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Sample records for arsenic-related skin lesions

  1. Detecting arsenic-related skin lesions: experiences from a large community-based survey in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hore, Samar Kumar; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Yunus, Mohammad; Das, Chandra Shakhar; Yeasmin, Sultana; Ahmad, S K Akhtar; Sayed, M H Salim Ullah; Islam, Azm Maidul; Vahter, Marie; Persson, Lars Ake

    2007-04-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Matlab, Bangladesh, to determine the prevalence of skin lesions (a three-step procedure) associated with arsenic exposure and discuss validity and feasibility in relation to recommended screening algorithms. Cases with skin lesions were identified by screening above 4 years of age (n = 166,934). Trained field teams conducted a careful house-to-house screening and identified 1682 individuals with skin lesions, who were referred to physicians for confirmation. Physicians diagnosed 579 cases as probable and documented all these with digital photographs. Two experts inspected all photographs for consensus agreement that was reached for 504 cases. Using the experts' opinions as reference, the positive predictive value of the physicians' diagnosis was 87% (male = 82% vs. female = 94%; p < 0.01). The physicians had difficulties in separating arsenic-induced keratosis from differential diagnoses, while probability for correct diagnosis was high for arsenic-related pigmentation changes. Including information on current arsenic concentration in drinking water (which was masked at time of skin examination) or urine in the diagnostic algorithm should have increased the number of false negative cases. In the present transition of drinking water sources these markers of current exposure levels provide no information on past exposure. A 2-3 step procedure with house-to-house screening and clinic-based confirmation of arsenic-induced skin lesions is a feasible approach. Information on arsenic concentration in current water sources or in urine should not have improved the precision in the diagnosis. These results may have policy implications for community screening of arsenic-related skin lesions in Bangladesh and elsewhere.

  2. Protective Effects of B Vitamins and Antioxidants on the Risk of Arsenic-Related Skin Lesions in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Zablotska, Lydia B.; Chen, Yu; Graziano, Joseph H.; Parvez, Faruque; van Geen, Alexander; Howe, Geoffrey R.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2008-01-01

    Background An estimated 25–40 million of the 127 million people of Bangladesh have been exposed to high levels of naturally occurring arsenic from drinking groundwater. The mitigating effects of diet on arsenic-related premalignant skin lesions are largely unknown. Objectives The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of the vitamin B group (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine, and cobalamin) and antioxidants (vitamins A, C, and E) on arsenic-related skin lesions. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study using baseline data from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS), 2000–2002, with individual-level, time-weighted measures of arsenic exposure from drinking water. A total of 14,828 individuals meeting a set of eligibility criteria were identified among 65,876 users of all 5,996 tube wells in the 25-km2 area of Araihazar, Bangladesh; 11,746 were recruited into the study. This analysis is based on 10,628 subjects (90.5%) with nonmissing dietary data. Skin lesions were identified according to a structured clinical protocol during screening and confirmed with further clinical review. Results Riboflavin, pyridoxine, folic acid, and vitamins A, C, and E significantly modified risk of arsenic-related skin lesions. The deleterious effect of ingested arsenic, at a given exposure level, was significantly reduced (ranging from 46% reduction for pyridoxine to 68% for vitamin C) for persons in the highest quintiles of vitamin intake. Conclusions Intakes of B-vitamins and antioxidants, at doses greater than the current recommended daily amounts for the country, may reduce the risk of arsenic-related skin lesions in Bangladesh. PMID:18709164

  3. A case-control study of GST polymorphisms and arsenic related skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Kathleen M; Ryan, Louise; Houseman, E Andres; Williams, Paige L; Miller, David P; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mahiuddin, Golam; Smith, Thomas; Gonzalez, Ernesto; Su, Li; Christiani, David C

    2007-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms in GSTT1, GSTM1 and GSTP1 impact detoxification of carcinogens by GSTs and have been reported to increase susceptibility to environmentally related health outcomes. Individual factors in arsenic biotransformation may influence disease susceptibility. GST activity is involved in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds, including catalyzing the formation of arsenic-GSH conjugates. Methods We investigated whether polymorphisms in GSTT1, GSTP1 and GSTM1 were associated with risk of skin lesions and whether these polymorphisms modify the relationship between drinking water arsenic exposure and skin lesions in a case control study of 1200 subjects frequency matched on age and gender in community clinics in Pabna, Bangladesh in 2001–2002. Results and discussion GSTT1 homozygous wildtype status was associated with increased odds of skin lesions compared to the null status (OR1.56 95% CI 1.10–2.19). The GSTP1 GG polymorphism was associated with greater odds of skin lesions compared to GSTP1 AA, (OR 1.86 (95%CI 1.15–3.00). No evidence of effect modification by GSTT1, GSTM1 or GSTP1 polymorphisms on the association between arsenic exposure and skin lesions was detected. Conclusion GSTT1 wildtype and GSTP1 GG are associated with increased risk of skin lesions. PMID:17284320

  4. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor gene variants and susceptibility of arsenic-related skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Cordova, E J; Valenzuela, O L; Sánchez-Peña, L C; Escamilla-Guerrero, G; Hernández-Zavala, A; Orozco, L; Del Razo, L M

    2014-06-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is an important pollutant associated with various chronic-degenerative diseases. The cytoprotective protein nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (NRF2) has been proposed as an important responsive mechanism against iAs exposure. The aim of this study was to determine whether the risk of skin lesions in people exposed to iAs-contaminated water could be modified by the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the NRF2 coding gene. We studied 117 individuals with long-term iAs exposure and 120 nonexposed individuals. Total As was determined in water, meanwhile iAs and its metabolites were measured in urine. The iAs-induced skin lesion status was evaluated by expert dermatologists. We sequenced the promoter region of NRF2 in a sample of 120 healthy donors. We found four polymorphisms previously reported and one novel polymorphism in the 5' regulatory region of the NRF2. In this study, we did not find allelic and genotype association of NRF2 polymorphisms with iAs-related skin lesion. However, the analysis of haplotypes composed by -653GA, and -617CA NRF2 single nucleotide polymorphisms showed a significant association with protection against skin lesions in the low-As exposure group. This is the first report studying the association between NRF2 polymorphisms and susceptibility of As-related skin lesions. Increasing the sample size will allow us to confirm this data. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. E-cadherin polymorphisms and susceptibility to arsenic-related skin lesions in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Nriagu, Jerome; Lin, Tser-Sheng; Mazumder, Debendranath Guha; Chatterjee, Debashis

    2012-03-15

    Although suppression of E-cadherin gene (CDH1) expression and exposure to arsenic have separately been associated with skin lesions, the combined effects of this "gene-environment" interaction have not been explored previously. A population-based cross-sectional survey. This study involved 100 cases with skin lesions and 100 controls who were family members with no lesions. The subjects were recruited from villages and hamlets in northern Nadia Province, West Bengal. Each participant was required to undergo a detailed face-to-face interview; provide spot urine sample; provide saliva sample; and sign a consent form. The type and severity of skin lesions were assessed during a general medical examination of each participant in the field. The following 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CDH1 were measured using DNA extracted from saliva samples: rs16260, rs5030625, rs155364, rs155808, rs155807, rs2303646, rs2059254, rs9925923, rs12919719, rs7188750, rs9989407, rs7196495, rs7196661, rs13689, rs12599393, and rs1862748. The main effects of SNPs on the risk for skin lesions were borderline for rs7196661 (p-value=0.092), rs7196495 (p-value=0.090), and rs12919719 (p-value=0.065); the strongest association was found for rs9989407 (p-value=0.058). Several SNPs, however, showed that the T>T genotype carriers are at higher relative risk for skin lesions compared to carriers of the C>C or C>T genotypes; these results need to be confirmed in a larger study. The main effects of some of the SNPs and genotype frequencies on the severity of skin lesions were found to be relatively weak. This is the first study that indicates that CDH1 polymorphisms can contribute to the etiology of premalignant skin lesions in people chronically exposed to arsenic in drinking water, and that this gene may be a factor in individual susceptibility to cutaneous diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Intakes of Several Nutrients Are Associated with Incidence of Arsenic-Related Keratotic Skin Lesions in Bangladesh12

    PubMed Central

    Melkonian, Stephanie; Argos, Maria; Chen, Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Pierce, Brandon; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Ahsan, Habibul

    2012-01-01

    Risk of skin lesions due to chronic arsenic exposure can be further affected by nutrient intake. We prospectively evaluated the association of nutrient intake and gender with incident skin lesions using data from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Araihazar, Bangladesh. Discrete time hazard models were used to estimate these effects in stratified analyses based on skin lesion severity. Overall, we observed significant associations between low intakes of various nutrients (retinol, calcium, fiber, folate, iron, riboflavin, thiamin, and vitamins A, C, and E) and skin lesion incidence, particularly for keratotic skin lesions. Associations for vitamins C and E showed significant linear trends. Gender-specific analyses revealed an inverse association between the lowest quartile of nutrient intake and keratotic skin lesion incidence for retinol equivalents, calcium, folate, iron, and fiber among women. Interactions by gender were observed for retinol equivalents (P-interaction = 0.03), calcium (P-interaction = 0.04), vitamin A (P-interaction = 0.03), and riboflavin (P-interaction = 0.04) with the incidence of keratotic skin lesions. Understanding differential susceptibility to skin lesion incidence based on nutrient intake will help researchers develop targeted interventions to prevent health consequences of arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh and beyond. PMID:23077185

  7. Intakes of several nutrients are associated with incidence of arsenic-related keratotic skin lesions in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Melkonian, Stephanie; Argos, Maria; Chen, Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Pierce, Brandon; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Ahsan, Habibul

    2012-12-01

    Risk of skin lesions due to chronic arsenic exposure can be further affected by nutrient intake. We prospectively evaluated the association of nutrient intake and gender with incident skin lesions using data from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Araihazar, Bangladesh. Discrete time hazard models were used to estimate these effects in stratified analyses based on skin lesion severity. Overall, we observed significant associations between low intakes of various nutrients (retinol, calcium, fiber, folate, iron, riboflavin, thiamin, and vitamins A, C, and E) and skin lesion incidence, particularly for keratotic skin lesions. Associations for vitamins C and E showed significant linear trends. Gender-specific analyses revealed an inverse association between the lowest quartile of nutrient intake and keratotic skin lesion incidence for retinol equivalents, calcium, folate, iron, and fiber among women. Interactions by gender were observed for retinol equivalents (P-interaction = 0.03), calcium (P-interaction = 0.04), vitamin A (P-interaction = 0.03), and riboflavin (P-interaction = 0.04) with the incidence of keratotic skin lesions. Understanding differential susceptibility to skin lesion incidence based on nutrient intake will help researchers develop targeted interventions to prevent health consequences of arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh and beyond.

  8. A Prospective Study of Blood Selenium Levels and the Risk of Arsenic-related Premalignant Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Hall, Marni; Graziano, Joseph H.; Slavkovich, Vesna; van Geen, Alexander; Parvez, Faruque; Ahsan, Habibul

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic exposure from drinking water is considered to be a risk factor for skin and internal cancers. Animal studies suggest a potential antagonism between As and Se in the body. We performed a case-cohort analysis to prospectively evaluate the association between As-related premalignant skin lesions and prediagnostic blood Se levels in 303 cases of skin lesions newly-diagnosed from November 2002 to April 2004 and 849 subcohort members randomly-selected from the 8,092 participants in the Health Effects of As Longitudinal Study with available baseline blood and urine samples collected in 2000. Incidence rate ratios for skin lesions in increasing blood Se quintiles were 1.00 (ref), 0.68 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.39, 1.18), 0.51 (95% CI: 0.29, 0.87), 0.52 (95% CI: 0.30, 0.91), and 0.53 (95% CI: 0.31, 0.90). Effect estimates remained similar with adjustments for age, sex, BMI, smoking status, excessive sunlight exposure (in men), well water As concentration at baseline, and nutritional intakes of folate, iron, protein, Vitamin E, and B Vitamins. At any given As exposure level, the risk of premalignant skin lesions was consistently greater among participants with blood Se lower than the average level. The findings support the hypothesis that dietary Se intake may reduce the incidence of As-related premalignant skin lesions among populations exposed to As exposure from drinking water. PMID:17301251

  9. Oxidative DNA damage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, selectively induced by chronic arsenic exposure, is associated with extent of arsenic-related skin lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Qiuling; Ma, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wenchao; Li, Yong; Ma, Zhifeng; Li, Yunyun; Tian, Fengjie; Zhang, Wenping; Mu, Jinjun; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Dongxing; Liu, Haifang; Yang, Mimi; Ma, Caifeng; Yun, Fen

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is an important risk factor for arsenic-related diseases. Peripheral blood leukocytes constitute an important defense against microorganisms or pathogens, while the research on the impact of chronic arsenic exposure on peripheral blood leukocytes is much more limited, especially at low level arsenic exposure. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether chronic arsenic exposure affects oxidative stress of peripheral blood leukocytes and possible linkages between oxidative stress and arsenic-induced skin lesions. 75 male inhabitants recruited from an As-endemic region of China were investigated in the present study. The classification of arsenicosis was based on the degree of skin lesions. Arsenic levels were measured in drinking water and urine by Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 8-OHdG of peripheral blood leukocytes was evaluated using immunocytochemical staining. 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not in monocytes (MNs). The 8-OHdG staining of PMN cytoplasm was observed in all investigated populations, while the 8-OHdG staining of PMN nuclei was frequently found along with the elevated amounts of cell debris in individuals with skin lesion. Urinary arsenic levels were increased in the severe skin lesion group compared with the normal group. No relationship was observed between drinking water arsenic or urine 8-OHdG and the degree of skin lesions. These findings indicated that the target and persistent oxidative stress in peripheral blood PMNs may be employed as a sensitive biomarker directly to assess adverse health effects caused by chronic exposure to lower levels of arsenic. -- Highlights: ► Male inhabitants were investigated from an As-endemic region of China. ► 8-OHdG-positive reactions were only present in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

  10. Risk of arsenic-related skin lesions in Bangladeshi villages at relatively low exposure: a report from Gonoshasthaya Kendra.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Corbett; Hoque, Rezaul; Huda, Nazmul; Cherry, Nicola

    2007-09-01

    Arsenic concentrations in 25% of tube wells in Bangladesh exceed 50 microg/L, a level known to be hazardous. Levels in individual wells vary widely. We gathered data on arsenic exposure levels and skin lesion prevalence to address the lack of knowledge about risks where the average arsenic concentrations was lower. The nongovernmental organization Gonoshasthaya Kendra did three related studies of keratotic skin lesions since 2004: (1) an ecological prevalence survey among 13 705 women aged > 18 in a random sample of 53 villages; (2) a case-control study of 176 cases and age- and village-matched referents; and (3) a prevalence survey of the entire population of 11,670 in two additional villages. We calculated prevalence as a function of average arsenic concentrations as reported in the National Hydrochemical Survey, and measured arsenic concentrations in wells used by subjects in the case-control study. The prevalence of skin lesions was 0.37% in people exposed to arsenic concentrations below 5 microg/L, 0.63% at 6-50 microg/L, and 6.84% at 81 microg/L. In the case-control analysis, relative risk of skin lesions increased threefold at concentrations above 50 microg/L (P < 0.05). Little serious skin disease is likely to occur if the arsenic concentration in drinking water is kept below 50 microg/L, but ensuring this water quality will require systematic surveillance and reliable testing of all wells, which may be impractical. More research is needed on feasible prevention of toxic effects from arsenic exposure in Bangladesh.

  11. Arsenic-related Bowen's disease, palmar keratosis, and skin cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cöl, M; Cöl, C; Soran, A; Sayli, B S; Oztürk, S

    1999-01-01

    Chronic arsenical intoxication can still be found in environmental and industrial settings. Symptoms of chronic arsenic intoxication include general pigmentation or focal "raindrop" pigmentation of the skin and the appearance of hyperkeratosis of the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. In addition to arsenic-related skin diseases including keratosis, Bowen's disease, basal-cell-carcinoma, and squamous-cell carcinoma, there is also an increased risk of some internal malignancies. Arsenic-related diseases are common in areas of the world where the drinking water has a high arsenic content. In this paper, we describe a 35-year-old male patient who had arsenic-related keratosis, squamous-cell carcinoma in the palmar area of his left hand, and Bowen's disease on his left thigh. The patient worked in a borax mine for 15 years, so he was exposed to arsenic in drinking water, airborne arsenic in his workplace, and had direct contact. The patient was treated for 11 months for arsenic-related keratosis until an axillary lymph node metastasis occurred; the lesion was excised and diagnosed to be malignant. Bowen's disease was detected when the patient was being treated for cancer. No other malignancy was found. The patient is still receiving regular follow-up care. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10417369

  12. Arsenic-related skin lesions and glutathione S-transferase P1 A1578G (Ile105Val) polymorphism in two ethnic clans exposed to indoor combustion of high arsenic coal in one village.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guo-Fang; Du, Hui; Chen, Ji-Gang; Lu, Hong-Chao; Guo, Wei-Chao; Meng, Hong; Zhang, Tian-Bao; Zhang, Xin-Jiang; Lu, Da-Ru; Golka, Klaus; Shen, Jian-Hua

    2006-12-01

    A total of 2402 patients with arsenic-related skin lesions, such as hyperkeratosis, hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation, or even skin cancer in a few villages in Southwest Guizhou Autonomous Prefecture, China represent a unique case of endemic arsenism related with indoor combustion of high arsenic coal. This study aimed to investigate the cluster of arsenism cases and the possible relevant factors including GSTP1 polymorphism in two clans of different ethnic origin living in one village for generations. A questionnaire-based study was performed in 170 Miao clan P members, 10 of whom had arsenic-related skin diseases, and 153 Han clan G1 members, 50 of whom had arsenic-related skin diseases. The data were checked against the registration archives since the 1980s. At the same time, arsenic concentrations in samples of coal, indoor air, drinking water, corn and chilli pepper that were once baked over the stoves for desiccation, as well as in samples of urine and hair of clan members were determined. Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) A1578G polymorphism was genotyped by a restriction fragment length polymorphism-based procedure. Arsenism morbidity in Miao clan P was significantly lower than in the neighbouring Han clan G1 [5.9 vs. 32.7%, odds ratio (OR)=0.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06-0.27, P<0.0001]. No sex differences were confirmed inside both clans. Analyses of the environmental samples indicated that Miao clan P members were exposed to higher amounts of arsenic via inhalation and food ingestion. Hair and urine samples also proved a higher arsenic body burden in ethnic Miao individuals. No corresponding differences by sex were found. Higher frequencies of combined mutant genotype G/G1578 and A/G1578 (OR=4.72, 95% CI: 2.34-9.54, P<0.0001) and of mutant allele G1578 (OR=3.22, 95% CI: 2.00-5.18, P<0.0001) were detected in diagnosed arsenism patients than in non-diseased individuals. The Miao individuals showed a lower percentage of combined mutant

  13. Arsenic-related skin lesions and glutathione S-transferase P1 A1578G (lle105Val) polymorphism in two ethnic clans exposed to indoor combustion of high arsenic coal in one village

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.F.; Du, H.; Chen, J.G.; Lu, H.C.; Guo, W.C.; Meng, H.; Zhang, T.B.; Zhang, X.J.; Lu, D.R.; Golka, K.; Shen, J.H.

    2006-12-15

    A total of 2402 patients with arsenic-related skin lesions, such as hyperkeratosis, hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation, or even skin cancer in a few villages in Southwest Guizhou Autonomous Prefecture, China represent a unique case of endemic arsenism related with indoor combustion of high arsenic coal. This study aimed to investigate the cluster of arsenism cases and the possible relevant factors including GSTP1 polymorphism in two clans of different ethnic origin living in one village for generations. Arsenism morbidity in Miao clan P was significantly lower than in the neighbouring Han clan G1 (5.9 vs. 32.7%, odds ratio (OR)=0.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06-0.27, P < 0.0001). No sex differences were confirmed inside both clans. Analyses of the environmental samples indicated that Miao clan P members were exposed to higher amounts of arsenic via inhalation and food ingestion. Hair and urine samples also proved a higher arsenic body burden in ethnic Miao individuals. No corresponding differences by sex were found. Higher frequencies of combined mutant genotype G/G1578 and A/G1578 (OR=4.72, 95% CI: 2.34-9.54, P < 0.0001) and of mutant allele G1578 (OR=3.22, 95% CI: 2.00-5.18, P < 0.0001) were detected in diagnosed arsenism patients than in non-diseased individuals. The Miao individuals showed a lower percentage of combined mutant genotypes (30.6 vs. 52.7%, OR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.19-0.84, P=0.015) as well as of mutant allele G1578 (OR=0.46, 95% CI: 0.24-0.88, P=0.017) than their Han neighbours. Conclusions Genetic predisposition influences dermal arsenism toxicity. The GSTP1 A1578G (IIe105Val) status might be a susceptibility factor for arsenic-related skin lesions.

  14. Skin lesion of blastomycosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000865.htm Skin lesion of blastomycosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A skin lesion of blastomycosis is a symptom of an infection with the ...

  15. Skin lesions in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Goodfield, M

    1994-05-01

    Psoriatic skin disease is common; it occurs at all ages and co-exists with joint disease in approximately 10% of cases. All areas of skin, scalp and nails may be involved. In the typical case, the skin lesions are easy to recognize. Atypical forms of skin involvement and lesions at unusual sites are less easily diagnosed by non-specialists. The cause is unknown, but there is a clear genetic element, with external factors being important in precipitation and exacerbations of the condition. Topical treatment is successful in most patients, but in resistant cases combinations of systemic therapy and ultraviolet radiation usually give good control. Although there is no cure, the majority of sufferers live normal lives and, with the exception of severe erythrodermic or generalized pustular psoriasis, there is no mortality. Morbidity, particularly social and occupational, is more of a problem than is often acknowledged.

  16. Monitoring pigmented skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Vincent P.; Bamber, Jeffery C.; Ott, Robert J.; Crawford, Diane C.; Mortimer, Peter S.

    2002-06-01

    The rising incidence of skin cancer has led to an increase in the number of patients with skin lesions that require diagnosis, mostly using subjective visual examination. Successful treatment depends on early diagnosis. Unfortunately diagnostic accuracy, even by experts, can be as low as 56%; therefore, an accurate, objective diagnostic aid is greatly needed. Reflectance characteristics of pigmented skin lesions were documented to evaluate their diagnostic potential. Reflectance spectra in the wavelength range 320-1100nm were obtained from 260 lesions. Differences between spectra from benign and malignant lesions were utilized by extracting features with the best discriminating power. Discrimination was evaluated using two techniques: multivariate statistical analysis and artificial neural networks, using histology as the standard. Each technique was tested in a blind study and assessed in terms of its ability to diagnose new cases and compared to the clinical diagnosis. The artificial neural network achieved the best diagnostic performance for discriminating between malignant melanoma and benign nevi, having a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 65%. Utilization of visible and infrared techniques for monitoring skin lesions has lead to improvements in diagnostic accuracy. We conclude that these techniques are worthy of further development and evaluation in clinical practice as a screening tool.

  17. Gram stain of skin lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Skin lesion gram stain Images Viral lesion culture References Hall GS, Woods GL. Medical bacteriology. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  18. Skin lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... confirms the diagnosis, your provider will start a treatment plan. A few of the skin problems that may be diagnosed are: Psoriasis Infection from bacteria or fungus Melanoma Basal cell skin cancer Squamous cell skin cancer Risks Risks of a ...

  19. Itchy lesions in pigmented skin

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Rachel; Ahmeen, Mahreen; Fleming, Ann; Hoque, Shamali

    2013-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman with type VI skin presented with 1-year history of pruritic lesions affecting her arms, chest and legs. The lesions were approximately 5 mm in diameter, annular and with a raised border. A skin biopsy was performed which showed a diagnosis of disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis. Porokeratosis is an unusual presentation in pigmented skin and there are very limited reports of this occurrence in the literature. PMID:24114602

  20. Fuzzy description of skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskaris, Nikolaos; Ballerini, Lucia; Fisher, Robert B.; Aldridge, Ben; Rees, Jonathan

    2010-02-01

    We propose a system for describing skin lesions images based on a human perception model. Pigmented skin lesions including melanoma and other types of skin cancer as well as non-malignant lesions are used. Works on classification of skin lesions already exist but they mainly concentrate on melanoma. The novelty of our work is that our system gives to skin lesion images a semantic label in a manner similar to humans. This work consists of two parts: first we capture they way users perceive each lesion, second we train a machine learning system that simulates how people describe images. For the first part, we choose 5 attributes: colour (light to dark), colour uniformity (uniform to non-uniform), symmetry (symmetric to non-symmetric), border (regular to irregular), texture (smooth to rough). Using a web based form we asked people to pick a value of each attribute for each lesion. In the second part, we extract 93 features from each lesions and we trained a machine learning algorithm using such features as input and the values of the human attributes as output. Results are quite promising, especially for the colour related attributes, where our system classifies over 80% of the lesions into the same semantic classes as humans.

  1. Dermoscopy of pigmented skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Soyer, H P; Argenziano, G; Chimenti, S; Ruocco, V

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the basic concepts of dermoscopy, the various dermoscopic equipments and the standard criteria for diagnosing pigmented skin lesions. In assessing dermoscopic images, both global and local features can be recognized. These features will be systematically described and illustrated in Part I of this article. First, we will focus on 8 morphologically rather distinctive global features that allow a quick, preliminary categorization of a given pigmented skin lesion. Second, we will describe various local features representing the letters of the dermoscopic alphabet. The local features permit a more detailed assessment of pigmented skin lesions.

  2. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hair Small blood vessels in the skin Tattoos CRYOTHERAPY Cryotherapy is a method of super-freezing tissue in ... warts, actinic keratoses, solar keratoses, and molluscum contagiosum. Cryotherapy is done using a cotton swab that has ...

  3. Skin lesion KOH exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... is present. The fungus may be related to ringworm , athlete's foot , jock itch , or another fungal infection. ... foot Candida infection of the skin Jock itch Ringworm Ringworm of the body Review Date 4/14/ ...

  4. Border preserving skin lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, Mostafa; Samei, Golnoosh

    2008-03-01

    Melanoma is a fatal cancer with a growing incident rate. However it could be cured if diagnosed in early stages. The first step in detecting melanoma is the separation of skin lesion from healthy skin. There are particular features associated with a malignant lesion whose successful detection relies upon accurately extracted borders. We propose a two step approach. First, we apply K-means clustering method (to 3D RGB space) that extracts relatively accurate borders. In the second step we perform an extra refining step for detecting the fading area around some lesions as accurately as possible. Our method has a number of novelties. Firstly as the clustering method is directly applied to the 3D color space, we do not overlook the dependencies between different color channels. In addition, it is capable of extracting fine lesion borders up to pixel level in spite of the difficulties associated with fading areas around the lesion. Performing clustering in different color spaces reveals that 3D RGB color space is preferred. The application of the proposed algorithm to an extensive data-base of skin lesions shows that its performance is superior to that of existing methods both in terms of accuracy and computational complexity.

  5. [Caring for perilesional skin or skin having a lesion risk].

    PubMed

    Segovia, Gómez T; Javares, Curto T; Barahona, M; Verdú, Soriano J

    2007-10-01

    In order to increase the clinical and scientific evidence of the Hyperoxygenated Fatty Acids (HFA) in emulsion preparation for skin care, this study considers to evaluate prospectively how it influences in the state of the periwound skin (when there are active lesions) or in which it presents a high risk of lesion production.

  6. Dermatology of the head and neck: skin cancer and benign skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Halem, Monica; Karimkhani, Chanté

    2012-10-01

    Skin lesions are extremely common, and early detection of dangerous lesions makes skin cancer one of the most highly curable malignancies. By simply becoming aware of common lesions and their phenotypic presentation, dental professionals are empowered to detect suspicious dermatologic lesions in unaware patients. This article serves as an introduction to skin cancer and benign skin lesions for dental professionals.

  7. [Examination procedure and description of skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Ochsendorf, Falk; Meister, Laura

    2017-02-09

    The dermatologic examination follows a clear structure. After a short history is taken, the whole skin is inspected. The description, which is ideally provided in writing, forces one to look at the skin more closely. The description should include an accurate description of the location, the distribution, the form, and the type of lesion. The article contains tables with internationally approved definitions to describe skin changes. The analysis of these findings allows one to deduce pathophysiologic mechanisms occurring in the skin and to deduce hypotheses, i. e., suspected and differential diagnoses. These are confirmed or excluded by further diagnostic measures. The expert comes to a diagnosis very quickly by a pattern-recognition process, whereby novices must still develop this kind of thinking. Experts can minimize cognitive bias by reflective analytical reasoning and reorganization of knowledge.

  8. Association between multi-level inorganic arsenic exposure from drinking water and skin lesions in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Ye, Xiaolei; Liu, Jun; Yoshimura, Takesumi

    2006-09-01

    Arsenic is one of the most important toxicants in the environment. In Inner Mongolia of China, 300,000 residents are believed to be drinking water containing >50 microg/liter. Skin lesions have been known as the most common consequences resulting from chronic exposure to arsenic. To clarify the prevalence of arsenic-induced skin lesions, it is important to assess the impact of this problem among the target population, and to make future planning. We evaluated the association between multi-levels inorganic arsenic exposure from drinking water and skin lesions in an arsenic-affected area in Inner Mongolia, China. One hundred nine and 32 subjects in high (>50 microg/liter) and low (<50 microg/liter) arsenic-affected villages were recruited and had the detailed physical examination with special emphasis on arsenic-related skin lesions. Arsenic exposure was measured for each participant with respect to iAs concentration of primary well and the duration using the well. Arsenic-induced skin lesions including keratosis, pigmentation, and/or depigmentation were diagnosed in 56 and 3 subjects in the two villages, respectively. Logistic regression was conducted to calculate odd ratios of skin lesions associated with arsenic exposure with adjustments for sex, age group, smoking and duration of exposure. A consistent dose-response relationship between arsenic exposure level and skin lesion risk was observed. Compared to those with iAs concentration <50 microg/liter, the adjusted odds ratios of skin lesions for the subjects with 51-99, 100-149 and >150 microg/liter were 33.3% (OR =15.50, 95% CI: 1.53-248.70), 46.7% (OR =16.10, 95% CI: 3.73-69.63) and 55.7% (OR= 25.70, 95% CI: 6.43-102.87), respectively. Duration of using well was not associated with increased risk of skin lesions in this population; (OR =1.68, 95% CI: 0.40-6.91 for 6-15 years, OR = 2.30, 95% CI: 0.58-9.14 for over 15 years) compared with the duration of less than 5 years.

  9. Malignant skin lesions in Oshogbo, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oseni, Ganiyu Oyediran; Olaitan, Peter Babatunde; Komolafe, Akinwumi Oluwole; Olaofe, Olaejirinde Olaniyi; Akinyemi, Hezekiah Adebola Morakinyo; Suleiman, Oreoluwa Adeola

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to retrospectively assess the prevalence of some of skin malignancies in our environment and to provide a data base for creating awareness for prevention and early detection of the diseases in order to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with these skin lesions in our environment. Methods This is a retrospective study of all histologically diagnosed malignant skin lesions which presented at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital Osogbo Osun State between January 2006 and December 2010. Results Ninety- eight patients presented with skin cancers out of which 60 (61.2%)were males and 38 (38.8%) were females. Malignant melanoma ranked highest followed by squamous cell carcinoma, dermatofibrosarcoma and basal cell carcinoma in that order. Malignant melanoma affects male more than female and it commonly affects lower limbs. Conclusion Skin malignancies pose a burden to the economy of the country. Efforts should be directed toward prevention, early diagnosis and management in order to abolish or reduce morbidity, as well as mortality associated with late presentation of people in the developing countries. PMID:26161176

  10. The Impact of Diet and Betel Nut Use on Skin Lesions Associated with Drinking-Water Arsenic in Pabna, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Kathleen M.; Houseman, E. Andres; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mahiuddin, Golam; Smith, Thomas; Ryan, Louise; Christiani, David C.

    2006-01-01

    An established exposure–response relationship exists between water arsenic levels and skin lesions. Results of previous studies with limited historical exposure data, and laboratory animal studies suggest that diet may modify arsenic metabolism and toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the effect of diet on the risk of arsenic-related skin lesions in Pabna, Bangladesh. Six hundred cases and 600 controls loosely matched on age and sex were enrolled at Dhaka Community Hospital, Bangladesh, in 2001–2002. Diet, demographic data, and water samples were collected. Water samples were analyzed for arsenic using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Betel nut use was associated with a greater risk of skin lesions in a multivariate model [odds ratio (OR) = 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18–2.36]. Modest decreases in risk of skin lesions were associated with fruit intake 1–3 times/month (OR = 0.68; 95%CI, 0.51–0.89) and canned goods at least 1 time/month (OR = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.20–0.86). Bean intake at least 1 time/day (OR = 1.89; 95% CI, 1.11–3.22) was associated with increased odds of skin lesions. Betel nut use appears to be associated with increased risk of developing skin lesions in Bangladesh. Increased intake of fruit and canned goods may be associated with reduced risk of lesions. Increased intake of beans may be associated with an increased risk of skin lesions. The results of this study do not provide clear support for a protective effect of vegetable and overall protein consumption against the development of skin lesions, but a modest benefit cannot be excluded. PMID:16507454

  11. Spontaneous endometriosis in an umbilical skin lesion.

    PubMed

    Chatzikokkinou, Paraskevi; Thorfinn, Johan; Angelidis, Ioannis K; Papa, Giovanni; Trevisan, Giusto

    2009-09-01

    Cutaneous endometriosis of the umbilicus is an unusual condition with unclear pathogenetic mechanisms that might be mistaken for a malignant condition. A 46-year-old woman presented with a cutaneous black mass in the umbilicus. The lesion was removed surgically and histological analyses revealed that it consisted of endometrial tissue. There was no recurrence at 18-month follow-up. Endometriosis of the umbilicus is a rare condition and the pathogenesis is not completely elucidated. According to one theory, intraperitoneal endometrial tissue is translocated during endoscopic surgery or other surgical procedures that involve the umbilicus. However, in this case there was no history of abdominal wall surgery. We conclude that endometriosis is important to consider in cases of unclear skin lesions of the umbilicus, even in cases with no previous abdominal surgery. Moreover, umbilical endometriosis of the skin can have different appearances that resemble malignant tumors, and radical surgery with histology is therefore indicated.

  12. Classification of melanocytic skin lesions from non-melanocytic lesions.

    PubMed

    Iyatomi, Hitoshi; Norton, Kerri-Ann; Celebi, M; Schaefer, Gerald; Tanaka, Masaru; Ogawa, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a classification method of dermoscopy images between melanocytic skin lesions (MSLs) and non-melanocytic skin lesions (NoMSLs). The motivation of this research is to develop a pre-processor of an automated melanoma screening system. Since NoMSLs have a wide variety of shapes and their border is often ambiguous, we developed a new tumor area extraction algorithm to account for these difficulties. We confirmed that this algorithm is capable of handling different dermoscopy images not only those of NoMSLs but also MSLs as well. We determined the tumor area from the image using this new algorithm, calculated a total 428 features from each image, and built a linear classifier. We found only two image features, "the skewness of bright region in the tumor along its major axis" and "the difference between the average intensity in the peripheral part of the tumor and that in the normal skin area using the blue channel" were very efficient at classifying NoMSLs and MSLs. The detection accuracy of MSLs by our classifier using only the above mentioned image feature has a sensitivity of 98.0% and a specificity of 86.6% in a set of 107 non-melanocytic and 548 melanocytic dermoscopy images using a cross-validation test.

  13. [Skin vessel lesions in aluminum potroom workers].

    PubMed

    Siurin, S A; Nikanov, A N; Shilov, V V

    2012-01-01

    The features of development of the skin vessels lesions in 550 aluminum production workers have been investigated. The high prevalence of these disorders have been revealed in anode-operators and cell-operators, 49, 3 and 26.0% of workers, respectively. The regularity and staging of the development of this abnormity have been established, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical significance of those remain unknown.

  14. Arsenic methylation capacity and its correlation with skin lesions induced by contaminated drinking water consumption in residents of chronic arsenicosis area.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Li, Bing; Xu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yi; Jin, Yaping; Itoh, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Takahiko; Sun, Guifan

    2011-04-01

    Chronic exposure to excess level of arsenic through contaminated drinking water is associated with many injuries, among which skin lesions are the most prominent. In this study, we measured the concentrations of inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in the blood of the residents of arsenicosis area, who demonstrated different skin lesion grade from mild, moderate to advanced. We evaluated the individual methylation capacity by two indices of the first and secondary methylation ratio (FMR and SMR). We found that SMR of moderate and advanced groups were markedly lower than that of mild group. Significant negative correlation was found between SMR of all the subjects and the grade of skin lesion, with Spearman's correlation coefficient of -0.429 (P = 0.016). Moreover, blood MMA proportion of moderate and advanced groups was found to be significantly higher than that of the mild group. These results suggest that low secondary arsenic methylation capacity and high MMA proportion are associated with the severity of arsenic-related skin lesions. Our findings evaluated by blood speciation is consistent with that evaluated by the generally accepted urinary arsenic speciation in the relationship between arsenic methylation capacity and arsenic-related lesions. Copyright © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Olanzapine-Induced Reversible Pellagroid Skin Lesion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lokesh K; Sahu, Manoj; Praharaj, Samir K

    2015-01-01

    Adverse cutaneous reactions are frequently reported to occur with the use of psychotropic medications, which may lead to poor drug compliance. As compared to other groups of psychotropic medication, antipsychotics, both typical and atypical, are less likely to cause adverse cutaneous reactions. The most frequent cutaneous adverse reactions associated with antipsychotics include fixed drug eruptions, exanthematous eruptions, photosensitivity reactions and altered skin pigmentation. Most of these commonly seen cutaneous adverse reactions are benign and easily treatable. Rarely, severe cutaneous adverse reactions such as erythema multiforme, Steven-Johnson syndrome are toxic epidermal necrolysis and have also been associated with antipsychotics. Olanzapine is one of the most commonly prescribed atypical antipsychotic with metabolic complications as most common adverse effects. Dermatological reactions are rarely observed with olanzapine. We report occurrence of pellagroid skin lesions over exposed areas of upper limbs with olanzapine that resolved completely after its discontinuation.

  16. A Prospective Study of the Synergistic Effects of Arsenic Exposure and Smoking, Sun Exposure, Fertilizer Use, and Pesticide Use on Risk of Premalignant Skin Lesions in Bangladeshi Men

    PubMed Central

    Melkonian, Stephanie; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L.; Chen, Yu; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Syed, Emdadul H.; Parvez, Faruque; Graziano, Joseph; Rathouz, Paul J.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-01-01

    Skin lesions are classic clinical signs of toxicity due to long-term exposure to arsenic, and they are considered precursors to arsenic-related skin cancer. The authors prospectively evaluated synergisms between effects of arsenic exposure and those of tobacco use, sun exposure, and pesticide and fertilizer use on incident skin lesions using risk factor data from 5,042 men from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Araihazar, Bangladesh, which recruited participants from October 2000 to May 2002. Discrete time hazard models were used to estimate measures of synergistic interactions on the additive scale. The authors observed significant synergistic effects between various measures of arsenic exposure and smoking and fertilizer use. The relative excess risks for the interactions between smoking status and arsenic exposure were 0.12 (95% confidence interval: 0.06, 0.19) for water arsenic and 0.11 (95% confidence interval: 0.05, 0.15) for urinary arsenic measures, respectively. Significant synergistic effects were also observed between fertilizer use and water arsenic (relative excess risk for the interaction = 0.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.01, 0.12). This is the first prospective study based on individual-level data that supports a role for smoking and certain occupational risk factors in modification of the effect of long-term arsenic exposure on skin lesions. Understanding differential arsenic susceptibility allows researchers to develop interventions to prevent the health consequences of this massive problem in the Bangladeshi population and beyond. PMID:21098630

  17. A prospective study of the synergistic effects of arsenic exposure and smoking, sun exposure, fertilizer use, and pesticide use on risk of premalignant skin lesions in Bangladeshi men.

    PubMed

    Melkonian, Stephanie; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L; Chen, Yu; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Syed, Emdadul H; Parvez, Faruque; Graziano, Joseph; Rathouz, Paul J; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-01-15

    Skin lesions are classic clinical signs of toxicity due to long-term exposure to arsenic, and they are considered precursors to arsenic-related skin cancer. The authors prospectively evaluated synergisms between effects of arsenic exposure and those of tobacco use, sun exposure, and pesticide and fertilizer use on incident skin lesions using risk factor data from 5,042 men from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Araihazar, Bangladesh, which recruited participants from October 2000 to May 2002. Discrete time hazard models were used to estimate measures of synergistic interactions on the additive scale. The authors observed significant synergistic effects between various measures of arsenic exposure and smoking and fertilizer use. The relative excess risks for the interactions between smoking status and arsenic exposure were 0.12 (95% confidence interval: 0.06, 0.19) for water arsenic and 0.11 (95% confidence interval: 0.05, 0.15) for urinary arsenic measures, respectively. Significant synergistic effects were also observed between fertilizer use and water arsenic (relative excess risk for the interaction = 0.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.01, 0.12). This is the first prospective study based on individual-level data that supports a role for smoking and certain occupational risk factors in modification of the effect of long-term arsenic exposure on skin lesions. Understanding differential arsenic susceptibility allows researchers to develop interventions to prevent the health consequences of this massive problem in the Bangladeshi population and beyond.

  18. Diversity of human papillomaviruses in skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Johanna; Mühr, Laila Sara Arroyo; Bzhalava, Davit; Söderlund-Strand, Anna; Hultin, Emilie; Nordin, Peter; Stenquist, Bo; Paoli, John; Forslund, Ola; Dillner, Joakim

    2013-12-01

    Pools of frozen biopsies from patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (n=29) actinic keratosis (AK) (n=31), keratoacanthoma (n=91) and swab samples from 84 SCCs and 91 AKs were analysed with an extended HPV general primer PCR and high-throughput sequencing of amplimers. We found 273 different HPV isolates (87 known HPV types, 139 previously known HPV sequences (putative types) and 47 sequences from novel putative HPV types). Among the new sequences, five clustered in genus Betapapillomavirus and 42 in genus Gammapapillomavirus. Resequencing of the three pools between 21 to 70 times resulted in the detection of 283 different known or putative HPV types, with 156 different sequences found in only one of the pools. Type-specific PCRs for 37 putative types from an additional 296 patients found only two of these putative types. In conclusion, skin lesions contain a large diversity of HPV types, but most appeared to be rare infections. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pigmented Skin Lesion Biopsies After Computer-Aided Multispectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Richard R; Tucker, Natalie; White, Richard; Rigel, Darrell S

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of melanoma has been rising over the past century. With 37% of patients presenting to their primary care physician with at least 1 skin problem, primary care physicians and other nondermatologist practitioners have substantial opportunity to make an impact at the forefront of the disease process. New diagnostic aids have been developed to augment physician analysis of suspicious pigmented skin lesions (PSLs). To determine the effects of computer-aided multispectral digital skin lesion analysis (MSDSLA) on dermatologists' and nondermatologist clinicians' decisions to biopsy suspicious PSLs after clinical and dermatoscopic evaluation. Participants were shown 6 images of PSLs. For each PSL, participants were asked 3 times if they would biopsy the lesion: first after reviewing a clinical image of the PSL, again after reviewing a high-resolution dermatoscopic image, and again after reviewing MSDSLA probability findings. An answer was right if a melanoma or high-risk lesion was selected for biopsy or a low-risk lesion was not selected for biopsy. An answer was wrong if a melanoma or high-risk lesion was not selected for biopsy or a low-risk lesion was selected for biopsy. Clinicians' decisions to biopsy were evaluated using χ² analysis for proportions. Data were analyzed from a total of 212 participants, 177 of whom were dermatologists. Overall, sensitivity of clinical image review was 63%; dermatoscopic image review, 5%; and MSDSLA, 83%. Specificity of clinical image review was 59%; dermatoscopic image review, 40%; and MSDSLA, 76%. Biopsy decision accuracy was 61% after review of clinical images, 52% after review of dermatoscopic images, and 80% after review of MSDSLA findings. The number of lesions participants indicated that they would biopsy increased significantly, from 52% after reviewing clinical images to 63% after reviewing dermatoscopic images (P<.001). However, the overall number of specimens that participants indicated they would biopsy did

  20. Hyperkeratotic Warty Skin Lesion of Foot Caused by Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ravinder; Maheshwari, Megha

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium species are common soil-inhabiting organisms and plant pathogens. Human infections are usually precipitated by local or systemic predisposing factors, and disseminated infection is associated with impaired immune responses. Skin infections caused by Fusarium spp. include keratitis, onychomycosis, mycetoma, painful discrete erythematous nodules. Hyperkeratotic skin lesions caused by Fusarium spp. are, however, rarely reported. We report a case of hyperkeratotic verrucous warty skin lesion in the foot of a 50-year-old immunocompetent male, farmer by occupation. PMID:23716829

  1. Acute skin lesions after surgical procedures: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Borrego, L

    2013-11-01

    In the hospital setting, dermatologists are often required to evaluate inflammatory skin lesions arising during surgical procedures performed in other departments. These lesions can be of physical or chemical origin. Povidone iodine is the most common reported cause of such lesions. If this antiseptic solution remains in contact with the skin in liquid form for a long period of time, it can give rise to serious irritant contact dermatitis in dependent or occluded areas. Less common causes of skin lesions after surgery include allergic contact dermatitis and burns under the dispersive electrode of the electrosurgical device. Most skin lesions that arise during surgical procedures are due to an incorrect application of antiseptic solutions. Special care must therefore be taken during the use of these solutions and, in particular, they should be allowed to dry.

  2. Analysis of skin line pattern for lesion classification.

    PubMed

    She, Zhishun; Fish, Peter J

    2003-02-01

    It has been observed that skin patterning tends to be disrupted by malignant but not by benign skin lesions. This suggests that measurements of skin pattern disruption on simply captured white light optical skin images could be a useful contribution to a diagnostic feature set. Previous work using a measurement of line strength by a consistent high-value profiling technique followed by local variance measurement or a region agglomerative classifier to measure skin line pattern disruption was extremely promising but computationally intensive, suggesting that the idea of measuring skin pattern disruption was useful but a simpler method was required. The skin pattern was extracted by high-pass filtration and enhanced by adaptive anisotropic (spatial variant) filtering which smoothes along skin lines but not across them. The skin line main direction and direction variance were estimated using a local image gradient matrix and the difference of these measures across the lesion image boundary was used as a lesion classifier. A set of images of malignant melanoma and benign naevi were processed as above and the scatter plot of results in a two-dimensional feature (line direction and line variation difference) space showed excellent separation of benign and malignant lesions. An ROC plot enclosed an area of 0.88. The experimental results showed that the local line direction and the local line variation were promising features for distinguishing malignant melanoma from benign lesion and the methods used were effective and computationally low-cost. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard 2003

  3. Acute disseminated candidiasis with skin lesions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Guarana, Mariana; Nucci, Marcio

    2017-08-25

    Neutropenic patients developing acute disseminated candidiasis may present with skin lesions. To evaluate the epidemiology of acute disseminated candidiasis with skin lesions in neutropenic patients, taking into consideration changes caused by different prophylactic strategies. A systematic review of English articles using PubMed (1963-2016) was performed. We asked the following questions: (1) What Candida species are more frequently involved in this syndrome? (2) Has antifungal prophylaxis changed the species causing skin lesions? (3) What are the typical patterns of skin lesions? (4) What is the frequency of skin lesions in neutropenic patients with candidemia or acute disseminated candidiasis? (5) Has antifungal prophylaxis decreased the incidence of acute disseminated candidiasis with skin lesions? Among 183 studies, 33 were selected, reporting 100 cases of acute disseminated candidiasis with skin lesions in neutropenic patients. It occurred more frequently in the setting of induction therapy for de novo or relapsed acute leukemia, and the most frequent species were C. tropicalis (68%) and C. krusei (15%). Diffuse maculopapular lesions predominated in cases caused by C. tropicalis and nodular and papular lesions in cases caused by C. krusei. Prophylaxis with fluconazole was reported in six cases; C. krusei in five, and C. ciferri in one. The death rate was 46.3%. Two patterns were recognized: disseminated maculopapular lesions caused by C. tropicalis in patients not receiving fluconazole prophylaxis, occurring in 39-44% of neutropenic patients with acute disseminated candidiasis, and nodular lesions caused by C. krusei in patients on fluconazole prophylaxis, occurring less frequently. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Association of NALP2 polymorphism with arsenic induced skin lesions and other health effects.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Pritha; Das, Nandana; Chatterjee, Debmita; Banerjee, Anirban; Das, Jayanta K; Basu, Santanu; Banerjee, Saptarshi; Majumder, Papia; Goswami, Prashant; Giri, Ashok K

    2013-07-04

    susceptible toward arsenic-related respiratory diseases [OR=0.47; 95%CI: 0.23-0.89]. These findings suggest that NALP2 A1052E SNP plays an important role toward development of arsenic-induced skin lesions, chromosomal damage and respiratory diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Qualitative thermograhic analysis of psoriatic skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Zalewska, A; Wiecek, B; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, A; Gralewicz, G; Owczarek, G

    2004-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris affects about 2% of the human population all over the world. The aim of this study was to evaluate usefulness of thermography in estimation of psoriatic lesion activity. A series of patients with plaque type psoriasis vulgaris were included. ThermaCam INFRAMETRICS 290E thermocamera with temperature resolution of 0.1 degrees C was employed. Both visual and thermal images of the patients were taken. Clinical severity of the lesions was evaluated by Plaque Severity Score (PSS, scale 0-4). We discovered higher temperature over psoriatic plaques and further vastly expanding beyond the visually documented borders of the lesions thus not corresponding to the individual shapes of the lesions, suggested that those lesions presented an active phase of the disease (developing over the last 2-3 weeks). To the contrary, areas of the increased temperature over chronic psoriatic plaques (already developed at least 8 weeks before without signs of visible progression) corresponded quite well to the shapes of clinically visible lesions i.e. single lesions could be differentiated within the area of the increased temperature. The above observations would allow to introduce more aggressive local treatment only to the selected lesions thus as much as possible sparing the rest of them from probable side-effects.

  6. Open season: select the best 'beast' for each skin lesion.

    PubMed

    Uber, Marjorie; Robl, Renata; Carvalho, Vania Oliveira; Abagge, Kerstin Taniguchi; Valério, Talita Sana; Marinoni, Leide Parolin; Cosechen Rosvailer, Mayara Schulze

    2015-10-01

    Animal bites can cause skin lesions that suggest other conditions, and therefore diagnosis can be a challenge. Four cases of skin injuries caused by arthropods are presented below. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Lesion classification using 3D skin surface tilt orientation.

    PubMed

    She, Zhishun; Excell, P S

    2013-02-01

    Current non-invasive diagnostic procedures to detect skin cancer rely on two-dimensional (2D) views of the skin surface. For example, the most commonly-used ABCD features are extracted from the 2D images of skin lesion. However, because the skin surface is an object in three-dimensional (3D) space, valuable additional information can be obtained from a perspective of 3D skin objects. The aim of this work is to discover the new diagnostic features by considering 3D views of skin artefacts. A surface tilt orientation parameter was proposed to quantify the skin and the lesion in 3D space. The skin pattern was first extracted from simply captured white light optical clinical (WLC) skin images by high-pass filtering. Then the directions of the projected skin lines were determined by skin pattern analysis. Next the surface tilt orientations of skin and lesion were estimated using the shape from texture technique. Finally the difference of tilt orientation in the lesion and normal skin areas, combined with the ABCD features, was used as a lesion classifier. The proposed method was validated by processing a set of images of malignant melanoma and benign naevi. The scatter plot of classification using the feature of surface tilt orientation alone showed the potential of the new 3D feature, enclosing an area of 0.78 under the ROC curve. The scatter plot of classification, combining the new feature with the ABCD features by use of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), demonstrated an excellent separation of benign and malignant lesions. An ROC plot for this case enclosed an area of 0.85. Compared with the ABCD analysis where the area under the ROC curve was 0.65, it indicated that the surface tilt orientation (3D information) was able to enhance the classification results significantly. The initial classification results show that the surface tilt orientation has a potential to increase lesion classifier accuracy. Combined with the ABCD features, it is very promising to

  8. Skin pattern analysis for lesion classification using local isotropy.

    PubMed

    She, Zhishun; Excell, Peter S

    2011-05-01

    The observation that skin pattern tends to be disrupted by malignant skin lesions, but not by benign ones suggests that measurements of skin pattern disruption on simply captured white light optical clinical (WLC) skin images could be a useful contribution to a diagnostic feature set. Previous work, which generated a flow field of skin pattern using a measurement of local line direction and intensity, was encouraging. The aim of this paper is to investigate the possibility of extracting new features using local isotropy metrics to quantify the skin pattern disruption. The skin pattern was extracted from WLC skin images by high-pass filtering. A local tensor matrix was computed. The local isotropy was measured by the condition number of the local tensor matrix. The difference of this measure over the lesion and normal skin areas, combined with the local line direction and the ABCD features, was used as a lesion classifier. A set of images of malignant melanoma and benign naevi was analysed. A one-dimensional scatter plot showed the potential of a local isotropy metric, showing an area of 0.70 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A two-dimensional scatter plot, combined with the local line direction, indicated enhancement of the classification performance, showing an area of 0.89 under the ROC curve. A three-dimensional scatter plot combined with the local line direction and the ABCD features, using principal component analysis, demonstrated excellent separation of benign and malignant lesions. An ROC plot for this case enclosed an area of 0.96. The experimental results show that the local isotropy metric has a potential to increase lesion classifier accuracy. Combined with the local line direction and the ABCD features, it is very promising as a method to distinguish malignant melanoma from benign lesions. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Multimodal digital color imaging system for facial skin lesion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Youngwoo; Lee, Youn-Heum; Jung, Byungjo

    2008-02-01

    In dermatology, various digital imaging modalities have been used as an important tool to quantitatively evaluate the treatment effect of skin lesions. Cross-polarization color image was used to evaluate skin chromophores (melanin and hemoglobin) information and parallel-polarization image to evaluate skin texture information. In addition, UV-A induced fluorescent image has been widely used to evaluate various skin conditions such as sebum, keratosis, sun damages, and vitiligo. In order to maximize the evaluation efficacy of various skin lesions, it is necessary to integrate various imaging modalities into an imaging system. In this study, we propose a multimodal digital color imaging system, which provides four different digital color images of standard color image, parallel and cross-polarization color image, and UV-A induced fluorescent color image. Herein, we describe the imaging system and present the examples of image analysis. By analyzing the color information and morphological features of facial skin lesions, we are able to comparably and simultaneously evaluate various skin lesions. In conclusion, we are sure that the multimodal color imaging system can be utilized as an important assistant tool in dermatology.

  10. The risk of arsenic induced skin lesions in Bangladeshi men and women is affected by arsenic metabolism and the age at first exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, Anna-Lena; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Persson, Lars-Ake; Vahter, Marie

    2008-07-01

    It is known that a high fraction of methylarsonate (MA) in urine is a risk modifying factor for several arsenic induced health effects, including skin lesions, and that men are more susceptible for developing skin lesions than women. Thus, we aimed at elucidating the interaction between gender and arsenic metabolism for the risk of developing skin lesions. This study is part of a population-based case-referent study concerning the risk for skin lesions in relation to arsenic exposure via drinking water carried out in Matlab, a rural area 53km south-east of Dhaka, Bangladesh. We randomly selected 526 from 1579 referents and all 504 cases for analysis of arsenic metabolites in urine using HPLC coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICPMS). The present study confirm previous studies, with the risk for skin lesions being almost three times higher in the highest tertile of %MA (adjusted OR 2.8, 95% CI: 1.9-4.2, p < 0.001) compared to the lowest tertile. The present study is the first to show that the well documented higher risk for men to develop arsenic-related skin lesions compared to women is mainly explained by the less efficient methylation of arsenic, as defined by a higher fraction of MA and lower fraction of DMA in the urine, among men. Our previously documented lower risk for skin lesions in individuals exposed since infancy, or before, was found to be independent of the observed arsenic methylation efficiency. Thus, it can be speculated that this is due to a programming effect of arsenic in utero.

  11. Epidermal hydrogen peroxide is not increased in lesional and non-lesional skin of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Zailaie, Mohammad Z

    2017-01-01

    It is widely believed that the loss of the epidermal melanocytes in vitiligo is basically due to excessive oxidative stress. Previous research work described abnormal elevation of the absolute concentration of the epidermal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in lesional and non-lesional skin of vitiligo. Based on this finding, our primary research objective was to use this feature as a screening marker in individuals at a great risk of developing vitiligo. Ninety-six patients of non-segmental vitiligo (NSV) of varying durations, skin phototypes, and treatment modalities (psoralen UVA-, narrow band UVB-treated) were recruited for this study. Raman spectroscopic measurements, using an external probehead, of the lesional and non-lesional skin were obtained, and the resulting spectra were analyzed using the Opus software package of the MultiRam spectrometer and the intensity of the peak at 875 cm(-1) that represents the absolute concentration of H2O2 was calculated. Contrary to previous reports, in patients of skin phototype IV, the absolute concentrations of H2O2 in non-lesional and lesional NSV of all groups were non-significantly decreased compared to normal control. In patients of NSV of skin phototype V, the decrease in the absolute concentrations of H2O2 was not significant in the untreated group, and a slight non-significant increase in the NBUVB-treated group was noted. However, in the PUVA-treated group, the non-lesional skin demonstrated significant increase in the absolute concentration of H2O2, whereas the lesional skin showed only a slight non-significant increase compared to normal control. In NSV patients of skin phototype VI who were previously treated with PUVA, the non-lesional skin showed a slight non-significant increase in the absolute concentration of H2O2; however, the lesional skin showed a marked significant decrease compared to normal control and the non-lesional skin. Thereof, one can conclude that the epidermal H2O2 is not increased in NSV as

  12. Pigmented Skin Lesions Classification Using Dermatoscopic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdehourat, Germán; Corez, Andrés; Bazzano, Anabella; Musé, Pablo

    In this paper we propose a machine learning approach to classify melanocytic lesions in malignant and benign from dermatoscopic images. The image database is composed of 433 benign lesions and 80 malignant melanoma. After an image pre-processing stage that includes hair removal filtering, each image is automatically segmented using well known image segmentation algorithms. Then, each lesion is characterized by a feature vector that contains shape, color and texture information, as well as local and global parameters that try to reflect structures used in medical diagnosis. The learning and classification stage is performed using AdaBoost.M1 with C4.5 decision trees. For the automatically segmented database, classification delivered a false positive rate of 8.75% for a sensitivity of 95%. The same classification procedure applied to manually segmented images by an experienced dermatologist yielded a false positive rate of 4.62% for a sensitivity of 95%.

  13. Relations between exposure to arsenic, skin lesions, and glucosuria

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M.; Tondel, M.; Chowdhury, I. A.; Axelson, O.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to arsenic causes keratosis, hyperpigmentation, and hypopigmentation and seemingly also diabetes mellitus, at least in subjects with skin lesions. Here we evaluate the relations of arsenical skin lesions and glucosuria as a proxy for diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Through existing measurements of arsenic in drinking water in Bangladesh, wells with and without arsenic contamination were identified. Based on a questionnaire, 1595 subjects > or = 30 years of age were interviewed; 1481 had a history of drinking water contaminated with arsenic whereas 114 had not. Time weighted mean arsenic concentrations and mg-years/l of exposure to arsenic were estimated based on the history of consumption of well water and current arsenic concentrations. Urine samples from the study subjects were tested by means of a glucometric strip. People with positive tests were considered to be cases of glucosuria. RESULTS: A total of 430 (29%) of the exposed people were found to have skin lesions. Corresponding to drinking water with < 0.5, 0.5-1.0, and > 1.0 mg/l of arsenic, and with the 114 unexposed subjects as the reference, the prevalence ratios for glucosuria, as adjusted for age and sex, were 0.8, 1.4, and 1.4 for those without skin lesions, and 1.1, 2.2, and 2.6 for those with skin lesions. Taking exposure as < 1.0, 1.0-5.0, > 5.0-10.0 and > 10.0 mg- years/l of exposure to arsenic the prevalence ratios, similarly adjusted, were 0.4, 0.9, 1.2, and 1.7 for those without and 0.8, 1.7, 2.1, and 2.9 for those with skin lesions. All series of risk estimates were significant for trend, (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that skin lesions and diabetes mellitus, as here indicated by glucosuria, are largely independent effects of exposure to arsenic although glucosuria had some tendency to be associated with skin lesions. Importantly, however, glucosuria (diabetes mellitus) may occur independently of skin lesions.   PMID:10450246

  14. Thermographic diagnostics to discriminate skin lesions: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringasci, Mirian Denise; Moriyama, Lilian Tan; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is responsible for about 13% of all causes of death in the world. Over 7 million people die annually of this disease. In most cases, the survival rates are greater when diagnosed in early stages. It is known that tumor lesions present a different temperature compared with the normal tissues. Some studies have been performed in an attempt to establish new diagnosis methods, targeting this temperature difference. In this study, we aim to investigate the use of a handheld thermographic camera to discriminate skin lesions. The patients presenting Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Actinic Keratosis, Pigmented Seborrheic Keratosis, Melanoma or Intradermal Nevus lesions have been investigated at the Skin Departament of Amaral Carvalho Hospital. Patients are selected by a dermatologist, and the lesion images are recorded using an infrared camera. The images are evaluated taken into account the temperature level, and differences into lesion areas, borders, and between altered and normal skin. The present results show that thermography may be an important tool for aiding in the clinical diagnostics of superficial skin lesions.

  15. Polymorphous light eruption. Experimental reproduction of skin lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzle, E.; Plewig, G.; Hofmann, C.; Roser-Maass, E.

    1982-07-01

    The clinical features of polymorphous light eruption (PLE) are reviewed from the literature with special emphasis on the experimental reproduction of skin lesions. Our clinical experience with 180 patients is reported. In forty-three patients a newly developed UVA provocation test was performed. UVA, free of sunburn radiation (50-100 J/cm2), was administered, sometimes repeatedly up to four times, to large sites of previously involved skin. With this technic the reproduction of PLE lesions under laboratory conditions was possible in 90% of this group of forty-three patients. The diagnosis was substantiated by microscopic examination of genuine and experimentally induced lesions. Characteristic histologic features of PLE are described. Phototesting with large doses of UVA aids in confirming the diagnosis of PLE. Hitherto, this diagnosis depended often on exclusion of other dermatoses. Eusolex 8021, a UVA-effective sunscreen, blocked eruptions of PLE lesions under laboratory conditions. An effective means of treatment is offered by PUVA therapy.

  16. Pathogenesis and treatment of skin lesions caused by sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Poursaleh, Zohreh; Ghanei, Mostafa; Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Izadi, Morteza; Harandi, Ali Amini; Emadi, Seyed Emad; Taghavi, Nez'hat-o-Sadat; Sayad-Nouri, Seyede Somaye; Emadi, Seyed Naser

    2012-09-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) exposure intensely causes lesions that range in severity from mild erythema to blister formation and necrosis. This review will discuss acute and long-term skin consequences due to exposure to SM and different kinds of medical prophylaxis and therapeutics against SM-induced skin lesions. Literature survey of medical case reports, clinical studies, and original articles was performed using PubMed, Medline, and the Cochrane Database (1917-2011 March). Key words included sulfur mustard, skin, toxicity, pathogenesis, cancer, treatment. SM-induced damage to the skin is characterized by edema, inflammation, and cell death mainly of the basal keratinocyte layer, with varying immunological and pathological changes in the acute phase. Also, xerosis, hypo or hyper pigmentation, scars, and rarely, skin cancers are long-term cutaneous effects. So far,the combination therapy of topical drugs and oral antihistamines, also iodine and antitumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies, are effective remedies in the treatment of skin lesions. The requirement for preparedness in the dermatological community concerning SM exposure is underlined. Novel treatments for prevention and therapeutics against SM toxicity and carcinogenicity are reviewed.

  17. Draining skin lesion from a desert poodle.

    PubMed

    Beaudin, Sylvie; Rich, Lon J; Meinkoth, James H; Cowell, Rick L

    2005-01-01

    A 16-month-old intact female Poodle in Arizona had a history of intermittent coughing of a few weeks duration. Coccidiomycosis antibody screening test results were negative for immunoglobulin (Ig) M, but were positive (1:64) for IgG. Fine needle aspiration specimens of a draining lesion on the right palmar front foot contained large numbers of neutrophils, many of which contained bacteria, and lower numbers of macrophages. A few small structures also were observed, 2-5 microm in diameter with thin, nonstaining capsules and small, round to oval densely aggregated, eccentric nuclei. Cytologic findings were consistent with septic pyogranulomatous inflammation with Coccidiodes immitis endospores. Fungal culture of a sample from the draining lesion yielded white growth with barrel-shaped arthroconidia. Identification of the organism as C immitis was confirmed by a commercial DNA probe test. Although coccidioidomycosis often is diagnosed by microscopic identification of C immitis spherules in cytologic specimens, in this case only endospores, which are released from mature spherules, were observed. In cases of suspected coccidiodomycosis, the unique morphology of endospores may be useful in making a cytologic diagnosis.

  18. Inflammatory features of melasma lesions in Asian skin.

    PubMed

    Noh, Tai Kyung; Choi, Seok Joo; Chung, Bo Young; Kang, Jin Soo; Lee, Jong Hee; Lee, Mi Woo; Chang, Sung Eun

    2014-09-01

    Melasma is triggered by various factors including ultraviolet radiation and estrogen; however, its pathogenesis is unclear. To investigate the inflammatory features of melasma lesions as triggers for this disorder, 197 women with melasma who attended Asan Medical Center and Kangskin Clinic, Seoul, from June 2011 to October 2011 completed a questionnaire concerning triggering or aggravating factors. These cases were divided into "non-inflammatory" and "inflammatory" groups. Skin biopsies and immunostaining for CD68, CD117, and leukocyte common antigen (LCA) were performed in the lesional and peri-lesional skin of ten cases in the non-inflammatory group and nine cases in the inflammatory group. Among the 197 subjects (mean age, 41.5 years; mean age of melasma onset, 33.8 years), 50 patients (25.4%) were categorized into the inflammatory group. This group comprised cases that had inflammatory symptoms and events that triggered the melasma lesions. The lesional dermis contained more CD68(+) melanophages, CD117(+) mast cells, and LCA(+) leukocytes in the inflammatory group than in the non-inflammatory group. Inflammatory clinical features and an increased number of inflammatory cells in the lesion may be involved in the development of melasma in Asian skin.

  19. [Skin lesions in chronic renal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Passarini, Sandra Regina; Branco, Michele Ferreira de Barros Tocollini; Kruger, Luci Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous and mucosal disorders are the most common problems in patients on long-term hemodialysis. The dialysis prolongs the life expectancy, giving time of these changes to manifest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dermatologic problems among patients with chronic renal disease (CRD) undergoing hemodialysis. One hundred forty-five patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis were studied. All patients were thoroughly examined for skin changes, hair, nails and mucous membranes by a single examiner and laboratory tests were assessed. The data were stored in a database Microsoft Excel and analyzed using descriptive statistics. The continuous variables were compared using Student's t-test and categorical variables the chi-square test or Fisher's Exact test. The study included 145 patients, mean age of 53.6 ± 14.7 years, predominantly male (64.1%) and caucasian (90.0%). The average time of dialysis was 43.3 ± 42.3 months. The main underlying diseases were: hypertension in 33.8%, diabetes mellitus in 29.6% and chronic glomerulonephritis in 13.1% of the patients. The main dermatologic manifestations observed were: xerosis in 109 (75.2%), ecchymosis in 87 (60.0%), pruritus in 78 (53.8%) and lentigo in 33 (22.8%) patients. Our study showed the presence of more than one alteration per patient. Cutaneous alterations are frequent in patients on dialysis. Further studies are needed to better characterization and management of these dermatosis.

  20. Skin lesion image segmentation using Delaunay Triangulation for melanoma detection.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Andrea; Bloisi, Domenico D; Nardi, Daniele; Giampetruzzi, Anna Rita; Mondino, Chiara; Facchiano, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Developing automatic diagnostic tools for the early detection of skin cancer lesions in dermoscopic images can help to reduce melanoma-induced mortality. Image segmentation is a key step in the automated skin lesion diagnosis pipeline. In this paper, a fast and fully-automatic algorithm for skin lesion segmentation in dermoscopic images is presented. Delaunay Triangulation is used to extract a binary mask of the lesion region, without the need of any training stage. A quantitative experimental evaluation has been conducted on a publicly available database, by taking into account six well-known state-of-the-art segmentation methods for comparison. The results of the experimental analysis demonstrate that the proposed approach is highly accurate when dealing with benign lesions, while the segmentation accuracy significantly decreases when melanoma images are processed. This behavior led us to consider geometrical and color features extracted from the binary masks generated by our algorithm for classification, achieving promising results for melanoma detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of skin temperature on lesion size in fractional photothermolysis.

