Science.gov

Sample records for arsenic-based antineoplastic drugs

  1. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  2. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  3. Stereocomplex micelle from nonlinear enantiomeric copolymers efficiently transports antineoplastic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jixue; Shen, Kexin; Xu, Weiguo; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Tongjun; Wang, Chunxi; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-05-01

    Nanoscale polymeric micelles have attracted more and more attention as a promising nanocarrier for controlled delivery of antineoplastic drugs. Herein, the doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(D-lactide)-based micelle (PDM/DOX), poly(L-lactide)-based micelle (PLM/DOX), and stereocomplex micelle (SCM/DOX) from the equimolar mixture of the enantiomeric four-armed poly(ethylene glycol)-polylactide (PEG-PLA) copolymers were successfully fabricated. In phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.4, SCM/DOX exhibited the smallest hydrodynamic diameter ( D h) of 90 ± 4.2 nm and the slowest DOX release compared with PDM/DOX and PLM/DOX. Moreover, PDM/DOX, PLM/DOX, and SCM/DOX exhibited almost stable D hs of around 115, 105, and 90 nm at above normal physiological condition, respectively, which endowed them with great potential in controlled drug delivery. The intracellular DOX fluorescence intensity after the incubation with the laden micelles was different degrees weaker than that incubated with free DOX · HCl within 12 h, probably due to the slow DOX release from micelles. As the incubation time reached to 24 h, all the cells incubated with the laden micelles, especially SCM/DOX, demonstrated a stronger intracellular DOX fluorescence intensity than free DOX · HCl-cultured ones. More importantly, all the DOX-loaded micelles, especially SCM/DOX, exhibited potent antineoplastic efficacy in vitro, excellent serum albumin-tolerance stability, and satisfactory hemocompatibility. These encouraging data indicated that the loading micelles from nonlinear enantiomeric copolymers, especially SCM/DOX, might be promising in clinical systemic chemotherapy through intravenous injection.

  4. Unexploited Antineoplastic Effects of Commercially Available Anti-Diabetic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Papanagnou, Panagiota; Stivarou, Theodora; Tsironi, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The development of efficacious antitumor compounds with minimal toxicity is a hot research topic. Numerous cancer cell targeted agents are evaluated daily in laboratories for their antitumorigenicity at the pre-clinical level, but the process of their introduction into the market is costly and time-consuming. More importantly, even if these new antitumor agents manage to gain approval, clinicians have no former experience with them. Accruing evidence supports the idea that several medications already used to treat pathologies other than cancer display pleiotropic effects, exhibiting multi-level anti-cancer activity and chemosensitizing properties. This review aims to present the anticancer properties of marketed drugs (i.e., metformin and pioglitazone) used for the management of diabetes mellitus (DM) type II. Mode of action, pre-clinical in vitro and in vivo or clinical data as well as clinical applicability are discussed here. Given the precious multi-year clinical experience with these non-antineoplastic drugs their repurposing in oncology is a challenging alternative that would aid towards the development of therapeutic schemes with less toxicity than those of conventional chemotherapeutic agents. More importantly, harnessing the antitumor function of these agents would save precious time from bench to bedside to aid the fight in the arena of cancer. PMID:27164115

  5. 77 FR 41190 - Revised Document Posted: NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... in the Federal Register June 27, 2012, (77 FR 38297). This notice is corrected as follows: On page... Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2012, Correction AGENCY: National Institute...

  6. Comparison of antineoplastic drug handling policies of hospitals with OSHA guidelines: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Valanis, B; Driscoll, K; McNeil, V

    1990-04-01

    Hospital antineoplastic drug handling policies of 24 hospitals in eight Southwestern Ohio counties were compared with recommendations of the 1986 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines. Although most study facilities where antineoplastics are handled have policies, content varies and is generally less complete than OSHA guidelines, particularly regarding storing, transporting, and disposing of drugs; managing equipment; informing personnel of risk; and surveillance. Recommendations for personal protection concur more closely with OSHA guidelines than do other content areas. PMID:2316776

  7. 75 FR 57044 - NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2010 AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human...

  8. Adherence to Safe Handling Guidelines by Health Care Workers Who Administer Antineoplastic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Boiano, James M.; Steege, Andrea L.; Sweeney, Marie H.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of antineoplastic drugs is well documented. Many are known or suspected human carcinogens where no safe exposure level exists. Authoritative guidelines developed by professional practice organizations and federal agencies for the safe handling of these hazardous drugs have been available for nearly three decades. As a means of evaluating the extent of use of primary prevention practices such as engineering, administrative and work practice controls, personal protective equipment (PPE), and barriers to using PPE, the National Institute for Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a web survey of health care workers in 2011. The study population primarily included members of professional practice organizations representing health care occupations which routinely use or come in contact with selected chemical agents. All respondents who indicated that they administered antineoplastic drugs in the past week were eligible to complete a hazard module addressing self-reported health and safety practices on this topic. Most (98%) of the 2069 respondents of this module were nurses. Working primarily in hospitals, outpatient care centers, and physician offices, respondents reported that they had collectively administered over 90 specific antineoplastic drugs in the past week, with carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel the most common. Examples of activities which increase exposure risk, expressed as percent of respondents, included: failure to wear nonabsorbent gown with closed front and tight cuffs (42%); intravenous (I.V.) tubing primed with antineoplastic drug by respondent (6%) or by pharmacy (12%); potentially contaminated clothing taken home (12%); spill or leak of antineoplastic drug during administration (12%); failure to wear chemotherapy gloves (12%); and lack of hazard awareness training (4%). The most common reason for not wearing gloves or gowns was “skin exposure was minimal”; 4% of respondents, however, reported skin contact during handling

  9. Causes of Health Care Workers’ Exposure to Antineoplastic Drugs: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Abusitta, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Background: The exposure of health care workers to antineoplastic drugs is associated with several adverse health effects, including reproductive toxicities and mutagenic effects. Recent studies have confirmed that Canadian health care workers are at risk of exposure to these agents. However, the causes leading to occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs are unknown. Objective: To perform an exploratory study to ascertain the immediate and contributing causes of health care workers’ exposure to antineoplastic drugs. Methods: Participants were recruited from 6 acute care facilities in Vancouver, British Columbia. Those agreeing to participate were asked to complete a questionnaire about previous exposure to antineoplastic drugs while at work and to describe the circumstances of each exposure incident. Responses were qualitatively analyzed, and the causes of each incident were classified as immediate (unsafe work acts and/or unsafe working conditions) or contributing (related to the management of the organization, the environment, and/or the physical and mental status of the worker). Results: Completed questionnaires were received from 120 participants, 18 (15.0%) of whom reported having had previous occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs. Qualitative analysis of the responses showed 4 categories of immediate causes (needlestick injury, spill, direct contact, and other unintended exposure) and 3 categories of contributing causes (poor communication, inadequate controls, and lack of training). Some incidents had multiple immediate and/or contributing causes. Conclusions: According to a review of the immediate and contributing causes identified in this study, many of the exposure incidents were deemed preventable. A “hierarchy of controls” should be implemented, including (in the following order) engineering controls, administrative controls, and personal protective equipment. The findings of this study can be used to develop job safety analyses

  10. Cardiotoxicity of copper-based antineoplastic drugs casiopeinas is related to inhibition of energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Esquivel, Luz; Marin-Hernandez, Alvaro; Pavon, Natalia; Carvajal, Karla; Moreno-Sanchez, Rafael . E-mail: rafael.moreno@cardiologia.org.mx

    2006-04-01

    Isolated rat hearts were perfused with glucose, octanoate or glucose + octanoate and different concentrations of the copper-based antineoplastic drugs casiopeina II-gly (CSII) or casiopeina III-i-a (CSIII). In isolated perfused hearts with glucose + octanoate, both casiopeinas induced diminution in cardiac work and O{sub 2} consumption with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 5}) of 4 (CSII) and 4.6 (CSIII) {mu}M, after 1 h of perfusion. Strong inhibition of the pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenases as well as total creatine kinase by casiopeinas suggested that ATP generation by oxidative phosphorylation and its transfer towards myofibrils were targets for these drugs. In consequence, the cellular contents of ATP and phosphocreatine were also lowered by casiopeinas. Remarkably, casiopeinas were less toxic than adriamycin (IC{sub 5} = 2.6 {mu}M), a well-known potent cardiotoxic and antineoplastic drug, which has a wide clinical use. In an open-chest animal, which is a more physiological model than the isolated heart, femoral administration of 1 {mu}M drug revealed that CSII was innocuous very likely due to strong binding to serum albumin, whereas adriamycin induced again a potent cardiotoxic effect (diminution in heart rate and severe depression of systolic blood pressure). Thus, it seems that casiopeinas are a group of new antineoplastic drugs with milder secondary toxic effects than proven drugs such as adriamycin.

  11. Comparison of three assays for genetic effects of antineoplastic drugs on cancer patients and their nurses

    SciTech Connect

    Krepinsky, A. ); Bryant, D.W.; Davison, L.; McCalla, D.R. ); Young, B. ); Heddle, J. ); Douglas, G. ); Michalko, K. )

    1990-01-01

    Three assays have been compared for their ability to detect genetic damage caused by antineoplastic drugs in cancer patients and possible damage in the nurses who administered these drugs. The assays were sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and the Salmonella/mammalian microsome assay on urine. Three comparisons were made: (1) patients before versus after treatment; (2) the administering nurses immediately after their work period versus after a few days off that followed (work and off-work); (3) the exposed nurses versus other nurses who did not administer antineoplastic drugs (controls). The SCE assay did not distinguish between the work and off-work samples in either the exposed or control nurses. Chromosomal aberration was the only assay which showed significant difference between the two samples of the exposed nurses and, consequently, between the exposed and control nurses. There is no evidence that the increase was connected to occupational exposure.

  12. Antineoplastic drug contamination on the hands of employees working throughout the hospital medication system.

    PubMed

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Teschke, Kay; Demers, Paul A; Venners, Scott

    2014-07-01

    We previously reported that antineoplastic drug contamination is found on various work surfaces situated throughout the hospital medication system (process flow of drug within a facility from initial delivery to waste disposal). The presence of drug residual on surfaces suggests that healthcare workers involved in some capacity with the system may be exposed through dermal contact. The purpose of this paper was to determine the dermal contamination levels of healthcare employees working throughout a hospital and to identify factors that may influence dermal contamination. We selected participants from six hospitals and wiped the front and back of workers' hands. Wipe samples were analyzed for cyclophosphamide (CP), a commonly used antineoplastic drug, using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Participants were asked about their frequency of handling antineoplastic drugs, known contact with CP on their work shift, gender, job title, and safe drug handling training. In addition, participants were surveyed regarding their glove usage and hand washing practices prior to wipe sample collection. We collected a total of 225 wipe samples. Only 20% (N = 44) were above the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.36ng per wipe. The average concentration was 0.36ng per wipe, the geometric mean < LOD, the geometric standard deviation 1.98, and the range < LOD to 22.8ng per wipe. Hospital employees were classified into eight different job categories and all categories had some dermal contamination levels in excess of the LOD. The job category with the highest proportion of samples greater than the LOD were those workers in the drug administration unit who were not responsible for drug administration (volunteer, oncologist, ward aide, dietician). Of note, the highest recorded concentration was from a worker who had no known contact with CP on their work shift. Our results suggest that a broader range of healthcare workers than previously believed, including

  13. Reproductive Health Risks Associated with Occupational Exposures to Antineoplastic Drugs in Health Care Settings: A Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Thomas H.; Lawson, Christina C.; Polovich, Martha; McDiarmid, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Antineoplastic drugs are known reproductive and developmental toxicants. Our objective was to review the existing literature of reproductive health risks to workers who handle antineoplastic drugs. Methods A structured literature review of 18 peer-reviewed, English language publications of occupational exposure and reproductive outcomes was performed. Results While effect sizes varied with study size and population, occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs appears to raise the risk of both congenital malformations and miscarriage. Studies of infertility and time-to-pregnancy also suggested an increased risk for sub-fertility. Conclusions Antineoplastic drugs are highly toxic in patients receiving treatment and adverse reproductive effects have been well documented in these patients. Healthcare workers with chronic, low level occupational exposure to these drugs also appear to have an increased risk of adverse reproductive outcomes. Additional precautions to prevent exposure should be considered. PMID:25153300

  14. Gold nanoparticle-based drug delivery platform for antineoplastic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liang, Juan-Juan; Zhou, Ying-Ying; Wu, Jun; Ding, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have demonstrated increasingly wide applications in drug delivery due to their unique physicochemical and optical properties as well as low toxicity. Compared to the organic nanocarriers for therapeutic agents, AuNPs have shown superior performance as drug delivery vectors, including the inert nature, well-developed synthesis strategies, tunable size, and flexible and easy surface modification with various chemical and biological molecules. In this review, we emphasize on the applications of AuNPs in the aspect of improving pharmaceutical property and therapeutic efficacy of drugs, especially those covalently and noncovalently connected to the surface of AuNPs. Acting as a solid core to link drugs and their derivatives, AuNPs provide the nano-prodrug system with compressed size, high loading efficiency, three-dimension structure, and enhanced cellular uptake capability. With the intensive and systematical investigation of the drug-connected AuNPs, several important issues will become the hot but emergent topics for future research in this field, such as the toxicity in live human subjects, ultimate destination, and possible pathways and mechanisms for their absorption, circulation, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. PMID:24909418

  15. Permeability of latex and polyvinyl chloride gloves to 20 antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, J L; Connor, T H; Theiss, J C; Anderson, R W; Matney, T S

    1984-12-01

    Permeability of latex and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) gloves to 20 injectable antineoplastic drugs was studied. Four types of gloves were evaluated: latex surgical gloves, latex examination gloves, and PVC gloves in two thicknesses. Each glove material was exposed to each drug for 90 minutes, and permeation was tested using a mutagenicity assay. Individual fingertips of thin PVC gloves and latex surgical gloves were tested for permeability at five time points (2-30 minutes) using a doxorubicin coloration assay. All drugs permeated the thin PVC gloves. Latex surgical gloves were definitely permeable to two drugs (carmustine and thiotepa) and exhibited borderline permeability to mechlorethamine hydrochloride. The thick PVC gloves were definitely permeable to four drugs (carmustine, thiotepa, mechlorethamine hydrochloride, and daunorubicin hydrochloride) and exhibited borderline permeability to two drugs (doxorubicin and mercaptopurine). The latex examination gloves were permeable to carmustine, thiotepa, mechlorethamine hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide. Doxorubicin permeation of individual fingertips of thin PVC gloves varied in time and amount. Doxorubicin did not permeate the latex surgical glove material, but testing with thiotepa showed that individual fingertips of this material also varied in permeability. Glove thickness was a major determinant of permeability; latex surgical gloves were the least permeable and thin PVC gloves the most permeable to the antineoplastic drugs tested. Within individual gloves and glove types, time and amount of permeation were not uniform. PMID:6440436

  16. Permeability of latex and polyvinyl chloride gloves to 20 antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, J L; Connor, T H; Theiss, J C; Anderson, R W; Matney, T S

    1984-12-01

    Permeability of latex and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) gloves to 20 injectable antineoplastic drugs was studied. Four types of gloves were evaluated: latex surgical gloves, latex examination gloves, and PVC gloves in two thicknesses. Each glove material was exposed to each drug for 90 minutes, and permeation was tested using a mutagenicity assay. Individual fingertips of thin PVC gloves and latex surgical gloves were tested for permeability at five time points (2-30 minutes) using a doxorubicin coloration assay. All drugs permeated the thin PVC gloves. Latex surgical gloves were definitely permeable to two drugs (carmustine and thiotepa) and exhibited borderline permeability to mechlorethamine hydrochloride. The thick PVC gloves were definitely permeable to four drugs (carmustine, thiotepa, mechlorethamine hydrochloride, and daunorubicin hydrochloride) and exhibited borderline permeability to two drugs (doxorubicin and mercaptopurine). The latex examination gloves were permeable to carmustine, thiotepa, mechlorethamine hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide. Doxorubicin permeation of individual fingertips of thin PVC gloves varied in time and amount. Doxorubicin did not permeate the latex surgical glove material, but testing with thiotepa showed that individual fingertips of this material also varied in permeability. Glove thickness was a major determinant of permeability; latex surgical gloves were the least permeable and thin PVC gloves the most permeable to the antineoplastic drugs tested. Within individual gloves and glove types, time and amount of permeation were not uniform.

  17. Adverse drug reaction profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs: A focused pharmacovigilance study in India

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Hasitha Diana; Adiga, Shalini; Thomas, Joseph; Sharma, Ajitha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to analyze the adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile of microtubule-damaging antineoplastic drugs (taxanes and vinca alkaloids) and to look for unexpected ADRs among the local population. Focused study on these drugs, rampantly used in oncology department for a wide variety of tumors including early and advanced malignancies, would enable better treatment care by physicians. Materials and Methods: Data on ADRs were collected from the cancer patients belonging to both gender and of all ages, on taxanes- or vinca-based cancer chemotherapy and reported in the Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission form. Causality was assessed using the WHO criteria and Naranjo's Algorithm. Preventability and severity of ADRs were also assessed. Results: A total of 97 ADRs were reported among 488 patients on microtubule-damaging anticancer drugs admitted over a period of 1 year. The incidence rate was 19.87%. Gastrointestinal system (40.2%) was the most affected followed by bone marrow (33%) and skin (8.2%). The highest incidence of ADRs was reported among paclitaxel (54.6%), and vincristine (39.2%). Most of the reported ADRs were of milder nature and preventable. The WHO causality assessment scale indicated 71.1% possible reactions. Conclusions: This study showed that most ADRs are preventable with effective ADR monitoring. There is a great need to create awareness among healthcare professionals regarding the importance of the pharmacovigilance system. Judicious use of the preventive measures will lead to a reduction in the incidence of ADRs due to the drug armamentarium, thereby enabling additional economic benefit to the patient and society. PMID:27721535

  18. Detection and measurement of surface contamination by multiple antineoplastic drugs using multiplex bead assay

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jerome P; Sammons, Deborah L; Robertson, Shirley A; Pretty, Jack; Debord, D Gayle; Connor, Thomas H; Snawder, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Contamination of workplace surfaces by antineoplastic drugs presents an exposure risk for healthcare workers. Traditional instrumental methods to detect contamination such as liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are sensitive and accurate but expensive. Since immunochemical methods may be cheaper and faster than instrumental methods, we wanted to explore their use for routine drug residue detection for preventing worker exposure. Methods In this study we examined the feasibility of using fluorescence covalent microbead immunosorbent assay (FCMIA) for simultaneous detection and semi-quantitative measurement of three antineoplastic drugs (5-fluorouracil, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin). The concentration ranges for the assay were 0–1000 ng/ml for 5-fluorouracil, 0–100 ng/ml for paclitaxel, and 0–2 ng/ml for doxorubicin. The surface sampling technique involved wiping a loaded surface with a swab wetted with wash buffer, extracting the swab in storage/blocking buffer, and measuring drugs in the extract using FCMIA. Results There was no significant cross reactivity between these drugs at the ranges studied indicated by a lack of response in the assay to cross analytes. The limit of detection (LOD) for 5-fluorouracil on the surface studied was 0.93 ng/cm2 with a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 2.8 ng/cm2, the LOD for paclitaxel was 0.57 ng/cm2 with an LOQ of 2.06 ng/cm2, and the LOD for doxorubicin was 0.0036 ng/cm2 with an LOQ of 0.013 ng/cm2. Conclusion The use of FCMIA with a simple sampling technique has potential for low cost simultaneous detection and semi-quantitative measurement of surface contamination from multiple antineoplastic drugs. PMID:25293722

  19. Permeability of four disposable protective-clothing materials to seven antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, J L; Connor, T H; Theiss, J C; Anderson, R W; Matney, T S

    1985-11-01

    The permeability of four types of protective-clothing material to seven injectable antineoplastic drugs was studied. The protective materials tested were Saranex-laminated Tyvek, polyethylene-coated Tyvek, nonporous Tyvek, and Kaycel. Circles 6 cm in diameter were cut from a single garment of each material and exposed to each drug. Permeation of cisplatin, etoposide, mitomycin, cyclophosphamide, carmustine, and thiotepa was assessed by the Salmonella mutagenicity test after four hours of exposure. Doxorubicin permeation was assessed qualitatively over an eight-hour exposure period using a coloration assay. Saranex-laminated Tyvek was not permeable under the test conditions. Polyethylene-coated Tyvek was slightly permeable to thiotepa and carmustine. Nonporous Tyvek was permeable to all seven drugs, and the Kaycel garment was permeable to all of the drugs except etoposide. In no instance did permeation exceed 3.3% of the applied drug dose. Saranex-laminated Tyvek was the most protective of the barrier garments, followed closely in effectiveness by the polyethylene-coated Tyvek. Clothing made from these two Tyvek composites would allow less air flow and, therefore, would be less comfortable to wear for extended periods. Garments made of nonporous Tyvek or Kaycel would be more comfortable, but their use should be accompanied by an awareness of their potential permeability to certain antineoplastic drugs. PMID:4073061

  20. Permeability of four disposable protective-clothing materials to seven antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, J L; Connor, T H; Theiss, J C; Anderson, R W; Matney, T S

    1985-11-01

    The permeability of four types of protective-clothing material to seven injectable antineoplastic drugs was studied. The protective materials tested were Saranex-laminated Tyvek, polyethylene-coated Tyvek, nonporous Tyvek, and Kaycel. Circles 6 cm in diameter were cut from a single garment of each material and exposed to each drug. Permeation of cisplatin, etoposide, mitomycin, cyclophosphamide, carmustine, and thiotepa was assessed by the Salmonella mutagenicity test after four hours of exposure. Doxorubicin permeation was assessed qualitatively over an eight-hour exposure period using a coloration assay. Saranex-laminated Tyvek was not permeable under the test conditions. Polyethylene-coated Tyvek was slightly permeable to thiotepa and carmustine. Nonporous Tyvek was permeable to all seven drugs, and the Kaycel garment was permeable to all of the drugs except etoposide. In no instance did permeation exceed 3.3% of the applied drug dose. Saranex-laminated Tyvek was the most protective of the barrier garments, followed closely in effectiveness by the polyethylene-coated Tyvek. Clothing made from these two Tyvek composites would allow less air flow and, therefore, would be less comfortable to wear for extended periods. Garments made of nonporous Tyvek or Kaycel would be more comfortable, but their use should be accompanied by an awareness of their potential permeability to certain antineoplastic drugs.

  1. Examining factors that influence the effectiveness of cleaning antineoplastic drugs from drug preparation surfaces: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Chua, Prescillia Ps; Danyluk, Quinn; Astrakianakis, George

    2014-06-01

    Occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs has been documented to result in various adverse health effects. Despite the implementation of control measures to minimize exposure, detectable levels of drug residual are still found on hospital work surfaces. Cleaning these surfaces is considered as one means to minimize the exposure potential. However, there are no consistent guiding principles related to cleaning of contaminated surfaces resulting in hospitals to adopt varying practices. As such, this pilot study sought to evaluate current cleaning protocols and identify those factors that were most effective in reducing contamination on drug preparation surfaces. Three cleaning variables were examined: (1) type of cleaning agent (CaviCide®, Phenokil II™, bleach and chlorhexidine), (2) application method of cleaning agent (directly onto surface or indirectly onto a wipe) and (3) use of isopropyl alcohol after cleaning agent application. Known concentrations of antineoplastic drugs (either methotrexate or cyclophosphamide) were placed on a stainless steel swatch and then, systematically, each of the three cleaning variables was tested. Surface wipes were collected and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to determine the percent residual of drug remaining (with 100% being complete elimination of the drug). No one single cleaning agent proved to be effective in completely eliminating all drug contamination. The method of application had minimal effect on the amount of drug residual. In general, application of isopropyl alcohol after the use of cleaning agent further reduced the level of drug contamination although measureable levels of drug were still found in some cases.

  2. Surface wipe sampling for antineoplastic (chemotherapy) and other hazardous drug residue in healthcare settings: Methodology and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Connor, Thomas H; Zock, Matthew D; Snow, Amy H

    2016-09-01

    Surface wipe sampling for various hazardous agents has been employed in many occupational settings over the years for various reasons such as evaluation of potential dermal exposure and health risk, source determination, quality or cleanliness, compliance, and others. Wipe sampling for surface residue of antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in healthcare settings is currently the method of choice to determine surface contamination of the workplace with these drugs. The purpose of this article is to review published studies of wipe sampling for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs, to summarize the methods in use by various organizations and researchers, and to provide some basic guidance for conducting surface wipe sampling for these drugs in healthcare settings.  Recommendations on wipe sampling methodology from several government agencies and organizations were reviewed. Published reports on wipe sampling for hazardous drugs in numerous studies were also examined. The critical elements of a wipe sampling program and related limitations were reviewed and summarized.  Recommendations and guidance are presented concerning the purposes of wipe sampling for antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in the healthcare setting, technical factors and variables, sampling strategy, materials required, and limitations. The reporting and interpretation of wipe sample results is also discussed.  It is recommended that all healthcare settings where antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs are handled consider wipe sampling as part of a comprehensive hazardous drug "safe handling" program. Although no standards exist for acceptable or allowable surface concentrations for these drugs in the healthcare setting, wipe sampling may be used as a method to characterize potential occupational dermal exposure risk and to evaluate the effectiveness of implemented controls and the overall safety program. A comprehensive safe-handling program for antineoplastic drugs may

  3. Toxicity of the mixture of selected antineoplastic drugs against aquatic primary producers.

    PubMed

    Elersek, Tina; Milavec, Sara; Korošec, Maša; Brezovsek, Polona; Negreira, Noelia; Zonja, Bozo; de Alda, Miren López; Barceló, Damià; Heath, Ester; Ščančar, Janez; Filipič, Metka

    2016-08-01

    The residues of antineoplastic drugs are considered as new and emerging pollutants in aquatic environments. Recent experiments showed relatively high toxicity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), imatinib mesylate (IM), etoposide (ET) and cisplatin (CP) that are currently among most widely used antineoplastic drugs, against phytoplankton species. In this study, we investigated the toxic potential of the mixture of 5-FU + IM + ET against green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis, and the stability and sorption of these drugs to algal cells. Toxic potential of the mixture was predicted by the concepts of 'concentration addition' and 'independent action' and compared to the experimentally determined toxicity. In both test species, the measured toxicity of the mixture was at effects concentrations EC10-EC50 higher than the predicted, whereas at higher effect concentration (EC90), it was lower. In general, P. subcapitata was more sensitive than S. leopoliensis. The stability studies of the tested drugs during the experiment showed that 5-FU, IM and CP are relatively stable, whereas in the cultures exposed to ET, two transformation products with the same mass as ET but different retention time were detected. The measurements of the cell-linked concentrations of the tested compounds after 72 h exposure indicated that except for CP (1.9 % of the initial concentration), these drugs are not adsorbed or absorbed by algal cells. The results of this study showed that in alga and cyanobacteria exposure to the mixture of 5-FU + ET + IM, in particular at low effect concentration range, caused additive or synergistic effect on growth inhibition, and they suggest that single compound toxicity data are not sufficient for the proper toxicity prediction for aquatic primary producers. PMID:26755176

  4. Recent Advances on Pathophysiology, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Insights in Cardiac Dysfunction Induced by Antineoplastic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Molinaro, Marilisa; Ameri, Pietro; Marone, Giancarlo; Petretta, Mario; Abete, Pasquale; Di Lisa, Fabio; De Placido, Sabino; Bonaduce, Domenico; Tocchetti, Carlo G.

    2015-01-01

    Along with the improvement of survival after cancer, cardiotoxicity due to antineoplastic treatments has emerged as a clinically relevant problem. Potential cardiovascular toxicities due to anticancer agents include QT prolongation and arrhythmias, myocardial ischemia and infarction, hypertension and/or thromboembolism, left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and heart failure (HF). The latter is variable in severity, may be reversible or irreversible, and can occur soon after or as a delayed consequence of anticancer treatments. In the last decade recent advances have emerged in clinical and pathophysiological aspects of LV dysfunction induced by the most widely used anticancer drugs. In particular, early, sensitive markers of cardiac dysfunction that can predict this form of cardiomyopathy before ejection fraction (EF) is reduced are becoming increasingly important, along with novel therapeutic and cardioprotective strategies, in the attempt of protecting cardiooncologic patients from the development of congestive heart failure. PMID:26583088

  5. Anti-inflammatory drugs and uterine cervical cancer cells: Antineoplastic effect of meclofenamic acid

    PubMed Central

    SORIANO-HERNANDEZ, ALEJANDRO D.; MADRIGAL-PÉREZ, DANIELA; GALVAN-SALAZAR, HECTOR R.; MARTINEZ-FIERRO, MARGARITA L.; VALDEZ-VELAZQUEZ, LAURA L.; ESPINOZA-GÓMEZ, FRANCISCO; VAZQUEZ-VUELVAS, OSCAR F.; OLMEDO-BUENROSTRO, BERTHA A.; GUZMAN-ESQUIVEL, JOSE; RODRIGUEZ-SANCHEZ, IRAM P.; LARA-ESQUEDA, AGUSTIN; MONTES-GALINDO, DANIEL A.; DELGADO-ENCISO, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer (UCC) is one of the main causes of cancer-associated mortality in women. Inflammation has been identified as an important component of this neoplasia; in this context, anti-inflammatory drugs represent possible prophylactic and/or therapeutic alternatives that require further investigation. Anti-inflammatory drugs are common and each one may exhibit a different antineoplastic effect. As a result, the present study investigated different anti-inflammatory models of UCC in vitro and in vivo. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, dexamethasone, meclofenamic acid, flufenamic acid and mefenamic acid were tested in UCC HeLa, VIPA, INBL and SiHa cell lines. The cytotoxicity of the drugs was evaluated in vitro. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, mefenamic acid and flufenamic acid presented with slight to moderate toxicity (10–40% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM) in certain cell lines, while meclofenamic acid exhibited significant cytotoxicity in all essayed cell lines (50–90% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM). The meclofenamic acid was tested in murine models (immunodeficient and immunocompetent) of UCC, which manifested a significant reduction in tumor growth and increased mouse survival. It was demonstrated that of the evaluated anti-inflammatory drugs, meclofenamic acid was the most cytotoxic, with a significant antitumor effect in murine models. Subsequent studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical utility of this drug. PMID:26622892

  6. Arsenic-Based Drugs: From Fowler's Solution to Modern Anticancer Chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibaud, Stéphane; Jaouen, Gérard

    Although arsenic is a poison and has a predominantly unfavorable reputation, it has been used as pharmaceutical agent since the first century BC. In 1786, Thomas Fowler reported the effects of arsenic in the cure of agues, remittent fevers, and periodic headaches. From this time on and despite abusive use, some interesting indications began to appear for trypanosomiasis, syphilis, and blood diseases. The first significant organoarsenical drug (atoxyl) was synthesized by Pierre Antoine Béchamp in 1859 by chemically reacting arsenic acid with aniline but additional experimentations on the properties of arsenic led Paul Ehrlich, the founder of chemotherapy, to the discovery of salvarsan in 1910. From the Second World War, Ernst A.H. Friedheim greatly improved the treatment of trypanosomiasis by melaminophenyl arsenicals. Until the 1990s some organoarsenicals were used for intestinal parasite infections but carcinogenic effects were displayed and all the drugs have been withdrawn in USA, in Europe, and elsewhere. In 2003, arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) was re-introduced for the treatment of very specific hematological malignancies.

  7. A polymer-based drug delivery system for the antineoplastic agent bis(maltolato)oxovanadium in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J K; Min, W; Cruz, T F; Cindric, S; Arsenault, L; Von Hoff, D D; Degan, D; Hunter, W L; Burt, H M

    1997-01-01

    Using vanadyl sulphate, sodium orthovanadate or bis(maltolato)oxovanadium (BMOV), Cruz TF, Morgan A, Min W (1995, Mol Cell Biochem 153: 161-166) have recently demonstrated the antineoplastic effects of vanadium in mice. In this study, the antineoplastic effects of BMOV against human tumour cell lines was confirmed, and this effect was shown to depend on the prolonged exposure of the cells to the drug. We have investigated a polymeric drug delivery system for the sustained delivery of BMOV as an antineoplastic agent in mice. The objective was to design and evaluate an injectable polymer-BMOV paste that would act as a drug implant for the slow but sustained release of BMOV in the mice. In vitro studies showed that the biodegradable polymer poly (Ghlr epsilon epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) released BMOV in a sustained manner with rates of drug release increasing with increased loading of the drug in the polymer. In vivo studies showed that PCL-BMOV paste implants produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of MDAY-D2 tumour growth via systemic drug delivery. Further in vivo studies showed that 5% BMOV-loaded PCL (containing 20% methoxypolyethylene glycol) was effective in preventing tumour regrowth of resected RIF tumour masses in mice when the PCL-BMOV paste was applied to the resected site for localized drug delivery. The results confirm the potential of vanadium as an antineoplastic agent and show that the injectable PCL-BMOV formulation releases a chemotherapeutic dose of vanadium for the systemic treatment of whole tumours as well as the localized treatment of resected RIF tumours.

  8. A polymer-based drug delivery system for the antineoplastic agent bis(maltolato)oxovanadium in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J. K.; Min, W.; Cruz, T. F.; Cindric, S.; Arsenault, L.; Von Hoff, D. D.; Degan, D.; Hunter, W. L.; Burt, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    Using vanadyl sulphate, sodium orthovanadate or bis(maltolato)oxovanadium (BMOV), Cruz TF, Morgan A, Min W (1995, Mol Cell Biochem 153: 161-166) have recently demonstrated the antineoplastic effects of vanadium in mice. In this study, the antineoplastic effects of BMOV against human tumour cell lines was confirmed, and this effect was shown to depend on the prolonged exposure of the cells to the drug. We have investigated a polymeric drug delivery system for the sustained delivery of BMOV as an antineoplastic agent in mice. The objective was to design and evaluate an injectable polymer-BMOV paste that would act as a drug implant for the slow but sustained release of BMOV in the mice. In vitro studies showed that the biodegradable polymer poly (Ghlr epsilon epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) released BMOV in a sustained manner with rates of drug release increasing with increased loading of the drug in the polymer. In vivo studies showed that PCL-BMOV paste implants produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of MDAY-D2 tumour growth via systemic drug delivery. Further in vivo studies showed that 5% BMOV-loaded PCL (containing 20% methoxypolyethylene glycol) was effective in preventing tumour regrowth of resected RIF tumour masses in mice when the PCL-BMOV paste was applied to the resected site for localized drug delivery. The results confirm the potential of vanadium as an antineoplastic agent and show that the injectable PCL-BMOV formulation releases a chemotherapeutic dose of vanadium for the systemic treatment of whole tumours as well as the localized treatment of resected RIF tumours. Images Figure 3 PMID:9083337

  9. Review of Experience of a Statewide Poison Control Center With Pediatric Exposures to Oral Antineoplastic Drugs in the Nonmedical Setting.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Stephen L; Liu, Jehnan; Soleymani, Kamyar; Romasco, Rebecca L; Farid, Hanieh; Clark, Richard F; Cantrell, F Lee

    2016-01-01

    The use of oral antineoplastic agents in nonmedical settings continues to increase. There are limited data available on pediatric exposures to these agents. We sought to identify characteristics of such exposures. We performed a retrospective review of database of a statewide poison system from 2000 to 2009 for all cases of pediatric exposures to oral antineoplastic agents, which took place in a nonmedical setting. Data collected include gender, age, agent of exposure, dose, drug concentration, reason for exposure, symptoms, outcomes, interventions, and length of hospital stay. There were a total of 328 patients. The mean average age was 4.1 years. Eighty-nine percentage (n = 293) was unintentional. Exposures to 21 different antineoplastic agents were identified. Methotrexate (n = 91) and 6-mercaptopurine (n = 47) were the most common agents encountered. Two hundred ninety-nine (91%) cases had no symptoms reported. When reported, gastrointestinal symptoms (n = 17) and central nervous system sedation (n = 6) were most common. One case of pancytopenia was reported. No deaths were reported in this series. Sixty-seven percent (n = 220) were managed at home, whereas 19 (6%) were admitted to a health care facility. Cases were followed by the poison control center for 0.34 days (SD = 1.40). In this study, exposures to oral antineoplastics were primarily unintentional, asymptomatic, and managed at home. Study limitations include possible reporting bias, inability to objectively confirm exposures, and limited duration of monitoring by the poison control center. In this retrospective review, no significant morbidity or mortality was reported from pediatric exposures to oral antineoplastic drugs in the nonmedical setting.

  10. Investigations on nanoconfinement of low-molecular antineoplastic agents into biocompatible magnetic matrices for drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Tomoiaga, Alina Maria; Cioroiu, Bogdan Ionel; Nica, Valentin; Vasile, Aurelia

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles are employed as biocompatible matrices to host low-molecular antineoplastic drugs. 5-Fluorouracil is a well-known antimetabolite drug used to treat many malignancies: colon, rectal, breast, head and neck, pancreatic, gastric, esophageal, liver and G-U (bladder, penile, vulva, prostate), skin cancers (basal cell and keratosis). Unfortunately severe gastrointestinal, hematological, neural, cardiac and dermatological toxic effects are often registered due to its cytotoxicity. Thus, this work focuses on development of a magnetic silica nanosystem, capable of hosting high amounts of 5-fluorouracil and delivers it in a targeted manner, under the influence of external magnetic field. There are few reports on nanoconfinement of this particular small molecule antimetabolite on mesoporous silica hosts. Therefore we have investigated different ways to confine high amounts of 5-FU within amino-modified and non-modified mesopores of the silica shell, from water and ethanol, under magnetic stirring and ultrasound irradiation. Also, we have studied the adsorption process from water as a function of pH in order to rationalize drug-support interactions. It is shown that nature of the solvent has great influence on diffusion of small molecules into mesopores, which is slower from alcoholic solutions. More importantly, sonication is proven as an excellent alternative to long adsorption tests, since the time necessary to reach equilibrium is drastically reduced to 1h and higher amounts of drug may be immobilized within the mesopores of amino-modified magnetic silica nanoparticles. These results are highly important for optimization of drug immobilization process in order to attain desired release profile. PMID:23777792

  11. Examination of the kinetics of degradation of the antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil by chlorine and bromine.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tanumihardja, Jessica; Masuyama, Takaaki; Korshin, Gregory

    2015-01-23

    This study examined the degradation of the widely used antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU) by chlorine and bromine. 5FU was determined to interact readily with free chlorine and bromine but was stable in the presence of chloramine. The removal of 5FU followed a second-order kinetic pattern. Apparent rates (kapp) of 5FU removal by chlorine and bromine were strongly pH dependent and had maximum 14.8M(-1)s(-1) and 1.9×10(3)M(-1)s(-1)kapp values, respectively at pH 7. Modeling of the dependence of the kapp values vs. pH indicated the presence of a relatively acidic (pK 6.4 vs. 8.5 of 5FU per se) 5FU intermediate generated in the presence of halogen species. Spectrophotometric measurements confirmed the increased acidity of 5FU chlorination products and allowed proposing a degradation pathway of 5FU by chlorine. This pathway suggests that 5FU chlorination proceeds via chlorine incorporation at the 6th carbon in the heterocyclic ring of 5FU.

  12. 76 FR 46299 - NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2012: Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-19-P ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other... List AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for...

  13. 78 FR 33097 - NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2014: Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Howard, Director, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other... List AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for...

  14. Identification of Knowledge Gaps Regarding Healthcare Workers' Exposure to Antineoplastic Drugs: Review of Literature, North America versus Europe

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Barzan, Cris; Astrakianakis, George

    2014-01-01

    We have been examining the issue of healthcare workers' exposure to antineoplastic drugs for nearly a decade and have observed that there appears to be more publications on the subject matter originating from Europe than from North America. The concern is that findings from Europe may not be generalizable to North America because of differences in handling practices, regulatory requirements, and training. Our objective was to perform a literature review to confirm our observation and, in turn, identify gaps in knowledge that warrants addressing in North America. Using select keywords, we searched for publications in PubMed and Web of Science. All papers were initially classified according to the originating continent and then categorized into one or more subject categories (analytical methods, biological monitoring, occupational exposure, surface contamination, and probability of risk/exposure). Our review identified 16 papers originating from North America and 55 papers from Europe with surface contamination being the subject matter most often studied overall. Based on our results, we are of the opinion that North American researchers need to further conduct dermal and/or urinary drug contamination studies as well as assess the exposure risk faced by healthcare workers who handle antineoplastic drugs. Trends in exposure levels should also be explored. PMID:25516807

  15. A Comprehensive Spectroscopic and Computational Investigation to Probe the Interaction of Antineoplastic Drug Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid with Serum Albumins.

    PubMed

    Nusrat, Saima; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Zaman, Masihuz; Zaidi, Nida; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Alam, Parvez; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous drugs that are used as antidote against chemotheray, inflammation or viral infection, gets absorbed and interacts reversibly to the major serum transport protein i.e. albumins, upon entering the circulatory system. To have a structural guideline in the rational drug designing and in the synthesis of drugs with greater efficacy, the binding mechanism of an antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory drug Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) with human and bovine serum albumins (HSA & BSA) were examined by spectroscopic and computational methods. NDGA binds to site II of HSA with binding constant (Kb) ~105 M-1 and free energy (ΔG) ~ -7.5 kcal.mol-1. It also binds at site II of BSA but with lesser binding affinity (Kb) ~105 M-1 and ΔG ~ -6.5 kcal.mol-1. The negative value of ΔG, ΔH and ΔS for both the albumins at three different temperatures confirmed that the complex formation process between albumins and NDGA is spontaneous and exothermic. Furthermore, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions are the main forces involved in complex formation of NDGA with both the albumins as evaluated from fluorescence and molecular docking results. Binding of NDGA to both the albumins alter the conformation and causes minor change in the secondary structure of proteins as indicated by the CD spectra. PMID:27391941

  16. A Comprehensive Spectroscopic and Computational Investigation to Probe the Interaction of Antineoplastic Drug Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid with Serum Albumins

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, Saima; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Zaman, Masihuz; Zaidi, Nida; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Alam, Parvez; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous drugs that are used as antidote against chemotheray, inflammation or viral infection, gets absorbed and interacts reversibly to the major serum transport protein i.e. albumins, upon entering the circulatory system. To have a structural guideline in the rational drug designing and in the synthesis of drugs with greater efficacy, the binding mechanism of an antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory drug Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) with human and bovine serum albumins (HSA & BSA) were examined by spectroscopic and computational methods. NDGA binds to site II of HSA with binding constant (Kb) ~105 M-1 and free energy (ΔG) ~ -7.5 kcal.mol-1. It also binds at site II of BSA but with lesser binding affinity (Kb) ~105 M-1 and ΔG ~ -6.5 kcal.mol-1. The negative value of ΔG, ΔH and ΔS for both the albumins at three different temperatures confirmed that the complex formation process between albumins and NDGA is spontaneous and exothermic. Furthermore, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions are the main forces involved in complex formation of NDGA with both the albumins as evaluated from fluorescence and molecular docking results. Binding of NDGA to both the albumins alter the conformation and causes minor change in the secondary structure of proteins as indicated by the CD spectra. PMID:27391941

  17. The antineoplastic drug flavopiridol reverses memory impairment induced by Amyloid-ß1-42 oligomers in mice.

    PubMed

    Leggio, Gian Marco; Catania, Maria Vincenza; Puzzo, Daniela; Spatuzza, Michela; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Gulisano, Walter; Torrisi, Sebastiano Alfio; Giurdanella, Giovanni; Piazza, Cateno; Impellizzeri, Agata Rita; Gozzo, Lucia; Navarria, Andrea; Bucolo, Claudio; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Palmeri, Agostino; Salomone, Salvatore; Copani, Agata; Caraci, Filippo; Drago, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    The ectopic re-activation of cell cycle in neurons is an early event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which could lead to synaptic failure and ensuing cognitive deficits before frank neuronal death. Cytostatic drugs that act as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors have been poorly investigated in animal models of AD. In the present study, we examined the effects of flavopiridol, an inhibitor of CDKs currently used as antineoplastic drug, against cell cycle reactivation and memory loss induced by intracerebroventricular injection of Aß1-42 oligomers in CD1 mice. Cycling neurons, scored as NeuN-positive cells expressing cyclin A, were found both in the frontal cortex and in the hippocampus of Aβ-injected mice, paralleling memory deficits. Starting from three days after Aβ injection, flavopiridol (0.5, 1 and 3mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected daily, for eleven days. Here we show that a treatment with flavopiridol (0.5 and 1mg/kg) was able to rescue the loss of memory induced by Aβ1-42, and to prevent the occurrence of ectopic cell-cycle events in the mouse frontal cortex and hippocampus. This is the first evidence that a cytostatic drug can prevent cognitive deficits in a non-transgenic animal model of AD. PMID:26875816

  18. A study protocol for the evaluation of occupational mutagenic/carcinogenic risks in subjects exposed to antineoplastic drugs: a multicentric project

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some industrial hygiene studies have assessed occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs; other epidemiological investigations have detected various toxicological effects in exposure groups labeled with the job title. In no research has the same population been studied both environmentally and epidemiologically. The protocol of the epidemiological study presented here uses an integrated environmental and biological monitoring approach. The aim is to assess in hospital nurses preparing and/or administering therapy to cancer patients the current level of occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs, DNA and chromosome damage as cancer predictive effects, and the association between the two. Methods/Design About 80 healthy non-smoking female nurses, who job it is to prepare or handle antineoplastic drugs, and a reference group of about 80 healthy non-smoking female nurses not occupationally exposed to chemicals will be examined simultaneously in a cross-sectional study. All the workers will be recruited from five hospitals in northern and central Italy after their informed consent has been obtained. Evaluation of surface contamination and dermal exposure to antineoplastic drugs will be assessed by determining cyclophosphamide on selected surfaces (wipes) and on the exposed nurses' clothes (pads). The concentration of unmetabolized cyclophosphamide as a biomarker of internal dose will be measured in end-shift urine samples from exposed nurses. Biomarkers of effect and susceptibility will be assessed in exposed and unexposed nurses: urinary concentration of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine; DNA damage detected using the single-cell microgel electrophoresis (comet) assay in peripheral white blood cells; micronuclei and chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Genetic polymorphisms for enzymes involved in metabolic detoxification (i.e. glutathione S-transferases) will also be analysed. Using standardized questionnaires, occupational exposure will

  19. Discovery and development of the epothilones : a novel class of antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, Hans; Höfle, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    The epothilones are a novel class of antineoplastic agents possessing antitubulin activity. The compounds were originally identified as secondary metabolites produced by the soil-dwelling myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. Two major compounds, epothilone A and epothilone B, were purified from the S. cellulosum strain So ce90 and their structures were identified as 16-member macrolides. Initial screening with these compounds revealed a very narrow and selective antifungal activity against the zygomycete, Mucor hiemalis. In addition, strong cytotoxic activity against eukaryotic cells, mouse L929 fibroblasts and human T-24 bladder carcinoma cells was observed. Subsequent studies revealed that epothilones induce tubulin polymerization and enhance microtubule stability. Epothilone-induced stabilisation of microtubules was shown to cause arrest at the G2/M transition of the cell cycle and apoptosis. The compounds are active against cancer cells that have developed resistance to taxanes as a result of acquisition of beta-tubulin overexpression or mutations and against multidrug-resistant cells that overexpress P-glycoprotein or multidrug resistance-associated protein. Thus, epothilones represent a new class of antimicrotubule agents with low susceptibility to key tumour resistance mechanisms. More recently, a range of synthetic and semisynthetic epothilone analogues have been produced to further improve the adverse effect profile (or therapeutic window) and to maximize pharmacokinetic and antitumour properties. Various epothilone analogues have demonstrated activity against many tumour types in preclinical studies and several compounds have been and still are being evaluated in clinical trials. This article reviews the identification and early molecular characterization of the epothilones, which has provided insight into the mode of action of these novel antitumour agents in vivo. PMID:18095749

  20. Application and assessment of a regular environmental monitoring of the antineoplastic drug contamination level in pharmacies - the MEWIP project.

    PubMed

    Kiffmeyer, Thekla K; Tuerk, Jochen; Hahn, Moritz; Stuetzer, Hartmut; Hadtstein, Claudia; Heinemann, André; Eickmann, Udo

    2013-05-01

    A large-scale study was carried out in order to determine the contamination level of antineoplastic drugs in pharmacies and to investigate the suitability and effects of wipe sample monitoring at regular intervals. A specific study design was developed. The 130 participating pharmacies were divided into a study and a control group, carrying out five and two wipe sampling cycles, respectively. The work practice was analyzed using questionnaires to identify factors that influence the contamination level. From 1269 wipe samples, 774 (61%) were contaminated with at least one of the analyzed cytotoxic drugs: cyclophosphamide, docetaxel, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine, ifosfamide, methotrexate, and paclitaxel. A significant decrease of the contamination with cyclophosphamide and 5-fluorouracil was observed in the study group. The Monitoring-Effect Study of Wipe Sampling in Pharmacies method has proven to be a reliable and affordable tool for contamination control. Based on the 90th percentile of the contamination values, a substance-independent performance-based guidance value of 0.1ng cm(-2) has been derived. PMID:23125441

  1. Removal of polycyclic synthetic musks and antineoplastic drugs in ozonated wastewater: Quantitation based on the data of differential spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Nanaboina, Venkateswarlu; Chen, Fang; Korshin, Gregory V

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the degradation behavior of polycyclic musks (PMs) and antineoplastic drugs (ADs) and the absorbance spectra of effluent organic matter (EfOM) in municipal wastewater by ozone. Specific ozone doses used in the experiments ranged from 0 to 1mg O3/mg dissolved organic matter (DOC). The examined PMs included galaxolide, tonalide, celestolide, traseolide and phantolide. ADs included busulfan, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, flutamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen and methotrexate. Strong monotonic albeit nonlinear correlations were found to exist between relative changes of EfOM absorbance at 254 nm (i.e. ΔA254/A(0)254) and the degradation of the selected PMs and ADs. This result was interpreted based on the concept of the simultaneous oxidation of EfOM and, on the other hand, PMs and ADs. This interpretation showed that PMs were degraded primarily via OH radical attack, with tonalide and phantolide being less reactive compared with the other PMs. ADs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and busulfan were also determined to undergo oxidation by OH radicals. Comparison of the behavior of the radical probe para-chlorobenzoic acid and the examined ADs and PMs allowed evaluating corresponding reaction rate constants for reactions between these species and OH radicals. PMID:26555374

  2. Oxidative stress induced in nurses by exposure to preparation and handling of antineoplastic drugs in Mexican hospitals: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Miranda-Mendoza, Gerardo Daniel; Cabrera-Galeana, Paula Anel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; Sanjuan-Reyes, Nely; Neri-Cruz, Nadia; García-Medina, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The impact of involuntary exposure to antineoplastic drugs (AD) was studied in a group of nurses in diverse hospitals in Mexico. The results were compared with a group of unexposed nurses. Anthropometric characteristics and the biochemical analysis were analyzed in both groups. Also, lipid peroxidation level (LPX), protein carbonyl content (PCC), and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were evaluated in blood of study participants as oxidative stress (OS) biomarkers. The group of occupationally exposed (OE) nurses consisted of 30 individuals ranging in age from 25 to 35 years. The control group included 30 nurses who were not occupationally exposed to the preparation and handling of AD and whose anthropometric and biochemical characteristics were similar to those of the OE group. All biomarkers evaluated were significantly increased (P < 0.5) in OE nurses compared to the control group. Results show that the assessment of OS biomarkers is advisable in order to evaluate exposure to AD in nurses.

  3. Oxidative Stress Induced in Nurses by Exposure to Preparation and Handling of Antineoplastic Drugs in Mexican Hospitals: A Multicentric Study

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Miranda-Mendoza, Gerardo Daniel; Cabrera-Galeana, Paula Anel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely; Neri-Cruz, Nadia; García-Medina, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The impact of involuntary exposure to antineoplastic drugs (AD) was studied in a group of nurses in diverse hospitals in Mexico. The results were compared with a group of unexposed nurses. Anthropometric characteristics and the biochemical analysis were analyzed in both groups. Also, lipid peroxidation level (LPX), protein carbonyl content (PCC), and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were evaluated in blood of study participants as oxidative stress (OS) biomarkers. The group of occupationally exposed (OE) nurses consisted of 30 individuals ranging in age from 25 to 35 years. The control group included 30 nurses who were not occupationally exposed to the preparation and handling of AD and whose anthropometric and biochemical characteristics were similar to those of the OE group. All biomarkers evaluated were significantly increased (P < 0.5) in OE nurses compared to the control group. Results show that the assessment of OS biomarkers is advisable in order to evaluate exposure to AD in nurses. PMID:24719678

  4. Multicenter study of environmental contamination with antineoplastic drugs in 36 Canadian hospitals: a 2013 follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Berruyer, M; Tanguay, C; Caron, N J; Lefebvre, M; Bussières, J F

    2015-01-01

    No occupational exposure limit exists for antineoplastic drugs. The main objective of this study was to describe environmental contamination with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and methotrexate in pharmacy and patient care areas of Canadian hospitals in 2013. The secondary objective was to compare the 2013 environmental monitoring results with previous studies. Six standardized sites in the pharmacy and six sites on patient care areas were sampled in each participating center. Samples were analyzed for the presence of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and methotrexate by UPLC-MSMS. The limit of detection (LOD) in pg/cm(2) was 1.8 for cyclophosphamide, 2.2 for ifosfamide, and 7.5 for methotrexate. The 75th percentile of cyclophosphamide concentration was compared between the 2013, 2008-2010, and 2012 studies. Thirty-six hospitals participated in the study and 422 samples were collected. Overall, 47% (198/422) of the samples were positive for cyclophosphamide, 18% (75/422) were positive for ifosfamide, and 3% (11/422) were positive for methotrexate. In 2013, the 75th percentile value of cyclophosphamide surface concentration was reduced to 8.4pg/cm(2) (n = 36), compared with 9.4pg/cm(2) in 2012 (n = 33) and 40pg/cm(2) (n = 25) in 2008-2010. The 75th percentile for ifosfamide and methotrexate concentration remained lower than the LOD. The 2013 study shows an improvement in the surface contamination level, and a plateau effect in the proportion of positive samples.

  5. List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings 2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs (for example, pharmacy and nursing personnel, physicians, operating room personnel, environmental services workers, workers in research ... personnel, pharmacists and pharmacy technicians, nursing personnel, physicians, operating room personnel, environmental services personnel, and workers in ...

