per day, over a period of 6 months. Genome damage was measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes by usage of sister chromatid exchange test and the cytokinesis-block micronuclei test. The frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronuclei (MN) in the exposed group was significantly higher when compared to the control group (SCE, p<0.05; MN, p<0.01 respectively). After antioxidant supplementation, the frequency of sister chromatid exchange and micronuclei decreased (p<0.05) when compared with the values from the beginning of the study, but were still above the values of the control group. The effects of confounding factors such as cigarette smoking and cytostatics exposure time were also evaluated. The data indicated that Oligogal Se contributed to the decreasing of genome damages in workers handling the cytostatics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Handling Cytotoxic Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Regulations Governing Cytotoxic Drugs-------------------------------- 7 National Institute for Occupational Safety and ke•alth Agency ( NIOSH ) 7...Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ( NIOSH ). Cytotoxic drugs, which are used extensively troughout the health care system to treat cancer, have...foodstufTs, inhalation of drug dusts or droplets, or direct skin contact (1:31). 2 An antineoplastic drug is a cytotoxic chemical substance that is

  1. Hypersensitivity and desensitization to antineoplastic agents: outcomes of 189 procedures with a new short protocol and novel diagnostic tools assessment.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Burgaleta, R; Berges-Gimeno, M P; Angel-Pereira, D; Ferreiro-Monteagudo, R; Guillen-Ponce, C; Pueyo, C; Gomez de Salazar, E; Alvarez-Cuesta, E

    2013-07-01

    Desensitization to antineoplastic agents is becoming a standard of care. Efforts to establish and improve these techniques are being made at many institutions. Our aims are to evaluate a new rapid desensitization protocol designed to be shorter (approximately 4 h) and safer (reducing hazardous drugs exposure risks) and to assess the oxaliplatin-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) as a novel diagnostic tool. Prospective, observational, longitudinal study with patients who, for a 1-year period, suffered reactions to antineoplastic agents and were referred to the Desensitization Program at Ramon y Cajal University Hospital (RCUH). Patients were included or excluded as desensitization candidates after anamnesis, skin testing, risk assessment, and graded challenge. Specific IgE was determined in oxaliplatin-reactive patients. Candidate patients were desensitized using the new RCUH rapid desensitization protocol. Of 189 intravenous rapid desensitizations, 188 were successfully accomplished in the 23 patients who met inclusion criteria for desensitization (of 58 referred patients). No breakthrough reactions occurred in 94% of desensitizations, and most breakthrough reactions were mild. In 10 oxaliplatin-reactive patients, 38 desensitizations were successfully accomplished. Sensitivity for oxaliplatin-specific IgE was 38% (0.35UI/l cutoff point) and 54% (0.10UI/l cutoff point); specificity was 100% for both cutoff points. In the hands of a Desensitization Program, managed by drug desensitization experts, this new protocol has proven an effective therapeutic tool for hypersensitivity to several antineoplastic agents (oxaliplatin, carboplatin, paclitaxel, docetaxel, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab); moreover, it improves safety handling of hazardous drugs. We report the first large series of oxaliplatin desensitizations. Oxaliplatin-specific IgE determination could be helpful. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Chronic Arsenic Poisoning Probably Caused by Arsenic-Based Pesticides: Findings from an Investigation Study of a Household

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongfang; Ye, Feng; Wang, Anwei; Wang, Da; Yang, Boyi; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan; Gao, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    In addition to naturally occurring arsenic, man-made arsenic-based compounds are other sources of arsenic exposure. In 2013, our group identified 12 suspected arsenicosis patients in a household (32 living members). Of them, eight members were diagnosed with skin cancer. Interestingly, all of these patients had lived in the household prior to 1989. An investigation revealed that approximately 2 tons of arsenic-based pesticides had been previously placed near a well that had supplied drinking water to the family from 1973 to 1989. The current arsenic level in the well water was 620 μg/L. No other high arsenic wells were found near the family’s residence. Based on these findings, it is possible to infer that the skin lesions exhibited by these family members were caused by long-term exposure to well water contaminated with arsenic-based pesticides. Additionally, biochemical analysis showed that the individuals exposed to arsenic had higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase than those who were not exposed. These findings might indicate the presence of liver dysfunction in the arsenic-exposed individuals. This report elucidates the effects of arsenical compounds on the occurrence of high levels of arsenic in the environment and emphasizes the severe human health impact of arsenic exposure. PMID:26784217

  3. Chronic Arsenic Poisoning Probably Caused by Arsenic-Based Pesticides: Findings from an Investigation Study of a Household.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfang; Ye, Feng; Wang, Anwei; Wang, Da; Yang, Boyi; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan; Gao, Xinghua

    2016-01-16

    In addition to naturally occurring arsenic, man-made arsenic-based compounds are other sources of arsenic exposure. In 2013, our group identified 12 suspected arsenicosis patients in a household (32 living members). Of them, eight members were diagnosed with skin cancer. Interestingly, all of these patients had lived in the household prior to 1989. An investigation revealed that approximately 2 tons of arsenic-based pesticides had been previously placed near a well that had supplied drinking water to the family from 1973 to 1989. The current arsenic level in the well water was 620 μg/L. No other high arsenic wells were found near the family's residence. Based on these findings, it is possible to infer that the skin lesions exhibited by these family members were caused by long-term exposure to well water contaminated with arsenic-based pesticides. Additionally, biochemical analysis showed that the individuals exposed to arsenic had higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase than those who were not exposed. These findings might indicate the presence of liver dysfunction in the arsenic-exposed individuals. This report elucidates the effects of arsenical compounds on the occurrence of high levels of arsenic in the environment and emphasizes the severe human health impact of arsenic exposure.

  4. Evaluation of decontamination efficacy of cleaning solutions on stainless steel and glass surfaces contaminated by 10 antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Queruau Lamerie, Thomas; Nussbaumer, Susanne; Décaudin, Bertrand; Fleury-Souverain, Sandrine; Goossens, Jean-François; Bonnabry, Pascal; Odou, Pascal

    2013-05-01

    The handling of antineoplastic agents results in chronic surface contamination that must be minimized and eliminated. This study was designed to assess the potential of several chemical solutions to decontaminate two types of work surfaces that were intentionally contaminated with antineoplastic drugs. A range of solutions with variable physicochemical properties such as their hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, oxidizing power, desorption, and solubilization were tested: ultrapure water, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, sodium hypochlorite, and surfactants such as dishwashing liquid (DWL), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Tween 40, and Span 80. These solutions were tested on 10 antineoplastic drugs: cytarabine, gemcitabine, methotrexate, etoposide phosphate, irinotecan, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, doxorubicin, epirubicin, and vincristine. To simulate contaminated surfaces, these molecules (200ng) were deliberately spread onto two types of work surfaces: stainless steel and glass. Recovered by wiping with a specific aqueous solvent (acetonitrile/HCOOH; 20/0.1%) and an absorbent wipe (Whatman 903®), the residual contamination was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to mass spectrometry. To compare all tested cleaning solutions, a performance value of effectiveness was determined from contamination residues of the 10 drugs. Sodium hypochlorite showed the highest overall effectiveness with 98% contamination removed. Ultrapure water, isopropyl alcohol/water, and acetone were less effective with effectiveness values of 76.8, 80.7, and 40.4%, respectively. Ultrapure water was effective on most hydrophilic molecules (97.1% for cytarabine), while on the other hand, isopropyl alcohol/water (70/30, vol/vol) was effective on the least hydrophilic ones (85.2% for doxorubicin and 87.8% for epirubicin). Acetone had little effect, whatever the type of molecule. Among products containing surfactants, DWL was found effective (91.5%), but its formulation

  5. Characterizing interspecies uncertainty using data from studies of anti-neoplastic agents in animals and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Paul S. Keenan, Russell E.; Swartout, Jeffrey C.

    2008-11-15

    For most chemicals, the Reference Dose (RfD) is based on data from animal testing. The uncertainty introduced by the use of animal models has been termed interspecies uncertainty. The magnitude of the differences between the toxicity of a chemical in humans and test animals and its uncertainty can be investigated by evaluating the inter-chemical variation in the ratios of the doses associated with similar toxicological endpoints in test animals and humans. This study performs such an evaluation on a data set of 64 anti-neoplastic drugs. The data set provides matched responses in humans and four species of test animals: mice, rats, monkeys, and dogs. While the data have a number of limitations, the data show that when the drugs are evaluated on a body weight basis: 1) toxicity generally increases with a species' body weight; however, humans are not always more sensitive than test animals; 2) the animal to human dose ratios were less than 10 for most, but not all, drugs; 3) the current practice of using data from multiple species when setting RfDs lowers the probability of having a large value for the ratio. These findings provide insight into inter-chemical variation in animal to human extrapolations and suggest the need for additional collection and analysis of matched toxicity data in humans and test animals.

  6. Cytogenotoxicological defense of retinyl palmitate in the front damage of antineoplastics.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Ricardo Melo; Aguiar, Rai Pablo de Sousa; Islam, Muhammad Torequl; de Alencar, Marcus Vinicius Oliveira Barros; da Mata, Ana Maria Oliveira Ferreira; Braga, Antonio Lima; Júnior, Josemar José da Silva; Sousa, Leonardo da Rocha; de Lima, Rosália Maria Tôrres; Paz, Márcia Fernanda Correia Jardim; E Sousa, João Marcelo de Castro; Melo-Cavalcante, Ana Amélia de Carvalho

    2017-06-14

    Cancer, the multifactorial pathology and to date is the most lethal causes of death in the world. Cyclophosphamide (CPA) and doxorubicin (DOX) are the individually or combindly used two anticancer drugs. The antineoplastic drugs-mediated genetic instability can be overcome by using antioxidants. The study evaluated the cytogenotoxic modulatory potentials of retinyl palmitate (RP) caused by CPA and DOX in Swiss mice. For this, adult Mus musculus of either sex were divided equally regarding to the gender. Toxicogenetic effects were induced by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of the CPA (20mg/kg) and/or DOX (2mg/kg), following to test for comet assay and micronucleus test in bone marrow cells after 48h (DOX) and 7h (CPA) of the administration of RP (100 IU/kg). Both CPA and DOX significantly (p<0.05) increased with the index and frequency of damages, clastogenic and/or aneugenic effects with the augmenting of micronuclei, demonstrating the cytotoxicity interference on the ratio of normochromatic to polychromatic erythrocytes and bone marrow cells of mice, that were found to reduce in RP treatment groups. In conclusion, RP has a modulatory effect on CPA and DOX-mediated cytogenotoxic events. The findings may be a good indication to manage the antioneoplastic drug-induced stress mediated detrimental effects by using RP, especially as a side effect minimizer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. A new monitoring method using solid sorbent media for evaluation of airborne cyclophosphamide and other antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Larson, Rodney R; Khazaeli, M B; Dillon, H Kenneth

    2003-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide is a known human carcinogen. In July 1999, in a report at a conference on cytotoxic drugs in Sweden, it was indicated that cyclophosphamide (CP) was not effectively controlled by high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters.((1)) This then raised a concern that the existing air monitoring methods, which utilize polytetrafluoroethylene (a.k.a. PTFE, or Teflon) or glass fiber filters for evaluation of antineoplastics such as CP in air may also be ineffective for collection and quantification of such agents. It was decided that further evaluation of the existing filter method for monitoring antineoplastics in air be conducted. This evaluation determined that the filter method of monitoring was minimally effective for some antineoplastic agents, and that an alternate method of monitoring should be sought. The method subsequently developed utilizes a solid sorbent tube, Anasorb 708, a methacrylic acid polymer. Evaluation of this sorbent tube for adsorption and desorption properties found it had a greater than 90 percent recovery for both CP and ifosfamide. Other agents evaluated included 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and paclitaxel. All three agents were able to be detected and measured by use of Anasorb 708 solid sorbent tube. Validation of the method was then conducted with air pulled through the tubes via attachment to an air manifold system at air flows ranging from 1.5 to approximately 4.0 liters per minute for up to 24 hours. This evaluation did validate the Anasorb 708 tube as an effective media for collection of airborne concentrations of CP from less than 1 microgram up to approximately 2 mg (2000 microgram) per tube. This corresponds to a concentration range of approximately 0.7 microgram/m(3) (0.0007 mg/m(3)) to 0.7 mg/m(3) in a 5.76 m(3) volume of air. This method can provide accurate information on airborne concentrations of CP for purposes of conducting risk assessments or evaluation of risk management methods.

  8. Evaluation of the anti-neoplastic effect of sorafenib on liver cancer through bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Ye, Jinzuo; Du, Yang; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most important leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of sorafenib on hepatocellular carcinoma through bioluminescence tomography (BLT) based on Micro-CT/BLT multi-modal system. Initially, the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2-Red-FLuc, which was transfected with luciferase gene, was cultured. And then, the orthotopic liver tumor mouse model was established on 4 5 weeks old athymic male Balb/c nude mice by inoculating the HepG2-Red-FLuc cell suspension into the liver lobe under isoflurane anesthesia. 15 20 days after tumor cells implantation, the mice were divided into two groups including the sorafenib treatment group and the control group. The mice in the treatment group were treated with sorafenib with dosage of 62 mg/kg/day by oral gavage for continuous 14 days, and the mice in the control group were treated with sterile water at equal volume. The tumor growth and drug treatment efficacy were dynamically monitored through BLT. The results in this study showed that the growth of liver cancer can be dynamically monitored from very early stage, and also the sorafenib treatment efficacy can be reliably and objectively assessed using BLT imaging method. Our experimental result demonstrated sorafenib can inhibit the tumor growth effectively. BLT enabled the non-invasive and reliable assessment of anti-neoplastic drug efficacy on liver cancer.

  9. Antineoplastic effects of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in the breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Kubatka, Peter; Kapinová, Andrea; Kružliak, Peter; Kello, Martin; Výbohová, Desanka; Kajo, Karol; Novák, Miroslav; Chripková, Martina; Adamkov, Marián; Péč, Martin; Mojžiš, Ján; Bojková, Bianka; Kassayová, Monika; Stollárová, Nadežda; Dobrota, Dušan

    2015-04-01

    There has been considerable interest in both clinical and preclinical research about the role of phytochemicals in the reduction of risk for cancer in humans. The aim of this study was to determine the antineoplastic effects of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in experimental breast cancer in vivo and in vitro. In this experiment, the antineoplastic effects of C. pyrenoidosa in the chemoprevention of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats were evaluated. Chlorella powder was administered through diet at concentrations of 0.3% and 3%. The experiment was terminated 14 wk after carcinogen administration. At autopsy, mammary tumors were removed and prepared for histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. In vitro cytotoxicity assay, parameters of apoptosis, and proliferation after chlorella treatment in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells were carried out. Basic parameters of experimental carcinogenesis, mechanism of action (biomarkers of apoptosis, proliferation, and angiogenesis), chosen metabolic variables, and side effects after long-term chlorella treatment in animals were assessed. Chlorella at higher concentration suppressed tumor frequency by 61% (P < 0.02) and lengthened tumor latency by 12.5 d (P < 0.02) in comparison with the controls. Immunohistochemical analysis of rat tumor cells showed caspase-7 expression increase by 73.5% (P < 0.001) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression decrease by 19% (P = 0.07) after chlorella treatment. In a parallel in vitro study, chlorella significantly decreased survival of MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In chlorella-treated MCF-7 cells, a significant increase in cells having sub-G0/G1 DNA content and significant increase of early apoptotic and late apoptotic/necrotic cells after annexin V/PI staining assay were found. Decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential and increasing reactive oxygen species generation were observed in the chlorella-treated MCF-7

  10. Testing the degradation effects of three reagents on various antineoplastic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gohma, Hiroshi; Inoue, Yoshio; Asano, Mika; Sugiura, Shin-Ichi

    2015-08-01

    Studies for decontamination of antineoplastic compounds have been conducted for decades. Nevertheless, recent studies indicate the contamination of work place in hospitals, and the exposure of workers. In this study, to develop an effective cleaning method for contaminated environments, the degradation efficacies of antineoplastic compounds by reagents were evaluated. The degradation efficacies of various combinations of three reagents (sodium hypochlorite, sodium thiosulfate, and sodium hydroxide) were evaluated with four antineoplastic compounds (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, cisplatin, and carboplatin). The residues of antineoplastic compounds were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography. Of the three reagents, sodium hypochlorite was the most effective to all antineoplastic compounds used in this study. Although sodium hypochlorite degraded 86.6% of cyclophosphamide, it degraded other three antineoplastic compounds completely. The combination with sodium hypochlorite and sodium thiosulfate degraded only 3.3% of cyclophosphamide, since sodium thiosulfate inhibited the degradation ability of sodium hypochlorite. Similarly, the combinations used in all three reagents failed to degrade cyclophosphamide. Although three of four antineoplastic compounds were degraded successfully, any combinations of three reagents could not degrade cyclophosphamide completely. However, the addition of sodium thiosulfate which inhibits the corrosion of metal by sodium hypochlorite is essential for daily cleaning. Therefore, the evaluation of reaction time before the addition of sodium thiosulfate may be required. We will continue to investigate the reagents for degradation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Delving into cornerstones of hypersensitivity to antineoplastic and biological agents: value of diagnostic tools prior to desensitization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cuesta, E; Madrigal-Burgaleta, R; Angel-Pereira, D; Ureña-Tavera, A; Zamora-Verduga, M; Lopez-Gonzalez, P; Berges-Gimeno, M P

    2015-07-01

    Evidence regarding drug provocation test (DPT) with antineoplastic and biological agents is scarce. Our aim was to assess the usefulness of including DPT as a paramount gold standard diagnostic tool (prior to desensitization). Prospective, observational, longitudinal study with patients who, during a 3-year period, were referred to the Desensitization Program at Ramon y Cajal University Hospital. Patients underwent a structured diagnostic protocol by means of anamnesis, skin tests (ST), risk assessment, and DPT. Oxaliplatin-specific IgE was determined in oxaliplatin-reactive patients (who underwent DPT regardless of oxaliplatin-specific IgE results). Univariate analysis and multivariate analysis were used to identify predictors of the final diagnosis among several variables. A total of 186 patients were assessed. A total of 104 (56%) patients underwent DPT. Sixty-four percent of all DPTs were negative (i.e., hypersensitivity was excluded). Sensitivity for oxaliplatin-specific IgE (0.35 UI/l cutoff point) was 34%, specificity 90.3%, negative predictive value 45.9%, positive predictive value 85%, negative likelihood ratio 0.7, and positive likelihood ratio 3.5. These are the first reported data based on more than 100 DPTs with antineoplastic and biological agents (paclitaxel, oxaliplatin, rituximab, infliximab, irinotecan, and other drugs). Implementation of DPT in diagnostic protocols helps exclude hypersensitivity (in 36% of all referred patients), and avoids unnecessary desensitizations in nonhypersensitive patients (30-56% of patients, depending on culprit-drug). Drug provocation test is vital to validate diagnostic tools; consequently, quality data are shown on oxaliplatin-specific IgE and oxaliplatin-ST in the largest series of oxaliplatin-reactive patients reported to date (74 oxaliplatin-reactive patients). Identifying phenotypes and predictors of a diagnosis of hypersensitivity may be helpful for tailored plans. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by

  12. Antineoplastic activity of didemnin congeners: nordidemnin and modified chain analogues.

    PubMed

    Jouin, P; Poncet, J; Dufour, M N; Aumelas, A; Pantaloni, A; Cros, S; François, G

    1991-02-01

    Nordidemnin (2), a natural analogue of the marine cyclodepsipeptide didemnin B (1b), showed cytotoxic activity against L1210 leukemia and antineoplastic activity against P388 leukemia as well as B16 melanoma; nordidemnin (2) was as active as didemnin B (1b). The influence of synthetic modifications in the linear peptidic chain on in vitro and in vivo activity was also studied. Replacement of the terminal lactyl residue by mandelyl and 3-(p-hydroxyphenyl)propionyl residues in compounds 3 and 4, respectively, did not affect the cytotoxic activity against L1210 leukemia (ID50 of 1.1 nM and 1.2 nM, respectively) or the in vivo activity against P388 leukemia. Unlike these aromatic substituants, the lipophilic palmityl residue induced a dramatic loss in cytotoxic activity. The inverted chirality of the MeLeu joining residue in compound 6 caused a marked reduction in the in vitro activity.

  13. A potential CARB-pharmacophore for antineoplastic activity: part 1.

    PubMed

    Witczak, Zbigniew J; Poplawski, Tomasz; Czubatka, Anna; Sarnik, Joanna; Tokarz, Pawel; VanWert, Adam L; Bielski, Roman

    2014-04-01

    Diverse functionalized representatives of various classes of sugars, such as thio-, anhydro-, and sulfamido-sugars and myo-inositol oxide, were synthesized and assessed for cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines (A549, LoVo, MCF-7 and HeLa). The inositol oxide (4) was more active against MCF-7 cells (i.e., an estrogen-dependent breast cancer line), whereas all 3 sulfur-containing compounds showed strongest activity against A549 cells (i.e., a lung adenocarcinoma line). We propose to use a concept of functional 'CARB-pharmacophores' when evaluating a potential for the compounds' general antineoplastic activity. Future studies will determine the reasons for cell-type specificity of these compounds. The thio-sugar motif appears to be a promising lead for future developments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cost savings realized by use of the PhaSeal(®) closed-system transfer device for preparation of antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Michael S; Solimando, Dominic A; Grollman, Franklin R; Pang, Janet L; Chasick, Ashley H; Hightman, Charlene M; Johnson, Anthony D; Mickens, Maxine G; Preston, Lorenzo M

    2013-12-01

    Medication cost is a major factor associated with increasing health care costs in the United States. Expenditures for prescription drugs in 2013 are estimated to be $283.7 billion. Closed system transfer devices are widely used for preparation of hazardous drugs. Reports indicate the Phaseal(®) closed system transfer device maintains sterility in vials for 7 days, suggesting the unused portion of single-use vials could be salvaged. This study was done to determine whether using a closed system transfer device to extend the beyond-use date of single-use vials of antineoplastic medications would result in a measurable cost saving. A list of 25 drugs available in single-use vials, with a chemical stability of at least 48 hours, was compiled. Use of these agents was recorded during a 50-day period in April through June 2012. Use from a total of 296 vials of 21 antineoplastic agents was recorded. After allowing for the initial use of each vial, the mean potential percentage of drug waste was calculated to be 57.03%. Actual savings during the study period was $96,348.70. The pharmacy avoided nearly half of the potential waste and saved a mean of 29% of each vial. The cost-saving during the study period represents a $703,047.67 annual saving; which more than offsets the $106,556.55 the pharmacy spent for the Phaseal(®) system in 2012. In addition to being a protective measure to reduce exposure to hazardous agents, use of the Phaseal(®) system results in a reduction in drug waste, and a noticeable cost saving for antineoplastic agents.

  15. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in biological samples and 14C contents in biological samples and antineoplastic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Konno, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we measured the 14C concentration in 14C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate samples in our Yamagata University (YU) - AMS system. The calibration curves of 14C concentration in serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate were linear (the correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9893), and the precision and accuracy was within the acceptance criteria. To examine a 14C content of water in three vacuum blood collection tubes and a syringe were measured. 14C was not detected from water in these devices. The mean 14C content in urine samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers was 0.144 dpm/mL, and the intra-day fluctuation of 14C content in urine from a volunteer was little. The antineoplastic agents are administered to the patients in combination. Then, 14C contents of the antineoplastic agents were quantitated. 14C contents were different among 10 antineoplastic agents; 14C contents of paclitaxel injection and docetaxel hydrate injection were higher than those of the other injections. These results indicate that our quantitation method using YU-AMS system is suited for microdosing studies and that measurement of baseline and co-administered drugs might be necessary for the studies in low concentrations.

  16. Relevance of the OCT1 transporter to the antineoplastic effect of biguanides

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, Eric D.; Yasmeen, Amber; Beauchamp, Marie-Claude; Rosenblatt, Joshua; Pollak, Michael; Gotlieb, Walter H.

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNA knockdown of OCT1 reduced sensitivity of EOC cells to metformin, but not to another biguanide, phenformin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppression of OCT1 also affects the activation of AMP kinase in response to metformin, but not to phenformin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct actions of metformin may be limited by low OCT1 expression in EOC tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenformin could be used as an alternative biguanide. -- Abstract: Epidemiologic and laboratory data suggesting that metformin has antineoplastic activity have led to ongoing clinical trials. However, pharmacokinetic issues that may influence metformin activity have not been studied in detail. The organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) is known to play an important role in cellular uptake of metformin in the liver. We show that siRNA knockdown of OCT1 reduced sensitivity of epithelial ovarian cancer cells to metformin, but interestingly not to another biguanide, phenformin, with respect to both activation of AMP kinase and inhibition of proliferation. We observed that there is heterogeneity between primary human tumors with respect to OCT1 expression. These results suggest that there may be settings where drug uptake limits direct action of metformin on neoplastic cells, raising the possibility that metformin may not be the optimal biguanide for clinical investigation.

  17. Adherence to oral antineoplastic agents by cancer patients: definition and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bassan, F; Peter, F; Houbre, B; Brennstuhl, M J; Costantini, M; Speyer, E; Tarquinio, C

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, oral chemotherapy has been gaining ground as cancer treatment. This therapy seems to have few toxic effects and offers patients good quality of life. However, in addition to the fears the therapy might generate in patients, oral treatment raises a new issue, which, until now, has been marginal in this field: therapeutic observance or adherence. We investigated the research into adherence to oral chemotherapy among cancer patients published between 1990 and July 2013. Studies showed considerable diversity in terms of both the definition and measurement of adherence. As well, adherence to antineoplastic therapy is affected by the patient's understanding of the treatment and ability to remember information provided by the physician, treatment length and psychological distress. Our review of the few studies on adherence to anticancer drug treatment raises some questions that could be pursued in future research. In light of our findings, patients should receive 'therapy education' to help them and their support groups better understand the disease and its treatment and to achieve optimal health management and improved treatment effectiveness. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Evaluation of two closed-system drug transfer device in the antineoplastic drug elaboration process].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Álvarez, Sandra; Porta-Oltra, Begoña; Hernandez-Griso, Marta; Pérez-Labaña, Francisca; Climente-Martí, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Objetivo: evaluar el impacto del uso de dos sistemas cerrados sobre el proceso de preparación de quimioterapia parenteral, con respecto al sistema estándar, en términos de contaminación local y ambiental, y tiempos de preparación. Método: estudio observacional prospectivo. Se compararon dos proveedores distintos de sistemas cerrados, Icu Medical® y Care Fusion®, frente al sistema estándar de preparación de quimioterapia parenteral. Quince enfermeros del Servicio de Farmacia elaboraron cada uno de ellos 5 preparaciones, una siguiendo el procedimiento estándar y cuatro usando los sistemas cerrados. Para evaluar la aparición de contaminación se elaboró una solución de fluoresceína al 0,5%. Se evaluaron dos tipos de contaminación: local (en tres puntos: sistema acoplado a vial, jeringa y envase final) y ambiental (guantes y mesa de trabajo), obteniéndose el porcentaje de preparaciones contaminadas en cada uno de ellos. Se registró el tiempo empleado por cada enfermero en cada una de las preparaciones. Resultados: se elaboraron 75 preparaciones. Se produjo una reducción global de la contaminación local para los SC Icu Medical® y Care Fusion® del 24% y 74%, respectivamente. En el sistema cerrado Care Fusion® la contaminación local fue significativamente menor que en el sistema estándar en vial, jeringa y envase final; mientras que en el sistema cerrado Icu Medical® solo fue significativamente menor en la conexión al vial. Se produjo un incremento significativo del tiempo de preparación con la utilización de sistemas cerrados de los entre 23,4 y 30,5 segundos. Conclusiones: ambos sistemas cerrados han mostrado un beneficio con respecto a la utilización del sistema estándar. Sin embargo, se han visto incrementados significativamente los tiempos de preparación con ambos sistemas.

  19. Antineoplastic effect of decoy oligonucleotide derived from MGMT enhancer.

    PubMed

    Canello, Tamar; Ovadia, Haim; Refael, Miri; Zrihan, Daniel; Siegal, Tali; Lavon, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Silencing of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) in tumors, mainly through promoter methylation, correlates with a better therapeutic response and with increased survival. Therefore, it is conceivable to consider MGMT as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancers. Our previous results demonstrated the pivotal role of NF-kappaB in MGMT expression, mediated mainly through p65/NF-kappaB homodimers. Here we show that the non-canonical NF-KappaB motif (MGMT-kappaB1) within MGMT enhancer is probably the major inducer of MGMT expression following NF-kappaB activation. Thus, in an attempt to attenuate the transcription activity of MGMT in tumors we designed locked nucleic acids (LNA) modified decoy oligonucleotides corresponding to the specific sequence of MGMT-kappaB1 (MGMT-kB1-LODN). Following confirmation of the ability of MGMT-kB1-LODN to interfere with the binding of p65/NF-kappaB to the NF-KappaB motif within MGMT enhancer, the efficacy of the decoy was studied in-vitro and in-vivo. The results of these experiments show that the decoy MGMT-kB1-LODN have a substantial antineoplastic effect when used either in combination with temozolomide or as monotherapy. Our results suggest that MGMT-kB1-LODN may provide a novel strategy for cancer therapy.

  20. Dental anomalies in children submitted to antineoplastic therapy.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Camila Merida; Corrêa, Fernanda Nahás Pires; Lopes, Nilza Nelly Fontana; Fava, Marcelo; Odone Filho, Vicente

    2014-06-01

    Cancer is the third most frequent cause of death in children in Brazil. Early diagnosis and medical advances have significantly improved treatment outcomes, which has resulted in higher survival rates and the management of late side effects has become increasingly important in caring for these patients. Dental abnormalities are commonly observed as late effects of antineoplastic therapy in the oral cavity. The incidence and severity of the dental abnormalities depend on the child's age at diagnosis and the type of chemotherapeutic agent used, as well as the irradiation dose and area. The treatment duration and aggressivity should also be considered. Disturbances in dental development are characterized by changes in shape, number and root development. Enamel anomalies, such as discoloration, opacities and hypoplasia are also observed in these patients. When severe, these abnormalities can cause functional and esthetic sequelae that have an impact on the children's and adolescents' quality of life. General dentists and pediatric dentists should understand these dental abnormalities and how to identify them aiming for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  1. Antineoplastic activity of rinvanil and phenylacetylrinvanil in leukaemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    LUVIANO, AXEL; AGUIÑIGA-SÁNCHEZ, ITZEN; DEMARE, PATRICIA; TIBURCIO, REYNALDO; LEDESMA-MARTÍNEZ, EDGAR; SANTIAGO-OSORIO, EDELMIRO; REGLA, IGNACIO

    2014-01-01

    In the search for novel chemotherapeutic agents for cancer treatment, capsaicin has been shown to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in various types of cancer cell line, including leukaemia cell lines. The capsaicin analogues, rinvanil and phenylacetylrinvanil (PhAR), share a binding affinity for vanilloid receptors and may have biological activities similar to capsaicin; however, their anticancer potential has not yet been reported. This study analyses the antineoplastic activities of rinvanil and PhAR in leukaemia versus normal cells. P388, J774 and WEHI-3 leukaemia cell lines, as well as mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells, were cultured with varying concentrations of rinvanil and PhAR. Following this, proliferation and apoptosis were determined by the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay and DNA ladder. Cultured leukaemia cell lines and mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation, while non-diseased cells were less sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of capsaicin, rinvanil and PhAR. Rinvanil and PhAR also induced apoptosis in leukaemia cell lines but not in bone marrow. Given the lower IC50 values for apoptosis induction in leukaemia cells compared with that of normal cells, PhAR is a promising selective anticancer agent. PMID:24765194

  2. PPAR-γ Agonists As Antineoplastic Agents in Cancers with Dysregulated IGF Axis

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Veronica; Nicolosi, Maria Luisa; Giuliano, Stefania; Bellomo, Maria; Belfiore, Antonino; Malaguarnera, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are associated to increased cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, cancer development and progression as well as cancer resistance to traditional anticancer therapies are often linked to a deregulation/overactivation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis, which involves the autocrine/paracrine production of IGFs (IGF-I and IGF-II) and overexpression of their cognate receptors [IGF-I receptor, IGF-insulin receptor (IR), and IR]. Recently, new drugs targeting various IGF axis components have been developed. However, these drugs have several limitations including the occurrence of insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia, which, in turn, may affect cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches are needed. In this regard, the pleiotropic effects of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonists may have promising applications in cancer prevention and therapy. Indeed, activation of PPAR-γ by thiazolidinediones (TZDs) or other agonists may inhibit cell growth and proliferation by lowering circulating insulin and affecting key pathways of the Insulin/IGF axis, such as PI3K/mTOR, MAPK, and GSK3-β/Wnt/β-catenin cascades, which regulate cancer cell survival, cell reprogramming, and differentiation. In light of these evidences, TZDs and other PPAR-γ agonists may be exploited as potential preventive and therapeutic agents in tumors addicted to the activation of IGF axis or occurring in hyperinsulinemic patients. Unfortunately, clinical trials using PPAR-γ agonists as antineoplastic agents have reached conflicting results, possibly because they have not selected tumors with overactivated insulin/IGF-I axis or occurring in hyperinsulinemic patients. In conclusion, the use of PPAR-γ agonists in combined therapies of IGF-driven malignancies looks promising but requires future developments. PMID:28275367

  3. SIMMEON-Prep study: SIMulation of Medication Errors in ONcology: prevention of antineoplastic preparation errors.

    PubMed

    Sarfati, L; Ranchon, F; Vantard, N; Schwiertz, V; Gauthier, N; He, S; Kiouris, E; Gourc-Berthod, C; Guédat, M G; Alloux, C; Gustin, M-P; You, B; Trillet-Lenoir, V; Freyer, G; Rioufol, C

    2015-02-01

    Medication errors (ME) in oncology are known to cause serious iatrogenic complications. However, MEs still occur at each step in the anticancer chemotherapy process, particularly when injections are prepared in the hospital pharmacy. This study assessed whether a ME simulation program would help prevent ME-associated iatrogenic complications. The 5-month prospective study, consisting of three phases, was undertaken in the centralized pharmaceutical unit of a university hospital of Lyon, France. During the first simulation phase, 25 instruction sheets each containing one simulated error were inserted among various instruction sheets issued to blinded technicians. The second phase consisted of activity aimed at raising pharmacy technicians' awareness of risk of medication errors associated with antineoplastic drugs. The third phase consisted of re-enacting the error simulation process 3 months after the awareness campaign. The rate and severity of undetected medication errors were measured during the two simulation (first and third) phases. The potential seriousness of the ME was assessed using the NCC MERP(®) index. The rate of undetected medication errors decreased from 12 in the first simulation phase (48%) to five in the second simulation phase (20%, P = 0.04). The number of potential deaths due to administration of a faulty preparation decreased from three to zero. Awareness of iatrogenic risk through error simulation allowed pharmacy technicians to improve their ability to identify errors. This study is the first demonstration of the successful application of a simulation-based learning tool for reducing errors in the preparation of injectable anticancer drugs. Such a program should form part of the continuous quality improvement of risk management strategies for cancer patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. PPAR-γ Agonists As Antineoplastic Agents in Cancers with Dysregulated IGF Axis.

    PubMed

    Vella, Veronica; Nicolosi, Maria Luisa; Giuliano, Stefania; Bellomo, Maria; Belfiore, Antonino; Malaguarnera, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are associated to increased cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, cancer development and progression as well as cancer resistance to traditional anticancer therapies are often linked to a deregulation/overactivation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis, which involves the autocrine/paracrine production of IGFs (IGF-I and IGF-II) and overexpression of their cognate receptors [IGF-I receptor, IGF-insulin receptor (IR), and IR]. Recently, new drugs targeting various IGF axis components have been developed. However, these drugs have several limitations including the occurrence of insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia, which, in turn, may affect cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches are needed. In this regard, the pleiotropic effects of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonists may have promising applications in cancer prevention and therapy. Indeed, activation of PPAR-γ by thiazolidinediones (TZDs) or other agonists may inhibit cell growth and proliferation by lowering circulating insulin and affecting key pathways of the Insulin/IGF axis, such as PI3K/mTOR, MAPK, and GSK3-β/Wnt/β-catenin cascades, which regulate cancer cell survival, cell reprogramming, and differentiation. In light of these evidences, TZDs and other PPAR-γ agonists may be exploited as potential preventive and therapeutic agents in tumors addicted to the activation of IGF axis or occurring in hyperinsulinemic patients. Unfortunately, clinical trials using PPAR-γ agonists as antineoplastic agents have reached conflicting results, possibly because they have not selected tumors with overactivated insulin/IGF-I axis or occurring in hyperinsulinemic patients. In conclusion, the use of PPAR-γ agonists in combined therapies of IGF-driven malignancies looks promising but requires future developments.

  5. Antineoplastic chemotherapy and congenital tooth abnormalities in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Brożyna, Agnieszka; Dembowska-Bagińska, Bożenna; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Chemotherapeutic treatment in children and adolescents carries a risk of congenital tooth disorders and dentinoma. Study objective is to assess the correlation between tooth abnormalities, early complications of multidrug chemotherapy, and chemotherapeutics used in different antineoplastic therapies in children and adolescents. Material and methods Enamel defects (developmental defects of enamel index – DDE index) and defects in tooth number, size, and structure were assessed clinically and radiologically in 60 patients who underwent chemotherapy on average 4.9 ±3.4 years earlier (PCH), and 60 generally healthy subjects (control group – CG), aged 6–18 years. Höltta’s defect index (DeI) was calculated. Medical files provided information on neoplasm type, age at treatment start and chemotherapy duration, chemotherapeutic type and dose, vomiting, and mucositis (CTCAE v4.0). Statistical significance of differences between groups was assessed with the Mann-Whitney U test and the correlation between dental defects and chemotherapy with Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (significance p ≤ 0.05). Results Enamel defects, tooth agenesis, microdontia, root resorption, taurodontism, and dentinoma occurred statistically significantly more often in the PCH group. A correlation was established between vincristine use and dose and all types of dental defects; cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and isophosphamide and hypodontia; microdontia, root resorption, and enamel defects; etoposide and cisplatin and microdontia, root resorption, and enamel defects; methotrexate root resorption and enamel defects; carboplatin and dentinoma and enamel defects. Mucositis and vomiting promoted root resorption, microdontia, and enamel defects. Conclusions Dental defects are related to both the use of respective chemotherapeutics, especially vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and isophosphamide, and to early complications in multidrug chemotherapy

  6. Antineoplastic chemotherapy and congenital tooth abnormalities in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Krasuska-Sławińska, Ewa; Brożyna, Agnieszka; Dembowska-Bagińska, Bożenna; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic treatment in children and adolescents carries a risk of congenital tooth disorders and dentinoma. Study objective is to assess the correlation between tooth abnormalities, early complications of multidrug chemotherapy, and chemotherapeutics used in different antineoplastic therapies in children and adolescents. Enamel defects (developmental defects of enamel index - DDE index) and defects in tooth number, size, and structure were assessed clinically and radiologically in 60 patients who underwent chemotherapy on average 4.9 ±3.4 years earlier (PCH), and 60 generally healthy subjects (control group - CG), aged 6-18 years. Höltta's defect index (DeI) was calculated. Medical files provided information on neoplasm type, age at treatment start and chemotherapy duration, chemotherapeutic type and dose, vomiting, and mucositis (CTCAE v4.0). Statistical significance of differences between groups was assessed with the Mann-Whitney U test and the correlation between dental defects and chemotherapy with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (significance p ≤ 0.05). Enamel defects, tooth agenesis, microdontia, root resorption, taurodontism, and dentinoma occurred statistically significantly more often in the PCH group. A correlation was established between vincristine use and dose and all types of dental defects; cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and isophosphamide and hypodontia; microdontia, root resorption, and enamel defects; etoposide and cisplatin and microdontia, root resorption, and enamel defects; methotrexate root resorption and enamel defects; carboplatin and dentinoma and enamel defects. Mucositis and vomiting promoted root resorption, microdontia, and enamel defects. Dental defects are related to both the use of respective chemotherapeutics, especially vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and isophosphamide, and to early complications in multidrug chemotherapy - mucositis and vomiting. Vincristine and carboplatin use may promote

  7. [Blending powdered antineoplastic medicine in disposable ointment container].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yasunori; Uchino, Tomonobu; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    On dispensing powdered antineoplastic medicines, it is important to prevent cross-contamination and environmental exposure. Recently, we developed a method for blending powdered medicine in a disposable ointment container using a planetary centrifugal mixer. The disposable container prevents cross-contamination. In addition, environmental exposure associated with washing the apparatus does not arise because no blending blade is used. In this study, we aimed to confirm the uniformity of the mixture and weight loss of medicine in the blending procedure. We blended colored lactose powder with Leukerin(®) or Mablin(®) powders using the new method and the ordinary pestle and mortar method. Then, the blending state was monitored using image analysis. Blending variables, such as the blending ratio (1:9-9:1), container size (35-125 mL), and charging rate (20-50%) in the container were also investigated under the operational conditions of 500 rpm and 50 s. At a 20% charging rate in a 35 mL container, the blending precision of the mixtures was not influenced by the blending ratio, and was less than 6.08%, indicating homogeneity. With an increase in the charging rate, however, the blending precision decreased. The possible amount of both mixtures rose to about 17 g with a 20% charging rate in a 125 mL container. Furthermore, weight loss of medicines with this method was smaller than that with the pestle and mortar method, suggesting that this method is safer for pharmacists. In conclusion, we have established a precise and safe method for blending powdered medicines in pharmacies.

