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Sample records for arterial baroreceptor function

  1. Field stimulation of the carotid baroreceptor complex does not compromise baroreceptor function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kouchaki, Zahra; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto P

    2014-01-01

    Field stimulation of the carotid baroreceptors has been successfully used to induce a long-term reduction in blood pressure. However, baroreceptor stimulation may interfere with or compromise the beneficial short-term blood pressure regulation function of the baroreceptors. This study aims to quantify the baroreceptor function before and during acute, unilateral field stimulation of the carotid baroreceptors. Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (n=7) were anaesthetised and instrumented to measure heart rate and mean arterial pressure (MAP), aortic pulse wave velocity (a surrogate measure of arterial stiffness), abdominal aortic flow and renal artery flow. A custom made field stimulation device was fitted to the left common carotid artery. Baroreceptor function was measured by quantifying heart rate response to MAP change induced by bolus injection of phenylephrine. Field stimulation of the baroreceptors reduced heart rate by 20 bpm (p=0.003) with MAP reduction of 18 mmHg (p=0.008). Maximal barorecep-tor gain without stimulation was -1.20±0.41 bpm/mmHg and during stimulation -1.41±0.52 bpm/mmHg (p=0.59). The MAP at which maximal gain occurred also did not change (152±11, 160±9 mmHg respectively, p=0.22). This study indicates that unilateral field stimulation of the carotid baroreceptor complex, while causing a sustained reduction of arterial pressure, does not alter acute baroreceptor function peak gain. PMID:25570608

  2. A molecular component of the arterial baroreceptor mechanotransducer.

    PubMed

    Drummond, H A; Price, M P; Welsh, M J; Abboud, F M

    1998-12-01

    Baroreceptor nerve endings detect acute fluctuations in arterial pressure. We tested the hypothesis that members of the DEG/ENaC family of cation channels, which are responsible for touch sensation in Caenorhabditis elegans, may be components of the baroreceptor mechanosensor. We found the gamma subunit of ENaC localized to the site of mechanotransduction in baroreceptor nerve terminals innervating the aortic arch and carotid sinus. A functional role for DEG/ENaC members was suggested by blockade of baroreceptor nerve activity and baroreflex control of blood pressure by an amiloride analog that inhibits DEG/ENaC channels. These data suggest that ENaC subunits may be components of the baroreceptor mechanotransducer and pave the way to a better definition of mechanisms responsible for blood pressure regulation and hypertension. PMID:9883735

  3. Role of arterial baroreceptors in mediating cardiovascular response to exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcritchie, R. J.; Vatner, S. F.; Patrick, T. A.; Braunwald, E.; Boettcher, D.; Heyndrickx, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to define the role of the major arterial baroreceptors during moderately severe exercise by comparing the responses of untethered conscious dogs instrumented for the measurement of aortic pressure and cardiac output with those of dogs with total arterial baroreceptor denervation. The reflex heart rate responses to intravenous bolus doses of methoxamine were also examined in intact animals, both at rest and during exercise. Methoxamine is found to cause striking bradycardia at rest, but little bradycardia during exercise. Experimental findings suggest that the arterial baroreceptor reflex is normally inhibited during severe exercise and therefore plays little role in modulating the cardiovascular response to exercise.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in arterial baroreceptor pathways: implications for activity-dependent plasticity at baroafferent synapses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Jenkins, Victoria K; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2009-01-01

    Functional characteristics of the arterial baroreceptor reflex change throughout ontogenesis, including perinatal adjustments of the reflex gain and adult resetting during hypertension. However, the cellular mechanisms that underlie these functional changes are not completely understood. Here, we provide evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin with a well-established role in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity, is abundantly expressed in vivo by a large subset of developing and adult rat baroreceptor afferents. Immunoreactivity to BDNF is present in the cell bodies of baroafferent neurons in the nodose ganglion, their central projections in the solitary tract, and terminal-like structures in the lower brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius. Using ELISA in situ combined with electrical field stimulation, we show that native BDNF is released from cultured newborn nodose ganglion neurons in response to patterns that mimic the in vivo activity of baroreceptor afferents. In particular, high-frequency bursting patterns of baroreceptor firing, which are known to evoke plastic changes at baroreceptor synapses, are significantly more effective at releasing BDNF than tonic patterns of the same average frequency. Together, our study indicates that BDNF expressed by first-order baroreceptor neurons is a likely mediator of both developmental and post-developmental modifications at first-order synapses in arterial baroreceptor pathways.

  5. Estimation of arterial and cardiopulmonary total peripheral resistance baroreflex gain values: validation by chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation.

    PubMed

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Kim, Jong-Kyung; Li, Ying; Sala-Mercado, Javier; Hammond, Robert L; Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Feedback control of total peripheral resistance (TPR) by the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex systems is an important mechanism for short-term blood pressure regulation. Existing methods for measuring this TPR baroreflex mechanism typically aim to quantify only the gain value of one baroreflex system as it operates in open-loop conditions. As a result, the normal, integrated functioning of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of TPR remains to be fully elucidated. To this end, the laboratory of Mukkamala et al. (Mukkamala R, Toska K, and Cohen RJ. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 284: H947-H959, 2003) previously proposed a potentially noninvasive technique for estimating the closed-loop (dimensionless) gain values of the arterial TPR baroreflex (GA) and the cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflex (GC) by mathematical analysis of the subtle, beat-to-beat fluctuations in arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, and stroke volume. Here, we review the technique with additional details and describe its experimental evaluation with respect to spontaneous hemodynamic variability measured from seven conscious dogs, before and after chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation. The technique was able to correctly predict the group-average changes in GA and GC that have previously been shown to occur following chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation. That is, reflex control by the arterial TPR baroreflex was virtually abolished (GA = -2.1 +/- 0.6 to 0.3 +/- 0.2; P < 0.05), while reflex control by the cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflex more than doubled (GC = -0.7 +/- 0.4 to -1.8 +/- 0.2; P < 0.05). With further successful experimental testing, the technique may ultimately be employed to advance the basic understanding of TPR baroreflex functioning in both humans and animals in health and disease.

  6. ENaC subunits are molecular components of the arterial baroreceptor complex.

    PubMed

    Drummond, H A; Welsh, M J; Abboud, F M

    2001-06-01

    Mechanosensation is essential to the perception of our environment. It is required for hearing, touch, balance, proprioception, and blood pressure homeostasis. Yet little is known about the identity of ion-channel complexes that transduce mechanical stimuli into neuronal responses. Genetic studies in Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that members of the DEG/ENaC family may be mechanosensors. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that mammalian epithelial Na(+)-channel (ENaC) subunits contribute to the mechanosensor in baroreceptor neurons. The data presented here show that ENaC transcripts and proteins are expressed in mechanosensory neurons and at the putative sites of mechanotransduction in baroreceptor sensory-nerve terminals. Additionally, known ENaC inhibitors, amiloride and benzamil, disrupt mechanotransduction in arterial baroreceptor neurons. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that DEG/ENaC proteins are components of mechanosensitive ion-channel complexes. PMID:11458698

  7. Vasopressin responses to unloading arterial baroreceptors during cardiac nerve blockade in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, C. P.; Keil, L. C.; Thrasher, T. N.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the relative contributions of afferent input from the heart and from arterial baroreceptors in the stimulation of arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion in response to hypotension caused by thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC). Afferent input from cardiac receptors was reversibly blocked by infusing 2% procaine into the pericardial space to anesthetize the cardiac nerves. Acute cardiac nerve blockade (CNB) alone caused a rise in mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 24 +/- 3 mmHg but no change in plasma AVP. If the rise in MAP was prevented by TIVCC, plasma AVP increased by 39 +/- 15 pg/ml, and if MAP was allowed to increase and then was forced back to control by TIVCC, plasma AVP increased by 34 +/- 15 pg/ml. Thus the rise in MAP during CNB stimulated arterial baroreceptors, which in turn compensated for the loss of inhibitory input from cardiac receptors on AVP secretion. These results indicate that the maximum secretory response resulting from complete unloading of cardiac receptors at a normal MAP results in a mean increase in plasma AVP of 39 pg/ml in this group of dogs. When MAP was reduced 25% below control levels (from 95 +/- 5 to 69 +/- 3 mmHg) by TIVCC during pericardial saline infusion, plasma AVP increased by 79 +/- 42 pg/ml. However, the same degree of hypotension during CNB (MAP was reduced from 120 +/- 5 to 71 +/- 3 mmHg) led to a greater (P less than 0.05) increase in plasma AVP of 130 +/- 33 pg/ml. Because completely unloading cardiac receptors can account for an increase of only 39 pg/ml on average in this group of dogs, the remainder of the increase in plasma AVP must be due to other sources of stimulation. We suggest that the principal stimulus to AVP secretion after acute CNB in these studies arises from unloading the arterial baroreceptors.