  6. Cell-based laboratory evaluation of coagulation activation by antineoplastic drugs for the treatment of lymphoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tsunaka, Misae; Arai, Reina; Ohashi, Ayaka; Koyama, Takatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Combining vorinostat, L-asparaginase, and doxorubicin (Dox) led to improved response rates in the treatment of lymphoid tumors. However, deep-vein thrombosis has been noted as one of the most serious side effects with these drugs, and how these regimens cause deep-vein thrombosis is unclear. Methods: We investigated the procoagulant effects of vorinostat, L-asparaginase, and doxorubicin in lymphoid tumors, focusing on tissue factor, phosphatidylserine, and antithrombin. The human vascular endothelial cell line EAhy926 as well as the lymphoid neoplastic cell lines HUT78 (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma), Molt4 (acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia), and Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) were employed to investigate these procoagulant effects. Results: Vorinostat, L-asparaginase, and doxorubicin induced exposure of phosphatidylserine and procoagulant activity on the surface of lymphoid tumor cells. Vorinostat and doxorubicin also induced phosphatidylserine exposure and increased procoagulant activity on EAhy926 cells. Expression of tissue factor antigen was induced by doxorubicin on the surface of each type of cells, whereas expression of tissue factor mRNA was unchanged. Secretion of antithrombin from HepG2 cells was reduced only by L-asparaginase. Conclusion: These data suggest that vorinostat and doxorubicin may induce procoagulant activity in vessels through apoptosis of tumor cells and through phosphatidylserine exposure and/or tissue factor expression on vascular endothelial cells. L-asparaginase may induce a thrombophilic state by reducing the secretion of anticoagulant proteins such as antithrombin. The laboratory methods described here could be useful to evaluate the procoagulant effects of antineoplastic drugs. PMID:27504186

  7. Prediction and assessment of ecogenotoxicity of antineoplastic drugs in binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kundi, Michael; Parrella, Alfredo; Lavorgna, Margherita; Criscuolo, Emma; Russo, Chiara; Isidori, Marina

    2016-08-01

    The combined genotoxic effects of four anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil [5-FU], cisplatin [CDDP], etoposide [ET], and imatinib mesylate [IM]) were studied testing their binary mixtures in two crustaceans that are part of the freshwater food chain, namely Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia. Genotoxicity was assessed using the in vivo comet assay. Assessment was based on two distinct effect sizes determined from dose-response experiments. Doses for single and combined exposures expected to result in these effect sizes were computed based on Bliss independence as reference model. Statistical comparison by analysis of variance of single and combined toxicities allowed accepting or rejecting the independency hypothesis. The results obtained for D. magna showed independent action for all mixtures except for IM+5-FU that showed an antagonistic interaction. In C. dubia, most mixtures had antagonist interactions except IM+5-FU and IM+CDDP that showed Bliss independence. Despite the antagonistic interactions, our results demonstrated that combinations of anticancer drugs could be of environmental concern because effects occur at very low concentrations that are in the range of concentrations encountered in aquatic systems.

  8. Selumetinib, an Oral Anti-Neoplastic Drug, May Attenuate Cardiac Hypertrophy via Targeting the ERK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao; Luo, Fangbo; Chen, Lihong; Cai, Huawei; Li, Yajiao; You, Guiying; Long, Dan; Li, Shengfu; Zhang, Qiuping; Rao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Aims Although extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) are a well-known central mediator in cardiac hypertrophy, no clinically available ERK antagonist has been tested for preventing cardiac hypertrophy. Selumetinib is a novel oral MEK inhibitor that is currently under Phase II and Phase III clinical investigation for advanced solid tumors. In this study, we investigated whether Selumetinib could inhibit the aberrant ERK activation of the heart in response to stress as well as prevent cardiac hypertrophy. Methods and Results In an in vitro model of PE-induced cardiac hypertrophy, Selumetinib significantly inhibited the ERK activation and prevented enlargement of cardiomyocytes or reactivation of certain fetal genes. In the pathologic cardiac hypertrophy model of ascending aortic constriction, Selumetinib provided significant ERK inhibition in the stressed heart but not in the other organs. This selective ERK inhibition prevented left ventricular (LV) wall thickening, LV mass increase, fetal gene reactivation and cardiac fibrosis. In another distinct physiologic cardiac hypertrophy model of a swimming rat, Selumetinib provided a similar anti-hypertrophy effect, except that no significant fetal gene reactivation or cardiac fibrosis was observed. Conclusions Selumetinib, a novel oral anti-cancer drug with good safety records in a number of Phase II clinical trials, can inhibit ERK activity in the heart and prevent cardiac hypertrophy. These promising results indicate that Selumetinib could potentially be used to treat cardiac hypertrophy. However, this hypothesis needs to be validated in human clinical trials. PMID:27438013

  9. Environmental contamination, product contamination and workers exposure using a robotic system for antineoplastic drug preparation.

    PubMed

    Sessink, Paul J M; Leclercq, Gisèle M; Wouters, Dominique-Marie; Halbardier, Loïc; Hammad, Chaïma; Kassoul, Nassima

    2015-04-01

    Environmental contamination, product contamination and technicians exposure were measured following preparation of iv bags with cyclophosphamide using the robotic system CytoCare. Wipe samples were taken inside CytoCare, in the clean room environment, from vials, and prepared iv bags including ports and analysed for contamination with cyclophosphamide. Contamination with cyclophosphamide was also measured in environmental air and on the technicians hands and gloves used for handling the drugs. Exposure of the technicians to cyclophosphamide was measured by analysis of cyclophosphamide in urine. Contamination with cyclophosphamide was mainly observed inside CytoCare, before preparation, after preparation and after daily routine cleaning. Contamination outside CytoCare was incidentally found. All vials with reconstituted cyclophosphamide entering CytoCare were contaminated on the outside but vials with powdered cyclophosphamide were not contaminated on the outside. Contaminated bags entering CytoCare were also contaminated after preparation but non-contaminated bags were not contaminated after preparation. Cyclophosphamide was detected on the ports of all prepared bags. Almost all outer pairs of gloves used for preparation and daily routine cleaning were contaminated with cyclophosphamide. Cyclophosphamide was not found on the inner pairs of gloves and on the hands of the technicians. Cyclophosphamide was not detected in the stationary and personal air samples and in the urine samples of the technicians. CytoCare enables the preparation of cyclophosphamide with low levels of environmental contamination and product contamination and no measurable exposure of the technicians.

  10. Ribosomal S6 kinase 4 (RSK4) expression in ovarian tumors and its regulation by antineoplastic drugs in ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabian; Zeferino-Toquero, Moises; Estrada-Moscoso, Isaias; Imani-Razavi, Fazlollah Shahram; Olivares, Aleida; Perez-Juarez, Carlos Eduardo; Diaz-Cueto, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Survival rate in ovarian cancer depends on the stage of the disease. RSK4, which has been considered as a tumor suppressor factor, controls cells invasion due to its antiinvasive and antimetastatic properties. Modulation of RSK4 expression could be an important event to increase the survival rate in ovarian cancer patients. Thus, the goal of the present study was to establish the differences in RSK4 expression among normal, benign and malignant ovarian tissues and to determine whether antineoplastic drugs regulate its expression in SKOV3 and TOV-112D cells. RSK4 levels in 30 malignant ovarian tumors, 64 benign tumors and 36 normal ovary tissues were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Modulation of RSK4 expression by two antineoplastic drugs (cisplatin and vorinostat) was also studied in the SKOV3 and TOV-112D ovarian cancer cell lines using the same techniques. RSK4 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in malignant ovarian tumors as compared to benign tumors and normal tissue. These low-RSK4 levels were significantly associated with advanced stages of ovarian cancer. RSK4 expression was increased after incubation of SKOV3 and TOV-112D cell lines with cisplatin and vorinostat for 24 h. The combination of these antineoplastic drugs did not produce a synergistic or additive effect. These results suggest that RSK4 is expressed at low levels in malignant ovarian tumors, which correlates with advanced stages of the disease. Additionally, RSK4 expression is regulated by cisplatin and vorinostat in two ovarian cancer cell lines.

  11. Prediction of drug distribution in subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines and healthy tissues in mouse: application of the tissue composition-based model to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Gould, Stephen E; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Messick, Kirsten; Oeh, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M

    2015-04-01

    Advanced tissue composition-based models can predict the tissue-plasma partition coefficient (Kp ) values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on healthy tissues and do not incorporate data from tumors. The objective of this study was to apply a tissue composition-based model to six marketed antineoplastic drugs (docetaxel, DOC; doxorubicin, DOX; gemcitabine, GEM; methotrexate, MTX; topotecan, TOP; and fluorouracil, 5-FU) to predict their Kp values in three human tumor xenografts (HCT-116, H2122, and PC3) as well as in healthy tissues (brain, muscle, lung, and liver) under steady-state in vivo conditions in female NCR nude mice. The mechanisms considered in the tissue/tumor composition-based model are the binding to lipids and to plasma proteins, but the transporter effect was also investigated. The method consisted of analyzing tissue composition, performing the pharmacokinetics studies in mice, and calculating the corresponding in vivo Kp values. Analyses of tumor composition indicated that the tumor xenografts contained no or low amounts of common transporters by contrast to lipids. The predicted Kp values were within twofold and threefold of the measured values in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively. However, predictions for brain for each drug, for liver for MTX, and for each tumor xenograft for GEM were disparate from the observed values, and, therefore, not well served by the model. Overall, this study is the first step toward the mechanism-based prediction of Kp values of small molecules in healthy and tumor tissues in mouse when no transporter and permeation limitation effect is evident. This approach will be useful in selecting compounds based on their abilities to penetrate human cancer xenografts with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, thereby increasing therapeutic index for chemotherapy in oncology study.

  12. Minimizing Occupational Exposure to Antineoplastic Agents.

    PubMed

    Polovich, Martha

    2016-01-01

    The inherent toxicity of antineoplastic drugs used for the treatment of cancer makes them harmful to healthy cells as well as to cancer cells. Nurses who prepare and/or administer the agents potentially are exposed to the drugs and their negative effects. Knowledge about these drugs and the precautions aimed at reducing exposure are essential aspects of infusion nursing practice. This article briefly reviews the mechanisms of action of common antineoplastic drugs, the adverse outcomes associated with exposure, the potential for occupational exposure from preparation and administration, and recommended strategies for minimizing occupational exposure. PMID:27598070

  13. Mycelial antineoplastic activity of Agaricus blazei.

    PubMed

    Bertéli, Míria Benetati Delgado; Umeo, Suzana Harue; Bertéli, André; do Valle, Juliana Silveira; Linde, Giani Andrea; Colauto, Nelson Barros

    2014-08-01

    Basidiocarp of Agaricus blazei (=Agaricus brasiliensis; =Agaricus subrufescens) is used as teas or capsules due to its antineoplastic effect but there are few reports of using mycelium for this purpose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antineoplastic activity on sarcoma 180 cells implanted in mice of two forms of preparation of the mycelium from two A. blazei strains grown in culture medium with different concentrations of isolated soy protein. Mycelia were grown in Pontecorvo medium with different concentrations of isolated soybean protein (ISP). Mycelial hot water extract, moistened mycelial powder, hot water extract of green tea, Ifosfamida(®) (ifosfamide drug), and saline solution were administered daily by gavage in mice with sarcoma 180 cells to evaluate antineoplastic activity. It was concluded that antineoplastic activity was the same for both strains, except when used as moistened mycelial powder, which rules out the use of mycelial powder in capsules. Mycelial hot water extract had high antineoplastic activity with lower metabolic demand on the spleen and maintenance of normal blood parameters. Mycelial growth in different ISP concentrations had the same antineoplastic activity. Also the vegetative mycelium was as effective as the basidiocarp for sarcoma 180 tumor inhibition. Green tea was as effective as mycelial hot water extract.

  14. Effectiveness of a Closed-System Transfer Device in Reducing Surface Contamination in a New Antineoplastic Drug-Compounding Unit: A Prospective, Controlled, Parallel Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinturaud, Marine; Soichot, Marion; Richeval, Camille; Humbert, Luc; Lebecque, Michèle; Sidikou, Ousseini; Barthelemy, Christine; Bonnabry, Pascal; Allorge, Delphine; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this randomized, prospective and controlled study was to investigate the ability of a closed-system transfer device (CSTD; BD-Phaseal) to reduce the occupational exposure of two isolators to 10 cytotoxic drugs and compare to standard compounding devices. Methods and Findings The 6-month study started with the opening of a new compounding unit. Two isolators were set up with 2 workstations each, one to compound with standard devices (needles and spikes) and the other using the Phaseal system. Drugs were alternatively compounded in each isolator. Sampling involved wiping three surfaces (gloves, window, worktop), before and after a cleaning process. Exposure to ten antineoplastic drugs (cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, dacarbazine, 5-FU, methotrexate, gemcitabine, cytarabine, irinotecan, doxorubicine and ganciclovir) was assessed on wipes by LC-MS/MS analysis. Contamination rates were compared using a Chi2 test and drug amounts by a Mann-Whitney test. Significance was defined for p<0.05. Overall contamination was lower in the “Phaseal” isolator than in the “Standard” isolator (12.24% vs. 26.39%; p < 0.0001) although it differed according to drug. Indeed, the contamination rates of gemcitabine were 49.3 and 43.4% (NS) for the Standard and Phaseal isolators, respectively, whereas for ganciclovir, they were 54.2 and 2.8% (p<0.0001). Gemcitabine amounts were 220.6 and 283.6 ng for the Standard and Phaseal isolators (NS), and ganciclovir amounts were 179.9 and 2.4 ng (p<0.0001). Conclusion This study confirms that using a CSTD may significantly decrease the chemical contamination of barrier isolators compared to standard devices for some drugs, although it does not eliminate contamination totally. PMID:27391697

  15. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  16. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  17. Hydrogels for combination delivery of antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Bouhadir, K H; Alsberg, E; Mooney, D J

    2001-10-01

    The systemic delivery of anticancer agents has been widely investigated during the past decade but localized delivery may offer a safer and more effective delivery approach. We have designed and synthesized a novel hydrogel to locally deliver antineoplastic agents, and demonstrate the different types of release that can be achieved from these hydrogels using three model drugs: methotrexate, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone. Alginate was chemically modified into low molecular weight oligomers and cross-linked with a biodegradable spacer (adipic dihydrazide) to form biodegradable hydrogels. The model antineoplastic agents were loaded into the hydrogel via three different mechanisms. Methotrexate was incorporated within the pores of the hydrogel and was released by diffusion into the surrounding medium. Doxorubicin was covalently attached to the polymer backbone via a hydrolytically labile linker and was released following the chemical hydrolysis of the linker. Mitoxantrone was ionically complexed to the polymer and was released after the dissociation of this complex. These three release mechanisms could potentially be used to deliver a wide selection of antineoplastic agents, based on their chemical structure. This novel delivery system allows for the release of single or combinations of antineoplastic agents, and may find utility in localized antineoplastic agent delivery. PMID:11519782

  18. Frequencies of 23 Functionally Significant Variant Alleles Related with Metabolism of Antineoplastic Drugs in the Chilean Population: Comparison with Caucasian and Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Roco, Ángela; Quiñones, Luis; Agúndez, José A. G.; García-Martín, Elena; Squicciarini, Valentina; Miranda, Carla; Garay, Joselyn; Farfán, Nancy; Saavedra, Iván; Cáceres, Dante; Ibarra, Carol; Varela, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. The cancer incidence rate in Chile is 133.7/100,000 inhabitants and it is the second cause of death, after cardiovascular diseases. Most of the antineoplastic drugs are metabolized to be detoxified, and some of them to be activated. Genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes can induce deep changes in enzyme activity, leading to individual variability in drug efficacy and/or toxicity. The present research describes the presence of genetic polymorphisms in the Chilean population, which might be useful in public health programs for personalized treatment of cancer, and compares these frequencies with those reported for Asian and Caucasian populations, as a contribution to the evaluation of ethnic differences in the response to chemotherapy. We analyzed 23 polymorphisms in a group of 253 unrelated Chilean volunteers from the general population. The results showed that CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*3, CYP2D6*3, CYP2C19*3, and CYP3A4*17 variant alleles are virtually absent in Chileans. CYP1A1*2A allele frequency (0.37) is similar to that of Caucasians and higher than that reported for Japanese people. Allele frequencies for CYP3A5*3(0.76) and CYP2C9*3(0.04) are similar to those observed in Japanese people. CYP1A1*2C(0.32), CYP1A2*1F(0.77), CYP3A4*1B(0.06), CYP2D6*2(0.41), and MTHFR T(0.52) allele frequencies are higher than the observed either in Caucasian or in Japanese populations. Conversely, CYP2C19*2 allelic frequency (0.12), and genotype frequencies for GSTT1 null (0.11) and GSTM1 null (0.36) are lower than those observed in both populations. Finally, allele frequencies for CYP2A6*4(0.04), CYP2C8*3(0.06), CYP2C9*2(0.06), CYP2D6*4(0.12), CYP2E1*5B(0.14), CYP2E1*6(0.19), and UGT2B7*2(0.40) are intermediate in relation to those described in Caucasian and in Japanese populations, as expected according to the ethnic origin of the Chilean population. In conclusion, our findings support the idea that ethnic variability must be

  19. Antineoplastic activity of monocrotaline against hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kusuma, Sandeep Solmon; Tanneeru, Karunakar; Didla, Swroopa; Devendra, Bellary Nagaraju; Kiranmayi, Patnala

    2014-01-01

    Plants are fantastic sources for present day life saving drugs. Monocrotaline a natural ligand exhibits dose-dependent cytotoxicity with potent antineoplastic activity. This study was intended to disclose the therapeutic potential of monocrotaline against hepatocellular carcinoma. The in silico predictions have highlighted the antineoplastic potential, druglikeness and biodegradability of monocrotaline. The in silico docking study has provided an insight and evidence for the antineoplastic activity of monocrotaline against p53, HGF and TREM1 proteins which play a threatening role in causing hepatocellular carcinoma. The mode of action of monocrotaline was determined experimentally by in vitro techniques such as XTT assay, NRU assay and whole cell brine shrimp assay have further supported our in silico studies. The in vitro cytotoxicity of monocrotaline was proved at IC50 24.966 µg/mL and genotoxicity at 2 X IC50 against HepG2 cells. Further, the credible druglike properties with non-mutagenicity, non-toxic on mammalian fibroblast and the potential antineoplastic activity through in vitro experimental validations established monocrotaline as a novel scaffold for liver cancer with superior efficacy and lesser side effects. PMID:25028149

  20. Antineoplastic compounds in the environment-substances of special concern.

    PubMed

    Kümmerer, Klaus; Haiß, Annette; Schuster, Armin; Hein, Arne; Ebert, Ina

    2016-08-01

    Antineoplastic drugs are important in the treatment of cancer. Some interact directly with the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and are of utmost importance in terms of risk. As highly active compounds, antineoplastics and their metabolites are largely excreted into wastewater and are found in the aquatic environment up to the lower μg/L range. Their predicted environmental concentrations are often below the action limit set in the European Medicines Agency (EMA) guideline. An in-depth risk assessment regarding their presence and effects in the aquatic environment is often not performed, and there is a lack of knowledge. This study considered whether there is an underestimation of possible risks associated with the presence of antineoplastic drugs with regard to trigger value stated in the EMA and FDA guidelines. In a balance, we identified a total of 102 active pharmaceutical ingredients of the ATC-group L01 (antineoplastic agents), which are environmentally relevant. In Germany, 20.7 t of antineoplastic agents was consumed in 2012. The share of drugs with DNA-damaging properties increased within the last 6 years from 24 up to 67 %. Solely, capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil amount together 8 t-which corresponds to 39 % of the total antineoplastic consumption. Around 80 % of the total mass consumed could be attributed to prescriptions issued by office-based practitioners and is mostly excreted at home. Based on the different mode of actions, a case-by-case evaluation of the risk connected to their presence in the environment is recommended. DNA-damaging drugs should be assessed independently as no action limit can be assumed. PMID:25475615

  1. Antineoplastic compounds in the environment-substances of special concern.

    PubMed

    Kümmerer, Klaus; Haiß, Annette; Schuster, Armin; Hein, Arne; Ebert, Ina

    2016-08-01

    Antineoplastic drugs are important in the treatment of cancer. Some interact directly with the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and are of utmost importance in terms of risk. As highly active compounds, antineoplastics and their metabolites are largely excreted into wastewater and are found in the aquatic environment up to the lower μg/L range. Their predicted environmental concentrations are often below the action limit set in the European Medicines Agency (EMA) guideline. An in-depth risk assessment regarding their presence and effects in the aquatic environment is often not performed, and there is a lack of knowledge. This study considered whether there is an underestimation of possible risks associated with the presence of antineoplastic drugs with regard to trigger value stated in the EMA and FDA guidelines. In a balance, we identified a total of 102 active pharmaceutical ingredients of the ATC-group L01 (antineoplastic agents), which are environmentally relevant. In Germany, 20.7 t of antineoplastic agents was consumed in 2012. The share of drugs with DNA-damaging properties increased within the last 6 years from 24 up to 67 %. Solely, capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil amount together 8 t-which corresponds to 39 % of the total antineoplastic consumption. Around 80 % of the total mass consumed could be attributed to prescriptions issued by office-based practitioners and is mostly excreted at home. Based on the different mode of actions, a case-by-case evaluation of the risk connected to their presence in the environment is recommended. DNA-damaging drugs should be assessed independently as no action limit can be assumed.

  2. MPT0G066, a novel anti-mitotic drug, induces JNK-independent mitotic arrest, JNK-mediated apoptosis, and potentiates antineoplastic effect of cisplatin in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han-Li; Chao, Min-Wu; Li, Ya-Chi; Chang, Li-Hsun; Chen, Chun-Han; Chen, Mei-Chuan; Cheng, Chun-Chun; Liou, Jing-Ping; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Developing new anticancer agents against ovarian cancer is an urgent medical need. MPT0G066, a novel synthetic arylsulfonamide compound, was shown to inhibit cell growth and decrease viability in human ovarian cancer cells. MPT0G066 induced arrest of the cell cycle at the multipolyploidy (MP) phase in SKOV3 and at the G2/M phase in A2780 cells, while increasing the proportion of cells in the subG1. Additionally, MPT0G066 induced c-Jun-NH2 terminal kinase (JNK) activation, influenced cell cycle regulatory and Bcl-2 family proteins, which triggered intrinsic apoptotic pathways through cleavage of caspase-3, -7, -9, and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Flow cytometry analysis of p-glycoprotein (p-gp) function showed that MPT0G066 was not a substrate of p-gp. Additionally, it was shown that MPT0G066 could decrease cell viability in multiple-drug-resistant human ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, the combination of MPT0G066 and cisplatin presented a synergistic cytotoxic effect against ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro. MPT0G066 also significantly suppressed the growth of ovarian carcinoma and potentiated the antineoplastic effects of cisplatin in vivo. In conclusion, these findings indicate that MPT0G066 can be a potential anticancer agent against ovarian cancer that worthy of further development. PMID:27526962

  3. MPT0G066, a novel anti-mitotic drug, induces JNK-independent mitotic arrest, JNK-mediated apoptosis, and potentiates antineoplastic effect of cisplatin in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han-Li; Chao, Min-Wu; Li, Ya-Chi; Chang, Li-Hsun; Chen, Chun-Han; Chen, Mei-Chuan; Cheng, Chun-Chun; Liou, Jing-Ping; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Developing new anticancer agents against ovarian cancer is an urgent medical need. MPT0G066, a novel synthetic arylsulfonamide compound, was shown to inhibit cell growth and decrease viability in human ovarian cancer cells. MPT0G066 induced arrest of the cell cycle at the multipolyploidy (MP) phase in SKOV3 and at the G2/M phase in A2780 cells, while increasing the proportion of cells in the subG1. Additionally, MPT0G066 induced c-Jun-NH2 terminal kinase (JNK) activation, influenced cell cycle regulatory and Bcl-2 family proteins, which triggered intrinsic apoptotic pathways through cleavage of caspase-3, -7, -9, and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Flow cytometry analysis of p-glycoprotein (p-gp) function showed that MPT0G066 was not a substrate of p-gp. Additionally, it was shown that MPT0G066 could decrease cell viability in multiple-drug-resistant human ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, the combination of MPT0G066 and cisplatin presented a synergistic cytotoxic effect against ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro. MPT0G066 also significantly suppressed the growth of ovarian carcinoma and potentiated the antineoplastic effects of cisplatin in vivo. In conclusion, these findings indicate that MPT0G066 can be a potential anticancer agent against ovarian cancer that worthy of further development. PMID:27526962

  4. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  5. Analysis of anti-neoplastic drug in bacterial ghost matrix, w/o/w double nanoemulsion and w/o nanoemulsion by a validated 'green' liquid chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Youssof, Abdullah M E; Salem-Bekhit, Mounir M; Shakeel, Faiyaz; Alanazi, Fars K; Haq, Nazrul

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to develop and validate a 'green' reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for rapid analysis of a cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in bulk drug, marketed injection, water-in-oil (w/o) nanoemulsion, double water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) nanoemulsion and bacterial ghost (BG) matrix. The chromatography study was carried out at room temperature (25±1°C) using an HPLC system with the help of ultraviolet (UV)-visible detector. The chromatographic performance was achieved with a Nucleodur 150mm×4.6mm RP C8 column filled with 5µm filler as a static phase. The mobile phase consisted of ethyl acetate: methanol (7:3% v/v) which was delivered at a flow rate of 1.0mLmin(-1) and the drug was detected in UV mode at 254nm. The developed method was validated in terms of linearity (r(2)=0.998), accuracy (98.19-102.09%), precision (% RSD=0.58-1.17), robustness (% RSD=0.12-0.53) and sensitivity with satisfactory results. The efficiency of the method was demonstrated by the assay of the drug in marketed injection, w/o nanoemulsion, w/o/w nanoemulsion and BG with satisfactory results. The successful resolution of the drug along with its degradation products clearly established the stability-indicating nature of the proposed method. Overall, these results suggested that the proposed analytical method could be effectively applied to the routine analysis of 5-FU in bulk drug, various pharmaceutical dosage forms and BG.

  6. Analysis of anti-neoplastic drug in bacterial ghost matrix, w/o/w double nanoemulsion and w/o nanoemulsion by a validated 'green' liquid chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Youssof, Abdullah M E; Salem-Bekhit, Mounir M; Shakeel, Faiyaz; Alanazi, Fars K; Haq, Nazrul

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to develop and validate a 'green' reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method for rapid analysis of a cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in bulk drug, marketed injection, water-in-oil (w/o) nanoemulsion, double water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) nanoemulsion and bacterial ghost (BG) matrix. The chromatography study was carried out at room temperature (25±1°C) using an HPLC system with the help of ultraviolet (UV)-visible detector. The chromatographic performance was achieved with a Nucleodur 150mm×4.6mm RP C8 column filled with 5µm filler as a static phase. The mobile phase consisted of ethyl acetate: methanol (7:3% v/v) which was delivered at a flow rate of 1.0mLmin(-1) and the drug was detected in UV mode at 254nm. The developed method was validated in terms of linearity (r(2)=0.998), accuracy (98.19-102.09%), precision (% RSD=0.58-1.17), robustness (% RSD=0.12-0.53) and sensitivity with satisfactory results. The efficiency of the method was demonstrated by the assay of the drug in marketed injection, w/o nanoemulsion, w/o/w nanoemulsion and BG with satisfactory results. The successful resolution of the drug along with its degradation products clearly established the stability-indicating nature of the proposed method. Overall, these results suggested that the proposed analytical method could be effectively applied to the routine analysis of 5-FU in bulk drug, various pharmaceutical dosage forms and BG. PMID:27154677

  7. Radiation survival parameters of antineoplastic drug-sensitive and -resistant human ovarian cancer cell lines and their modification by buthionine sulfoximine

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, K.G.; Behrens, B.C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Hamilton, T.C.; Grotzinger, K.R.; McKoy, W.M.; Winker, M.A.; Ozols, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    The optimum integration of chemotherapy and irradiation is of potential clinical significance in the treatment of ovarian cancer. A series of human ovarian cancer cell lines have been developed in which dose-response relationships to standard anticancer drugs have been determined, and the patterns of cross-resistance between these drugs and irradiation have been established. By stepwise incubation with drugs, sublines of A2780, a drug-sensitive cell line, have been made 100-fold, 10-fold, and 10-fold more resistant to Adriamycin (2780AD), melphalan (2780ME), and cisplatin (2780CP). Two additional cell lines, NIH:OVCAR-3nu(Ag+) and NIH:OVCAR-4(Ag+), were established from drug-refractory patients. 2780ME, 2780CP, OVCAR-3nu(Ag+), and OVCAR-4(Ag+) are all cross-resistant to irradiation, with DOS of 146, 187, 143, and 203, respectively. However, 2780AD remains sensitive to radiation, with a DO of 111, which is similar to that of A2780 (101). Glutathione (GSH) levels are elevated in 2780ME, 2780CP, OVCAR-3nu(Ag+), and OVCAR-4(Ag+) to 4.58, 6.13, 12.10, and 15.14 nmol/10(6) cells as compared to A2780, with 1.89 nmol/10(6) cells. However, the GSH level in 2780AD is only minimally higher than that in A2780 (2.94 nmol/10(6) cells). Buthionine sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH synthesis, significantly increases the radiation sensitivity of 2780ME (changing the DO from 143 to 95) and 2780CP to a lesser extent, suggesting that intracellular GSH levels may play an important role in the radiation response of certain neoplastic cells.

  8. Impact of Robotic Antineoplastic Preparation on Safety, Workflow, and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Seger, Andrew C.; Churchill, William W.; Keohane, Carol A.; Belisle, Caryn D.; Wong, Stephanie T.; Sylvester, Katelyn W.; Chesnick, Megan A.; Burdick, Elisabeth; Wien, Matt F.; Cotugno, Michael C.; Bates, David W.; Rothschild, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Antineoplastic preparation presents unique safety concerns and consumes significant pharmacy staff time and costs. Robotic antineoplastic and adjuvant medication compounding may provide incremental safety and efficiency advantages compared with standard pharmacy practices. Methods: We conducted a direct observation trial in an academic medical center pharmacy to compare the effects of usual/manual antineoplastic and adjuvant drug preparation (baseline period) with robotic preparation (intervention period). The primary outcomes were serious medication errors and staff safety events with the potential for harm of patients and staff, respectively. Secondary outcomes included medication accuracy determined by gravimetric techniques, medication preparation time, and the costs of both ancillary materials used during drug preparation and personnel time. Results: Among 1,421 and 972 observed medication preparations, we found nine (0.7%) and seven (0.7%) serious medication errors (P = .8) and 73 (5.1%) and 28 (2.9%) staff safety events (P = .007) in the baseline and intervention periods, respectively. Drugs failed accuracy measurements in 12.5% (23 of 184) and 0.9% (one of 110) of preparations in the baseline and intervention periods, respectively (P < .001). Mean drug preparation time increased by 47% when using the robot (P = .009). Labor costs were similar in both study periods, although the ancillary material costs decreased by 56% in the intervention period (P < .001). Conclusion: Although robotically prepared antineoplastic and adjuvant medications did not reduce serious medication errors, both staff safety and accuracy of medication preparation were improved significantly. Future studies are necessary to address the overall cost effectiveness of these robotic implementations. PMID:23598843

  9. Synthesis of the vitamin E amino acid esters with an enhanced anticancer activity and in silico screening for new antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Gagic, Zarko; Ivkovic, Branka; Srdic-Rajic, Tatjana; Vucicevic, Jelica; Nikolic, Katarina; Agbaba, Danica

    2016-06-10

    Tocopherols and tocotrienols belong to the family of vitamin E (VE) with the well-known antioxidant properties. For certain α-tocopherol and γ-tocotrienol derivatives used as the lead compounds in this study, antitumor activities against various cancer cell types have been reported. In the course of the last decade, structural analogs of VE (esters, ethers and amides) with an enhanced antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity against various cancer cells were synthesized. Within the framework of this study, seven amino acid esters of α-tocopherol (4a-d) and γ-tocotrienol (6a-c) were prepared using the EDC/DMAP reaction conditions and their ability to inhibit proliferation of the MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and the A549 lung cancer cells was evaluated. Compound 6a showed an activity against all three cell lines (IC50: 20.6μM, 28.6μM and 19μM for the MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and A549 cells, respectively), while compound 4a inhibited proliferation of the MCF-7 (IC50=8.6μM) and A549 cells (IC50=8.6μM). Ester 4d exerted strong antiproliferative activity against the estrogen-unresponsive, multi-drug resistant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line, with IC50 value of 9.2μM. Compared with the strong activity of compounds 4a, 4d and 6a, commercial α-tocopheryl succinate and γ-tocotrienol showed only a limited activity against all three cell lines, with IC50 values >50μM. Investigation of the cell cycle phase distribution and the cell death induction confirmed an apoptosis of the MDA-MB-231 cells treated with 4d, as well as a synergistic effect of 4d with the known anticancer drug doxorubicin. This result suggests a possibility of a combined therapy of breast cancer in order to improve the therapeutic response and to lower the toxicity associated with a high dose of doxorubicin. The stability study of 4d in human plasma showed that ca. 83% initial concentration of this compound remains in plasma in the course of six hours incubation. The ligand based

  10. A uniform procedure for reimbursing the off-label use of antineoplastic drugs according to the value-for-money approach.

    PubMed

    Messori, A; Fadda, V; Trippoli, S

    2011-04-01

    National healthcare systems as well as local institutions generally reimburse numerous off-label uses of anticancer drugs, but an explicit framework for managing these payments is still lacking. As in the case of on-label uses, an optimal management of off-label uses should be aimed at a direct proportionality between cost and clinical benefit. Within this framework, assessing the incremental cost/effectiveness ratio becomes mandatory, and measuring the magnitude of the clinical benefit (e.g. gain in overall survival or progression-free survival) is essential.This paper discusses how the standard principles of cost-effectiveness and value-for-money can be applied to manage the reimbursement of off-label treatments in oncology. It also describes a detailed operational scheme to appropriately implement this aim. Two separate approaches are considered: a) a trial-based approach, which is designed for situations where enough information is available from clinical studies about the expected effectiveness of the off-label treatment; b) an individualized payment-by-results approach, which is designed for situations in which adequate information on effectiveness is lacking; this latter approach requires that each patient receiving off-label treatment is followed-up to determine individual outcomes and tailor the extent of payment to individual results.Some examples of application of both approaches are presented in detail, which have been extracted from a list of 184 off-label indications approved in 2010 by the Region of tuscany in italy. these examples support the feasibility of the two methods proposed.In conclusion, the scheme described in this paper represents an operational solution to an unsettled problem in the area of oncology drugs. PMID:21571620

  11. Exposure of hospital workers to airborne antineoplastic agents

    SciTech Connect

    deWerk Neal, A.; Wadden, R.A.; Chiou, W.L.

    1983-04-01

    Practices for handling antineoplastic drugs were surveyed, and ambient-air sampling for four antineoplastic agents was conducted in outpatient oncology clinics. A questionnaire was administered in 1981 to the nurse or pharmacist in charge of drug preparation at 10 hospital oncology clinics. At three sites, air samples were collected during working hours in medication-preparation rooms and nearby offices. The air-sampling pumps contained filters at breathing-zone height; room air was drawn through each filter for 40 hours. Extracts from the filters were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for fluorouracil and cyclophosphamide in seven sets of samples and methotrexate and doxorubicin in five sets of samples. Mass spectrometry (MS) was used to confirm detection of fluorouracil. Total use of each monitored drug was recorded at each site. Nine clinics had no ventilation hood, and drugs were prepared by nurses in eight clinics. Routine use of gloves (three clinics) and masks (one clinic) was uncommon, and wastes were disposed of in uncovered receptacles in four of the clinics. Eating and drinking occurred in seven of the preparation rooms. At the main air-sampling site, fluorouracil (0.12-82.26 ng/cu m) was detected in air during 200 of the 320 hours monitored. Cyclophosphamide (370 ng/cu m) was present during 80 hours. In the two other sites, fluorouracil was detected by HPLC but not confirmed by MS, and no cyclophosphamide was detected. No detectable amounts of methotrexate and doxorubicin were present. Fluorouracil was the most frequently used drug, and cyclophosphamide was second. Results suggest that personnel handling antineoplastic drugs are subject to potential systemic absorption of these agents by inhalation.

  12. Potential antineoplastic effects of Aloe-emodin: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruie; Zhang, Jinming; Hu, Yangyang; Wang, Shengpeng; Chen, Meiwan; Wang, Yitao

    2014-01-01

    Aloe-emodin (AE), a bioactive anthraquinone derived from both Aloe vera and Rheum officinale, has recently been demonstrated to have various pharmacological activities. With the widespread popularity of natural products, such as antineoplastic drugs, AE has attracted much attention due to its remarkable antineoplastic activity on multiple tumor cells involving multi-channel mechanisms, including the disruption of cell cycle, induction of apoptosis, anti-metastasis, antiangiogenic, and strengthening of immune function. Experimental data have revealed AE as a potentially potent anti-cancer candidate. Despite this, the pharmaceutical application of AE is still in a fledging period as most research has concentrated on the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of action of existing treatments, rather than the development of novel formulations. Therefore, the present review summarizes the potential toxicity, molecular mechanism, pharmacokinetic characteristics, and pharmaceutical development of AE as an antineoplastic agent. This is based on its physicochemical properties, in an attempt to encourage further research on AE as a potential anti-cancer agent. PMID:24707862

  13. Intestinal and Liver Toxicity of Antineoplastic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, George B.; Tirumali, Nigendra

    1984-01-01

    This discussion was selected from the weekly Grand Rounds in the Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle. Taken from a transcription, it has been edited by Drs Paul G. Ramsey, Assistant Professor of Medicine, and Philip J. Fialkow, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Medicine. PMID:6375139

  14. Coping with arsenic-based pesticides on Dine (Navajo) textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jae R.

    Arsenic-based pesticide residues have been detected on Arizona State Museum's (ASM) Dine (Navajo) textile collection using a handheld portable X-ray (pXRF) spectrometer. The removal of this toxic pesticide from historic textiles in museums collections is necessary to reduce potential health risks to Native American communities, museum professionals, and visitors. The research objective was divided into three interconnected stages: (1) empirically calibrate the pXRF instrument for arsenic contaminated cotton and wool textiles; (2) engineer an aqueous washing treatment exploring the effects of time, temperature, agitation, and pH conditions to efficiently remove arsenic from wool textiles while minimizing damage to the structure and properties of the textile; (3) demonstrate the devised aqueous washing treatment method on three historic Navajo textiles known to have arsenic-based pesticide residues. The preliminary results removed 96% of arsenic from a high arsenic concentration (~1000 ppm) textile opposed to minimal change for low arsenic concentration textiles (<100 ppm).

  15. Monitoring method for surface contamination caused by selected antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Larson, R R; Khazaeli, M B; Dillon, H Kenneth

    2002-02-01

    A method of evaluating surface contamination caused by selected antineoplastic agents was studied. The antineoplastic agents tested were cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, fluorouracil, and paclitaxel. Each agent was reconstituted and prepared as a stock solution. A 0.1-mL portion of each solution was spread evenly over a 600-cm2 area of a stainless steel surface, a resin countertop surface, and a vinyl flooring surface. After drying, the surfaces were wiped with each of two types of commercially available wiping materials (What-man no. 42 filters and Kimberly-Clark Kimwipes). A blend of methanol, acetonitrile, and buffered water was used both as the wetting agent for wiping the surfaces and as a desorbing solution. The desorbate was analyzed for drug concentration by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Mean +/- S.D. percent total recovery ranged from 72.4% +/- 17.6% to 95.3% +/- 2.9% for the vinyl surface wiped with filters, 91.5% +/- 5.4% to 104.7% +/- 0.8% for the resin surface wiped with filters, 73.9% +/- 2.3% to 95.3% +/- 1.7% for the stainless steel surface wiped with filters, and 18.2% +/- 1.4% to 372.8% +/- 8.0% for the stainless steel surface wiped with Kimwipes. Results were best for ifosfamide and cyclophosphamide. Kimwipes were deemed ineffective for this monitoring method because an ingredient interfered with the quantitative analytical tests. A wipe-sampling, desorption, and HPLC method for monitoring surface contamination by selected antineoplastic agents was sufficiently accurate and sensitive to evaluate surfaces typically found in both the pharmacy and drug administration areas of oncology treatment facilities. PMID:11862639

  16. Serine deprivation enhances antineoplastic activity of biguanides.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Hulea, Laura; Toban, Nader; Birman, Elena; Blouin, Marie-José; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Zhao, Yunhua; Topisirovic, Ivan; St-Pierre, Julie; Pollak, Michael

    2014-12-15

    Metformin, a biguanide widely used in the treatment of type II diabetes, clearly exhibits antineoplastic activity in experimental models and has been reported to reduce cancer incidence in diabetics. There are ongoing clinical trials to evaluate its antitumor properties, which may relate to its fundamental activity as an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation. Here, we show that serine withdrawal increases the antineoplastic effects of phenformin (a potent biguanide structurally related to metformin). Serine synthesis was not inhibited by biguanides. Instead, metabolic studies indicated a requirement for serine to allow cells to compensate for biguanide-induced decrease in oxidative phosphorylation by upregulating glycolysis. Furthermore, serine deprivation modified the impact of metformin on the relative abundance of metabolites within the citric acid cycle. In mice, a serine-deficient diet reduced serine levels in tumors and significantly enhanced the tumor growth-inhibitory actions of biguanide treatment. Our results define a dietary manipulation that can enhance the efficacy of biguanides as antineoplastic agents that target cancer cell energy metabolism.

  17. Hypersensitivity reactions to oxaliplatin and other antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Syrigou, Ekaterini; Syrigos, Kostas; Saif, M Wasif

    2008-03-01

    Although the reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to antineoplastic agents is considered to be uncommon, it is difficult to evaluate their exact prevalence, mainly because their definition is vast and pathogenic mechanisms are vague. HSR include facial flushing, erythema, pruritus, fever, tachycardia, dyspnea, tongue swelling, rash/hives, headache, chills, weakness, vomiting, burning sensations, dizziness, and edema. Treatment and prevention consists of slowing the infusion rate, steroids, and type 1 and 2 histamine receptor antagonists. Desensitization could allow the small number of patients who experience severe HSR to receive effective therapy for their cancer. Reintroductions have only been reported as single case studies or small cohorts. Large-scale validation on desensitization strategies is still missing. With regard to oxaliplatin, knowledge of its rare but eminent toxicity is paramount, because this drug is widely used in treating colorectal cancer, the second-highest cause of cancer mortality in the United States. PMID:18377776

  18. Gastrointestinal and liver infections in children undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy in the years 2000

    PubMed Central

    Castagnola, Elio; Ruberto, Eliana; Guarino, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review gastrointestinal and liver infections in children undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy. To look at gut microflora features in oncology children. METHODS: We selected studies published after year 2000, excluding trials on transplanted pediatric patients. We searched English language publications in MEDLINE using the keywords: “gastrointestinal infection AND antineoplastic chemotherapy AND children”, “gastrointestinal infection AND oncology AND children”, “liver infection AND antineoplastic chemotherapy AND children”, “liver abscess AND chemotherapy AND child”, “neutropenic enterocolitis AND chemotherapy AND children”, “thyphlitis AND chemotherapy AND children”, “infectious diarrhea AND children AND oncology”, “abdominal pain AND infection AND children AND oncology”, “perianal sepsis AND children AND oncology”, “colonic pseudo-obstruction AND oncology AND child AND chemotherapy”, “microflora AND children AND malignancy”, “microbiota AND children AND malignancy”, “fungal flora AND children AND malignancy”. We also analysed evidence from several articles and book references. RESULTS: Gastrointestinal and liver infections represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children undergoing antineoplastic chemotherapy. Antineoplastic drugs cause immunosuppression in addition to direct toxicity, predisposing to infections, although the specific risk is variable according to disease and host features. Common pathogens potentially induce severe diseases whereas opportunistic microorganisms may attack vulnerable hosts. Clinical manifestations can be subtle and not specific. In addition, several conditions are rare and diagnostic process and treatments are not standardized. Diagnosis may be challenging, however early diagnosis is needed for quick and appropriate interventions. Interestingly, the source of infection in those children can be exogenous or endogenous. Indeed, mucosal damage may allow the

  19. Calcium channel antagonist properties of the antineoplastic antiestrogen tamoxifen in the PC12 neurosecretory cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, D.A.; Carpenter, C.L.; Messing, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    In view of existing evidence that Ca2+ may be important for tumor cell growth and metastasis, we investigated the effects of three antineoplastic drugs on K+-stimulated /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels of the PC12 neurosecretory cell line. The agents chosen for study (vinblastine, doxorubicin, and tamoxifen) were those previously shown to inhibit Ca2+/calmodulin- or Ca2+/phospholipid-activated protein kinases. Neither vinblastine nor doxorubicin altered /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake at concentrations that inhibit these Ca2+-dependent enzymes. However, tamoxifen reduced uptake (50% inhibitory dose, 8.6 +/- 0.9 (SE) microM) and competed for Ca2+ channel antagonist binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)-(+)PN200-110 (ki = 2.2 +/- 0.3 microM). Ca2+ channel antagonist properties may contribute to the effects of antineoplastic agents such as tamoxifen.

  20. Interaction of human organic anion transporter polypeptides 1B1 and 1B3 with antineoplastic compounds.

    PubMed

    Marada, Venkata V V R; Flörl, Saskia; Kühne, Annett; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Hagos, Yohannes

    2015-03-01

    Antineoplastic compounds are used in the treatment of a variety of cancers. The effectiveness of an antineoplastic compound to exert its activity is largely dependent on transport proteins involved in the entry of the compound into the cells, and those which drive it out of the cell. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) and organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3), belonging to the SLCO family of proteins, are specifically expressed in the sinusoidal membranes of the liver, and are known to interact with a variety of drugs. The present study deals with the interaction of these proteins with antineoplastic compounds routinely used in cancer chemotherapy. The proteins OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 were functionally characterized in stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells using [(3)H] labeled estrone 3-sulfate and [(3)H] labeled cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) as substrates, respectively. Substrate uptake experiments performed in the presence of antineoplastic compounds showed that vinblastine and paclitaxel strongly interacted with the OATP1B1 with Ki values of 10.2 μM and 0.84 μM, respectively. OATP1B3 showed highly significant interactions with a variety of antineoplastic compounds including chlorambucil, mitoxantrone, vinblastine, vincristine, paclitaxel and etoposide, with Ki values of 40.6 μM, 3.2 μM, 15.9 μM, 30.6 μM, 1.8 μM and 13.5 μM, respectively. We report several novel interactions of the transporter proteins OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 highlighting the need to investigate their role in drug-drug interactions and cancer chemotherapy.

  1. Redox-directed cancer therapeutics: Taurolidine and Piperlongumine as broadly effective antineoplastic agents (review).

    PubMed

    Möhler, Hanns; Pfirrmann, Rolf W; Frei, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Targeting the oxygen stress response pathway is considered a promising strategy to exert antineoplastic activity in a broad spectrum of tumor types. Supporting this view, we summarize the mechanism of action of Taurolidine and Piperlongumine, two antineoplastic agents with strikingly broad tumor selectivity. Taurolidine enhances the oxidative stress (ROS) selectively in tumor cells. Its cytotoxicity for various tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, which includes tumor stem cells, is based on the induction of programmed cell death, largely via apoptosis but also necroptosis and autophagy. The redox-directed mechanism of action of Taurolidine is apparent from the finding that reducing agents e.g., N-acetylcysteine or glutathione impair its cytotoxicity, while its effectiveness is enhanced by agents which inhibit the cellular anti‑oxidant capacity. A similar redox-directed antineoplastic action is shown by Piperlongumine, a recently described experimental drug of plant origin. Taurolidine is particularly advantageous in surgical oncology as this taurine-derivative can be applied perioperatively or systemically with good tolerability as shown in initial clinical applications.

  2. Occupational exposure to antineoplastic agents induces a high level of chromosome damage. Lack of an effect of GST polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, Antonella Giachelia, Manuela; Palma, Selena; Appolloni, Massimo; Padua, Luca; Tranfo, Giovanna; Spagnoli, Mariangela; Tirindelli, Donatella; Cozzi, Renata

    2007-08-15

    The aim of our study was to investigate whether occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs (AND) resulted in genetic damage, possibly indicative of adverse health effects in the long term. We performed a chromosomal aberrations (CA) analysis in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of a group of 76 trained nurses occupationally exposed to AND. Furthermore, we analysed whether genetic polymorphisms in four metabolic genes of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) family involved in antineoplastic drugs detoxification (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1, GSTA1) had any effect on the yield of chromosomal aberrations in nurses exposed to antineoplastic agents. The exposed group showed a very significant increase of genetic damage (p < 0.0001) potentially indicative of an increased risk of cancer. Unexpectedly, besides the elevated level of chromatid-type aberrations usually related to exposure to chemical agents, we found also severe chromosome damages such as chromosome deletions and dicentric chromosomes, usually related to radiation exposure. No significant association was detected between all GSTs genotypes and chromosome damage. In conclusion, our data show how the occupational exposure to AND is associated to a potential cancer risk, suggesting that current prevention methods do not completely eliminate opportunities for exposure and supporting the need to improve the actual safety practices.

  3. Bioactive substances with anti-neoplastic efficacy from marine invertebrates: Porifera and Coelenterata

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Peter; Vetvicka, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    An ever increasing demand for new lead compounds in the pharmaceutical industry has led scientists to search for natural bioactive products. Based on this extensive research, marine invertebrates now represent a rich source of novel substances with significant anti-neoplastic activities. As the current approach of synthesizing new and chemically modifying old drugs seems to have slowed down, and the identification of new anticancer drugs is not too promising, a new approach is clearly needed. The objective of this review is to present up-to-date data on these newer compounds. Based on the data summarized in this short review, it is clear that marine invertebrates represent an extremely important source of compounds with potential anti-cancer effects. Considering that we tested only a tiny number of Porifera and Coelenterata, the best is yet to come. PMID:22087433

  4. Oral Antineoplastic Agents: Assessing the Delay in Care

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Brandi; Shillingburg, Alexandra; Newton, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the length of time between when a prescription for an oral antineoplastic agent is written by the provider and when the medication is received by the patient and to identify risk factors that significantly increase time to medication receipt. First-time fill prescriptions for oral antineoplastic agents were identified. The date the prescription was written and received by the patient was determined. A retrospective review was completed to gather additional information, including prescribed medication, indication, insurance coverage, patient assistance program use, dispensing pharmacy, and prior authorization requirements. The data was analyzed through multivariate statistical analysis and used to identify risk factors that may significantly increase the time to medication receipt. A total of 58 patients were included in the study. A median of 8 days elapsed between when the medication was prescribed and when it was received by the patient. Medication prescribed, absence of a Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategies (REMS) program, and insurance type are factors that increased time to medication receipt. An understanding of the median time involved, as well as factors affecting the time to delivery of prescriptions, will help healthcare providers better plan and prepare for the use of oral antineoplastic agents. PMID:26605087

  5. Relevance of the OCT1 transporter to the antineoplastic effect of biguanides.

    PubMed

    Segal, Eric D; Yasmeen, Amber; Beauchamp, Marie-Claude; Rosenblatt, Joshua; Pollak, Michael; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2011-11-01

    Epidemiologic and laboratory data suggesting that metformin has antineoplastic activity have led to ongoing clinical trials. However, pharmacokinetic issues that may influence metformin activity have not been studied in detail. The organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) is known to play an important role in cellular uptake of metformin in the liver. We show that siRNA knockdown of OCT1 reduced sensitivity of epithelial ovarian cancer cells to metformin, but interestingly not to another biguanide, phenformin, with respect to both activation of AMP kinase and inhibition of proliferation. We observed that there is heterogeneity between primary human tumors with respect to OCT1 expression. These results suggest that there may be settings where drug uptake limits direct action of metformin on neoplastic cells, raising the possibility that metformin may not be the optimal biguanide for clinical investigation.

  6. Effects of subconjunctivally injected antineoplastic agents on three models of corneal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rootman, J; Bussanich, N; Gudauskas, G; Kumi, C

    1985-06-01

    Three models of corneal inflammation--acute toxic keratitis, phlyctenular keratitis and corneal graft rejection--were induced in rabbits and treated with subconjunctival injections of antineoplastic agents (methotrexate, cytosine arabinoside, 5-fluorouracil and 6-mercaptopurine) and Solu-Medrol (methylprednisolone sodium succinate). The inflammations responded to the drugs to various degrees when compared with the response in control animals treated with saline. Cytosine arabinoside effected a slight decrease in the clinical features of acute toxic keratitis, methotrexate was superior in decreasing inflammation and neovascularization in phlyctenular keratitis, and Solu-Medrol appeared to be the most useful in the treatment of graft rejection. When injected repeatedly, 5-fluorouracil tended to have significant toxicity in the presence of inflammation.

  7. [The potential antineoplastic acting constituents of Physalis alkekengi L. var franchetii Mast].

    PubMed

    Dornberger, K

    1986-04-01

    In a continuing search for potent antineoplastic compounds in indigenous plants, a water extract of Physalis alkekengi L. var. franchetii Mast. fruits was shown to have reproducible antineoplastic activity against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in mice. Systematic fractionation of the extract led to the isolation of citric acid as the major active principle.

  8. Characterizing interspecies uncertainty using data from studies of anti-neoplastic agents in animals and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Paul S. Keenan, Russell E.; Swartout, Jeffrey C.

    2008-11-15

    For most chemicals, the Reference Dose (RfD) is based on data from animal testing. The uncertainty introduced by the use of animal models has been termed interspecies uncertainty. The magnitude of the differences between the toxicity of a chemical in humans and test animals and its uncertainty can be investigated by evaluating the inter-chemical variation in the ratios of the doses associated with similar toxicological endpoints in test animals and humans. This study performs such an evaluation on a data set of 64 anti-neoplastic drugs. The data set provides matched responses in humans and four species of test animals: mice, rats, monkeys, and dogs. While the data have a number of limitations, the data show that when the drugs are evaluated on a body weight basis: 1) toxicity generally increases with a species' body weight; however, humans are not always more sensitive than test animals; 2) the animal to human dose ratios were less than 10 for most, but not all, drugs; 3) the current practice of using data from multiple species when setting RfDs lowers the probability of having a large value for the ratio. These findings provide insight into inter-chemical variation in animal to human extrapolations and suggest the need for additional collection and analysis of matched toxicity data in humans and test animals.