  8. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging and photodynamic therapy with indocyanine green lactosome has antineoplastic effects for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Takumi; Kaibori, Masaki; Hishikawa, Hidehiko; Nakatake, Richi; Okumura, Tadayoshi; Ozeki, Eiichi; Hara, Isao; Morimoto, Yuji; Yoshii, Kengo; Kon, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    Anticancer agents and operating procedures have been developed for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, but their prognosis remains poor. It is necessary to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for HCC to improve its prognosis. Lactosome is a core-shell-type polymeric micelle, and enclosing labeling or anticancer agents into this micelle enables drug delivery. In this study, we investigated the diagnostic and therapeutic efficacies of indocyanine green (ICG)-loaded lactosome for near-infrared fluorescence (NIF) imaging and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for HCC. The human HCC cell line HuH-7 was treated with ICG or ICG-lactosome, followed by PDT, and the cell viabilities were measured (in vitro PDT efficiency). For NIF imaging, HuH-7 cells were subcutaneously transplanted into BALB/c nude mice, followed by intravenous administration of ICG or ICG-lactosome. The transplanted animals were treated with PDT, and the antineoplastic effects were analyzed (in vivo PDT efficiency). PDT had toxic effects on HuH-7 cells treated with ICG-lactosome, but not ICG alone. NIF imaging revealed that the fluorescence of tumor areas in ICG-lactosome-treated animals was higher than that of contralateral regions at 24 h after injection and thereafter. PDT exerted immediate and continuous phototoxic effects in the transplanted mice treated with ICG-lactosome. Our results demonstrate that ICG-lactosome accumulated in xenograft tumors, and that PDT had antineoplastic effects on these malignant implants. NIF imaging and PDT with ICG-lactosome could be useful diagnostic and/or therapeutic strategies for HCC.

  9. Chemomodulation of human dendritic cell function by antineoplastic agents in low noncytotoxic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Kaneno, Ramon; Shurin, Galina V; Tourkova, Irina L; Shurin, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    The dose-delivery schedule of conventional chemotherapy, which determines its efficacy and toxicity, is based on the maximum tolerated dose. This strategy has lead to cure and disease control in a significant number of patients but is associated with significant short-term and long-term toxicity. Recent data demonstrate that moderately low-dose chemotherapy may be efficiently combined with immunotherapy, particularly with dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, to improve the overall therapeutic efficacy. However, the direct effects of low and ultra-low concentrations on DCs are still unknown. Here we characterized the effects of low noncytotoxic concentrations of different classes of chemotherapeutic agents on human DCs in vitro. DCs treated with antimicrotubule agents vincristine, vinblastine, and paclitaxel or with antimetabolites 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and methotrexate, showed increased expression of CD83 and CD40 molecules. Expression of CD80 on DCs was also stimulated by vinblastine, paclitaxel, azacytidine, methotrexate, and mitomycin C used in low nontoxic concentrations. Furthermore, 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine, methotrexate, and mitomycin C increased the ability of human DCs to stimulate proliferation of allogeneic T lymphocytes. Thus, our data demonstrate for the first time that in low noncytotoxic concentrations chemotherapeutic agents do not induce apoptosis of DCs, but directly enhance DC maturation and function. This suggests that modulation of human DCs by noncytotoxic concentrations of antineoplastic drugs, i.e. chemomodulation, might represent a novel approach for up-regulation of functional activity of resident DCs in the tumor microenvironment or improving the efficacy of DCs prepared ex vivo for subsequent vaccinations. PMID:19591684

  10. The husk fiber of Cocos nucifera L. (Palmae) is a source of anti-neoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Koschek, P R; Alviano, D S; Alviano, C S; Gattass, C R

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated the in vitro anti-tumoral activities of fractions from aqueous extracts of the husk fiber of the typical A and common varieties of Cocos nucifera (Palmae). Cytotoxicity against leukemia cells was determined by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cells (2 x 10(4)/well) were incubated with 0, 5, 50 or 500 microg/mL high- or low-molecular weight fractions for 48 h, treated with MTT and absorbance was measured with an ELISA reader. The results showed that both varieties have almost similar antitumoral activity against the leukemia cell line K562 (60.1 +/- 8.5 and 47.5 +/- 11.9% for the typical A and common varieties, respectively). Separation of the crude extracts with Amicon membranes yielded fractions with molecular weights ranging in size from 1-3 kDa (fraction A) to 3-10 kDa (fraction B) and to more than 10 kDa (fraction C). Cells were treated with 500 microg/mL of these fractions and cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT. Fractions ranging in molecular weight from 1-10 kDa had higher cytotoxicity. Interestingly, C. nucifera extracts were also active against Lucena 1, a multidrug-resistant leukemia cell line. Their cytotoxicity against this cell line was about 50% (51.9 +/- 3.2 and 56.3 +/- 2.9 for varieties typical A and common, respectively). Since the common C. nucifera variety is extensively cultured in Brazil and the husk fiber is its industrial by-product, the results obtained in the present study suggest that it might be a very inexpensive source of new antineoplastic and anti-multidrug resistant drugs that warrants further investigation.

  11. Oral antineoplastic agent interactions with medicinal plants and food: an issue to take into account.

    PubMed

    Collado-Borrell, Roberto; Escudero-Vilaplana, Vicente; Romero-Jiménez, Rosa; Iglesias-Peinado, Irene; Herranz-Alonso, Ana; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María

    2016-11-01

    To review interactions between oral antineoplastic agents (OAAs) for the treatment of solid and hematological tumors and common food and medicinal plants. All potential interactions between OAAs, medicinal plants and food were reviewed. OAAs were considered to be drugs for oral administration that have direct antitumor activity and were approved by the European Medicines Agency in April 2015. We performed the literature search in Pubmed(®) considering only medicinal plants and food. In addition, available data were analyzed from each OAA in secondary data sources taken from Thomson Micromedex(®) and Lexi-comp(®), as well as in the summary of product characteristics. Fifty-eight OAAs were analyzed. We found interactions in 60.3 % of OAAs. Those with most interactions described were: imatinib and procarbazine (4 interactions) and erlotinib, vemurafenib, pomalidomide, medroxyprogesterone and methotrexate (3 interactions). We found 39 interactions (74.4 % important). St. John's wort was the medicinal plant with most interactions (92.6 % were considered important). The rest were: important (ginseng-imatinib, methotrexate-cola and tobacco-erlotinib and tobacco-pomalidomide) and moderate (caffeine-vemurafenib/medroxyprogesterone, medroxyprogesterone-ruxolitinib/St. John's wort, garlic-anagrelide and ginseng-procarbazine). Twenty-six interactions (61.5 % important). Grapefruit had most interactions (82.4 % were considered important). The rest were: important (alcohol-procarbazine) and moderate (dairy-estramustine, methotrexate-ethanol, procarbazine-tyramine, vitamin A-tretinoin/bexarotene and grapefruit-bexarotene/etoposide/sunitinib). A review of interactions of medicinal plants and food should be taken into account in the management of OAAs, since more than half have interactions with MPs and food, of which 70.3 % are considered important. The most relevant are HSJ, grapefruit, ginseng and tobacco. This review is intended to serve as a support to all healthcare

  12. Terminal arbor degeneration (TAD): a novel lesion produced by the antineoplastic agent, paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Gary J.; Liu, Guo Kai; Xiao, Wen Hua; Jin, Hai Wei; Siau, Chiang

    2011-01-01

    The anti-neoplastic agent, paclitaxel, causes a dose-limiting distal, symmetrical, sensory peripheral neuropathy that is often accompanied by a neuropathic pain syndrome. In a low-dose model of paclitaxel-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy in the rat, we have shown that the drug causes degeneration of intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs), i.e., the fibers which give rise to the sensory afferent’s terminal receptor arbour. However, we did not find any evidence for axonal degeneration in samples taken at the mid-nerve level. Here we aimed to determine whether the absence of degenerating peripheral nerve axons was due to sampling a level that was too proximal. We used electron microscopy to study the distal-most branches of the nerves innervating the hind paw glabrous skin of normal and paclitaxel-treated rats. We confirmed that we sampled at a time when IENF degeneration was prominent. Because degeneration might be easier to detect with higher paclitaxel doses, we examined a four-fold cumulative dose range (8–32 mg/kg). We found no evidence of degeneration in the superficial subepidermal axon bundles (sSAB) that are located just a few microns below the epidermal basal lamina. Specifically, for all three dose groups there was no change in the number of sSAB per mm of epidermal border, no change in the number of axons per sSAB, and no change in the diameter of sSAB axons. We conclude that paclitaxel produces a novel type of lesion that is restricted to the afferent axon’s terminal arbor; we name this lesion “terminal arbor degeneration (TAD)”. PMID:21395870

  13. [Summary of recommendations for a rational implementation of the ministry of health guidelines on the prevention of occupational risks in handling antineoplastic agents].

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    The Italian Society of Preventive Medicine for Health Care Workers has examined the guidelines recently published by the Italian Ministry of Health for implementation of safe handling practices for antineoplastic drugs and produced recommendations. On the basis of literature data and the field research carried out by the Society, different aspects covering risk assessment, environmental and biological monitoring, workplace and individual protection measures, education and training of health care and technical personnel, health surveillance programs, were focused on. The creation of a single central unit for preparing antineoplastic drugs or at least a drastic reduction in the number of preparation units currently operating in each hospital are the most relevant objectives of both the guidelines and the Society document. This must be accompanied by correct management of technical and organizational measures, improvement of safety and health of personnel involved in different activities and reduction of the number of exposed subjects. Finally the importance is stressed of clear specific mandatory procedures with which to manage and control the different aspects of job organization.

  14. Guiding pharmacist clinical interviews: a safety tool to support the education of patients treated with oral antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Ribed, Almudena; Escudero-Vilaplana, Vicente; Romero-Jimenez, Rosa Maria; Iglesias-Peinado, Irene; Herranz-Alonso, Ana; Sanjurjo-Saez, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Oral antineoplastic agents (OAA) lead to new challenges in patient education, monitoring, medication errors, drug interactions, adverse events management, and adherence. The aim is to develop a structured guide supporting pharmacist interviews and onco-hematologic outpatients' education process and to identify the key points that a pharmacist should address in order to increase OAA safety and efficacy. A literature review was performed and the recommended standards associated with OAA approved by ASCO and MASCC were analyzed. Additionally, a multidisciplinary team was formed to address the key points associated with OAA in clinical practice and to create a useful clinical guide. The multidisciplinary team defined the safety and efficacy key points during patient education and issued recommendations regarding the following items: dose, drug administration, interactions, adverse events, adherence, literacy, quality of life, storage, and handling. A guide was created as a check-list in support of the pharmacist clinical interview. Implications for clinical practice, including adverse events management, drug interactions management, and interventions on adherence were added. This article provides a consensus set of safety recommendations regarding OAA in clinical practice and a well-researched easily implementable support guide to standardize and guarantee quality pharmaceutical care of onco-hematologic outpatients.

  15. Mediastinal sarcoidosis mimicking lymph malignancy recurrence after anti-neoplastic therapy.

    PubMed

    El Hammoumi, Massine; El Marjany, Mohamed; Moussaoui, Driss; Doudouh, Aberahim; Mansouri, Hamid; Kabiri, El Hassane

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our work is to promote the awareness about the development of sarcoidosis after antineoplastic therapy in order to avoid diagnostic errors with FDG-PET/CT findings. We report the observation of three women with breast, cervix and stomach treated cancers who developed a sarcoidosis after the end of anti-neoplastic therapy. The utility of FDG-PET/CT is in pinpointing the organs candidates for diagnostic biopsy and not distinguishing between the malignancy and granulomatous or inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Flavonoids from Heliotropium subulatum exudate and their evaluation for antioxidant, antineoplastic and cytotoxic activities II.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bharat; Sahu, Pooran M; Sharma, Ram A

    2017-02-01

    The flavonoids are the largest group of phenolic compounds isolated from a wide range of higher plants. These compounds work as antimicrobials, anti-insect agents and protect plants from other types of biotic and abiotic stresses. Various researchers have suggested that flavonoids possessed antioxidant, antineoplastic and cytotoxic activities. The main objective of this study was to test dichloromethane fraction of resinous exudate of Heliotropium subulatum for their antioxidant, antineoplastic and cytotoxic activities, as well as to search new antioxidant and antineoplastic agents for pharmaceutical formulations. Five flavonoids were isolated from resinous exudate of this plant species and screened for their in vitro and in vivo antioxidant models (DPPH radical scavenging, reducing power, superoxide anion scavenging, metal chelating scavenging systems, catalase and lipid peroxidation), antineoplastic (Sarcoma 180), and cytotoxic (Chinese hamster V79 cells) activities. Tricetin demonstrated maximum antioxidant activity against both in vitro and in vivo experimental systems while galangin exhibited maximum inhibition (78.35%) at a dose of 10 µg/kg/day against Sarcoma 180. Similarly, it was found that galangin also showed highest activity (21.1 ± 0.15%) at a concentration of 70 µg/ml to Chinese hamster V79 cells. The observed results suggest that tricetin has a potential to scavenge free radicals in both in vitro and in vivo models while the galangin could be considered as antitumor and cytotoxic agent.

  17. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  18. Does applying technology throughout the medication use process improve patient safety with antineoplastics?

    PubMed

    Bubalo, Joseph; Warden, Bruce A; Wiegel, Joshua J; Nishida, Tess; Handel, Evelyn; Svoboda, Leanne M; Nguyen, Lam; Edillo, P Neil

    2014-12-01

    Medical errors, in particular medication errors, continue to be a troublesome factor in the delivery of safe and effective patient care. Antineoplastic agents represent a group of medications highly susceptible to medication errors due to their complex regimens and narrow therapeutic indices. As the majority of these medication errors are frequently associated with breakdowns in poorly defined systems, developing technologies and evolving workflows seem to be a logical approach to provide added safeguards against medication errors. This article will review both the pros and cons of today's technologies and their ability to simplify the medication use process, reduce medication errors, improve documentation, improve healthcare costs and increase provider efficiency as relates to the use of antineoplastic therapy throughout the medication use process. Several technologies, mainly computerized provider order entry (CPOE), barcode medication administration (BCMA), smart pumps, electronic medication administration record (eMAR), and telepharmacy, have been well described and proven to reduce medication errors, improve adherence to quality metrics, and/or improve healthcare costs in a broad scope of patients. The utilization of these technologies during antineoplastic therapy is weak at best and lacking for most. Specific to the antineoplastic medication use system, the only technology with data to adequately support a claim of reduced medication errors is CPOE. In addition to the benefits these technologies can provide, it is also important to recognize their potential to induce new types of errors and inefficiencies which can negatively impact patient care. The utilization of technology reduces but does not eliminate the potential for error. The evidence base to support technology in preventing medication errors is limited in general but even more deficient in the realm of antineoplastic therapy. Though CPOE has the best evidence to support its use in the

  19. Antineoplastic Agents. 603. Quinstatins: Exceptional Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pettit, George R; Melody, Noeleen; Chapuis, Jean-Charles

    2017-03-24

    Discovery of the exceptionally powerful anticancer drug dolastatin 10 (1), contained in the sea hare Dolabella auricularia, opened a new frontier needed for improving human cancer treatment. Subsequently, major advances have been achieved based on results of structurally modifying this unusual natural peptide while maintaining the remarkable anticancer activity necessary for preparation of successful monoclonal antibody drug conjugates (ADC). Among the first several hundred SAR products based on dolastatin 10 our group synthesized and termed auristatins was auristatin E (2a). An anticancer activity-equivalent, desmethylaurisatin E (2b), linked to a CD30 monoclonal antibody is the very successful anticancer drug Adcetris, now approved for use in 65 countries. In the present investigation, we discovered a new subset of auristatins designated quinstatins derived from dolastatin 10 by replacing the C-terminal Doe unit with a carefully designed quinoline, which led to low or subnanomolar levels of cancer cell growth inhibition required for construction of chemically unique ADC drugs. The synthesis of quinstatins 2-8 is presented along with their cancer cell line biological data.

  20. Estimating National-Level Exposure to Antineoplastic Agents in the Workplace: CAREX Canada Findings and Future Research Needs.

    PubMed

    Hall, Amy L; Demers, Paul A; Astrakianakis, George; Ge, Calvin; Peters, Cheryl E

    2017-07-01

    Occupational exposure to antineoplastic agents occurs in various environments and is associated with increased cancer risk and adverse reproductive outcomes. National-level information describing the location and extent of occupational exposure to antineoplastic agents is unavailable in Canada and most other countries. CAREX Canada aimed to estimate the prevalence and relative levels of occupational exposures to antineoplastic agents across work setting, occupation, and sex. 'Exposure' was defined as any potential for worker contact with antineoplastic agents. Baseline numbers of licensed workers were obtained from their respective professional bodies. For unlicensed workers, Census data or data extrapolated from human resources reports (e.g., staffing ratios) were used. Prevalence was estimated by combining population estimates with exposure proportions from peer-reviewed and grey literature. Exposure levels (classified as low, moderate, and high) by occupation and work setting were estimated qualitatively by combining estimates of contact frequency and exposure control practices. Approximately 75000 Canadians (0.42% of the total workforce) are estimated as occupationally exposed to antineoplastic agents; over 75% are female. The largest occupational group exposed to antineoplastic agents is community pharmacy workers, with 30200 exposed. By work setting, 39000 workers (52% of all exposed) are located in non-hospital settings; the remaining 48% are exposed in hospitals. The majority (75%) of workers are in the moderate exposure category. These estimates of the prevalence and location of occupational exposures to antineoplastic agents could be used to identify high-risk groups, estimate disease burden, and target new research and prevention activities. The limited secondary data available for developing these estimates highlights the need for increased quantitative measurement and documentation of antineoplastic agent contamination and exposure, particularly in

  1. [Antineoplastic effect of hydrogel prospidin on Seidel ascites hepatoma used as a model].

    PubMed

    Bychkovskiĭ, P M; Iurkshtovich, T L; Kladiev, A A; Revtovich, M Iu

    2012-01-01

    Antineoplastic effect of hydrogel dextran phosphate, hydrogel prospidin, and prospidin in an injectable preparation has been assessed using Seidel ascites hepatoma as a model. Injectable and hydrogel prospidin in doses from 250, 500 to 1000 mg/kg and hydrogel phosphate dextran in doses of 500 and 1000 mg/kg were administered to rats intraperitoneally in a single dose in a volume of 1 or 2 ml per each 100 g of animal body weight. The study has shown that irrespective of rats with Seidel ascites hepatoma and significantly increase in the dosage of prospidin preparations and hydrogel dextran phosphate results in a longer average life expectancy of rats Compared with its injectable variant, hydrogel prospidin appears to produce more than twice as high antineoplastic effect, and is found to provide prolonged therapeutic effects, as well as cure of animals in more than 60 % of cases.

  2. Antineoplastic Agents 552. Oxidation of Combretastatin A-1

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, George R.; Thornhill, Andrew J.; Moser, Bryan R.; Hogan, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    The very unstable (< 10 min at rt) o-quinone (5) derived from the vicinal diphenol anticancer drug combretastatin A-1 (1) has been obtained by careful oxidation with NaIO4 and tetrabutylammonium bromide in water/dichloromethane. Immediate reaction with phenylenediamine (6) allowed o-quinone 5 to be trapped as the stable phenazine derivative (7). For further confirmation, 5 was also captured as a dimethoxyphenylenediamine-derived phenazine (11). Both phenazines 7 and 11 significantly inhibited (ED50 ~ 0.2 μg/mL) growth of the murine P388 lymphocytic leukemia cell line and provided a new SAR insight in the combretastatin series of naturally occurring anticancer drugs. PMID:18729517

  3. Use of antineoplastic agents in cancer patients with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Rudek, Michelle A.; Flexner, Charles; Ambinder, Richard F.

    2011-01-01

    In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have reduced morbidity and mortality of AIDS-related complications. However, there is an increase in the prevalence of AIDS-defining and non-AIDS-defining cancers. This article provides an up-to-date review of management of HAART pharmacotherapy in the context of cytotoxic chemotherapy or targeted antineoplastic agents. PMID:21570912

  4. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents: mechanisms and treatment with rapid desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Simarro, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to chemotherapy drugs, such as taxanes and platins, and to monoclonal antibodies limit their therapeutic use due to the severity of some reactions and the fear of inducing a potentially lethal reaction in highly sensitized patients. Patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions face the prospect of abandoning first-line treatment and switching to a second-line, less effective therapy. Some of these reactions are mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, a subset of which occur through an immunoglobulin (IgE)-dependent mechanism, and are thus true allergies. Others involve mast cells without a demonstrable IgE mechanism. Whether basophils can participate in these reactions has not been demonstrated. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) is a procedure that induces temporary tolerance to a drug, allowing a medication allergic patient to receive the optimal agent for his or her disease. Through RDD, patients with IgE and non-IgE HSRs can safely be administered important medications while minimizing or completely inhibiting adverse reactions. Due to the clinical expansion and success of RDD, the molecular mechanisms inducing the temporary tolerization have been investigated and are partially understood, allowing for safer and more effective protocols. This article reviews the current literature on molecular mechanisms of RDD with an emphasis in our recent contributions to this field as well as the indications, methods and outcomes of RDD for taxanes, platins, and monoclonal antibodies.

  5. Trabectedin, a drug acting on both cancer cells and the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    D'Incalci, M; Badri, N; Galmarini, C M; Allavena, P

    2014-01-01

    Trabectedin is the first marine-derived anti-neoplastic drug approved for the treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma and, in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, for the treatment of patients with relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. From the beginning of its development, trabectedin showed some peculiar properties that clearly distinguished it from other anti-cancer drugs. In this mini-review, we will outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mode of action of trabectedin, which appears to represent a new class of anti-neoplastic drugs acting both on cancer cells and on the tumour microenvironment. PMID:24755886

  6. [Implementation of a robot for the preparation of antineoplastic drugs in the Pharmacy Service].

    PubMed

    Pacheco Ramos, María de la Paz; Arenaza Peña, Ainhoa Elisa; Santiago Pérez, Alejandro; Bilbao Gómez-Martino, Cristina; Zamora Barrios, María Dolores; Arias Fernández, María Lourdes

    2015-05-01

    Objetivo: Describir la implantación de un robot para la elaboración de antineoplásicos en el Servicio de Farmacia y evaluar el valor añadido al proceso farmacoterapéutico. Método: La implantación se llevó a cabo en Junio 2012 en un hospital de tercer nivel, realizándose en dos períodos: 1-Período de pruebas con la instalación del robot, configuración técnica del equipo, validación de 29 principios activos e integración con el software de prescripción electrónica (9 meses); 2-Período de utilización (22 meses). Se impartieron cursos de formación a farmacéuticos y personal de enfermería. Para su funcionamiento el robot emplea reconocimiento fotográfico, identificación por código de barras y controles gravimétricos, que proporcionaron datos de error cometido por preparación, tolerando ±10% y restringiéndolo, tras un estudio piloto, a un intervalo de tolerancia de ±4%. El robot fue programado para reconocer bolsas, infusores, jeringas y viales. El valor añadido se evaluó durante 31 meses con la identificación de los errores de preparación. Resultados: Se realizaron 11.865 preparaciones en el robot, que correspondieron al 40% del global de antineoplásicos elaborados, de 29 principios activos diferentes. Se identificaron y evitaron errores de dosificación en el 1,12% (n=133) de las preparaciones, que no alcanzaron al paciente al ser identificadas por el robot como preparaciones con desviación negativa (-4%) y ser corregidas manualmente. Conclusiones: La implantación de un robot en la elaboración de antineoplásicos permite identificar los errores de elaboración y evitar que lleguen al paciente, promoviendo la seguridad y calidad del proceso farmacoterapéutico de antineoplásicos y reduciendo la exposición del manipulador a los mismos.

  7. The association between the antineoplastic drug daunomycin and iron. evidence for polynuclear aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzanke, B. F.; Bill, E.; Winkler, H.; Trautwein, A. X.

    1992-04-01

    In contrast to literature data, at millimolar iron and daunomycin (DN) concentrations no solitary Fe(DN)3 complexes are formed in appreciable amounts. The Mössbauer spectroscopic analysis revealed severe dependencies on temperature and on the metal ligand ratio. Two species can be discerned: exchange-coupled polynuclear aggregates, which are magnetically highly anisotropic and another superparamagnetic system, exhibiting much less magnetic anisotropy. The cooperative phenomena observed are attributed to stacking effects of daunomycin.

  8. [Risk assessment concerning hospital personnel participating in the preparation and administration of antineoplastic drugs].

    PubMed

    Minoia, C; Turci, R; Sottani, C; Schiavi, A; Perbellini, L; Angeleri, S; Frigerio, F; Draicchio, F; Apostoli, P

    1999-01-01

    24 workers (10 involved in the preparation and 14 in administration) exposed to cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) in two Italian hospitals were monitored. The extent of exposure was assessed by the analysis of air samples, wipe samples, pads and gloves. Urinary excretion at the beginning and at the end of the work shift was also measured by liquid-liquid extraction and analysis by HPLC-MS/MS. 3 out of 24 air samples resulted to be positive for CP or IF. In wipe samples, CP concentrations ranging from < 0.001 to 82.4 micrograms/dm2 in Hospital A (32 samples) and from 0.2 to 383.3 micrograms/dm2 in Hospital B (17 samples), were found. IF concentrations varied from < 0.001 to 90.9 micrograms/dm2 in Hospital A and from 0.01 to 141.5 micrograms/dm2 in Hospital B. Pads (from 11 to 13 for each operator) were contaminated with CP and IF especially on arms, legs and chest. The use of a plastic-backed liner on the working tray in the laminar flow hoods was demonstrated to compromise the containment properties of the hood. Urine samples were positive for CP in 50% of the workers (range: 0.1-2.1 micrograms/L), whereas IF was detected in 2 subjects only (range: 0.1-0.8 microgram/L). The results from this investigation demonstrated that vertical laminar airflow hoods, when incorrectly used, might represent a source of contamination and that higher risk may depend on lack of educational programmes and observance of preventive guidelines.

  9. Ecotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of cytotoxic antineoplastic drugs and their metabolites.

    PubMed

    Zounkova, Radka; Kovalova, Lubomira; Blaha, Ludek; Dott, Wolfgang

    2010-09-01

    In spite of growing scientific concern about pharmaceuticals in the environment, there is still a lack of information especially with regard to their metabolites. The present study investigated ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of three widely used cytostatic agents 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cytarabine (CYT) and gemcitabine (GemC) and their major human metabolites, i.e. alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), uracil-1-beta-D-arabinofuranoside (AraU) and 2',2'-difluorodeoxyuridine (dFdU), respectively. Effects were studied in acute immobilization and reproduction assays with crustacean Daphnia magna and growth inhibition tests with alga Desmodesmus subspicatus and bacteria Pseudomonas putida. Genotoxicity was tested with umu-test employing Salmonella choleraesius subsp. chol. Toxicity was relatively high at parent compounds with EC(50) values ranging from 44 microg L(-1) (5-fluorouracil in the P. putida test) to 200 mg L(-1) (cytarabine in D. magna acute test). In general, the most toxic compound was 5-FU. Studied metabolites showed low or no toxicity; only FBAL (metabolite of 5-FU) showed low toxicity to D. subspicatus and P. putida with EC(50) values 80 and 140 mg L(-1), respectively. All parent cytostatics showed genotoxicity with minimum genotoxic concentrations (MGC) ranging from 40 to 330 mg L(-1). From metabolites, only FBAL was genotoxic in high concentrations. To our knowledge, the present study provides some of the first ecotoxicity data for both cytostatics and their metabolites, which might further serve for serious evaluation of ecological risks. The observed EC(50) values within the microg L(-1) range were fairly close to concentrations reported in hospital sewage water, which indicates further research needs, especially studies of chronic toxicity.

  10. [Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs)].

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kumi; Ichinohe, Tatsuo

    2014-06-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) are a new class of anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic agents that have structural and functional similarities with their prototype compound, thalidomide. Although thalidomide and its derivatives, lenalidomide and pomalidomide, are widely used as an essential component in the treatment of selected hematologic neoplasms including multiple myeloma, the precise mechanisms by which these agents exert anti-tumor effects have yet to be clarified. Recently, a component of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, cereblon (CRBN), has been identified as a direct molecular target for anti-neoplastic activities of IMiDs. CRBN has also been shown to be involved in IMiDs-mediated T-cell co-stimulation and cytokine production. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the CRBN-related molecular pathways that are essential for antitumor and immunomodulatory activities of IMiDs.

  11. Antineoplastic agents. 553. The Texas grasshopper Brachystola magna.

    PubMed

    Pettit, George R; Meng, Yanhui; Herald, Delbert L; Knight, John C; Day, John F

    2005-08-01

    Bioassay (P388 lymphocytic leukemia cell line and human cancer cell lines) guided separation of an extract prepared from the previously chemically uninvestigated Texas grasshopper Brachystola magna led to isolation of the cancer cell growth inhibitory pancratistatin (1), narciclasine (2), and ungeremine (3). Pancratistatin (1) was first isolated from the bulbs of Hymenocallis littoralis), and the original crystal structure was deduced by X-ray analysis of a monomethyl ether derivative. In the present study pancratistatin (1) was isolated from an extract of B. magna, which led to the X-ray crystal structure of this anticancer drug. Since isoquinoline derivatives 1-3 are previously known only as constituents of amaryllidaceous plants, some of the interesting implications of their rediscovery in the grasshopper B. magna that does not appear to utilize amaryllis family plants were discussed.

  12. Antineoplastic Agents 553. The Texas Grasshopper Brachystola magna1

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, George R.; Meng, Yanhui; Herald, Delbert L.; Knight, John C.; Day, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay (P388 lymphocytic leukemia cell line and human cancer cell lines) -guided separation of an extract prepared from the previously chemically uninvestigated Texas grasshopper Brachystola magna led to isolation of the cancer cell growth inhibitory pancratistatin (1), narciclasine (2) and ungeremine (3). Pancratistatin (1) was first isolated from the bulbs of Hymenocallis littoralis (a.k.a. Pancratium littorale Jacq) and the original crystal structure was deduced by X-ray analysis of a monomethyl ether derivative. In the present study a crystal of pancratistatin (1) was isolated from an extract of B. magna, which led to the X-ray crystal structure of this anticancer drug. Since isoquinoline derivatives 1–3 are previously known only as constituents of amaryllidaceous plants, some of the interesting implications of their rediscovery in the grasshopper B. magna that does not appear to utilize amaryllis family plants were discussed. PMID:16124772

  13. Hypersensitivity Reactions Associated with Platinum Antineoplastic Agents: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Makrilia, Nektaria; Syrigou, Ekaterini; Kaklamanos, Ioannis; Manolopoulos, Leonidas; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2010-01-01

    Platinum-containing chemotherapy agents (cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin) have been approved in the first-line setting of numerous malignancies, such as ovarian, bladder, head and neck, colorectal, and lung cancer. Their extensive use over the last decade has led to a significant increase in the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions, which are defined as unforeseen reactions whose signs and symptoms cannot be explained by the known toxicity of these drugs. Skin rash, flushing, abdominal cramping, itchy palms, and back pain are common symptoms. Cardiovascular and respiratory complications can prove fatal. Multiple pathogenetic mechanisms have been suggested. Hypersensitivity usually appears after multiple infusions, suggesting type I allergic reactions; however, other types of hypersensitivity also seem to be implicated. Several management options are available to treating physicians: discontinuation of chemotherapy, premedication, prolonging of infusion duration, desensitization protocols, and replacement with a different platinum compound after performing skin tests that rule out cross-reactions among platinum agents. PMID:20886011

  14. Early effects of the antineoplastic agent salinomycin on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Managò, A; Leanza, L; Carraretto, L; Sassi, N; Grancara, S; Quintana-Cabrera, R; Trimarco, V; Toninello, A; Scorrano, L; Trentin, L; Semenzato, G; Gulbins, E; Zoratti, M; Szabò, I

    2015-10-22

    Salinomycin, isolated from Streptomyces albus, displays antimicrobial activity. Recently, a large-scale screening approach identified salinomycin and nigericin as selective apoptosis inducers of cancer stem cells. Growing evidence suggests that salinomycin is able to kill different types of non-stem tumor cells that usually display resistance to common therapeutic approaches, but the mechanism of action of this molecule is still poorly understood. Since salinomycin has been suggested to act as a K(+) ionophore, we explored its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic performance at an early time point following drug application. In contrast to the K(+) ionophore valinomycin, salinomycin induced a rapid hyperpolarization. In addition, mitochondrial matrix acidification and a significant decrease of respiration were observed in intact mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in cancer stem cell-like HMLE cells within tens of minutes, while increased production of reactive oxygen species was not detected. By comparing the chemical structures and cellular effects of this drug with those of valinomycin (K(+) ionophore) and nigericin (K(+)/H(+) exchanger), we conclude that salinomycin mediates K(+)/H(+) exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compatible with its direct modulation of mitochondrial function, salinomycin was able to induce cell death also in Bax/Bak-less double-knockout MEF cells. Since at the concentration range used in most studies (around 10 μM) salinomycin exerts its effect at the level of mitochondria and alters bioenergetic performance, the specificity of its action on pathologic B cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) versus B cells from healthy subjects was investigated. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), proposed to mimic the tumor environment, attenuated the apoptotic effect of salinomycin on B-CLL cells. Apoptosis occurred to a significant extent in healthy B cells as well as in MSCs and human primary

  15. Early effects of the antineoplastic agent salinomycin on mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Managò, A; Leanza, L; Carraretto, L; Sassi, N; Grancara, S; Quintana-Cabrera, R; Trimarco, V; Toninello, A; Scorrano, L; Trentin, L; Semenzato, G; Gulbins, E; Zoratti, M; Szabò, I

    2015-01-01

    Salinomycin, isolated from Streptomyces albus, displays antimicrobial activity. Recently, a large-scale screening approach identified salinomycin and nigericin as selective apoptosis inducers of cancer stem cells. Growing evidence suggests that salinomycin is able to kill different types of non-stem tumor cells that usually display resistance to common therapeutic approaches, but the mechanism of action of this molecule is still poorly understood. Since salinomycin has been suggested to act as a K+ ionophore, we explored its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic performance at an early time point following drug application. In contrast to the K+ ionophore valinomycin, salinomycin induced a rapid hyperpolarization. In addition, mitochondrial matrix acidification and a significant decrease of respiration were observed in intact mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in cancer stem cell-like HMLE cells within tens of minutes, while increased production of reactive oxygen species was not detected. By comparing the chemical structures and cellular effects of this drug with those of valinomycin (K+ ionophore) and nigericin (K+/H+ exchanger), we conclude that salinomycin mediates K+/H+ exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compatible with its direct modulation of mitochondrial function, salinomycin was able to induce cell death also in Bax/Bak-less double-knockout MEF cells. Since at the concentration range used in most studies (around 10 μM) salinomycin exerts its effect at the level of mitochondria and alters bioenergetic performance, the specificity of its action on pathologic B cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) versus B cells from healthy subjects was investigated. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), proposed to mimic the tumor environment, attenuated the apoptotic effect of salinomycin on B-CLL cells. Apoptosis occurred to a significant extent in healthy B cells as well as in MSCs and human primary fibroblasts. The

  16. The Antineoplastic Effect of Nitric Oxide-Donating Acetylsalicylic Acid (NO-ASA) in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Cells is Highly Dependent on its Positional Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Iris; Razavi, Regina; Poll-Wolbeck, Simon Jonas; Berkessel, Albrecht; Hallek, Michael; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton

    2011-10-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is not curable in patients that are not eligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Therefore, new treatment options are highly desirable. Chemically modified nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as nitric-oxide-donating acetylsalicylic acid (NO-ASA), have been described to possess antineoplastic capacity. Recently, we could demonstrate a potent apoptosis induction in primary CLL cells in vitro and tumor growth inhibition by para-NO-ASA in a xenograft mouse model. However, little is known about the impact of positional isomerism of NO-ASA on its antineoplastic capacity in CLL. Primary CLL cells were treated with the meta-or para-isomer of NO-ASA at varying concentrations and durations. Viability was assessed flow cytometrically by annexin V-FITC/PI staining and by CellTiter-Glo luminescence cell viability assay. Caspase and PARP cleavage as well as involvement of β-catenin/Lef-1 signaling was determined by immunoblotting. For caspase inhibition, BD™ ApoBlock was used. Nude mice were xenografted with JVM3 cells and treated with meta-NO-ASA, para-NO-ASA or vehicle control. The meta-isomer was entirely ineffective in inducing CLL cell apoptosis in concentrations up to 100 μM, while para-NO-ASA acted in the low micromolar range. meta-NO-ASA, in contrast to para-NO-ASA, did not alter caspase activity. While para-NO-ASA action involved inhibition of β-catenin/Lef-1 signaling, meta-NO-ASA did not show any impact on this signaling pathway. Further, meta-NO-ASA did not significantly reduce tumor growth in a CLL xenograft mouse model, while para-NO-ASA was highly potent. We conclude that positional isomerism is crucial for the antineoplastic effect of NO-ASA in CLL. It can be suggested that the para-isomer, but not the meta-isomer, generates a chemical structure which is essential for the neoplastic effect of NO-ASA.