    PubMed

    Laubach, Hans; Chan, Henry H; Rius, Francisca; Anderson, R Rox; Manstein, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    Fractional photothermolysis is a new concept in cutaneous re-modeling whereby laser-induced microscopic zones of thermal injury (MTZ-Microscopic Treatment Zones) are surrounded by normal, viable tissue. This unique thermal damage pattern allows re-epithelialization in less than 24 hours. To increase patient comfort level during the procedure of fractional photothermolysis, simultaneous skin cooling has been proposed and is now extensively used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to examine the influence of skin temperature on the diameter of the epidermal microthermal zone and the extent of thermal injury per unit area. The determination of the changes in these parameters that are due to skin temperature will allow the better control and understanding of fractional photothermolysis at different skin temperatures. Fractional photothermolysis was performed with a 1,550 nm fiber laser (Fraxel SR Laser) with 10 mJ per pulse on full-thickness cadaver skin. The skin samples were brought prior to exposure to temperatures that ranged from 0 to 45 degrees C. The epidermis of the skin samples was separated by dispase treatment, stained for thermal damage by NBTC stain, and lesion diameter was assessed by a blinded investigator. The average MTZ diameter exhibits a positive, linear relationship with skin temperature (R(2) = 0.904, P < 0.0001). As the skin temperature increases from 0 to 45 degrees C. The MTZ diameter increases from 93 to 147 microm (58%), and the MTZ area from 6,870 to 17,050 microm(2) (148%). The skin temperature affects the size of epidermal MTZs during fractional photothermolysis and is an important variable factor. The use of simultaneous skin cooling increases patient comfort; however, as it also decreases MTZ size, it may interfere with treatment efficacy. The control of skin temperature is necessary to provide a consistent outcome and to be able to compare treatments. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Markers of Aberrantly Activated Innate Immunity in Vitiligo Lesional and Non-Lesional Skin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanshen; Wang, Yang; Yu, Jie; Gao, Min; Levings, Megan; Wei, Shencai; Zhang, Shengquan; Xu, Aie; Su, Mingwan; Dutz, Jan; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhou, Youwen

    2012-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is characterized by the death of melanocytes in the skin. This is associated with the presence of T cell infiltrates in the lesional borders. However, at present, there is no detailed and systematic characterization on whether additional cellular or molecular changes are present inside vitiligo lesions. Further, it is unknown if the normal appearing non-lesional skin of vitiligo patients is in fact normal. The purpose of this study is to systematically characterize the molecular and cellular characteristics of the lesional and non-lesional skin of vitiligo patients. Methods and Materials Paired lesional and non-lesional skin biopsies from twenty-three vitiligo patients and normal skin biopsies from sixteen healthy volunteers were obtained with informed consent. The following aspects were analyzed: (1) transcriptome changes present in vitiligo skin using DNA microarrays and qRT-PCR; (2) abnormal cellular infiltrates in vitiligo skin explant cultures using flow cytometry; and (3) distribution of the abnormal cellular infiltrates in vitiligo skin using immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Compared with normal skin, vitiligo lesional skin contained 17 genes (mostly melanocyte-specific genes) whose expression was decreased or absent. In contrast, the relative expression of 13 genes was up-regulated. The up-regulated genes point to aberrant activity of the innate immune system, especially natural killer cells in vitiligo. Strikingly, the markers of heightened innate immune responses were also found to be up-regulated in the non-lesional skin of vitiligo patients. Conclusions and Clinical Implications As the first systematic transcriptome characterization of the skin in vitiligo patients, this study revealed previously unknown molecular markers that strongly suggest aberrant innate immune activation in the microenvironment of vitiligo skin. Since these changes involve both lesional and non-lesional skin, our results suggest that therapies targeting

  3. Role of skin lesions in the Salem witchcraft trials.

    PubMed

    Flotte, T J; Bell, D A

    1989-12-01

    In the late 17th century, several hundred people were tried for the crime of practicing witchcraft in Salem Village, Massachusetts. Twenty-four people died before the Superior Court of Judicature dismissed the remaining cases and Governor Phips pardoned and granted amnesty to all of the accused and convicted. The evidence used to convict a person of being a witch included spectral evidence confessions, and apparent proof of that person's alleged supernatural abilities. Also used as evidence were skin lesions characteristic of what were termed "devil's marks" or "witch's marks." It was believed that the devil would confirm his pact with a witch by giving her or him a mark of identification. Devil's marks included a variety of skin lesions described as flat or raised, red, blue, or brown lesions, sometimes with unusual outlines. Witch's marks were most probably supernumerary nipples. It was believed that familiars (agents of the devil, usually in animal form) would receive sustenance by being suckled. In the Salem witchcraft trials, a variety of skin lesions were used as confirmatory evidence that the accused person had made a pact with the devil, but there is no indication in the trial transcripts that anyone was convicted based on this evidence alone.

  4. Association of XPD/ERCC2 G23591A and A35931C polymorphisms with skin lesion prevalence in a multiethnic, arseniasis-hyperendemic village exposed to indoor combustion of high arsenic coal.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guo-fang; Du, Hui; Chen, Ji-gang; Lu, Hong-chao; Guo, Wei-chao; Golka, Klaus; Shen, Jian-hua

    2010-01-01

    More than 2,000 arsenic-related skin lesions (as at 2002) in a few villages of China's Southwest Guizhou Autonomous Prefecture represent a unique case of endemic arseniasis related with indoor combustion of high-arsenic coal. The skin lesion prevalence was significantly higher in ethnic Han villagers than in ethnic Hmong villagers. This study was focused on a possible involvement of XPD/ERCC2 G23591A and A35931C polymorphisms in risk modulation of skin lesions and in the body burden of As in this unique case of As exposure. G23591A and A35931C were genotyped by a PCR-based procedure. Total As contents in hair and urine samples as well as environmental samples of the homes of the two ethnic clans were analysed. A significant higher presentation of A/A35931 (homozygous wild) genotype in both clans was found in skin lesion patients, compared with their asymptomatic fellow villagers (67.1 vs. 46.3%, OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.35-4.14, P=0.002). Interestingly, the population frequencies of the A/A35931 genotype did not show significant differences between ethnic Han villagers and their Hmong neighbours (47.1 vs. 45.5%). Very low frequencies of homozygous and heterozygous variant genotypes of G23591A were recorded in the residents in target village. G/A23591 and A/A23591 were detected only in 3.2% (8/244) and 0.8% (2/244) of the villagers, respectively. The polymorphic status at the locus of A35931C might modulate the risk for arsenic-related skin lesions in the investigated groups.

  5. Melanoma Is Skin Deep: A 3D Reconstruction Technique for Computerized Dermoscopic Skin Lesion Classification

    PubMed Central

    Satheesha, T. Y.; Prasad, M. N. Giri; Dhruve, Kashyap D.

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma mortality rates are the highest amongst skin cancer patients. Melanoma is life threating when it grows beyond the dermis of the skin. Hence, depth is an important factor to diagnose melanoma. This paper introduces a non-invasive computerized dermoscopy system that considers the estimated depth of skin lesions for diagnosis. A 3-D skin lesion reconstruction technique using the estimated depth obtained from regular dermoscopic images is presented. On basis of the 3-D reconstruction, depth and 3-D shape features are extracted. In addition to 3-D features, regular color, texture, and 2-D shape features are also extracted. Feature extraction is critical to achieve accurate results. Apart from melanoma, in-situ melanoma the proposed system is designed to diagnose basal cell carcinoma, blue nevus, dermatofibroma, haemangioma, seborrhoeic keratosis, and normal mole lesions. For experimental evaluations, the PH2, ISIC: Melanoma Project, and ATLAS dermoscopy data sets is considered. Different feature set combinations is considered and performance is evaluated. Significant performance improvement is reported the post inclusion of estimated depth and 3-D features. The good classification scores of sensitivity = 96%, specificity = 97% on PH2 data set and sensitivity = 98%, specificity = 99% on the ATLAS data set is achieved. Experiments conducted to estimate tumor depth from 3-D lesion reconstruction is presented. Experimental results achieved prove that the proposed computerized dermoscopy system is efficient and can be used to diagnose varied skin lesion dermoscopy images. PMID:28512610

  6. Automatic differentiation of melanoma and clark nevus skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeAnder, R. W.; Kasture, A.; Pandey, A.; Umbaugh, S. E.

    2007-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Although melanoma accounts for just 11% of all types of skin cancer, it is responsible for most of the deaths, claiming more than 7910 lives annually. Melanoma is visually difficult for clinicians to differentiate from Clark nevus lesions which are benign. The application of pattern recognition techniques to these lesions may be useful as an educational tool for teaching physicians to differentiate lesions, as well as for contributing information about the essential optical characteristics that identify them. Purpose: This study sought to find the most effective features to extract from melanoma, melanoma in situ and Clark nevus lesions, and to find the most effective pattern-classification criteria and algorithms for differentiating those lesions, using the Computer Vision and Image Processing Tools (CVIPtools) software package. Methods: Due to changes in ambient lighting during the photographic process, color differences between images can occur. These differences were minimized by capturing dermoscopic images instead of photographic images. Differences in skin color between patients were minimized via image color normalization, by converting original color images to relative-color images. Relative-color images also helped minimize changes in color that occur due to changes in the photographic and digitization processes. Tumors in the relative-color images were segmented and morphologically filtered. Filtered, relative-color, tumor features were then extracted and various pattern-classification schemes were applied. Results: Experimentation resulted in four useful pattern classification methods, the best of which was an overall classification rate of 100% for melanoma and melanoma in situ (grouped) and 60% for Clark nevus. Conclusion: Melanoma and melanoma in situ have feature parameters and feature values that are similar enough to be considered one class of tumor that significantly differs from

  7. Leprosy with Atypical Skin Lesions Masquerading as Relapsing Polychondritis

    PubMed Central

    Munganda, Hariharan; Bangia, Amit; Rani, Uma; Budhiraja, Rajesh; Brajpuriya, Swapnil

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy can present with a variety of clinical manifestations depending on the immune status of the individual. After dermatological and neurological involvement, rheumatic features specially various forms of arthritis are the third most common manifestation of the disease. We describe a unique case of a 22-year-old patient presenting with external ear involvement mimicking relapsing polychondritis along with inflammatory joint symptoms and skin lesions. Ear involvement in relapsing polychondritis characteristically is painful and spares the noncartilaginous ear lobules, in contrast to painless ear involvement in leprosy affecting the lobules as well. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis, although the ear and skin lesions were not classical of leprosy. Such a presentation of leprosy closely mimicking relapsing polychondritis has not been described previously. Tissue diagnosis should always be attempted whenever possible in patients presenting with autoimmune features, so that inappropriate therapy with immunosuppressants is avoided. PMID:28116186

  8. Sandfly Fever with Skin Lesions: A Case Series from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Temocin, Fatih; Sari, Tugba; Tulek, Necla

    2016-01-01

    Sand fly fever (SF) is an arthropod-borne viral disease, also known as “Phlebotomus fever”, “mosquito fever”, three-day fever or “Papatacci fever”. It is transmitted by Phlebotomus papatasi, starts with acute onset of high fever, and lasts for three days. We present first cases in a different district of Turkey with the clinical findings of fever, myalgia-arthralgia, headache, gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhoea and nausea-vomiting and skin lesions (in two of them). All the patients were treated symptomatically and discharged with complete cure. These cases are indicating that sand fly fever is more common than we thought. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with fever, arthralgia-myalgia and skin lesions, especially it is important to be aware of this disease in travellers returning from endemic areas. PMID:28032114

  9. A cross sectional study of anemia and iron deficiency as risk factors for arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Kile, Molly L; Faraj, Joycelyn M; Ronnenberg, Alayne G; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmudar; Mostofa, Golam; Afroz, Sakila; Christiani, David C

    2016-02-16

    In the Ganges Delta, chronic arsenic poisoning is a health concern affecting millions of people who rely on groundwater as their potable water source. The prevalence of anemia is also high in this region, particularly among women. Moreover, arsenic is known to affect heme synthesis and erythrocytes and the risk of arsenic-induced skin lesions appears to differ by sex. We conducted a case-control study in 147 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi women to assess the association between anemia and arsenic-induced skin lesions. We observed that the odds of arsenic-related skin lesions were approximately three times higher among women who were anemic (hemoglobin < 120 g/L) compared to women with normal hemoglobin levels [Odds Ratio (OR) = 3.32, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 1.29, 8.52] after adjusting for arsenic levels in drinking water and other covariates. Furthermore, 75% of the women with anemia had adequate iron stores (serum ferritin ≥ 12 μg/L), suggesting that the majority of anemia detected in this population was unrelated to iron depletion. Considering the magnitude of arsenic exposure and prevalence of anemia in Bangladeshi women, additional research is warranted that identifies the causes of anemia so that effective interventions can be implemented while arsenic remediation efforts continue.

  10. Surgical treatment of skin lesions in lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowicz, Edward; Zieliński, Tomasz; Iljin, Aleksandra; Fijałkowska, Marta; Kasielska-Trojan, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Lipodystrophies are a wide group of diseases with various etiology, mainly genetic, metabolic or autoimmune. The treatment of these diseases is chronic and not always effective. Major concerns for patients with lipodystrophies are also esthetic defects, especially deformities in the face, neck and upper limbs. There are many surgical methods that can be used to improve patient's appearance like fillers, autologous fat transfer and skin flaps. The aim of this paper is to present and discuss surgical techniques used for correction of lipoatrophy and other skin lesions present in lupus erythematosus. In the first presented patient, lipodermal grafts were performed in two stages (first – to both zygomatic areas, the second – to both nasolabial folds). Moreover, the patient was qualified for arm scar plasty. Deepithelialized skin in the affected area was covered with advanced local skin flaps. In the second patient, an extensive scarring lesion on the scalp was excised and the defect was closed with an expanded scalp flap. Patients with lipodystrophies may require aesthetic surgical procedures to improve their appearance. In patients with lupus erythematosus, autologous fat graft in the face area seems to be a safe and effective method of refilling the volume of atrophic tissues. On the basis of our experience, it is worth emphasizing that the process of fat graft resorption is typical. In patients with scalp scars, an effective method of their removal and hairline restoring is usage of the tissue expander. PMID:25610357

  11. MONTENEGRO SKIN TEST AND AGE OF SKIN LESION AS PREDICTORS OF TREATMENT FAILURE IN CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Liliane de Fátima; Fagundes, Aline; Oliveira, Raquel Vasconcellos Carvalhaes; Pinto, Priscila Garcia; Bedoya-Pacheco, Sandro Javier; Vasconcellos, Érica de Camargo Ferreira e; Valete-Rosalino, Maria Cláudia; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Passos, Sônia Regina Lambert; Pimentel, Maria Inês Fernandes; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to examine the association among the Montenegro skin test (MST), age of skin lesion and therapeutic response in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) treated at Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases (INI), Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For each treatment failure (case), two controls showing skin lesion healing following treatment, paired by sex and age, were randomly selected. All patients were treated with 5 mg Sb5+/kg/day of intramuscular meglumine antimoniate (Sb5+) for 30 successive days. Patients with CL were approximately five times more likely to fail when lesions were less than two months old at the first appointment. Patients with treatment failure showed less intense MST reactions than patients progressing to clinical cure. For each 10 mm of increase in MST response, there was a 26% reduction in the chance of treatment failure. An early treatment - defined as a treatment applied for skin lesions, which starts when they are less than two months old at the first appointment -, as well as a poor cellular immune response, reflected by lower reactivity in MST, were associated with treatment failure in cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:25229216

  12. Salvia plebeia suppresses atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Salvia plebeia R. Br. (Lamiaceae) has been used for folk medicines in Asian countries, including Korea and China, to treat skin inflammatory diseases and asthma. In this study, we investigated the effects of S. plebeia extract (SPE) on atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions and defined underlying mechanisms of action. We established an AD model in BALB/c mice by repeated local exposure of house dust mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to the ears. Repeated alternative treatment of DFE/DNCB caused AD-like skin lesions. The oral administration of SPE decreased AD symptoms based on ear thickness and histopathological analysis, in addition to serum IgE and IgG2a levels. SPE suppressed mast cell infiltration into the ear and serum histamine level. SPE inhibited Th1/Th2/Th17 phenotype CD4(+) T lymphocytes expansion in the lymph node and the expression of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines in the ear tissue. To define the underlying mechanisms of action, the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ activated human keratinocytes (HaCaT) model was used. SPE significantly suppressed the expression of cytokines and chemokines through the down-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-κB, and STAT1 in HaCaT cells. Taken together, our results suggest that SPE might be a candidate for the treatment of AD.

  13. Ranavirus infections associated with skin lesions in lizards.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Anke C; Blahak, Silvia; Heckers, Kim O; Wiechert, Jutta; Behncke, Helge; Mathes, Karina; Günther, Pascale; Zwart, Peer; Ball, Inna; Rüschoff, Birgit; Marschang, Rachel E

    2013-09-27

    Ranaviral disease in amphibians has been studied intensely during the last decade, as associated mass-mortality events are considered to be a global threat to wild animal populations. Several studies have also included other susceptible ectothermic vertebrates (fish and reptiles), but only very few cases of ranavirus infections in lizards have been previously detected. In this study, we focused on clinically suspicious lizards and tested these animals for the presence of ranaviruses. Virological screening of samples from lizards with increased mortality and skin lesions over a course of four years led to the detection of ranaviral infections in seven different groups. Affected species were: brown anoles (Anolis sagrei), Asian glass lizards (Dopasia gracilis), green anoles (Anolis carolinensis), green iguanas (Iguana iguana), and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps). Purulent to ulcerative-necrotizing dermatitis and hyperkeratosis were diagnosed in pathological examinations. All animals tested positive for the presence of ranavirus by PCR and a part of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of each virus was sequenced. Three different ranaviruses were isolated in cell culture. The analyzed portions of the MCP gene from each of the five different viruses detected were distinct from one another and were 98.4-100% identical to the corresponding portion of the frog virus 3 (FV3) genome. This is the first description of ranavirus infections in these five lizard species. The similarity in the pathological lesions observed in these different cases indicates that ranaviral infection may be an important differential diagnosis for skin lesions in lizards.

  14. Ranavirus infections associated with skin lesions in lizards

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ranaviral disease in amphibians has been studied intensely during the last decade, as associated mass-mortality events are considered to be a global threat to wild animal populations. Several studies have also included other susceptible ectothermic vertebrates (fish and reptiles), but only very few cases of ranavirus infections in lizards have been previously detected. In this study, we focused on clinically suspicious lizards and tested these animals for the presence of ranaviruses. Virological screening of samples from lizards with increased mortality and skin lesions over a course of four years led to the detection of ranaviral infections in seven different groups. Affected species were: brown anoles (Anolis sagrei), Asian glass lizards (Dopasia gracilis), green anoles (Anolis carolinensis), green iguanas (Iguana iguana), and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps). Purulent to ulcerative-necrotizing dermatitis and hyperkeratosis were diagnosed in pathological examinations. All animals tested positive for the presence of ranavirus by PCR and a part of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of each virus was sequenced. Three different ranaviruses were isolated in cell culture. The analyzed portions of the MCP gene from each of the five different viruses detected were distinct from one another and were 98.4-100% identical to the corresponding portion of the frog virus 3 (FV3) genome. This is the first description of ranavirus infections in these five lizard species. The similarity in the pathological lesions observed in these different cases indicates that ranaviral infection may be an important differential diagnosis for skin lesions in lizards. PMID:24073785

  15. Increased transepidermal water loss and decreased ceramide content in lesional and non-lesional skin of dogs with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenichiro; Yoon, Ji-Seon; Yoshihara, Toru; Iwasaki, Toshiroh; Nishifuji, Koji

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration and intercorneal lipid content in dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD). TEWL and skin hydration were measured in the inguinal skin of 10 dogs with AD and 30 normal dogs. TEWL was significantly higher in both lesional skin (94.3 +/- 38.8 g/m(2)/h) and non-lesional skin (28.8 +/- 9.5) of dogs with AD than healthy controls (12.3 +/- 2.3) (P < 0.05). Water content in the lesional skin of dogs with AD (15.8 +/- 7.0 AU) was significantly lower than that of controls (24.2 +/- 8.8) (P < 0.05), whereas no significant differences were recognized in water content between non-lesional skin of dogs with AD and controls. To compare the lipid content between lesional and non-lesional skin of dogs with AD and controls, intercorneal lipids, extracted from the stratum corneum, were quantified by thin-layer chromatography. The relative amounts of ceramides in the lesional skin (24.4 +/- 5.6%) and non-lesional skin (25.6 +/- 3.8%) of dogs with AD were significantly lower than those in controls (31.4 +/- 6.9%) (P < 0.05). Conversely, no significant differences were recognized in the relative amounts of cholesterols and free fatty acids (FFA) between dogs with AD and controls. Moreover, there are statistical correlations between TEWL and the relative amounts of ceramides, but not those of cholesterols and FFA, in both lesional and non-lesional skin of dogs with AD. These results strongly suggest that decreased ceramide content accelerates TEWL in dogs with AD, similar to the situation seen in the corresponding human disease.

  16. Skin Lesions in Swine with Decompression Sickness: Clinical Appearance and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Long; Ariyadewa, Dinesh K; Yi, Hongjie; Wang, Yewei; Zhou, Quan; Xu, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    Skin lesions are visual clinical manifestations of decompression sickness (DCS). Comprehensive knowledge of skin lesions would give simple but strong clinical evidence to help diagnose DCS. The aim of this study was to systematically depict skin lesions and explore their pathophysiological basis in a swine DCS model. Thirteen Bama swine underwent simulated diving in a hyperbaric animal chamber with the profile of 40 msw-35 min exposure, followed by decompression in 11 min. After decompression, chronological changes in the appearance of skin lesions, skin ultrasound, temperature, tissue nitric oxide (NO) levels, and histopathology were studied. Meanwhile bubbles and central nervous system (CNS) function were monitored. All animals developed skin lesions and two died abruptly possibly due to cardiopulmonary failure. A staging approach was developed to divide the appearance into six consecutive stages, which could help diagnosing the progress of skin lesions. Bubbles were only seen in right but not left heart chambers. There were strong correlations between bubble load, lesion area, latency to lesion appearance and existence of cutaneous lesions (P = 0.007, P = 0.002, P = 0.004, respectively). Even though local skin temperature did not change significantly, skin thickness increased, NO elevated and histological changes were observed. Increased vessel echo-reflectors in lesion areas were detected ultrasonically. No CNS dysfunction was detected by treadmill walking and evoked potential. The present results suggest skin lesions mainly result from local bubbles and not CNS injuries or arterial bubbles.

  17. Skin Lesions in Swine with Decompression Sickness: Clinical Appearance and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Long; Ariyadewa, Dinesh K.; Yi, Hongjie; Wang, Yewei; Zhou, Quan; Xu, Weigang

    2017-01-01

    Skin lesions are visual clinical manifestations of decompression sickness (DCS). Comprehensive knowledge of skin lesions would give simple but strong clinical evidence to help diagnose DCS. The aim of this study was to systematically depict skin lesions and explore their pathophysiological basis in a swine DCS model. Thirteen Bama swine underwent simulated diving in a hyperbaric animal chamber with the profile of 40 msw-35 min exposure, followed by decompression in 11 min. After decompression, chronological changes in the appearance of skin lesions, skin ultrasound, temperature, tissue nitric oxide (NO) levels, and histopathology were studied. Meanwhile bubbles and central nervous system (CNS) function were monitored. All animals developed skin lesions and two died abruptly possibly due to cardiopulmonary failure. A staging approach was developed to divide the appearance into six consecutive stages, which could help diagnosing the progress of skin lesions. Bubbles were only seen in right but not left heart chambers. There were strong correlations between bubble load, lesion area, latency to lesion appearance and existence of cutaneous lesions (P = 0.007, P = 0.002, P = 0.004, respectively). Even though local skin temperature did not change significantly, skin thickness increased, NO elevated and histological changes were observed. Increased vessel echo-reflectors in lesion areas were detected ultrasonically. No CNS dysfunction was detected by treadmill walking and evoked potential. The present results suggest skin lesions mainly result from local bubbles and not CNS injuries or arterial bubbles. PMID:28790934

  18. A fuzzy-based histogram analysis technique for skin lesion discrimination in dermatology clinical images

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, R. Joe; Moss, Randy Hays; Van Stoecker, William; Aggarwal, Chetna

    2011-01-01

    A fuzzy logic-based color histogram analysis technique is presented for discriminating benign skin lesions from malignant melanomas in dermatology clinical images. The approach utilizes a fuzzy set for benign skin lesion color, and alpha-cut and support set cardinality for quantifying a fuzzy ratio skin lesion color feature. Skin lesion discrimination results are reported for the fuzzy ratio and fusion with a previously determined percent melanoma color feature over a data set of 258 clinical images. For the fusion technique, alpha-cuts for the fuzzy ratio can be chosen to recognize over 93.30% of melanomas with approximately 15.67% false positive lesions. PMID:12821032

  19. Applying laser speckle images to skin science: skin lesion differentiation by polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tim K.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Sotoodian, Bahman; Kalai, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.

    2011-09-01

    Skin cancer is a worldwide health problem. It is the most common cancer in the countries with a large white population; furthermore, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, has been increasing steadily over the last three decades. There is an urgent need to develop in-vivo, noninvasive diagnostic tools for the disease. This paper attempts to response to the challenge by introducing a simple and fast method based on polarization and laser speckle. The degree of maintaining polarization estimates the fraction of linearly maintaining polarization in the backscattered speckle field. Clinical experiments of 214 skin lesions including malignant melanomas, squamous cell carcinomas, basal cell carcinomas, nevi, and seborrheic keratoses demonstrated that such a parameter can potentially diagnose different skin lesion types. ROC analyses showed that malignant melanoma and seborrheic keratosis could be differentiated by both the blue and red lasers with the area under the curve (AUC) = 0.8 and 0.7, respectively. Also malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma could be separated by the blue laser (AUC = 0.9), while nevus and seborrheic keratosis could be identified using the red laser (AUC = 0.7). These experiments demonstrated that polarization could be a potential in-vivo diagnostic indicator for skin diseases.

  20. Applying laser speckle images to skin science: skin lesion differentiation by polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tim K.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Sotoodian, Bahman; Kalai, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Skin cancer is a worldwide health problem. It is the most common cancer in the countries with a large white population; furthermore, the incidence of malignant melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, has been increasing steadily over the last three decades. There is an urgent need to develop in-vivo, noninvasive diagnostic tools for the disease. This paper attempts to response to the challenge by introducing a simple and fast method based on polarization and laser speckle. The degree of maintaining polarization estimates the fraction of linearly maintaining polarization in the backscattered speckle field. Clinical experiments of 214 skin lesions including malignant melanomas, squamous cell carcinomas, basal cell carcinomas, nevi, and seborrheic keratoses demonstrated that such a parameter can potentially diagnose different skin lesion types. ROC analyses showed that malignant melanoma and seborrheic keratosis could be differentiated by both the blue and red lasers with the area under the curve (AUC) = 0.8 and 0.7, respectively. Also malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma could be separated by the blue laser (AUC = 0.9), while nevus and seborrheic keratosis could be identified using the red laser (AUC = 0.7). These experiments demonstrated that polarization could be a potential in-vivo diagnostic indicator for skin diseases.

  1. Melanoma and other skin lesion detection using smart handheld devices.

    PubMed

    Zouridakis, George; Wadhawan, Tarun; Situ, Ning; Hu, Rui; Yuan, Xiaojing; Lancaster, Keith; Queen, Courtney M

    2015-01-01

    Smartphones of the latest generation featuring advanced multicore processors, dedicated microchips for graphics, high-resolution cameras, and innovative operating systems provide a portable platform for running sophisticated medical screening software and delivering point-of-care patient diagnostic services at a very low cost. In this chapter, we present a smartphone digital dermoscopy application that can analyze high-resolution images of skin lesions and provide the user with feedback about the likelihood of malignancy. The same basic procedure has been adapted to evaluate other skin lesions, such as the flesh-eating bacterial disease known as Buruli ulcer. When implemented on the iPhone, the accuracy and speed achieved by this application are comparable to that of a desktop computer, demonstrating that smartphone applications can combine portability and low cost with high performance. Thus, smartphone-based systems can be used as assistive devices by primary care physicians during routine office visits, and they can have a significant impact in underserved areas and in developing countries, where health-care infrastructure is limited.

  2. Risk group, skin lesion history, and sun sensitivity reliability in squamous cell skin cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Clouser, Mary C; Harris, Robin B; Roe, Denise J; Saboda, Kathylynn; Ranger-Moore, James; Duckett, Laura; Alberts, David S

    2006-11-01

    In studies of skin cancer, participants are often classified into risk groups based on self-reported history of sun exposure or skin characteristics. We sought to determine the reliability of self-reported skin characteristics among participants of a study to evaluate markers for nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Multiple questionnaires and screening protocols were administered over a 3-month period to individuals from three risk groups: existing sun damage on forearms but no visible actinic keratoses (n = 91), visible actinic keratoses (n = 38), and history of resected squamous cell skin cancer in the last 12 months (n = 35). We assessed consistency of risk group assignment between telephone screen and study dermatologist assignment, self-reported sun sensitivity (telephone recruitment form versus participant completed profile), and self-reported history of NMSC skin lesions (telephone recruitment form versus health history). There was substantial agreement between probable risk group and final assignment (kappa = 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.85) and agreement did not differ by gender. Agreement for self-reported sun sensitivity was moderate (kappa weighted = 0.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.56) with higher agreement for women. For self-reported NMSC lesion history between two interviews, 24 days apart, kappa estimates ranged from 0.66 to 0.78 and were higher for women than men. Overall, there was evidence for substantial reproducibility related to risk group assignment and self-reported history of NMSC, with self-reported sun sensitivity being less reliable. In all comparisons, women had higher kappa values than men. These results suggest that self-reported measures of skin cancer risk are reasonably reliable for use in screening subjects into studies.

  3. Acute skin lesions due to localized ``hot particle`` radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.W.; Carsten, A.L.; Kaurin, D.G.L.; Schaefer, C.W.

    1996-06-01

    Purpose of the studies was to determine incidence and severity of lesions resulting from localized deposition of dose to the skin from small (<0.5 mm) discrete radioactive particles. Hanford mini-swine were exposed to localized doses from 0.2 to over 600 Gy (averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 70{mu}m depth) from isotopes having max beta particle energies from about 0.3-3 MeV. Incidence of erythema and scabs (indicating ulceration) were scored routinely for up to 71 days post-irradiation. Responses followed normal probability distributions, and thus, no true threshold could be defined. Ten and 50% incidence rates were deduced using probit analyses. Lowest dose producing 10% incidence was about 1 Gy for exposures to Yb-175 (0.5 MeV max energy) beta particles. Severity of lesions was estimated using diameters and persistence. From preliminary considerations of probability of induction, size, and persistence of acute lesions, a special limit for hot particle exposures in the range of 5-50 Gy may be reasonable, with an action level between about 1 Gy and the limit.

  4. Extensive regression in pigmented skin lesions: a dangerous confounding feature

    PubMed Central

    Lallas, Aimilios; Apalla, Zoe; Moscarella, Elvira; Zalaudek, Iris; Tzellos, Thrasivoulos; Lefaki, Ioanna; Cota, Carlo; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous regression in melanomas is not an uncommon phenomenon, as it has been described in 10–35% of primary cutaneous lesions [1]. Regression does not appear to predict a more favorable course, since even fully regressed melanomas may progress into metastatic disease [2]. Several dermoscopic features have been correlated with the regression process, including white scar-like depigmented areas and gray-blue, pepper-like granules, which correspond to dermal scarring, pigment incontinence and presence of melanophages [3,4]. Regression may occur not only in melanomas, but also in melanocytic nevi, which similarly may exhibit white areas and gray-blue granules or areas under dermoscopy [5]. Overall, white areas have been proposed to be associated with the fibrosis type of regression and gray-blue areas to the melanosis type of regression of melanocytic tumors [3]. Lichen planus like keratosis (LPLK) is considered to represent a regressed solar lentigo or seborrheic keratosis. Dermoscopy of LPLK at the late stage of the regression process reveals a diffuse gray-blue granular pattern, similar to that observed in regressed melanocytic lesions [6]. In this context, when evaluating skin lesions that exhibit high degree of regression, interpretation of dermoscopic findings may be problematic, especially when no other dermoscopic clues can be recognized. PMID:23785596

  5. Extensive regression in pigmented skin lesions: a dangerous confounding feature.

    PubMed

    Lallas, Aimilios; Apalla, Zoe; Moscarella, Elvira; Zalaudek, Iris; Tzellos, Thrasivoulos; Lefaki, Ioanna; Cota, Carlo; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    Spontaneous regression in melanomas is not an uncommon phenomenon, as it has been described in 10-35% of primary cutaneous lesions [1]. Regression does not appear to predict a more favorable course, since even fully regressed melanomas may progress into metastatic disease [2]. Several dermoscopic features have been correlated with the regression process, including white scar-like depigmented areas and gray-blue, pepper-like granules, which correspond to dermal scarring, pigment incontinence and presence of melanophages [3,4]. Regression may occur not only in melanomas, but also in melanocytic nevi, which similarly may exhibit white areas and gray-blue granules or areas under dermoscopy [5]. Overall, white areas have been proposed to be associated with the fibrosis type of regression and gray-blue areas to the melanosis type of regression of melanocytic tumors [3]. Lichen planus like keratosis (LPLK) is considered to represent a regressed solar lentigo or seborrheic keratosis. Dermoscopy of LPLK at the late stage of the regression process reveals a diffuse gray-blue granular pattern, similar to that observed in regressed melanocytic lesions [6]. In this context, when evaluating skin lesions that exhibit high degree of regression, interpretation of dermoscopic findings may be problematic, especially when no other dermoscopic clues can be recognized.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in Acute and Chronic Skin Lesions of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Young; Kim, Cho-Rok; Huh, Ik-Soo; Jung, Mi-Young; Seo, Eun-Young; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Dong-Youn

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus (SA) has peculiar abilities to colonize the skin in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. Objective We sought to determine the colonization rates of SA in acute and chronic skin lesions of AD patients, to find any difference in colonization rates according to age and to find the influences of total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and eosinophil counts to the colonization of SA. Methods We evaluated the total IgE level and eosinophil counts, and cultured SA from the skin lesions of 687 AD patients (131 acute and 556 chronic skin lesions) and 247 control urticaria patients (July 2009 to November 2010; Samsung Medical Center Dermatology Clinic, Seoul, Korea). Results The SA colonization rates were 74%, 38% and 3% in acute, chronic skin lesions and control skin, respectively, and they were increased with age in AD patients. The colonization rate in chronic skin lesions was higher in the high IgE/eosinophilia groups as compared to the normal IgE/eosinophil groups. Conclusion The SA colonization rate was higher in AD patients and especially in acute lesions, and had a tendency to increase with age. As the colonization rates were only higher in the high IgE/eosinophilia groups of chronic skin lesions, we suggested that SA may invade the skin through barrier defects in acute skin lesions, but the colonization in chronic lesions may be orchestrated through many different factors. PMID:24371386

  7. Progression of skin lesions from normal skin to squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Krouse, Robert S; Alberts, David S; Prasad, Anil R; Yozwiak, Michael; Bartels, Hubert G; Liu, Yun; Bartels, Peter H

    2009-02-01

    To assess the changes in the nuclear chromatin pattern concomitant with progressive sun damage in skin biopsies ranging from sun-exposed, normal-appearing skin to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Biopsies were taken from 140 cases with sun-exposed but histopathologically normal skin, from 20 cases visually assessed as pre-actinic keratosis (pre-AK) or early AK, from 30 cases of AK, and from 21 cases of SCC. A total of 21,094 nuclei were recorded from these biopsies. High-resolution digital imagery was recorded, and features descriptive of the nuclear chromatin pattern were computed. Both supervised learning and unsupervised learning algorithms were employed to derive progression plots. With increased sun exposure, the proportion of nuclei exhibiting changes in the nuclear chromatin pattern rises notably. Using karyometry, no significant differences could be substantiated between nuclei collected from early AK sites and AK lesions. Cases of SCC fell into 2 distinct groups. A larger group (approximately 66.7% of cases) had characteristics similar to AK. A smaller group (approximately 33.3% of cases) represented much more progressed lesions. Karyometric assessment can provide a numeric measure of progression for sun damage and of the deviation from normal in both AK and SCC lesions.

  8. Use of optical skin phantoms for preclinical evaluation of laser efficiency for skin lesion therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wróbel, Maciej S.; Jędrzejewska-Szczerska, Malgorzata; Galla, Stanislaw; Piechowski, Leszek; Sawczak, Miroslaw; Popov, Alexey P.; Bykov, Alexander V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Cenian, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Skin lesions are commonly treated using laser heating. However, the introduction of new devices into clinical practice requires evaluation of their performance. This study presents the application of optical phantoms for assessment of a newly developed 975-nm pulsed diode laser system for dermatological purposes. Such phantoms closely mimic the absorption and scattering of real human skin (although not precisely in relation to thermal conductivity and capacitance); thus, they can be used as substitutes for human skin for approximate evaluation of laser heating efficiency in an almost real environment. Thermographic imaging was applied to measure the spatial and temporal temperature distributions on the surface of laser-irradiated phantoms. The study yielded results of heating with regard to phantom thickness and absorption, as well as laser settings. The methodology developed can be used in practice for preclinical evaluations of laser treatment for dermatology. PMID:26263414

  9. Ectoparasites are the major causes of various types of skin lesions in small ruminants in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Chanie, Mersha; Negash, Tamiru; Sirak, Asegedech

    2010-08-01

    Ectoparasites are the major causes of skin lesions in animals. Clinical, skin scraping examination, and histopathological studies were conducted to identify and characterize skin lesions in small ruminants caused by ectoparasites. Mange mites, lice, sheep keds, and ticks were collected from the skin of affected animals for species identification. Skin biopsies were collected from affected part of the skin and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin for histopathology. Of 1,000 sheep and 600 goats examined, 815 (81.50%) sheep and 327 (54.5%) goats were infested with one or more types of ectoparasites. Sarcoptes scabiei var ovis, Demodex ovis, Psoroptes ovis, Bovicola ovis, Melophagus ovinus, and Amblyomma variegatum and other tick species were identified from sheep. S. scabiei var caprae, Demodex caprae, Linognathus stenopsis, and A. variegatum and other tick species were identified from goats. Gross skin lesions or defects observed on the skin include stained and ragged wool, loss of wool/hair, nodules, crusts, lichenification, and fissuring. Microscopic evaluation of H and E stained skin sections revealed lesions in the epidermal layer such as hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, and melanin inconsistency on the basal cells of the epidermis. Follicular keratosis, perifolliculitis, frunculosis, perivasculitis, and aggregates of inflammatory cells (of acute and chronic type) with fibrosis were experiential in the dermal layer of the skin. Most of the skin lesions caused by ectoparasites are overlapping. Thus, ectoparasites control program should be executed to reduce skin lesions as skins are the major export commodity of the country.

  10. Global Gene Expression Profiling of Hyperkeratotic Skin Lesions from Inner Mongolians Chronically Exposed to Arsenic

    EPA Science Inventory

    The skin is an organ that is highly sensitive to chronic arsenic exposure. Skin lesions such as hyperkeratoses (HKs), which are characterized by hyperproliferation and aberrations in terminal epidermal differentiation, are common early manifestations of arsenicosis in humans. H...

  11. Global Gene Expression Profiling of Hyperkeratotic Skin Lesions from Inner Mongolians Chronically Exposed to Arsenic

    EPA Science Inventory

    The skin is an organ that is highly sensitive to chronic arsenic exposure. Skin lesions such as hyperkeratoses (HKs), which are characterized by hyperproliferation and aberrations in terminal epidermal differentiation, are common early manifestations of arsenicosis in humans. H...

  12. Automated Dermoscopy Image Analysis of Pigmented Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Alfonso; Quartulli, Marco; Murace, Raffaele; Dragonetti, Emanuele; Manganaro, Mario; Guerra, Oscar; Bizzi, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Dermoscopy (dermatoscopy, epiluminescence microscopy) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique for the in vivo observation of pigmented skin lesions (PSLs), allowing a better visualization of surface and subsurface structures (from the epidermis to the papillary dermis). This diagnostic tool permits the recognition of morphologic structures not visible by the naked eye, thus opening a new dimension in the analysis of the clinical morphologic features of PSLs. In order to reduce the learning-curve of non-expert clinicians and to mitigate problems inherent in the reliability and reproducibility of the diagnostic criteria used in pattern analysis, several indicative methods based on diagnostic algorithms have been introduced in the last few years. Recently, numerous systems designed to provide computer-aided analysis of digital images obtained by dermoscopy have been reported in the literature. The goal of this article is to review these systems, focusing on the most recent approaches based on content-based image retrieval systems (CBIR). PMID:24281070

  13. Computerized analysis of pigmented skin lesions: a review.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Konstantin; Garcia, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    Computerized analysis of pigmented skin lesions (PSLs) is an active area of research that dates back over 25years. One of its main goals is to develop reliable automatic instruments for recognizing skin cancer from images acquired in vivo. This paper presents a review of this research applied to microscopic (dermoscopic) and macroscopic (clinical) images of PSLs. The review aims to: (1) provide an extensive introduction to and clarify ambiguities in the terminology used in the literature and (2) categorize and group together relevant references so as to simplify literature searches on a specific sub-topic. The existing literature was classified according to the nature of publication (clinical or computer vision articles) and differentiating between individual and multiple PSL image analysis. We also emphasize the importance of the difference in content between dermoscopic and clinical images. Various approaches for implementing PSL computer-aided diagnosis systems and their standard workflow components are reviewed and summary tables provided. An extended categorization of PSL feature descriptors is also proposed, associating them with the specific methods for diagnosing melanoma, separating images of the two modalities and discriminating references according to our classification of the literature. There is a large discrepancy in the number of articles published on individual and multiple PSL image analysis and a scarcity of reported material on the automation of lesion change detection. At present, computer-aided diagnosis systems based on individual PSL image analysis cannot yet be used to provide the best diagnostic results. Furthermore, the absence of benchmark datasets for standardized algorithm evaluation is a barrier to a more dynamic development of this research area. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Noninvasive inspection of skin lesions via multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelagotti, Anna; Ferrara, Pasquale; Pescitelli, Leonardo; Gerlini, Gianni; Piva, Alessandro; Borgognoni, Lorenzo

    2013-04-01

    An optical noninvasive inspection tool is presented to, in vivo, better characterize biological tissues such as human skin. The method proposed exploits a multispectral imaging device to acquire a set of images in the visible and NIR range. This kind of information can be very helpful to improve early diagnosis of melanoma, a very aggressive cutaneous neoplasm, incidence and mortality of which continues to rise worldwide. Currently, noninvasive methods (i.e. dermoscopy) have improved melanoma detection, but the definitive diagnosis is still achieved only by invasive method (istopathological observation of the excised lesion). The multispectral system we developed is capable of imaging layers of structures placed at increasing depth, thanks to the fact that light propagates into the skin and reaches different depths depending on its wavelength. This allows to image many features which are less or not visible in the clinical and dermoscopic examination. A new semeiotics is proposed to describe the content of multispectral images. Dermoscopic criteria can be easily applied to describe each image in the set, however inter-images correlations need new suitable descriptors. The first group of new parameters describes how the dermoscopic features, vary across the set of images. More aspects are then introduced. E.g. the longest wavelength where structures can be detected gives an estimate of the maximum depth reached by the pigmented lesion. While the presence of a bright-to-dark transition between the wavebands in the violet to blue range, reveals the presence of blue-whitish veil, which is a further malignancy marker.

  15. 3-D volume reconstruction of skin lesions for melanin and blood volume estimation and lesion severity analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Brian; Dhawan, Atam P

    2012-11-01

    Subsurface information about skin lesions, such as the blood volume beneath the lesion, is important for the analysis of lesion severity towards early detection of skin cancer such as malignant melanoma. Depth information can be obtained from diffuse reflectance based multispectral transillumination images of the skin. An inverse volume reconstruction method is presented which uses a genetic algorithm optimization procedure with a novel population initialization routine and nudge operator based on the multispectral images to reconstruct the melanin and blood layer volume components. Forward model evaluation for fitness calculation is performed using a parallel processing voxel-based Monte Carlo simulation of light in skin. Reconstruction results for simulated lesions show excellent volume accuracy. Preliminary validation is also done using a set of 14 clinical lesions, categorized into lesion severity by an expert dermatologist. Using two features, the average blood layer thickness and the ratio of blood volume to total lesion volume, the lesions can be classified into mild and moderate/severe classes with 100% accuracy. The method therefore has excellent potential for detection and analysis of pre-malignant lesions.

  16. Navigated tracking of skin lesion progression with optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Lasser, Tobias; Wendler, Thomas; Safi, Asad; Ziegler, Sibylle; Navab, Nassir

    2010-03-01

    Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma (CTCL) is a cancer type externally characterized by alterations in the coloring of skin. Optical spectroscopy has been proposed for quantification of minimal changes in skin offering itself as an interesting tool for monitoring of CTCL in real-time. However, in order to be used in a valid way, measurements on the lesions have to be taken at the same position and with the same orientation in each session. Combining hand-held optical spectroscopy devices with tracking and acquiring synchronously spectral information with position and orientation, we introduce a novel computer-assisted scheme for valid spectral quantification of disease progression. We further present an implementation for an augmented reality guidance system that allows to find a point previously analyzed with an accuracy of 0.8[mm] and 5.0[deg] (vs. 1.6[mm] and 6.6[deg] without guidance). The intuitive guidance, as well as the preliminary results shows that the presented approach has great potential towards innovative computer-assistance methods for quantification of disease progression.

  17. Psychological distress surrounding diagnosis of malignant and nonmalignant skin lesions at a pigmented lesion clinic.

    PubMed

    Al-Shakhli, H; Harcourt, D; Kenealy, J

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed prospectively to investigate psychological distress throughout the diagnostic process in an outpatient pigmented lesion clinic (PLC). Psychological distress was measured at pre clinical diagnosis, post clinical diagnosis, pre histological diagnosis (including a benign follow-up) and post histological diagnosis stages using standard anxiety measurement scales and a study specific measure of satisfaction with care. In total 324 patients undergoing investigation of a suspicious skin lesion consented to take part out of a cohort of 463 patients who attended the PLC in a 6 month period. Using recognised cut-off scores, 27% of women on clinic arrival reported clinically high levels of anxiety, in comparison with 10% of men (p < 0.0001). Patients given an immediate benign post clinical diagnosis reported a reduction in anxiety (p < 0.0001) but patients requiring a biopsy reported elevated levels of anxiety. Approximately, 30% of these biopsy patients reported clinically high levels of anxiety both before and after diagnosis. Patients who received a post histological diagnosis of malignant melanoma also reported the pre histological stage at the clinic as more distressing than waiting for and receiving results (p < 0.01). Patient's quality of life prior to diagnosis was excellent, but emotional functioning (p < 0.05), insomnia (pLesion Clinics in UK. The diagnostic process of a suspicious lesion is evidently a 'critical' stage requiring appropriate provision of care to meet patients' psychosocial and information needs

  18. Characterization of Corynebacterium diphtheriae isolates from infected skin lesions in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Claire L; Fagan, Peter; Hennessy, Jann; Baird, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae is commonly isolated from cutaneous skin lesions in the Northern Territory of Australia. We prospectively assessed 32 recent isolates from infected skin lesions, in addition to reviewing 192 isolates collected over 5 years for toxin status. No isolates carried the toxin gene. Toxigenic C. diphtheriae is now a rare occurrence in the Northern Territory.

  19. Microbial community profiling shows dysbiosis in the lesional skin of Vitiligo subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, Parul; Nagpal, Sunil; Mohammed, MH; Nishal Kumar, P; Pandey, Rajesh; Natarajan, Vivek T; Mande, Sharmila S.; Gokhale, Rajesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Healthy human skin harbours a diverse array of microbes that comprise the skin microbiome. Commensal bacteria constitute an important component of resident microbiome and are intricately linked to skin health. Recent studies describe an association between altered skin microbial community and epidemiology of diseases, like psoriasis, atopic dermatitis etc. In this study, we compare the differences in bacterial community of lesional and non-lesional skin of vitiligo subjects. Our study reveals dysbiosis in the diversity of microbial community structure in lesional skin of vitiligo subjects. Although individual specific signature is dominant over the vitiligo-specific microbiota, a clear decrease in taxonomic richness and evenness can be noted in lesional patches. Investigation of community specific correlation networks reveals distinctive pattern of interactions between resident bacterial populations of the two sites (lesional and non-lesional). While Actinobacterial species constitute the central regulatory nodes (w.r.t. degree of interaction) in non-lesional skin, species belonging to Firmicutes dominate on lesional sites. We propose that the changes in taxonomic characteristics of vitiligo lesions, as revealed by our study, could play a crucial role in altering the maintenance and severity of disease. Future studies would elucidate mechanistic relevance of these microbial dynamics that can provide new avenues for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26758568

  20. An ICA-based method for the segmentation of pigmented skin lesions in macroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Pablo G; Scharcanski, Jacob; Di Persia, Leandro E; Milone, Diego H

    2011-01-01

    Segmentation is an important step in computer-aided diagnostic systems for pigmented skin lesions, since that a good definition of the lesion area and its boundary at the image is very important to distinguish benign from malignant cases. In this paper a new skin lesion segmentation method is proposed. This method uses Independent Component Analysis to locate skin lesions in the image, and this location information is further refined by a Level-set segmentation method. Our method was evaluated in 141 images and achieved an average segmentation error of 16.55%, lower than the results for comparable state-of-the-art methods proposed in literature.

  1. Multimodal facial color imaging modality for objective analysis of skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngwoo; Nelson, J. Stuart; Jung, Byungjo

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a multimodal facial color imaging modality that provides a conventional color image, parallel and cross-polarization color images, and a fluorescent color image. We characterize the imaging modality and describe the image analysis methods for objective evaluation of skin lesions. The parallel and cross-polarization color images are useful for the analysis of skin texture, pigmentation, and vascularity. The polarization image, which is derived from parallel and cross-polarization color images, provides morphological information of superficial skin lesions. The fluorescent color image is useful for the evaluation of skin chromophores excited by UV-A radiation. In order to demonstrate the validity of the new imaging modality in dermatology, sample images were obtained from subjects with various skin disorders and image analysis methods were applied for objective evaluation of those lesions. In conclusion, we are confident that the imaging modality and analysis methods should be useful tools to simultaneously evaluate various skin lesions in dermatology. PMID:19123654

  2. Color analysis of skin lesion regions for melanoma discrimination in clinical images

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jixiang; Stanley, R. Joe; Moss, Randy H.; Van Stoecker, William

    2011-01-01

    Background Skin lesion color is an important feature for diagnosing malignant melanoma. Color histogram analysis over a training set of images has been used to identify colors characteristic of melanoma, i.e., melanoma colors. A percent melanoma color feature defined as the percentage of the lesion pixels that are melanoma colors has been used as a feature to discriminate melanomas from benign lesions. Methods In this research, the color histogram analysis technique is extended to evaluate skin lesion discrimination based on color feature calculations in different regions of the skin lesion. The color features examined include percent melanoma color and a novel color clustering ratio. Experiments are performed using clinical images of 129 malignant melanomas and 129 benign lesions consisting of 40 seborrheic keratoses and 89 nevocellular nevi. Results Experimental results show improved discrimination capability for feature calculations focused in the lesion boundary region. Specifically, correct melanoma and benign recognition rates are observed as high as 89 and 83%, respectively, for the percent melanoma color feature computed using only the outermost, uniformly distributed 10% of the lesion’s area. Conclusions The experimental results show for the features investigated that the region closest to the skin lesion boundary contains the greatest color discrimination information for lesion screening. Furthermore, the percent melanoma color feature consistently outperformed the color clustering ratio for the different skin lesion regions examined. The clinical application of this result is that clustered colors appear to be no more significant than colors of arbitrary distribution within a lesion. PMID:12709126

  3. A Case of Intermittently Discharging Skin Lesion: Orodentocutaneous Fistula Demonstrated on CT Fistulography

    PubMed Central

    Ranga, Upasana; Veeraiyan, Saveetha

    2014-01-01

    Orodentocutaneous fistula is a rare entity where periapical dental abscess communicates with both oral cavity and external skin. In few cases, patients presents initially with only cutaneous manifestation with no recollectable history of dental problem. Delay in diagnosis of odontogenic cause of skin lesion makes the disease more chronic and extensive. We hereby present a case of orodentocutaneous fistula that presented with intermittently discharging skin lesion and was evaluated by using CT fistulography. PMID:25302272

  4. Development of Protective Agent Against Sulfur Mustard-Induced Skin Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-2-0013 TITLE: Development of Protective Agent Against Sulfur Mustard- Induced Skin Lesions PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Uri...Protective Agent Against Sulfur Mustard- DAMDl7-03-2-0013 Induced Skin Lesions 6. A UTHOR(S) Uri Wormser, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZA TION NAME(S) AND...5 The involvement of inflammatory mediators in SM-induced skin toxicity ......... 6 Experimental procedures

  5. Application of principal component analysis to multispectral imaging data for evaluation of pigmented skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Lihacova, Ilze; Kuzmina, Ilona; Spigulis, Janis

    2013-11-01

    Non-invasive and fast primary diagnostics of pigmented skin lesions is required due to frequent incidence of skin cancer - melanoma. Diagnostic potential of principal component analysis (PCA) for distant skin melanoma recognition is discussed. Processing of the measured clinical multi-spectral images (31 melanomas and 94 nonmalignant pigmented lesions) in the wavelength range of 450-950 nm by means of PCA resulted in 87 % sensitivity and 78 % specificity for separation between malignant melanomas and pigmented nevi.

  6. A digital image acquisition system for skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglogiannis, Ilias G.; Kosmopoulos, Dimitrios I.

    2003-05-01

    A major issue concerning the design and implementation of an acquisition system for digital images of skin lesions is the ability of capturing reproducible images. The reproducibility is considered essential for image analysis classification and for the comparison of sequential images during follow-up studies. This paper describes a complete image acquisition system used for the collection of reproducible images of patients having melanoma and compares them with images displaying dysplastic nevus for diagnostic purposes. The system includes a standardized illumination and capturing geometry with polarizing filters and a series of software corrections: Calibration to Black, White, Internal and External camera parameters, Shading correction and Median filtering. The validity of the calibration procedure and the ability of the implemented system to produce reproducible images were tested by capturing sample images in 3 different lighting conditions of the surrounding environment: dark, medium and intense lighting. For each case the average values of the three-color planes RGB and their standard deviations were calculated and the measured error differences ranged between 0,4 and 13,2 (in the 0-255 scale). Preliminary experiments for stereo measurements provided repeatability of about 0.3mm. The above numbers demonstrate the reproducibility of the captured images at a satisfactory level.

  7. Neutrophilic Skin Lesions in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Estelle; Vignon Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Battistella, Maxime; Saussine, Anne; Bergis, Maud; Cavelier-Balloy, Benedicte; Janier, Michel; Cordoliani, Florence; Bagot, Martine; Rybojad, Michel; Bouaziz, Jean-David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of neutrophilic dermatoses (NDs) and autoimmune connective tissue diseases (AICTDs) is incompletely understood. The association between NDs and AICTDs is rare; recently, however, a distinctive subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE, the prototypical AICTD) with neutrophilic histological features has been proposed to be included in the spectrum of lupus. The aim of our study was to test the validity of such a classification. We conducted a monocentric retrospective study of 7028 AICTDs patients. Among these 7028 patients, a skin biopsy was performed in 932 cases with mainly neutrophilic infiltrate on histology in 9 cases. Combining our 9 cases and an exhaustive literature review, pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet syndrome (n = 49), Sweet-like ND (n = 13), neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (n = 6), palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (n = 12), and histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatitis (n = 2) were likely to occur both in AICTDs and autoinflammatory diseases. Other NDs were specifically encountered in AICTDs: bullous LE (n = 71), amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (n = 28), autoimmunity-related ND (n = 24), ND resembling erythema gyratum repens (n = 1), and neutrophilic annular erythema (n = 1). The improvement of AICTDS neutrophilic lesions under neutrophil targeting therapy suggests possible common physiopathological pathways between NDs and AICTDs. PMID:25546688

  8. Evaluation of skin thickness lesions in patients with Lyme disease measured by modified Rodnan total skin score.

    PubMed

    Moniuszko, A; Gińdzieńska-Sieśkiewicz, E; Pancewicz, S A; Czupryna, P; Zajkowska, J; Sierakowski, S

    2012-10-01

    Recently, a possible etiological connection between infection with Borrelia burgdorferi and various skin lesions, including morphea and systemic sclerosis (SSc), has been discussed. The aim of our study was the evaluation of frequency of skin thickening typical of SSc or morphea in the group of patients with Lyme disease (LD) with frequent exposition to tick bites. The group consisted of 110 patients with LD frequently exposed to tick bites form the northeastern Poland, which is an endemic area for this disease. To measure the skin lesions, the modified Rodnan total skin score (RTSS) was used. In the analyzed group, no skin changes typical of morphea or skin thickening were found. According to RTSS, all patients scored 0 points. Raynaud's phenomenon in all patients was not found. The relationship between scleroderma or morphea and LD is still a matter of controversy. Described by some authors, cases with LD and scleroderma may be associated with co-existence of B. burgdorferi infection with autoimmune process.

  9. A basis function feature-based approach for skin lesion discrimination in dermatology dermoscopy images

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, R. Joe; Stoecker, William V.; Moss, Randy H.; Rabinovitz, Harold S.; Cognetta, Armand B.; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Soyer, H. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background Skin lesion color is an important feature for diagnosing malignant melanoma. New basis function correlation features are proposed for discriminating malignant melanoma lesions from benign lesions in dermoscopy images. The proposed features are computed based on correlating the luminance histogram of melanoma or benign labeled relative colors from a specified portion of the skin lesion with a set of basis functions. These features extend previously developed statistical and fuzzy logic-based relative color histogram analysis techniques for automated mapping of colors representative of melanoma and benign skin lesions from a training set of lesion images. Methods Using the statistical and fuzzy logic-based approaches for relative color mapping, melanoma and benign color features are computed over skin lesion region of interest, respectively. Luminance histograms are obtained from the melanoma and benign mapped colors within the lesion region of interest and are correlated with a set of basis functions to quantify the distribution of colors. The histogram analysis techniques and feature calculations are evaluated using a data set of 279 malignant melanomas and 442 benign dysplastic nevi images. Results Experimental test results showed that combining existing melanoma and benign color features with the proposed basis function features found from the melanoma mapped colors yielded average correct melanoma and benign lesion discrimination rates as high as 86.45% and 83.35%, respectively. Conclusions The basis function features provide an alternative approach to melanoma discrimination that quantifies the variation and distribution of colors characteristic of melanoma and benign skin lesions. PMID:18937777

  10. Study of early appearance of skin lesions in coal gasification workers.

    PubMed

    Begraca, M; Ukmata, H; Morris, S C; Canhasi, B; Haxhiu, M A

    1991-09-01

    A retrospective cohort morbidity study was conducted among workers employed at the Kosovo coal gasification plant and a reference population of open-pit lignite miners. The aim was to determine the rate of early skin cancer and pre-cancerous skin lesions. In 15 years of commercial operation of the coal gasification plant, seven workers were diagnosed with benign skin tumors, six with pre-cancerous skin diseases, but none with skin cancer. The lesions were significantly fewer than were reported earlier over a shorter time period and in a smaller population at a coal hydrogenation plant. Compared to the reference population who received medical care in the same clinic, gasification workers had a lower skin cancer rate, but a higher rate of benign skin tumors and potentially pre-cancerous skin diseases.

  11. In vivo optical elastography: stress and strain imaging of human skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Gong, Peijun; Kennedy, Kelsey M.; Wijesinghe, Philip; Sampson, David D.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2015-03-01

    Probing the mechanical properties of skin at high resolution could aid in the assessment of skin pathologies by, for example, detecting the extent of cancerous skin lesions and assessing pathology in burn scars. Here, we present two elastography techniques based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to probe the local mechanical properties of skin. The first technique, optical palpation, is a high-resolution tactile imaging technique, which uses a complaint silicone layer positioned on the tissue surface to measure spatially-resolved stress imparted by compressive loading. We assess the performance of optical palpation, using a handheld imaging probe on a skin-mimicking phantom, and demonstrate its use on human skin. The second technique is a strain imaging technique, phase-sensitive compression OCE that maps depth-resolved mechanical variations within skin. We show preliminary results of in vivo phase-sensitive compression OCE on a human skin lesion.

  12. Computer aided analysis of epi-illumination and transillumination images of skin lesions for diagnosis of skin cancers.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Brian; Dhawan, Atam P; Mullani, Nizar

    2011-01-01

    Skin lesion pigmentation area from surface, or, epi-illumination (ELM) images and blood volume area from transillumination (TLM) images are useful features to aid a dermatologist in the diagnosis of melanoma and other skin cancers in early curable stages. However, segmentation of these areas is difficult. In this work, we present an automatic segmentation tool for ELM and TLM images that also provides additional choices for user selection and interaction with adaptive learning. Our tool uses a combination of k-means clustering, wavelet analysis, and morphological operations to segment the lesion and blood volume, and then presents the user with six segmentation suggestions for both ELM and TLM images. The final selection of segmentation boundary may then be iteratively improved through scoring by multiple users. The ratio of TLM to ELM segmented areas is an indicator of dysplasia in skin lesions for detection of skin cancers, and this ratio is found to show a statistically significant trend in association with lesion dysplasia on a set of 81 pathologically validated lesions (p = 0.0058). We then present a support vector machine classifier using the results from the interactive segmentation method along with ratio, color, texture, and shape features to characterize skin lesions into three degrees of dysplasia with promising accuracy.

  13. Molecular changes in skin pigmented lesions of the coral trout Plectropomus leopardus.

    PubMed

    Lerebours, Adélaïde; Chapman, Emma C; Sweet, Michael J; Heupel, Michelle R; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2016-09-01

    A high prevalence of skin pigmented lesions of 15% was recently reported in coral trout Plectropomus leopardus, a commercially important marine fish, inhabiting the Great Barrier Reef. Herein, fish were sampled at two offshore sites, characterised by high and low lesion prevalence. A transcriptomic approach using the suppressive subtractive hybridisation (SSH) method was used to analyse the differentially expressed genes between lesion and normal skin samples. Transcriptional changes of 14 genes were observed in lesion samples relative to normal skin samples. These targeted genes encoded for specific proteins which are involved in general cell function but also in different stages disrupted during the tumourigenesis process of other organisms, such as cell cycling, cell proliferation, skeletal organisation and cell migration. The results highlight transcripts that are associated with the lesion occurrence, contributing to a better understanding of the molecular aetiology of this coral trout skin disease.

  14. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Papulonodular Lesions of Skin: A Study of 50 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevappa, Asha; Manjunath, Gubbanna Vimalambike

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin is one of the frequent site of disease in human body. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) is a safe diagnostic method in these cases. FNAC has some limitation, particularly related to representativity of samples, exact typing of skin adnexal tumours and classifying the nature of metastatic cutaneous nodules. Thus, FNAC alone may not give a confirmative diagnosis regarding few skin lesions. Hence, histopathological study has been the standard technique for the diagnosis of skin lesions. Aim To study the FNAC findings in various papulonodular lesions and to correlate them with histopathological findings wherever possible. Materials and Methods In the present study, 50 cases of clinically diagnosed papulonodular lesions were evaluated by FNAC and correlated with histopathology wherever possible. Results There was 100% correlation in cases of epidermal cyst, leprosy, tuberculosis, actinomycosis, acute and chronic inflammatory lesions and 67% accuracy was seen in adnexal tumours. Aspiration cytology along with radiological studies proved very useful in classifying the nature of metastatic cutaneous nodules and suggesting the possible site of unknown primary. Sensitivity of FNAC for epidermal cyst and inflammatory lesions was 100%. In case of adnexal tumours, sensitivity and specificity was 67% and 50% respectively. Conclusion FNAC is a rapid, efficient, cost effective, relatively painless procedure and produces a speedy result with high diagnostic accuracy. It has high rates of sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing papulonodular lesions of skin and hence, is a valuable tool in the diagnosis and management of patients with papulonodular skin lesions. PMID:28208863

  15. Relationship between arsenic skin lesions and the age of natural menopause

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with neoplastic, cardiovascular, endocrine, neuro-developmental disorders and can have an adverse effect on women’s reproductive health outcomes. This study examined the relationship between arsenic skin lesions (a hallmark sign of chronic arsenic poisoning) and age of natural menopause (final menopausal period) in populations with high levels of arsenic exposure in Bangladesh. Methods We compared menopausal age in two groups of women – with and without arsenic skin lesions; and presence of arsenic skin lesions was used as an indicator for chronic arsenic exposure. In a cross-sectional study, a total of 210 participants were randomly identified from two ongoing studies— participants with arsenic skin lesions were identified from an ongoing clinical trial and participants with no arsenic skin lesions were identified from an ongoing cohort study. Mean age of menopause between these two groups were calculated and compared. Multivariable linear regression was used to estimate the relationship between the status of the arsenic skin lesions and age of natural menopause in women. Results Women with arsenic skin lesions were 1.5 years younger (p <0.001) at the time of menopause compared to those without arsenic skin lesions. After adjusting with contraceptive use, body mass index, urinary arsenic level and family history of premature menopause, the difference between the groups’ age at menopause was 2.1 years earlier (p <0.001) for respondents with arsenic skin lesions. Conclusions The study showed a statistically significant association between chronic exposure to arsenic and age at menopause. Heavily exposed women experienced menopause two years earlier than those with lower or no exposure. PMID:24886424

  16. Relationship between arsenic skin lesions and the age of natural menopause.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Fakir Md; Rahman, Musarrat Jabeen; Alam, Md Zahidul; Hore, Samar Kumar; Rahman, Mahfuzar

    2014-05-02

    Chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with neoplastic, cardiovascular, endocrine, neuro-developmental disorders and can have an adverse effect on women's reproductive health outcomes. This study examined the relationship between arsenic skin lesions (a hallmark sign of chronic arsenic poisoning) and age of natural menopause (final menopausal period) in populations with high levels of arsenic exposure in Bangladesh. We compared menopausal age in two groups of women--with and without arsenic skin lesions; and presence of arsenic skin lesions was used as an indicator for chronic arsenic exposure. In a cross-sectional study, a total of 210 participants were randomly identified from two ongoing studies--participants with arsenic skin lesions were identified from an ongoing clinical trial and participants with no arsenic skin lesions were identified from an ongoing cohort study. Mean age of menopause between these two groups were calculated and compared. Multivariable linear regression was used to estimate the relationship between the status of the arsenic skin lesions and age of natural menopause in women. Women with arsenic skin lesions were 1.5 years younger (p <0.001) at the time of menopause compared to those without arsenic skin lesions. After adjusting with contraceptive use, body mass index, urinary arsenic level and family history of premature menopause, the difference between the groups' age at menopause was 2.1 years earlier (p <0.001) for respondents with arsenic skin lesions. The study showed a statistically significant association between chronic exposure to arsenic and age at menopause. Heavily exposed women experienced menopause two years earlier than those with lower or no exposure.

  17. Characterization of skin lesions induced by skin-tropic α- and β-papillomaviruses in a patient with epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Borgogna, C; Landini, M M; Lanfredini, S; Doorbar, J; Bouwes Bavinck, J N; Quint, K D; de Koning, M N C; Genders, R E; Gariglio, M

    2014-12-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare, lifelong, autosomal recessive skin disease associated with an unusual susceptibility to infections with ubiquitous β-human papillomaviruses (β-HPVs), and in some cases also skin-tropic α genotypes. In this case report, HPV infection patterns were correlated with pathology and clinical manifestations of skin lesions from a patient with EV, without loss-of-function mutations in the EVER genes. HPV infection was investigated by both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and laser capture microdissection (LCM) PCR, alongside immunofluorescence for the viral proteins E4 and L1. Analysis of eyebrow hair bulbs revealed multiple β-genus HPV infections, including HPV20 and HPV24, which were consistently found in all 11 skin lesions on the patient. Six lesions were also positive for the skin tropic α-genotype, HPV27. Clear-cut differences between two wart-like lesions, one caused by a skin-tropic α-genotype and the other by β-genotypes (as detected by LCM PCR) are shown, including the high cellular proliferation rate in β-HPV-induced lesions. Widespread expression of the early protein E4 was also evident in skin lesions positive for HPV20 by LCM PCR in both tumours and nearby intraepidermal proliferative areas. L1 expression was restricted to areas of intraepidermal proliferation showing productive infection. The patient's inability to control HPV infections is conclusive to the uncontrolled replication of few genotypes from both α and β genera, which cause proliferative lesions with clear-cut clinical and histological features.