  9. Gold(III)–pyrrolidinedithiocarbamato Derivatives as Antineoplastic Agents**

    PubMed Central

    Nardon, Chiara; Chiara, Federica; Brustolin, Leonardo; Gambalunga, Alberto; Ciscato, Francesco; Rasola, Andrea; Trevisan, Andrea; Fregona, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Transition metals offer many possibilities in developing potent chemotherapeutic agents. They are endowed with a variety of oxidation states, allowing for the selection of their coordination numbers and geometries via the choice of proper ligands, leading to the tuning of their final biological properties. We report here on the synthesis, physico-chemical characterization, and solution behavior of two gold(III) pyrrolidinedithiocarbamates (PDT), namely [AuIIIBr2(PDT)] and [AuIIICl2(PDT)]. We found that the bromide derivative was more effective than the chloride one in inducing cell death for several cancer cell lines. [AuIIIBr2(PDT)] elicited oxidative stress with effects on the permeability transition pore, a mitochondrial channel whose opening leads to cell death. More efficient antineoplastic strategies are required for the widespread burden that is cancer. In line with this, our results indicate that [AuIIIBr2(PDT)] is a promising antineoplastic agent that targets cellular components with crucial functions for the survival of tumor cells. PMID:25969817

  10. Nutlin-3 loaded nanocarriers: Preparation, characterization and in vitro antineoplastic effect against primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Belletti, D; Tosi, G; Riva, G; Lagreca, I; Galliania, M; Luppi, M; Vandelli, M A; Forni, F; Ruozi, B

    2015-07-25

    In this investigation, Nutlin-3 (Nut3), a novel antitumor drug with low water solubility (<0.1mg/L at 25°C), was loaded into liposomes (Lipo-Nut3), polymeric nanoparticles (NPs-Nut3) and nanoparticles engineered with an antibody direct against Syndecan-1/CD 138 (Syn-NPs-Nut3) to obtain carriers targeted to PEL (primary effusion lymphoma). The physicochemical properties of these carriers were determined. Atomic force microscopy showed that all the particles were well formed and spherical in shape. The presence of the antibody on surface led to a significant increase of mean diameter (280 ± 63 nm), PDI (0.3) and the shift of zeta potential towards neutrality (-1 mV). The entrapment efficiency of Lipo-Nut3, NPs-Nut3 and Syn-NPs-Nut3 was 30, 52 and 29%, and drug loading was 1.4, 4.5 and 2.6%, respectively. By performing cytofluorimetric analyses and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay, the efficacy of nanocarriers to deliver the antineoplastic drug into a PEL cell line namely BCBL-1 (immortalized body cavity B-cell lymphoma) was investigated. Two days after the treatment with 20 μM of Syn-NPs-Nut3, the cell density decreased at about 60% while the cell viability decreased at 56% only 5 days after transfection, when compared with untreated cells. A cell cycle arrest was observed with a significant decrease of cells in S-phase and increasing of apoptotic cell, if compared with untreated control. These results confirms the potential of nanocarriers approaches to deliver antitumor drug with unfavorable chemico-physical properties. Moreover, this study strongly suggests that Syn-NPs-Nut3 can be a valuable drug carrier system for the treatment of PEL lymphoma. PMID:25987470

  11. Regulatory and logistical issues influencing access to antineoplastic and supportive care medications for children with cancer in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Wiernikowski, John T; MacLeod, Stuart

    2014-08-01

    Globally there are numerous impediments, both logistical, regulatory and more recently global drug shortages, hindering pediatric access to therapeutic drugs of all types. Efforts to reduce barriers are ongoing and are especially important in low and middle income countries and for children requiring treatment of conditions such as those encountered in pediatric oncology characterized by the risk of life threatening treatment failures. Progress has been made through the efforts of the World Health Organization and regulators in the US and Europe to encourage the development of therapeutic agents for use in pediatrics and measures taken have fostered the availability of stronger pediatric data to guide therapeutic decisions. Nonetheless, pharmaceuticals remain a global commodity, subject to regulation by the World Trade Organization and this has often had detrimental effects in low and middle income countries. This article emphasizes the need for closer international collaboration to address the barriers currently impeding access to antineoplastic and supportive care medicines for children.

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of 14C-oxaliplatin concentrations in biological samples and 14C contents in biological samples and antineoplastic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoguchi, Teiko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Konno, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Kato, Kazuhiro; Tokanai, Fuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is expected to play an important role in microdose trials. In this study, we measured the 14C concentration in 14C-oxaliplatin-spiked serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate samples in our Yamagata University (YU) - AMS system. The calibration curves of 14C concentration in serum, urine and supernatant of fecal homogenate were linear (the correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9893), and the precision and accuracy was within the acceptance criteria. To examine a 14C content of water in three vacuum blood collection tubes and a syringe were measured. 14C was not detected from water in these devices. The mean 14C content in urine samples of 6 healthy Japanese volunteers was 0.144 dpm/mL, and the intra-day fluctuation of 14C content in urine from a volunteer was little. The antineoplastic agents are administered to the patients in combination. Then, 14C contents of the antineoplastic agents were quantitated. 14C contents were different among 10 antineoplastic agents; 14C contents of paclitaxel injection and docetaxel hydrate injection were higher than those of the other injections. These results indicate that our quantitation method using YU-AMS system is suited for microdosing studies and that measurement of baseline and co-administered drugs might be necessary for the studies in low concentrations.

  13. Comparison of new nitrosoureas esters with modified steroidal nucleus for cytogenetic and antineoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Hussein, A; Mioglou-Kalouptsi, E; Papageorgiou, A; Karapidaki, I; Iakovidou-Kritsi, Z; Lialiaris, T; Xrysogelou, E; Camoutsis, C; Mourelatos, D

    2007-01-01

    Nitrosourea is decomposed under physiological conditions to react with biological macromolecules by two mechanisms: alkylation (with proteins and nucleic acids) and carbamoylation (with proteins but not nucleic acids). It has been suggested that the alkylating action is responsible for the therapeutic effects of nitrosoureas, and that the carbamoylation activity leads to toxicity effects. In order to reduce systemic toxicity and improve specificity and distribution for cancer therapy, 2-haloethyl nitrosourea has been esterified with modified steroids, which are used as biological platforms for transporting the alkylating agent to the tumor site in a specific manner. The cytogenetic and antineoplastic effect were studied of seven newly synthesized esters of N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)alanyl carboxyl derivatives with a modified steroidal nucleus (compounds 1-7). As a very sensitive indicator of genotoxicity the Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE) assay was used and as a valuable marker of cytostatic activity the cell Proliferation Rate Index (PRI) in cultures of normal human lymphocytes was used. The order of magnitude of the cytogenetic activity on a molar basis (15, 30, 120 microM) of the compounds was 7>6>3>5>2>4>1. The most active compound 7 has an enlarged (seven carbon atoms) A ring modified with a lactam group (-NHCO-) with the nitrosourea moiety esterified at position 17 In the group of seven substances a correlation was observed between the magnitude of SCE response and the depression in PRI (r=-O, 65, p<0.001). According to the criterion of activity of National Cancer Institute (NCI), the order of antineoplastic activity of compounds on lymphoid L1210 leukemia is 7>6>2>5>4>3>1 and on lympocytic P388 leukemia cells is 7>2>6>5>4>3>1. The present results are in agreement with previous suggestions that the effectiveness in cytogenetic activity may well be correlated with antitumor effects [T/C: 248% for the compound 7 in 250 mg/kg b.w.; T/C: mean survival time of drug

  14. Mediastinal sarcoidosis mimicking lymph malignancy recurrence after anti-neoplastic therapy.

    PubMed

    El Hammoumi, Massine; El Marjany, Mohamed; Moussaoui, Driss; Doudouh, Aberahim; Mansouri, Hamid; Kabiri, El Hassane

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our work is to promote the awareness about the development of sarcoidosis after antineoplastic therapy in order to avoid diagnostic errors with FDG-PET/CT findings. We report the observation of three women with breast, cervix and stomach treated cancers who developed a sarcoidosis after the end of anti-neoplastic therapy. The utility of FDG-PET/CT is in pinpointing the organs candidates for diagnostic biopsy and not distinguishing between the malignancy and granulomatous or inflammatory diseases.

  15. Relevance of the OCT1 transporter to the antineoplastic effect of biguanides

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, Eric D.; Yasmeen, Amber; Beauchamp, Marie-Claude; Rosenblatt, Joshua; Pollak, Michael; Gotlieb, Walter H.

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNA knockdown of OCT1 reduced sensitivity of EOC cells to metformin, but not to another biguanide, phenformin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppression of OCT1 also affects the activation of AMP kinase in response to metformin, but not to phenformin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct actions of metformin may be limited by low OCT1 expression in EOC tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenformin could be used as an alternative biguanide. -- Abstract: Epidemiologic and laboratory data suggesting that metformin has antineoplastic activity have led to ongoing clinical trials. However, pharmacokinetic issues that may influence metformin activity have not been studied in detail. The organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) is known to play an important role in cellular uptake of metformin in the liver. We show that siRNA knockdown of OCT1 reduced sensitivity of epithelial ovarian cancer cells to metformin, but interestingly not to another biguanide, phenformin, with respect to both activation of AMP kinase and inhibition of proliferation. We observed that there is heterogeneity between primary human tumors with respect to OCT1 expression. These results suggest that there may be settings where drug uptake limits direct action of metformin on neoplastic cells, raising the possibility that metformin may not be the optimal biguanide for clinical investigation.

  16. Chronic Arsenic Poisoning Probably Caused by Arsenic-Based Pesticides: Findings from an Investigation Study of a Household.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfang; Ye, Feng; Wang, Anwei; Wang, Da; Yang, Boyi; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan; Gao, Xinghua

    2016-01-16

    In addition to naturally occurring arsenic, man-made arsenic-based compounds are other sources of arsenic exposure. In 2013, our group identified 12 suspected arsenicosis patients in a household (32 living members). Of them, eight members were diagnosed with skin cancer. Interestingly, all of these patients had lived in the household prior to 1989. An investigation revealed that approximately 2 tons of arsenic-based pesticides had been previously placed near a well that had supplied drinking water to the family from 1973 to 1989. The current arsenic level in the well water was 620 μg/L. No other high arsenic wells were found near the family's residence. Based on these findings, it is possible to infer that the skin lesions exhibited by these family members were caused by long-term exposure to well water contaminated with arsenic-based pesticides. Additionally, biochemical analysis showed that the individuals exposed to arsenic had higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase than those who were not exposed. These findings might indicate the presence of liver dysfunction in the arsenic-exposed individuals. This report elucidates the effects of arsenical compounds on the occurrence of high levels of arsenic in the environment and emphasizes the severe human health impact of arsenic exposure.

  17. Chronic Arsenic Poisoning Probably Caused by Arsenic-Based Pesticides: Findings from an Investigation Study of a Household.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfang; Ye, Feng; Wang, Anwei; Wang, Da; Yang, Boyi; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan; Gao, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    In addition to naturally occurring arsenic, man-made arsenic-based compounds are other sources of arsenic exposure. In 2013, our group identified 12 suspected arsenicosis patients in a household (32 living members). Of them, eight members were diagnosed with skin cancer. Interestingly, all of these patients had lived in the household prior to 1989. An investigation revealed that approximately 2 tons of arsenic-based pesticides had been previously placed near a well that had supplied drinking water to the family from 1973 to 1989. The current arsenic level in the well water was 620 μg/L. No other high arsenic wells were found near the family's residence. Based on these findings, it is possible to infer that the skin lesions exhibited by these family members were caused by long-term exposure to well water contaminated with arsenic-based pesticides. Additionally, biochemical analysis showed that the individuals exposed to arsenic had higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase than those who were not exposed. These findings might indicate the presence of liver dysfunction in the arsenic-exposed individuals. This report elucidates the effects of arsenical compounds on the occurrence of high levels of arsenic in the environment and emphasizes the severe human health impact of arsenic exposure. PMID:26784217

  18. Chronic Arsenic Poisoning Probably Caused by Arsenic-Based Pesticides: Findings from an Investigation Study of a Household

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongfang; Ye, Feng; Wang, Anwei; Wang, Da; Yang, Boyi; Zheng, Quanmei; Sun, Guifan; Gao, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    In addition to naturally occurring arsenic, man-made arsenic-based compounds are other sources of arsenic exposure. In 2013, our group identified 12 suspected arsenicosis patients in a household (32 living members). Of them, eight members were diagnosed with skin cancer. Interestingly, all of these patients had lived in the household prior to 1989. An investigation revealed that approximately 2 tons of arsenic-based pesticides had been previously placed near a well that had supplied drinking water to the family from 1973 to 1989. The current arsenic level in the well water was 620 μg/L. No other high arsenic wells were found near the family’s residence. Based on these findings, it is possible to infer that the skin lesions exhibited by these family members were caused by long-term exposure to well water contaminated with arsenic-based pesticides. Additionally, biochemical analysis showed that the individuals exposed to arsenic had higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase than those who were not exposed. These findings might indicate the presence of liver dysfunction in the arsenic-exposed individuals. This report elucidates the effects of arsenical compounds on the occurrence of high levels of arsenic in the environment and emphasizes the severe human health impact of arsenic exposure. PMID:26784217

  19. [Evaluation of two closed-system drug transfer device in the antineoplastic drug elaboration process].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Álvarez, Sandra; Porta-Oltra, Begoña; Hernandez-Griso, Marta; Pérez-Labaña, Francisca; Climente-Martí, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Objetivo: evaluar el impacto del uso de dos sistemas cerrados sobre el proceso de preparación de quimioterapia parenteral, con respecto al sistema estándar, en términos de contaminación local y ambiental, y tiempos de preparación. Método: estudio observacional prospectivo. Se compararon dos proveedores distintos de sistemas cerrados, Icu Medical® y Care Fusion®, frente al sistema estándar de preparación de quimioterapia parenteral. Quince enfermeros del Servicio de Farmacia elaboraron cada uno de ellos 5 preparaciones, una siguiendo el procedimiento estándar y cuatro usando los sistemas cerrados. Para evaluar la aparición de contaminación se elaboró una solución de fluoresceína al 0,5%. Se evaluaron dos tipos de contaminación: local (en tres puntos: sistema acoplado a vial, jeringa y envase final) y ambiental (guantes y mesa de trabajo), obteniéndose el porcentaje de preparaciones contaminadas en cada uno de ellos. Se registró el tiempo empleado por cada enfermero en cada una de las preparaciones. Resultados: se elaboraron 75 preparaciones. Se produjo una reducción global de la contaminación local para los SC Icu Medical® y Care Fusion® del 24% y 74%, respectivamente. En el sistema cerrado Care Fusion® la contaminación local fue significativamente menor que en el sistema estándar en vial, jeringa y envase final; mientras que en el sistema cerrado Icu Medical® solo fue significativamente menor en la conexión al vial. Se produjo un incremento significativo del tiempo de preparación con la utilización de sistemas cerrados de los entre 23,4 y 30,5 segundos. Conclusiones: ambos sistemas cerrados han mostrado un beneficio con respecto a la utilización del sistema estándar. Sin embargo, se han visto incrementados significativamente los tiempos de preparación con ambos sistemas.

  20. Dental anomalies in children submitted to antineoplastic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Camila Merida; Corrêa, Fernanda Nahás Pires; Lopes, Nilza Nelly Fontana; Fava, Marcelo; Filho, Vicente Odone

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the third most frequent cause of death in children in Brazil. Early diagnosis and medical advances have significantly improved treatment outcomes, which has resulted in higher survival rates and the management of late side effects has become increasingly important in caring for these patients. Dental abnormalities are commonly observed as late effects of antineoplastic therapy in the oral cavity. The incidence and severity of the dental abnormalities depend on the child's age at diagnosis and the type of chemotherapeutic agent used, as well as the irradiation dose and area. The treatment duration and aggressivity should also be considered. Disturbances in dental development are characterized by changes in shape, number and root development. Enamel anomalies, such as discoloration, opacities and hypoplasia are also observed in these patients. When severe, these abnormalities can cause functional and esthetic sequelae that have an impact on the children's and adolescents' quality of life. General dentists and pediatric dentists should understand these dental abnormalities and how to identify them aiming for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:24964309

  1. Chondroitin sulfate derived theranostic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Oommen P; Liu, Jianping; Sundaram, Karthi; Hilborn, Jöns; Oommen, Oommen P

    2016-08-16

    Glycosaminoglycan derived nanoparticles are a promising delivery system owing to their unique tumour targeting ability. Exploiting fluorescein for inducing amphiphilicity in these biopolymers provides inherent imaging and drug stabilization capabilities by π-π stacking interactions with aromatic antineoplastic agents. This offers a versatile and highly customizable nanocarrier with narrow size distribution and high drug loading efficiency (80%) with sustained drug release. PMID:27431007

  2. [Blending powdered antineoplastic medicine in disposable ointment container].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yasunori; Uchino, Tomonobu; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    On dispensing powdered antineoplastic medicines, it is important to prevent cross-contamination and environmental exposure. Recently, we developed a method for blending powdered medicine in a disposable ointment container using a planetary centrifugal mixer. The disposable container prevents cross-contamination. In addition, environmental exposure associated with washing the apparatus does not arise because no blending blade is used. In this study, we aimed to confirm the uniformity of the mixture and weight loss of medicine in the blending procedure. We blended colored lactose powder with Leukerin(®) or Mablin(®) powders using the new method and the ordinary pestle and mortar method. Then, the blending state was monitored using image analysis. Blending variables, such as the blending ratio (1:9-9:1), container size (35-125 mL), and charging rate (20-50%) in the container were also investigated under the operational conditions of 500 rpm and 50 s. At a 20% charging rate in a 35 mL container, the blending precision of the mixtures was not influenced by the blending ratio, and was less than 6.08%, indicating homogeneity. With an increase in the charging rate, however, the blending precision decreased. The possible amount of both mixtures rose to about 17 g with a 20% charging rate in a 125 mL container. Furthermore, weight loss of medicines with this method was smaller than that with the pestle and mortar method, suggesting that this method is safer for pharmacists. In conclusion, we have established a precise and safe method for blending powdered medicines in pharmacies.

  3. [Blending powdered antineoplastic medicine in disposable ointment container].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yasunori; Uchino, Tomonobu; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    On dispensing powdered antineoplastic medicines, it is important to prevent cross-contamination and environmental exposure. Recently, we developed a method for blending powdered medicine in a disposable ointment container using a planetary centrifugal mixer. The disposable container prevents cross-contamination. In addition, environmental exposure associated with washing the apparatus does not arise because no blending blade is used. In this study, we aimed to confirm the uniformity of the mixture and weight loss of medicine in the blending procedure. We blended colored lactose powder with Leukerin(®) or Mablin(®) powders using the new method and the ordinary pestle and mortar method. Then, the blending state was monitored using image analysis. Blending variables, such as the blending ratio (1:9-9:1), container size (35-125 mL), and charging rate (20-50%) in the container were also investigated under the operational conditions of 500 rpm and 50 s. At a 20% charging rate in a 35 mL container, the blending precision of the mixtures was not influenced by the blending ratio, and was less than 6.08%, indicating homogeneity. With an increase in the charging rate, however, the blending precision decreased. The possible amount of both mixtures rose to about 17 g with a 20% charging rate in a 125 mL container. Furthermore, weight loss of medicines with this method was smaller than that with the pestle and mortar method, suggesting that this method is safer for pharmacists. In conclusion, we have established a precise and safe method for blending powdered medicines in pharmacies. PMID:24790050

  4. Terminal arbor degeneration (TAD): a novel lesion produced by the antineoplastic agent, paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Gary J.; Liu, Guo Kai; Xiao, Wen Hua; Jin, Hai Wei; Siau, Chiang

    2011-01-01

    The anti-neoplastic agent, paclitaxel, causes a dose-limiting distal, symmetrical, sensory peripheral neuropathy that is often accompanied by a neuropathic pain syndrome. In a low-dose model of paclitaxel-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy in the rat, we have shown that the drug causes degeneration of intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs), i.e., the fibers which give rise to the sensory afferent’s terminal receptor arbour. However, we did not find any evidence for axonal degeneration in samples taken at the mid-nerve level. Here we aimed to determine whether the absence of degenerating peripheral nerve axons was due to sampling a level that was too proximal. We used electron microscopy to study the distal-most branches of the nerves innervating the hind paw glabrous skin of normal and paclitaxel-treated rats. We confirmed that we sampled at a time when IENF degeneration was prominent. Because degeneration might be easier to detect with higher paclitaxel doses, we examined a four-fold cumulative dose range (8–32 mg/kg). We found no evidence of degeneration in the superficial subepidermal axon bundles (sSAB) that are located just a few microns below the epidermal basal lamina. Specifically, for all three dose groups there was no change in the number of sSAB per mm of epidermal border, no change in the number of axons per sSAB, and no change in the diameter of sSAB axons. We conclude that paclitaxel produces a novel type of lesion that is restricted to the afferent axon’s terminal arbor; we name this lesion “terminal arbor degeneration (TAD)”. PMID:21395870

  5. Combination of Pitavastatin and melatonin shows partial antineoplastic effects in a rat breast carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Kubatka, Peter; Bojková, Bianka; Kassayová, Monika; Orendáš, Peter; Kajo, Karol; Výbohová, Desanka; Kružliak, Peter; Adamicová, Katarína; Péč, Martin; Stollárová, Nadežda; Adamkov, Marián

    2014-10-01

    Our previous results indicated significant tumor-suppressive effects of different statins in rat mammary carcinogenesis. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the chemopreventive effects of Pitavastatin alone and in combination with the pineal hormone melatonin in the model of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Pitavastatin was administered dietary (10mg/kg) and melatonin in an aqueous solution (20μg/ml). Chemoprevention began 7 days prior to carcinogen administration and subsequently continued for 15 weeks until autopsy. At autopsy, mammary tumors were removed and prepared for histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. Compared to controls, Pitavastatin alone reduced average tumor volume by 58% and lengthened latency by 8 days; on the other hand, the drug increased tumor frequency by 23%. Combined administration of Pitavastatin with melatonin decreased tumor frequency by 23%, tumor volume by 44% and lengthened tumor latency by 5.5 days compared to control animals. The analysis of carcinoma cells showed significant increase in caspase-3 expression in both treated groups and a tendency of increased caspase-7 expression after Pitavastatin treatment alone. Significant expression decrease of Ki67 was found in carcinoma cells from both treated groups. Compared to control carcinoma cells, Pitavastatin alone increased VEGF expression by 41%, however melatonin totally reversed its undesirable effect. Pitavastatin combined with melatonin significantly increased femur compact bone thickness in animals. Pitavastatin alone decreased plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol levels, however it significantly increased levels of glucose. In summary, our results show a partial antineoplastic effect of Pitavastatin combined with melatonin in the rat mammary gland carcinoma model. PMID:25450902

  6. Rational study endpoints in anti-neoplastic agent regulatory approval trials in the gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Markman, Maurie

    2016-07-01

    A discussion of rational endpoints in clinical trials seeking regulatory approval for new anti-neoplastic agents involving the three major gynecologic malignancies, cancers of the ovary, cervix, and endometrial, is particularly interesting as (in the opinion of this commentator) the conclusion will be different in the individual cancers. PMID:27638892

  7. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  8. Cytotoxicity and Antineoplastic Activities of Alkylamines and Their Borane Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Elaine Y.; Muhammad, Rosallah A.

    1996-01-01

    The alkylamines and their related boron derivatives demonstrated potent cytotoxicity against the growth of murine and human tissue cultured cells. These agents did not necessarily require the boron atom to possess potent cytotoxic action in certain tumor lines. Their ability to suppress tumor cell growth was based on their inhibition of DNA and protein syntheses. DNA synthesis was reduced because purine synthesis was blocked at the enzyme site of IMP dehydrogenase by the agents. In addition ribonucleotide reductase and nucleoside kinase activities were reduced by the agents which would account for the reduced d[NTP] pools. The DNA template or molecule may be a target of the drugs with regard to binding of the drug to nucleoside bases or intercalaction of the drug between DNA base pairs. Only some Of the agents caused DNA fragmentation with reduced DNA viscosity. These effects would contribute to overall cell death afforded by the agents. PMID:18472803

  9. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents: mechanisms and treatment with rapid desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Simarro, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to chemotherapy drugs, such as taxanes and platins, and to monoclonal antibodies limit their therapeutic use due to the severity of some reactions and the fear of inducing a potentially lethal reaction in highly sensitized patients. Patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions face the prospect of abandoning first-line treatment and switching to a second-line, less effective therapy. Some of these reactions are mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, a subset of which occur through an immunoglobulin (IgE)-dependent mechanism, and are thus true allergies. Others involve mast cells without a demonstrable IgE mechanism. Whether basophils can participate in these reactions has not been demonstrated. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) is a procedure that induces temporary tolerance to a drug, allowing a medication allergic patient to receive the optimal agent for his or her disease. Through RDD, patients with IgE and non-IgE HSRs can safely be administered important medications while minimizing or completely inhibiting adverse reactions. Due to the clinical expansion and success of RDD, the molecular mechanisms inducing the temporary tolerization have been investigated and are partially understood, allowing for safer and more effective protocols. This article reviews the current literature on molecular mechanisms of RDD with an emphasis in our recent contributions to this field as well as the indications, methods and outcomes of RDD for taxanes, platins, and monoclonal antibodies. PMID:22576054

  10. Antineoplastic activities of protein-conjugated silver sulfide nano-crystals with different shapes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Jie; Yang, Lin; Yang, Hua-Yan; Wang, Kui; Yao, Wen-Guang; Jiang, Kai; Huang, Xiao-Lan; Zheng, Zhi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, antineoplastic activities of protein-conjugated silver sulfide nano-crystals with different shapes were described in detail. Transmission electron microscope analysis demonstrated that stable and well-disperse protein-conjugated silver sulfide nano-particles, nano-rods, and nano-wires could be prepared by aqueous chemistry method. The Fourier transform infrared spectrograph analysis indicated the strong coordination between silver sulfide surfaces and -OH and -NH groups in bovine serum albumin. The antineoplastic activities of protein-conjugated silver sulfide nano-crystals were examined by cell viability analysis, optical and electron microscopy methods. The results showed that nano-particles, nano-rods and nano-wires could inhibit the proliferations of human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402 cells and C6 glioma cells, and the activities were size-dependent.

  11. Use of antineoplastic agents in cancer patients with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Rudek, Michelle A.; Flexner, Charles; Ambinder, Richard F.

    2011-01-01

    In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have reduced morbidity and mortality of AIDS-related complications. However, there is an increase in the prevalence of AIDS-defining and non-AIDS-defining cancers. This article provides an up-to-date review of management of HAART pharmacotherapy in the context of cytotoxic chemotherapy or targeted antineoplastic agents. PMID:21570912

  12. 77 FR 38297 - Revised Document Posted: NIOSH List of Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and... for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-19-P ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Revised Document Posted: NIOSH List...

  13. [Implementation of a robot for the preparation of antineoplastic drugs in the Pharmacy Service].

    PubMed

    Pacheco Ramos, María de la Paz; Arenaza Peña, Ainhoa Elisa; Santiago Pérez, Alejandro; Bilbao Gómez-Martino, Cristina; Zamora Barrios, María Dolores; Arias Fernández, María Lourdes

    2015-05-01

    Objetivo: Describir la implantación de un robot para la elaboración de antineoplásicos en el Servicio de Farmacia y evaluar el valor añadido al proceso farmacoterapéutico. Método: La implantación se llevó a cabo en Junio 2012 en un hospital de tercer nivel, realizándose en dos períodos: 1-Período de pruebas con la instalación del robot, configuración técnica del equipo, validación de 29 principios activos e integración con el software de prescripción electrónica (9 meses); 2-Período de utilización (22 meses). Se impartieron cursos de formación a farmacéuticos y personal de enfermería. Para su funcionamiento el robot emplea reconocimiento fotográfico, identificación por código de barras y controles gravimétricos, que proporcionaron datos de error cometido por preparación, tolerando ±10% y restringiéndolo, tras un estudio piloto, a un intervalo de tolerancia de ±4%. El robot fue programado para reconocer bolsas, infusores, jeringas y viales. El valor añadido se evaluó durante 31 meses con la identificación de los errores de preparación. Resultados: Se realizaron 11.865 preparaciones en el robot, que correspondieron al 40% del global de antineoplásicos elaborados, de 29 principios activos diferentes. Se identificaron y evitaron errores de dosificación en el 1,12% (n=133) de las preparaciones, que no alcanzaron al paciente al ser identificadas por el robot como preparaciones con desviación negativa (-4%) y ser corregidas manualmente. Conclusiones: La implantación de un robot en la elaboración de antineoplásicos permite identificar los errores de elaboración y evitar que lleguen al paciente, promoviendo la seguridad y calidad del proceso farmacoterapéutico de antineoplásicos y reduciendo la exposición del manipulador a los mismos.

  14. Early effects of the antineoplastic agent salinomycin on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Managò, A; Leanza, L; Carraretto, L; Sassi, N; Grancara, S; Quintana-Cabrera, R; Trimarco, V; Toninello, A; Scorrano, L; Trentin, L; Semenzato, G; Gulbins, E; Zoratti, M; Szabò, I

    2015-01-01

    Salinomycin, isolated from Streptomyces albus, displays antimicrobial activity. Recently, a large-scale screening approach identified salinomycin and nigericin as selective apoptosis inducers of cancer stem cells. Growing evidence suggests that salinomycin is able to kill different types of non-stem tumor cells that usually display resistance to common therapeutic approaches, but the mechanism of action of this molecule is still poorly understood. Since salinomycin has been suggested to act as a K(+) ionophore, we explored its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic performance at an early time point following drug application. In contrast to the K(+) ionophore valinomycin, salinomycin induced a rapid hyperpolarization. In addition, mitochondrial matrix acidification and a significant decrease of respiration were observed in intact mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in cancer stem cell-like HMLE cells within tens of minutes, while increased production of reactive oxygen species was not detected. By comparing the chemical structures and cellular effects of this drug with those of valinomycin (K(+) ionophore) and nigericin (K(+)/H(+) exchanger), we conclude that salinomycin mediates K(+)/H(+) exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compatible with its direct modulation of mitochondrial function, salinomycin was able to induce cell death also in Bax/Bak-less double-knockout MEF cells. Since at the concentration range used in most studies (around 10 μM) salinomycin exerts its effect at the level of mitochondria and alters bioenergetic performance, the specificity of its action on pathologic B cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) versus B cells from healthy subjects was investigated. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), proposed to mimic the tumor environment, attenuated the apoptotic effect of salinomycin on B-CLL cells. Apoptosis occurred to a significant extent in healthy B cells as well as in MSCs and human primary

  15. Disposition of antineoplastic agents in the very young child.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, H. L.; Relling, M. V.; Crom, W. R.; Silverstein, K.; Groom, S.; Rodman, J. H.; Rivera, G. K.; Crist, W. M.; Evans, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Maturation of physiologic process which govern the disposition of pharmacologic agents can yield significant changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of drugs in neonates, infants and children. However, there are very little data concerning the disposition of anticancer drugs in young children. Pharmacokinetic data for six anticancer agents were compared in infants less than 1 year of age and children greater than 1 year of age treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital. No pharmacokinetic data were available for infants less than 2 months of age. Median methotrexate clearance tended to be lower in four infants (0.26-0.99 years) vs 108 children (1-19 years): 80 vs 103 ml min-1 m-2, respectively (P = 0.01). There was no difference in the median 42 h methotrexate concentration. Teniposide systemic clearance and terminal half-life and cytarabine systemic clearance were not different between the two groups. There was no significant difference in etoposide systemic clearance when normalised to body surface area (ml min-1 m-2), however a significantly lower systemic clearance relative to body weight (ml min-1 kg-1) was observed in two infants, 0.5 to 1 year of age, vs 23 children, 3-18 years of age. Doxorubicin systemic clearance was not significantly different between the two groups when systemic clearance was expressed in ml min-1 kg-1. However, there was a trend toward a lower rate of systemic clearance in ml min-1 m-2 in infants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1503923

  16. On/off-switchable anti-neoplastic nanoarchitecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Hirak K.; Imani, Roghayeh; Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R.; Pazoki, Meysam; Iglič, Aleš; Turner, Anthony P. F.; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-09-01

    Throughout the world, there are increasing demands for alternate approaches to advanced cancer therapeutics. Numerous potentially chemotherapeutic compounds are developed every year for clinical trial and some of them are considered as potential drug candidates. Nanotechnology-based approaches have accelerated the discovery process, but the key challenge still remains to develop therapeutically viable and physiologically safe materials suitable for cancer therapy. Here, we report a high turnover, on/off-switchable functionally popping reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator using a smart mesoporous titanium dioxide popcorn (TiO2 Pops) nanoarchitecture. The resulting TiO2 Pops, unlike TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), are exceptionally biocompatible with normal cells. Under identical conditions, TiO2 Pops show very high photocatalytic activity compared to TiO2 NPs. Upon on/off-switchable photo activation, the TiO2 Pops can trigger the generation of high-turnover flash ROS and can deliver their potential anticancer effect by enhancing the intracellular ROS level until it crosses the threshold to open the ‘death gate’, thus reducing the survival of cancer cells by at least six times in comparison with TiO2 NPs without affecting the normal cells.

  17. On/off-switchable anti-neoplastic nanoarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Hirak K.; Imani, Roghayeh; Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R.; Pazoki, Meysam; Iglič, Aleš; Turner, Anthony P. F.; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the world, there are increasing demands for alternate approaches to advanced cancer therapeutics. Numerous potentially chemotherapeutic compounds are developed every year for clinical trial and some of them are considered as potential drug candidates. Nanotechnology-based approaches have accelerated the discovery process, but the key challenge still remains to develop therapeutically viable and physiologically safe materials suitable for cancer therapy. Here, we report a high turnover, on/off-switchable functionally popping reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator using a smart mesoporous titanium dioxide popcorn (TiO2 Pops) nanoarchitecture. The resulting TiO2 Pops, unlike TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), are exceptionally biocompatible with normal cells. Under identical conditions, TiO2 Pops show very high photocatalytic activity compared to TiO2 NPs. Upon on/off-switchable photo activation, the TiO2 Pops can trigger the generation of high-turnover flash ROS and can deliver their potential anticancer effect by enhancing the intracellular ROS level until it crosses the threshold to open the ‘death gate’, thus reducing the survival of cancer cells by at least six times in comparison with TiO2 NPs without affecting the normal cells. PMID:26415561

  18. On/off-switchable anti-neoplastic nanoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Patra, Hirak K; Imani, Roghayeh; Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R; Pazoki, Meysam; Iglič, Aleš; Turner, Anthony P F; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the world, there are increasing demands for alternate approaches to advanced cancer therapeutics. Numerous potentially chemotherapeutic compounds are developed every year for clinical trial and some of them are considered as potential drug candidates. Nanotechnology-based approaches have accelerated the discovery process, but the key challenge still remains to develop therapeutically viable and physiologically safe materials suitable for cancer therapy. Here, we report a high turnover, on/off-switchable functionally popping reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator using a smart mesoporous titanium dioxide popcorn (TiO2 Pops) nanoarchitecture. The resulting TiO2 Pops, unlike TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), are exceptionally biocompatible with normal cells. Under identical conditions, TiO2 Pops show very high photocatalytic activity compared to TiO2 NPs. Upon on/off-switchable photo activation, the TiO2 Pops can trigger the generation of high-turnover flash ROS and can deliver their potential anticancer effect by enhancing the intracellular ROS level until it crosses the threshold to open the 'death gate', thus reducing the survival of cancer cells by at least six times in comparison with TiO2 NPs without affecting the normal cells. PMID:26415561

  19. Drug-induced infertility.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, J F; Davis, L J

    1984-02-01

    Primary infertility may result from the use of various drugs. This phenomenon may be the result of an effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or a direct toxic effect on the gonads. Some of the drugs considered in this article demonstrate sex-related differences in their ability to cause infertility; there also may be age-related differences. The drugs described in this review, in regard to their association with the development of infertility, include various individual antineoplastic agents (cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil, busulphan, and methotrexate) and combinations of these chemotherapeutic drugs, glucocorticosteroids, hormonal steroids (diethylstilbestrol, medroxyprogesterone acetate, estrogen, and the constituents of oral contraceptives), antibiotics (sulfasalazine and co-trimoxazole), thyroid supplements, spironolactone, cimetidine, colchicine, marihuana, opiates, and neuroleptic agents.

  20. Which drugs are contraindicated during breastfeeding? Practice guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, M. E.; Lee, A.; Ito, S.

    2000-01-01

    QUESTION: Many breastfeeding mothers are concerned about taking medications that might affect their babies. Are there any guidelines on which drugs are safe? ANSWER: Only a few drugs pose a clinically significant risk to breastfed babies. In general, antineoplastics, drugs of abuse, some anticonvulsants, ergot alkaloids, and radiopharmaceuticals should not be taken, and levels of amiodarone, cyclosporine, and lithium should be monitored. Images p1757-a PMID:11013791

  1. Changes in leukocyte gene expression profiles induced by antineoplastic chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    GONZÁLEZ-FERNÁNDEZ, REBECA; MORALES, MANUEL; AVILA, JULIO; MARTÍN-VASALLO, PABLO

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we studied changes in gene expression induced by chemotherapy (CT) on normal peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs), at baseline and following three CT cycles, in order to identify which genes were specifically affected and were potentially useful as biomarkers for a personalised prognosis and follow-up. A PBL subtraction cDNA library was constructed from four patients undergoing CT with paclitaxel and carboplatin (PC). mRNA from the PBLs was isolated prior to the patients receiving the first cycle and following the completion of the third cycle. The library was screened and the expression of the identified genes was studied in PBLs obtained from patients suffering from cancer prior to and following three cycles of PC and a reference group of patients undergoing treatment with Adriamycin-cyclophosphamide (AC). From the 1,200 screened colonies, 65 positive clones showed varied expression intensity and were sequenced; 27 of these were mitochondrial DNA and 38 clones (27 different) were coded for cytosolic and nuclear proteins. The genes that were studied in patients undergoing CT were ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene), eIF4B (translation initiation factor 4B), MATR3 (Matrin 3), MORC3 (microrchidia 3), PCMTD2 (protein-L-isoaspartate O-methyltransferase), PDCD10 (programmed cell death gene 10), PSMB1 (proteasome subunit type β), RMND5A (required for meiotic nuclear division 5 homologue A), RUNX2 (runt-related transcription factor 2), SACM1L (suppressor of actin mutations 1-like), TMEM66 (transmembrane protein 66) and ZNF644 (zinc finger protein 644). Certain variations were observed in the expression of the genes that are involved in drug resistance mechanisms, some of which may be secondary to non-desirable effects and others of which may cause the undesired effects of CT. The expression of genes with a dynamic cellular role showed a marked positive correlation, indicating that their upregulation may be involved in a specific pattern of cell

  2. Antineoplastic copper coordinated complexes (Casiopeinas) uncouple oxidative phosphorylation and induce mitochondrial permeability transition in cardiac mitochondria and cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Silva-Platas, Christian; Guerrero-Beltrán, Carlos Enrique; Carrancá, Mariana; Castillo, Elena Cristina; Bernal-Ramírez, Judith; Oropeza-Almazán, Yuriana; González, Lorena N; Rojo, Rocío; Martínez, Luis Enrique; Valiente-Banuet, Juan; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Bravo-Gómez, María Elena; García, Noemí; Carvajal, Karla; García-Rivas, Gerardo

    2016-02-01

    Copper-based drugs, Casiopeinas (Cas), exhibit antiproliferative and antineoplastic activities in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Unfortunately, the clinical use of these novel chemotherapeutics could be limited by the development of dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying Cas cardiotoxicity and anticancer activity are not completely understood. Here, we explore the potential impact of Cas on the cardiac mitochondria energetics as the molecular mechanisms underlying Cas-induced cardiotoxicity. To explore the properties on mitochondrial metabolism, we determined Cas effects on respiration, membrane potential, membrane permeability, and redox state in isolated cardiac mitochondria. The effect of Cas on the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) was also evaluated in isolated cardiomyocytes by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Cas IIIEa, IIgly, and IIIia predominately inhibited maximal NADH- and succinate-linked mitochondrial respiration, increased the state-4 respiration rate and reduced membrane potential, suggesting that Cas also act as mitochondrial uncouplers. Interestingly, cyclosporine A inhibited Cas-induced mitochondrial depolarization, suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Similarly to isolated mitochondria, in isolated cardiomyocytes, Cas treatment decreased the Δψm and cyclosporine A treatment prevented mitochondrial depolarization. The production of H2O2 increased in Cas-treated mitochondria, which might also increase the oxidation of mitochondrial proteins such as adenine nucleotide translocase. In accordance, an antioxidant scavenger (Tiron) significantly diminished Cas IIIia mitochondrial depolarization. Cas induces a prominent loss of membrane potential, associated with alterations in redox state, which increases mPTP opening, potentially due to thiol-dependent modifications of the pore, suggesting that direct or indirect inhibition of mPTP opening might

  3. Chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles functionalized with a pH-responsive amphiphile improved the in vitro antineoplastic effects of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Librelotto, Daniele R; Scheeren, Laís E; Vinardell, M Pilar; Mitjans, Montserrat; Rolim, Clarice M B

    2016-11-01

    Delivery systems with pH-responsiveness behavior are of particular interest because they could allow exploring the various pH gradients within the body, for example, between healthy tissue and tumor tissue, or between extracellular tissue and some cell compartments. Likewise, modifications in nanocarriers with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and poloxamer could be a potential approach to improve the effectiveness of cancer treatments. On these premises, we prepared pH-responsive DOX-loaded chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles (NPs), modified or not with PEG or poloxamer, and incorporating an anionic dyacyl lysine-based surfactant with sodium counterion (77KS) as a pH-sensitive adjuvant. Owing to its pH-sensitivity, the CS-NPs showed membranolytic behavior upon reducing the pH value of surrounding media to 6.6 and 5.4, which are characteristic of the endosomal compartments. The in vitro antiproliferative assays with MCF-7 and HeLa tumor cells indicated that the NPs themselves had no associated significant cytotoxicity, while DOX-loaded NPs induced higher cytotoxicity than free drug. Additionally, DOX-loaded CS-NPs displayed greater selectivity to tumor cells than to the non-tumor 3T3 fibroblasts. The feasibility of using these NPs to target tumor microenvironment was proven, as cytotoxicity against cancer cell models was higher in a mildly acidic environment. Finally, the hemocompatibility of NPs was demonstrated, indicating their suitability for intravenous administration. Altogether, the results suggest that the combination of endosomal acidity with the potential endosomolytic capability of these pH-responsive nanocarriers could increase the intracellular delivery of DOX and, thus, might enhance its antineoplastic efficacy.

  4. Chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles functionalized with a pH-responsive amphiphile improved the in vitro antineoplastic effects of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Librelotto, Daniele R; Scheeren, Laís E; Vinardell, M Pilar; Mitjans, Montserrat; Rolim, Clarice M B

    2016-11-01

    Delivery systems with pH-responsiveness behavior are of particular interest because they could allow exploring the various pH gradients within the body, for example, between healthy tissue and tumor tissue, or between extracellular tissue and some cell compartments. Likewise, modifications in nanocarriers with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and poloxamer could be a potential approach to improve the effectiveness of cancer treatments. On these premises, we prepared pH-responsive DOX-loaded chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles (NPs), modified or not with PEG or poloxamer, and incorporating an anionic dyacyl lysine-based surfactant with sodium counterion (77KS) as a pH-sensitive adjuvant. Owing to its pH-sensitivity, the CS-NPs showed membranolytic behavior upon reducing the pH value of surrounding media to 6.6 and 5.4, which are characteristic of the endosomal compartments. The in vitro antiproliferative assays with MCF-7 and HeLa tumor cells indicated that the NPs themselves had no associated significant cytotoxicity, while DOX-loaded NPs induced higher cytotoxicity than free drug. Additionally, DOX-loaded CS-NPs displayed greater selectivity to tumor cells than to the non-tumor 3T3 fibroblasts. The feasibility of using these NPs to target tumor microenvironment was proven, as cytotoxicity against cancer cell models was higher in a mildly acidic environment. Finally, the hemocompatibility of NPs was demonstrated, indicating their suitability for intravenous administration. Altogether, the results suggest that the combination of endosomal acidity with the potential endosomolytic capability of these pH-responsive nanocarriers could increase the intracellular delivery of DOX and, thus, might enhance its antineoplastic efficacy. PMID:27543694

  5. Effect of implementing a cancer chemotherapy order form on prescribing habits for parenteral antineoplastics.

    PubMed

    Pastel, D A; Fay, P; Lee, D

    1993-12-01

    Effect of implementing a cancer chemotherapy order form on prescribing habits for parenteral antineoplastics. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of a cancer chemotherapy order form improved prescriber inclusion of necessary prescription information to minimize errors for parenteral antineoplastics when compared to orders written on standard treatment-order forms. Standard treatment order forms and the newly developed chemotherapy order forms were examined for differences in completeness of the following 13 prescription components: diagnosis, height, weight, body surface area, start date and time, dosage (e.g., mg/m2), dose (mg), solution diluent (drips only) and volume (drips only), infusion rate (drips only), route (i.e., IV push or IV drip), frequency of administration, and total number of scheduled doses. The results demonstrate a significant improvement in completeness of necessary prescription information when cancer chemotherapy was ordered by physicians using a chemotherapy order form compared to a standard treatment order form. Importantly, the availability of various prescription components such as height, weight, and dosage may be used by the pharmacist to verify physicians' calculations of body surface area and dose and thereby reduce the chance of serious medication dosage errors. An additional benefit of the new form is a reduction in the time pharmacists spend clarifying orders.

  6. Integrative review of factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea during antineoplastic chemotherapy 1

    PubMed Central

    Moysés, Aline Maria Bonini; Durant, Lais Corsino; de Almeida, Ana Maria; Gozzo, Thais de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Method: integrative review conducted in four electronic databases (PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and LILACS) using the key words: neoplasia, antineoplastic agents and nausea. Results: only 30 out of 1,258 papers identified met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent related factors were: being younger than 50 years old, motion sickness, being a woman, emetogenic potential of the chemotherapy, anxiety, conditioned stimulus, and expecting nausea after treatment. Conclusion: this review's findings, coupled with the incidence of nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, reveal an important difference between evidence found and that used by NANDA International, Inc. Even though it provides an appropriate definition of related factors, it does not mention chemotherapy, despite the various studies addressing the topic using different designs and presenting various objectives and outcomes. PMID:27737380

  7. Preparation, In Vivo Administration, Dose-Limiting Toxicities, and Antineoplastic Activity of Cytochalasin B

    PubMed Central

    Trendowski, Matthew; Zoino, Joseph N.; Christen, Timothy D.; Acquafondata, Christopher; Fondy, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    An effective and inexpensive protocol for producing cytochalasins A and B is being disclosed to propose a viable method by which to examine the in vivo antineoplastic activity of these congeners in preclinical tumor-bearing mammalian models. In addition, we determine the maximum tolerated doses of cytochalasin B using multiple routes and formulations, characterize the tissue distribution of intravenous bolus cytochalasin B, and assess the in vivo antineoplastic activity of cytochalasin B in comparison in doxorubicin in Balb/c mice challenged intradermally with M109 murine lung carcinoma. We also examine the effects of cytochalasin B against several other murine neoplastic cell lines (Lewis lung, LA4, B16F10, and M5076). Finally, we examine a potential mechanism of the antimetastatic activity of cytochalasin B by observing the effects of the agent on the secretion of N-acetylglucosaminidase (GlcNACase) by B16BL6 and B16F10 murine melanomas in vitro. The results of the study can be summarized as follows: 1) Cytochalasin B can be safely administered intravenously, intraperitoneally, and subcutaneously in murine models, with the maximum tolerated dose of all routes of administration being increased by liposome encapsulation. 2) Cytochalasin B can significantly inhibit the growth of tumors in mice challenged with M109, Lewis lung, LA4, B16F10, or M5076, producing long-term survival against lung carcinomas and adenocarcinomas (M109, Lewis lung, and LA4) and B16F10 melanoma, but not M5076 sarcoma. These effects were comparable to intraperitoneally administered doxorubicin. 4) Low concentrations of cytochalasin B inhibit the secretion of GlcNACase, indicating that cytochalasin B may inhibit metastatic progression by mechanisms not directly associated with its influence on cell adhesion and motility. PMID:26310377

  8. Evaluation of an electrolysis apparatus for inactivating antineoplastics in clinical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toyohide; Hirose, Jun; Sano, Kouichi; Hiro, Naoki; Ijiri, Yoshio; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Tamai, Hiroshi; Takenaka, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Nakano, Takashi

    2008-06-01

    We recently reported a system for inactivating antineoplastics in which sodium hypochlorite is supplied by the electrolysis of sodium chloride solution. In this study, we designed an electrolysis apparatus for inactivating the cytotoxicity of antineoplastics in clinical wastewater using the system. The apparatus consists of an electrolysis cell with platinum-iridium electrodes, a pool tank, a circulating system for wastewater, a safety system for explosive gas and overflow, and an exhaust duct. The free chlorine concentration increased linearly up to 6500 mg l(-1), and pH also increased to 9.0-10.0 within 2h, when 0.9% sodium chloride solution was electrolyzed. We examined its efficacy with model and clinical wastewaters. The reciprocal of dilution factor for disappearance of cytotoxicity using Molt-4 cells was compared before and after electrolysis. In the model wastewater, that was 9.10 x 10(4) before electrolysis, and 3.56 x 10(2) after 2h of electrolysis. In the clinical wastewater (n=26), that was 6.90 x 10(3)-1.02 x 10(6) before electrolysis, and 1.08 x 10(2)-1.45 x 10(4) after 2h of electrolysis. Poisonous and explosive gases released by the electrolysis were measured; however, they were found to be negligible in terms of safety. The environmental load was evaluated by carbon dioxide generation as an index and it was found that the carbon dioxide generated by the electrolysis method was 1/70 lower than that by the dilution method with tap water. Moreover, the cost of the electrolysis method was 1/170 lower than that of the dilution method. This method was found to be both effective and economically valuable. PMID:18423519

  9. Hypolipidemic, anti-obesity, anti-inflammatory, anti-osteoporotic, and anti-neoplastic properties of amine carboxyboranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, I H; Chen, S Y; Rajendran, K G; Sood, A; Spielvogel, B F; Shih, J

    1994-01-01

    The amine-carboxyborane derivatives were shown to be effective antineoplastic/cytotoxic agents with selective activity against single-cell and solid tumors derived from murine and human leukemias, lymphomas, sarcomas, and carcinomas. The agents inhibited DNA and RNA synthesis in preference to protein synthesis in L1210 lymphoid leukemia cells. Inosine-monophosphate dehydrogenase apparently is a target site of the compounds; similar effects on phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate amido transferase, orotidine-monophosphate decarboxylase, and both nucleoside and nucleotide kinases were observed. Deoxyribonucleotide pool levels were reduced in the cells; DNA strand scission was observed with the agents. In rodents, the amine carboxyboranes were potent hypolipidemic agents, lowering both serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, in addition to lowering cholesterol content of very low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and elevating high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations. De novo regulatory enzymes involved in lipid synthesis were also inhibited (e.g., hypocholesterolemic 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-Coenzyme A reductase, acyl-Coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase, and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase). Concurrently, the agents modulated LDL and HDL receptor binding, internalization, and degradation, so that less cholesterol was delivered to the plaques and more broken down from esters and conducted to the liver for biliary excretion. Tissue lipids in the aorta wall of the rat were reduced and fewer atherosclerotic morphologic lesions were present in quail aortas after treatment with the agents. Cholesterol resorption from the rat intestine was reduced in the presence of drug. Genetic hyperlipidemic mice demonstrated the same types of reduction after treatment with the agents. The agents would effectively lower lipids in tissue based on the inhibition of regulatory enzymes in pigs. These findings should help improve domestic meat

  10. Correcting for bias in relative risk estimates due to exposure measurement error: a case study of occupational exposure to antineoplastics in pharmacists.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelman, D; Valanis, B

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This paper describes 2 statistical methods designed to correct for bias from exposure measurement error in point and interval estimates of relative risk. METHODS: The first method takes the usual point and interval estimates of the log relative risk obtained from logistic regression and corrects them for nondifferential measurement error using an exposure measurement error model estimated from validation data. The second, likelihood-based method fits an arbitrary measurement error model suitable for the data at hand and then derives the model for the outcome of interest. RESULTS: Data from Valanis and colleagues' study of the health effects of antineoplastics exposure among hospital pharmacists were used to estimate the prevalence ratio of fever in the previous 3 months from this exposure. For an interdecile increase in weekly number of drugs mixed, the prevalence ratio, adjusted for confounding, changed from 1.06 to 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04, 1.26) after correction for exposure measurement error. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure measurement error is often an important source of bias in public health research. Methods are available to correct such biases. PMID:9518972

  11. Synthesis and Characterization with Antineoplastic, Biochemical, Cytotoxic, and Antimicrobial Studies of Schiff Base Cu(II) Ion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Haque, M. M.; Kudrat-E-Zahan, Md.; Banu, Laila Arjuman; Islam, Md. Shariful; Islam, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Copper(II) complexes containing two Schiff base ligands derived from 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde with 2-aminophenol and 3-aminophenol have been synthesized and characterized by means of analytical, magnetic, and spectroscopic methods. Bacteria, fungus, Entamoeba histolytica, and antineoplastic activities of the synthesized complexes have been determined by monitoring the parameters cell growth inhibition, survival time of tumour mice, time-body relation, causing of intraperitoneal cells and macrophages, alkaline phosphatase activity, hematological effect, and biopsy of tumour. PMID:26294901

  12. Aptamers as targeting delivery devices or anti-cancer drugs for fighting tumors.

    PubMed

    Scaggiante, Bruna; Dapas, Barbara; Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Pozzato, Gabriele; Giansante, Carlo; Fiotti, Nicola; Tamai, Elisa; Tonon, Federica; Grassi, Gabriele

    2013-06-01

    Aptamer researches applied to the treatment of human cancers have increased since their discovery in 1990. This is due to different factors including: 1) the technical possibility to select, by SELEX-based procedures, specific aptamers targeting virtually any given molecule, 2) the aptamer favorable bio-activity in vivo, 3) the low production costs and 4) the ease synthesis and storage for the marketing. In the field of cancer treatments, aptamers have been studied as tumor-specific agents driving drugs into cancer cells; additionally they have been used as anti-neoplastic agents, able to inhibit tumor cell growth and dissemination when administered alone or in combination with conventional anti-neoplastic drugs. Aptamers are gaining an increased interest for pharmaceutical companies and some of them are under clinical evaluation trials. In this review we update the findings about the use of aptamers as "escort" molecules able to drive drugs into the cells and as antineoplastic drugs. Current anti-neoplastic treatments suffer from the intrinsic toxicity related to the un-specific targeting of both normal and tumorigenic proliferating cells. The aptamers could be useful to improve: 1) the selective targeting of molecules essential for the viability and expansion of tumor cells and/or the selective driving of chemotherapies into tumor cells, thus resulting in higher effectiveness and lower systemic side-effects compared to conventional anti-neoplastic drugs alone and 2) to improve the therapeutic index of currently used chemotherapies. Even if some problems related to the in vivo stability and pharmacokinetic/dynamics of aptamers remain to be improved, their potential use in the treatment of different human cancers is getting closer and closer to a practical therapeutic use.