  17. The Antineoplastic Effect of Nitric Oxide-Donating Acetylsalicylic Acid (NO-ASA) in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Cells is Highly Dependent on its Positional Isomerism

    PubMed Central

    Gehrke, Iris; Razavi, Regina; Poll-Wolbeck, Simon Jonas; Berkessel, Albrecht; Hallek, Michael; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is not curable in patients that are not eligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Therefore, new treatment options are highly desirable. Chemically modified nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as nitric-oxide-donating acetylsalicylic acid (NO-ASA), have been described to possess antineoplastic capacity. Recently, we could demonstrate a potent apoptosis induction in primary CLL cells in vitro and tumor growth inhibition by para-NO-ASA in a xenograft mouse model. However, little is known about the impact of positional isomerism of NO-ASA on its antineoplastic capacity in CLL. Methods: Primary CLL cells were treated with the meta-or para-isomer of NO-ASA at varying concentrations and durations. Viability was assessed flow cytometrically by annexin V-FITC/PI staining and by CellTiter-Glo luminescence cell viability assay. Caspase and PARP cleavage as well as involvement of β-catenin/Lef-1 signaling was determined by immunoblotting. For caspase inhibition, BD™ ApoBlock was used. Nude mice were xenografted with JVM3 cells and treated with meta-NO-ASA, para-NO-ASA or vehicle control. Results: The meta-isomer was entirely ineffective in inducing CLL cell apoptosis in concentrations up to 100 μM, while para-NO-ASA acted in the low micromolar range. meta-NO-ASA, in contrast to para-NO-ASA, did not alter caspase activity. While para-NO-ASA action involved inhibition of β-catenin/Lef-1 signaling, meta-NO-ASA did not show any impact on this signaling pathway. Further, meta-NO-ASA did not significantly reduce tumor growth in a CLL xenograft mouse model, while para-NO-ASA was highly potent. Conclusion: We conclude that positional isomerism is crucial for the antineoplastic effect of NO-ASA in CLL. It can be suggested that the para-isomer, but not the meta-isomer, generates a chemical structure which is essential for the neoplastic effect of NO-ASA. PMID:23556096

  18. Which drugs are contraindicated during breastfeeding? Practice guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, M. E.; Lee, A.; Ito, S.

    2000-01-01

    QUESTION: Many breastfeeding mothers are concerned about taking medications that might affect their babies. Are there any guidelines on which drugs are safe? ANSWER: Only a few drugs pose a clinically significant risk to breastfed babies. In general, antineoplastics, drugs of abuse, some anticonvulsants, ergot alkaloids, and radiopharmaceuticals should not be taken, and levels of amiodarone, cyclosporine, and lithium should be monitored. Images p1757-a PMID:11013791

  19. On/off-switchable anti-neoplastic nanoarchitecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Hirak K.; Imani, Roghayeh; Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R.; Pazoki, Meysam; Iglič, Aleš; Turner, Anthony P. F.; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-09-01

    Throughout the world, there are increasing demands for alternate approaches to advanced cancer therapeutics. Numerous potentially chemotherapeutic compounds are developed every year for clinical trial and some of them are considered as potential drug candidates. Nanotechnology-based approaches have accelerated the discovery process, but the key challenge still remains to develop therapeutically viable and physiologically safe materials suitable for cancer therapy. Here, we report a high turnover, on/off-switchable functionally popping reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator using a smart mesoporous titanium dioxide popcorn (TiO2 Pops) nanoarchitecture. The resulting TiO2 Pops, unlike TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), are exceptionally biocompatible with normal cells. Under identical conditions, TiO2 Pops show very high photocatalytic activity compared to TiO2 NPs. Upon on/off-switchable photo activation, the TiO2 Pops can trigger the generation of high-turnover flash ROS and can deliver their potential anticancer effect by enhancing the intracellular ROS level until it crosses the threshold to open the ‘death gate’, thus reducing the survival of cancer cells by at least six times in comparison with TiO2 NPs without affecting the normal cells.

  20. On/off-switchable anti-neoplastic nanoarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Hirak K.; Imani, Roghayeh; Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R.; Pazoki, Meysam; Iglič, Aleš; Turner, Anthony P. F.; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the world, there are increasing demands for alternate approaches to advanced cancer therapeutics. Numerous potentially chemotherapeutic compounds are developed every year for clinical trial and some of them are considered as potential drug candidates. Nanotechnology-based approaches have accelerated the discovery process, but the key challenge still remains to develop therapeutically viable and physiologically safe materials suitable for cancer therapy. Here, we report a high turnover, on/off-switchable functionally popping reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator using a smart mesoporous titanium dioxide popcorn (TiO2 Pops) nanoarchitecture. The resulting TiO2 Pops, unlike TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), are exceptionally biocompatible with normal cells. Under identical conditions, TiO2 Pops show very high photocatalytic activity compared to TiO2 NPs. Upon on/off-switchable photo activation, the TiO2 Pops can trigger the generation of high-turnover flash ROS and can deliver their potential anticancer effect by enhancing the intracellular ROS level until it crosses the threshold to open the ‘death gate’, thus reducing the survival of cancer cells by at least six times in comparison with TiO2 NPs without affecting the normal cells. PMID:26415561

  1. Pyrazolopyrimidine Derivatives as Antineoplastic Agents: with a Special Focus on Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; La Motta, Concettina; Sartini, Stefania; Baldini, Enke; Materazzi, Gabriele; Politti, Ugo; Ruffilli, Ilaria; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are molecules that compete with ATP on tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs), blocking tyrosine kinase (TK) activation and then oncogenic pathways; they have been studied, and some of them are right approved for the treatment of many types of cancer. Among TKIs, one of the most explored chemical template is the pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP) heterocyclic core, which proved to be a useful scaffold for the obtainment of effective compounds. Actually, derivatives belonging to this structural class show a large spectrum of activity, thus standing out as multi-target agents. Different PP compounds have been shown to act as: a) ABL inhibitors and antiproliferative agents against human leukemia cell lines; b) Src kinase inhibitors in neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma and osteosarcoma; c) Phospholipase D inhibitors in different neoplasias; d) Urokinase plasminogen activator inhibitors, in breast cancer. In thyroid cancer (TC), PP1 and PP2 (inhibitors of RET, Hck, lck, and fynT kinases, and a good inhibitor of c-Src and platelet-derived growth factor receptor) showed antineoplastic actvity in human papillary TC cell lines that carry spontaneous RET/PTC1 rearrangements. More recently, new derivatives, (R)-1-phenethyl-N-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidin-4- amine, namely, CLM3 and CLM29, have been demonstrated to exert a multiple signal transduction inhibition (including the RET-TK, BRAF, EGFR, and with antiangiogenic activity), showing antineoplastic activity, in vitro and in vivo, in papillary dedifferentiated, medullary and anaplastic TC. These data have shown the antineoplastic activity of PP in different neoplasias, opening the way to a future clinical evaluation in human cancers.

  2. A probabilistic assessment of the impact of interventions on oncology nurses' exposure to antineoplastic agents

    PubMed Central

    Meijster, T; Fransman, W; van Hemmen, J; Kromhout, H; Heederik, D; Tielemans, E

    2006-01-01

    Objective The main goal was to investigate the potential of a probabilistic approach for exposure assessment and use this information to evaluate the impact of a complex of policy actions/interventions on dermal exposure to antineoplastic agents among oncology nurses. The central theme of this study was to make optimal use of existing data, supplemented only with limited additional information from a questionnaire survey. Methods A task based exposure model was used to estimate dermal exposure of the hands among oncology nurses in non‐academic hospitals in the Netherlands. Monte Carlo simulation was used to integrate information from available (exposure) studies and generate exposure distributions for the total population of oncology nurses in both pre‐ and post‐intervention situation. Graphs and descriptive statistics of the simulated exposure distributions were used to evaluate trends in population exposure. Results The inventory showed that important intervention occurred in the preparation and administering of antineoplastic agents and in the handling of urine. Hardly any changes were identified in de nursing tasks. The use of gloves seemed to have decreased for a number of tasks. The results of the analysis show that the interventions did not affect the median exposure. However frequencies of occurrence of individuals with very high and very low total dermal exposures decreased substantially in the post‐intervention situation. Analysis of the effect of pregnancy showed that pregnancy is very unlikely to influence exposure or any of the key input variables. Conclusions The present study shows that the probabilistic approach adds valuable information to deterministic exposure assessment, especially when extrapolating data on a subpopulation to populations of individuals at large. The results show that the identified changes in the past decade in Dutch non‐academic hospitals resulted in changes in the exposure distribution of antineoplastic agents among

  3. A probabilistic assessment of the impact of interventions on oncology nurses' exposure to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Meijster, T; Fransman, W; van Hemmen, J; Kromhout, H; Heederik, D; Tielemans, E

    2006-08-01

    The main goal was to investigate the potential of a probabilistic approach for exposure assessment and use this information to evaluate the impact of a complex of policy actions/interventions on dermal exposure to antineoplastic agents among oncology nurses. The central theme of this study was to make optimal use of existing data, supplemented only with limited additional information from a questionnaire survey. A task based exposure model was used to estimate dermal exposure of the hands among oncology nurses in non-academic hospitals in the Netherlands. Monte Carlo simulation was used to integrate information from available (exposure) studies and generate exposure distributions for the total population of oncology nurses in both pre- and post-intervention situation. Graphs and descriptive statistics of the simulated exposure distributions were used to evaluate trends in population exposure. The inventory showed that important intervention occurred in the preparation and administering of antineoplastic agents and in the handling of urine. Hardly any changes were identified in de nursing tasks. The use of gloves seemed to have decreased for a number of tasks. The results of the analysis show that the interventions did not affect the median exposure. However frequencies of occurrence of individuals with very high and very low total dermal exposures decreased substantially in the post-intervention situation. Analysis of the effect of pregnancy showed that pregnancy is very unlikely to influence exposure or any of the key input variables. The present study shows that the probabilistic approach adds valuable information to deterministic exposure assessment, especially when extrapolating data on a subpopulation to populations of individuals at large. The results show that the identified changes in the past decade in Dutch non-academic hospitals resulted in changes in the exposure distribution of antineoplastic agents among oncology nurses.

  4. The antineoplastic quassinoids of Simaba cuspidata spruce and Ailanthus grandis Prain.

    PubMed

    Polonsky, J; Varon, Z; Moretti, C; Pettit, G R; Herald, C L; Rideout, J A; Saha, S B; Khastgir, H N

    1980-01-01

    The South American Simaba cuspidata Spruce and North Indian Ailanthus grandis Prain were investigated as sources of potentially useful antineoplastic agents. Both of these Simaroubaceae plant species were found to produce 6 alpha-tigloyloxychaparrinone (4a) and the new quassinoid 6 alpha-tigloyloxychaparrin (3b). The latter structure was determined by interpretation of spectral data and oxidation to 6 alpha-tigloyloxychaparrinone (4a). While both glycol 3b and alpha-ketol 4a were found to significantly inhibit growth of the murine P388 lymphocytic leukemia cell line, only the alpha-ketol (4a) inhibited growth of the corresponding in vivo system.

  5. Regression of a glioblastoma multiforme: spontaneous versus a potential antineoplastic effect of dexamethasone and levetiracetam

    PubMed Central

    Peddi, Prakash; Ajit, Nisha Elizabeth; Burton, Gary Von; El-Osta, Hazem

    2016-01-01

    Patients with grade IV astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) have a median survival of <12 months, increased to 14.6 months by maximal safe resection with radiation and temozolamide. In the absence of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, spontaneous regression of GBM or regression while only being on dexamethasone (DEX) and levetiracetam (LEV) have seldom been reported. Here, we present a case of a patient who had significant regression of the GBM with DEX and LEV alone. In this study, we hypothesise a plausible antineoplastic role of DEX and or LEV in GBM and highlight molecular, preclinical and clinical studies supporting this role. PMID:28011886

  6. Berberine and Coptidis rhizoma as novel antineoplastic agents: a review of traditional use and biomedical investigations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Feng, Yibin; Tsao, Saiwah; Wang, Ning; Curtain, Robert; Wang, Youwei

    2009-10-29

    Coptidis rhizoma (huanglian) and its major component, berberine, have drawn extensive attention toward their antineoplastic effects in the recent years. The antineoplastic effects are related to the Chinese Medicine (CM) properties of huanglian in treating diseases by removing damp-heat and purging fire and counteracting toxicity. To trace the long history of the traditional use of huanglian from folk medicines, especially from Chinese medicine, to recent pharmacological studies of huanglian and berberine, with an emphasis on their antineoplastic effects and the promise as novel antineoplastic agents. A total of seven databases were extensively searched for literature research. The terms and keywords for searching included huanglian, berberine, Coptis, Coptidis rhizoma, anticancer, anti-invasion, antimatastasis and mechanism. The papers including ours with studies on anticancer and mechanism, pharmacology and toxicology of huanglian and/or berberine were focused. In view of traditional use, the anticancer effects of huanglian can be ascribed to its CM trait by removing damp-heat, fire and toxicity. From modern biomedical studies, anticancer effects have been demonstrated in both huanglian and berberine. The underlying molecular mechanisms involve cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis induction and anti-inflammation. Berberine is an essential anticancer compound in huanglian. In some studies, the use of huanglian was shown to be more effective and beneficial than the use of berberine alone. The presence of other protoberberine-type alkaloids in huanglian might give synergistic effects for the anticancer effects. Berberine also demonstrates effects of antiangiogenesis, anti-invasion and anti-metastasis in some cancer cell lines, however, more investigations are required to unravel the underlying mechanisms involved. The modern evidences of treating cancer with huanglian and berberine have a strong linkage with traditional concept and rules of using huanglian in CM practice

  7. QSPR modeling of octanol/water partition coefficient of antineoplastic agents by balance of correlations.

    PubMed

    Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Raska, Ivan; Benfenati, Emilio

    2010-04-01

    Three different splits into the subtraining set (n = 22), the set of calibration (n = 21), and the test set (n = 12) of 55 antineoplastic agents have been examined. By the correlation balance of SMILES-based optimal descriptors quite satisfactory models for the octanol/water partition coefficient have been obtained on all three splits. The correlation balance is the optimization of a one-variable model with a target function that provides both the maximal values of the correlation coefficient for the subtraining and calibration set and the minimum of the difference between the above-mentioned correlation coefficients. Thus, the calibration set is a preliminary test set.

  8. Antineoplastic copper coordinated complexes (Casiopeinas) uncouple oxidative phosphorylation and induce mitochondrial permeability transition in cardiac mitochondria and cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Silva-Platas, Christian; Guerrero-Beltrán, Carlos Enrique; Carrancá, Mariana; Castillo, Elena Cristina; Bernal-Ramírez, Judith; Oropeza-Almazán, Yuriana; González, Lorena N; Rojo, Rocío; Martínez, Luis Enrique; Valiente-Banuet, Juan; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Bravo-Gómez, María Elena; García, Noemí; Carvajal, Karla; García-Rivas, Gerardo

    2016-02-01

    Copper-based drugs, Casiopeinas (Cas), exhibit antiproliferative and antineoplastic activities in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Unfortunately, the clinical use of these novel chemotherapeutics could be limited by the development of dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying Cas cardiotoxicity and anticancer activity are not completely understood. Here, we explore the potential impact of Cas on the cardiac mitochondria energetics as the molecular mechanisms underlying Cas-induced cardiotoxicity. To explore the properties on mitochondrial metabolism, we determined Cas effects on respiration, membrane potential, membrane permeability, and redox state in isolated cardiac mitochondria. The effect of Cas on the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) was also evaluated in isolated cardiomyocytes by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Cas IIIEa, IIgly, and IIIia predominately inhibited maximal NADH- and succinate-linked mitochondrial respiration, increased the state-4 respiration rate and reduced membrane potential, suggesting that Cas also act as mitochondrial uncouplers. Interestingly, cyclosporine A inhibited Cas-induced mitochondrial depolarization, suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Similarly to isolated mitochondria, in isolated cardiomyocytes, Cas treatment decreased the Δψm and cyclosporine A treatment prevented mitochondrial depolarization. The production of H2O2 increased in Cas-treated mitochondria, which might also increase the oxidation of mitochondrial proteins such as adenine nucleotide translocase. In accordance, an antioxidant scavenger (Tiron) significantly diminished Cas IIIia mitochondrial depolarization. Cas induces a prominent loss of membrane potential, associated with alterations in redox state, which increases mPTP opening, potentially due to thiol-dependent modifications of the pore, suggesting that direct or indirect inhibition of mPTP opening might

  9. Influence of gap junction intercellular communication composed of connexin 43 on the antineoplastic effect of adriamycin in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guojun; Dong, Shuying; Yu, Meiling; Han, Xi; Zheng, Chao; Zhu, Xiaoguang; Tong, Xuhui

    2017-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) serve the principal role in the antineoplastic (cytotoxicity and induced apoptosis) effect of chemical drugs. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of GJ intercellular communication (GJIC) composed of connexin 43 (Cx43) on adriamycin cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Four cell lines (Hs578T, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3) with different degree of malignancy were used in the study. The results of western blotting and immunofluorescence revealed that, in Hs578T and MCF-7 cells, which have a low degree of malignancy, the expression levels of Cx43 and GJIC were higher than those in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells (which have a high degree of malignancy). In Hs578T and MCF-7 cells, where GJ could be formed, the function of GJ was modulated by a pharmacological potentiators [retinoid acid (RA)]/inhibitors [oleamide and 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18-α-GA)] and small interfering RNA (siRNA). In high-density cells (where GJ was formed), enhancement of GJ function by RA increased the cytotoxicity of adriamycin, while inhibition of GJ function by oleamide/18-α-GA and siRNA decreased the cytotoxicity caused by adriamycin. Notably, the modulation of GJ did not affect the survival of cells treated with adriamycin when cells were in low density (no GJ was formed). The present study illustrated the association between GJIC and the antitumor effect of adriamycin in breast cancer cells. The cytotoxicity of adriamycin on breast cancer cells was increased when the function of gap junctions was enhanced. PMID:28356970

  10. Raising the bar for antineoplastic agents: how to choose threshold values for superiority trials in advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Sobrero, Alberto F; Pastorino, Alessandro; Sargent, Daniel J; Bruzzi, Paolo

    2015-03-01

    To establish the concept of minimum clinically meaningful outcome (mCMO) of treatment in advanced solid tumors, to establish its threshold and evaluate how many superiority trials of new antineoplastic agents pass this threshold. We chose overall survival as the primary indicator of patient benefit. Four conceptually different types of treatment effect can be identified in OS curves: HR, gains in median OS, proportional, and absolute increases at long-term OS. We postulated threshold levels for these four parameters defining the mCMO and set the bar at three different levels of required benefit: high, medium, and low. The postulated values were then studied by comparing our thresholds with the actual results of the pivotal superiority phase III trials on new drugs reporting on mature OS data. Forty-three trials on 35,419 patients in 12 cancer types on 23 novel agents met these criteria. Only two trials reached the postulated "high" thresholds for HR and median OS. The number of "positive trials" increased to eight and 15 when the bar was lowered to the "medium" and "low" levels, respectively. The same analysis was done for proportional and absolute increases in long-term OS. No trial satisfied the criteria for long-term benefit, whereas only two and nine trials satisfied both parameters for the "medium and low" required benefit levels, respectively. All four OS-related parameters contribute to define the mCMO. If the bar for the mCMO is raised too much, positive trials are exceptional. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles functionalized with a pH-responsive amphiphile improved the in vitro antineoplastic effects of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Librelotto, Daniele R; Scheeren, Laís E; Vinardell, M Pilar; Mitjans, Montserrat; Rolim, Clarice M B

    2016-11-01

    Delivery systems with pH-responsiveness behavior are of particular interest because they could allow exploring the various pH gradients within the body, for example, between healthy tissue and tumor tissue, or between extracellular tissue and some cell compartments. Likewise, modifications in nanocarriers with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and poloxamer could be a potential approach to improve the effectiveness of cancer treatments. On these premises, we prepared pH-responsive DOX-loaded chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles (NPs), modified or not with PEG or poloxamer, and incorporating an anionic dyacyl lysine-based surfactant with sodium counterion (77KS) as a pH-sensitive adjuvant. Owing to its pH-sensitivity, the CS-NPs showed membranolytic behavior upon reducing the pH value of surrounding media to 6.6 and 5.4, which are characteristic of the endosomal compartments. The in vitro antiproliferative assays with MCF-7 and HeLa tumor cells indicated that the NPs themselves had no associated significant cytotoxicity, while DOX-loaded NPs induced higher cytotoxicity than free drug. Additionally, DOX-loaded CS-NPs displayed greater selectivity to tumor cells than to the non-tumor 3T3 fibroblasts. The feasibility of using these NPs to target tumor microenvironment was proven, as cytotoxicity against cancer cell models was higher in a mildly acidic environment. Finally, the hemocompatibility of NPs was demonstrated, indicating their suitability for intravenous administration. Altogether, the results suggest that the combination of endosomal acidity with the potential endosomolytic capability of these pH-responsive nanocarriers could increase the intracellular delivery of DOX and, thus, might enhance its antineoplastic efficacy.

  12. Clinically relevant drug interactions with antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    Some patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy benefit from combination therapy with two or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Additionally, virtually all epilepsy patients will receive, at some time in their lives, other medications for the management of associated conditions. In these situations, clinically important drug interactions may occur. Carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone induce many cytochrome P450 (CYP) and glucuronyl transferase (GT) enzymes, and can reduce drastically the serum concentration of associated drugs which are substrates of the same enzymes. Examples of agents whose serum levels are decreased markedly by enzyme-inducing AEDs, include lamotrigine, tiagabine, several steroidal drugs, cyclosporin A, oral anticoagulants and many cardiovascular, antineoplastic and psychotropic drugs. Valproic acid is not enzyme inducer, but it may cause clinically relevant drug interactions by inhibiting the metabolism of selected substrates, most notably phenobarbital and lamotrigine. Compared with older generation agents, most of the recently developed AEDs are less likely to induce or inhibit the activity of CYP or GT enzymes. However, they may be a target for metabolically mediated drug interactions, and oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, felbamate and, at high dosages, topiramate may stimulate the metabolism of oral contraceptive steroids. Levetiracetam, gabapentin and pregabalin have not been reported to cause or be a target for clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions. Pharmacodynamic interactions involving AEDs have not been well characterized, but their understanding is important for a more rational approach to combination therapy. In particular, neurotoxic effects appear to be more likely with coprescription of AEDs sharing the same primary mechanism of action. PMID:16487217

  13. Kojic acid--a new leading molecule for a preparation of compounds with an anti-neoplastic potential.

    PubMed

    Novotný, L; Rauko, P; Abdel-Hamid, M; Váchalková, A

    1999-01-01

    Kojic acid as a molecule of natural origin may serve as template for the synthesis of new biologically active compounds. The synthetic KA (pyranone) derivatives possess various kinds of biological activities which are related by their similarity to flavonoids. The most important property is the antifungal and antineoplastic activity and capability of chelating metals. It is shown that the antineoplastic activity of kojic acid derivatives is based on various mechanisms of action on different levels of cellular metabolism and functions what makes this compound interesting for future investigation as cytotoxic agent.

  14. [Emetogenic potential of antineoplastic agents based on clinical trials in Japan].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomoki; Handa, Satoko; Kato, Yasuhisa

    2015-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of chemotherapy that decreases patients' quality of life and motivation for treatment. Therefore, prevention and treatment of CINV are essential for motivating patients to continue chemotherapy. International societies such as American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC)/European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) have published guidelines for using antiemetics, and these guidelines were published in Japan in May 2010. However, both the Japananese and international guidelines do not provide sufficient clinical trial-based evidence for antiemetic use in the Japanese population. In this study, we attempted to evaluate and clarify the frequency of CINV in clinical trials in Japan. We found that thet guidelines specify different emetogenic potentials of some antineoplastic agents such as gemcitabine. Therefore, we believe that it is necessary to reevaluate the emetogenic risk of such antineoplastic agents and to develop a practical and standard antiemetic therapy so that in the future, patients do not hesitate to undergo chemotherapy because of side effects.

  15. Adherence, compliance and persistence to oral antineoplastic therapy: a review focused on chemotherapeutic and biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Gebbia, Vittorio; Bellavia, Giuseppe; Ferraù, Francesco; Valerio, Maria Rosaria

    2012-05-01

    To date, orally administered chemotherapy and biologic agents represent a significant percentage of all antineoplastic treatments in several types of cancer, which are most likely to increase in the near future. In this scenario, the issue of adherence and persistence to oral therapy is a key issue since poor compliance to oral antineoplastic treatments may negatively influence patients' clinical outcomes and, in turn, cause an increase in costs, number of hospitalizations and time spent in the hospital. The issue of adherence to new oral chemotherapeutic and/or biologic agents has not been deeply evaluated and data published in medical literature are quite scarce. Adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon, which may be influenced by patient- and health-care provider-related factors, anticancer therapy itself, education and socioeconomic aspects. Patients' selection plays, therefore, a key role in maximizing adherence and persistence to oral therapies. Treating health-care practitioners should first evaluate patient reliability to avoid prescribing oral treatments to patients with socioeconomic and medical conditions, which may predict poor adherence. Adherence and persistence to new oral biologic agents, which are linked to several side effects and whose use is constantly widening, should represent a main endpoint of clinical research in the nearest future.

  16. Pyruvate attenuates the anti-neoplastic effect of carnosine independently from oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Meixensberger, Jürgen; Gaunitz, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Here we analyzed whether the anti-neoplastic effect of carnosine, which inhibits glycolytic ATP production, can be antagonized by ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation fueled by pyruvate. Therefore, glioblastoma cells were cultivated in medium supplemented with glucose, galactose or pyruvate and in the presence or absence of carnosine. CPI-613 was employed to inhibit the entry of pyruvate into the tricarboxylic acid cycle and 2,4-dinitrophenol to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation. Energy metabolism and viability were assessed by cell based assays and histochemistry. ATP in cell lysates and dehydrogenase activity in living cells revealed a strong reduction of viability under the influence of carnosine when cells received glucose or galactose but not in the presence of pyruvate. CPI-613 and 2,4-dinitrophenol reduced viability of cells cultivated in pyruvate, but no effect was seen in the presence of glucose. No effect of carnosine on viability was observed in the presence of glucose and pyruvate even in the presence of 2,4-dinitrophenol or CPI-613. In conclusion, glioblastoma cells produce ATP from pyruvate via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in the absence of a glycolytic substrate. In addition, pyruvate attenuates the anti-neoplastic effect of carnosine, even when ATP production via tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation is blocked. We also observed an inhibitory effect of carnosine on the tricarboxylic acid cycle and a stimulating effect of 2,4-dinitrophenol on glycolytic ATP production. PMID:27811375

  17. Anticancer Alkaloids from Trees: Development into Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Isah, Tasiu

    2016-01-01

    Trees have made an enormous phytochemical contribution in anticancer drugs' development more than any other life form. The contributions include alkaloids that are biosynthesized in various ways and yield. Lead alkaloids isolated from the trees are taxol and camptothecins that currently have annual sales in billion dollars. Other important alkaloids isolated from these life forms include rohitukine, harringtonine, acronycine, thalicarpine, usambarensine, ellipticine, and matrines. Studies on their mechanism of action and target on the DNA and protein of cancerous cells aided the development of potent hemisynthesized congeners. The molecules and their congeners passed/are passing a long period of historical development before approved as antineoplastic drugs for cancer chemotherapy. Some of them did not find the application as anticancer drugs due to ineffectiveness in clinical trials; others are generating research interest in the antineoplastic activity at the present and have reached clinical trial stages. Potentials in antineoplastic molecules from trees are high and are hoped to be commensurate with cancer types afflicting human society in the future. PMID:28082790

  18. Pharmaceutical development, quality control, stability and compatibility of a parenteral lyophilized formulation of the investigational polymer-conjugated platinum antineoplastic agent AP5346.

    PubMed

    Van der Schoot, S C; Nuijen, B; Sood, P; Thurmond, K B; Stewart, D R; Rice, J R; Beijnen, J H

    2006-10-01

    AP5346 is a low molecular weight polymer-conjugated platinum antineoplastic agent. The lyophilized drug product has completed a phase I clinical trial. In order to guarantee a constant quality of AP5346 pharmaceutical products, quality control and analysis of the drug substance and final product were performed. The identity of AP5346 was confirmed using 1H NMR, 195Pt NMR and IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the free platinum content, platinum release characteristics, molecular size and size distribution were established. With the selected analytical techniques, AP5346 could be distinguished very well from its polymeric analogues, such as AP5280 and AP5279. Stability experiments revealed that AP5346 final product is stable for 12 months at 5 degrees C, in the dark. For administration to patients, AP5346 final product is reconstituted with 5% w/v dextrose and diluted in infusion containers. To investigate the influence of container materials, the stability of AP5346 after reconstitution and dilution in infusion containers was determined. The infusion containers investigated were composed of glass, polyvinyl chloride (PVC, intraflex) and low density polyethylene (LD-PE, Ecoflac). AP5346 was shown to be stable after reconstitution and dilution with 5% w/v dextrose in these infusion containers for at least 96 h at 2-8 degrees C in the dark and at room temperature with ambient light conditions.

  19. [Example of safety measures for antineoplastic agents immediately after market launch--a case of TS-1 capsule all example use result investigation that executes safety monitoring--].

    PubMed

    Ito, Kunio

    2006-01-01

    As a measure to ensure safe use of TS-1 during the early marketing period, a drug use investigation was conducted on an all-case basis. Extra safety monitoring,rarely included in the use investigation,was also planned for patients who began therapy with this agent. Of the 4,177 subjects registered during the year beginning in March 1999, 3,882 started TS-1 therapy. Aside from 74 dropouts, 3,808 cases were evaluable for safety. The overall incidence of adverse reactions, with high frequencies of myelosuppression and gastrointestinal disorders, was 74.3%: a result similar to an incidence of 77.5% (100/129) found in the early phase II trial with gastric cancer patients. Safety monitoring made it possible to check if a given patients was eligible for proper use before treatment is begun. During TS-1 administration,collaboration was formed between physicians and medical representatives to ensure regular laboratory testing and to check the test findings. Measures were considered necessary to secure the safe use of drugs with manifest risk of serious adverse reactions, such as antineoplastic agents, during the initial period of market introduction. Our present approach proved effective as one of such measures.

  20. Iodine and doxorubicin, a good combination for mammary cancer treatment: antineoplastic adjuvancy, chemoresistance inhibition, and cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although mammary cancer (MC) is the most common malignant neoplasia in women, the mortality for this cancer has decreased principally because of early detection and the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Of several preparations that cause MC regression, doxorubicin (DOX) is the most active, first-line monotherapeutic. Nevertheless, its use is limited due to the rapid development of chemoresistance and to the cardiotoxicity caused by free radicals. In previous studies we have shown that supplementation with molecular iodine (I2) has a powerful antineoplastic effect in methylnitrosourea (MNU)-induced experimental models of MC. These studies also showed a consistent antioxidant effect of I2 in normal and tumoral tissues. Methods Here, we analyzed the effect of I2 in combination with DOX treatment in female Sprague Dawley rats with MNU-induced MC. In the first experiment (short) animals were treated with the therapeutic DOX dose (16 mg/kg) or with lower doses (8 and 4 mg/Kg), in each case with and without 0.05% I2 in drinking water. Iodine treatment began on day 0, a single dose of DOX was injected (ip) on day 2, and the analysis was carried out on day 7. In the second experiment (long) animals with and without iodine supplement were treated with one or two injections of 4 mg/kg DOX (on days 0 and 14) and were analyzed on day 56. Results At all DOX doses, the short I2 treatment induced adjuvant antineoplastic effects (decreased tumor size and proliferating cell nuclear antigen level) with significant protection against body weight loss and cardiotoxicity (creatine kinase MB, cardiac lipoperoxidation, and heart damage). With long-term I2, mammary tumor tissue became more sensitive to DOX, since a single injection of the lowest dose of DOX (4 mg/Kg) was enough to stop tumor progression and a second DOX4 injection on day 14 caused a significant and rapid decrease in tumor size, decreased the expression of chemoresistance markers (Bcl2 and survivin), and increased

  1. In vitro and in vivo antineoplastic activity of a novel bromopyrrole and its potential mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Sheng; Pang, Hui-dan; Fan, Jun; Ge, Feng; Yang, Xiao-xia; Liu, Qiu-ying; Liao, Xiao-jian; Xu, Shi-hai

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many bromopyrrole compounds have been reported to have in vitro antineoplastic activity. In a previous study, we isolated N-(4, 5-dibromo-pyrrole-2-carbonyl)-L-amino isovaleric acid methyl ester (B6) from marine sponges. Here, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo antineoplastic activity of B6 and its potential mechanism. Experimental approach: The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to determine the in vitro antineoplastic activity of B6. Flow cytometry, western blot analysis and morphological observations were used to investigate its mechanism of action. A mouse xenograft model was used to determine its in vivo activity. Key results: B6 inhibited the proliferation of various human cancer cells in vitro, with highest activity on LOVO and HeLa cells. B6 also exhibited significant growth inhibitory effects in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Acute toxicity analysis suggested that B6 has low toxicity. B6-treated cells arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and had an increased fraction of sub-G1 cells. In addition, the population of Annexin V-positive/propidium iodide-negative cells increased, indicating the induction of early apoptosis. Indeed, B6-treated cells exhibited morphologies typical of cells undergoing apoptosis. Western blotting showed cleaved forms of caspase-9 and caspase-3 in cells exposed to B6. Moreover, B6-promoted Ca2+ release and apoptosis was associated with elevated intracellular Ca2+concentration. Conclusions and implications: B6 has significant antineoplastic activity in vitro as well as in vivo. It inhibits tumour cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. With its low toxicity, B6 represents a promising antineoplastic, primary compound. PMID:20067467

  2. Thio-sugar motif of functional CARB-pharmacophore for antineoplastic activity. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Witczak, Zbigniew J; Sarnik, Joanna; Czubatka, Anna; Forma, Ewa; Poplawski, Tomasz

    2014-12-15

    Diverse functionalized representatives of (1-4)-S-thiodisaccharides, 6-9 were synthesized and assessed for cytotoxicity and apoptosis against human cancer cell lines (A549, LoVo, MCF-7 and HeLa). The FCP 6 was more active against MCF-7 cells (i.e., an estrogen-dependent breast cancer line), whereas other (1-4)-S-thiodisaccharides showed strongest activity against A549 cells (i.e., a lung adenocarcinoma line). We propose to use a concept of functional 'CARB-pharmacophores' when evaluating a potential for the compounds' general antineoplastic activity. Future studies will determine the reasons for cell-type specificity of these compounds. The thio-sugar motif appears to be a promising lead for future developments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Structure-activity relations of antineoplastic platinum II and platinum IV coordination compounds].

    PubMed

    Gutsche, W; Baumgart, J; Schröer, H P

    1989-01-01

    Five diammine-Pt(II) or Pt(IV) coordination compounds, namely cis-diammine-dichloro-platinum (II) "cis-DDP", transdihydroxy-cis-diammine-dichloro-platinum (IV) "trans-ODDP", and derived substitution products of lactic acid (racemates or L-forms) with diminished toxicity in comparison to cis-DDP have been tested against mouse leukemia P388, and partly on melanoma B16 for antineoplastic activity. The results have been compared with those obtained with the clinical approved cis-DDP. They were not in every way equal to the antitumor efficiency of cis-DDP. Improved physicochemical properties as well as favorable differences of side effects in contrast to cis-DDP, could be decisive for the potential value of these substances.

  4. Integrative review of factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea during antineoplastic chemotherapy 1

    PubMed Central

    Moysés, Aline Maria Bonini; Durant, Lais Corsino; de Almeida, Ana Maria; Gozzo, Thais de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Method: integrative review conducted in four electronic databases (PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and LILACS) using the key words: neoplasia, antineoplastic agents and nausea. Results: only 30 out of 1,258 papers identified met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent related factors were: being younger than 50 years old, motion sickness, being a woman, emetogenic potential of the chemotherapy, anxiety, conditioned stimulus, and expecting nausea after treatment. Conclusion: this review's findings, coupled with the incidence of nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, reveal an important difference between evidence found and that used by NANDA International, Inc. Even though it provides an appropriate definition of related factors, it does not mention chemotherapy, despite the various studies addressing the topic using different designs and presenting various objectives and outcomes. PMID:27737380

  5. Avoiding accidental exposure to intravenous cytotoxic drugs.

    PubMed

    Meade, Elizabeth

    Many cytotoxic drugs have been shown to be mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic with second malignancies known to be associated with several specific cancer drugs. Occupational exposure to cytotoxic drugs presents a signification danger to healthcare staff and unwarranted handling of these drugs should be avoided. Guidelines have been established for the safe handling of hazardous drugs but not all professionals are adhering to these recommendations. Recent environmental studies have demonstrated measurable drug contamination on surfaces even when recommended guidelines are followed. It is therefore imperative that healthcare workers are aware of the potential hazards of antineoplastic agents and employ the recommended precautions to minimise exposure. This article outlines the potential risks associated with exposure to cytotoxic drugs for healthcare staff. The safe-handling precautions required in the storage, preparation, transport, administration and waste disposal of cytotoxic drugs are presented.

  6. [Antineoplastic treatment impact on nutritional status in patients with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Monroy Cisneros, Karina; Astiazarán García, Humberto; Esparza Romero, Julián; Guevara Torres, Alfonso Genaro; Valencia Juillerat, Mauro E; Méndez Estrada, Rosa Olivia; Tortoledo Ortiz, Orlando; Pacheco Moreno, Bertha Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in women in Mexico and also has the highest mortality. Although treatment has improved significantly, it can affect the nutritional status of the recipients. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the initial phase of antineoplastic therapy on the nutritional status in patients with breast cancer. Forty subjects with primary diagnosed of invasive breast cancer were studied in a before and after intervention (six month apart) using a quasi-experimental design. Basal and six month after intervention measurements included were anthropometry, body composition by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), diet by 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire, as well as serum -carotene and retinol. The therapy effect was analyzed using repeated measurements mixed linear regression. Lean tissue decreased after the studied period (p=0.032). Addicionally, there was an interaction between weight, BMI and body fat parameters with menopausal status, increasing in these variables due to therapy only premenopausal patients (p=0.005, 0.006 and 0.001, respectively). Decreased serum retinol (p=0.049) despite the improvement in -carotene status (p=0.03). In general there was an increase the consumption of vegetables food products whilst a decrease in animal foods. The breast cancer antineoplastic treatment had a negative effect on weight and body fat, especially in young women. Although there were some positive dietary changes, vegetables consumption remained insufficient, which was also reflected in serum biomarkers. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of an electrolysis apparatus for inactivating antineoplastics in clinical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toyohide; Hirose, Jun; Sano, Kouichi; Hiro, Naoki; Ijiri, Yoshio; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Tamai, Hiroshi; Takenaka, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Nakano, Takashi

    2008-06-01

    We recently reported a system for inactivating antineoplastics in which sodium hypochlorite is supplied by the electrolysis of sodium chloride solution. In this study, we designed an electrolysis apparatus for inactivating the cytotoxicity of antineoplastics in clinical wastewater using the system. The apparatus consists of an electrolysis cell with platinum-iridium electrodes, a pool tank, a circulating system for wastewater, a safety system for explosive gas and overflow, and an exhaust duct. The free chlorine concentration increased linearly up to 6500 mg l(-1), and pH also increased to 9.0-10.0 within 2h, when 0.9% sodium chloride solution was electrolyzed. We examined its efficacy with model and clinical wastewaters. The reciprocal of dilution factor for disappearance of cytotoxicity using Molt-4 cells was compared before and after electrolysis. In the model wastewater, that was 9.10 x 10(4) before electrolysis, and 3.56 x 10(2) after 2h of electrolysis. In the clinical wastewater (n=26), that was 6.90 x 10(3)-1.02 x 10(6) before electrolysis, and 1.08 x 10(2)-1.45 x 10(4) after 2h of electrolysis. Poisonous and explosive gases released by the electrolysis were measured; however, they were found to be negligible in terms of safety. The environmental load was evaluated by carbon dioxide generation as an index and it was found that the carbon dioxide generated by the electrolysis method was 1/70 lower than that by the dilution method with tap water. Moreover, the cost of the electrolysis method was 1/170 lower than that of the dilution method. This method was found to be both effective and economically valuable.