  18. Drinking Water Arsenic Contamination, Skin Lesions, and Malignancies: A Systematic Review of the Global Evidence.

    PubMed

    Karagas, Margaret R; Gossai, Anala; Pierce, Brandon; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-03-01

    Skin lesions and cancer are known manifestations of chronic exposure to arsenic contaminated drinking water. Epidemiologic data primarily comes from regions with exposures 1-2 orders of magnitude above the current World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines of 10 μg/L. Emerging evidence indicates that more common exposures may also be related to both noncancerous and cancerous changes to the skin. In this review, we focus on the body of epidemiologic literature that encompasses exposures within the WHO guidelines, excluding studies that lacked individual exposure estimates and case reports. For skin lesions and skin cancers, 15 and 10 studies were identified that met our criteria, respectively. For skin lesions, a consistent dose-response relationship with water arsenic has been observed, with increased risk evident at low- to moderate-dose exposure. Of the larger studies of specific histologic types of skin cancers, although with differing exposure definitions, there was evidence of dose-related relationships with both basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. The effect of arsenic exposure on skin lesion risk is likely modified by genetic variants that influence arsenic metabolism. Accumulating evidence suggests that arsenic may increase risk of skin lesions and skin cancers at levels not previously considered harmful, and that genetic factors may influence risk.

  19. Drinking Water Arsenic Contamination, Skin Lesions, and Malignancies: A Systematic Review of the Global Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Karagas, Margaret R.; Gossai, Anala; Pierce, Brandon; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Skin lesions and cancer are known manifestations of chronic exposure to arsenic contaminated drinking water. Epidemiologic data primarily comes from regions with exposures 1–2 orders of magnitude above the current World Health Organization (WHO)’s guidelines of 10 μg/L. Emerging evidence indicates that more common exposures may also be related to both non-cancerous and cancerous changes to the skin. In this review, we focus on the body of epidemiologic literature that encompasses exposures within the WHO guidelines, excluding studies that lacked individual exposure estimates and case reports. For skin lesions and skin cancers, 15 and 10 studies were identified that met our criteria, respectively. For skin lesions, a consistent dose-response relationship with water arsenic has been observed, with increased risk evident at low- to moderate-dose exposure. Of the larger studies of specific histologic types of skin cancers, although with differing exposure definitions, there was evidence of dose-related relationships with both basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. The effect of arsenic exposure on skin lesion risk is likely modified by genetic variants that influence arsenic metabolism. Accumulating evidence suggests that arsenic may increase risk of skin lesions and skin cancers at levels not previously considered harmful, and that genetic factors may influence risk. PMID:26231242

  20. A coarse-to-fine approach for segmenting melanocytic skin lesions in standard camera images.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Pablo G; Scharcanski, Jacob

    2013-12-01

    Melanoma is a type of malignant melanocytic skin lesion, and it is among the most life threatening existing cancers if not treated at an early stage. Computer-aided prescreening systems for melanocytic skin lesions is a recent trend to detect malignant melanocytic skin lesions in their early stages, and lesion segmentation is an important initial processing step. A good definition of the lesion area and its border is very important for discriminating between benign and malignant cases. In this paper, we propose to segment melanocytic skin lesions using a sequence of steps. We start by pre-segmenting the skin lesion, creating a new image representation (channel) where the lesion features are more evident. This new channel is thresholded, and the lesion border pre-detection is refined using an active-contours algorithm followed by morphological operations. Our experimental results based on a publicly available dataset suggest that our method potentially can be more accurate than comparable state-of-the-art methods proposed in literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased Activity and Number of Epidermal Melanocytes in Lesional Psoriatic Skin.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Naser, Mohamed Badawy; Liakou, Aikaterini I; Elewa, Rana; Hippe, Sabine; Knolle, Jürgen; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic lesions may resolve with hypo- or hyperpigmentation. The involvement of melanocytes in this dichotomous clinical outcome is not fully investigated. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of melanocytes in untreated lesional and non-lesional psoriatic skin (n = 15) and healthy controls (n = 10). Skin biopsies were labelled immunohistochemically (APAAP technique) with the antimelanocyte monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) HMB45, Melan A, tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). The labelled melanocytes were evaluated by an independent investigator with a digital image analyser. Lesional melanocytes, in contrast to those in non-lesional and healthy skin, exhibited features of activation in the form of dilatation, prominent and long dendrites and intense labelling. The number of melanocytes was significantly increased in psoriatic lesions in comparison with non-lesional psoriatic and healthy skin as shown by counts of cells labelled with the MoAbs HMB45 (3-fold; p < 0.001), Melan A (1.6-fold; p < 0.01) and tyrosinase (1.5-fold; p < 0.01). In contrast, labelling with MITF revealed no significant difference (1.2-fold increase; p > 0.05). Likewise, no significant difference between non-lesional psoriatic and healthy skin control was found (p > 0.05). Furthermore, no positively labelled dermal cells were detected, apart from few only detected with Melan A. Epidermal melanocyte activity and numbers are increased in the epidermal compartment of psoriatic lesions providing an explanation for postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in skin lesions of classic Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Karouni, Mirna; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-09-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are the most potent producers of type I interferons (IFNs), which allows them to provide anti-viral resistance and to link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. pDCs are involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious [especially viral, such as Molluscum contagiosum (MC)], inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a multifocal, systemic lympho-angioproliferative tumor associated with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. Microscopy typically exhibits a chronic inflammatory lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate in addition to the vascular changes and spindle cell proliferation. Despite the extensive research done on the immune evasion strategies employed by KSHV, pDCs role in relation to KS has only rarely been investigated. Given this, we intend to investigate pDC occurrence and activity in the skin lesions of KS. Immunohistochemical staining for BDCA-2 (specific pDC marker) and MxA (surrogate marker for local type I IFN production) was performed on classic KS (n = 20) with the control group comprising inflamed MC (n = 20). As expected, BDCA-2+ pDCs were present in abundance with diffuse and intense MxA expression (indicative of local type I IFN production) in all inflamed MC cases (20 of 20, 100 %). Though present in all the KS cases, pDCs were significantly less abundant in KS than in inflamed MC cases, and MxA expression was patchy/weak in most KS cases. In summary, pDCs are part of the inflammatory host response in KS; however, they were generally low in number with decreased type I IFN production which is probably related to KSHV's ability to evade the immune system through the production of different viral proteins capable of suppressing IFN production as well as pDC function.

  3. Enhancement of lesion classification using divergence, curl and curvature of skin pattern.

    PubMed

    She, Zhishun; Duller, A W G; Fish, P J

    2004-11-01

    The observation that skin pattern tends to be disrupted by malignant but not by benign skin lesions suggests that measurements of skin pattern disruption on simply captured white light optical clinical (WLC) skin images could be a useful contribution to a diagnostic feature set. Previous work which generated a flow field of skin pattern using a measurement of local line direction and variation determined by the minimum eigenvalue and its corresponding eigenvector of the local tensor matrix to measure skin pattern disruption was computationally low cost and encouraging. This paper explores the possibility of extracting new features from the first and second differentiations of this flow field to enhance classification performance. The skin pattern was extracted from WLC skin images by high-pass filtering. The skin line direction was estimated using a local image gradient matrix to produce a flow field of skin pattern. Divergence, curl, mean and Gaussian curvatures of this flow field were computed from the first and second differentiations of this flow field. The difference of these measures combined with skin line direction across the lesion image boundary was used as a lesion classifier. A set of images of malignant melanoma and benign naevi were analysed as above and the scatter plot in a two-dimensional dominant feature space using principal component analysis showed excellent separation of benign and malignant lesions. A receiver operating characteristic plot enclosed an area of 0.96. The experimental results show that the divergence, curl, mean and Gaussian curvatures of the flow field can increase lesion classifier accuracy. Combined with skin line direction they are promising features for distinguishing malignant melanoma from benign lesions and the methods used are computationally efficient which is important if their use is to be considered in clinical practice.

  4. Reconstructing in-vivo reflectance spectrum of pigmented skin lesion by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuang; He, Qingli; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2012-03-01

    In dermatology applications, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been extensively investigated as a promising tool for the noninvasive method to distinguish melanoma from benign pigmented skin lesion (nevus), which is concentrated with the skin chromophores like melanin and hemoglobin. We carried out a theoretical study to examine melanin distribution in human skin tissue and establish a practical optical model for further pigmented skin investigation. The theoretical simulation was using junctional nevus as an example. A multiple layer skin optical model was developed on established anatomy structures of skin, the published optical parameters of different skin layers, blood and melanin. Monte Carlo simulation was used to model the interaction between excitation light and skin tissue and rebuild the diffuse reflectance process from skin tissue. A testified methodology was adopted to determine melanin contents in human skin based on in vivo diffuse reflectance spectra. The rebuild diffuse reflectance spectra were investigated by adding melanin into different layers of the theoretical model. One of in vivo reflectance spectra from Junctional nevi and their surrounding normal skin was studied by compare the ratio between nevus and normal skin tissue in both the experimental and simulated diffuse reflectance spectra. The simulation result showed a good agreement with our clinical measurements, which indicated that our research method, including the spectral ratio method, skin optical model and modifying the melanin content in the model, could be applied in further theoretical simulation of pigmented skin lesions.

  5. Reconstructing in-vivo reflectance spectrum of pigmented skin lesion by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuang; He, Qingli; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2011-11-01

    In dermatology applications, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been extensively investigated as a promising tool for the noninvasive method to distinguish melanoma from benign pigmented skin lesion (nevus), which is concentrated with the skin chromophores like melanin and hemoglobin. We carried out a theoretical study to examine melanin distribution in human skin tissue and establish a practical optical model for further pigmented skin investigation. The theoretical simulation was using junctional nevus as an example. A multiple layer skin optical model was developed on established anatomy structures of skin, the published optical parameters of different skin layers, blood and melanin. Monte Carlo simulation was used to model the interaction between excitation light and skin tissue and rebuild the diffuse reflectance process from skin tissue. A testified methodology was adopted to determine melanin contents in human skin based on in vivo diffuse reflectance spectra. The rebuild diffuse reflectance spectra were investigated by adding melanin into different layers of the theoretical model. One of in vivo reflectance spectra from Junctional nevi and their surrounding normal skin was studied by compare the ratio between nevus and normal skin tissue in both the experimental and simulated diffuse reflectance spectra. The simulation result showed a good agreement with our clinical measurements, which indicated that our research method, including the spectral ratio method, skin optical model and modifying the melanin content in the model, could be applied in further theoretical simulation of pigmented skin lesions.

  6. The effect of pimecrolimus on expression of genes associated with skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Grzanka, Alicja; Zebracka-Gala, Jadwiga; Rachowska, Regina; Bozek, Andrzej; Kowalska, Małgorzata; Jarzab, Jerzy

    2012-03-01

    The mechanism of action of pimecrolimus (PIM) on atopic lesions is still under consideration. Thus far, we have evidence of its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity, and recent papers focus on its effect on epidermal barrier function. This study analysed changes in the expression of genes associated with skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis (AD) skin lesions after 2 weeks of exposure to PIM 1% cream. A real-time quantitative PCR analysis of selected epidermal differentiation complex genes and three alternative pathway keratins was performed in skin biopsies from 11 individuals with AD before and after PIM exposure. The real-time quantitative PCR analysis was compared to non-lesional skin in the same patients. Involucrin, a small proline-rich region (SPRR) 2C gene, and alternative pathway keratin 16 showed significant over-expression in lesional skin followed by significant decrease after PIM therapy. The SPRR1A gene, S100A9, and keratin 6A were also increased; however, the decrease after PIM treatment was not significant. The changes in S100 A2, A7 and A8 followed a similar course with borderline significance. SPRR4 had a significant decrease in expression in lesional versus non-lesional skin, which persisted after PIM treatment. No significant changes were detected in mRNA expression levels of filaggrin and loricrin. Our results suggest that PIM can be effective in restoring the epidermal barrier in patients with AD at least in part by its impact on expression of genes, which are important for the normal barrier function of skin.

  7. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy imaging of melanocytic skin lesions: consensus terminology glossary and illustrative images.

    PubMed

    Scope, Alon; Benvenuto-Andrade, Cristiane; Agero, Anna-Liza C; Malvehy, Josep; Puig, Susana; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Busam, Klaus J; Marra, Diego E; Torres, Abel; Propperova, Iva; Langley, Richard G; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Pellacani, Giovanni; Seidenari, Stefania; Halpern, Allan C; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2007-10-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has been used for over 10 years for in vivo skin imaging. However, to date no standard RCM terminology has been published. To establish a glossary of terms for RCM evaluation of melanocytic lesions. Prominent RCM researchers were presented with RCM images of melanocytic lesions. Reviewers evaluated RCM images for image quality, lesion architecture, and cellular details. Reviewers could utilize published descriptors or contribute unpublished terminology to describe lesion attributes. An online meeting was conducted to reach consensus that integrates and defines existing and new RCM descriptive terms. We present a glossary with descriptors of image quality, normal skin morphology, lesion architecture, and cellular details for RCM evaluation of melanocytic lesions. Usefulness of the glossary in RCM diagnosis of melanocytic lesions needs to be assessed. Standardization of terminology is important toward implementation of RCM in the clinical setting.

  8. Detection of human papillomavirus in nonmelanoma skin cancer lesions and healthy perilesional skin in kidney transplant recipients and immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Bernat-García, J; Morales Suárez-Varela, M; Vilata-Corell, J J; Marquina-Vila, A

    2014-04-01

    The influence of human papillomavirus (HPV) on the development of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is a topic of debate. HPV types from the beta genus (HPV-β) have been most frequently associated with the development of skin cancer. To analyze the prevalence and range of HPV types in NMSC lesions and healthy perilesional skin in immunodepressed and immunocompetent patients and to evaluate the influence of various clinical factors on the prevalence of HPV in skin cancer. Nested polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used to detect HPV in 120 NMSC samples obtained by biopsy from 30 kidney transplant recipients and 30 immunocompetent patients. In all cases, a sample was taken from the tumor site and the surrounding healthy skin. Potential confounders were assessed and the data analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. HPV DNA was detected in 44 (73.3%) of the 60 samples from immunodepressed patients and in 32 (53.3%) of the 60 samples from immunocompetent patients (adjusted odds ratio, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.2-9.6). In both groups of patients, HPV was more common in healthy perilesional skin than in lesional skin. HPV-β was the most common type isolated. We found a wide range of HPV types (mostly HPV-β) in the skin of kidney transplant recipients and immunocompetent patients with skin cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. The important role of interdisciplinary collaboration in the management of a melanocytic skin lesion

    PubMed Central

    Balato, Anna; Raimondo, Annunziata; Cantelli, Mariateresa; Siano, Maria; Lembo, Serena; Scalvenzi, Massimiliano; Balato, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    One of the most confounding characteristics, commonly seen in malignant, but even in benign melanocytic nevi, is represented by the regression phenomenon. The identification of regression, through dermoscopical observation, can be predictive of a tricky histopathological examination. Therefore, this feature should be an alert to a meticulous clinical, dermoscopical and histopathological correlation for correct analysis of melanocytic skin lesions. A 26-year-old man was referred to our department for a pigmented skin lesion localized on his trunk. It was clinically and dermoscopically diagnosed as atypical melanocytic nevus with central regression. After 1 year the lesion underwent considerable changes, leading to a nearly complete regression. The lesion was excised and, on the basis of clinical, dermoscopical and histopathological correlation, was interpreted as a junctional melanocytic nevus with regression. In our case the association of clinical, dermoscopical and histopathological experience, resulted an important and useful method, in order to proper interpret and correctly diagnose an atypical melanocytic skin lesion. PMID:25386254

  10. Arsenic exposure, dietary patterns, and skin lesion risk in bangladesh: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brandon L; Argos, Maria; Chen, Yu; Melkonian, Stephanie; Parvez, Faruque; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Hasan, Rabiul; Rathouz, Paul J; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-02-01

    Dietary factors are believed to modulate arsenic toxicity, potentially influencing risk of arsenical skin lesions. The authors evaluated associations among dietary patterns, arsenic exposure, and skin lesion risk using baseline food frequency questionnaire data collected in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Araihazar, Bangladesh (2000-2009). They identified dietary patterns and estimated dietary pattern scores using factor analysis. Scores were tested for association with incident skin lesion risk and interaction with water arsenic exposure by using ∼6 years of follow-up data (814 events among 9,677 individuals) and discrete time hazards models (adjusting for key covariates). The authors identified 3 clear dietary patterns: the "gourd and root," "vegetable," and "animal protein" patterns. The gourd and root pattern score was inversely associated with skin lesion risk (P(trend) = 0.001), with hazard ratios of 0.86, 0.73, and 0.69 for the second, third, and fourth highest quartiles. Furthermore, the association between water arsenic and skin lesion incidence was stronger among participants with low gourd and root scores (multiplicative P(interaction) < 0.001; additive P(interaction) = 0.05). The vegetable pattern and animal protein pattern showed similar but weaker associations and interactions. Eating a diet rich in gourds and root vegetables and increasing dietary diversity may reduce arsenical skin lesion risk in Bangladesh.

  11. Arsenic Exposure, Dietary Patterns, and Skin Lesion Risk in Bangladesh: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Brandon L.; Argos, Maria; Chen, Yu; Melkonian, Stephanie; Parvez, Faruque; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Hasan, Rabiul; Rathouz, Paul J.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-01-01

    Dietary factors are believed to modulate arsenic toxicity, potentially influencing risk of arsenical skin lesions. The authors evaluated associations among dietary patterns, arsenic exposure, and skin lesion risk using baseline food frequency questionnaire data collected in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Araihazar, Bangladesh (2000–2009). They identified dietary patterns and estimated dietary pattern scores using factor analysis. Scores were tested for association with incident skin lesion risk and interaction with water arsenic exposure by using ∼6 years of follow-up data (814 events among 9,677 individuals) and discrete time hazards models (adjusting for key covariates). The authors identified 3 clear dietary patterns: the “gourd and root,” “vegetable,” and “animal protein” patterns. The gourd and root pattern score was inversely associated with skin lesion risk (Ptrend = 0.001), with hazard ratios of 0.86, 0.73, and 0.69 for the second, third, and fourth highest quartiles. Furthermore, the association between water arsenic and skin lesion incidence was stronger among participants with low gourd and root scores (multiplicative Pinteraction < 0.001; additive Pinteraction = 0.05). The vegetable pattern and animal protein pattern showed similar but weaker associations and interactions. Eating a diet rich in gourds and root vegetables and increasing dietary diversity may reduce arsenical skin lesion risk in Bangladesh. PMID:21178101

  12. Assessing the arsenic-contaminated rice (Oryza sativa) associated children skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chung-Min; Lin, Tzu-Ling; Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Chen, Wei-Yu

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential risk of children skin lesions from arsenic-contaminated rice (Oryza sativa) consumption in West Bengal (India). Published age- and gender-specific skin lesions data in West Bengal were reanalyzed and incorporated into a Weibull dose-response model to predict children skin lesion prevalence. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) levels in urine was used as a biomarker that could be predicted from a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. This study integrated arsenic contents in irrigation water, bioaccumulation factors of paddy soil, cooking methods, and arsenic bioavailability of cooked rice in gastrointestinal tract into a probabilistic risk model. Results indicated that children aged between 13 and 18 years might pose a relative higher potential risk of skin lesions to arsenic-contaminated cooked rice (odds ratios (ORs)=1.18 (95% CI 1.12-2.15)) than those of 1-6 years children (ORs=0.98 (0.85-1.40)). This study revealed the need to consider the relationships between cooking method and arsenic in cooked rice when assessing the risk associated with children skin lesions from rice consumption. This study suggested that arsenic-associated skin lesions risk from arsenic-contaminated rice consumption would be reduced significantly by adopting traditional rice cooking method (wash until clean; rice:water=1:6; discard excess water) as followed in West Bengal (India) and using water containing lower arsenic (e.g., <10 microg L(-1)) for cooking.

  13. Associations of arsenic metabolites, methylation capacity, and skin lesions caused by chronic exposure to high arsenic in tube well water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linsheng; Chai, Yuanqing; Yu, Jiangping; Wei, Binggan; Xia, Yajuan; Wu, Kegong; Gao, Jianwei; Guo, Zhiwei; Cui, Na

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the interaction between skin lesion status and arsenic methylation profiles, the concentrations and proportions of arsenic metabolites in urine and arsenic methylation capacities of study subjects were determined. The results showed that the mean urinary concentrations of iAs (inorganic arsenic), MMA (monomethylarsonic acid), DMA (dimethylarsinic acid), and TAs (total arsenic) were 75.65, 68.78, 265.81, and 410.24 μg/L, respectively, in the skin lesions subjects. The highest values were observed in the multiple skin lesions subjects. Higher %iAs and %MMA, and lower %DMA, PMI (primary methylation index), and SMI (secondary methylation index) were found in skin lesions subjects. The multiple skin lesions subjects had highest %iAs and %MMA, and lowest %DMA, PMI, and SMI. The prevalence of skin lesions strongly, positively correlated with arsenic levels in drinking water. The elder persons also had higher frequency of skin lesions compared with younger persons. It can be concluded that arsenic levels in drinking water significantly affected the prevalence of skin lesions. Male subjects usually had higher proportions of skin lesions when compared with female subjects. Moreover, it may be concluded that MMA was significantly related to single skin lesion, whereas DMA and iAs were associated with multiple skin lesions. It seemed that MMA had greater toxicity to hyperkeratosis, whereas DMA and iAs had higher toxicity to depigmentation or pigmentation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 28-36, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A case report of disappearing pigmented skin lesions associated with pembrolizumab treatment for metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wolner, Z J; Marghoob, A A; Pulitzer, M P; Postow, M A; Marchetti, M A

    2017-01-28

    Pembrolizumab is an immune checkpoint inhibitor that targets the programmed cell death (PD)-1 receptor. Common cutaneous adverse side effects of PD-1 inhibitors include maculopapular rash, pruritus, vitiligo, and lichenoid skin and mucosal reactions. Here, we describe a man in his sixties with metastatic melanoma treated with pembrolizumab who subsequently developed fading or disappearance of pigmented skin lesions, lightening of the skin, and poliosis of the eyebrows, eyelashes, and scalp and body hair. Compared to baseline high-resolution three-dimensional total body photography, we observed fading or disappearing of solar lentigines, seborrheic keratoses, and melanocytic naevi, suggesting that PD-1 inhibitors may affect the evolution of these benign skin lesions. With dermatoscopic follow-up, altered lesions showed either blue-grey peppering/granularity or fading in colour without other identifiable features. No halo lesions or lesions with surrounding inflammation were identified. One changed pigmented lesion that showed blue-grey peppering/granularity on dermoscopy was biopsied and interpreted as a macular seborrheic keratosis with melanophages. Further studies are required to elucidate the effects of PD-1 inhibition on benign skin lesions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of housing conditions on the development of wet skin lesions in the NOA mouse.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Taizo; Kondo, Toshio; Shiomoto, Yasuhisa; Momii, Akira

    2005-04-01

    The effects of housing on the onset time and prevalence of wet skin lesions were investigated in NOA mice, which spontaneously develop these lesions at a high rate. Wet skin lesions developed earliest in mice that were housed individually. For mice that were housed in groups, the lesions developed earlier in mice with non-littermate group housing than in mice with littermate group housing. The prevalence of lesions was in the following order: individual housing > non-littermate group housing > littermate group housing. These results suggest that socio-psychological factors are involved in the etiology of wet skin lesions in the NOA mouse. Under individual housing conditions, two other novel characters of the NOA mouse were also observed, specifically, development of dry skin and wet skin lesions at the tail root. These characteristics developed early and with high prevalence and were easily observed on external examination. Therefore, these novel characteristics observed in NOA mice are potential markers of the psychological state of the animals.

  16. Actinic keratosis: preventable and treatable like other precancerous and cancerous skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Nicol, N H

    1989-01-01

    Actinic keratosis, like many other precancerous and cancerous skin lesions are preventable and treatable. Nurses, physicians, other health care providers, school teachers, daycare workers, grandparents, parents, and children must assume the role of educating others regarding attitudes and knowledge about sun damage to the skin. Protecting one's skin should be a lifelong process from the newborn period onward. However, if sun damage does occur, the next important step is early detection of skin cancer. Individuals with associated risk factors should be screened routinely by health care personnel with expertise in the area of skin cancer. The best treatment of actinic keratosis, as with most diseases, is prevention.

  17. A histopathological study of melanocytic and pigmented skin lesions in patients with albinism.

    PubMed

    van der Westhuizen, Gerhard; Beukes, Catherine A; Green, Brent; Sinclair, Werner; Goedhals, Jacqueline

    2015-11-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by diminished pigmentation of the skin, hair and eyes. Individuals with OCA are at increased risk to develop sun-induced skin malignancies. The incidence of malignant melanoma in OCA individuals is, however, very low. The aim of this study was to document pigmented and melanocytic skin lesions occurring in patients with OCA. A prospective study was performed. Sixteen patients with OCA presenting at the Oncology and Dermatology Departments at Universitas Academic Hospital Annex in Bloemfontein, South Africa, were included. Selected clinically pigmented and/or melanocytic lesions were biopsied and studied by light microscopy. Twenty-four punch biopsies were taken. Ten dendritic freckles and 10 melanocytic nevi were confirmed histologically. The nevi, which occurred in eight patients, were found on sun-protected skin. All the freckles occurred on sun-exposed skin. Twelve patients had current or previous skin malignancies. No melanomas were present in the study population. Other skin lesions ranged from solar keratoses to squamous cell carcinomas. The majority of pigmented lesions were dendritic freckles that occurred on sun-exposed skin. None of the patients had a current or previous diagnosis of malignant melanoma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Distinct profile of the mitochondrial DNA common deletion in benign skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Christian; Kamenisch, York; Landthaler, Michael; Berneburg, Mark

    2011-02-01

    Mutations of mitochondrial (mt) DNA, particularly the 4977 bp long common deletion, are increased in aging tissues and preferentially found in chronologically and photoaged skin. Mutations of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have also been identified in malignant tumors of the skin and of other organs. However, benign skin lesions have not yet been investigated. We analyzed the frequency of the common deletion in 27 benign skin lesions [8 seborrheic keratoses (SK), 5 epidermal nevi (EN), 14 solar lentigos (SL)] by quantitative real-time PCR, because SK and especially SL have been related to (photo)aged skin. All SK and four of five EN displayed reduced common deletion levels compared with adjacent normal skin. In contrast, 50% of SL revealed a higher percentage of the common deletion than the adjacent normal skin, and some SL showed very high absolute common deletion levels up to 14% of total mtDNA. Our results show that the amount of the common deletion is significantly different in benign skin lesions and raise further questions regarding the pathogenesis of SL and its possible role as a precursor lesion of SK.

  19. Pulmonary cavitation and skin lesions mimicking tuberculosis in a HIV negative patient caused by Sporothrix brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Orofino-Costa, Rosane; Unterstell, Natasha; Carlos Gripp, Alexandre; de Macedo, Priscila Marques; Brota, Arles; Dias, Emylli; de Melo Teixeira, Marcus; Felipe, Maria Sueli; Bernardes-Engemann, Andréa R; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila Maria

    2013-01-01

    A 32-year-old HIV negative male presented with multiple pulmonary cavitation and skin abscesses up to 15 cm in diameter mimicking tuberculosis. Sporothrix brasiliensis was isolated and patient responded well to amphotericin B followed by itraconazole, except the skin lesions that had to be surgical drained to obtain cure. PMID:24432220

  20. Gabor filter for the segmentation of skin lesions from ultrasonographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrella, Lorena I.; Gómez, W.; Alvarenga, André V.; Pereira, Wagner C. A.

    2012-05-01

    The present work applies Gabor filters bank for texture analysis of skin lesions images, obtained by ultrasound biomicroscopy. The regions affected by the lesions were differentiated from surrounding tissue in all the analyzed cases; however the accuracy of the traced borders showed some limitations in part of the images. Future steps are being contemplated, attempting to enhance the technique performance.

  1. Locomotion Disorders and Skin and Claw Lesions in Gestating Sows Housed in Dynamic versus Static Groups

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Emilie-Julie; Maes, Dominiek; van Riet, Miriam M. J.; Millet, Sam; Ampe, Bart; Janssens, Geert P. J.; Tuyttens, Frank A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Lameness and lesions to the skin and claws of sows in group housing are commonly occurring indicators of reduced welfare. Typically, these problems are more common in group housing than in individual housing systems. Group management type (dynamic versus static) and stage of gestation influence the behavior of the animals, which in turn influences the occurrence of these problems. The present study compared prevalence, incidence and mean scores of lameness and skin and claw lesions in static versus dynamic group housed sows at different stages of gestation during three consecutive reproductive cycles. A total of 10 Belgian sow herds were monitored; 5 in which dynamic groups and 5 in which static groups were utilized. All sows were visually assessed for lameness and skin lesions three times per cycle and the claws of the hind limbs were assessed once per cycle. Lameness and claw lesions were assessed using visual analogue scales. Static groups, in comparison with dynamic groups, demonstrated lower lameness scores (P<0.05) and decreased skin lesion prevalence (24.9 vs. 47.3%, P<0.05) at the end of gestation. There was no difference between treatment group regarding claw lesion prevalence with 75.5% of sows demonstrating claw lesions regardless of group management. Prevalences of lameness (22.4 vs. 8.9%, P<0.05) and skin lesions (46.6 vs. 4.4%, P<0.05) were highest during the group-housed phase compared to the individually housed phases. Although the prevalence of lameness and skin lesions did not differ three days after grouping versus at the end of the group-housing phase, their incidence peaked during the first three days after moving from the insemination stalls to the group. In conclusion, the first three days after grouping was the most risky period for lameness incidence, but there was no significant difference between static or dynamic group management. PMID:27680675

  2. Locomotion Disorders and Skin and Claw Lesions in Gestating Sows Housed in Dynamic versus Static Groups.

    PubMed

    Bos, Emilie-Julie; Maes, Dominiek; van Riet, Miriam M J; Millet, Sam; Ampe, Bart; Janssens, Geert P J; Tuyttens, Frank A M

    Lameness and lesions to the skin and claws of sows in group housing are commonly occurring indicators of reduced welfare. Typically, these problems are more common in group housing than in individual housing systems. Group management type (dynamic versus static) and stage of gestation influence the behavior of the animals, which in turn influences the occurrence of these problems. The present study compared prevalence, incidence and mean scores of lameness and skin and claw lesions in static versus dynamic group housed sows at different stages of gestation during three consecutive reproductive cycles. A total of 10 Belgian sow herds were monitored; 5 in which dynamic groups and 5 in which static groups were utilized. All sows were visually assessed for lameness and skin lesions three times per cycle and the claws of the hind limbs were assessed once per cycle. Lameness and claw lesions were assessed using visual analogue scales. Static groups, in comparison with dynamic groups, demonstrated lower lameness scores (P<0.05) and decreased skin lesion prevalence (24.9 vs. 47.3%, P<0.05) at the end of gestation. There was no difference between treatment group regarding claw lesion prevalence with 75.5% of sows demonstrating claw lesions regardless of group management. Prevalences of lameness (22.4 vs. 8.9%, P<0.05) and skin lesions (46.6 vs. 4.4%, P<0.05) were highest during the group-housed phase compared to the individually housed phases. Although the prevalence of lameness and skin lesions did not differ three days after grouping versus at the end of the group-housing phase, their incidence peaked during the first three days after moving from the insemination stalls to the group. In conclusion, the first three days after grouping was the most risky period for lameness incidence, but there was no significant difference between static or dynamic group management.

  3. Theoretical review of the treatment of pigmented lesions in Asian skin

    PubMed Central

    Shek, Samantha Y.; Chan, Henry H.L.; Groff, William F.; Imagawa, Kotaro; Akamatsu, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Asian skin has a higher epidermal melanin content, making it more likely to develop adverse pigmentary reactions following laser surgery. The nanosecond lasers are the gold standard for the treatment of pigmented lesions, but the risk of complications, such as post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, is increased in dark-skinned patients. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) or long-pulsed lasers are available for treating superficial pigmented lesions, and fewer complications are seen when using these devices compared to the nanosecond lasers. Nanosecond lasers are essential in the treatment of dermal melanosis. Recently, picosecond lasers have been investigated. Picosecond lasers will also play an important role in the treatment of pigmented lesions. PMID:27853342

  4. Theoretical review of the treatment of pigmented lesions in Asian skin.

    PubMed

    Kono, Taro; Shek, Samantha Y; Chan, Henry H L; Groff, William F; Imagawa, Kotaro; Akamatsu, Tadashi

    2016-10-01

    Asian skin has a higher epidermal melanin content, making it more likely to develop adverse pigmentary reactions following laser surgery. The nanosecond lasers are the gold standard for the treatment of pigmented lesions, but the risk of complications, such as post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, is increased in dark-skinned patients. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) or long-pulsed lasers are available for treating superficial pigmented lesions, and fewer complications are seen when using these devices compared to the nanosecond lasers. Nanosecond lasers are essential in the treatment of dermal melanosis. Recently, picosecond lasers have been investigated. Picosecond lasers will also play an important role in the treatment of pigmented lesions.

  5. Quantitative measure in image segmentation for skin lesion images: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Nurulhuda Firdaus Mohd; Ibrahim, Mohd Hakimi Aiman; Keng, Lau Hui; Ibrahim, Nuzulha Khilwani; Sarkan, Haslina Md

    2014-12-01

    Automatic Skin Lesion Diagnosis (ASLD) allows skin lesion diagnosis by using a computer or mobile devices. The idea of using a computer to assist in diagnosis of skin lesions was first proposed in the literature around 1985. Images of skin lesions are analyzed by the computer to capture certain features thought to be characteristic of skin diseases. These features (expressed as numeric values) are then used to classify the image and report a diagnosis. Image segmentation is often a critical step in image analysis and it may use statistical classification, thresholding, edge detection, region detection, or any combination of these techniques. Nevertheless, image segmentation of skin lesion images is yet limited to superficial evaluations which merely display images of the segmentation results and appeal to the reader's intuition for evaluation. There is a consistent lack of quantitative measure, thus, it is difficult to know which segmentation present useful results and in which situations they do so. If segmentation is done well, then, all other stages in image analysis are made simpler. If significant features (that are crucial for diagnosis) are not extracted from images, it will affect the accuracy of the automated diagnosis. This paper explore the existing quantitative measure in image segmentation ranging in the application of pattern recognition for example hand writing, plat number, and colour. Selecting the most suitable segmentation measure is highly important so that as much relevant features can be identified and extracted.

  6. Imaging the mechanical stiffness of skin lesions by in vivo acousto-optical elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Sean J.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Duncan, Donald D.; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Lee, Ken

    2006-10-01

    Optical elastography is an imaging modality that relies on variations in the local mechanical properties of biological tissues as the contrast mechanism for image formation. Skin lesions, such as melanomas and other invasive conditions, are known to alter the arrangement of collagen fibers in the skin and thus should lead to alterations in local skin mechanical properties. We report on an acousto-optical elastography (AOE) imaging modality for quantifying the mechanical behavior of skin lesions. The method relies upon stimulating the tissue with a low frequency acoustic force and imaging the resulting strains in the tissue by means of quantifying the magnitude of the dynamic shift in a back-reflected laser speckle pattern from the skin. The magnitude of the shift reflects the local stiffness of the tissue. We demonstrate AOE on a tissue-mimicking phantom, an in vivo mouse melanoma lesion and two types of in vivo human melanocytic nevi. The skin lesions we examined were found to have distinct mechanical properties that appear to correlate with the varying degrees of dermal involvement of the lesions.

  7. Optical palpation in vivo: imaging human skin lesions using mechanical contrast.

    PubMed

    Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Kennedy, Kelsey M; Gong, Peijun; Sampson, David D; McLaughlin, Robert A; Kennedy, Brendan F

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the first application of the recently proposed method of optical palpation to in vivo imaging of human skin. Optical palpation is a tactile imaging technique that probes the spatial variation of a sample's mechanical properties by producing an en face map of stress measured at the sample surface. This map is determined from the thickness of a translucent, compliant stress sensor placed between a loading element and the sample and is measured using optical coherence tomography. We assess the performance of optical palpation using a handheld imaging probe on skin-mimicking phantoms, and demonstrate its use on human skin lesions. Our results demonstrate the capacity of optical palpation to delineate the boundaries of lesions and to map the mechanical contrast between lesions and the surrounding normal skin.

  8. Non-linear laser imaging of skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, R.; Sestini, S.; De Giorgi, V.; Stambouli, D.; Carli, P.; Massi, D.; Lotti, T.; Pavone, F. S.

    2007-07-01

    We investigated different kinds of human cutaneous ex-vivo skin samples by combined two photon intrinsic fluorescence (TPE), second harmonic generation microscopy (SHG), fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), spectral lifetime imaging (SLIM), and multispectral two photon emission detection (MTPE). Morphological and spectroscopic differences were found between healthy and pathological skin samples, including tumors. In particular, we examined tissue samples from normal and pathological scar tissue (keloid), and skin tumors, including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and malignant melanoma (MM). By using combined TPE-SHG microscopy we investigated morphological features of different skin regions, as BCC, tumor stroma, healthy dermis, fibroblastic proliferation, and keloids. A score, based on the SHG to autofluorescence aging index of dermis (SAAID), was assigned to characterize each region. We found that both BCC and surrounding dermis have a negative SAAID value, tumor stroma has a positive SAAID value, whereas fibroblastic proliferation and keloids have a SAAID value close to the unit. Further comparative analysis of healthy skin and neoplastic samples was performed using FLIM, SLIM, and MTPE. In particular, BCC showed a blue-shifted fluorescence emission, a higher fluorescence response at 800 nm excitation wavelength and a slightly longer mean fluorescence lifetime. MM showed an emission spectrum similar to the corresponding healthy skin emission spectrum, and a mean fluorescence lifetime distribution shifted towards shorter values. Finally, the use of aminolevulinic acid as a contrast agent has been demonstrated to increase the constrast in BCC border detection. The results obtained represent further support for in-vivo non-invasive imaging of diseased skin.

  9. Dermatoscopic imaging of skin lesions by high school students: a cross-sectional pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Michael A.; Fonseca, Maira; Dusza, Stephen W.; Scope, Alon; Geller, Alan C.; Bishop, Marilyn; Marghoob, Ashfaq A.; Oliveria, Susan A.; Halpern, Allan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The ability of novices to perform imaging of skin lesions is not well studied. Objectives: To determine the ability of 12th grade high school students without formal training to take clinical and dermatoscopic images of skin lesions on patient-actors. Patients/Methods: Nineteen participants were divided into 11 gender-specific groups of 1–2 students. Groups were provided written instructions and assessed in their ability to (a) identify 8 pre-specified skin lesions, (b) take overview clinical images, and (c) take contact, polarized dermatoscopic images. Groups captured the same images twice using two different cameras [Nikon TM 1 J1 / VEOS HD1 and a VEOS DS3 (Canfield Scientific, Inc.)]. The sequence of camera use was determined using block randomization. If students made visibly poor skin contact during dermatoscopic imaging using their first camera, study investigators provided verbal instructions to place the second camera directly onto the skin. Students completed anonymous surveys before and after the imaging activity. Results: Students were proficient at identifying the correct pre-specified skin lesions (86/88, 98%), capturing sufficient quality overview clinical images of the back and legs (41/42, 98%), and taking dermatoscopic images of the entire skin lesion (174/176, 99%). Regarding dermatoscopic image quality, 116 of 175 (66%) images were in focus. Out of focus images were attributed to poor skin contact. Groups that received feedback (n=4) were able to obtain a significantly higher proportion of in focus dermatoscopic images using their second camera compared to their first camera (16% to 72%, P<0.001). Conclusions: We identified several barriers that exist for participant-acquired dermatoscopic imaging. Instructions emphasizing the importance of skin contact are useful. Our results may help guide future patient-acquired teledermatoscopy efforts. PMID:25692076

  10. Dermatoscopic imaging of skin lesions by high school students: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Michael A; Fonseca, Maira; Dusza, Stephen W; Scope, Alon; Geller, Alan C; Bishop, Marilyn; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Oliveria, Susan A; Halpern, Allan C

    2015-01-01

    The ability of novices to perform imaging of skin lesions is not well studied. To determine the ability of 12th grade high school students without formal training to take clinical and dermatoscopic images of skin lesions on patient-actors. Nineteen participants were divided into 11 gender-specific groups of 1-2 students. Groups were provided written instructions and assessed in their ability to (a) identify 8 pre-specified skin lesions, (b) take overview clinical images, and (c) take contact, polarized dermatoscopic images. Groups captured the same images twice using two different cameras [Nikon TM 1 J1 / VEOS HD1 and a VEOS DS3 (Canfield Scientific, Inc.)]. The sequence of camera use was determined using block randomization. If students made visibly poor skin contact during dermatoscopic imaging using their first camera, study investigators provided verbal instructions to place the second camera directly onto the skin. Students completed anonymous surveys before and after the imaging activity. Students were proficient at identifying the correct pre-specified skin lesions (86/88, 98%), capturing sufficient quality overview clinical images of the back and legs (41/42, 98%), and taking dermatoscopic images of the entire skin lesion (174/176, 99%). Regarding dermatoscopic image quality, 116 of 175 (66%) images were in focus. Out of focus images were attributed to poor skin contact. Groups that received feedback (n=4) were able to obtain a significantly higher proportion of in focus dermatoscopic images using their second camera compared to their first camera (16% to 72%, P<0.001). We identified several barriers that exist for participant-acquired dermatoscopic imaging. Instructions emphasizing the importance of skin contact are useful. Our results may help guide future patient-acquired teledermatoscopy efforts.

  11. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia: unique histopathological findings in skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Leithauser, Laurel A; Mutasim, Diya F

    2012-04-01

    Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD) is a rare, autosomal dominantly inherited, multisystem disease thought to be caused by abnormalities in desmosomes and gap junctions. HMD affects the skin, mucosae, hair, eyes and lungs. Nearly all patients clinically display the triad of non-scarring alopecia, well-demarcated mucosal erythema and erythematous intertriginous plaques. Although histopathological findings of mucous membrane epithelium have been well characterized, only three reports have described histopathologic findings in the skin. We report a case with unique histopathological findings not previously reported in HMD.

  12. Skin Lesions on Common Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from Three Sites in the Northwest Atlantic, USA

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Leslie Burdett; Rotstein, Dave S.; Wells, Randall S.; Allen, Jason; Barleycorn, Aaron; Balmer, Brian C.; Lane, Suzanne M.; Speakman, Todd; Zolman, Eric S.; Stolen, Megan; McFee, Wayne; Goldstein, Tracey; Rowles, Teri K.; Schwacke, Lori H.

    2012-01-01

    Skin disease occurs frequently in many cetacean species across the globe; methods to categorize lesions have relied on photo-identification (photo-id), stranding, and by-catch data. The current study used photo-id data from four sampling months during 2009 to estimate skin lesion prevalence and type occurring on bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from three sites along the southeast United States coast [Sarasota Bay, FL (SSB); near Brunswick and Sapelo Island, GA (BSG); and near Charleston, SC (CHS)]. The prevalence of lesions was highest among BSG dolphins (P = 0.587) and lowest in SSB (P = 0.380), and the overall prevalence was significantly different among all sites (p<0.0167). Logistic regression modeling revealed a significant reduction in the odds of lesion occurrence for increasing water temperatures (OR = 0.92; 95%CI:0.906–0.938) and a significantly increased odds of lesion occurrence for BSG dolphins (OR = 1.39; 95%CI:1.203–1.614). Approximately one-third of the lesioned dolphins from each site presented with multiple types, and population differences in lesion type occurrence were observed (p<0.05). Lesions on stranded dolphins were sampled to determine the etiology of different lesion types, which included three visually distinct samples positive for herpesvirus. Although generally considered non-fatal, skin disease may be indicative of animal health or exposure to anthropogenic or environmental threats, and photo-id data provide an efficient and cost-effective approach to document the occurrence of skin lesions in free-ranging populations. PMID:22427955

  13. Confocal imaging of benign and malignant proliferative skin lesions in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Salvador; Rajadhyaksha, Milind M.; Anderson, R. Rox

    1999-06-01

    Near-infrared confocal reflectance microscopy (CM) provides non- invasive real-time images of thin en-face tissue sections with high resolution and contrast. Imaging of cells, nuclei, other organelles, microvessels, and hair follicles has been possible at resolution comparable to standard histology, to a maximum depth of 250-300 μm in human skin in vivo. We have characterized psoriasis as a prototype of benign proliferative skin conditions, and non-pigmented skin malignancies in vivo based on their unstained, native histologic features using CM. Our data shows that reflectance CM may potentially diagnose and morphometrically evaluate proliferative skin lesions in vivo.

  14. Dermal absorption of aromatic amines in workers with different skin lesions: a report on 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Korinth, Gintautas; Weiss, Tobias; Angerer, Jürgen; Drexler, Hans

    2006-07-19

    There are only few studies about the relationship of skin lesions and the percutaneous uptake of hazardous substances in exposed workers. Several aromatic amines are well known carcinogens for humans and/or animals. This case report emphasizes the relevance of dermal absorption of the aromatic amine ortho-toluidine considering four workers with different skin status (healthy, erythematous and burned skin as well as dishydrotic eczema) during the vulcanisation process of rubber products in a components supplier plant for automobile industry. The results of our case report show that dermal absorption of o-toluidine through damaged epidermal barrier is significantly higher than through healthy skin.

  15. Dermal absorption of aromatic amines in workers with different skin lesions: a report on 4 cases

    PubMed Central

    Korinth, Gintautas; Weiss, Tobias; Angerer, Jürgen; Drexler, Hans

    2006-01-01

    There are only few studies about the relationship of skin lesions and the percutaneous uptake of hazardous substances in exposed workers. Several aromatic amines are well known carcinogens for humans and/or animals. This case report emphasizes the relevance of dermal absorption of the aromatic amine ortho-toluidine considering four workers with different skin status (healthy, erythematous and burned skin as well as dishydrotic eczema) during the vulcanisation process of rubber products in a components supplier plant for automobile industry. The results of our case report show that dermal absorption of o-toluidine through damaged epidermal barrier is significantly higher than through healthy skin. PMID:16854230

  16. Diagnostic value of Tzanck smear in various erosive, vesicular, and bullous skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yaeen, Atiya; Ahmad, Qazi Masood; Farhana, Anjum; Shah, Parveen; Hassan, Iffat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous cytology has long been shown to be useful in the diagnosis of several erosive, vesicular, and bullous skin lesions. The Tzanck smear although an old tool, still remains a simple, rapid, easily applied, and inexpensive test for these skin lesions. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of Tzanck smear by determining its sensitivity and specificity in various erosive, vesicular, and bullous skin lesions. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty-two patients with erosive, vesicular, and/or bullous skin lesions were included in the study. Four groups of disorders were identified: infections, immunologic disorders, genodermatosis, and spongiotic dermatitis. All the study cases were evaluated by Tzanck smear. Definitive diagnosis was established by standard diagnostic techniques (including when appropriate, viral serology, bacterial culture, histopathology, direct immunoflourescence). Results: The sensitivity and specificity of cytologic findings was respectively 86.36% and 91.30% for viral infections; for bacterial infections, it was 85.7% and 66.6%. The sensitivity and specificity of Tzanck smear was respectively 85.0% and 83.33% for pemphigus; for bullous pemhigoid it was 11.11% and 100.0%. Tzanck smear sensitivity in genodermatoses was 100%. The sensitivity and specificity of the test in spongiotic dermatitis could not be calculated due to an insufficient number of patients. Conclusion: The Tzanck smear is a quick and reliable tool for the evaluation of various erosive and vesiculobullous skin lesions. PMID:26751561

  17. Prevalence of arsenic exposure and skin lesions. A population based survey in Matlab, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mahfuzar; Vahter, Marie; Wahed, Mohammad Abdul; Sohel, Nazmul; Yunus, Mohammad; Streatfield, Peter Kim; Arifeen, Shams El; Bhuiya, Abbas; Zaman, Khalequz; Chowdhury, A Mushtaq R; Ekström, Eva‐Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    Study objective To assess prevalence of arsenic exposure through drinking water and skin lesions, and their variation by geographical area, age, sex, and socioeconomic conditions. Design, setting, and participants Skin lesion cases were identified by screening the entire population above 4 years of age (n = 166 934) living in Matlab, a rural area in Bangladesh, during January 2002 and August 2003. The process of case identification involved initial skin examinations in the field, followed by verification by physicians in a clinic, and final confirmation by two independent experts reviewing photographs. The tubewell water arsenic concentrations (n = 13 286) were analysed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Drinking water history since 1970 was obtained for each person. Exposure information was constructed using drinking water histories and data on water arsenic concentrations. Main results The arsenic concentrations ranged from <1 to 3644 μg/l, and more than 70% of functioning tubewells exceeded the World Health Organisation guideline of 10 μg/l. Arsenic exposure had increased steadily from 1970s to the late 1990s, afterwards a decrease could be noted. In total, 504 skin lesions cases were identified, and the overall crude prevalence was 3/1000. Women had significantly higher cumulative exposure to arsenic, while men had significantly higher prevalence of skin lesions (SMR 158, 95% CI 133 to 188). The highest prevalence occurred in 35–44 age groups for both sexes. Arsenic exposure and skin lesions had a positive association with socioeconomic groups and achieved educational level. Conclusions The result showed sex, age, and socioeconomic differentials in both exposure and skin lesions. Findings clearly showed the urgency of effective arsenic mitigation activities. PMID:16476755

  18. Notes from the field: outbreak of skin lesions among high school wrestlers--Arizona, 2014.

    PubMed

    Williams, Candice; Wells, Jamie; Klein, Ronald; Sylvester, Tammy; Sunenshine, Rebecca

    2015-05-29

    Skin infections are a common problem among athletes at all levels of competition; among wrestlers, 8.5% of all adverse events are caused by skin infections. Wrestlers are at risk because of the constant skin-to-skin contact required during practice and competition. The most common infections transmitted among high school wrestlers include fungal infections (e.g., ringworm), the viral infection herpes gladiatorum caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), and bacterial infections (e.g., impetigo) caused by Staphylococcus or Streptococcus species, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal aureus (MRSA). On February 7, 2014, the Maricopa County Department of Public Health was notified of multiple wrestlers who reported skin lesions 2 weeks after participating in a wrestling tournament at school A. The tournament was held on January 24-25 and included 168 wrestlers representing 24 schools. The county health department initiated an investigation to identify cases of skin lesion, determine lesion etiology, identify risks associated with lesion development, and provide guidance for preventing additional cases.

  19. Expression of RANTES mRNA in skin lesions of feline eosinophilic plaque.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomoe; Kano, Rui; Maeda, Sadatoshi; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nagata, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2003-10-01

    One of the mechanisms of eosinophil infiltration is its induction by chemoattractants such as regulated upon activation, normal T-expressed and secreted (RANTES) which is a cysteine-cysteine chemokine that mediates chemotaxis and activation of eosinophils in humans and mice. Skin lesions of feline eosinophilic plaque are characterized by a predominant infiltration of eosinophils. The mechanism(s) of eosinophilic infiltration in the skin and/or mucosa of cats is unknown. It is possible that RANTES is involved. To investigate the presence of RANTES in the skin of cats with eosinophilic plaques and nonaffected skin, we cloned and sequenced the full-length feline RANTES cDNA gene, in order to determine whether it is present in the skin of cats with eosinophilic plaques and/or if it is present in normal adjacent skin. We were able to document the the expression of RANTES mRNAs in skin with feline eosinophilic plaque as well as in normal cat skin. The full-length cDNA sequence of the RANTES gene (742 bp) contained a single open reading frame of 276 bp encoding a protein of 92 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of feline RANTES shared 67 and 74% sequence identity with that of bovine and mouse RANTES genes, respectively. RT-PCR analysis on RANTES mRNA in the skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque revealed that its expression was higher in the eosinophilic plaque skin lesions than in the normal skin. The result suggested that RANTES might play a role to induce eosinophil infiltration in feline eosinophilic plaque lesions.

  20. Hyperadrenocorticism in 10 dogs with skin lesions as the only presenting clinical signs.

    PubMed

    Zur, Gila; White, Stephen D

    2011-01-01

    Ten dogs that had skin lesions as the only presenting signs of hyperadrenocorticism (HAC) and as the owners' primary complaint are described. Dogs were included if the initial examination was for skin disease, there were no signs of systemic illness on initial presentation and there was a confirmed diagnosis of HAC by specific screening tests. Dogs were excluded if they had a severe disease that might interfere with screening tests for HAC or if the screening tests were not diagnostic. There were five males and five females; six dogs were intact. Nine dogs were diagnosed at ≥7 years. Eight dogs weighed ≤10 kg. Alopecia was present in nine dogs. Eight dogs had bacterial pyoderma, five had hyperpigmentation, and four had thin skin. One dog had unresolved dermatophytosis. Skin lesions resolved after treatment in eight dogs. One dog was not treated and one was lost to follow-up. This study showed that skin lesions may be the only clinical signs of HAC. The presence of the more common clinical signs of HAC, such as a non-pruritic, truncal alopecia and/or thin skin, without any systemic signs of HAC and/or the presence of poorly responsive skin infections warrant screening for this disease.

  1. Skin lesion metrics: role of photography in acne.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Audris; Hafeez, Farhaan; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-04-01

    Accurate assessment of acne severity is essential for determining the appropriate treatment required. This paper reviews photographic methods for such assessment. Literature included met the following criteria: proposed photographic standards to assess acne, evaluated such standards, or offered photographic methods to improve visualization and assessment. Validity was evaluated by comparing given photographic grading methods to other methods, such as lesion counting. Many photographic standards were shown to be objective, time-efficient, and have intra-grader and inter-grader consistency. Photography also documents progress for retrospective verification. Drawbacks include not allowing determination of depth, minimization of small lesions and erythema, and difficulty in maintaining consistent settings. Fluorescence and polarized photography improve visualization beyond clinical observation alone. Advances such as computer alignment, imaging segmentation, and three-dimensional analysis methods track lesions and measure objective characteristics. The combined experience summarized here strongly promotes the use of a photographic standard in assessing acne severity. Cook's method can also be used to train and qualify graders. Photographic advancements improve accuracy of assessment by solving problems with consistent settings and depth visualization. Further advancements can improve image analysis through analysis of objective attributes.

  2. Association of AS3MT polymorphisms and the risk of premalignant arsenic skin lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, Olga L.; Drobna, Zuzana; Hernandez-Castellanos, Erika; Sanchez-Pena, Luz C.; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Borja-Aburto, Victor H.; Styblo, Miroslav; Del Razo, Luz M.

    2009-09-01

    Exposure to naturally occurring inorganic arsenic (iAs), primarily from contaminated drinking water, is considered one of the top environmental health threats worldwide. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is the key enzyme in the biotransformation pathway of iAs. AS3MT catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to trivalent arsenicals, resulting in the production of methylated (MAs) and dimethylated arsenicals (DMAs). MAs is a susceptibility factor for iAs-induced toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the association of the polymorphism in AS3MT gene with iAs metabolism and with the presence of arsenic (As) premalignant skin lesions. This is a case-control study of 71 cases with skin lesions and 51 controls without skin lesions recruited from a iAs endemic area in Mexico. We measured urinary As metabolites, differentiating the trivalent and pentavalent arsenical species, using the hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. In addition, the study subjects were genotyped to analyze three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), A-477G, T14458C (nonsynonymus SNP; Met287Thr), and T35587C, in the AS3MT gene. We compared the frequencies of the AS3MT alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes in individuals with and without skin lesions. Marginal differences in the frequencies of the Met287Thr genotype were identified between individuals with and without premalignant skin lesions (p = 0.055): individuals carrying the C (TC+CC) allele (Thr) were at risk [odds ratio = 4.28; 95% confidence interval (1.0-18.5)]. Also, individuals with C allele of Met287Thr displayed greater percentage of MAs in urine and decrease in the percentage of DMAs. These findings indicate that Met287Thr influences the susceptibility to premalignant As skin lesions and might be at increased risk for other adverse health effects of iAs exposure.

  3. A Prospective Study of Arsenic Exposure From Drinking Water and Incidence of Skin Lesions in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Argos, Maria; Kalra, Tara; Pierce, Brandon L.; Chen, Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Hasan, Rabiul; Hasan, Khaled; Sarwar, Golam; Levy, Diane; Slavkovich, Vesna; Graziano, Joseph H.; Rathouz, Paul J.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic in groundwater pose a public health threat to millions of people worldwide. The authors aimed to evaluate the association between arsenic exposure and skin lesion incidence among participants in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS). The analyses used data on 10,182 adults free of skin lesions at baseline through the third biennial follow-up of the cohort (2000–2009). Discrete-time hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for incident skin lesions. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for incident skin lesions comparing 10.1–50.0, 50.1–100.0, 100.1–200.0, and ≥200.1 μg/L with ≤10.0 μg/L of well water arsenic exposure were 1.17 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.92, 1.49), 1.69 (95% CI: 1.33, 2.14), 1.97 (95% CI: 1.58, 2.46), and 2.98 (95% CI: 2.40, 3.71), respectively (Ptrend = 0.0001). Results were similar for the other measures of arsenic exposure, and the increased risks remained unchanged with changes in exposure in recent years. Dose-dependent associations were more pronounced in females, but the incidence of skin lesions was greater in males and older individuals. Chronic arsenic exposure from drinking water was associated with increased incidence of skin lesions, even at low levels of arsenic exposure (<100 μg/L). PMID:21576319

  4. A prospective study of arsenic exposure from drinking water and incidence of skin lesions in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Argos, Maria; Kalra, Tara; Pierce, Brandon L; Chen, Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Hasan, Rabiul; Hasan, Khaled; Sarwar, Golam; Levy, Diane; Slavkovich, Vesna; Graziano, Joseph H; Rathouz, Paul J; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-07-15

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic in groundwater pose a public health threat to millions of people worldwide. The authors aimed to evaluate the association between arsenic exposure and skin lesion incidence among participants in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS). The analyses used data on 10,182 adults free of skin lesions at baseline through the third biennial follow-up of the cohort (2000-2009). Discrete-time hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for incident skin lesions. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for incident skin lesions comparing 10.1-50.0, 50.1-100.0, 100.1-200.0, and ≥200.1 μg/L with ≤10.0 μg/L of well water arsenic exposure were 1.17 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.92, 1.49), 1.69 (95% CI: 1.33, 2.14), 1.97 (95% CI: 1.58, 2.46), and 2.98 (95% CI: 2.40, 3.71), respectively (P(trend) = 0.0001). Results were similar for the other measures of arsenic exposure, and the increased risks remained unchanged with changes in exposure in recent years. Dose-dependent associations were more pronounced in females, but the incidence of skin lesions was greater in males and older individuals. Chronic arsenic exposure from drinking water was associated with increased incidence of skin lesions, even at low levels of arsenic exposure (<100 μg/L).

  5. Modeling spatial relation in skin lesion images by the graph walk kernel.

    PubMed

    Situ, Ning; Wadhawan, Tarun; Yuan, Xiaojing; Zouridakis, George

    2010-01-01

    Early skin cancer detection with the help of dermoscopic images is becoming more and more important. Previous methods generally ignored the spatial relation of the pixels or regions inside the lesion. We propose to employ a graph representation of the skin lesion to model the spatial relation. We then use the graph walk kernel, a similarity measure between two graphs, to build a classifier based on support vector machines for melanoma detection. In experiments, we compare the sensitivities and specificities of models with and without spatial information. Experimental results show that the model with spatial information performs the best in both sensitivity and specificity. Statistical test indicates that the improvement is significant.

  6. Technique Standards for Skin Lesion Imaging: A Delphi Consensus Statement.

    PubMed

    Katragadda, Chinmayee; Finnane, Anna; Soyer, H Peter; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Halpern, Allan; Malvehy, Josep; Kittler, Harald; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Da Silva, Dennis; Abraham, Ivo; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara

    2016-11-23

    Variability in the metrics for image acquisition at the total body, regional, close-up, and dermoscopic levels impacts the quality and generalizability of skin images. Consensus guidelines are indicated to achieve universal imaging standards in dermatology. To achieve consensus among members of the International Skin Imaging Collaboration (ISIC) on standards for image acquisition metrics using a hybrid Delphi method. Delphi study with 5 rounds of ratings and revisions until relative consensus was achieved. The initial set of statements was developed by a core group (CG) on the basis of a literature review and clinical experience followed by 2 rounds of rating and revisions. The consensus process was validated by an extended group (EG) of ISIC members through 2 rounds of scoring and revisions. In all rounds, respondents rated the draft recommendations on a 1 (strongly agree) to 5 (strongly disagree) scale, explained ratings of less than 5, and optionally provided comments. At any stage, a recommendation was retained if both mean and median rating was 4 or higher. The initial set of 45 items (round 1) was expanded by the CG to 56 variants in round 2, subsequently reduced to 42 items scored by the EG in round 3, yielding an EG set of 33 recommendations (rounds 4 and 5): general recommendation (1 guideline), lighting (5), background color (3), field of view (3), image orientation (8), focus/depth of field (3), resolution (4), scale (3), color calibration (2), and image storage (1). This iterative process of ratings and comments yielded a strong consensus on standards for skin imaging in dermatology practice. Adoption of these methods for image standardization is likely to improve clinical practice, information exchange, electronic health record documentation, harmonization of clinical studies and database development, and clinical decision support. Feasibility and validity testing under real-world clinical conditions is indicated.

  7. Estimation of Fractal Dimension in Differential Diagnosis of Pigmented Skin Lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aralica, Gorana; Milošević, Danko; Konjevoda, Paško; Seiwerth, Sven; Štambuk, Nikola

    Medical differential diagnosis is a method of identifying the presence of a particular entity (disease) within a set of multiple possible alternatives. The significant problem in dermatology and pathology is the differential diagnosis of malignant melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions, especially of dysplastic nevi. Malignant melanoma is the most malignant skin neoplasma, with increasing incidence in various parts of the world. It is hoped that the methods of quantitative pathology, i.e. morphometry, can help objectification of the diagnostic process, since early discovery of melanoma results in 10-year survival rate of 90%. The aim of the study was to use fractal dimension calculated from the perimeter-area relation of the cell nuclei as a tool for the differential diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions. We analyzed hemalaun-eosin stained pathohistological slides of pigmented skin lesions: intradermal naevi (n = 45), dysplastic naevi (n = 47), and malignant melanoma (n = 50). It was found that fractal dimension of malignant melanoma cell nuclei differs significantly from the intradermal and dysplastic naevi (p ≤ 0. 001, Steel-Dwass Multiple Comparison Test). Additionaly, ROC analysis confirmed the value of fractal dimension based evaluation. It is suggested that the estimation of fractal dimension from the perimeter-area relation of the cell nuclei may be a potentially useful morphometric parameter in the medical differential diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions.

  8. Depletion of Epidermal Langerhans Cells in the Skin Lesions of Pellagra Patients.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Sayaka; Miyagi, Takuya; Sogabe, Yoko; Yasuda, Masahito; Kanazawa, Nobuo; Utani, Atsushi; Izaki, Seiichi; Uezato, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kenzo

    2017-02-28

    Pellagra is a nutrient deficiency disease caused by insufficient niacin levels. Recent studies have shown that numbers of epidermal Langerhans cells decreased in other diseases caused by nutritional deficiencies, including necrolytic migratory erythema and acrodermatitis enteropathica. Epidermal Langerhans cells are capable of modulating or even halting the inflammatory reaction. The aim of this study was to examine changes in the number of Langerhans cells and other dendritic cells, and maturation of epidermal Langerhans cells in the lesional and adjacent non-lesional skin in pellagra patients. Seven pellagra patients and 10 healthy individuals who served as controls were included. The number and distribution of dendritic cells and other cutaneous cells were examined by immunohistochemistry. Epidermal Langerhans cells decreased considerably in the skin lesions of pellagra patients, whereas other dendritic cells did not change. The decrease in the number of Langerhans cells was positively correlated with the histological severity of skin lesions. As the number of Langerhans cells was not reduced in the undisturbed neighboring skin, the depletion of epidermal Langerhans cells did not precede skin damage but was a cause of prolonged severe inflammation.

  9. Detection of equine herpesvirus 3 in equine skin lesions by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Kleiboeker, Steven B; Chapman, Rodney K

    2004-01-01

    During a recent breeding season, ulcerative, pustular skin lesions were observed on the external genitalia of 2 mares and 1 stallion within a small herd. Based on the location and description of the skin lesions plus the clinical history, equine coital exanthema, caused by equine herpesvirus 3 (EHV3), was the primary differential diagnosis. Scrapings of skin lesions from the perineum of 2 mares were submitted for diagnostic evaluation. Virus isolation was attempted by inoculation of several cell lines of equine origin, but no cytopathic agent was detected. The skin scrapings were processed for DNA extraction, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was performed for herpesvirus DNA polymerase and DNA-packaging protein (terminase) genes using nested, degenerate primers targeted to conserved regions of the herpesvirus genome. Products of the expected sizes were generated for both assays, and subsequent nucleotide sequencing of the amplification products established that EHV3 had been detected in DNA extracted from the skin lesions. Detection of EHV3 was confirmed using an EHV3-specific PCR assay targeted to the gC gene. Using the novel EHV3 nucleotide sequence identified in this report, a sensitive and specific PCR assay targeted to the highly conserved DNA polymerase gene was developed.

  10. Arsenic in drinking water and skin lesions: dose-response data from West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Haque, Reina; Mazumder, D N Guha; Samanta, Sambit; Ghosh, Nilima; Kalman, David; Smith, Meera M; Mitra, Soma; Santra, Amal; Lahiri, Sarbari; Das, Subhankar; De, Binay K; Smith, Allan H

    2003-03-01

    Over 6 million people live in areas of West Bengal, India, where groundwater sources are contaminated with naturally occurring arsenic. The key objective of this nested case-control study was to characterize the dose-response relation between low arsenic concentrations in drinking water and arsenic-induced skin keratoses and hyperpigmentation. We selected cases (persons with arsenic-induced skin lesions) and age- and sex-matched controls from participants in a 1995-1996 cross-sectional survey in West Bengal. We used a detailed assessment of arsenic exposure that covered at least 20 years. Participants were reexamined between 1998 and 2000. Consensus agreement by four physicians reviewing the skin lesion photographs confirmed the diagnosis in 87% of cases clinically diagnosed in the field. The average peak arsenic concentration in drinking water was 325 microg/liter for cases and 180 microg/liter for controls. The average latency for skin lesions was 23 years from first exposure. We found strong dose-response gradients with both peak and average arsenic water concentrations. The lowest peak arsenic ingested by a confirmed case was 115 microg/liter. Confirmation of case diagnosis and intensive longitudinal exposure assessment provide the basis for a detailed dose-response evaluation of arsenic-caused skin lesions.

  11. Health economic benefits of cyanoacrylate skin protectants in the management of superficial skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y

    2014-08-01

    Superficial skin damages, including stage II pressure ulcer, skin tears and moisture-associated skin damages (MASDs) are common and constitute a significant disease burden to the health care system. A cost analysis was conducted by comparing a cyanoacrylate barrier film with routine care in the treatment of superficial skin damages in a chronic care facility. The analysis included 12 patients: four patients with stage II pressure ulcers, six with MASD and two with skin tears. Cost analysis was conducted comparing the cost of care 7 days before and 7 days after the acrylate barrier was used. The total cost took into consideration the time, products and supplies required to manage the skin problem. © 2014 The Author. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Homology of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from skin lesions and nose of patients with impetigo].

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Zhu; Ma, Lin; Kong, Fan-Rong

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the homology of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) strains isolated from nose and skin lesions of impetigo children. Totally 263 outpatients aged 3 months to 14 years who were seen by the Department of Dermatology of Beijing Children's Hospital between August 2005 and March 2006 were enrolled in this study. The isolations from nose and skin lesions of 58 impetigo children who were randomly selected from these 263 children with spa sequence were typed. The sequence results of SA were analyzed using special websites. There were 106 impetigo patients in these 263 children. The isolation rate of SA was 78.3% in the nose of 106 impetigo patients and was 21.0% in that of the rest 157 patients (P < 0.01). The age of all nasal carriers was concentrated in 1-6 years. Among the 106 impetigo patients, 30 patients had their primary lesions on the face (including 28 cases of SA nose isolates) and 76 patients had their primary lesions on the other parts of body (including 56 cases of SA nose isolates) (P < 0.01). The spa typing showed that 26 of the 30 impetigo patients had the same type pairs of nose and skin. SA isolated from the skin lesions and nose of impetigo patients has remarkably homology. Nasal carriage of SA may be closely relevant with the occurrence of impetigo.

  13. Study of apoptosis in skin lesions of leprosy in relation to treatment and lepra reactions.

    PubMed

    Ajith, C; Gupta, Sachin; Radotra, Bishan D; Arora, Sunil K; Kumar, Bhushan; Dogra, Sunil; Kaur, Inderjeet

    2005-12-01

    In leprosy on treatment, one factor contributing to the healing of skin lesions with minimal fibrosis may be apoptosis of inflammatory cells, even though apoptosis is sparse in leprosy as compared to tuberculosis. The degree of apoptosis in skin lesions of leprosy was studied by histopathologic examination (HPE) and by DNA fragmentation and electrophoresis. The effect of various parameters on apoptosis was noted in untreated disease, during treatment at 3 and 6 months, and in lepra reactions in different parts of the spectrum of leprosy. Of the 31 patients, 13 had paucibacillary (PB) and 18 multibacillary (MB) disease. Twenty one patients were in reaction: 16 had type 1 reaction and 5 had type 2 reaction. The controls included patients with non-granulomatous skin diseases; there were no normal controls, and no separate controls for cases with reaction. Apoptosis occurred more frequently in patients with leprosy as compared to the controls. In both PB & MB lesions, apoptosis was observed to increase progressively with treatment at 3 and 6 months, and was more prominent in the MB cases at 6 months of treatment. When lesions in either type 1 or type 2 reaction were compared to lesions not in reaction, a significant increase in apoptosis (p = 0.014) was found only in lesions with type 2 reaction and those which were at 6 months of treatment. The type of treatment regimen, or oral steroids given for reactions, did not significantly alter the degree of apoptosis. Our observations indicate that increased apoptosis is present in leprosy lesions and that in leprosy it progressively increases with anti-leprosy treatment up to 6 months. If the process of apoptosis in skin lesions is followed up for a longer period of time, the degree of apoptosis may be expected to decline. The study of apoptosis may help to understand the mechanism of clearance of bacilli and resolution of granulomas in leprosy patients.