  13. Synthesis of N-methylarylnitrones derived from alkyloxybenzaldehydes and antineoplastic effect on human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Costa, Débora S S; Martino, Thiago; Magalhães, Fernanda C; Justo, Graça; Coelho, Marsen G P; Barcellos, Julio C F; Moura, Victor B; Costa, Paulo R R; Sabino, Kátia C C; Dias, Ayres G

    2015-05-01

    New O-isoprenylated-N-methylarylnitrones derived from isomeric o, m and p-hydroxybenzaldehydes have been prepared and the antineoplastic effects on human cancer cell lines were evaluated. The O-geranylated nitrone LQB-278 (1b) and its isomers 2b and 3b inhibited the NO production, but the anti-leukemic activity was drastically dependent on nitrone isomer, with the 1b being the most effective one (IC₅₀ of 6.7 μM) on Jurkat leukemia cell, by MTT assay. In addition, 1b up-regulated p21CIP1/WAF1/Sdi1 protein expression (flow cytometry), a cell cycle inhibitor, reduced cell growth, and induced DNA fragmentation (increased sub-G1 phase cells) and phosphatidylserine externalization in plasmatic membrane (increased annexin V positive cells). Finally, the 1b up-regulation of p21 expression and apoptosis induction seem to be the mechanisms by which it promotes its anti-leukemic effects, making this new molecular architecture a promising prototype for leukemia intervention. PMID:25813896

  14. Antineoplastic effects of Rhodiola crenulata treatment on B16-F10 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Maxine C; Wong, Kaitlyn E; Bassa, Lotfi M; Mora, Maria Carmen; Ser-Dolansky, Jennifer; Henneberry, Jean M; Crisi, Giovanna M; Arenas, Richard B; Schneider, Sallie S

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer with limited treatment options for advanced stage disease. Early detection and wide surgical excision remain the initial mode of treatment for primary tumors thus preventing metastases and leading to improved prognosis. Through this work, we have evaluated the antineoplastic effects of Rhodiola crenulata (R. crenulata) root extracts on the B16-F10 melanoma cell line, both in vitro and in vivo. We observed that R. crenulata treatment resulted in increased cell death as well as a reduction in tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Additionally, we observed that R. crenulata decreased the expression of integrin β1 and vimentin and increased the expression of E-cadherin. Further, in mice treated with a topical R. crenulata-based cream therapy, tumors were more likely to have a radial growth pattern, a reduction in mitotic activity, and an increase in tumor necrosis. We also observed that mice drinking water supplemented with R. crenulata displayed a reduction of metastatic foci in disseminated models of melanoma. Collectively, these findings suggest that R. crenulata exhibits striking antitumorigenic and antimetastatic properties and that this extract may harbor potential novel adjuvant therapy for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:26159852

  15. New Trends on Antineoplastic Therapy Research: Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana Shaw) Oil Nanostructured Systems.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Machado, Lucas; Xavier-Júnior, Francisco H; Rutckeviski, Renata; Morais, Andreza R V; Alencar, Éverton N; Dantas, Teresa R F; Cruz, Ana K M; Genre, Julieta; da Silva-Junior, Arnóbio A; Pedrosa, Matheus F F; Rocha, Hugo A O; Egito, Eryvaldo S T

    2016-01-01

    Bullfrog oil is a natural product extracted from the Rana catesbeiana Shaw adipose tissue and used in folk medicine for the treatment of several diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extraction process of bullfrog oil, to develop a suitable topical nanoemulsion and to evaluate its efficacy against melanoma cells. The oil samples were obtained by hot and organic solvent extraction processes and were characterized by titration techniques and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The required hydrophile-lipophile balance and the pseudo-ternary phase diagram (PTPD) were assessed to determine the emulsification ability of the bullfrog oil. The anti-tumoral activity of the samples was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay for normal fibroblast (3T3) and melanoma (B16F10) cell lines. Both extraction methods produced yielded around 60% and the oil was mainly composed of unsaturated compounds (around 60%). The bullfrog oil nanoemulsion obtained from PTPD presented a droplet size of about 390 nm and polydispersity = 0.05 and a zeta potential of about -25 mV. Both the bullfrog oil itself and its topical nanoemulsion did not show cytotoxicity in 3T3 linage. However, these systems showed growth inhibition in B16F10 cells. Finally, the bullfrog oil presented itself as a candidate for the development of pharmaceutical products free from cytotoxicity and effective for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:27144557

  16. Antineoplastic Activity Comparison of Bovine Serum Albumin--Conjugated Sulfides Semiconductor Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Jie; Huang, Jing-Chun; Wu, Sha-Sha; Wang, Cai-Feng; Yu, Xue-Hong; Cao, Ying

    2015-04-01

    Although tumor is one of the most frequently occurring diseases and a leading cause of death, nanotechnology, one of the frontier sciences, is exhibiting its great potential to tumor treatments. The aim of this study was to design a facile and environmentally-friendly method to prepare bovine serum albumin-conjugated heavy metal sulfides nano-materials, including Ag2S, PbS and CdS. Here, bovine serum albumin was introduced in order to direct the synthesis of nano-materials by using its template effect and supply more sites for further modification in future. The crystal structure and morphology were analyzed by XRD and TEM, respectively. Additionally, the antineoplastic activity of nano-materials was compared by cell viability analysis, optical and electron microscopy observation after exposure of the human hepatoma cell line. The results showed that the inhibition effect of heavy metal sulfides on tumor cells was in the order of nano-PbS > bulk CdS > nano-Ag2S > nano-CdS > bulk PbS > bulk Ag2S. It could be concluded that heavy metal sulfides had significantly negative impact on human hepatoma cells growth but it could not be obviously generalized that nano-particles were always more effective to kill tumor cells than bulk materials. The size and surface reactivity might be the important factors causing the difference.

  17. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Neoplastic Effects of Endostar on Liver Cancer through Optical Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhenwen; Chi, Chongwei; Jia, Xiaohua; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth, progression, and drug treatment response, and it has become an important tool to promote biological studies in recent years. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the in vivo anti-angiogenic and anti-neoplastic effects of Endostar on liver cancer based on the optical molecular imaging systems including micro-computer tomography (Micro-CT), bioluminescence molecular imaging (BLI) and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). Firefly luciferase (fLuc) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) dual labeled human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC-LM3-fLuc-GFP cells) were used to establish the subcutaneous and orthotopic liver tumor model. After the tumor cells were implanted 14∼18 days, Endostar (5 mg/kg/day) was administered through an intravenous tail vein injection for continuous 14 days. The computer tomography angiography (CTA) and BLI were carried out for the subcutaneous tumor model. FMT was executed for the orthotopic tumor model. The CTA data showed that tumor vessel formation and the peritumoral vasculature of subcutaneous tumor in the Endostar treatment group was significantly inhibited compared to the control group. The BLI data exhibited the obvious tumor inhibition day 8 post-treatment. The FMT detected the tumor suppression effects of Endostar as early as day 4 post-treatment and measured the tumor location. The above data confirmed the effects of Endostar on anti-angiogenesis and tumor suppression on liver cancer. Our system combined CTA, BLI, and FMT to offer more comprehensive information about the effects of Endostar on the suppression of vessel and tumor formation. Optical molecular imaging system enabled the non-invasive and reliable assessment of anti-tumor drug efficacy on liver cancer. PMID:24416426

  18. Pyrimidinyl-arylpropionic acid derivatives: viable resources in the development of new antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xishan; Wang, Li; Ye, Yangliang; Fu, Lili; Chen, Minli; Wang, Qingyi; Liu, Moyan; Tang, Jing; Dai, Bing; Shen, Jianhua; Mei, Changlin

    2010-08-01

    Numerous studies have documented that various naturally derived ligands or synthetic non-thiazolidinediones (TZD) as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonists have shown moderate or potent antitumor activities, which is PPARgamma independent or partially dependent. However, the PPARgamma agonistic or glucose-lowering activity is ranked first more often than antitumor activity to determine promising novel PPARgamma agonists for potential clinical use. In this study, we hypothesized that there might exist some compounds with less PPARgamma agonistic activity but potent antitumor activity. Thereafter, we evaluated the PPARgamma agonistic and antitumor activity of a novel series of alpha-aryloxy-alpha-methylhydrocinnamic acid derivatives synthesized with the initial aim of developing novel PPARgamma agonists as hypoglycemic agents. MTT assay results revealed that several compounds were able to inhibit cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner with IC(50) 12.7-29.7 microM, better than that of rosiglitazone (45.9-141 microM), although the PPARgamma agonistic activity of most compounds is much lower than rosiglitazone. Some compounds induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis tested by Flow Cytometry. Oral administration of DH9 (100 mg/kg/d) for 21 days to BALB/c nude mice bearing xenografts including MGC-803, NCI-H460, HT-29 and OS-RC-2 cells significantly retarded tumor growth. DG8 and DJ5 showed benefits in some of the above four xenografts. Our findings demonstrate that these compounds have potent antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and pyrimidinyl-arylpropionic acid derivatives might be viable resources in the development of new antineoplastic agents.

  19. Intravenous bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws: Influence of coadjuvant antineoplastic treatment and study of buccodental condition

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, José; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether coadjuvant antineoplastic treatment can influence the number and size of bone exposures among patients with intravenous bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (iBRONJ), and to analyze the buccodental condition of these patients. Material and methods: The study sample comprised 67 patients with iBRONJ, 53 patients without iBRONJ receiving treatment with intravenous bisphosphonates, and 36 healthy subjects. In all three groups, measurements were made of the CAO index and of resting whole saliva and stimulated whole saliva. In the patients with iBRONJ, the size (cm) and number of bone exposures were recorded. The data obtained were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Mann-Whitney U-test, and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 57.6% of the patients presented single bone exposure, 25.4% presented two, and 17% more than two exposures. The mean exposure size was 2.3±1.9 cm. Neither the bivariate analysis nor the multivariate multiple regression analysis found coadjuvant antineoplastic treatment to exert a statistically significant effect upon the number and size of bone exposures. On the other hand, there were statistically significant differences among the three study groups in relation to the CAO index (p=0.02) and the number of missing teeth (p=0.00). The resting whole saliva and stimulated whole saliva levels were similar in the three groups, though the patients with osteonecrosis of the jaws showed comparatively lower SWS levels. Conclusions: Coadjuvant antineoplastic treatment alone appears to exert no influence upon the size and number of bone exposures in iBRONJ. The patients with this disease show a higher CAO index and a larger number of missing teeth. Key words:Osteonecrosis of the jaws, bisphosphonates, bone exposure, CAO index, resting whole saliva, stimulated whole saliva. PMID:23229272

  20. Serum α-1 acid glycoprotein and serum amyloid A concentrations in cats receiving antineoplastic treatment for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Valter M; Pavan, Tatiana L R; Wirthl, Vera A B F; Alves, Ana L N; Lucas, Silvia R R

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize serum α-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) concentrations at diagnosis and during treatment in cats with lymphoma. ANIMALS 16 cats with various anatomic forms of lymphoma and 25 healthy cats. PROCEDURES Blood samples were collected from healthy cats once and from cats with lymphoma at diagnosis and 2-week intervals until the 12th week of antineoplastic treatment. Serum harvested from blood samples was assessed for AGP and SAA concentrations. Differences in serum AGP and SAA values were investigated between healthy cats and cats with lymphoma (at diagnosis) and, for cats with lymphoma, between diagnosis and various points during treatment. RESULTS Serum AGP and SAA concentrations were higher in cats with lymphoma at diagnosis (median, 832.60 and 1.03 μg/mL, respectively), compared with those in healthy cats (median, 269.85 and 0.10 μg/mL). Treatment resulted in a gradual decrease in serum AGP concentration after 4 weeks and in SAA concentration after 8 weeks of treatment, and these concentrations returned to values comparable with those of healthy cats by 12 weeks of treatment, by which point all cats had achieved complete remission of the disease. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Serum AGP and SAA concentrations in cats with lymphoma were higher at diagnosis than after antineoplastic treatment. Decreases to values established for healthy cats corresponded with achievement of complete disease remission. Serum AGP and SAA may be useful protein markers for monitoring of antineoplastic treatment in cats with lymphoma.

  1. [Latin-American plants as a source of new antineoplastic drugs, current situation and new opportunities against cancer].

    PubMed

    Orrego Escobar, Eduardo Freddy

    2015-04-13

    Cancer is one of the most relevant pandemics in modern world. There is a clear predominance of this pathology with distinct epidemiological characteristics in developing and developed countries. Effective, low-cost treatment and prophylaxis strategies that also have minimal side effects are needed. The present work is a brief revision of research that show the great therapeutic potential of plants, highlighting those carried out in Latin America with local plants considering that this is a yet incipient field of study. The great pool of organic compounds and other substances such as proteins indicate that they might provide a reliable alternative in the search for new actors in the battle against cancer.

  2. Effects on bone metabolism of new therapeutic strategies with standard chemotherapy and biologic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ciolli, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent biological advances have provided the framework for novel therapeutic strategies in oncology. Many new treatments are now based on standard cytotoxic drugs plus biologic agents. In Multiple Myeloma, a plasma cell neoplasm characterized by a severe bone disease, biologic drugs such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents, above their antineoplastic efficacy have a beneficial effects on bone disease. Bortezomib, a clinically available proteasome inhibitor active against myeloma, induces the differentiation of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells into osteoblasts, resulting in new bone formation. Immunomodulatory drugs (e.g., thalidomide and lenalidomide), which are active against myeloma, also block the activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. These data reflect the utility of targeting endogenous mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells for the purpose of tissue repair and suggest that combining different classes of agents that are antineoplastic and also inhibit bone destruction and increase bone formation should be very beneficial for myeloma patients suffering from severe bone disease. PMID:24554928

  3. Drug Cocktail Optimization in Chemotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Preissner, Saskia; Dunkel, Mathias; Hoffmann, Michael F.; Preissner, Sarah C.; Genov, Nikolai; Rong, Wen Wei; Preissner, Robert; Seeger, Karlheinz

    2012-01-01

    Background In general, drug metabolism has to be considered to avoid adverse effects and ineffective therapy. In particular, chemotherapeutic drug cocktails strain drug metabolizing enzymes especially the cytochrome P450 family (CYP). Furthermore, a number of important chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen or procarbazine are administered as prodrugs and have to be activated by CYP. Therefore, the genetic variability of these enzymes should be taken into account to design appropriate therapeutic regimens to avoid inadequate drug administration, toxicity and inefficiency. Objective The aim of this work was to find drug interactions and to avoid side effects or ineffective therapy in chemotherapy. Data sources and methods Information on drug administration in the therapy of leukemia and their drug metabolism was collected from scientific literature and various web resources. We carried out an automated textmining approach. Abstracts of PubMed were filtered for relevant articles using specific keywords. Abstracts were automatically screened for antineoplastic drugs and their synonyms in combination with a set of human CYPs in title or abstract. Results We present a comprehensive analysis of over 100 common cancer treatment regimens regarding drug-drug interactions and present alternatives avoiding CYP overload. Typical concomitant medication, e.g. antiemetics or antibiotics is a preferred subject to improvement. A webtool, which allows drug cocktail optimization was developed and is publicly available on http://bioinformatics.charite.de/chemotherapy. PMID:23236419

  4. A genome scale overexpression screen to reveal drug activity in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Target identification is a critical step in the lengthy and expensive process of drug development. Here, we describe a genome-wide screening platform that uses systematic overexpression of pooled human ORFs to understand drug mode-of-action and resistance mechanisms. We first calibrated our screen with the well-characterized drug methotrexate. We then identified new genes involved in the bioactivity of diverse drugs including antineoplastic agents and biologically active molecules. Finally, we focused on the transcription factor RHOXF2 whose overexpression conferred resistance to DNA damaging agents. This approach represents an orthogonal method for functional screening and, to our knowledge, has never been reported before. PMID:24944581

  5. Drug- and heavy metal--induced hyperpigmentation.

    PubMed

    Granstein, R D; Sober, A J

    1981-07-01

    Several categories of chemical and pharmacologic agents can cause alterations in cutaneous pigmentation, although the mechanisms differ and in several instances may be unknown. Fixed drug eruptions appear to have alteration of the basement membrane zone with incontinence of epidermal pigment as the mechanism of hyperpigmentation. Heavy metals produce increased pigmentation in part from deposition of metal particles and in part from an increase in epidermal melanin production. The antimalarials may bind to melanin. The phenothiazines and minocycline produce pigmentation from deposition of the drug. The mechanism, site, and nature of the pigment occurring with antineoplastic agents is not well understood, but the location is most likely predominantly epidermal. Clofazimine (Lamprene) alteration in pigmentation appears to result from deposition of the drug in subcutaneous fat.

  6. Interactions between antiepileptic drugs, and between antiepileptic drugs and other drugs.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Perucca, Emilio

    2014-12-01

    Interactions between antiepileptic drugs, or between antiepileptic drugs and other drugs, can be pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic in nature. Pharmacokinetic interactions involve changes in absorption, distribution or elimination, whereas pharmacodynamic interactions involve synergism and antagonism at the site of action. Most clinically important interactions of antiepileptic drugs result from induction or inhibition of drug metabolism. Carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone are strong inducers of cytochrome P450 and glucuronizing enzymes (as well as P-glycoprotein) and can reduce the efficacy of co-administered medications such as oral anticoagulants, calcium antagonists, steroids, antimicrobial and antineoplastic drugs through this mechanism. Oxcarbazepine, eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, rufinamide, topiramate (at doses ≥ 200 mg/day) and perampanel (at doses ≥ 8 mg/day) have weaker inducing properties, and a lower propensity to cause interactions mediated by enzyme induction. Unlike enzyme induction, enzyme inhibition results in decreased metabolic clearance of the affected drug, the serum concentration of which may increase leading to toxic effects. Examples of important interactions mediated by enzyme inhibition include the increase in the serum concentration of phenobarbital and lamotrigine caused by valproic acid. There are also interactions whereby other drugs induce or inhibit the metabolism of antiepileptic drugs, examples being the increase in serum carbamazepine concentration by erythromycin, and the decrease in serum lamotrigine concentration by oestrogen-containing contraceptives. Pharmacodynamic interactions between antiepileptic drugs may also be clinically important. These interactions can have potentially beneficial effects, such as the therapeutic synergism of valproic acid combined with lamotrigine, or adverse effects, such as the reciprocal potentiation of neurotoxicity observed in patients treated with a combination of

  7. Cataloging antineoplastic agents according to their effectiveness against platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive ovarian carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Kimiko; Zhu, Yong-Lian; Lin, Z. Ping; Penketh, Philip G.; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Zhu, Rui; Baumann, Raymond P.; Sartorelli, Alan C.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Ratner, Elena S.

    2016-01-01

    Although epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) are initially treated with platinum-based chemotherapy, EOCs vary in platinum responsiveness. Cataloging antineoplastic agents according to their effectiveness against platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive EOC cell lines is valuable for development of therapeutic strategies to avoid platinum inefficacy and to exploit platinum sensitivity. TOV-21G devoid of FANCF expression, OV-90 and SKOV-3 were employed as examples of platinum-sensitive, platinum-intermediate and platinum-resistant cell lines, respectively. Antineoplastic agents examined included mitomycin C, doxorubicin, etoposide, gemcitabine, chlorambucil, paclitaxel, triapine and X-rays. Their effectiveness against cell lines was analyzed by clonogenic assays. Cytotoxic profiles of mitomycin C and carboplatin were similar, with mitomycin C exhibiting greater potency and selectivity against TOV-21G than carboplatin. Cytotoxic profiles of doxorubicin, etoposide and X-rays overlapped with that of carboplatin, while OV-90 overexpressing Rad51 was more resistant to chlorambucil than SKOV-3. The efficacy of paclitaxel and triapine was independent of platinum sensitivity or resistance. Consistent with these cytotoxic profiles, cisplatin/mitomycin C, triapine, and paclitaxel differed in the capacity to induce phosphorylation of H2AX, and produced unique inhibitory patterns of DNA/RNA syntheses in HL-60 human leukemia cells. Paclitaxel and triapine in combination produced additive antitumor effects in M109 murine lung carcinoma. In conclusion, mitomycin C is potentially more effective against Fanconi anemia pathway-deficient EOCs than carboplatin. Doxorubicin and etoposide, because of their overlapping cytotoxic properties with carboplatin, are unlikely to be efficacious against platinum-refractory EOCs. Paclitaxel and triapine are effective regardless of platinum sensitivity status, and promising in combination for both platinum-sensitive and platinum-refractory EOCs

  8. The antineoplastic properties of FTY720: evidence for the repurposing of fingolimod

    PubMed Central

    Patmanathan, Sathya Narayanan; Yap, Lee Fah; Murray, Paul G; Paterson, Ian C

    2015-01-01

    Almost all drugs approved for use in humans possess potentially beneficial ‘off-target’ effects in addition to their principal activity. In some cases this has allowed for the relatively rapid repurposing of drugs for other indications. In this review we focus on the potential for re-purposing FTY720 (also known as fingolimod, Gilenya™), an immunomodulatory drug recently approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). The therapeutic benefit of FTY720 in MS is largely attributed to the immunosuppressive effects that result from its modulation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor signalling. However, this drug has also been shown to inhibit other cancer-associated signal transduction pathways in part because of its structural similarity to sphingosine, and consequently shows efficacy as an anti-cancer agent both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we review the effects of FTY720 on signal transduction pathways and cancer-related cellular processes, and discuss its potential use as an anti-cancer drug. PMID:26171944

  9. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  10. [Effect of antineoplastic agents and ionizing radiation on a human testicular cancer heterograft].

    PubMed

    Osieka, R; Bamberg, M; Pfeiffer, R; Glatte, P; Scherer, E; Schmidt, C G

    1985-01-01

    Chemotherapy has afforded a high percentage of definitive cures in advanced testicular cancer. Nevertheless some patients with large tumor burden still succumb to chemorefractory disease. Therefore preclinical and clinical evaluation of new drugs and agents not primarily used against this type of disease are still mandatory. For preclinical drug screening purposes heterotransplantation of specific human tumors yields a model with high validity for tumor markers and drug response. Heterotransplantation of a human embryonal testicular cancer was used for simultaneous testing of established agents such as cisplatin, melphalan, bleomycin, vinblastine, etoposide and adriamycin and some newer derivatives such as PHM or mafosfamide. Furthermore agents such as procarbazine, dacarbazine and methyl-CCNU that cross the blood-brain-barrier displayed some interesting activity. The results hint at a unique chemosensitivity pattern of the xenograft line, with some accordance between clinical response to vinblastine and bleomycin and good response of the xenografts to bleomycin but not to vinblastine. Radiotherapy was also effective against this tumor line, but there was not much difference in response when the schedule of fractionation was changed. It is concluded that a combined modality approach might salvage patients with residual, chemorefractory disease.

  11. Mono-guanidine heterolipid based SMEDDS: A promising tool for cytosolic delivery of antineoplastics.

    PubMed

    Shete, Harshad; Sable, Sandip; Tidke, Pritish; Selkar, Nilakash; Pawar, Yogita; Chakraborty, Avik; De, Abhijit; Vanage, Geeta; Patravale, Vandana

    2015-07-01

    In the present work, we designed and synthesized a novel mono-guanidine heterolipid (MGH) and confirmed its structure by NMR and ESI-MS. The MGH was used as cationic lipid in developing etoposide loaded cationic self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (ECS) intended to be delivered by intratumoral route. The ECS exhibited size <50 nm and zeta potential +32.6 mV on dilution with various isotonic vehicles with no phase separation or drug precipitation. The ECS could be easily sterilized by membrane filtration method and showed excellent stability for 6 months. The ECS demonstrated excellent in vitro antiproliferative activity against B16F10 cells which is attributed to its high transfection efficiency and capability to cause prolonged drug release in cytosolic space. In vivo antitumor activity of ECS was conducted in B16F10 induced melanoma tumor model. ECS at 12 mg/kg dose showed superior tumor suppression ability and exhibited 100% survival compared to other formulations. Mice treated with ECS by intratumoral route, showed neither systemic side effect nor any evidences of hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. In contrast, etoposide administered by intravenous route showed remarkable systemic toxicity, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity.

  12. Organotypic Culture of Breast Tumor Explants as a Multicellular System for the Screening of Natural Compounds with Antineoplastic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Carranza-Torres, Irma Edith; Guzmán-Delgado, Nancy Elena; Coronado-Martínez, Consuelo; Bañuelos-García, José Inocente; Viveros-Valdez, Ezequiel; Morán-Martínez, Javier; Carranza-Rosales, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women worldwide. The search for novel compounds with antitumor activity, with less adverse effects and higher efficacy, and the development of methods to evaluate their toxicity is an area of intense research. In this study we implemented the preparation and culture of breast tumor explants, which were obtained from precision-cut breast tumor slices. In order to validate the model we are proposing to screen antineoplastic effect of natural compounds, we selected caffeic acid, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid. Using the Krumdieck tissue slicer, precision-cut tissue slices were prepared from breast cancer samples; from these slices, 4 mm explants were obtained and incubated with the selected compounds. Viability was assessed by Alamar Blue assay, LDH release, and histopathological criteria. Results showed that the viability of the explants cultured in the presence of paclitaxel (positive control) decreased significantly (P < 0.05); however, tumor samples responded differently to each compound. When the explants were coincubated with paclitaxel and compounds, a synergic effect was observed. This study shows that ex vivo culture of breast cancer explants offers a suitable alternative model for evaluating natural or synthetic compounds with antitumor properties within the complex microenvironment of the tumor. PMID:26075250

  13. Antioxidants Impair Anti-Tumoral Effects of Vorinostat, but Not Anti-Neoplastic Effects of Vorinostat and Caspase-8 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Bergadà, Laura; Yeramian, Andree; Sorolla, Annabel

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat, applied as a single therapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation exhibits high anti-tumoral activity on endometrial carcinoma cell lines. In the present study, we have assessed the signalling processes underlying anti-tumoral effects of Vorinostat. Increasing evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are responsible for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell killing. We have found that Vorinostat induces formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. To investigate the role of oxidative stress as anti-neoplastic mechanism, we have evaluated the effects of different antioxidants (Bha, Nac and Tiron) on endometrial carcinoma cell line Ishikawa treated with Vorinostat. We show that Bha, Nac and Tiron markedly inhibited the cytotoxic effects of Vorinostat, increasing cell viability in vitro. We found that all three antioxidants did not inhibited accumulation of acetyl Histone H4, so that antioxidants did not inhibit Vorinostat activity. Finally, we have evaluated the effects of antioxidants on anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat as monotherapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation in vivo. Interestingly, antioxidants blocked the reduction of tumour growth caused by Vorinostat, but they were unable to inhibit anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat plus caspase-8 inhibition. PMID:24651472

  14. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-wen; Yu, Jia-ying; Xu, Huai-long; Bao, Jin-ku

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. {yields} ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. {yields} ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+}-dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-{kappa}B-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  15. Drug cutaneous side effect: focus on skin ulceration.

    PubMed

    D'Epiro, S; Salvi, M; Luzi, A; Mattozzi, C; Luci, C; Macaluso, L; Marzocca, F; Salvo, V; Cantisani, C; Paolino, G; Calvieri, S; Richetta, A G

    2014-01-01

    Skin ulcers are defined as tissue loss interesting the deeper layers of the dermis and hypodermis, with low tendency to spontaneous healing. They cause disability related to pain, risk of infection and amputation, chronic management, requiring working absence with notably economic burden. The major cause is often related to underlying vascular disease, infections, tumors, autoimmunity, trauma, even if literature occasionally reported several cases of drug inducing skin ulceration. Most of drugs involved are chemotherapy agents and more recently molecular target therapies. Evidences supporting these drugs as the major cause of skin ulcers include delay of onset after therapy initiation, improvement after withdrawal of the drug, recurrence after its reintroduction and, sometimes, simultaneous occurrence of other skin lesions that have previously been reported to be associated with these agents. Attention should be reserved to patients undergoing antineoplastic agents, especially if previously affected by predisposing comorbidities, considering such side effect as possible differential diagnosis for skin ulceration in neoplastic patients. PMID:25203350

  16. [Contribution of antineoplastic biotherapy in the treatment of leukemia in children].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, R; Bollard, C; Heslop, H

    2002-03-01

    Improvements in the chemotherapeutic and transplant regimens have had a significant impact in improving survival rates for pediatric leukemia. However, there are still major problems to address including what options are available for patients with chemoresistant disease and what strategies are available to avoid toxicity associated with highly cytotoxic treatment regimens. Gene and immunotherapy protocols hold great promise. Using gene transfer of a marker gene, a number of biologic issues in the therapy of leukemia have been addressed. For example, by gene marking autologous bone marrow grafts it has been possible to demonstrate that infused marrow contributes to relapse in acute and chronic myeloid leukemias. In the allogeneic transplant setting, genetically modified T-cells have proven valuable for the prophylaxis and treatment of viral diseases and may have an important role in preventing or treating disease relapse. Gene transfer is also being used to modify tumor function, enhance immunogenicity, and confer drug-resistance to normal hematopoietic stem cells. With the continued scientific advancements in this field, gene therapy will almost certainly have a major impact on the treatment of pediatric leukemia in the future.

  17. Antineoplastic activity of ouabain and pyrithione zinc in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tailler, M; Senovilla, L; Lainey, E; Thépot, S; Métivier, D; Sébert, M; Baud, V; Billot, K; Fenaux, P; Galluzzi, L; Boehrer, S; Kroemer, G; Kepp, O

    2012-07-26

    Despite recent progress in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the prognosis of this rather heterogeneous disease remains poor and novel chemotherapeutics that specifically target leukemic cells must be developed. To address this need at the preclinical level, we implemented a high content imaging-based screen for the identification of small agents that induce AML cell death in vitro. Among a panel of 1040 Food and Drug Administration-approved agents, we identified pyrithione zinc (PZ) and ouabain (OUA) as potential antileukemic compounds. Both PZ and OUA efficiently induced cell death associated with apoptotic chromatin condensation and inhibition of nuclear factor-κB survival signaling, leading to reduced expression of antiapoptotic proteins, in several AML cell lines. PZ- and OUA-induced cell death was associated with the permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane and led to the release of cytochrome c followed by caspase activation. Both PZ and OUA exerted significant anticancer effects in vivo, on human AML cells xenografts as well as ex vivo, on CD34(+) (but not CD34(-)) malignant myeloblasts from AML patients. Altogether, our results suggest that PZ and OUA may exhibit antileukemic effects by inducing the apoptotic demise of AML cells. PMID:22105358

  18. [Contribution of antineoplastic biotherapy in the treatment of leukemia in children].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, R; Bollard, C; Heslop, H

    2002-03-01

    Improvements in the chemotherapeutic and transplant regimens have had a significant impact in improving survival rates for pediatric leukemia. However, there are still major problems to address including what options are available for patients with chemoresistant disease and what strategies are available to avoid toxicity associated with highly cytotoxic treatment regimens. Gene and immunotherapy protocols hold great promise. Using gene transfer of a marker gene, a number of biologic issues in the therapy of leukemia have been addressed. For example, by gene marking autologous bone marrow grafts it has been possible to demonstrate that infused marrow contributes to relapse in acute and chronic myeloid leukemias. In the allogeneic transplant setting, genetically modified T-cells have proven valuable for the prophylaxis and treatment of viral diseases and may have an important role in preventing or treating disease relapse. Gene transfer is also being used to modify tumor function, enhance immunogenicity, and confer drug-resistance to normal hematopoietic stem cells. With the continued scientific advancements in this field, gene therapy will almost certainly have a major impact on the treatment of pediatric leukemia in the future. PMID:11938542

  19. Ellipticine derivative NSC 338258 represents a potential new antineoplastic agent for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Tian, Erming; Landowski, Terry H; Stephens, Owen W; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D

    2008-03-01

    High-risk multiple myeloma can be correlated with amplification and overexpression of the cell cycle regulator CKS1B. Herein, we used the COMPARE algorithm to correlate high expression of CKS1B mRNA in the NCI-60 cell line panel with the concentration causing 50% growth inhibition (GI(50)) of >40,000 synthetic compounds. This led to the identification of NSC 338258 (EPED3), a highly stable, hydrophilic derivative of the plant alkaloid ellipticine. In vitro, this synthetic anticancer compound exhibits dramatic cytotoxic activity against myeloma cells grown in suspension or in coculture with stromal cells. EPED3-induced cell cycle arrest and an apoptotic progression that appear to be a consequence of the instantaneous effect of the drug on cytoplasmic organelles, particularly mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondria and cytoplasmic distribution of cytochrome c initiated the intracellular proteolytic cascade through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. EPED3 is able to induce apoptosis in myeloma cells with de novo or acquired resistance to commonly administered antimyeloma agents. Collectively, our data suggest that EPED3 targets mitochondrial function to rapidly deplete chemical energy and initiate apoptosis in myeloma cells at nanomolar concentrations while leaving stromal cells unharmed.

  20. Antineoplastic Effects of PPARγ Agonists, with a Special Focus on Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated nuclear hormone receptor that functions as transcription factor and plays an important role in lipid metabolism and insulin sensitization. Recent studies have shown that PPARγ is overexpressed in many tumor types, including cancers of breast, lung, pancreas, colon, glioblastoma, prostate and thyroid differentiated/anaplastic cancers. These data suggest a role of PPARγ in tumor development and/or progression. PPARγ is emerging as a growth-limiting and differentiation-promoting factor, and it exerts a tumor suppressor role. Moreover, naturally-occurring and synthetic PPARγ agonists promote growth inhibition and apoptosis. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic agonists of PPARγ that were developed to treat type II diabetes. These compounds also display anticancer effects which appear mainly to be independent of their PPARγ agonist activity. Various preclinical and clinical studies strongly suggest a role for TZDs both alone and in combination with existing chemotherapeutic agents, for the treatment of cancer. Differentiation therapy involves the use of agents with the ability to induce differentiation in cells that have lost this ability, i.e. cancer cells, targeting pathways capable of re-activating blocked terminal differentiation programs. PPARγ agonists have been shown to induce differentiation in solid tumors such as thyroid differentiated/ anaplastic cancers and sarcomas. However, emerging data suggest that chronic use of TZDs is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The exploration of newer PPARγ agonists can help in unveiling the underlying mechanisms of these drugs, providing new molecules that are able to treat cancer, without increasing the cardiovascular risk of neoplastic patients.

  1. Influence of pain severity on the quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer before antineoplastic therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the severity of pain and its impact on the quality of life (QoL) in untreated patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods A study group of 127 patients with HNSCC were interviewed before antineoplastic treatment. The severity of pain was measured using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaire, and the QoL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the head and neck module (QLQ-H&N35). Results The mean age of the patients was 57.9 years, and there was a predominance of men (87.4%). The most frequent site of the primary tumor was the oral cavity (70.6%), and the majority of the patients had advanced cancers (stages III and IV). QoL in early stage of cancer obtained better scores. Conversely, the patients with advanced stage cancer scored significantly higher on the symptom scales regarding fatigue, pain, appetite loss and financial difficulties, indicating greater difficulties. Regard to the severity of pain, patients with moderate-severe pain revealed a significantly worse score than patients without pain. Conclusions The severity of pain is statistically related to the advanced stages of cancer and directly affects the QoL. An assessment of the quality of life and symptoms before therapy can direct attention to the most important symptoms, and appropriate interventions can then be directed toward improving QoL outcomes and the response to treatment. PMID:24460780

  2. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rohypnol, ketamine, as well as MDMA (ecstasy) and methamphetamine ( Drug Facts: Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug ... Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2010). Methamphetamine is a powerfully addictive stimulant associated with serious ...

  3. Controllable synthesis and adjustable antineoplastic activity of bovine serum albumin-conjugated PbS/Ag2S core/shell nano-composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Jie; Yu, Xue-Hong; Cao, Ying; Zhou, Bei; Wang, Cai-Feng

    2012-08-01

    Series of mono-dispersed bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated PbS/Ag(2)S core/shell nano-composites with different Pb/Ag ratios had been successfully synthesized by an ion-exchange method under the gentle conditions using BSA-conjugated PbS nano-crystals as precursors, which were prepared by a biomimetic method. Fourier transform infrared spectra analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation demonstrated that BSA was a key factor to control the morphology and size of final products. Additionally, the real-time TEM observation, X-ray powder diffraction and atomic absorption spectroscopy analysis were applied to monitor the synthesis process. The results indicated that the shell thickness and ratio of Pb to Ag could be controlled by adjusting the ion-exchange time. Both metabolic and morphological methods revealed that the proliferation of rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells could be inhibited by BSA-conjugated PbS/Ag(2)S core/shell nano-composites, and the antineoplastic activity was Pb/Ag ratio-dependent. It might be explained by a Trojan horse-type mechanism. Summarily, the present study would be helpful to find a new core/shell nano-composite with higher and controllable antineoplastic activity due to the synergistic reaction of different metal ions.

  4. Antineoplastic effect of iodine and iodide in dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary tumors: association between lactoperoxidase and estrogen-adduct production.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Ofelia; Delgado, Guadalupe; Anguiano, Brenda; Petrosyan, Pavel; Molina-Servín, Edith D; Gonsebatt, Maria E; Aceves, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    Several groups, including ours, have reported that iodine exhibited antiproliferative and apoptotic effects in various cancer cells only if this element is supplemented as molecular iodine, or as iodide, to cells that are able to oxidize it with the enzyme thyroperoxidase. In this study, we analyzed the effect of various concentrations of iodine and/or iodide in the dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) mammary cancer model in rats. The results show that 0.1% iodine or iodide increases the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type γ (PPARγ), triggering caspase-mediated apoptosis pathways in damaged mammary tissue (DMBA-treated mammary gland) as well as in frank mammary tumors, but not in normal mammary gland. DMBA treatment induces the expression of lactoperoxidase, which participates in the antineoplastic effect of iodide and could be involved in the pro-neoplastic effect of estrogens, increasing the formation of DNA adducts. In conclusion, our results show that a supplement of 0.1% molecular iodine/potassium iodide (0.05/0.05%) exert antineoplastic effects, preventing estrogen-induced DNA adducts and inducing apoptosis through PPARγ/caspases in pre-cancer and cancerous cells. Since this iodine concentration does not modify the cytology (histology, apoptosis rate) or physiology (triiodothyronine and thyrotropin) of the thyroid gland, we propose that it be considered as an adjuvant treatment for premenopausal mammary cancer.

  5. Reduced Expression of the Retinoblastoma Protein Shows That the Related Signaling Pathway Is Essential for Mediating the Antineoplastic Activity of Erufosine

    PubMed Central

    Zaharieva, Maya M.; Kirilov, Milen; Chai, Minquang; Berger, Stefan M.; Konstantinov, Spiro; Berger, Martin R.

    2014-01-01

    Erufosine is a new antineoplastic agent of the group of alkylphosphocholines, which interferes with signal transduction and induces apoptosis in various leukemic and tumor cell lines. The present study was designed to examine for the first time the mechanism of resistance to erufosine in malignant cells with permanently reduced expression of the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Bearing in mind the high number of malignancies with reduced level of this tumor-suppressor, this investigation was deemed important for using erufosine, alone or in combination, in patients with compromised RB1 gene expression. For this purpose, clones of the leukemic T-cell line SKW-3 were used, which had been engineered to constantly express differently low Rb levels. The alkylphosphocholine induced apoptosis, stimulated the expression of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 and inhibited the synthesis of cyclin D3, thereby causing a G2 phase cell cycle arrest and death of cells with wild type Rb expression. In contrast, Rb-deficiency impeded the changes induced by eru-fosine in the expression of these proteins and abrogated the induction of G2 arrest, which was correlated with reduced antiproliferative and anticlonogenic activities of the compound. In conclusion, analysis of our results showed for the first time that the Rb signaling pathway is essential for mediating the antineoplastic activity of erufosine and its efficacy in patients with malignant diseases may be predicted by determining the Rb status. PMID:24987858

  6. Functional differentiation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gian C; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Galati, Giuseppe; Kluwe, William M

    2014-10-01

    There is no nationally or internationally binding definition of the term "cytotoxic drug" although this term is used in a variety of regulations for pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of drugs as well as in regulations for protecting medical personnel from occupational exposure in pharmacy, hospital, and other healthcare settings. The term "cytotoxic drug" is frequently used as a synonym for any and all oncology or antineoplastic drugs. Pharmaceutical companies generate and receive requests for assessments of the potential hazards of drugs regularly - including cytotoxicity. This publication is intended to provide functional definitions that help to differentiate between generically-cytotoxic cancer drugs of significant risk to normal human tissues, and targeted cancer therapeutics that pose much lesser risks. Together with specific assessments, it provides comprehensible guidance on how to assess the relevant properties of cancer drugs, and how targeted therapeutics discriminate between cancer and normal cells. The position of several regulatory agencies in the long-term is clearly to regulate all drugs regardless of classification, according to scientific risk based data. Despite ongoing discussions on how to replace the term "cytotoxic drugs" in current regulations, it is expected that its use will continue for the near future.

  7. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  8. New strategies to deliver anticancer drugs to brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Laquintana, Valentino; Trapani, Adriana; Denora, Nunzio; Wang, Fan; Gallo, James M.; Trapani, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Malignant brain tumors are among the most challenging to treat and at present there are no uniformly successful treatment strategies. Standard treatment regimens consist of maximal surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The limited survival advantage attributed to chemotherapy is partially due to low CNS penetration of antineoplastic agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). OBJECTIVE The objective of this paper is to review recent approaches to deliver anticancer drugs into primary brain tumors. METHODS Both preclinical and clinical strategies to circumvent the BBB are considered that includes chemical modification and colloidal carriers. CONCLUSION Analysis of the available data indicates that novel approaches may be useful for CNS delivery, yet an appreciation of pharmacokinetic issues, and improved knowledge of tumor biology will be needed to significantly impact drug delivery to the target site. PMID:19732031

  9. Venetoclax (ABT-199) Might Act as a Perpetrator in Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Johanna; Gajek, Thomas; Köhler, Bruno Christian; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2016-01-01

    Venetoclax (ABT-199) represents a specific B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) inhibitor that is currently under development for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. So far, there is no published information on its interaction potential with important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, or its efficacy in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. We therefore scrutinized its drug-drug interaction potential in vitro. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) was quantified by commercial kits. Inhibition of drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)) was evaluated by the use of fluorescent probe substrates. Induction of drug transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The efficacy of venetoclax in MDR cells lines was evaluated with proliferation assays. Venetoclax moderately inhibited P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19, whereas CYP2B6 activity was increased. Venetoclax induced the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A3, and UGT1A9. In contrast, expression of ABCB1 was suppressed, which might revert tumor resistance towards antineoplastic P-gp substrates. P-gp over-expression led to reduced antiproliferative effects of venetoclax. Effective concentrations for inhibition and induction lay in the range of maximum plasma concentrations of venetoclax, indicating that it might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. PMID:26927160

  10. Cross-comparison of cancer drug approvals at three international regulatory agencies

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, N.; Verma, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary objective of the present study was to examine the drug approval process and the time to approval (tta) for cancer drugs by 3 major international regulatory bodies—Health Canada, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (fda), and the European Medicines Agency (ema)—and to explore differences in the drug approval processes that might contribute to any disparities. Methods The publicly available Health Canada Drug Product Database was surveyed for all marketed antineoplastic agents approved between 1 January 2005 and 1 June 2013. For the resulting set of cancer drugs, public records of sponsor submission and approval dates by Health Canada, the fda, and the ema were obtained. Results Overall, the tta for the 37 antineoplastic agents that met the study criteria was significantly less for the fda than for the ema (X̄ = 6.7 months, p < 0.001) or for Health Canada (X̄ = 6.4 months, p < 0.001). The tta was not significantly different for Health Canada and the ema (X̄ = 0.65 months, p = 0.89). An analysis of the review processes demonstrated that the primary reason for the identified discrepancies in tta was the disparate use of accelerated approval mechanisms. Summary In the present study, we systematically compared cancer drug approvals at 3 international regulatory bodies. The differences in tta reflect several important considerations in the regulatory framework of cancer drug approvals. Those findings warrant an enhanced dialogue between clinicians and government agencies to understand opportunities and challenges in the current approval processes and to work toward balancing drug safety with timely access. PMID:27803605

  11. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  12. Factors associated with prescribing restriction on oncology formulary drugs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fatokun, Omotayo; Olawepo, Michael N

    2016-10-01

    Background Drugs listed on formularies are often subjected to a variety of utilization restriction measures. However, the degree of restriction is influenced by multiple factors, including the characteristics and attributes of the listed drugs. Objective To identify the factors that are associated with the levels of prescribing restriction on oncology formulary drugs in Malaysia. Setting Oncology formulary in Malaysia. Method The Malaysia Drug Code assigned to each of the drug products on the Malaysia Ministry of Health (MOH) drug formulary was used to identify oncology drugs belonging to WHO ATC class L (antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents). Main outcome measures Categories of prescribing restrictions, therapeutic class, drug type, administration mode, number of sources and the post-approval use period. Results Oncology drugs having a shorter post-approval use period (p < 0.001), biologic oncology drugs (p = 0.01) and oncology drugs belonging to immunosuppressant therapeutic class (p = 0.03) were all significantly associated with a greater likelihood of being subjected to a higher level of prescribing restriction. Conclusion This study suggests that safety concerns, costs and potentials for inappropriate use were the important considerations influencing a higher level of prescribing restriction placement on oncology drugs in the Malaysia MOH drug formulary. PMID:27586371

  13. X-ray structure and mechanism of RNA polymerase II stalled at an antineoplastic monofunctional platinum-DNA adduct

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Zhu, Guangyu; Huang, Xuhui; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    DNA is a major target of anticancer drugs. The resulting adducts interfere with key cellular processes, such as transcription, to trigger downstream events responsible for drug activity. cis-Diammine(pyridine)chloroplatinum(II), cDPCP or pyriplatin, is a monofunctional platinum(II) analogue of the widely used anticancer drug cisplatin having significant anticancer properties with a different spectrum of activity. Its novel structure-activity properties hold promise for overcoming drug resistance and improving the spectrum of treatable cancers over those responsive to cisplatin. However, the detailed molecular mechanism by which cells process DNA modified by pyriplatin and related monofunctional complexes is not at all understood. Here we report the structure of a transcribing RNA polymerase II (pol II) complex stalled at a site-specific monofunctional pyriplatin-DNA adduct in the active site. The results reveal a molecular mechanism of pol II transcription inhibition and drug action that is dramatically different from transcription inhibition by cisplatin and UV-induced 1,2-intrastrand cross-links. Our findings provide insight into structure-activity relationships that may apply to the entire family of monofunctional DNA-damaging agents and pave the way for rational improvement of monofunctional platinum anticancer drugs. PMID:20448203

  14. Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for Melanoma Antitumoral Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rigon, Roberta Balansin; Oyafuso, Márcia Helena; Fujimura, Andressa Terumi; do Prado, Alice Haddad; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma (MEL) is a less common type of skin cancer, but it is more aggressive with a high mortality rate. The World Cancer Research Fund International (GLOBOCAN 2012) estimates that there were 230,000 new cases of MEL in the world in 2012. Conventional MEL treatment includes surgery and chemotherapy, but many of the chemotherapeutic agents used present undesirable properties. Drug delivery systems are an alternative strategy by which to carry antineoplastic agents. Encapsulated drugs are advantageous due to such properties as high stability, better bioavailability, controlled drug release, a long blood circulation time, selective organ or tissue distribution, a lower total required dose, and minimal toxic side effects. This review of scientific research supports applying a nanotechnology-based drug delivery system for MEL therapy. PMID:26078967

  15. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  16. Drug delivery systems, CNS protection, and the blood brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods.

  17. Plasmodium Drug Targets Outside the Genetic Control of the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug development often seeks to find “magic bullets” which target microbiologic proteins while not affecting host proteins. Paul Ehrlich tested methylene blue as an antimalarial but this dye was not superior to quinine. Many successful antimalarial therapies are “magic shotguns” which target many Plasmodium pathways with little interference in host metabolism. Two malaria drug classes, the 8-aminoquinolines and the artemisinins interact with cytochrome P450s and host iron protoporphyrin IX or iron, respectively, to generate toxic metabolites and/or radicals, which kill the parasite by interference with many proteins. The non 8-amino antimalarial quinolines like quinine or piperaquine bind heme to inhibit the process of heme crystallization, which results in multiple enzyme inhibition and membrane dysfunction. The quinolines and artemisinins are rapidly parasiticidal in contrast to metal chelators, which have a slower parasite clearance rate with higher drug concentrations. Iron chelators interfere with the artemisinins but otherwise represent a strategy of targeting multiple enzymes containing iron. Interest has been revived in antineoplastic drugs that target DNA metabolism as antimalarials. Specific drug targeting or investigation of the innate immunity directed to the more permeable trophozoite or schizont infected erythrocyte membrane has been under explored. Novel drug classes in the antimalarial development pipeline which either target multiple proteins or unchangeable cellular targets will slow the pace of drug resistance acquisition. PMID:22973888

  18. Uncaria tomentosa Exerts Extensive Anti-Neoplastic Effects against the Walker-256 Tumour by Modulating Oxidative Stress and Not by Alkaloid Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dreifuss, Arturo Alejandro; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda Leite; Fabossi, Isabella Aviles; Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida dos Reis; Stolf, Aline Maria; Alves de Souza, Carlos Eduardo; Gomes, Liana de Oliveira; Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Teixeira, Simone; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolás; Stefanello, Maria Elida Alves; Acco, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the anti-neoplastic effects of an Uncaria tomentosa (UT) brute hydroethanolic (BHE) extract with those of two fractions derived from it. These fractions are choroformic (CHCl3) and n-butanolic (BuOH), rich in pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (POA) and antioxidant substances, respectively. The cancer model was the subcutaneous inoculation of Walker-256 tumour cells in the pelvic limb of male Wistar rat. Subsequently to the inoculation, gavage with BHE extract (50 mg.kg−1) or its fractions (as per the yield of the fractioning process) or vehicle (Control) was performed during 14 days. Baseline values, corresponding to individuals without tumour or treatment with UT, were also included. After treatment, tumour volume and mass, plasma biochemistry, oxidative stress in liver and tumour, TNF-α level in liver and tumour homogenates, and survival rates were analysed. Both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction successfully reduced tumour weight and volume, and modulated anti-oxidant systems. The hepatic TNF-α level indicated a greater effect from the BHE extract as compared to its BuOH fraction. Importantly, both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction increased the survival time of the tumour-bearing animals. Inversely, the CHCl3 fraction was ineffective. These data represent an in vivo demonstration of the importance of the modulation of oxidative stress as part of the anti-neoplastic activity of UT, as well as constitute evidence of the lack of activity of isolated POAs in the primary tumour of this tumour lineage. These effects are possibly resulting from a synergic combination of substances, most of them with antioxidant properties. PMID:23408945

  19. Uncaria tomentosa exerts extensive anti-neoplastic effects against the Walker-256 tumour by modulating oxidative stress and not by alkaloid activity.

    PubMed

    Dreifuss, Arturo Alejandro; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda Leite; Fabossi, Isabella Aviles; Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida Dos Reis; Stolf, Aline Maria; Alves de Souza, Carlos Eduardo; Gomes, Liana de Oliveira; Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Teixeira, Simone; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolás; Stefanello, Maria Elida Alves; Acco, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the anti-neoplastic effects of an Uncaria tomentosa (UT) brute hydroethanolic (BHE) extract with those of two fractions derived from it. These fractions are choroformic (CHCl3) and n-butanolic (BuOH), rich in pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (POA) and antioxidant substances, respectively. The cancer model was the subcutaneous inoculation of Walker-256 tumour cells in the pelvic limb of male Wistar rat. Subsequently to the inoculation, gavage with BHE extract (50 mg.kg(-1)) or its fractions (as per the yield of the fractioning process) or vehicle (Control) was performed during 14 days. Baseline values, corresponding to individuals without tumour or treatment with UT, were also included. After treatment, tumour volume and mass, plasma biochemistry, oxidative stress in liver and tumour, TNF-α level in liver and tumour homogenates, and survival rates were analysed. Both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction successfully reduced tumour weight and volume, and modulated anti-oxidant systems. The hepatic TNF-α level indicated a greater effect from the BHE extract as compared to its BuOH fraction. Importantly, both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction increased the survival time of the tumour-bearing animals. Inversely, the CHCl3 fraction was ineffective. These data represent an in vivo demonstration of the importance of the modulation of oxidative stress as part of the anti-neoplastic activity of UT, as well as constitute evidence of the lack of activity of isolated POAs in the primary tumour of this tumour lineage. These effects are possibly resulting from a synergic combination of substances, most of them with antioxidant properties.