  8. In Vivo Antineoplastic Effects of the NSAID Sulindac in an Oral Carcinogenesis Model.

    PubMed

    Katoumas, Konstantinos; Nikitakis, Nikolaos; Perrea, Despina; Dontas, Ismene; Sklavounou, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    The antineoplastic properties of the NSAID sulindac have long been studied. The purpose of this study was to explore sulindac's in vivo effects on oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) oncogenesis using the hamster cheek pouch oral carcinogenesis model (HOCM). Thirty Syrian golden hamsters were divided into three experimental and two control groups (n = 6 each). The animals' right buccal pouches were treated with carcinogen for 9 weeks in one experimental and one control group and for 14 weeks in all other three groups. The animals of two experimental groups received sulindac from the 1st week and those of the third experimental group from the 10th week. After the end of carcinogenesis, treated buccal pouches were removed and examined. In animals treated with carcinogen for 14 weeks, development of oral SCC and tumor volume were significantly lower in animals that received sulindac from the first week of the experiment. Oral SCC developing in animals that received sulindac were more frequently well differentiated compared with the control group. In animals treated with carcinogen for 9 weeks, the animals that received sulindac developed lower grade of epithelial dysplasia. Proliferation index Ki-67 and positivity for the antiapoptotic molecule survivin were lower in the animals that received sulindac. Treatment with sulindac appears to delays the progression of oral premalignant lesions to oral SCC in the HOCM, also resulting in smaller and better differentiated tumors. These in vivo antineoplastic effects may be related to sulindac's ability to decrease cell proliferation and to prevent survivin expression. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Novel High-Throughput Drug Screening Platform for Chemotherapy-Induced Axonal Neuropathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    COVERED 1 May 201 - 30 Apr 201 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE : Novel High-Throughput Drug Screening Platform for Chemotherapy-Induced axonal...Introduction-page 1 Results- page 1,2,3 Conclusion-page 3 Introduction: Taxol is an antineoplastic agent, which is used for the treatment of

  10. Novel combination of 2-methoxyestradiol and cyclophosphamide enhances the antineoplastic and pro-apoptotic effects on S-180 ascitic tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Srabantika; Barua, Atish; Paul, Goutam; Banerjee, Samarendra Nath

    2017-08-10

    Sarcoma 180 (S-180) tumour cell line is a stable murine tumour cell line with 98-99% stumour takes capacity in Swiss albino mouse - Mus musculus. 2 Methoxyestradiol (2ME) - a promising anti-neoplastic and anti-angiogenic agent, showed toxicity to host body in higher concentration. Cyclophosphamide (CP), the anti-neoplastic agent has long been used as a chemotherapeutic drug for treatment of different cancers. Our studies have shown that the combination effect of 2ME and CP on S-180 tumour cell line is anti-proliferative and less toxic. The treatment with lower concentrations of 2ME and CP (6.5 mg 2ME/kg body weight + 75 mg CP/kg body weight) antagonistically increased the life span of tumour bearing mice and synergistically inhibited the viable cell population. 2ME or CP treatment individually induces G2/M arrest. The combination treatment of 2ME + CP (6.5 mg 2ME/kg body weight + 75 mg CP/kg body weight) produced a significant increase of cells in the G0 which is the indication of cell arrest or apoptosis. Reduction of cell viability by 2ME + CP treatments is due to apoptotic cell death. This combination therapy produced a significant inhibitory effect of cell proliferation and augmentation of cell accumulation in the G0 phase (i.e. apoptosis). Apoptosis is validated by Fluorescence staining of control and treated S-180 tumour cells with Acridine Orange and EtBr dye. Moreover, a steady increase in the frequency of complex chromosomal aberrations (i.e. tri-, qudri-radial translocations) in tumour cells was noted in that particular concentration of combination therapy treated series along with the increase in dead cell frequency and tumour regression pattern. It is assumed that, these chromosomal abnormalities or damages recorded in higher frequency prevent the affected metaphases to enter into the next cell cycle through apoptosis or necrosis. This study introduces a novel combination, where this particular concentration of 2ME + CP (i.e. 6.5 mg 2ME/kg body weight

  11. Role of Oxidative Stress in the Induction of Metallothionein-2A and Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Expression by the Antineoplastic Agent Gallium Nitrate in Human Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meiying; Chitambar, Christopher R.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms of action of gallium nitrate, an antineoplastic drug, are only partly understood. Using a DNA microarray to examine genes induced by gallium nitrate in CCRF-CEM cells, we found that gallium increased metallothionein-2A (MT2A) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene expression and altered the levels of other stress-related genes. MT2A and HO-1 were increased after 6 and 16 h of incubation with gallium nitrate. An increase in oxidative stress, evidenced by a decrease in cellular GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio, and an increase in dichlorodihydrofluoroscein (DCF) fluorescence, was seen after 1 – 4 h incubation of cells with gallium nitrate. DCF fluorescence was blocked by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone. N-acetyl-L-cysteine blocked gallium-induced MT2A and HO-1 expression and increased gallium’s cytotoxicity. Studies with a zinc-specific fluoroprobe suggested that gallium produced an expansion of an intracellular labile zinc pool, suggesting an action of gallium on zinc homeostasis. Gallium nitrate increased the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and activated Nrf-2, a regulator of HO-1 gene transcription. Gallium-induced Nrf-2 activation and HO-1 expression were diminished by a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor. We conclude that gallium nitrate induces cellular oxidative stress as an early event which then triggers the expression of HO-1 and MT2A through different pathways. PMID:18586083

  12. Drug-induced diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Michaux, A; Bergmann, J F

    2000-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a relatively frequent adverse event, accounting for about 7% of all drug adverse effects. More than 700 drugs have been implicated in causing diarrhoea; those most frequently involved are antimicrobials, laxatives, magnesium-containing antacids, lactose- or sorbitol-containing products, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, prostaglandins, colchicine, antineoplastics, antiarrhythmic drugs and cholinergic agents. Certain new drugs are likely to induce diarrhoea because of their pharmacodynamic properties; examples include anthraquinone-related agents, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, lipase inhibitors and cholinesterase inhibitors. Antimicrobials are responsible for 25% of drug-induced diarrhoea. The disease spectrum of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea ranges from benign diarrhoea to pseudomembranous colitis. Several pathophysiological mechanisms are involved in drug-induced diarrhoea: osmotic diarrhoea, secretory diarrhoea, shortened transit time, exudative diarrhoea and protein-losing enteropathy, and malabsorption or maldigestion of fat and carbohydrates. Often 2 or more mechanisms are present simultaneously. In clinical practice, 2 major types of diarrhoea are seen: acute diarrhoea, which usually appears during the first few days of treatment, and chronic diarrhoea, lasting more than 3 or 4 weeks and which can appear a long time after the start of drug therapy. Both can be severe and poorly tolerated. In a patient presenting with diarrhoea, the medical history is very important, especially the drug history, as it can suggest a diagnosis of drug-induced diarrhoea and thereby avoid multiple diagnostic tests. The clinical examination should cover severity criteria such as fever, rectal emission of blood and mucus, dehydration and bodyweight loss. Establishing a relationship between drug consumption and diarrhoea or colitis can be difficult when the time elapsed between the start of the drug and the onset of symptoms is long, sometimes up to several

  13. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  14. Cost-benefit analysis of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during CHOP antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dranitsaris, G; Altmayer, C; Quirt, I

    1997-06-01

    Several randomised comparative trials have shown that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces the duration of neutropenia, hospitalisation and intravenous antibacterial use in patients with cancer who are receiving high-dosage antineoplastic therapy. However, one area that has received less attention is the role of G-CSF in standard-dosage antineoplastic regimens. One such treatment that is considered to have a low potential for inducing fever and neutropenia is the CHOP regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We conducted a cost-benefit analysis from a societal perspective in order to estimate the net cost or benefit of prophylactic G-CSF in this patient population. This included direct costs for hospitalisation with antibacterial support, as well as indirect societal costs, such as time off work and antineoplastic therapy delays secondary to neutropenia. The findings were then tested by a comprehensive sensitivity analysis. The administration of G-CSF at a dosage of 5 micrograms/kg/day for 11 doses following CHOP resulted in an overall net cost of $Can1257. In the sensitivity analysis, lowering the G-CSF dosage to 2 micrograms/kg/day generated a net benefit of $Can6564, indicating a situation that was cost saving to society. The results of the current study suggest that the use of G-CSF in patients receiving CHOP antineoplastic therapy produces a situation that is close to achieving cost neutrality. However, low-dosage (2 micrograms/kg/day) G-CSF is an economically attractive treatment strategy because it may result in overall savings to society.

  15. Incidence of infusion reactions to anti-neoplastic agents in early phase clinical trials: The MD Anderson Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Bupathi, Manojkumar; Hajjar, Joud; Bean, Stacie; Fu, Siqing; Hong, David; Karp, Daniel; Stephen, Bettzy; Hess, Kenneth; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Naing, Aung

    2017-02-01

    Infusion reactions (IRs) to anti-neoplastic agents require prompt recognition and immediate treatment to avert significant complications. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of consecutive patients who received anti-neoplastic therapy in the outpatient treatment center of the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics from January 1, 2013 to November 30, 2013. Of the 597 patients who received treatment, 9 (1.5 %) had IRs (all ≤ grade 2). The most common IRs observed on first occurrence were chills (n = 5), itching, rash, and facial flushing (n = 3 each). There were no IR-related deaths. All the IRs were reversible with appropriate symptomatic treatment and the therapy was completed after temporary cessation of infusion in 7 of the 9 patients. The infusion was stopped in 2 patients due to symptoms suggestive of IgE-mediated allergic reaction and cytokine storm. Five of the 8 patients who were re-challenged with the same therapy developed a similar reaction. However, the infusion was completed in 4 of the 5 patients after administration of intravenous diphenhydramine and/or hydrocortisone, or slowing the rate of infusion. And, subsequent cycles with the same agents were uneventful. IRs to anti-neoplastic agents are rare. Though the clinical presentations are overlapping, most IRs are not IgE-mediated allergic reactions. Appropriate premedication and slow rate of infusion facilitates uneventful administration of the anti-neoplastic agents in subsequent cycles. Further study in a larger cohort of patients to identify biomarkers of hypersensitivity is warranted.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization with Antineoplastic, Biochemical, Cytotoxic, and Antimicrobial Studies of Schiff Base Cu(II) Ion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Haque, M. M.; Kudrat-E-Zahan, Md.; Banu, Laila Arjuman; Islam, Md. Shariful; Islam, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Copper(II) complexes containing two Schiff base ligands derived from 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde with 2-aminophenol and 3-aminophenol have been synthesized and characterized by means of analytical, magnetic, and spectroscopic methods. Bacteria, fungus, Entamoeba histolytica, and antineoplastic activities of the synthesized complexes have been determined by monitoring the parameters cell growth inhibition, survival time of tumour mice, time-body relation, causing of intraperitoneal cells and macrophages, alkaline phosphatase activity, hematological effect, and biopsy of tumour. PMID:26294901

  17. Effect of corticosteroids on phlebitis induced by intravenous infusion of antineoplastic agents in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Emiko; Murase, Saori; Matsuyama, Kenji; Okamura, Noboru

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Phlebitis caused by intravenous infusion of antineoplastic agents is one of the critical problems when anticancer therapy is prolonged. We have already reported that both rapid infusion and dilution of the injection solution were effective methods for reducing phlebitis caused by vinorelbine (VNR) in rabbits. The aim of this study was to explore other practical methods for preventing phlebitis caused by VNR and doxorubicin (DXR) in a rabbit model. VNR is often used with cisplatin, and dexamethasone (DEX) has been co-administered for prevention of cisplatin-induced nausea. DXR is used with prednisolone (PSL) in the CHOP regimen for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Therefore, the present study investigated the prevention of phlebitis due to VNR with DEX and that due to DXR with PSL. Methods: VNR and DXR were diluted with normal saline to prepare test solutions at concentrations of 0.6 mg/mL and 1.4 mg/mL, respectively. Each test solution was infused into the auricular veins of rabbits. Two days after VNR infusion and three days after DXR infusion, the veins were evaluated histopathologically. The effect of DEX on VNR-induced phlebitis was evaluated by infusion of DEX before or after VNR. The effect of PSL on DXR-induced phlebitis was similarly evaluated by co-infusion of PSL. Results: The histopathological features of phlebitis caused by the antineoplastic agents differed between VNR and DXR: VNR did not cause the loss of venous endothelial cells, but caused inflammatory cell infiltration, edema, and epidermal degeneration. In contrast, DXR caused the loss of venous endothelial cells and chrondrocyte necrosis. Pre-treatment and post-treatment with DEX significantly decreased VNR-induced phlebitis compared with the control group and pre-treatment was particularly effective. Co-infusion of PSL also significantly decreased phlebitis caused by DXR, but its effect was less marked. Conclusion: The present findings suggested that pre-treatment with DEX may

  18. Antineoplastic activity of povidone-iodine on different mesothelioma cell lines: results of in vitro study†

    PubMed Central

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Pentimalli, Francesca; D'Urso, Vittorio; Di Marzo, Domenico; Forte, Iris Maria; Giordano, Antonio; Di Domenico, Marina; Accardo, Marina; Di Serio, Umberto; Santini, Mario

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Povidone-iodine (PVP-I) or Betadine, owing to its antineoplastic activity, is also used as an adjuvant during intra-abdominal or intrathoracic surgery. However, the protocol of PVP-I administration has not been optimized to achieve the best antitumoural efficacy. We aimed to determine the optimal concentration of PVP-I, the time of incubation and the mechanism of cell death by analysing the effect of different doses and time of administration of PVP-I on the cell viability of different mesothelioma cell lines. METHODS Four different cell lines (MET 5A/normal mesothelium; H2052/sarcomatoid mesothelioma; ISTMES2/epithelial mesothelioma; MSTO/biphasic mesothelioma) were incubated with increasing concentrations of diluted PVP-I (0.0001; 0.001; 0.01; 0.1; 1%) for 5, 10, 30, 60 min and 24 h, respectively. Cell viability was determined using cell direct cytotoxicity assay and cell death was determined through flow cytometry assay analysis. The superoxide dismutase activity was assessed functionally through a specific inhibitor to evaluate the mechanism of cell death. RESULTS The antiproliferative effect of PVP-I varied largely among different cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. At 0.1% concentration for 10 min of incubation, the percentage of viable cells was 0.5 ± 0.1; 0.8 ± 0.5 and 0% (P < 0.01) for MET5A, ISTMES2 and MSTO, respectively. Conversely, the same concentration did not significantly affect the H2052 cell line which was completely suppressed at a 1% concentration of PVP-I. Double staining of Annexin V and DNA showed that PVP-I induced cell death in all four cell lines via necrosis depending on PVP-I concentration. However, H2052 was found to be more resistant than MSTO, ISTMES2 and MET 5A cells lines. The activity of superoxide dismutase was significantly inhibited in all cell lines. CONCLUSIONS Our results confirmed the anti-neoplastic activity of PVP-I especially on ISTMES2 and MSTO cell lines. With respect to chemotherapy pleural

  19. [Antineoplastic profile assessment for the evaluation of occupational exposure in hospital personnel involved in handling cytotoxic agents].

    PubMed

    Sottani, C; Fugnoli, L; Businaro, J; Poma, P; Ronchi, A; Micoli, G; Minoia, C

    2012-01-01

    Environmental and biological monitoring performed in health care settings during a 14-year period allowed numerous data to be obtained by using the HPLC coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Data was stored in a specific data-base for the assessment of risk exposure to antineoplastic agents (CA). The strategy of analysis was based on the simultaneous determination of different active substances with a lower limit of quantification (LOQ) optimized in the range of sub-units of microg/L. In the present study, the MRM-ESI-MS/MS profiles of seven antineoplastic agents in both environmental and biological matrices are reported. These methods validated according to FDA guidelines allowed our lab to define a profile of antineoplastic agents that was representative of the four IARC classes, such as cyclophosphamide (group 1), cisplatin and doxorubicin (group 2A), daunorubicin (group 2B), 5-fluorouracil, ifosfamide (group 3), taxol, and gemcitabine (group 4). Moreover, contamination levels on a number of work surfaces and trends over a 14-year period are presented. The evaluation of occupational exposure to CA has been based on ALARA principle for most of the past decades but this principle is nowadays overwhelmed by the fast development of technology. The assessment of a possible in-take of CA in hospital personnel, when the sources of environmental contamination are identified, has become possible by the defining of a limit of exposure close to the limit of detection of the analytical method.

  20. Bryostatins trigger human polymorphonuclear neutrophil and monocyte oxidative metabolism: association with in vitro antineoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Esa, A H; Warren, J T; Hess, A D; May, W S

    1995-01-01

    Bryostatin-1-but not bryostatin-13-a macrocyclic lactone isolated from the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina, triggered human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) and monocyte release of reactive oxygen radicals, as measured by the generation of lucigenin chemiluminescence and by the ferricytochrome c reduction assay. The release of oxygen radicals by bryostatins was sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinases, but resistant to the inhibition of phospholipase A2 activity and arachidonic acid metabolism (prior treatment with mepacrine or indomethacin). Comparison of the effect of protein kinase (PK) inhibitors H-8, H-7 and staurosporine on bryostatin-1-induced neutrophil oxygen radical release further suggested a requirement for activation of phospholipid-dependent PKC, but not for cGMP- or cAMP-dependent PK. In cytostatic assays, PMNs treated with bryostatin-1 inhibited the growth of the erythroleukaemic cell line K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings suggest that the reported antineoplastic effect of bryostatins may result at least in part from activation of PMNs and monocytes.

  1. Recombinant L-asparaginase 1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: an allosteric enzyme with antineoplastic activity

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Iris Munhoz; Schultz, Leonardo; de Araujo Bianchi Pedra, Beatriz; Leite, Mariana Silva Moreira; Farsky, Sandra H. P.; de Oliveira, Marcos Antonio; Pessoa, Adalberto; Monteiro, Gisele

    2016-01-01

    L-asparaginase (L-ASNase) (EC 3.5.1.1) is an important enzyme for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Currently, the enzyme is obtained from bacteria, Escherichia coli and Erwinia chrysanthemi. The bacterial enzymes family is subdivided in type I and type II; nevertheless, only type II have been employed in therapeutic proceedings. However, bacterial enzymes are susceptible to induce immune responses, leading to a high incidence of adverse effects compromising the effectiveness of the treatment. Therefore, alternative sources of L-ASNase may be useful to reduce toxicity and enhance efficacy. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the ASP1 gene responsible for encoding L-asparaginase 1 (ScASNase1), an enzyme predicted as type II, like bacterial therapeutic isoforms, but it has been poorly studied. Here we characterised ScASNase1 using a recombinant enzyme purified by affinity chromatography. ScASNase1 has specific activity of 196.2 U/mg and allosteric behaviour, like type I enzymes, but with a low K0.5 = 75 μM like therapeutic type II. We showed through site-directed mutagenesis that the T64-Y78-T141-K215 residues are involved in catalysis. Furthermore, ScASNase1 showed cytotoxicity for the MOLT-4 leukemic cell lineage. Our data show that ScASNase1 has characteristics described for the two subfamilies of l-asparaginase, types I and II, and may have promising antineoplastic properties. PMID:27824095

  2. New Trends on Antineoplastic Therapy Research: Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana Shaw) Oil Nanostructured Systems.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Machado, Lucas; Xavier-Júnior, Francisco H; Rutckeviski, Renata; Morais, Andreza R V; Alencar, Éverton N; Dantas, Teresa R F; Cruz, Ana K M; Genre, Julieta; da Silva-Junior, Arnóbio A; Pedrosa, Matheus F F; Rocha, Hugo A O; Egito, Eryvaldo S T

    2016-04-30

    Bullfrog oil is a natural product extracted from the Rana catesbeiana Shaw adipose tissue and used in folk medicine for the treatment of several diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extraction process of bullfrog oil, to develop a suitable topical nanoemulsion and to evaluate its efficacy against melanoma cells. The oil samples were obtained by hot and organic solvent extraction processes and were characterized by titration techniques and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The required hydrophile-lipophile balance and the pseudo-ternary phase diagram (PTPD) were assessed to determine the emulsification ability of the bullfrog oil. The anti-tumoral activity of the samples was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay for normal fibroblast (3T3) and melanoma (B16F10) cell lines. Both extraction methods produced yielded around 60% and the oil was mainly composed of unsaturated compounds (around 60%). The bullfrog oil nanoemulsion obtained from PTPD presented a droplet size of about 390 nm and polydispersity = 0.05 and a zeta potential of about -25 mV. Both the bullfrog oil itself and its topical nanoemulsion did not show cytotoxicity in 3T3 linage. However, these systems showed growth inhibition in B16F10 cells. Finally, the bullfrog oil presented itself as a candidate for the development of pharmaceutical products free from cytotoxicity and effective for antineoplastic therapy.

  3. Synthesis of N-methylarylnitrones derived from alkyloxybenzaldehydes and antineoplastic effect on human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Costa, Débora S S; Martino, Thiago; Magalhães, Fernanda C; Justo, Graça; Coelho, Marsen G P; Barcellos, Julio C F; Moura, Victor B; Costa, Paulo R R; Sabino, Kátia C C; Dias, Ayres G

    2015-05-01

    New O-isoprenylated-N-methylarylnitrones derived from isomeric o, m and p-hydroxybenzaldehydes have been prepared and the antineoplastic effects on human cancer cell lines were evaluated. The O-geranylated nitrone LQB-278 (1b) and its isomers 2b and 3b inhibited the NO production, but the anti-leukemic activity was drastically dependent on nitrone isomer, with the 1b being the most effective one (IC₅₀ of 6.7 μM) on Jurkat leukemia cell, by MTT assay. In addition, 1b up-regulated p21CIP1/WAF1/Sdi1 protein expression (flow cytometry), a cell cycle inhibitor, reduced cell growth, and induced DNA fragmentation (increased sub-G1 phase cells) and phosphatidylserine externalization in plasmatic membrane (increased annexin V positive cells). Finally, the 1b up-regulation of p21 expression and apoptosis induction seem to be the mechanisms by which it promotes its anti-leukemic effects, making this new molecular architecture a promising prototype for leukemia intervention.

  4. Enhanced topical and transdermal delivery of antineoplastic and antiviral acyclic nucleoside phosphonate cPr-PMEDAP.

    PubMed

    Vávrová, Kateřina; Kovaříková, Petra; Skolová, Barbora; Líbalová, Martina; Roh, Jaroslav; Cáp, Robert; Holý, Antonín; Hrabálek, Alexandr

    2011-12-01

    Acyclic nucleoside phosphonates possess unique antiviral and antineoplastic activities; however, their polar phosphonate moiety is associated with low ability to cross biological membranes. We explored the potential of transdermal and topical delivery of 2,6-diaminopurine derivative cPr-PMEDAP. In vitro diffusion of cPr-PMEDAP was investigated using formulations at different pH and concentration and with permeation enhancer through porcine and human skin. Ability of 0.1-5% cPr-PMEDAP to cross human skin barrier was very low with flux values ~40 ng/cm(2)/h, the majority of compound found in the stratum corneum. The highest permeation rates were found at pH 6; increased donor concentration had no influence. The permeation enhancer dodecyl 6-dimethylaminohexanoate (DDAK, 1%) increased flux of cPr-PMEDAP (up to 61 times) and its concentration in nucleated epidermis (up to ~0.5 mg of cPr-PMEDAP/g of the tissue). No deamination of cPr-PMEDAP into PMEG occurred during permeation studies, but N-dealkylation into PMEDAP mediated by skin microflora was observed. Transdermal or topical application of cPr-PMEDAP enabled by the permeation enhancer DDAK may provide an attractive alternative route of administration of this potent antitumor and antiviral compound.

  5. Phytic acid (IP6), novel broad spectrum anti-neoplastic agent: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fox, C H; Eberl, M

    2002-12-01

    Phytic acid or IP6 has been extensively studied in animals and is being promoted as an anti-cancer agent in health food stores. It is naturally found in legumes, wheat bran, and soy foods. It is believed to be the active ingredient that gives these substances their cancer fighting abilities. Proposed mechanisms of action include gene alteration, enhanced immunity, and anti-oxidant properties. A Medline search from 1966 to May 2002 using the keywords phytic acid and cancer, and limiting the search to the subheadings of therapeutic uses, prevention, and adverse effects revealed 28 studies. These studies were included in the review. A great majority of the studies were done in animals and showed that phytic acid had anti-neoplastic properties in breast, colon, liver, leukemia, prostate, sarcomas, and skin cancer. There were no human studies. Side effects included chelation of multivalent cations, and an increase in bladder and renal papillomas. This increase in papilloma formation only occurred with the sodium salt of phytic acid. It did not occur with either the potassium or magnesium salts. There is a large body of animal evidence to show that phytic acid may have a role in both the prevention and treatment of many forms of cancer. There is clearly enough evidence to justify the initiation of Phase I and Phase II clinical trials in humans.

  6. Homeopathic remedies with antineoplastic properties have immunomodulatory effects in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Remya, Valsalakumari; Kuttan, Girija

    2015-07-01

    Our previous work suggests that Thuja occidentalis, Carcinosinum and Ruta graveolens have antineoplastic properties. The mechanism of this action has not previously been studied. We studied the hypothesis that the mechanism of action is through the immune modulation. We evaluated the effects of Thuja occidentalis, Carcinosinum and Ruta graveolens 1M, 200c and 30c on the immune system of Balb/c mice. The homeopathic preparations were administered orally for ten consecutive days. Haematological parameters (Total White Blood Cell (WBC) Count, Differential Count and Haemoglobin content), haematopoietic parameters (bone marrow cellularity and α-esterase positive cells) and immune parameters for antibody response and lymphoid cell proliferation were assessed using standard methods. Results were analysed by statistical comparison with the control. We observed significant enhancement of haematological parameters including total WBC count, haematopoietic parameters such as bone marrow cellularity and the number of α-esterase positive cells, other parameters of immune response such as circulating antibody titre and the number of plaque forming cells (PFC), particularly with higher dilutions of Thuja and Ruta. Enhanced proliferation of B and T lymphoid cells was also observed. No toxic effects were observed. The results suggest immunomodulatory activity of homeopathic preparations in high dilution. This may be a mechanism through which homeopathic preparations act. Copyright © 2014 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. BEL β-trefoil: a novel lectin with antineoplastic properties in king bolete (Boletus edulis) mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Bovi, Michele; Cenci, Lucia; Perduca, Massimiliano; Capaldi, Stefano; Carrizo, Maria E; Civiero, Laura; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Galliano, Monica; Monaco, Hugo L

    2013-05-01

    A novel lectin was purified from the fruiting bodies of king bolete mushrooms (Boletus edulis, also called porcino, cep or penny bun). The lectin was structurally characterized i.e its amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure were determined. The new protein is a homodimer and each protomer folds as β-trefoil domain and therefore we propose the name Boletus edulis lectin (BEL) β-trefoil to distinguish it from the other lectin that has been described in these mushrooms. The lectin has potent anti-proliferative effects on human cancer cells, which confers to it an interesting therapeutic potential as an antineoplastic agent. Several crystal forms of the apoprotein and of complexes with different carbohydrates were studied by X-ray diffraction. The structure of the apoprotein was solved at 1.12 Å resolution. The interaction of the lectin with lactose, galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and T-antigen disaccharide, Galβ1-3GalNAc, was examined in detail. All the three potential binding sites present in the β-trefoil fold are occupied in at least one crystal form and are described in detail in this paper. No important conformational changes are observed in the lectin when comparing its co-crystals with carbohydrates with those of the ligand-free protein.

  8. Nitric oxide donor augments antineoplastic effects of arginine deprivation in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mayevska, Oksana; Chen, Oleh; Karatsai, Olena; Bobak, Yaroslav; Barska, Maryna; Lyniv, Liliana; Pavlyk, Iuliia; Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Igumentseva, Natalia; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta; Stasyk, Oleh

    2017-06-15

    Anticancer therapy based on recombinant arginine-degrading enzymes has been proposed for the treatment of several types of malignant cells deficient in arginine biosynthesis. One of the predicted side effects of such therapy is restricted bioavailability of nitric oxide as arginine catabolic product. Prolonged NO limitation may lead to unwanted disturbances in NO-dependent vasodilation, cardiovascular and immune systems. This problem can be overcome by co-supplementation with exogenous NO donor. However, NO may potentially counteract anticancer effects of therapy based on arginine deprivation. In this study, we evaluate for the first time the effects of an exogenous NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, on viability and metastatic properties of two human melanoma cell lines SK-MEL-28 and WM793 under arginine-deprived conditions. It was revealed that NO did not rescue melanoma cells from specific effects evoked by arginine deprivation, namely decreased viability and induction of apoptosis, dramatically reduced motility, invasiveness and clonogenic potential. Moreover, sodium nitroprusside co-treatment augmented several of these antineoplastic effects. We report that a combination of NO-donor and arginine deprivation strongly and specifically impaired metastatic behavior of melanoma cells. Thus, sodium nitroprusside can be considered as an adjuvant for the more efficient treatment of malignant melanoma and possibly other tumors with arginine-degrading enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of Fenton, photo-Fenton, solar photo-Fenton, and UV/H2O2 to degradation of the antineoplastic agent mitoxantrone and toxicological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Rodrigo Pereira; da Rocha Sandim, Lucas; Bogo, Danielle; Barbosa, Antônio Marcos Jacques; Osugi, Marly Eiko; Blanco, Matildes; de Oliveira, Silvio Cesar; de Fatima Cepa Matos, Maria; Machulek, Amilcar; Ferreira, Valdir Souza

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, selected advanced oxidation processes (AOPs)-namely, photo-Fenton (with Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and potassium ferrioxalate-FeOx-as iron sources), solar photo-Fenton, Fenton, and UV/H2O2-were investigated for degradation of the antineoplastic drug mitoxantrone (MTX), frequently used to treat metastatic breast cancer, skin cancer, and acute leukemia. The results showed that photo-Fenton processes employing Fe(III) and FeOx and the UV/H2O2 process were most efficient for mineralizing MTX, with 77, 82, and 90% of total organic carbon removal, respectively. MTX probably forms a complex with Fe(III), as demonstrated by voltammetric and spectrophotometric measurements. Spectrophotometric titrations suggested that the complex has a 2:1 Fe(3+):MTX stoichiometric ratio and a complexation constant (K) of 1.47 × 10(4) M(-1), indicating high MTX affinity for Fe(3+). Complexation partially inhibits the involvement of iron ions and hence the degradation of MTX during photo-Fenton. The UV/H2O2 process is usually slower than the photo-Fenton process, but, in this study, the UV/H2O2 process proved to be more efficient due to complexing of MTX with Fe(III). The drug exhibited no cytotoxicity against NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells when oxidized by UV/H2O2 or by UV/H2O2/FeOx at the concentrations tested.

  10. Antineoplastic activity of N-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)2'-hydroxyphenylimine aqua nickel(II) complex [NI(H₂O)HHP] on ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Israt Ara; Khanam, Jahan Ara; Jesmin, Mele; Ali, Mohammud Mohshin

    2016-01-01

    The present study is aimed at evaluating the antineoplastic activity of N[(2-hydroxybenzylidene)2'-hydroxyphenylimine] aqua nickel(II) complex abbreviated as [Ni(H2O)HHP] complex against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells in Swiss albino mice. The effectiveness of the drug at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg body weight was assessed for five consecutive days in previously inoculated tumor (137×10(4) EAC) cells containing mice. After administration of the last dose followed by 16 h fasting, the effect of the [Ni(H2O)HHP] complex on tumor was assessed by EAC cell growth inhibition, solid tumor mass, survival time, peritoneal cell count, hematological profiles like red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), haemoglobin (Hb)% and differential counts (i.e., lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes) and biochemical parameters like serum glucose, total cholesterol, total protein, serum urea and liver enzymes, respectively. The results have been compared with the data obtained by using a standard and highly effective clinically used anticancer drug bleomycin. [Ni(H2O)HHP] complex at dose 2.0 mg/kg i.p. (intra peritoneal) showed a significant (P=0.001) decrease in tumor volume of each mice and increased the life span as well as mean survival time of EAC bearing mice. Hematological and biochemical parameters of EAC bearing mice get back normal values after 15 days of the initial treatment. From the above outcomes indicate the possible potential use of the compound as antitumor agent in advanced researches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Neoplastic Effects of Endostar on Liver Cancer through Optical Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhenwen; Chi, Chongwei; Jia, Xiaohua; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth, progression, and drug treatment response, and it has become an important tool to promote biological studies in recent years. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the in vivo anti-angiogenic and anti-neoplastic effects of Endostar on liver cancer based on the optical molecular imaging systems including micro-computer tomography (Micro-CT), bioluminescence molecular imaging (BLI) and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). Firefly luciferase (fLuc) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) dual labeled human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC-LM3-fLuc-GFP cells) were used to establish the subcutaneous and orthotopic liver tumor model. After the tumor cells were implanted 14∼18 days, Endostar (5 mg/kg/day) was administered through an intravenous tail vein injection for continuous 14 days. The computer tomography angiography (CTA) and BLI were carried out for the subcutaneous tumor model. FMT was executed for the orthotopic tumor model. The CTA data showed that tumor vessel formation and the peritumoral vasculature of subcutaneous tumor in the Endostar treatment group was significantly inhibited compared to the control group. The BLI data exhibited the obvious tumor inhibition day 8 post-treatment. The FMT detected the tumor suppression effects of Endostar as early as day 4 post-treatment and measured the tumor location. The above data confirmed the effects of Endostar on anti-angiogenesis and tumor suppression on liver cancer. Our system combined CTA, BLI, and FMT to offer more comprehensive information about the effects of Endostar on the suppression of vessel and tumor formation. Optical molecular imaging system enabled the non-invasive and reliable assessment of anti-tumor drug efficacy on liver cancer. PMID:24416426

  12. Non-steroidal drug-induced glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Razeghinejad, M R; Pro, M J; Katz, L J

    2011-01-01

    Numerous systemically used drugs are involved in drug-induced glaucoma. Most reported cases of non-steroidal drug-induced glaucoma are closed-angle glaucoma (CAG). Indeed, many routinely used drugs that have sympathomimetic or parasympatholytic properties can cause pupillary block CAG in individuals with narrow iridocorneal angle. The resulting acute glaucoma occurs much more commonly unilaterally and only rarely bilaterally. CAG secondary to sulfa drugs is a bilateral non-pupillary block type and is due to forward movement of iris–lens diaphragm, which occurs in individuals with narrow or open iridocorneal angle. A few agents, including antineoplastics, may induce open-angle glaucoma. In conclusion, the majority of cases with glaucoma secondary to non-steroidal medications are of the pupillary block closed-angle type and preventable if the at-risk patients are recognized and treated prophylactically. PMID:21637303

  13. Synthesis and in vitro antineoplastic evaluation of silver nanoparticles mediated by Agrimoniae herba extract

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Ding; Sun, Wenjie; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Congyan

    2014-01-01

    A rapid synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using Agrimoniae herba extract as reducing agent and stabilizer (A. herba-conjugated AgNPs [AH-AgNPs]) were designed, characterized, and evaluated for antitumor therapy feasibility. In this study, critical factors in the preparation of silver nanoparticles, including extraction time, reaction temperature, the concentration of AgNO3, and A. herba extract amount, were investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. AH-AgNPs with well-defined spherical shape, homogeneous distributional small size (30.34 nm), narrow polydispersity index (0.142), and high negative zeta potential (−36.8 mV) were observed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Furthermore, the results of X-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy further indicated successful preparation of AH-AgNPs. Acceptable long-term storage stability of AH-AgNPs was also confirmed. More importantly, AH-AgNPs displayed significantly higher antiproliferative effect against a human lung carcinoma cell line (A549 cells) compared with A. herba extract and bare AgNPs prepared by sodium citrate. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of AH-AgNPs, bare AgNPs, and A. herba extract were 38.13 μg · mL−1, 184.87 μg · mL−1, and 1.147 × 104 μg · mL−1, respectively. It is suggested that AH-AgNPs exhibit a strong antineoplastic effect on A549 cells, pointing to feasibility of antitumor treatment in the future. PMID:24790429

  14. ATP-dependent uptake of anti-neoplastic agents by acidic organelles.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Y; Manabe, T; Yoshimori, T; Tashiro, Y; Futai, M

    1994-02-01

    Daunomycin, an anti-neoplastic agent, is known to be sequestered by acidic organelles in normal and multidrug-resistant cells [Willingham, M.C., Cornwell, M.M., Cardarelli, C.O., Gottesman, M.M., & Pastan, I. (1986) Cancer Res. 46, 5941-5946]. We studied the mechanism of accumulation of daunomycin into acidic organelles using chromaffin granule vesicles and proteoliposomes reconstituted with purified F-type H(+)-ATPase as model systems. Radiolabeled daunomycin was taken up by chromaffin vesicles upon addition of ATP. Its ATP-dependent uptake was stimulated about 1.4- to 1.8-fold by valinomycin plus K+, but was inhibited by ammonium chloride (10 mM) and nigericin plus K+. Quinidine (5 microM), verapamil (5 microM), or vanadate (0.5 mM), inhibitors of P-glycoprotein, had no effect on its uptake. Daunomycin was also taken up by liposomes reconstituted with F-type H(+)-ATPase. Furthermore, doxorubicin and vinblastine were taken up by these vesicles, whereas colchicine and rhodamine 123 were not. The accumulations of daunomycin and doxorubicin in acidic organelles of cultured cells were decreased by inhibiting vacuolar ATPase by addition of bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A, or by increasing the internal pH by addition of nigericin. Melittin and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide dissipated the delta pH and inhibited accumulation of daunomycin in the membrane vesicles and acidic organelles in cultured cells. These results indicate that the delta pH established by vacuolar-type ATPase drives the uptake of daunomycin, doxorubicin or vinblastine into acidic organelles, and that no specific transporters are involved in their uptakes.

  15. Strong antineoplastic effects of metformin in preclinical models of liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cauchy, François; Mebarki, Mouniya; Leporq, Benjamin; Laouirem, Samira; Albuquerque, Miguel; Lambert, Simon; Bourgoin, Pierre; Soubrane, Olivier; Van Beers, Bernard E; Faivre, Sandrine; Bedossa, Pierre; Paradis, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Studies suggest that metformin, widely used for treating Type 2 diabetes, possesses innate antineoplastic properties. For metabolic syndrome patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), metformin may provide antitumoral effects. We evaluated the impact of metformin on tumour growth and visceral fat composition using relevant preclinical models of metabolic syndrome. Studies were performed in three hepatoma cell lines, in HepG2 xenograft mice fed with standard chow (SC) diet, 60% high-fat diet (HFD) or 30% fructose diet (FR), and an ex vivo model of human cultured HCC slices. Visceral fatty acid composition was analysed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Metformin had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro through the deregulation of mTOR/AMPK, AKT and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathways. Tumour engraftment rates were higher in HFD mice than SC mice (hepatic: 79% compared with 25%, P=0.02) and FR mice (subcutaneous: 86% compared with 50%, P=0.04). Subcutaneous tumour volume was increased in HFD mice (+64% compared with FR and SC, P=0.03). Metformin significantly decreased subcutaneous tumour growth via cell-cycle block and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway inhibition, and also induced hypoxia and decreased angiogenesis. In ex vivo tumour slices, metformin treatment led to increased necrosis, decreased cyclin D1 and increased carbonic anhydrase-9 (CA-9). Metformin caused qualitative changes in visceral fat composition of HFD mice, with decreased proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids (14.6% ± 2.3% compared with 17.9% ± 3.0%, P=0.04). The potent antitumoral effects of metformin in multiple preclinical models implicating several molecular mechanisms provide a strong rationale for clinical trials including combination studies in HCC patients. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. Synthesis and in vitro antineoplastic evaluation of silver nanoparticles mediated by Agrimoniae herba extract.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ding; Sun, Wenjie; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Congyan

    2014-01-01

    A rapid synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using Agrimoniae herba extract as reducing agent and stabilizer (A. herba-conjugated AgNPs [AH-AgNPs]) were designed, characterized, and evaluated for antitumor therapy feasibility. In this study, critical factors in the preparation of silver nanoparticles, including extraction time, reaction temperature, the concentration of AgNO3, and A. herba extract amount, were investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. AH-AgNPs with well-defined spherical shape, homogeneous distributional small size (30.34 nm), narrow polydispersity index (0.142), and high negative zeta potential (-36.8 mV) were observed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Furthermore, the results of X-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy further indicated successful preparation of AH-AgNPs. Acceptable long-term storage stability of AH-AgNPs was also confirmed. More importantly, AH-AgNPs displayed significantly higher antiproliferative effect against a human lung carcinoma cell line (A549 cells) compared with A. herba extract and bare AgNPs prepared by sodium citrate. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of AH-AgNPs, bare AgNPs, and A. herba extract were 38.13 μg · mL(-1), 184.87 μg · mL(-1), and 1.147 × 10(4) μg · mL(-1), respectively. It is suggested that AH-AgNPs exhibit a strong antineoplastic effect on A549 cells, pointing to feasibility of antitumor treatment in the future.