  8. Effects of middle cerebral artery occlusion on baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate in the rat.

    PubMed

    Saad, M A; Huerta, F; Trancard, J; Elghozi, J L

    1989-07-01

    Neurons in the insular cortex have recently been shown to innervate medullary autonomic nuclei such as the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). The present study examines the effect of lesioning the insular cortex on baroreceptor-heart rate reflex in conscious rats. We did this by occluding the stem of the left proximal middle cerebral artery which causes a lesion of the insular and adjacent lateral frontoparietal cortices. Nine and 10 days after lesioning or sham operation, reflex heart rate responses were recorded following i.v. doses of the pressor agent phenylephrine and the depressor agent sodium nitroprusside. Baroreceptor reflex parameters were determined by computerized sigmoidal curve-fitting. The overall contribution of the sympathetic and the cardiac vagus were assessed by using peripherally acting muscarinic and beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, respectively. Lesioned rats were compared to sham-operated rats. Lesioning the insular cortex did not affect mean blood pressure and heart rate. However, the lesion selectively enhanced reflex vagal bradycardia that occurred when mean blood pressure was artificially elevated. A greater vagal bradycardia with no change in the upper plateau indicated that ischemia was acting entirely on the baroreflex-dependent vagal cardiac motoneurons. There was no effect on the sympathetic heart rate range but the normalized gain of the sympathetic component was increased in those lesioned rats. These observations suggest that the unilateral cortical lesion chronically affected the baroreceptor control of heart rate through mechanisms differentially affecting the vagus and the cardiac sympathetic nerves. PMID:2778268

  9. Aortic Baroreceptors Display Higher Mechanosensitivity than Carotid Baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eva On-Chai; Lo, Chun-Yin; Yao, Yifei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Jiang, Liwen; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Arterial baroreceptors are mechanical sensors that detect blood pressure changes. It has long been suggested that the two arterial baroreceptors, aortic and carotid baroreceptors, have different pressure sensitivities. However, there is no consensus as to which of the arterial baroreceptors are more sensitive to changes in blood pressure. In the present study, we employed independent methods to compare the pressure sensitivity of the two arterial baroreceptors. Firstly, pressure-activated action potential firing was measured by whole-cell current clamp with a high-speed pressure clamp system in primary cultured baroreceptor neurons. The results show that aortic depressor neurons possessed a higher percentage of mechano-sensitive neurons. Furthermore, aortic baroreceptor neurons show a lower pressure threshold than that of carotid baroreceptor neurons. Secondly, uniaxial stretching of baroreceptor neurons, that mimics the forces exerted on blood vessels, elicited a larger increase in intracellular Ca2+ rise in aortic baroreceptor neurons than in carotid baroreceptor neurons. Thirdly, the pressure-induced action potential firing in the aortic depressor nerve recorded in vivo was also higher. The present study therefore provides for a basic physiological understanding on the pressure sensitivity of the two baroreceptor neurons and suggests that aortic baroreceptors have a higher pressure sensitivity than carotid baroreceptors. PMID:27630578

  10. Aortic Baroreceptors Display Higher Mechanosensitivity than Carotid Baroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lau, Eva On-Chai; Lo, Chun-Yin; Yao, Yifei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Jiang, Liwen; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Arterial baroreceptors are mechanical sensors that detect blood pressure changes. It has long been suggested that the two arterial baroreceptors, aortic and carotid baroreceptors, have different pressure sensitivities. However, there is no consensus as to which of the arterial baroreceptors are more sensitive to changes in blood pressure. In the present study, we employed independent methods to compare the pressure sensitivity of the two arterial baroreceptors. Firstly, pressure-activated action potential firing was measured by whole-cell current clamp with a high-speed pressure clamp system in primary cultured baroreceptor neurons. The results show that aortic depressor neurons possessed a higher percentage of mechano-sensitive neurons. Furthermore, aortic baroreceptor neurons show a lower pressure threshold than that of carotid baroreceptor neurons. Secondly, uniaxial stretching of baroreceptor neurons, that mimics the forces exerted on blood vessels, elicited a larger increase in intracellular Ca(2+) rise in aortic baroreceptor neurons than in carotid baroreceptor neurons. Thirdly, the pressure-induced action potential firing in the aortic depressor nerve recorded in vivo was also higher. The present study therefore provides for a basic physiological understanding on the pressure sensitivity of the two baroreceptor neurons and suggests that aortic baroreceptors have a higher pressure sensitivity than carotid baroreceptors. PMID:27630578

  11. Aortic Baroreceptors Display Higher Mechanosensitivity than Carotid Baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eva On-Chai; Lo, Chun-Yin; Yao, Yifei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Jiang, Liwen; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Arterial baroreceptors are mechanical sensors that detect blood pressure changes. It has long been suggested that the two arterial baroreceptors, aortic and carotid baroreceptors, have different pressure sensitivities. However, there is no consensus as to which of the arterial baroreceptors are more sensitive to changes in blood pressure. In the present study, we employed independent methods to compare the pressure sensitivity of the two arterial baroreceptors. Firstly, pressure-activated action potential firing was measured by whole-cell current clamp with a high-speed pressure clamp system in primary cultured baroreceptor neurons. The results show that aortic depressor neurons possessed a higher percentage of mechano-sensitive neurons. Furthermore, aortic baroreceptor neurons show a lower pressure threshold than that of carotid baroreceptor neurons. Secondly, uniaxial stretching of baroreceptor neurons, that mimics the forces exerted on blood vessels, elicited a larger increase in intracellular Ca2+ rise in aortic baroreceptor neurons than in carotid baroreceptor neurons. Thirdly, the pressure-induced action potential firing in the aortic depressor nerve recorded in vivo was also higher. The present study therefore provides for a basic physiological understanding on the pressure sensitivity of the two baroreceptor neurons and suggests that aortic baroreceptors have a higher pressure sensitivity than carotid baroreceptors.

  12. Functional magnetic resonance signal changes in neural structures to baroreceptor reflex activation.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Luke A; Richard, Chris A; Macey, Paul M; Runquist, Matthew L; Yu, Pearl L; Galons, Jean-Philippe; Harper, Ronald M

    2004-02-01

    The sequence of neural responses to exogenous arterial pressure manipulation remains unclear, especially for extramedullary sites. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging procedures to visualize neural responses during pressor (phenylephrine) and depressor (sodium nitroprusside) challenges in seven isoflurane-anesthetized adult cats. Depressor challenges produced signal-intensity declines in multiple cardiovascular-related sites in the medulla, including the nucleus tractus solitarius, and caudal and rostral ventrolateral medulla. Signal decreases also emerged in the cerebellar vermis, inferior olive, dorsolateral pons, and right insula. Rostral sites, such as the amygdala and hypothalamus, increased signal intensity as arterial pressure declined. In contrast, arterial pressure elevation elicited smaller signal increases in medullary regions, the dorsolateral pons, and the right insula and signal declines in regions of the hypothalamus, with no change in deep cerebellar areas. Responses to both pressor and depressor challenges were typically lateralized. In a subset of animals, barodenervation resulted in rises and falls of blood pressure that were comparable to these resulting from the pharmacological challenges but different regional neural responses, indicating that the regional signal intensity responses did not derive from global perfusion effects but from baroreceptor mediation of central mechanisms. The findings demonstrate widespread lateralized distribution of neural sites responsive to blood pressure manipulation. The distribution and time course of neural responses follow patterns associated with early and late compensatory reactions. PMID:14565965