  20. Cellular uptake mechanism and comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects of paclitaxel-cholesterol lipid emulsion on triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Xia, Xuejun; Dong, Wujun; Hao, Huazhen; Meng, Luhua; Yang, Yanfang; Wang, Renyun; Lyu, Yuanfeng; Liu, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    There is no effective clinical therapy for triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs), which have high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) requirements and express relatively high levels of LDL receptors (LDLRs) on their membranes. In our previous study, a novel lipid emulsion based on a paclitaxel-cholesterol complex (PTX-CH Emul) was developed, which exhibited improved safety and efficacy for the treatment of TNBC. To date, however, the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul have not been investigated. In order to offer powerful proof for the therapeutic effects of PTX-CH Emul, we systematically studied the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul and made a comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects on TNBC (MDA-MB-231) and non-TNBC (MCF7) cell lines through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The in vitro antineoplastic effects and in vivo tumor-targeting efficiency of PTX-CH Emul were significantly more enhanced in MDA-MB-231-based models than those in MCF7-based models, which was associated with the more abundant expression profile of LDLR in MDA-MB-231 cells. The results of the cellular uptake mechanism indicated that PTX-CH Emul was internalized into breast cancer cells through the LDLR-mediated internalization pathway via clathrin-coated pits, localized in lysosomes, and then released into the cytoplasm, which was consistent with the internalization pathway and intracellular trafficking of native LDL. The findings of this paper further confirm the therapeutic potential of PTX-CH Emul in clinical applications involving TNBC therapy. PMID:27601899

  1. Cellular uptake mechanism and comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects of paclitaxel–cholesterol lipid emulsion on triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Xia, Xuejun; Dong, Wujun; Hao, Huazhen; Meng, Luhua; Yang, Yanfang; Wang, Renyun; Lyu, Yuanfeng; Liu, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    There is no effective clinical therapy for triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs), which have high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) requirements and express relatively high levels of LDL receptors (LDLRs) on their membranes. In our previous study, a novel lipid emulsion based on a paclitaxel–cholesterol complex (PTX-CH Emul) was developed, which exhibited improved safety and efficacy for the treatment of TNBC. To date, however, the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul have not been investigated. In order to offer powerful proof for the therapeutic effects of PTX-CH Emul, we systematically studied the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul and made a comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects on TNBC (MDA-MB-231) and non-TNBC (MCF7) cell lines through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The in vitro antineoplastic effects and in vivo tumor-targeting efficiency of PTX-CH Emul were significantly more enhanced in MDA-MB-231-based models than those in MCF7-based models, which was associated with the more abundant expression profile of LDLR in MDA-MB-231 cells. The results of the cellular uptake mechanism indicated that PTX-CH Emul was internalized into breast cancer cells through the LDLR-mediated internalization pathway via clathrin-coated pits, localized in lysosomes, and then released into the cytoplasm, which was consistent with the internalization pathway and intracellular trafficking of native LDL. The findings of this paper further confirm the therapeutic potential of PTX-CH Emul in clinical applications involving TNBC therapy. PMID:27601899

  2. Cellular uptake mechanism and comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects of paclitaxel–cholesterol lipid emulsion on triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Xia, Xuejun; Dong, Wujun; Hao, Huazhen; Meng, Luhua; Yang, Yanfang; Wang, Renyun; Lyu, Yuanfeng; Liu, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    There is no effective clinical therapy for triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs), which have high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) requirements and express relatively high levels of LDL receptors (LDLRs) on their membranes. In our previous study, a novel lipid emulsion based on a paclitaxel–cholesterol complex (PTX-CH Emul) was developed, which exhibited improved safety and efficacy for the treatment of TNBC. To date, however, the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul have not been investigated. In order to offer powerful proof for the therapeutic effects of PTX-CH Emul, we systematically studied the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular trafficking of PTX-CH Emul and made a comparative evaluation of antineoplastic effects on TNBC (MDA-MB-231) and non-TNBC (MCF7) cell lines through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The in vitro antineoplastic effects and in vivo tumor-targeting efficiency of PTX-CH Emul were significantly more enhanced in MDA-MB-231-based models than those in MCF7-based models, which was associated with the more abundant expression profile of LDLR in MDA-MB-231 cells. The results of the cellular uptake mechanism indicated that PTX-CH Emul was internalized into breast cancer cells through the LDLR-mediated internalization pathway via clathrin-coated pits, localized in lysosomes, and then released into the cytoplasm, which was consistent with the internalization pathway and intracellular trafficking of native LDL. The findings of this paper further confirm the therapeutic potential of PTX-CH Emul in clinical applications involving TNBC therapy.

  3. Drug interactions with the newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)--Part 2: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between AEDs and drugs used to treat non-epilepsy disorders.

    PubMed

    Patsalos, Philip N

    2013-12-01

    Since antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are prescribed to treat various non-epilepsy-related disorders in addition to the fact that patients with epilepsy may develop concurrent disorders that will need treatment, the propensity for AEDs to interact with non-AEDs is considerable and indeed can present a difficult clinical problem. The present review details the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that have been reported to occur with the new AEDs (eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, perampanel, pregabalin, retigabine (ezogabine), rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide) and drugs used to treat non-epilepsy disorders. Interaction study details are described, as necessary, so as to allow the reader to take a view as to the possible clinical significance of particular interactions. Pharmacokinetic interactions relate to hepatic enzyme induction or inhibition and involved a variety of drugs including psychoactive drugs, cardioactive drugs, oral contraceptives, antituberculous agents, analgesics and antineoplastic drugs. A total of 68 pharmacokinetic interactions have been described, with lamotrigine (n = 22), topiramate (n = 18) and oxcarbazepine (n = 7) being associated with most, whilst lacosamide, pregabalin, stiripentol and vigabatrin are associated with none. Overall, only three pharmacodynamic interactions have been described and occur with oxcarbazepine, perampanel and pregabalin. PMID:23794036

  4. A Comprehensive Review on Cyclodextrin-Based Carriers for Delivery of Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxic Anticancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Gidwani, Bina; Vyas, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Most of the cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents have poor aqueous solubility. These molecules are associated with poor physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which makes the formulation difficult. An important approach in this regard is the use of combination of cyclodextrin and nanotechnology in delivery system. This paper provides an overview of limitations associated with anticancer drugs, their complexation with cyclodextrins, loading/encapsulating the complexed drugs into carriers, and various approaches used for the delivery. The present review article aims to assess the utility of cyclodextrin-based carriers like liposomes, niosomes, nanoparticles, micelles, millirods, and siRNA for delivery of antineoplastic agents. These systems based on cyclodextrin complexation and nanotechnology will camouflage the undesirable properties of drug and lead to synergistic or additive effect. Cyclodextrin-based nanotechnology seems to provide better therapeutic effect and sustain long life of healthy and recovered cells. Still, considerable study on delivery system and administration routes of cyclodextrin-based carriers is necessary with respect to their pharmacokinetics and toxicology to substantiate their safety and efficiency. In future, it would be possible to resolve the conventional and current issues associated with the development and commercialization of antineoplastic agents. PMID:26582104

  5. A Comprehensive Review on Cyclodextrin-Based Carriers for Delivery of Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxic Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gidwani, Bina; Vyas, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Most of the cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents have poor aqueous solubility. These molecules are associated with poor physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which makes the formulation difficult. An important approach in this regard is the use of combination of cyclodextrin and nanotechnology in delivery system. This paper provides an overview of limitations associated with anticancer drugs, their complexation with cyclodextrins, loading/encapsulating the complexed drugs into carriers, and various approaches used for the delivery. The present review article aims to assess the utility of cyclodextrin-based carriers like liposomes, niosomes, nanoparticles, micelles, millirods, and siRNA for delivery of antineoplastic agents. These systems based on cyclodextrin complexation and nanotechnology will camouflage the undesirable properties of drug and lead to synergistic or additive effect. Cyclodextrin-based nanotechnology seems to provide better therapeutic effect and sustain long life of healthy and recovered cells. Still, considerable study on delivery system and administration routes of cyclodextrin-based carriers is necessary with respect to their pharmacokinetics and toxicology to substantiate their safety and efficiency. In future, it would be possible to resolve the conventional and current issues associated with the development and commercialization of antineoplastic agents. PMID:26582104

  6. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  7. Evaluation of clay/poly (L-lactide) microcomposites as anticancer drug, 6-mercaptopurine reservoir through in vitro cytotoxicity, oxidative stress markers and in vivo pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Kevadiya, Bhavesh D; Chettiar, Shiva Shankaran; Rajkumar, Shalini; Bajaj, Hari C; Gosai, Kalpeshgiri A; Brahmbhatt, Harshad

    2013-12-01

    Intercalation of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP), an antineoplastic drug in interlayer gallery of Na(+)-clay (MMT) was further entrapped in poly (L-lactide) matrix to form microcomposite spheres (MPs) in order to reduce the cell toxicity and enhance in vitro release and pharmacokinetic proficiency. The drug-clay hybrid was fabricated via intercalation by ion-exchange method to form MPs from hybrid. In vitro drug release showed controlled pattern, fitted to kinetic models suggested controlled exchange and partial diffusion through swollen matrix of clay inter layered gallery. The in vitro efficacy of formulated composites drug was tested in Human neuroblastoma cell line (IMR32) by various cell cytotoxic and oxidative stress marker indices. In vivo pharmacokinetics suggested that the intensity of formulated drug level in plasma was within remedial borders as compared to free drug. These clay based composites therefore have great potential of becoming a new dosage form of 6-MP.

  8. Methodological aspects of current problems in target-based anticancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Takeharu; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Ichinose, Yukito; Oda, Shinya; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2006-06-01

    Differently from the conventional antineoplastic agents, target-based drugs are designed a priori, based on our knowledge of various physiological molecules that has been obtained by the development of molecular biology. This "Copernican revolution" in drug development may imply a paradigm shift in this field. However, contrary to the initial expectations, many drugs developed by this approach are now faced with difficulties, mainly because of the fundamental and theoretical limits of this approach. All of the physiological functions are not always known in all target molecules. In low-molecular-weight drugs, i.e., "inhibitors," targets disperse, due to the structural similarities in physiological molecules. This double-faced "out-of-focusing" causes many problems in various steps of drug development, drug design, clinical trials, and administration to patients. Many drugs are now being abandoned because of unexpectedly lower response rates or unforeseeable adverse effects, and the variety of the drugs exhibits a kaleidoscopic appearance. The double-faced "out-of-focusing" derives from the methodological limits in molecular biology, i.e., elementalism, and limits in our techniques for drug development. To overcome these currently inevitable limits, it appears essential to elucidate the specific changes in target molecules that chiefly promote tumor growth and, consequently, strongly predict response to the administered drugs. Precise and efficient detection of responder populations is the key to the development and establishment of target-based anticancer therapies. PMID:16850122

  9. Dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR]: molecular design, synthetic organic chemistry reactions, and antineoplastic cytotoxic potency against pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549)

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Cody P; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Corticosteroids are effective in the management of a variety of disease states, such as several forms of neoplasia (leukemia and lymphoma), autoimmune conditions, and severe inflammatory responses. Molecular strategies that selectively “target” delivery of corticosteroids minimize or prevents large amounts of the pharmaceutical moiety from passively diffusing into normal healthy cell populations residing within tissues and organ systems. Materials and methods The covalent immunopharmaceutical, dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was synthesized by reacting dexamethasone-21-monophosphate with a carbodiimide reagent to form a dexamethasone phosphate carbodiimide ester that was subsequently reacted with imidazole to create an amine-reactive dexamethasone-(C21-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate. Monoclonal anti-EGFR immunoglobulin was combined with the amine-reactive dexamethasone-(C21-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate, resulting in the synthesis of the covalent immunopharmaceutical, dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR]. Following spectrophotometric analysis and validation of retained epidermal growth factor receptor type 1 (EGFR)-binding avidity by cell-ELISA, the selective anti-neoplasic cytotoxic potency of dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was established by MTT-based vitality stain methodology using adherent monolayer populations of human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) known to overexpress the tropic membrane receptors EGFR and insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1. Results The dexamethasone:IgG molar-incorporation-index for dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was 6.95:1 following exhaustive serial microfiltration. Cytotoxicity analysis: covalent bonding of dexamethasone to monoclonal anti-EGFR immunoglobulin did not significantly modify the ex vivo antineoplastic cytotoxicity of dexamethasone against pulmonary adenocarcinoma at and between the standardized dexamethasone equivalent concentrations of 10

  10. Active vitamin D potentiates the anti-neoplastic effects of calcium in the colon: A cross talk through the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Abhishek; Höbaus, Julia; Tennakoon, Samawansha; Prinz-Wohlgenannt, Maximilian; Graça, João; Price, Sally A; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Kállay, Enikö

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest an inverse correlation between dietary calcium (Ca(2+)) and vitamin D intake and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). It has been shown in vitro that the active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D3) can upregulate expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). In the colon, CaSR has been suggested to regulate proliferation of colonocytes. However, during tumorigenesis colonic CaSR expression is downregulated and we hypothesized that the loss of CaSR could influence the anti-tumorigenic effects of Ca(2+) and vitamin D. Our aim was to assess the impact of CaSR expression and function on the anti-neoplastic effects of 1,25-D3 in colon cancer cell lines. We demonstrated that in the healthy colon of mice, high vitamin D diet (2500 IU/kg diet) increased expression of differentiation and apoptosis markers, decreased expression of proliferation markers and significantly upregulated CaSR mRNA expression, compared with low vitamin D diet (100 IU/kg diet). To determine the role of CaSR in this process, we transfected Caco2-15 and HT29 CRC cells with wild type CaSR (CaSR-WT) or a dominant negative CaSR mutant (CaSR-DN) and treated them with 1,25-D3 alone, or in combination with CaSR activators (Ca(2+) and NPS R-568). 1,25-D3 enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of Ca(2+) and induced differentiation and apoptosis only in cells with a functional CaSR, which were further enhanced in the presence of NPS R-568, a positive allosteric modulator of CaSR. The mutant CaSR inhibited the anti-tumorigenic effects of 1,25-D3 suggesting that the anti-neoplastic effects of 1,25-D3 are, at least in part, mediated by the CaSR. Taken together, our data provides molecular evidence to support the epidemiological observation that both, vitamin D and calcium are needed for protection against malignant transformation of the colon and that their effect is modulated by the presence of a functional CaSR. This article is part of a Special Issue

  11. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  12. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  13. The unexpected formation of [M - H]+ species during MALDI and dopant-free APPI MS analysis of novel antineoplastic curcumin analogues.

    PubMed

    Awad, H; Stoudemayer, M J; Usher, L; Amster, I J; Cohen, A; Das, U; Whittal, R M; Dimmock, J; El-Aneed, A

    2014-11-01

    Unusual ionization behavior was observed with novel antineoplastic curcumin analogues during the positive ion mode of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and dopant-free atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). The tested compounds produced an unusual significant peak designated as [M - H](+) ion along with the expected [M + H](+) species. In contrast, electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and the dopant-mediated APPI (dopant-APPI) showed only the expected [M + H](+) peak. The [M - H](+) ion was detected with all evaluated curcumin analogues including phosphoramidates, secondary amines, amides and mixed amines/amides. Our experiments revealed that photon energy triggers the ionization of the curcumin analogues even in the absence of any ionization enhancer such as matrix, solvent or dopant. The possible mechanisms for the formation of both [M - H](+) and [M + H](+) ions are discussed in this paper. In particular, three proposed mechanisms for the formation of [M - H](+) were evaluated. The first mechanism involves the loss of H2 from the protonated [M + H](+) species. The other two mechanisms include hydrogen transfer from the analyte radical cation or hydride abstraction from the neutral analyte molecule.

  14. Identification of differential anti-neoplastic activity of copper bis(thiosemicarbazones) that is mediated by intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and lysosomal membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Christian; Al-Eisawi, Zaynab; Jansson, Patric J; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R

    2015-11-01

    Bis(thiosemicarbazones) and their copper (Cu) complexes possess unique anti-neoplastic properties. However, their mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the structure-activity relationships of twelve bis(thiosemicarbazones) to elucidate factors regarding their anti-cancer efficacy. Importantly, the alkyl substitutions at the diimine position of the ligand backbone resulted in two distinct groups, namely, unsubstituted/monosubstituted and disubstituted bis(thiosemicarbazones). This alkyl substitution pattern governed their: (1) Cu(II/I) redox potentials; (2) ability to induce cellular (64)Cu release; (3) lipophilicity; and (4) anti-proliferative activity. The potent anti-cancer Cu complex of the unsubstituted bis(thiosemicarbazone) analog, glyoxal bis(4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) (GTSM), generated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was attenuated by Cu sequestration by a non-toxic Cu chelator, tetrathiomolybdate, and the anti-oxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Fluorescence microscopy suggested that the anti-cancer activity of Cu(GTSM) was due, in part, to lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). For the first time, this investigation highlights the role of ROS and LMP in the anti-cancer activity of bis(thiosemicarbazones).

  15. Lysophosphatidylcholine attenuates the cytotoxic effects of the antineoplastic phospholipid 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3- phosphocholine.

    PubMed

    Boggs, K P; Rock, C O; Jackowski, S

    1995-05-12

    A colony-stimulating factor 1-dependent cell line was used to determine the relationship between the inhibition of phospholipid synthesis and the cytotoxic activity of the antineoplastic ether lipid, 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3). ET-18-OCH3 inhibited choline incorporation into phosphatidylcholine as well as total phospholipid synthesis. Exposure to ET-18-OCH3 at the G1/S boundary led to the accumulation of cells in G2, whereas the addition of ET-18-OCH3 in the G1 phase of the cell cycle prevented entry into the S phase. In both cases, ET-18-OCH3 treatment triggered DNA fragmentation and morphological changes associated with apoptosis within 10 h. The addition of lysophosphatidylcholine provided an exogenous source of cellular phospholipid and prevented ET-18-OCH3-dependent accumulation of cells in G2 and apoptosis. However, lysophosphatidylcholine did not overcome the ET-18-OCH3-dependent G1 block, although the growth-arrested cells remained viable. These data indicate that restoring phosphatidylcholine synthesis by supplementation with lysophosphatidylcholine overrides the cytotoxic but not the cytostatic activity of ET-18-OCH3.

  16. Porous nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffold containing drug-loaded ADM-PLGA microspheres for bone cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zi-Jie; Yang, Lian-Jun; Cai, Bao-Ta; Zhu, Li-Xin; Cao, Yan-Lin; Wu, Guo-Feng; Zhang, Zan-Jie

    2016-05-01

    To develop adriamycin (ADM)-encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles in a porous nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffold (ADM-PLGA-NHAC). To provide novel strategies for future treatment of osteosarcoma, the properties of the scaffold, including its in vitro extended-release properties, the inhibition effects of ADM-PLGA-NHAC on the osteosarcoma MG63 cells, and its bone repair capacity, were investigated in vivo and in vitro. The PLGA copolymer was utilized as a drug carrier to deliver ADM-PLGA nanoparticles (ADM-PLGA-NP). Porous nano-hydroxyapatite and collagen were used to materials to produce the porous nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffold (NHAC), into which the ADM-PLGA-NP was loaded. The performance of the drug-carrying scaffold was assessed using multiple techniques, including scanning electron microscopy and in vitro extended release. The antineoplastic activities of scaffold extracts on the human osteosarcoma MG63 cell line were evaluated in vitro using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK8) method and live-dead cell staining. The bone repair ability of the scaffold was assessed based on the establishment of a femoral condyle defect model in rabbits. ADM-PLGA-NHAC and NHAC were implanted into the rat muscle bag for immune response experiments. A tumor-bearing nude mice model was created, and the TUNEL and HE staining results were observed under optical microscopy to evaluate the antineoplastic activity and toxic side effects of the scaffold. The composite scaffold demonstrated extraordinary extended-release properties, and its extracts also exhibited significant inhibition of the growth of osteosarcoma MG63 cells. In the bone repair experiment, no significant difference was observed between ADM-PLGA-NHAC and NHAC by itself. In the immune response experiments, ADM-PLGA-NHAC exhibited remarkable biocompatibility. The in vivo antitumor experiment revealed that the implantation of ADM-PLGA-NHAC in the tumor resulted in a improved antineoplastic

  17. Porous nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffold containing drug-loaded ADM-PLGA microspheres for bone cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zi-Jie; Yang, Lian-Jun; Cai, Bao-Ta; Zhu, Li-Xin; Cao, Yan-Lin; Wu, Guo-Feng; Zhang, Zan-Jie

    2016-05-01

    To develop adriamycin (ADM)-encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles in a porous nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffold (ADM-PLGA-NHAC). To provide novel strategies for future treatment of osteosarcoma, the properties of the scaffold, including its in vitro extended-release properties, the inhibition effects of ADM-PLGA-NHAC on the osteosarcoma MG63 cells, and its bone repair capacity, were investigated in vivo and in vitro. The PLGA copolymer was utilized as a drug carrier to deliver ADM-PLGA nanoparticles (ADM-PLGA-NP). Porous nano-hydroxyapatite and collagen were used to materials to produce the porous nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffold (NHAC), into which the ADM-PLGA-NP was loaded. The performance of the drug-carrying scaffold was assessed using multiple techniques, including scanning electron microscopy and in vitro extended release. The antineoplastic activities of scaffold extracts on the human osteosarcoma MG63 cell line were evaluated in vitro using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK8) method and live-dead cell staining. The bone repair ability of the scaffold was assessed based on the establishment of a femoral condyle defect model in rabbits. ADM-PLGA-NHAC and NHAC were implanted into the rat muscle bag for immune response experiments. A tumor-bearing nude mice model was created, and the TUNEL and HE staining results were observed under optical microscopy to evaluate the antineoplastic activity and toxic side effects of the scaffold. The composite scaffold demonstrated extraordinary extended-release properties, and its extracts also exhibited significant inhibition of the growth of osteosarcoma MG63 cells. In the bone repair experiment, no significant difference was observed between ADM-PLGA-NHAC and NHAC by itself. In the immune response experiments, ADM-PLGA-NHAC exhibited remarkable biocompatibility. The in vivo antitumor experiment revealed that the implantation of ADM-PLGA-NHAC in the tumor resulted in a improved antineoplastic

  18. A Novel AP-1 Element in the CD95 Ligand Promoter Is Required for Induction of Apoptosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells upon Treatment with Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorst, Sören T.; Müller, Martina; Li-Weber, Min; Schulze-Bergkamen, Henning; Angel, Peter; Krammer, Peter H.

    2000-01-01

    The CD95 (also called APO-1 or Fas) system plays a major role in the induction of apoptosis in lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues in response to a variety of extracellular signals, including chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we report that the CD95 ligand (CD95L) is upregulated in hepatoma cells upon treatment with antineoplastic drugs. Upregulation by different chemotherapeutic drugs is functionally relevant for drug-induced apoptosis and is mediated by transcriptional mechanisms. The MEKK1/JNKK pathway and a novel AP-1 element in the CD95L promoter downstream of the TATA box are required for CD95L upregulation. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of CD95-mediated apoptosis through CD95L upregulation upon treatment of hepatocellular carcinomas with chemotherapeutic drugs may contribute to the improvement of anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:11003676

  19. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing. PMID:27441421

  20. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing.

  1. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  2. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  3. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs. There are a few other differences— like color, shape, size, or taste—but they do not ... different . Brand-name drugs are often advertised by color and shape. Remember the ads for the “purple ...

  4. Potentiation of antitumor drug action by centrophenoxine: specificity.

    PubMed

    Sladek, N E

    1977-05-01

    The cytotoxic action of certain antitumor agents is potentiated by centrophenoxine although centrophenoxine itself is not an antitumor agent. Previous investigations have suggested that centrophenoxine might potentiate the cytotoxicity produced by antitumor drugs that alkylate, and other modalities that damage, DNA, but that it would not potentiate the cytotoxicity produced by antitumor drugs that inflict cellular damage in other ways. To test this hypothesis, the antitumor effects of X-irradiation UV-irradiation, alkylating agents and antitumor drugs that are not ordinarily considered to be alkylating agents were determined in the presence and absence of centrophenoxine. Mouse P388 lymphoma cells growing in static suspension culture were used as the experimental tumor. The cytotoxic action of most alkylating agents was found to be potentiated by centrophenoxine; Included in this group were several difunctional nitrogen mustards, two ethylenimines, a nitrosourea and mitomycin C. Greatest enhancement, 7-fold, was of chlorambucil antitumor activity. Centrophenoxine did not potentiate the lethality of X- or UV-irradiation or the cytotoxicity of several antineoplastic drugs that are not alkylating agents.

  5. A 25-Year Experience of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Somatostatin (Congeners) Analogs: From Symptom Control to Antineoplastic Therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Anthony, Lowell B

    2015-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay technology was utilized in the discovery of somatostatin and was quickly brought into therapeutics; however, it took the development of somatostatin congeners to solve its limitations of a short half-life. Therapeutic medical control of hyperhormonal states such as acromegaly, carcinoid syndrome and VIPoma significantly advanced from a nonspecific approach to one that specifically and effectively targeted the underlying pathophysiology. Clinical care was transformed from nonspecific symptom control to one of a significant improvement in not only quality of life, but also quantity of life. These data submitted to US and European regulatory authorities for approval included many investigative sites with no uniform protocol and multiple investigational new drugs, and have not been previously published. This review includes the original data demonstrating the transformational impact this class of agents had on specific disease subsets resulting in regulatory approval 25 years ago. Autoradiography techniques using somatostatin resulted in identifying, localizing and characterizing its receptor subtypes. Translating in vitro data to in vivo resulted in scintigraphic whole body and SPECT scans with (111)In-pentetreotide and was incorporated into standard clinical care 20 years ago. (68)Ga-octreotide congeners using PET scanning offers a major imaging advance. Peptide receptor radiotherapy has evolved over the last 2 decades and utilizes several therapeutic isotopes, including (90)Y and (177)Lu. PMID:26303712

  6. Cancer cell spheroids for screening of chemotherapeutics and drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Patel, Niravkumar R; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Abouzeid, Abraham H; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, the most popular platform to perform high-throughput screening for viable anti-neoplastic compounds has been monolayer cell culture. However, cells in monolayer culture lose many of their in vivo characteristics. As a result, this platform provides a limited predictive value in determining the clinical outcome of the compounds of interest. Using a technique known as 3D spheroid culture, may be the answer to this conundrum. Spheroids have been shown to mimic the tissue-like properties of tumors necessary for the proper evaluation of compounds. In this review, production of cancer cell spheroids, utilization of these spheroids in understanding various therapeutic mechanisms and the potential for their use in high-throughput screening of drugs and drug-delivery systems are discussed in detail. PMID:25996047

  7. Adverse drug events in a sentinel hospital in the State of Goiás, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Reis, Adriano Max Moreira; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Santos, Jânia Oliveira; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli

    2011-01-01

    This was a retrospective, descriptive and documental study with the aim of identifying adverse drug events which occurred in the medication administration process and to classify these medication errors. This study was developed in the internal medicine unit of a general hospital of Goiás, Brazil. Report books used by nursing staff from the period 2002 to 2007, were analyzed. A total of 230 medication errors were identified, most of which occurred in the preparation and administration of the medications (64.3%). Medication errors were of omission (50.9%), of dose (16.5%), of schedule (13.5%) and of administration technique (12.2%) and were more frequent with antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents (24.3%) and anti-infective agents (20.9%). It was found that 37.4% of drugs were high alert medications. Considering the medication errors detected it is important to promote a culture of safety in the hospital. PMID:21584386

  8. Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tong Logan, Angela; Silverman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    One of the most clinically significant complications related to the use of pharmacotherapy is the potential for drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. The gastrointestinal system plays a large role in the pharmacokinetic profile of most medications, and many medications utilized in gastroenterology have clinically significant drug interactions. This review will discuss the impact of alterations of intestinal pH, interactions mediated by phase I hepatic metabolism enzymes and P-glycoprotein, the impact of liver disease on drug metabolism, and interactions seen with commonly utilized gastrointestinal medications. PMID:22933873

  9. Anti-neoplastic activities of sepia officinalis ink and coelatura aegyptiaca extracts against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Amel M; Fahmy, Sohair R; El-Abied, Salma A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: With the development of sophisticated instruments for the isolation and elucidation of natural products structures from marine and freshwater organisms, major advances have been made in the discovery of aquatic derived therapeutics. Present investigations were carried out to evaluate cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) ink extract (IE) and freshwater clam (Coelatura aegyptiaca) extract (CE) for their anticancer and antioxidant activities as compared to 5-flurouracil (5-Fu), in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC). Methods: Sixty female Swiss albino mice were divided into five groups (n = 12). All groups except group I received EAC cells (5 × 106 cells/mouse i.p.) and this was taken as the 0th day. Group I served as saline control (5 ml/kg 0.9% NaCl w/v p.o). Group II served as EAC control. Rats of groups III, IV and V received IE, CE (200 mg/kg body weight i.p.), and reference drug (5-Fu, 20 mg/kg body weight i.p.), respectively. Results: The reduction in tumor volume, packed cell volume, tumor cell counts and increase in median survival time and percentage increase in life span in treated animals were observed. There was a significant increase in RBC count; Hb content in treated animals and reduction in total WBC count. There was a significant decrease in AST, ALT, ALP and liver MDA levels and increase in GSH, SOD and NO levels were observed in all treated animals. Conclusion: Both IE and CE were effective in inhibiting the tumor growth in ascitic tumor models. The biochemical, antioxidants and histopathological studies were also supported their antitumor properties. PMID:26097537

  10. Antitumor efficacy and apoptotic activity of substituted chloroalkyl 1H-benz[de]isoquinoline-1,3-diones: a new class of potential antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Asama; Hazra, Suva; Dutta, Sushanta; Muthiah, Shanmugavel; Mondhe, Dilip Manikrao; Sharma, Parduman Raj; Singh, Shashank Kumar; Saxena, Ajit Kumar; Qazi, Gulam Nabi; Sanyal, Utpal

    2011-06-01

    A series of ten chloroalkyl 1H-benz[de]isoquinoline-1,3-diones (naphthalimides) were synthesized and evaluated for antitumor activity. Amongst them, new compounds 2d and 2i carrying a 6-NO(2) substituent in the aromatic portion of the molecule possessed significant antineoplastic activity. The most active compound 2i had elicited significant cytotoxicity in 15 human tumor cell lines namely Leukemia: MOLT-4, HL-60; Lymphoma: U-937; Colon: 502713, HT-29, SW-620, HCT-15, COLO-205; Liver: Hep-2; Prostate DU-145, PC-3; Breast: MCF-7; Neuroblastoma: IMR-32, SK-N-SH and Ovary: OVCAR-5 out of the 17 cell lines screened. Flow cytometric analysis performed to study the effect of compound 2i on the progression of cell cycle of MOLT-4 cells, revealed rise in sub-G(1) fraction and concomitant accumulation of cells in S and G(2)/M phases, indicating apoptosis, mitotic arrest and/or delay in exit of daughter cells from mitotic cycle respectively. It also induced caspase-mediated apoptosis of MOLT-4 cells in a dose dependant manner. Light and electron microscopic studies revealed characteristic morphology of apoptotic MOLT-4 cells after in vitro treatment with 10 μM concentration of the compound. Apoptosis induction was also observed in HL-60 cells by compounds 2d and 2i to an extent much greater than camptothecin and cis-platin at 10 μM concentration. Both the compounds have shown minimal suppressive effect on human PBMC having high IC(50) values of 3,582 and 1,536 μM respectively. These compounds inhibited DNA and RNA synthesis in murine ascites Sarcoma-180 tumor cells in vitro at 8 μM concentration. Above results indicate promising chemotherapeutic potential of the key compound 2i.

  11. Quantitative assessment of the relative antineoplastic potential of the n-butanolic leaf extract of Annona muricata Linn. in normal and immortalized human cell lines.

    PubMed

    George, V Cijo; Kumar, D R Naveen; Rajkumar, V; Suresh, P K; Kumar, R Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Natural products have been the target for cancer therapy for several years but there is still a dearth of information on potent compounds that may protect normal cells and selectively destroy cancerous cells. The present study was aimed to evaluate the cytotoxic potential of n-butanolic leaf extract of Annona muricata L. on WRL-68 (normal human hepatic cells), MDA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma cells) and HaCaT (human immortalized keratinocyte cells) lines by XTT assay. Prior to cytotoxicity testing, the extract was subjected to phytochemical screening for detecting the presence of compounds with therapeutic potential. Their relative antioxidant properties were evaluated using the reducing power and DPPH* radical scavenging assay. Since most of the observed chemo-preventive potential invariably correlated with the amount of total phenolics present in the extract, their levels were quantified and identified by HPLC analysis. Correlation studies indicated a strong and significant (P<0.05) positive correlation of phenolic compounds with free radical scavenging potential. The results revealed that the extract was moderately cytotoxic to normal cells with a mean IC50 value of 52.4 μg when compared with those obtained for cancerous cells (IC50 values of 29.2 μg for MDA-MB-435S and 30.1 μg for HaCaT respectively). The study confirms the presence of therapeutically active antineoplastic compounds in the n-butanolic leaf extract of Annona muricata. Isolation of the active metabolites from the extract is in prospect.

  12. Quantitative assessment of the relative antineoplastic potential of the n-butanolic leaf extract of Annona muricata Linn. in normal and immortalized human cell lines.

    PubMed

    George, V Cijo; Kumar, D R Naveen; Rajkumar, V; Suresh, P K; Kumar, R Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Natural products have been the target for cancer therapy for several years but there is still a dearth of information on potent compounds that may protect normal cells and selectively destroy cancerous cells. The present study was aimed to evaluate the cytotoxic potential of n-butanolic leaf extract of Annona muricata L. on WRL-68 (normal human hepatic cells), MDA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma cells) and HaCaT (human immortalized keratinocyte cells) lines by XTT assay. Prior to cytotoxicity testing, the extract was subjected to phytochemical screening for detecting the presence of compounds with therapeutic potential. Their relative antioxidant properties were evaluated using the reducing power and DPPH* radical scavenging assay. Since most of the observed chemo-preventive potential invariably correlated with the amount of total phenolics present in the extract, their levels were quantified and identified by HPLC analysis. Correlation studies indicated a strong and significant (P<0.05) positive correlation of phenolic compounds with free radical scavenging potential. The results revealed that the extract was moderately cytotoxic to normal cells with a mean IC50 value of 52.4 μg when compared with those obtained for cancerous cells (IC50 values of 29.2 μg for MDA-MB-435S and 30.1 μg for HaCaT respectively). The study confirms the presence of therapeutically active antineoplastic compounds in the n-butanolic leaf extract of Annona muricata. Isolation of the active metabolites from the extract is in prospect. PMID:22524847

  13. Carcinogenicity of the antineoplastic agent, 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)-imidazole-4-carboxamide, and its metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Beal, D D; Skibba, J L; Croft, W A; Cohen, S M; Bryan, G T

    1975-04-01

    Chronic oral administration of the antineoplastic agent, 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (NSC-45388, DTIC), induced predominantly thymic and mammary tumors as demonstrated previously. Male and female Sprague-Dawley and female Buffalo rats were susceptible to the carcinogenicity of DTIC. A 50% incidence of mammary adenocarcinomas was induced in males within 18 weeks. Type of tumor and tumor incidence were dose dependent. Single and multiple intraperitoneal injections of DTIC did not alter organ specificity. DTIC-induced thymic lymphosarcomas and mammary adenocarcinomas were transplantable. Tissue distribution studies revealed no correlation between uptake of DTIC by a given tissue and its susceptibility to carcinogenicity. Metabolites of DTIC were tested for carcinogenic activity. Animals administered 5-diazoimidazole-4-carboxamide orally, intraperitoneally, or intragastrically developed low incidences of thymic, stomach, bladder, or mammary tumors. A low incidence of mammary tumors developed in rats fed 2-azahypoxanthine. A variety of tumors, including several ependymoblastomas, were induced in rats that received 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide orally. 5-(3-Methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC), when fed or given in single or multiple intraperitoneal injections, induced a high incidence of mammary adenofibromas and a low incidence of uterine leiomyosarcomas. Control rats had low incidences of mammary adenocarcinomas and adenofibromas after 52 weeks. These data show that the carcinogenic properties of DTIC resemble those of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds, hydrazine, azo, and azoxy-alkanes and aryltriazenes and thus suggest similar mechanism(s) of action. These data also indicate that MTIC is involved in the induction of mammary adenofibromas and uterine leiomyosarcomas by DTIC.

  14. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  15. Cell cycle effects of drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Dethlefsen, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Cell Growth and Division Cycle; Cell Cycle Effects of Alkylating Agents; Biological Effects of Folic Acid Antagonists with Antineoplastic Activity; and Bleomycin-Mode of Action with Particular Reference to the Cell Cycle.

  16. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  17. [Drug dependence and psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Giraud, M J; Lemonnier, E; Bigot, T

    1994-11-01

    Although the utility of psychotropic drugs has been well demonstrated, caution must still be exercised in their use. Among their potential risks, drug dependency must be kept in mind. This risk is well accepted with regard to benzodiazepines, and it appeared useful to study the potential risk for antidepressants, neuroleptics and thymoregulatory agents. Whatever the drug, the predominant factor appears to be psychological dependency. Prevention of drug dependency is most often achieved by informing the patient, limiting the length of use of the drug, making regular reevaluation of symptoms and of drug indication, and frequently be establishing a "treatment contract". The importance of the patient-physician relationship in the prescription of such treatment must be underlined. PMID:7984941

  18. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  19. Potential risks and prevention, Part 2: Drug-induced permanent disabilities.

    PubMed

    Kelly, W N

    2001-07-15

    Potential risk factors for and the preventability of drug-induced permanent disabilities were studied. Case reports of adverse drug events (ADEs) published in Clin-Alert during 1978-97 were the source of information on drug-induced permanent disabilities. Patient, drug, and event variables were identified, and the causality, predictability, and preventability of each case were assessed. Data were entered into a relational database for analysis. The data indicated 227 cases of drug-induced permanent disabilities. Twenty-three percent of the cases were assessed as definite, 47% as probable, and 30% as possible. Twenty-nine percent of the patients were less than 10 years old, and 36% were considered healthy. The drug categories most commonly associated with a drug-induced permanent disability were antimicrobials, vaccines, central-nervous-system agents, and antineoplastics. About half of the patients received more than the usual dosage. The most common permanent disabilities were brain damage, blindness, tardive dyskinesia, deafness, quadriplegia, and hearing loss. Event types were distributed as medication errors (55%), adverse drug reactions (43%), and drug interactions (2%). Eighty-four percent of the drug-induced permanent disabilities were judged to have been preventable; of these, a pharmacist could have prevented 40%. Litigation was reported for 56% of the cases of drug-induced permanent disability; judgments and settlements averaged $4.3 million. A review of published case reports of ADEs for 1978-97 yielded information on possible risk factors for drug-induced permanent disabilities and on which events may have been preventable.

  20. Forecasting drug utilization and expenditure in a metropolitan health region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background New pharmacological therapies are challenging the healthcare systems, and there is an increasing need to assess their therapeutic value in relation to existing alternatives as well as their potential budget impact. Consequently, new models to introduce drugs in healthcare are urgently needed. In the metropolitan health region of Stockholm, Sweden, a model has been developed including early warning (horizon scanning), forecasting of drug utilization and expenditure, critical drug evaluation as well as structured programs for the introduction and follow-up of new drugs. The aim of this paper is to present the forecasting model and the predicted growth in all therapeutic areas in 2010 and 2011. Methods Linear regression analysis was applied to aggregate sales data on hospital sales and dispensed drugs in ambulatory care, including both reimbursed expenditure and patient co-payment. The linear regression was applied on each pharmacological group based on four observations 2006-2009, and the crude predictions estimated for the coming two years 2010-2011. The crude predictions were then adjusted for factors likely to increase or decrease future utilization and expenditure, such as patent expiries, new drugs to be launched or new guidelines from national bodies or the regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee. The assessment included a close collaboration with clinical, clinical pharmacological and pharmaceutical experts from the regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee. Results The annual increase in total expenditure for prescription and hospital drugs was predicted to be 2.0% in 2010 and 4.0% in 2011. Expenditures will increase in most therapeutic areas, but most predominantly for antineoplastic and immune modulating agents as well as drugs for the nervous system, infectious diseases, and blood and blood-forming organs. Conclusions The utilisation and expenditure of drugs is difficult to forecast due to uncertainties about the rate of adoption of new

  1. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ...

  2. In vitro tests for haematotoxicity: prediction of drug-induced myelosuppression by the CFU-GM assay.

    PubMed

    Pessina, Augusto; Albella, Beatriz; Bayo, Maria; Bueren, Juan; Brantom, Paul; Casati, Silvia; Croera, Cristina; Parchment, Ralph; Parent-Massin, Dominique; Schoeters, Greet; Sibiri, Yann; Van Den Heuvel, Rosette; Gribaldo, Laura

    2002-12-01

    In a prevalidation study, a standard operating procedure (SOP) for human and mouse in vitro tests was developed, for evaluating the potential haematotoxicity of xenobiotics in terms of their direct, adverse effects on the myeloid colony-forming unit (CFU-GM). Based on the adjustment of the mouse-derived maximum tolerated dose (MTD), a prediction model was set up to calculate the human MTD, and an international blind trial was designed to apply this model to the clinical neutropenia of 23 drugs including 17 antineoplastics. The model correctly predicted the human MTD for 20 drugs out of the 23 (87%). This high percentage of predictivity, and the reproducibility of the SOP testing, confirmed the scientific validation of this model, and suggest promising applications for developing and validating other in vitro methods for use in haematotoxicology.

  3. Prescription Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, especially in brain areas involved in the perception of pain and pleasure. Prescription stimulants , such as ... of drug that causes changes in your mood, perceptions, and behavior can affect judgment and willingness to ...

  4. Antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one.

  5. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  6. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & ... Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs ...

  7. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... distance, and decrease coordination. Drivers who have used cocaine or methamphetamine can be aggressive and reckless when ...

  8. Drug Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... not be taken at the same time as antacids. WHAT CAUSES THE MOST INTERACTIONS WITH HIV MEDICATIONS? ... azole” Some antibiotics (names end in “mycin”) The antacid cimetidine (Tagamet) Some drugs that prevent convulsions, including ...

  9. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... also known as Ecstasy XTC, X, E, Adam, Molly, Hug Beans, and Love Drug Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), also known as G, Liquid Ecstasy, and Soap Ketamine, also known as Special K, K, Vitamin K, and Jet Rohypnol, also known ...

  10. [Adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy].

    PubMed

    Olivera-Fernandez, R; Fernandez-Ribeiro, F; Piñeiro-Corrales, G; Crespo-Diz, C

    2014-11-03

    Introducción: Los tratamientos antineoplasicos orales presentan ventajas en cuanto a coste, comodidad y mejora potencial en la calidad de vida respecto al tratamiento endovenoso, pero es mas dificil controlar la adherencia y monitorizar los efectos adversos. El objetivo de este estudio fue conocer la adherencia real en pacientes con antineoplasicos orales en nuestro centro, analizar la influencia de las caracteristicas del paciente y del tratamiento, identificar motivos de no adherencia, oportunidades de mejora en la atencion farmaceutica y evaluar la posible relacion adherencia y respuesta al tratamiento. Método: estudio prospectivo observacional de cuatro meses de duracion, en los pacientes con tratamiento antineoplasico oral dispensado desde la consulta de farmacia oncologica. Para la recogida de datos se utilizaron: orden medica, historia clinica y visita con entrevistas al paciente. Resultados: Se evaluaron un total de 141 pacientes. Un 72% se considero totalmente adherente, mientras que en un 28% se detecto algun tipo de no adherencia. El tiempo desde el diagnostico y la presencia de efectos adversos fueron las variables que afectaron a la adherencia. No se pudo demostrar relacion entre adherencia y respuesta al tratamiento. Conclusiones: La adherencia al tratamiento antineoplasico oral en nuestro centro fue del 72%, identificando oportunidades de mejora en la atencion farmaceutica dirigidas a prevenir los efectos adversos y a potenciar la adherencia de nuestros pacientes.

  11. Drug allergy

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Allergic drug reactions occur when a drug, usually a low molecular weight molecule, has the ability to stimulate an immune response. This can be done in one of two ways. The first is by binding covalently to a self-protein, to produce a haptenated molecule that can be processed and presented to the adaptive immune system to induce an immune response. Sometimes the drug itself cannot do this but a reactive breakdown product of the drug is able to bind covalently to the requisite self-protein or peptide. The second way in which drugs can stimulate an immune response is by binding non-covalently to antigen presenting or antigen recognition molecules such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or the T cell receptor. This is known as the p-I or pharmacological interaction hypothesis. The drug binding in this situation is reversible and stimulation of the response may occur on first exposure, not requiring previous sensitization. There is probably a dependence on the presence of certain MHC alleles and T cell receptor structures for this type of reaction to occur. PMID:22922763

  12. Roles of sildenafil in enhancing drug sensitivity in cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi; Tiwari, Amit K; Patel, Atish S; Fu, Li-Wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2011-06-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR) has decreased the hope for successful cancer chemotherapy. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily is the largest transmembrane family. The overexpression of ABC transporters is a major determinant of MDR in cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Unfortunately, until recently, most of the strategies used to surmount ABC-transporter-mediated MDR have had limited success. An ideal modulator of MDR would be one that has a low liability to induce toxicity and alter the pharmacokinetic profile of antineoplastic drugs. Sildenafil, an inhibitor of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5, was found to significantly reverse ABC-transporter-mediated MDR. Our results indicate that sildenafil has differential inhibitory effects on ABC transporters: It significantly decreases the efflux activity of ABCB1 and ABCG2, but has no significant effects on ABCC1. Emerging evidence indicates that sildenafil and other phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors may enhance the sensitivity of certain types of cancer to standard chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:21610107

  13. Drug misuse.

    PubMed Central

    Waller, T.

    1992-01-01

    1. Assessment by history and examination should include: a history of all drugs taken during each day for the previous 7 days (including alcohol), length of drug use and route (including the sharing of needles or syringes), the possibility of pregnancy if female, previous psychiatric history and treatment of drug misuse, social factors (including employment, family, friends, involvement in prostitution, legal problems), medical problems, including evidence of hepatitis, injection abscesses and other infections, suicide attempts, and weight loss. 2. Notification to the Chief Medical Officer of the Drug Branch of the Home Office is a legal obligation. 3. Investigations include: liver function tests (LFTs), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis C antibody, full blood count (FBC), and urine for drug screening. Consider HIV testing if at risk but it is usually better arranged at a later stage. 4. Prescribing may be considered for a variety of drugs but objectives will differ according to drug type and individual. 5. In the case of opioid users, prescribing may be useful to stabilize their lives and to promote attendance for professional help. It may reduce high risk behaviour for contracting and spreading HIV. 6. If medication is given to opioid users, methadone mixture 1 mg/ml given once a day is the prescription of choice. Dispensing should be on a daily basis and the blue prescription form FP10 (MDA) allows the chemist to dispense daily for up to 14 days. A maximum ceiling of 100 mg methadone/day should not be exceeded. The initial dose will depend on the amount of opioid consumed in the previous week.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1345155

  14. Synthesis, characterization, and magnetically guided antiproliferative activity studies of drug-loaded superparamagnetic nanovectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Vázquez Ortega, Salvador; Barriga-Castro, Enrique Díaz; Mendoza-Reséndez, Raquel; Gómez-Treviño, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    Commonly, the key players in anticancer therapies and, more specifically, antineoplastic drugs display poor water solubility and slow dissolution rates. As a consequence, they present low bioavailability, poor tissue distribution, and unfavorable pharmacokinetic profiles, limiting their use. To overcome these barriers and improve efficacy, various drug formulations and delivery strategies have been developed. For example, nanoparticles can be used as drug delivery vehicles and current research is encouraging. However, the intra-tumoral diffusion of functionalized nanovehicles remains to be achieved. In the present study, the anticancer drug paclitaxel was loaded into superparamagnetic nanoparticles and characterized. Novel in vitro experiments based on one or two layers of cells revealed important information about the conditions required to achieve efficient drug intra-tumoral diffusion, using these superparamagnetic nanovectors, once they have been localized by external magnetic fields. These studies indicated that ultralow concentrations of paclitaxel (i.e., tenths of ng/μl) significantly reduce the viability of neoplastic cells when they are delivered with control using these nanovectors. Moreover, we showed that a discontinuous application of a magnetic field promotes the localization of the nanoparticles in a targeted region and favors the subsequent dissemination of the nanoparticles between cellular layers.

  15. Eco-genotoxicity of six anticancer drugs using comet assay in daphnids.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Alfredo; Lavorgna, Margherita; Criscuolo, Emma; Russo, Chiara; Isidori, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The eco-genotoxicity of six anti-neoplastic drugs, 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, cisplatin, doxorubicin, etoposide, and imatinib, belonging to five classes of anatomical therapeutic classification (ATC), was studied applying the in vivo comet assay on cells from whole organisms of Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia. For the first time, this test was performed in C. dubia. In addition, to have a wider genotoxic/mutagenic profile of the anticancer drugs selected, SOS chromotest and Salmonella mutagenicity assay were performed. The comet results showed that all drugs induced DNA damage, in both Cladocerans, with environmental concern; indeed Doxorubicin induced DNA damage in the order of tens of ng L(-1) in both crustaceans, as well as 5-flurouracil in C. dubia and cisplatin in D. magna. In the SOS Chromotest all drugs, except imatinib, were able to activate the repair system in Escherichia coli PQ37 while in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay, doxorubicin was the only drug able to cause direct and indirect frameshift and base-pair substitution mutations. Comet assay was the most sensitive tool of genotoxic exposure assessment, able to detect in vivo the adverse effects at concentration lower than those evaluated in vitro by bacterial assays.

  16. Biomarkers to assess the efficiency of treatment with platinum-based drugs: what can metallomics add?

    PubMed

    Araujo, Thiago de O; Costa, Lilian T; Fernandes, Janaina; Aucélio, Ricardo Queiroz; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto

    2014-12-01

    Since the approval of cisplatin as an antineoplastic drug, the medical and the scientific communities have been concerned about the side effects of platinum-based drugs, and this has been the dose-limiting factor that leads to reduced treatment efficiency. Another important issue is the intrinsic or acquired resistance of some patients to treatment. Identifying proper biomarkers is crucial in evaluating the efficiency of a treatment, assisting physicians in determining, at early stages, whether or not the patient presents resistance to the drug, minimizing severe side effects, and allowing them to redirect the established course of chemotherapy. A great effort is being made to identify biomarkers that can be used to predict the outcome of the treatment of cancer patients with platinum-based drugs. In this context, the metallomic approach has not yet been used to its full potential. Since the basis of these drugs is platinum, the monitoring of biomarkers containing this metal should be the natural approach to evaluate treatment progress. This review intends to show where the research in this field stands and points out some gaps that can be filled by metallomics.

  17. Stability of solutions of antineoplastic agents during preparation and storage for in vitro assays. General considerations, the nitrosoureas and alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Bosanquet, A G

    1985-01-01

    In vitro drug sensitivity of tumour biopsies is currently being determined using a variety of methods. For these chemosensitivity assays many drugs are required at short notice, and this in turn means that the drugs must generally be stored in solution. There are, however, a number of potential problems associated with dissolving and storing drugs for in vitro use, which include (a) drug adsorption; (b) effects of freezing; (c) drug stability under the normal conditions of dilution and setting up of an in vitro assay; and (d) insolubility of drugs in normal saline (NS) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). These problems are considered in general, and some recommendations for use of solutions of drugs in in vitro assays are suggested. The nitrosoureas and alkylating agents are also investigated in greater detail in this respect. The nitrosoureas are found to be very labile in PBS at pH 7, with 5% degradation (t0.95) occurring in 10-50 min at room temperature. These values are increased about 10-fold on refrigeration and about 5- to 10-fold on reduction of the pH of the medium to pH 4-5. At pH 7 and room temperature, t0.95 is observed in under 1 h with the alkylating agents nitrogen mustard, chlorambucil, melphalan, 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,6-bis(2-hydroxyethylamino)-1,4-benzoquinone (BZQ), dibromodulcitol, dibromomannitol, treosulphan, and procarbazine. Of the other alkylating agents, 4-hydroperoxycylophosphamide (sometimes used in vitro in place of cyclophosphamide), busulphan, dianhydrogalactitol, aziridinylbenzoquinone (AZQ), and dacarbazine have a t0.95 of between 2 and 24 h, while ifosfamide and pentamethylmelamine are both stable in aqueous solution for greater than 7 days. About half the drugs studied in detail have been stored frozen in solution for in vitro use, although very little is known about their stability under these conditions.

  18. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments on new anti-HIV agents and drugs for opportunistic infections are highlighted. Information is provided on the infusion inhibitor T-20; DuPont's second generation non-nukes, DPC 961 and DPC 963; Papirine (PEN203) for the human papilloma virus; Sporanox for treating fungal infections; and the antiretroviral protein, lysozyme. In addition, information is given on a plant found in the Bolivian rainforest that may contain compounds to prevent HIV infection by blocking the enzyme, integrase. Other promising new drugs addressed at the 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections are listed in a table. Contact information for US clinical trials is provided.

  19. Drug Allergy.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul; Hill, Tiffany; Dhawan, Nidhi

    2016-09-01

    An adverse drug reaction relates to an undesired response to administration of a drug. Type A reactions are common and are predictable to administration, dose response, or interaction with other medications. Type B reactions are uncommon with occurrences that are not predictable. Appropriate diagnosis, classification, and entry into the chart are important to avoid future problems. The diagnosis is made with careful history, physical examination, and possibly allergy testing. It is recommended that help from allergy immunology specialists should be sought where necessary and that routine prescription of Epi pen should be given to patients with multiple allergy syndromes. PMID:27545730

  20. [Ureter drugs].

    PubMed

    Raynal, G; Bellan, J; Saint, F; Tillou, X; Petit, J

    2008-03-01

    Many improvements have been made recently in the field of the ureteral smooth muscle pharmacology. After a brief summary on physiological basis, we review what is known about effects on ureter of different drugs class. In a second part, we review clinical applications for renal colic analgesia, calculi expulsive medical therapy, ESWL adjuvant treatment and preoperative treatment before retrograde access. There are now sufficient data on NSAID and alpha-blockers. beta-agonists, especially for beta3 selective ones, and topical drugs before retrograde access are interesting and should be further evaluated.

  1. Antineoplastic Activity of New Transition Metal Complexes of 6-Methylpyridine-2-carbaldehyde-N(4)-ethylthiosemicarbazone: X-Ray Crystal Structures of [VO2(mpETSC)] and [Pt(mpETSC)Cl

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Shadia A.; El-Hendawy, Ahmed M.; Mostafa, Sahar I.; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J.; Todorova, Margarita; Butler, Ian S.