  17. Significance of targeting polyamine metabolism as an antineoplastic strategy: unique targets for polyamine analogues.

    PubMed

    Casero, Robert A; Frydman, Benjamin; Stewart, Tracy Murray; Woster, Patrick M

    2005-01-01

    The polyamines, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine, are naturally occurring polycationic alkylamines that are absolutely required for eukaryotic cell growth. Importantly, the polyamine metabolic pathway, as well as the requirement of polyamines for cell growth, is frequently dysregulated in cancer cells, thus providing a unique set of targets for therapeutic intervention. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), a rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, is frequently up-regulated in preneoplastic cells, and has been implicated as an oncogene in multiple tumor types. Several model systems have demonstrated that inhibition of ODC's enzymatic activity and down-regulation of its expression are rational strategies for both chemotherapy and chemoprevention. Specific inhibitors of ODC, most notably 2-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), have been used experimentally to validate polyamine metabolism as an antineoplastic strategy. However, multiple biochemical and clinical limitations to these ODC-targeting strategies minimize their value as therapeutic tools. Included among these limitations are poor bioavailability of the inhibitor, and the compensatory up-regulation of polyamine metabolism and transport that allow tumor cells to escape the growth inhibitory effects of blockers specifically targeting ODC. As a strategy to overcome the limitations of direct enzyme inhibition, several groups have pursued the design of polyamine analogues that specifically target the dysregulated polyamine metabolism found in tumors. These analogues have been developed specifically to target the specific polyamine transporter, thus competing with circulating natural polyamines. Additionally, most of the analogues examined thus far maintain the regulatory function of the natural polyamines, but are unable to functionally substitute for them in promoting growth. Specifically, individual analogues have demonstrated the ability to down-regulate each of the biosynthetic enzymes without causing

  18. Psidium guajava L. anti-neoplastic effects: induction of apoptosis and cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bontempo, P; Doto, A; Miceli, M; Mita, L; Benedetti, R; Nebbioso, A; Veglione, M; Rigano, D; Cioffi, M; Sica, V; Molinari, A M; Altucci, L

    2012-02-01

    Curative properties of medicinal plants such as Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) have often been indicated by epidemiological studies on populations in which these fruits are consumed daily. However, complete characterization of the active principles responsible for this ability has never been performed. Here, we have characterized P. guajava's anti-cancer potential and identified the parts of the fruit involved in its anti-neoplastic action. We studied morphology of our cells, cell cycle characteristics and apoptosis and performed immunostaining, differentiation and western blot analyses. We report that the P. guajava extract exerted anti-cancer control on both haematological and solid neoplasias. P. guajava extract's anti-tumour properties were found to be tightly bound to induction of apoptosis and differentiation. Use of ex vivo myeloid leukaemia blasts corroborated that P. guajava was able to induce cell death but did not exhibit anti-cancer effects on all malignant cells investigated, indicating selective activity against certain types of tumour. Analyses of P. guajava pulp, peel and seeds identified the pulp as being the most relevant component for causing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, whereas peel was responsible for causing cell differentiation. P. guajava itself and its pulp-derived extract were found to induce apoptosis accompanied by caspase activation and p16, p21, Fas ligand (FASL TNF super-family, member 6), Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD) and tumour necrosis factor receptor super-family, member 10b (DR5), overexpression. Our findings showed that P. guajava L. extract was able to exert anti-cancer activity on cultures in vitro and ex vivo, supporting the hypothesis of its anti malignant pro-apoptotic modulation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Simultaneous Dual Selective Targeted Delivery of Two Covalent Gemcitabine Immunochemotherapeutics and Complementary Anti-Neoplastic Potency of [Se]-Methylselenocysteine

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, C. P.; Jones, Toni; Bear, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The anti-metabolite chemotherapeutic, gemcitabine is relatively effective for a spectrum of neoplastic conditions that include various forms of leukemia and adenocarcinoma/carcinoma. Rapid systemic deamination of gemcitabine accounts for a brief plasma half-life but its sustained administration is often curtailed by sequelae and chemotherapeutic-resistance. A molecular strategy that diminishes these limitations is the molecular design and synthetic production of covalent gemcitabine immunochemotherapeutics that possess properties of selective “targeted” delivery. The simultaneous dual selective “targeted” delivery of gemcitabine at two separate sites on the external surface membrane of a single cancer cell types represents a therapeutic approach that can increase cytosol chemotherapeutic deposition; prolong chemotherapeutic plasma half-life (reduces administration frequency); minimize innocent exposure of normal tissues and healthy organ systems; and ultimately enhance more rapid and thorough resolution of neoplastic cell populations. Materials and Methods: A light-reactive gemcitabine intermediate synthesized utilizing succinimidyl 4,4-azipentanoate was covalently bound to anti-EGFR or anti-HER2/neu IgG by exposure to UV light (354-nm) resulting in the synthesis of covalent immunochemotherapeutics, gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EGFR] and gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu]. Cytotoxic anti-neoplastic potency of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EGFR] and gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] between gemcitabine-equivalent concentrations of 10−12 M and 10−6 M was determined utilizing chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKRr-3). The organoselenium compound, [Se]-methylselenocysteine was evaluated to determine if it complemented the anti-neoplastic potency of the covalent gemcitabine immunochemotherapeutics. Results: Gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EGFR], gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] and the dual simultaneous combination of gemcitabine

  20. In vitro toxicity of ET-743 and aplidine, two marine-derived antineoplastics, on human bone marrow haematopoietic progenitors. comparison with the clinical results.

    PubMed

    Albella, B; Faircloth, G; López-Lázaro, L; Guzmán, C; Jimeno, J; Bueren, J A

    2002-07-01

    Ecteinascidine-743 (ET-743) and aplidine are two marine-derived antineoplastics currently in phase II development. With the aim of evaluating whether in vitro haematopoietic studies can predict the toxicity of these two drugs in patients, human bone marrow (BM) samples were incubated with these drugs under conditions which mimicked the administration exposures used in the clinics. As it was observed in different cancer cell lines, ET-743 was more toxic on an equimolar basis in human hematopoietic progenitors (inhibitory concentration reducing the viability to 50% after 24 h exposures; IC50(24h): 10-50 nM) compared with doxorubicin (IC50(24h) values: 280-460 nM), used as a control anticancer drug. In contrast to the high haematotoxic effects observed for ET-743, similar IC values were obtained for aplidine (IC50(24h): 150-530 nM) compared with doxorubicin. For both ET-743 and aplidine, the megakaryocytic progenitor was the most sensitive, compared with the other haematopoietic progenitors (IC50 values were 3- to 5-fold lower in the CFU-Megs compared with the CFU-GMs). The observation that the Cmax observed in patients treated with the aplidine maximum tolerated dose (MTD) (7.1 nM) was 21-75 fold lower than the IC50(24h) value observed for the different haematopoietic progenitors is highly consistent with the lack of haematotoxicity observed in patients treated with this drug. In the case of ET-743, differences between the Cmax value corresponding to the MTD (2.6 nM) and the in vitro IC50 values corresponding to the different progenitors were much lower (4-19-fold), also consistent with the haematotoxicity that was observed in patients treated at recommended doses (RDs) and MTDs. Although CFU-Megs were more sensitive than CFU-GM progenitors to ET-743 in vitro, clinical data showed that neutropenic events were more frequent than thrombocytopenic episodes. Aiming to further improve the predictive value of in vitro IC values corresponding to the different haematopoietic

  1. Intravenous bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws: Influence of coadjuvant antineoplastic treatment and study of buccodental condition

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, José; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether coadjuvant antineoplastic treatment can influence the number and size of bone exposures among patients with intravenous bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (iBRONJ), and to analyze the buccodental condition of these patients. Material and methods: The study sample comprised 67 patients with iBRONJ, 53 patients without iBRONJ receiving treatment with intravenous bisphosphonates, and 36 healthy subjects. In all three groups, measurements were made of the CAO index and of resting whole saliva and stimulated whole saliva. In the patients with iBRONJ, the size (cm) and number of bone exposures were recorded. The data obtained were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Mann-Whitney U-test, and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 57.6% of the patients presented single bone exposure, 25.4% presented two, and 17% more than two exposures. The mean exposure size was 2.3±1.9 cm. Neither the bivariate analysis nor the multivariate multiple regression analysis found coadjuvant antineoplastic treatment to exert a statistically significant effect upon the number and size of bone exposures. On the other hand, there were statistically significant differences among the three study groups in relation to the CAO index (p=0.02) and the number of missing teeth (p=0.00). The resting whole saliva and stimulated whole saliva levels were similar in the three groups, though the patients with osteonecrosis of the jaws showed comparatively lower SWS levels. Conclusions: Coadjuvant antineoplastic treatment alone appears to exert no influence upon the size and number of bone exposures in iBRONJ. The patients with this disease show a higher CAO index and a larger number of missing teeth. Key words:Osteonecrosis of the jaws, bisphosphonates, bone exposure, CAO index, resting whole saliva, stimulated whole saliva. PMID:23229272

  2. The kallikrein-related peptidase 13 (KLK13) gene is substantially up-regulated after exposure of gastric cancer cells to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Florou, Dimitra; Mavridis, Konstantinos; Scorilas, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Gastric cancer constitutes one of the most common neoplasms globally. Kallikrein-related peptidases have attracted interest as potential tumor markers and future targets for novel cancer therapeutics. We have recently reported KLK13 clinical importance as a favorable prognostic biomarker for gastric cancer patients' survival. By aiming to explore how the molecular profile of KLK13 is modified in stomach cancer cells treated with antineoplastic drugs, we examined, for the first time, the mRNA alterations of this gene following gastric cancer cells' exposure to the prominent chemotherapeutic substances epirubicin, oxaliplatin, or methotrexate. The antiproliferative effects of these agents, on AGS cells' growth, were determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and trypan blue assays. Total RNA, isolated from the harvested cells, was reverse-transcribed to cDNA. KLK13 levels were quantified via real-time PCR using the SYBR Green chemistry. The relative changes of KLK13 expression were calculated with the comparative C (t) (2(-ddCt)) method. Distinct KLK13 profiles resulted from AGS cells' incubation with epirubicin or methotrexate for 24, 36, and 48 h. KLK13 expression increased in a time-dependent manner up to 5.70 times (for epirubicin) or 5.76 times (for methotrexate) at 48 h compared with the corresponding untreated cells. According to our results, KLK13 expression is implicated in the molecular pathways that are triggered after administration of anticancer agents on gastric cancer cells. Moreover, our data support the possibility that KLK13 may be exploited as a future molecular predictor of gastric cancer cells' response to chemotherapy.

  3. [Latin-American plants as a source of new antineoplastic drugs, current situation and new opportunities against cancer].

    PubMed

    Orrego Escobar, Eduardo Freddy

    2015-04-13

    Cancer is one of the most relevant pandemics in modern world. There is a clear predominance of this pathology with distinct epidemiological characteristics in developing and developed countries. Effective, low-cost treatment and prophylaxis strategies that also have minimal side effects are needed. The present work is a brief revision of research that show the great therapeutic potential of plants, highlighting those carried out in Latin America with local plants considering that this is a yet incipient field of study. The great pool of organic compounds and other substances such as proteins indicate that they might provide a reliable alternative in the search for new actors in the battle against cancer.

  4. To create a cleanroom controlled environment using a mobile air decontamination unit for the preparation of antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Lecordier, Julien; Plivard, Claire; Gardeux, Michel; Daouadi, Karim; Lahet, Jean-Jacques

    2016-02-01

    To use a mobile air decontamination unit (MADU) for a microbial destruction and decreased particle burden making a cleanroom controlled environment in a Centralized Chemotherapy Preparation Unit (CCPU). Good manufacturing practices (GMP) in France specify that the ambient air in the vicinity of a class III biosafety cabinet (isolator) complies with air cleanliness ISO 8 level in CCPU. This guideline has a significant impact because implementing a dedicated air handling unit (AHU) brings some engineering constraints and generates substantial additional costs. Authors have previously studied some technical and economical aspects to evaluate the feasibility of the MADU option. Using a MADU was the chosen option. Qualification of the CCPU showed that results were in compliance with the French GMP. After one year of use, the efficiency of the MADU was confirmed. According to these results, using a MADU constitutes a beneficial option for CCPU previously equipped with an isolator when compared to renovation work involving a standard built-in AHU. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Bacterial inactivation of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Westman, Erin L; Canova, Marc J; Radhi, Inas J; Koteva, Kalinka; Kireeva, Inga; Waglechner, Nicholas; Wright, Gerard D

    2012-10-26

    Microbes are exposed to compounds produced by members of their ecological niche, including molecules with antibiotic or antineoplastic activities. As a result, even bacteria that do not produce such compounds can harbor the genetic machinery to inactivate or degrade these molecules. Here, we investigated environmental actinomycetes for their ability to inactivate doxorubicin, an aminoglycosylated anthracycline anticancer drug. One strain, Streptomyces WAC04685, inactivates doxorubicin via a deglycosylation mechanism. Activity-based purification of the enzymes responsible for drug inactivation identified the NADH dehydrogenase component of respiratory electron transport complex I, which was confirmed by gene inactivation studies. A mechanism where reduction of the quinone ring of the anthracycline by NADH dehydrogenase leads to deglycosylation is proposed. This work adds anticancer drug inactivation to the enzymatic inactivation portfolio of actinomycetes and offers possibilities for novel applications in drug detoxification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antineoplastic treatment effect on bone mineral density in Mexican breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Monroy-Cisneros, Karina; Esparza-Romero, Julián; Valencia, Mauro E; Guevara-Torres, Alfonso G; Méndez-Estrada, Rosa O; Anduro-Corona, Iván; Astiazarán-García, Humberto

    2016-11-08

    Breast cancer is the most deadly malignancy in Mexican women. Although treatment has improved, it may significantly affect bone mineral status in those who receive it. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of cancer treatment on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC), in patients with breast cancer and explore the interaction of menopausal status and clinical stage with cancer treatment on such changes. A quasi-experimental design was applied with measurements before and after a chemotherapy treatment in 40 patients with primary diagnosis of invasive breast cancer. BMD and body composition measurements were taken by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and changes in these variables due to therapy were analyzed using mixed regression for repeated measurements. Significant loss was found in femoral neck and L2-L4 BMD (p < 0.001). Patients diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis received calcium + vitamin D supplementation (600 mg/200 IU day). It showed a protective effect in the decrease of femoral neck BMD and total BMC. BMD loss in both femoral neck and L2-L4 BMD was higher in premenopausal women: 0.023 g/cm(2) in femoral neck and 0.063 g/cm(2) in L2-L4 (p < 0.001), while in postmenopausal women BMD loss was 0.015 g/cm(2) in femoral neck and 0.035 g/cm(2) in L2-L4 (p = 0.021 and p = 0.001 respectively). Change in lumbar spine BMD was prominent in premenopausal women with advanced clinical stage (IIB, IIIA, IIIB): 0.066 g/cm(2) (p = 0.003). The antineoplastic breast cancer treatment with chemotherapy had a negative impact on BMD, in premenopausal women overall, although a differential effect was found according to clinical stage and calcium supplementation status.

  7. Rapid, in vivo, evaluation of antiangiogenic and antineoplastic gene products by nonviral transfection of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jonathan M; Shivakumar, Rama; Feller, Stephanie; Li, Lin-Hong; Hanson, Art; Fogler, William E; Fratantoni, Joseph C; Liu, Linda N

    2004-05-01

    Using a nonviral, electroporation-based gene transfection approach, we demonstrate the efficient and consistent transfection of two poorly immunogenic tumor cell lines: B16F10 melanoma and renal carcinoma (RENCA). Three genes, IL-12, angiostatin (AS), and an endostatin:angiostatin fusion protein (ES:AS) were subcloned into a DNA plasmid containing EBNA1-OriP, which was then transfected into B16F10 and RENCA cells. Significant levels of protein were secreted into the culture supernatants of transfected cells in vitro. Transfected tumor cells were injected subcutaneously into mice. All the three transgenes were capable of significantly delaying and reducing the formation of primary B16F10 and RENCA tumors, as well as B16F10 lung metastases. By day 11 post-injection, all control mice that received either mock-transfected or empty vector DNA-transfected B16F10 tumor cells had developed large primary tumors. In contrast, mice that received IL-12-transfected B16F10 cells did not develop appreciable tumors until day 17, and these were significantly smaller than controls. Similar results were observed for the RENCA model, in which only one of the IL-12 mice had developed tumors out to day 31. Expression of AS or ES:AS also significantly delayed and reduced primary tumors. Overall, ES:AS was more effective than AS alone. Furthermore, 25% of the AS mice and 33% of the ES:AS mice remained tumor-free at day 17, by which point all control mice had significant tumors. Mouse survival rates also correlated with the extent of tumor burden. Importantly, no lung metastases were detected in the lungs of mice that had received either AS or ES:AS-transfected B16F10 tumor cells and significantly fewer metastases were found in the IL-12 group. The consistency of our transfection results highlight the feasibility of directly electroporating tumor cells as a means to screen, identify, and validate in vivo potentially novel antiangiogenic and/or antineoplastic genes.

  8. The antineoplastic effect of carnosine is accompanied by induction of PDK4 and can be mimicked by L-histidine.

    PubMed

    Letzien, Ulrike; Oppermann, Henry; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Gaunitz, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a naturally occurring dipeptide that shows antineoplastic effects in cell culture as well as in animal experiments. Since its mode of action and the targets at the molecular level have not yet been elucidated, we performed qRT-PCR experiments with RNA isolated from glioblastoma cell lines treated with carnosine, β-alanine, L-alanine, L-histidine and the dipeptide L-alanine-L-histidine. The experiments identified a strong induction of expression of the gene encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase 4 (PDK4) under the influence of carnosine and L-histidine, but not by the other substances employed. In addition, inhibition of cell viability was only detected in cells treated with carnosine and L-histidine, with the latter showing a significantly stronger effect than carnosine. Since the tumor cells expressed the tissue form of carnosinase (CN2) but almost no serum carnosinase (CN1), we conclude that cleavage by CN2 is a prerequisite for the antineoplastic effect of carnosine. In addition, enhanced expression of PDK4 under the influence of carnosine/L-histidine opens a new perspective for the interpretation of the ergogenic potential of dietary β-alanine supplementation and adds a new contribution to a growing body of evidence that single amino acids can regulate key metabolic pathways important in health and disease.

  9. Evaluation of Antibacterial, Antineoplastic, and Immunomodulatory Activity of Paullinia cupana Seeds Crude Extract and Ethyl-Acetate Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Lidiane Vasconcelos do Nascimento; Cordeiro, Marina Ferraz; e Lins, Thiago Ubiratan Lins; Sampaio, Maria Clara Pinheiro Duarte; de Mello, Gabriela Souto Vieira; da Costa, Valécia de Cassia Mendonça; Marques, Leila Larisa Medeiros; Klein, Traudi; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Cavalcanti, Isabella Macário Ferro; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Paullinia cupana (Guarana) is a native plant of Amazon region that has very traditional importance. Its seeds are rich in bioactive compounds, including tannins, which exhibit relevant properties. Objective. This study aimed to evaluate antibacterial, antineoplastic, and immunomodulatory activity of P. cupana seeds crude extract (CE) and ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF). Methods. Antibacterial activity was evaluated by determination of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). Antineoplastic activity was evaluated by MTT assays in hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), ductal carcinoma (T47-D), non-Hodgkin's B cell lymphoma (Toledo), T cell leukemia (Jukart), and Acute Leukemia (HL-60) cell lines. BALB/c mice splenocytes were treated to assess IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-10 levels by sandwich ELISA. Results. CE and EAF were not toxic to peripheral blood cells and splenocytes. CE and EAF fractions showed a bacteriostatic activity (MIC = 250 μg/mL) and presented IC50 values of 70.25 μg/mL and 61.18 μg/mL in HL-60 leukemia cell line. All cytokines evaluated had their levels reduced after treatment, following dose-response model. Discussion and Conclusion. Different biological activities were observed for both CE and EAF, suggesting P. cupana as a source of bioactive substances, especially tannins that may be used for several diseases treatments. PMID:28053639

  10. Evaluation of Antibacterial, Antineoplastic, and Immunomodulatory Activity of Paullinia cupana Seeds Crude Extract and Ethyl-Acetate Fraction.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Lidiane Vasconcelos do Nascimento; Cordeiro, Marina Ferraz; E Lins, Thiago Ubiratan Lins; Sampaio, Maria Clara Pinheiro Duarte; de Mello, Gabriela Souto Vieira; da Costa, Valécia de Cassia Mendonça; Marques, Leila Larisa Medeiros; Klein, Traudi; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Cavalcanti, Isabella Macário Ferro; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha; Galdino da Rocha Pitta, Maira; Rêgo, Moacyr Jesus Barreto de Melo

    2016-01-01

    Paullinia cupana (Guarana) is a native plant of Amazon region that has very traditional importance. Its seeds are rich in bioactive compounds, including tannins, which exhibit relevant properties. Objective. This study aimed to evaluate antibacterial, antineoplastic, and immunomodulatory activity of P. cupana seeds crude extract (CE) and ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF). Methods. Antibacterial activity was evaluated by determination of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). Antineoplastic activity was evaluated by MTT assays in hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), ductal carcinoma (T47-D), non-Hodgkin's B cell lymphoma (Toledo), T cell leukemia (Jukart), and Acute Leukemia (HL-60) cell lines. BALB/c mice splenocytes were treated to assess IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-10 levels by sandwich ELISA. Results. CE and EAF were not toxic to peripheral blood cells and splenocytes. CE and EAF fractions showed a bacteriostatic activity (MIC = 250 μg/mL) and presented IC50 values of 70.25 μg/mL and 61.18 μg/mL in HL-60 leukemia cell line. All cytokines evaluated had their levels reduced after treatment, following dose-response model. Discussion and Conclusion. Different biological activities were observed for both CE and EAF, suggesting P. cupana as a source of bioactive substances, especially tannins that may be used for several diseases treatments.

  11. Preliminary screening of some traditional Zulu medicinal plants for antineoplastic activities versus the HepG2 cell line.

    PubMed

    Opoku, A R; Geheeb-Keller, M; Lin, J; Terblanche, S E; Hutchings, A; Chuturgoon, A; Pillay, D

    2000-11-01

    Aqueous and methanol extracts of nine traditional Zulu medicinal plants, Cissus quandrangularis L., Cyphostemma flaviflorum (Sprague) Descoings, Cyphostemma lanigerum (Harv.) Descoings ex Wild & Drum, Cyphostemma natalitium (Szyszyl.) J. v. d. Merwe, Cyphostemma sp., Rhoicissus digitata (L. F.) Gilg & Brandt, Rhoicissus rhomboidea (E. Mey. Ex harv.) Planch, Rhoicissus tomentosa (Lam.) Wild & Drum, R. tridentata (L. F.) Wild & Drum and Rhoicissus tridentata (L. F.) Wild & Drum subsp. cuneifolia (Eckl. & Zeyh.) N. R. Urton, all belonging to the Vitaceae family, were evaluated to determine their therapeutic potentials as antineoplastic agents. The antiproliferative activity in vitro against HepG2 cells was determined. Twenty-two of the twenty-seven crude plant extracts showed activities ranging from 25% to 97% inhibition of proliferation when compared with the control which showed no inhibitory activity. Higher degrees of growth inhibition were found in aqueous root extracts in comparison with the methanol extracts of the same plant parts. The results show potential antineoplastic activity, indicating some scientific validation for traditional usage.

  12. Drug Cocktail Optimization in Chemotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Preissner, Saskia; Dunkel, Mathias; Hoffmann, Michael F.; Preissner, Sarah C.; Genov, Nikolai; Rong, Wen Wei; Preissner, Robert; Seeger, Karlheinz

    2012-01-01

    Background In general, drug metabolism has to be considered to avoid adverse effects and ineffective therapy. In particular, chemotherapeutic drug cocktails strain drug metabolizing enzymes especially the cytochrome P450 family (CYP). Furthermore, a number of important chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen or procarbazine are administered as prodrugs and have to be activated by CYP. Therefore, the genetic variability of these enzymes should be taken into account to design appropriate therapeutic regimens to avoid inadequate drug administration, toxicity and inefficiency. Objective The aim of this work was to find drug interactions and to avoid side effects or ineffective therapy in chemotherapy. Data sources and methods Information on drug administration in the therapy of leukemia and their drug metabolism was collected from scientific literature and various web resources. We carried out an automated textmining approach. Abstracts of PubMed were filtered for relevant articles using specific keywords. Abstracts were automatically screened for antineoplastic drugs and their synonyms in combination with a set of human CYPs in title or abstract. Results We present a comprehensive analysis of over 100 common cancer treatment regimens regarding drug-drug interactions and present alternatives avoiding CYP overload. Typical concomitant medication, e.g. antiemetics or antibiotics is a preferred subject to improvement. A webtool, which allows drug cocktail optimization was developed and is publicly available on http://bioinformatics.charite.de/chemotherapy. PMID:23236419

  13. Assessment of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and proliferation rate index in peripheral lymphocytes from Tunisian nurses handling cytotoxic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bouraoui, Sana; Brahem, Aicha; Tabka, Faten; Mrizek, Najib; Saad, Ali; Elghezal, Hatem

    2011-01-01

    Anti-neoplastic agents are widely used in the treatment of cancer and some non-neoplastic diseases. These drugs have been proved to be mutagens, carcinogens and teratogens. To check the eventual effects of anti-cancer drugs on occupationally exposed Tunisian nurses, we used chromosomal aberration assay and micronucleus assay. Both parameters have been used to evaluate cellular DNA damage in the biological monitoring of occupationally exposed workers and each assay has its own aim .We used the proliferation rate index to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of antineoplastic drugs in exposed nurses. The frequency of binucleated micronucleated cells was significantly higher in nurses handling cytostatic drugs than in control. We detected also a significant increase of structural chromosomal aberrations. Control subjects generally had significantly higher values of proliferation rate index compared to expose ones. Our results confirm the genotoxic and the cytotoxic effects of antineoplastic drugs in blood lymphocytes circulation. This study points to the necessity to work under more safe and controlled conditions during the preparation and the administration of anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Antineoplastic Agents 454. Synthesis of the Strong Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitors trans-Dihydronarciclasine and 7-Deoxy-trans-dihydronarciclasine1a

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, George R.; Ducki, Sylvie; Eastham, Stephen A.; Melody, Noeleen

    2009-01-01

    To further pursue the antineoplastic leads offered by our isolation of trans-dihydronarciclasine (1a) and 7-deoxy-trans-dihydronarciclasine (1c) from two medicinal plant species of the Amaryllidaceae family, a practical palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation procedure was developed for synthesis of these isocarbostyrils from narciclasine (2a) and 7-deoxynarciclasine (2c). PMID:19522518

  15. Integrative review of factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea during antineoplastic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moysés, Aline Maria Bonini; Durant, Lais Corsino; Almeida, Ana Maria de; Gozzo, Thais de Oliveira

    2016-10-10

    to identify factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. integrative review conducted in four electronic databases (PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and LILACS) using the key words: neoplasia, antineoplastic agents and nausea. only 30 out of 1,258 papers identified met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent related factors were: being younger than 50 years old, motion sickness, being a woman, emetogenic potential of the chemotherapy, anxiety, conditioned stimulus, and expecting nausea after treatment. this review's findings, coupled with the incidence of nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, reveal an important difference between evidence found and that used by NANDA International, Inc. Even though it provides an appropriate definition of related factors, it does not mention chemotherapy, despite the various studies addressing the topic using different designs and presenting various objectives and outcomes. identificar os fatores relacionados ao diagnóstico de enfermagem náusea entre pacientes oncológicos durante o tratamento quimioterápico. revisão integrativa de quatro bases eletrônicas de dados (PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL e LILACS) com as palavras-chaves neoplasia, agentes antineoplásicos e náusea. dos 1258 artigos identificados, somente 30 atenderam aos critérios de inclusão. Os fatores relacionados mais frequentes foram: idade abaixo de 50 anos, doença do movimento, sexo feminino, potencial emético do quimioterápico, ansiedade, estímulo condicionado e expectativa de náuseas depois do tratamento. diante dos resultados encontrados e da incidência de náusea entre os pacientes oncológicos em tratamento quimioterápico, observa-se diferença importante entre as evidências encontradas e as utilizadas pela NANDA International, Inc. Apesar da definição estar adequada entre os fatores relacionados, não há menção à quimioterapia mesmo com inúmeros estudos, com diferentes delineamentos

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors: role of isoform gamma in the antineoplastic effect of iodine in mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Nunez-Anita, R E; Cajero-Juarez, M; Aceves, C

    2011-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are ligand-activated transcription factors. Three subtypes--PPAR alpha, PPAR beta, and PPAR gamma--have been identified and are differentially expressed in tissues. Originally, they were described as molecular regulators of lipid metabolism; recently, it has been shown that they are also involved in regulating the cell cycle and apoptosis in both normal and tumoral cells. In fact, some synthetic PPAR ligands are used to treat dyslipidemia, metabolic diseases, and type 2 diabetes. Here, we review the role of PPAR gamma (PPARγ) in tumor initiation and progression, emphasizing the relationship between this isoform and the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the antineoplastic effect of iodine on mammary cancer.

  17. Safe handling of oral antineoplastic medications: Focus on targeted therapeutics in the home setting.

    PubMed

    Cass, Yaakov; Connor, Thomas H; Tabachnik, Alexander

    2017-07-01

    Introduction With the growing number of oral targeted therapies being approved for use in cancer therapy, the potential for long-term administration of these drugs to cancer patients is expanding. The use of these drugs in the home setting has the potential to expose family members and caregivers to them either through direct contact with the drugs or indirectly by exposure to the parent compounds and/or their active metabolites in contaminated patients' waste. Methods A systematic literature review was performed and the known adverse health effect of 32 oral targeted therapeutics is summarized. In particular, the carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, and embryo-fetal toxicity, along with the route of excretion were evaluated. Results Carcinogenicity testing has not been performed on most of the oral targeted therapeutics and the genotoxicity data are mixed. However, the majority of these drugs exhibit adverse reproductive effects, some of which are severe. Currently, available data does not permit the possibility of a health hazard from inappropriate handling of drugs and contaminated patients waste to be ignored, especially in a long-term home setting. Further research is needed to understand these issues. Conclusions With the expanding use of targeted therapies in the home setting, family members and caregivers, especially those of reproductive risk age, are, potentially at risk. Overall basic education and related precautions should be taken to protect family members and caregivers from indirect or direct exposure from these drugs. Further investigations and discussion on this subject are warranted.

  18. Grape Seed Procyanidin Extract Mediates Antineoplastic Effects against Lung Cancer via Modulations of Prostacyclin and 15-HETE Eicosanoid Pathways.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jenny T; Smoake, Jane; Park, Heesung K; Lu, Qing-Yi; Xue, Bingye

    2016-12-01

    Grape seed procyanidin extract (GSE) has been reported to exert antineoplastic properties via the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) eicosanoid pathways. In addition, ample data link carcinogenesis to inflammatory events involving other major eicosanoid metabolic pathways, including prostacyclin (PGI2) and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE). We therefore evaluated the effects of GSE on prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS)/PGI2 and 15-lipoxigenase-2 (15-LOX-2)/15-HETE productions by human lung premalignant and malignant cells and correlated the findings with antiproliferative or proapoptotic effects of GSE. The effects of GSE on PGI2 and 15-HETE productions by human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells ex vivo were also determined. We further evaluated the bioactivity of oral administration of leucoselect phytosome (a standardized GSE) in the lungs of subjects participating in a lung cancer chemoprevention trial, by comparing the antiproliferative effects of coculturing matched pre- versus posttreatment BAL fluids with lung premalignant and malignant cells. GSE significantly increased PGI2 (as measured by 6-keto PGF1α) and 15-HETE productions by these cells. Transfections of PTGIS or 15-LOX-2-specific siRNA partially abrogated the antiproliferative or proapoptotic effects of GSE in lung premalignant and malignant cells, respectively. GSE also increased PTGIS and inhibition of caspase-3, and transfection of 15-LOX-2 siRNA abrogated the GSE-induced apoptosis in A549 cells. In addition, culture supernatants from ex vivo GSE-treated baseline BAL cells, as well as BAL fluids from subjects treated with leucoselect phytosome, significantly decreased proliferations of lung premalignant and malignant cells. Our findings support the continued investigation of GSE as an anti-neoplastic and chemopreventive agent against lung cancer. Cancer Prev Res; 9(12); 925-32. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. The antineoplastic properties of FTY720: evidence for the repurposing of fingolimod

    PubMed Central

    Patmanathan, Sathya Narayanan; Yap, Lee Fah; Murray, Paul G; Paterson, Ian C

    2015-01-01

    Almost all drugs approved for use in humans possess potentially beneficial ‘off-target’ effects in addition to their principal activity. In some cases this has allowed for the relatively rapid repurposing of drugs for other indications. In this review we focus on the potential for re-purposing FTY720 (also known as fingolimod, Gilenya™), an immunomodulatory drug recently approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). The therapeutic benefit of FTY720 in MS is largely attributed to the immunosuppressive effects that result from its modulation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor signalling. However, this drug has also been shown to inhibit other cancer-associated signal transduction pathways in part because of its structural similarity to sphingosine, and consequently shows efficacy as an anti-cancer agent both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we review the effects of FTY720 on signal transduction pathways and cancer-related cellular processes, and discuss its potential use as an anti-cancer drug. PMID:26171944

  20. Somatostatin receptor expression in vivo and response to somatostatin analog therapy with or without other antineoplastic treatments in advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vainas, I; Koussis, Ch; Pazaitou-Panayiotou, K; Drimonitis, A; Chrisoulidou, A; Iakovou, I; Boudina, M; Kaprara, A; Maladaki, A

    2004-12-01

    The long-term treatment of metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with somatostatin (SST) analogs was evaluated in 22 patients with persistant or relapsed disease and with in vivo positive SST receptor (SSTR) tumors. After surgical intervention all patients but one, initially or at a later time, had persistenly (15) or after relapse (7) elevated serum calcitonin (CT, 252-69482 pg/ml) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, 8-1130 ng/ml) concentrations; also, all of them showed positive uptake in 111In-pentetreotide scanning. Daily doses of 0.4-1.0 mg octreotide subcutaneously, or monthly doses of 20-30 mg long-acting octreotide (LAR) intramuscularly for 3-21 months were administered. Systemic chemotherapy (Ch) with or without external radiotherapy (eRT) was given to 13 patients simultaneously. A beneficial effect on pre-existing diarrhea was observed in 8 patients (subjective partial remmission, sPR 36.4%); 10 other patients showed stable disease, while in 4 a worsening of pre-existing diarrhea was observed. CT and CEA concentrations decreased more than 25% in 4 out of 22 patients (18%) and 11 patients showed a decrease of less than 25% (biological SD). No objective response in tumour growth was demonstrated. Patients (10 survivors in group B) treated with Ch+eRT plus Octerotide showed higher sR (92.5%), lower mortality (23.1%), longer mean time to death (130 months) and longer mean total survival (mts) time (145 months) in comparison to group A patients who had 66.7% sR, 33.3% mortality, only 88.5 months mean time to death and 101 months mts-time. Long-term octreotide and octreotide-LAR treatment offers a subjective and biological partial remission in one third and in one fourth of the MTC patients respectively, but it does not improve the natural course of the tumor. It remains to be answered if these drugs, combined with other antineoplastic therapies, have a synergistic effect relating to treatment response and to patient survival and mortality.

  1. Biocompatible APTES-PEG modified magnetite nanoparticles: effective carriers of antineoplastic agents to ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Javid, Amaneh; Ahmadian, Shahin; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Kalantar, Seyed Mehdi; Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed; Shahzad, Sughra

    2014-05-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles are particularly attractive for drug delivery applications because of their size-dependent superparamagnetism, low toxicity, and biocompatibility with cells and tissues. Surface modification of iron oxide nanoparticles with biocompatible polymers is potentially beneficial to prepare biodegradable nanocomposite-based drug delivery agents for in vivo and in vitro applications. In the present study, the bare (10 nm) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-(3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) (PA) modified (17 nm) superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were synthesized by coprecipitation method. The anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX), were separately encapsulated into the synthesized polymeric nanocomposites for localized targeting of human ovarian cancer in vitro. Surface morphology analysis by scanning electron microscopy showed a slight increase in particle size (27 ± 0.7 and 30 ± 0.45 nm) with drug loading capacities of 70 and 61.5 % and release capabilities of 90 and 93 % for the DOX- and PTX-AP-SPIO NPs, respectively (p < 0.001). Ten milligrams/milliliter DOX- and PTX-loaded AP-SPIO NPs caused a significant amount of cytotoxicity and downregulation of antiapoptotic proteins, as compared with same amounts of free drugs (p < 0.001). In vivo antiproliferative effect of present formulation on immunodeficient female Balb/c mice showed ovarian tumor shrinkage from 2,920 to 143 mm(3) after 40 days. The present formulation of APTES-PEG-SPIO-based nanocomposite system of targeted drug delivery proved to be effective enough in order to treat deadly solid tumor of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Plasma protein binding of phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate, two novel antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, S; Lush, R M; McCall, N A; Samid, D; Reed, E; Figg, W D

    1996-12-01

    Phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate, two novel inducers of tumor cytostasis and differentiation, are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer in adults. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the plasma protein-binding characteristics of phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate in the plasma of normal volunteers and that of patients with cancer. Drug plasma protein-binding analysis was examined using three separate devices: a micropartition system and two equilibrium dialysis systems, all of which exhibited similar results. Phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Both drugs exhibited concentration-dependent binding. Our results showed sodium phenylacetate to have a higher free fraction than sodium phenylbutyrate at corresponding concentrations (> 0.442 +/- 0.008 and > 0.188 +/- 0.001, respectively). Plasma pH did not greatly affect protein binding of either drug. As albumin concentration decreased, an increase in free fraction of both drugs was observed, however alpha 1-acid glyco-protein showed no change in free fraction as its concentration increased. Patients with cancer with lower levels of albumin showed an increase in free fraction with both phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate. When phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate were added together in plasma, the free fraction of phenylacetate increased, whereas the phenylbutyrate free fraction slightly decreased. We conclude that phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate have high free fractions that change with varying albumin levels and when both phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate are present together in plasma.

  3. The Application of Pattern Recognition to Screening Prospective Anti-Cancer Drugs: Adenocarcinoma 775 Biological Activity Test.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A novel application of pattern recognition to the screening of potential anti-cancer drugs is presented. Structural features of 200 drugs previously tested by the National Cancer Institute for activity in the solid tumor adenocarcinoma 755 screening test are input to a master program of pattern recognition methods. The programs were 93.5% accurate in discriminating drugs with positive anti-neoplastic activity versus those with no anti-cancer activity. Extensions to a more rational approach to ’ drug design ’ are also discussed. (Author)

  4. Soil DNA libraries for anticancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Robin K

    2004-07-01

    Soil has the largest population of microbes of any habitat, but only about 0.3% of soil microbes are cultivable with current techniques. Cultured soil microbes have been an incredibly productive source of drugs, for example the cancer chemotherapeutics doxorubicin hydrochloride, bleomycin, daunorubicin and mitomycin. Unfortunately, the current yield of new drugs from soil microbes is low due to repeated cultivation of the same small fraction of cultivable microbes. Uncultured soil species represent a tremendous untapped resource of new antineoplastic agents. Methods have recently been developed to access the diversity of secondary metabolites from uncultured soil microbes. Briefly, total DNA is extracted from soil samples, purified, partially digested, and fragments inserted into vectors for expression in readily fermented microbes such as Escherichia coli. Clones expressing enzymatic and antibiotic activities that are encoded by novel sequences have been reported.