  13. Right prefrontal activation produced by arterial baroreceptor stimulation: a PET study.

    PubMed

    Weisz, J; Emri, M; Fent, J; Lengyel, Z; Márián, T; Horváth, G; Bogner, P; Trón, L; Adám, G

    2001-10-29

    This study was performed to test the hypothesis of greater right hemispheric involvement in the processing of baroreceptor stimuli. Carotid sinus baroreceptors were stimulated by rhythmically decreasing air pressure in a neck chamber, and under control conditions the thorax was stimulated in a similar manner. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured by PET. Baroreceptor stimulation resulted in rCBF increase in the right anterior-inferior prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas (BA) 10/44/47) and bilaterally in BA 6/8. We conclude that in at least some stages of baroreceptor information processing the right hemisphere plays a greater role than the left hemisphere. PMID:11711862

  14. Mapping baroreceptor function to genome: a mathematical modeling approach.

    PubMed Central

    Kendziorski, C M; Cowley, A W; Greene, A S; Salgado, H C; Jacob, H J; Tonellato, P J

    2002-01-01

    To gain information about the genetic basis of a complex disease such as hypertension, blood pressure averages are often obtained and used as phenotypes in genetic mapping studies. In contrast, direct measurements of physiological regulatory mechanisms are not often obtained, due in large part to the time and expense required. As a result, little information about the genetic basis of physiological controlling mechanisms is available. Such information is important for disease diagnosis and treatment. In this article, we use a mathematical model of blood pressure to derive phenotypes related to the baroreceptor reflex, a short-term controller of blood pressure. The phenotypes are then used in a quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping study to identify a potential genetic basis of this controller. PMID:11973321

  15. Expression of messenger RNAs for peptides and tyrosine hydroxylase in primary sensory neurons that innervate arterial baroreceptors and chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1991-08-01

    Retrograde fiber tracing and in situ hybridization were used to determine expression of mRNAs for preprotachykinin A (ppTA), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), preproenkephalin A (ENK), neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY) and somatostatin (SOM) as well as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the petrosal ganglia primary sensory neurons which innervate carotid sinus baroreceptors and carotid body chemoreceptors. Perfusion of the carotid sinus with the retrogradely transported dye (Fluoro-Gold) labeled primary sensory neurons in petrosal ganglion. Numerous somata in the petrosal ganglion labeled with dye contained mRNAs for all the above peptides, except SOM. Moreover, TH mRNA was found in a substantial number of retrogradely labeled cells in the petrosal ganglion. This study provides information concerning which of the numerous peptides identified in sensory neurons of petrosal ganglion may be involved in modulation of the arterial baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. PMID:1681484

  16. Effects of chronic lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle region on baroreceptor reflex function in conscious rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, S. J.; Whalen, E. J.; Beltz, T. G.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    This study determined baroreceptor reflex (BR) function in conscious rats which had received sham or electrolytic lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) 54-56 days previously. Resting mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) values of the AV3V-lesion rats were similar to those of sham-lesion rats (P>0.05 for both comparisons). The sensitivity of the BR-mediated tachycardia in AV3V-lesion was greater than in sham-lesion rats (-9. 92+/-1.00 vs. -4.54+/-0.45 bpm/mmHg, P<0.05). The sensitivity of the BR-mediated bradycardia in AV3V-lesion rats was also greater than in rats with sham lesions (-3.56+/-0.38 vs. -2.06+/-0.42 bpm/mmHg, P<0. 05). The AV3V lesions did not affect other BR parameters. These findings demonstrate that chronic lesions of the AV3V region increase the sensitivity of the baroreceptor HR reflex in conscious rats. Copyright 1999 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aljuri, A. N.; Bursac, N.; Marini, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals. Grant numbers: NAG5-4989. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurohumoral mechanisms and the role of arterial baroreceptors in the reno-vascular response to haemorrhage in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Courneya, C A; Korner, P I

    1991-01-01

    1. Conscious rabbits, with implanted renal artery Doppler flow probes were bled at a constant rate (4 ml min-1). We assessed the contribution of autonomic, hormonal and local factors to the renal vasoconstrictor response to 20% loss of blood volume (BV) and the role of the sinoaortic baroreceptors in the neurohumoral response. 2. With intact autonomic effectors, 20% BV loss was associated with a small fall in vascular conductance, which was completely unaffected by inhibition or blockade of the combined effects of the two major pressor hormones angiotensin II (AII) and arginine vasopressin (AVP). Combined blockade of the autonomic effects plus those of the two pressor hormones resulted in marked elevation of vascular conductance, considered to be due to the local effects of haemorrhage. This response provided the baseline for assessing the constrictor response in the intact animal which, during 20% BV loss, was entirely due to reflex activity through the sympatho-adrenal system. 3. In contrast to the early phase of haemorrhage (less than 20% BV removal) both hormones played a role in the maintenance of mean arterial pressure immediately after haemorrhage and in the maintenance of renal vascular tone. This suggested that the contribution by hormones occurs only after more pronounced blood loss and hypotension. 4. In the presence of autonomic blockade with mecamylamine plus methscopolamine (plus a constant infusion of noradrenaline to maintain resting blood pressure) the renal vasoconstrictor response was similar to that of the intact animal. We have previously found that this regime is associated with greatly enhanced release of AVP and plasma renin activity. Sinoaortic denervation had no effect on this hormonally mediated vasoconstriction. 5. When the autonomic nervous system was intact but the effects of AII and AVP were blocked to prevent the accentuated hormonally mediated vasoconstriction, sinoaortic denervation completely abolished the normal autonomic renal

  19. Forebrain neural patterns associated with sex differences in autonomic and cardiovascular function during baroreceptor unloading.

    PubMed

    Kimmerly, D S; Wong, S; Menon, R; Shoemaker, J K

    2007-02-01

    Generally, women demonstrate smaller autonomic and cardiovascular reactions to stress, compared with men. The mechanism of this sex-dependent difference is unknown, although reduced baroreflex sensitivity may be involved. Recently, we identified a cortical network associated with autonomic cardiovascular responses to baroreceptor unloading in men. The current investigation examined whether differences in the neural activity patterns within this network were related to sex-related physiological responses to lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 5, 15, and 35 mmHg). Forebrain activity in healthy men and women (n = 8 each) was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast. Stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were collected on a separate day. Men had larger decreases in SV than women (P < 0.01) during 35 mmHg LBNP only. At 35 mmHg LBNP, HR increased more in males then females (9 +/- 1 beats/min vs. 4 +/- 1 beats/min, P < 0.05). Compared with women, increases in total MSNA were similar at 15 mmHg LBNP but greater during 35 mmHg LBNP in men [1,067 +/- 123 vs. 658 +/- 103 arbitrary units (au), P < 0.05]. BOLD signal changes (P < 0.005, uncorrected) were identified within discrete forebrain regions associated with these sex-specific HR and MSNA responses. Men had larger increases in BOLD signal within the right insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex than women. Furthermore, men demonstrated greater BOLD signal reductions in the right amygdala, left insula, ventral anterior cingulate, and ventral medial prefrontal cortex vs. women. The greater changes in forebrain activity in men vs. women may have contributed to the elevated HR and sympathetic responses observed in men during 35 mmHg LBNP. PMID:17272671

  20. Decreased excitability and voltage-gated sodium currents in aortic baroreceptor neurons contribute to the impairment of arterial baroreflex in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choong-Ku; Park, Kwang-Hwa; Baik, Soon-Koo; Jeong, Seong-Woo