    2010-01-01

    New complexes of dioxovanadium(V), zinc(II), ruthenium(II), palladium(II), and platinum(II) with 6-methylpyridine-2-carbaldehyde-N(4)-ethylthiosemicarbazone (HmpETSC) have been synthesized. The composition of these complexes is discussed on the basis of elemental analyses, IR, Raman, NMR (1H, 13C, and 31P), and electronic spectral data. The X-ray crystal structures of [VO2(mpETSC)] and [Pt(mpETSC)Cl] are also reported. The HmpETSC and its [Zn(HmpETSC)Cl2] and [Pd(mpETSC)Cl] complexes exhibit antineoplastic activity against colon cancer human cell lines (HCT 116). PMID:20671978

  2. Applying ligands profiling using multiple extended electron distribution based field templates and feature trees similarity searching in the discovery of new generation of urea-based antineoplastic kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dokla, Eman M; Mahmoud, Amr H; Elsayed, Mohamed S A; El-Khatib, Ahmed H; Linscheid, Michael W; Abouzid, Khaled A

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a comprehensive computational procedure for the discovery of novel urea-based antineoplastic kinase inhibitors while focusing on diversification of both chemotype and selectivity pattern. It presents a systematic structural analysis of the different binding motifs of urea-based kinase inhibitors and the corresponding configurations of the kinase enzymes. The computational model depends on simultaneous application of two protocols. The first protocol applies multiple consecutive validated virtual screening filters including SMARTS, support vector-machine model (ROC = 0.98), Bayesian model (ROC = 0.86) and structure-based pharmacophore filters based on urea-based kinase inhibitors complexes retrieved from literature. This is followed by hits profiling against different extended electron distribution (XED) based field templates representing different kinase targets. The second protocol enables cancericidal activity verification by using the algorithm of feature trees (Ftrees) similarity searching against NCI database. Being a proof-of-concept study, this combined procedure was experimentally validated by its utilization in developing a novel series of urea-based derivatives of strong anticancer activity. This new series is based on 3-benzylbenzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-one scaffold which has interesting chemical feasibility and wide diversification capability. Antineoplastic activity of this series was assayed in vitro against NCI 60 tumor-cell lines showing very strong inhibition of GI(50) as low as 0.9 uM. Additionally, its mechanism was unleashed using KINEX™ protein kinase microarray-based small molecule inhibitor profiling platform and cell cycle analysis showing a peculiar selectivity pattern against Zap70, c-src, Mink1, csk and MeKK2 kinases. Interestingly, it showed activity on syk kinase confirming the recent studies finding of the high activity of diphenyl urea containing compounds against this kinase. Allover, the new series, which is based on

  3. Glutathione S-conjugates as prodrugs to target drug-resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Emma E.; Dilda, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Living organisms are continuously exposed to xenobiotics. The major phase of enzymatic detoxification in many species is the conjugation of activated xenobiotics to reduced glutathione (GSH) catalyzed by the glutathione-S-transferase (GST). It has been reported that some compounds, once transformed into glutathione S-conjugates, enter the mercapturic acid pathway whose end products are highly reactive and toxic for the cell responsible for their production. The cytotoxicity of these GSH conjugates depends essentially on GST and gamma-glutamyl transferases (γGT), the enzymes which initiate the mercapturic acid synthesis pathway. Numerous studies support the view that the expression of GST and γGT in cancer cells represents an important factor in the appearance of a more aggressive and resistant phenotype. High levels of tumor GST and γGT expression were employed to selectively target tumor with GST- or γGT-activated drugs. This strategy, explored over the last two decades, has recently been successful using GST-activated nitrogen mustard (TLK286) and γGT-activated arsenic-based (GSAO and Darinaparsin) prodrugs confirming the potential of GSH-conjugates as anticancer drugs. PMID:25157234

  4. Pediatric Drug Safety Surveillance in FDA-AERS: A Description of Adverse Events from GRiP Project.

    PubMed

    de Bie, Sandra; Ferrajolo, Carmen; Straus, Sabine M J M; Verhamme, Katia M C; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Wong, Ian C K; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M

    2015-01-01

    Individual case safety reports (ICSRs) are a cornerstone in drug safety surveillance. The knowledge on using these data specifically for children is limited. We studied characteristics of pediatric ICSRs reported to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Public available ICSRs reported in children (0-18 years) to FAERS were downloaded from the FDA-website for the period Jan 2004-Dec 2011. Characteristics of these ICSRs, including the reported drugs and events, were described and stratified by age-groups. We included 106,122 pediatric ICSRs (55% boys and 58% from United States) with a median of 1 drug [range 1-3] and 1 event [1-2] per ICSR. Mean age was 9.1 years. 90% was submitted through expedited (15-days) (65%) or periodic reporting (25%) and 10% by non-manufacturers. The proportion and type of pediatric ICSRs reported were relatively stable over time. Most commonly reported drug classes by decreasing frequency were 'nervous system drugs' (58%), 'antineoplastics' (32%) and 'anti-infectives' (25%). Most commonly reported system organ classes were 'general' (13%), 'nervous system' (12%) and 'psychiatric' (11%) disorders. Duration of use could be calculated for 19.7% of the reported drugs, of which 14.5% concerned drugs being used long-term (>6 months). Knowledge on the distribution of the drug classes and events within FAERS is a key first step in developing pediatric specific methods for drug safety surveillance. Because of several differences in terms of drugs and events among age-categories, drug safety signal detection analysis in children needs to be stratified by each age group. PMID:26090678

  5. Therapeutic drug monitoring: antiarrhythmic drugs.

    PubMed

    Campbell, T J; Williams, K M

    2001-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents are traditionally classified according to Vaughan Williams into four classes of action. Class I antiarrhythmic agents include most of the drugs traditionally thought of as antiarrhythmics, and have as a common action, blockade of the fast-inward sodium channel on myocardium. These agents have a very significant toxicity, and while they are being used less, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) does significantly increase the safety with which they can be administered. Class II agents are antisympathetic drugs, particularly the b-adrenoceptor blockers. These are generally safe agents which do not normally require TDM. Class III antiarrhythmic agents include sotalol and amiodarone. TDM can be useful in the case of amiodarone to monitor compliance and toxicity but is generally of little value for sotalol. Class IV antiarrhythmic drugs are the calcium channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem. These are normally monitored by haemodynamic effects, rather than using TDM. Other agents which do not fall neatly into the Vaughan Williams classification include digoxin and perhexiline. TDM is very useful for monitoring the administration (and particularly the safety) of both of these agents.

  6. Therapeutic drug monitoring: antiarrhythmic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, T J; Williams, K M

    2001-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents are traditionally classified according to Vaughan Williams into four classes of action. Class I antiarrhythmic agents include most of the drugs traditionally thought of as antiarrhythmics, and have as a common action, blockade of the fast-inward sodium channel on myocardium. These agents have a very significant toxicity, and while they are being used less, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) does significantly increase the safety with which they can be administered. Class II agents are antisympathetic drugs, particularly the b-adrenoceptor blockers. These are generally safe agents which do not normally require TDM. Class III antiarrhythmic agents include sotalol and amiodarone. TDM can be useful in the case of amiodarone to monitor compliance and toxicity but is generally of little value for sotalol. Class IV antiarrhythmic drugs are the calcium channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem. These are normally monitored by haemodynamic effects, rather than using TDM. Other agents which do not fall neatly into the Vaughan Williams classification include digoxin and perhexiline. TDM is very useful for monitoring the administration (and particularly the safety) of both of these agents. PMID:11564050

  7. Assessment of surface concentrations in resorbable ocular implants: controlled drug delivery devices for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Peter J.; Gautier, Sandrine; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Jallet, Valerie

    1997-05-01

    The antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-fluoro- 2,4,(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione; 5-FU) has been used to control proliferation of penetrating fibroblasts and to prevent channel closure following glaucoma filtration surgery (trabeculectomy) or laser sclerectomy. Because of the toxicity of the drug, administration of low dosages slowly over time, at the site of the desired treatment, is indicated for optimum efficacy. Repeated injections of low dosages of the drug represent an undesirable intervention and may also result in unwanted toxicity to the corneal epithelium. A suitable biocompatible and resorbable polymer matrix composed of a poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid: PLGA) has been admixed with varying amounts of 5-FU and cast as shapes suitable for intracorneal implantation. Slow biodegradation of this polymer over a one to two week period has been shown to result in an acceptably slow drug release mechanism. An issue arising during the clinical evaluation of the efficacy of this drug delivery system was how best to quantify the concentration of 5-FU and its distribution spatially in the solid implant. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies distinguishes between the drug and the polymer matrix and were used to differentiate and quantitate the 5-FU concentration of the implants.

  8. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Current research findings and treatment issues related to a number of drugs are briefly outlined. Topics include T-20, a reformulation of ddI, PMPA, chicoric acid, Omniferon (alpha leukoferon), and Mepron. Also discussed is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor called calanolide A, which is synthesized from a tree native to Malaysian rain forests. An update is provided on Panretin, a gel which is used to treat KS lesions. Contact information is provided.

  9. Curcumin loaded pH-sensitive hybrid lipid/block copolymer nanosized drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Jelezova, Ivelina; Drakalska, Elena; Momekova, Denitsa; Shalimova, Natalia; Momekov, Georgi; Konstantinov, Spiro; Rangelov, Stanislav; Pispas, Stergios

    2015-10-12

    Curcumin is a perspective drug candidate with pleiotropic antineoplastic activity, whose exceptionally low aqueous solubility and poor pharmacokinetic properties have hampered its development beyond the preclinical level. A possible approach to overcome these limitations is the encapsulation of curcumin into nano-carriers, incl. liposomes. The present contribution is focused on feasibility of using hybrid pH-sensitive liposomes, whereby curcumin is entrapped as a free drug and as a water soluble inclusion complex with PEGylated tert-butylcalix[4]arene, which allows the drug to occupy both the phospholipid membranes and the aqueous core of liposomes. The inclusion complexes were encapsulated in dipalmithoylphosphathydilcholine:cholesterol liposomes, whose membranes were grafted with a poly(isoprene-b-acrylic acid) diblock copolymer to confer pH-sensitivity. The liposomes were characterized by DLS, ζ-potential measurements, cryo-TEM, curcumin encapsulation efficacy, loading capacity, and in vitro release as a function of pH. Free and formulated curcumin were further investigated for cytotoxicity, apoptosis-induction and caspase-8, and 9 activation in chemosensitive HL-60 and its resistant sublines HL-60/Dox and HL-60/CDDP. Formulated curcumin was superior cytotoxic and apoptogenic agent vs. the free drug. The mechanistic assay demonstrated that the potent proapoptotic effects of pH-sensitive liposomal curcumin presumably mediated via recruitment of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in both HL-60 and HL-60/CDDP cells.

  10. Venetoclax (ABT-199) Might Act as a Perpetrator in Pharmacokinetic Drug–Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Johanna; Gajek, Thomas; Köhler, Bruno Christian; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2016-01-01

    Venetoclax (ABT-199) represents a specific B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) inhibitor that is currently under development for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. So far, there is no published information on its interaction potential with important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, or its efficacy in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. We therefore scrutinized its drug–drug interaction potential in vitro. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) was quantified by commercial kits. Inhibition of drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)) was evaluated by the use of fluorescent probe substrates. Induction of drug transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The efficacy of venetoclax in MDR cells lines was evaluated with proliferation assays. Venetoclax moderately inhibited P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19, whereas CYP2B6 activity was increased. Venetoclax induced the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A3, and UGT1A9. In contrast, expression of ABCB1 was suppressed, which might revert tumor resistance towards antineoplastic P-gp substrates. P-gp over-expression led to reduced antiproliferative effects of venetoclax. Effective concentrations for inhibition and induction lay in the range of maximum plasma concentrations of venetoclax, indicating that it might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions. PMID:26927160

  11. Drug Rash (Unclassified Drug Eruption) in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Drug Eruption, Unclassified (Pediatric) A parent's guide to condition ... lesions coming together into larger lesions typical of drug rashes (eruptions). Overview A drug eruption, also known ...

  12. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - inhaled corticosteroids; Asthma - long-acting beta-agonists; Asthma - leukotriene modifiers; Asthma - cromolyn; Bronchial asthma-control drugs; Wheezing - control drugs; Reactive airway disease - control drugs

  13. Anti-Neoplastic Cytotoxicity of SN-38-Loaded PCL/Gelatin Electrospun Composite Nanofiber Scaffolds against Human Glioblastoma Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Ni, Shilei; Xia, Tongliang; Yao, Qingyu; Li, Haoyuan; Wang, Benlin; Wang, Jiangang; Li, Xingang; Su, Wandong

    2015-12-01

    Electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)/gelatin (GT) scaffolds were developed to provide controlled release of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin (SN-38). Acetic acid was introduced to improve the miscibility of PCL and GT to produce a homogeneous nanofiber membrane mixture. The effect of SN-38 content in binary mixtures on processability, fiber morphology, water sorption, swelling, and drug release was investigated. Electrospun PCL/GT blend nonwoven fibers showed fiber surface roughness, decreased PCL crystallinity, and increased swelling with increasing drug content of 1, 2, and 4 wt %. Additionally, increasing the SN-38 concentration reduced the degradation rate of the GT. Furthermore, we hypothesize the existence of a drug content saturation point in the monoaxial fiber to explain the different drug release patterns of PG2 compared with those of PG1 and PG4. The matrix also showed good biodegradation and anti-tumor function. Our results demonstrate that SN-38-loaded PCL/GT fibers can be obtained by electrospinning. The SN-38-loaded fibers merit further evaluation as a means to potentially prevent locoregional recurrence following surgical tumor resection. PMID:26505475

  14. Antineoplastic agents 552. Oxidation of combretastatin A-1: Trapping the o-Quinone intermediate considered metabolic product of the corresponding phosphate prodrug

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The very unstable (< 10 min at rt) o-quinone derived from the vicinol diphenol anticancer drug combretastatin A-1 has been obtained by careful oxidation with NaIO4 employing tetrabutylammonium bromide in water/dichloromethane. Immediate reaction with phenylenediamine allowed o-quinone 5 to be trapp...

  15. Nuclear export of proteins and drug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, Joel G; Dawson, Jana; Sullivan, Daniel M

    2012-04-15

    The intracellular location of a protein is crucial to its normal functioning in a cell. Cancer cells utilize the normal processes of nuclear-cytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore complex of a cell to effectively evade anti-neoplastic mechanisms. CRM1-mediated export is increased in various cancers. Proteins that are exported in cancer include tumor-suppressive proteins such as retinoblastoma, APC, p53, BRAC1, FOXO proteins, INI1/hSNF5, galectin-3, Bok, nucleophosmin, RASSF2, Merlin, p21(CIP), p27(KIP1), N-WASP/FAK, estradiol receptor and Tob, drug targets topoisomerase I and IIα and BCR-ABL, and the molecular chaperone protein Hsp90. Here, we review in detail the current processes and known structures involved in the export of a protein through the nuclear pore complex. We also discuss the export receptor molecule CRM1 and its binding to the leucine-rich nuclear export signal of the cargo protein and the formation of a nuclear export trimer with RanGTP. The therapeutic potential of various CRM1 inhibitors will be addressed, including leptomycin B, ratjadone, KOS-2464, and specific small molecule inhibitors of CRM1, N-azolylacrylate analogs, FOXO export inhibitors, valtrate, acetoxychavicol acetate, CBS9106, and SINE inhibitors. We will also discuss examples of how drug resistance may be reversed by targeting the exported proteins topoisomerase IIα, BCR-ABL, and galectin-3. As effective and less toxic CRM1 export inhibitors become available, they may be used as both single agents and in combination with current chemotherapeutic drugs. We believe that the future development of low-toxicity, small-molecule CRM1 inhibitors may provide a new approach to treating cancer.

  16. Antiplatelet Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Jack; Spencer, Frederick A.; Baglin, Trevor P.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of aspirin, dipyridamole, cilostazol, the thienopyridines, and the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists. The relationships among dose, efficacy, and safety are discussed along with a mechanistic overview of results of randomized clinical trials. The article does not provide specific management recommendations but highlights important practical aspects of antiplatelet therapy, including optimal dosing, the variable balance between benefits and risks when antiplatelet therapies are used alone or in combination with other antiplatelet drugs in different clinical settings, and the implications of persistently high platelet reactivity despite such treatment. PMID:22315278

  17. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  20. Drug Plan Coverage Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... works with other insurance Find health & drug plans Drug plan coverage rules Note Call your Medicare drug ... shingles vaccine) when medically necessary to prevent illness. Drugs you get in hospital outpatient settings In most ...

  1. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Share this page: Was this page ... Monitored Drugs | Common Questions | Related Pages What is therapeutic drug monitoring? Therapeutic drug monitoring is the measurement ...

  2. [Drug poisoning].

    PubMed

    Gainza, I; Nogué, S; Martínez Velasco, C; Hoffman, R S; Burillo-Putze, G; Dueñas, A; Gómez, J; Pinillos, M A

    2003-01-01

    A review is made of acute poisoning by opiates and its treatment in the emergency services, bearing in mind the progressive decline in the number of cases presented with the arrival of new forms of their administration, as well as the presence of new addictive drugs that have resulted in a shift in consumption habits. Reference is also made to the way in which the different types of existing substances originated, with the aim of achieving a better understanding of their use and in order to administer the most suitable treatment when poisoning occurs. Cocaine poisoning is discussed, with reference to its clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment. The consumption of illegal drugs in our country has undergone a notable change in recent years, with heroin being relegated and the incorporation of cocaine, amphetamine derivatives such as "ecstasy" (MDMA), "liquid ecstasy" (GHB) and, to a lesser extent, ketamine. A review is made of cannabis and its derivates, from the history of its consumption and the preparations employed to the effects produced in the different bodily systems. A brief explanation is also given of its metabolites and its principal mechanisms of action. Finally, we comment on the effects of LSD and hallucinogenic mushrooms.

  3. ‘One-pot’ synthesis of multifunctional GSH-CdTe quantum dots for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoqin; Tang, Yajun; Cai, Bing; Fan, Hongsong

    2014-06-01

    A novel quantum dots-based multifunctional nanovehicle (DOX-QD-PEG-FA) was designed for targeted drug delivery, fluorescent imaging, tracking, and cancer therapy, in which the GSH-CdTe quantum dots play a key role in imaging and drug delivery. To exert curative effects, the antineoplastic drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) was loaded on the GSH-CdTe quantum dots through a condensation reaction. Meanwhile, a polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell was introduced to wrap the DOX-QD, thus stabilizing the structure and preventing clearance and drug release during systemic circulation. To actively target cancer cells and prevent the nanovehicles from being absorbed by normal cells, the nanoparticles were further decorated with folic acid (FA), allowing them to target HeLa cells that express the FA receptor. The multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA conjugates were simply prepared using the ‘one pot’ method. In vitro study demonstrated that this simple, multifunctional nanovehicle can deliver DOX to the targeted cancer cells and localize the nanoparticles. After reaching the tumor cells, the FA on the DOX-QD-PEG surface allowed folate receptor recognition and increased the drug concentration to realize a higher curative effect. This novel, multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA system shows great potential for tumor imaging, targeting, and therapy.

  4. Drugs and the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet explores various aspects of drug addiction, with a special focus on drugs' effects on the brain. A brief introduction presents information on the rampant use of drugs in society and elaborates the distinction between drug abuse and drug addiction. Next, a detailed analysis of the brain and its functions is given. Drugs target the more…

  5. Anti-Neoplastic and Calcium Modulatory Action of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Dasatinib in C6 Glial Cells: A Therapeutic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Balkhi, Henah M; Gul, Taseen; Haq, Ehtishamul

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are often recognized as highly heterogeneous cancerous phenotype. They are perpetually recurrent, obstinately resistant to treatment and hence almost incurable. Drug development studies to date have revealed only modest effect in attenuating growth of these tumors. The present study was aimed at elucidating the potential of targeting glioma through a novel combination of drugs in comparison to single agent. Here, we show that the combined administration of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester [CAPE] and Dasatinib exerts a strong antitumor action on C6 glioma cells. Combinational treatment inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis, modulates astrocytic phenotype and decreases cell density. Results suggest that combinational therapy inhibits migration and invasiveness, decreases cell survival fraction and hence clonogenic property of C6 cells. The Nitric oxide [NO] levels were significantly reduced by combination treatment at all time points and effect was persistent over the time in comparison to single drug treatment. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy [AAS] analysis of intracellular and extracellular calcium revealed that the treatment with CAPE and Dasatinib strongly modulates the calcium [Ca(2+)] levels. Herein, we demonstrate that treatment of C6 glioma cells with CAPE and Dasatinib significantly decrease the activity of catalase [CAT]. The results in totality suggest that the combinational therapy remarkably reduces the proliferation of glioma cells possibly through different mechanisms, targeting multiple pathways involved in tumor growth, proliferation and development implicating the relevance of using these drugs in combination therapy for effective treatment of glioma. In vitro results suggest that CAPE and Dasatinib cotreatment could be therapeutically exploited for the management of gliomas. PMID:26553160

  6. Methotrexate diethyl ester-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in aqueous solution increased antineoplastic effects in resistant breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Yurgel, Virginia C; Oliveira, Catiuscia P; Begnini, Karine R; Schultze, Eduarda; Thurow, Helena S; Leon, Priscila M M; Dellagostin, Odir A; Campos, Vinicius F; Beck, Ruy C R; Guterres, Silvia S; Collares, Tiago; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Seixas, Fabiana K

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer affecting women. Methotrexate (MTX) is an antimetabolic drug that remains important in the treatment of breast cancer. Its efficacy is compromised by resistance in cancer cells that occurs through a variety of mechanisms. This study evaluated apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest induced by an MTX derivative (MTX diethyl ester [MTX(OEt)2]) and MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in two MTX-resistant breast adenocarcinoma cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. The formulations prepared presented adequate granulometric profile. The treatment responses were evaluated through flow cytometry. Relying on the mechanism of resistance, we observed different responses between cell lines. For MCF-7 cells, MTX(OEt)2 solution and MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules presented significantly higher apoptotic rates than untreated cells and cells incubated with unloaded lipid-core nanocapsules. For MDA-MB-231 cells, MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules were significantly more efficient in inducing apoptosis than the solution of the free drug. S-phase cell cycle arrest was induced only by MTX(OEt)2 solution. The drug nanoencapsulation improved apoptosis induction for the cell line that presents MTX resistance by lack of transport receptors.

  7. Methotrexate diethyl ester-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in aqueous solution increased antineoplastic effects in resistant breast cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Yurgel, Virginia C; Oliveira, Catiuscia P; Begnini, Karine R; Schultze, Eduarda; Thurow, Helena S; Leon, Priscila MM; Dellagostin, Odir A; Campos, Vinicius F; Beck, Ruy CR; Guterres, Silvia S; Collares, Tiago; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Seixas, Fabiana K

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer affecting women. Methotrexate (MTX) is an antimetabolic drug that remains important in the treatment of breast cancer. Its efficacy is compromised by resistance in cancer cells that occurs through a variety of mechanisms. This study evaluated apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest induced by an MTX derivative (MTX diethyl ester [MTX(OEt)2]) and MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in two MTX-resistant breast adenocarcinoma cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. The formulations prepared presented adequate granulometric profile. The treatment responses were evaluated through flow cytometry. Relying on the mechanism of resistance, we observed different responses between cell lines. For MCF-7 cells, MTX(OEt)2 solution and MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules presented significantly higher apoptotic rates than untreated cells and cells incubated with unloaded lipid-core nanocapsules. For MDA-MB-231 cells, MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules were significantly more efficient in inducing apoptosis than the solution of the free drug. S-phase cell cycle arrest was induced only by MTX(OEt)2 solution. The drug nanoencapsulation improved apoptosis induction for the cell line that presents MTX resistance by lack of transport receptors. PMID:24741306

  8. Methotrexate diethyl ester-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in aqueous solution increased antineoplastic effects in resistant breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Yurgel, Virginia C; Oliveira, Catiuscia P; Begnini, Karine R; Schultze, Eduarda; Thurow, Helena S; Leon, Priscila M M; Dellagostin, Odir A; Campos, Vinicius F; Beck, Ruy C R; Guterres, Silvia S; Collares, Tiago; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Seixas, Fabiana K

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer affecting women. Methotrexate (MTX) is an antimetabolic drug that remains important in the treatment of breast cancer. Its efficacy is compromised by resistance in cancer cells that occurs through a variety of mechanisms. This study evaluated apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest induced by an MTX derivative (MTX diethyl ester [MTX(OEt)2]) and MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in two MTX-resistant breast adenocarcinoma cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. The formulations prepared presented adequate granulometric profile. The treatment responses were evaluated through flow cytometry. Relying on the mechanism of resistance, we observed different responses between cell lines. For MCF-7 cells, MTX(OEt)2 solution and MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules presented significantly higher apoptotic rates than untreated cells and cells incubated with unloaded lipid-core nanocapsules. For MDA-MB-231 cells, MTX(OEt)2-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules were significantly more efficient in inducing apoptosis than the solution of the free drug. S-phase cell cycle arrest was induced only by MTX(OEt)2 solution. The drug nanoencapsulation improved apoptosis induction for the cell line that presents MTX resistance by lack of transport receptors. PMID:24741306

  9. NAD(P) biosynthesis enzymes as potential targets for selective drug design.

    PubMed

    Magni, G; Di Stefano, M; Orsomando, G; Raffaelli, N; Ruggieri, S

    2009-01-01

    NAD(P) biosynthetic pathways can be considered a generous source of enzymatic targets for drug development. Key reactions for NAD(P) biosynthesis in all organisms, common to both de novo and salvage routes, are catalyzed by NMN/NaMN adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), NAD synthetase (NADS), and NAD kinase (NADK). These reactions represent a three-step pathway, present in the vast majority of living organisms, which is responsible for the generation of both NAD and NADP cellular pools. The validation of these enzymes as drug targets is based on their essentiality and conservation among a large variety of pathogenic microorganisms, as well as on their differential structural features or their differential metabolic contribution to NAD(P) homeostasis between microbial and human cell types. This review describes the structural and functional properties of eubacterial and human enzymes endowed with NMNAT, NADS, and NADK activities, as well as with nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NamPRT) and nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) activities, highlighting the species-related differences, with emphasis on their relevance for drug design. In addition, since the overall NMNAT activity in humans is accounted by multiple isozymes differentially involved in the metabolic activation of antineoplastic compounds, their individual diagnostic value for early therapy optimization is outlined. The involvement of human NMNAT in neurodegenerative disorders and its role in neuroprotection is also discussed. PMID:19355893

  10. Synergistic Nanomedicine: Passive, Active, and Ultrasound-Triggered Drug Delivery in Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Elkhodiry, Mohamed A; Momah, Christian C; Suwaidi, Shaima R; Gadalla, Dina; Martins, Ana M; Vitor, Rute F; Husseini, Ghaleb A

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarriers are heavily researched as drug delivery vehicles capable of sequestering antineoplastic agents and then releasing their contents at the desired location. The feasibility of using such carriers stems from their ability to produce a multimodel delivery system whereby passive, ligand and triggered targeting can be applied in the fight against cancer. Passive targeting capitalizes on the leaky nature of tumor tissue which allows for the extravasation of particles with a size smaller than 0.5 µm into the tumors. Ligand targeting utilizes the concept of receptor-mediated endocytosis and involves the conjugation of ligands onto the surface of nanoparticles, while triggered targeting involves the use of external and internal stimuli to release the carriers contents upon reaching the diseased location. In this review, micelles and liposomes have been considered due to the promising results they have shown in vivo and in vitro and their potential for advancements into clinical trials. Thus, this review focuses on the most recent advancements in the field of micellar and liposomal drug delivery and considers the synergistic effect of passive- and ligand-targeting strategies, and the use of ultrasound in triggering drug release at the tumor site. PMID:27398430

  11. Cancer stem cells are the cause of drug resistance in multiple myeloma: fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Janz, Siegfried; Zhan, Fenghuang; Tricot, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains a largely incurable, genetically heterogeneous plasma-cell malignancy that contains – just like many other cancers – a small fraction of clonogenic stem cell-like cells that exhibit pronounced self-renewal and differentiation capacities, but also pronounced drug resistance. These MM stem cells (MMSCs) are a controversial but highly significant issue in myeloma research because, in our opinion, they are at the root of the failure of anti-neoplastic chemotherapies to transform myeloma to a manageable chronic disease. Several markers including CD138−, ALDH1+ and SP have been used to identify MMSCs; however, no single marker is reliable for the isolation of MMSC. Nonetheless, it is now known that MMSCs depend on self-renewal and pro-survival pathways, such as AKT, Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Hedgehog, which can be targeted with novel drugs that have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Here, we review the pathways of myeloma “stemness”, the interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment that promote drug resistance, and the obstacles that must be overcome to eradicate MMSCs and make myeloma a curable disease. PMID:26415231

  12. Applying Ligands Profiling Using Multiple Extended Electron Distribution Based Field Templates and Feature Trees Similarity Searching in the Discovery of New Generation of Urea-Based Antineoplastic Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dokla, Eman M.; Mahmoud, Amr H.; Elsayed, Mohamed S. A.; El-Khatib, Ahmed H.; Linscheid, Michael W.; Abouzid, Khaled A.

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a comprehensive computational procedure for the discovery of novel urea-based antineoplastic kinase inhibitors while focusing on diversification of both chemotype and selectivity pattern. It presents a systematic structural analysis of the different binding motifs of urea-based kinase inhibitors and the corresponding configurations of the kinase enzymes. The computational model depends on simultaneous application of two protocols. The first protocol applies multiple consecutive validated virtual screening filters including SMARTS, support vector-machine model (ROC = 0.98), Bayesian model (ROC = 0.86) and structure-based pharmacophore filters based on urea-based kinase inhibitors complexes retrieved from literature. This is followed by hits profiling against different extended electron distribution (XED) based field templates representing different kinase targets. The second protocol enables cancericidal activity verification by using the algorithm of feature trees (Ftrees) similarity searching against NCI database. Being a proof-of-concept study, this combined procedure was experimentally validated by its utilization in developing a novel series of urea-based derivatives of strong anticancer activity. This new series is based on 3-benzylbenzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-one scaffold which has interesting chemical feasibility and wide diversification capability. Antineoplastic activity of this series was assayed in vitro against NCI 60 tumor-cell lines showing very strong inhibition of GI50 as low as 0.9 uM. Additionally, its mechanism was unleashed using KINEX™ protein kinase microarray-based small molecule inhibitor profiling platform and cell cycle analysis showing a peculiar selectivity pattern against Zap70, c-src, Mink1, csk and MeKK2 kinases. Interestingly, it showed activity on syk kinase confirming the recent studies finding of the high activity of diphenyl urea containing compounds against this kinase. Allover, the new series, which is

  13. Clinically significant drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Ament, P W; Bertolino, J G; Liszewski, J L

    2000-03-15

    A large number of drugs are introduced every year, and new interactions between medications are increasingly reported. Consequently, it is no longer practical for physicians to rely on memory alone to avoid potential drug interactions. Multiple drug regimens carry the risk of adverse interactions. Precipitant drugs modify the object drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or actual clinical effect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. Many other drugs, act as precipitants or objects, and a number of drugs act as both. Regularly updated manuals of drug interactions and CD-ROM-formatted programs are useful office references. PMID:10750880

  14. Personality, Drug Preference, Drug Use, and Drug Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V. K.; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967)…

  15. The anti-histaminic cyproheptadine synergizes the antineoplastic activity of bortezomib in mantle cell lymphoma through its effects as a histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Paoluzzi, Luca; Scotto, Luigi; Marchi, Enrica; Seshan, Venkatraman E; O'Connor, Owen A

    2009-09-01

    Cyproheptadine, an inhibitor of the H1 histamine receptors, has recently shown activity in models of leukaemia and myeloma, presumably through inhibition of cyclin-D expression. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by overexpression of cyclin-D1. We investigated the effect of cyproheptadine alone and in combination with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in models of MCL. The combination of these drugs was mathematically synergistic, producing significant reductions in the mitochondrial membrane potential leading to apoptosis. In a severe combined immunodeficient beige mouse model, cyproheptadine plus bortezomib demonstrated a statistically significant advantage compared to either agent alone.

  16. Risks to health professionals from hazardous drugs in Iran: a pilot study of understanding of healthcare team to occupational exposure to cytotoxics

    PubMed Central

    Shahrasbi, Abdol ali; Afshar, Minoo; Shokraneh, Farnaz; Monji, Faezeh; Noroozi, Mahjabin; Ebrahimi-Khojin, Maryam; Madani, Seyed Farzam; Ahadi-Barzoki, Mehdi; Rajabi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing concerns exist regarding the dangers inherent when handling cytotoxics, particularly drugs which are in parenteral formulations. On occasions, nurses and medical doctors have been preparing and administrating these drugs in the open spaces of wards in the absence of suitable personal protective equipment (PPE) and safety cabinets. To explore further into the severity of occupational hazards, we conducted our research in order to evaluate the healthcare’s understanding of occupational exposure to cytotoxics and occurrence of any side effects. A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire was distributed amongst oncology nurses in nine specialized cancer centers in Tehran. The questionnaire was based on most reputable international guidelines, aiming to evaluate the attitude, knowledge and safe practices of nurses' handling cytotoxic drugs. The gathered data and reported side effects were compared between “oncology/hematology” and “non-oncology” participants. The majority of nurses from oncology wards were aware of the potential hazards associated with handling of chemotherapy and reported high levels of compliance with the use of PPE during reconstitution of antineoplastic agents. Almost all nurses reported the use of a safety cabinet during preparation, however only 55 % reported that they have annual medical checkups and 45 % reported having received specialized training. This work was also to evaluate the experimental procedures as well as cleaning solutions used to reduce the level exposure. While the level of knowledge about antineoplastic agents is high among nurses, along with the level of PPE use, medical surveillance and employee training seems to be lagging behind. PMID:26417276

  17. A highly efficient tumor-infiltrating MDSC differentiation system for discovery of anti-neoplastic targets, which circumvents the need for tumor establishment in mice.

    PubMed

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Gato, Maria; Caliendo, Fabio; Kochan, Grazyna; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Van der Jeught, Kevin; Arce, Frederick; Guerrero-Setas, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquin; Santamaria, Enrique; Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2014-09-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) exhibit potent immunosuppressive activities in cancer. MDSCs infiltrate tumors and strongly inhibit cancer-specific cytotoxic T cells. Their mechanism of differentiation and identification of MDSC-specific therapeutic targets are major areas of interest. We have devised a highly efficient and rapid method to produce very large numbers of melanoma-infiltrating MDSCs ex vivo without inducing tumors in mice. These MDSCs were used to study their differentiation, immunosuppressive activities and were compared to non-neoplastic counterparts and conventional dendritic cells using unbiased systems biology approaches. Differentially activated/deactivated pathways caused by cell type differences and by the melanoma tumor environment were identified. MDSCs increased the expression of trafficking receptors to sites of inflammation, endocytosis, changed lipid metabolism, and up-regulated detoxification pathways such as the expression of P450 reductase. These studies uncovered more than 60 potential novel therapeutic targets. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that P450 reductase is the target of pro-drugs such as Paclitaxel, which depletes MDSCs following chemotherapy in animal models of melanoma and in human patients. Conversely, P450 reductase protects MDSCs against the cytotoxic actions of other chemotherapy drugs such as Irinotecan, which is ineffective for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25151659

  18. A highly efficient tumor-infiltrating MDSC differentiation system for discovery of anti-neoplastic targets, which circumvents the need for tumor establishment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Gato, Maria; Caliendo, Fabio; Kochan, Grazyna; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Van der Jeught, Kevin; Arce, Frederick; Guerrero-Setas, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquin; Santamaria, Enrique; Breckpot, Karine; Escors, David

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) exhibit potent immunosuppressive activities in cancer. MDSCs infiltrate tumors and strongly inhibit cancer-specific cytotoxic T cells. Their mechanism of differentiation and identification of MDSC-specific therapeutic targets are major areas of interest. We have devised a highly efficient and rapid method to produce very large numbers of melanoma-infiltrating MDSCs ex vivo without inducing tumors in mice. These MDSCs were used to study their differentiation, immunosuppressive activities and were compared to non-neoplastic counterparts and conventional dendritic cells using unbiased systems biology approaches. Differentially activated/deactivated pathways caused by cell type differences and by the melanoma tumor environment were identified. MDSCs increased the expression of trafficking receptors to sites of inflammation, endocytosis, changed lipid metabolism, and up-regulated detoxification pathways such as the expression of P450 reductase. These studies uncovered more than 60 potential novel therapeutic targets. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that P450 reductase is the target of pro-drugs such as Paclitaxel, which depletes MDSCs following chemotherapy in animal models of melanoma and in human patients. Conversely, P450 reductase protects MDSCs against the cytotoxic actions of other chemotherapy drugs such as Irinotecan, which is ineffective for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25151659

  19. 99 Films on Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, David O., Ed.

    This catalog describes and evaluates 16-millimeter films about various aspects of drug use. Among the subjects covered by the 99 films are the composition and effects of different drugs, reasons why people use drugs, life in the drug culture, the problem of law enforcement, and various means of dealing with drug users. Each film is synopsized. Two…

  20. Drosophila modifier screens to identify novel neuropsychiatric drugs including aminergic agents for the possible treatment of Parkinson’s disease and depression

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Terrell, Ashley; Lam, Hoa A.; Djapri, Christine; Jang, Jennifer; Hadi, Richard; Roberts, Logan; Shahi, Varun; Chou, Man-Ting; Biedermann, Traci; Huang, Brian; Lawless, George M.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the presynaptic function of aminergic cells may provide neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease as well as treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression. Model genetic organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster may enhance the detection of new drugs via modifier or “enhancer/suppressor” screens, but this technique has not been applied to processes relevant to psychiatry. To identify new aminergic drugs in vivo, we used a mutation in the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (dVMAT) as a sensitized genetic background, and performed a suppressor screen. We fed dVMAT mutant larvae ~1000 known drugs and quantitated rescue (suppression) of an amine-dependent locomotor deficit in the larva. To determine which drugs might specifically potentiate neurotransmitter release, we performed an additional secondary screen for drugs that require presynaptic amine storage to rescue larval locomotion. Using additional larval locomotion and adult fertility assays, we validated that at least one compound previously used clinically as an antineoplastic agent potentiates the presynaptic function of aminergic circuits. We suggest that structurally similar agents might be used to development treatments for Parkinson’s disease, depression and ADHD and that modifier screens in Drosophila provide a new strategy to screen for neuropsychiatric drugs. More generally, our findings demonstrate the power of physiologically based screens for identifying bioactive agents for select neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23229049

  1. Sustained Accumulation of Microtubule-Binding Chemotherapy Drugs in the Peripheral Nervous System: Correlations with Time Course and Neurotoxic Severity.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Krystyna M; Vornov, James J; Wu, Ying; Nomoto, Kenichi; Littlefield, Bruce A; DesJardins, Christopher; Yu, Yanke; Lai, George; Reyderman, Larisa; Wong, Nancy; Slusher, Barbara S

    2016-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting side effect of many antineoplastic agents, but the mechanisms underlying the toxicities are unclear. At their MTDs, the microtubule-binding drugs paclitaxel and ixabepilone induce more severe neuropathy in mice relative to eribulin mesylate, paralleling their toxicity profiles in clinic. We hypothesized that the severity of their neurotoxic effects might be explained by the levels at which they accumulate in the peripheral nervous system. To test this hypothesis, we compared their pharmacokinetics and distribution in peripheral nerve tissue. After administration of a single intravenous dose, each drug was rapidly cleared from plasma but all persisted in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and sciatic nerve (SN) for up to 72 hours. Focusing on paclitaxel and eribulin, we performed a 2-week MTD-dosing regimen, followed by a determination of drug pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and multiple functional measures of peripheral nerve toxicity for 4 weeks. Consistent with the acute dosing study, both drugs persisted in peripheral nervous tissues for weeks, in contrast to their rapid clearance from plasma. Notably, although eribulin exhibited greater DRG and SN penetration than paclitaxel, the neurotoxicity observed functionally was consistently more severe with paclitaxel. Overall, our results argue that sustained exposure of microtubule-binding chemotherapeutic agents in peripheral nerve tissues cannot by itself account for their associated neurotoxicity. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3332-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197173

  2. [Ilicit drugs frequently used by drug addicts].

    PubMed

    Cirriez, J P

    2015-03-01

    Drugs stimulate the brain causing mental and physical effects. The effects of drugs can be stimulating, narcotic or mind-altering. This article briefly discusses some commonly used illicit drugs, namely heroin, cocaine, cannabis, ecstasy, amphetamines, LSD, psilocybin mushrooms and poppers. PMID:26571792

  3. Attitudes towards drug legalization among drug users.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Roberto A; Richard, Alan J

    2002-01-01

    Research shows that support for legalization of drugs varies significantly among different sociodemographic and political groups. Yet there is little research examining the degree of support for legalization of drugs among drug users. This paper examines how frequency and type of drug use affect the support for legalization of drugs after adjusting for the effects of political affiliation and sociodemographic characteristics. A sample of 188 drug users and non-drug users were asked whether they would support the legalization of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Respondents reported their use of marijuana, crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines during the previous 30 days. Support for legalization of drugs was analyzed by estimating three separate logistic regressions. The results showed that the support for the legalization of drugs depended on the definition of "drug user" and the type of drug. In general, however, the results showed that marijuana users were more likely to support legalizing marijuana, but they were less likely to support the legalization of cocaine and heroin. On the other hand, users of crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines were more likely to support legalizing all drugs including cocaine and heroin.

  4. Drug Use by Students of Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Ronald; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of differences in the use of certain psychoactive drugs among students who enrolled for an elective drug abuse course and students not enrolled, or who have not previously taken a drug abuse course. (Author)

  5. Discontinued drugs in 2008: cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Song; Xiang, Bing-Ren

    2009-07-01

    This perspective is part of an annual series of papers discussing drugs dropped from clinical development in the previous year. Specifically, this paper focuses on the 16 cardiovascular drugs discontinued in 2008. Information for this perspective was derived from a search of the Pharmaprojects database for drugs discontinued after reaching Phase I-III clinical trials. PMID:19548849

  6. Access to Investigational Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... drug if the supply is limited and the demand is high. Are all investigational drugs available through ... be limited in part by drug supply, patient demand, or other factors. What is NCI’s role in ...

  7. Drug Development Process

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approvals The Drug Development Process The Drug Development Process Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... public. More Information More in The Drug Development Process Step 1: Discovery and Development Step 2: Preclinical ...

  8. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Leukemia This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... not listed here. Drugs Approved for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Arranon (Nelarabine) Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi ...

  9. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  10. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  11. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  12. ORAL ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS TO CARDIOVASCULAR DRUGS.

    PubMed

    Torpet, Lis Andersen; Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, Jesper; Nauntofte, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    A great many cardiovascular drugs (CVDs) have the potential to induce adverse reactions in the mouth. The prevalence of such reactions is not known, however, since many are asymptomatic and therefore are believed to go unreported. As more drugs are marketed and the population includes an increasing number of elderly, the number of drug prescriptions is also expected to increase. Accordingly, it can be predicted that the occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), including the oral ones (ODRs), will continue to increase. ODRs affect the oral mucous membrane, saliva production, and taste. The pathogenesis of these reactions, especially the mucosal ones, is largely unknown and appears to involve complex interactions among the drug in question, other medications, the patient's underlying disease, genetics, and life-style factors. Along this line, there is a growing interest in the association between pharmacogenetic polymorphism and ADRs. Research focusing on polymorphism of the cytochrome P450 system (CYPs) has become increasingly important and has highlighted the intra- and inter-individual responses to drug exposure. This system has recently been suggested to be an underlying candidate regarding the pathogenesis of ADRs in the oral mucous membrane. This review focuses on those CVDs reported to induce ODRs. In addition, it will provide data on specific drugs or drug classes, and outline and discuss recent research on possible mechanisms linking ADRs to drug metabolism patterns. Abbreviations used will be as follows: ACEI, ACE inhibitor; ADR, adverse drug reaction; ANA, antinuclear antigen; ARB, angiotensin II receptor blocker; BAB, beta-adrenergic blocker; CCB, calcium-channel blocker; CDR, cutaneous drug reaction; CVD, cardiovascular drug; CYP, cytochrome P450 enzyme; EM, erythema multiforme; FDE, fixed drug eruption; I, inhibitor of CYP isoform activity; HMG-CoA, hydroxymethyl-glutaryl coenzyme A; NAT, N-acetyltransferase; ODR, oral drug reaction; RDM, reactive

  13. [Drug-induced dementia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taro; Akishita, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Many drugs have been reported to induce not only delirium but also cognitive impairment. Some types of drugs are reported to induce dementia, and prolonged hypotension or hypoglycemia induced by overuse of antihypertensive drugs or oral antidiabetic drugs could result in dementia. Recently, taking multiple drugs with anticholinergic activity are reported to cause cognitive decline and anticholinergic burden should be avoided especially in patients with dementia. Drug-induced dementia can be prevented by avoiding polypharmacy and adhering to the saying 'start low and go slow' . Early diagnosis of drug-induced dementia and withdrawal of the offending drug is essential to improve cognitive function. PMID:27025096

  14. Nanoencapsulation for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Avnesh; Singla, Rubbel; Guliani, Anika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoencapsulation of drug/small molecules in nanocarriers (NCs) is a very promising approach for development of nanomedicine. Modern drug encapsulation methods allow efficient loading of drug molecules inside the NCs thereby reducing systemic toxicity associated with drugs. Targeting of NCs can enhance the accumulation of nanonencapsulated drug at the diseased site. This article focussed on the synthesis methods, drug loading, drug release mechanism and cellular response of nanoencapsulated drugs on liposomes, micelles, carbon nanotubes, dendrimers, and magnetic NCs. Also the uses of these various NCs have been highlighted in the field of nanotechnology. PMID:26417260

  15. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  16. Identification of drugs that restore primary cilium expression in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Niamat Ali; Willemarck, Nicolas; Talebi, Ali; Marchand, Arnaud; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Dehairs, Jonas; Rueda-Rincon, Natalia; Daniels, Veerle W; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Thimiri Govinda Raj, Deepak Balaji; Vanderhoydonc, Frank; Munck, Sebastian; Chaltin, Patrick; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2016-03-01

    The development of cancer is often accompanied by a loss of the primary cilium, a microtubule-based cellular protrusion that functions as a cellular antenna and that puts a break on cell proliferation. Hence, restoration of the primary cilium in cancer cells may represent a novel promising approach to attenuate tumor growth. Using a high content analysis-based approach we screened a library of clinically evaluated compounds and marketed drugs for their ability to restore primary cilium expression in pancreatic ductal cancer cells. A diverse set of 118 compounds stimulating cilium expression was identified. These included glucocorticoids, fibrates and other nuclear receptor modulators, neurotransmitter regulators, ion channel modulators, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitors, antibacterial compounds, protein inhibitors, microtubule modulators, and COX inhibitors. Certain compounds also dramatically affected the length of the cilium. For a selection of compounds (Clofibrate, Gefitinib, Sirolimus, Imexon and Dexamethasone) their ability to restore ciliogenesis was confirmed in a panel of human cancer cell line models representing different cancer types (pancreas, lung, kidney, breast). Most compounds attenuated cell proliferation, at least in part through induction of the primary cilium, as demonstrated by cilium removal using chloral hydrate. These findings reveal that several commonly used drugs restore ciliogenesis in cancer cells, and warrant further investigation of their antineoplastic properties. PMID:26862738

  17. Identification of drugs that restore primary cilium expression in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Niamat Ali; Willemarck, Nicolas; Talebi, Ali; Marchand, Arnaud; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Dehairs, Jonas; Rueda-Rincon, Natalia; Daniels, Veerle W.; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Raj, Deepak Balaji Thimiri Govinda; Vanderhoydonc, Frank; Munck, Sebastian; Chaltin, Patrick; Swinnen, Johannes V.

    2016-01-01

    The development of cancer is often accompanied by a loss of the primary cilium, a microtubule-based cellular protrusion that functions as a cellular antenna and that puts a break on cell proliferation. Hence, restoration of the primary cilium in cancer cells may represent a novel promising approach to attenuate tumor growth. Using a high content analysis-based approach we screened a library of clinically evaluated compounds and marketed drugs for their ability to restore primary cilium expression in pancreatic ductal cancer cells. A diverse set of 118 compounds stimulating cilium expression was identified. These included glucocorticoids, fibrates and other nuclear receptor modulators, neurotransmitter regulators, ion channel modulators, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitors, antibacterial compounds, protein inhibitors, microtubule modulators, and COX inhibitors. Certain compounds also dramatically affected the length of the cilium. For a selection of compounds (Clofibrate, Gefitinib, Sirolimus, Imexon and Dexamethasone) their ability to restore ciliogenesis was confirmed in a panel of human cancer cell line models representing different cancer types (pancreas, lung, kidney, breast). Most compounds attenuated cell proliferation, at least in part through induction of the primary cilium, as demonstrated by cilium removal using chloral hydrate. These findings reveal that several commonly used drugs restore ciliogenesis in cancer cells, and warrant further investigation of their antineoplastic properties. PMID:26862738

  18. Roles of dextrans on improving lymphatic drainage for liposomal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linglin; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Min; Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Chenyu; Gu, Bing; Liu, Yu; Wei, Gang; Zhong, Gaoren; Lu, Weiyue

    2010-04-01

    Our aim was to develop a novel liposomal drug delivery system containing dextrans to reduce undesirable retention of antineoplastic agents and thus alleviate local tissue damage. At the cell level, diethylaminoethyl-dextran (DEAE-Dx) showed the strongest inhibiting effect on liposome uptake by macrophages among tested dextrans. The distribution of radiolabeled liposomes mixed with dextrans in injection site and draining lymph node was investigated in rats after subcutaneous injection. DEAE-Dx substantially reduced the undesired local retention and promoted the draining of liposome into lymphatics, which was further confirmed by confocal microscopy images revealing the substantial prevention of rhodamine B-labelled liposome sequestration by macrophages in normal lymph node in rats. Pharmacokinetic data indicated the accelerated drainage of liposome through lymphatics back to systemic circulation by mixing with DEAE-Dx. In the toxicological study in rabbits, DEAE-Dx alleviated the local tissue damage caused by liposomal doxorubicin. In conclusion, dextrans, particularly DEAE-Dx, could efficiently enhanced liposomes drainage into lymphatics, which proves themselves as promising adjuvants for lymphatic-targeted liposomal drug delivery system.

  19. COX-Independent Mechanisms of Cancer Chemoprevention by Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gurpinar, Evrim; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is responsible for the chemopreventive efficacy of these agents. However, the precise mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their antiproliferative effects are still a matter of debate. Numerous other studies have shown that NSAIDs can act through COX-independent mechanisms. This review provides a detailed description of the major COX-independent molecular targets of NSAIDs and discusses how these targets may be involved in their anticancer effects. Toxicities resulting from COX inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis preclude the long-term use of NSAIDs for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, chemopreventive efficacy is incomplete and treatment often leads to the development of resistance. Identification of alternative NSAID targets and elucidation of the biochemical processes by which they inhibit tumor growth could lead to the development of safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:23875171

  20. Regulation of Multi-drug Resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells is TRPC6/Calcium Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Liang; Liang, Chao; Chen, Enjiang; Chen, Wei; Liang, Feng; Zhi, Xiao; Wei, Tao; Xue, Fei; Li, Guogang; Yang, Qi; Gong, Weihua; Feng, Xinhua; Bai, Xueli; Liang, Tingbo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is notoriously refractory to chemotherapy because of its tendency to develop multi-drug resistance (MDR), whose various underlying mechanisms make it difficult to target. The calcium signalling pathway is associated with many cellular biological activities, and is also a critical player in cancer. However, its role in modulating tumour MDR remains unclear. In this study, stimulation by doxorubicin, hypoxia and ionizing radiation was used to induce MDR in HCC cells. A sustained aggregation of intracellular calcium was observed upon these stimuli, while inhibition of calcium signalling enhanced the cells’ sensitivity to various drugs by attenuating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), Hif1-α signalling and DNA damage repair. The effect of calcium signalling is mediated via transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a subtype of calcium-permeable channel. An in vivo xenograft model of HCC further confirmed that inhibiting TRPC6 enhanced the efficacy of doxorubicin. In addition, we deduced that STAT3 activation is a downstream signalling pathway in MDR. Collectively, this study demonstrated that the various mechanisms regulating MDR in HCC cells are calcium dependent through the TRPC6/calcium/STAT3 pathway. We propose that targeting TRPC6 in HCC may be a novel antineoplastic strategy, especially combined with chemotherapy. PMID:27011063

  1. The complex metabolic network gearing the G1/S transition in leukemic stem cells: Hints to a rational use of antineoplastic agents

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Massimo; Mannini, Antonella; Mini, Enrico; Rovida, Elisabetta; Dello Sbarba, Persio; Olivotto, Massimo; Marzi, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    We defined the stem cell profile of K562 line, demonstrating the expression of the Embryonic Transcription Factors Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and Nanog. This profile was associated with a high vulnerability to the physiological oxidizable substrate pyruvate. remarkably, this substrate was shown to be innocuous, even at the highest doses, to normal differentiated cells. This vulnerability is based on a complex metabolic trim centered on the cellular redox state expressed by the NADP/NADPH ratio geared by the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Flow cytometry revealed that the inhibition of this chain by antimycin A produced cell accumulation in the S phase of cell cycle and apoptosis. This block negatively interferes with the aerobic synthesis of purines, without affecting the anaerobic synthesis of pyrimidines. This imbalance was reproduced by using two antifolate agents, LY309887 and raltitrexed (TDX), inhibitors of purine or pyrimidine synthesis, respectively. All this revealed the apparent paradox that low doses of TDX stimulated, instead of inhibiting, leukemia cell growth. This paradox might have significant impact on therapy with regard to the effects of TDX during the intervals of administration, when the drug concentrations become so low as to promote maintenance of dormant cancer cells in hypoxic tissue niches. PMID:26396171

  2. Fighting the Drug War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Journal of State Government, 1990

    1990-01-01

    All nine articles in this periodical issue focus on the theme of the war against illegal drug use, approaching the topic from a variety of perspectives. The articles are: "The Drug War: Meeting the Challenge" (Stanley E. Morris); "Ways to Fight Drug Abuse" (Bruce A. Feldman); "Treatment Key to Fighting Drugs" (Stan Lundine); "Patience and…

  3. What Are Drugs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association.

    This guide for parents presents, in Laotian and English, information about drugs, drug use and abuse, and treatment for drug use. Most of the information is presented in question and answer form to give parents the information they need to answer their children's questions and help prevent drug use. The following sections are included: (1)…

  4. Drugs and Young People

    MedlinePlus

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. It affects almost every community and family in some way. Drug abuse in children and teenagers may pose a ... of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs ...