  5. In vitro effect of amifostine on haematopoietic progenitors exposed to carboplatin and non-alkylating antineoplastic drugs: haematoprotection acts as a drug-specific progenitor rescue.

    PubMed Central

    Pierelli, L.; Scambia, G.; Fattorossi, A.; Bonanno, G.; Battaglia, A.; Perillo, A.; Menichella, G.; Panici, P. B.; Leone, G.; Mancuso, S.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the protective ability of amifostine on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived colony-forming unit (CFU) and PB CD34+ cells which were previously exposed in vitro to etoposide, carboplatin, doxorubicin and taxotere. Amifostine pretreatment protected PBMC-derived CFU from the toxic effect of etoposide, carboplatin and taxotere. A significant detrimental effect was exerted by amifostine on the growth of doxorubicin-treated PBMC-derived CFU. Liquid cultures of PB CD34+ cells reproduced faithfully the effects observed on growth of PBMC-derived CFU and confirmed amifostine chemoprotection against etoposide and carboplatin with its detrimental effect on doxorubicin-treated progenitors. Combining the data of viable cell count, cytometric estimation of apoptosis, cell cycle and viable cell replication rate, we found that amifostine protects from etoposide and carboplatin toxicity mainly through a mechanism of cell rescue. Conversely, the detrimental effect of amifostine on the growth of doxorubicin-treated PB CD34+ cells is apparently due to an increased G2/M arrest. In conclusion, amifostine protects haematopoietic progenitors from etoposide, carboplatin and taxotere. Progenitor rescue is the mechanism through which amifostine reduced etoposide and carboplatin toxicity. PMID:9792145

  6. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  7. Targeted sustained delivery of antineoplastic agent with multicomponent polylactide stereocomplex micelle.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kexin; Li, Di; Guan, Jingjing; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Zhongtang; Gu, Jingkai; Liu, Tongjun; Chen, Xuesi

    2017-04-01

    A c(RGDfC)-decorated polylactide stereocomplex micelle (cRGD-SCM) was prepared through the stereocomplex and hydrophobic interactions among 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(D-lactide) (4-arm PEG-b-PDLA), methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lactide) (mPEG-b-PLLA), and c(RGDfC)-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lactide) (cRGD-PEG-b-PLLA) for targeted treatment of αvβ3 integrin-positive C26 colon cancer. Doxorubicin (DOX), a model antitumor drug, was loaded into cRGD-SCM with a diameter of approximately 100nm, and the drug loading efficiency was 45.9wt.%. cRGD-SCM/DOX with a sustained release pattern exhibited prolonged circulation time, upregulated accumulation in tumor, enhanced tumor inhibition, and decreased side effects compared with free DOX and non-targeting SCM/DOX in vivo. More interestingly, the targeting ligand in the terminal of PEG can be easily replaced with other targeting groups according to the different types of malignancies. Therefore, the cRGD-decorated platform might be a promising targeted drug delivery system for personal chemotherapy clinically. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Early Diagnosis and Prediction of Anticancer Drug-induced Cardiotoxicity: From Cardiac Imaging to "Omics" Technologies.

    PubMed

    Madonna, Rosalinda

    2017-07-01

    Heart failure due to antineoplastic therapy remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in oncological patients. These patients often have no prior manifestation of disease. There is therefore a need for accurate identification of individuals at risk of such events before the appearance of clinical manifestations. The present article aims to provide an overview of cardiac imaging as well as new "-omics" technologies, especially with regard to genomics and proteomics as promising tools for the early detection and prediction of cardiotoxicity and individual responses to antineoplastic drugs. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-wen; Yu, Jia-ying; Xu, Huai-long; Bao, Jin-ku

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. {yields} ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. {yields} ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+}-dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-{kappa}B-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  10. Organotypic Culture of Breast Tumor Explants as a Multicellular System for the Screening of Natural Compounds with Antineoplastic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Carranza-Torres, Irma Edith; Guzmán-Delgado, Nancy Elena; Coronado-Martínez, Consuelo; Bañuelos-García, José Inocente; Viveros-Valdez, Ezequiel; Morán-Martínez, Javier; Carranza-Rosales, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women worldwide. The search for novel compounds with antitumor activity, with less adverse effects and higher efficacy, and the development of methods to evaluate their toxicity is an area of intense research. In this study we implemented the preparation and culture of breast tumor explants, which were obtained from precision-cut breast tumor slices. In order to validate the model we are proposing to screen antineoplastic effect of natural compounds, we selected caffeic acid, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid. Using the Krumdieck tissue slicer, precision-cut tissue slices were prepared from breast cancer samples; from these slices, 4 mm explants were obtained and incubated with the selected compounds. Viability was assessed by Alamar Blue assay, LDH release, and histopathological criteria. Results showed that the viability of the explants cultured in the presence of paclitaxel (positive control) decreased significantly (P < 0.05); however, tumor samples responded differently to each compound. When the explants were coincubated with paclitaxel and compounds, a synergic effect was observed. This study shows that ex vivo culture of breast cancer explants offers a suitable alternative model for evaluating natural or synthetic compounds with antitumor properties within the complex microenvironment of the tumor. PMID:26075250

  11. Antineoplastic and cytogenetic effects of chlorpromazine on human lymphocytes in vitro and on Ehrlich ascites tumor cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lialiaris, Theodore S; Papachristou, Fotini; Mourelatos, Constantine; Simopoulou, Maria

    2009-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of phenothiazines in tumor growth and cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo has been established. These reports motivated us to investigate the genotoxic, cytotoxic, and cytostatic potential of chlorpromazine, alone or in combination with mitomycin C, in vitro and in vivo. Sister chromatid exchange levels were assessed providing a quantitative index of genotoxicity. In-vitro studies were performed on human lymphocyte cultures and in-vivo studies involved Ehrilch ascites tumor (EAT) cells. An antitumour study was also conducted on the survival time and the ascitic volume in EAT-bearing Balb/C mice. The combination of chlorpromazine plus caffeine and mitomycin C exerted cytostatic and cytotoxic actions in human lymphocytes. The combination of chlorpromazine plus mitomycin C exerted cytostatic and cytotoxic actions in EAT cells, significantly increased the survival span of the mice inoculated with EAT cells, and suppressed the expected tumor growth increase. The findings of this basic study illustrate that high chlorpromazine concentrations increase chemotherapeutic effectiveness of mitomycin C. Chlorpromazine concentrations within the observed human plasma concentration range need to be tested along with antineoplastic agents in vitro for its synergistic action so as to evaluate a potential clinical application. Further investigation including other phenothiazines, biological systems, and cancer models is required.

  12. Antioxidants Impair Anti-Tumoral Effects of Vorinostat, but Not Anti-Neoplastic Effects of Vorinostat and Caspase-8 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Bergadà, Laura; Yeramian, Andree; Sorolla, Annabel

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat, applied as a single therapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation exhibits high anti-tumoral activity on endometrial carcinoma cell lines. In the present study, we have assessed the signalling processes underlying anti-tumoral effects of Vorinostat. Increasing evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are responsible for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell killing. We have found that Vorinostat induces formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. To investigate the role of oxidative stress as anti-neoplastic mechanism, we have evaluated the effects of different antioxidants (Bha, Nac and Tiron) on endometrial carcinoma cell line Ishikawa treated with Vorinostat. We show that Bha, Nac and Tiron markedly inhibited the cytotoxic effects of Vorinostat, increasing cell viability in vitro. We found that all three antioxidants did not inhibited accumulation of acetyl Histone H4, so that antioxidants did not inhibit Vorinostat activity. Finally, we have evaluated the effects of antioxidants on anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat as monotherapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation in vivo. Interestingly, antioxidants blocked the reduction of tumour growth caused by Vorinostat, but they were unable to inhibit anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat plus caspase-8 inhibition. PMID:24651472

  13. Antioxidants impair anti-tumoral effects of Vorinostat, but not anti-neoplastic effects of Vorinostat and caspase-8 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Bergadà, Laura; Yeramian, Andree; Sorolla, Annabel; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat, applied as a single therapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation exhibits high anti-tumoral activity on endometrial carcinoma cell lines. In the present study, we have assessed the signalling processes underlying anti-tumoral effects of Vorinostat. Increasing evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are responsible for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell killing. We have found that Vorinostat induces formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. To investigate the role of oxidative stress as anti-neoplastic mechanism, we have evaluated the effects of different antioxidants (Bha, Nac and Tiron) on endometrial carcinoma cell line Ishikawa treated with Vorinostat. We show that Bha, Nac and Tiron markedly inhibited the cytotoxic effects of Vorinostat, increasing cell viability in vitro. We found that all three antioxidants did not inhibited accumulation of acetyl Histone H4, so that antioxidants did not inhibit Vorinostat activity. Finally, we have evaluated the effects of antioxidants on anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat as monotherapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation in vivo. Interestingly, antioxidants blocked the reduction of tumour growth caused by Vorinostat, but they were unable to inhibit anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat plus caspase-8 inhibition.

  14. Organotypic culture of breast tumor explants as a multicellular system for the screening of natural compounds with antineoplastic potential.

    PubMed

    Carranza-Torres, Irma Edith; Guzmán-Delgado, Nancy Elena; Coronado-Martínez, Consuelo; Bañuelos-García, José Inocente; Viveros-Valdez, Ezequiel; Morán-Martínez, Javier; Carranza-Rosales, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women worldwide. The search for novel compounds with antitumor activity, with less adverse effects and higher efficacy, and the development of methods to evaluate their toxicity is an area of intense research. In this study we implemented the preparation and culture of breast tumor explants, which were obtained from precision-cut breast tumor slices. In order to validate the model we are proposing to screen antineoplastic effect of natural compounds, we selected caffeic acid, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid. Using the Krumdieck tissue slicer, precision-cut tissue slices were prepared from breast cancer samples; from these slices, 4 mm explants were obtained and incubated with the selected compounds. Viability was assessed by Alamar Blue assay, LDH release, and histopathological criteria. Results showed that the viability of the explants cultured in the presence of paclitaxel (positive control) decreased significantly (P < 0.05); however, tumor samples responded differently to each compound. When the explants were coincubated with paclitaxel and compounds, a synergic effect was observed. This study shows that ex vivo culture of breast cancer explants offers a suitable alternative model for evaluating natural or synthetic compounds with antitumor properties within the complex microenvironment of the tumor.

  15. Investigational inhibitors of PTP4A3 phosphatase as antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R; Wipf, Peter; McQueeney, Kelley E; Bakan, Ahmet; Lazo, John S

    2014-05-01

    Protein tyrosine (Tyr) phosphatases have been implicated in many diseases, most notably in cancer. While there are a significant number of clinically approved inhibitors of protein Tyr kinases, there are no drugs specifically targeting protein Tyr phosphatases in clinical use despite the attractiveness of the molecular target. This review examines the investigational challenges in identifying Tyr phosphatase inhibitors using the oncogenic phosphatase PTP4A3 as a prototype. The article includes a review of the structure, functionality and validation of PTP4A3 as a cancer target. It also provides an evaluation of existing small molecule and antibody inhibitors and provides new computational guidance for potentially more potent small molecule inhibitors. Tyr phosphatases, like PTP4A3, represent high value but ignored molecular targets for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Although phosphatases are challenging targets, it seems likely that drug-like inhibitors of this important enzyme family would complement the growing number of protein Tyr kinase inhibitors. Animal models are beginning to provide validation for PTP4A3 as a molecular target for cancer progression and metastasis. The authors posit that greater efforts should be directed towards identifying Tyr phosphatase inhibitors for lead optimization and tool compounds to assist in interrogating and validating phosphatase involvement in physiological and pathological processes.

  16. Use of liposomes as injectable-drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ostro, M J; Cullis, P R

    1989-08-01

    The formation of liposomes and their application as delivery systems for injectable drugs are described. Liposomes are microscopic vesicles composed of one or more lipid membranes surrounding discrete aqueous compartments. These vesicles can encapsulate water-soluble drugs in their aqueous spaces and lipid-soluble drugs within the membrane itself. Liposomes release their contents by interacting with cells in one of four ways: adsorption, endocytosis, lipid exchange, or fusion. Liposome-entrapped drugs are distributed within the body much differently than free drugs; when administered intravenously to healthy animals and humans, most of the injected vesicles accumulate in the liver, spleen, lungs, bone marrow, and lymph nodes. Liposomes also accumulate preferentially at the sites of inflammation and infection and in some solid tumors; however, the reason for this accumulation is not clear. Four major factors influence liposomes' in vivo behavior and biodistribution: (1) liposomes tend to leak if cholesterol is not included in the vesicle membrane, (2) small liposomes are cleared more slowly than large liposomes, (3) the half-life of a liposome increases as the lipid dose increases, and (4) charged liposomal systems are cleared more rapidly than uncharged systems. The most advanced application of liposome-based therapy is in the treatment of systemic fungal infections, especially with amphotericin B. Liposomes are also under investigation for treatment of neoplastic disorders. Liposomes' uses in cancer therapy include encapsulation of known antineoplastic agents such as doxorubicin and methotrexate, delivery of immune modulators such as N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine-D-isoglutamine, and encapsulation of new chemical entities that are synthesized with lipophilic segments tailored for insertion into lipid bilayers. Liposomal formulations of injectable antimicrobial agents and antineoplastic agents already are undergoing clinical testing, and most probably will receive

  17. [Activity of nonspecific hepatic oxidases and the biological effects of the antineoplastic antibiotic adriamycin].

    PubMed

    Bogush, T A; Syrkin, A B; Donenko, F V

    1981-10-01

    It was shown in male CBA mice that toxic doses (15 and 20 mg/kg) of adriamycin (AD) inhibited the activity of nonspecific liver oxidases and noticeably increased the duration of the animals' sleep after injection of hexenal which is a substrate of this enzymatic system. The inhibitory effect of AD remained unchanged in the course of 9 days of the experiment. The nontoxic dose of AD (5 mg/kg) inhibited the activity of the enzymatic system on the 2nd--3rd days after the injection of the drug. Meanwhile the activity of the enzymatic system returned to the level seen in intact animals by days 5--6. The toxic action of AD declined on activation of nonspecific liver oxidases with phenobarbital and rose as a result of administering the inhibitor SKF 525-A. The authors discuss whether it is possible to use the data obtained for clinical application of AD.

  18. [Nephrotoxicity and myelotoxicity of antineoplastic Pt(II) and Pt(IV) coordination compounds in rats].

    PubMed

    Horn, U; Härtl, A; Neuhaus, G; Stöckel, U; Schröer, H P; Hoffmann, H

    1989-01-01

    In comparison with cis-DDP four new platinum (II) and platinum (IV) complexes were evaluated for their acute nephrotoxic and myelotoxic potency in male rats following i.v. administration of maximum tolerated doses on 5 consecutive days. Parameters for nephrotoxicity determined on day 6, 13 and 22 after the first administration of the drugs included blood, urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, urine volume, urinary glucose and tubule cell excretion. Parameters for myelotoxicity determined on the same days included leucocytes, platelets, hemoglobin and hematocrit. Cis-DDP was found to be the most nephrotoxic compound. The myelotoxicity of the new platinum complexes appeared to be similar to that of cis-DDP with exception of trans-ODDP.

  19. pH-Responsive Reversible PEGylation Improves Performance of Antineoplastic Agent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Diankui; Ding, Jianxun; Xiao, Chunsheng; Chen, Jinjin; Zhuang, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-04-22

    The reversible PEGylation endows antitumor drugs with various fascinating advantages, including prolonged circulation time in blood, enhanced accumulation in tumor tissue, increased cellular uptake, and promoted intracellular drug release, to improve the therapeutic efficacy and security. Here, the obtained succinic anhydride (SA)-functionalized DOX (SAD) (i.e., insensitive succinic anhydride-functionalized doxorubicin (DOX)) and aconitic anhydride (CA)-modified DOX (CAD) (i.e., acid-sensitive cis-aconitic anhydride-modified DOX) are conjugated to the terminal of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) yielding the unresponsive SAD-PEG-SAD and pH-responsive CAD-PEG-CAD prodrugs, respectively. The prepared prodrugs can self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution. Both micelles are sufficiently stable at normal physiological pH (i.e., 7.4), while CAD-PEG-CAD micelle gradually swells and finally disassembles at intratumoral (i.e., 6.8) and especially endosomal pHs (i.e., 5.5). DOX release from CAD-PEG-CAD at pH 7.4 is efficiently inhibited, whereas it is significantly accelerated by the rapid cleavage of amide bond at pH 5.5. In addition, CAD-PEG-CAD exhibits more efficient cellular uptake and potent cytotoxicity in vitro, as well as improved tissue distribution and superior tumor suppression in vivo than free DOX and SAD-PEG-SAD. More importantly, the PEGylated DOX exhibits favorable security in vivo. In brief, the smart CAD-PEG-CAD with enhanced antitumor efficacy and decreased side effects shows as a promising powerful platform for the clinical chemotherapy of malignancy.

  20. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Antineoplastic Activity of Novel Carbocyclic Nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Helguera, Aliuska M; Rodríguez-Borges, J E; Caamaño, Olga; García-Mera, Xerardo; González, Maykel Pérez; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2010-03-15

    Cancer is the leading cause of death among men and women under age 85. Every year, millions of individuals are diagnosed with cancer. But finding new drugs is a complex, expensive, and very time-consuming task. Over the past decade, the cancer research community has begun to address the in silico modeling approaches, such as Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR), as an important alternative tool for targeting potential anticancer drugs. With the compilation of a large dataset of nucleosides synthesized in our laboratories, or elsewhere, and tested in a single cytotoxic assay under the same experimental conditions, we recognized a unique opportunity to attempt to build predictive QSAR models. Early efforts with 2D classification models built from part of this dataset were very encouraging. Here we report a further detailed evaluation of classification models to flag potential anticancer activities derived from a variety of 3D molecular representations. A quantitative 3D-model model that discriminates anticancer compounds from the inactive ones was attained, which allowed the correct classification of 82 % of compounds in such a large and diverse dataset, with only 5 % of false inactives and 11 % of false actives. The model developed here was then used to select and design a new series of nucleosides, by classifying beforehand them as active/inactive anticancer compounds. From the compounds so designed, 22 were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory effects on the proliferation of murine leukemia cells (L1210/0), of which 86 % were well-classified as active or inactive, and only two were false actives, corroborating the good predictive ability of the present discriminant model. The results of this study thus provide a valuable tool for the design of novel potent anticancer nucleoside analogues. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Drug interactions with phytotherapeutics in oncology.

    PubMed

    Haefeli, Walter Emil; Carls, Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Because 30 to 70% of tumour patients use complementary and alternative medicines; herb-drug combinations are particularly frequent in this population. Some of these combinations can critically alter exposure of anti-neoplastic and palliative treatment. This review summarises pharmacokinetic drug interactions caused by the herbal products most frequently used by tumour patients (garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, echinacea and St John's wort [SJW]). Herb-drug interactions, in general, and some interactions in particular (e.g., transporters, Phase II metabolism enzymes) are still poorly investigated and are difficult to evaluate because mixtures are administered with variable and often unspecified amounts of ingredients. Current evidence suggests that garlic and ginkgo can be safely co-administered, whereas CYP2C9 substrates (e.g., warfarin) should be monitored closely when ginseng therapy is started. Echinacea can induce drug metabolism mediated by CYP3A, but most likely relevant when administered with substances with a narrow therapeutic index or low oral bioavailability. The most relevant herbal perpetrator drug is SJW, which has substantial impact on CYP3A4- and CYP2C9-mediated metabolism and P-glycoprotein-mediated transport. This may lower exposure of co-administered drugs by up to 70%. Such an interaction is expected to occur with most of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but current evidence is limited.

  2. Paradoxical and bidirectional drug effects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Silas W; Hauben, Manfred; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2012-03-01

    -dimensional architectural constraints; pharmacokinetic competing compartment effects; disruption and non-linear effects in oscillating systems, systemic overcompensation, and other higher-level feedback mechanisms and feedback response loops at multiple levels. Here we review and provide a compendium of multiple class effects and individual reactions, relevant mechanisms, and specific clinical toxicological considerations of antibiotics, immune modulators, antineoplastic drugs, and cardiovascular, CNS, dermal, endocrine, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, haematological, respiratory, and psychotropic agents.

  3. Antineoplastic activity of ouabain and pyrithione zinc in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tailler, M; Senovilla, L; Lainey, E; Thépot, S; Métivier, D; Sébert, M; Baud, V; Billot, K; Fenaux, P; Galluzzi, L; Boehrer, S; Kroemer, G; Kepp, O

    2012-07-26

    Despite recent progress in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the prognosis of this rather heterogeneous disease remains poor and novel chemotherapeutics that specifically target leukemic cells must be developed. To address this need at the preclinical level, we implemented a high content imaging-based screen for the identification of small agents that induce AML cell death in vitro. Among a panel of 1040 Food and Drug Administration-approved agents, we identified pyrithione zinc (PZ) and ouabain (OUA) as potential antileukemic compounds. Both PZ and OUA efficiently induced cell death associated with apoptotic chromatin condensation and inhibition of nuclear factor-κB survival signaling, leading to reduced expression of antiapoptotic proteins, in several AML cell lines. PZ- and OUA-induced cell death was associated with the permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane and led to the release of cytochrome c followed by caspase activation. Both PZ and OUA exerted significant anticancer effects in vivo, on human AML cells xenografts as well as ex vivo, on CD34(+) (but not CD34(-)) malignant myeloblasts from AML patients. Altogether, our results suggest that PZ and OUA may exhibit antileukemic effects by inducing the apoptotic demise of AML cells.

  4. [Safety notice for the use of drugs for intravesical instillations and cost analysis].

    PubMed

    Zanni, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Among the objectives outlined in the National Health Plan 1998-2000 are some interventions to improve the safety of public and private health-care facilities. One of the significant risks in the health sector is the one resulting from exposure to chemotherapy drugs. The Health Surveillance must take into account that anticancer drugs are cytotoxic compounds, which can cause cancer. It is necessary that occupational exposure to antineoplastic agents be kept within the lowest possible level. The potential absorption due to exposure to chemotherapy may be significantly reduced by adopting preventive measures specific to particular concern in a centralization of structures and activities. To ensure an adequate system of protection for people who use these substances in professional health-care settings, there should be the establishment of a specific "Anticancer Drugs Unit" to entrust the working cycle. The places reserved for the preparation of cytotoxic chemotherapy must be equipped with floor and walls up to heights of appropriate plastic material easily washable. Inside the room there must be a "point of decontamination" for washing hands and eyes. The preparation of antineoplastic agents should be performed under hoods positioned away from heat sources and any air currents. It is advisable to use disposable surgical gowns with long sleeves with elastic cuffs or knitted sleeve to allow the gloves sticking above the gown itself. In the preparation of drugs the vial opening procedure must be implemented after verifying that no liquid is left at the top, and by wrapping the neck of the vial with a sterile gauze. Any accidental contamination must be reported to the Physician. All waste materials produced from the handling of cytotoxic chemotherapy should be considered as special hospital waste. To achieve high standards of safety and prevention for the personnel exposed to antineoplastic agents, it is necessary that workers are adequately informed about the risks and

  5. Physiological characterization of human ovarian cancer cells in a rat model of intraperitoneal antineoplastic therapy.

    PubMed

    Flessner, Michael F; Choi, Jaehwa; He, Zhi; Credit, Kimberly

    2004-10-01

    Destruction of cancer cells by therapies directed against new molecular targets requires their effective delivery to the tumor. To study diffusion and convection of intraperitoneal (ip) therapy to ip tumors, we established a new athymic rat (RNU) model with ovarian tumor cells (SKOV3 and OVCAR3) implanted in the abdominal wall. The model simulates metastatic tumor and facilitates the measurement of physiological parameters that govern transport forces. CD31 immunohistochemistry revealed unique patterns of angiogenesis, with a tissue-averaged vascular volume of approximately 0.01 ml/g for each tumor. The extracellular volume (SKOV3: 0.54 +/- 0.11 ml/g, n=5; OVCAR3: 0.61 +/- 0.03, n=5) was over twice that of the adjacent normal muscle (0.22 +/- 0.06 ml/g, n=5). Intravenous-injected antibody tumor clearance was two to three times that of muscle. Interstitial pressures were higher than normal tissue with a median of 10-15 mmHg. Quantitative autoradiography of frozen tissue slices from rats exposed to ip solutions containing [14C]mannitol or 125I-immunoglobulin G (trastuzumab) was performed to determine transport of small and large molecules. With ip pressure of 0-6 mmHg, both mannitol and immunoglobulin G displayed steep concentration profiles close to the tumor surface with limited penetration deeper within the tumor tissue; antibody penetration was significantly affected by ip pressure. These results demonstrated effects of molecular size, ip pressure, the limited but highly permeable tumor vasculature, and the expanded interstitium on drug penetration from the peritoneal cavity. In conclusion, we have characterized physical and chemical parameters that determine transport of therapeutic agents in our unique tumor-bearing rat model.

  6. Antineoplastic-related cardiotoxicity, morphofunctional aspects in a murine model: contribution of the new tool 2D-speckle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Carmela; Riccio, Gennaro; Barbieri, Antonio; Monti, Maria Gaia; Piscopo, Giovanna; Rea, Domenica; Arra, Claudio; Maurea, Carlo; De Lorenzo, Claudia; Maurea, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Objective Considering that global left ventricular systolic radial strain is a sensitive technique for the early detection of left ventricular dysfunction due to antineoplastics and the analysis of segmental myocardial contractility, we evaluated this technique for early detection of trastuzumab-related cardiotoxicity by comparing it with cardiac structural damage. Methods Groups of six mice were injected with trastuzumab or doxorubicin, used either as single agents or in combination. Cardiac function was evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography measurements before and after treatment for 2 or 7 days, by using a Vevo 2100 high-resolution imaging system. After echocardiography, mice were euthanized, and hearts were processed for histological evaluations, such as cardiac fibrosis, apoptosis, capillary density, and inflammatory response. Results Trastuzumab-related cardiotoxicity was detected early by 2D strain imaging. Radial strain was reduced after 2 days in mice treated with trastuzumab alone (21.2%±8.0% vs 40.5%±4.8% sham; P<0.01). Similarly, trastuzumab was found to induce apoptosis, capillary density reduction, and inflammatory response in cardiac tissue after 2 days of treatment, in a fashion similar to doxorubicin. On the contrary, fractional shortening reduction and cardiac fibrosis were observed only after 7 days of trastuzumab treatment, in contrast to doxorubicin treatment which induced early fibrosis and fractional shortening reduction. Conclusion The reduction of left ventricular systolic strain after 2 days of trastuzumab treatment may indicate early myocardial functional damage before the reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction and this early dysfunction is well correlated with structural myocardial damage, such as apoptosis and inflammatory response. Fractional shortening reduction after 7 days of trastuzumab treatment is related to fibrosis in cardiac tissue. PMID:27843329

  7. In vitro anti-neoplastic activity of the ethno-pharmaceutical plant Hypericum adenotrichum Spach endemic to Western Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Ali; Bauer, Sabine; Gridling, Manuela; Singhuber, Judith; Krasteva, Stanimira; Madlener, Sibylle; Vo, Than Phuong Nha; Stark, Nicole; Saiko, Philipp; Fritzer-Szekeres, Monika; Szekeres, Thomas; Askin-Celik, Tülay; Krenn, Liselotte; Krupitza, Georg

    2009-10-01

    Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort) is well-established for its antidepressant activity throughout the world and also various other species within this genus are used in different folk medicines. Hyperforin of St. John's wort inhibited growth of cancer cell lines and the use of hypericin (another compound of H. perforatum) in cancer photodynamic therapy is proposed. Therefore, we investigated the anti-cancer properties of H. adenotrichum Spach (Guttiferae), an endemic species in Turkey called 'kantaron', which is used for wound healing and antiseptic effects. Freeze-dried plant was extracted with petroleum ether, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and methanol and the bioactivity of these extracts was analysed by proliferation assay, cell death determination, by investigating protein expression profiles specific for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as composition by HPLC. The strongest anti-proliferative activity was determined for the petroleum ether extract with an IpC50 of approximately 5.8 microg/ml medium (referring to 1 mg dried plant) which correlated with cyclin D1 suppression and p21 induction. This extract also induced phosphorylation of H2AX, and activated caspase-3 followed by signature-type cleavage of PARP resulting in approximately 50% apoptosis at 23.2 microg/ml after 24 h of treatment. Neither hyperforin, hypericin, or amentoflavone contributed to these properties. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that the endemic plant H. adenotrichum Spach exhibits potent p53-independent anti-neoplastic properties due to yet unexplored Hypericum constituents.

  8. Influence of pain severity on the quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer before antineoplastic therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the severity of pain and its impact on the quality of life (QoL) in untreated patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods A study group of 127 patients with HNSCC were interviewed before antineoplastic treatment. The severity of pain was measured using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaire, and the QoL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the head and neck module (QLQ-H&N35). Results The mean age of the patients was 57.9 years, and there was a predominance of men (87.4%). The most frequent site of the primary tumor was the oral cavity (70.6%), and the majority of the patients had advanced cancers (stages III and IV). QoL in early stage of cancer obtained better scores. Conversely, the patients with advanced stage cancer scored significantly higher on the symptom scales regarding fatigue, pain, appetite loss and financial difficulties, indicating greater difficulties. Regard to the severity of pain, patients with moderate-severe pain revealed a significantly worse score than patients without pain. Conclusions The severity of pain is statistically related to the advanced stages of cancer and directly affects the QoL. An assessment of the quality of life and symptoms before therapy can direct attention to the most important symptoms, and appropriate interventions can then be directed toward improving QoL outcomes and the response to treatment. PMID:24460780

  9. The arsenic-based cure of acute promyelocytic leukemia promotes cytoplasmic sequestration of PML and PML/RARA through inhibition of PML body recycling.

    PubMed

    Lång, Emma; Grudic, Amra; Pankiv, Serhiy; Bruserud, Oystein; Simonsen, Anne; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Bjørås, Magnar; Bøe, Stig Ove

    2012-07-26

    Arsenic in the form of arsenic trioxide (ATO) is used as a therapeutic drug for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The mechanism by which this agent cures this disease was previously shown to involve direct interactions between ATO and the promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML), as well as accelerated degradation of the APL-associated fusion oncoprotein PML/retinoic acid receptor α (RARA). Here we investigated the fate of PML-generated nuclear structures called PML bodies in ATO-treated cells. We found that ATO inhibits formation of progeny PML bodies while it stabilizes cytoplasmic precursor compartments, referred to as cytoplasmic assemblies of PML and nucleoporins (CyPNs), after cell division. This block in PML body recycling is readily detected at pharmacologic relevant ATO concentrations (0.02-0.5μM) that do not cause detectable cell-cycle defects, and it does not require modification of PML by SUMOylation. In addition, PML and PML/RARA carrying mutations previously identified in ATO-resistant APL patients are impeded in their ability to become sequestered within CyPNs. Thus, ATO may inhibit nuclear activities of PML and PML/RARA in postmitotic cells through CyPN-dependent cytoplasmic sequestration.

  10. Assessment of genotoxic effects in nurses handling cytostatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ladeira, C; Viegas, S; Pádua, M; Gomes, M; Carolino, E; Gomes, M C; Brito, M

    2014-01-01

    Several antineoplastic drugs have been classified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) on the basis of epidemiological findings, animal carcinogenicity data, and outcomes of in vitro genotoxicity studies. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), which is easily absorbed through the skin, is the most frequently used antineoplastic agent in Portuguese hospitals and therefore may be used as an indicator of surface contamination. The aims of the present investigation were to (1) examine surface contamination by 5-FU and (2) assess the genotoxic risk using cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in nurses from two Portuguese hospitals. The study consisted of 2 groups: 27 nurses occupationally exposed to cytostatic agents (cases) and 111 unexposed individuals (controls). Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were collected in order to measure micronuclei (MN) in both groups. Hospital B showed a higher numerical level of contamination but not significantly different from Hospital A. However; Hospital A presented the highest value of contamination and also a higher proportion of contaminated samples. The mean frequency of MN was significantly higher in exposed workers compared with controls. No significant differences were found among MN levels between the two hospitals. The analysis of confounding factors showed that age is a significant variable in MN frequency occurrence. Data suggest that there is a potential genotoxic damage related to occupational exposure to cytostatic drugs in oncology nurses.

  11. Synergistic antineoplastic effect of DLC1 tumor suppressor protein and histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), on prostate and liver cancer cells: perspectives for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Yang, Xu-Yu; Popescu, Nicholas C

    2010-04-01

    Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes is a major contributing alteration in the initiation or progression of cancer. The human tumor suppressor gene DLC1 (deleted in liver cancer 1) is frequently downregulated or silenced in multiple cancers, predominantly by epigenetic mechanisms. With the current considerable interest and progress in epigenetic therapy, a number of promising antineoplastic agents, particularly histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, have been developed and used successfully in clinical trials. Both DLC1 and HDAC inhibitors exert antineoplastic functions, and their combined action could be exploited for a more effective cancer therapy. To evaluate the potential benefits of this approach, we examined the antineoplastic effects of adenoviral (Ad)-DLC1-mediated transduction and exposure to suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a powerful HDAC inhibitor, in two human cancer cell lines that lack intrinsic DLC1 expression, 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells and 7703K human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Consistent with the oncosuppressive function of DLC1 in several cancers, including prostate and liver cancer, transduction of 22Rv1 and 7703K cells with an Ad-DLC1 expression vector resulted in alterations of cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth. A low concentration of SAHA (5 microM) efficiently restored the expression of DLC1 in 22Rv1 cells that lack DLC1 expression due to histone deacetylation but had a minimal effect in 7703K cells in which silencing of the DLC1 gene is due mainly to promoter hypermethylation. Regardless of the epigenetic mechanism of DLC1 inactivation, SAHA treatment of DLC1-transduced cells had a synergistic inhibitory effect on tumor cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in both cell lines. In 22Rv1 cells, this combination regimen nearly abolished the formation of colonies in semisolid media as a measure of tumorigenicity in vitro. Current in vitro

  12. MicroRNA-19a/b mediates grape seed procyanidin extract-induced anti-neoplastic effects against lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jenny T; Xue, Bingye; Smoake, Jane; Lu, Qing-Yi; Park, Heesung; Henning, Susanne M; Burns, Windie; Bernabei, Alvise; Elashoff, David; Serio, Kenneth J; Massie, Larry

    2016-08-01

    Oncomirs are microRNAs (miRNA) associated with carcinogenesis and malignant transformation. They have emerged as potential molecular targets for anti-cancer therapy. We hypothesize that grape seed procyanidin extract (GSE) exerts antineoplastic effects through modulations of oncomirs and their downstream targets. We found that GSE significantly down-regulated oncomirs miR-19a and -19b in a variety of lung neoplastic cells. GSE also increased mRNA and protein levels of insulin-like growth factor II receptor (IGF-2R) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), both predicted targets of miR-19a and -19b. Furthermore, GSE significantly increased PTEN activity and decreased AKT phosphorylation in A549 cells. Transfection of miR-19a and -19b mimics reversed the up-regulations of IGF2R and PTEN gene expression and abrogated the GSE induced anti-proliferative response. Additionally, oral administration of leucoselect phytosome, comprised of standardized grape seed oligomeric procyanidins complexed with soy phospholipids, to athymic nude mice via gavage, significantly down-regulated miR-19a, -19b and the miR-17-92 cluster host gene (MIR17HG) expressions, increased IGF-2R, PTEN, decreased phosphorylated-AKT in A549 xenograft tumors, and markedly inhibited tumor growth. To confirm the absorption of orally administered GSE, plasma procyanidin B1 levels, between 60 and 90 min after gavage of leucoselect phytosome (400 mg/kg), were measured by LC/MS at week 2 and 8 of treatment; the estimated concentration that was associated with 50% growth inhibition (IC50) (1.3 μg/mL) in vitro was much higher than the IC50 (0.032-0.13 μg/ml) observed in vivo. Our findings reveal novel antineoplastic mechanisms by GSE and support the clinical translation of leucoselect phytosome as an anti-neoplastic and chemopreventive agent for lung cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Equitable Prices of Single-Source Drugs in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ngorsuraches, Surachat; Chaiyakan, Kanokkan

    2015-08-01

    In Thailand, total drug expenditure has grown rapidly. Recently, the Thai government has addressed the issue of drug pricing, but the prices of single-source drugs remain a major challenge. To examine equitable prices of single-source drugs in Thailand. A total of 98 single-source and high-expenditure drugs were examined. Unit prices from the Drug and Medical Supplies Information Center (DMSIC) and National Average Drug Acquisition Cost (NADAC) were used to represent drug prices at the provider level in Thailand and the U.S., respectively. Data for measuring drug affordability, e.g., dose and poverty line, were obtained from Micromedex online and the National Statistical Office (NSO). The U.S. drug prices were adjusted by the Human Development Index (HDI) to be equitable prices for Thailand. Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) was used to convert US currency into Thai baht. All prices in this study were based on the year 2012. Catastrophic, Impoverishment, and WHO/Health Action International (HAI) approaches were used to determine Thai citizens' ability to afford the study drugs. Finally, uncertainty analyses were conducted. From all study drugs, 55 single-source drugs were priced higher than their equitable prices, ranging from 0.38 to 422.36% higher. Among these, 28 items were antineoplastic drugs. The prices of drugs outside the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), as well as the country's newer drugs, tended to be higher than their calculated equitable prices. The majority of drugs in Thailand priced higher than equitable prices were unaffordable for most Thai citizens. The uncertainty analyses revealed that almost all results were relatively robust. Most single-source drug prices in Thailand were higher than their equitable prices, and were likely to be unaffordable to Thai citizens.

  14. Anti-neoplastic action of aspirin against a T-cell lymphoma involves an alteration in the tumour microenvironment and regulation of tumour cell survival.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anjani; Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Tyagi, Abhishek; Bharti, Alok Chandra; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2012-02-01

    The present study explores the potential of the anti-neoplastic action of aspirin in a transplantable murine tumour model of a spontaneously originated T-cell lymphoma designated as Dalton's lymphoma. The antitumour action of aspirin administered to tumour-bearing mice through oral and/or intraperitoneal (intratumoral) routes was measured via estimation of survival of tumour-bearing mice, tumour cell viability, tumour progression and changes in the tumour microenvironment. Intratumour administration of aspirin examined to assess its therapeutic potential resulted in retardation of tumour progression in tumour-bearing mice. Oral administration of aspirin to mice as a prophylactic measure prior to tumour transplantation further primed the anti-neoplastic action of aspirin administered at the tumour site. The anti-neoplastic action of aspirin was associated with a decline in tumour cell survival, augmented induction of apoptosis and nuclear shrinkage. Tumour cells of aspirin-treated mice were found arrested in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and showed nuclear localization of cyclin B1. Intratumoral administration of aspirin was accompanied by alterations in the biophysical, biochemical and immunological composition of the tumour microenvironment with respect to pH, level of dissolved O2, glucose, lactate, nitric oxide, IFNγ (interferon γ), IL-4 (interleukin-4), IL-6 and IL-10, whereas the TGF-β (tumour growth factor-β) level was unaltered. Tumour cells obtained from aspirin-treated tumour-bearing mice demonstrated an altered expression of pH regulators monocarboxylate transporter-1 and V-ATPase along with alteration in the level of cell survival regulatory molecules such as survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor, heat-shock protein 70, glucose transporter-1, SOCS-5 (suppressor of cytokine signalling-5), HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1α) and PUMA (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis). The study demonstrates a possible indirect involvement of the

  15. Repositioning metformin in cancer: genetics, drug targets, and new ways of delivery.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Mihaela; Craciun, Lucian; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Kacso, Gabriel; Florian, Ioan Stefan; Crivii, Carmen

    2014-06-01

    After sitting many years on the shelves of drug stores as a harmless antidiabetic drug, metformin comes back in the spotlight of the scientific community as a surprisingly effective antineoplastic drug. Metformin targets multiple pathways that play pivotal roles in cancer progression, impacting various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell death, metabolism, and even the cancer stemness features. The biomolecular characteristics of tumors, such as appropriate expression of organic cation transporters or genetic alterations including p53, K-ras, LKB1, and PI3K may impact metformin's anticancer efficiency. This could indicate a need for tumor genetic profiling in order to identify patients most likely to benefit from metformin treatment. Considering that the majority of experimental models suggest that higher, supra-clinical doses of metformin should be used in order to obtain an antineoplastic effect, new ways of drug delivery could be developed, such as metformin-loaded nanoparticles or incorporation of metformin into microparticles used in transarterial chemoembolization, with the aim of obtaining higher intratumoral drug concentrations and a targeted therapy which will ultimately maximize metformin's efficacy.