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, which is manifested by an impairment of the arterial baroreflex, is prevalent irrespective of etiology and contributes to the increased morbidity and mortality in cirrhotic patients. However, the cellular mechanisms that underlie the cirrhosis-impaired arterial baroreflex remain unknown. In the present study, we examined whether the cirrhosis-impaired arterial baroreflex is attributable to the dysfunction of aortic baroreceptor (AB) neurons. Biliary and nonbiliary cirrhotic rats were generated via common bile duct ligation (CBDL) and intraperitoneal injections of thioacetamide (TAA), respectively. Histological and molecular biological examinations confirmed the development of fibrosis in the livers of both cirrhotic rat models. The heart rate changes during phenylephrine-induced baroreceptor activation indicated that baroreflex sensitivity was blunted in the CBDL and TAA rats. Under the current-clamp mode of the patch-clamp technique, cell excitability was recorded in DiI-labeled AB neurons. The number of action potential discharges in the A- and C-type AB neurons was significantly decreased because of the increased rheobase and threshold potential in the CBDL and TAA rats compared with sham-operated rats. Real-time PCR and Western blotting indicated that the NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9 transcripts and proteins were significantly downregulated in the nodose ganglion neurons from the CBDL and TAA rats compared with the sham-operated rats. Consistent with these molecular data, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive NaV currents and the tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV currents were significantly decreased in A- and C-type AB neurons, respectively, from the CBDL and TAA rats compared with the sham-operated rats. Taken together, these findings implicate a key cellular mechanism in the cirrhosis-impaired arterial baroreflex. PMID:26984890

  1. Altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor input following hindlimb unloading in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, J. A.; Schadt, J. C.; Hasser, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of cardiovascular deconditioning on central nervous system processing of baroreceptor afferent activity was evaluated following 14 days of hindlimb unloading (HU). Inactin-anesthetized rats were instrumented with catheters, renal sympathetic nerve electrodes, and aortic depressor nerve electrodes for measurement of mean arterial pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and aortic depressor nerve activity (ADNA). Baroreceptor and baroreflex functions were assessed during infusion of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Central processing of baroreceptor afferent input was evaluated by linear regression relating RSNA to ADNA. The maximum baroreflex-elicited increase in RSNA was significantly reduced in HU rats (122 +/- 3.8 vs. 144 +/- 4.9% of baseline RSNA), whereas ADNA was not altered. The slope (-0.18 +/- 0.04 vs. -0.40 +/- 0.04) and y-intercept (121 +/- 3.2 vs. 146 +/- 4.3) of the linear regression relating increases in efferent RSNA to decreases in afferent ADNA during hypotension were significantly reduced in HU rats. There were no differences during increases in arterial pressure. Results demonstrate that the attenuation in baroreflex-mediated increases in RSNA following HU is due to changes in central processing of baroreceptor afferent information rather than aortic baroreceptor function.

  2. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI. PMID:25994953

  3. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI.

  4. Forebrain regions associated with postexercise differences in autonomic and cardiovascular function during baroreceptor unloading.

    PubMed

    Kimmerly, D S; Wong, S W; Salzer, D; Menon, R; Shoemaker, J K

    2007-07-01

    The cortical regions representing peripheral autonomic reactions in humans are poorly understood. This study examined whether changes in forebrain activity were associated with the altered physiological responses to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) following a single bout of dynamic exercise (POST-EX). We hypothesized that, compared with the nonexercised condition (NO-EX), POST-EX would elicit greater reductions in stroke volume (SV) and larger increases in heart rate (HR) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during LBNP (5, 15, and 35 mmHg). Forebrain neural activity (n = 11) was measured using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging. HR, SV, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and MSNA were collected separately. Compared with NO-EX, baseline ABP was reduced, whereas HR and total vascular conductance (TVC) were elevated in POST-EX (P < 0.05). In both conditions, 5 mmHg LBNP did not elicit a change (from baseline) in any physiological parameter. Compared with NO-EX, 35 mmHg LBNP-mediated decreases in SV and TVC produced greater increases in HR and MSNA during POST-EX (P < 0.05). The right posterior insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex demonstrated a larger decrease in BOLD at 5 mmHg LBNP but greater BOLD increase at 15 and 35 mmHg LBNP POST-EX vs. NO-EX (P < 0.005). Conversely, the thalamus and ventral medial prefrontal cortex displayed the opposite BOLD activity pattern (i.e., larger increase at 5 mmHg LBNP but greater decrease at 15 and 35 mmHg LBNP POST-EX vs. NO-EX). Our findings suggest that discrete forebrain regions may be involved with the generation of baroreflex-mediated sympathetic and cardiovascular responses elicited by moderate LBNP. PMID:17351074

  5. Modulation of parasympathetic and baroreceptor control of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, A U

    1993-03-01

    The heart rate is modulated from beat to beat by efferent vagal and sympathetic fibers, the former being the predominant mediators of the chronotropic influence of arterial baroreceptors and respiration and the latter being important in the cardiac responses to physical and mental stress. Cardiac vagal influences are modulated by a number of factors. These can be grouped as: 1) neural factors, such as the wakefulness-sleep cycle, the alerting reaction, and exercise; 2) humoral-pharmacological factors, such as angiotensin II, atrial natriuretic factor, cardiac glycosides; 3) normal aging; 4) a number of cardiovascular and other diseases, such as arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and diabetes mellitus. The mechanisms underlying modulation of cardiac vagal control are not completely understood, the range of the possibilities including structural or functional alterations in baroreceptor afferents, in central and efferent vagal pathways and in cardiac responsiveness to neural stimuli. Irrespective of the mechanisms involved, the modulation of cardiac vagal control may have important implications for normal cardiovascular homeostasis, as well as for the pathophysiology, diagnosis and prognosis of various diseases.

  6. Baroreceptor afferents modulate brain excitation and influence susceptibility to toxic effects of hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Ivan T; Gasier, Heath G; Zhilyaev, Sergei Yu; Moskvin, Alexander N; Krivchenko, Alexander I; Piantadosi, Claude A; Allen, Barry W

    2014-09-01

    Unexplained adjustments in baroreflex sensitivity occur in conjunction with exposures to potentially toxic levels of hyperbaric oxygen. To investigate this, we monitored central nervous system, autonomic and cardiovascular responses in conscious and anesthetized rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen at 5 and 6 atmospheres absolute, respectively. We observed two contrasting phases associated with time-dependent alterations in the functional state of the arterial baroreflex. The first phase, which conferred protection against potentially neurotoxic doses of oxygen, was concurrent with an increase in baroreflex sensitivity and included decreases in cerebral blood flow, heart rate, cardiac output, and sympathetic drive. The second phase was characterized by baroreflex impairment, cerebral hyperemia, spiking on the electroencephalogram, increased sympathetic drive, parasympatholysis, and pulmonary injury. Complete arterial baroreceptor deafferentation abolished the initial protective response, whereas electrical stimulation of intact arterial baroreceptor afferents prolonged it. We concluded that increased afferent traffic attributable to arterial baroreflex activation delays the development of excessive central excitation and seizures. Baroreflex inactivation or impairment removes this protection, and seizures may follow. Finally, electrical stimulation of intact baroreceptor afferents extends the normal delay in seizure development. These findings reveal that the autonomic nervous system is a powerful determinant of susceptibility to sympathetic hyperactivation and seizures in hyperbaric oxygen and the ensuing neurogenic pulmonary injury.

  7. Influence of low and high pressure baroreceptors on plasma renin activity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Abboud, F. M.; Fitz, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of low and high pressure baroreceptors on plasma renin activity (immunoassay) were evaluated using graded lower body suction (LBS) in six healthy men. LBS at -10 and -20 mmHg for 10 min decreased central venous pressure without changing arterial pressure and thereby presumably reduced low but not high pressure baroreceptor inhibition of renin release. LBS at these levels produced forearm vasoconstriction, but did not increase renin. LBS at -40 mmHG decreased central venous and arterial pulse pressure and thus reduced both low and high pressure baroreceptor inhibition. LBS at this level produced forearm vasoconstriction and tachycardia and increased renin. In summary, reduction in low pressure baroreceptor inhibition in humans did not increase renin in the presence of physiological tonic inhibition from high pressure baroreceptors. Increases in renin did not occur until there was combined reduction of high and low pressure baroreceptor inhibition on plasma renin activity.