  14. Necessity of Distinguishing Verrucous Carcinoma From Verrucous Skin Lesion Overlaying Residual Skin Staples in an Area of Sensory Loss: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tokiyoshi, Takahiro; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Terashi, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy is a condition usually induced by chronic mechanical stimulation of the feet of patients with diabetic neuropathy and usually occurs at weight-bearing sites. We here present a rare case involving a man with verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy at an unusual, non–weight-bearing site. Methods: A 58-year-old man with diabetic neuropathy presented with a verrucous skin lesion overlaying residual skin staples and an amputation stump of the second metatarsal bone on the dorsal foot. Results: The biopsy findings were inconclusive and suggested the necessity of distinguishing the lesion from verrucous carcinoma. The lesion was resected, and the residual skin staples were simultaneously removed. Investigation of the excisional biopsy confirmed our diagnosis of verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy. Conclusions: Verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy is often difficult to distinguish from verrucous carcinoma; in this case, the unusual location of the lesion could be attributed not only to sensory loss but also to the presence of an amputation stump and the persistence of the residual skin staples. PMID:26171095

  15. Necessity of Distinguishing Verrucous Carcinoma From Verrucous Skin Lesion Overlaying Residual Skin Staples in an Area of Sensory Loss: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Shunsuke; Tokiyoshi, Takahiro; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Terashi, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    Verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy is a condition usually induced by chronic mechanical stimulation of the feet of patients with diabetic neuropathy and usually occurs at weight-bearing sites. We here present a rare case involving a man with verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy at an unusual, non-weight-bearing site. A 58-year-old man with diabetic neuropathy presented with a verrucous skin lesion overlaying residual skin staples and an amputation stump of the second metatarsal bone on the dorsal foot. The biopsy findings were inconclusive and suggested the necessity of distinguishing the lesion from verrucous carcinoma. The lesion was resected, and the residual skin staples were simultaneously removed. Investigation of the excisional biopsy confirmed our diagnosis of verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy. Verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy is often difficult to distinguish from verrucous carcinoma; in this case, the unusual location of the lesion could be attributed not only to sensory loss but also to the presence of an amputation stump and the persistence of the residual skin staples.

  16. Coriander alleviates 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced contact dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Hyo Geun; Lim, Soonmin; Lee, Wonil; Sim, Yeomoon; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-08-01

    Contact dermatitis (CD) is a pattern of inflammatory responses in the skin that occurs through contact with external factors. The clinical picture is a polymorphic pattern of skin inflammation characterized by a wide range of clinical features, including itching, redness, scaling, and erythema. Coriandrum sativum L. (CS), commonly known as coriander, is a member of the Apiaceae family and is cultivated throughout the world for its nutritional and culinary values. Linoleic acid and linolenic acid in CS have various pharmacological activities. However, no study of the inhibitory effects of CS on CD has been reported. In this study, we demonstrated the protective effect of CS against 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced CD-like skin lesions. CS, at doses of 0.5-1%, applied to the dorsal skin inhibited the development of CD-like skin lesions. Moreover, the Th2-mediated inflammatory cytokines, immunoglobulin E, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-4, and IL-13, were significantly reduced. In addition, CS increased the levels of total glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 protein. Thus, CS can inhibit the development of CD-like skin lesions in mice by regulating immune mediators and may be an effective alternative therapy for contact diseases.

  17. Coriander Alleviates 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Contact Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Hyo Geun; Lim, Soonmin; Lee, Wonil; Sim, Yeomoon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Contact dermatitis (CD) is a pattern of inflammatory responses in the skin that occurs through contact with external factors. The clinical picture is a polymorphic pattern of skin inflammation characterized by a wide range of clinical features, including itching, redness, scaling, and erythema. Coriandrum sativum L. (CS), commonly known as coriander, is a member of the Apiaceae family and is cultivated throughout the world for its nutritional and culinary values. Linoleic acid and linolenic acid in CS have various pharmacological activities. However, no study of the inhibitory effects of CS on CD has been reported. In this study, we demonstrated the protective effect of CS against 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced CD-like skin lesions. CS, at doses of 0.5–1%, applied to the dorsal skin inhibited the development of CD-like skin lesions. Moreover, the Th2-mediated inflammatory cytokines, immunoglobulin E, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-4, and IL-13, were significantly reduced. In addition, CS increased the levels of total glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 protein. Thus, CS can inhibit the development of CD-like skin lesions in mice by regulating immune mediators and may be an effective alternative therapy for contact diseases. PMID:24963872

  18. Clinico-morphological features of BRAF inhibition-induced proliferative skin lesions in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Belum, Viswanath Reddy; Rosen, Alyx C; Jaimes, Natalia; Dranitsaris, George; Pulitzer, Melissa P; Busam, Klaus J; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Carvajal, Richard D; Chapman, Paul B; Lacouture, Mario E

    2015-01-01

    The use of BRAF inhibitors may lead to the development of cutaneous toxicities such as rashes, photosensitivity, alopecia, palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia, and proliferative skin lesions, including keratoacanthomas (KAs) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cuSCCs). The latter are noteworthy for their potential to exhibit malignant features, and they may necessitate invasive treatment. Their prompt identification is of primary importance for directing supportive care efforts and maintaining dose intensity while minimizing the morbidity associated with supportive care interventions. Because such lesions are less familiar to oncologists, this study was designed to characterize their clinico-morphological features, which have not been hitherto described. The clinical and dermoscopic characteristics and risk factors of new-onset proliferative skin lesions (benign verrucous lesions and KAs/cuSCCs) developing after the initiation of treatment with vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and XL281 were analyzed; the histopathological diagnoses were ascertained. The majority of the lesions were benign verrucous lesions (78%, n = 87), whereas KAs/cuSCCs represented 22% (n = 25). The median times to biopsy for the initial verrucous lesions and KAs/cuSCCs were 4.8 and 10.5 weeks, respectively. The clinico-morphological features significant for KAs/cuSCCs included a larger size (P < .001), a nodular appearance (P < .001), a central keratin plug (P < .001), a central ulceration or crust (P = .04), an adherent scale (P = .02), an erythematous halo (P = .03), and a scaly ring (collarette; P < .001) at the periphery. Our findings represent the first detailed description of the clinico-morphological characteristics that permit distinction between the benign and malignant skin lesions induced by BRAF inhibitors. They are valuable for the recognition of lesions that require intervention and/or a dermatology referral versus those that permit provisional

  19. Orocutaneous Fistula or Traumatic Infectious Skin Lesion: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Vermani, Mayank; Kalia, Vimal; Singh, Sumita; Garg, Sunny; Aggarwal, Shweta; Khurana, Richa; Kalra, Geeta

    2015-01-01

    Orocutaneous fistula (OCF) (of dental origin) is an uncommon but well-described condition in the literature. These are often misdiagnosed by physicians and dentists. Careful selection of investigating modality is important in case of diagnostically challenging cases. A 19-year-old female came with a complaint of a lesion on the chin reported with h/o trauma with the impact on chin presented as diagnostic dilemma because of unusual case history and clinical examination. Commonly used radiographic investigations like IOPA and orthopantomograph did not resolve the dilemma whereas advanced imaging modality like CT scan, 3D volume imaging, and contrast enhanced CT played an important role in the diagnosis of OCF and selecting the treatment plan. PMID:26618009

  20. Arsenic Reduction in Drinking Water and Improvement in Skin Lesions: A Follow-Up Study in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Wei Jie; Pan, Wen-Chi; Kile, Molly L.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mahiuddin, Golam; Mostofa, Golam; Lin, Xihong

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with skin lesions. However, it is not known whether reducing arsenic exposure will improve skin lesions. Objective: We evaluated the association between reduced arsenic exposures and skin lesion recovery over time. Methods: A follow-up study of 550 individuals was conducted in 2009–2011 on a baseline population of skin lesion cases (n = 900) previously enrolled in Bangladesh in 2001–2003. Arsenic in drinking water and toenails, and skin lesion status and severity were ascertained at baseline and follow-up. We used logistic regression and generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to evaluate the association between log10-transformed arsenic exposure and skin lesion persistence and severity. Results: During the study period, water arsenic concentrations decreased in this population by 41% overall, and 65 individuals who had skin lesions at baseline had no identifiable lesions at follow-up. In the adjusted models, every log10 decrease in water arsenic and toenail arsenic was associated with 22% [odds ratio (OR) = 1.22; 95% CI: 0.85, 1.78] and 4.5 times (OR = 4.49; 95% CI: 1.94, 11.1) relative increase in skin lesion recovery, respectively. In addition, lower baseline arsenic levels were significantly associated with increased odds of recovery. A log10 decrease in toenail arsenic from baseline to follow-up was also significantly associated with reduced skin lesion severity in cases over time (mean score change of –5.22 units; 95% CI: –8.61, –1.82). Conclusions: Reducing arsenic exposure increased the odds that an individual with skin lesions would recover or show less severe lesions within 10 years. Reducing arsenic exposure must remain a public health priority in Bangladesh and in other regions affected by arsenic-contaminated water. PMID:23060367

  1. Comparative genomic profiling of synovium versus skin lesions in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Belasco, Jennifer; Louie, James S; Gulati, Nicholas; Wei, Nathan; Nograles, Kristine; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Krueger, James G

    2015-04-01

    To our knowledge, there is no broad genomic analysis comparing skin and synovium in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Also, there is little understanding of the relative levels of cytokines and chemokines in skin and synovium. The purpose of this study was to better define inflammatory pathways in paired lesional skin and affected synovial tissue in patients with PsA. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of cytokine and chemokine activation and genes representative of the inflammatory processes in PsA. Paired PsA synovial tissue and skin samples were obtained from 12 patients on the same day. Gene expression studies were performed using Affymetrix HGU133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Confirmatory quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on selected transcripts. Cell populations were assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Globally, gene expression in PsA synovium was more closely related to gene expression in PsA skin than to gene expression in synovium in other forms of arthritis. However, PsA gene expression patterns in skin and synovium were clearly distinct, showing a stronger interleukin-17 (IL-17) gene signature in skin than in synovium and more equivalent tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon-γ gene signatures in both tissues. These results were confirmed with real-time PCR. This is the first comprehensive molecular comparison of paired lesional skin and affected synovial tissue samples in PsA. Our results support clinical trial data showing that PsA skin and joint disease are similarly responsive to TNF antagonists, while IL-17 antagonists have better results in PsA skin than in PsA joints. Genes selectively expressed in PsA synovium might direct future therapies for PsA. © 2015 The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology is published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Comparative Genomic Profiling of Synovium Versus Skin Lesions in Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Belasco, Jennifer; Louie, James S; Gulati, Nicholas; Wei, Nathan; Nograles, Kristine; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Krueger, James G

    2015-01-01

    Objective To our knowledge, there is no broad genomic analysis comparing skin and synovium in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Also, there is little understanding of the relative levels of cytokines and chemokines in skin and synovium. The purpose of this study was to better define inflammatory pathways in paired lesional skin and affected synovial tissue in patients with PsA. Methods We conducted a comprehensive analysis of cytokine and chemokine activation and genes representative of the inflammatory processes in PsA. Paired PsA synovial tissue and skin samples were obtained from 12 patients on the same day. Gene expression studies were performed using Affymetrix HGU133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Confirmatory quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on selected transcripts. Cell populations were assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Results Globally, gene expression in PsA synovium was more closely related to gene expression in PsA skin than to gene expression in synovium in other forms of arthritis. However, PsA gene expression patterns in skin and synovium were clearly distinct, showing a stronger interleukin-17 (IL-17) gene signature in skin than in synovium and more equivalent tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon-γ gene signatures in both tissues. These results were confirmed with real-time PCR. Conclusion This is the first comprehensive molecular comparison of paired lesional skin and affected synovial tissue samples in PsA. Our results support clinical trial data showing that PsA skin and joint disease are similarly responsive to TNF antagonists, while IL-17 antagonists have better results in PsA skin than in PsA joints. Genes selectively expressed in PsA synovium might direct future therapies for PsA. PMID:25512250

  3. First experiences using reflectance confocal microscopy on equivocal skin lesions in Queensland.

    PubMed

    Curchin, Claudia E S; Wurm, Elisabeth M T; Lambie, Duncan Lj; Longo, Caterina; Pellacani, Giovanni; Soyer, H Peter

    2011-05-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive method of imaging human skin in vivo. The purpose of this study was to observe the experience of using RCM on equivocal skin lesions in a tertiary clinical setting in Queensland. Fifty equivocal lesions on 42 patients were imaged using a reflectance confocal microscope immediately prior to being excised. The images were then analysed blind to the histopathological diagnosis. The experience and problems encountered when using RCM on skin lesions for the first time was also observed. On RCM analysis 12/13 melanomas (92.3% sensitivity, 75% specificity), 19/22 benign naevi (86% sensitivity, 95% specificity), 6/9 basal cell carcinomas (66.7% sensitivity, 100% specificity)and 6/6 squamous cell carcinomas and its precursors (100% sensitivity, 75% specificity) were diagnosed correctly when using histology as the gold standard. We identified three common problems that affected image quality: object artefacts; positioning artefacts; and movement artefacts. Using simple techniques we found that common RCM features were readily identifiable and common artefacts could be minimized, making RCM a useful tool to aid the diagnosis of equivocal skin lesions in a clinical setting. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2011 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  4. Vibrio furnissii: an Unusual Cause of Bacteremia and Skin Lesions after Ingestion of Seafood▿†

    PubMed Central

    Derber, Catherine; Coudron, Philip; Tarr, Cheryl; Gladney, Lori; Turnsek, Maryann; Shankaran, Shivanjali; Wong, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio furnissii in the blood is rarely reported, which may explain why clinical features of bloodstream infections with this organism have not been described. We describe a patient who developed skin lesions and V. furnissii bacteremia and was successfully treated with fluoroquinolones. V. furnissii may be a serious pathogen in patients with underlying comorbidities who are exposed to seafood. PMID:21450956

  5. [The morphological characteristic of the skin lesions inflicted by plastic knives with four cutting edges].

    PubMed

    Leonov, S V; Finkel'shtein, V T

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the morphological features of the skin lesions inflicted by the blades of the Fgx Boot Blade I knives having four cutting edges. The study revealed the signs that can be used to distinguish between morphological characteristics of the stab and lacerated wounds having the primary and secondary incisions made by the four-edge blade.

  6. Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm with Pulmonary Involvement and Atypical Skin Lesion

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Barros Romão, Cyndi Myrelle; dos Santos Júnior, Cláudio José; Leite, Luiz Arthur Calheiros; Alves, Maria Jordana Rocha Gomes; Araújo, Nathalia Silva; Castro, Anderson Feitosa Lisboa; Moura, Muriel Silva; Gomes, Vitória Mikaelly da Silva; Batinga, Arthur Moacir Costa Sampaio; Queiroz, João Antonio da Silva; dos Santos, Natanael Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 51 Final Diagnosis: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm Symptoms: Pulmonary bleeding • small skin lesion Medication: Hyper-CVAD • methotrexate • cytarabine Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematodermic malignancy neoplasm with highly aggressive course and poor prognosis. This disease typically presents with cutaneous involvement as the first manifestation, with subsequent or simultaneous spread to bone marrow and peripheral blood. Case Report: Here, we report the case of a 51-year-old woman who presented a violaceus skin lesion on the lateral region of the right thigh, weight loss, fever, and lymphadenopathies. Computed tomography (CT) displayed thoracic and abdominal lymph node and alveolar bleeding. Flow cytometry from circulating blastic cells was compatible with BPDCN (CD4+, CD56+ and CD123+). She underwent 5 cycles of hyper-CVAD alternating with high-dose methotrexate and cytarabine, but the patient died due to alveolar bleeding and sepsis. Conclusions: We report a rare case of BPDCN characterized by an aggressive course, presence of atypical skin lesion, a finding suggestive of pulmonary infiltration, and nonresponse to induction chemotherapy, leading to late diagnosis and therapeutic management. Because of the late recognition of the skin lesion, neoplastic cells infiltrated the dermis and spread as the disease progressed rapidly to a fatal course. PMID:28635683

  7. Correlation Between the Evaluation of Pigmented Lesions by a Multi-spectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis Device and the Clinical and Histological Features of Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Richard R; Rigel, Darrell S; Ferris, Laura; Sober, Arthur; Tucker, Natalie; Cockerell, Clay J

    2016-03-01

    To correlate Multi-spectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis classifier scores with histopathological severity of pigmented lesions and clinical features of melanoma. Classifier scores were computed for 1,632 skin lesions. Dermatologists evaluated the same lesions for Asymmetry, Border Irregularity, Color variegation, Diameter >6mm, Evolution, Patient's Concern, Regression, and/or "Ugly Duckling" sign. Classifier scores were correlated to the number of clinical risk features and for six histopathological severity levels of pigmented lesions. Average classifier score, Welch's t-test, and chi-square analysis. Melanomas had higher mean classifier scores (3.5) than high-grade dysplastic nevi (2.7, p=0.002), low-grade dysplastic nevi (1.7, p<0.0001), non-dysplastic nevi (1.6, p<0.0001), and benign non-melanocytic lesions (2.0, p<0.0001). Classifier score and the number of clinical risk characteristics directly correlated (Pearson coefficient 0.32, p<0.0001). Correlation of classifier scores to clinical and histological melanoma features supports the effectiveness of Multi-spectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis in assessing the risk of pigmented lesions requiring biopsy. Optimizing outcomes of dermatologist decisions to biopsy suspicious pigmented lesions may be enhanced utilizing Multi-spectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis.

  8. Fibroblast-dependent induction of a murine skin lesion with similarity to human common blue nevus.

    PubMed Central

    Prouty, S. M.; Lawrence, L.; Stenn, K. S.

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to define epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in skin appendage formation, we have been studying a nude mouse grafting model that permits the combination of heterotypic and heterochronic epithelial and mesenchymal cells. In this study using neonatal hair bud cells combined with various mesenchymal cell preparations, we show that one can regenerate near-complete skin with intact epidermal and dermal layers plus mature hair follicles. It was determined that the character of the resulting regenerated skin could be manipulated as a function of the specific mesenchymal component. Lack of dermal cells resulted in a scar, whereas inclusion of a suspension of dissociated total dermal cells resulted in near-complete skin regeneration, and in the presence of follicular papilla fibroblasts (both hair-inductive and non-hair-inductive) or NIH3T3 fibroblasts, the reconstitution had similarity to the common blue nevus. The results indicate that 1) a stimulant of human common blue nevus can be produced in an animal model, 2) the underlying disorder of the lesion in mice appears to be entirely dermal in origin, arising independent of the epidermal component, and 3) complex dermal cell interactions involving lesion-initiative and lesion-suppressive activities underlie the pathogenesis. This experimental system will serve as a valuable tool in elucidating cutaneous dermal-epidermal signals in normal skin as well as the alteration of these signals in malformations such as the hamartoma described here. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8669473

  9. Identification, molecular and phylogenetic analysis of poxvirus in skin lesions of southern right whale.

    PubMed

    Fiorito, Carla; Palacios, Carlos; Golemba, Marcelo; Bratanich, Ana; Argüelles, Maria Belen; Fazio, Ana; Bertellotti, Marcelo; Lombardo, Daniel

    2015-10-16

    Poxvirus skin disease has been reported in several species of cetaceans, principally in odontocetes, and a single report in mysticetes. Southern right whales Eubalaena australis in Peninsula Valdes, Argentina, show a variety of skin lesions of unknown etiology, and the number of these lesions has increased in recent years. Samples from dead whales were taken in order to establish the etiology of these lesions. One calf and one adult presented ring-type lesions, characterized by a circumscribed and slightly raised area of skin. Lesions were histologically characterized by the presence of microvesicles and vacuolated cells in the stratum spinosum, along with hyperplasia of the stratum corneum and eosinophilic inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy showed aggregations of virions with typical poxvirus morphology. PCR of cetacean poxvirus (CPV) DNA polymerase, DNA topoisomerase I and parapoxvirus DNA polymerase gene fragments was done, and confirmed the presence of poxvirus in one sample. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the detected poxvirus belongs to the CPV-2 group. This is the first confirmed report of poxvirus in southern right whales in Argentina.

  10. Using Urgotul dressing for the management of epidermolysis bullosa skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Blanchet-Bardon, C; Bohbot, S

    2005-11-01

    To evaluate the acceptability, tolerance and efficacy of Urgotul wound dressing in the management of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) skin lesions. This was an open-label uncontrolled clinical trial involving 20 patients (I I adults and nine children) with EB simplex or dystrophic EB. Patients were selected from the register of EB patients at the investigating centre and included if they presented with at least one skin lesion requiring management with a non-adherent wound dressing. Lesions were treated with the study dressing for a maximum of four weeks. All dressing changes, wound parameters, pain and effect on quality of life were recorded. All patients completed the trial. Nineteen out of 20 wounds healed within 8.7 +/- 8.5 days. Overall, 11 patients (55%) considered that their quality of life had improved following use of the dressing, which was also reported to be pain free and 'very easy' or 'easy' to remove at most dressing changes. Nineteen out of 20 patients stated that they would use the study dressing to manage their lesions in future. This study confirmed the very good acceptability and efficacy of Urgotul in the treatment of skin lesions in patients with EB.

  11. A Weibull-PBPK model for assessing risk of arsenic-induced skin lesions in children.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chung-Min; Lin, Tzu-Ling; Chen, Szu-Chieh

    2008-03-25

    Chronic arsenic exposure and skin lesions (keratosis and hyperpigmentation) are inextricably linked. This paper was to quantify the children skin lesions risks and to further recommend safe drinking water arsenic standard based on reported arsenic epidemiological data. We linked the Weibull dose-response function and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to estimate safe drinking water arsenic concentrations and to perform the risk characterization. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) to assess the relative magnitude of the effect of the arsenic exposure on the likelihood of the prevalence of children skin lesions by calculating proposed Weibull-based prevalence ratios of exposed to control groups associated with the age group-specific PBPK model predicted dimethylarsinite (MMA(III)) levels in urine. Positive relationships between arsenic exposures and cumulative prevalence ratios of skin lesions were found using Weibull dose-response model (r2=0.91-0.96). We reported that the safe drinking water arsenic standards were recommended to be 2.2 and 1 microg/L for male and 6 and 2.8 microg/L for female in 0-6 and 7-18 years age groups, respectively, based on hyperpigmentation with an excess risk of 10(-3) for a 75 years lifetime exposure. Risk predictions indicate that estimated ORs have 95% confidence intervals of 1.33-5.12, 1.74-19.15, and 2.81-19.27 based on mean drinking water arsenic contents of 283.19, 282.65, and 468.81 microg/L, respectively, in West Bengal, India, Bangladesh, and southwestern Taiwan. Our findings also suggest that increasing urinary monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) levels are associated with an increase in risks of arsenic-induced children skin lesions.

  12. Tumour necrosis factor α is expressed in refractory skin lesions from patients with subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, S; Alaibac, M; Iaccarino, L; Rondinone, R; Ghirardello, A; Sarzi‐Puttini, P; A Peserico; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) is expressed in subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) skin lesions. Methods The in situ expression of TNFα in refractory lesional and non‐lesional skin biopsy specimens from patients with SCLE was analysed using an immunohistochemical approach. At the time of biopsy these patients were receiving treatment with systemic medications such as antimalarial agents, immunosuppressive drugs, and thalidomide. Expression of TNFα was also evaluated in cutaneous lesions of patients with other inflammatory and neoplastic skin diseases as controls. Results The data showed that refractory lesional skin tissue from patients with SCLE displays a strongly positive distribution of TNFα, particularly within the epidermis. No prominent staining was seen in non‐lesional skin from the same group of patients or in cutaneous lesions from the control group. Conclusions These findings suggest that TNFα is localised and produced by epidermal cells within SCLE skin lesions and support its potential role in the pathogenesis of SCLE. The tissue localisation of TNFα may represent a potential therapeutic target providing a new perspective in the treatment of refractory skin lesions in patients with SCLE. PMID:16096331

  13. Skin lesion computational diagnosis of dermoscopic images: Ensemble models based on input feature manipulation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Roberta B; Pereira, Aledir S; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2017-10-01

    The number of deaths worldwide due to melanoma has risen in recent times, in part because melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer. Computational systems have been developed to assist dermatologists in early diagnosis of skin cancer, or even to monitor skin lesions. However, there still remains a challenge to improve classifiers for the diagnosis of such skin lesions. The main objective of this article is to evaluate different ensemble classification models based on input feature manipulation to diagnose skin lesions. Input feature manipulation processes are based on feature subset selections from shape properties, colour variation and texture analysis to generate diversity for the ensemble models. Three subset selection models are presented here: (1) a subset selection model based on specific feature groups, (2) a correlation-based subset selection model, and (3) a subset selection model based on feature selection algorithms. Each ensemble classification model is generated using an optimum-path forest classifier and integrated with a majority voting strategy. The proposed models were applied on a set of 1104 dermoscopic images using a cross-validation procedure. The best results were obtained by the first ensemble classification model that generates a feature subset ensemble based on specific feature groups. The skin lesion diagnosis computational system achieved 94.3% accuracy, 91.8% sensitivity and 96.7% specificity. The input feature manipulation process based on specific feature subsets generated the greatest diversity for the ensemble classification model with very promising results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular Characterization of Poxviruses Associated with Tattoo Skin Lesions in UK Cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Blacklaws, Barbara A.; Gajda, Anna M.; Tippelt, Sabine; Jepson, Paul D.; Deaville, Rob; Van Bressem, Marie-Francoise; Pearce, Gareth P.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing concern for the well-being of cetacean populations around the UK. Tattoo skin disease (characterised by irregular, grey, black or yellowish, stippled cutaneous lesions) caused by poxvirus infection is a potential health indicatora potential health indicator for cetaceans. Limited sequence data indicates that cetacean poxviruses (CPVs) belong to an unassigned genus of the Chordopoxvirinae. To obtain further insight into the phylogenetic relationships between CPV and other Chordopoxvirinae members we partially characterized viral DNA originating from tattoo lesions collected in Delphinidae and Phocoenidae stranded along the UK coastline in 1998–2008. We also evaluated the presence of CPV in skin lesions other than tattoos to examine specificity and sensitivity of visual diagnosis. After DNA extraction, regions of the DNA polymerase and DNA topoisomerase I genes were amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared with other isolates. The presence of CPV DNA was demonstrated in tattoos from one striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), eight harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) and one short-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and in one ‘dubious tattoo’ lesion detected in one other porpoise. Seventeen of the 18 PCR positive skin lesions had been visually identified as tattoos and one as a dubious tattoo. None of the other skin lesions were PCR positive. Thus, visual identification had a 94.4% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The DNA polymerase PCR was most effective in detecting CPV DNA. Limited sequence phylogeny grouped the UK samples within the odontocete poxviruses (CPV group 1) and indicated that two different poxvirus lineages infect the Phocoenidae and the Delphinidae. The phylogenetic tree had three major branches: one with the UK Phocoenidae viruses, one with the Delphinidae isolates and one for the mysticete poxvirus (CPV group 2). This implies a radiation of poxviruses according to the host suborder and the families within these

  15. Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors associated with infected skin lesions: influence on the local immune response.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Patricia M; Cardenas, Tatiana C P; Snyder, Richard V; Kinney, Megan A; Davis, Stephen C; Plano, Lisa R W

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate Staphylococcus aureus isolates from infected skin lesions for their potential to produce immune system-modulating toxins and to correlate these with white blood cell (WBC) counts associated with these lesions. Specimens were obtained for bacterial culture and gram staining from 105 infected skin lesions, and the number of WBCs per low-power field (LPF) was determined. Chromosomal DNA was prepared from 84 bacterial isolates and subjected to real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis to determine the presence of genes encoding potential immunomodulating toxins. Bacterial populations were divided into 2 groups: those associated with low WBC counts (0-5 WBCs/LPF) and those with high WBC counts (> 5 WBCs/LPF). We applied chi(2) statistical analyses to compare the toxin gene profiles associated with WBC counts on initial swab for culture. Samples were obtained from patients at a single geographic location. A higher than expected percentage of bacteria capable of producing the exfoliative toxins A and/or B (ETA and/or ETB) and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was seen in all skin lesions infected with S aureus without regard to WBC count with initial cultures. Comparison of the toxins associated with the low WBC group vs the high WBC group showed that low WBC counts were associated with ETA and ETB, while high WBC counts were associated with PVL and toxic shock syndrome toxin. There were no differences in the clinical appearance of the lesions between groups. Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors ETA, ETB, and PVL are associated with WBC counts from infected skin lesions. The exact role they play in affecting the WBC counts remains to be determined.

  16. Skin lesion removal: practice by general practitioners in Grampian Region before and after April 1990.

    PubMed

    Brown, P A; Kernohan, N M; Smart, L M; Savargaonkar, P; Atkinson, P; Robinson, S; Russell, D; Kerr, K M

    1992-10-01

    The introduction of new GP contracts in April 1990 incorporated a financial incentive to undertake minor surgical procedures. Previous reports have noted large increases in the number of GP-derived skin specimens after April 1990. Our present study intended to address whether similar changes have occurred in Grampian Region as well as, more specifically, noting whether there have been changes in the quality of practice following the 1st April 1990. A retrospective study of skin biopsies removed by general practitioners in Grampian Region was undertaken. Cases were selected from four periods of six months (1st April to end of September) in 1987, 1988, 1989 and 1990. All skin specimens sent by general practitioners to the Department of Pathology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, were included. Following April 1990 there was a two-fold increase in skin specimen numbers--an increase significantly greater than increases observed over previous years (p < 0.01). Of particular note was the contribution made to this increase by Aberdeen City GPs whose contribution rose five-fold (p < 0.0001). Non-benign lesions (ie malignant plus carcinoma-in-situ-) represented 6% of lesions excised. A non-benign clinical diagnosis or an indication of suspicion was written on only one third of request forms for histopathologically diagnosed non-benign lesions. The proportion of histologically incompletely excised lesions rose over the four years (p < 0.01); moreover the increase in total numbers of lesions resulted in a striking increase in the actual numbers of incompletely excised lesions after April 1990.

  17. The microbiological signature of human cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions exhibits restricted bacterial diversity compared to healthy skin

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Vanessa R; de Queiroz, Artur TL; Sanabani, Sabri S; de Oliveira, Camila I; Carvalho, Edgar M; Costa, Jackson ML; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2016-01-01

    Localised cutaneous leishmaniasis (LCL) is the most common form of cutaneous leishmaniasis characterised by single or multiple painless chronic ulcers, which commonly presents with secondary bacterial infection. Previous culture-based studies have found staphylococci, streptococci, and opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in LCL lesions, but there have been no comparisons to normal skin. In addition, this approach has strong bias for determining bacterial composition. The present study tested the hypothesis that bacterial communities in LCL lesions differ from those found on healthy skin (HS). Using a high throughput amplicon sequencing approach, which allows for better populational evaluation due to greater depth coverage and the Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology pipeline, we compared the microbiological signature of LCL lesions with that of contralateral HS from the same individuals.Streptococcus, Staphylococcus,Fusobacterium and other strict or facultative anaerobic bacteria composed the LCL microbiome. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria found in HS, including environmental bacteria, were significantly decreased in LCL lesions (p < 0.01). This paper presents the first comprehensive microbiome identification from LCL lesions with next generation sequence methodology and shows a marked reduction of bacterial diversity in the lesions. PMID:27074253

  18. Density-based parallel skin lesion border detection with webCL

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Dermoscopy is a highly effective and noninvasive imaging technique used in diagnosis of melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions. Many aspects of the lesion under consideration are defined in relation to the lesion border. This makes border detection one of the most important steps in dermoscopic image analysis. In current practice, dermatologists often delineate borders through a hand drawn representation based upon visual inspection. Due to the subjective nature of this technique, intra- and inter-observer variations are common. Because of this, the automated assessment of lesion borders in dermoscopic images has become an important area of study. Methods Fast density based skin lesion border detection method has been implemented in parallel with a new parallel technology called WebCL. WebCL utilizes client side computing capabilities to use available hardware resources such as multi cores and GPUs. Developed WebCL-parallel density based skin lesion border detection method runs efficiently from internet browsers. Results Previous research indicates that one of the highest accuracy rates can be achieved using density based clustering techniques for skin lesion border detection. While these algorithms do have unfavorable time complexities, this effect could be mitigated when implemented in parallel. In this study, density based clustering technique for skin lesion border detection is parallelized and redesigned to run very efficiently on the heterogeneous platforms (e.g. tablets, SmartPhones, multi-core CPUs, GPUs, and fully-integrated Accelerated Processing Units) by transforming the technique into a series of independent concurrent operations. Heterogeneous computing is adopted to support accessibility, portability and multi-device use in the clinical settings. For this, we used WebCL, an emerging technology that enables a HTML5 Web browser to execute code in parallel for heterogeneous platforms. We depicted WebCL and our parallel algorithm design. In

  19. Density-based parallel skin lesion border detection with webCL.

    PubMed

    Lemon, James; Kockara, Sinan; Halic, Tansel; Mete, Mutlu

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy is a highly effective and noninvasive imaging technique used in diagnosis of melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions. Many aspects of the lesion under consideration are defined in relation to the lesion border. This makes border detection one of the most important steps in dermoscopic image analysis. In current practice, dermatologists often delineate borders through a hand drawn representation based upon visual inspection. Due to the subjective nature of this technique, intra- and inter-observer variations are common. Because of this, the automated assessment of lesion borders in dermoscopic images has become an important area of study. Fast density based skin lesion border detection method has been implemented in parallel with a new parallel technology called WebCL. WebCL utilizes client side computing capabilities to use available hardware resources such as multi cores and GPUs. Developed WebCL-parallel density based skin lesion border detection method runs efficiently from internet browsers. Previous research indicates that one of the highest accuracy rates can be achieved using density based clustering techniques for skin lesion border detection. While these algorithms do have unfavorable time complexities, this effect could be mitigated when implemented in parallel. In this study, density based clustering technique for skin lesion border detection is parallelized and redesigned to run very efficiently on the heterogeneous platforms (e.g. tablets, SmartPhones, multi-core CPUs, GPUs, and fully-integrated Accelerated Processing Units) by transforming the technique into a series of independent concurrent operations. Heterogeneous computing is adopted to support accessibility, portability and multi-device use in the clinical settings. For this, we used WebCL, an emerging technology that enables a HTML5 Web browser to execute code in parallel for heterogeneous platforms. We depicted WebCL and our parallel algorithm design. In addition, we tested

  20. Comments on "A new algorithm for border description of polarized light surface microscopic images of pigmented skin lesions".

    PubMed

    Burroni, Marco; Alparone, Luciano; Argenti, Fabrizio

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, discrepancies and reference inaccuracies in the paper (Grana et al., 2003) are pointed out. Specifically, it is demonstrated that the definitions of "lesion gradient" and "skin lesion gradient," widely used in a number of medical papers on computer analysis of pigmented skin lesions, are unambiguous, and that the "new algorithm for border description" described in the subject paper substantially relies on well-established concepts dating back over one decade ago.

  1. Pityrosporum folliculitis. Its potential for confusion with skin lesions of systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Klotz, S A; Drutz, D J; Huppert, M; Johnson, J E

    1982-11-01

    Development of an erythematous, papulonodular to papulopustular skin eruption in four febrile, immunocompromised patients raised the possibility of a systemic mycosis when Gram's stains of unroofed lesions disclosed budding yeasts. Candidiasis, torulopsosis, sporotrichosis, and cryptococcosis were considered in the differential diagnosis, and therapy with amphotericin B was begun. Skin biopsy specimens disclosed fungi to be located exclusively within intact and ruptured hair follicles. Inability of the fungi to grow on media that were not supplemented with lipid and their structure and location all suggested the presence of Pityrosporum sp. When hematogenous dissemination of a mycosis to the skin is suspected, the diagnosis must be based on biopsy specimen demonstration of dermal invasion, ideally with positive cultures. Pityrosporum sp, common skin saprophytes, may produce folliculitis, and be mistaken for pathogenic yeasts.

  2. Virus-associated papillomatous skin lesions in a giant guitarfish Rhynchobatus djiddensis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Camus, Alvin; Dill, Jennifer; McDermott, Alexa; Camus, Melinda; Fan Ng, Terry Fei

    2016-01-13

    Although elasmobranch species are increasingly displayed in public aquaria, knowledge of disease in wild and captive elasmobranchs, as well as the agents involved, remains limited, and descriptions are often incomplete. This report describes papillomatous skin lesions in a juvenile giant guitarfish Rhynchobatus djiddensis associated with intranuclear viral particles. Skin biopsies were collected from multiple, friable, raised, villonodular skin lesions affecting pigmented and non-pigmented skin of the caudal fin and ventrum, respectively. Microscopic examination revealed papillary proliferation of the epidermis, with widespread marked karyomegaly of squamous epithelial cells. In approximately 75% of nuclei, chromatin was marginated by one to multiple, large, amphophilic inclusions. Large numbers of unencapsulated, 75 nm, icosahedral viral particles were observed to form large arrays in affected nuclei using transmission electron microscopy. Based on intranuclear location, particle size and morphology, a consensus nested-PCR for adenovirus polymerase was attempted. However, no adenoviral gene sequence was amplified. The nature of the involved virus remains unknown and an ongoing area of investigation. Lesions regressed completely over a 6 mo period, during which time the animal showed no signs of systemic illness, and there has been no recrudescence for 6 mo following resolution. Two cohorts of similar age and in close contact with the case animal were unaffected.

  3. Improved detection reveals active β-papillomavirus infection in skin lesions from kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Borgogna, Cinzia; Lanfredini, Simone; Peretti, Alberto; De Andrea, Marco; Zavattaro, Elisa; Colombo, Enrico; Quaglia, Marco; Boldorini, Renzo; Miglio, Umberto; Doorbar, John; Bavinck, Jan N Bouwes; Quint, Koen D; de Koning, Maurits N C; Landolfo, Santo; Gariglio, Marisa

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether detection of β-HPV gene products, as defined in epidermodysplasia verruciformis skin cancer, could also be observed in lesions from kidney transplant recipients alongside the viral DNA. A total of 111 samples, corresponding to 79 skin lesions abscised from 17 kidney transplant recipients, have been analyzed. The initial PCR analysis demonstrated that β-HPV-DNA was highly present in our tumor series (85%). Using a combination of antibodies raised against the E4 and L1 proteins of the β-genotypes, we were able to visualize productive infection in 4 out of 19 actinic keratoses, and in the pathological borders of 1 out of 14 squamous cell carcinomas and 1 out of 31 basal cell carcinomas. Increased expression of the cellular proliferation marker minichromosome maintenance protein 7 (MCM7), that extended into the upper epithelial layers, was a common feature of all the E4-positive areas, indicating that cells were driven into the cell cycle in areas of productive viral infections. Although the present study does not directly demonstrate a causal role of these viruses, the detection of E4 and L1 positivity in actinic keratosis and the adjacent pathological epithelium of skin cancer, clearly shows that β-HPV are actively replicating in the intraepidermal precursor lesions of kidney transplant recipients and can therefore cooperate with other carcinogenic agents, such as UVB, favoring skin cancer promotion.

  4. Automatic detection of basal cell carcinoma using telangiectasia analysis in dermoscopy skin lesion images.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Beibei; Erdos, David; Stanley, Ronald J; Stoecker, William V; Calcara, David A; Gómez, David D

    2011-08-01

    Telangiectasia, dilated blood vessels near the surface of the skin of small, varying diameter, are critical dermoscopy structures used in the detection of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Distinguishing these vessels from other telangiectasia, that are commonly found in sun-damaged skin, is challenging. Image analysis techniques are investigated to find vessels structures in BCC automatically. The primary screen for vessels uses an optimized local color drop technique. A noise filter is developed to eliminate false-positive structures, primarily bubbles, hair, and blotch and ulcer edges. From the telangiectasia mask containing candidate vessel-like structures, shape, size and normalized count features are computed to facilitate the discrimination of benign skin lesions from BCCs with telangiectasia. Experimental results yielded a diagnostic accuracy as high as 96.7% using a neural network classifier for a data set of 59 BCCs and 152 benign lesions for skin lesion discrimination based on features computed from the telangiectasia masks. In current clinical practice, it is possible to find smaller BCCs by dermoscopy than by clinical inspection. Although almost all of these small BCCs have telangiectasia, they can be short and thin. Normalization of lengths and areas helps to detect these smaller BCCs. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Premalignant and Malignant Skin Lesions in Two Recipients of Vascularized Composite Tissue Allografts (Face, Hands)

    PubMed Central

    Kanitakis, Jean; Petruzzo, Palmina; Gazarian, Aram; Testelin, Sylvie; Devauchelle, Bernard; Badet, Lionel; Dubernard, Jean-Michel; Morelon, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ transplants (RSOT) have a highly increased risk for developing cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions, favored by the lifelong immunosuppression. Vascularized composite tissue allografts (VCA) have been introduced recently, and relevant data are sparse. Two patients with skin cancers (one with basal cell carcinoma and one with squamous cell carcinomas) have been so far reported in this patient group. Since 2000 we have been following 9 recipients of VCA (3 face, 6 bilateral hands) for the development of rejection and complications of the immunosuppressive treatment. Among the 9 patients, one face-grafted recipient was diagnosed with nodular-pigmented basal cell carcinoma of her own facial skin 6 years after graft, and one patient with double hand allografts developed disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis, a potentially premalignant dermatosis, on her skin of the arm and legs. Similar to RSOT, recipients of VCA are prone to develop cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions. Prevention should be applied through sun-protective measures, regular skin examination, and early treatment of premalignant lesions. PMID:26550517

  6. Automatic detection of basal cell carcinoma using telangiectasia analysis in dermoscopy skin lesion images

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Beibei; Erdos, David; Stanley, Ronald J.; Stoecker, William V.; Calcara, David A.; Gómez, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Telangiectasia, dilated blood vessels near the surface of the skin of small, varying diameter, are critical dermoscopy structures used in the detection of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Distinguishing these vessels from other telangiectasia, that are commonly found in sun-damaged skin, is challenging. Methods Image analysis techniques are investigated to find vessels structures found in BCC automatically. The primary screen for vessels uses an optimized local color drop technique. A noise filter is developed to eliminate false-positive structures, primarily bubbles, hair, and blotch and ulcer edges. From the telangiectasia mask containing candidate vessel-like structures, shape, size and normalized count features are computed to facilitate the discrimination of benign skin lesions from BCCs with telangiectasia. Results Experimental results yielded a diagnostic accuracy as high as 96.7% using a neural network classifier for a data set of 59 BCCs and 152 benign lesions for skin lesion discrimination based on features computed from the telangiectasia masks. Conclusion In current clinical practice, it is possible to find smaller BCCs by dermoscopy than by clinical inspection. Although almost all of these small BCCs have telangiectasia, they can be short and thin. Normalization of lengths and areas helps to detect these smaller BCCs. PMID:23815446

  7. Multispectral transillumination imaging of skin lesions for oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin measurement.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Brian; Dhawan, Atam P

    2010-01-01

    The early detection of melanoma is critical for patient survival. One of the indentifying features of new malignancy is increased blood flow to the lesion. Multispectral transillumination using the Nevoscope has been demonstrated to be an effective tool for imaging the sub-surface vascular architecture of skin lesions. Using multispectral images obtained from this tool in the visible and near-infrared range, as well as the relative difference in spectral absorption due to oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin, we propose an empirical method to estimate the blood flow volume within a skin lesion. From the images, estimates of the distribution of both Hb and HbO(2) are calculated along with a ratiometric feature describing the relative oxygen saturation level in the blood. We validate our proposed method through the imaging of a skin phantom with embedded capillaries which can be filled with either an artificial Hb or HbO(2) liquid. Our near-IR, multispectral computations nicely differentiate the Hb filled phantom versus the HbO(2) filled phantom, demonstrating that these chromophores can be successfully separated and individually characterized for use in estimating the relative oxygen saturation of skin tissue.

  8. Topical Application of Eupatilin Ameliorates Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in NC/Nga Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Ye Jin; Lee, Jun Young; Park, Young Min

    2017-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disorder with severe pruritus. Despite advancements in medicine, therapeutic treatments for AD are still limited. Eupatilin (5,7-dihydroxy-30,40,6-trimethoxyflavone) is one of the lipophilic flavonoids from Artemisia umbelliformis Lam. and Artemisia genipi Weber. Although it has been reported to act a role in improving inflammation, its action on AD is uncertain. In this study, we examined the role of eupatilin on AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene was repeatedly applied to the ear of NC/Nga mice to produce AD-like skin lesions. Eupatilin (1%, once a day for 5 consecutive days/week) was applied topically for four weeks for the evaluation of its therapeutic effects. 1% eupatilin cream significantly reduced the clinical severity score of AD-like lesions, compared to the vehicle (p<0.005). A histopathological analysis revealed that 1% eupatilin cream significantly decreased the mast cell infiltration as well as inflammatory cell infiltration, compared to the vehicle (p<0.005). We showed that 1% eupatilin cream significantly reduced the expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-4, and interleukin-19, but not interferon-γ, compared to the vehicle (p<0.005). Considering the therapeutic reaction of eupatilin on AD-like lesions as in this study, the substance has a promising to be an adjuvant topical agent for the control of AD.

  9. Topical Application of Eupatilin Ameliorates Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in NC/Nga Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Ye Jin; Lee, Jun Young

    2017-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disorder with severe pruritus. Despite advancements in medicine, therapeutic treatments for AD are still limited. Eupatilin (5,7-dihydroxy-30,40,6-trimethoxyflavone) is one of the lipophilic flavonoids from Artemisia umbelliformis Lam. and Artemisia genipi Weber. Objective Although it has been reported to act a role in improving inflammation, its action on AD is uncertain. In this study, we examined the role of eupatilin on AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. Methods 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene was repeatedly applied to the ear of NC/Nga mice to produce AD-like skin lesions. Eupatilin (1%, once a day for 5 consecutive days/week) was applied topically for four weeks for the evaluation of its therapeutic effects. Results 1% eupatilin cream significantly reduced the clinical severity score of AD-like lesions, compared to the vehicle (p<0.005). A histopathological analysis revealed that 1% eupatilin cream significantly decreased the mast cell infiltration as well as inflammatory cell infiltration, compared to the vehicle (p<0.005). We showed that 1% eupatilin cream significantly reduced the expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-4, and interleukin-19, but not interferon-γ, compared to the vehicle (p<0.005). Conclusion Considering the therapeutic reaction of eupatilin on AD-like lesions as in this study, the substance has a promising to be an adjuvant topical agent for the control of AD. PMID:28223748

  10. Suction blistering the lesional skin of vitiligo patients reveals useful biomarkers of disease activity.

    PubMed

    Strassner, James P; Rashighi, Mehdi; Ahmed Refat, Maggi; Richmond, Jillian M; Harris, John E

    2017-05-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease of the skin with limited treatment options; there is an urgent need to identify and validate biomarkers of disease activity to support vitiligo clinical studies. To investigate potential biomarkers of disease activity directly in the skin of vitiligo subjects and healthy subjects. Patient skin was sampled via a modified suction-blister technique, allowing for minimally invasive, objective assessment of cytokines and T-cell infiltrates in the interstitial skin fluid. Potential biomarkers were first defined and later validated in separate study groups. In screening and validation, CD8(+) T-cell number and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand (CXCL) 9 protein concentration were significantly elevated in active lesional compared to nonlesional skin. CXCL9 protein concentration achieved greater sensitivity and specificity by receiver operating characteristic analysis. Suction blistering also allowed for phenotyping of the T-cell infiltrate, which overwhelmingly expresses C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 3. A small number of patients were enrolled for the study, and only a single patient was used to define the treatment response. Measuring CXCL9 directly in the skin might be effective in clinical trials as an early marker of treatment response. Additionally, use of the modified suction-blister technique supports investigation of inflammatory skin diseases using powerful tools like flow cytometry and protein quantification. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Status of oxidative stress on lesional skin surface of plantar warts.

    PubMed

    Arican, O; Ozturk, P; Kurutas, E B; Unsal, V

    2013-03-01

    Warts are abnormal skin growths caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) infections within the skin of the patients. Sometimes the disease is difficult to treatment, and also, the relationship between HPV and some forms of skin cancers is important. The cutaneous oxidative stress status of warts is absent in the literature. To evaluate the role of oxidative stress in affected skin areas in a group of patients with plantar warts. Thirty-six consecutive patients with a diagnosis of plantar warts were enrolled. The samples were obtained by scraping the skin surface. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured spectrophotometrically at samples. The SOD activity was significantly lower, and the MDA level was significantly higher on the lesional area than on the non-lesional area (P < 0.001 for each), and there was no significant difference in the CAT activity between both areas (P = 0.11). Cutaneous oxidative stress in patients with plantar warts may play a role in pathogenesis of the disease. The addition of topical drugs with antioxidative effects may be valuable in the treatment of warts. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. Novel Approaches for Diagnosing Melanoma Skin Lesions Through Supervised and Deep Learning Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Premaladha, J; Ravichandran, K S

    2016-04-01

    Dermoscopy is a technique used to capture the images of skin, and these images are useful to analyze the different types of skin diseases. Malignant melanoma is a kind of skin cancer whose severity even leads to death. Earlier detection of melanoma prevents death and the clinicians can treat the patients to increase the chances of survival. Only few machine learning algorithms are developed to detect the melanoma using its features. This paper proposes a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system which equips efficient algorithms to classify and predict the melanoma. Enhancement of the images are done using Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization technique (CLAHE) and median filter. A new segmentation algorithm called Normalized Otsu's Segmentation (NOS) is implemented to segment the affected skin lesion from the normal skin, which overcomes the problem of variable illumination. Fifteen features are derived and extracted from the segmented images are fed into the proposed classification techniques like Deep Learning based Neural Networks and Hybrid Adaboost-Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithms. The proposed system is tested and validated with nearly 992 images (malignant & benign lesions) and it provides a high classification accuracy of 93 %. The proposed CAD system can assist the dermatologists to confirm the decision of the diagnosis and to avoid excisional biopsies.

  13. Linear skin atrophy, scarring alopecia, anonychia, and tongue lesion: a "new" syndrome?

    PubMed

    Sequeiros, J; Sack, G H

    1985-08-01

    One of a pair of female monozygotic twins showed skin atrophy with linear alternation of depressed scarlike areas and intervening ridges of normal or nearly normal skin. She was born with friable skin and a vesicular-bullous eruption which was followed by gradual scabbing. Hypohidrosis in the affected areas, heat intolerance, and febrile convulsions were noted in infancy and childhood. No new skin lesions developed, and the existing ones, the sweating disturbance, and the heat intolerance gradually improved with time. Scarring alopecia, congenital absence of three toenails, and a scarlike lesion of the tongue were also present. Their absence in the other twin supports the view that 1) these manifestations all are part of the same syndrome, and 2) this syndrome is nongenetic. Histologically, there were no diagnostic or consistent findings, but the number of skin appendages was diminished, and the elastic fibers were reduced in number and size in one biopsy. The calculated probability for the twins being monozygotic was 0.9998. This family was also remarkable for the presence of alopecia areata in three successive generations with only one instance of apparent nonpenetrance. We conclude that this may represent a previously undescribed syndrome of congenital fragility of connective tissue which predisposed to damage of the elastica, possibly caused by an early inflammatory phase.

  14. [Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and premalignant skin lesions--how to treat?].

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Sari; Jeskanen, Leila; Ylitalo, Leea

    2014-01-01

    Increasing exposure to UV radiation is considered the most important etiologic factor of nonmelanoma skin cancers. Consequently, exposed areas such as the scalp and face, are the primary areas for developing non-melanoma skin cancers. Once a patient has presented with one tumor, additional lesions are common. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical picture and biopsy or excision for histopathological analysis. Various non-surgical treatment options have been established. Superficial basal cell carcinoma, superficial carcinoma in situ and all actinic keratoses are preferentially treated non-surgically. Most other basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas should be surgically removed.

  15. Development of terminal hair following skin lesion treatments with an intense pulsed light source.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Spiros P; Kontoes, Paraskevas P

    2002-01-01

    Laser and other light sources have been used to treat vascular and pigmented skin lesions and to remove tattoos and unwanted hair, with varying degrees of success and various side effects. It has not yet been reported that hair growth can occur as a side effect of such treatments. In this paper two cases are presented, one port wine stain and one tattoo, that were each treated several times with an intense pulsed light source (IPLS) for removal. Terminal hair, not present before treatment, partially developed in treated areas of both lesions. Local inflammatory reactions are believed to trigger such outcomes.

  16. Histopathology of Incontinence-Associated Skin Lesions: Inner Tissue Damage Due to Invasion of Proteolytic Enzymes and Bacteria in Macerated Rat Skin

    PubMed Central

    Mugita, Yuko; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Nakagami, Gojiro; Kishi, Chihiro; Ichikawa, Yoshie; Nagase, Takashi; Oe, Makoto; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Mori, Taketoshi; Abe, Masatoshi; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    A common complication in patients with incontinence is perineal skin lesions, which are recognized as a form of dermatitis. In these patients, perineal skin is exposed to digestive enzymes and intestinal bacterial flora, as well as excessive water. The relative contributions of digestive enzymes and intestinal bacterial flora to skin lesion formation have not been fully shown. This study was conducted to reveal the process of histopathological changes caused by proteases and bacterial inoculation in skin maceration. For skin maceration, agarose gel containing proteases was applied to the dorsal skin of male Sprague-Dawley rats for 4 h, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculation for 30 min. Macroscopic changes, histological changes, bacterial distribution, inflammatory response, and keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation were examined. Proteases induced digestion in the prickle cell layer of the epidermis, and slight bleeding in the papillary dermis and around hair follicles in the macerated skin without macroscopic evidence of erosion. Bacterial inoculation of the skin macerated by proteolytic solution resulted in the formation of bacteria-rich clusters comprising numerous microorganisms and inflammatory cells within the papillary dermis, with remarkable tissue damage around the clusters. Tissue damage expanded by day 2. On day 3, the proliferative keratinocyte layer was elongated from the bulge region of the hair follicles. Application of proteases and P. aeruginosa induced skin lesion formation internally without macroscopic erosion of the overhydrated area, suggesting that the histopathology might be different from regular dermatitis. The healing process of this lesion is similar to transepidermal elimination. PMID:26407180

  17. Arsenic methylation and skin lesions in migrant and native adult women with chronic exposure to arsenic from drinking groundwater.

    PubMed

    Wei, Binggan; Yu, Jiangping; Yang, Linsheng; Li, Hairong; Chai, Yuanqing; Xia, Yajuan; Wu, Kegong; Gao, Jianwei; Guo, Zhiwei; Cui, Na

    2017-02-01

    In order to figure out the prevalence of skin lesions and methylation capacity for migrant and native adult women in an endemic area for arsenic poisoning in Inner Mongolia, China, 207 adult women were selected for study subjects. The results showed that the prevalence of skin lesions for the external group, provincial group and native group was 36.54, 26.15 and 35.56 %, respectively. The nail content of arsenic and urinary concentrations of dimethylarsenic (DMA), monomethylarsenic (MMA) and inorganic arsenic (iAs) were significantly higher in women with skin lesions than in those without skin lesions. The highest urinary concentrations of DMA, MMA and iAs were 213.93, 45.72 and 45.01 μg/L in the native group. The arsenic methylation capacity index revealed that the external group had the greatest capacity, while the native group had the lowest. The odds ratios of skin lesions in relation to arsenic metabolites and arsenic methylation capacity varied widely among the three groups. Urinary MMA and iAs concentrations were positively associated with risk of skin lesions in the three groups of adult women, while primary and secondary methylation capacities were negatively related to risk of skin lesions in native and provincial groups. The external group might be more susceptible to MMA and iAs, while the provincial and native groups were more tolerance to MMA and iAs. Lower primary and secondary arsenic methylation capacities increased the risk of skin lesions in native and provincial groups. Moreover, higher nail arsenic concentration increased the risk of skin lesions of adult women.

  18. High-frequency (20–50 MHz) ultrasonography of pseudoxanthoma elasticum skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Guérin-Moreau, M.; Leftheriotis, G.; Le Corre, Y.; Etienne, M.; Amode, R.; Hamel, J.F.; Croué, A.; Le Saux, O.; Machet, L.; Martin, L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background In most patients pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) manifests with yellowish cutaneous papules and dermal elastorrhexis on skin biopsy. However, in a small number of cases there are no skin manifestations on clinical examination. To establish a diagnosis of PXE in such patients with limited manifestations such as angioid streaks and/or premature cardiovascular disease is challenging. It would therefore be valuable to predict the skin areas that would yield a biopsy specimen positive for elastorrhexis with a non-invasive procedure. High frequency ultrasonography (HFUS) should be evaluated in this respect. Objectives Prior to achieve the goal mentioned above we aimed at describing the characteristics of clinically visible PXE skin using HFUS, and to evaluate its relevance for diagnosis. Methods HFUS was performed in a cohort of PXE patients and controls at a referral centre. HFUS images of PXE skin were compared to those of other conditions. Five operators were tasked with the blind scoring of multiple HFUS images of photoprotected or photoexposed skin from patients with PXE and controls. The diagnostic relevance indices (sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, inter-observer agreement) were calculated. Results The HFUS changes considered as diagnostic for PXE were primarily oval homogeneous hypoechogenic areas in the middermis. The size of these areas closely matched the extent of the histological changes. The sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic items and inter-observer agreement were high, particularly in photoprotected skin. Dermal hypoechogenicity in PXE could be related to high hydration of connective tissue due to the presence of glycosaminoglycans despite elastic fibre mineralization. Conclusions HFUS provides suggestive images of PXE skin lesions. HFUS should be now studied to determine if it is a potentially valuable technique for the non-invasive identification of elastorrhexis in PXE patients in whom skin involvement is

  19. High-frequency (20-50 MHz) ultrasonography of pseudoxanthoma elasticum skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Guérin-Moreau, M; Leftheriotis, G; Le Corre, Y; Etienne, M; Amode, R; Hamel, J F; Croué, A; Le Saux, O; Machet, L; Martin, L

    2013-12-01

    In most patients pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) manifests with yellowish cutaneous papules and dermal elastorrhexis on skin biopsy. In a small number of cases there are no skin manifestations on clinical examination, and establishing a diagnosis of PXE in such patients is challenging. High-frequency ultrasonography (HFUS) may be of use in predicting skin areas that would yield a biopsy specimen positive for elastorrhexis. To describe characteristics of clinically visible PXE skin using HFUS, and to evaluate its relevance for diagnosis. HFUS was performed in a cohort of patients with PXE and in controls at a referral centre. HFUS images of PXE skin were compared with those of other conditions. Five operators blind-scored multiple HFUS images of photoprotected or photoexposed skin from patients with PXE and controls. The diagnostic indices (sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, interobserver agreement) were calculated. The HFUS changes considered as diagnostic for PXE were primarily oval homogeneous hypoechogenic areas in the mid-dermis. The size of these areas closely matched the extent of the histological changes. The sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic items and interobserver agreement were high, particularly in photoprotected skin. Dermal hypoechogenicity in PXE could be related to high hydration of connective tissue due to the presence of glycosaminoglycans despite elastic fibre mineralization. HFUS provides suggestive images of PXE skin lesions. HFUS should now be studied to determine whether it is a potentially valuable technique for the noninvasive identification of elastorrhexis in patients with PXE in whom skin involvement is clinically minimal or absent. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. Implementation and analysis of relief patterns of the surface of benign and malignant lesions of the skin by microtopography.

    PubMed

    del Carmen López Pacheco, María; da Cunha Martins-Costa, Manuel Filipe Pereira; Zapata, Aura Judith Pérez; Cherit, Judith Domínguez; Gallegos, Eva Ramón

    2005-12-07

    The objective of this study was to be able to distinguish between healthy skin tissue and malignant ones, furthermore determining a unique pattern of roughness for each skin lesion by microtopographic analysis of the skin surface of Mexican patients during the period from April to October 2002. The standard technique used in this study for the diagnosis of skin cancer and the comparison of the results was the haematoxylin-eosin histopathological technique. Latex impressions were taken from skin lesions as well as from the healthy skin of each patient to serve as control samples. These impressions were analysed by the MICROTOP.03.MFC microtopographic system inspection. It was observed that when the tumour becomes rougher, more malign will be the lesion. On average, the melanoma present an increase of roughness of 67% compared to healthy skin, obtaining a roughness relation of 1:2.54. The percentage decreases to 49% (49%, 1:60) in the case of basal cell carcinoma and to 40% in pre-malignant lesions such as melanocytic nevus (40%, 1:150). In benign lesions such as the seborrhoea keratosis only a small increase in roughness was noted (4%, 1:0.72). Microtopographic inspection of the skin surface can be considered as a complementary diagnostic technique for skin cancer.

  1. Implementation and analysis of relief patterns of the surface of benign and malignant lesions of the skin by microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Pacheco, María del Carmen; Filipe Pereira da Cunha Martins-Costa, Manuel; Pérez Zapata, Aura Judith; Domínguez Cherit, Judith; Ramón Gallegos, Eva

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this study was to be able to distinguish between healthy skin tissue and malignant ones, furthermore determining a unique pattern of roughness for each skin lesion by microtopographic analysis of the skin surface of Mexican patients during the period from April to October 2002. The standard technique used in this study for the diagnosis of skin cancer and the comparison of the results was the haematoxylin eosin histopathological technique. Latex impressions were taken from skin lesions as well as from the healthy skin of each patient to serve as control samples. These impressions were analysed by the MICROTOP.03.MFC microtopographic system inspection. It was observed that when the tumour becomes rougher, more malign will be the lesion. On average, the melanoma present an increase of roughness of 67% compared to healthy skin, obtaining a roughness relation of 1:2.54. The percentage decreases to 49% (49%, 1:60) in the case of basal cell carcinoma and to 40% in pre-malignant lesions such as melanocytic nevus (40%, 1:150). In benign lesions such as the seborrhoea keratosis only a small increase in roughness was noted (4%, 1:0.72). Microtopographic inspection of the skin surface can be considered as a complementary diagnostic technique for skin cancer.

  2. Herpes Zoster Lesions on Reconstructed Breast Skin: Rare Objective Proof of Reinervation.

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Laurenz; Valina, Stephan Wolfgang; Schoeller, Thomas; Ehebruster, Gudrun

    2017-01-01

    Blazed up Herpes zoster lesions have been described in very few patients after free and pedicled flap transfer for reconstructive purpose. Although sensory recovery after flap reconstructions has been studied extensively most studies addressed subjective perceptions of sensation. Objective investigations of spontaneous reinervation of free and pedicled flaps are rare. We would like to present a witnessed herpes zoster infection of a latissimus dorsi skin flap 2 years after breast reconstruction.

  3. Plasmodium berghei infection ameliorates atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Kishi, C; Amano, H; Suzue, K; Ishikawa, O

    2014-10-01

    Atopic diseases are more prevalent in industrialized countries than in developing countries. In addition, significant differences in the prevalence of allergic diseases are observed between rural and urban areas within the same country. This difference in prevalence has been attributed to what is called the 'hygiene hypothesis'. Although parasitic infections are known to protect against allergic reactions, the mechanism is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not malarial infections can inhibit atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions in a mouse model of AD. We used NC/Nga mice which are a model for AD. The NC/Nga mice were intraperitoneally infected with 1 × 10(5) Plasmoduim berghei (Pb) XAT-infected erythrocytes. Malarial infections ameliorated AD-like skin lesions in the NC/Nga mice. This improvement was blocked by the administration of anti-asialo GM1 antibodies, which are anti-natural killer (NK) cells. Additionally, adoptive transfer of NK cells markedly improved AD-like skin lesions in conventional NC/Nga mice; these suggest that the novel protective mechanism associated with malaria parasitic infections is at least, in part, dependent on NK cells. We have experimentally demonstrated for the first time that malarial infections ameliorated AD-like skin lesions in a mouse model of AD. Our study could explain in part the mechanism of the 'hygiene hypothesis', which states that parasitic infections can inhibit the development of allergic diseases. © 2014 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Noninvasive Real-Time Automated Skin Lesion Analysis System for Melanoma Early Detection and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Abuzaghleh, Omar; Barkana, Buket D.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma spreads through metastasis, and therefore, it has been proved to be very fatal. Statistical evidence has revealed that the majority of deaths resulting from skin cancer are as a result of melanoma. Further investigations have shown that the survival rates in patients depend on the stage of the cancer; early detection and intervention of melanoma implicate higher chances of cure. Clinical diagnosis and prognosis of melanoma are challenging, since the processes are prone to misdiagnosis and inaccuracies due to doctors’ subjectivity. Malignant melanomas are asymmetrical, have irregular borders, notched edges, and color variations, so analyzing the shape, color, and texture of the skin lesion is important for the early detection and prevention of melanoma. This paper proposes the two major components of a noninvasive real-time automated skin lesion analysis system for the early detection and prevention of melanoma. The first component is a real-time alert to help users prevent skinburn caused by sunlight; a novel equation to compute the time for skin to burn is thereby introduced. The second component is an automated image analysis module, which contains image acquisition, hair detection and exclusion, lesion segmentation, feature extraction, and classification. The proposed system uses PH2 Dermoscopy image database from Pedro Hispano Hospital for the development and testing purposes. The image database contains a total of 200 dermoscopy images of lesions, including benign, atypical, and melanoma cases. The experimental results show that the proposed system is efficient, achieving classification of the benign, atypical, and melanoma images with accuracy of 96.3%, 95.7%, and 97.5%, respectively. PMID:27170906

  5. Herpes Zoster Lesions on Reconstructed Breast Skin: Rare Objective Proof of Reinervation

    PubMed Central

    Valina, Stephan Wolfgang; Schoeller, Thomas; Ehebruster, Gudrun

    2017-01-01

    Blazed up Herpes zoster lesions have been described in very few patients after free and pedicled flap transfer for reconstructive purpose. Although sensory recovery after flap reconstructions has been studied extensively most studies addressed subjective perceptions of sensation. Objective investigations of spontaneous reinervation of free and pedicled flaps are rare. We would like to present a witnessed herpes zoster infection of a latissimus dorsi skin flap 2 years after breast reconstruction. PMID:28194351

  6. Noninvasive monitoring of photodynamic therapy on skin neoplastic lesions using the optical attenuation coefficient measured by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, Viviane P.; dos Santos, Moisés O.; Latrive, Anne; Freitas, Anderson Z.; Correa, Luciana; Zezell, Denise M.

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become a promising alternative for treatment of skin lesions such as squamous cell carcinoma. We propose a method to monitor the effects of PDT in a noninvasive way by using the optical attenuation coefficient (OAC) calculated from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. We conducted a study on mice with chemically induced neoplastic lesions and performed PDT on these lesions using homemade photosensitizers. The response of neoplastic lesions to therapy was monitored using, at the same time, macroscopic clinical visualization, histopathological analysis, OCT imaging, and OCT-based attenuation coefficient measurement. Results with all four modalities demonstrated a positive response to treatment. The attenuation coefficient was found to be 1.4 higher in skin lesions than in healthy tissue and it decreased after therapy. This study shows that the OAC is a potential tool to noninvasively assess the evolution of skin neoplastic lesions with time after treatment.