  16. Highly sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography/selective reaction monitoring mass spectrometry method for the determination of cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide in urine of health care workers exposed to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Sottani, Cristina; Tranfo, Giovanna; Faranda, Paolo; Minoia, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the potential for exposure of health care workers to antineoplastic agents has led to the establishment of more restrictive government and professional standards and procedures for handling cytotoxic drugs. Therefore, the detection of low exposure levels is a new and important aim of biological monitoring. In the present paper we report an assay for the simultaneous determination of cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) in urine, using electrospray ionization liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with selective reaction monitoring (HPLC/SRM-MS). A rapid sample preparation procedure uses a solid-phase extraction stage with C18 columns. The urine assay is linear over the range 0.02 to 0.4 microg/L, with lower limits of quantification (LLOQs) of 0.02 and 0.04 microg/L for CP and IF. The accuracy and precision have been carried out through the validation study. The intra-day precision, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), is found to be always less than 14.7% for both analytes. The overall precision, assessed on three different days, is less than 15.0%. The recovery of ozaxaphosphorines ranges from 83.5% (CP) to 88.5% (IF) with a RSD always less than 14.6%. The uncertainty of the overall method was also evaluated, to identify possible sources of error. The combined uncertainty was less than 25% over all the days of the validation study. This method is selective and sensitive enough to determine trace levels of CP and IF in a range of urine concentrations relevant to performing low exposure assessment.

  17. Drug-induced progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: a case/noncase study in the French pharmacovigilance database.

    PubMed

    Colin, Olivier; Favrelière, Sylvie; Quillet, Alexandre; Neau, Jean-Philippe; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Lafay-Chebassier, Claire; Pérault-Pochat, Marie-Christine

    2017-04-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an often fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. As effective treatment is unavailable, identification of all drugs that could be associated with PML is essential. The objective of this study was to investigate the putative association of reports of PML and drugs. We used the case/noncase method in the French PharmacoVigilance database (FPVD). Cases were reports of PML in the FPVD between January 2008 and December 2015. Noncases were all other reports during the same period. To assess the association between PML and drug intake, we calculated an adverse drug report odds ratio (ROR) with its 95% confidence interval. We have studied the delay of onset of PML for each drug concerned. Among the 101 cases of PML, 39 drugs were mentioned as suspect. The main therapeutic classes suspected with significant ROR were antineoplastic agents (n = 85), immunosuppressants (n = 67), and corticosteroids. A latent interval from the time of drug initiation to the development of PML is established: the median time to onset was 365 days (123-1095 days). The onset of PML is highly variable and differs among drug classes [from 1 to 96 months (IQR: 39.0-126)]. An association between PML and some immunosuppressant drugs was found as expected, but also with antineoplastic agents and glucocorticoids. An important delay of PML onset after stopping treatment is suspected and should alert prescribers. Prescribers but also patients should be informed about the potential associations with all these drugs. Monitoring could be necessary for many drugs to early detect PML.

  18. Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum-containing drugs in two hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Bettina; Crauste-Manciet, Sylvie; Guibert, Agnès; Mourier, Wilhelmine; Guerrault-Moro, Marie-Noelle; Ferrari, Sylvie; Jomier, Jean-Yves; Brossard, Denis; Schierl, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    Environmental and biological monitoring of platinum containing drugs was implemented in two French hospital pharmacies using positive air pressure isolators and having similar working procedures when preparing antineoplastic drugs. Wipe sampling of surfaces, gloves, and vials was performed in the preparation room and in storage areas. All employees involved in the preparation of antineoplastic drugs were tested for urinary platinum on Monday before work and Friday after shift. Only traces of platinum were detected on surfaces in the preparation room outside the isolators (less than 1.61 pg cm(-2)). However, in one center, significant contamination was found in the storage area of the drug vials, which can most likely be linked to the rupture of a platinum vial and due to inefficient cleaning procedures. Surfaces inside the isolators were found to be contaminated (maximum: 198.4 pg cm(-2)). A higher level of contamination was detected in one pharmacy and could be explained by the lack of overgloving with regular changes during the preparation process. Nitrile gloves used during drug handling outside the isolator showed the highest platinum concentration (maximum: 5.86 ng per pair). With regards to platinum urine concentration, no significant difference was found between exposed and unexposed pharmacy personnel. Isolator technology combined with individual protective measures seems to be efficient to protect workers from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, whereas specific individual protective procedures implemented were focussing on the risk of handling vials outside the isolator (e.g. high frequency of glove changing). Moreover, overgloving inside the isolator would contribute to substantially decrease inner surface contamination and should be recommended in order to limit the transfer of chemical contamination to the end products.

  19. Functional differentiation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gian C; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Galati, Giuseppe; Kluwe, William M

    2014-10-01

    There is no nationally or internationally binding definition of the term "cytotoxic drug" although this term is used in a variety of regulations for pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of drugs as well as in regulations for protecting medical personnel from occupational exposure in pharmacy, hospital, and other healthcare settings. The term "cytotoxic drug" is frequently used as a synonym for any and all oncology or antineoplastic drugs. Pharmaceutical companies generate and receive requests for assessments of the potential hazards of drugs regularly - including cytotoxicity. This publication is intended to provide functional definitions that help to differentiate between generically-cytotoxic cancer drugs of significant risk to normal human tissues, and targeted cancer therapeutics that pose much lesser risks. Together with specific assessments, it provides comprehensible guidance on how to assess the relevant properties of cancer drugs, and how targeted therapeutics discriminate between cancer and normal cells. The position of several regulatory agencies in the long-term is clearly to regulate all drugs regardless of classification, according to scientific risk based data. Despite ongoing discussions on how to replace the term "cytotoxic drugs" in current regulations, it is expected that its use will continue for the near future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Drug Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizure Loss of consciousness Other conditions resulting from drug allergy Less common drug allergy reactions occur days ... occur the first time you take the drug. Drugs commonly linked to allergies Although any drug can ...

  1. Anthracyclines and ellipticines as DNA-damaging anticancer drugs: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech; Hrabeta, Jan; Eckschlager, Tomas; Smutny, Svatopluk; Burda, Jaroslav V; Frei, Eva; Stiborova, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Over the past forty years, anthracyclines and ellipticines have attracted attention as promising cytostatics. In this review, we focus on their mechanisms of cytoxicity, DNA-damaging effects and adverse side-effects. We also summarize ways to enhance the therapeutic effects of these drugs together with a decrease in their adverse effects. Current drug design strategies are focused on drug bioavailability and their tissue targeting, whereas drug delivery to specific intracellular compartments is rarely addressed. Therefore, therapies utilizing the antineoplastic activities of anthracyclines and ellipticines combined with novel strategies such as nanotechnologies for safer drug delivery, as well as strategies based on gene therapy, could significantly contribute to medical practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reduced Expression of the Retinoblastoma Protein Shows That the Related Signaling Pathway Is Essential for Mediating the Antineoplastic Activity of Erufosine

    PubMed Central

    Zaharieva, Maya M.; Kirilov, Milen; Chai, Minquang; Berger, Stefan M.; Konstantinov, Spiro; Berger, Martin R.

    2014-01-01

    Erufosine is a new antineoplastic agent of the group of alkylphosphocholines, which interferes with signal transduction and induces apoptosis in various leukemic and tumor cell lines. The present study was designed to examine for the first time the mechanism of resistance to erufosine in malignant cells with permanently reduced expression of the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Bearing in mind the high number of malignancies with reduced level of this tumor-suppressor, this investigation was deemed important for using erufosine, alone or in combination, in patients with compromised RB1 gene expression. For this purpose, clones of the leukemic T-cell line SKW-3 were used, which had been engineered to constantly express differently low Rb levels. The alkylphosphocholine induced apoptosis, stimulated the expression of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 and inhibited the synthesis of cyclin D3, thereby causing a G2 phase cell cycle arrest and death of cells with wild type Rb expression. In contrast, Rb-deficiency impeded the changes induced by eru-fosine in the expression of these proteins and abrogated the induction of G2 arrest, which was correlated with reduced antiproliferative and anticlonogenic activities of the compound. In conclusion, analysis of our results showed for the first time that the Rb signaling pathway is essential for mediating the antineoplastic activity of erufosine and its efficacy in patients with malignant diseases may be predicted by determining the Rb status. PMID:24987858

  3. Controllable synthesis and adjustable antineoplastic activity of bovine serum albumin-conjugated PbS/Ag2S core/shell nano-composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Jie; Yu, Xue-Hong; Cao, Ying; Zhou, Bei; Wang, Cai-Feng

    2012-08-01

    Series of mono-dispersed bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated PbS/Ag(2)S core/shell nano-composites with different Pb/Ag ratios had been successfully synthesized by an ion-exchange method under the gentle conditions using BSA-conjugated PbS nano-crystals as precursors, which were prepared by a biomimetic method. Fourier transform infrared spectra analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation demonstrated that BSA was a key factor to control the morphology and size of final products. Additionally, the real-time TEM observation, X-ray powder diffraction and atomic absorption spectroscopy analysis were applied to monitor the synthesis process. The results indicated that the shell thickness and ratio of Pb to Ag could be controlled by adjusting the ion-exchange time. Both metabolic and morphological methods revealed that the proliferation of rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells could be inhibited by BSA-conjugated PbS/Ag(2)S core/shell nano-composites, and the antineoplastic activity was Pb/Ag ratio-dependent. It might be explained by a Trojan horse-type mechanism. Summarily, the present study would be helpful to find a new core/shell nano-composite with higher and controllable antineoplastic activity due to the synergistic reaction of different metal ions.

  4. Anti-Neoplastic Cytotoxicity of Gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] in Combination with Griseofulvin against Chemotherapeutic-Resistant Mammary Adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3)

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, CP; Jones, Toni; Bear, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gemcitabine is a pyrimidine nucleoside analog that becomes triphosphorylated and in this form it competitively inhibits cytidine incorporation into DNA strands. Diphosphorylated gemcitabine irreversibly inhibits ribonucleotide reductase thereby preventing deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Functioning as a potent chemotherapeutic, gemcitabine decreases neoplastic cell proliferation and induces apoptosis which accounts for its effectiveness in the clinical treatment of several leukemia and carcinoma cell types. A brief plasma half-life due to rapid deamination, chemotherapeuticresistance and sequelae restricts gemcitabine utility in clinical oncology. Selective “targeted” gemcitabine delivery represents a molecular strategy for prolonging its plasma half-life and minimizing innocent tissue/organ exposure. Methods A previously described organic chemistry scheme was applied to synthesize a UV-photoactivated gemcitabine intermediate for production of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu]. Immunodetection analysis (Western-blot) was applied to detect the presence of any degradative fragmentation or polymerization. Detection of retained binding-avidity for gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] was determined by cell-ELISA using populations of chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3) that highly over-express the HER2/neu trophic membrane receptor. Anti-neoplastic cytotoxicity of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] and the tubulin/microtubule inhibitor, griseofulvin was established against chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3). Related investigations evaluated the potential for gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] in dual combination with griseofulvin to evoke increased levels of anti-neoplastic cytotoxicity compared to gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu]. Results Covalent gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] immunochemotherapeutic and griseofulvin exerted anti-neoplastic cytotoxicity against chemotherapeutic

  5. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-05-26

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery.

  6. Venetoclax (ABT-199) Might Act as a Perpetrator in Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Johanna; Gajek, Thomas; Köhler, Bruno Christian; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2016-02-24

    Venetoclax (ABT-199) represents a specific B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) inhibitor that is currently under development for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. So far, there is no published information on its interaction potential with important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, or its efficacy in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. We therefore scrutinized its drug-drug interaction potential in vitro. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) was quantified by commercial kits. Inhibition of drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)) was evaluated by the use of fluorescent probe substrates. Induction of drug transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The efficacy of venetoclax in MDR cells lines was evaluated with proliferation assays. Venetoclax moderately inhibited P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19, whereas CYP2B6 activity was increased. Venetoclax induced the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A3, and UGT1A9. In contrast, expression of ABCB1 was suppressed, which might revert tumor resistance towards antineoplastic P-gp substrates. P-gp over-expression led to reduced antiproliferative effects of venetoclax. Effective concentrations for inhibition and induction lay in the range of maximum plasma concentrations of venetoclax, indicating that it might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

  7. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  8. Cardiotoxicity of commercial 5-fluorouracil vials stems from the alkaline hydrolysis of this drug.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, L.; Malet-Martino, M. C.; de Forni, M.; Martino, R.; Lasserre, B.

    1992-01-01

    The cardiotoxicity of 5-fluorouracil (FU) was attributed to impurities present in the injected vials. One of these impurities was identified as fluoroacetaldehyde which is metabolised by isolated perfused rabbit hearts into fluoroacetate (FAC), a highly cardiotoxic compound. FAC was also detected in the urine of patients treated with FU. These impurities were found to be degradation products of FU that are formed in the basic medium employed to dissolve this compound. To avoid chemical degradation of this antineoplastic drug, the solution of FU that will be injected should be prepared immediately before use. PMID:1637660

  9. Cross-comparison of cancer drug approvals at three international regulatory agencies

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, N.; Verma, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary objective of the present study was to examine the drug approval process and the time to approval (tta) for cancer drugs by 3 major international regulatory bodies—Health Canada, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (fda), and the European Medicines Agency (ema)—and to explore differences in the drug approval processes that might contribute to any disparities. Methods The publicly available Health Canada Drug Product Database was surveyed for all marketed antineoplastic agents approved between 1 January 2005 and 1 June 2013. For the resulting set of cancer drugs, public records of sponsor submission and approval dates by Health Canada, the fda, and the ema were obtained. Results Overall, the tta for the 37 antineoplastic agents that met the study criteria was significantly less for the fda than for the ema (X̄ = 6.7 months, p < 0.001) or for Health Canada (X̄ = 6.4 months, p < 0.001). The tta was not significantly different for Health Canada and the ema (X̄ = 0.65 months, p = 0.89). An analysis of the review processes demonstrated that the primary reason for the identified discrepancies in tta was the disparate use of accelerated approval mechanisms. Summary In the present study, we systematically compared cancer drug approvals at 3 international regulatory bodies. The differences in tta reflect several important considerations in the regulatory framework of cancer drug approvals. Those findings warrant an enhanced dialogue between clinicians and government agencies to understand opportunities and challenges in the current approval processes and to work toward balancing drug safety with timely access. PMID:27803605

  10. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  11. Factors associated with prescribing restriction on oncology formulary drugs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fatokun, Omotayo; Olawepo, Michael N

    2016-10-01

    Background Drugs listed on formularies are often subjected to a variety of utilization restriction measures. However, the degree of restriction is influenced by multiple factors, including the characteristics and attributes of the listed drugs. Objective To identify the factors that are associated with the levels of prescribing restriction on oncology formulary drugs in Malaysia. Setting Oncology formulary in Malaysia. Method The Malaysia Drug Code assigned to each of the drug products on the Malaysia Ministry of Health (MOH) drug formulary was used to identify oncology drugs belonging to WHO ATC class L (antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents). Main outcome measures Categories of prescribing restrictions, therapeutic class, drug type, administration mode, number of sources and the post-approval use period. Results Oncology drugs having a shorter post-approval use period (p < 0.001), biologic oncology drugs (p = 0.01) and oncology drugs belonging to immunosuppressant therapeutic class (p = 0.03) were all significantly associated with a greater likelihood of being subjected to a higher level of prescribing restriction. Conclusion This study suggests that safety concerns, costs and potentials for inappropriate use were the important considerations influencing a higher level of prescribing restriction placement on oncology drugs in the Malaysia MOH drug formulary.

  12. A targeted drug delivery system based on dopamine functionalized nano graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudipour, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Maleki, Nasim

    2017-01-01

    The cellular targeting property of a biocompatible drug delivery system can widely increase the therapeutic effect against various diseases. Here, we report a dopamine conjugated nano graphene oxide (DA-nGO) carrier for cellular delivery of the anticancer drug, Methotrexate (MTX) into DA receptor positive human breast adenocarcinoma cell line. The material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Furthermore, the antineoplastic action of MTX loaded DA-nGO against DA receptor positive and negative cell lines were explored. The results presented in this article demonstrated that the application of DA functionalized GO as a targeting drug carrier can improve the drug delivery efficacy for DA receptor positive cancer cell lines and promise future designing of carrier conjugates based on it.

  13. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Melanoma Antitumoral Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rigon, Roberta Balansin; Oyafuso, Márcia Helena; Fujimura, Andressa Terumi; do Prado, Alice Haddad; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma (MEL) is a less common type of skin cancer, but it is more aggressive with a high mortality rate. The World Cancer Research Fund International (GLOBOCAN 2012) estimates that there were 230,000 new cases of MEL in the world in 2012. Conventional MEL treatment includes surgery and chemotherapy, but many of the chemotherapeutic agents used present undesirable properties. Drug delivery systems are an alternative strategy by which to carry antineoplastic agents. Encapsulated drugs are advantageous due to such properties as high stability, better bioavailability, controlled drug release, a long blood circulation time, selective organ or tissue distribution, a lower total required dose, and minimal toxic side effects. This review of scientific research supports applying a nanotechnology-based drug delivery system for MEL therapy. PMID:26078967

  14. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  15. Plasmodium Drug Targets Outside the Genetic Control of the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug development often seeks to find “magic bullets” which target microbiologic proteins while not affecting host proteins. Paul Ehrlich tested methylene blue as an antimalarial but this dye was not superior to quinine. Many successful antimalarial therapies are “magic shotguns” which target many Plasmodium pathways with little interference in host metabolism. Two malaria drug classes, the 8-aminoquinolines and the artemisinins interact with cytochrome P450s and host iron protoporphyrin IX or iron, respectively, to generate toxic metabolites and/or radicals, which kill the parasite by interference with many proteins. The non 8-amino antimalarial quinolines like quinine or piperaquine bind heme to inhibit the process of heme crystallization, which results in multiple enzyme inhibition and membrane dysfunction. The quinolines and artemisinins are rapidly parasiticidal in contrast to metal chelators, which have a slower parasite clearance rate with higher drug concentrations. Iron chelators interfere with the artemisinins but otherwise represent a strategy of targeting multiple enzymes containing iron. Interest has been revived in antineoplastic drugs that target DNA metabolism as antimalarials. Specific drug targeting or investigation of the innate immunity directed to the more permeable trophozoite or schizont infected erythrocyte membrane has been under explored. Novel drug classes in the antimalarial development pipeline which either target multiple proteins or unchangeable cellular targets will slow the pace of drug resistance acquisition. PMID:22973888

  16. A sensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor for antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil based on glassy carbon electrode modified with poly(bromocresol purple).

    PubMed

    Koyuncu Zeybek, Derya; Demir, Burcu; Zeybek, Bülent; Pekyardımcı, Şule

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an electrochemical sensor for the first time based on poly(bromocresol purple) (P(BCP)) developed to observe the interaction between 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and fish sperm double strand DNA (dsDNA). The P(BCP) film was electrosynthesized by cyclic voltammetry method on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The dsDNA was electrochemically immobilized on the surface of P(BCP) modified GCE and the DNA biosensor was prepared. The interaction mechanism of dsDNA with 5-FU was investigated by differential pulse voltammetry using this biosensor. A decrease in the guanine oxidation peak current of the biosensor was observed after the interaction of dsDNA and 5-FU in 0.5 mol L(-1) acetate buffer (pH 4.8) containing 0.02 mol L(-1) NaCl. The accumulation time and dsDNA concentration were optimized to obtain the best peak current response. Under optimum conditions, the linear response on the guanine signal decreasing curve was observed in the 5-FU concentration range of 1.0-50 mg L(-1). The interaction mechanism between dsDNA and 5-FU was further investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy and viscometer. The results reveal that intercalation is the primary mode of interaction between 5-FU and dsDNA.

  17. A Comprehensive Review on Cyclodextrin-Based Carriers for Delivery of Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxic Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gidwani, Bina; Vyas, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Most of the cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents have poor aqueous solubility. These molecules are associated with poor physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which makes the formulation difficult. An important approach in this regard is the use of combination of cyclodextrin and nanotechnology in delivery system. This paper provides an overview of limitations associated with anticancer drugs, their complexation with cyclodextrins, loading/encapsulating the complexed drugs into carriers, and various approaches used for the delivery. The present review article aims to assess the utility of cyclodextrin-based carriers like liposomes, niosomes, nanoparticles, micelles, millirods, and siRNA for delivery of antineoplastic agents. These systems based on cyclodextrin complexation and nanotechnology will camouflage the undesirable properties of drug and lead to synergistic or additive effect. Cyclodextrin-based nanotechnology seems to provide better therapeutic effect and sustain long life of healthy and recovered cells. Still, considerable study on delivery system and administration routes of cyclodextrin-based carriers is necessary with respect to their pharmacokinetics and toxicology to substantiate their safety and efficiency. In future, it would be possible to resolve the conventional and current issues associated with the development and commercialization of antineoplastic agents. PMID:26582104

  18. Curcumol induces apoptosis in SPC-A-1 human lung adenocarcinoma cells and displays anti-neoplastic effects in tumor bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi-Ling; Guo, Ji-Quan; Wang, Qi-You; Lin, Hai-Shu; Yang, Zhou-Ping; Peng, Tong; Pan, Xue-Diao; Liu, Bing; Wang, Su-Jun; Zang, Lin-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Curcumol is a sesquiterpene originally isolated from curcuma rhizomes, a component of herbal remedies commonly used in oriental medicine. Its beneficial pharmacological activities have attract significant interest recently. In this study, anti-cancer activity of curcumol was examined with both in vitro and in vivo models. It was found that curcumol exhibited time- and concentration-dependent anti-proliferative effects in SPC-A-1 human lung adenocarcinoma cells with cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase while apoptosis-induction was also confirmed with flow cytometry and morphological analyses. Interestingly, curcumol did not display growth inhibition in MRC-5 human embryonic lung fibroblasts, suggesting the anti-proliferative effects of curcumol were specific to cancer cells. Anti-neoplastic effects of curcumol were also confirmed in tumor bearing mice. Curcumol (60 mg/kg daily) significantly reduced tumor size without causing notable toxicity. In conclusion, curcumol appears a favorable anti-cancer candidate for further development.

  19. Uncaria tomentosa exerts extensive anti-neoplastic effects against the Walker-256 tumour by modulating oxidative stress and not by alkaloid activity.

    PubMed

    Dreifuss, Arturo Alejandro; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda Leite; Fabossi, Isabella Aviles; Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida Dos Reis; Stolf, Aline Maria; Alves de Souza, Carlos Eduardo; Gomes, Liana de Oliveira; Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Teixeira, Simone; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolás; Stefanello, Maria Elida Alves; Acco, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the anti-neoplastic effects of an Uncaria tomentosa (UT) brute hydroethanolic (BHE) extract with those of two fractions derived from it. These fractions are choroformic (CHCl3) and n-butanolic (BuOH), rich in pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (POA) and antioxidant substances, respectively. The cancer model was the subcutaneous inoculation of Walker-256 tumour cells in the pelvic limb of male Wistar rat. Subsequently to the inoculation, gavage with BHE extract (50 mg.kg(-1)) or its fractions (as per the yield of the fractioning process) or vehicle (Control) was performed during 14 days. Baseline values, corresponding to individuals without tumour or treatment with UT, were also included. After treatment, tumour volume and mass, plasma biochemistry, oxidative stress in liver and tumour, TNF-α level in liver and tumour homogenates, and survival rates were analysed. Both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction successfully reduced tumour weight and volume, and modulated anti-oxidant systems. The hepatic TNF-α level indicated a greater effect from the BHE extract as compared to its BuOH fraction. Importantly, both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction increased the survival time of the tumour-bearing animals. Inversely, the CHCl3 fraction was ineffective. These data represent an in vivo demonstration of the importance of the modulation of oxidative stress as part of the anti-neoplastic activity of UT, as well as constitute evidence of the lack of activity of isolated POAs in the primary tumour of this tumour lineage. These effects are possibly resulting from a synergic combination of substances, most of them with antioxidant properties.

  20. Uncaria tomentosa Exerts Extensive Anti-Neoplastic Effects against the Walker-256 Tumour by Modulating Oxidative Stress and Not by Alkaloid Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dreifuss, Arturo Alejandro; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda Leite; Fabossi, Isabella Aviles; Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida dos Reis; Stolf, Aline Maria; Alves de Souza, Carlos Eduardo; Gomes, Liana de Oliveira; Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Teixeira, Simone; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolás; Stefanello, Maria Elida Alves; Acco, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the anti-neoplastic effects of an Uncaria tomentosa (UT) brute hydroethanolic (BHE) extract with those of two fractions derived from it. These fractions are choroformic (CHCl3) and n-butanolic (BuOH), rich in pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (POA) and antioxidant substances, respectively. The cancer model was the subcutaneous inoculation of Walker-256 tumour cells in the pelvic limb of male Wistar rat. Subsequently to the inoculation, gavage with BHE extract (50 mg.kg−1) or its fractions (as per the yield of the fractioning process) or vehicle (Control) was performed during 14 days. Baseline values, corresponding to individuals without tumour or treatment with UT, were also included. After treatment, tumour volume and mass, plasma biochemistry, oxidative stress in liver and tumour, TNF-α level in liver and tumour homogenates, and survival rates were analysed. Both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction successfully reduced tumour weight and volume, and modulated anti-oxidant systems. The hepatic TNF-α level indicated a greater effect from the BHE extract as compared to its BuOH fraction. Importantly, both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction increased the survival time of the tumour-bearing animals. Inversely, the CHCl3 fraction was ineffective. These data represent an in vivo demonstration of the importance of the modulation of oxidative stress as part of the anti-neoplastic activity of UT, as well as constitute evidence of the lack of activity of isolated POAs in the primary tumour of this tumour lineage. These effects are possibly resulting from a synergic combination of substances, most of them with antioxidant properties. PMID:23408945

  1. Cellular uptake mechanism and comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects of paclitaxel-cholesterol lipid emulsion on triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Xia, Xuejun; Dong, Wujun; Hao, Huazhen; Meng, Luhua; Yang, Yanfang; Wang, Renyun; Lyu, Yuanfeng; Liu, Yuling

    There is no effective clinical therapy for triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs), which have high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) requirements and express relatively high levels of LDL receptors (LDLRs) on their membranes. In our previous study, a novel lipid emulsion based on a paclitaxel-cholesterol complex (PTX-CH Emul) was developed, which exhibited improved safety and efficacy for the treatment of TNBC. To date, however, the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul have not been investigated. In order to offer powerful proof for the therapeutic effects of PTX-CH Emul, we systematically studied the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul and made a comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects on TNBC (MDA-MB-231) and non-TNBC (MCF7) cell lines through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The in vitro antineoplastic effects and in vivo tumor-targeting efficiency of PTX-CH Emul were significantly more enhanced in MDA-MB-231-based models than those in MCF7-based models, which was associated with the more abundant expression profile of LDLR in MDA-MB-231 cells. The results of the cellular uptake mechanism indicated that PTX-CH Emul was internalized into breast cancer cells through the LDLR-mediated internalization pathway via clathrin-coated pits, localized in lysosomes, and then released into the cytoplasm, which was consistent with the internalization pathway and intracellular trafficking of native LDL. The findings of this paper further confirm the therapeutic potential of PTX-CH Emul in clinical applications involving TNBC therapy.

  2. Cellular uptake mechanism and comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects of paclitaxel–cholesterol lipid emulsion on triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Xia, Xuejun; Dong, Wujun; Hao, Huazhen; Meng, Luhua; Yang, Yanfang; Wang, Renyun; Lyu, Yuanfeng; Liu, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    There is no effective clinical therapy for triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs), which have high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) requirements and express relatively high levels of LDL receptors (LDLRs) on their membranes. In our previous study, a novel lipid emulsion based on a paclitaxel–cholesterol complex (PTX-CH Emul) was developed, which exhibited improved safety and efficacy for the treatment of TNBC. To date, however, the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul have not been investigated. In order to offer powerful proof for the therapeutic effects of PTX-CH Emul, we systematically studied the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul and made a comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects on TNBC (MDA-MB-231) and non-TNBC (MCF7) cell lines through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The in vitro antineoplastic effects and in vivo tumor-targeting efficiency of PTX-CH Emul were significantly more enhanced in MDA-MB-231-based models than those in MCF7-based models, which was associated with the more abundant expression profile of LDLR in MDA-MB-231 cells. The results of the cellular uptake mechanism indicated that PTX-CH Emul was internalized into breast cancer cells through the LDLR-mediated internalization pathway via clathrin-coated pits, localized in lysosomes, and then released into the cytoplasm, which was consistent with the internalization pathway and intracellular trafficking of native LDL. The findings of this paper further confirm the therapeutic potential of PTX-CH Emul in clinical applications involving TNBC therapy. PMID:27601899

  3. Drugs, drugs--who has the drugs?

    PubMed

    Blair, James

    2012-01-01

    Drug diversion, although on the increase, is not the only problem involving drugs that hospital security officials should be concerned with. Growing drug shortages, offshore production, counterfeiting, and weaknesses in the drug supply chain in case of a world-wide pandemic, are even greater causes for concern, the author claims.

  4. Clinically relevant drug–drug interactions in oncology

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Howard L

    1998-01-01

    Although anticancer agents are one of the most toxic classes of medication prescribed today, there is relatively little information available about clinically relevant drug–drug interactions. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions have been described, including alterations in absorption, catabolism, and excretion. For example, an increased bioavailability of 6-mercaptopurine has been observed when combined with either allopurinol or methotrexate, leading to increased toxicity in some patients. Induction of etoposide or teniposide clearance by anticonvulsants has also been described, resulting in a lower systemic exposure and risk for lower anticancer activity. Alterations in elimination of methotrexate has been observed with probenecid, presumably through competition for renal secretion. There are also several examples of pharmacodynamic interactions. The combination of 5-fluorouracil plus folinic acid results in more efficient inhibition of thymidylate synthase, a finding which is now utilized routinely in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Improvements in the in vitro and early clinical testing now allow a relatively high degree of prediction of potential clinical drug interactions, prior to observations of untoward drug effects. In conclusion, drug interactions among commonly used anticancer agents have been identified. Their clinical significance can have more impact than many other classes of medications due to the narrow therapeutic index of antineoplastic agents and the potential for lethal side-effects. It is only through prospective, preclinical and early clinical evaluation that the presence of clinically significant drug interactions can be identified and the information used to provide better therapy for this significant health problem. PMID:9663808

  5. Unusual case of desmotropy. Combined spectroscopy (¹H-¹⁴N NQDR) and quantum chemistry (periodic hybrid DFT/QTAIM and Hirshfeld surface-based) study of solid dacarbazine (anti-neoplastic).

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Burchardt, Dorota V; Derwich, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Antineoplastic chemo-therapeutic drug 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazenyl)imidazole-4-carboxamide (Dacarbazine, DTIC), has been studied experimentally in solid state by ¹H-¹⁴N NQDR double resonance at 295 K and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory (DFT)/Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and Hirshfeld surfaces analysis. Only one set of eighteen resonance frequencies was found in the experiment. This indicates the presence of six inequivalent nitrogen sites: -N(CH₃), -NH₂, -NH- and three -N= (of which one is a ring, two are from triazene) in the DTIC molecule. This contradicts the X-ray data which revealed the multiplication of nitrogen sites due to unusual desmotropism. The averaging of NQR frequencies caused by the fast in NQR time-scale exchange of protons in a double-well potential combined with the oscillations of twisted supramolecular synthons was proposed as a potential mechanism responsible for this apparent contradiction. An effective improvement in the quality of the spectrum reproduction was achieved when the calculations were performed assuming the periodic boundary conditions, BLYP functional, the DNP basis set and taking the 3×3×3 k-point separation. The ordering of the nitrogen sites according to the increasing quadrupole coupling constant (QCC): N(3)

  6. [Current movements of four serious adverse events induced by medicinal drugs based on spontaneous reports in Japan].

    PubMed

    Sudo, Chie; Azuma, Yu-ichiro; Maekawa, Keiko; Kaniwa, Nahoko; Sai, Kimie; Saito, Yoshiro

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous reports on suspected serious adverse events caused by medicines from manufacturing/distributing pharmaceutical companies or medical institutions/pharmacies are regulated by the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law of Japan, and this system is important for post-marketing safety features. Although causal relationship between the medicine and the adverse event is not evaluated, and one incidence may be redundantly reported, this information would be useful to roughly grasp the current movements of drug-related serious adverse events, We searched open-source data of the spontaneous reports publicized by Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency for 4 serious adverse events (interstitial lung disease, rhabdomyolysis, anaphylaxis, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis) from 2004 to 2010 fiscal year (for 2010, from April 1 st to January 31th). Major drug-classes suspected to the adverse events were antineoplastics for interstitial lung disease, hyperlipidemia agents and psychotropics for rhabdomyolysis, antibiotics/chemotherapeutics, antineoplastics and intracorporeal diagnostic agents for anaphylaxis (anaphylactic shock, anaphylactic reactions, anaphylactoid shock and anaphylactoid reactions), and antibiotics/chemotherapeutics, antipyretics and analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents/common cold drugs, and antiepileptics for Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. These results would help understanding of current situations of the 4 drug-related serious adverse events in Japan.

  7. Sequence-specific interactions of drugs interfering with the topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Manlio; Gatto, Barbara; Moro, Stefano; Sissi, Claudia; Zagotto, Giuseppe

    2002-07-18

    DNA-processing enzymes, such as the topoisomerases (tops), represent major targets for potent anticancer (and antibacterial) agents. The drugs kill cells by poisoning the enzymes' catalytic cycle. Understanding the molecular details of top poisoning is a fundamental requisite for the rational development of novel, more effective antineoplastic drugs. In this connection, sequence-specific recognition of the top-DNA complex is a key step to preferentially direct the action of the drugs onto selected genomic sequences. In fact, the (reversible) interference of drugs with the top-DNA complex exhibits well-defined preferences for DNA bases in the proximity of the cleavage site, each drug showing peculiarities connected to its structural features. A second level of selectivity can be observed when chemically reactive groups are present in the structure of the top-directed drug. In this case, the enzyme recognizes or generates a unique site for covalent drug-DNA binding. This will further subtly modulate the drug's efficiency in stimulating DNA damage at selected sites. Finally, drugs can discriminate not only among different types of tops, but also among different isoenzymes, providing an additional level of specific selection. Once the molecular basis for DNA sequence-dependent recognition has been established, the above-mentioned modes to generate selectivity in drug poisoning can be rationally exploited, alone or in combination, to develop tailor-made drugs targeted at defined loci in cancer cells.

  8. New drugs in Brazil: do they meet Brazilian public health needs?

    PubMed

    Vidotti, Carlos Cezar Flores; de Castro, Lia Lusitana Cardozo; Calil, Simone Saad

    2008-07-01

    To describe the new drugs marketed in Brazil during the period 2000-2004, compare the description to the country's burden of disease, and suggest initiatives capable of addressing the situation from the perspective of a developing country. Records of new drugs were surveyed in an official drug registration database. The new drugs were categorized by Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification, indication, and innovation, and compared with the needs of the country's burden of disease. Data on the morbidity and mortality rates of selected diseases (diabetes, Hansen's disease, hypertension, tuberculosis) were retrieved from official documents and the literature. During the period investigated, 109 new drugs were launched. Most were general anti-infectives for systemic use (19), followed by antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents (16). The number of new drugs launched in 2004 was roughly one-third that of 2000. Of 65 new drugs, only one-third can be classified as innovative. Most new drugs were intended to treat noninfectious diseases that typically affect developed countries, diseases that constitute only a fraction of the country's challenges. A mismatch occurs between public health needs and the new drugs launched on the Brazilian market. Not only did the number of new drugs decrease in the study period, but only a few were actually new in therapeutic terms. Developing countries must acquire expertise in research and development to strengthen their capacity to innovate and produce the drugs they need.

  9. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  10. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids ... more: Commonly Abused Drugs Charts Research Report on Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs Research Report on Methamphetamine Research ...

  11. Adverse Drug Events-based Tumor Stratification for Ovarian Cancer Patients Receiving Platinum Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Chute, Christopher G.; Jiang, Guoqian

    2015-01-01

    The underlying molecular mechanisms of adverse drug events (ADEs) associated with cancer therapy drugs may overlap with their antineoplastic mechanisms. In a previous study, we developed an ADE-based tumor stratification framework (known as ADEStrata) with a case study of breast cancer patients receiving aromatase inhibitors, and demonstrated that the prediction of per-patient ADE propensity simultaneously identifies high-risk patients experiencing poor outcomes. In this study, we aim to evaluate the ADEStrata framework with a different tumor type and chemotherapy class – ovarian cancer treated with platinum chemotherapeutic drugs. We identified a cohort of ovarian cancer patients receiving cisplatin (a standard platinum therapy) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n=156). We demonstrated that somatic variant prioritization guided by known ADEs associated with cisplatin could be used to stratify patients treated with cisplatin and uncover tumor subtypes with different clinical outcomes. PMID:26306234

  12. NSAIDs: Old Drugs Reveal New Anticancer Targets.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Gary A; Keeton, Adam B; Tinsley, Heather N; Whitt, Jason D; Gary, Bernard D; Mathew, Bini; Singh, Raj; Grizzle, William E; Reynolds, Robert C

    2010-05-25

    There is compelling evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors have antineoplastic activity, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and the suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limits their use for cancer chemoprevention. Previous studies as reviewed here suggest that the mechanism for their anticancer properties does not require COX inhibition, but instead involves an off-target effect. In support of this possibility, recent molecular modeling studies have shown that the NSAID sulindac can be chemically modified to selectively design out its COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. Unexpectedly, certain derivatives that were synthesized based on in silico modeling displayed increased potency to inhibit tumor cell growth. Other experiments have shown that sulindac can inhibit phosphodiesterase to increase intracellular cyclic GMP levels and that this activity is closely associated with its ability to selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Together, these studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  13. Metabolic drug interactions between antidepressants and anticancer drugs: focus on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and hypericum extract.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Crupi, Rosalia; Drago, Filippo; Spina, Edoardo

    2011-07-01

    Different antidepressant drugs are currently used for the treatment of depression in cancer patients, such as second-generation antidepressants and, recently, the extracts of Hypericum perforatum. These agents are susceptible to metabolically-based drug interactions with anticancer drugs. The aim of the present article is to provide an updated review of clinically relevant metabolic drug interactions between selected anticancer drugs and antidepressants, focusing on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and Hypericum extract. SSRIs can cause pharmacokinetic interactions through their in vitro ability to inhibit one or more cytochrome P450 isoenzymes (CYPs). SSRIs differ in their potential for metabolic drug interactions with anticancer drugs. Fluoxetine and paroxetine are potent inhibitors of CYP2D6 and administration of these SSRIs reduces the clinical benefit of an anticancer drug, such as tamoxifen, by decreasing the formation of active metabolites of this drug. Women with breast cancer who receive paroxetine in combination with tamoxifen are at increased risk for death. Other SSRIs, including citalopram, escitalopram, are weak or negligible inhibitors of CYP2D6 and are less likely to interact with anticancer drugs, while sertraline causes significant inhibition of this isoform only at high doses. Hypericum extract, by inducing both the CYP3A4 and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), can reduce the plasma concentrations of different antineoplastic agents such as imatinib, irinotecan and docetaxel, thus reducing the clinical efficacy of these drugs. Although these interactions are often predictable, the use of fluoxetine, paroxetine and Hypericum extract should be avoided in cancer patients.