  8. The Ion Channel ASIC2 is Required for Baroreceptor and Autonomic Control of the Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongjun; Ma, Xiuying; Sabharwal, Rasna; Snitsarev, Vladislav; Morgan, Donald; Rahmouni, Kamal; Drummond, Heather A.; Whiteis, Carol A.; Costa, Vivian; Price, Margaret; Benson, Christopher; Welsh, Michael J.; Chapleau, Mark W.; Abboud, François M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Arterial baroreceptors provide a neural sensory input that reflexly regulates the autonomic drive of the circulation. Our goal was to test the hypothesis that a member of the acid sensing ion channel (ASIC) subfamily of the DEG/ENaC superfamily is an important determinant of the arterial baroreceptor reflex. We found that aortic baroreceptor neurons in the nodose ganglia and their terminals express ASIC2. Conscious ASIC2 null mice developed hypertension, had exaggerated sympathetic and depressed parasympathetic control of the circulation, and a decreased gain of the baroreflex, all indicative of an impaired baroreceptor reflex. Multiple measures of baroreceptor activity each suggests that mechanosensitivity is diminished in ASIC2- null mice. The results define ASIC2 as an important determinant of autonomic circulatory control and of baroreceptor sensitivity. The genetic disruption of ASIC2 recapitulates the pathological dysautonomia seen in heart failure and hypertension and defines a molecular defect that may be relevant to its development. PMID:20064394

  9. The ion channel ASIC2 is required for baroreceptor and autonomic control of the circulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongjun; Ma, Xiuying; Sabharwal, Rasna; Snitsarev, Vladislav; Morgan, Donald; Rahmouni, Kamal; Drummond, Heather A; Whiteis, Carol A; Costa, Vivian; Price, Margaret; Benson, Christopher; Welsh, Michael J; Chapleau, Mark W; Abboud, François M

    2009-12-24

    Arterial baroreceptors provide a neural sensory input that reflexly regulates the autonomic drive of circulation. Our goal was to test the hypothesis that a member of the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) subfamily of the DEG/ENaC superfamily is an important determinant of the arterial baroreceptor reflex. We found that aortic baroreceptor neurons in the nodose ganglia and their terminals express ASIC2. Conscious ASIC2 null mice developed hypertension, had exaggerated sympathetic and depressed parasympathetic control of the circulation, and a decreased gain of the baroreflex, all indicative of an impaired baroreceptor reflex. Multiple measures of baroreceptor activity each suggest that mechanosensitivity is diminished in ASIC2 null mice. The results define ASIC2 as an important determinant of autonomic circulatory control and of baroreceptor sensitivity. The genetic disruption of ASIC2 recapitulates the pathological dysautonomia seen in heart failure and hypertension and defines a molecular defect that may be relevant to its development. PMID:20064394

  10. Continuous resetting of the human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex.

    PubMed

    Kasting, G A; Eckberg, D L; Fritsch, J M; Birkett, C L

    1987-04-01

    Although human baroreflex responses have been studied during night as well as day, there has been no attempt to distinguish circadian changes of baroreflex function from those related to sleep. We measured carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses serially during a 24-h period in 11 normotensive volunteers who were awake and cooperative during testing. We applied sequences of ramped R-wave-triggered neck chamber pressure changes from +40 to -65 mmHg, during held expiration, at 3-h intervals. Subjects maintained their usual sleep-wake cycles but were awakened for three 30-min periods for night testing. There was no systematic change of baroreflex slope during the 24-h period. There were, however, parallel shifts of the entire sigmoid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex response relation along its R-R interval and arterial pressure axes associated with small, but significant, circadian changes of baseline R-R intervals and arterial pressures. Thus, although our data do not point toward major circadian variability of baro-reflex responsiveness, they provide evidence for an ongoing process of human baroreflex resetting.

  11. Interaction of Baroreceptor and Chemoreceptor Reflexes MODULATION OF THE CHEMORECEPTOR REFLEX BY CHANGES IN BARORECEPTOR ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Heistad, Donald D.; Abboud, Francois M.; Mark, Allyn L.; Schmid, Phillip G.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the level of arterial pressure and degree of baroreceptor activation affect responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors. Chemoreceptors were stimulated by injecting nicotine into the common carotid artery of anesthetized and paralyzed dogs. Responses were observed in the innervated gracilis muscle, perfused at constant flow while perfusion pressure was measured. Arterial pressure was lowered by bleeding the animals and raised by transient occlusion of the descending aorta. Vasoconstrictor responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors were enhanced by hypotension and inhibited by elevation of arterial pressure. Potentiation of the chemoreceptor reflex by hemorrhagic hypotension was not the result of altered vascular resistance in the gracilis muscle, sensitization of chemoreceptors by catecholamines or acidosis, or changes in cerebral perfusion pressure. Additional studies were done in which we excluded the possibility that the changes resulted from direct effects of changes in arterial pressure on chemoreceptors. Both carotid bifurcations were isolated and perfused. On one side, pressure was raised to stimulate the carotid sinus baroreceptors. On the other side, the carotid body chemoreceptors were stimulated by nicotine or by hypoxic and hypercapnic blood. Activation of baroreceptors on one side attenuated the vasoconstrictor response to chemoreceptor stimulation on the other side. This excludes a direct effect of changes in arterial pressure on the chemoreceptors and suggests a central interaction of these reflexes. We conclude that vasoconstrictor responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors are potentiated by hypotension and inhibited by transient hypertension. These effects appear to result at least in part from a central interaction of chemoreceptor and baroreceptor reflexes. PMID:4825222

  12. Carotid baroreceptor influence on forearm vascular resistance during low level lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    The degree of forearm vasoconstriction induced by low levels of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) provides a measure of the responsiveness of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex. The validity of this measurement is based on the assumption that this vasoconstriction response is not influenced by unloading of carotid baroreceptors. To test the hypothesis that arterial baroreceptor unloading does not alter the degree of forearm vascular resistance during low levels of LBNP, 12 subjects were exposed to -15 and -20 mm Hg LBNP with and without additional artificial (+ 10 mm Hg neck pressure) unloading of the carotid baroreceptors. There was no measurable influence of carotid unloading on forearm vascular resistance at either level of LBNP. It is concluded that forearm vascular resistance measured during cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading is unaffected by carotid baroreceptor unloading within the magnitude encountered during low levels of LBNP.

  13. Effects of baroreceptor stimulation on performance of the Sternberg short-term memory task: a cardiac cycle time study.

    PubMed

    Quelhas Martins, Amadeu; McIntyre, David; Ring, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Activation of arterial baroreceptors can affect cortical activity. Cardiac cycle time studies have established that natural variations in baroreceptor activation are associated with changes in basic sensorimotor function whereas few have investigated more complex cognitive function. Aiming to improve our understanding of this phenomenon, this study examined performance on the Sternberg memory task as a function of the phase of the cardiac cycle. In each trial, participants were shown either two or six digits followed by a probe digit that either had or had not been presented previously and were required to press one of two response buttons to indicate a match and mismatch, respectively. Response latency per additional digit was greater for stimuli presented late compared to early in the cardiac cycle whereas the zero intercept was greatest at the start of the cardiac cycle and reduced as the cycle progressed. These findings provide evidence that natural baroreceptor stimulation can affect complex cognitive processes, such as serial-comparison in short-term memory, as well as basic sensorimotor processes.

  14. Experimenting With Baroreceptor Reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Goble, Ross L.

    1988-01-01

    Carotid arteries stimulated by pressure or suction on neck. Baro-Cuff is silicone-rubber chamber that fits on front of subject's neck. Electronic system, stepping motor, bellows, and umbilical tube furnish controlled pressure to chamber. Pressure sensor provides feedback to microprocessor in electronic system. Developed to study blood-pressure-reflex responses of astronauts in outer space. Useful for terrestrial studies of patients with congestive heart failure, chronic diabetes mellitus, and other conditions in which blood-pressure-reflex controls behave abnormally.