  7. Effects of maxacalcitol ointment on skin lesions in patients with psoriasis receiving treatment with adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Karakawa, Masaru; Komine, Mayumi; Kishimoto, Megumi; Maki, Nobuki; Matsumoto, Ai; Sugai, Junichi; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro

    2016-11-01

    Adalimumab is a biologic that is very effective for treatment of psoriasis. However, recalcitrant or recurrent lesions sometimes occur during treatment. Maxacalcitol is an active vitamin D3 ointment that is effective in treatment of psoriasis. Topical therapy may be beneficial in treatment of recalcitrant or recurrent lesions during treatment with systemic therapy, but there is little evidence on this topic. We investigated the effect of maxacalcitol on skin lesions during treatment with adalimumab in patients with psoriasis. Twelve patients with psoriasis were randomly assigned to two groups after informed consent - treatment with adalimumab only (n = 6), and treatment with adalimumab and maxacalcitol (n = 6) - and they were evaluated every 4 weeks for 44 weeks. Exacerbation was defined as an increase of the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score. The interval between adalimumab treatments was elongated to 3-4 weeks from 2 weeks according to the individual patient's condition. The PASI score was evaluated every 4 weeks, and the frequency of exacerbations was counted. The overall improvement in PASI score was not statistically different between the two groups, but the frequency of exacerbations was significantly less in the maxacalcitol combination group compared with the adalimumab monotherapy group (Mann-Whitney U-test, P < 0.05). The better control of skin lesions in patients who elongated the interval of adalimumab administration was achieved in the maxacalcitol combination group compared with the adalimumab monotherapy group. Topical maxacalcitol treatment is effective and useful in controlling skin lesions in patients with psoriasis when used in combination with adalimumab. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Nigerian Female with Skin Lesions in the Leg and Face: Herpetic Sycosis Folliculitis

    PubMed Central

    Dilorenzo, Dominique; Gilford, Patricia; Deschere, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Nongenital HSV 1 presents outside the mucus membrane. Our patient had unusual presentation that caused diagnostic dilemma. 30-year-old native Nigerian female coming with fiancée to the United States presented to our service one day after arrival through ER with a lesion on her right ankle. She was diagnosed with cellulitis, started on antibiotics, and admitted to hospital. She had fever of 39.1°C. Head and neck exam showed multiple sized lesions over tongue and palate and inner aspect of lower lip. Abdomen and genital exam was normal. Skin exam showed lesions over the face and lesions over the lateral aspect of the right leg. There was ulcerated lesion over the right lateral malleolus with surrounding erythema and edema. Her tests showed elevated ESR of 98; HIV test was negative; CT scan of the ankle showed no abscess or osteomyelitis. TB quantiferon was indeterminate; AFB stain and culture were negative; HSV IgM was elevated at 1 : 16; RPR was negative; ANA was negative; malaria screen was negative, and blood cultures were negative for bacteria, fungus, and virus. Debrided wound had no growth of bacteria or fungus or virus. This case illustrates the unusual presentation of the HSV1 outside the mucus membrane and how it can be confused with other conditions that required extensive tests. Therapeutic trail with antiviral medications resolved lesions over the leg and face. PMID:28018688

  9. Nigerian Female with Skin Lesions in the Leg and Face: Herpetic Sycosis Folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Dilorenzo, Dominique; Channaveeraiah, Naganna; Gilford, Patricia; Deschere, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Nongenital HSV 1 presents outside the mucus membrane. Our patient had unusual presentation that caused diagnostic dilemma. 30-year-old native Nigerian female coming with fiancée to the United States presented to our service one day after arrival through ER with a lesion on her right ankle. She was diagnosed with cellulitis, started on antibiotics, and admitted to hospital. She had fever of 39.1°C. Head and neck exam showed multiple sized lesions over tongue and palate and inner aspect of lower lip. Abdomen and genital exam was normal. Skin exam showed lesions over the face and lesions over the lateral aspect of the right leg. There was ulcerated lesion over the right lateral malleolus with surrounding erythema and edema. Her tests showed elevated ESR of 98; HIV test was negative; CT scan of the ankle showed no abscess or osteomyelitis. TB quantiferon was indeterminate; AFB stain and culture were negative; HSV IgM was elevated at 1 : 16; RPR was negative; ANA was negative; malaria screen was negative, and blood cultures were negative for bacteria, fungus, and virus. Debrided wound had no growth of bacteria or fungus or virus. This case illustrates the unusual presentation of the HSV1 outside the mucus membrane and how it can be confused with other conditions that required extensive tests. Therapeutic trail with antiviral medications resolved lesions over the leg and face.

  10. Investigation of relations between skin cancer lesions' images and their fluorescent spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, P.; Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.; Petkova, El.; Troyanova, P.

    2010-03-01

    This investigation is based on images obtained from healthy tissue and skin cancer lesions and their fluorescent spectra of cutaneous lesions derived after optical stimulation. Our analyses show that the lesions’ spectra of are different of those, obtained from normal tissue and the differences depend on the type of cancer. We use a comparison between these “healthy” and “unhealthy” spectra to define forms of variations and corresponding diseases. However, the value of the emitted light varies not only between the patients, but also depending on the position of the tested area inside of one lesion. These variations could be result from two reasons: different degree of damaging and different thickness of the suspicious lesion area. Regarded to the visible image of the lesion, it could be connected with the chroma of colour of the tested area and the lesion homogeneity that corresponds to particular disease. For our investigation, images and spectra of three non-melanoma cutanous malignant tumors are investigated, namely—basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and keratoacanthoma. The images were processed obtaining the chroma by elimination of the background—healthy tissue, and applying it as a basic signal for transformation from RGB to Lab colorimetric model. The chroma of the areas of emission is compared with the relative value of fluorescence spectra. Specific spectral features are used to develop hybrid diagnostic algorithm (including image and spectral features) for differentiation of these three kinds of malignant cutaneous pathologies.

  11. Digital mucous cyst: surgical closure technique based on self-grafting using skin overlying the lesion.

    PubMed

    Di Chiacchio, Nilton G; Fonseca Noriega, Leandro; Ocampo-Garza, Jorge; Di Chiacchio, Nilton

    2017-04-01

    Digital mucous cysts or myxoid cysts are relatively common, benign pseudocysts of the digits typically located at the distal interphalangeal joints or in the proximal nail fold. There are several therapeutic modalities for its treatment ranging from conservative to surgical procedures; however, there is no consensus about the best approach. We describe a surgical technique based on the excision of the digital mucous cyst and reconstruction using a self-grafting from the overlying skin lesion. The use of the cyst's overlying skin as a partial cutaneous graft followed by a long-term Brown's dressing, in this case, provided a satisfactory functional and esthetic result. This technique is a new option for the reconstruction of digital mucous cyst defects that decreases the surgical time and avoids a graft removal of healthy skin and consequently a new scar. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. SPECTRUM OF NON-INFECTIOUS ERYTHEMATOUS, PAPULAR AND SQUAMOUS LESIONS OF THE SKIN

    PubMed Central

    D’ Costa, Grace; Bharambe, Bhavana M

    2010-01-01

    Background: Dermatopathologists base their diagnostic approach on the tissue reaction pattern. This study mainly includes the interpretation of two major tissue reaction patterns, the psoriasiform and the lichenoid reactions, with clinicopathological correlation. Aims: To analyze the spectrum of non-infectious erythematous papular and squamous lesions of the skin at our institute, study the age, sex and anatomic distribution pattern and classify the lesions into major categories; determine the incidence of each subcategory. Materials and Methods: Study period: two years; prospective, sample size: 161 cases, proforma filled. Results: The lesions comprised 15.80% of the total load of surgical pathology and 30.99% of total number of skin biopsies. The highest percentage was in the 30-40 year age group (28.6%) with a male preponderance of 60.25%. The extremities were most frequently involved (67.79%). Lichenoid lesions were the commonest (46.57%) with lichen planus 26.7% and psoriasis vulgaris-19.88% being the most frequent. There were 5.6% seropositive cases. Correlation with the histopathological diagnosis was positive in 97.52% cases and negative in 2.48% cases. Conclusion: The contribution of histopathology to the final diagnosis was significant. It confirmed the diagnosis in 92.55% and gave the diagnosis in 4.97% cases. PMID:21063511

  13. Skin lesion classification using oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MehrübeoğLu, Mehrübe; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Marquez, Guillermo; Duvic, Madeleine; Wang, Lihong V.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the use of a noninvasive in vivo optical technique, diffuse reflectance spectroscopic imaging with oblique incidence, to distinguish between benign and cancer-prone skin lesions. Various image features were examined to classify the images from lesions into benign and cancerous categories. Two groups of lesions were processed separately: Group 1 includes keratoses, warts versus carcinomas; and group 2 includes common nevi versus dysplastic nevi. A region search algorithm was developed to extract both one- and two-dimensional spectral information. A bootstrap-based Bayes classifier was used for classification. A computer-assisted tool was then devised to act as an electronic second opinion to the dermatologist. Our approach generated only one false-positive misclassification out of 23 cases collected for group 1 and two misclassifications out of 34 cases collected for group 2 under the worst estimation condition.

  14. Skin lesion classification using oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Mehrübeoğlu, Mehrübe; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Marquez, Guillermo; Duvic, Madeleine; Wang, Lihong V

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the use of a noninvasive in vivo optical technique, diffuse reflectance spectroscopic imaging with oblique incidence, to distinguish between benign and cancer-prone skin lesions. Various image features were examined to classify the images from lesions into benign and cancerous categories. Two groups of lesions were processed separately: Group 1 includes keratoses, warts versus carcinomas; and group 2 includes common nevi versus dysplastic nevi. A region search algorithm was developed to extract both one- and two-dimensional spectral information. A bootstrap-based Bayes classifier was used for classification. A computer-assisted tool was then devised to act as an electronic second opinion to the dermatologist. Our approach generated only one false-positive misclassification out of 23 cases collected for group 1 and two misclassifications out of 34 cases collected for group 2 under the worst estimation condition.

  15. Pre-diagnostic digital imaging prediction model to discriminate between malignant melanoma and benign pigmented skin lesion.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jeppe H; Soerensen, Mads B T; Linghui, Zhong; Chen, Sun; Jensen, Morten O

    2010-02-01

    Malignant cutaneous melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer with an increasing incidence over the past decades. The final diagnosis provided is typically based on a biopsy of the skin lesion under consideration. To assist the naked-eye examination and decision on whether or not a biopsy is necessary, digital image processing techniques provide promising results. The hypothesis of this study was that a computer-aided assessment tool could assist the evaluation of a pigmented skin lesion. Hence, the overall aim was to discriminate between malignant and benign pigmented skin lesions using digital image processing. Discriminating algorithms utilizing novel well-established morphological operations and methods were constructed. The algorithms were implemented utilizing graphical programming (LabVIEW Vision). Verification was performed with reference to an image database consisting of 97 pigmented skin lesion pictures of various resolutions and light distributions. The outcome of the algorithms was analysed statistically with MATLAB and a prediction model was constructed. The prediction model evaluates pigmented skin lesions with regards to the overall shape, border and colour distribution with a total of nine different discriminating parameters. The prediction model outputs an index score, and by using the optimal threshold value, a diagnostic accuracy of 77% in discriminating between malignant and benign skin lesions was obtained. This is an improvement compared with the naked-eye analysis performed by professionals, rendering the system a significant assistance in detecting malignant cutaneous melanoma.

  16. Molluscum Contagiosum Virus Transcriptome in Abortively Infected Cultured Cells and a Human Skin Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Mendez-Rios, Jorge D.; Yang, Zhilong; Erlandson, Karl J.; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Martens, Craig A.; Bruno, Daniel P.; Porcella, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molluscum contagiosum virus (MOCV), the only circulating human-specific poxvirus, has a worldwide distribution and causes benign skin lesions that may persist for months in young children and severe infections in immunosuppressed adults. Studies of MOCV are restricted by the lack of an efficient animal model or a cell culture replication system. We used next-generation sequencing to analyze and compare polyadenylated RNAs from abortive MOCV infections of several cell lines and a human skin lesion. Viral RNAs were detected for 14 days after MOCV infection of cultured cells; however, there was little change in the RNA species during this time and a similar pattern occurred in the presence of an inhibitor of protein synthesis, indicating a block preventing postreplicative gene expression. Moreover, a considerable number of MOCV RNAs mapped to homologs of orthopoxvirus early genes, but few did so to homologs of intermediate or late genes. The RNAs made during in vitro infections represent a subset of RNAs detected in human skin lesions which mapped to homologs of numerous postreplicative as well as early orthopoxvirus genes. Transfection experiments using fluorescent protein and luciferase reporters demonstrated that vaccinia virus recognized MOCV intermediate and late promoters, indicating similar gene regulation. The specific recognition of the intermediate promoter in MOCV-infected cells provided evidence for the synthesis of intermediate transcription factors, which are products of early genes, but not for late transcription factors. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) and reporter gene assays may be useful for testing engineered cell lines and conditions that ultimately could provide an in vitro replication system. IMPORTANCE The inability to propagate molluscum contagiosum virus, which causes benign skin lesions in young children and more extensive infections in immunosuppressed adults, has constrained our understanding of the biology of this human

  17. [The care of skin lesions caused by extravasation of intravenous fluids in peripheral venous perfusion].

    PubMed

    Ly, C

    2017-09-01

    Infiltration and extravasation account for 23-78 % of the complications stemming from peripheral venous perfusions in neonatal intensive care units. Their consequences, sometimes dramatic, can be pain, infections, or even loss of skin, which can lead to nerve and/or muscle damage, particularly severe for preterm neonates. Today there are no recommendations on the care of these lesions, which can lead to an erroneous choice or to a delay in the possible treatments. This review of the literature aims to explore and propose elements of therapeutic care collected in the scientific literature. It focuses on skin lesions due to extravasation of peripheral venous perfusions in neonatal intensive care units. The PubMed database and the publishers' platform ScienceDirect were used. The bibliographies of the selected articles were also run. All types of studies examining one or several treatments for the care of postextravasation skin lesions in neonatal intensive care units were included in the search, without any limit on the date, except for case reports. To estimate the quality of the studies, the tool proposed by the French National Authority for Health, which classifies the various types of studies according to their proof level, was used. Thirteen publications were analyzed, including four case series, five retrospective studies, and four interventional studies. The vast majority of these studies have been published since 2005. No comparative, controlled, and randomized trials appear in the literature. Chronologically, we observed a growing interest in the premature infant population, in parallel with the increasing number of publications. Among the significant number of treatments proposed, five main categories were identified: topical treatment, surgery, the Gault method, no specific treatment, and others. All the skin lesions of the babies studied healed, without important aftereffects. These publications also show that most of the time a combination of different

  18. Effect of rubber flooring on group-housed sows' gait and claw and skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Bos, E-J; van Riet, M M J; Maes, D; Millet, S; Ampe, B; Janssens, G P J; Tuyttens, F A M

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the influence of floor type on sow welfare in terms of lameness, claw lesions, and skin lesions. In a 2 × 3 factorial design, we have investigated the effect of rubber coverings on concrete floors and the effect of 3 levels of dietary zinc supplementation on locomotion and claw and skin lesions in group-housed sows. Six groups of 21 ± 4 hybrid sows were monitored during 3 successive reproductive cycles. The sows were group housed from d 28 after insemination (d 0) until 1 wk before expected farrowing date (d 108) in pens with either exposed concrete floors or concrete floors covered with rubber in part of the lying area and the fully slatted area. During each reproductive cycle, locomotion and skin lesions were assessed 4 times (d 28, 50, 108, and 140) and claw lesions were assessed twice (d 50 and 140). Results are given as least squares means ± SE. Locomotion and claw scores were given in millimeters, on analog scales of 150 and 160 mm, respectively. Here, we report on the effect of floor type, which did not interact with dietary zinc concentration ( > 0.10 for all variables). At move to group (d 28) and mid gestation (d 50), no differences between floor treatments were seen in locomotion ( > 0.10). At the end of gestation (d 108), sows housed on rubber flooring scored 9.9 ± 4.1 mm better on gait ( < 0.001). Regarding claw disorders, both parameters "heel overgrowth and erosion" (difference of 4.6 ± 1.8 mm; = 0.01) and "heel-sole crack" (difference of 3.1 ± 1.5 mm; = 0.04) scores were better for sows on rubber flooring at mid gestation (d 50). However, sows on rubber flooring scored worse for "vertical cracks in the wall horn" (difference of 3.4 ± 1.7 mm; = 0.04). At the end of lactation (d 140), both "white line" (difference of 2.9 ± 1 mm; = 0.02) and "claw length" (difference of 4.7 ± 1.4 mm; < 0.001) had better scores on rubber flooring. No differences for skin lesions were observed between floor treatments. The improved scores

  19. Prevalence of Oral, Skin, and Oral and Skin Lesions of Lichen Planus in Patients Visiting a Dental School in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Omal, PM; Jacob, Vimal; Prathap, Akhilesh; Thomas, Nebu George

    2012-01-01

    Background: Lichen planus (LP) is a mucocutaneous disease that is relatively common among adult population. LP can present as skin and oral lesions. This study highlights the prevalence of oral, skin, and oral and skin lesions of LP. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral, skin, and oral and skin lesions of LP from a population of patients attending the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiodiagnosis, Pushpagiri College of Dental Sciences, Tiruvalla, Kerala, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of oral, skin, and oral and skin lesions of LP. This is a ongoing prospective study with results of 2 years being reported. LP was diagnosed on the basis of clinical presentation and histopathological analysis of mucosal and skin biopsy done for all patients suspected of having LP. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS (Statistical package for social sciences) software version 14. To test the statistical significance, chi-square test was used. Results: Out of 18,306 patients screened, 8,040 were males and 10,266 females. LP was seen in 118 cases (0.64%). Increased prevalence of LP was observed in middle age adults (40–60 years age group) with lowest age of 12 years and highest age of 65 years. No statistically significant differences were observed between the genders in skin LP group (P=0.12) and in oral and skin LP groups (P=0.06); however, a strong female predilection was seen in oral LP group (P=0.000036). The prevalence of cutaneous LP in oral LP patients was 0.06%. Conclusion: This study showed an increased prevalence of oral LP than skin LP, and oral and skin LP with a female predominance. PMID:22615505

  20. Evaluation of selenium in biological sample of arsenic exposed female skin lesions and skin cancer patients with related to non-exposed skin cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kolachi, Nida F; Kazi, Tasneem G; Wadhwa, Sham K; Afridi, Hassan I; Baig, Jameel A; Khan, Sumaira; Shah, Faheem

    2011-08-01

    The antagonistic effects between selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) suggest that low Se status plays an important role in arsenism development. The objective of present study was to assess Se contents in biological samples of As exposed females have skin lesions and cancer with related to non-exposed skin cancer patients. The biological samples (blood and scalp hair) of As exposed group comprises, female skin cancer (ESC) patients admitted in cancer hospitals have skin lesions (ESL) and exposed referents have not both diseases (ER), belongs to As exposed area of Pakistan. For comparative purposes, age matched female skin cancerous patient (RP) and non-cancerous females (NER) belong to non-exposed areas were also selected. The As and Se in acid digests of biological samples were pre-concentrated by complexing with chelating agent (ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate), and resulted complexes were extracted into non-ionic extractant (Triton X-114), prior to analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The enhancement factor of about 25 was obtained by pre-concentrating 10 mL of sample solutions. The accuracy of the optimized procedure was evaluated by using certified reference material (BCR 397) with certified values for Se and As and standard addition method at three concentration levels in real samples. No significant differences was observed (p>0.05) when comparing the values obtained by the proposed method, added and certified values of both elements. The biological samples of ESC patients had 2-3 folds higher As and lower Se levels as compared to RP (p<0.001). Understudied exposed referents have high level of As and lower Se contents as compared to referents subjects of non-exposed area (p<0.01). The higher concentration of As and lower levels of Se in biological samples of cancerous patients are consisted with reported studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of a 308-nm excimer laser on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang Taek; Kwon, Tae-Rin; Seok, Joon; Choi, Eun Ja; Kim, Soon Re; Jang, Yu-Jin; Mun, Seog Kyun; Kim, Chan Woong; Lee, Sungeun; Lee, Jongmin; Kim, Myeung Nam; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Beom Joon

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease that can affect all age groups. It has a relapsing course, which dramatically affects the quality of life of patients. A 308-nm excimer laser has been reported to be a safe and effective treatment for inflammatory skin diseases, although the range of potential application has not been fully explored. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of a 308-nm laser on AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. Dermatophagoides farinae-exposed NC/Nga mice with a clinical score of 12 were treated with either a 308-nm excimer laser or narrowband-UVB (NB-UVB). The effects of the 308-nm excimer laser were evaluated by dermatitis scores, skin histology, skin barrier function, and immunological parameters, including IgE and Th2-mediated cytokines. The 308-nm excimer laser significantly reduced the severity of skin lesions and decreased the total serum levels of IgE and Th2-mediated cytokines. The excimer laser also significantly reduced the inflammatory cellular infiltrate into AD-induced skin lesions. Moreover, treatment with the 308-nm excimer laser led to recovery of skin barrier function in AD-induced skin lesions. The 308-nm excimer laser can be considered a valid and safe therapeutic option for the treatment of localized AD. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:629-637, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nutritional factors and susceptibility to arsenic-caused skin lesions in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Soma R; Mazumder, D N Guha; Basu, Arindam; Block, Gladys; Haque, Reina; Samanta, Sambit; Ghosh, Nilima; Smith, Meera M Hira; von Ehrenstein, Ondine S; Smith, Allan H

    2004-07-01

    There has been widespread speculation about whether nutritional deficiencies increase the susceptibility to arsenic health effects. This is the first study to investigate whether dietary micronutrient and macronutrient intake modulates the well-established human risk of arsenic-induced skin lesions, including alterations in skin pigmentation and keratoses. The study was conducted in West Bengal, India, which along with Bangladesh constitutes the largest population in the world exposed to arsenic from drinking water. In this case-control study design, cases were patients with arsenic-induced skin lesions and had < 500 microg/L arsenic in their drinking water. For each case, an age- and sex-matched control was selected from participants of a 1995-1996 cross-sectional survey, whose drinking water at that time also contained < 500 microg/L arsenic. Nutritional assessment was based on a 24-hr recall for major dietary constituents and a 1-week recall for less common constituents. Modest increases in risk were related to being in the lowest quintiles of intake of animal protein [odds ratio (OR) = 1.94; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-3.59], calcium (OR = 1.89; 95% CI, 1.04-3.43), fiber (OR = 2.20; 95% CI, 1.15-4.21), and folate (OR = 1.67; 95% CI, 0.87-3.2). Conditional logistic regression suggested that the strongest associations were with low calcium, low animal protein, low folate, and low fiber intake. Nutrient intake was not related to arsenic exposure. We conclude that low intake of calcium, animal protein, folate, and fiber may increase susceptibility to arsenic-caused skin lesions. However, in light of the small magnitude of increased risks related to these dietary deficiencies, prevention should focus on reducing exposure to arsenic.

  3. Pigmented skin lesion detection using random forest and wavelet-based texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ping; Yang, Tie-jun

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma, a disease of worldwide distribution and is the deadliest form of skin cancer, has been rapidly increasing over the last few decades. Because advanced cutaneous melanoma is still incurable, early detection is an important step toward a reduction in mortality. Dermoscopy photographs are commonly used in melanoma diagnosis and can capture detailed features of a lesion. A great variability exists in the visual appearance of pigmented skin lesions. Therefore, in order to minimize the diagnostic errors that result from the difficulty and subjectivity of visual interpretation, an automatic detection approach is required. The objectives of this paper were to propose a hybrid method using random forest and Gabor wavelet transformation to accurately differentiate which part belong to lesion area and the other is not in a dermoscopy photographs and analyze segmentation accuracy. A random forest classifier consisting of a set of decision trees was used for classification. Gabor wavelets transformation are the mathematical model of visual cortical cells of mammalian brain and an image can be decomposed into multiple scales and multiple orientations by using it. The Gabor function has been recognized as a very useful tool in texture analysis, due to its optimal localization properties in both spatial and frequency domain. Texture features based on Gabor wavelets transformation are found by the Gabor filtered image. Experiment results indicate the following: (1) the proposed algorithm based on random forest outperformed the-state-of-the-art in pigmented skin lesions detection (2) and the inclusion of Gabor wavelet transformation based texture features improved segmentation accuracy significantly.

  4. A heat transfer model of skin tissue for the detection of lesions: sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Cetingül, M Pirtini; Herman, C

    2010-10-07

    In this paper, we study the transient thermal response of skin layers to determine to which extent the surface temperature distribution reflects the properties of subsurface structures, such as benign or malignant lesions. Specifically, we conduct a detailed sensitivity analysis to interpret the changes in the surface temperature distribution as a function of variations in thermophysical properties, blood perfusion rate, metabolic heat generation and thicknesses of skin layers, using a multilayer computational model. These properties can vary from individual to individual or depend on location, external and internal influences, and in certain situations accurate property data are not available in the literature. Therefore, the uncertainties in these data could potentially affect the accuracy of the interpretation/diagnosis of a lesion in a clinical setting. In this study, relevant parameters were varied within characteristic physiological ranges, and differences in the surface temperature response were quantified. It was observed that variations in these parameters have a small influence on the surface temperature distribution. Analysis using this multilayer model was further conducted to determine the sensitivity of transient thermal response to different lesion sizes. This work validates the idea of examining the transient thermal response obtained using a thermal imaging system with the objective of lesion identification. The modeling effort and the sensitivity analysis reported in this paper comprise a portion of a comprehensive research effort involving experimentation on a skin phantom model as well as measurements on patients in a clinical setting, that are currently underway. One of the preliminary results from the ongoing clinical trial is also included to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  5. Well Water Arsenic Exposure, Arsenic Induced Skin-Lesions and Self-Reported Morbidity in Inner Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yajuan; Wade, Timothy J.; Wu, Kegong; Li, Yanhong; Ning, Zhixiong; Le, X Chris; He, Xingzhou; Chen, Binfei; Feng, Yong; Mumford, Judy L.

    2009-01-01

    Residents of the Bayingnormen region of Inner Mongolia have been exposed to arsenic-contaminated well water for over 20 years, but relatively few studies have investigated health effects in this region. We surveyed one village to document exposure to arsenic and assess the prevalence of arsenic-associated skin lesions and self-reported morbidity. Five-percent (632) of the 12,334 residents surveyed had skin lesions characteristics of arsenic exposure. Skin lesions were strongly associated with well water arsenic and there was an elevated prevalence among residents with water arsenic exposures as low as 5 μg/L-10 μg/L. The presence of skin lesions was also associated with self-reported cardiovascular disease. PMID:19440430

  6. Time course pathogenesis of sulphur mustard-induced skin lesions in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lomash, Vinay; Jadhav, Sunil E; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan; Pant, Satish C

    2013-08-01

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes cutaneous blistering in humans and animals. In this study, we have presented closer views on pathogenesis of SM-induced skin injury in a mouse model. SM diluted in acetone was applied once dermally at a dose of 5 or 10 mg/kg to Swiss albino mice. Skin was dissected out at 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours, post-SM exposure for studying histopathological changes and immunohistochemistry of inflammatory-reparative biomarkers, namely, transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and interlukin 6 (IL-6). Histopathological changes were similar to other mammalian species and basal cell damage resembled the histopathological signs observed with vesication in human skin. Inflammatory cell recruitment at the site of injury was supported by differential expressions of IL-6 at various stages. Time-dependent expressions of eNOS played pivotal roles in all the events of wound healing of SM-induced skin lesions. TGF-α and FGF were strongly associated with keratinocyte migration, re-epithelialisation, angiogenesis, fibroblast proliferation and cell differentiation. Furthermore, quantification of the tissue leukocytosis and DNA damage along with semiquantitative estimation of re-epithelialisation, fibroplasia and neovascularisation on histomorphologic scale could be efficiently used for screening the efficacy of orphan drugs against SM-induced skin injury. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  7. The "Umbrella Sign": A Useful Clue in the Diagnosis of Melanocytic Lesions in Sun Damaged Skin.

    PubMed

    Wood, Benjamin A; Harvey, Nathan T

    2016-07-01

    As ultraviolet radiation is an important aetiological agent in melanoma development, the presence of solar elastosis is an important factor in the assessment of any melanocytic lesion. However, melanocytic naevi are also seen in chronically sun damaged skin, particularly in regions with high levels of ultraviolet exposure and fair skinned populations. It has previously been noted that the relationship of a melanocytic proliferation to elastic fibers in the dermis can be of discriminatory value in the separation of melanoma from melanocytic naevus, in particular, it has been proposed that naevi act as a "sunscreen," which may result in a histological clue that the authors colloquially refer to in practice as "the umbrella sign." The aim of this study was to evaluate the patterns of solar elastosis within and beneath melanocytic proliferations developing in sun damaged skin and to determine the utility of the "umbrella sign" in diagnostic practice. We assessed 81 melanocytic proliferations in sun damaged skin for the presence of an umbrella sign, that was present in 49/53 melanocytic naevi (92%) compared with only 2/28 melanomas (7%, P < 0.05). In addition, entrapped elastotic fibers displaying distinct purple discolouration were identified in 16 melanocytic naevi. This finding was not identified in any of the melanomas. The umbrella sign appears to be a useful clue in the distinction of melanoma from melanocytic naevus in sun damaged skin, although as with all histological features in melanocytic pathology, it requires interpretation within a multifactorial assessment cognizant of potential diagnostic pitfalls.

  8. Prehistological evaluation of benign and malignant pigmented skin lesions with optical computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokolakis, Athanasios; Zacharakis, Giannis; Krasagakis, Konstantin; Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Favicchio, Rosy; Spiliopoulos, George; Giannikaki, Elpida; Ripoll, Jorge; Tosca, Androniki

    2012-06-01

    Discrimination of benign and malignant melanocytic lesions is a major issue in clinical dermatology. Assessment of the thickness of melanoma is critical for prognosis and treatment selection. We aimed to evaluate a novel optical computed tomography (optical-CT) system as a tool for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of melanocytic lesions and its ability to discriminate benign from malignant melanocytic lesions while simultaneously determining the thickness of invasive melanoma. Seventeen melanocytic lesions, one hemangioma, and normal skin were assessed immediately after their excision by optical-CT and subsequently underwent histopathological examination. Tomographic reconstructions were performed with a back-propagation algorithm calculating a 3-D map of the total attenuation coefficient (AC). There was a statistically significant difference between melanomas, dysplastic nevi, and non-dysplastic nevi, as indicated by Kruskal-Wallis test. Median AC values were higher for melanomas compared with dysplastic and non-dysplastic nevi. No statistically significant difference was observed when thickness values obtained by optical-CT were compared with histological thickness using a Wilcoxon sighed rank test. Our results suggest that optical-CT can be important for the immediate prehistological evaluation of biopsies, assisting the physician for a rapid assessment of malignancy and of the thickness of a melanocytic lesion.

  9. Development of a three-dimensional surface imaging system for melanocytic skin lesion evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosca, Androniki; Kokolakis, Athanasios; Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Zabulis, Xenophon; Marnelakis, Ioannis; Ripoll, Jorge; Stephanidis, Constantine

    2013-01-01

    Even though surface morphology is always taken into account when assessing clinically pigmented skin lesions, it is not captured by most modern imaging systems using digital imaging. Our aim is to develop a novel three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique to record detailed information of the surface anatomy of melanocytic lesions that will enable improved classification through digital imaging. The apparatus consists of three high-resolution cameras, a light source, and accompanying software. Volume measurements of specific phantoms using volumetric tubes render slightly lower values than those obtained by our 3D imaging system (mean%±SD, 3.8%±0.98, P<0.05). To examine the reproducibility of the method, sequential imaging of melanocytic lesions is carried out. The mean%±SD differences of area, major axis length, volume, and maximum height are 2.1%±1.1, 0.9%±0.8, 3.8%±2.9, and 2.5%±3.5, respectively. Thirty melanocytic lesions are assessed, including common and dysplastic nevi and melanomas. There is a significant difference between nevi and melanomas in terms of variance in height and boundary asymmetry (P<0.001). Moreover, dysplastic nevi have significantly higher variances in pigment density values than common nevi (P<0.001). Preliminary data suggest that our instrument has great potential in the evaluation of the melanocytic lesions. However, these findings should be confirmed in larger-scale studies.

  10. Clinical studies of pigmented lesions in human skin by using a multiphoton tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Mihaela; Kelly, Kristen M.; Zachary, Christopher B.; Harris, Ronald M.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; König, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-02-01

    In vivo imaging of pigmented lesions in human skin was performed with a clinical multiphoton microscopy (MPM)-based tomograph (MPTflex, JenLab, Germany). Two-photon excited fluorescence was used for visualizing endogenous fluorophores such as NADH/FAD, keratin, melanin in the epidermal cells and elastin fibers in the dermis. Collagen fibers were imaged by second harmonic generation. Our study involved in vivo imaging of benign melanocytic nevi, atypical nevi and melanoma. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify in vivo the characteristic features and their frequency in pigmented lesions at different stages (benign, atypical and malignant) and to evaluate the ability of in vivo MPM to distinguish atypical nevi from melanoma. Comparison with histopathology was performed for the biopsied lesions. Benign melanocytic nevi were characterized by the presence of nevus cell nests at the epidermal-dermal junction. In atypical nevi, features such as lentiginous hyperplasia, acanthosis and architectural disorder were imaged. Cytological atypia was present in all the melanoma lesions imaged, showing the strongest correlation with malignancy. The MPM images demonstrated very good correlation with corresponding histological images, suggesting that MPM could be a promising tool for in vivo non-invasive pigmented lesion diagnosis, particularly distinguishing atypical nevi from melanoma.

  11. Topical Application of Josamycin Inhibits Development of Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in NC/Nga Mice.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Katsuhiko; Tachioka, Kanta; Onodera, Kei; Ikeda, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have superficial skin colonization by Staphylococcus aureus and an increased number of T helper type 2 (Th2) cells in their peripheral blood. Our previous study showed that josamycin, a macrolide antibiotic, had excellent bactericidal activity against S. aureus strains isolated from AD patients and simultaneously inhibited Th1 and Th2 cell development mediated by Langerhans cells. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of topical application of josamycin on AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. Josamycin (0.1%) was topically administered to NC/Nga mice with AD-like skin lesions induced by 2, 4, 6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB). The therapeutic effects of josamycin were assessed by measurement of the skin severity scores, histological changes in the lesioned skin, serum levels of total IgE, and expression of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 in lymph nodes and skin lesions. Topical treatment with josamycin significantly suppressed the increase in the skin severity score in NC/Nga mice. This suppressive effect was equal to that of betamethasone, and was associated with a decrease in the density of cellular infiltration into the dermis, the mast cell count in the dermis and the serum IgE level. Furthermore, topical application of josamycin reduced the expression of IFN-γ and IL-4 in auricular lymph node cells and the skin lesions. The present results show that topical application of josamycin inhibits the development of AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. This suggests that topical application of josamycin to AD lesions colonized by S. aureus would be beneficial for control of AD by acting on superficially located S. aureus and by inhibiting the development of Th1 and Th2 cells.This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  12. Interleukin-6 receptor alpha blockade improves skin lesions in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Birner, Peter; Heider, Susanne; Petzelbauer, Peter; Wolf, Peter; Kornauth, Christoph; Kuroll, Madeleine; Merkel, Olaf; Steiner, Günter; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu; Rose-John, Stefan; Soleiman, Afschin; Moriggl, Richard; Kenner, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease, characterized by antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) and immunocomplexes, commonly affecting kidneys, skin, heart, lung or even the brain. We have shown that JunB(Δep) mice develop a SLE phenotype linked to increased epidermal Interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. Blocking of IL-6 receptor alpha (IL-6Rα) is considered as therapeutic strategy for the treatment of SLE. JunB(Δep) and wild-type mice were treated for short (5 weeks) or long term (21 weeks) with the IL-6Rα-blocking antibody MR16-1. Skin and kidney of mice were investigated by histology and immunofluorescence, and in addition, kidneys were analysed by electron microscopy. Furthermore, soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R), antihistone and antinucleosome antibodies levels were measured and associated with disease parameters. Treatment with MR16-1 resulted in significant improvement of SLE-like skin lesions in JunB(Δep) mice, compared to untreated mice. The sIL-6R amount upon long-term treatment with MR16-1 was significantly higher in JunB(Δep) versus untreated JunB(Δep) (P = 0.034) or wild-type mice (P = 0.034). MR16-1 treatment over these time spans did not significantly improve kidney pathology of immunoglobulin deposits causing impaired function. Significantly higher antihistone (P = 0.028) and antinucleosome antibody levels (P = 0.028) were measured in MR16-1-treated JunB(Δep) mice after treatment compared to levels before therapy. In conclusion, blockade of IL-6Rα improves skin lesions in a murine SLE model, but does not have a beneficial effect on autoimmune-mediated kidney pathology. Inhibition of IL-6R signalling might be helpful in lupus cases with predominant skin involvement, but combinatorial treatment might be required to restrain autoantibodies.

  13. The association of anti-annexin1 antibodies with the occurrence of skin lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Meng, Z; Shi, Z-R; Tan, G-Z; Yin, J; Wu, J; Mi, X-B; Wang, L

    2014-02-01

    Anti-annexin1 antibodies are associated with the subtypes of cutaneous lupus and are elevated in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. In this study, we investigated the correlation of this antibody with the incidence of SLE skin lesions. The presence of anti-annexin1-IgG and-IgM determined by Western blot was no different among healthy controls and SLE patients with and without skin lesions. Serum levels of anti-annexin1-IgG and -IgM measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were comparable between patients with and without skin lesions, whereas anti-annexin1-IgM was lower in SLE patients than in healthy controls. Annexin1 was abundantly detected in each epidermal layer in lupus lesional skin. Additionally, anti-annexin1-IgG was higher in SLE patients with arthritis and negatively correlated with white blood cells (WBC). Anti-annexin1-IgM was higher in patients with antinuclear antibody (ANA)-positive sera, and was positively related to hemoglobin and total serum IgM. Collectively, anti-annexin1 antibodies are not related to the incidence of skin lesions in SLE, and annexin1 abundantly distributes in epidermis in lesional skin.

  14. An effective hair detection algorithm for dermoscopic melanoma images of skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Damayanti; Kaur, Ravneet; Umbaugh, Scott; LeAnder, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Dermoscopic images are obtained using the method of skin surface microscopy. Pigmented skin lesions are evaluated in terms of texture features such as color and structure. Artifacts, such as hairs, bubbles, black frames, ruler-marks, etc., create obstacles that prevent accurate detection of skin lesions by both clinicians and computer-aided diagnosis. In this article, we propose a new algorithm for the automated detection of hairs, using an adaptive, Canny edge-detection method, followed by morphological filtering and an arithmetic addition operation. The algorithm was applied to 50 dermoscopic melanoma images. In order to ascertain this method's relative detection accuracy, it was compared to the Razmjooy hair-detection method [1], using segmentation error (SE), true detection rate (TDR) and false positioning rate (FPR). The new method produced 6.57% SE, 96.28% TDR and 3.47% FPR, compared to 15.751% SE, 86.29% TDR and 11.74% FPR produced by the Razmjooy method [1]. Because of the 7.27-9.99% improvement in those parameters, we conclude that the new algorithm produces much better results for detecting thick, thin, dark and light hairs. The new method proposed here, shows an appreciable difference in the rate of detecting bubbles, as well.

  15. Skin lesions on North Atlantic right whales: categories, prevalence and change in occurrence in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Philip K; Marx, Marilyn K

    2005-12-30

    North Atlantic right whales Eubalaena glacialis experienced decreased reproduction and body condition in the 1990s, causing concern about the overall health of this critically endangered population. Images from a detailed photo-identification catalog of right whales were analyzed for the presence of skin lesions. Lesions were categorized as white lesions or blister lesions and each of those categories were further divided based on lesion morphology and location. Of 439 whales photo-analyzed between 1980 and 2002, white lesions were detected on 227 ind. (51.7%) and blister lesions were found on 76 ind. (17.3%). The majority of white lesions (72.8%) were detected in the Bay of Fundy where their prevalence increased dramatically during the 1990s (peaking at 40 and 41% of all identified whales in 1997 and 1999, respectively). A correlation between whale density and white lesions in the Bay of Fundy suggested that this lesion type may have been the result of a contagious agent, though the data on mother/calf pairs did not indicate transmission from mother to calf. Blister lesions appeared at low levels throughout the population over the study period. Neither lesion category was more prevalent on males or females, nor were there any differences between adults and juveniles. One white lesion type appeared exclusively on whales that had been entangled, and whose subsequent survival was in most cases questionable. This is the first detailed analysis of skin lesions in this species. Only 1 tissue sample has been previously obtained from a lesion, and thus the histology and etiology of these lesions remain unknown. Further work is needed to explore the role of disease and environmental variables in lesion prevalence.

  16. Inter- and intra-variability of pigmented skin lesions: could the ABCD rule be influenced by host characteristics?

    PubMed

    Burroni, Marco; Dell'Eva, Giordana; Corona, Rosamaria; Sera, Francesco; Bono, Riccardo; Sbano, Paolo; Andreassi, Lucio; Rubegni, Pietro

    2004-08-01

    Many differences in color, shape and dimension exist between different moles even in the same individual. Major differences might be accounted for anatomical location, genetic factors and by environmental factors, mainly sunlight exposure. Therefore, it would be of great value, when evaluating skin lesions, to take into account the degree of intra- and inter-variability of several diagnostic parameters. In order to assess the morphologic and chromatic differences between lesions belonging to different patients and between lesions belonging to the same individual, we examined objective digital parameters obtained with dermatoscopic analysis, using the DBDermo MIPS system (BIO MIPS Engineering, S.R.L, siena, Italy). The automatic classifier inside the software is based on a 'match by similarity' algorithm, based on the measurement of the Euclidean distances of all variables considered from the reference image. Two-hundred and four clinically benign pigmented lesion, belonging to 18 patients were examined, stored and automatically processed. For each lesion objective parameters related to geometry, color and texture were automatically evaluated. We found skin color (healthy skin) is objectively different from subject to subject and the lesion color is more similar among different lesions of the same patient than among lesions belonging to different individuals both in their darkest and slightly dark component. We also observed that lesion dimensions are individual correlates, i.e. the probability for a lesion to be large is higher when the other, in the same patient, is large. Many parameters of pigmented skin lesions evaluated by digital dermoscopy analysis are similar in the same patient and different from those belonging to different individuals. This indicates that, when considering a lesion, we should take into account the peculiar patient's characteristics.

  17. A Pathway-based Analysis of Urinary Arsenic Metabolites and Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Molly L.; Hoffman, Elaine; Rodrigues, Ema G.; Breton, Carrie V.; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mahiuddin, Golam; Hsueh, Yu-Mei; Christiani, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is metabolized to monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Limited evidence suggests that the ability to fully metabolize arsenic into DMA influences susceptibility to disease. To determine whether percentage of MMA was predictive of disease, the authors used data from a case-control study conducted in Bangladesh (2001–2003). Persons who were diagnosed with keratosis, melanosis, Bowen's disease, or squamous cell carcinoma were matched on age, sex, and village to persons without these conditions. This analysis was restricted to persons who had no missing data on covariates (859 cases, 868 controls). A path analysis was used to evaluate simultaneously the association between the percentage of all urinary arsenic metabolites and the odds of skin lesions using PROC CALIS in SAS, version 9.1 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, North Carolina) and Mplus, version 6.1 (Muthén & Muthén, Los Angeles, California). The odds of skin lesions were significantly associated with log10 percentage of MMA (adjusted odds ratio (ORadj) = 1.56, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15, 2.12) but not log10 percentage of inorganic arsenic (ORadj = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.75, 1.50) or log10 percentage of DMA (ORadj = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.33, 3.46). This novel analysis confirmed that persons who excrete a higher proportion of MMA have a greater risk of skin lesions after data are adequately controlled for urinary arsenic metabolites, current arsenic exposure, and other risk factors. PMID:21378128

  18. Dendritic cell subsets and immunological milieu in inflammatory human papilloma virus-related skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yumi; Asagoe, Kenji; Yamauchi, Akiko; Yamamoto, Takenobu; Shirafuji, Yoshinori; Morizane, Shin; Nakanishi, Gen; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2011-09-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-related warts persist, evading host immune surveillance, but sometimes disappear with inflammation. To elucidate the immune evasion mechanisms of HPV, we have examined the density, dynamics, and subsets of dendritic cell (DC) types in non-inflammatory or inflammatory HPV-related skin lesions such as warts and Bowen's disease (HPV-Bowen), and compared the epidermal expression levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α and E-cadherin. The expression of various DC markers, MIP-3α, and E-cadherin in the tissue samples obtained from patients with warts, HPV-Bowen and HPV-unrelated skin diseases was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. MIP-3α gene expression levels were examined in warts and HPV-Bowen by in situ hybridization (ISH) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The numbers of Langerhans cells (LCs) and the expression levels of MIP-3α and E-cadherin were decreased in non-inflammatory warts and HPV-Bowen, as compared with normal skin. Both epidermal LCs and MIP-3α expression reappeared in inflammatory warts, associated with dermal infiltrates composed of many cytotoxic T cells and various subsets of DCs, while cellular infiltrates in HPV-Bowen contained many B cells and plasma cells with sparse infiltration of DCs. The upregulation of MIP-3α gene expression was confirmed in the inflammatory warts and HPV-Bowen by ISH and RT-qPCR. The depletion of LCs in the non-inflammatory warts and HPV-Bowen is associated with a down-regulation of expression levels of MIP-3α and E-cadherin in the lesional keratinocytes. MIP-3α expression is upregulated in lesional keratinocytes of inflammatory warts, with the subsequent recruitment of various DC subsets and cytotoxic T cells, whereas plasma cell-rich infiltration was induced in HPV-Bowen. Copyright © 2011 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevention and treatment of skin lesions associated with non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Recommendations of experts.

    PubMed

    Raurell-Torredà, M; Romero-Collado, A; Rodríguez-Palma, M; Farrés-Tarafa, M; Martí, J D; Hurtado-Pardos, B; Peñarrubia-San Florencio, L; Saez-Paredes, P; Esquinas, A M

    In the last two decades, non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) has been consolidated as an initial strategy for the management of respiratory failure in critical adult and paediatric patients. To identify risk factors and preventive strategies to reduce the incidence of skin lesions associated with clinical devices (LESADIC) related to NIV, as well as the most effective treatment for injuries that cannot be avoided. Review in the MEDLINE, CINAHL and Cochrane databases of studies published in the last 10years to reach consensus through an expert panel. Knowledge about how to measure correct mask size and protection of the skin with foam or hydrocolloids dressings are factors related to the incidence of LESADIC, as it conditions the degree of pressure-friction and shear that the interface exerts on the skin. The interface that causes fewer LESADIC and is better tolerated is the face mask. When there are injuries, the first thing is to remove the interface that causes pressure on damaged skin, recommending a Helmet(®) hood as an alternative, treating the infection, managing the exudate and stimulating perilesional skin. The mask of choice is the facial, always using foam or hydrocolloid dressings on the nasal bridge. Evaluate the condition of the skin under the interface and harness every 4hours (recommended) and 11hours (maximum). Evaluate the rotation strategy of the interface at 24hours if the NIV is still needed on an ongoing basis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Generalised anhidrosis: different lesion sites demonstrated by microneurography and skin biopsy.

    PubMed

    Donadio, V; Montagna, P; Nolano, M; Cortelli, P; Misciali, C; Pierangeli, G; Provitera, V; Casano, A; Baruzzi, A; Liguori, R

    2005-04-01

    Generalised anhidrosis (GA) shows a uniform clinical picture whether the pathogenesis involves intrinsic abnormalities of sweat glands or postganglionic sympathetic cholinergic nerve dysfunction. We describe two patients who presented intolerance to heat and anhidrosis. In the first patient, symptoms started at 33 years of age, and were associated with absent tendon reflexes and a mydriatic right pupil unreactive to light. The other patient had been unable to sweat since birth. GA was diagnosed on the basis of clinical findings and thermoregulatory tests. Microneurography and morphological analysis of the skin and its innervation disclosed a different lesion site underlying GA in the two patients, and distinguished between a postganglionic autonomic nerve fibre lesion and sweat gland dysfunction.

  1. Psoriasiform lesions induced by tumour necrosis factor antagonists: a skin-deep medical conundrum.

    PubMed

    Carter, J D; Gerard, H C; Hudson, A P

    2008-08-01

    Rarely, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)alpha antagonist therapy has been associated with de novo psoriasiform eruptions. This is unusual in that these same drugs are used to treat psoriasis. Most of these cases involve the palms and soles, yet palmoplantar pustular psoriasis represents only 1.7% of all cases of psoriasis. Keratoderma blenorrhagicum is a psoriasiform rash that occurs primarily on the palms and soles of some patients with reactive arthritis. It is grossly and histologically indistinguishable from pustular psoriasis. Chlamydia trachomatis is a common aetiological agent for reactive arthritis, and in vitro studies have shown that chlamydial replication is inversely proportional to TNFalpha levels. Three patients taking TNFalpha antagonists are presented who developed such lesions and who were found to be positive for C trachomatis DNA in the affected skin. It is proposed that these psoriasiform lesions may not be psoriasis, but rather keratoderma blenorrhagicum.

  2. Gene expression is differently affected by pimecrolimus and betamethasone in lesional skin of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, J M; Scherer, A; Wanke, C; Bräutigam, M; Bongiovanni, S; Letzkus, M; Staedtler, F; Kehren, J; Zuehlsdorf, M; Schwarz, T; Weichenthal, M; Fölster-Holst, R; Proksch, E

    2012-03-01

    Topical corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors are well-known treatments of atopic dermatitis (AD) but differ in their efficacy and side effects. We recently showed that betamethasone valerate (BM) although clinically more efficient impaired skin barrier repair in contrast to pimecrolimus in AD. This study elucidates the mode of action of topical BM and pimecrolimus cream in AD. Lesional AD skin samples after topical treatment with either BM or pimecrolimus were subjected to gene expression profile analysis. Betamethasone valerate resulted in a significant reduction in mRNA levels of genes encoding markers of immune cells and inflammation, dendritic cells, T cells, cytokines, chemokines, and serine proteases, whereas pimecrolimus exerted minor effects only. This corroborates the clinical finding that BM reduces inflammation more effectively than pimecrolimus. Genes encoding molecules important for skin barrier function were differently affected. Both BM and pimecrolimus normalized the expression of filaggrin and loricrin. BM, but not pimecrolimus, significantly reduced the expression of rate-limiting enzymes for lipid synthesis and the expression of involucrin and small proline-rich proteins, which covalently bind ceramides. This may explain the lack of restoration of functional stratum corneum layers observed after BM treatment. The gene expression profiles are consistent with our previous findings that corticosteroids may exert a more potent anti-inflammatory effect but may impair the restoration of the skin barrier. Corticosteroids are still the main treatment for severe and acutely exacerbated AD; pimecrolimus may be preferable for long-term treatment and stabilization. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Health burden of skin lesions at low arsenic exposure through groundwater in Pakistan. Is river the source?

    SciTech Connect

    Fatmi, Zafar; Azam, Iqbal; Ahmed, Faiza; Kazi, Ambreen; Gill, Albert Bruce; Kadir, Muhmmad Masood; Ahmed, Mubashir; Ara, Naseem; Janjua, Naveed Zafar

    2009-07-15

    A significant proportion of groundwater in south Asia is contaminated with arsenic. Pakistan has low levels of arsenic in groundwater compared with China, Bangladesh and India. A representative multi-stage cluster survey conducted among 3874 persons {>=}15 years of age to determine the prevalence of arsenic skin lesions, its relation with arsenic levels and cumulative arsenic dose in drinking water in a rural district (population: 1.82 million) in Pakistan. Spot-urine arsenic levels were compared among individuals with and without arsenic skin lesions. In addition, the relation of age, body mass index, smoking status with arsenic skin lesions was determined. The geographical distribution of the skin lesions and arsenic-contaminated wells in the district were ascertained using global positioning system. The total arsenic, inorganic and organic forms, in water and spot-urine samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The prevalence of skin lesions of arsenic was estimated for complex survey design, using surveyfreq and surveylogistic options of SAS 9.1 software.The prevalence of definitive cases i.e. hyperkeratosis of both palms and soles, was 3.4 per 1000 and suspected cases i.e. any sign of arsenic skin lesions (melanosis and/or keratosis), were 13.0 per 1000 among {>=}15-year-old persons in the district. Cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) was calculated from levels of arsenic in water and duration of use of current drinking water source. Prevalence of skin lesions increases with cumulative arsenic exposure (dose) in drinking water and arsenic levels in urine. Skin lesions were 2.5-fold among individuals with BMI <18.5 kg/m{sup 2}. Geographically, more arsenic-contaminated wells and skin lesions were alongside Indus River, suggests a strong link between arsenic contamination of groundwater with proximity to river.This is the first reported epidemiological and clinical evidence of arsenic skin lesions due to groundwater in Pakistan. Further

  4. African American female with renal failure presenting with skin lesions: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Nejla; Markova, Tsveti

    2009-01-01

    Calciphylaxis is a lethal disorder seen in patients with end-stage renal disease and is characterized by painful necrotic skin lesions. The pathophysiology is still unknown. Elevated calcium, phosphorous and parathormone appear to play a role in causing small and medium sized vasculopathy. Diagnosis is delayed, prognosis is poor and mortality remains high. In this article we describe the case of calciphylaxis in a patient with chronic renal failure and multiple medical comorbidities, and discuss diagnostic management, prognosis and treatment options. PMID:19830094

  5. A corneal dendritic lesion with a skin eruption: eczema herpeticum, an important differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Steptoe, Alex; Young-Zvandasara, Tafadzwa; Muhtaseb, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Eczema herpeticum is a rare and potentially life-threatening viral infection. We present the case of a 54-year-old man who presented to the emergency eye clinic with a dendritic ulcer and a facial rash. An initial diagnosis of herpes zoster ophthalmicus was suspected. On follow-up, the rash had begun to rapidly disseminate and was no longer respecting dermatome boundaries. A diagnosis of eczema herpeticum was made and appropriate treatment started. This case highlights the importance of a comprehensive history and close inspection of skin lesions in patients with herpetic eye disease. PMID:25636633

  6. Muckle-Wells syndrome: report of six cases with hyperpigmented sclerodermoid skin lesions.

    PubMed

    El-Darouti, Mohammad A; Marzouk, Salonaz A; Abdel-Halim, Mona R E

    2006-03-01

    Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) is a rare syndrome, characterized by chronic recurrent urticaria, often combined with fever, chills, rigors, malaise, and arthralgia. Progressive sensorineural deafness, and, in approximately one third of the patients, amyloidosis of the kidneys as well as of other organs may occur. It was first described in 1962 by Muckle and Wells. Herein we describe six cases of MWS showing, in addition to the classic features of MWS, unique skin lesions that to the best of our knowledge have not been described before in association with MWS.

  7. Granulomatous Skin Lesions in Moray Eels Caused by a Novel Mycobacterium Species Related to Mycobacterium triplex

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Lawrence H.; Costa, Sylvia F.; Weiss, Louis M.; Johnson, Linda K.; Bartell, John; Davis, Raymond; Walsh, Michael; Levi, Michael

    2001-01-01

    An outbreak of granulomatous dermatitis was investigated in a captive population of moray eels. The affected eels had florid skin nodules concentrated around the head and trunk. Histopathological examination revealed extensive granulomatous inflammation within the dermis and subcutaneous fascial plane between the fat and axial musculature. Acid-fast rods were detected within the smallest lesions, which were presumably the ones that had developed earliest. Eventually, after several months of incubation at room temperature, a very slowly growing acid-fast organism was isolated. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified it as a Mycobacterium species closely related (0.59% divergence) to M. triplex, an SAV mycobacterium. Intradermal inoculation of healthy green moray eels with this organism reliably reproduced the lesion. Experimentally induced granulomatous dermatitis appeared within 2 weeks of inoculation and slowly but progressively expanded during the 2 months of the experiment. Live organisms were recovered from these lesions at all time points, fulfilling Koch's postulates for this bacterium. In a retrospective study of tissues collected between 1993 and 1999 from five spontaneous disease cases, acid-fast rods were consistently found within lesions, and a nested PCR for the rRNA gene also demonstrated the presence of mycobacteria within affected tissues. PMID:11402008

  8. A novel papillomavirus isolated from proliferative skin lesions of a wild American beaver (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Rogovskyy, Artem S; Baszler, Timothy V; Bradway, Daniel S; Bruning, Darren L; Davitt, Christine M; Evermann, James F; Burk, Robert D; Chen, Zigui; Mansfield, Kristin G; Haldorson, Gary J

    2012-07-01

    Cutaneous papillomatosis was diagnosed in an adult American beaver (Castor canadensis). Gross lesions included numerous exophytic, roughly circular, lightly pigmented lesions on hairless areas of fore and hind feet and the nose. The most significant histopathologic findings were multifocal papilliform hyperplasia of the superficial stratified squamous epithelium, with multifocal koilocytes, and multiple cells with large, darkly basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. A virus with properties consistent with papillomavirus (PV) was recovered by virus isolation of skin lesions, utilizing rabbit and feline kidney cell lines. The presence of the virus was confirmed by PV-specific polymerase chain reaction. The partial sequences of E1 and L1 genes did not closely match those of any PVs in GenBank, suggesting that this might be a new type of PV. Partial E1 and L1 nucleotide sequences of the beaver papillomavirus (hereafter, ARbeaver-PV1) were used to create a phylogenetic tree employing the complete E1 and L1 open reading frame nucleotide sequences of 68 PVs. The phylogenetic tree placed the ARbeaver-PV1 in a clade that included the Mupapillomavirus (HPV1 and HPV63) and Kappapapillomavirus (OcPV1 and SfPV1) genera. The present article confirms the papillomaviral etiology of cutaneous exophytic lesions in the beaver.

  9. Dermatophytes from skin lesions of domestic animals in Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chah, Kennedy F; Majiagbe, Kehinde A; Kazeem, Haruna M; Ezeanyika, Ogechukwu; Agbo, Ifeoma C

    2012-12-01

    Dermatophytes are well-recognized cutaneous fungi with public health implications. In Nigeria, several studies have been carried out on dermatophytosis in humans; however, data on dermatophytes in animals are lacking. This study was conducted to determine the occurrence and species of dermatophytes in skin lesions in domestic animals in Nsukka Agricultural Zone of Enugu State, Nigeria. Forty-six domestic animals (dogs, goats, sheep and pigs) presented for sale in the local markets in the study area and with suspected lesions of dermatophytosis were used for the study. Plucked hairs and epidermal scales from the skin lesions of affected animals were inoculated on Sabouraud dextrose agar slants containing 0.05 mg/mL of chloramphenicol and 0.5 mg/mL of cycloheximide. Inoculated slants were incubated at room temperature (27°C) for up to 4 weeks and examined at 2-3 day intervals for fungal growth. Laboratory identification of the fungal isolates was based on their colonial, microscopic and biochemical characteristics. Of the 46 animals with suspected lesions of dermatophytosis, six (13.0%) were positive for a dermatophyte, and the following dermatophytes were identified: Microsporum gypseum, two of 12 sheep; Microsporum audouinii, one of 16 dogs; Trichophyton mentagrophytes, one of 16 dogs and one of 12 sheep; and Trichophyton schoenleinii, one of 13 goats. Anthropophilic dermatophytes are among the fungal agents associated with dermatophytosis in animals in Nsukka Agricultural Zone. These dermatophytes could constitute health risks to humans in contact with the animals. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2012 ESVD and ACVD.

  10. Initial evaluation of an ultrasound measure for assessing the activity of skin lesions in juvenile localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Li, S C; Liebling, M S; Haines, K A; Weiss, J E; Prann, A

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the construct validity of 2 proposed measures (the Ultrasound Disease Activity [U-DA] and the Tissue Thickness Score [TTS]) for evaluating sonographic differences in juvenile localized scleroderma skin lesions. We conducted a retrospective review of juvenile localized scleroderma patients who had ultrasound scans of their skin lesions between October 2005 and February 2009. Imaged lesions were classified as active or inactive based upon clinical assessment. Lesions had to have been imaged within 1 month of a clinic visit or have the same clinical assessment during both the visit before and the visit after the scan. Two physicians scored the scans using the U-DA, which scores for differences in lesion echogenicity and vascularity compared with normal tissue. Tissue thickness differences were evaluated by percent differences and by using the TTS. Wilcoxon's rank sum test was performed to assess differences. We studied 52 scans from 21 patients, 32 scans of active skin lesions and 20 scans of inactive skin lesions. Features reported by clinicians as indicative of active disease included erythema, warmth, violaceous color, new lesion, expansion of lesion, and induration. The U-DA was significantly different between active and inactive skin lesions (P = 0.0010) with significant differences found for the parameters of total echogenicity, hypodermis echogenicity, and deep tissue layer vascularity (P = 0.0014, P = 0.0023, and P = 0.0374, respectively). No significant differences were found for tissue layer thickness or TTS. The U-DA may be a useful tool in the identification of localized scleroderma activity. Further study is needed to prospectively evaluate the validity, reliability, and sensitivity of this potential monitoring tool. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Simultaneous assessment of pulsating and total blood in inflammatory skin lesions using functional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the visible range.

    PubMed

    Seo, InSeok; Bargo, Paulo R; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple and cost-effective optical technique for the simultaneous assessment of pulsating and total blood noninvasively in an inflammatory skin lesion. Acquisitions of diffuse reflectance spectra in the visible range at 6 Hz are used to trace the oscillating components of reflectance. Measurements on erythematous lesions from a UV insult show slow changing signal at about 0.1 Hz and heart-driven regular oscillations at about 1 Hz simultaneously. The results demonstrate the potential of the technique in monitoring both pulsating and steady components of the blood in inflammatory lesions of the skin.

  12. Functional polysaccharides from Grifola frondosa aqueous extract inhibit atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeon Soo; Hwang, Yong Hyeon; Kim, Mun Ki; Hong, Gyeong Eun; Lee, Ho Jeong; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Yumnam, Silvia; Kim, Eun Hee; Heo, Jeong Doo; Lee, Sang Joon; Won, Chung Kil; Kim, Gon Sup

    2015-01-01

    Grifola frondosa (GF), distributed widely in far east Asia including Korea, is popularly used as traditional medicines and health supplementary foods, especially for enhancing the immune functions of the body. To extend the application of GF polysaccharides (GFP) for atopic dermatitis (AD), we investigated the effects of GFP on the 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced AD-like skin lesion in NC/Nga mice. GFP treatment significantly reduced the dorsa skin dermatitis score and combination treatment with GFP, and dexamethasone has a synergistic effect in AD-like skin lesion by reduced Serum IgE, mast cells infiltration, and cytokines expression. These results indicate that GFP suppressed the AD-like skin lesions by controlling the Th-1/Th-2-type cytokines in NC/Nga mice. These findings strongly suggest that GFP can be useful for AD patients as a novel therapeutic agent and might be used for corticosteroids replacement or supplement agent.

  13. The lesional skin of linear IgA bullous dermatosis expresses growth-regulated peptide (GRO)-alpha.

    PubMed

    Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Ihn, Hironobu; Saeki, Hidehisa; Tamaki, Kunihiko

    2004-07-01

    The patient was a 62-year-old man with erythema with tense vesiculobullae and erosions on the bilateral elbows, right knee, and one buttock. A skin biopsy specimen revealed subepidermal blister formation with a predominant infiltration of neutrophils and papillary neutrophilic microabscesses. Direct immunofluorescence study showed linear deposition of IgA and weak deposition of IgG at the basement membrane zone of the lesional skin, and indirect immunofluorescence study showed linear deposition of IgA at the epidermal side of the 1M NaCl-separated normal skin. He was diagnosed with linear IgA bullous dermatosis. Immunohistochemical study revealed that the lesional and perilesional keratinocytes expressed growth-regulated peptide (GRO) -alpha, a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils. This suggests that GRO-alpha plays a role in the infiltration of neutrophils into the lesional skin and in bulla formation in linear IgA bullous dermatosis.

  14. Keratotic Skin Lesions and Other Risk Factors Are Associated with Skin Cancer in Organ-Transplant Recipients: A Case–Control Study in The Netherlands, United Kingdom, Germany, France, and Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bouwes Bavinck, Jan N.; Euvrard, Sylvie; Naldi, Luigi; Nindl, Ingo; Proby, Charlotte M.; Neale, Rachel; Abeni, Damiano; Tessari, Gian P.; Feltkamp, Mariet C.W.; Claudy, Alain; Stockfleth, Eggert; Harwood, Catherine A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the association of keratotic skin lesions with the development of skin cancer in 915 solid organ-transplant recipients in five European countries. In a hospital-based case–control study, cases with squamous- and basal-cell carcinoma were compared with controls without skin cancer. Questionnaires, scrutiny of medical charts, and skin examination were delivered according to a standardized protocol. Keratotic skin lesions and viral warts were counted on different body sites. Keratotic skin lesions were strongly associated with an increased risk of squamous-cell carcinoma, with adjusted odds ratios of 4.1 (2.4;7.0) and 12.1 (6.1;24) for 1–49 and 50 and more keratotic skin lesions compared with no lesions, respectively. Keratotic skin lesions were also associated with basal-cell carcinoma with adjusted odds ratios of 2.9 (1.7;4.9) and 4.0 (1.7;9.2) for 1–49 and 50 and more lesions, respectively. Lighter skin types and painful sunburns were also significantly associated with an increased risk of squamous- and basal-cell carcinoma. Keratotic skin lesions are strongly associated with skin cancer and are, thus, an important clinical criterion for identifying those organ-transplant recipients at an increased risk of skin cancers who should be offered more intensive skin surveillance. PMID:17380113

  15. [Study of relationship between arsenic methylation and skin lesion in a population with long-term high arsenic exposure].

    PubMed

    Su, Liqin; Cheng, Yibin; Lin, Shaobin; Wu, Chuanye

    2007-05-01

    To investigate the difference of arsenic metabolism in populations with long-term high arsenic exposure and explore the relationship between arsenic metabolism diversity and skin lesion. 327 residents in an arsenic polluted village were voluntarily enrolled in this study. Questionnaire survey and medical examination were carried out to learn basic information and detect skin lesions. Urinary inorganic and methylated arsenic were speciated by high performance liquid chromatography combined with hydride-generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Total arsenic concentration in hair was determined with DDC-Ag method. Hair arsenic content of studied polutions was generally high, but no significant difference were found among the studied four groups. MMA and DMA concentration in urine increased with studied polution age, and were positively related with skin lesion grade. The relative proportion of MMA in serious skin lesion group was significantly higher than in other 3 groups, while DMA/MMA ratio was significantly lower than control and mild group. The relative proportion of MMA was positively related with skin lesion grade, DMA/ MMA ratio was negatively related with skin lesion grade. Males could have higher arsenic cumulation and lower methylation capacity than those of females. The population of above 40 years old may have higher methylation capacity than those of adults below 40yeas old. Smokers and drinkers seemed lower methylation capacity than those of non-smokers and non-drinkers respectively. The methylation of arsenic could affect by several factors, including age gender, smoking and drinking. Arsenic methylation copacity mey be associated with skin lesion induced by arsenic exposure.

  16. Inhibitory effect of galangin on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-06-01

    Galangin is a member of the flavonol class of flavonoids having anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative potential. Previously we reported the inhibitory effect of galangin on the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation. For incremental research, we investigated the effects of galangin on atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions and underlying mechanisms of action. We established an atopic dermatitis model in BALB/c mice by repeated local exposure of house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae) extract (DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to the ears. Repeated alternative treatment of DFE/DNCB caused AD-like skin lesions. Topical application of galangin reduced AD symptoms based on ear thickness and histopathological analysis, in addition to serum IgE and IgG2a levels. Galangin inhibited mast cell infiltration into the ear and serum histamine level. Galangin suppressed DFE/DNCB-induced expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-31, IL-32, and interferon (IFN)-γ in the ear tissue. To define the underlying mechanisms of action, tumor necrosis factor-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocytes (HaCaT) model was used. Galangin significantly inhibited the expression of cytokines and chemokine by the down-regulation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases in HaCaT cells. Taken together, the results demonstrate that galangin inhibited AD-like symptoms, suggesting that galangin might be a candidate for the treatment of AD.

  17. Statistical image segmentation for the detection of skin lesion borders in UV fluorescence excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Padilla-Martinez, Juan Pablo; Franco, Walfre

    2016-04-01

    The skin contains several fluorescent molecules or fluorophores that serve as markers of structure, function and composition. UV fluorescence excitation photography is a simple and effective way to image specific intrinsic fluorophores, such as the one ascribed to tryptophan which emits at a wavelength of 345 nm upon excitation at 295 nm, and is a marker of cellular proliferation. Earlier, we built a clinical UV photography system to image cellular proliferation. In some samples, the naturally low intensity of the fluorescence can make it difficult to separate the fluorescence of cells in higher proliferation states from background fluorescence and other imaging artifacts -- like electronic noise. In this work, we describe a statistical image segmentation method to separate the fluorescence of interest. Statistical image segmentation is based on image averaging, background subtraction and pixel statistics. This method allows to better quantify the intensity and surface distributions of fluorescence, which in turn simplify the detection of borders. Using this method we delineated the borders of highly-proliferative skin conditions and diseases, in particular, allergic contact dermatitis, psoriatic lesions and basal cell carcinoma. Segmented images clearly define lesion borders. UV fluorescence excitation photography along with statistical image segmentation may serve as a quick and simple diagnostic tool for clinicians.

  18. Lesions in the skin, intestine, and central nervous system induced by an antimetabolite of niacin.

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, H.; Suzuki, K.