  5. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine. PMID:26341013

  6. In vitro and in vivo studies of the antineoplastic activity of copper (II) compounds against human leukemia THP-1 and murine melanoma B16-F10 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Borges, Layla J H; Bull, Érika S; Fernandes, Christiane; Horn, Adolfo; Azeredo, Nathalia F; Resende, Jackson A L C; Freitas, William R; Carvalho, Eulógio C Q; Lemos, Luciana S; Jerdy, Hassan; Kanashiro, Milton M

    2016-11-10

    We investigated the antineoplastic activities of a previously reported copper (II) coordination compound, [Cu(BMPA)Cl2]CH3OH (1), and a new compound, [Cu(HBPA)Cl2]H2O (2), where BMPA is bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amine and HBPA is (2-hydroxybenzyl)(2-pyridylmethyl)amine, using various cellular models of human leukemia (THP-1, U937, HL60, Molt-4, JURKAT) and human colon cancer (COLO 205), as well as a murine highly metastatic melanoma (B16-F10) cell line. Compound (2) was characterized using several physical and chemical techniques, including X-ray diffraction studies. The IC50 values of the copper coordination complexes in the human leukemia cell lines ranged from 87.63 ± 1.02 to ≥400 μM at high cell concentrations and from 19.17 ± 1.06 to 97.67 ± 1.23 μM at low cell concentrations. Both compounds induced cell death, which was determined by cell cycle analyses and phosphatidylserine exposure studies. THP-1 cells released cytochrome c to the cytoplasm 12 h after treatment with 400 μM of compound (2). To evaluate the apoptosis pathway induced by compound (2), we measured the activities of initiator caspases 8 and 9 and executioner caspases 3 and 6. The results were suggestive of the activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways. To investigate the activities of the compounds in vivo, we selected two sensitive cell lines from leukemia (THP-1) and solid tumor (B16-F10) lineages. BALB/c nude bearing THP-1 tumors treated with 12 mg·kg(-1) of compound (2) showed a 92.4% inhibition of tumor growth compared with the control group.

  7. Antineoplastic effects of α-santalol on estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells through cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Santha, Sreevidya; Bommareddy, Ajay; Rule, Brittny; Guillermo, Ruth; Kaushik, Radhey S; Young, Alan; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer efficacy and the mechanism of action of α-santalol, a terpenoid isolated from sandalwood oil, were investigated in human breast cancer cells by using p53 wild-type MCF-7 cells as a model for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and p53 mutated MDA-MB-231 cells as a model for ER-negative breast cancer. α-Santalol inhibited cell viability and proliferation in a concentration and time-dependent manner in both cells regardless of their ER and/or p53 status. However, α-santalol produced relatively less toxic effect on normal breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A. It induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Cell cycle arrest induced by α-santalol was associated with changes in the protein levels of BRCA1, Chk1, G2/M regulatory cyclins, Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), Cell division cycle 25B (Cdc25B), Cdc25C and Ser-216 phosphorylation of Cdc25C. An up-regulated expression of CDK inhibitor p21 along with suppressed expression of mutated p53 was observed in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with α-santalol. On the contrary, α-santalol did not increase the expression of wild-type p53 and p21 in MCF-7 cells. In addition, α-santalol induced extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis in both cells with activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9. It led to the activation of the executioner caspase-6 and caspase-7 in α-santalol-treated MCF-7 cells and caspase-3 and caspase-6 in MDA-MB-231 cells along with strong cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in both cells. Taken together, this study for the first time identified strong anti-neoplastic effects of α-santalol against both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancer cells.

  8. Antineoplastic Effects of α-Santalol on Estrogen Receptor-Positive and Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer Cells through Cell Cycle Arrest at G2/M Phase and Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Santha, Sreevidya; Bommareddy, Ajay; Rule, Brittny; Guillermo, Ruth; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Young, Alan; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer efficacy and the mechanism of action of α-santalol, a terpenoid isolated from sandalwood oil, were investigated in human breast cancer cells by using p53 wild-type MCF-7 cells as a model for estrogen receptor(ER)-positive and p53 mutated MDA-MB-231 cells as a model for ER-negative breast cancer. α-Santalol inhibited cell viability and proliferation in a concentration and time-dependent manner in both cells regardless of their ER and/or p53 status. However, α-santalol produced relatively less toxic effect on normal breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A. It induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Cell cycle arrest induced by α-santalol was associated with changes in the protein levels of BRCA1, Chk1, G2/M regulatory cyclins, Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), Cell division cycle 25B (Cdc25B), Cdc25C and Ser-216 phosphorylation of Cdc25C. An up-regulated expression of CDK inhibitor p21 along with suppressed expression of mutated p53 was observed in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with α-santalol. On the contrary, α-santalol did not increase the expression of wild-type p53 and p21 in MCF-7 cells. In addition, α-santalol induced extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis in both cells with activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9. It led to the activation of the executioner caspase-6 and caspase-7 in α-santalol-treated MCF-7 cells and caspase-3 and caspase-6 in MDA-MB-231 cells along with strong cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in both cells. Taken together, this study for the first time identified strong anti-neoplastic effects of α-santalol against both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:23451128

  9. Revisiting the structure of the anti-neoplastic glucans of Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin. Structural analysis of the extracellular and boiling water extract-derived glucans of the vaccine substrains.

    PubMed

    Dinadayala, Premkumar; Lemassu, Anne; Granovski, Pierre; Cérantola, Stéphane; Winter, Nathalie; Daffé, Mamadou

    2004-03-26

    The attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), used worldwide to prevent tuberculosis and leprosy, is also clinically used as an immunotherapeutic agent against superficial bladder cancer. An anti-tumor polysaccharide has been isolated from the boiling water extract of the Tice substrain of BCG and tentatively characterized as consisting primarily of repeating units of 6-linked-glucosyl residues. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacterial species produce a glycogen-like alpha-glucan composed of repeating units of 4-linked glucosyl residues substituted at some 6 positions by short oligoglucosyl units that also exhibits an anti-tumor activity. Therefore, the impression prevails that mycobacteria synthesize different types of anti-neoplastic glucans or, alternatively, the BCG substrains are singular in producing a unique type of glucan that may confer to them their immunotherapeutic property. The present study addresses this question through the comparative analysis of alpha-glucans purified from the extracellular materials and boiling water extracts of three vaccine substrains. The polysaccharides were purified, and their structural features were established by mono- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the enzymatic and chemical degradation products of the purified compounds. The glucans isolated by the two methods from the three substrains of BCG were shown to exhibit identical structural features shared with the glycogen-like alpha-glucan of M. tuberculosis and other mycobacteria. Incidentally, we observed an occasional release of dextrans from Sephadex columns that may explain the reported occurrence of 6-substituted alpha-glucans in mycobacteria.

  10. Synthesis of Gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] Utilizing a UV-Photoactivated Gemcitabine Intermediate: Cytotoxic Anti-Neoplastic Activity against Chemotherapeutic-Resistant Mammary Adenocarcinoma SKBr-3

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Cody P.; Jones, Toni; Bear, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a pyrimidine nucleoside analog that becomes triphosphorylated intracellularly where it competitively inhibits cytidine incorporation into DNA strands. Another mechanism-of-action of gemcitabine (diphosphorylated form) involves irreversible inhibition of the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase thereby preventing deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Functioning as a potent chemotherapeutic gemcitabine promote decreases in neoplastic cell proliferation and apoptosis which is frequently found to be effective for the treatment of several leukemias and a wide spectrum of carcinomas. A brief plasma half-life in part due to rapid deamination and chemotherapeutic-resistance restricts the utility of gemcit-abine in clinical oncology. Selective “targeted” delivery of gemcitabine represents a potential molecular strategy for simultaneously prolonging its plasma half-life and minimizing innocient tissues and organ systems exposure to chemotherapy. The molecular design and an organic chemistry based synthesis reaction is described that initially generates a UV-photoactivated gemcitabine intermediate. In a subsequent phase of the synthesis method the UV-photoactivated gemcitabine intermediate is covalently bonded to a monoclonal immunoglobulin yielding an end-product in the form of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu]. Analysis by SDS-PAGE/chemiluminescent auto-radiography did not detect evidence of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] polymerization or degradative fragmentation while cell-ELISA demonstrated retained binding-avidity for HER2/neu trophic membrane receptor complexes highly over-expressed by chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3). Compared to chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3), the covalent immunochemotherapeutic, gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] is anticipated to exert greater levels of cytotoxic anti-neoplastic potency against other neoplastic cell types like pancreatic carcinoma, small-cell lung

  11. Nanotransporters for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lühmann, Tessa; Meinel, Lorenz

    2016-06-01

    Soluble nanotransporters for drugs can be profiled for targeted delivery particularly to maximize the efficacy of highly potent drugs while minimizing off target effects. This article outlines on the use of biological carrier molecules with a focus on albumin, various drug linkers for site specific release of the drug payload from the nanotransporter and strategies to combine these in various ways to meet different drug delivery demands particularly the optimization of the payload per nanotransporter.

  12. Magneto-electric nanoparticles to enable field-controlled high-specificity drug delivery to eradicate ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guduru, Rakesh; Liang, Ping; Runowicz, Carolyn; Nair, Madhavan; Atluri, Venkata; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology capable of high-specificity targeted delivery of anti-neoplastic drugs would be a significant breakthrough in Cancer in general and Ovarian Cancer in particular. We addressed this challenge through a new physical concept that exploited (i) the difference in the membrane electric properties between the tumor and healthy cells and (ii) the capability of magneto-electric nanoparticles (MENs) to serve as nanosized converters of remote magnetic field energy into the MENs' intrinsic electric field energy. This capability allows to remotely control the membrane electric fields and consequently trigger high-specificity drug uptake through creation of localized nano-electroporation sites. In in-vitro studies on human ovarian carcinoma cell (SKOV-3) and healthy cell (HOMEC) lines, we applied a 30-Oe d.c. field to trigger high-specificity uptake of paclitaxel loaded on 30-nm CoFe₂O₄ @BaTiO₃ MENs. The drug penetrated through the membrane and completely eradicated the tumor within 24 hours without affecting the normal cells. PMID:24129652

  13. Magneto-electric Nanoparticles to Enable Field-controlled High-Specificity Drug Delivery to Eradicate Ovarian Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guduru, Rakesh; Liang, Ping; Runowicz, Carolyn; Nair, Madhavan; Atluri, Venkata; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2013-10-01

    The nanotechnology capable of high-specificity targeted delivery of anti-neoplastic drugs would be a significant breakthrough in Cancer in general and Ovarian Cancer in particular. We addressed this challenge through a new physical concept that exploited (i) the difference in the membrane electric properties between the tumor and healthy cells and (ii) the capability of magneto-electric nanoparticles (MENs) to serve as nanosized converters of remote magnetic field energy into the MENs' intrinsic electric field energy. This capability allows to remotely control the membrane electric fields and consequently trigger high-specificity drug uptake through creation of localized nano-electroporation sites. In in-vitro studies on human ovarian carcinoma cell (SKOV-3) and healthy cell (HOMEC) lines, we applied a 30-Oe d.c. field to trigger high-specificity uptake of paclitaxel loaded on 30-nm CoFe2O4@BaTiO3 MENs. The drug penetrated through the membrane and completely eradicated the tumor within 24 hours without affecting the normal cells.

  14. Food-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen; Khan, Arshad Yar

    2011-01-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least food-drug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:22043389

  15. Herb-drug, food-drug, nutrient-drug, and drug-drug interactions: mechanisms involved and their medical implications.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Janina Maria

    2002-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and iatrogenic diseases have been identified as significant factors responsible for patient morbidity and mortality. Significant studies on drug metabolism in humans have been published during the last few years, offering a deeper comprehension of the mechanisms underlying adverse drug reactions and interactions. More understanding of these mechanisms, and of recent advances in laboratory technology, can help to evaluate potential drug interactions when drugs are prescribed concurrently. Increasing knowledge of interindividual variation in drug breakdown capacity and recent findings concerning the influence of environment, diet, nutrients, and herbal products can be used to reduce ADRs and iatrogenic diseases. Reviewed data suggest that drug treatment should be increasingly custom tailored to suit the individual patient and that appropriately co-prescribed diet and herbal remedies, could increase drug efficacy and lessen drug toxicity. This review focuses mainly on recently published research material. The cytochrome p450 enzymes, their role in metabolism, and their mechanisms of action are reviewed, and their role in drug-drug interactions are discussed. Drug-food and drug-herb interactions have garnered attention. Interdisciplinary communication among medical herbalists, medical doctors, and dietetic experts needs to be improved and encouraged. Internet resources for obtaining current information regarding drug-drug, drug-herb, and drug-nutrient interactions are provided. PMID:12165187

  16. Do drug offences matter?

    PubMed

    Gordon, A M

    1978-07-15

    Drug offences in addicts are often thought to indicate little more than continued dependency. In a four-year follow-up study of 60 men attending a drug clinic a history of repeated convictions for drug offences was found to be strongly related to patterns of delinquency. The following variables were associated with a history of repeated drug offences: a higher conviction rate for "non-drug" offences; younger age at first conviction; conviction preceding drug use; convictions for offences of sex and violence; longer prison sentences; and regular narcotic use and continued dependency at follow-up. Receiving a clinic prescription was not associated with a lower incidence of drug offences. Repeated drug offences identified a subgroup of drug users who were characterised by extensive sociopathic behaviour. Such offences should not be dismissed as an unavoidable, unimportant part of addiction. PMID:678840

  17. Drugs and drug administration in extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Thomas E A H; Schraut, Bettina; Rieke, Burkhard; Hemmerling, Arnica-Verena; Schöffl, Volker; Steffgen, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    Emergency medicine must often cope with harsh climates far below freezing point or high temperatures, and sometimes, an alternative to the normal route of drug administration is necessary. Most of this information is not yet published. Therefore, we summarized the information about these topics for most drugs used in medical emergencies by combining literature research with extensive personal communications with the heads of the drug safety departments of the companies producing these drugs. Most drugs can be used after temperature stress of limited duration. Nevertheless, we recommend replacing them at least once per year or after extreme heat. Knowledge about drugs used in extreme environments will be of increasing importance for medical personnel because in an increasingly mobile society, more and more people, and especially elderly -often with individual medical risks-travel to extreme regions such as tropical or arctic regions or to high altitude, and some of them need medical care during these activities. Because of this increasing need to use drugs in harsh climates (tourism, expeditions, peace corps, military, etc) the actual International Congress of Harmonization recommendations should be added with stability tests at +50 degrees C, freezing and oscillating temperatures, and UV exposure to simulate the storage of the drugs at "outdoor conditions." PMID:16412107

  18. Discontinued drugs in 2010: cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-ping; Zhang, Xu-song; Xiang, Bing-ren

    2011-10-01

    This perspective is a paper discussing drugs dropped from clinical development in the previous years. Specifically, this paper focuses on 16 cardiovascular drugs discontinued in 2010 after reaching Phase I - III clinical trials. Information for this perspective is mainly derived from a search of Pharmaprojects. PMID:21870899

  19. Studies of Electronic Conduction in Some Small Gallium Arsenic Based.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, Geoffrey

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis describes experimental investigations of the physics involved with low temperature electronic conduction in three different semiconductor systems. The research relies upon technological advances in fabrication of such semiconductor samples. The first work deals with the effects of quantum interference of electrons in some submicron size, heavily doped Gallium Arsenide wire samples. The interesting effect of aperiodic fluctuations in the magnetoresistance of these samples is studied, making use of recently formulated theory on the subject, and with experimental data taken over the magnetic field range 0 to 10 tesla. The results verify the connection between the mean amplitude of the fluctuations and the field correlation period, in terms of the correlation function introduced in the theory. The second work is on the impurity-assisted tunnelling conduction in a magnetic field of three thin rm n^{+}/n^{-}/n^ {+} GaAs sandwich layer structures. The conduction of the system is shown to be determined by impurities lying in the centre of the middle layer. This allows the connection to be made between the conductivity of the system in a magnetic field, and the field-dependent shape of the donor electron wavefunction. The relative variation in resistance with angle to an applied magnetic field was measured, and is shown to be in agreement with predictions based on calculations of the shape of a normalised hydrogenic state wavefunction in high magnetic fields. The third work concerns the tunnelling conduction of a symmetrical GaAs/(AlGa)As/GaAs hetero-barrier system. The current-voltage characteristics at low temperature are fully modelled for applied voltages up to 180mV, using conventional theory of tunnelling and a position-dependent effective mass in the barrier. Low current oscillations in the Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling regime, corresponding to quantum reflection at the collector/barrier interface, are observed and compared with theory. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  20. Adverse drug reactions in veterinary patients associated with drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L

    2013-09-01

    For many drugs used in veterinary practice, plasma and tissue concentrations are highly dependent on the activity of drug transporters. This article describes how functional changes in drug transporters, whether mediated by genetic variability or drug-drug interactions, affect drug disposition and, ultimately, drug safety and efficacy in veterinary patients. A greater understanding of species, breed, and individual (genetic) differences in drug transporter function, as well as drug-drug interactions involving drug transporters, will result in improved strategies for drug design and will enable veterinarians to incorporate individualized medicine in their practices.

  1. Adverse drug reactions in veterinary patients associated with drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L

    2013-09-01

    For many drugs used in veterinary practice, plasma and tissue concentrations are highly dependent on the activity of drug transporters. This article describes how functional changes in drug transporters, whether mediated by genetic variability or drug-drug interactions, affect drug disposition and, ultimately, drug safety and efficacy in veterinary patients. A greater understanding of species, breed, and individual (genetic) differences in drug transporter function, as well as drug-drug interactions involving drug transporters, will result in improved strategies for drug design and will enable veterinarians to incorporate individualized medicine in their practices. PMID:23890239

  2. Students and Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Introduction to "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  3. Antidiarrheal drug overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... class of drugs that includes morphine and other narcotics. Use of prescription opioids for nonmedical reasons is ... tracing) Intravenous fluids (given through a vein) Laxative Narcotic-counteracting drug (antagonist), approximately every 30 minutes Tube ...

  4. What Are Narcotic Drugs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Part of "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  5. The Drug Education Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, John C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Examines the problems of alcoholism, smoking and drug addiction and their influence on students. Suggests that intermediate and secondary schools can assist in alcohol and tobacco (the two legal drugs) programs through improved educational methods. (Author/RK)

  6. Therapeutic drug levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003430.htm Therapeutic drug levels To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Therapeutic drug levels are lab tests to look for the presence ...

  7. Alcoholism, Alcohol, and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Emanuel; Lieber, Charles S.

    1971-01-01

    Describes research on synergistic effects of alcohol and other drugs, particularly barbiturates. Proposes biochemical mechanisms to explain alcoholics' tolerance of other drugs when sober, and increased sensitivity when drunk. (AL)

  8. Drug discovery in academia.

    PubMed

    Shamas-Din, Aisha; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-08-01

    Participation of academic centers in aspects of drug discovery and development beyond target identification and clinical trials is rapidly increasing. Yet many academic drug discovery projects continue to stall at the level of chemical probes, and they infrequently progress to drugs suitable for clinical trials. This gap poses a major hurdle for academic groups engaged in drug discovery. A number of approaches have been pursued to overcome this gap, including stopping at the production of high-quality chemical probes, establishing the resources in-house to advance select projects toward clinical trials, partnering with not-for-profit groups to bring the necessary resources and expertise to develop probes into drugs, and drug repurposing, whereby known drugs are advanced into clinical trials for new indications. In this review, we consider the role of academia in anticancer drug discovery and development, as well as the strategies used by academic groups to overcome barriers in this process.

  9. Animal Drug Safety FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... the top How do you determine if a veterinary drug is safe to market? As mandated by the ... to the top How does CVM remove unsafe veterinary drugs from the market? See Withdrawal of New Animal ...

  10. Drug Interaction and Pharmacist

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, JA

    2010-01-01

    The topic of drug–drug interactions has received a great deal of recent attention from the regulatory, scientific, and health care communities worldwide. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. The pharmacist, along with the prescriber has a duty to ensure that patients are aware of the risk of side effects and a suitable course of action should they occur. With their detailed knowledge of medicine, pharmacists have the ability to relate unexpected symptoms experienced by patients to possible adverse effects of their drug therapy. PMID:21042495

  11. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include narcotic painkillers, ...

  12. Treating Prescription Drug Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription ... View all ​Research Reports Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic (HHS website) NIDA Home Site Map ...

  13. Reduction in Surface Contamination With Cyclophosphamide in 30 US Hospital Pharmacies Following Implementation of a Closed-System Drug Transfer Device

    PubMed Central

    Sessink, Paul J.M.; Trahan, Jason; Coyne, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In a follow-up to a previous study, surface contamination with the antineoplastic drug cyclophosphamide was compared in 30 US hospital pharmacies from 2004 to 2010 following preparation with standard drug preparation techniques or the PhaSeal closed system drug transfer device (CSTD). Methods: Wipe samples were taken from biological safety cabinet (BSC) surfaces, BSC airfoils (the front leading edge of the BSC), floors in front of BSCs, and countertops in the pharmacy, and they were analyzed for contamination with cyclophosphamide. Contamination was reassessed after a minimum of 6 months following the implementation of the CSTD. Surface contamination (ng/cm2) was compared between the 2 techniques and between the previous and current test periods and evaluated with the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: With the use of CSTD compared to the standard preparation techniques, a significant reduction in levels of contamination with cyclophosphamide was observed (P < .0001). Median values for surface contamination with cyclophosphamide were reduced by 86% compared to 95% in the previous study. Conclusions: The CSTD significantly reduced, but did not totally eliminate, surface contamination with cyclophosphamide. In addition to other protective measures, increased usage of CSTDs should be employed to help protect health care workers from exposure to hazardous drugs. PMID:24421463

  14. Black Youths and Illegal Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Janice; Pearson, Patricia G.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the effect of drugs on black youths, discussing different types of drug involvement, reasons for drug involvement, extent and nature of involvement, drugs and crime, drugs and health issues, drug control strategies, and prevention. Policy implications include prioritizing drug prevention among black youths, providing alternatives to drug…

  15. Contemporary drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Giannini, A J; Price, W A; Giannini, M C

    1986-03-01

    The physician needs to know the signs, symptoms and recommended treatments of drug overdoses. Overdose of hallucinogens usually does not require drug therapy. Overdose of amphetamines ("uppers") may be complicated by the presence of PCP, a dissociative substance. It is important for the physician to be familiar with the street terminology for contemporary drugs of abuse and to be aware of how users obtain these drugs.

  16. Polypharmacology in a single drug: multitarget drugs.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, M L

    2013-01-01

    Polypharmacology offers a model for the way drug discovery must evolve to develop therapies most suited to treating currently incurable diseases. It is driven by a worldwide demand for safer, more effective, and affordable medicines against the most complex diseases, and by the failures of modern drug discovery to provide these. Polypharmacology can involve combinations and/or multitarget drugs (MTD). Although not mutually exclusive, my premise is that MTDs have inherent advantages over combinations. This review article focuses on MTDs from a medicinal chemistry perspective. I will explore their use in current clinical practice, their likely application in the future, and the challenges to be overcome to achieve this goal.

  17. Drug Enforcement Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet contains information relating to drug abuse and abusers; drug traffic legislation; law enforcement; and descriptions of commonly used narcotics, stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens. Also included is a short but explicit listing of audiovisual aids, an annotated bibliography, and drug identification pictures. The booklet…

  18. Educating against Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This book is a compilation of drug education and drug abuse prevention materials collected by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) along with example of activities carried out by various countries. It opens with four introductory papers by separate authors: (1) "Prevention of Drug Dependence: A Utopian Dream?"…

  19. Other Drugs of Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... can make you pass out. It's called a "date rape" drug because someone can secretly put it in your ... you without your permission. Rohypnol (roofies) is a date rape pill and can ... about these drugs . Bath Salts are drugs made with chemicals like ...

  20. Strategies against Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzler, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    The main private organization in Germany dedicated to combatting drug addition--the DHS and the Federal Health Information Agency (BzGA) jointly estimate the number of persons addicted to "illegal" drugs in Germany at around 200,000. Yet, people may grow up immune to drug addiction if they acquire a stable basis for self-confidence and…

  1. Keeping Youth Drug Free.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This guide is designed to help caregivers prevent children from getting involved in drugs. It details six key prevention principles, including actions caregivers can take that can help their child make healthy choices. Each section includes language to use with children, activities to do, information about drugs, statistics about youth drug use,…

  2. Drugs and the Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Kenneth S., Ed.

    This volume is based on the premise that professional preparation for coaching should include viable experiences in drug education, with particular reference to coping with drug-related problems. The first section provides general information on the purposes and effects of drugs, controls, and concepts of doping. The second section deals with four…

  3. Drugs of Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Donald E., Ed.

    This Drug Enforcement Administration publication delivers clear, scientific information about drugs in a factual, straightforward way, combined with precise photographs shot to scale. The publication is intended to serve as an A to Z guide for drug history, effects, and identification information. Chapters are included on the Controlled Substances…

  4. Development of a large-scale chemogenomics database to improve drug candidate selection and to understand mechanisms of chemical toxicity and action.

    PubMed

    Ganter, Brigitte; Tugendreich, Stuart; Pearson, Cecelia I; Ayanoglu, Eser; Baumhueter, Susanne; Bostian, Keith A; Brady, Lindsay; Browne, Leslie J; Calvin, John T; Day, Gwo-Jen; Breckenridge, Naiomi; Dunlea, Shane; Eynon, Barrett P; Furness, L Mike; Ferng, Joe; Fielden, Mark R; Fujimoto, Susan Y; Gong, Li; Hu, Christopher; Idury, Radha; Judo, Michael S B; Kolaja, Kyle L; Lee, May D; McSorley, Christopher; Minor, James M; Nair, Ramesh V; Natsoulis, Georges; Nguyen, Peter; Nicholson, Simone M; Pham, Hang; Roter, Alan H; Sun, Dongxu; Tan, Siqi; Thode, Silke; Tolley, Alexander M; Vladimirova, Antoaneta; Yang, Jian; Zhou, Zhiming; Jarnagin, Kurt

    2005-09-29

    Successful drug discovery requires accurate decision making in order to advance the best candidates from initial lead identification to final approval. Chemogenomics, the use of genomic tools in pharmacology and toxicology, offers a promising enhancement to traditional methods of target identification/validation, lead identification, efficacy evaluation, and toxicity assessment. To realize the value of chemogenomics information, a contextual database is needed to relate the physiological outcomes induced by diverse compounds to the gene expression patterns measured in the same animals. Massively parallel gene expression characterization coupled with traditional assessments of drug candidates provides additional, important mechanistic information, and therefore a means to increase the accuracy of critical decisions. A large-scale chemogenomics database developed from in vivo treated rats provides the context and supporting data to enhance and accelerate accurate interpretation of mechanisms of toxicity and pharmacology of chemicals and drugs. To date, approximately 600 different compounds, including more than 400 FDA approved drugs, 60 drugs approved in Europe and Japan, 25 withdrawn drugs, and 100 toxicants, have been profiled in up to 7 different tissues of rats (representing over 3200 different drug-dose-time-tissue combinations). Accomplishing this task required evaluating and improving a number of in vivo and microarray protocols, including over 80 rigorous quality control steps. The utility of pairing clinical pathology assessments with gene expression data is illustrated using three anti-neoplastic drugs: carmustine, methotrexate, and thioguanine, which had similar effects on the blood compartment, but diverse effects on hepatotoxicity. We will demonstrate that gene expression events monitored in the liver can be used to predict pathological events occurring in that tissue as well as in hematopoietic tissues.

  5. Drug companies, UNAIDS make drugs available.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS) initiative is working with several drug companies and four countries on a pilot program to build a health infrastructure that provides affordable drugs to insure that combination therapies are used appropriately. The countries involved in the program are Uganda, Chile, Vietnam and Cote d'Ivoire, and the drug companies are Glaxo Wellcome, Hoffmann-La Roche, and Virco NV. Each country agreed to form national HIV/AIDS drug advisory boards, and non-profit companies will act as clearinghouses. Financing will come from the pharmaceutical companies, local health ministries, and a $1 million grant from UNAIDS. The program will be evaluated in terms of improvements to overall health care delivery, number of people treated, the impact on emergency care, and the rate of illness and death.

  6. Drug Rash (Unclassified Drug Eruption) in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... microscope by a specially trained physician (dermatopathologist). In addition, your doctor may want to perform blood work to look for signs of an allergic reaction. The best treatment for a drug rash is ...

  7. Drug abuse and addiction.

    PubMed

    Nessa, A; Latif, S A; Siddiqui, N I; Hussain, M A; Hossain, M A

    2008-07-01

    Among the social and medical ills of the twentieth century, substance abuse ranks as on one of the most devastating and costly. The drug problem today is a major global concern including Bangladesh. Almost all addictive drugs over stimulate the reward system of the brain, flooding it with the neurotransmitter dopamine. That produces euphoria and that heightened pleasure can be so compelling that the brain wants that feeling back again and again. However repetitive exposure induces widespread adaptive changes in the brain. As a consequence drug use may become compulsive. An estimated 4.7% of the global population aged 15 to 64 or 184 million people, consume illicit drug annually. Heroin use alone is responsible for the epidemic number of new cases of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis and drug addicted infant born each year. Department of narcotic control (DNC) in Bangladesh reported in June 2008 that about 5 million drug addicts in the country & addicts spend at least 17 (Seventeen) billion on drugs per year. Among these drug addicts, 91% are young and adolescents population. Heroin is the most widely abused drugs in Bangladesh. For geographical reason like India, Pakistan and Myanmar; Bangladesh is also an important transit root for internationally trafficking of illicit drug. Drug abuse is responsible for decreased job productivity and attendance increased health care costs, and escalations of domestic violence and violent crimes. Drug addiction is a preventable disease. Through scientific advances we now know much more about how exactly drugs work in the brain, and we also know that drug addiction can be successfully treated to help people stop abusing drugs and resume their productive lives. Most countries have legislation designed to criminalize some drugs. To decrease the prevalence of this problem in our setting; increase awareness, promoting additional research on abused and addictive drugs, and exact implementation of existing laws are strongly recommended. We should

  8. Drug discovery in jeopardy

    PubMed Central

    Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Despite striking advances in the biomedical sciences, the flow of new drugs has slowed to a trickle, impairing therapeutic advances as well as the commercial success of drug companies. Reduced productivity in the drug industry is caused mainly by corporate policies that discourage innovation. This is compounded by various consequences of mega-mergers, the obsession for blockbuster drugs, the shift of control of research from scientists to marketers, the need for fast sales growth, and the discontinuation of development compounds for nontechnical reasons. Lessons from the past indicate that these problems can be overcome, and herein, new and improved directions for drug discovery are suggested. PMID:17080187

  9. Drug Facts Chat Day: NIH Experts Answer Students' Drug Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Drug Facts Chat Day: NIH Experts Answer Students' Drug Questions Past Issues / ... Drug Abuse during their first Drug Facts Chat Day. Photo courtesy of NIDA The questions poured in… ...

  10. Models of Heart Failure Based on the Cardiotoxicity of Anticancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Valentina; Pirozzi, Flora; Lazzarini, Edoardo; Marone, Giancarlo; Rizzo, Paola; Agnetti, Giulio; Tocchetti, Carlo G; Ghigo, Alessandra; Ameri, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complication of oncological treatments that may have dramatic clinical impact. It may acutely worsen a patient's condition or it may present with delayed onset, even years after treatment, when cancer has been cured or is in stable remission. Several studies have addressed the mechanisms of cancer therapy-related HF and some have led to the definition of disease models that hold valid for other and more common types of HF. Here, we review these models of HF based on the cardiotoxicity of antineoplastic drugs and classify them in cardiomyocyte-intrinsic, paracrine, or potentially secondary to effects on cardiac progenitor cells. The first group includes HF resulting from the combination of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and activation of the DNA damage response, which is typically caused by anthracyclines, and HF resulting from deranged myocardial energetics, such as that triggered by anthracyclines and sunitinib. Blockade of the neuregulin-1/ErbB4/ErbB2, vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and platelet-derived growth factor /platelet-derived growth factor receptor pathways by trastuzumab, sorafenib and sunitinib is proposed as paradigm of cancer therapy-related HF associated with alterations of myocardial paracrine pathways. Finally, anthracyclines and trastuzumab are also presented as examples of antitumor agents that induce HF by affecting the cardiac progenitor cell population.

  11. Models of Heart Failure Based on the Cardiotoxicity of Anticancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Valentina; Pirozzi, Flora; Lazzarini, Edoardo; Marone, Giancarlo; Rizzo, Paola; Agnetti, Giulio; Tocchetti, Carlo G; Ghigo, Alessandra; Ameri, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complication of oncological treatments that may have dramatic clinical impact. It may acutely worsen a patient's condition or it may present with delayed onset, even years after treatment, when cancer has been cured or is in stable remission. Several studies have addressed the mechanisms of cancer therapy-related HF and some have led to the definition of disease models that hold valid for other and more common types of HF. Here, we review these models of HF based on the cardiotoxicity of antineoplastic drugs and classify them in cardiomyocyte-intrinsic, paracrine, or potentially secondary to effects on cardiac progenitor cells. The first group includes HF resulting from the combination of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and activation of the DNA damage response, which is typically caused by anthracyclines, and HF resulting from deranged myocardial energetics, such as that triggered by anthracyclines and sunitinib. Blockade of the neuregulin-1/ErbB4/ErbB2, vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and platelet-derived growth factor /platelet-derived growth factor receptor pathways by trastuzumab, sorafenib and sunitinib is proposed as paradigm of cancer therapy-related HF associated with alterations of myocardial paracrine pathways. Finally, anthracyclines and trastuzumab are also presented as examples of antitumor agents that induce HF by affecting the cardiac progenitor cell population. PMID:27103426

  12. Hybrid liposomal PEGylated calix[4]arene systems as drug delivery platforms for curcumin.

    PubMed

    Drakalska, Elena; Momekova, Denitsa; Manolova, Yana; Budurova, Dessislava; Momekov, Georgi; Genova, Margarita; Antonov, Liudmil; Lambov, Nikolay; Rangelov, Stanislav

    2014-09-10

    The tremendous therapeutic potential of curcumin as a chemopreventive, antineoplastic and chemosensitizing agent has failed to progress towards clinical development and commercialization due to its unfavorable physicochemical properties, low aqueous solubility, chemical instability, and pharmacokinetics. The present contribution is focused on the feasibility of using PEGylated calixarene, in particular polyoxyethylene-derivatized tert-butylcalix[4]arene, to prepare various platforms for delivery of curcumin such as inclusion complex, supramolecular aggregates, and hybrid liposomal systems. The inclusion complex is characterized by UV-vis and FT-IR spectroscopy as well as thermal gravimetrical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. At concentrations exceeding the critical micellization concentration of PEGylated calixarene, the tremendous solubility enhancement of curcumin is attributed to additional solubilization and hydrophobic non-covalent interactions of the drug with supramolecular aggregates. A hybrid liposomal system is created via encapsulation of the inclusion complex in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine:cholesterol liposomes. Bare and liposomal curcumin:BEC-X inclusion complexes, as well as free curcumin were additionally investigated for cytotoxicity and apoptogenic activity against human tumor cell lines.

  13. Workplace Activity in Health Professionals Exposed to Chemotherapy Drugs: An Otoneurological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Natália Martinez; Pelissari, Isadora Gonçalves; Cogo, Licia Assunção; Santos Filha, Valdete Alves Valentins dos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The manipulation of antineoplastic drugs presents high risk for accidents and occupational diseases. Objective To evaluate the auditory and vestibular systems of workers who are exposed to chemotherapeutic treatment in the University Hospital of Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil, and to identify the use of individual protection equipment, related to the obtained results. Methods This study is a cross-sectional study using a quantitative method. We evaluate 33 male and female workers, ranging from 21–60 years old, of the nursing and pharmacy sectors. The workers underwent conventional Audiologic Assessment; Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions; and Computerized Vectoelectronystagmography. Results The majority of the sample was female (90.9%). Individual protection equipment was used by 90.9% of the workers. Complaints of dizziness were reported by 56.25% of nursing workers and 52.94% of pharmacy workers. Audiological and vestibular assessment results were within normal limits, 96.97% and 74.20%, respectively. However, audiometric configuration of notch type was identified in 75.75% of all workers. Audiometric notches (76%) and altered caloric test (100%) were often associated with decreased use of coal masks. Conclusion Among the workers evaluated, the vestibulocochlear system was within the normal limits. The presence of notch configuration indicates the need to use individual protection equipment. PMID:27746836

  14. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of target-mediated drug disposition of bortezomib in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Mager, Donald E

    2015-10-01

    Bortezomib is a reversible proteasome inhibitor with potent antineoplastic activity that exhibits dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (PK). Proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition is proposed as the primary source of its nonlinear and apparent nonstationary PK behavior. Single intravenous (IV) doses of bortezomib (0.25 and 1 mg/kg) were administrated to BALB/c mice, with blood and tissue samples obtained over 144 h, which were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model incorporating tissue drug-target binding was developed to test the hypothesis of proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition. The final model reasonably captured bortezomib plasma and tissue PK profiles, and parameters were estimated with good precision. The rank-order of model estimated tissue target density correlated well with experimentally measured proteasome concentrations reported in the literature, supporting the hypothesis that binding to proteasome influences bortezomib disposition. The PBPK model was further scaled-up to humans to assess the similarity of bortezomib disposition among species. Human plasma bortezomib PK profiles following multiple IV dosing (1.3 mg/m(2)) on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 were simulated by appropriately scaling estimated mouse parameters. Simulated and observed bortezomib concentrations after multiple dosing were in good agreement, suggesting target-mediated bortezomib disposition is likely for both mice and humans. Furthermore, the model predicts that renal impairment should exert minimal influence on bortezomib exposure in humans, confirming that bortezomib dose adjustment is not necessary for patients with renal impairment.

  15. Drug Interactions and Antiretroviral Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Matthew; Sperati, C. John; Lucas, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the improved longevity afforded by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV-infected individuals are developing several non-AIDS related comorbid conditions. Consequently, medical management of the HIV-infected population is increasingly complex, with a growing list of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This article reviews some of the most relevant and emerging potential interactions between antiretroviral medications and other agents. The most common DDIs are those involving protease inhibitors or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors which alter the cytochrome P450 enzyme system and/or drug transporters such as p-glycoprotein. Of note are the new agents for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. These new classes of drugs and others drugs which are increasingly used in this patient population represent a significant challenge with regard to achieving the goals of effective HIV suppression and minimization of drug-related toxicities. Awareness of DDIs and a multidisciplinary approach are imperative in reaching these goals. PMID:24950731

  16. Influence of Drug Formulation on OATP1B-Mediated Transport of Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Nieuweboer, Annemieke J.M.; Hu, Shuiying; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Moghaddam-Helmantel, Inge Ghobadi; Gibson, Alice A.; de Bruijn, Peter; Mathijssen, Ron H. J.; Sparreboom, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Taxane antineoplastic agents are extensively taken up into hepatocytes by OATP1B-type transporters prior to metabolism and excretion. Because the biodistributional properties imposed upon these agents by different solubilizers drive clinically-important pharmacodynamic endpoints, we tested the hypothesis that the in vitro and in vivo interaction of taxanes with OATP1B transporters is affected by the choice of drug delivery system. Experimental Design Transport of paclitaxel, docetaxel, and cabazitaxel was studied in vitro using various cell lines transfected with OATP1B1, OATP1B3, or the rodent equivalent Oatp1b2. Pharmacokinetic studies were done in wildtype and Oatp1b2-knockout mice in the presence or absence of polysorbate 80 (PS80) or Kolliphor EL (formerly Cremophor EL; CrEL). Results Paclitaxel and docetaxel, but not cabazitaxel, were transported substrates of OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and Oatp1b2, and these transport processes were strongly reduced in the presence of clinically-relevant concentrations of PS80 and CrEL. In the absence of solubilizers, deficiency of Oatp1b2 in mice was associated with a significantly decreased taxane clearance due to a liver distribution defect (P<0.00001), but these kinetic changes were masked in the presence of PS80 or CrEL (P>0.05). Conclusions Our findings confirm the importance of OATP1B-type transporters in the hepatic elimination of taxanes, and that this process can be inhibited by PS80 and CrEL. These results suggest that the likelihood of drug-drug interactions mediated by these transporters is strongly dependent on the selected taxane solubilizer. PMID:24755470

  17. Drug-Related Hospital Visits and Admissions Associated with Laboratory or Physiologic Abnormalities—A Systematic-Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, Kerry; Hazi, Huda; El-Bedawi, Aya

    2013-01-01

    Countless studies have demonstrated that many emergency-room visits and hospital admissions are drug-related and that a significant proportion of these drug-related visits (DRVs) are preventable. It has not been previously studied which DRVs could be prevented through enhanced monitoring of therapy. The objective of the study was to determine the incidence of DRVs attributed to laboratory or physiologic abnormalities. Three authors independently performed comprehensive searches in relevant health care databases using pre-determined search terms. Articles discussing DRV associated with poisoning, substance abuse, or studied among existing in-patient populations were excluded. Study country, year, sample, design, duration, DRV identification method, proportion of DRVs associated with laboratory or physiologic abnormalities and associated medications were extracted. The three authors independently assessed selected relevant articles according to the Strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology (STROBE) as applicable according to the studies' methodology. The initial literature search yielded a total of 1,524 articles of which 30 articles meeting inclusion criteria and reporting sufficient laboratory or physiologic data were included in the overall analysis. Half employed prospective methodologies, which included both chart review and patient interview; however, the overwhelming majority of identified studies assessed only adverse drug reactions (ADRs) as a drug-related cause for DRV. The mean (range) prevalence of DRVs found in all studies was 15.4% (0.44%–66.7%) of which an association with laboratory or physiologic abnormalities could be attributed to a mean (range) of 29.4% (4.3%–78.1%) of cases. Most laboratory-associated DRVs could be linked to immunosuppressant, antineoplastic, anticoagulant and diabetes therapy, while physiologic-associated DRVs were attributed to cardiovascular therapies and NSAIDs. Significant proportions of

  18. Drugs Approved for Wilms Tumor

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Wilms tumor and other childhood kidney cancers. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Drugs Approved for Kaposi Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Kaposi sarcoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for malignant mesothelioma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. How to Read Drug Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... and alternative medicine Healthy Aging How to read drug labels Printer-friendly version How to Read Drug ... read drug labels How to read a prescription drug label View a text version of this picture. ...

  2. COPD - quick-relief drugs

    MedlinePlus

    COPD - quick-relief drugs; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Chronic obstructive airways disease - quick-relief drugs; Chronic obstructive lung disease - quick-relief drugs; Chronic bronchitis - quick-relief ...

  3. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. DEA Multimedia Drug Library: Marijuana

    MedlinePlus

    ... OPERATIONS Diversion Control Programs Most Wanted Fugitives Training Intelligence Submit a Tip DRUG INFO Drug Fact Sheets ... Operations Diversion Control Programs Most Wanted Fugitives Training Intelligence Submit a Tip Drug Info Drug Fact Sheets ...

  6. Drugs Approved for Penile Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for penile cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  8. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  9. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  13. Drug abuse and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, C G; Asch, R H

    1987-09-01

    It is clear that a number of CNS agents, including drugs of abuse, can inhibit reproductive function. Figure 1 shows the chemical diversity of some of the drug groups that affect reproductive hormones. Their structural dissimilarity to the steroid hormones is also readily apparent in the figure. These chemically diverse drugs share an important pharmacologic property: they are highly potent neuroactive drugs, and they can disrupt hypothalamic-pituitary function. Although it is frequently difficult to distinguish between direct drug actions on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and subsequent effects on gonadal hormones and sex accessory gland function, the distinction is an important one. Most neuroactive drugs produce only transient effects on the central nervous pathways necessary for normal gonadotropin secretion. The disruptive effects of these drugs are likely to be transient and completely reversible, and tolerance to the inhibitory drug effects may occur even with continued drug use. Under these circumstances, normal adults may experience only subtle changes in sexual function. However, individuals with compromised reproductive function may exhibit major problems. It is also likely that adolescents may be at substantial risk for reproductive damage from these neuroactive drugs since the endocrine events associated with puberty are dependent on the normal development of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  14. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases. PMID:20437123

  15. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases.

  16. Antineoplastic And Antiviral Properties Of Merocyanine 540

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, Fritz

    1989-03-01

    Simultaneous exposure to the lipophilic photosensitizer, merocyanine 540, and light in the presence of serum (or certain serum components) and oxygen kills leukemia cells, lymphoma cells, neuroblastoma cells, cell-free enveloped viruses, cell-associated enveloped viruses, and virus-infected cells. The same treatment spares pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, mature erythrocytes, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, and probably other blood components. Merocyanine 540-mediated photosensitization is now being evaluated clinically as a means to eliminate residual tumor cells from autologous remission bone marrow grafts and preclinically as a means to inactivate pathogenic viruses in blood products.

  17. Antineoplastic unsaturated fatty acids from Fijian macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ren-Wang; Hay, Mark E; Fairchild, Craig R; Prudhomme, Jacques; Roch, Karine Le; Aalbersberg, William; Kubanek, Julia

    2008-10-01

    Phytochemical analysis of Fijian populations of the green alga Tydemania expeditionis led to the isolation of two unsaturated fatty acids, 3(zeta)-hydroxy-octadeca-4(E),6(Z),15(Z)-trienoic acid (1) and 3(zeta)-hydroxy-hexadeca-4(E),6(Z)-dienoic acid (2), along with the known 3(zeta)-hydroxy-octadeca-4(E),6(Z)-dienoic acid (4). Investigations of the red alga Hydrolithon reinboldii led to identification of a glycolipid, lithonoside (3), and five known compounds, 15-tricosenoic acid, hexacosa-5,9-dienoic methyl ester, beta-sitosterol, 10(S)-hydroxypheophytin A, and 10(R)-hydroxypheophytin A. The structures of 1-3 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods (1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS). Compounds 1, 2, and 4, containing conjugated double bonds, demonstrated moderate inhibitory activity against a panel of tumor cell lines (including breast, colon, lung, prostate and ovarian cells) with IC(50) values ranging from 1.3 to 14.4 microM. The similar cell selectivity patterns of these three compounds suggest that they might act by a common, but unknown, mechanism of action.

  18. Cross-validation of a mass spectrometric-based method for the therapeutic drug monitoring of irinotecan: implementation of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry in pharmacokinetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Calandra, Eleonora; Posocco, Bianca; Crotti, Sara; Marangon, Elena; Giodini, Luciana; Nitti, Donato; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Traldi, Pietro; Agostini, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Irinotecan is a widely used antineoplastic drug, mostly employed for the treatment of colorectal cancer. This drug is a feasible candidate for therapeutic drug monitoring due to the presence of a wide inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters. In order to determine the drug concentration during the administration protocol, we developed a quantitative MALDI-MS method using CHCA as MALDI matrix. Here, we demonstrate that MALDI-TOF can be applied in a routine setting for therapeutic drug monitoring in humans offering quick and accurate results. To reach this aim, we cross validated, according to FDA and EMA guidelines, the MALDI-TOF method in comparison with a standard LC-MS/MS method, applying it for the quantification of 108 patients' plasma samples from a clinical trial. Standard curves for irinotecan were linear (R (2) ≥ 0.9842) over the concentration ranges between 300 and 10,000 ng/mL and showed good back-calculated accuracy and precision. Intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy, determined on three quality control levels were always <12.8 % and between 90.1 and 106.9 %, respectively. The cross-validation procedure showed a good reproducibility between the two methods, the percentage differences within 20 % in more than 70 % of the total amount of clinical samples analysed. PMID:27235158

  19. Opioid pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Overholser, Brian R; Foster, David R

    2011-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) involving opioid analgesics can be problematic. Opioids are widely used, have a narrow therapeutic index, and can be associated with severe toxicity. The purpose of this review is to describe pharmacokinetic DDIs associated with opioids frequently encountered in managed care settings (morphine, codeine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, fentanyl, tramadol, and methadone). An introduction to the pharmacokinetic basis of DDIs is provided, and potential DDIs associated with opioids are reviewed. Opioids metabolized by the drug metabolizing enzymes of the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) system (codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, fentanyl, tramadol, and methadone) are associated with numerous DDIs that can result in either a reduction in opioid effect or excess opioid effects. Conversely, opioids that are not metabolized by that system (morphine, oxymorphone, and hydromorphone) tend to be involved in fewer CYP450-associated pharmacokinetic DDIs.

  20. Informatics confronts drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Percha, Bethany; Altman, Russ B

    2013-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are an emerging threat to public health. Recent estimates indicate that DDIs cause nearly 74000 emergency room visits and 195000 hospitalizations each year in the USA. Current approaches to DDI discovery, which include Phase IV clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance, are insufficient for detecting many DDIs and do not alert the public to potentially dangerous DDIs before a drug enters the market. Recent work has applied state-of-the-art computational and statistical methods to the problem of DDIs. Here we review recent developments that encompass a range of informatics approaches in this domain, from the construction of databases for efficient searching of known DDIs to the prediction of novel DDIs based on data from electronic medical records, adverse event reports, scientific abstracts, and other sources. We also explore why DDIs are so difficult to detect and what the future holds for informatics-based approaches to DDI discovery. PMID:23414686

  1. Discontinued drugs in 2012: cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Min; Xiang, Bing-Ren

    2013-11-01

    The continued high rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has attracted wide concern and great attention of pharmaceutical industry. In order to reduce the attrition of cardiovascular drug R&D, it might be helpful recapitulating previous failures and identifying the potential factors to success. This perspective mainly analyses the 30 cardiovascular drugs dropped from clinical development in 2012. Reasons causing the termination of the cardiovascular drugs in the past 5 years are also tabulated and analysed. The analysis shows that the attrition is highest in Phase II trials and financial and strategic factors and lack of clinical efficacy are the principal reasons for these disappointments. To solve the four problems (The 'better than the Beatles' problem, the 'cautious regulator' problem, the 'throw money at it' tendency and the 'basic researchbrute force' bias) is recommended as the main measure to increase the number and quality of approvable products. PMID:23992034

  2. New Antithrombotic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Eikelboom, John W.; Samama, Meyer Michel

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on new antithrombotic drugs that are in or are entering phase 3 clinical testing. Development of these new agents was prompted by the limitations of existing antiplatelet, anticoagulant, or fibrinolytic drugs. Addressing these unmet needs, this article (1) outlines the rationale for development of new antithrombotic agents; (2) describes the new antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and fibrinolytic drugs; and (3) provides clinical perspectives on the opportunities and challenges faced by these novel agents. PMID:22315258

  3. [Safety nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa-Espinoza, Teodoro Julio

    2015-01-01

    The choice of a specific medication belonging to a drug class is under the criteria of efficacy, safety, cost and suitability. NSAIDs currently constitute one of the most consumed drug in the world, so it is very important review of the safety aspects of this drug class. This review has the objective of analyze the safety of NSAIDs on 3 main criteria: gastrolesivity, cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity.

  4. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  5. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  6. Vaccines for Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Current medications for drug abuse have had only limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines to elicit antibodies that block the pharmacological effects of drugs have great potential for treating drug abuse. We review the status for two vaccines that are undergoing clinical trials (cocaine and nicotine) and two that are still in pre-clinical development (methamphetamine and heroin). We also outline the challenges and ethical concerns for anti-addiction vaccine development and their use as future therapeutics. PMID:22130115

  7. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antibiotic-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria ...

  8. Newer drugs for arthritis.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, D C

    1977-01-01

    The major area of new drug discoveries for the treatment of arthritis is in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIA). Unfortunately, as yet no new and safe drug of major significance has appeared. Aspirin still ranks high beside the newcomers. Indomethacin, ibuprofen, naproxen, fenoprofen and tolmetin are described and their roles in therapy are discussed. A further group of older drugs receiving new application in the treatment of arthritis is presented. These include penicillamine and the immunosuppressive drugs. Gold and chloroquin are also discussed to put these agents in their proper perspective.

  9. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Hydrogels as 3D Matrices for in Vitro Evaluation of Chemotherapeutic Drugs Using Poorly Adherent Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gurski, Lisa A.; Jha, Amit K.; Zhang, Chu; Jia, Xinqiao; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a biomimetic, three-dimensional (3D) culture system for poorly adherent bone metastatic prostate cancer cells (C4-2B) for use as an in vitro platform for anti-cancer drug screening. To this end, hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives carrying complementary aldehyde (HAALD) and hydrazide (HAADH) groups were synthesized and characterized. In situ encapsulation of C4-2B cells was achieved by simple mixing of HAALD and HAADH in the presence of the cells. Unlike two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture in which cells adopt an atypical spread morphology, cells residing in the HA matrix formed distinct clustered structures which grew and merged, reminiscent of real tumors. Anti-cancer drugs added to the media surrounding the cell/gel construct diffused into the gel and killed the embedded cells. The HA hydrogel system was used successfully to test the efficacy of anti-cancer drugs including camptothecin, docetaxel, and rapamycin, alone and in combination, including specificity, dose and time responses. Responses of cells to anti-neoplastics differed between the 3D HA hydrogel and 2D monolayer systems. We suggest that the data obtained from 3D HA systems is superior to that from conventional 2D monolayers as the 3D system better reflects the bone metastatic microenvironment of the cancer cells. PMID:19695694

  10. [The importance of therapeutic drug monitoring for psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Messer, Thomas; Schmauss, Max

    2006-05-15

    The goal of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is the optimization of the psychiatric pharmacotherapy. Above all, TDM is absolutely indicated for the prevention of adverse drug effects or poisoning. TDM is well-established for therapies with antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs and mood stabilizers. For anti-dementia drugs, anxiolytic drugs, hypnotic drugs and medications for treating addiction, monitoring is currently applied to the interpretation of side effects, drug interactions and to forensic questions. PMID:20104722

  11. Cytotoxic drugs in drinking water: a prediction and risk assessment exercise for the thames catchment in the United kingdom.

    PubMed

    Rowney, Nicole C; Johnson, Andrew C; Williams, Richard J

    2009-12-01

    Cytotoxic, also known as antineoplastic, drugs remain an important weapon in the fight against cancer. This study considers the water quality implications for the Thames catchment (United Kingdom) arising from the routine discharge of these drugs after use, down the drain and into the river. The review focuses on 13 different cytotoxic drugs from the alkylating agent, antimetabolite, and anthracycline antibiotic families. A geographic-information-system-based water quality model was used in the present study. The model was informed by literature values on consumption, excretion, and fate data to predict raw drinking water concentrations at the River Thames abstraction points at Farmoor, near Oxford, and Walton, in West London. To discover the highest plausible values, upper boundary values for consumption and excretion together with lower removal values for sewage treatment were used. The raw drinking water cytotoxic drug maximum concentrations at Walton (the higher of the two) representative of mean and low flow conditions were predicted to be 11 and 20 ng/L for the five combined alkylating agents, 2 and 4 ng/L for the three combined antimetabolites, and 0.05 and 0.10 ng/L the for two combined anthracycline antibiotics, respectively. If they were to escape into tap water, then the highest predicted concentrations would still be a factor of between 25 and 40 below the current recommended daily doses of concern. Although the risks may be negligible for healthy adults, more concern may be associated with special subgroup populations, such as pregnant women, their fetuses, and breast-feeding infants, due to their developmental vulnerability.