  15. Phase dependencies of the human baroreceptor reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, H.; Herzel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the influence of respiratory and cardiac phase on responses of the cardiac pacemaker to brief (0.35-s) increases of carotid baroreceptor afferent traffic provoked by neck suction in seven healthy young adult subjects. Cardiac responses to neck suction were measured indirectly from electrocardiographic changes of heart period. Our results show that it is possible to separate the influences of respiratory and cardiac phases at the onset of a neck suction impulse by a product of two factors: one depending only on the respiratory phase and one depending only on the cardiac phase. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that efferent vagal activity is a function of afferent baroreceptor activity, whereas respiratory neurons modulate that medullary throughput independent of the cardiac phase. Furthermore, we have shown that stimulus broadening and stimulus cropping influence the outcome of neck suction experiments in a way that makes it virtually impossible to obtain information on the phase dependency of the cardiac pacemaker's sensitivity to vagal stimulation without accurate knowledge of the functional shape of stimulus broadening.

  16. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  17. Short-duration spaceflight impairs human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, Janice M.; Charles, John B.; Bennett, Barbara S.; Jones, Michele M.; Eckberg, Dwain L.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of a spaceflight on the vagally mediated baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses of humans were investigated by measuring the responses (provoked by neck pressure changes) in supine position and the heart rate and blood pressure in the supine and standing positions in 16 astronauts before and after 4- to 5-day long Space Shuttle missions. The results showed that exposures to spaceflight resulted in reduced baseline levels of the vagal-cardiac outflow and the vagally mediated responses to changes of the arterial baroreceptor input and that these changes contribute to postflight reductions of astronauts' ability to maintain standing arterial pressures.

  18. Short-duration spaceflight impairs human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Janice M.; Charles, John B.; Bennett, Barbara S.; Jones, Michele M.; Eckberg, Dwain L.

    1992-08-01

    The effect of a spaceflight on the vagally mediated baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses of humans were investigated by measuring the responses (provoked by neck pressure changes) in supine position and the heart rate and blood pressure in the supine and standing positions in 16 astronauts before and after 4- to 5-day long Space Shuttle missions. The results showed that exposures to spaceflight resulted in reduced baseline levels of the vagal-cardiac outflow and the vagally mediated responses to changes of the arterial baroreceptor input and that these changes contribute to postflight reductions of astronauts' ability to maintain standing arterial pressures.

  19. Cardiopulmonary baroreceptor control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Etzel, R. A.; Farr, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heating decreases central venous pressure (CVP) while increasing muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). In normothermia, similar decreases in CVP elevate MSNA, presumably via cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading. The purpose of this project was to identify whether increases in MSNA during whole body heating could be attributed to cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading coincident with the thermal challenge. Seven subjects were exposed to whole body heating while sublingual temperature, skin blood flow, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and MSNA were monitored. During the heat stress, 15 ml/kg warmed saline was infused intravenously over 7-10 min to increase CVP and load the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors. We reported previously that this amount of saline was sufficient to return CVP to pre-heat stress levels. Whole body heating increased MSNA from 25 +/- 3 to 39 +/- 3 bursts/min (P < 0. 05). Central blood volume expansion via rapid saline infusion did not significantly decrease MSNA (44 +/- 4 bursts/min, P > 0.05 relative to heat stress period) and did not alter mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) or pulse pressure. To identify whether arterial baroreceptor loading decreases MSNA during heat stress, in a separate protocol MAP was elevated via steady-state infusion of phenylephrine during whole body heating. Increasing MAP from 82 +/- 3 to 93 +/- 4 mmHg (P < 0.05) caused MSNA to decrease from 36 +/- 3 to 15 +/- 4 bursts/min (P < 0.05). These data suggest that cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading during passive heating is not the primary mechanism resulting in elevations in MSNA. Moreover, arterial baroreceptors remain capable of modulating MSNA during heat stress.

  20. Modulation of the baroreceptor reflex by the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus and perifornical area.

    PubMed

    McDowall, Lachlan M; Horiuchi, Jouji; Killinger, Suzanne; Dampney, Roger A L

    2006-04-01

    Neurons within the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) and perifornical area (PeF), which lie within the classic hypothalamic defense area, subserve the cardiovascular response to psychological stress. Previous studies have shown that electrical stimulation of the hypothalamic defense area causes inhibition of the cardiac and (in some cases) sympathetic components of the baroreceptor reflex. In contrast, naturally evoked psychological stress does not appear to be associated with such inhibition. In this study, we tested the effect of specific activation of neurons within the DMH and PeF on the baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate in urethane-anesthetized rats. Microinjection of bicuculline (a GABA(A) receptor antagonist) into the DMH caused dose-dependent increases in heart rate and renal sympathetic activity, shifted the baroreflex control of both variables to higher levels (i.e., increased the upper and lower plateaus of the baroreflex function curves, and increased the threshold, midpoint, and saturation levels of mean arterial pressure). The maximum gain of the sympathetic component of the baroreflex was also increased, while that of the cardiac component was not significantly changed. Increases in the midpoint were very similar in magnitude to the evoked increases in baseline mean arterial pressure. Microinjection of bicuculline into the PeF evoked very similar effects. The results indicate that disinhibition of neurons in the DMH/PeF region not only increases sympathetic vasomotor activity and heart rate but also resets the baroreceptor reflex such that it remains effective, without any decrease in sensitivity, over a higher operating range of arterial pressure. PMID:16284085

  1. Baroreceptor-heart rate reflex function before and after surgical reversal of two-kidney, one-clip hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, M E; Russell, G I; Burton, P R; Swales, J D

    1990-06-01

    Baroreflex function was studied in conscious early phase (less than 6 weeks) two-kidney, one-clip hypertensive rats before and 24 hours after surgical reversal of hypertension by removal of the constricting renal artery clip or after pharmacological reduction of blood pressure by an infusion of hydralazine or captopril. A normotensive sham-clipped group was included. Another group of two-kidney, one-clip rats was studied 3 weeks after unclipping. Baroreflex sensitivity, as assessed by the steady-state method using a graded phenylephrine infusion, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate were measured preoperatively and at 24 hours postoperatively. Two-kidney, one-clip rats were significantly hypertensive preoperatively compared with control (mean arterial pressure, 183 +/- 4 vs. 106 +/- 2 mm Hg, p less than 0.001), heart rate was similar (420 +/- 9 vs. 401 +/- 9 beats/min, p greater than 0.05), and baroreflex sensitivity was significantly reduced (0.76 +/- 0.07 vs. 1.50 +/- 0.20 msec/mm Hg; p less than 0.001). There was a minimal change in heart rate despite the fall in mean arterial pressure in all hypertensive groups, indicating resetting of the baroreflexes. At 24 hours after the operation, baroreflex sensitivity was unchanged in all groups compared with the preoperative value. By 3 weeks, baroreflex sensitivity was significantly greater than in the hypertensive two-kidney, one-clip rats before the operation and 24 hours after they were unclipped, but not compared with normotensive sham-clipped rats. Thus, although resetting occurs within 24 hours, whatever the method of blood pressure reduction, baroreflex sensitivity remains impaired at this time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Hereditary and environmental influences on arterial function.

    PubMed

    Hayward, C S; Benetos, A

    2007-07-01

    1. With the ageing population and increasing heart failure, arterial function has been shown to contribute to cardiovascular risk because of its adverse effects on ventriculovascular coupling. Population studies have confirmed independent prognostic information of arterial stiffening on cardiovascular survival. 2. The term 'arterial function' encompasses a range of phenotypes, including measures of arterial structure/remodelling, measures of arterial wall mechanics, surrogate measures of stiffness and of wave reflection. There exists significant interaction between these measures and none is truly independent of the others. Added to this complexity is the recognition that, although arterial function has a strong genetic component, quantification requires a range of techniques from twin to family and population studies. 3. The contribution of heritability is often derived from statistical models with input from genomic scanning and candidate gene studies. Studies to date confirm a significant heritable component for the majority of phenotypes examined. However, it has also been recognized that the factors involved in blood pressure maintenance are likely to be separate to those in arterial structural degeneration with ageing. Candidate genes for arterial function go beyond those of the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin systems and include genes involved in signalling pathways and extracellular matrix modulation. 4. The present review examines the evidence for heritability of the major arterial function phenotypes with environmental and ageing modulation. A brief overview of the impact of atherosclerotic risk factors on arterial function is included.