    1986-01-01

    Pellagra in the human is characterized by the clinical "three D's," namely, dermatitis, diarrhea, and dementia. Newborn mice that received a single intraperitoneal injection of 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN) (50 mg/kg body weight), an antagonist of niacin, consistently developed lesions in the skin, intestinal tract, and central nervous system. Anterior horn cells in the spinal cord as well as motor neurons in the brain showed the ultrastructural features of neuronal chromatolysis, while glial and ependymal cells showed postinjection (PI) edematous changes on Day 5. In the skin, correlating with clinical delay of hair growth, the first discernible microscopic abnormality was vacuolar change in the hair follicles on PI Day 3. By PI Day 5, hyperkeratosis and irregular acanthosis were noted. Edematous swelling of the enteric glial cells was observed in the myenteric plexus of the descending colon on PI Day 5. Although the pathologic features of these 6-AN-treated mice may not be exactly identical to those of human pellagra, possible contributory mechanisms in the development of pellagra lesions may be elucidated by this experimental model. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2936253

  19. Assembly and characterization of a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for skin lesions diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Texiera Rosa, Ramon Gabriel; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; D´Almeida, Camila de Paula; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime analysis in biological tissues has been presented as a technique of a great potential for tissue characterization for diagnostic purposes. The objective of this study is to assemble and characterize a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for diagnostic of clinically similar skin lesions in vivo. The fluorescence lifetime measurements were performed using the Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (Becker & Hickl, Berlin, Germany) technique. Two lasers, one emitting at 378 nm and another at 445 nm, are used for excitation with 20, 50 and 80 MHz repetition rate. A bifurcated optical fiber probe conducts the excitation light to the sample, the collected light is transmitted through bandpass filters and delivered to a hybrid photomultiplier tube detector. The fluorescence spectra were obtained by using a portable spectrometer (Ocean Optics USB-2000-FLG) with the same excitation sources. An instrument response function of about 300 ps was obtained and the spectrum and fluorescence lifetime of a standard fluorescent molecule (Rhodamine 6G) was measured for the calibration of the system ((4.1 +/- 0.3) ns). The assembled system was considered robust, well calibrated and will be used for clinical measurements of skin lesions.

  20. Discrimination of non-melanoma skin lesions from non-tumor human skin tissues in vivo using Raman spectroscopy and multivariate statistics.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Fabricio L; Pacheco, Marcos T T; Bodanese, Benito; Pasqualucci, Carlos A; Zângaro, Renato A; Silveira, Landulfo

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to discriminate human non-melanoma skin lesions from non-tumor tissues in vivo. This work proposed the discrimination between non-melanoma (basal cell carcinoma, BCC; squamous cell carcinoma, SCC) and pre-cancerous lesions (actinic keratosis, AK) from benign lesions and normal (non-tumor group, NT) tissues, using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy with a Raman probe. Prior to surgery, the spectra of suspicious lesions were obtained in situ. The spectra of adjacent, clinically normal skin were also obtained. Lesions were resectioned and submitted for histopathology. The Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm). Two types of discrimination models were developed to distinguish the different histopathological groups. The principal components analysis discriminant analysis (PCA/DA) and the partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS/DA) were based on Euclidean, quadratic and Mahalanobis distances. PCA and PLS spectral vectors showed spectral features of skin constituents, such as lipids (between 1,250 cm(-1) and 1,300 cm(-1) and at 1,450 cm(-1)) and proteins (between 870 cm(-1) and 940 cm(-1), 1,240 cm(-1) and 1,271 cm(-1), and at 1,000 cm(-1) and 1,450 cm(-1)). Despite the small spectral differences between malignant lesions and benign tissues, the algorithms discriminated the spectra of non-melanoma skin and pre-cancerous lesions from benign and normal tissues, with an overall accuracy of 82.8% and 91.9%, respectively. PCA and PLS could discriminate Raman spectra of skin tissues, opening the way for an in vivo optical diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Altered leukocyte delivery to specific and nonspecific inflammatory skin lesions following burn injury

    SciTech Connect

    Tchervenkov, J.I.; Latter, D.A.; Psychogios, J.; Christou, N.V.

    1988-05-01

    This study assessed the effect of burn trauma on the in vivo leukocyte cell delivery during the first 24 hr of the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test reaction and a bacterial skin abscess. Inbred male Lewis rats sensitized to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) were given a 30% scald burn or sham burn. Three days later the animals were injected intradermally, at different sites, with 0.3 mg of KLH, 10(8) organisms of S. aureus 502A, and 0.1 cc of saline, at 2 to 24 hr. Leukocytes labelled with Indium-111 oxine(leu-111) were injected intravenously. In sham rats the peak leu-111 influx in the DTH reaction occurred at 2-4 hr while in the abscess it was biphasic with peaks at 3 hr and 6-8 hr. In burn trauma rats there was a markedly increased leu111 peak at 2 hr in both the DTH and abscess reactions followed by a significantly lower than normal leu111 delivery in the late (6-24) hours. This marked early leukocyte influx in burned rats was paralleled by a reduced DTH skin test lesion (8.2 +/- 1.1 mm to 4.2 +/- 1.1 mm) and an increased bacterial abscess (5.1 +/- 1.1 mm to 8.1 +/- 0.9 mm) post burn. There was a direct correlation between leukocyte cell delivery to a DTH reaction and a bacterial abscess (r8 = 0.69, Spearman rank; p less than 0.001). We conclude that burn trauma results in altered leukocyte delivery to inflammatory lesions and the DTH response can be used to assess the ability of a burn trauma host to recruit leukocytes at a site of infection.

  2. Adaptive technique for matching the spectral response in skin lesions' images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, P.; Borisova, E.; Pavlova, E.; Avramov, L.

    2015-03-01

    The suggested technique is a subsequent stage for data obtaining from diffuse reflectance spectra and images of diseased tissue with a final aim of skin cancer diagnostics. Our previous work allows us to extract patterns for some types of skin cancer, as a ratio between spectra, obtained from healthy and diseased tissue in the range of 380 - 780 nm region. The authenticity of the patterns depends on the tested point into the area of lesion, and the resulting diagnose could also be fixed with some probability. In this work, two adaptations are implemented to localize pixels of the image lesion, where the reflectance spectrum corresponds to pattern. First adapts the standard to the personal patient and second - translates the spectrum white point basis to the relative white point of the image. Since the reflectance spectra and the image pixels are regarding to different white points, a correction of the compared colours is needed. The latest is done using a standard method for chromatic adaptation. The technique follows the steps below: -Calculation the colorimetric XYZ parameters for the initial white point, fixed by reflectance spectrum from healthy tissue; -Calculation the XYZ parameters for the distant white point on the base of image of nondiseased tissue; -Transformation the XYZ parameters for the test-spectrum by obtained matrix; -Finding the RGB values of the XYZ parameters for the test-spectrum according sRGB; Finally, the pixels of the lesion's image, corresponding to colour from the test-spectrum and particular diagnostic pattern are marked with a specific colour.

  3. Isolation and partial characterization of a parapoxvirus isolated from a skin lesion of a Weddell seal.

    PubMed

    Tryland, M; Klein, J; Nordøy, E S; Blix, A S

    2005-03-01

    A solitary skin lesion was found on the neck of a Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii), chemically immobilized in Queen Maud Land (70 degrees 09'S, 05 degrees 22'E) Antarctica 2001. The lesion was elevated and 3cm in diameter, consisting of partly fresh and partly necrotic tissue, and proliferative papilloma-like structures were seen. Electron microscopy on a biopsy from the lesion revealed typical parapoxvirus particles. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR; B2L gene) generated amplicons of approximately 594 base pairs, comparable to Orf-virus, the prototype parapoxvirus. A comparison of these B2L PCR amplicon DNA sequences with corresponding sequences from other parapoxviruses, showed that the Weddell seal virus resembled isolates from grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) and harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) more than parapoxvirus from red deer (Cervus elaphus), sheep, cattle and Japanese serows (Capricornis crispus). It is thus concluded that the Weddell seal parapoxvirus belong to the tentative seal parapoxvirus species. Since parapox and orthopoxviruses may cause similar clinical diseases, we suggest that the term sealpox should be restricted to the clinical disease, whereas seal parapoxvirus should be used when caused by a parapoxvirus, rather than the general term "sealpox virus". This is the first verified case of parapoxvirus infection in a Weddell seal, and also the first report of any such infections in the Antarctic.

  4. An algorithm for the characterization of digital images of pigmented lesions of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera-González, Laura Y.; Delgado-Atencio, José A.; Valdiviezo-Navarro, Juan C.; Cunill-Rodríguez, Margarita

    2014-09-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer in human in all over the world with an increase number of victims yearly. One traditional form of diagnosis melanoma is by using the so called ABCDE rule which stands for Asymmetry, Border, Color, Diameter and Evolution of the lesion. For melanoma lesions, the color as a descriptor exhibits heterogeneous values, ranging from light brown to dark brown (sometimes blue reddish or even white). Therefore, investigating on color features from digital melanoma images could provide insights for developing automated algorithms for melanoma discrimination from common nevus. In this research work, an algorithm is proposed and tested to characterize the color in a pigmented lesion. The developed algorithm measures the hue of different sites in the same pigmented area from a digital image using the HSI color space. The algorithm was applied to 40 digital images of unequivocal melanomas and 40 images of common nevus, which were taken from several data bases. Preliminary results indicate that visible color changes of melanoma sites are well accounted by the proposed algorithm. Other factors, such as quality of images and the influence of the shiny areas on the results obtained with the proposed algorithm are discussed.

  5. Early burn wound excision and skin grafting postburn trauma restores in vivo neutrophil delivery to inflammatory lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Tchervenkov, J.I.; Epstein, M.D.; Silberstein, E.B.; Alexander, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of early vs delayed postburn wound excision and skin grafting on the in vivo neutrophil delivery to a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction and a bacterial skin lesion (BSL). Male Lewis rats were presensitized to keyhole-limpet hemocyanin. Group 1 comprised sham controls. Groups 2 through 4 were given a 30% 3 degrees scald burn, but the burn wounds were excised, and skin was grafted on days 1, 3, and 7, respectively, after the burn. Group 5 comprised burn controls. Twelve days after burn trauma, all rats were injected at different intervals (during a 24-hour period) with a trio of intradermal injections of keyhole-limpet hemocyanin, Staphylococcus aureus 502A, and saline at different sites. In vivo neutrophil delivery to these dermal lesions was determined by injecting indium in 111 oxyquinoline-labeled neutrophils isolated from similarly treated groups of rats. Neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL lesions was restored to normal by excision and skin grafting of the burn wound one day after burn trauma. Waiting three days after burn trauma to excise and skin graft the wound partially, but not completely, restored the in vivo neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL lesions. Waiting one week to excise and skin graft a burn wound resulted in no improvement in neutrophil delivery to DTH and BSL dermal lesions. It was concluded that burn wound excision and skin grafting immediately after burn trauma restored in vivo neutrophil delivery to a BSL and DTH dermal lesion. This may, in part, explain the beneficial effect of early aggressive burn wound debridement in patients with burn injuries.

  6. Hyperproliferation of normally quiescent keratinocytes in non-lesional psoriatic skin due to high calcium concentration (an organotypic culture model).

    PubMed

    Szabó, Anna Kenderessy; Bos, J D; Das, P K

    2002-01-01

    Calcium plays an important role in the regulation of different functions of keratinocytes. In the present work we studied the effect of different extracellular calcium concentrations (0.01 mM-2.0 mM) on the proliferation and differentiation of human keratinocytes in normal human and non-lesional psoriatic skin. Using explant culture model, the proliferative and differentiated subsets of keratinocytes were detected by specific antibodies related to cell proliferation [beta-1 integrin (CD29), proliferating cell antigen (Ki67), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)] and differentiation [differentiated cell cytokeratins (K1/K10) and differentiating cell antigen (lectin Ulex europaius agglutinin, UEA-1)]. After 4 days of culturing at high Ca2+ (2.0 mM) we observed marked hyperproliferation among the normally quiescent keratinocytes of non-lesional psoriatic skin. In normal uncultured and cultured skin and in uncultured and two-day-cultured non-lesional psoriatic skin both at normal (1.2 mM) and at high (2.0 mM) Ca2+ concentration only one layer of basal CD29+/Ki67+/K1/K10-/UEA-1- cell was observed. In sections from non-lesional psoriatic skin cultured for 4 days in the presence of high Ca2+ (2.0 mM) this cell population has expanded from at least three layers above the basement membrane. This expanded cell population of the 4-day high Ca2+ cultured non-lesional skin showed clear PCNA positive staining on frozen sections with the strongest positivity among the most basal localized cells. These data suggest that (i) extracellular Ca2+ concentration can influence the proliferation of basal ("stem") keratinocytes, (ii) the proliferative response to high Ca2+ concentration of psoriatic non-lesional basal keratinocytes differs from that of normal basal keratinocytes, (iv) changes in the extracellular Ca2+ milieu might play a role in the induction of the hyperproliferative psoriatic lesion.

  7. A Review of the Quantification and Classification of Pigmented Skin Lesions: From Dedicated to Hand-Held Devices.

    PubMed

    Filho, Mercedes; Ma, Zhen; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the incidence of skin cancer cases has risen, worldwide, mainly due to the prolonged exposure to harmful ultraviolet radiation. Concurrently, the computer-assisted medical diagnosis of skin cancer has undergone major advances, through an improvement in the instrument and detection technology, and the development of algorithms to process the information. Moreover, because there has been an increased need to store medical data, for monitoring, comparative and assisted-learning purposes, algorithms for data processing and storage have also become more efficient in handling the increase of data. In addition, the potential use of common mobile devices to register high-resolution images of skin lesions has also fueled the need to create real-time processing algorithms that may provide a likelihood for the development of malignancy. This last possibility allows even non-specialists to monitor and follow-up suspected skin cancer cases. In this review, we present the major steps in the pre-processing, processing and post-processing of skin lesion images, with a particular emphasis on the quantification and classification of pigmented skin lesions. We further review and outline the future challenges for the creation of minimum-feature, automated and real-time algorithms for the detection of skin cancer from images acquired via common mobile devices.

  8. Bee venom acupuncture alleviates trimellitic anhydride-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sur, Bongjun; Lee, Bombi; Yeom, Mijung; Hong, Ju-Hee; Kwon, Sunoh; Kim, Seung-Tae; Lee, Hyang Sook; Park, Hi-Joon; Lee, Hyejung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2016-01-29

    Bee venom acupuncture (BVA), a novel type of acupuncture therapy in which purified bee venom is injected into the specific acupuncture point on the diseased part of the body, is used primarily for relieving pain and other musculoskeletal symptoms. In the present study, therapeutic potential of BVA to improve atopic dermatitis, a representative allergic dysfunction, was evaluated in the mouse model of trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced skin impairment. Mice were treated with 5% TMA on the dorsal flank for sensitization and subsequently treated with 2% TMA on the dorsum of both ears for an additional 12 days after a 3-day interval. From the 7(th) day of 2% TMA treatment, bilateral subcutaneous injection of BV (BV, 0.3 mg/kg) was performed daily at BL40 acupuncture points (located behind the knee) 1 h before 2% TMA treatment for 5 days. BVA treatment markedly inhibited the expression levels of both T helper cell type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines in ear skin and lymph nodes of TMA-treated mice. Clinical features of AD-like symptoms such as ear skin symptom severity and thickness, inflammation, and lymph node weight were significantly alleviated by BV treatment. BV treatment also inhibited the proliferation and infiltration of T cells, the production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, and the synthesis of interleukin (IL)-4 and immunoglobulin E (IgE)-typical allergic Th2 responses in blood. The inhibitory effect of BVA was more pronounced at BL40 acupoint than non-acupuncture point located at the base of the tail. These results indicate that BV injection at specific acupuncture points effectively alleviates AD-like skin lesions by inhibiting inflammatory and allergic responses in a TMA-induced contact hypersensitivity mouse model.

  9. Altered expression of keratin 14 in lesional epidermis of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoying; Fricker, Katharina; Enk, Alexander H; Hadaschik, Eva N

    2016-06-01

    Keratin 14 (K14) is an intermediate filament protein that is mainly expressed in the basal layer of healthy stratified epithelia. K14 has been identified as an autoantigen in the autoimmune-mediated skin disease of Scurfy mice and patients with the "immune dysregulation polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked" syndrome. To examine whether K14 is a target protein in autoimmune skin diseases (ASD), we analyzed the expression pattern of K14 in lesional skin of patients with lichen ruber, cutaneous lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, graft-versus-host disease, psoriasis, and pemphigus vulgaris, and evaluated the reactivity of patient sera with recombinantly expressed and epidermis-derived K14. K14 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 17 healthy individuals and 58 patients with ASD. Sera from 10 healthy individuals and 41 patients with ASD were analyzed by Western blot for the presence of anti-K14 autoantibodies. In skin of patients with ASD, K14 expression is retained in suprabasal layers. In ASD with interface dermatitis, we observed focal loss of K14 within the basal layer and in hair follicles as well. A scattered dot-like K14 staining is seen in papillary dermis, most prominently in cutaneous lupus erythematosus and lichen ruber. Using Western blot, we show that sera of different patients with ASD recognize recombinantly expressed K14. We show focal loss of K14 in the basal epidermis correlating with interface dermatitis and hair follicle involvement. Moreover, enhanced reactivity of sera of patients with atopic dermatitis with K14 suggests K14 may function as an autoantigen in ASD. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  10. Detection of Loxosceles venom in lesional hair shafts and skin: application of a specific immunoassay to identify dermonecrotic arachnidism.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; Gomez, H F; Snider, R J; Stephens, E L; Czop, R M; Warren, J S

    2000-09-01

    Loxosceles spiders, of which the brown recluse is the best known, are indigenous to southcentral and southwestern regions of the United States. Loxosceles spider envenomation frequently results in painful, centrally necrotic, erythematous skin lesions that evolve over 24 to 48 hours and may take several weeks to completely heal. The diagnosis of loxoscelism is typically is based on the presence of the characteristic dermal lesion, because no definitive clinical diagnostic assay exists, and the spider is generally not available for identification. We used a rapid Loxosceles-specific enzyme immunoassay to detect spider venom in a dermal biopsy and hairs plucked from a suspicious skin lesion on the lower extremity of a 52-year-old man. This report indicates that in using a novel Loxosceles-specific immunoassay, venom can be detected in dermonecrotic skin and hair specimens for up to 4 days after envenomation.

  11. In-vivo characterization of optical properties of pigmented skin lesions including melanoma using oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Smith, Elizabeth B.; Zou, Jun; Duvic, Madeleine; Prieto, Victor; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter, we report the first use of oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry to conduct in-vivo measurements of optical properties of three different types of pigmented skin lesions, including melanoma, dysplastic, and common nevi. Both absorption and reduced scattering coefficient spectra were estimated from the spatially resolved diffuse reflectance within the wavelength range of 455–765 nm for 144 pigmented skin lesions including 16 melanomas. The absorption and reduced scattering spectra were found to change with the malignancy of the skin lesions, which were generally higher for the malignant cases than the benign ones. Based on the measurement results, the physiological origin leading to the change of the absorption and scattering properties is also discussed. PMID:21361657

  12. Mantle cell lymphoma of blastoid variant with skin lesion and rapid progression: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qinghua; Li, Yang; Lin, Hanliang; Ke, Zunfu; Liu, Yongdong; Ye, Ziyin

    2013-12-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a type of aggressive mature B-cell neoplasm. Skin involvement of MCL is extremely rare, with only 21 cases reported so far. We report a case of MCL with blastoid variant, presenting as skin lesion initially. A 53-year-old man presented with increasing petechiae and ecchymosis after slight hit. Biopsy of skin showed tumor cells densely infiltrated dermal and subcutis with blastoid cytological features and numerous mitotic figures. Immunohistochemistry study showed tumor cells were positive for CD20, CD79a, BCL2, CyclinD1, and MUM1 but lost CD5 expression. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies demonstrated t(11;14). Although received chemotherapy after the diagnosis established, the patient deteriorated rapidly and died 5 weeks after presenting with skin lesions.

  13. Automatic classification of skin lesions using color mathematical morphology-based texture descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Castro, Victor; Debayle, Johan; Wazaefi, Yanal; Rahim, Mehdi; Gaudy-Marqueste, Caroline; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Fertil, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    In this paper an automatic classification method of skin lesions from dermoscopic images is proposed. This method is based on color texture analysis based both on color mathematical morphology and Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps (SOM), and it does not need any previous segmentation process. More concretely, mathematical morphology is used to compute a local descriptor for each pixel of the image, while the SOM is used to cluster them and, thus, create the texture descriptor of the global image. Two approaches are proposed, depending on whether the pixel descriptor is computed using classical (i.e. spatially invariant) or adaptive (i.e. spatially variant) mathematical morphology by means of the Color Adaptive Neighborhoods (CANs) framework. Both approaches obtained similar areas under the ROC curve (AUC): 0.854 and 0.859 outperforming the AUC built upon dermatologists' predictions (0.792).

  14. [Patient safety and the prevention of skin and mucosal lesions associated with airway invasive devices].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Deisy Mello de; Schons, Estela dos Santos; Busanello, Josefine; Costa, Valdecir Zavarese da

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the care implemented by the nursing team to promote the safety of adult patients and prevention of skin and mucosal lesions associated with the presence of lower airways invasive devices. Study with qualitative and quantitative approach, descriptive and exploratory type, whose investigative scenarios were adult inpatient units of a hospital in the West Frontier of Rio Grande do Sul. The study subjects consisted of nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants. A total of 118 professionals were interviewed. We highlight the observed specific care with endotracheal tube and tracheostomy, management and assessment of the cuff and the criteria used to secretion aspiration. There is a superficial nursing work in the patient direct care and a differentiation in relation to the perception of nurse technicians, especially those working in the intensive care unit, who presented major property and view of the patient's clinical status.

  15. Color diffusion model for active contours - an application to skin lesion segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ivanovici, Mihai; Stoica, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Most of the existing diffusion models are defined for gray-scale images. We propose a diffusion model for color images to be used as external energy for active contours. Our diffusion model is based on the first-order moment of the correlation integral expressed using ΔE distances in the CIE Lab color space. We use a multi-scale approach for active contours, the diffusion being independently computed at various scales. We validate the model on synthetic images, including multi-fractal color textures, as well as medical images representing melanoma. We conclude that the proposed diffusion model is valid for use in skin lesion segmentation in color images using active contours.

  16. In Situ complement activation and T-cell immunity in leprosy spectrum: An immunohistological study on leprosy lesional skin.

    PubMed

    Bahia El Idrissi, Nawal; Iyer, Anand M; Ramaglia, Valeria; Rosa, Patricia S; Soares, Cleverson T; Baas, Frank; Das, Pranab K

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infection causes nerve damage and the condition worsens often during and long after treatment. Clearance of bacterial antigens including lipoarabinomannan (LAM) during and after treatment in leprosy patients is slow. We previously demonstrated that M. leprae LAM damages peripheral nerves by in situ generation of the membrane attack complex (MAC). Investigating the role of complement activation in skin lesions of leprosy patients might provide insight into the dynamics of in situ immune reactivity and the destructive pathology of M. leprae. In this study, we analyzed in skin lesions of leprosy patients, whether M. leprae antigen LAM deposition correlates with the deposition of complement activation products MAC and C3d on nerves and cells in the surrounding tissue. Skin biopsies of paucibacillary (n = 7), multibacillary leprosy patients (n = 7), and patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) (n = 6) or reversal reaction (RR) (n = 4) and controls (n = 5) were analyzed. The percentage of C3d, MAC and LAM deposition was significantly higher in the skin biopsies of multibacillary compared to paucibacillary patients (p = <0.05, p = <0.001 and p = <0.001 respectively), with a significant association between LAM and C3d or MAC in the skin biopsies of leprosy patients (r = 0.9578, p< 0.0001 and r = 0.8585, p<0.0001 respectively). In skin lesions of multibacillary patients, MAC deposition was found on axons and co-localizing with LAM. In skin lesions of paucibacillary patients, we found C3d positive T-cells in and surrounding granulomas, but hardly any MAC deposition. In addition, MAC immunoreactivity was increased in both ENL and RR skin lesions compared to non-reactional leprosy patients (p = <0.01 and p = <0.01 respectively). The present findings demonstrate that complement is deposited in skin lesions of leprosy patients, suggesting that inflammation driven by complement activation might contribute to nerve damage in the lesions of

  17. Skin lesion-associated pathogens from Octopus vulgaris: first detection of Photobacterium swingsii, Lactococcus garvieae and betanodavirus.

    PubMed

    Fichi, G; Cardeti, G; Perrucci, S; Vanni, A; Cersini, A; Lenzi, C; De Wolf, T; Fronte, B; Guarducci, M; Susini, F

    2015-07-23

    The common octopus Octopus vulgaris Cuvier, 1798 is extremely important in fisheries and is a useful protein source in most Mediterranean countries. Here we investigated pathogens associated with skin lesions in 9 naturally deceased specimens that included both cultured and wild common octopus. Within 30 min after death, each octopus was stored at 4°C and microbiologically examined within 24 h. Bacterial colonies, cultured from swabs taken from the lesions, were examined using taxonomical and biochemical analyses. Vibrio alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus were only isolated from cultured animals. A conventional PCR targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and sequencing were performed on 2 bacterial isolates that remained unidentified after taxonomical and biochemical analysis. The sequence results indicated that the bacteria had a 99% identity with Lactococcus garvieae and Photobacterium swingsii. L. garvieae was confirmed using a specific PCR based on the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region, while P. swingsii was confirmed by phylogenetic analyses. Although all animals examined were found to be infected by the protozoan species Aggregata octopiana localised in the intestines, it was also present in skin lesions of 2 of the animals. Betanodavirus was detected in both cultured and wild individuals by cell culture, PCR and electron microscopy. These findings are the first report of L. garvieae and betanodavirus from skin lesions of common octopus and the first identification of P. swingsii both in octopus skin lesions and in marine invertebrates in Italy.

  18. Topical efficacy of dimercapto-chelating agents against lewisite-induced skin lesions in SKH-1 hairless mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Nguon, Nina; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Dorandeu, Frédéric; Boudry, Isabelle

    2013-10-15

    Lewisite is a potent chemical warfare arsenical vesicant that can cause severe skin lesions. Today, lewisite exposure remains possible during demilitarization of old ammunitions and as a result of deliberate use. Although its cutaneous toxicity is not fully elucidated, a specific antidote exists, the British anti-lewisite (BAL, dimercaprol) but it is not without untoward effects. Analogs of BAL, less toxic, have been developed such as meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and have been employed for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. However, efficacy of DMSA against lewisite-induced skin lesions remains to be determined in comparison with BAL. We have thus evaluated in this study the therapeutic efficacy of BAL and DMSA in two administration modes against skin lesions induced by lewisite vapor on SKH-1 hairless mice. Our data demonstrate a strong protective efficacy of topical application of dimercapto-chelating agents in contrast to a subcutaneous administration 1 h after lewisite exposure, with attenuation of wound size, necrosis and impairment of skin barrier function. The histological evaluation also confirms the efficacy of topical application by showing that treatments were effective in reversing lewisite-induced neutrophil infiltration. This protective effect was associated with an epidermal hyperplasia. However, for all the parameters studied, BAL was more effective than DMSA in reducing lewisite-induced skin injury. Together, these findings support the use of a topical form of dimercaprol-chelating agent against lewisite-induced skin lesion within the first hour after exposure to increase the therapeutic management and that BAL, despite its side-effects, should not be abandoned. - Highlights: • Topically applied dimercapto-chelating agents reduce lewisite-induced skin damage. • One topical application of BAL or DMSA is sufficient to reverse lewisite effects. • Topical BAL is more effective than DMSA to counteract lewisite-induced skin damage.

  19. "Spider bite" lesions are usually diagnosed as skin and soft-tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Suchard, Jeffrey Ross

    2011-11-01

    Many people seek medical attention for skin lesions and other conditions they attribute to spider bites. Prior experience suggests that many of these lesions have alternate causes, especially infections with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). This study determined the percentage of emergency department (ED) patients reporting a "spider bite" who received a clinical diagnosis of spider bite by their physician vs. other etiologies, and if the diagnoses correlated with demographic risk factors for developing CA-MRSA infections. ED patients who reported that their condition was caused by a "spider bite" were prospectively enrolled in an anonymous, voluntary survey regarding details of their illness and demographic information. Discharge diagnoses were also collected and categorized as: spider bite, bite from other animal (including unknown arthropod), infection, or other diagnosis. There were 182 patients enrolled over 23 months. Seven patients (3.8%) were diagnosed with actual spider bites, 9 patients (4.9%) with bites from other animals, 156 patients (85.7%) with infections, and 6 patients (3.3%) were given other diagnoses. Four patients were given concurrent diagnoses in two categories, and 8 (4.4%) did not have the diagnosis recorded on the data collection instrument. No statistically significant associations were found between the patients' diagnostic categories and the demographic risk factors for CA-MRSA assessed. ED patients reporting a "spider bite" were most frequently diagnosed with skin and soft-tissue infections. Clinically confirmed spider bites were rare, and were caused by black widow spiders when the species could be identified. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased microRNA 21 expression contributes to arsenic induced skin lesions, skin cancers and respiratory distress in chronically exposed individuals.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Nilanjana; Bandyopadhyay, Apurba K; Dutta, Suman; Das, Jayanta K; Roy Chowdhury, Tarit; Bandyopadhyay, Arun; Giri, Ashok K

    2017-03-01

    More than 26 million people in West Bengal, India, are exposed to arsenic through drinking water, leading to several deleterious endpoints including precancerous and cancerous skin lesions and other non-dermatological health effects. Here, our aim was to identify whether miR21 is associated with such dermatological and non-dermatological health outcomes in chronically exposed humans. A total of 123 subjects from West Bengal were recruited for this study (45 exposed individuals with skin lesions, 38 exposed individuals without skin lesions and 40 unexposed individuals). The miR21 expression patterns in the lymphocytes were studied by quantitative realtime PCR and the effects on downstream targets were validated by Western blotting. Associations between the miR21 expression patterns and non-dermatological health effects were determined from epidemiological survey data. In vitro studies were done with low dose (0.05ppm) of chronic arsenic exposure to HaCaT cells for 15 passages. Interestingly, within the exposed group, the skin lesion individuals showed almost 4.5 fold up-regulation of miR21 compared to the no skin lesion group. The expression of the downstream targets of miR21 (PTEN and PDCD4) varied inversely, while the expression of pAKT and PI3K varied proportionately with its expression levels. Results of in vitro studies showed similar trends. Again miR21 was 2.03 fold up-regulated in the exposed individuals with respiratory diseases compared to the individuals without the same. This study for the first time shows that miR21 plays an important role in contributing to arsenic induced dermatological and non-dermatological health outcomes in an exposed population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A 28-Year-Old Male Patient with Nail Tumors, Skin Lesions, and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Balak, Deepak M.W.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Spitzer-Naaijkens, Juliette M.J.; Hulshof, Mieke M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of benign hamartomas in multiple organs. Most patients with TSC exhibit cutaneous manifestations. Methods We report a 28-year-old patient with multiple pink papules at the proximal nail fold of several toes. Results Histopathological analysis of a biopsy of a papule was consistent with an ungual fibroma. Histopathological analysis of a biopsy of an elevated skin-colored plaque at the lower back was diagnostic for a Shagreen patch. These findings were consistent with a clinical diagnosis of TSC. This patient was subsequently referred to a multidisciplinary TSC clinic for further screening, which revealed a giant cell astrocytoma and multiple subependymal tubers. Annual monitoring was recommended. The skin lesions were treated with topical rapamycin ointment. Conclusions Recognizing dermatological manifestations of TSC is of importance to allow early diagnosis. TSC should be considered as a differential diagnosis in the case of ungual fibromas, even in older patients. PMID:28203158

  2. CCN1, a Pro-Inflammatory Factor, Aggravates Psoriasis Skin Lesions by Promoting Keratinocyte Activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Zhou; Wu, Pinru; Huo, Rongfen; Wang, Beiqing; Shen, Zhengyu; Li, Huidan; Zhai, Tianhang; Shen, Baihua; Chen, Xiangdong; Li, Ningli

    2015-11-01

    Psoriasis is a common chronic skin disease characterized by epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. The pathogenesis of psoriasis is multifactorial and is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that CCN1 (also called Cyr61, which is short for cysteine-rich 61), an extracellular matrix protein that is also considered a pro-inflammatory factor, is highly expressed in the lesional skin of psoriasis patients, as well as in that of imiquimod (IMQ)- and IL-23-treated psoriasis-like mice. Then we show that blocking CCN1 function in vivo attenuates epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation in psoriasis-like mice. Further, in primary cultured normal human keratinocytes and HaCaT (human keratinocyte cell line) cells, CCN1 promotes keratinocyte activation, including the proliferation and expression of immune-related molecules. Finally, we observe that integrin α6β1 is the receptor of CCN1 in keratinocytes, and CCN1 stimulation activates the downstream phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway. Taken together, our findings reveal that CCN1 has a critical role in psoriasis pathogenesis. Moreover, as CCN1 is a secreted extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, our study also provides evidence that ECM, which is involved in psoriatic pathogenesis, could be a potent target for psoriasis treatment.

  3. A robust hair segmentation and removal approach for clinical images of skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Adam; Kwan, Shun-Yuen; Chang, Wen-Yu; Liu, Min-Yin; Chi, Min-Hsiu; Chen, Gwo-Shing

    2013-01-01

    Artifacts such as hair are major obstacles to automatic segmentation of pigmented skin lesion images for computer-aided diagnosis systems. It is even more challenging to process clinical images taken by a regular digital camera, where the shadows of the skin texture may mimic hair-like curvilinear structures. In this study, we examined the popular DullRazor software with a dataset of 20 clinical images. The software, specifically designed for dermoscopic images, was unable to remove fine hairs or hairs in the shade. Alternatively, we proposed using conventional matched filters to enhance curvilinear structures. The more complicate hair intersection patterns, which were known to generate low matched filtering responses, were recovered by using region growing algorithms from nearby detected hair segments with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based on a color similarity criterion. The preliminary results indicated the proposed method was able to remove more fine hairs and hairs in the shade, and lower false hair detection rate by 58% (from 0.438 to 0.183) as compared to the DullRazor's approach.

  4. Family with MSH2 mutation presenting with keratoacanthoma and precancerous skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Naohito; Takata, Akiko; Ishizawa, Shin; Niida, Yo

    2015-11-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is a familial cancer syndrome characterized by a predisposition to keratoacanthoma (KA) and sebaceous tumors. Although MTS and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) share the same genetic alterations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, the other skin lesions in MTS or HNPCC have been only rarely reported. We report a family with an MSH2 mutation c.1126_1127delTT (p.Leu376Thrfs*12). A 46-year-old male proband developed KA with sebaceous differentiation, colon cancer and gastric cancer, and fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for MTS. His 80-year-old mother, diagnosed with HNPCC, presented with multiple gastrointestinal tract cancers, Bowen's disease and actinic keratosis. Immunostaining revealed attenuated MSH2 protein expression in KA, as well as in Bowen's disease and actinic keratosis lesions. These findings suggest that MMR gene abnormality is also critical in the development of benign or malignant cutaneous tumors such as actinic keratosis and Bowen's disease in MTS/HNPCC patients. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  5. Survey of Dermatophytes in Stray Cats with and without Skin Lesions in Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Proverbio, Daniela; Perego, Roberta; Spada, Eva; Bagnagatti de Giorgi, Giada; Della Pepa, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dermatophytes in stray cats with and without clinical lesions from different colonies in rural and urban areas of Milan and surroundings in northern Italy. Stray cats (273) were caught during a trap-neuter-release (TNR) program conducted in different colonies of northern Italy in both rural and urban areas. Each cat was examined in dark environment with a Wood's lamp prior to sample collection. Hair or scales exhibiting typical fluorescence were removed with a pair of sterile hemostats and cultured. The hair of all cats was then sampled by Mackenzie modified brush technique regardless of the presence or absence of skin lesions attributable to dermatophytosis. All the hair samples were subjected to fungal culture. 15 cats were positive (5.5%). Microsporum canis was the most common dermatophyte isolated (13/15). The only other isolated dermatophyte was Trichophyton mentagrophytes (2/15). Our estimated prevalence of dermatophytes in stray cats was much lower than other Italian studies on the same population. PMID:24955280

  6. Increased numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Roosje, P J; van Kooten, P J; Thepen, T; Bihari, I C; Rutten, V P; Koeman, J P; Willemse, T

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize T cells in the skin of cats with an allergic dermatitis histologically compatible with atopic dermatitis, since T cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in humans. We observed a significantly greater number of T cells in lesional skin of domestic short-haired cats with allergic dermatitis (n = 10; median age 5.8 years) than in the skin of healthy control animals (n = 10; median age 5.0 years). In the skin of the healthy control animals, one or two CD4+ cells and no CD8+ cells were found. A predominant increase of CD4+ T cells and a CD4+/CD8+ ratio (mean +/- SD: 3.9 +/- 2.0) was found in the lesional skin of 10 cats with allergic dermatitis. The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in the skin of healthy control animals could not be determined because of the absence of CD8+ cells. The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in the peripheral blood of 10 cats with allergic dermatitis (mean +/- SD: 1.9 +/- 0.4) did not differ significantly from that in 10 healthy control animals (2.2 +/- 0.4). The CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio and predominance of CD4+ T cells in the lesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis is comparable to that found in atopic dermatitis in humans. In addition, the observed increase of CD4+ T cells in the nonlesional skin of cats with allergic dermatitis compared to the skin of healthy cats is similar to what is seen in humans. Cytokines produced by T cells and antigen-specific T cells are important mediators in the inflammatory cascade resulting in atopic dermatitis in humans. This study is a first step to investigate their role in feline allergic dermatitis.

  7. Correlations between skin lesions induced by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α and selected cytokines in Crohn's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk, Marcin; Sobolewska, Aleksandra; Wójcik, Bartosz; Loga, Karolina; Fichna, Jakub; Wiśniewska-Jarosińska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between the appearance of skin lesions and concentration of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-23 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients during anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) therapy METHODS: A prospective study included 30 adult patients with CD of Caucasian origin (19 men and 11 women; mean age ± SD 32.0 ± 8.6 years) during biological therapy with anti-TNF-α antibodies from January 2012 to March 2013. Eighteen patients were treated with infliximab, seven with adalimumab and five with certolizumab. Inclusion criteria were exacerbation of the underlying disease, Crohn’s Disease Activity Index over 300 and the ineffectiveness of previously used non-biological therapies. Patients with a history of psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and other autoimmune skin lesions were excluded from the study. The control group consisted of 12 healthy subjects. A diagnostic survey was carried out, blood tests and careful skin examination were performed, and the serum levels of IL-17, IL-23 and IFN-γ were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays technique. Dermatoses that have developed in the course of biological therapy in patients who had no pre-existing skin lesions of similar character were qualified as skin lesions induced by anti-TNF-α therapy. RESULTS: Skin manifestations occurred in 18 of CD patients during the anti-TNF-α therapy (60%), in the average time of 10.16 ± 3.42 mo following the beginning of the 52-wk treatment cycle. Skin lesions observed in CD patients during biological therapy included psoriasiform lesions (44.4%), and eczema forms lesions (22.2%). In CD patients with drug induced skin lesions significantly higher levels of hemoglobin (13.3 ± 1.5 g/dL vs 10.8 ± 1.9 g/dL, P = 0.018) and hematocrit (39.9% ± 4.5% vs 34.3% ± 5.4%, P = 0.01), as well as a significantly lower level of platelets (268 ± 62 × 103/μL vs 408 ± 239 × 103/μL, P = 0.046) was observed compared with CD patients

  8. Anesthetic Considerations for Neuraxial Anesthesia in Pregnant Patients With Pityriasis Rosea With Skin Lesions Covering the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Werntz, Megan; Chun, Carlene; Togioka, Brandon Michael

    2016-10-15

    Pityriasis rosea (PR) is an acute exanthematous skin disease that is likely due to reactivation of human herpesviruses (HHVs) 6b and 7. In contrast to herpes simplex and zoster (alphaherpesviruses), HHV-6b and -7 (betaherpesviruses) are not found predominantly in skin lesions. This difference in virion location may decrease the possibility of causing central nervous system infection through skin contamination, but the risk for hematogenous spread likely remains the same. This article uses the first-known epidural placement through active PR to illustrate risk-benefit considerations when deciding between neuraxial and general anesthesia for obstetric patients with PR.

  9. Disodium Phosphonoacetate in Cream Base as a Possible Topical Treatment for Skin Lesions of Herpes Simplex Virus in Cebus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Amos E.; London, William T.; Sever, John L.

    1977-01-01

    Disodium phosphonoacetate (PAA) in a cream-ointment base was applied to herpesvirus skin lesions on the genitalia of cebus monkeys. The lesions had been produced by the intradermal injection of herpes simplex virus type 2. Concentrations of 0.2, 2, and 5% PAA were used. Liberal application of PAA at concentrations of 2 and 5% proved extremely irritating and produced extensive, severe lesions over the treated area. The 2% PAA, when applied carefully to the lesion area, proved less irritating, but did not reduce healing time when compared with the placebo-treated animals. The 0.2% PAA caused slight reduction in lesion size and duration, but these differences were not statistically significant when compared with placebo-treated animals. PMID:411417

  10. Histomorphology and vascular lesions in dorsal rat skin used as injection sites for a subcutaneous toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Wells, Monique Y; Voute, Hélène; Bellingard, Valérie; Fisch, Cécile; Boulifard, Virginie; George, Catherine; Picaut, Philippe

    2010-02-01

    Subcutaneous injection of pharmaceutical compounds into the dorsal skin of rats is common in preclinical and nonclinical studies. However, no detailed histologic description of this anatomic location has been published to date. Following the observation of vascular lesions in the dorsum of rats in a thirteen-week toxicity study, a complementary study was performed on untreated Sprague-Dawley rats to evaluate the normal histology of the skin and subcutis, the potential effect of chronic subcutaneous injection on the morphology of the skin and its vasculature, and the spontaneous vascular pathology in the areas used as injection sites in the principal study. This study showed that saline injection did not fundamentally alter the morphology of the injection sites used for the principal study. Skin thickness was greater in males than in females. Although acellular intimal thickening occurred spontaneously in the dorsal skin of untreated males and females, only males had a spontaneous incidence of intimal hyperplasia. No site predilection for intimal lesions was apparent for either sex. Saline injection, or the physical trauma of injection, may induce intimal hyperplasia; males appear more likely to develop the lesion than do females. It is possible that acellular intimal thickening can progress to intimal hyperplasia under appropriate conditions.

  11. Oral mucosal lesions in skin diseased patients attending a dermatologic clinic: a cross-sectional study in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background So far there have been no studies focusing on the prevalence of a wide spectrum of oral mucosal lesions (OML) in patients with dermatologic diseases. This is noteworthy as skin lesions are strongly associated with oral lesions and could easily be neglected by dentists. This study aimed to estimate the frequency and socio-behavioural correlates of OML in skin diseased patients attending outpatient's facility of Khartoum Teaching Hospital - Dermatology Clinic, Sudan. Methods A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted in Khartoum from October 2008 to January 2009. A total of 588 patients (mean age 37.2 ± 16 years, 50.3% females) completed an oral examination and a personal interview of which 544 patients (mean age 37.1 ± 15.9 years, 50% females) with confirmed skin disease diagnosis were included for further analyses. OML were recorded using the World Health Organization criteria (WHO). Biopsy and smear were used as adjuvant techniques for confirmation. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Science (Version 15.0.1). Cross tabulation and Chi-square with Fisher's exact test were used. Results A total of 438 OML were registered in 315 (57.9%, males: 54.6% versus females: 45.6%, p < 0.05) skin diseased patients. Thus, a certain number of patients had more than one type of OML. Tongue lesions were the most frequently diagnosed OML (23.3%), followed in descending order by white lesions (19.1%), red and blue lesions (11%) and vesiculobullous diseases (6%). OML in various skin diseases were; vesiculobullous reaction pattern (72.2%), lichenoid reaction pattern (60.5%), infectious lesions (56.5%), psoriasiform reaction pattern (56.7%), and spongiotic reaction pattern (46.8%). Presence of OML in skin diseased patients was most frequent in older age groups (62.4% older versus 52.7% younger, p < 0.05), in males (63.2% males versus 52.6% females, p < 0.05), patients with a systemic disease (65.2% with systemic versus 51.9% without

  12. Plasma cell dyscrasia with polyneuropathy--POEMS syndrome presenting with vasculitic skin lesions and responding to combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Y; Raanani, P; Shenkar, A; Thaler, M; Grossman, E

    2000-12-01

    We report a 61-year-old male patient who presented with severe sensorimotor neuropathy, leg edema and skin lesions with M-paraprotein and 50% plasma cells in the bone marrow. The POEMS (Crow-Fukase) syndrome was diagnosed and the skin lesions were compatible with vasculitis according to the histopathology. The patient was treated with aggressive combined chemotherapy, which induced improvement in both the clinical and laboratory parameters of his disease. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a vasculitic process underlying the skin changes in the POEMS syndrome. Our findings may shed light on the unknown pathogenesis of this syndrome and the successful results of treatment support the adoption of an aggressive therapeutic approach in symptomatic patients.

  13. Identification and partial sequencing of a crocodile poxvirus associated with deeply penetrating skin lesions in farmed Nile crocodiles, Crocodylus niloticus.

    PubMed

    Huchzermeyer, F W; Wallace, D B; Putterill, J F; Gerdes, G H

    2009-09-01

    When large numbers of crocodile skins were downgraded because of the presence of small pin prick-like holes, collapsed epidermal cysts were found deep in the dermis of juvenile crocodiles while forming cysts were observed in hatchlings. Histopathology of these forming cysts showed the presence of intracytoplasmic inclusions in proliferating and ballooning epidermal cells. Pox virions were seen in electron microscope preparations made from the scabs of such early lesions. The partial sequencing of virus material from scrapings of these lesions and comparison of it with the published sequence of crocodile poxvirus showed the virus associated with the deep lesions to be closely related, but different. To differentiate between the two forms of crocodile pox infection it is suggested that the previously known form should be called "classical crocodile pox" and the newly discovered form "atypical crocodile pox". The application of strict hygiene measures brought about a decline in the percentage of downgraded skins.

  14. Topical efficacy of dimercapto-chelating agents against lewisite-induced skin lesions in SKH-1 hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Nguon, Nina; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Dorandeu, Frédéric; Boudry, Isabelle

    2013-10-15

    Lewisite is a potent chemical warfare arsenical vesicant that can cause severe skin lesions. Today, lewisite exposure remains possible during demilitarization of old ammunitions and as a result of deliberate use. Although its cutaneous toxicity is not fully elucidated, a specific antidote exists, the British anti-lewisite (BAL, dimercaprol) but it is not without untoward effects. Analogs of BAL, less toxic, have been developed such as meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and have been employed for the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. However, efficacy of DMSA against lewisite-induced skin lesions remains to be determined in comparison with BAL. We have thus evaluated in this study the therapeutic efficacy of BAL and DMSA in two administration modes against skin lesions induced by lewisite vapor on SKH-1 hairless mice. Our data demonstrate a strong protective efficacy of topical application of dimercapto-chelating agents in contrast to a subcutaneous administration 1h after lewisite exposure, with attenuation of wound size, necrosis and impairment of skin barrier function. The histological evaluation also confirms the efficacy of topical application by showing that treatments were effective in reversing lewisite-induced neutrophil infiltration. This protective effect was associated with an epidermal hyperplasia. However, for all the parameters studied, BAL was more effective than DMSA in reducing lewisite-induced skin injury. Together, these findings support the use of a topical form of dimercaprol-chelating agent against lewisite-induced skin lesion within the first hour after exposure to increase the therapeutic management and that BAL, despite its side-effects, should not be abandoned. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pathogenesis of skin lesions in mice with chronic proliferative dermatitis (cpdm/cpdm).

    PubMed Central

    Gijbels, M. J.; Zurcher, C.; Kraal, G.; Elliott, G. R.; HogenEsch, H.; Schijff, G.; Savelkoul, H. F.; Bruijnzeel, P. L.

    1996-01-01

    Chronic proliferative dermatitis is a spontaneous mutation in C57BL/Ka mice (cpdm/cpdm), showing alopecia, epithelial hyperproliferation, infiltration by eosinophils and macrophages, and vascular dilatation. To further elucidate its pathogenesis, organs of 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-week-old cpdm/cpdm mice were examined. At 4 weeks, the epidermal thickness was increased, whereas already at 3 weeks, the bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was increased in the basal keratinocytes. However, already at the age of 1 week, skin, lungs, and lymph nodes were infiltrated by eosinophils although no macroscopic lesions were present. Compared with control animals, 6-week-old cpdm/cpdm mice had decreased serum IgE levels and increased numbers of mast cells. From the age of 1 week these mast cells became increasingly IgE positive. In contrast, the mast cells of the control animals remained IgE negative. Mast cells of control and cpdm/cpdm mice were interleukin-4 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha positive. A likely explanation for the tissue infiltration of eosinophils could be the release of interleukin-4 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha from activated mast cells. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha may lead to the expression of E-selectin on endothelial cells, facilitating interleukin-4-mediated eosinophil transendothelial migration. Although various pathogenetic aspects of the cpdm/cpdm mouse need further elucidation, this model can be a tool to study eosinophil infiltration, leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions, and mast cell proliferation. Furthermore, the cpdm/cpdm mouse can be used to study chronic inflammatory skin disease because of the severe epidermal proliferation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8774148

  16. Skin Involvement and Breast Cancer: Are T4B Lesions of All Sizes Created Equal?

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Diana; Ruth, Karen; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Egleston, Brian L.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Wong, Yu-Ning; Boraas, Marcia; Bleicher, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonmetastatic non-inflammatory invasive breast cancers having skin involvement (SI) are classified as T4b, regardless of size. This study evaluated disease specific survival (DSS) to determine whether size should be considered for these lesions, rather than grouping them all into Stage III. Study Design Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data linked to Medicare claims were reviewed. SI and nonSI tumors were reclassified using AJCC 7th Edition groupings using tumor size and nodal involvement alone without considering SI (neostage). DSS was adjusted for demographics, histology and treatment using competing risk methods with propensity score-based weighting and bootstrap standard errors. Results Among 924 SI patients diagnosed between 1992 and 2005, tumors were 0.1–2.0, 2.1–5.0, and >5.0 cm in 11.6%, 51.1%, and 37.3% of cases, respectively. There were no nodal metastases in 22.3%, 1–3 positive nodes in 31.7%, 4–9 positive in 28.6% and ≥10 positive in 17.4% of cases. For SI patients, adjusted 5-year DSS was 95.8% [95%CI: 95.6–96.0] for neostage I, declining progressively to 36.4% [95%CI: 33.8–39.2] for neostage IIIC patients. Adjusted 5-year DSS for SI and nonSI tumors (n=66,185) was similar for neostage I, IIA, and IIB, and markedly lower for IIIA and IIIC. Adjusted DSS for SI IIIA was similar to nonSI IIIC. Conclusions Noninflammatory SI breast cancers have widely varied DSS that differs by tumor size and nodal involvement, and therefore should not all be stage III. SI should be subordinate to T and N groupings to classify SI with nonSI lesions having similar prognoses. PMID:25026875

  17. HPV16-E7 Expression in skin induces TSLP secretion, type 2 ILC infiltration and atopic dermatitis-like lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Monnet, Nastasia; Tran, Le Son; Mittal, Deepak; Al-Kouba, Jane; Steptoe, Raymond J.; Grimbaldeston, Michele A.; Frazer, Ian H.; Wells, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common pruritic and inflammatory skin disorder with unknown etiology. Most commonly occurring during early childhood, atopic dermatitis is associated with eczematous lesions and lichenification, in which the epidermis becomes hypertrophied resulting in thickening of the skin. In this study, we report an atopic dermatitis-like pathophysiology results in a murine model following the expression of the high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16 oncoprotein E7 in keratinocytes under the Keratin 14 promoter. We show that HPV 16 E7 expression in the skin is associated with skin thickening, acanthosis and light spongiosis. Locally, HPV 16 E7 expressing skin secreted high levels of TSLP and contained increased numbers of ILCs. High levels of circulating IgE were associated with increased susceptibility to skin allergy in a model of cutaneous challenge, and to airway bronchiolar inflammation, enhanced airway goblet cell metaplasia and mucus production in a model of atopic march. Surprisingly, skin pathology occurred independently of T-cells and mast cells. Thus, our findings suggest that the expression of a single HPV oncogene in the skin can drive the onset of atopic dermatitis-like pathology through the induction of TSLP and type 2 ILC infiltration. PMID:25601274

  18. Assessment of a Diagnostic Predictive Probability Model Provided by a Multispectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis Device for Melanoma and Other High-risk Pigmented Lesions and its Impact on Biopsy Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jane; Tucker, Natalie; White, Richard; Rigel, Darrell S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Risk prediction models for primary malignant melanoma thus far have relied on qualitative patient information. The authors propose a quantitative diagnostic predictive probability model using Multispectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis for melanoma and other high-risk pigmented lesions and evaluate its effectiveness optimizing biopsy decisions by dermatologists. Design: Data from 1,632 pigmented lesions analyzed by a Multispectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis device were used to perform a logistic regression analysis. This new quantitative melanoma or melanoma/atypical melanocytic hyperplasia/high-grade dysplastic nevus probability model was then evaluated to determine its impact on dermatologist decisions to biopsy pigmented lesions clinically suggestive of melanoma. Participants were given an electronic keypad and answered “yes” or “no” if they would biopsy each of 12 pigmented lesions when presented first with patient history, clinical images, and dermoscopic images and again when subsequently shown Multispectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis data. Setting/participants: Study of 191 dermatologists at a medical conference. Measurements: Sensitivity, specificity, biopsy accuracy, overall biopsy rate, and percentage dermatologists biopsying all five melanomas. Results: Dermatologists were significantly more sensitive, specific, and accurate while decreasing overall biopsy rates with Multispectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis probability information. Conclusion: Integration of Multispectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis probability information in the biopsy evaluation and selection process of pigmented lesions has the potential to improve melanoma sensitivity of dermatologists without the concomitant costs associated with additional biopsies being performed. PMID:25584133

  19. Assessment of tumor thickness in melanocytic skin lesions: comparison of optical coherence tomography, 20-MHz ultrasound and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Torsten; Ehler, Lin-Kristin; Voth, Harald; Fortmeier, Ines; Hoeller, Tobias; Hornung, Thorsten; Schmid-Wendtner, Monika-Hildegard

    2011-01-01

    Accurate assessment of vertical tumor size is important for surgical treatment planning of melanocytic skin lesions. High-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) is frequently used for this purpose, but overestimation of tumor thickness is known as a problem especially in thin melanocytic lesions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a new imaging technique might be a promising alternative. To evaluate the ability of OCT to accurately determine the vertical tumor thickness of melanocytic skin lesions and to compare it with HFUS and histopathology in order to improve surgical planning. In this single-center study, 26 melanocytic lesions were imaged by OCT and HFUS. Vertical lesion dimensions of both methods were compared with histopathological measurements. Bland-Altman plots for OCT and histopathology as well as for HFUS and histopathology revealed better agreement for OCT and histopathology concerning tumor thickness measurements. Tumor thickness values for the melanocytic lesions measured by OCT presented a median tumor thickness of 0.31 mm (range 0.10-0.77) compared to a median tumor thickness of 0.25 mm (range 0.06-1.5) measured by histopathology. The median tumor thickness of HFUS was 0.44 mm (range 0.23-1.1). A Spearman correlation procedure including the correlation coefficient (r) showed a stronger relationship between OCT and histopathology (r = 0.734) compared to HFUS and histopathology (r = 0.390). On the basis of this smaller study cohort, OCT seems to be more exact than HFUS as far as thickness determination of thin melanocytic skin lesions is concerned. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Influence of social mixing and group size on skin lesions and mounting in organic entire male pigs.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, R; Edwards, S A; Rousing, T; Labouriau, R; Sørensen, J T

    2016-07-01

    Alternatives to surgical castration are needed, due to stress and pain caused by castration of male pigs. One alternative is production of entire male pigs. However, changed behaviour of entire males compared with castrated males might adversely affect the welfare of entire males and changes in management procedures and production system might be needed. Elements from the organic pig production system might be beneficial in this aspect. The aim of this article is to investigate the effect of grouping strategy including social mixing and group size on levels of mounting behaviour and skin lesions, hypothesising that procedures that disrupt the social stability (e.g. regrouping) will have a larger negative effect in small groups compared with large groups. Approximately 1600 organic entire male pigs of the breed (Landrace×Yorkshire)×Duroc were reared in parallel in five organic herds, distributed across four batches in a 2×2 factorial design in order to test the influence of social mixing (presence or absence of social mixing at relocation) and group size (15 and 30 animals). Animals were able to socialise with piglets from other litters during the lactation period, and were all mixed across litters at weaning. A second mixing occurred at insertion to fattening pens for pigs being regrouped. Counting of skin lesions (1348 or 1124 pigs) and registration of mounting behaviour (1434 or 1258 pigs) were done on two occasions during the experimental period. No interactive effects were found between social mixing and group size on either skin lesions or mounting frequency. Herd differences were found for both mounting frequency and number of skin lesions. No association between skin lesions and mounting were revealed. Social mixing and group size were shown as interacting effects with herds on mounting frequency (P<0.0001), but with no consistent pattern across all herds. In addition, no effect of social mixing was found on mean number of skin lesions, but more lesions

  1. Photobleaching measurements of pigmented and vascular skin lesions: results of a clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihachev, Alexey; Rozniece, Kristine; Lesins, Janis; Spigulis, Janis

    2011-07-01

    The autofluorescence photobleaching intensity dynamics of in vivo skin and skin pathologies under continuous 532 nm laser irradiation have been studied. Overall the 141 human skin malformations were investigated by laser induced skin autofluorescence photobleaching analysis. Details of equipment are described along with some measurement results illustrating potentiality of the technology.

  2. PIACS: A System for the Automatic Detection, Categorization and Comparison of Scratch-Related Skin Lesions in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Bruland, Philipp; Hänse, Waldemar; Schedel, Fiona; Ständer, Sonja; Fritz, Fleur

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of chronic pruritus-related, scratch-induced skin lesions the categorization, counting and temporal comparison are common methodologies. The observation requires a good memory and expertise in this field to gain comparable findings for this time-consuming process. Digital image processing aims at supporting such manual detections. The objective is to develop a software tool for automatic image detection and comparison. The new photographic setting implies the usage of markers to derive the brightness and size of lesions. MATLAB has been used for the software development. The newly defined setting allows taking standardized images of pruritus-associated cutaneous lesions for detection and comparison. The tool named PIACS (Prurigo Image Analyzing and Comparing System) allows automatically detecting, categorizing and comparing lesions based on digital images.

  3. Tissue immunostaining for factor XIIIa in dermal dendrocytes of pityriasis alba skin lesions*

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Francisca Regina Oliveira; do Amaral, Gabriela Borborema; Mendes, Maiana Darwich; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pityriasis alba affects 1% of the world population and about 9.9% of the children in Brazil. However, its etiology remains uncertain. OBJECTIVE The objective of the present study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of factor XIIIa in dermal dendrocytes of skin lesions of pityriasis alba. METHOD Twenty patients with pityriasis alba and 20 patients with atopic dermatitis underwent biopsy. The dermal dendrocytes marked by factor XIIIa were counted by means of immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS The mean amount of dermal dendrocytes found in the patients with pityriasis alba was 2, whereas in the patients with atopic dermatitis it was 4, with a statistically significant difference between them. A cutoff point of 3 cells/square inch was established to differentiate pityriasis alba from atopic dermatitis, with 80% sensibility and 90% specificity. CONCLUSION We believe that pityriasis alba and atopic dermatitis should be considered different clinical forms within the spectrum of atopic disease, in which sun radiation plays an important role by modulating the progression of the disease. PMID:24770500

  4. Tissue immunostaining for factor XIIIa in dermal dendrocytes of pityriasis alba skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Francisca Regina Oliveira; Amaral, Gabriela Borborema do; Mendes, Maiana Darwich; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões

    2014-01-01

    Pityriasis alba affects 1% of the world population and about 9.9% of the children in Brazil. However, its etiology remains uncertain. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of factor XIIIa in dermal dendrocytes of skin lesions of pityriasis alba. Twenty patients with pityriasis alba and 20 patients with atopic dermatitis underwent biopsy. The dermal dendrocytes marked by factor XIIIa were counted by means of immunohistochemical analysis. The mean amount of dermal dendrocytes found in the patients with pityriasis alba was 2, whereas in the patients with atopic dermatitis it was 4, with a statistically significant difference between them. A cutoff point of 3 cells/square inch was established to differentiate pityriasis alba from atopic dermatitis, with 80% sensibility and 90% specificity. We believe that pityriasis alba and atopic dermatitis should be considered different clinical forms within the spectrum of atopic disease, in which sun radiation plays an important role by modulating the progression of the disease.

  5. Understanding visual search patterns of dermatologists assessing pigmented skin lesions before and after online training.

    PubMed

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Chao, Joseph; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Morrison, Lynne; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this investigation was to explore the feasibility of characterizing the visual search characteristics of dermatologists evaluating images corresponding to single pigmented skin lesions (PSLs) (close-ups and dermoscopy) as a venue to improve training programs for dermoscopy. Two Board-certified dermatologists and two dermatology residents participated in a phased study. In phase I, they viewed a series of 20 PSL cases ranging from benign nevi to melanoma. The close-up and dermoscopy images of the PSL were evaluated sequentially and rated individually as benign or malignant, while eye position was recorded. Subsequently, the participating subjects completed an online dermoscopy training module that included a pre- and post-test assessing their dermoscopy skills (phase 2). Three months later, the subjects repeated their assessment on the 20 PSLs presented during phase I of the study. Significant differences in viewing time and eye-position parameters were observed as a function of level of expertise. Dermatologists overall have more efficient search than residents generating fewer fixations with shorter dwells. Fixations and dwells associated with decisions changing from benign to malignant or vice versa from photo to dermatoscopic viewing were longer than any other decision, indicating increased visual processing for those decisions. These differences in visual search may have implications for developing tools to teach dermatologists and residents about how to better utilize dermoscopy in clinical practice.

  6. Texture descriptors based on adaptive neighborhoods for classification of pigmented skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Castro, Víctor; Debayle, Johan; Wazaefi, Yanal; Rahim, Mehdi; Gaudy-Marqueste, Caroline; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Fertil, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Different texture descriptors are proposed for the automatic classification of skin lesions from dermoscopic images. They are based on color texture analysis obtained from (1) color mathematical morphology (MM) and Kohonen self-organizing maps (SOMs) or (2) local binary patterns (LBPs), computed with the use of local adaptive neighborhoods of the image. Neither of these two approaches needs a previous segmentation process. In the first proposed descriptor, the adaptive neighborhoods are used as structuring elements to carry out adaptive MM operations which are further combined by using Kohonen SOM; this has been compared with a nonadaptive version. In the second one, the adaptive neighborhoods enable geometrical feature maps to be defined, from which LBP histograms are computed. This has also been compared with a classical LBP approach. A receiver operating characteristics analysis of the experimental results shows that the adaptive neighborhood-based LBP approach yields the best results. It outperforms the nonadaptive versions of the proposed descriptors and the dermatologists' visual predictions.

  7. A comparison of classification methods as diagnostic system: A case study on skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Suhail M; Baareh, Abdel Karim Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    Numerous classification methods are currently available, but most of them were performed on different datasets. In this paper, different classification techniques were used for a diagnostic system on different skin lesions for the same data, which gives consistency for the data to have more accurate and better results. Four classification methods were proposed, a classical method based on K-Nearest Neighbor with Sequential Scanning selection technique for feature selection, a classical method with complex technique KNN with Genetic Algorithm, a complex method based on Artificial Neural Networks with Genetic Algorithm and an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System. From the results obtained we can say that the performance of KNN with optimization of genetic algorithm for the feature selection was the best with an accuracy rate of 94%. The Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System result was also good with an accuracy rate of 92%, and the other techniques' results were also satisfactory. The improvement on the performance of the classifier depends on the feature selection methods. In addition, the diagnosis system as a decision support tool could be used to increase the performance of human experts to make a correct decision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Receptor for advanced glycation end as drug targets in diabetes-induced skin lesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang-Fang; Tang, Wei; Lin, Wei-Dong; Liu, Zi-Yu; Lu, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Bei; Ye, Fei; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zou, Jun-Jie; Liao, Wan-Qing

    2017-01-01

    The involvement of the receptor for advanced glycation end (RAGE) in different diseases has been reviewed in great detail, previously, but the effects of diabetic drugs on RAGE-induced skin lesion during long course diabetes remains poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that RAGE was overexpressed in both diabetic rats and human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as alternations of relative protein levels were also found in diabetic rats and HaCaT cells with overexpression of RAGE that were rectified by metformin (Met) treatment. Moreover, overexpression of RAGE was also found to induce secretions of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, ICAM-1 and COX-2 in HaCaT cells, and Met treatment corrected these inflammatory factor secretions. In addition, treatment with Met markedly reduced RAGE overexpression-induced p38 and NF-κB activation. Taken together, the findings of the present study have demonstrated, for the first time that Met protects HaCaT cells against diabetes-induced injuries and inflammatory responses through inhibiting activated RAGE. PMID:28337263

  9. Receptor for advanced glycation end as drug targets in diabetes-induced skin lesion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Fang; Tang, Wei; Lin, Wei-Dong; Liu, Zi-Yu; Lu, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Bei; Ye, Fei; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zou, Jun-Jie; Liao, Wan-Qing

    2017-01-01

    The involvement of the receptor for advanced glycation end (RAGE) in different diseases has been reviewed in great detail, previously, but the effects of diabetic drugs on RAGE-induced skin lesion during long course diabetes remains poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that RAGE was overexpressed in both diabetic rats and human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as alternations of relative protein levels were also found in diabetic rats and HaCaT cells with overexpression of RAGE that were rectified by metformin (Met) treatment. Moreover, overexpression of RAGE was also found to induce secretions of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, ICAM-1 and COX-2 in HaCaT cells, and Met treatment corrected these inflammatory factor secretions. In addition, treatment with Met markedly reduced RAGE overexpression-induced p38 and NF-κB activation. Taken together, the findings of the present study have demonstrated, for the first time that Met protects HaCaT cells against diabetes-induced injuries and inflammatory responses through inhibiting activated RAGE.

  10. Impact of Guidance Provided by a Multispectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis Device Following Dermoscopy on Decisions to Biopsy Atypical Melanocytic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Richard R; Yoo, Jane; Tucker, Natalie; White, Richard; Rigel, Darrell S

    2015-09-01

    To determine how a multispectral digital skin lesion analysis (MSDSLA) device data affects the biopsy performance of dermatologists and non-dermatologist practitioners following clinical and dermoscopic pigmented lesion evaluation. MSDSLA employs near infrared light to image and analyze pigmented skin lesions. MSDSLA generates a "classifier score" based on morphological disorganization. Using a logistical regression model, 1) a probability of being melanoma and, 2) a probability of being melanoma, atypical melanocytic hyperplasia, or a high grade dysplastic nevus is computed. PARTICIPANTS were shown clinical images of 12 lesions (2 melanomas in situ, 3 invasive melanomas, and 7 low grade DNs). They were asked first if they would biopsy the lesion based on clinical images, again after observing dermoscopy images, and once more when presented with MSDSLA probability information. National dermoscopy conference. Sixty-four healthcare providers; 30 dermatologists and 34 non-dermatologist practitioners. Sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, biopsy rates Results: For the 30 dermatologists, sensitivity was 65 percent after clinical evaluation (C) and 65% post-dermoscopy (D) but improved to 91% after MSDSLA. For the 34 non-dermatologist practitioners, sensitivity improved from 66 percent (C) to 70 percent (D) to 95 percent after MSDSLA. With MSDSLA information, dermatologist specificity increased from 40 percent (D) to 58 percent while non-dermatologist practitioners specificity increased from 34 percent (D) to 55 percent. Diagnostic accuracy of malignant and benign lesions decreased for both groups 55 percent (C) to 51 percent (D) for dermatologists and 54 percent (C) to 49 percent (D) for non-dermatologist practitioners. However, diagnostic accuracy increased to 72 percent for dermatologists and 72 percent for non-dermatologist practitioners with MSDSLA data. Non-melanoma biopsy percentages by dermatologists increased from 53 percent (C) to 60 percent (D), but

  11. The use of teledermoscopy in the accurate identification of cancerous skin lesions in the adult population: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Amy F; Mallow, Jennifer A; Theeke, Laurie A

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of teledermoscopy in the diagnostic management of pre-cancerous and cancerous skin lesions involves digital dermoscopic images transmitted over telecommunication networks via email or web applications. Teledermoscopy may improve the accuracy in clinical diagnoses of melanoma skin cancer if integrated into electronic medical records and made available to rural communities, potentially leading to decreased morbidity and mortality. Objective and method The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic review of evidence on the use of teledermoscopy to improve the accuracy of skin lesion identification in adult populations. The PRISMA method guided the development of this systematic review. A total of seven scholarly databases were searched for articles published between the years of 2000 and 2015. All studies were critically appraised using the Rosswurm and Larrabee critique worksheet, placed in a matrix for comparison evaluating internal and external validity and inspected for homogeneity of findings. Results Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria for this review. A majority of the studies were cross-sectional and non-experimental. Ten of the 16 focused on interobserver concordance and diagnostic agreement between teledermoscopy and another comparator. Instrumentation in conducting the studies showed inconsistency with reported results. Discussion Higher level evidence is needed to support clinical application of teledermoscopy for accuracy of diagnostic measurement in the treatment of pre-cancerous and cancerous skin lesions in adults. Future research is needed to develop a standardized, reliable and valid measurement tool for implementation in clinical practice.