  14. Comparative Analysis of the Antineoplastic Activity of C60 Fullerene with 5-Fluorouracil and Pyrrole Derivative In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynchak, O. V.; Prylutskyy, Yu I.; Rybalchenko, V. K.; Kyzyma, O. A.; Soloviov, D.; Kostjukov, V. V.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Ritter, U.; Scharff, P.

    2017-01-01

    The antitumor activity of pristine C60 fullerene aqueous solution (C60FAS) compared to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and pyrrole derivative 1-(4-Cl-benzyl)-3-Cl-4-(CF3-fenylamino)-1H-pyrrol-2.5-dione (MI-1) cytostatic drugs was investigated and analyzed in detail using the model of colorectal cancer induced by 1.2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rats. The number, size, and location of the tumors were measured, and the pathology was examined. It was found that the number of tumors and total lesion area decreased significantly under the action of C60FAS and MI-1. Because these drugs have different mechanisms of action, their simultaneous administration can potentially increase the effectiveness and significantly reduce the side effects of antitumor therapy.

  15. Dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR]: molecular design, synthetic organic chemistry reactions, and antineoplastic cytotoxic potency against pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549)

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Cody P; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Corticosteroids are effective in the management of a variety of disease states, such as several forms of neoplasia (leukemia and lymphoma), autoimmune conditions, and severe inflammatory responses. Molecular strategies that selectively “target” delivery of corticosteroids minimize or prevents large amounts of the pharmaceutical moiety from passively diffusing into normal healthy cell populations residing within tissues and organ systems. Materials and methods The covalent immunopharmaceutical, dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was synthesized by reacting dexamethasone-21-monophosphate with a carbodiimide reagent to form a dexamethasone phosphate carbodiimide ester that was subsequently reacted with imidazole to create an amine-reactive dexamethasone-(C21-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate. Monoclonal anti-EGFR immunoglobulin was combined with the amine-reactive dexamethasone-(C21-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate, resulting in the synthesis of the covalent immunopharmaceutical, dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR]. Following spectrophotometric analysis and validation of retained epidermal growth factor receptor type 1 (EGFR)-binding avidity by cell-ELISA, the selective anti-neoplasic cytotoxic potency of dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was established by MTT-based vitality stain methodology using adherent monolayer populations of human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) known to overexpress the tropic membrane receptors EGFR and insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1. Results The dexamethasone:IgG molar-incorporation-index for dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was 6.95:1 following exhaustive serial microfiltration. Cytotoxicity analysis: covalent bonding of dexamethasone to monoclonal anti-EGFR immunoglobulin did not significantly modify the ex vivo antineoplastic cytotoxicity of dexamethasone against pulmonary adenocarcinoma at and between the standardized dexamethasone equivalent concentrations of 10

  16. Active vitamin D potentiates the anti-neoplastic effects of calcium in the colon: A cross talk through the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Abhishek; Höbaus, Julia; Tennakoon, Samawansha; Prinz-Wohlgenannt, Maximilian; Graça, João; Price, Sally A; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Kállay, Enikö

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest an inverse correlation between dietary calcium (Ca(2+)) and vitamin D intake and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). It has been shown in vitro that the active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D3) can upregulate expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). In the colon, CaSR has been suggested to regulate proliferation of colonocytes. However, during tumorigenesis colonic CaSR expression is downregulated and we hypothesized that the loss of CaSR could influence the anti-tumorigenic effects of Ca(2+) and vitamin D. Our aim was to assess the impact of CaSR expression and function on the anti-neoplastic effects of 1,25-D3 in colon cancer cell lines. We demonstrated that in the healthy colon of mice, high vitamin D diet (2500 IU/kg diet) increased expression of differentiation and apoptosis markers, decreased expression of proliferation markers and significantly upregulated CaSR mRNA expression, compared with low vitamin D diet (100 IU/kg diet). To determine the role of CaSR in this process, we transfected Caco2-15 and HT29 CRC cells with wild type CaSR (CaSR-WT) or a dominant negative CaSR mutant (CaSR-DN) and treated them with 1,25-D3 alone, or in combination with CaSR activators (Ca(2+) and NPS R-568). 1,25-D3 enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of Ca(2+) and induced differentiation and apoptosis only in cells with a functional CaSR, which were further enhanced in the presence of NPS R-568, a positive allosteric modulator of CaSR. The mutant CaSR inhibited the anti-tumorigenic effects of 1,25-D3 suggesting that the anti-neoplastic effects of 1,25-D3 are, at least in part, mediated by the CaSR. Taken together, our data provides molecular evidence to support the epidemiological observation that both, vitamin D and calcium are needed for protection against malignant transformation of the colon and that their effect is modulated by the presence of a functional CaSR. This article is part of a Special Issue

  17. Dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR]: molecular design, synthetic organic chemistry reactions, and antineoplastic cytotoxic potency against pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549).

    PubMed

    Coyne, Cody P; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids are effective in the management of a variety of disease states, such as several forms of neoplasia (leukemia and lymphoma), autoimmune conditions, and severe inflammatory responses. Molecular strategies that selectively "target" delivery of corticosteroids minimize or prevents large amounts of the pharmaceutical moiety from passively diffusing into normal healthy cell populations residing within tissues and organ systems. The covalent immunopharmaceutical, dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was synthesized by reacting dexamethasone-21-monophosphate with a carbodiimide reagent to form a dexamethasone phosphate carbodiimide ester that was subsequently reacted with imidazole to create an amine-reactive dexamethasone-(C21-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate. Monoclonal anti-EGFR immunoglobulin was combined with the amine-reactive dexamethasone-(C21-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate, resulting in the synthesis of the covalent immunopharmaceutical, dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR]. Following spectrophotometric analysis and validation of retained epidermal growth factor receptor type 1 (EGFR)-binding avidity by cell-ELISA, the selective anti-neoplasic cytotoxic potency of dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was established by MTT-based vitality stain methodology using adherent monolayer populations of human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) known to overexpress the tropic membrane receptors EGFR and insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1. The dexamethasone:IgG molar-incorporation-index for dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was 6.95:1 following exhaustive serial microfiltration. Cytotoxicity analysis: covalent bonding of dexamethasone to monoclonal anti-EGFR immunoglobulin did not significantly modify the ex vivo antineoplastic cytotoxicity of dexamethasone against pulmonary adenocarcinoma at and between the standardized dexamethasone equivalent concentrations of 10(-9) M and 10(-5) M. Rapid increases in

  18. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Generic Drugs: The Same Medicine for Less Money What is a generic drug? A generic is a copy of a brand-name drug. A brand- name drug has a patent. When ... benefit to your health, and you will save money. 7KH IHGHUDO )RRG DQG 'UXJ $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ )'$ UHJXODWHV ERWK ...

  19. Drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yawalkar, N

    2009-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity represents an immune-mediated reaction to a drug. Although several drug hypersensitivity reactions are confined to the skin and rather mild, some may be life threatening and also involve further organs such as liver, kidney and bone marrow. The exact pathogenesis of many drug hypersensitivity reactions is still obscure. In this review the concepts on how small molecular drugs can activate the immune system are discussed and the hapten, prohapten and p-i concept are explained. Furthermore, the classification of drug hypersensitivity reactions and some common and severe clinical manifestations of drug-induced T cell mediated reactions are presented.

  20. Personal imports of drugs to Japan in 2005--an analysis of import certificates.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, K; Tsutani, K

    2008-10-01

    Personal imports of unapproved drugs are made by physicians and patients in Japan. Such imports require submission of a request for an import certificate from the Regional Bureau of Health and Welfare (RBHW). So far, there have been few reports on personal imports of drugs in Japan. To assess the extent and nature of personal imports of drugs in Japan. The date, product name and amount of drug imported were provided by RBHW for each personal import made by physicians in 2005. All imports were classified into several groups including whether they were for 'prescription drugs for non-cosmetic use (PDNC)' or 'prescription drugs for cosmetic use (PDC)'. Identification of PDNC was made by International Non-proprietary Name (INN). All drugs were classified under therapeutic groups. For the most frequently imported unapproved drugs, the approval year in the US/EU and development status in Japan were recorded. A total of 12 196 personal imports were initiated by physicians in 2005. 5428 were for PDNCs corresponding to 242 drugs by INN. 55 PDNCs were each the subject of 10 or more imports. 11 drugs (252 imports) out of the top 55 PDNCs were available on the Japanese market during 2005 and 44 (4713 imports) were not approved. Of the 44 unapproved drugs, 11 (1019 imports) had been approved and 10 (2785 imports) were in the pre-registration phase as of December 31, 2006. Of the 44 unapproved drugs, 12 (1213 imports) were approved during 2000-2004, and 17 (3138 imports), during 1995-1999 in the US or EU. While the majority of imported drugs were antineoplastic drugs, drugs for various kinds of non-serious diseases were also imported. A substantial number of unapproved drugs were being imported to Japan. A formal system for monitoring the use of those drugs should be established.

  1. A fresh perspective on comparing the FDA and the CHMP/EMA: approval of antineoplastic tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi R; Roberts, Samantha A; Shah, Devron R

    2013-09-01

    We compared and determined the reasons for any differences in the review and approval times of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European EMA/CHMP. Applications for these novel cancer drugs were submitted to them within a mean of 31.2 days of each other, providing a fair basis for comparison. The FDA had granted priority review to 12 TKIs but the EMA/CHMP did not grant the equivalent accelerated assessment to any. The FDA granted accelerated approvals to six (38%) and CHMP granted (the equivalent) conditional approvals to four (29%) of these agents. On average, the review and approval times were 205.3 days in the US compared with 409.6 days in the European Union (EU). The active review times, however, were comparable (225.4 days in the EU and 205.3 days in the US). Since oncology drug development lasts about 7 years, the 20 days difference in review times between the two agencies is inconsequential. Clock stops during review and the time required to issue an approval had added the extra 184.2 days to review time in the EU. We suggest possible solutions to expedite the EU review and approval processes. However, post-marketing emergence of adverse efficacy and safety data on gefitinib and lapatinib, respectively, indicate potential risks of expedited approvals. We challenge the widely prevalent myth that early approval translates into early access or beneficial impact on public health. Both the agencies collaborate closely but conduct independent assessments and make decisions based on distinct legislation, procedures, precedents and societal expectations.

  2. Porous nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffold containing drug-loaded ADM-PLGA microspheres for bone cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zi-Jie; Yang, Lian-Jun; Cai, Bao-Ta; Zhu, Li-Xin; Cao, Yan-Lin; Wu, Guo-Feng; Zhang, Zan-Jie

    2016-05-01

    To develop adriamycin (ADM)-encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles in a porous nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffold (ADM-PLGA-NHAC). To provide novel strategies for future treatment of osteosarcoma, the properties of the scaffold, including its in vitro extended-release properties, the inhibition effects of ADM-PLGA-NHAC on the osteosarcoma MG63 cells, and its bone repair capacity, were investigated in vivo and in vitro. The PLGA copolymer was utilized as a drug carrier to deliver ADM-PLGA nanoparticles (ADM-PLGA-NP). Porous nano-hydroxyapatite and collagen were used to materials to produce the porous nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffold (NHAC), into which the ADM-PLGA-NP was loaded. The performance of the drug-carrying scaffold was assessed using multiple techniques, including scanning electron microscopy and in vitro extended release. The antineoplastic activities of scaffold extracts on the human osteosarcoma MG63 cell line were evaluated in vitro using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK8) method and live-dead cell staining. The bone repair ability of the scaffold was assessed based on the establishment of a femoral condyle defect model in rabbits. ADM-PLGA-NHAC and NHAC were implanted into the rat muscle bag for immune response experiments. A tumor-bearing nude mice model was created, and the TUNEL and HE staining results were observed under optical microscopy to evaluate the antineoplastic activity and toxic side effects of the scaffold. The composite scaffold demonstrated extraordinary extended-release properties, and its extracts also exhibited significant inhibition of the growth of osteosarcoma MG63 cells. In the bone repair experiment, no significant difference was observed between ADM-PLGA-NHAC and NHAC by itself. In the immune response experiments, ADM-PLGA-NHAC exhibited remarkable biocompatibility. The in vivo antitumor experiment revealed that the implantation of ADM-PLGA-NHAC in the tumor resulted in a improved antineoplastic

  3. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1 tumors and tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, L.E.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1989-11-01

    The RIF-1 tumor cell line contains a small number of cells (1-20 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to various single antineoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), and adriamycin (ADR). For 5FU the frequency of drug resistance is lower for tumor-derived cells than for cells from cell culture; for MTX the reverse is true, and for ADR there is no difference. In vitro irradiation at 5 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU, MTX, and ADR. In vivo irradiation at 3 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU and MTX, but not for ADR. The absolute risk for in vitro induction of MTX, 5FU, and ADR resistance, and for in vivo induction of 5FU resistance, was 1-3 per 10(6) cells per Gy; but the absolute risk for in vivo induction of MTX resistance was 54 per 10(6) cells per Gy. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors was highly variable; among individual irradiated tumors the frequency of drug-resistant cells was significantly less variable. These studies provide supporting data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be due to radiation-induced drug resistance.

  4. [Drug allergy].

    PubMed

    Pichler, W J

    1994-01-01

    Drug allergies can cause a great variety of symptoms and can thus imitate various diseases, like in previous times the lues. Drug allergies can be classified into three subgroups, which differ in their pathophysiology and require different diagnostic steps: firstly, classical drug allergies which are directed to the drug itself, a reactive compound of it or some contamination of the drug; secondly, pseudoallergic reactions which are caused by nonimmune mediated degranulation of mast cells and basophils; and thirdly, autoimmune reactions in which the drug elicits an immune reaction to autologous structures. A very detailed (criminalistic) history has the highest priority for the clarification of a suspected drug-allergic reaction; in addition, skin tests, serological tests and the lymphocyte transformation test might be useful. One should differentiate between tests which imitate the drug-elicited allergic reaction (i.e. Coombs test in drug induced hemolytic anemia) and tests which solely indicate a sensitization, these tests should be interpreted accordingly.

  5. Anti-Neoplastic Therapy Use in Advanced Cancer Patients Admitted to an Acute Palliative Care Unit at a Comprehensive Cancer Center: A Simultaneous Care Model

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; Elsayem, Ahmed; Li, Zhijun; De La Cruz, Maxine; Palmer, J Lynn; Bruera, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancer patients admitted to a palliative care unit generally have a poor prognosis. The role of antineoplastic therapy (ANT) in these patients is controversial. We examined the frequency and predictors associated with ANT use in hospitalized patients who required an acute palliative care unit (APCU) stay. METHODS We included all 2604 patients admitted over a five-year period to a 12-bed APCU located within a National Cancer Institute comprehensive cancer center, where patients can access both palliative care and ANT. We retrospectively retrieved from institutional databases patient demographics, cancer diagnosis, ANT use, length of hospital stay, and survival from time of admission. RESULTS The median hospital stay was 11 days and the median survival was 22 days. During hospitalization, 435 patients (17%) received ANT, including chemotherapy (N=297, 11%), hormonal agents (N=54, 2%) and targeted therapy (N=155, 6%). No significant change in frequency of ANT use was detected over the 5 year period. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that younger age, specific cancer diagnoses and longer admissions were independently associated with ANT use. CONCLUSION The use of ANT during hospitalization that included an APCU stay was limited to a small percentage of patients, and did not increase over time. ANT use was associated with younger age, specific cancer diagnoses and longer admissions. The APCU facilitates simultaneous care where patients access palliative care while on ANT. PMID:20162701

  6. Prevention of disease progression in a patient with a gastric cancer-re-recurrence. Outcome after intravenous treatment with the novel antineoplastic agent taurolidine. Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Braumann, Chris; Winkler, Goetz; Rogalla, Patrick; Menenakos, Charalambos; Jacobi, Christoph A

    2006-01-01

    Background Taurolidine (TRD) is a novel agent with multimodal antineoplastic effects. We present the case of a tumor remission after intravenous administration of taurolidine in a patient with gastric cancer re-recurrence. Case presentation A 58 years old male patient suffering from a gastric adenocarcinoma was submitted to partial gastrectomy and partial liver resection (pT2, pN1, pM1L (liver segment 2), N0, V0). 24 months later a local recurrence was diagnosed and the patient was reoperated. Postoperatively the patient underwent a palliative chemotherapy with eloxatin, FU, and leucovorin. A subsequent CT-revealed a liver metastasis and a recurrence adjacent to the hepatic artery. After successful radiofrequency ablation of the liver metastasis the patient was intravenously treated with 2% taurolidine. The patient endured the therapy well and no toxicity was observed. CT-scans revealed a stable disease without a tumor progression or metastatic spread. After 39 cycles the patient was submitted to left nephrectomy due to primary urothelial carcinoma and died 2 days later due to myocardial infarction. Postmortem histology of the esophageal-jejunal anastomosis and liver revealed complete remission of the known metastasized gastric adenocarcinoma. Conclusion The intravenous treatment with 2% taurolidine led to a histological remission of the tumor growth without any toxicity for the patient. PMID:16796759

  7. Interaction of mesalasine (5-ASA) with translational initiation factors eIF4 partially explains 5-ASA anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic activities.

    PubMed

    Lyakhovich, Alex; Michlmayr, Anna; Bakulina, Anastasia; Gerner, Christopher; Oehler, Rudolf; Gasche, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA or mesalazine) is widely used for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and considered to be cancer preventive. Still, the molecular mechanisms explaining its properties remain largely unknown, partially due to the lack of instrumentarium needed to identify its array of molecular targets. Modern OMICs-based technologies utilized in this study may serve as a powerful and unbiased tool to search for such targets. Here we demonstrate that 5-ASA alters β-catenin immunocomplex formation by changing complex binding of seven proteins including translation initiation factors eIF4b. OMICs-based cross-testing by reverse in-gel chemogenomics (utilizing 5-ASA's fluorescent properties), in-silico docking and surface plasmon resonance experiments identified binding of 5-ASA to eIF4e's cap-binding pocket, a key regulatory site for protein synthesis. In-vitro translation experiments with rabbit reticulocytes confirmed a dose-dependent inhibition of protein syntheses by 5-ASA. By using two unbiased and independent OMICs-based experimental approaches two members of the cellular translation machinery, eIF4b and IF4e, were identified as targets of 5-ASA. Inhibition of protein syntheses is a previously unrecognized property of 5-ASA that may add to its anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic activities.

  8. Determination of MKT-077, a novel antineoplastic agent, in plasma samples by high-performance liquid chromatography and its application to pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Tatsuta, N; Suzuki, N; Koya, K; Kawakami, M; Shishido, T; Chen, L B

    1999-03-01

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for determination of a novel antineoplastic agent MKT-077 in plasma. MKT-077 was extracted from 50 microl of plasma with acetonitrile containing 1 ml trifluoroacetic acid per liter. Chromatographic separation was achieved within 13.5 min using a reverse-phase Puresil C18 analytical column. A visible detector operated at 490 nm was used. The linearity of the calibration curve was obtained (r2 = 0.99986) over the analytical range of 10-500 ng/ml(-1). The intra- and inter-assay precision was in the range of 0.9-11.1 and 0.3-4.4%, respectively. The intra- and inter-assay bias ranged from -7.3 to 11.1% and from 0.4 to 11.6%, respectively. The utility of this assay was demonstrated after the administration of a single dose of MKT-077 to rats. The plasma elimination half-life of MKT-077 was 1.8-4 h.

  9. Effect of Nutritional Supplementation Enriched with Eicosapentaenoic Acid on Inflammatory Profile of Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer in Antineoplastic Pretreatment: A Controlled and Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Thayana C; Cruz, Bruna C S; Viana, Monica S; Martucci, Renata B; Saraiva, Danúbia C A; Reis, Patrícia F

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of nutritional supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-enriched formula on the inflammatory profile of patients with oral cavity cancer. The study was conducted with 53 patients with oral cavity cancer in antineoplastic pretreatment who were randomized into two groups: the control group received a powdered supplement without EPA during 4 wk and the intervention group received a liquid supplement enriched with EPA (2 g/day) during the same period. In the baseline and after 4 wk of supplementation, serum concentrations of albumin, prealbumin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured. Values of CRP and of CRP/albumin ratio were lower in the intervention group than those in the control group. However, when the two groups were compared to each other after intervention, any significant difference was not observed. There was a significant negative correlation between levels of CRP and albumin, and IL-6 and albumin, both in the control and in the intervention groups. In both groups, a positive correlation between concentrations of IL-6 and CRP was observed. No significant difference was encountered in the assessed parameters between the group that received standard supplement and the group that received EPA-enriched supplement.

  10. Necroptosis mediates the antineoplastic effects of the soluble fraction of polysaccharide from red wine in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Stipp, Maria Carolina; Bezerra, Iglesias de Lacerda; Corso, Claudia Rita; Dos Reis Livero, Francislaine A; Lomba, Luiz Alexandre; Caillot, Adriana Rute Cordeiro; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Queiroz-Telles, José Ederaldo; Klassen, Giseli; Ramos, Edneia A S; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; Acco, Alexandra

    2017-03-15

    Polysaccharides are substances that modify the biological response to several stressors. The present study investigated the antitumor activity of the soluble fraction of polysaccharides (SFP), extracted from cabernet franc red wine, in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats. The monosaccharide composition had a complex mixture, suggesting the presence of arabinoglactans, mannans, and pectins. Treatment with SFP (30 and 60mg/kg, oral) for 14days significantly reduced the tumor weight and volume compared with controls. Treatment with 60mg/kg SFP reduced blood monocytes and neutrophils, reduced the tumor activity of N-acetylglucosaminidase, myeloperoxidase, and nitric oxide, increased blood lymphocytes, and increased the levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in tumor tissue. Treatment with SFP also induced the expression of the cell necroptosis-related genes Rip1 and Rip3. The antineoplastic effect of SFP appears to be attributable to its action on the immune system by controlling the tumor microenvironment and stimulating TNF-α production, which may trigger the necroptosis pathway.

  11. Attempts at the production of more selective antitumourals. Part II. The antineoplastic activity of cyclophosphazenes linked to spermine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sournies, François; Labarre, Jean-François; Spreafico, Federico; Filippeschi, Stefania; Quan Jin, Xing

    1986-09-01

    In an attempt to design antitumour cyclophosphazenes of improved specificity by linking them to some natural tumour finders, we studied the binding of gem-N 3P 3Az 4Cl 2 to spermine. Synthesis, NMR and mass spectra of the vectorized drug (in which two N 3P 3Az 4 active principles are linked to spermine in a DISPIROBINO configuration) are described. Results obtained with this compound in 6 murine tumour systems (L1210 and P388 leukaemias, 3LL carcinoma, M5076 reticulum cell sarcoma, B16 melanoma and line 16 mammary carcinoma), are also described and compared with results previously obtained about the targeting of gem-N 3P 3Az 4Cl 2 through 1,3-diaminopropane and 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine).

  12. Modulation of antineoplastic activity of cyclophosphamide by Alstonia scholaris in the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2003-01-01

    Alterations in the neoplastic activity of cyclophosphamide (CPA) by the extract of Alstonia scholaris(ASE) were studied in mice transplanted with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC). The tumor-bearing animals were injected with various doses of ASE and 25 mg/kg of CPA (1/10th of the LD50 dose). The combination of 120 mg/kg of ASE with 25 mg/kg of CPA was most effective, as it caused the highest tumor regression and enhanced the mean survival time (MST) and the average survival time (AST) up to 42 and 40.7, as against the 29 and 27.5 of CPA alone, respectively. Similarly, when 120 mg/kg of ASE was combined with different doses of CPA (3.125 to 50 mg/kg), a dose-dependent increase in the anticancer activity was observed up to 25 mg/kg of CPA. However, a further increase in the CPA dose up to 37.5 or 50 mg/kg resulted in toxic side effects and death. The best effect was observed when 120 mg/kg of ASE was combined with 25 mg/kg followed by 12.5 mg/kg of CPA, as evident by the greater tumor remission, when compared with the concurrent doses of either drug alone. The administration of 120 mg/kg of ASE 6 h before the administration of 25 mg/kg of CPA resulted in a drastic decline in the glutathione levels and increased the lipid peroxidation considerably when compared with either drug alone.

  13. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse also plays a role in many major social problems, such as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a ...

  14. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  15. Drugs (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs for fever, cough, stuffy nose, runny nose, diarrhea, and allergies are common drugs which are especially helpful during times of illness. All medications should be kept out of the reach of children.

  16. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  17. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing.

  18. Assay of anti-cancer drugs in tissue culture: conditions affecting their ability to incorporate 3H-leucine after drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Freshney, R I; Paul, J; Kane, I M

    1975-01-01

    An attempt has been made to construct an assay potentially suitable for use with primary cultures of human tumours to measure the survival of exponentially growing monolayer cultures after exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs. Cell survival was assessed using their protein synthetic capacity after removal of drugs. HeLa cells were employed to avoid the ingerent variability and heterogeneity of primary cultures from human tumours, and an assay has been constructed using microtitration trays to provide large numbers of replicate cultures without the requirement of a large number cells. An increase in the duration of the exposure to drug increased sensitivity in nearly all cases examined. Similarly, an increase in the period of culture following drug removal produced increased sensitivity to alkylating agents but allowed recovery from exposure to certain cycle-dependent drugs. Some of the drugs used were shown to be unstable under culture conditions and vinblastine was actively metabolized, although this instability was not necessarily reflected in the time course of the drug's effect. Mustine sensitivity was shown to be reduced by an increase in cell density at a level where density limitation of 3H-thymidine incorporation becomes apparent. These variations and possible methods of minimizing their effects are discussed.

  19. Assay of anti-cancer drugs in tissue culture: conditions affecting their ability to incorporate 3H-leucine after drug treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Freshney, R. I.; Paul, J.; Kane, I. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt has been made to construct an assay potentially suitable for use with primary cultures of human tumours to measure the survival of exponentially growing monolayer cultures after exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs. Cell survival was assessed using their protein synthetic capacity after removal of drugs. HeLa cells were employed to avoid the ingerent variability and heterogeneity of primary cultures from human tumours, and an assay has been constructed using microtitration trays to provide large numbers of replicate cultures without the requirement of a large number cells. An increase in the duration of the exposure to drug increased sensitivity in nearly all cases examined. Similarly, an increase in the period of culture following drug removal produced increased sensitivity to alkylating agents but allowed recovery from exposure to certain cycle-dependent drugs. Some of the drugs used were shown to be unstable under culture conditions and vinblastine was actively metabolized, although this instability was not necessarily reflected in the time course of the drug's effect. Mustine sensitivity was shown to be reduced by an increase in cell density at a level where density limitation of 3H-thymidine incorporation becomes apparent. These variations and possible methods of minimizing their effects are discussed. PMID:1156513

  20. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors and their Ligands in Cancer Drug- Resistance: Opportunity or Challenge.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Bahman; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Samadi, Nasser; Majidinia, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Development of resistance in cancer cells results in a high failure rate in cancer chemotherapy in the clinic. Therefore, investigating the mechanisms by which cancer cells acquire the capability to avoid cell death upon exposure to antineoplastic agents is of great significance in cancer research. In this review article, we will provide an overview of the mechanisms and molecular machinery of drug resistance in cancer cells which include but may not be limited to altered membrane transport and drug metabolizing enzymes, genetic response, enhanced DNA repair and alternation in the target molecules. A special focus will be on describing the strategies and the rationale for exploitation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors for overcoming the observed resistance in cancer cells.

  1. Poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles via solvent evaporation in water-soluble porous polymers.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Aled D; Zhang, Haifei

    2013-04-15

    A generic method is described to form poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles within water-soluble porous polymer by solvent evaporation. The simple dissolution of porous polymer with drug nanoparticles results in stable aqueous drug nanoparticle suspension under the optimized conditions. The porous polymers were prepared by freeze-drying aqueous solutions of polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol, and a surfactant. They were then used as scaffolds for the formation of nanoparticles by initially soaking them in an organic drug solution, followed with removing the solvent via evaporation under ambient conditions. This process was optimized for an antifungal drug griseofulvin, before being translated to anticonvulsant carbamazepine and antineoplastic paclitaxel via a similar procedure, with an aim to improve the loading of drug nanoparticles. By varying certain process parameters a degree of control over the particle size and surface charge could be attained, as well as the drug to stabilizer ratio (drug payload). Noticeably, aqueous paclitaxel nanoparticles (500 nm) were prepared which used the equivalent of 46% less stabilizer than the formulation Taxol.

  2. Potential drug-drug interactions in hospitalized patients undergoing systemic chemotherapy: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Paula; Kopittke, Luciane

    2015-06-01

    Adverse drug-drug interactions (DDI) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in susceptible populations. Cancer patients are a population at high risk for DDI especially because they commonly receive several drugs concomitantly. The knowledge about the most common interactions between drugs used in oncology inpatients is essential to reduce drug-related problems and increase the safety and efficacy of the therapy. To assess the frequency of potential DDI throughout the hospital stay of cancer patients undergoing systemic chemotherapy, describe their epidemiology, and identify risk factors for major DDI. Setting An oncology-hematology inpatient unit of a public hospital in southern Brazil. Drug prescriptions were prospectively reviewed throughout the hospital stay of patients admitted for systemic chemotherapy. Descriptive statistics and Poisson regression were used for data analysis. Potential DDI and their characteristics. The cohort consisted of 113 patients, who used a mean of 8.9 ± 2.7 drugs/day. All patients had at least one potential DDI (median, 7.0/patient; 25th-75th percentile, 3.5-12.0), and 46 % of the patients had at least one DDI classified as major, i.e. that it may result in death, hospitalization, permanent injury, or therapeutic failure. Only 13.7 % of all interactions involved antineoplastic agents, identified in 62.8 % of patients. Most interactions were of moderate severity, 6.4 % were major, and 8.5 % had a recommendation for therapy modification. Multivariate analysis revealed mean number of drugs prescribed [relative risk (RR) for each additional drug: 1.12; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.17; P < 0.01] and age ≥60 years (RR 1.48; 95 % CI 1.03-2.14; P < 0.01) as independent risk factors for major DDI. Potential DDI were highly frequent in this cohort. Older age and number of drugs prescribed were more likely to lead to major interactions. Prospective surveillance is required to detect adverse DDI, aiming primarily at reducing the

  3. 518A2 melanoma cells are protected by G3139 and other antineoplastic agents against the cytotoxic effects of DTIC.

    PubMed

    Benimetskaya, Luba; Miller, Paul; Stein, C A

    2005-01-01

    G3139 is an antisense Bcl-2 phosphorothioate oligonucleotide that has been combined with DTIC in a phase III clinical trial in melanoma. However, its actual mechanism of action in melanoma is controversial. Treatment of 518A2 melanoma cells with either G3139 or G4126 (a two-base mismatch) and then with light-activated DTIC caused these cells (but not SK-Mel-30 or 346.1 cells) to be protected against the cytotoxic effects of DTIC. This cytoprotection was not recapitulated with a phosphodiester congener of G3139 nor with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) also targeted to the Bcl-2 mRNA. Administering the drugs in reverse order also did not produce cytoprotection, and an 18- mer phosphorothioate homopolymer of thymidine was also inactive. Subsequently, it was discovered that gemcitibine and cis-platinum also induced cytoprotection to DTIC in this cell line, suggesting that the cytoprotection is a stress response to chemical proapoptotic stress. Cytoprotection was completely inhibited by O(6)-benzylguanine, an inhibitor of O(6)-guanosine alkyltransferase (OGAT) activity. However, a direct assay of OGAT activity demonstrated that 518A2 melanoma cells are essentially completely devoid of it, either basally or induced. The cytoprotection may thus be caused by a chemical stress-induced increase in mismatch repair activity.

  4. The receptor binding fragment of alpha-fetoprotein is a promising new vector for the selective delivery of antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Posypanova, Galina A; Makarov, Vladimir A; Savvateeva, Mariya V; Bereznikova, Anastasiya V; Severin, Evgeny S

    2013-05-01

    The alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) binding protein, a putative AFP receptor, is a tumour marker that is present on the surfaces of malignant cells. AFP enters cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The recombinant C-terminal fragment of AFP (AFP-3BC, which consists of amino acid residues 473-596) was obtained by the expression in Escherichia coli. AFP-3BC was shown to be bound specifically to the AFP putative receptor on tumour cells and accumulated by endocytosis in these cells in a similar manner to that of full-length human AFP. In lymphocytes, the binding and endocytosis of AFP-3BC were absent. Thus, the AFP receptor binding site was shown experimentally to be located within the AFP-3BC sequence. A conjugate of synthesised AFP-3BC with the antitumour antibiotic doxorubicin (DOX-AFP-3BC) demonstrated high antitumour activity in vitro. Thus, AFP-3BC can be used successfully as a vector for the targeted selective delivery of drugs into tumour cells.

  5. A 25-Year Experience of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Somatostatin (Congeners) Analogs: From Symptom Control to Antineoplastic Therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Anthony, Lowell B

    2015-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay technology was utilized in the discovery of somatostatin and was quickly brought into therapeutics; however, it took the development of somatostatin congeners to solve its limitations of a short half-life. Therapeutic medical control of hyperhormonal states such as acromegaly, carcinoid syndrome and VIPoma significantly advanced from a nonspecific approach to one that specifically and effectively targeted the underlying pathophysiology. Clinical care was transformed from nonspecific symptom control to one of a significant improvement in not only quality of life, but also quantity of life. These data submitted to US and European regulatory authorities for approval included many investigative sites with no uniform protocol and multiple investigational new drugs, and have not been previously published. This review includes the original data demonstrating the transformational impact this class of agents had on specific disease subsets resulting in regulatory approval 25 years ago. Autoradiography techniques using somatostatin resulted in identifying, localizing and characterizing its receptor subtypes. Translating in vitro data to in vivo resulted in scintigraphic whole body and SPECT scans with (111)In-pentetreotide and was incorporated into standard clinical care 20 years ago. (68)Ga-octreotide congeners using PET scanning offers a major imaging advance. Peptide receptor radiotherapy has evolved over the last 2 decades and utilizes several therapeutic isotopes, including (90)Y and (177)Lu. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Cell cycle effects of drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Dethlefsen, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Cell Growth and Division Cycle; Cell Cycle Effects of Alkylating Agents; Biological Effects of Folic Acid Antagonists with Antineoplastic Activity; and Bleomycin-Mode of Action with Particular Reference to the Cell Cycle.

  7. Protection behaviors for cytotoxic drugs in oncology nurses of chemotherapy centers in Shiraz hospitals, South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Khadijeh; Hazrati, Maryam; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Ansari, Jasem; Sajadi, Mahboubeh; Hosseinnazzhad, Azam; Moshiri, Esmail

    2016-01-01

    Context: The use of antineoplastic agents for the treatment of cancer is an increasingly common practice in hospitals. As a result, workers involved with handling antineoplastic drugs may be accidentally exposed to these agents, placing them at potential risk for long-term adverse effects. This study aimed to determine the occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs. Subjects and Methods: The study was designed as an analytic descriptive survey. The research settings took place in six centers of chemotherapy in Shiraz, Iran. The participants were 86 nurses who worked in oncology units and administered cytotoxic drugs. Data were collected using a questionnaire and a checklist which was developed by the investigators to determine occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs. Percentage calculations and the independent samples t-test were used to see the general distribution and analysis of data. To statistically analyze of the data, SPSS software (version 16) was applied. Results: The mean age of participants was 30.52 ± 6.50 years and 66.27% of the nurses worked on inpatient oncology wards. The mean practice score was 21.1 ± 3.76 that ranged from 12.5 to 31. The independent samples t-test showed the outpatient nurses were weaker in practice (17.2 ± 2.52) in comparison with university hospitals (23.35 ± 3.02, P < 0.001). Occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs especially during administration and disposal of medicines was poor and rarely trained with this subject and was observed under the standard conditions. Conclusions: There is deficiency in the understanding and related protection practices of clinical nursing staff vocationally exposed to cytotoxic drugs. It is recommended that all clinical nursing staff should receive full occupational protection training about these matters and the authorities provide standard conditions of oncology

  8. Protection behaviors for cytotoxic drugs in oncology nurses of chemotherapy centers in Shiraz hospitals, South of Iran.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Khadijeh; Hazrati, Maryam; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Ansari, Jasem; Sajadi, Mahboubeh; Hosseinnazzhad, Azam; Moshiri, Esmail

    2016-01-01

    The use of antineoplastic agents for the treatment of cancer is an increasingly common practice in hospitals. As a result, workers involved with handling antineoplastic drugs may be accidentally exposed to these agents, placing them at potential risk for long-term adverse effects. This study aimed to determine the occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs. The study was designed as an analytic descriptive survey. The research settings took place in six centers of chemotherapy in Shiraz, Iran. The participants were 86 nurses who worked in oncology units and administered cytotoxic drugs. Data were collected using a questionnaire and a checklist which was developed by the investigators to determine occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs. Percentage calculations and the independent samples t-test were used to see the general distribution and analysis of data. To statistically analyze of the data, SPSS software (version 16) was applied. The mean age of participants was 30.52 ± 6.50 years and 66.27% of the nurses worked on inpatient oncology wards. The mean practice score was 21.1 ± 3.76 that ranged from 12.5 to 31. The independent samples t-test showed the outpatient nurses were weaker in practice (17.2 ± 2.52) in comparison with university hospitals (23.35 ± 3.02, P < 0.001). Occupational protection status of clinical nursing staff exposed to cytotoxic drugs especially during administration and disposal of medicines was poor and rarely trained with this subject and was observed under the standard conditions. There is deficiency in the understanding and related protection practices of clinical nursing staff vocationally exposed to cytotoxic drugs. It is recommended that all clinical nursing staff should receive full occupational protection training about these matters and the authorities provide standard conditions of oncology wards.

  9. Anti-neoplastic activities of sepia officinalis ink and coelatura aegyptiaca extracts against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Amel M; Fahmy, Sohair R; El-Abied, Salma A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: With the development of sophisticated instruments for the isolation and elucidation of natural products structures from marine and freshwater organisms, major advances have been made in the discovery of aquatic derived therapeutics. Present investigations were carried out to evaluate cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) ink extract (IE) and freshwater clam (Coelatura aegyptiaca) extract (CE) for their anticancer and antioxidant activities as compared to 5-flurouracil (5-Fu), in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC). Methods: Sixty female Swiss albino mice were divided into five groups (n = 12). All groups except group I received EAC cells (5 × 106 cells/mouse i.p.) and this was taken as the 0th day. Group I served as saline control (5 ml/kg 0.9% NaCl w/v p.o). Group II served as EAC control. Rats of groups III, IV and V received IE, CE (200 mg/kg body weight i.p.), and reference drug (5-Fu, 20 mg/kg body weight i.p.), respectively. Results: The reduction in tumor volume, packed cell volume, tumor cell counts and increase in median survival time and percentage increase in life span in treated animals were observed. There was a significant increase in RBC count; Hb content in treated animals and reduction in total WBC count. There was a significant decrease in AST, ALT, ALP and liver MDA levels and increase in GSH, SOD and NO levels were observed in all treated animals. Conclusion: Both IE and CE were effective in inhibiting the tumor growth in ascitic tumor models. The biochemical, antioxidants and histopathological studies were also supported their antitumor properties. PMID:26097537

  10. Formation and rejoining of deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand breaks induced in isolated cell nuclei by antineoplastic intercalating agents.