  3. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  4. Familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome): when baroreceptor feedback fails.

    PubMed

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2012-12-24

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare hereditary disorder caused by mutations within the gene that encodes for I-κ-B kinase complex associated protein (IKAP). A deficiency of IKAP affects the development of primary sensory neurons including those carrying baroreflex afferent volleys, a feature that explains their characteristic sensory loss and labile blood pressure. This review describes the history, the genotype of FD and the unusual cardiovascular autonomic phenotype of these patients. We outline the main consequences of a failure to receive information from arterial baroreceptors, including the characteristic "autonomic storms" and severe end-organ target damage.

  5. Baroreceptor cortical effects, emotions and pain.

    PubMed

    Mini, A; Rau, H; Montoya, P; Palomba, D; Birbaumer, N

    1995-02-01

    The specificity of baroreceptor-dependent inhibition of pain reactions to electrical stimuli was investigated during induction of different emotional states in 27 subjects. Baroreceptors were stimulated through the PRES (Phase Related External Suction) technique, while emotions were induced by means of pleasant, neutral and unpleasant slides. The dependent variables were pain ratings, somatic evoked potentials (N150 and P260) recorded from Fz, Cz and Pz, and skin conductance response (SCR), while heart rate was recorded as a PRES requirement. Valence and arousal ratings were obtained in front of each slide. During suction (external baroreceptor activation) reduced pain ratings, cortical disfacilitation (from Pz, as revealed by N150) and lower SCR were found as compared to pressure (baroreceptor deactivation). Moreover, brain evoked potentials (N150 and P260) reflecting cortical inhibition were found under condition of baroreceptor stimulation during unpleasant slides, but not during pleasant or neutral ones: this result was found in the high blood pressure subjects only. Data showed also a valence effect on pain ratings: pain was evaluated to be higher during unpleasant slides, than neutral and pleasant ones. Results are discussed in the light of "baroreceptor reward" hypothesis, which proposes a learning mechanism for the development of essential hypertension. PMID:7790290

  6. Diet-induced obesity severely impairs myelinated aortic baroreceptor reflex responses.

    PubMed

    McCully, Belinda H; Brooks, Virginia L; Andresen, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) attenuates the arterial cardiac baroreceptor reflex, but the mechanisms and sites of action are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that DIO impairs central aortic baroreceptor pathways. Normal chow control (CON) and high-fat-chow obesity-resistant (OR) and obesity-prone (OP) rats were anesthetized (inactin, 120 mg/kg) and underwent sinoaortic denervation. The central end of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) was electrically stimulated to generate frequency-dependent baroreflex curves (5-100 Hz) during selective activation of myelinated (A-fiber) or combined (A- and C-fiber) ADN baroreceptors. A mild stimulus (1 V) that activates only A-fiber ADN baroreceptors induced robust, frequency-dependent depressor and bradycardic responses in CON and OR rats, but these responses were completely abolished in OP rats. Maximal activation of A fibers (3 V) elicited frequency-dependent reflexes in all groups, but a dramatic deficit was still present in OP rats. Activation of all ADN baroreceptors (20 V) evoked even larger reflex responses. Depressor responses were nearly identical among groups, but OP rats still exhibited attenuated bradycardia. In separate groups of rats, the reduced heart rate (HR) response to maximal activation of ADN A fibers (3 V) persisted in OP rats following pharmacological blockade of β(1)-adrenergic or muscarinic receptors, suggesting deficits in both parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) reflex pathways. However, the bradycardic responses to direct efferent vagal stimulation were similar among groups. Taken together, our data suggest that DIO severely impairs the central processing of myelinated aortic baroreceptor control of HR, including both PNS and SNS components.

  7. Integrating the theories of Darwin and Bernoulli: maladaptive baroreceptor network dysfunction may explain the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Conley, Buford R; Doux, John D; Lee, Patrick Y; Bazar, Kimberly A; Daniel, Stephanie M; Yun, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    Current treatment options for aortic aneurysms are suboptimal and their pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear. We propose the existence of a coordinated multi-node baroreceptor network that measures pressures at all vascular bifurcations and enables system-wide hemodynamic coordination and vasomotor regulation, in accordance with the principle of Bernoulli. While the presence of baroreceptors at bifurcations remains unknown, behavior at the level of systems predicts their existence, possibly as glomus cell derivatives. We propose that pressure misregistration among sensor nodes at different vascular bifurcations can precipitate feed-forward dysfunctions that promote thrombosis, inflammation, and vasomotor dysregulation resulting in aneurysm formation. One example of this phenomenon is aortic aneurysm, which is currently attributed to focal anatomic defects. As plaque builds in the infrarenal aorta, the increased blood velocity through this segment can widen the difference between pressures sensed at the iliac and the renal artery bifurcations. Due to the Bernoulli effect, this change creates an incorrect impression of reduced dynamic pressure at the kidneys. The erroneous perception of hypovolemia can induce a pernicious cycle of maladaptive adrenergia and associated coagulation and thrombosis, particularly in the infrarenal aortic segment as the body attempts to normalize renal perfusion. Atherosclerosis can further exacerbate baroreceptor dysfunction by interfering with sensor biology in feed-forward fashion. Hypertension may be a consequence as well as a source of atherosclerosis and aneurysm. The described system may have evolved when trauma-related hypovolemia was a far more prevalent driver of natural selection but may be rendered maladaptive in the setting of modern stressors. Failure to address these factors may explain the suboptimal long-term outcomes with current surgical and endovascular treatments for aneurysms. Implications for other potential sensor

  8. Effects of acute and chronic baroreceptor denervation on diving responses in ducks.

    PubMed

    Smith, F M; Jones, D R

    1990-04-01

    To investigate the effects of barodenervation on the cardiovascular responses to forced submersion, we implanted snares around the aortic nerves innervating the baroreceptors in anesthetized (pentobarbital sodium, 35-45 mg/kg) ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). Snares were withdrawn 1 wk after surgery to effect barodenervation in the absence of complications from surgical trauma or anesthesia. After barodenervation, resting heart rate (HR), hind limb vascular resistance (HLVR), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) all increased, with different time courses, over the 16-day observation period. Bradycardia developed during forced submersion in ducks before and after barodenervation, although this response was reduced for 1-3 days after nerve section. The HR response to diving intensified 4-5 days after denervation, and the level of dive bradycardia at 16 days was similar to that before denervation. End-dive MAP fell further, as a proportion of predive MAP, with time after baroreceptor loss. The absolute level of HLVR reached during diving was unaffected by barodenervation. These results show that diving responses develop in the absence of baroreceptors, but MAP in the dive is not maintained as well in barodenervates as in baroreceptor-intact animals. PMID:2331033

  9. Baroreceptor sensitivity in supine man following inhalation of amyl nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Rubal, B.J.; Moody, J.M.; Bailey, S.R. Univ. of Texas, San Antonio )

    1991-03-15

    This study compares baroreceptor sensitivity derived from high-fidelity central aortic blood pressure (BP) measurements following amyl nitrite inhalation (ANI) during BP fall and recovery in seven male subjects undergoing diagnostic catheterization for chest pain syndrome. Continuous beat-by-beat plots of BP va pulse interval revealed that all subjects exhibited a counter-clockwise loop with varying degrees of hysteresis. Baroreceptor sensitivity was derived from the slope of a linear plot of systolic BP vs pulse interval and central aortic BP. When baroreceptor sensitivities were compared during BP fall and recovery, the mean values did not differ for the group; however, the slope of regression lines differed in six of the seven subjects. In summary, this study: describes the use of hi-fi central aortic pressure recordings in assessments of baroreceptor sensitivity which avoids the influence of local BP wave reflections in determining baroreceptor sensitivity, and demonstrates the complex nature of the baroreceptor responses to ANI.