  12. Risk factors for saddle-related skin lesions on elephants used in the tourism industry in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Magda, Scarlett; Spohn, Olivia; Angkawanish, Taweepoke; Smith, Dale A; Pearl, David L

    2015-05-19

    Lesions related to working conditions and improper saddle design are a concern for a variety of working animals including elephants. The objectives of the present study were to determine the prevalence of cutaneous lesions in anatomic regions (i.e., neck, girth, back, tail) in contact with saddle-related equipment among elephants in Thailand working in the tourism industry, and to identify potential risk factors associated with these lesions. Data for this cross-sectional study were collected between May 2007 and July 2007 on 194 elephants from 18 tourism camps across Thailand. There was a high prevalence (64.4 %; 95 % CI 57.3 - 71.2) of active lesions, most often located on the back region. Using multilevel multivariable logistic regression modelling containing a random intercept for camp we identified the following risk factors: increasing elephant age, the use of rice sacks as padding material in contact with the skin, and the provision of a break for the elephants. Working hours had a quadratic relationship with the log odds of an active lesion where the probability of an active lesion initially increased with the number of working hours per day and then declined possibly reflecting a "healthy worker" bias where only animals without lesions continue to be able to work these longer hours. While we recognize that the cross-sectional nature of the study posed some inferential limitations, our results offer several potential intervention points for the prevention of these lesions. Specifically, we recommend the following until longitudinal studies can be conducted: increased monitoring of older elephants and the back region of all elephants, working less than 6 hours per day, and the avoidance of rice sacks as padding material in contact with skin.

  13. Elevated levels of plasma Big endothelin-1 and its relation to hypertension and skin lesions in individuals exposed to arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Islam, Khairul; Yeasmin, Fouzia; Karim, Md. Rezaul; Rahman, Mashiur; Agarwal, Smita; Hossain, Shakhawoat; Aziz, Abdul; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Sheikh, Afzal; Haque, Abedul; Hossain, M. Tofazzal; Hossain, Mostaque; Haris, Parvez I.; Ikemura, Noriaki; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro; Hossain, Khaled

    2012-03-01

    Chronic arsenic (As) exposure affects the endothelial system causing several diseases. Big endothelin-1 (Big ET-1), the biological precursor of endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a more accurate indicator of the degree of activation of the endothelial system. Effect of As exposure on the plasma Big ET-1 levels and its physiological implications have not yet been documented. We evaluated plasma Big ET-1 levels and their relation to hypertension and skin lesions in As exposed individuals in Bangladesh. A total of 304 study subjects from the As-endemic and non-endemic areas in Bangladesh were recruited for this study. As concentrations in water, hair and nails were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The plasma Big ET-1 levels were measured using a one-step sandwich enzyme immunoassay kit. Significant increase in Big ET-1 levels were observed with the increasing concentrations of As in drinking water, hair and nails. Further, before and after adjusting with different covariates, plasma Big ET-1 levels were found to be significantly associated with the water, hair and nail As concentrations of the study subjects. Big ET-1 levels were also higher in the higher exposure groups compared to the lowest (reference) group. Interestingly, we observed that Big ET-1 levels were significantly higher in the hypertensive and skin lesion groups compared to the normotensive and without skin lesion counterpart, respectively of the study subjects in As-endemic areas. Thus, this study demonstrated a novel dose–response relationship between As exposure and plasma Big ET-1 levels indicating the possible involvement of plasma Big ET-1 levels in As-induced hypertension and skin lesions. -- Highlights: ► Plasma Big ET-1 is an indicator of endothelial damage. ► Plasma Big ET-1 level increases dose-dependently in arsenic exposed individuals. ► Study subjects in arsenic-endemic areas with hypertension have elevated Big ET-1 levels. ► Study subjects with arsenic

  14. Outdoor sports and risk of ultraviolet radiation-related skin lesions in children: evaluation of risks and prevention.

    PubMed

    Mahé, E; Beauchet, A; de Paula Corrêa, M; Godin-Beekmann, S; Haeffelin, M; Bruant, S; Fay-Chatelard, F; Jégou, F; Saiag, P; Aegerter, P

    2011-08-01

    Excessive ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure can cause skin cancers, skin photoageing and cataracts. Children are targeted by sun-protection campaigns because high sun exposure and sunburn in childhood increase the risk of melanoma in adulthood. Little information is available about UV radiation risk and exposure in children who take part in outdoor sports. To evaluate the risk of developing UV radiation-induced skin lesions run by children who practise outdoor sports, and UV radiation exposure and sun-protection measures during a soccer tournament. Firstly, we evaluated the relationship between melanocytic naevus - a skin lesion linked with exposure to UV radiation - and outdoor sports in 660 11-year-old children. Secondly, we used the occasion of a 1-day soccer tournament held in the spring to evaluate UV radiation-protective measures used by soccer players and the public. We also evaluated the UV radiation index and cloud cover during the tournament, and calculated the UV radiation dose and minimal erythema dose depending on skin phototype. The naevus count and acquired naevus count measured over the 2 years of the study were higher in the 344 children who practised outdoor sports. Sun-protective measures were insufficient for soccer players and the public. This study shows that outdoor sports increase the risk of developing UV radiation-induced skin lesions in childhood. During a 1-day soccer tournament held in the spring, children and their parents were inadequately protected against the sun. These results suggest that sun-protection campaigns should be aimed at children who practise popular outdoor sports. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists 2011.

  15. Clinical and histological characterization of oral pemphigus lesions in patients with skin diseases: a cross sectional study from Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pemphigus is a rare group of life-threatening mucocutaneous autoimmune blistering diseases. Frequently, oral lesions precede the cutaneous ones. This study aimed to describe clinical and histological features of oral pemphigus lesions in patients with skin disease has been canceled aged 18 years and above, attending outpatient’s facility of Khartoum Teaching Hospital - Dermatology Clinic, Sudan. In addition, the study aimed to assess the diagnostic significance of routine histolopathology along with immunohistochemical (IHC) examination of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens in patients with oral pemphigus. Methods A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted from October 2008 to January 2009. A total of 588 patients with confirmed skin has been canceled disease diagnosis completed an oral examination and a personal interview. Clinical evaluations supported with histopathology were the methods of diagnosis. IHC was used to confirm the diagnosis. Location, size, and pain of oral lesions were used to measure the oral disease activity. Results Twenty-one patients were diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), 19 of them (mean age: 43.0; range: 20–72 yrs) presented with oral manifestations. Pemphigus foliaceus was diagnosed in one patient. In PV, female: male ratio was 1.1:1.0. Buccal mucosa was the most commonly affected site. Exclusive oral lesions were detected in 14.2% (3/21). In patients who experienced both skin and oral lesion during their life time, 50.0% (9/18) had oral mucosa as the initial site of involvement, 33.3% (6/18) had skin as the primary site, and simultaneous involvement of both skin and oral mucosa was reported by 5.5% (1/18). Two patients did not provide information regarding the initial site of involvement. Oral lesion activity score was higher in those who reported to live outside Khartoum state, were outdoor workers, had lower education and belonged to Central and Western tribes compared with their

  16. Dermocystid infection and associated skin lesions in free-living palmate newts (Lissotriton helveticus) from Southern France.

    PubMed

    González-Hernández, Milagros; Denoël, Mathieu; Duffus, Amanda J L; Garner, Trenton W J; Cunningham, Andrew A; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina

    2010-09-01

    Since the early 1900s, mesomycetozoan parasites have been reported in both European anuran and caudate species. These reports have primarily been descriptive, which has made assessing the impact of these parasites on host populations difficult. Anecdotal reports of dermocystidium-like parasites are becoming widespread across Europe, possibly indicating that these mesomycetozoan parasites are increasing in distribution and/or abundance. This highlights the need for further investigations into the occurrence, pathogenesis and effects on host health of these parasitic infections for free-living amphibian populations, particularly those which are already stressed or threatened by other factors. Here we report the results of pathological, microbiological and molecular investigations used to characterize unidentified skin lesions in palmate newts (Lissotriton helveticus) from Larzac, France. We confirm that the lesions are the result of infection with a novel dermocystidium-like parasite, which is related to Amphybiocystidium ranae. We also show that the same parasite is distributed across several newt breeding sites. The lesions that result from infection with this parasite range from single or few vesicular or nodular cutaneous lesions to multiple coalescing skin ulcers with extensive hemorrhages. The latter have not been previously described in amphibians due to mesomycetozoan parasitic infection. Dermocystid DNA was detected only in newts that showed lesions, providing comparative evidence of the parasite's pathogenicity. We discuss the potential significance of the presence of this pathogen in the context of the population health of palmate newts.

  17. Effect of a deproteinized blood extract on the recovery of blood circulation in an ischaemic skin lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Smahel, J.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental model was used to study the revascularization of an ischaemic skin lesion and the effect on this process of the blood extract Solcoseryl. Under the conditions given in the experiment, restoration of the circulation was by 2 modes--re-flow in the original vessels, and neovascularization. Solcoseryl given daily i.p. encouraged the re-flow phenomenon and therefore, by improving the microcirculation and nutrition, the healing of the ischaemic lesions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6176254

  18. Verrucous lesions arising in lymphedema and diabetic neuropathy: Elephantiasis nostras verrucosa or verrucous skin lesions on the feet of patients with diabetic neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Hotta, Eri; Asai, Jun; Okuzawa, Yasutaro; Hanada, Keiji; Nomiyama, Tomoko; Takenaka, Hideya; Katoh, Norito

    2016-03-01

    Verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy (VSLDN) develop in areas with sensory loss in diabetic patients. Although various types of chronic stimulation, such as pressure or friction, are considered an important factor in the development of such lesions, the precise pathogenesis of VSLDN remains obscure, and there is currently no established treatment for this disease. Here, we present a case of VSLDN on the dorsum of the right foot. However, because lymphedema was also observed at the same site, this lesion could also be diagnosed as elephantiasis nostras verrucosa arising in diabetic neuropathy. The lesion was successfully treated with a combination of elastic stocking and mixed killed bacterial suspension and hydrocortisone ointment, which suggested that VSLDN might have been exacerbated by the pre-existing lymphedema. Because various types of chronic stimulation can trigger VSLDN, treatment plans should be devised on a case-by-case basis. Therefore, it is important to investigate the presence of factors that can induce or exacerbate chronic inflammatory stimulation, such as lymphedema in our case, in each patient with VSLDN. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  19. ARSENIC AND SKIN LESION STATUS IN RELATION TO MALIGNANT AND NON-MALIGNANT LUNG DISEASE MORTALITY IN BANGLADESHI ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Argos, Maria; Parvez, Faruque; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Ahmed, Alauddin; Hore, Samar Kumar; Islam, Tariqul; Chen, Yu; Pierce, Brandon L.; Slavkovich, Vesna; Olopade, Christopher; Yunus, Muhammad; Baron, John A.; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic arsenic exposure through drinking water is a public health problem affecting millions of people worldwide, including at least 30 million in Bangladesh. We prospectively investigated the associations of arsenic exposure and arsenical skin lesion status with lung disease mortality in Bangladeshi adults. Methods Data are from a population-based sample of 26,043 adults, with an average of 8.5 years of follow-up (220,157 total person-years). There were 156 non-malignant lung disease deaths and 90 lung cancer deaths ascertained through October 2013. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for lung disease mortality. Results Creatinine-adjusted urinary total arsenic was associated with non-malignant lung disease mortality, with persons in the highest tertile of exposure having a 75% increased risk for mortality (95% CI=1.15–2.66) compared with those in the lowest tertile of exposure. Persons with arsenical skin lesions were at increased risk of lung cancer mortality (hazard ratio=4.53 [95% CI=2.82–7.29]) compared with those without skin lesions. Conclusions This prospective investigation of lung disease mortality, utilizing individual-level arsenic measures and skin lesion status, confirms a deleterious effect of ingested arsenic on mortality from lung disease. Further investigations should evaluate effects on the incidence of specific lung diseases, more fully characterize dose-response, and evaluate screening and biomedical interventions to prevent premature death among arsenic-exposed populations, particularly among those who may be most susceptible to arsenic toxicity. PMID:24802365

  20. A case of stranded Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) with lobomycosis-like skin lesions in Kinko-wan, Kagoshima, Japan

    PubMed Central

    TAJIMA, Yuko; SASAKI, Kyoko; KASHIWAGI, Nobuyuki; YAMADA, Tadasu K.

    2015-01-01

    Lobomycosis is a chronic fungal disease caused by the etiologic agent, Lacazia loboi, in the skin and subcutaneous tissues in humans and dolphins in tropical and transitional tropical climates. An Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) stranded in Kagoshima, Japan, had severe skin lesions characterized by granulomatous reactions and hyperkeratosis that were similar to those of the lobomycosis, but no fungal organism was observed in the skin lesion. In this paper, we report a stranded Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin with lobomycosis-like lesions based on pathological examinations in Japan. PMID:25866402

  1. Ivermectin in human onchocerciasis: a clinical-pathological study of skin lesions before and three days after treatment.

    PubMed

    Vuong, P N; Traoré, S; Wanji, S; Diarrassouba, S; Balaton, A; Bain, O

    1992-01-01

    Findings are presented from an histological study of 360 skin-snips (from iliac crests, calves, ankles) taken from 30 Ivory Coast onchocerciasis patients before and three days after an oral dose of ivermectin (200 micrograms/kg). This dose causes a nearly complete disappearance of the intralymphatic microfilariae and, surprisingly, of the "extra-vascular" ones. That shows the difficulty to localize the microfilariae on histological sections; these microfilariae are in fact inside the lymphatic pre-capillaries. There was no intensification of acute skin lesions after the treatment, thus showing that, contrary to diethylcarbamazine (DEC), ivermectin does not induce an exit of microfilariae into the extralymphatic connective tissue. Under the influence of ivermectin, paralyzed microfilariae may be carried passively towards the deep sub-cutaneous lymphatics, and then destroyed inside the regional lymph nodes, without producing major changes in the skin.

  2. Molecular detection of avian pox virus from nodular skin and mucosal fibrinonecrotic lesions of Iranian backyard poultry.

    PubMed

    Gholami-Ahangaran, Majid; Zia-Jahromi, Noosha; Namjoo, Abdolrasul

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, some outbreaks of skin lesions suspected to be avian pox were observed in the backyard poultry in different parts of western areas in Iran. Consequently, 328 backyard poultries with suspected signs of avian pox virus infection were sampled. All birds showed nodular lesions on unfeathered head skin and/or fibronecrotic lesions on mucus membrane of the oral cavity and upper respiratory tract. For histopathological analysis, the sections of tissue samples from cutaneous lesions of examined birds were stained with H&E method. For PCR, after DNA extraction a 578-bp fragment of avian pox virus from 4b core protein gene was amplified. Results showed 217 and 265 out of 328 (66.1 and 80.7%, respectively) samples were positive for avian pox virus on histopathological and PCR examination, respectively. In this study, the samples that had intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies on pathologic examination were PCR positive. This study revealed that PCR is a valuable tool for identification of an avian pox virus and that the frequency of pox infection in backyard poultry in western areas of Iran is high.

  3. Tissue histiocyte reactivity with CD31 is comparable to CD68 and CD163 in common skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, W James; Googe, Paul B

    2014-06-01

    CD31 is a standard immunostain for evaluating vascular lesions of the skin, but CD31 reactivity for histiocytes is reported in only a small variety of pathological conditions. CD68 and CD163 are well recognized stains for cutaneous histiocytic lesions. We compared immunostaining of CD31 within that of CD68 and CD163 in five cases each of cutaneous lesions containing histiocytes: healing biopsy site, granuloma annulare, xanthogranuloma, ruptured follicular cyst and sarcoidosis. Reactivity was graded on a scale of 0-3 for brightness of immunostaining. Immunoreactivity was seen in histiocytes in all specimens for CD31, CD68 and CD163. The average intensity of staining was 1.7-2.5 for CD31, 2.6-3 for CD68 and 2.9-3 for CD163. The staining was somewhat less for CD31 because the reactivity is localized on the cell surfaces, whereas CD68 and CD163 react with cell surfaces and cytoplasm. We conclude that histiocytes in cutaneous lesions stain for CD31 and the staining is comparable to, but less intense, than that seen with CD68 and CD163. Caution is suggested in interpretation of CD31 staining in skin specimens, as CD31 shows reactivity with histiocytes as well as endothelial cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. In vivo assessment of optical properties of melanocytic skin lesions and differentiation of melanoma from non-malignant lesions by high-definition optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Boone, M A L M; Suppa, M; Dhaenens, F; Miyamoto, M; Marneffe, A; Jemec, G B E; Del Marmol, V; Nebosis, R

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems in clinical dermatology is the early detection of melanoma. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is an added tool to dermoscopy improving considerably diagnostic accuracy. However, diagnosis strongly depends on the experience of physicians. High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) appears to offer additional structural and cellular information on melanocytic lesions complementary to that of RCM. However, the diagnostic potential of HD-OCT seems to be not high enough for ruling out the diagnosis of melanoma if based on morphology analysis. The aim of this paper is first to quantify in vivo optical properties such as light attenuation in melanocytic lesions by HD-OCT. The second objective is to determine the best critical value of these optical properties for melanoma diagnosis. The technique of semi-log plot whereby an exponential function becomes a straight line has been implemented on HD-OCT signals coming from four successive skin layers (epidermis, upper papillary dermis, deeper papillary dermis and superficial reticular dermis). This permitted the HD-OCT in vivo measurement of skin entrance signal (SES), relative attenuation factor normalized for the skin entrance signal (µ raf1) and half value layer (z 1/2). The diagnostic accuracy of HD-OCT for melanoma detection based on the optical properties, µ raf1 , SES and z 1/2 was high (95.6, 82.2 and 88.9 %, respectively). High negative predictive values could be found for these optical properties (96.7, 89.3 and 96.3 %, respectively) compared to morphologic assessment alone (89.9 %), reducing the risk of mistreating a malignant lesion to a more acceptable level (3.3 % instead of 11.1 %). HD-OCT seems to enable the combination of in vivo morphological analysis of cellular and 3-D micro-architectural structures with in vivo analysis of optical properties of tissue scatterers in melanocytic lesions. In vivo HD-OCT analysis of optical properties permits melanoma

  5. mHealth App for Risk Assessment of Pigmented and Nonpigmented Skin Lesions-A Study on Sensitivity and Specificity in Detecting Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Thissen, Monique; Udrea, Andreea; Hacking, Michelle; von Braunmuehl, Tanja; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2017-05-31

    With the advent of smartphone devices, an increasing number of mHealth applications that target melanoma identification have been developed, but none addresses the general context of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer identification. In this study a smartphone application using fractal and classical image analysis for the risk assessment of skin lesions is systematically evaluated to determine its sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer along with actinic keratosis and Bowen's disease. In the Department of Dermatology, Catharina Hospital Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 341 melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions were imaged using SkinVision app; 239 underwent histopathological examination, while the rest of 102 lesions were clinically diagnosed as clearly benign and not removed. The algorithm has been calibrated using the images of the first 233 lesions. The calibrated version of the algorithm was used in a subset of 108 lesions, and the obtained results were compared with the medical findings. On the 108 cases used for evaluation the algorithm scored 80% sensitivity and 78% specificity in detecting (pre)malignant conditions. Although less accurate than the dermatologist's clinical eye, the app may offer support to other professionals who are less familiar with differentiating between benign and malignant lesions. An mHealth application for the risk assessment of skin lesions was evaluated. It adds value to diagnosis tools of its type by taking into consideration pigmented and nonpigmented lesions all together and detecting signs of malignancy with high sensitivity.

  6. Penicillamine-induced elastosis perforans serpiginosa with abnormal "lumpy-bumpy" elastic fibers in lesional and non-lesional skin.

    PubMed

    Khatu, Swapna S; Dhurat, Rachita S; Nayak, Chitra S; Pereira, Rickson R; Kagne, Rucha B

    2011-01-01

    Four types of elastosis perforans serpiginosa (EPS) have been described in literature: 1) idiopathic EPS, 2) reactive perforating elastosis associated with connective tissue disorders, 3) in some instances of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), disease-specific calcified elastic tissue is extruded, producing a clinical picture indistinguishable from other types, may also be seen in patients undergoing hemodialysis and 4) EPS induced by long-term treatment with D-penicillamine is observed in patients suffering from Wilson's disease. Long term D-penicillamine therapy causes an alteration in the dermal elastic tissue. D-penicillamine induced EPS has a distinctive histopathologic feature - serrated appearance of elastic fibers due to perpendicular budding from their surface giving a "lumpy-bumpy" look. D-penicillamine induced elastic fiber alteration may not always manifest clinically as EPS. We report a case of D-penicillamine induced widespread alteration in skin elastic tissue with distinct histopathologic features.

  7. The significance of reflectance confocal microscopy in the assessment of solitary pink skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Braga, Juliana Casagrande Tavoloni; Scope, Alon; Klaz, Itay; Mecca, Patricia; González, Salvador; Rabinovitz, Harold; Marghoob, Ashfaq A

    2009-08-01

    Solitary pink lesions often manifest nondescript clinical and dermatoscopic primary morphologic features. The differential diagnosis for pink lesions tends, therefore, to be broad, ranging from inflammatory processes to malignancy. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) may help in the evaluation of pink lesions. We sought to demonstrate the use of RCM as an adjunct to the bedside diagnosis of pink lesions. We describe a series of patients with clinically and dermatoscopically equivocal pink lesions for which RCM examination allowed for a rapid and accurate diagnosis. All lesions were excised for histopathologic evaluation. Integrating the findings in the case series with a literature review, we present RCM diagnostic criteria for pink lesions. Lesions included basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, amelanotic melanoma, and inflamed seborrheic keratosis. RCM shows distinctive findings for each diagnostic entity when stratified by anatomic level into suprabasal epidermis, dermoepidermal junction, and papillary dermis. In the cases presented RCM allowed for a rapid and accurate noninvasive diagnosis. The study is descriptive and does not test accuracy of RCM criteria in a prospective series of pink lesions. RCM may add useful diagnostic features to the clinical evaluation of solitary pink lesions.

  8. Gene expression profiles in peripheral lymphocytes by arsenic exposure and skin lesion status in a Bangladeshi population.

    PubMed

    Argos, Maria; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Parvez, Faruque; Jasmine, Farzana; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Ahsan, Habibul

    2006-07-01

    Millions of individuals worldwide are chronically exposed to arsenic through their drinking water. In this study, the effect of arsenic exposure and arsenical skin lesion status on genome-wide gene expression patterns was evaluated using RNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes of individuals selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study. Affymetrix HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) arrays were used to measure the expression of approximately 22,000 transcripts. Our primary statistical analysis involved identifying differentially expressed genes between participants with and without arsenical skin lesions based on the significance analysis of microarrays statistic with an a priori defined 1% false discovery rate to minimize false positives. To better characterize differential expression, we also conducted Gene Ontology and pathway comparisons in addition to the gene-specific analyses. Four-hundred sixty-eight genes were differentially expressed between these two groups, from which 312 differentially expressed genes were identified by restricting the analysis to female never-smokers. We also explored possible differential gene expression by arsenic exposure levels among individuals without manifest arsenical skin lesions; however, no differentially expressed genes could be identified from this comparison. Our findings show that microarray-based gene expression analysis is a powerful method to characterize the molecular profile of arsenic exposure and arsenic-induced diseases. Genes identified from this analysis may provide insights into the underlying processes of arsenic-induced disease and represent potential targets for chemoprevention studies to reduce arsenic-induced skin cancer in this population.

  9. Skin lesions in European hibernating bats associated with Geomyces destructans, the etiologic agent of white-nose syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wibbelt, Gudrun; Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Ohlendorf, Bernd; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Bosch, Thijs; Görföl, Tamás; Passior, Karsten; Kurth, Andreas; Lacremans, Daniel; Forget, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) has claimed the lives of millions of hibernating insectivorous bats in North America. Its etiologic agent, the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans, causes skin lesions that are the hallmark of the disease. The fungal infection is characterized by a white powdery growth on muzzle, ears and wing membranes. While WNS may threaten some species of North American bats with regional extinction, infection in hibernating bats in Europe seems not to be associated with significant mortality. We performed histopathological investigations on biopsy samples of 11 hibernating European bats, originating from 4 different countries, colonized by G. destructans. One additional bat was euthanized to allow thorough examination of multiple strips of its wing membranes. Molecular analyses of touch imprints, swabs and skin samples confirmed that fungal structures were G. destructans. Additionally, archived field notes on hibernacula monitoring data in the Harz Mountains, Germany, over an 11-year period (2000-2011) revealed multiple capture-recapture events of 8 banded bats repeatedly displaying characteristic fungal colonization. Skin lesions of G. destructans-affected hibernating European bats are intriguingly similar to the epidermal lesions described in North American bats. Nevertheless, deep invasion of fungal hyphae into the dermal connective tissue with resulting ulceration like in North American bats was not observed in the biopsy samples of European bats; all lesions found were restricted to the layers of the epidermis and its adnexae. Two bats had mild epidermal cupping erosions as described for North American bats. The possible mechanisms for any difference in outcomes of G. destructans infection in European and North American bats still need to be elucidated.

  10. Early Activation of Th2/Th22 Inflammatory and Pruritogenic Pathways in Acute Canine Atopic Dermatitis Skin Lesions.

    PubMed

    Olivry, Thierry; Mayhew, David; Paps, Judy S; Linder, Keith E; Peredo, Carlos; Rajpal, Deepak; Hofland, Hans; Cote-Sierra, Javier

    2016-10-01

    Determining inflammation and itch pathway activation in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) is fraught with the inability to precisely assess the age of skin lesions, thus affecting the analysis of time-dependent mediators. To characterize inflammatory events occurring during early experimental acute AD lesions, biopsy samples were collected 6, 24, and 48 hours after epicutaneous application of Dermatophagoides farinae house dust mites to sensitized atopic dogs. The skin transcriptome was assessed using a dog-specific microarray and quantitative PCR. Acute canine AD skin lesions had a significant up-regulation of genes encoding T helper (Th) 2 (e.g., IL4, IL5, IL13, IL31, and IL33), Th9 (IL9), and Th22 (IL22) cytokines as well as Th2-promoting chemokines such as CCL5 and CCL17. Proinflammatory (e.g., IL6, LTB, and IL18) cytokines were also up-regulated. Other known pruritogenic pathways were also activated: there was significant up-regulation of genes encoding proteases cathepsin S (CTSS), mast cell chymase (CMA1), tryptase (TPS1) and mastin, neuromedin-B (NMB), nerve growth factor (NGF), and leukotriene-synthesis enzymes (ALOX5, ALOX5AP, and LTA4H). Experimental acute canine house dust mite-induced AD lesions exhibit an activation of innate and adaptive immune responses and pruritogenic pathways similar to those seen in humans with acute AD, thereby validating this model to test innovative therapeutics modalities for this disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Skin Lesions in European Hibernating Bats Associated with Geomyces destructans, the Etiologic Agent of White-Nose Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wibbelt, Gudrun; Puechmaille, Sébastien J.; Ohlendorf, Bernd; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Bosch, Thijs; Görföl, Tamás; Passior, Karsten; Kurth, Andreas; Lacremans, Daniel; Forget, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) has claimed the lives of millions of hibernating insectivorous bats in North America. Its etiologic agent, the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans, causes skin lesions that are the hallmark of the disease. The fungal infection is characterized by a white powdery growth on muzzle, ears and wing membranes. While WNS may threaten some species of North American bats with regional extinction, infection in hibernating bats in Europe seems not to be associated with significant mortality. We performed histopathological investigations on biopsy samples of 11 hibernating European bats, originating from 4 different countries, colonized by G. destructans. One additional bat was euthanized to allow thorough examination of multiple strips of its wing membranes. Molecular analyses of touch imprints, swabs and skin samples confirmed that fungal structures were G. destructans. Additionally, archived field notes on hibernacula monitoring data in the Harz Mountains, Germany, over an 11-year period (2000–2011) revealed multiple capture-recapture events of 8 banded bats repeatedly displaying characteristic fungal colonization. Skin lesions of G. destructans-affected hibernating European bats are intriguingly similar to the epidermal lesions described in North American bats. Nevertheless, deep invasion of fungal hyphae into the dermal connective tissue with resulting ulceration like in North American bats was not observed in the biopsy samples of European bats; all lesions found were restricted to the layers of the epidermis and its adnexae. Two bats had mild epidermal cupping erosions as described for North American bats. The possible mechanisms for any difference in outcomes of G. destructans infection in European and North American bats still need to be elucidated. PMID:24023927

  12. Skin-colour changes i the lizard, Anolis carolinensis, in response to localized electrical stimulation and lesions in the diencephalon.

    PubMed

    Hemer, J H; Salas, M A; LaPointe, J L

    1981-05-01

    A study was made of changes in skin colour in the lizard, Anolis carolinensis, in response to deep electrical stimulation at 0.2 mm intervals throughout the periventricular region of the diencephalon and the anterior brain stem. Double-barrelled glass microelectrodes with tip diameters of 3 microns were used. A 20 microA pulse-train consisting of a 500 Hz signal lasting for 1 s yielded localized responses. Skin darkening occurred only in response to stimulation delivered in the anterior and dorsal region of the diencephalon and skin lightening only in response to stimulation in a small area in the posterior and ventral region of the hypothalamus. Electrical lesions in the latter region resulted in permanent skin darkening. Surgical interruption of the hypothalamo-hypophysial neurosecretory tract did not block skin-colour change in response to dark or light backgrounds. It was concluded that MSH release is under tonic inhibitory control by hypothalamic neurones in Anolis. Both inhibitory and stimulatory neurones can be localized stereotaxically in the diencephalon and neither type corresponds with the neurosecretory neurones of the hypothalamo-hypophysial tract. The functional relationship between the stimulatory neurones and the inhibitory neurones and pars intermedia remains unclear.

  13. Positive tuberculin skin test or interferon-gamma release assay in patients with radiographic lesion suggesting old healed tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yun-Jeong; Yoon, Soonho; Koo, Hyeon-kyoung; Lim, Hyo-Jeong; Lee, Ji Sun; Lee, Sang-Min; Yang, Seok-Chul; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young-Whan; Han, Sung-Koo; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2012-07-01

    Radiographic lesions suggesting old healed tuberculosis (TB) is considered a risk factor for the subsequent development of active TB. The aim of this study was to estimate the positive rates of tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) in persons with old healed TB. Participants with lesions suggesting old healed TB on chest images and controls without such lesions were prospectively enrolled between January 1, 2010, and January 31, 2011. TST and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) were performed. In total, 193 participants with old healed TB and 126 controls were recruited. The rates of positive TST and QFT-GIT among patients with old healed TB were 54.6% and 77.7%, respectively. The rates of positive TST and QFT-GIT among patients without old healed TB were 38.9% and 61.9%. Sixteen percent of participants with old healed TB showed negative results by both TST and QFT-GIT. The positive rate of TST waned among participants with old healed TB who were older than 60 yr, whereas QFT-GIT positivity was unaffected by age. The positive rates of TST and IGRA among participants with radiographic lesions suggesting old healed TB was higher than without those lesions. In addition, IGRA may be more accurate than TST for the detection of latent TB infection, especially in populations of individuals older than 60 yr.

  14. Combined Spline and B-spline for an improved automatic skin lesion segmentation in dermoscopic images using optimal color channel.

    PubMed

    Abbas, A A; Guo, X; Tan, W H; Jalab, H A

    2014-08-01

    In a computerized image analysis environment, the irregularity of a lesion border has been used to differentiate between malignant melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions. The accuracy of the automated lesion border detection is a significant step towards accurate classification at a later stage. In this paper, we propose the use of a combined Spline and B-spline in order to enhance the quality of dermoscopic images before segmentation. In this paper, morphological operations and median filter were used first to remove noise from the original image during pre-processing. Then we proceeded to adjust image RGB values to the optimal color channel (green channel). The combined Spline and B-spline method was subsequently adopted to enhance the image before segmentation. The lesion segmentation was completed based on threshold value empirically obtained using the optimal color channel. Finally, morphological operations were utilized to merge the smaller regions with the main lesion region. Improvement on the average segmentation accuracy was observed in the experimental results conducted on 70 dermoscopic images. The average accuracy of segmentation achieved in this paper was 97.21 % (where, the average sensitivity and specificity were 94 % and 98.05 % respectively).

  15. Differences in HTLV-I integration patterns between skin lesions and peripheral blood lymphocytes of HTLV-I seropositive patients with cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Hamada, T; Setoyama, M; Katahira, Y; Furuno, T; Fujiyoshi, T; Sonoda, S; Tashiro, M

    1992-09-01

    We examined HTLV-I integration patterns in nine cases of HTLV-I-seropositive patients with cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders. The Southern blot on EcoRI digests of DNA revealed a discrete band of HTLV-I provirus (monoclonal integration) in either skin lesions or peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Four cases showed the monoclonal integration of HTLV-I provirus only in skin lesions: one case showed only in PBL and two cases showed in both skin and PBL. The Southern blot on PstI digests of DNA revealed a 2.4 Kb band of the internal construct of HTLV-I provirus (polyclonal integration) in the PBL of EcoRI-negative samples. The difference in HTLV-I integration patterns between skin lesions and PBL in these cases suggests that the monoclonal outgrowth of HTLV-I-infected cells in the skin is causatively associated with the pathogenesis of cutaneous ATL.

  16. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation changes with development of arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladesh: a case-control follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Seow, Wei Jie; Kile, Molly L; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Pan, Wen-Chi; Byun, Hyang-Min; Mostofa, Golam; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C

    2014-07-01

    Studies have found an association between aberrant DNA methylation and arsenic-induced skin lesions. However, little is known about DNA methylation changes over time in people who develop arsenic-induced skin lesions. We sought to investigate epigenome-wide changes of DNA methylation in people who developed arsenic-induced skin lesions in a 10-year period. In 2009-2011, we conducted a follow-up study of 900 skin lesion cases and 900 controls and identified 10 people who developed skin lesions since a baseline survey in 2001-2003. The 10 cases ("New Cases") were matched with 10 controls who did not have skin lesions at baseline or follow-up ("Persistent Controls"). Drinking water and blood samples were collected, and skin lesion was diagnosed by the same physician at both time points. We measured DNA methylation in blood using Infinium HumanMethylation450K BeadChip, followed by quantitative validation using pyrosequencing. Two-sample t-tests were used to compare changes in percent methylation between New Cases and Persistent Controls. Six CpG (cytosine-phosphate-guanine) sites with greatest changes of DNA methylation over time among New Cases were further validated with a correlation of 93% using pyrosequencing. One of the validated CpG site (cg03333116; change of %methylation was 13.2 in New Cases versus -0.09 in Persistent Controls; P < 0.001) belonged to the RHBDF1 gene, which was previously reported to be hypermethylated in arsenic-exposed cases. We examined DNA methylation changes with the development of arsenic-induced skin lesions over time but nothing was statistically significant given the small sample size of this exploratory study and the high dimensionality of data.

  17. Epigenome-wide DNA methylation changes with development of arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladesh: a case-control follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Wei Jie; Kile, Molly L.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Pan, Wen-Chi; Byun, Hyang-Min; Mostofa, Golam; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Studies have found an association between aberrant DNA methylation and arsenic-induced skin lesions. Yet, little is known about DNA methylation changes over time in people who develop arsenic-induced skin lesions. We sought to investigate epigenome-wide changes of DNA methylation in people who developed arsenic-induced skin lesions in a ten year period. In 2009–2011, we conducted a follow-up study of 900 skin lesion cases and 900 controls and identified 10 people who developed skin lesions since a baseline survey in 2001–2003. The 10 cases (“New Cases”) were matched with 10 controls who did not have skin lesions at baseline or follow-up (“Persistent Controls”). Drinking water and blood samples were collected and skin lesion was diagnosed by the same physician at both time points. We measured DNA methylation in blood using Infinium HumanMethylation450K BeadChip, followed by quantitative validation using pyrosequencing. Two-sample t-tests were used to compare changes in percent methylation between New Cases and Persistent Controls. Six CpG sites with greatest changes of DNA methylation over time among New Cases were further validated with a correlation of 93% using pyrosequencing. One of the validated CpG site (cg03333116; change of %methylation was 13.2 in New Cases versus −0.09 in Persistent Controls; P <0.001) belonged to the RHBDF1 gene, which was previously reported to be hypermethylated in arsenic-exposed cases. We examined DNA methylation changes with the development of arsenic-induced skin lesions over time but nothing was statistically significant given the small sample size of this exploratory study and the high dimensionality of data. PMID:24677489

  18. A case of multiple metastatic malignant melanoma with the largest lesion in the ileum and no skin lesion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shuji; Watanabe, Shoichi; Kato, Hiroshi; Hattori, Hideo; Morita, Akimichi

    2012-12-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old woman with malignant melanoma and multiple metastases; the largest tumor was in the ileum. The patient experienced general fatigue and bloody feces for 1 month before consulting a nearby clinic. Blood tests revealed anemia, and fecal occult blood was positive, but no abnormalities were detected using gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy or the skin of the entire body. Computed tomography images of the chest, abdomen, and pelvic region, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography images of the entire body revealed multiple nodules in the ileum, left mammary gland, left thyroid, right inguinal lymph node, and on the fascia of the right thoracic area and right buttocks. The tumor in the left mammary gland was excised and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the excised tissue was positive for HMB45, melan-A, and MITF, but negative for S-100 protein. Diagnosed with melanoma with multiple metastases, the patient underwent four cycles of dacarbazine, nimustine hydrochloride, and vincristine (DAV) plus interferon beta chemotherapy and one cycle of dacarbazine, nimustine hydrochloride, cisplatin, and tamoxifen (DAC-Tam) chemotherapy. Two series of embolizations of the artery feeding the ileum tumors, as well as a series of plasma and red blood cell transfusions, were performed for ileum tumor hemorrhage. The patient was hospitalized eight times, for a total of 204 days during the 1-year survival period before her death from respiratory failure.

  19. The influence of a magnesium-rich marine extract on behaviour, salivary cortisol levels and skin lesions in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, K; O'Gorman, D M; Taylor, S; Boyle, L A

    2013-06-01

    Growing pigs can display undesirable behaviours, reflecting or causing poor welfare. Addition of magnesium (Mg) to the diet could reduce these, as Mg supplementation has been associated with improved coping ability in response to stress. This study examined the effect of supplementation with a Mg-rich marine extract-based product (Supplement) on the behaviour, skin and tail lesion scores and salivary cortisol concentrations of growing pigs. At weaning (28 days), 448 piglets were assigned to either Control or Supplement (0.05%) diets in single-sex groups of 14. Four weeks later (c. 17 kg), pigs were blocked according to weight and back test scores. Seven piglets from each pen were mixed with seven from another pen of the same sex and dietary treatment to yield the following groups: control male, Supplement male, control female and Supplement female (n = 4 of each). This marked the start of the 9-week experimental period. Instances of the following behaviours were recorded in each pen for 8 × 2 min periods 1 day/week: aggression (fight, head-knock and bite); harmful (tail-in-mouth, ear-chewing and belly-nosing); and sexual/mounting behaviour. Four focal pigs were selected from each pen, and their behaviour was continuously recorded for 2 × 5 min periods on the same day. Saliva was collected once per week at 1000 h by allowing pigs to chew on a cotton bud for c. 1 min. Salivary cortisol was analysed in duplicate by an enzyme immunoassay. Skin and tail lesions were scored according to severity 1 day/week. There were fewer aggressive incidents in Supplement pens (P < 0.01), and mounting behaviour (performed only by males) was almost three times lower in Supplement than in control pens (P < 0.01). However, there was no effect of Supplement on the incidence of each of the harmful behaviours. Behaviour of the focal pigs showed no treatment effect on the duration or incidence of aggressive behaviour. However, Supplement pigs spent less time performing harmful behaviours

  20. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius infection associated with nodular skin lesions and systemic inflammatory response syndrome in a dog.

    PubMed

    Min, Sa-Hee; Kang, Min-Hee; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-05-01

    A 10-year-old Pekingese dog with atopic dermatitis was referred due to pyrexia, multiple skin nodules, anorexia, and depression. The dog was diagnosed as having systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) induced by bacterial dermatitis. This case presents diagnosis and treatment of SIRS with staphylococcal skin infection in a dog that was immunosuppressed due to long-term use of corticosteroid.

  1. Dermoscopy for the pediatric dermatologist part I: dermoscopy of pediatric infectious and inflammatory skin lesions and hair disorders.

    PubMed

    Haliasos, Elena C; Kerner, Miryam; Jaimes-Lopez, Natalia; Rudnicka, Lidia; Zalaudek, Iris; Malvehy, Josep; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Braun, Ralph P; Marghoob, Ashfaq A

    2013-01-01

    The dermoscope allows physicians to examine the macroscopic and microscopic primary morphology of skin lesions, identify subtle clinical clues, confirm naked-eye clinical diagnoses, and monitor treatment progress while posing little threat to the young patient. This review summarizes important dermoscopic structures seen in infectious and inflammatory skin conditions and hair disorders in children. Scabies, pediculosis, phthiriasis, molluscum contagiosum, tinea nigra, and verrucae are well characterized dermoscopically by delta-shaped structures, ovoid-shaped nits, the crab louse, red corona, brown strands or spicules, and multiple densely packed papilla with a central black dot surrounded by a whitish halo, respectively. These dermoscopic structures will be discussed, focusing on the dermoscopic morphologies and dermoscopic sensitivity for diagnosis and its utility in monitoring treatment progress. Dermoscopy has also been shown to significantly improve the clinician's diagnostic and monitoring accuracy of inflammatory skin lesions such as psoriasis, which is characterized dermoscopically by uniformly distributed dotted blood vessels, and lichen planus, which is characterized by whitish lines on a purple to reddish background. Dermoscopy of the hair and scalp (trichoscopy) facilitates the differential diagnosis of hair diseases in children, including alopecia areata, trichotillomania, and tinea capitis. It can also assist in the diagnosis of multiple genetic hair shaft disorders, such as monilethrix, trichorrhexis invaginata, trichorrhexis nodosa, pili torti, and pili annulati.

  2. DA-9601 suppresses 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene and dust mite extract-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Ju; Lee, Soyoung; Hwang, Ji-Sun; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Jun, Chang-Duk; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2011-09-01

    DA-9601 (Stillen™) is a novel anti-peptic formulation prepared from the ethanol extracts of Artemisia asiatica possessing anti-oxidative, anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory activities. However, their effect on atopic dermatitis (AD) has not been studied yet. In this study, we report that topical application of DA-9601 suppressed house dust mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced AD-like skin lesions in BALB/c mice model. We established atopic dermatitis model in BALB/c mice by repeated local exposure of DFE/DNCB to the ears. Repeated alternative treatment of DFE/DNCB caused AD-like lesions. DA-9601 reduced AD-like skin lesions based on ear thickness and histopathological analysis, and serum IgE levels. DA-9601 inhibited mast cell infiltration into the ear and elevation of serum histamine in AD model. In addition, DA-9601 suppressed DFE/DNCB-induced expression of IL-4, IL-13, IL-31, and TNF-α in the ears. Taken together, our results showed that topical application of DA-9601 exerts beneficial effects in animal model of AD, suggesting that DA-9601 might be a candidate for the treatment of AD.

  3. An Overlap of Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia with Eosinophilia and Kimura's Disease: Successful Treatment of Skin Lesions with Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Praveen Kumar S; Prasad, Arakali Lakshminarayana Shyam; Sumathy, Tharayil Kunneth; Shivaswamy, Kanakapura Nanjundaswamy; Ranganathan, Chandrasekaran

    2015-01-01

    Kimura's disease is characterized by a triad of painless subcutaneous masses, eosinophilia in the peripheral blood and in tissues with marked increase in Serum Ig E. Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) manifests with the presence of dermal papules and nodules. Unique clinical, histopathological, and biochemical findings are noted in these individual entities. A 32-year-female presented with multiple nodules in the axillae for 2 years. Peripheral smear showed eosinophilia with AEC of 6080. Histopathological examination showed features of overlap. Antinuclear antibody immunoflorescence was was negative. CD31, CD34, and FVIII were positive in vascular component. A CT chest revealed left axillary lymphadenopathy. The patient was treated with Cryotherapy and there was complete regression of skin lesions, with no recurrence after 1 year of follow-up. ALHE and KD are common in the head and neck region, but no reports of an overlap, presenting with lesions in the axillae are available to date, to the best of our knowledge. Response of skin lesions to cryotherapy is highlighted. PMID:25814755

  4. Dermoscopic and Clinical Features of Pigmented Skin Lesions of the Genital Area*

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan; Wellenhof, Rainer Hofmann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The dermoscopic features of vulvar melanosis lesions are well known. To our knowledge, there are only a few case reports about dermoscopic features of pigmented genital lesions in male patients. OBJECTIVE To evaluate dermoscopic and clinical characteristics of benign lesions of the genital area in both males and females, and to assess the distinguishing dermoscopic criteria of vulvar melanosis and atypical melanocytic nevi of the genital type. METHODS 68 patients with pigmented genital lesions were included in this observational study (28 male and 40 female). A punch biopsy was taken from all pigmented lesions and histopathological examination was performed on all specimens. RESULTS We histopathologically diagnosed: genital melanosis in 40 lesions, atypical melanocytic nevi of the genital type in 15 lesions, melanocytic nevi in 9 lesions, seborrheic keratosis in 4 lesions. The most frequent locations were the glans penis (19 patients, 67.9%) in males and the labia minora (19 patients, 47.5%) in females. The mean age of patients with atypical nevi (28,6 ± 11,36) was significantly lower than the mean age of patients with genital melanosis (47,07 ± 15,33). CONCLUSIONS Parallel pattern is prominent in genital melanosis, ring-like pattern is only observed in genital melanosis. Most pigmented lesions on the genital area are solitary. Blue-white veil and irregular dots are only observed in AMNGT. According to these results, we propose that histopathological examination is performed, especially if blue-white veil and irregular dots are found by dermoscopy. PMID:25830986

  5. Acute skin lesions following psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation investigated by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. M.; Zhong, H. Q.; Zhai, J.; Wang, C. X.; Xiong, H. L.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2013-08-01

    Psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation (PUVA) therapy is a very important clinical treatment of skin diseases such as vitiligo and psoriasis, but associated with an increased risk of skin photodamage, especially photoaging. In this work, optical coherence tomography (OCT), a novel non-invasive imaging technology, was introduced to investigate in vivo the photodamage induced by PUVA qualitatively and quantitatively. Balb/c mouse dorsal skin was treated with 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), and then exposed to UVA radiation. OCT images of the tissues were obtained by an OCT system with a 1310 nm central wavelength. Skin thickness and the attenuation coefficient were extracted from the OCT images to analyze the degree of injury to mouse skin. The results demonstrated that PUVA-treated skin showed an increase in skin thickness, and a reduction of attenuation coefficient in the OCT signal compared with the control groups. The data also showed good correlation with the results observed in histological sections using hematoxylin and eosin staining. In conclusion, OCT is a promising tool for photobiological studies aimed at assessing the effect of PUVA therapy in vivo.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein by activated p21-activated kinase-1 protects keratinocytes in UV-B-induced premalignant skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Beesetti, S; Mavuluri, J; Surabhi, R P; Oberyszyn, T M; Tober, K; Pitani, R S; Joseph, L D; Venkatraman, G; Rayala, S K

    2017-07-10

    Sun-induced skin lesions, in particular actinic keratosis, are generally considered as premalignant skin lesions that can progress into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and invasive SCC if left untreated. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms by which the ultraviolet-B (UV-B)-exposed cells are being protected and the signaling pathways that promote the progression of certain premalignant skin lesions to malignant lesions will permit us to prevent or cure skin cancers. In the current study, we found that phospho-p21-activated kinase-1 (Pak1) and Pak1 expression was high in clinical samples of sunlight-induced premalignant skin lesions assessed by immunohistochemistry. Further, we observed that phospho-Pak1 and Pak1 levels are high in UV-B-exposed hairless SKH mouse model skin samples as compared with unexposed skin tissue. Our results from cell line and animal models showed that Pak1 is activated in response to UV-B radiation, and this activated Pak1 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Inside the nucleus, Pak1 via C-Fos binds to a specific promoter region of DNA repair kinase ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein) and acts as a transcriptional regulator of ATR. Results from our analysis showed that Pak1 overexpression, knockdown and Pak1 knockout cell line models showed that Pak1 confers protection to keratinocytes from UV-B-induced apoptosis and DNA damage via ATR. To our knowledge, this is the first study that evaluates the functional and clinical significance of a signaling molecule, Pak1, in sun-induced premalignant skin lesions and indicates that increased Pak1 activation and expression could serve as an early warning sign of progression toward non-melanoma skin cancer, if ignored.Oncogene advance online publication, 10 July 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.218.

  7. Serum Proteome Analysis for Profiling Predictive Protein Markers Associated with the Severity of Skin Lesions Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chaze, Thibault; Hornez, Louis; Chambon, Christophe; Haddad, Iman; Vinh, Joelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Benderitter, Marc; Guipaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The finding of new diagnostic and prognostic markers of local radiation injury, and particularly of the cutaneous radiation syndrome, is crucial for its medical management, in the case of both accidental exposure and radiotherapy side effects. Especially, a fast high-throughput method is still needed for triage of people accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation. In this study, we investigated the impact of localized irradiation of the skin on the early alteration of the serum proteome of mice in an effort to discover markers associated with the exposure and severity of impending damage. Using two different large-scale quantitative proteomic approaches, 2D-DIGE-MS and SELDI-TOF-MS, we performed global analyses of serum proteins collected in the clinical latency phase (days 3 and 7) from non-irradiated and locally irradiated mice exposed to high doses of 20, 40 and 80 Gy which will develop respectively erythema, moist desquamation and necrosis. Unsupervised and supervised multivariate statistical analyses (principal component analysis, partial-least square discriminant analysis and Random Forest analysis) using 2D-DIGE quantitative protein data allowed us to discriminate early between non-irradiated and irradiated animals, and between uninjured/slightly injured animals and animals that will develop severe lesions. On the other hand, despite a high number of animal replicates, PLS-DA and Random Forest analyses of SELDI-TOF-MS data failed to reveal sets of MS peaks able to discriminate between the different groups of animals. Our results show that, unlike SELDI-TOF-MS, the 2D-DIGE approach remains a powerful and promising method for the discovery of sets of proteins that could be used for the development of clinical tests for triage and the prognosis of the severity of radiation-induced skin lesions. We propose a list of 15 proteins which constitutes a set of candidate proteins for triage and prognosis of skin lesion outcomes. PMID:28250398

  8. Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 Ameliorates House Dust Mite Extract Induced Atopic Dermatitis Like Skin Lesions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Baek, Hyunjung; Kang, Manho; Kim, Namsik; Lee, Seung Young; Bae, Hyunsu

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a biphasic inflammatory skin disease that is provoked by epidermal barrier defects, immune dysregulation, and increased skin infections. Previously, we have demonstrated that bvPLA2 evoked immune tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg), and thus alleviated Th2 dominant allergic asthma in mice. Here, we would like to determine whether treatment with bvPLA2 exacerbates the AD-like allergic inflammations induced by house dust mite extract (DFE) in a murine model. Epidermal thickness, immune cell infiltration, serum immunoglobulin, and cytokines were measured. Ear swelling, skin lesions, and the levels of total serum IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokines were elevated in DFE/DNCB-induced AD mice. Topical application of bvPLA2 elicited significant suppression of the increased AD symptoms, including ear thickness, serum IgE concentration, inflammatory cytokines, and histological changes. Furthermore, bvPLA2 treatment inhibited mast cell infiltration into the ear. On the other hand, Treg cell depletion abolished the anti-atopic effects of bvPLA2, suggesting that the effects of bvPLA2 depend on the existence of Tregs. Taken together, the results revealed that topical exposure to bvPLA2 aggravated atopic skin inflammation, suggesting that bvPLA2 might be a candidate for the treatment of AD. PMID:28218721

  9. Histological and parasitological distinctive findings in clinically-lesioned and normal-looking skin of dogs with different clinical stages of leishmaniosis.

    PubMed

    Ordeix, Laura; Dalmau, Annabel; Osso, Montsant; Llull, Joan; Montserrat-Sangrà, Sara; Solano-Gallego, Laia

    2017-03-13

    Normal-looking skin of dogs with leishmaniosis frequently shows microscopic lesions along with the presence of Leishmania amastigotes. However, histological lesions with or without detection of amastigotes might not occur in less severe clinical cases. In addition, comparative studies between paired clinically-lesioned and normal-looking skin samples from dogs with different disease severity are lacking. The objective of this study was to compare histological and parasitological findings by Leishmania immunohistochemistry (IHC) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) on paired clinically-lesioned and normal-looking skin biopsies from 25 dogs with different clinical stages of leishmaniosis, 11 with stage I-mild disease (papular dermatitis) and 14 with stage II-III (ulcerative or exfoliative dermatitis). The study demonstrated microscopic lesions in 14 out of 25 (56%) samples from normal-looking skin biopsies. In those samples, perivascular to interstitial dermatitis composed by macrophages with lymphocytes and plasma cells was observed mainly in the superficial and mid-dermis. The intensity of the dermatitis was mild to moderate and always less prominent than in the clinically-lesioned skin. In normal-looking skin samples, the presence of parasites was detected by histology, IHC and qPCR in 5/25 (20%), 8/25 (32%) and 18/25 (72%), respectively. Leishmania was encountered in 11/25 (44%), 23/25 (92%) and 25/25 (100%) of clinically-lesioned skin samples by histology, IHC and qPCR, respectively. Normal-looking skin from dogs with stage I-mild disease was less frequently inflamed (P = 0.0172). Furthermore, Leishmania was more easily demonstrated by histology (P = 0.0464), IHC (P = 0.0421) or qPCR (P = 0.0068) in normal-looking skin of dogs with stage II-III-moderate to severe disease. In addition, in the latter group, there was a significantly higher parasite load studied by means of qPCR than in dogs with less severe disease (P = 0.043). Clinically-lesioned skin

  10. Clinical outcome of skin yaws lesions after treatment with benzathinebenzylpenicillin in a pygmy population in Lobaye, Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Yaws is a bacterial skin and bone infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum pertenue. It is endemic, particularly among pygmies in Central African Republic. To assess the clinical cure rate after treatment with benzathinepenicillin in this population, we conducted a cohort survey of 243 patients in the Lobaye region. Findings and conclusion The rate of healing of lesions after 5 months was 95.9%. This relatively satisfactory level of therapeutic response implies that yaws could be controlled in the Central African Republic. Thus, reinforcement of the management of new cases and of contacts is suggested. PMID:22171605

  11. Histological Lesions and Cellular Response in the Skin of Alpine Chamois (Rupicapra r. rupicapra) Spontaneously Affected by Sarcoptic Mange

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Claudia; Lazzarotti, Camilla; Trogu, Tiziana; Lanfranchi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Population dynamics of chamois (genus Rupicapra, subfamily Caprinae) can be influenced by infectious diseases epizootics, of which sarcoptic mange is probably the most severe in the Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra rupicapra). In this study, skin lesions and cellular inflammatory infiltrates were characterized in 44 Alpine chamois affected by sarcoptic mange. Dermal cellular responses were evaluated in comparison with chamois affected by trombiculosis and controls. In both sarcoptic mange and trombiculosis, a significantly increase of eosinophils, mast cells, T and B lymphocytes, and macrophages was detected. Moreover, in sarcoptic mange significant higher numbers of T lymphocytes and macrophages compared to trombiculosis were observed. Lesions in sarcoptic mange were classified in three grades, according to crusts thickness, correlated with mite counts. Grade 3 represented the most severe form with crust thickness more than 3.5 mm, high number of mites, and severe parakeratosis with diffuse bacteria. Evidence of immediate and delayed hypersensitivity was detected in all three forms associated with diffuse severe epidermal hyperplasia. In grade 3, a significant increase of B lymphocytes was evident compared to grades 1 and 2, while eosinophil counts were significantly higher than in grade 1, but lower than in grade 2 lesions. An involvement of nonprotective Th2 immune response could in part account for severe lesions of grade 3. PMID:27403422

  12. Optical configuration of pigmented lesion detection by frequency analysis of skin speckle patterns

    PubMed Central

    Bishitz, Yael; Ozana, Nisan; Schwarz, Ariel; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach of realizing a safe, simple, and inexpensive sensor applicable to pigmented lesions detection. The approach is based on temporal tracking of back-reflected secondary speckle patterns generated while illuminating the affected area with a laser and applying periodic pressure to the surface via a controlled vibration source. When applied to pigmented lesions, the technique is superior to visual examination in avoiding many false positives and resultant unnecessary biopsies. Applying a series of different vibration frequencies at the examined tissue and analyzing the 2-D time varying speckle patterns in response to the applied periodic pressure creates a unique signature for each and different pigmented lesion. Analyzing these signatures is the first step toward detection of malignant melanoma. In this paper we present preliminary experiments that show the validity of the developed sensor for the classification of pigmented lesions. PMID:27231603

  13. The role of skin trauma in the distribution of morphea lesions: a cross-sectional survey of the Morphea in Adults and Children cohort IV.

    PubMed

    Grabell, Daniel; Hsieh, Clifford; Andrew, Rachel; Martires, Kathryn; Kim, Andrew; Vasquez, Rebecca; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-09-01

    Skin trauma may play a role in the development of morphea lesions. The association between trauma and the distribution of cutaneous lesions has never been examined to our knowledge. We sought to determine whether patients enrolled in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort exhibit skin lesions distributed in areas of prior (isotopic) or ongoing (isomorphic) trauma. This was a cross-sectional analysis of the MAC cohort. Of 329 patients in the MAC cohort, 52 (16%) had trauma-associated lesions at the onset of disease. Patients with lesions in an isotopic distribution had greater clinical severity as measured by a clinical outcome measure (mean modified Rodnan Skin Score of 13.8 vs 5.3, P = .004, 95% confidence interval 3.08-13.92) and impact on life quality (mean Dermatology Life Quality Index score 8.4 vs 4.1, P = .009, 95% confidence interval 1.18-7.50) than those with an isomorphic distribution. Most frequent associated traumas were chronic friction (isomorphic) and surgery/isotopic. Recall bias for patient-reported events is a limitation. Of patients in the MAC cohort, 16% developed initial morphea lesions at sites of skin trauma. If these findings can be confirmed in additional series, they suggest that elective procedures and excessive skin trauma or friction might be avoided in these patients. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Study on the Nature of Association between Demodex Mites and Bacteria Involved in Skin and Meibomian Gland Lesions of Demodectic Mange in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Samra, Mukhtar Taha; Shuaib, Yassir Adam

    2014-01-01

    The nature of association between Demodex mites and bacteria involved in bovine demodectic mange lesions and the normal flora inhabiting the skin of noninfected animals was investigated. Demodex bovis and D. ghanensis mites were isolated from the infected purulent material extracted from skin and meibomian gland lesions, respectively. The mites could not be demonstrated in skin brushings or impression smears from the eyes of noninfected cattle. Pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A)) and opportunistic organisms (Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Trueperella pyogenes) were isolated from skin lesions of demodectic mange, and Moraxella bovis and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from meibomian gland lesions. Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A) were isolated from skin brushings from noninfected cattle. The nature of association between Demodex mites and bacteria in demodectic mange lesions is synergistic and of equal significance. Pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria facilitated the establishment of Demodex mites in the lesions produced and provided an excellent microclimate for the mites to propagate and reproduce, resulting in severe and progressive disease. The “high-turnover” granulomatous reaction which characterized the histopathological changes proved that Demodex mites and associated bacteria were persistent and immunogenic. PMID:25177514

  15. The role of skin trauma in the distribution of morphea lesions: a cross-sectional survey of the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort IV

    PubMed Central

    Grabell, Daniel; Hsieh, Clifford; Andrew, Rachel; Martires, Kathryn; Kim, Andrew; Vasquez, Rebecca; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Background Skin trauma may play a role in the development of morphea lesions. The association between trauma and the distribution of cutaneous lesions has never been examined. Objective Determine whether patients enrolled in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort exhibit skin lesions distributed in areas of prior (isotopic) or ongoing (isomorphic) trauma. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of the MAC cohort. Results Of 329 patients in the MAC cohort, 52 (16%) had trauma associated lesions at the onset of disease. Patients with lesions in an isotopic distribution had greater clinical severity as measured by a clinical outcome measure (mean modified Rodnan Skin Score of 13.8 vs. 5.3, P=0.004, 95% CI=3.08-13.92) and impact on life quality (mean Dermatology Life Quality Index 8.4 vs. 4.1, P=0.009, 95% CI 1.18-7.50) than those with an isomorphic distribution. Most frequent associated trauma were chronic friction (isomorphic) and surgery/isotopic. Limitations Recall bias for patient reported events. Conclusion Sixteen percent of patients in the MAC cohort developed initial morphea lesions at sites of skin trauma. If these findings can be confirmed in additional series, they suggest that elective procedures and excessive skin trauma or friction might be avoided in these patients. PMID:24880663

  16. A Study on the Nature of Association between Demodex Mites and Bacteria Involved in Skin and Meibomian Gland Lesions of Demodectic Mange in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Abu-Samra, Mukhtar Taha; Shuaib, Yassir Adam

    2014-01-01

    The nature of association between Demodex mites and bacteria involved in bovine demodectic mange lesions and the normal flora inhabiting the skin of noninfected animals was investigated. Demodex bovis and D. ghanensis mites were isolated from the infected purulent material extracted from skin and meibomian gland lesions, respectively. The mites could not be demonstrated in skin brushings or impression smears from the eyes of noninfected cattle. Pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A)) and opportunistic organisms (Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Trueperella pyogenes) were isolated from skin lesions of demodectic mange, and Moraxella bovis and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from meibomian gland lesions. Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A) were isolated from skin brushings from noninfected cattle. The nature of association between Demodex mites and bacteria in demodectic mange lesions is synergistic and of equal significance. Pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria facilitated the establishment of Demodex mites in the lesions produced and provided an excellent microclimate for the mites to propagate and reproduce, resulting in severe and progressive disease. The "high-turnover" granulomatous reaction which characterized the histopathological changes proved that Demodex mites and associated bacteria were persistent and immunogenic.

  17. Histomorphology and Immunophenotype of Eczematous Skin Lesions Revisited-Skin Biopsies Are Not Reliable in Differentiating Allergic Contact Dermatitis, Irritant Contact Dermatitis, and Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Frings, Verena G; Böer-Auer, Almut; Breuer, Kristine

    2017-03-10

    Lesions of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), and atopic dermatitis (AD) share similar clinical features and thus, their diagnosis can be challenging. The aim of this study was to reassess histopathology and immunophenotyping properties to distinguish between ACD, ICD, and AD. Charts of patients with eczema, who had undergone complete routine diagnostic workup (skin biopsies, patch tests, skin prick tests, and respectively or serum IgE levels), were reviewed. Thirty-five skin biopsy specimens of 28 patients (mean age 64 ± 15 years; ♀ = 13 ♂ = 15) with clear diagnosis of ACD (n = 15), ICD (n = 6), or AD (n = 14) were analyzed. Histomorphological and immunohistochemical (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD11c, CD34, CD123, S100, and IL-17) parameters were evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon test, Fisher exact test, and decision tree analysis. Eosinophils were statistically significant (P = 0.0184), more often observed in AD than in ACD or ICD. No other statistically significant differences were found with regard to epidermal patterns, patterns of dermal infiltrates, or immunophenotyping. Using predictive modeling approaches, dermal eosinophils were found to be associated with AD, necrotic epidermal keratinocytes with ICD, and a focal type of parakeratosis with ACD. As an additional finding, pseudo-Pautrier microabscesses, which were present in the skin of 2 AD and 2 ACD patients, contained myeloid dendritic cells (CD11c-+). Differentiation of ACD, ICD, and AD should be based on clinical features and results of allergy tests. Histopathology does not reliably differentiate between ACD, ICD, and AD, but helps to exclude psoriasis, tinea, or T-cell lymphoma.

  18. Research Note Mesenchymal stem cells from skin lesions of psoriasis patients promote proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, R F; Wang, F; Wang, Q; Zhao, X C; Zhang, K M

    2015-12-22

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by excessive proliferation and abnormal differentiation and apoptosis of keratinocytes (KCs). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from skin lesions of psoriasis patients demonstrate abnormal cytokine secretion, which may affect KC proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we explored how MSCs from skin lesions of psoriasis patients affect HaCaT cell proliferation and apoptosis. First, flow cytometry and multipotent differentiation methods were used to identify skin MSCs, which were then co-cultured with HaCaT cells. HaCaT cell proliferation was analyzed in real-time, and cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. Cell morphologies and multipotencies of skin MSCs were similar between the psoriasis group and healthy control group, with high levels of CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105 and limited expression of CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. MSCs from skin lesions of psoriasis patients promote KC proliferation more potently and are less capable of inducing KC apoptosis. This may underlie KC proliferation and abnormal apoptosis in psoriasis skin lesions, which results in abnormal thickening of the epidermis.

  19. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis interacts with dermal dendritic cells and keratinocytes in human skin and oral mucosa lesions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Wellington Luiz Ferreira da; Pagliari, Carla; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Sotto, Mirian N

    2016-05-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic disease caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii. In PCM the skin and oral mucosa are often affected. Dendritic cells and keratinocytes of the integument play a role in innate and adaptive immune response against pathogens, due to their function as antigen presenting cells. Aiming to verify the interaction of P. brasiliensis with these cell populations, we studied 52 skin and 47 oral mucosa samples taken from patients with proven diagnosis of PCM. The biopsies were subjected to immunohistochemical and/or immunofluorescence staining with anti-factor XIIIa (marker of dermal dendrocytes), anti-CD207 (marker of mature Langerhans cells), anti-pan cytokeratins (AE1-AE3) and anti-P. brasiliensis antibodies. Analyses with confocal laser microscopy were also performed for better visualization of the interaction between keratinocytes and the fungi. In sum, 42% of oral mucosa samples displayed yeast forms in Factor XIIIa dermal dendrocytes cytoplasm. Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa samples did not show yeast cells in their cytoplasm. In sum, 54% of skin and 60% of mucosal samples displayed yeast cells in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. The parasitism of keratinocytes may represent a possible mechanism of evasion of the fungus to local immune mechanisms. Factor XIIIa dendrocytes and keratinocytes may be acting as antigen-presenting cells to fulfill the probably impaired function of Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa of human PCM.

  20. Concurrent Bartonella henselae infection in a dog with panniculitis and owner with ulcerated nodular skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Michael A; Balakrishnan, Nandhakumar; Linder, Keith E; Messa, Jacqueline B; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2015-02-01

    Bartonella henselae, a Gram-negative, zoonotic Alphaproteobacteria that infects erythrocytes, endothelial cells and dendritic cells, has previously been implicated as a cause of panniculitis in dogs and a human. An 8-year-old, spayed female Labrador retriever and its 78-year-old male owner living in the same household. When preliminary and advanced testing failed to identify the cause of near-simultaneous-onset dermatological lesions, Bartonella serology, Bartonella Alphaproteobacteria growth medium (BAPGM) enrichment blood culture/PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to test specimens from the dog and owner. Bartonella henselae, genotype San Antonio 2 DNA was amplified and sequenced from the man's BAPGM enrichment blood culture and the dog's panniculitis lesion. The bacterium was visualized by immunohistochemistry in the dog's panniculitis lesion; however, neither the dog nor the owner was B. henselae seroreactive. Antibiotic therapy elicited dermatological improvement in both dog and owner. Bartonella henselae is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that induces granulomatous inflammatory lesions in various tissues of animals, including humans. We conclude that this bacterium had a contributory or causative role in the development of the dermatological lesions in the dog and owner. © 2014 ESVD and ACVD.

  1. Mantle cell lymphoma involving skin: cutaneous lesions may be the first manifestation of disease and tumors often have blastoid cytologic features.

    PubMed

    Sen, Filiz; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Lu, Di; Jones, Dan; Lai, Raymond; Katz, Ruth; Abruzzo, Lynne V

    2002-10-01

    We describe five cases of mantle cell lymphoma involving skin. Three patients initially presented with skin lesions but had evidence of widespread disease at time of diagnosis or with relatively short follow-up. One patient was known to have disseminated disease before he developed skin lesions. One patient presented with a solitary skin nodule on the thigh and has developed multiple smaller nodules on the same leg, but no other sites of disease over 30 months of clinical follow-up. This case fulfills the criteria for primary cutaneous lymphoma as proposed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. Biopsy of the skin lesions in all cases showed predominantly dermal and focally subcutaneous lymphoid infiltrates, preferentially perivascular and periadnexal in four cases, and nodular in one case. The tumors were composed of small- to medium-sized lymphocytes with irregular nuclear contours. Four cases had blastoid and one case had typical cytologic features. Immunophenotypic studies showed that all cases were positive for CD20 and cyclin D1, and four of five were positive for CD5. Four cases, including the CD5-negative case, had evidence of the t(11;14) shown by either fluorescence in situ hybridization methods performed on skin tumors or conventional cytogenetic analysis performed on involved bone marrow. We conclude that mantle cell lymphoma can involve skin, usually as a manifestation of disseminated disease, and is often associated with blastoid cytologic features. Rare cases of mantle cell lymphoma may arise in skin.