  12. Recommunalizing Drug Offenders: The "Drug Peace" Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrigo, Bruce A.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the manner in which substance-using shelter tenants, many of them ex-offenders, who lived in an urban, single- room-occupancy neighborhood, engaged in the process of recommunalization. Identifies and describes eight developmental stages of recommunalization, and links recommunalization to proposals for solving the war on drugs. (RJM)

  13. Drugs and Drug Abuse: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook.

    For a relatively new field of research and interest, the bibliographic control of drug literature (indexing and recording for retrieval) is remarkable. Public and private agencies have taken the initiative in compiling catalogs, bibliographies and indexes which, although often duplicatory, nonetheless ensure access to the many aspects of the drug…

  14. Nanosize drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize materials provide hopes, speculations and chances for an unprecedented change in drug delivery in near future. Nanotechnology is an emerging field to produce nanomaterials for drug delivery that can offer a new tool, opportunities and scope to provide more focused and fine-tuned treatment of diseases at a molecular level, enhancing the therapeutic potential of drugs so that they become less toxic and more effective. Nanodimensional drug delivery systems are of great scientific interest as they project their tremendous utility because of their capability of altering biodistribution of therapeutic agents so that they can concentrate more in the target tissues. Nanosize drug delivery systems generally focus on formulating bioactive molecules in biocompatible nanosystems such as nanocrystals, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructure lipid carriers, lipid drug conjugates, nanoliposomes, dendrimers, nanoshells, emulsions, nanotubes, quantum dots etc. Extensively versatile molecules like synthetic chemicals to naturally occurring complex macromolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins could be dispensed in such formulations maintaining their stability and efficacy. Empty viral capsids are being tried to deliver drug as these uniformly sized bionanomaterials can be utilized to load drug to improve solubility, reduce toxicity and provide site specific targeting. Nanomedicines offer a wide scope for delivery of smart materials from tissue engineering to more recently artificial RBCs. Nanocomposites are the future hope for tailored and personalized medicines as well as for bone repairing and rectification of cartilage impairment. Nanosize drug delivery systems are addressing the challenges to overcome the delivery problems of wide ranges of drugs through their narrow submicron particle size range, easily manipulatable surface characteristics in achievement of versatile tissue targeting (includes active and passive drug targeting), controlled and sustained drug

  15. The Drug War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCrosta, Anthony

    1989-01-01

    The role of teachers in helping fight against drug abuse is discussed stressing the teacher's ability to see changes in the students and the potential for positive influence. A vital school role involves teaching life skills and wellness principles. Information on commonly abused drugs and their effects is presented. (SM)

  16. Drug and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Latest Research Getting More Help Related Topics Anxiety COPD Delirium Depression Pain Management Prevention Related News Older Adults Who Drink Alcohol at Risk for Drug Interactions Monday, November 23, 2015 Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Drug and Substance Abuse ...

  17. Dimensions of Drug Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    The high number, heterogeneity, and inadequate integration of drug information resources constitute barriers to many drug information usage scenarios. In the biomedical domain there is a rich legacy of knowledge representation in ontology-like structures that allows us to connect this problem both to the very mature field of library and…

  18. Drug effects on spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amory, John K

    2007-10-01

    Many drugs can adversely affect spermatogenesis. These effects can occur either by directly inhibiting sperm or testicular function or indirectly by impairing the hypothalamic pituitary testicular axis. In this paper, we will review the drugs that are known to adversely impact spermatogenesis, and/or sperm function and detail what is known about the mechanisms through which these compounds impair fertility in men.

  19. Drugs and Personal Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Richard H.

    Drug use and abuse have two major motivations: the medical or curative, and the religious or supplementary. The author discusses the expanding use of drugs for both purposes, suggesting a possible connection between increased medical use and confidence, and increased religious or pleasure use. He outlines many problems of definition and public…

  20. Enhancing Drug Court Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschenes, Elizabeth Piper; Ireland, Connie; Kleinpeter, Christine B.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of enhanced drug court services in a large county in Southern California. These enhanced services, including specialty counseling groups, educational/employment resources, and increased Residential Treatment (RT) beds, were designed to increase program retention and successful completion (graduation) of drug court.…

  1. Automated drug identification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campen, C. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    System speeds up analysis of blood and urine and is capable of identifying 100 commonly abused drugs. System includes computer that controls entire analytical process by ordering various steps in specific sequences. Computer processes data output and has readout of identified drugs.

  2. Drug Testing. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, the United States Supreme Court confirmed that in the school's role of in loco parentis, drug testing of students who were involved in athletics and extracurricular activities was constitutional. In a state of the union address, George W. Bush stated that drug testing in schools had been effective and was part of "our aggressive…

  3. Drugs, Alcohol & Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Christina

    Expectant parents are introduced to the effects of a variety of drugs on the unborn baby. Material is divided into seven sections. Section 1 deals with the most frequently used recreational drugs, including alcohol, marijuana, narcotics, depressants, stimulants, inhalants, and hallucinogens. Sections 2 and 3 focus on the effects of prescription…

  4. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations. PMID:23636733

  5. Interoception and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Martin P.; Stewart, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The role of interoception and its neural basis with relevance to drug addiction is reviewed. Interoception consists of the receiving, processing, and integrating body-relevant signals with external stimuli to affect ongoing motivated behavior. The insular cortex is the central nervous system hub to process and integrate these signals. Interoception is an important component of several addiction relevant constructs including arousal, attention, stress, reward, and conditioning. Imaging studies with drug-addicted individuals show that the insular cortex is hypo-active during cognitive control processes but hyperactive during cue reactivity and drug-specific, reward-related processes. It is proposed that interoception contributes to drug addiction by incorporating an “embodied” experience of drug uses together with the individual’s predicted versus actual internal state to modulate approach or avoidance behavior, i.e. whether to take or not to take drugs. This opens the possibility of two types of interventions. First, one may be able to modulate the embodied experience by enhancing insula reactivity where necessary, e.g. when engaging in drug seeking behavior, or attenuating insula when exposed to drug-relevant cues. Second, one may be able to reduce the urge to act by increasing the frontal control network, i.e. inhibiting the urge to use by employing cognitive training. PMID:23855999

  6. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse Healthy School Lunch Planner How Can I ...

  7. Newer antithrombotic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pranav; Bindra, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    Thromboembolic disorders are one of the disorders for which we are still on the look out for a safe and efficient drug. Despite the widespread use of antithrombotic drugs for the prevention and treatment of arterial and venous thrombosis, thromboembolic diseases continue to be a major cause of death and disability worldwide. This shows our inefficiency in searching efficacious and safe antithrombotic drugs. We have reached the basic mechanism of thrombus formation and by interrupting various steps of this mechanism, we can prevent as well as treat thromboembolic disorders. In continuation of Aspirin, now, we are using Clopidogrel, Ticlopidine and GpIIb/IIIa inhibitors (Abciximab, Tirofiban and Eptifibatide). Warfarin is an old antithrombotic drug which is still being used; but due to various side effects and drug interactions, we are bound to use newer drugs. Newer antiplatelet drugs include Prasugrel, Ticagrelor and Cangrelor, whereas newer thrombin inhibitors are Ximelgatran and Dabigatran. Apixaban is also a newer entry in this category as factor Xa inhibitor. Idrabiotaparinux is an indirect inhibitor of Xa as it accelerates the activity of antithrombin. Moreover, researches and trials for better and safe drugs are ongoing. PMID:21572750

  8. PRESERVATION OF DRUGS

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R. Bhima; Natarajan, R.K.; Sarma, P.S. Nataraja; Purushothaman, K.K.

    1982-01-01

    In this article the factors likely to cause spoilage of the drugs of the Indian systems of medicine are reviewed. Methods for the prevention of spoilage are discussed. The results of a limited study carried out on the stability of a few selected drug preparations representing the main dosage forms are also presented PMID:22556951

  9. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  10. Single compartment drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as “privileged,” since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  11. Drug Testing. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2005-01-01

    The Vernonia School District v. Acton Supreme Court decision in 1995, forever changed the landscape of the legality of drug testing in schools. This decision stated that students who were involved in athletic programs could be drug tested as long as the student's privacy was not invaded. According to some in the medical profession, there are two…

  12. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations.

  13. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  14. Drugs and Addictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, S. Mae; Miller, Eva

    The effects of drug abuse and dependence vary, depending on the type of drug, polydrug use, and characteristics of the user. The influence of genetic, neurochemical, neuropsyiological, sociocultural, and economic factors suggest that the etiology of substance abuse and dependence is multiply determined. Models explaining the causation of substance…

  15. Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... people also have to pay an additional monthly cost. Private companies provide Medicare prescription drug coverage. You choose the drug plan you like best. Whether or not you should sign up depends on how good your current coverage is. You need to sign up as ...

  16. Ayurvedic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Premalatha; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2007-12-01

    Ayurveda is a major traditional system of Indian medicine that is still being successfully used in many countries. Recapitulation and adaptation of the older science to modern drug discovery processes can bring renewed interest to the pharmaceutical world and offer unique therapeutic solutions for a wide range of human disorders. Eventhough time-tested evidences vouch immense therapeutic benefits for ayurvedic herbs and formulations, several important issues are required to be resolved for successful implementation of ayurvedic principles to present drug discovery methodologies. Additionally, clinical examination in the extent of efficacy, safety and drug interactions of newly developed ayurvedic drugs and formulations are required to be carefully evaluated. Ayurvedic experts suggest a reverse-pharmacology approach focusing on the potential targets for which ayurvedic herbs and herbal products could bring tremendous leads to ayurvedic drug discovery. Although several novel leads and drug molecules have already been discovered from ayurvedic medicinal herbs, further scientific explorations in this arena along with customization of present technologies to ayurvedic drug manufacturing principles would greatly facilitate a standardized ayurvedic drug discovery.

  17. Safety of obesity drugs.

    PubMed

    Greenway, Frank L; Caruso, Mary K

    2005-11-01

    The safety of obesity drugs has historically been poor. This and the stigmatisation of obesity in society ensured that a higher standard of safety for obesity drugs must be met. The authors review the safety disasters of obesity drugs that were withdrawn. The authors then review the safety of presently available drugs--benzphetamine, phendimetrazine, diethylpropion, phentermine, sibutramine and orlistat. The safety of rimonabant, a drug with a pending new drug application that has an independent effect on metabolic syndrome, is also reviewed. The authors compare the stage of obesity drug development to that of hypertension in the 1950s. As new and safer drugs with more downstream mechanisms are developed that have independent effects on the cardiovascular risks associated with obesity, third party reimbursement for obesity medicine is likely to improve. This may lead to obesity being treated like hypertension and other chronic diseases with long-term medication. With improved technological tools, the authors believe this process will be more rapid for obesity than it was for hypertension.

  18. Evaluation of enzyme inhibition kinetics in drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ang; Qin, Xuan; Tang, Yu; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Inhibition of CYP enzymes is thought to be the most common cause of drug-drug and/or herb-drug interactions. To characterize the inhibition of CYP enzymes activities by chemicals, enzyme inhibition kinetic experiments are usually carried out. The purpose of this letter is to call attention to evaluate the enzyme inhibition kinetics in drug-drug interactions.

  19. Pharmacogenetics of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J; Mallal, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions and severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, are examples of serious adverse drug reactions mediated through a combination of metabolic and immunological mechanisms that could traditionally not have been predicted based on the pharmacological characteristics of the drug alone. The discovery of new associations between these syndromes and specific HLA has created the promise that risk for these reactions could be predicted through pharmacogenetic screening, thereby avoiding serious morbidity and mortality associated with these types of drug reactions. Despite this, several hurdles exist in the translation of these associations into pharmacogenetic tests that could be routinely used in the clinical setting. HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome is an example of a test now in widespread routine clinical use in the developed world. PMID:20602616

  20. Potential Drug - Drug Interactions among Medications Prescribed to Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Barna

    2014-01-01

    Context: Drug-drug interactions(DDIs) are significant but avoidable causes of iatrogenic morbidity and hospital admission. Aim: To detect potential drug-drug interactions among medications received by hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: Patients of both sex and all adult age groups, who were attending medicine out -patient department (OPD) of a tertiary care teaching rural hospital since last six months and were being prescribed antihypertensive drug/s for essential hypertension, were selected for the study. Hypertensive patient with co-morbities diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart diseases, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal diseases were also included in the study. Potential drug drug interactions were checked with medscape drug interaction software. Results: With the help of medscape drug interaction software, 71.50% prescriptions were identified having atleast one drug-drug interaction. Total 918 DDIs were found in between 58 drug pairs. 55.23% DDIs were pharmacodynamic, 4.79% pharmacokinetic type of DDIs. 32.24% DDIs were found affecting serum potassium level. 95.42% DDIs were found significant type of DDIs. Drug drug interaction between atenolol & amlodipine was the most common DDI (136) followed by metoprolol and amlodine (88) in this study. Atenolol and amlodipine ( 25.92%) was the most common drugs to cause DDIs in our study. Conclusion: We detected a significant number of drug drug interaction in hypertensive patients. These interactions were between antihypertensive agents or between hypertensive and drug for co-morbid condition. PMID:25584241

  1. Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for multiple myeloma and other plasma cell neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Off-label Drug Use What is off-label drug use? In the United States new drugs are ... unapproved use of a drug. Is off-label drug use legal? The off-label use of FDA- ...

  5. Is the Drug Problem Soluble?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonas, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Concludes that the principle drug problems in the United States arise from the use of cigarette tobacco and alcoholic beverages. Identifies a drug culture as the persistent force in society that promotes drug use. Points out that the influence of the primary drug industries inhibit attempts to deal effectively with drug problems. (KO)

  6. Drugs, Society, and Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Oakley

    The varied aspects of drugs, their source, abuse, chemical composition, and physical, personal, and social effects are explored. Seven units cover the following areas: (1) an overview on drug use, a brief history of drugs and discussion of social implications; (2) the human nervous system and the actions of drugs; (3) "nondrug drugs" such as…

  7. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  8. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  9. The Great Drug Debate: II. Taking Drugs Seriously.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, John

    1988-01-01

    Argues that legalization is not the solution to drug-related problems. Proposes increased emphasis on the small retailers of drugs, and mandatory urinalysis for heroin, cocaine, and PCP for those arrested for typical drug-related crimes. (FMW)

  10. Irreversible enzyme inhibition kinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mohutsky, Michael; Hall, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the types of irreversible inhibition of drug-metabolizing enzymes and the methods commonly employed to quantify the irreversible inhibition and subsequently predict the extent and time course of clinically important drug-drug interactions.

  11. Bioequivalence of generic drugs.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-09-01

    Generic drugs are bioequivalent to the original brand; this is a prerequisite for marketing approval. It is theoretically possible that one generic drug may overestimate the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of the original and another generic may underestimate these PK parameters; in consequence, these 2 generics may not be bioequivalent between themselves. The result could be loss of efficacy or development of drug-related adverse effects if these generics are interchanged in stable patients. In a recent study involving 292 indirect comparisons of generic formulations of 9 different drugs, mathematical modeling showed that in most cases (87.0% for maximum concentration, 90.1% for area under the curve, and 80.5% for both) generic drugs are bioequivalent to each other. These reassuring findings notwithstanding, prudence dictates that, in stable patients, generic drugs should be interchanged only if there is a good reason for it. This is because bioequivalent brands of drugs may differ in their excipient content, and this can result in variations in safety profiles. PMID:26455677

  12. Benzylpiperazine: "A messy drug".

    PubMed

    Katz, D P; Deruiter, J; Bhattacharya, D; Ahuja, M; Bhattacharya, S; Clark, C R; Suppiramaniam, V; Dhanasekaran, M

    2016-07-01

    Designer drugs are synthetic structural analogues/congeners of controlled substances with slightly modified chemical structures intended to mimic the pharmacological effects of known drugs of abuse so as to evade drug classification. Benzylpiperazine (BZP), a piperazine derivative, elevates synaptic dopamine and serotonin levels producing stimulatory and hallucinogenic effects, respectively, similar to the well-known drug of abuse, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Furthermore, BZP augments the release of norepinephrine by inhibiting presynaptic autoreceptors, therefore, BZP is a "messy drug" due to its multifaceted regulation of synaptic monoamine neurotransmitters. Initially, pharmaceutical companies used BZP as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of various disease states, but due to its contraindications and abuse potential it was withdrawn from the market. BZP imparts predominately sympathomimetic effects accompanied by serious cardiovascular implications. Addictive properties of BZP include behavioral sensitization, cross sensitization, conditioned place preference and repeated self-administration. Additional testing of piperazine derived drugs is needed due to a scarcity of toxicological data and widely abuse worldwide. PMID:27207154

  13. Anticancer drugs during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Yamada, Manabu; Kasai, Yasuyo; Miyauchi, Akito; Andoh, Kazumichi

    2016-09-01

    Although cancer diagnoses during pregnancy are rare, they have been increasing with the rise in maternal age and are now a topic of international concern. In some cases, the administration of chemotherapy is unavoidable, though there is a relative paucity of evidence regarding the administration of anticancer drugs during pregnancy. As more cases have gradually accumulated and further research has been conducted, we are beginning to elucidate the appropriate timing for the administration of chemotherapy, the regimens that can be administered with relative safety, various drug options and the effects of these drugs on both the mother and fetus. However, new challenges have arisen, such as the effects of novel anticancer drugs and the desire to bear children during chemotherapy. In this review, we outline the effects of administering cytotoxic anticancer drugs and molecular targeted drugs to pregnant women on both the mother and fetus, as well as the issues regarding patients who desire to bear children while being treated with anticancer drugs. PMID:27284093

  14. Anti-Microtubule Drugs.

    PubMed

    Florian, Stefan; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule drugs that target microtubules (MTs), many of them natural products, have long been important tools in the MT field. Indeed, tubulin (Tb) was discovered, in part, as the protein binding partner of colchicine. Several anti-MT drug classes also have important medical uses, notably colchicine, which is used to treat gout, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), and pericarditis, and the vinca alkaloids and taxanes, which are used to treat cancer. Anti-MT drugs have in common that they bind specifically to Tb in the dimer, MT or some other form. However, their effects on polymerization dynamics and on the human body differ markedly. Here we briefly review the most-studied molecules, and comment on their uses in basic research and medicine. Our focus is on practical applications of different anti-MT drugs in the laboratory, and key points that users should be aware of when designing experiments. We also touch on interesting unsolved problems, particularly in the area of medical applications. In our opinion, the mechanism by which any MT drug cures or treats any disease is still unsolved, despite decades of research. Solving this problem for particular drug-disease combinations might open new uses for old drugs, or provide insights into novel routes for treatment. PMID:27193863

  15. Bioequivalence of generic drugs.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-09-01

    Generic drugs are bioequivalent to the original brand; this is a prerequisite for marketing approval. It is theoretically possible that one generic drug may overestimate the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of the original and another generic may underestimate these PK parameters; in consequence, these 2 generics may not be bioequivalent between themselves. The result could be loss of efficacy or development of drug-related adverse effects if these generics are interchanged in stable patients. In a recent study involving 292 indirect comparisons of generic formulations of 9 different drugs, mathematical modeling showed that in most cases (87.0% for maximum concentration, 90.1% for area under the curve, and 80.5% for both) generic drugs are bioequivalent to each other. These reassuring findings notwithstanding, prudence dictates that, in stable patients, generic drugs should be interchanged only if there is a good reason for it. This is because bioequivalent brands of drugs may differ in their excipient content, and this can result in variations in safety profiles.

  16. Teratogenic drugs and their drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ahn, M R; Li, L; Shon, J; Bashaw, E D; Kim, M-J

    2016-09-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Guidance for Industry-Drug Interaction Studies, recommends that a potential human teratogen needs to be studied in vivo for effects on contraceptive steroids.(1) This article highlights the need to evaluate the drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between drugs with teratogenic potential and hormonal contraceptives (HCs) during drug development. It also addresses the FDA's effort of communicating DDI findings in product labels to mitigate the risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:27090193

  17. [Pharmacopsychoses during drug addiction].

    PubMed

    Cottereau, M J; Lôo, H; Poirier, M F; Deniker, P

    1975-01-01

    Widespread use of certain drugs (amphetamines, L.S.D., hypnotics) in France, allowed us to observe more than 200 cases of acute or chronic psychoses among addicts. Sometimes these are transitory outburst but the occurrence of a delusional psychosis with long range evolution raises a difficult diagnosis problem in relation to functional psychoses. The emphasis should be put on respective roles of the drug and of a predisposed mental state. Circumstances of beginning, apparently direct relationship between drug taking and pathological symptoms, therapy efficiency, absence of earlier pathological traits (as in many of our patients) and relapse when intoxication starts again, are in favour of a pharmacological origin of the troubles.

  18. Lipidomics in drug development.

    PubMed

    Dehairs, Jonas; Derua, Rita; Rueda-Rincon, Natalia; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2015-06-01

    Numerous human pathologies, including common conditions such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, inflammatory disease and neurodegeneration, involve changes in lipid metabolism. Likewise, a growing number of drugs are being developed that directly or indirectly affect lipid metabolic pathways. Instead of classical and cumbrous radiochemical analyses, lipid profiling by mass spectrometry (MS)-based lipidomics holds great potential as companion diagnostic in several steps along the drug development process. In this review we describe some typical lipidomics set-ups and illustrate how these technologies can be implemented in target discovery, compound screening, in vitro and in vivo preclinical testing, toxicity testing of drugs, and prediction and monitoring of response. PMID:26190681

  19. Prescription Drugs and Cold Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abuse » Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Email Facebook Twitter What is Prescription Drug Abuse: ... treatment of addiction. Read more Safe Disposal of Medicines Disposal of Unused Medicines: What You Should Know ( ...

  20. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  1. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  2. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) ...

  3. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  4. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  5. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors This page lists cancer drugs approved by ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors Afinitor (Everolimus) Afinitor Disperz (Everolimus) Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  6. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Google Plus Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs ... HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with drug abuse ...

  7. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  8. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  9. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Cosmegen (Dactinomycin) Dactinomycin Denosumab Doxorubicin Hydrochloride ...

  10. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Adriamycin PFS (Doxorubicin Hydrochloride) Adriamycin RDF (Doxorubicin Hydrochloride) ...

  11. Analysis of Street Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Stuart H.; Bhatt, Sudhir

    1972-01-01

    A study of the content of street drugs available to a college campus and a community is presented. Emphasis is given to the adulterants and substitutions encountered in the illicit preparations. (Author)

  12. Metalloid compounds as drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    The six elements commonly known as metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium. Metalloid containing compounds have been used as antiprotozoal drugs. Boron-based drugs, the benzoxaboroles have been exploited as potential treatments for neglected tropical diseases. Arsenic has been used as a medicinal agent and arsphenamine was the main drug used to treat syphilis. Arsenic trioxide has been approved for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Pentavalent antimonials have been the recommended drug for visceral leishmaniasis and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Tellurium (IV) compounds may have important roles in thiol redox biological activity in the human body, and ammonium trichloro (dioxoethylene-O, O’-)tellurate (AS101) may be a promising agent for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Organosilicon compounds have been shown to be effective in vitro multidrug-resistance reverting agents. PMID:24019824

  13. Drug testing programs.

    PubMed

    Willette, R E

    1986-01-01

    Many Federal agencies and private companies are conducting drug tests on job applicants and employees. Although the reasons for testing and the circumstances under which testing is conducted vary considerably, the main intent of these programs is to provide a drug-free environment for other employees and a safe service to the public. The programs that have been most successful usually include a clear communication to all employees and applicants as to the nature of the drug program and the consequences of detected drug use. Also, successful programs usually afford employees some type of assistance and a second chance. Finally, it is essential for successful programs to provide a reasonable and fair approach that includes procedures for due process, that is, a line of review and appeal. PMID:3127722

  14. Information for Consumers (Drugs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advertising: Questions to Ask Yourself Sample Prescription Drug Advertisements Give Us Feedback Resources for You Report a ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  15. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider). The following drugs may be used to control pain: Over-the-counter pain relievers may be helpful ... as morphine or fentanyl, may be needed to control severe pain. Whenever possible, avoid or reduce use of medicines ...

  16. Calculating drug doses.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Numeracy and calculation are key skills for nurses. As nurses are directly accountable for ensuring medicines are prescribed, dispensed and administered safely, they must be able to understand and calculate drug doses. PMID:27615351

  17. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  18. Teenagers and drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of appetite (occurs with amphetamine, methamphetamine, or cocaine use) Increased appetite (with marijuana use) Unsteady gait ... drugs) Hyperactivity (as seen with uppers such as cocaine and methamphetamine) You also may notice changes in ...

  19. Drug use first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... addiction is gradual. And some drugs (such as cocaine ) can cause addiction after only a few doses. ... Saunders; 2013:chap 150. Rao RB, Hoffman RS. Cocaine and other sympathomimetics. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, ...

  20. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat (macular) and depigmented, but maintains ...

  1. The drug swindlers.

    PubMed

    Silverman, M; Lydecker, M; Lee, P R

    1990-01-01

    In a number of important developing nations--among them Indonesia, India, and Brazil--clinical pharmacologists and other drug experts are revealing mounting concern over the marketing of fraudulent drug products. These are shaped, colored, flavored, marked, and packaged to mimic the real product. They may contain the actual antibiotic or other drug indicated on the label, but so "cut" that the product provides only a small fraction of the labeled amount, or they may contain only useless flour or starch. At best, they are worthless. At the worst, they can kill. In most instances, it is believed that these "drugs" are produced and marketed by local or domestic fly-by-night groups and not by multinational pharmaceutical firms. Blame for these practices is placed on inadequate or unenforced laws, only trivial punishments, bribery and corruption, and the fact that generally "nobody inspects the inspectors."

  2. National Drug IQ Challenge

    MedlinePlus

    ... See 2016's Chat Day Transcript Drugs: SHATTER THE MYTHS Order Free Copies Now for Your NDAFW Event! ... dress are registered trademarks of HHS. SHATTER THE MYTHS is a trademark and service mark of HHS. ...

  3. The drug swindlers.

    PubMed

    Silverman, M; Lydecker, M; Lee, P R

    1990-01-01

    In a number of important developing nations--among them Indonesia, India, and Brazil--clinical pharmacologists and other drug experts are revealing mounting concern over the marketing of fraudulent drug products. These are shaped, colored, flavored, marked, and packaged to mimic the real product. They may contain the actual antibiotic or other drug indicated on the label, but so "cut" that the product provides only a small fraction of the labeled amount, or they may contain only useless flour or starch. At best, they are worthless. At the worst, they can kill. In most instances, it is believed that these "drugs" are produced and marketed by local or domestic fly-by-night groups and not by multinational pharmaceutical firms. Blame for these practices is placed on inadequate or unenforced laws, only trivial punishments, bribery and corruption, and the fact that generally "nobody inspects the inspectors." PMID:2265874

  4. Substance use - prescription drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... substance use; Oxycodone - substance use; Hydrocodone - substance use; Morphine - substance use; Fentanyl - substance use ... fluff, hydros, v-itamin, vic, vike, Watson-387. Morphine. Drugs include Avinza, Duramorph, Kadian, Ormorph, Roxanol. Street ...

  5. Inexpensive portable drug detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Heimbuch, A. H.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive, easy-to-use, self-scanning, self-calibrating, portable unit automatically graphs fluorescence spectrum of drug sample. Device also measures rate of movement through chromatographic column for forensic and medical testing.

  6. Drugs in breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Hotham, Neil; Hotham, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Most commonly used drugs are relatively safe for breastfed babies. The dose received via milk is generally small and much less than the known safe doses of the same drug given directly to neonates and infants. Drugs contraindicated during breastfeeding include anticancer drugs, lithium, oral retinoids, iodine, amiodarone and gold salts. An understanding of the principles underlying the transfer into breast milk is important, as is an awareness of the potential adverse effects on the infant. Discussion with the mother about the possibility of either negative product information or ill-informed advice from others will reduce the confusion and anxiety that may be generated. Good resources about medicines and breastfeeding are available and include state-based medicines information services. PMID:26648652

  7. Drug therapy smartens up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  8. Professional thieves and drugs.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, J A; Russe, B R

    1977-12-01

    The "professional thief" is a highly specialized predatory offender with a history that dates back to Elizabethan England. Although this type of criminal is generally associated with narcotic addiction, his drug-taking typically involved the use of heroin, morphine, and cocaine on an intermittent basis. However, trafficking in drugs was common to the "professional" underworld, and as a result this deviant fraternity had a notable impact on the impressment of a criminal model of drug use on twentieth century conceptions of the addict. The concept of "professional" theft is reviewed, the use of drugs by professional thieves is discussed, and the interaction between this underworld group and the early Federal Bureau of Narcotics is examined.

  9. Club Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... MDMA ("ecstasy"), GHB ("liquid ecstasy"), flunitrazepam ("roofies") and ketamine ("special K"). They have many other slang names. ... also can become addicted if they use GHB, ketamine and flunitrazepam repeatedly. These drugs can cause severe ...

  10. Drug-induced diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    Diarrhea associated with medicines ... Nearly all medicines may cause diarrhea as a side effect. The drugs listed below, however, are more likely to cause diarrhea. Laxatives are meant to cause diarrhea. ...

  11. Drugs, Alcohol and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning ... follow these reminders: Never reuse or "share" syringes, water, or drug preparation equipment. Use only syringes obtained ...

  12. Oral Diabetes Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... could save hundreds of dollars a month by switching to generic metformin, a Consumer Reports Best Buy ... drugs because they are effective, generally safe, and cost less. Work with your doctor to choose the ...

  13. Bibliography [On Drugs].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Detroit, MI.

    A bibliography of materials on drugs is presented. The book and paper back entries are annotated. Selected technical references are listed under these major findings: (1) dependency, (2) barbiturates, (3) amphetamines, and (4) general pharmacology. (PS)

  14. Clinical nutrition and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Ekincioğlu, Aygin Bayraktar; Demirkan, Kutay

    2013-01-01

    A drug's plasma level, pharmacological effects or side effects, elimination, physicochemical properties or stability could be changed by interactions of drug-drug or drug-nutrition products in patients who receive enteral or parenteral nutritional support. As a result, patients might experience ineffective outcomes or unexpected effects of therapy (such as drug toxicity, embolism). Stability or incompatibility problems between parenteral nutrition admixtures and drugs might lead to alterations in expected therapeutic responses from drug and/or parenteral nutrition, occlusion in venous catheter or symptoms or mortality due to infusion of composed particles. Compatibilities between parenteral nutrition and drugs are not always guaranteed in clinical practice. Although the list of compatibility or incompatibilities of drugs are published for the use of clinicians in their practices, factors such as composition of parenteral nutrition admixture, drug concentration, contact time in catheter, temperature of the environment and exposure to light could change the status of compatibilities between drugs and nutrition admixtures. There could be substantial clinical changes occurring in the patient's nutritional status and pharmacological effects of drugs due to interactions between enteral nutrition and drugs. Drug toxicity and ineffective nutritional support might occur as a result of those predictable interactions. Although administration of drugs via feeding tube is a complex and problematic route for drug usage, it is possible to minimise the risk of tube occlusion, decreased effects of drug and drug toxicity by using an appropriate technique. Therefore, it is important to consider pharmacological dosage forms of drugs while administering drugs via a feeding tube. In conclusion, since the pharmacists are well-experienced and more knowledgeable professionals in drugs and drug usage compared to other healthcare providers, it is suggested that provision of information and

  15. Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program started in 1966 and conducted epidemiologic research to quantify the potential adverse effects of prescription drugs, utilizing in-hospital monitoring.

  16. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus

    MedlinePlus

    ... that caused the condition. Treatment may include: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat arthritis and pleurisy Corticosteroid creams to treat skin rashes Antimalarial drugs (hydroxychloroquine) to ...

  17. New drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Rech, Megan A; Donahey, Elisabeth; Cappiello Dziedzic, Jacqueline M; Oh, Laura; Greenhalgh, Elizabeth

    2015-02-01

    Drug abuse is a common problem and growing concern in the United States, and over the past decade, novel or atypical drugs have emerged and have become increasingly popular. Recognition and treatment of new drugs of abuse pose many challenges for health care providers due to lack of quantitative reporting and routine surveillance, and the difficulty of detection in routine blood and urine analyses. Furthermore, street manufacturers are able to rapidly adapt and develop new synthetic isolates of older drugs as soon as law enforcement agencies render them illegal. In this article, we describe the clinical and adverse effects and purported pharmacology of several new classes of drugs of abuse including synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, salvia, desomorphine, and kratom. Because many of these substances can have severe or life-threatening adverse effects, knowledge of general toxicology is key in recognizing acute intoxication and overdose; however, typical toxidromes (e.g., cholinergic, sympathomimetic, opioid, etc.) are not precipitated by many of these agents. Medical management of patients who abuse or overdose on these drugs largely consists of supportive care, although naloxone may be used as an antidote for desomorphine overdose. Symptoms of aggression and psychosis may be treated with sedation (benzodiazepines, propofol) and antipsychotics (haloperidol or atypical agents such as quetiapine or ziprasidone). Other facets of management to consider include treatment for withdrawal or addiction, nutrition support, and potential for transmission of infectious diseases. PMID:25471045

  18. Eosinophilic Drug Allergy.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Merin; Khan, David A

    2016-04-01

    While peripheral or tissue eosinophilia may certainly characterize drug eruptions, this feature is hardly pathognomonic for a medication-induced etiology. While delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions with prominent eosinophilic recruitment have been typically classified as type IVb reactions, their pathophysiology is now known to be more complex. Eosinophilic drug reactions have a diversity of presentations and may be benign and self-limited to severe and life-threatening. The extent of clinical involvement is also heterogeneous, ranging from isolated peripheral eosinophilia or single organ involvement (most often the skin and lung) to systemic disease affecting multiple organs, classically exemplified by drug-reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). The spectrum of implicated medications in the causation of DRESS is ever expanding, and multiple factors including drug metabolites, specific HLA alleles, herpes viruses, and immune system activation have been implicated in pathogenesis. Due to this complex interplay of various factors, diagnostic workup in terms of skin and laboratory testing has not been validated. Similarly, the lack of controlled trials limits treatment options. This review also describes other localized as well as systemic manifestations of eosinophilic disease induced by various medication classes, including their individual pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management. Given the multitude of clinical patterns associated with eosinophilic drug allergy, the diagnosis can be challenging. Considerable deficits in our knowledge of these presentations remain, but the potential for severe reactions should be borne in mind in order to facilitate diagnosis and institute appropriate management. PMID:26006718

  19. Safety of antiobesity drugs.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Bernard Man Yung; Cheung, Tommy Tsang; Samaranayake, Nithushi Rajitha

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is a major health problem worldwide. Although diet and physical activity are crucial in the management of obesity, the long-term success rate is low. Therefore antiobesity drugs are of great interest, especially when lifestyle modification has failed. As obesity is not an immediate life-threatening disease, these drugs are required to be safe. Antiobesity drugs that have been developed so far have limited efficacies and considerable adverse effects affecting tolerability and safety. Therefore, most antiobesity drugs have been withdrawn. Fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine were withdrawn because of the potential damage to heart valves. Sibutramine was associated with an increase in major adverse cardiovascular events in the Sibutramine Cardiovascular Outcomes (SCOUT) trial and it was withdrawn from the market in 2010. Rimonabant was withdrawn because of significant psychiatric adverse effects. Orlistat was approved in Europe and the United States for long-term treatment of obesity, but many patients cannot tolerate its gastrointestinal side effects. Phentermine and diethylpropion can only be used for less than 12 weeks because the long-term safety of these drugs is unknown. Ephedrine and caffeine are natural substances but the effects on weight reduction are modest. As a result there is a huge unmet need for effective and safe antiobesity drugs. Recently lorcaserin and topiramate plus phentermine have been approved for the treatment of obesity but long-term safety data are lacking. PMID:25114779

  20. Drug abuse in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Claudia L; Creado, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with “advances” in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. PMID:25187752

  1. [Drug use in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    von Mandach, U

    2005-01-01

    Drug use in pregnancy is associated with a number of serious complications for mother and fetus. There are safe data on destructive effects of alcohol, cocain, marijuana and tobacco on pregnancy and neonatal outcome. Of importance is the fact that for many drugs similar effects on pregnancy could be observed: vasoconstriction of the placental vessels resulting in placental abruption, preterm labour (mother), spontaneous abortion, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preterm delivery and stillbirth (fetus). Symptoms of withdrawal and neurodevelopmental disorders are the most important problems of the neonate. However, only small data exist about the effects of recently popular party drugs like ecstasy or LSD. In addition, from most drugs, with exception of alcohol, safe information about the risk of congenital malformations doesn't exist. Nevertheless they may be a useful guide in the diagnostic of potential malformations by ultrasound. Most of pregnant women using drugs are poly-drug users and are often in reduced general condition. They need therefore the intensive care of the obstetrician in cooperation with other specialists (internal medicine, psychiatry).

  2. Development of a Novel In Vitro Human Tissue-Based Angiogenesis Assay to Evaluate the Effect of Antiangiogenic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Woltering, Eugene A.; Lewis, James M.; Maxwell, P. Johnstone; Frey, Daniel J.; Wang, Yi-Zarn; Rothermel, John; Anthony, Catherine T.; Balster, Douglas A.; O’Leary, J. Patrick; Harrison, Lynn H.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To describe a novel in vitro human tissue-based angiogenic model that can predict an individual tumor’s response to antiangiogenic drugs. Summary Background Data A number of in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays exist, but they do not provide potentially useful information for the treatment of an individual patient. Clonogenic assays have been used to evaluate the response of an individual’s tumor to antineoplastic agents, but these tumor fragments are cultured in an environment that does not lead to neovessel growth. The authors have previously demonstrated that human vein disks or human tumor xenograft fragments incorporated into a 0.3% fibrin-thrombin clot will develop angiogenic vessel growth from the cut edge of the vessel disk or xenograft fragment. Methods Fresh human tumor or normal tissue disks (2 × 1 mm) from fresh surgical specimens were incorporated into fibrin-thrombin clots overlain with nutrient medium containing either 20% fetal bovine serum alone or in combination with Epothilone B, a tubulin inhibitor with antiangiogenic properties. Tissue disks were visually assessed over time to determine the percentage of wells that developed an angiogenic response. Neovessel growth, density, and length were graded at intervals using a semiquantitative visual neovessel growth-rating scheme (angiogenic index, 0–16 scale) devised in the authors’ laboratory. Results Epothilone B treatment at doses of 10−6 mol/L and 10−8 mol/L decreased the number of wells that developed an invasive angiogenic response and limited the development of vessels that invaded the matrix. At these doses, Epothilone B also caused regression of vessels in wells that had been allowed to develop an angiogenic response. Treatment of tumors or normal tissues with Epothilone B at doses less than 10−8 mol/L was ineffective. Conclusions Epothilone B may be an effective antiangiogenic agent in a variety of tumor types. The authors speculate that this in vitro model might

  3. Artemisinin-derived dimer ART-838 potently inhibited human acute leukemias, persisted in vivo, and synergized with antileukemic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer M.; Moynihan, James R.; Mott, Bryan T.; Mazzone, Jennifer R.; Anders, Nicole M.; Brown, Patrick A.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Liu, Jun O.; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Posner, Gary H.

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinins, endoperoxide-containing molecules, best known as antimalarials, have potent antineoplastic activity. The established antimalarial, artesunate (AS), and the novel artemisinin-derived trioxane diphenylphosphate dimer 838 (ART-838) inhibited growth of all 23 tested acute leukemia cell lines, reduced cell proliferation and clonogenicity, induced apoptosis, and increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ART-838 was 88-fold more potent that AS in vitro, inhibiting all leukemia cell lines at submicromolar concentrations. Both ART-838 and AS cooperated with several established antileukemic drugs and newer kinase inhibitors to inhibit leukemia cell growth. ART-838 had a longer plasma half-life than AS in immunodeficient NOD-SCID-IL2Rgnull (NSG) mice, remaining at effective antileukemic concentrations for >8h. Intermittent cycles of ART-838 inhibited growth of acute leukemia xenografts and primagrafts in NSG mice, at higher potency than AS. Based on these preclinical data, we propose that AS, with its established low toxicity and low cost, and ART-838, with its higher potency and longer persistence in vivo, should be further developed toward integration into antileukemic regimens. PMID:26771236

  4. Drug-specific [sup 19]F NMR and dynamic [sup 18]F PET imaging of the cytostatic agent 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Bellemann, M.E.; Brix, G.; Haberkorn, U.; Ostertag, H.J.; Lorenz, W.J. )

    1994-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the antineoplastic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been mapped both with [sup 19]F NMR and [sup 18]F PET imaging techniques. For [sup 19]F NMR imaging of 5-FU and its major catabolite [alpha]-fluoro-[beta]-alanine (FBAL), a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence was employed. A chemical-shift selective saturation pulse was used to suppress either the 5-FU or the FBAL resonance before the other component of the [sup 19]F NMR spectrum was images. This approach yielded selective 5-FU and FBAL NMR images free of chemical-shift artifacts in readout and slice-selection direction. In phantom experiments, [sup 19]F 5-FU and FBAL images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 x 12.5 x 20 mm[sup 3] were obtained in 32 min from model solutions with drug and catabolite concentrations similar to those estimated in animals and patients undergoing i.v. chemotherapy with 5-FU. The biodistribution of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in rats shortly after administration of the drug demonstrated the good vascularization of the transplanted tumors. The metabolic turnover of the cytostatic agent started about 10--20 min p.i. and was predominant in the tumor and liver tissue. The rapid adjustment of the [sup 18]F metabolite concentrations in the transplanted tumors to a steady state provides evidence of anabolic tumor activity, which supports the hypothesis of 5-FU trapping in malignant cells based on [sup 19]F NMR spectroscopy data. The high uptake of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in the liver, on the other hand, mainly reflects the catabolization of 5-FU to the noncytotoxic FBAL, which leads to a reduced bioavailability of the drug.

  5. Haemotoxicity of busulphan, doxorubicin, cisplatin and cyclophosphamide in the female BALB/c mouse using a brief regimen of drug administration.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, Gemma; Andrews, Michael; Sones, William; York, Malcolm; Barnett, Anne; Quirk, Edel; Yeung, Wing; Turton, John

    2011-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are myelotoxic and cause bone marrow depression; however, generally, the marrow/blood returns to normal after treatment. Nevertheless, after the administration of some anti-neoplastic agents (e.g. busulphan, BU) under conditions as yet undefined, the marrow may begin a return towards normal, but normality may not be achieved, and late-stage/residual marrow injury may be evident. The present studies were conducted to develop a short-term mouse model (a 'screen') to identify late-stage/residual marrow injury using a brief regimen of drug administration. Female BALB/c mice were treated with BU, doxorubicin (DOX), cisplatin (CISPLAT) or cyclophosphamide (CYCLOPHOS) on days 1, 3 and 5. In 'preliminary studies', a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for each drug was determined for use in 'main studies'. In main studies, mice were treated with vehicle (control), low and high (the MTD) dose levels of each agent. Necropsies were performed, and blood parameters and femoral/humeral nucleated marrow cell counts (FNCC/HNCC) were assessed on six occasions (from days 1 to 60/61 post-dosing). Late-stage/residual changes were apparent in BU-treated mice at day 61 post-dosing: RBC, Hb and haematocrit were reduced, mean cell volume/mean cell haemoglobin were increased and platelet and FNCC counts were decreased. Mice given DOX, CISPLAT and CYCLOPHOS, in general, showed no clear late-stage/residual effects (day 60/61). It was concluded that a brief regimen of drug administration, at an MTD, with assessment at day 60/61 post-dosing was a suitable short-term method/screen in the mouse for detecting late-stage/residual marrow injury for BU, a drug shown to exhibit these effects in man.

  6. Miami Drug Court Gives Drug Defendants a Second Chance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; Newlyn, Andrea K.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Diversion and Drug Treatment program, known as "Drug Court," in Miami (Florida) in which nonviolent drug offenders have prosecution of their cases deferred while they participate in a court-ordered drug-rehabilitation program. Those who successfully complete the program have their cases dismissed. Whereas typical recidivism rates for…

  7. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J

    2003-10-21

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds, such as drugs, can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, and lungs. In many drug hypersensitivity reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognize drugs through their alphabeta T-cell receptors in an MHC-dependent way. Drugs stimulate T cells if they act as haptens and bind covalently to peptides or if they have structural features that allow them to interact with certain T-cell receptors directly. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthema reveal that distinct T-cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. In maculopapular exanthema, perforin-positive and granzyme B-positive CD4+ T cells kill activated keratinocytes, while a large number of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the epidermis is associated with formation of vesicles and bullae. Drug-specific T cells also orchestrate inflammatory skin reactions through the release of various cytokines (for example, interleukin-5, interferon) and chemokines (such as interleukin-8). Activation of T cells with a particular function seems to lead to a specific clinical picture (for example, bullous or pustular exanthema). Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T-cell reactions, which through the release of certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions.

  8. Role of Hepatic Drug Transporters in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Houfu; Sahi, Jasminder

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic drug transporters can play an important role in pharmacokinetics and the disposition of therapeutic drugs and endogenous substances. Altered function of hepatic drug transporters due to drug-drug interactions (DDIs), genetic polymorphisms, and disease states can often result in a change in systemic and/or tissue exposure and subsequent pharmacological/toxicological effects of their substrates. Regulatory agencies including the US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and Japan Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency have issued guidance for industry on drug interaction studies, which contain comprehensive recommendations on in vitro and in vivo study tools and cutoff values to evaluate the DDI potential of new molecular entities mediated by hepatic drug transporters. In this report we summarize the latest regulatory and scientific progress of hepatic drug transporters in clinical DDIs, pharmacogenetics, drug-induced liver injury (DILI), as well as methods for predicting transporter-mediated pharmacokinetics and DDIs. PMID:27385168

  9. Recent New Drug Approvals. Part 1: Drugs with Pediatric Indications

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Chasity M.; Chhim, Rebecca F.; Christensen, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    This two-part review provides information about drugs that have been recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration and focuses on drugs approved with pediatric indications or approved in adults with active pediatric studies. Information was obtained from the product labeling and selected published studies. Part 1 reviews recently approved drugs with labeled pediatric indications, and Part 2 will review recent drug approvals in adults that have potential use in pediatrics and have active studies. PMID:23412997

  10. [Benefit assessment of drugs].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Thomas; Vervölgyi, V; Wieseler, B

    2015-03-01

    In Germany, new drugs are subject to a benefit assessment at the time of their market access. This "early benefit assessment" is the method primarily used for the benefit assessment of pharmaceuticals in Germany. While for the authorization of a drug a positive risk-benefit ratio is sufficient, early benefit assessment examines whether the new drug has an added benefit compared with other therapies, and thus differs significantly from authorization. For the evaluation, the manufacturer is required to submit a dossier, which must contain all the relevant studies. Early benefit assessment is very transparent in international comparisons, because all the relevant data and the evaluation report will be published. The assessment is carried out with regard to the evidence-based standard of care (the "appropriate comparator"). If the new drug is found to have an additional benefit, the extent of this added benefit is assessed. In addition, groups of patients should be identified with the particular extent of the added benefit. Therefore, subgroup analyses have to be carried out frequently. Often, for new drugs, only registration studies are available. General requirements for such studies (e.g., placebo comparison, endpoints) and decisions regarding the approval process (e.g., dosage regimens) can affect the level of confidence of these studies in the benefit assessment. Joint scientific advice by regulatory authorities and HTA (health technology assessment) agencies are provided to solve this problem. However, this is not possible without additional expense for the pharmaceutical companies. PMID:25566842

  11. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Timshina, Dependra K; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), viz., phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic or collagen vascular disorders. The risk for developing hypersensitivity within 60 days of the first or second prescription in new users of PHT or CBZ was estimated to be 2.3-4.5 per 10,000 and 1-4.1 per 10,000, respectively. The syndrome is defined by the fever, skin rash, lymphadenopathy and internal organ involvement within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis and myositis. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Cross-reactivity among PHT, CBZ and PB is as high as 70%-80%. Management mainly includes immediate withdrawal of the culprit drug, symptomatic treatment and systemic steroids or immunoglobulins.

  12. Photomechanical drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukas, Apostolos G.; Lee, Shun

    2000-05-01

    Photomechanical waves (PW) are generated by Q-switched or mode-locked lasers. Ablation is a reliable method for generating PWs with consistent characteristics. Depending on the laser wavelength and target material, PWs with different parameters can be generated which allows the investigation of PWs with cells and tissue. PWs have been shown to permeabilize the stratum corneum (SC) in vivo and facilitate the transport of drugs into the skin. Once a drug has diffused into the dermis it can enter the vasculature, thus producing a systemic effect. Fluorescence microscopy of biopsies show that 40-kDa molecules can be delivered to a depth of > 300 micrometers into the viable skin of rats. Many important drugs such as insulin, and erythropoietin are smaller or comparable in size, making the PWs attractive for transdermal drug delivery. There are three possible pathways through the SC: Transappendageal via hair follicles or other appendages, transcellular through the corneocytes, and intercellular via the extracellular matrix. The intracellular route appears to be the most likely pathway of drug delivery through the SC.

  13. Drug consumption among Polish centenarians.

    PubMed

    Rajska-Neumann, A; Mossakowska, M; Klich-Rączka, A; Życzkowska, J; Grześkowiak, E; Shieh, S; Wieczorowska-Tobis, K

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the quantitative and qualitative aspects of pharmacotherapy of Polish centenarians. The studied group consisted of 92 centenarians (mean age: 101.7±1.2 years, 77 females, mean age: 101.5±1.2; 15 males mean age: 102.2±1.2). Among the studied subjects, 18 individuals (19.6% of all subjects) did not use any drugs in his or her daily regimen. The mean number of drugs per person was 2.5±2.5 drugs (prescription drugs: 1.9±2.2 and non-prescription drugs: 0.5±0.8). Fifty-six centenarians (60.9% of all studied subjects) took concomitantly 0-3 drugs daily while 36 (39.1%) took more than 3 drugs daily. Within this group, 30 centenarians (32.6%) took 5 or more drugs concomitantly every day. The most commonly used groups of drugs were: gastrointestinal drugs (55 centenarians, 74.3% of all drug consumed), cardiovascular drugs (51 centenarians, 68.9%) and central nervous system drugs (N) (38 centenarians, 51.4%). In the studied group, 6 persons (8.1% of all drug consumers) were taking one potentially inappropriate drug based on the Beers criteria. To conclude, the mean number of drugs, the prevalence of polypharmacy, and the tendency for potential inappropriateness of treatment are lower among Polish centenarians comparing to the common elderly.

  14. National Drug Control Strategy. Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    President Bush's new National Drug Control Strategy for 2003 focuses on three core priorities: stopping drug use before it starts; healing America's drug users; and disrupting the market. The 2003 strategy reports progress toward meeting the President's goals of reducing drug use by 10 percent over 2 years, and 25 percent over 5 years. With regard…

  15. Overview of Selected Drug Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Edgar H.; And Others

    This document begins with a brief overview of findings from national surveys conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse which show increasing drug use throughout the 1970s and a decreasing trend in drug use during the 1980s. In spite of this decline, drug use in the U.S. is described as still constituting a major public health problem that…

  16. Drug Use in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliams, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses drug use in U.S. history. Argues that a "get-tough" approach did not work in the past and will not work in the future. Suggests that history can provide a scholarly assessment of drugs, foster understanding of drugs in contemporary society, and enable students to evaluate drug policies more objectively. (DK)

  17. Drug-Path: a database for drug-induced pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Qiu, Chengxiang; Cui, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Some databases for drug-associated pathways have been built and are publicly available. However, the pathways curated in most of these databases are drug-action or drug-metabolism pathways. In recent years, high-throughput technologies such as microarray and RNA-sequencing have produced lots of drug-induced gene expression profiles. Interestingly, drug-induced gene expression profile frequently show distinct patterns, indicating that drugs normally induce the activation or repression of distinct pathways. Therefore, these pathways contribute to study the mechanisms of drugs and drug-repurposing. Here, we present Drug-Path, a database of drug-induced pathways, which was generated by KEGG pathway enrichment analysis for drug-induced upregulated genes and downregulated genes based on drug-induced gene expression datasets in Connectivity Map. Drug-Path provides user-friendly interfaces to retrieve, visualize and download the drug-induced pathway data in the database. In addition, the genes deregulated by a given drug are highlighted in the pathways. All data were organized using SQLite. The web site was implemented using Django, a Python web framework. Finally, we believe that this database will be useful for related researches.

  18. Synthesis and Applications of Multimodal Hybrid Albumin Nanoparticles for Chemotherapeutic Drug Delivery and Photothermal Therapy Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Donna V.

    cellular uptake of AuNR-HSAPs via fluorescence microscopy. Finally, camptothecin (CPT) an antineoplastic agent and BACPT (7-butyl-10-aminocamptothecin) were loaded into HSAPs to combat their aqueous insolubility. BACPT-HSAPs loaded up to 5.25 micrograms BACPT/ mg of HSA. CPT encapsulation could not be determined. BACPT-HSAPs and CPT-HSAPs showed cytotoxicity to human sarcoma cells in vitro. Key words: Hybrid Nanoparticles, Photothermal Therapy, Gold Nanomaterials, Drug Delivery, Combinational Cancer Therapies, Materials, Human Serum Albumin, Colloidal Carriers.

  19. Drugs, the Internet and change.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the symbiotic relationship between drugs and the Internet, focusing (though not exclusively) on psychedelics. Programming on psychedelics in Silicon Valley from the 1960s to date is detailed, as are the twinned conceptualizations of drugs as a technology and technology as a drug. The correlation between drugs, the Internet, and consumerism is explored: the Internet is a medium through which "white," "grey" and "black" drug markets flourish. Thus, this article details the burgeoning online trades in pharmaceuticals, recreational, and "life-style" drugs that turn the Internet into a veritable candy store. Drug forums transmogrify into street corners, threatening the continued existence of the current system of global prohibition. However, it is arguably the use of the Web as an information source that may offer the greatest challenge to the incumbent paradigm, with experiential discourses offering alternatives to the hegemonic narrative, as the relationships between drugs, those who sell drugs and drug takers are reconfigured online. PMID:21615008

  20. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059