  2. Risk Factors in Patients with Venous Stasis-Related Skin Lesions without Major Abnormalities on Duplex Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Kotaro; Morikage, Noriyasu; Yamashita, Osamu; Harada, Takasuke; Samura, Makoto; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Mizoguchi, Takahiro; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the risk factors for venous stasis-related skin lesions in the legs in patients without major abnormalities on duplex ultrasonography (DUS). Methods: Fifty patients (nine males and 41 females, age 27-93 years) with symptoms of C4 or greater according to the Clinical, Etiological, Anatomical, Pathological (CEAP) classification, but having no abnormalities on DUS were reviewed for known risk factors for chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) such as older age (>70 years), obesity (body mass index [BMI] >30 kg/m(2)), short walking distance (<200 m/day), reduced ankle range of motion (<20°), and occupation requiring prolonged standing (>8h per day). Results: The risk factor was different between male and female patients; although all patients had at least one of the above risk factors, the most commonly found risk factor in male patients was occupation requiring prolonged standing (63%), while advanced age (78%) and limited walking distance (83%) were risk factors in female patients. Conclusions: Although male and female patients had different risk factors, insufficient walking seemed to be closely related to the development of venous stasis-related skin lesions.

  3. Risk Factors in Patients with Venous Stasis-Related Skin Lesions without Major Abnormalities on Duplex Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Morikage, Noriyasu; Yamashita, Osamu; Harada, Takasuke; Samura, Makoto; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Mizoguchi, Takahiro; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the risk factors for venous stasis-related skin lesions in the legs in patients without major abnormalities on duplex ultrasonography (DUS). Methods: Fifty patients (nine males and 41 females, age 27–93 years) with symptoms of C4 or greater according to the Clinical, Etiological, Anatomical, Pathological (CEAP) classification, but having no abnormalities on DUS were reviewed for known risk factors for chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) such as older age (>70 years), obesity (body mass index [BMI] >30 kg/m2), short walking distance (<200 m/day), reduced ankle range of motion (<20°), and occupation requiring prolonged standing (>8h per day). Results: The risk factor was different between male and female patients; although all patients had at least one of the above risk factors, the most commonly found risk factor in male patients was occupation requiring prolonged standing (63%), while advanced age (78%) and limited walking distance (83%) were risk factors in female patients. Conclusions: Although male and female patients had different risk factors, insufficient walking seemed to be closely related to the development of venous stasis-related skin lesions. PMID:27738462

  4. An estimation of the global burden of disease due to skin lesions caused by arsenic in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Fewtrell, Lorna; Fuge, Ron; Kay, David

    2005-06-01

    The global burden of disease due to skin lesions caused by arsenic in drinking water was estimated by combining country-based exposure data with selected exposure-response relationships derived from the literature. Populations were considered to be exposed to elevated arsenic levels if their drinking water contained arsenic concentrations of 50 microg I(-1) or greater. Elevated arsenic concentrations in drinking water result in a significant global burden of disease, even when confining the health outcome to skin lesions. The burden of disease was particularly marked in the World Health Organization (WHO) comparative risk assessment (CRA) 'Sear D' region, which includes Bangladesh, India and Nepal. Unsurprisingly, Bangladesh was the worst affected country with 143 disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per 1,000 population. Although this initial estimate is subject to a large degree of uncertainty, it does represent an important first step in allowing the comparison of the problem relating to elevated arsenic in drinking water to other environmental health outcomes.

  5. Porcine skin visible lesion thresholds for near-infrared lasers including modeling at two pulse durations and spot sizes.

    PubMed

    Cain, C P; Polhamus, G D; Roach, W P; Stolarski, D J; Schuster, K J; Stockton, K L; Rockwell, B A; Chen, Bo; Welch, A J

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of such systems as the airborne laser and advanced tactical laser, high-energy lasers that use 1315-nm wavelengths in the near-infrared band will soon present a new laser safety challenge to armed forces and civilian populations. Experiments in nonhuman primates using this wavelength have demonstrated a range of ocular injuries, including corneal, lenticular, and retinal lesions as a function of pulse duration. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) laser safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental data, and there is scant data for this wavelength. We are reporting minimum visible lesion (MVL) threshold measurements using a porcine skin model for two different pulse durations and spot sizes for this wavelength. We also compare our measurements to results from our model based on the heat transfer equation and rate process equation, together with actual temperature measurements on the skin surface using a high-speed infrared camera. Our MVL-ED50 thresholds for long pulses (350 micros) at 24-h postexposure are measured to be 99 and 83 J cm(-2) for spot sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 mm diam, respectively. Q-switched laser pulses of 50 ns have a lower threshold of 11 J cm(-2) for a 5-mm-diam top-hat laser pulse.

  6. Analysis of Malassezia microbiota in healthy superficial human skin and in psoriatic lesions by multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Luciana C; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Blaser, Martin J

    2008-05-01

    Yeasts from the genus Malassezia are members of the normal biota of human skin, and may play a role in dermatopathology. Our previous study of the fungal microbiota from healthy subjects and from patients with psoriasis using clone library analysis revealed the presence of five Malassezia species and four uncharacterized phylotypes. We now compared the Malassezia microbiota from six healthy body locations and two psoriatic lesions, and evaluated its stability over time using multiplex real-time PCR. Samples from each body location were obtained monthly, for 4 months. Dual-labeled probes were designed to recognize four Malassezia sp. and two uncharacterized groups, and a genus-specific probe was also developed. A good correspondence was obtained between real-time PCR data and clone library analyses. Malassezia restricta was the most abundant species in the majority of samples, and high amounts of Malassezia globosa were also detected. The uncharacterized phylotype 1 was usually detected in lower proportions, nevertheless it was present in most samples. The microbiota was host-specific and relatively stable over time. In accordance with our previous observations, no significant dichotomy between samples from healthy skin and from psoriatic lesions was found; the samples clustered according to the subject, rather than health status.

  7. Porcine skin visible lesion thresholds for near-infrared lasers including modeling at two pulse durations and spot sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; Polhamus, Garrett D.; Roach, William P.; Stolarski, David J.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Stockton, Kevin; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Chen, Bo; Welch, Ashley J.

    2006-07-01

    With the advent of such systems as the airborne laser and advanced tactical laser, high-energy lasers that use 1315-nm wavelengths in the near-infrared band will soon present a new laser safety challenge to armed forces and civilian populations. Experiments in nonhuman primates using this wavelength have demonstrated a range of ocular injuries, including corneal, lenticular, and retinal lesions as a function of pulse duration. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) laser safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental data, and there is scant data for this wavelength. We are reporting minimum visible lesion (MVL) threshold measurements using a porcine skin model for two different pulse durations and spot sizes for this wavelength. We also compare our measurements to results from our model based on the heat transfer equation and rate process equation, together with actual temperature measurements on the skin surface using a high-speed infrared camera. Our MVL-ED50 thresholds for long pulses (350 µs) at 24-h postexposure are measured to be 99 and 83 Jcm-2 for spot sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 mm diam, respectively. Q-switched laser pulses of 50 ns have a lower threshold of 11 Jcm-2 for a 5-mm-diam top-hat laser pulse.

  8. Histoplasmosis and skin lesions in HIV: a safe and accurate diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Coutiño, Gabriela; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia; Montiel-Robles, Melisa; Sánchez-Pérez, Fiama Selene; Xicohtencatl-Cortés, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Human histoplasmosis is caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. This infection can run asymptomatic or be life-threatening, depending fundamentally on the host's immune status. Immunocompromised patients can present disseminated disease to the skin, making the biopsy an accessible approach. The current diagnosis gold standard is fungal culture which takes several days or weeks to grow and must be handled in a biosafe laboratory which is avoided if we use the technique here described. We propose the use of molecular biology for diagnosis confirmation, considering it can shorten diagnosis lapse, has good specificity and sensitivity and reduces the risk of infection for the medical and laboratory personnel. Seven paraffin-embedded skin biopsy samples were included from patients with confirmed HIV and histoplasmosis diagnosis. Total DNA was isolated and molecular typing of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum. All samples were positive. This is a safe and accurate method for skin histoplasmosis diagnosis.

  9. Skin and skeletal system lesions of european pond turtles (Emys orbicularis) from natural habitats.

    PubMed

    Aleksić-Kovačević, Sanja; Ozvegy, József; Krstić, Nikola; Rusvai, Miklós; Jakab, Csaba; Stanimirović, Zoran; Becskei, Zsolt

    2014-06-01

    Water pollution is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of plastron, carapace and skin diseases of turtles. In this study, a total of 150 European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis) of different age and both sexes, originating from natural habitats in Serbia, were examined for morphological changes of the skin, plastron, carapace and skeletal system. The turtles were taken out from their natural habitats in Lake Ludas, Lake Palic and Lake Tresetiste. After artificial hibernation, they were subjected to detailed examination, sampled and treated, and finally returned into their natural habitat. Biopsies from the skin and shell were subjected to histopathological examination and microbiological analysis. X-ray scanning was also performed to detect changes in the skeletal system. Macroscopic changes of the skin, most frequently degenerative, inflammatory or neoplastic diseases, were diagnosed in 49.33% of the turtles examined. Dermatitis of different origin and form was the most prominent histopathological finding (28.00%). In the plastron, inflammatory and degenerative processes were frequently found. Osteopathy and mechanical injuries were the dominant findings. Macroscopic changes of the plastron, carapace and skeletal system were diagnosed in 67.33% of the turtles examined. Using X-ray scanning, generalised osteopathy, anomalies and malformations of different aetiology were also diagnosed on the tail and legs. Microbiological examinations showed the presence of a variety of bacterial and fungal agents, either primary pathogens or potential polluters, which invaded the skin and shell, or were present in cloacal swab samples. Bacterial infection was diagnosed in 76.66% of the turtles, first of all in those with skin and shell necrosis. Mycoses were diagnosed in 33.33% of the animals.

  10. [Role of integrin-linked kinase signaling pathway in skin lesions and wound healing in diabetic rats].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rixing; Li, Yeyang; Li, Gang; Lin, Weihua; Sun, Jing' en; Zhou, Wangbiao

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signaling pathway in the skin lesions and wound healing in diabetic rats. Thirty-six SD rats were divided into diabetic wound group (D) and non-diabetic wound group (N) according to the random number table, with 18 rats in each group. 10 g/L streptozocin (60 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected in rats in group D, while the rats in group N were given same quantity of sodium citrate buffer. Two weeks after successful reproduction of diabetic model of rats in group D, two full-thickness skin of an area of 2 cm × 2 cm was resected on both sides of back of rats in the two groups. Wounds of three rats of each group were photographed and examined on post injury day (PID) 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21, and the wound healing rates were calculated. The non-injured skin and wound tissue (central part) on back of three rats of the rest 15 rats in the two groups were harvested on PID 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21, respectively. Morphology of the non-injured skin tissue was observed with HE staining, and the thickness of full-thickness skin and epidermis were measured. The mRNA expression levels of ILK, protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) in non-injured skin tissue were determined with real-time fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR. The protein expression levels of ILK, Akt, phosphorylated Akt, GSK-3β, and phosphorylated GSK-3β in non-injured skin tissue, and ILK, phosphorylated Akt in wound tissue were assessed with Western blotting. Data were processed with two independent-sample t test, one-way analysis of variance, SNK test and analysis of variance of factorial design. (1) After injury, the wound scabs of rats in group N were dry, and red granulation tissue with no excretion were seen when the scabs fell off, and the wound healed fast. After injury, excretion under the wound scabs of rats in group D was seen, and the scabs easily fell off with exposure of pink granulation tissue with much excretion, and

  11. Detection and characterisation of papillomavirus in skin lesions of giraffe and sable antelope in South Africa.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, E; Bosman, A M; van Wilpe, E; Williams, J H; Bengis, R G; van Heerden, J; Venter, E H

    2011-06-01

    Papillomavirus was detected electron microscopically in cutaneous fibropapillomas of a giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and a sable antelope (Hippotragus niger). The virus particles measured 45 nm in diameter. Histopathologically, the lesions showed histopathological features similar to those of equine sarcoid as well as positive immunoperoxidase-staining of tissue sections for papillomavirus antigen. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detected bovine papillomavirus (BPV) DNA. Bovine papillomavirus-1 was characterised by real-time PCR in the sable and giraffe, and cloning and sequencing of the PCR product revealed a similarity to BPV-1. As in the 1st giraffe, the lesions from a 2nd giraffe revealed locally malignant pleomorphism, possibly indicating the lesional end-point of papilloma infection. Neither virus particles nor positively staining papillomavirus antigen could be demonstrated in the 2nd giraffe but papillomavirus DNA was detected by real-time PCR which corresponded with BPV-1 and BPV-2.

  12. Specific skin lesions in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: a spectrum of myelomonocytic and dendritic cell proliferations: a study of 42 cases.

    PubMed

    Vitte, Franck; Fabiani, Bettina; Bénet, Claire; Dalac, Sophie; Balme, Brigitte; Delattre, Claire; Vergier, Béatrice; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Vignon-Pennamen, Dominique; Ortonne, Nicolas; Algros, Marie Paule; Carlotti, Agnès; Samaleire, Dimitri; Frouin, Eric; Levy, Anne; Laroche, Liliane; Theate, Ivan; Monnien, Franck; Mugneret, Francine; Petrella, Tony

    2012-09-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a rare clonal hematopoietic disorder that can also involve the skin. The histopathology of these skin lesions is not clearly defined, and few data are available in the literature. To better understand tumoral skin involvements in CMML we carried out an extensive, retrospective clinicopathologic study of 42 cases selected from the database of the French Study Group of Cutaneous Lymphomas. On the basis of clinical data, morphology, and phenotype we identified 4 clinicopathologic profiles representing 4 distinct groups. The first group comprised myelomonocytic cell tumors (n=18), exhibiting a proliferation of granulocytic or monocytic blast cells, which were CD68 and/or MPO positive but negative for dendritic cell markers. The second group comprised mature plasmacytoid dendritic cell tumors (n=16), denoted by a proliferation of mature plasmacytoid dendritic cells, which were CD123, TCL1, and CD303 positive but CD56, CD1a, and S100 negative. The third group comprised blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell tumors (n=4), characterized by a proliferation of monomorphous medium-sized blast cells, which were CD4, CD56, CD123, TCL1 positive but CD1a and S100 negative. The fourth group consisted of a putatively novel category of tumor that we named blastic indeterminate dendritic cell tumors (n=4), distinguished by a proliferation of large blast cells that not only exhibited monocytic markers but also the dendritic markers CD1a and S100. These 4 groups showed distinctive outcomes. Finally, we showed, by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, a clonal link between bone marrow disease and skin lesions in 4 patients. Herein, we have described a novel scheme for pathologists and physicians to handle specific lesions in CMML, which correspond to a spectrum of myelomonocytic and dendritic cell proliferations with different outcomes. A minimal panel of immunohistochemical markers including CD68, CD1a, S100, Langerin, and CD123 is

  13. Improvement of psoriasis-associated arthritis and skin lesions by treatment with molecular hydrogen: A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Toru; Ichikawa, Miki; Sato, Bunpei; Shibata, Shinji; Hara, Yuichi; Naritomi, Yuji; Okazaki, Ken; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Koyanagi, Samon; Hara, Hiroshi; Nagao, Tetsuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease, is caused by infiltrating lymphocytes and associated cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-17. Effective treatments, including pathogenesis-based biological agents against psoriasis, are currently under development. Although the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been investigated, it remains to be fully elucidated; ROS-targeted therapeutic strategies are also lacking at present. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to assess whether H2, a ROS scavenger, has a therapeutic effect on psoriasis-associated inflammation by reducing hydroxyl radicals or peroxynitrite in the immunogenic psoriasis cascade. Three methods were used to administer H2: Drop infusion of saline containing 1 ppm H2 (H2-saline), inhalation of 3% H2 gas, and drinking of water containing a high concentration (5-7-ppm) of H2 (high-H2 water). Treatment efficacy was estimated using the disease activity score 28 (DAS28) system, based on C-reactive protein levels, and the psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) score, determined at baseline and following each H2 treatment. Furthermore, levels of TNFα, IL-6, and IL-17 were analyzed. The DAS28 and PASI score of the three patients decreased during H2 treatment, regardless of the administration method. The psoriatic skin lesions almost disappeared at the end of the treatment. IL-6 levels decreased during H2 treatment in Case 1 and 2. IL-17, whose concentration was high in Case 1, was reduced following H2 treatment, and TNFα also decreased in Case 1. In conclusion, H2 administration reduced inflammation associated with psoriasis in the three cases examined and it may therefore be considered as a treatment strategy for psoriasis-associated skin lesions and arthritis.

  14. Amentoflavone protects against psoriasis-like skin lesion through suppression of NF-κB-mediated inflammation and keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    An, Jingang; Li, Zhengxiao; Dong, Yingying; Ren, Jianwen; Huo, Jia

    2016-02-01

    Psoriasis is a one of the most common chronic skin diseases, which affects 0.6-4.8% of the general population. Amentoflavone (AMF) belongs to the biflavonoid class of flavonoids, possessing various biological effects, such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-apoptotic effects. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of AMF on psoriasis in imiquimod (IMQ) psoriasis-like lesions in mice and keratinocyte proliferation in HaCaT cells. We showed that AMF reduced skinfold thickening, and improved erythema and scaling scores and histological lesions in IMQ-treated mice. AMF exerted potent anti-inflammatory effect via influencing a variety of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22, and IL-23 in local skin lesions and the whole body. In M5 (a cocktail of cytokines)-treated HaCaT cells, AMF significantly inhibited cell proliferation, promoted apoptosis, and inhibited the increase of expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, IL-17A, and IL-22. In addition, AMF inhibited the upregulation of p65 NF-κB under psoriatic condition. Moreover, overexpression of p65 NF-κB significantly suppressed the effect of AMF on keratinocyte proliferation, apoptosis, and expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, IL-17A, and IL-22. These results demonstrated that suppression of NF-κB was involved in AMF-resulted anti-proliferative, apoptosis-promoting, anti-inflammatory effects in keratinocytes. The data demonstrate that AMF may serve as potential therapeutic option for patients with psoriasis.

  15. Sulfur Mustard (SM) Lesions in Organ-Cultured Human Skin: Markers of Injury and Inflammatory Mediators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-16

    this in vitro system , the viable kera- tinocytes are protected by the same keratinized layer as skin remaining on the donor. There was a straight-line...components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 19 DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS .............. ........... 19 The organ-oulture system ... systemic absorption of the toxicant. Iso~lated human keretinocytes (in culture) can be used for testing the effects of various toxicants (1-5

  16. Isogarcinol Extracted from Garcinia mangostana L. Ameliorates Imiquimod-Induced Psoriasis-like Skin Lesions in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanzao; Han, Kesheng; Li, Hu; Cen, Juren; Yang, Yanfang; Wu, Hezhen; Wei, Qun

    2017-02-01

    Isogarcinol (YDIS), a natural compound extracted from Garcinia mangostana L., has a significant immunosuppressive effect on systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. This paper reports that it reduced imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like skin lesions in mice. It strongly attenuated the aberrant proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. Moreover, the expression of genes involving the interleukin-23 (IL-23)/T-helper 17 (Th17) axis was significantly inhibited in the dorsal skin of the YDIS-treated mice, as was that of the other pro-inflammatory factors TNF-α, IL-2, and even interferon (IFN)-γ. Furthermore, YDIS prevented the abnormal distribution of T cell types and suppressed the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells into Th17 cells in the spleens of mice exposed to imiquimod. Interestingly, it elevated numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the spleen and boosted IL-10 expression in the skin. In agreement with the above, YDIS increased serum IL-10 and reduced serum IL-17. It also caused less damage to the liver and, especially, kidneys of mice than cyclosporine A (CsA). In vitro, YDIS caused more death of HaCaT keratinocytes than CsA. It also strongly inhibited inflammatory factor expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated HaCaT cells. These findings suggest that YDIS is a promising immunosuppressive agent for treating psoriasis.

  17. Multimodal imaging findings of SAPHO syndrome with no skin lesions: A report of three cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Duan, Na; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhongqiu

    2016-10-01

    Synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis syndrome (SAPHO) is a rare syndrome that affects the skin, bones and joints. Diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome is established on clinical appearance and imaging features. The present case report described the imaging features of three cases of SAPHO with sternoclavicular joint arthritis but without skin manifestations using multiple imaging modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scintigraphy. The first case was a 52-year-old male who suffered from progressive sternoclavicular arthritis for 2 years. The second case was a 62-year-old female with arthritis in the larger joints for 5 years, particularly on the right thoracic area. The third case was a 44-year-old male who exhibited a slight bulge accompanied by pain in the upper anterior chest wall for 4 years. All of them lacked cutaneous lesions. CT demonstrated sclerosis and hyperostosis with subchondral erosions in the sternocostoclavicular joints. MRI revealed bone marrow edema that was slightly hypointense on T1-weighted imaging, and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. Typical 'bull head' signs were observed in bone scintigraphy images. The present case study demonstrated that SAPHO syndrome should be suspected in patients with multifocal osteitis or arthritis affecting the chest wall that lack skin manifestations. Multimodal imaging modalities in combination are helpful for SAPHO diagnosis.

  18. Reduced arterial circulation to the legs in spinal cord injury as a cause of skin breakdown lesions.

    PubMed

    Deitrick, George; Charalel, Joseph; Bauman, William; Tuckman, John

    2007-01-01

    Skin breakdown lesions (SBLs) of the legs are common in spinal cord injury (SCI). It is assumed that the cause is deficient sensitivity and immobility of the limbs, which result in areas subjected to prolonged pressures. However, poor circulation may also be a significant factor. Indeed, strong reasons suggest that small vessel circulation is decreased in SCI because these patients have increased arteriosclerotic risk factors. Patients in the SCI population have advanced age, are sedentary, often have abnormal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and many use tobacco products. Total blood flow (TBF) to the legs and skin blood flows (SBFs) to 4 areas of the feet were measured simultaneously by duplex Doppler sonography and laser Doppler flowmetry in 10 healthy control and 10 chronic subjects with SCI when supine and during 30 minutes in a wheelchair. The average supine control TBF was 540 mL/minute, but greatly reduced between 24-76 mL/minute in 4 of the subjects. During sitting, the average TBF fell by 41% in the controls and increased by 6% in SCI. Nonetheless, in all control and SCI subjects the average sitting SBFs were severely decreased in all areas between 53-75%, similar to results found by others elsewhere in the foreleg. Ischemia of the skin and underlying muscles is important as a cause for the poor healing of SBLs in persons with SCI who daily spend many hours in a wheelchair.

  19. Multimodal imaging findings of SAPHO syndrome with no skin lesions: A report of three cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Na; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhongqiu

    2016-01-01

    Synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis syndrome (SAPHO) is a rare syndrome that affects the skin, bones and joints. Diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome is established on clinical appearance and imaging features. The present case report described the imaging features of three cases of SAPHO with sternoclavicular joint arthritis but without skin manifestations using multiple imaging modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scintigraphy. The first case was a 52-year-old male who suffered from progressive sternoclavicular arthritis for 2 years. The second case was a 62-year-old female with arthritis in the larger joints for 5 years, particularly on the right thoracic area. The third case was a 44-year-old male who exhibited a slight bulge accompanied by pain in the upper anterior chest wall for 4 years. All of them lacked cutaneous lesions. CT demonstrated sclerosis and hyperostosis with subchondral erosions in the sternocostoclavicular joints. MRI revealed bone marrow edema that was slightly hypointense on T1-weighted imaging, and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. Typical ‘bull head’ signs were observed in bone scintigraphy images. The present case study demonstrated that SAPHO syndrome should be suspected in patients with multifocal osteitis or arthritis affecting the chest wall that lack skin manifestations. Multimodal imaging modalities in combination are helpful for SAPHO diagnosis. PMID:27698770

  20. Association of single nucleotide polymorphism with arsenic-induced skin lesions and genetic damage in exposed population of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Nandana; Giri, Allan; Chakraborty, Sayan; Bhattacharjee, Pritha

    2016-10-01

    Long term consumption of arsenic contaminated water causes a number of dermatological and non-dermatological health problems and cancer. In a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) on Bangladesh population, a significant association of asingle nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the C10orf32 region (rs 9527; G>A) with urinary metabolites and arsenic induced skin lesions was reported. This study aims to evaluate the association of the C10orf32 G to A polymorphism (rs9527), concerned with As3MT read-through transcription, with the development of arsenic induced skin lesions in the arsenic exposed individuals of West Bengal, India. A total of 157 individuals with characteristic skin lesions (cases) and 158 individuals without any skin lesion (controls) were recruited for this study. The G>A polymorphism (rs9527) having at least one minor allele 'A' was found to be significantly higher in cases compared to controls, implying increased risk toward the development of skin lesions. The risk genotype was also found to be significantly associated with cytogenetic damage as measured by chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei formation in lymphocytes. Hence, it can be concluded that G>A change in the C10orf32 region plays an important role in arsenic induced toxicity and susceptibility.

  1. Prevalence of actinic skin lesions in patients with basal cell carcinoma of the head: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Chinem, Valquíria Pessoa; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of actinic skin lesions in patients with basal cell carcinoma of the head. A case-control study was carried out. Cases were patients with primary, solid basal cell carcinoma of the head, less than two centimeters in diameter; and as controls, patients with other dermatoses. Constitutional and behavioral variables were analyzed, as well as actinic lesions. One hundred twenty cases and 360 controls were evaluated. Facial milia (OR = 2.3), leukoderma punctata of the upper limbs (OR = 2.9), and cutis rhomboidalis nuchae (OR = 1.8) were associated with neoplasms regardless of other variables, suggesting a risk phenotype. There was also association with light hair and eye color phenotypes, family genetics, and cumulative sun exposure. Sunburn, smoking, and alcoholism were not identified as risk factors. The use of sunscreens showed no evidence of protection; however, the control group consisted of dermatology patients who are often prescribed sunscreens. Actinic lesions were more prevalent in patients with solid basal cell carcinoma of the head than in controls, especially milia, cutis rhomboidalis nuchae, and leukoderma punctata, regardless of other known risk factors.

  2. Complete response of endemic Kaposi sarcoma lesions with high-dose-rate brachytherapy: treatment method, results, and toxicity using skin surface applicators.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Michael E; Richter, Sam; Warren, Nicholas; Benda, Rashmi; Shang, Charles; Ouhib, Zoubir

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the clinical outcome of Kaposi sarcoma skin lesions treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with a minimum of 2 years of followup. Between February 2006 and July 2008, all patients with Kaposi sarcoma who received (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy using a skin surface applicator were evaluated for clinical response. Responses to treatment and toxicity were scored using standard criteria. Sixteen cases were collected. Treatment was delivered in four to six fractions, over a period of approximately 12 days. The specified dose ranged from 24 to 35Gy. Median followup the lesion was 41.4 months. No lesion was greater than 2cm. All patients had a complete response to treatment, with no evidence of local recurrence or tumor progression. Thirteen lesions developed Grade 1 and two lesions had Grade 2 acute skin reactions. One patient developed late skin changes with telangiectasias and hypopigmentation. HDR brachytherapy treatment seems to be an effective noninvasive option for patients with small cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma lesions, delivering excellent cosmesis and local control in our small series. Fewer fractions over a shorter period used in our group offer patients more convenience compared with other common regimens. Although HDR is being used more frequently for many surface applications, additional clinical studies with larger numbers of patients and longer followup are needed to confirm the general impression that it is an excellent option for many patients. Copyright © 2013 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Distinct and Replicable Squamous Cell Carcinoma Gene INPPA5 Variant Modifies Susceptibility of Arsenic-Associated Skin Lesions in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Wei Jie; Pan, Wen-Chi; Kile, Molly L.; Lin, Tong; Baccarelli, Andrea; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mostofa, Golam; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Kibriya, Muhammad; Ahsan, Habibul; Lin, Xihong; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in inflammation, one-carbon metabolism and skin cancer genes might influence susceptibility to arsenic-induced skin lesions. Methods A case-control study was conducted in Pabna, Bangladesh (2001-2003) and drinking water arsenic concentration was measured for each participant. A panel of twenty-five candidate SNPs was analyzed in 540 cases and 400 controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between each SNP and the potential for gene-environment interactions in skin lesion risk adjusting for relevant covariates. Replication testing was conducted in an independent Bangladesh population with 488 cases and 2,794 controls. Results In the discovery population, genetic variants in the one-carbon metabolism genes PEMT (rs2278952, P for interaction = 0.004; rs897453, P for interaction = 0.05) and DHFR (rs1650697, P for interaction = 0.02), inflammation gene IL10 (rs3024496, P for interaction = 0.04), and skin cancer genes INPP5A (rs1133400, P for interaction = 0.03) and XPC (rs2228000, P for interaction = 0.01) significantly modified the association between arsenic and skin lesions after adjusting for multiple comparisons. The significant gene-environment interaction between a SNP in INPP5A gene (rs1133400) and water arsenic on skin lesion risk was successfully replicated in an independent population (P for interaction = 0.03). Conclusion Minor allele carriers of skin cancer gene INPP5A modified odds of arsenic-induced skin lesions in both main and replicative populations. Genetic variation in INPP5A appears to have a role in susceptibility to arsenic toxicity. PMID:25759212

  4. Inhibitory effects of Juglans mandshurica leaf on allergic dermatitis-like skin lesions-induced by 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Gunhyuk; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-03-01

    Allergic dermatitis among common skin diseases is a chronic and recurrent inflammatory skin disorder caused by genetic, environmental, allergens as well as microbial factors. Allergic dermatitis patients clinically present skin erythematous plaques, eruption, elevated serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and T helper cell type 2 (Th2) cytokine levels. The leaf of walnut tree Juglans mandshurica Maxim (JM) is consumed food and traditional phytomedicine in Asia, China, Siberia and Korea. JM has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-tumor, anti-oxidative, and anti-bacterial effects. However, no study of the inhibitory effects of JM on allergic dermatitis has been reported. Here, we demonstrated the effect of JM against 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced allergic dermatitis-like skin lesions. 0.5% JM or 1% dexamethasone (positive control) applied to the dorsal skin inhibited development of allergic dermatitis-like skin lesions and scratching behavior. Moreover, the Th2-mediated inflammatory cytokines IgE, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-13, were significantly reduced by JM treatment. Thus JM can inhibit development of allergic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice by regulating immune mediators, and may be an effective alternative therapy for allergic dermatitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology in the Diagnosis of Skin and Superficial Soft Tissue Lesions: A Study of 510 Cases.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Abhijit; Mallick Sinha, Mamata Guha; Barman, Dilip Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of the skin and superficial subcutaneous soft tissues present with a wide array of lesions ranging from nonspecific dermatoses and inflammatory lesions to frank neoplasms. Though cytopathology is an excellent diagnostic tool in routine dermatologic practice, studies relating to histopathological and cytological correlation are sparse. The aim of this study was to analyze the concordance rate between cytological and histopathological diagnosis of skin and superficial soft tissue lesions. We retrospectively studied 510 consecutive fine needle aspiration cytology findings of cases from North Bengal Medical College and Hospital and correlated their diagnoses based upon cytological and histopathological grounds. Out of the 510 cases studied, 253 were non neoplastic lesions and 257 were neoplastic. A high degree of concordance was observed (100% for malignant and 96.15% for benign lesions) when these two diagnostic modalities were compared. Histopathological correlation was possible in all malignant, 52/189 (27.51%) of benign and 27/253 (10.67%) of non-neoplastic lesions. Sensitivity and specificity of diagnoses were 95.31% and 97.6%, respectively. It can be safely concluded that fine needle aspiration cytology is a rapid, reliable and fairly accurate tool for initial triage and treatment of skin and superficial soft tissue lesions.

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Valencene on the Development of Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in NC/Nga Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, In Jun

    2016-01-01

    Valencene (VAL) isolated from Cyperus rotundus possesses various biological effects such as antiallergic and antimelanogenesis activity. We investigated the effect of VAL on atopic dermatitis (AD) skin lesions and their molecular mechanisms. We topically applied VAL to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) sensitized NC/Nga mice. Modified scoring atopic dermatitis index, scratching behavior, and histological/immunohistochemical staining were used to monitor disease severity. RT-PCR, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to determine the level of IgE, proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines production, and skin barrier proteins expression. Topical application of VAL significantly reduced AD-like symptoms and recovered decreased expression of filaggrin in DNCB-sensitized NC/Nga mice. The levels of serum IgE, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-13 in skin/splenic tissue were reduced. In vitro studies using TNF-α and IFN-γ treated HaCaT cells revealed that VAL inhibited the exaggerated expression of Th2 chemokines including TARC/CCL17, MDC/CCL22, and proinflammatory chemokines such as CXCL8, GM-CSF, and I-CAM through blockade of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, expression of the skin barrier protein, involucrin, was also increased by VAL treatment. VAL inhibited the production and expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that VAL may serve as a potential therapeutic option for AD. PMID:27630735

  7. Reduction of regulatory T cells in skin lesions but not in peripheral blood of patients with systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Klein, S; Kretz, C C; Ruland, V; Stumpf, C; Haust, M; Hartschuh, W; Hartmann, M; Enk, A; Suri-Payer, E; Oberle, N; Krammer, P H; Kuhn, A

    2011-08-01

    To determine the frequency and suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells (T(reg)) and their association with clinical parameters in patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc). Peripheral blood from 25 patients with SSc, 15 patients with localised scleroderma (LS) and 29 healthy controls (HC) was studied. Analysis of CD4(+) forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)(+) and CD4(+)CD25(++)Foxp3(+) T(reg) subpopulations was carried out by flow cytometry and cell proliferation was quantified by (3)H-thymidine incorporation. Quantitative analysis of T(reg) was further performed in skin biopsies from 17 patients with SSc and 21 patients with LS using anti-CD4 and anti-Foxp3 monoclonal antibodies for immunohistochemistry. The frequency of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) and CD4(+)CD25(++)Foxp3(+) T(reg) in peripheral blood from patients with SSc was not significantly different from that of patients with LS or HC. The suppressive capacity of CD4(+)CD25(++) T(reg) in SSc was also found to be similar to that of HC. Phenotypic and functional data revealed no significant difference between the limited or diffuse form of SSc. Moreover, therapy with bosentan showed no significant effect on the frequency of T(reg) during the course of the disease. However, the frequency of T(reg) in skin lesions from patients with SSc or LS, determined as the percentage of CD4(+) cells expressing Foxp3 in the inflammatory infiltrate, was significantly reduced compared with other inflammatory skin diseases. These results indicate that although the authors found no defect in the frequency or function of peripheral T(reg) subpopulations, the reduction of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) in the skin of patients with SSc may be important in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  8. Sulfur Mustard (SM) Lesions in Organ-Cultured Human Skin: Markers of Injury and Inflammatory Mediators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    second, but more cumbersome, way to assess injury to human skin explants is the interference with the incorporation of [14C]leucine by the epidermal cells ...assayed for markers of cell death and early inflammatory media- tors. Lactic dehydrogenase (LDE), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), trypsin-like and...markers for injury produced by SM. ACE is a marker for endo- thelial damage. Lysosomal enzymes participate in cell autolysis. We did, however, find one

  9. Modified watershed technique and post-processing for segmentation of skin lesions in dermoscopy images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanzheng; Moss, Randy H; Chen, Xiaohe; Stanley, R Joe; Stoecker, William V; Celebi, M Emre; Malters, Joseph M; Grichnik, James M; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Rabinovitz, Harold S; Menzies, Scott W; Szalapski, Thomas M

    2011-03-01

    In previous research, a watershed-based algorithm was shown to be useful for automatic lesion segmentation in dermoscopy images, and was tested on a set of 100 benign and malignant melanoma images with the average of three sets of dermatologist-drawn borders used as the ground truth, resulting in an overall error of 15.98%. In this study, to reduce the border detection errors, a neural network classifier was utilized to improve the first-pass watershed segmentation; a novel "edge object value (EOV) threshold" method was used to remove large light blobs near the lesion boundary; and a noise removal procedure was applied to reduce the peninsula-shaped false-positive areas. As a result, an overall error of 11.09% was achieved.

  10. Space allowance for dry, pregnant sows in pens: body condition, skin lesions, and performance.

    PubMed

    Salak-Johnson, J L; Niekamp, S R; Rodriguez-Zas, S L; Ellis, M; Curtis, S E

    2007-07-01

    Different floor space allowances for dry, pregnant sows in pens were evaluated to determine the impacts of space on sow performance, productivity, and body lesions during 2 consecutive farrowings. Treatment groups of 5 sows/pen were assigned to 1.4, 2.3, or 3.3 m(2) of floor space/sow or of 5 sows in individual stalls (1.34 m(2)). The experiment consisted of 6 replications (blocks 1 to 6), and within each block measurements were recorded for 2 consecutive pregnancies and farrowings. A total of 152 sows were measured at 1 farrowing, and 65 of those sows were measured at the successive farrowing (n = 217 records). Performance traits were BCS, BW, backfat (BF), days until rebred, and proportion culled. Litter traits were number of piglets born alive, male:female ratio, and proportions of stillborn, mummified, or dead piglets after birth. Litter performance measures were mean piglet BW and gain and litter BW. Lesion scores were assessed for several body regions. There were treatment and parity effects and interactions for several traits. An interaction of space treatment and parity occurred for sow mean BW, d-110 BW, BF, litter size, and litter and piglet BW and gain, with most effects in parity 2, 3, and 4 sows. Space affected sow mean (P < 0.001) and d-110 BW (P < 0.05) and mean BF and adjusted BF (P < 0.001); sows in pens at lesion score were affected by floor space (P < 0.001) and parity (P < 0.01); BCS was reduced in sows in pens at 1.4 m(2), and their lesion score was consistently greater (P < 0.05) than that of other space allowances. Primiparous sows often had the least (P

  11. Empiric Antibiotic Treatment of Erythema Migrans-Like Skin Lesions As a Function of Geography: A Clinical and Cost Effectiveness Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Brinkerhoff, R. Jory; Wormser, Gary P.; Clemen, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The skin lesion of early Lyme disease, erythema migrans (EM), is so characteristic that routine practice is to treat all such patients with antibiotics. Because other skin lesions may resemble EM, it is not known whether presumptive treatment of EM is appropriate in regions where Lyme disease is rare. We constructed a decision model to compare the cost and clinical effectiveness of three strategies for the management of EM: Treat All, Observe, and Serology as a function of the probability that an EM-like lesion is Lyme disease. Treat All was found to be the preferred strategy in regions that are endemic for Lyme disease. Where Lyme disease is rare, Observe is the preferred strategy, as presumptive treatment would be expected to produce excessive harm and increased costs. Where Lyme disease is rare, clinicians and public health officials should consider observing patients with EM-like lesions who lack travel to Lyme disease-endemic areas. PMID:24107201

  12. Empiric antibiotic treatment of erythema migrans-like skin lesions as a function of geography: a clinical and cost effectiveness modeling study.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Wormser, Gary P; Clemen, Robert

    2013-12-01

    The skin lesion of early Lyme disease, erythema migrans (EM), is so characteristic that routine practice is to treat all such patients with antibiotics. Because other skin lesions may resemble EM, it is not known whether presumptive treatment of EM is appropriate in regions where Lyme disease is rare. We constructed a decision model to compare the cost and clinical effectiveness of three strategies for the management of EM: Treat All, Observe, and Serology as a function of the probability that an EM-like lesion is Lyme disease. Treat All was found to be the preferred strategy in regions that are endemic for Lyme disease. Where Lyme disease is rare, Observe is the preferred strategy, as presumptive treatment would be expected to produce excessive harm and increased costs. Where Lyme disease is rare, clinicians and public health officials should consider observing patients with EM-like lesions who lack travel to Lyme disease-endemic areas.

  13. Sepsis with bullous necrotizing skin lesions due to vibrio vulnificus acquired through recreational activities in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Kuhnt-Lenz, K; Krengel, S; Fetscher, S; Heer-Sonderhoff, A; Solbach, W

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 59-year-old woman with a history of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who developed bacteremia with Vibrio vulnificus. The patient had been swimming in the unusually warm Baltic Sea in the summer of 2002. She presented with symptoms of septicemia and severe bullous necrotizing skin lesions of the extremities. Blood culture revealed Vibrio vulnificus as the pathogenic organism. Under treatment with cefotaxime and gentamicin, she recovered slowly without further complications. Vibrio vulnificus is a marine bacterium that is present in aquatic ecosystems worldwide, especially when water temperatures exceed 20 degrees C. Infections with Vibrio vulnificus are uncommon in Europe, and most cases are reported from subtropical or tropical regions.

  14. Performance of a dermoscopy-based computer vision system for the diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions compared with visual evaluation by experienced dermatologists.

    PubMed

    Zortea, Maciel; Schopf, Thomas R; Thon, Kevin; Geilhufe, Marc; Hindberg, Kristian; Kirchesch, Herbert; Møllersen, Kajsa; Schulz, Jörn; Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Godtliebsen, Fred

    2014-01-01

    It is often difficult to differentiate early melanomas from benign melanocytic nevi even by expert dermatologists, and the task is even more challenging for primary care physicians untrained in dermatology and dermoscopy. A computer system can provide an objective and quantitative evaluation of skin lesions, reducing subjectivity in the diagnosis. Our objective is to make a low-cost computer aided diagnostic tool applicable in primary care based on a consumer grade camera with attached dermatoscope, and compare its performance to that of experienced dermatologists. We propose several new image-derived features computed from automatically segmented dermoscopic pictures. These are related to the asymmetry, color, border, geometry, and texture of skin lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of the system is compared with that of three dermatologists. With a data set of 206 skin lesions, 169 benign and 37 melanomas, the classifier was able to provide competitive sensitivity (86%) and specificity (52%) scores compared with the sensitivity (85%) and specificity (48%) of the most accurate dermatologist using only dermoscopic images. We show that simple statistical classifiers can be trained to provide a recommendation on whether a pigmented skin lesion requires biopsy to exclude skin cancer with a performance that is comparable to and exceeds that of experienced dermatologists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of skin lesions from sporotrichosis epidemic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cassio Porto; Oliveira de Almeida, Ana Cristina; Corte-Real, Suzana

    2015-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy can yield useful information in a range of scientific fields; it is capable of imaging at a significantly higher resolution than light microscopes and has been a very useful tool in the identification of morphological changes of the dermis as well as assessment of changes in the extracellular matrix. Our aim is to characterize by electron microscopy the cellular profile of lesions caused by Sporothrix schenckii from the sporotrichosis epidemic in its zoonotic form that occurs in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  16. Invited Commentary: Use of Arsenical Skin Lesions to Predict Risk of Internal Cancer—Implications for Prevention and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Habibul; Steinmaus, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic exposure affects millions of people worldwide, causing substantial mortality and morbidity from cancers and cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. An article in the current issue (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;177(3):202–212) reports that classic dermatological manifestations, typically associated with chronic arsenic exposure, are predictive of internal cancers among Taiwanese decades after the cessation of exposure. Specifically, the risk of lung and urothelial cancers was elevated, which was evident regardless of arsenic dose, smoking, and age. There was also an unexpected elevated risk of prostate cancer. Despite some methodological limitations, these findings underscore the need for assessing whether dermatological manifestations are also predictive of cardiovascular, respiratory, and other arsenic-related, long-term health consequences. Given the emerging evidence of arsenic exposure from dietary sources beyond contaminated drinking water and occupational and environmental settings, and also because the vast majority of diseases and deaths among exposed populations do not show classic dermatological manifestations, larger and more comprehensive investigations of the health effects of arsenic exposure, especially at lower doses, are needed. In parallel, because the risk of known arsenic-related health outcomes remains elevated decades after exposure cessation, research toward identification of early clinical and biological markers of long-term risk as well as avenues for prevention, in addition to policy actions for exposure reductions, is warranted. PMID:23299696

  17. Invited commentary: use of arsenical skin lesions to predict risk of internal cancer: implications for prevention and future research.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Habibul; Steinmaus, Craig

    2013-02-01

    Arsenic exposure affects millions of people worldwide, causing substantial mortality and morbidity from cancers and cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. An article in the current issue (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;177(3):202-212) reports that classic dermatological manifestations, typically associated with chronic arsenic exposure, are predictive of internal cancers among Taiwanese decades after the cessation of exposure. Specifically, the risk of lung and urothelial cancers was elevated, which was evident regardless of arsenic dose, smoking, and age. There was also an unexpected elevated risk of prostate cancer. Despite some methodological limitations, these findings underscore the need for assessing whether dermatological manifestations are also predictive of cardiovascular, respiratory, and other arsenic-related, long-term health consequences. Given the emerging evidence of arsenic exposure from dietary sources beyond contaminated drinking water and occupational and environmental settings, and also because the vast majority of diseases and deaths among exposed populations do not show classic dermatological manifestations, larger and more comprehensive investigations of the health effects of arsenic exposure, especially at lower doses, are needed. In parallel, because the risk of known arsenic-related health outcomes remains elevated decades after exposure cessation, research toward identification of early clinical and biological markers of long-term risk as well as avenues for prevention, in addition to policy actions for exposure reductions, is warranted.

  18. PDGFRa amplification in multiple skin lesions of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma: A clue for intimal sarcoma metastases.

    PubMed

    Osio, Amélie; Vignon-Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Pedeutour, Florence; Le Maignan, Christine; Koskas, Fabien; Lebbé, Célèste; Janin, Anne; Battistella, Maxime

    2017-05-01

    A 62-year-old human immunodeficiency virus-positive man was admitted for multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules on his lower limbs, corresponding to an undifferentiated proliferation of spindle and pleomorphic cells, with irregular nuclei and numerous mitoses. The tumor cells were negative for a large panel of immunohistochemical markers, except CD10. MDM2 immunohistochemical staining was also negative, leading to the diagnosis of Fédération Nationale des Centres de Lutte contre le Cancer grade III undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS). Array-comparative genomic hybridization showed a highly complex karyotype, with amplification of the 4q12 region, an area that contains only the platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRa) gene. This amplification of PDFGRa, molecular hallmark of intimal sarcoma (IS), led to the diagnosis of skin IS metastasis. A positron emission tomography showed a hypermetabolic mass protruding in the preaortic area, consistent with the diagnosis of aortic IS. Our study shows that a rare differential diagnosis in peripheral UPS can be IS skin metastasis, and underlines the importance of molecular analyses in UPS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Simulated color: a diagnostic tool for skin lesions like port-wine stain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2001-05-01

    A device independent method for skin color visualization has been developed. Colors reconstructed from a reflectance spectrum are presented on a computer screen by sRGB (standard Red Green Blue) color coordinates. The colors are presented as adjacent patches surrounded by a medium grey border. CIELAB color coordinates and CIE (International Commission on Illumination) color difference (Delta) E are computed. The change in skin color due to a change in average blood content or scattering properties in dermis is investigated. This is done by analytical simulations based on the diffusion approximation. It is found that an 11% change in average blood content and a 15% change in scattering properties will give a visible color change. A supposed visibility limit for (Delta) E is given. This value is based on experimental testing and the known properties of the human visual system. This limit value can be used as a tool to determine when to terminate laser treatment of port- wine stain due to low treatment response, i.e. low (Delta) E between treatments. The visualization method presented seems promising for medical applications as port-wine stain diagnostics. The method gives good possibilities for electronic transfer of data between clinics because it is device independent.

  20. [A comparison of biochemical and genetic classification of propionibacterium acnes strains isolated from skin lesions of patients with acne].

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, Andrzej; Owczarek, Magdalena M; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Białecka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is dominating group of resident bacteria in skin biocenosis. These bacteria participate in autosterilisation of skin with the process of decomposition of triglycerides into free fatty acids and by keeping the pH of skin on the level 5.5. When the process goes out of control the excess of fatty acids in sebaceous glands leads to necrosis and inflammation. Apart of the presence on the skin P acnes also are present in mucous membranes of intestinal tract, eyes, internal ears channels, and in upper respiratory tracts. Traditionally they are regarded as anaerobes, but they tolerate oxygen atmosphere and are resistant to phagocytosis, surviving even in macrophages. These bacteria produce a number of enzymes and proinflammatory factors activating monocytes, stimulating mitogenic activity of lymphocytes T. According to common opinion they are responsible for disease acne vulgaris, but there are also researchers claiming their low pathogenicity. The list of the P acnes related diseases is not short, some of these diseases may be facilitated by predisposing factors as surgery interventions, diagnostic, or cosmetic procedures. The aim of the study was to compare standard biochemical analysis of P acnes strains to genotypic typing basing on the results from MP-PCR analyses. Relations of hemolysis activity to biochemical types or genetic types were also analysed. The analysis of 66 P acnes strains isolated from skin lesions of patients with acne vulgaris was performed. A collection of the strains was analysed biochemically according to Pulverer, Sourek and Hoffler method modified by Kasprowicz, and typed genetically by MP-PCR method. Relations of biochemical and genetic types to beta-hemolysis of strains were studied. Dominating biochemical type was type number I grouping 79% of all isolates, and dominant genotype was A which was detected in 75% of all collected strains. Beta-hemolysis was a feature present in 34% of strains, more frequently in type I

  1. Bull's-Eye and Nontarget Skin Lesions of Lyme Disease: An Internet Survey of Identification of Erythema Migrans

    PubMed Central

    Aucott, John N.; Crowder, Lauren A.; Yedlin, Victoria; Kortte, Kathleen B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Lyme disease is an emerging worldwide infectious disease with major foci of endemicity in North America and regions of temperate Eurasia. The erythema migrans rash associated with early infection is found in approximately 80% of patients and can have a range of appearances including the classic target bull's-eye lesion and nontarget appearing lesions. Methods. A survey was designed to assess the ability of the general public to distinguish various appearances of erythema migrans from non-Lyme rashes. Participants were solicited from individuals who visited an educational website about Lyme disease. Results. Of 3,104 people who accessed a rash identification survey, 72.7% of participants correctly identified the classic target erythema migrans commonly associated with Lyme disease. A mean of 20.5% of participants was able to correctly identify the four nonclassic erythema migrans. 24.2% of participants incorrectly identified a tick bite reaction in the skin as erythema migrans. Conclusions. Participants were most familiar with the classic target erythema migrans of Lyme disease but were unlikely to correctly identify the nonclassic erythema migrans. These results identify an opportunity for educational intervention to improve early recognition of Lyme disease and to increase the patient's appropriate use of medical services for early Lyme disease diagnosis. PMID:23133445

  2. Luffa cylindrica suppresses development of Dermatophagoides farinae-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in Nc/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hyekyung; Lim, Hye-Sun; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Jeon, Woo Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Hyeun Kyoo

    2015-04-01

    The fruit pulp of Luffa cylindrica Roemer (Cucurbitaceae) (LC) has been used to induce hemostasis, resolve phlegm and clear fever in traditional Korean medicine. However, the efficacy of LC has not been examined in atopic dermatitis (AD). A 70% ethanol extract of LC was evaluated to determine anti-inflammation and anti-AD effects in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitory effects of LC on the production of PGE2 and histamine were respectively measured in lipopolysaccharide-treated (1 μg/mL) RAW264.7 macrophages and phorbol-12 myristate 13-acetate (50 nM) and A23187 (1 µM)-stimulated HMC-1 mast cells. The production of AD-related chemokines (RANTES, TARC, and MDC) were evaluated in IFN-γ and TNF-α-stimulated (10 ng/mL, each) HaCaT keratinocytes. LC (10 mg/mouse/d) was topically applied to the dorsal skin and ears of Dermatophagoides farina (Pyroglyphidae)-sensitized Nc/Nga mice for 4 weeks. The IC50 values of LC on PGE2 and histamine production were 16.89 and 139.9 μg/mL, individually. The production of TARC and RANTES were inhibited 20% and 12% by LC (50 μg/mL) in HaCaT cells, respectively (p < 0.05). In sensitized-NC/Nga mice, the plasma levels of IgE and histamine were suppressed 36% and 41% by LC, respectively (p < 0.05). LC also reduced hemorrhage, hypertrophy, and hyperkeratosis of the epidermis and infiltration of mast cells in the dorsal skin and ear. LC can inhibit AD-like skin lesions and reduce the generation of IgE via inhibition of the inflammatory responses. LC has potential as a therapeutic agent to treat allergic diseases, including AD.

  3. Dynamic markers based on blood perfusion fluctuations for selecting skin melanocytic lesions for biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Gemma; Stefanovska, Aneta; Pesce, Margherita; Marco Vezzoni, Gian; Loggini, Barbara; Pingitore, Raffaele; Ghiara, Fabrizio; Barachini, Paolo; Cervadoro, Gregorio; Romanelli, Marco; Rossi, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Skin malignant melanoma is a highly angiogenic cancer, necessitating early diagnosis for positive prognosis. The current diagnostic standard of biopsy and histological examination inevitably leads to many unnecessary invasive excisions. Here, we propose a non-invasive method of identification of melanoma based on blood flow dynamics. We consider a wide frequency range from 0.005-2 Hz associated with both local vascular regulation and effects of cardiac pulsation. Combining uniquely the power of oscillations associated with individual physiological processes we obtain a marker which distinguishes between melanoma and atypical nevi with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90.9%. The method reveals valuable functional information about the melanoma microenvironment. It also provides the means for simple, accurate, in vivo distinction between malignant melanoma and atypical nevi, and may lead to a substantial reduction in the number of biopsies currently undertaken.

  4. Upregulation and nuclear localization of TNF-like cytokine 1A (TL1A) and its receptors DR3 and DcR3 in psoriatic skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Bamias, Giorgos; Evangelou, Kostas; Vergou, Theognosia; Tsimaratou, Katerina; Kaltsa, Garyfallia; Antoniou, Christina; Kotsinas, Athanasios; Kim, Sungee; Gorgoulis, Vassilis; Stratigos, Alexander J; Sfikakis, Petros P

    2011-09-01

    TNF is critically involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. TL1A is a TNF-like cytokine, which, after binding to death domain receptor DR3, provides costimulatory signals to lymphocytes, amplifies Th1- and Th17-mediated immune responses and induces apoptotic cell death. These functions are inhibited when TL1A associates to decoy receptor DcR3. In the present study, we investigated the expression profiles for TL1A, DR3 and DcR3 in the normal skin and in psoriatic skin lesions. By use of immunohistochemistry, we were able to demonstrate constitutive cutaneous expression of DR3 and DcR3 but not of TL1A in healthy skin. On the other hand, in patients with active psoriasis, we observed abundant immunostaining for TL1A and significant upregulation of its receptors (P < 0.05 in comparison to healthy skin). TL1A, DR3 and DcR3 proteins, as well as mRNA transcripts reflecting in situ production of TL1A and DcR3, were also specifically increased in lesional as compared to non-lesional skin from patients with psoriasis (P < 0.05). These proteins were upregulated in cell populations that are critically involved in the pathogenesis of chronic skin inflammation, such as keratinocytes, macrophages in deep dermis and cells at the perivascular/endothelial area. Finally, we provide evidence for the existence of nuclear localization of TL1A in inflammatory cells from psoriatic lesions. This was also observed in inflamed synovia from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but not in neoplastic TL1A-expressing cell lines. We conclude that interactions between TL1A and its two receptors may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic skin inflammation that takes place in psoriasis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Correspondence between Pigmented Lesions Identified by Melanoma Patients Trained to Perform Partner-Assisted Skin Self-Examination and Dermatological Examination

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Jerod L.; Turrisi, Rob; Mallett, Kimberly A.; Robinson, June K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin-self examination (SSE) training interventions can increase understanding of melanoma early detection criteria and promote SSE. However, there remains a need to evaluate whether intervention participants can apply such early detection skills to accurately identify concerning, or potentially malignant, pigmented lesions during full body SSE. Methods We assessed SSE accuracy using data from a randomized control trial of a SSE skills training intervention designed to promote partner-assisted SSE among melanoma patients. In the trial, patient-partner pairs were administered the training intervention and performed monthly SSE to identify, evaluate, and track concerning pigmented skin lesions. Patients received a total body skin examination by a dermatologist approximately 4-months post-intervention. SSE accuracy was assessed as the correspondence between the specific concerning pigmented lesions identified by 274 study pairs during SSE with those identified during dermatological examination. We also examined whether lesions that were biopsied during the study were identified prior to biopsy during SSE. Results Approximately 3 in 4 of the concerning lesions identified by pairs during SSE were also identified during the dermatological exam. There were 81 biopsies performed during the study and pairs had identified 73% of the corresponding lesions during SSE. Of the 5 melanoma detected, 3 were identified during SSE. Conclusion Melanoma patients and partner taught to do SSE using an evidence-based program developed a high degree of correspondence with the study dermatologist in identifying concerning lesions. Impact This study provides novel evidence that supports the accuracy of full-body SSE for the patient identification of concerning lesions. PMID:26063475

  6. Spotlight on talimogene laherparepvec for the treatment of melanoma lesions in the skin and lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Orloff, Marlana

    2016-01-01

    On October 27, 2015, talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a first in class intralesional oncolytic virotherapy, was granted the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of melanoma in the skin and lymph nodes. Its approval has added yet another therapeutic option to the growing list of effective therapies for melanoma. Though the Phase III OPTiM trial has demonstrated its efficacy as a single agent, the target patient population remains narrow. With numerous effective and tolerable treatments available for unresectable and metastatic melanoma, intralesional therapies such as T-VEC are still finding their niche. T-VEC is now widely accepted as option for treatment; however, its combination with various other agents in an effort to expand its use and synergize with other interventions is still being explored. This article will review the pre-clinical and clinical work that eventually led to the Food and Drug Administration approval of this first-in-class agent, as well as address concerns about clinical application and ongoing research. PMID:27785448

  7. Asymmetric stem-cell division ensures sustained keratinocyte hyperproliferation in psoriatic skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    JIA, HAI-YAN; SHI, YING; LUO, LONG-FEI; JIANG, GUAN; ZHOU, QIONG; XU, SHI-ZHENG; LEI, TIE-CHI

    2016-01-01

    Excessive expansion of the transit-amplifying (TA) cell compartment is a distinct morphological characteristic of psoriatic epidermal hyperplasia. In order to examine the activation of basal stem cells and how they replenish such an enlarged compartment of TA cells in psoriatic epidermis, we utilized a BrdU labeling method to monitor mitotic stem cells in a mouse model of psoriasiform dermatitis, which was induced by imiquimod. Our results showed that perpendicular and parallel cell division characteristics of dividing stem cells existed in the inflamed epidermis. When we analyzed template-DNA strand segregation in trypsin-dissociated human psoriatic keratinocytes using BrdU pulse-chase labeling, we found that the percentage of asymmetric segregation of BrdU was significantly increased in the cell pairs of psoriatic epidermal cells compared with normal epidermal cells. Furthermore, we also examined the effects of both interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-22 cytokines on the differentiation status of cultured human keratinocytes. The results indicated that both cytokines had synergistic effects on passage-one epidermal cell sheets derived from skin explants and also on cultured keratinocytes, were involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated stem cell phenotype, and these results suggest an efficient mechanism for preventing the premature loss of basal stem-cell pools in the pro-inflammatory cytokine-enriched milieu of the psoriatic epidermis. Our findings suggest that inhibition of hyperactive stem cells represents a potential therapeutic target to combat recalcitrant epidermal hyperplasia in psoriasis. PMID:26707630

  8. Effects of low intensity laser irradiation during healing of infected skin lesions in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, Ethne L.; Lilge, Lothar; Mazzulli, Tony; Pritzker, Kenneth P.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of low intensity laser therapy (LILT) on healing of infected skin wounds in the rat. Methods: Wounds on the dorsum of Sprague-Dawley rats (14 per group) were inoculated or sham-inoculated with P. aeruginosa. Wounds were irradiated or sham-irradiated three times weekly from Day 1-19 using 635nm or 808nm diode lasers at radiant exposure of 1 or 20 J/cm2 delivered in continuous wave (CW) or at an intensity modulation frequency of 3800Hz. Wound area and bacterial growth were evaluated three times weekly. Results: CW 808 nm (1 and 20 J/cm2) irradiation generally delayed healing in acute wounds. However, from Day 10 onwards CW 808 nm (1 J/cm2 and 20 J/cm2) and 808 nm 3800 Hz (1 J/cm2) irradiation improved healing in inoculated wounds. Healing in acute wounds improved using 635 nm irradiation at low radiant exposure (1 J/cm2); however, using 635 nm irradiation at high radiant exposure (20 J/cm2) delayed healing. Bacterial balance in wounds was significantly altered using 635 nm (20 J/cm2) and CW 808 nm irradiation (1 and 20 J/cm2). Conclusion: Clearing wounds of normal flora was not associated with improved healing. Proliferation of staphylococcal species in wounds was associated with delayed healing.

  9. [Terbinafine : Drug-induced lupus erythematodes and triggering of psoriatic skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Mayser, P

    2016-09-01

    Based on the technical information that oral terbinafine must be used with caution in patients with pre-existing psoriasis or lupus erythematosus, the literature was summarized. Terbinafine belongs to the drugs able to induce subcutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE)-with a relatively high risk. The clinical picture of terbinafine-induced SCLE may be highly variable and can also include erythema exsudativum multiforme-like or bullous lesions. Thus, differentiation of terbinafine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis may be difficult. Therefore, terbinafine should be prescribed with caution in patients who show light sensitivity, arthralgias, positive antinuclear antibodies or have a history of SLE or SCLE. Case reports include wide-spread, but mostly nonlife-threatening courses, which did not require systemic therapy with steroids or antimalarials in every case. Terbinafine is also able to induce or to aggravate psoriasis. The latency period seems to be rather short (<4 weeks). Terbinafine therefore is not first choice if a systemic therapy with antimycotics is indicated in a patient with psoriasis or psoriatic diathesis. Azole derivatives according to the guidelines may be used as an alternative.

  10. Case report: Dermanyssus gallinae in a patient with pruritus and skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Cihangir; Gülcan, Erim; Tanritanir, Pinar

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year old woman patient who presented at the Dumlupinar University Faculty of Medicine Hospital reported intensified itching on her body during evening hours. During her physical examination, puritic dermatitis lesions were found on the patient's shoulders, neck and arms in particular, and systemic examination and laboratory tests were found to be normal. The patient's story showed that similar signs had been seen in other members of the household. They reside on the top floor of a building and pigeons are occasionally seen in the ventilation shaft. Examination of the house was made. The walls of the house, door architraves and finally beds, sheets and blankets and the windows opening to the outside were examined. During the examination, arthropoda smaller than 1 mm were detected. Following preparation of the collected samples, these were found to be Dermanyssus gallinae. Together with this presentation of this event, it is believed cutaneous reactions stemming from birds could be missed and that whether or not of pets or wild birds exist in or around the homes should be investigated.

  11. Estimation of the environmental effect of natural volatile organic compounds from Chamaecyparis obtusa and their effect on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun; Ahn, Changhwan; Choi, In-Gyu; Choi, Won-Sil; Park, Mi-Jin; Lee, Sung-Suk; Choi, Don-Ha; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2015-07-01

    Aromatherapy has been suggested as an alternative therapeutic method for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD), eczema and other skin diseases. In the current study, the anti-atopic properties of the volatile organic compounds of Chamaecyparis obtusa (VOCCo) were examined to determine whether they are amenable for use as a pharmaceutical candidate. The alterations in histological features, serum IgE levels and mast cell infiltration following exposure to VOCCo were determined in a 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced AD-like mouse model. The results of these experiments demonstrated that VOCCo inhibited the development of AD-like skin lesions by reducing the serum IgE level and mast cell infiltration into the dermal and subcutaneous layers. This was supported by screening of immune cytokine mRNAs, including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 from the skin of DNCB-treated mice. The expression of IL-1β and IL-6 in the skin lesions of mice was dose-dependently inhibited by treatment with VOCCo. Furthermore, treatment with VOCCo resulted in the recovery of histopathological features in AD-like skin lesions. These results suggest that VOCCo may have therapeutic and preventive effects for the development of AD.

  12. A novel use of social media to evaluate the occurrence of skin lesions affecting wild dusky grouper, Epinephelus marginatus (Lowe, 1834), in Libyan coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Rizgalla, J; Shinn, A P; Ferguson, H W; Paladini, G; Jayasuriya, N S; Bron, J E

    2017-05-01

    The social media network Facebook(™) was used to gather information on the occurrence and geographical distribution of dusky grouper dermatitis, a skin lesion affecting the dusky grouper, Epinephelus marginatus. Dusky grouper are common targets for spear fishermen in the Mediterranean and by monitoring spearfishing activity in Libyan waters, it was possible to document skin lesions from their entries on Facebook. Thirty-two Facebook accounts and 8 Facebook groups posting from 23 Libyan coastal cities provided a retrospective observational data set comprising a total of 382 images of dusky grouper caught by spearfishing between December 2011 and December 2015. Skin lesions were observable on 57/362 fish, for which images were of sufficient quality for analysis, giving a minimal prevalence for lesions of 15.75%. Only dusky grouper exceeding an estimated 40 cm total length exhibited lesions. The ability to collect useful data about the occurrence and geographical distribution of pathological conditions affecting wild fish using social media networks demonstrates their potential utility as a tool to support epidemiological studies and monitor the health of populations of aquatic animals. To our knowledge, this represents the first time that such an approach has been applied for assessing health in a wild population of fish. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Drug-induced Skin Lesions in Cynomolgus Macaques Treated with Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGluR5) Negative Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Gopinath S; Marcek, John M; Cappon, Gregg D; Whritenour, Jessica; Shaffer, Christopher L; Brady, Joseph T; Houle, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Three orally administered metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators caused skin lesions consistent with delayed type-IV hypersensitivity in cynomolgus macaques in 2- and 12-week toxicity studies. Several monkeys developed macroscopic skin lesions in multiple locations after 8 to 9 days of dosing; the most prominent effects involved the genital region of males and generalized erythema occurred in both sexes. Microscopic lesions occurred in both clinically affected and unaffected areas and were characterized by lymphocytic interface inflammation, subepidermal bullae, and individual keratinocyte vacuolation/necrosis. In the 12-week study, clinical effects in 2 animals resolved with continued dosing, whereas in others the inflammatory process progressed with 1 female exhibiting systemic lymphocytic inflammation in multiple tissues. The inflammatory infiltrate consisted of CD3 and CD4 positive T lymphocytes with minimal CD68 positive macrophages and only rare CD8 positive T lymphocytes. A subset of animals given a dosing holiday was subsequently rechallenged with similar lesions developing but with a more rapid clinical onset. These skin lesions were consistent with type-IV delayed hypersensitivity with some features comparable to bullous drug eruptions in humans. A relationship between these findings and the intended mode of action for these compounds could not be ruled out, given the occurrence across different chemotypes.

  14. Oral administration of the extract from Hatakeshimeji (Lyophyllum decastes sing.) mushroom inhibits the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, Yuuichi; Izumi, Yoshiya; Ohbuchi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Tetsunari; Ikemizu, Shoichi; Kojima, Yasushi

    2007-06-01

    We examined whether the extract from Hatakeshimeji (Lyophyllum decastes, LD) mushrooms suppresses the development of atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions induced by repeated application of picryl chloride (PiCl) in NC/Nga mice. Oral administration of LD extract to NC/Nga mice inhibited the development of AD-like skin lesions based on lower total skin severity scores and serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels. Splenic lymphocytes were stimulated with the T cell mitogen concanavalin A, and secretion of a Th1 cytokine (IFN-gamma) and a Th2 cytokine (IL-4) was determined by ELISA. IFN-gamma production was not inhibited by treatment with LD extract. On the other hand, IL-4 production was significantly decreased by treatment with LD extract. These results suggest that LD extract exerts anti-allergic actions by suppressing the serum IgE and Th2-type immune responses.

  15. Subcutaneous administration of collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone down regulates IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta1, ELAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in scleroderma skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, J; Krötzsch, E; Barile-Fabris, L; Alcalá, M; Espinosa-Morales, R

    2005-01-01

    In this study the effect of collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone (collagen-PVP) vs. triamcinolone acetonide (Triam) in scleroderma (SSc) skin lesions was evaluated. Ten SSc patients were treated weekly with subcutaneous injections of 0.2 mL Triam (8 mg/mL) or 0.2 mL collagen-PVP (1.66 mg collagen). Skin biopsies were obtained from lesions before and after treatment. Tissue sections were evaluated by histology and immunohistochemistry (ELAM-1, VCAM-1, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta1 and PDGF). The corticoid-treated group showed abnormal tissue architecture while the biodrug-treatment restored cutaneous appendages and type I/III collagen proportion. Cytokine and adhesion molecule expression was almost inhibited with Triam, while collagen-PVP down-regulated it. Collagen-PVP improved the tissue architecture of SSc lesions and down-regulated some proinflammatory parameters, without the side effects induced by corticoids.

  16. SU-E-T-560: Commissioning An HDR Freiburg Flap Applicator for Skin Lesion Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, K; Li, B; Lerma, F; Aroumougame, V; Sarfaraz, M; Laser, B; Jacobs, M

    2014-06-01