  10. Inhibition of the baroreceptor reflex on stimulation in the brain stem defence centre

    PubMed Central

    Coote, J. H.; Hilton, S. M.; Perez-Gonzalez, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    1. In anaesthetized cats, the pattern of cardiovascular response characteristic of the defence reaction has been elicited by localized electrical stimulation within the appropriate region of the hypothalamus. The baroreceptor reflex response has been elicited by raising the pressure in a blind sac preparation of the carotid sinus or by electrical stimulation of the sinus nerve. 2. In addition to arterial blood pressure, heart rate and regional blood flows, activity was recorded in cardiac and renal sympathetic nerves, to assess more precisely the cardiomotor and vasomotor changes during interactions between brain stem stimulation and baroreceptor activation. 3. The sympatho-inhibitory and depressor effects of carotid sinus stimulation or electrical stimulation of the sinus nerve could be completely suppressed by stimulation within the hypothalamic defence area, as could the reflex bradycardia. It is concluded that this suppression is effected through the central nervous system. 4. Stimulation at points in the hypothalamus close to, but outside, the defence area, and which elicited increases in arterial pressure and sympathetic activity of similar magnitude to those from the defence area itself, did not abolish the sympatho-inhibitory or depressor effects of baroreceptor activation, though the reflex bradycardia was usually inhibited. It is suggested that this less localized change results from augmentation of the central inspiratory drive which inhibits the vagal outflow to the heart. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:572871

  11. Effects of horizontal body casting on the baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, G. E.; Dickey, D. T.; Sandler, H.; Stone, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term horizontal body position on baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate. Six male rhesus monkeys (6.2-9.4 kg) were given bolus injections of 4.0 microgram/kg, phenylephrine during each of the following conditions: awake, anesthetized (10 mg/kg ketamine HCl), and after beta-blockade (1 mg/kg propranolol HCl) before, 7, 14, and 28 days after being placed in a horizontal body cast. R-R interval vs. systolic arterial pressure was plotted, and the slope was determined by least-squares-fit linear regression. Baroreceptor slope was significantly reduced by 7 days of horizontal body position and remained attenuated throughout the 28-day restraint period both before and after beta-receptor blockade. These data are consistent with the thesis that prolonged exposure to a zero-gravity environment impairs autonomic reflex regulation of the cardiovascular system.

  12. [The effect of halothane and enflurane as well as of propanidid and ketamin on the aortic baroreceptor discharge of decerebrated cats (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hagenau, W; Pietsch, D; Arndt, J O

    1976-07-01

    The effect of halothane, enflurane, propanidid and ketamine on the sensitivity of the aortic baroreceptors and its quantitative relationship with arterial pressure were studied in decerebrated cats. Receptor response curves (single baroreceptor fibres of the depressor nerve) were constructed by plotting the average discharge rate (spikes/sec) against the aortic mean pressure and the effect of the anaesthetics on them was analysed. The blood pressure was changed over wide ranges by inflating a balloon placed in the thoracic part of the descending aorta through a femoral artery. Receptor sensitivity increased with halothane and enflurane, yet it decreased with propanidid. It remained uneffected duringanesthesia with ketamine. Thus, different anesthetics act differently on the afferent impulse traffic of baroreceptors. The possible role of these effects on blood pressure control during anaesthesia is discussed.

  13. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans.

  14. Baroreceptor activation attenuates attentional effects on pain-evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Gray, Marcus A; Minati, Ludovico; Paoletti, Giulia; Critchley, Hugo D

    2010-12-01

    Focused attention typically enhances neural nociceptive responses, reflected electroencephalographically as increased amplitude of pain-evoked event-related potentials (ERPs). Additionally, pain-evoked ERPs are attenuated by hypertension and baroreceptor activity, through as yet unclear mechanisms. There is indirect evidence that these two effects may interact, suggesting that baroreceptor-related modulation of nociception is more than a low-level gating phenomenon. To address this hypothesis, we explored in a group of healthy participants the combined effects of cue-induced expectancy and baroreceptor activity on the amplitude of pain-evoked ERPs. Brief nociceptive skin stimuli were delivered during a simple visual task; half were preceded by a visual forewarning cue, and half were unpredictable. Nociceptive stimuli were timed to coincide either with systole (maximum activation of cardiac baroreceptors) or with diastole (minimum baroreceptor activation). We observed a strong interaction between expectancy and cardiac timing for the amplitude of the P2 ERP component; no effects were observed for the N2 component. Cued stimuli were associated with larger P2 amplitude, but this effect was abolished for stimuli presented during baroreceptor activation. No cardiac timing effect was observed for un-cued stimuli. Taken together, these findings suggest a close integration of cognitive-affective aspects of expectancy and baroreceptor influences on pain, and as such may cast further light on mechanisms underlying mental and physiological contributions to clinical pain.

  15. Relationships between baroreceptor cardiac reflex sensitivity and cognitive performance: modulations by gender and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Paso, Gustavo A Reyes Del; Mata, José Luis; Martín-Vázquez, María

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at replicating and extending previous results on the association between baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) and cognitive performance. Thirty men and 31 women performed an arithmetic task. After adjusting for numerical aptitude and effort, no predictors of performance were found in men. In women, the relationships between BRS and parameters related to correct responses were modulated by blood pressure (BP). BRS was inversely associated with these parameters for participants with BP>1 SD above the mean, whereas the associations were positive in participants with BP<1 SD below the mean. Also for women, BRS was positively associated with number of errors during the task. These results suggest that the relation between BRS and performance varies as a function of the type of cognitive processes assessed and that the central nervous system effects of the baroreceptors on cognitive functioning are modulated by gender and BP.

  16. Baroreceptor reflex dysfunction in the BACHD mouse model of Huntington’s disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Analyne M.; Loh, Dawn H; Jordan, Maria C.; Roos, Kenneth P.; Colwell, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder that presents with a triad of clinical symptoms, which include movement abnormalities, emotional disturbance and cognitive impairment. Recent studies reported dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system in Huntington’s disease patients, which may contribute to the increased incidence of cardiovascular events in this patient population that often leads to death. We measured the baroreceptor reflex, a process dependent on proper autonomic function, in the BACHD mouse model of Huntington’s disease. We found a blunted response of the baroreceptor reflex as well as significantly higher daytime blood pressure in BACHD mice compared to WT controls, which are both indications of autonomic dysfunction. BACHD mice had increased heart weight to tibia length ratios at 7 and 12 mo of age suggesting hypertrophic changes of the heart, which we speculate is a response to the increased blood pressure and aberrant baroreceptor reflex. Despite these structural changes, the hearts of BACHD mice continue to function normally as assessed by echocardiographic analysis. Studies of autonomic and cardiovascular function in BACHD mice may help elucidate the pathophysiology of Huntington’s disease and aid in the development of clinical strategies to offset the incidence of fatal cardiovascular events in the Huntington’s disease patient population. PMID:22069044

  17. Short-duration spaceflight impairs human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, J M; Charles, J B; Bennett, B S; Jones, M M; Eckberg, D L

    1992-08-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is a predictable but poorly understood consequence of space travel. Because arterial baroreceptors modulate abrupt pressure transients, we tested the hypothesis that spaceflight impairs baroreflex mechanisms. We studied vagally mediated carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses (provoked by neck pressure changes) in the supine position and heart rate and blood pressure in the supine and standing positions in 16 astronauts before and after 4- to 5-day Space Shuttle missions. On landing day, resting R-R intervals and standard deviations, and the slope, range, and position of operational points on the carotid transmural pressure-sinus node response relation were all reduced relative to preflight. Stand tests on landing day revealed two separate groups (one maintained standing arterial pressure better) that were separated by preflight slopes, operational points, and supine and standing R-R intervals and by preflight-to-postflight changes in standing pressures, body weights, and operational points. Our results suggest that short-duration spaceflight leads to significant reductions in vagal control of the sinus node that may contribute to, but do not account completely for, orthostatic intolerance.

  18. Forebrain organization representing baroreceptor gating of somatosensory afferents within the cortical autonomic network.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ruma; Frances, Maria Fernanda; Steinback, Craig Douglas; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2012-07-01

    Somatosensory afferents are represented within the cortical autonomic network (CAN). However, the representation of somatosensory afferents, and the consequent cardiovascular effects, may be modified by levels of baroreceptor input. Thus, we examined the cortical regions involved with processing somatosensory inputs during baroreceptor unloading. Neuroimaging sessions (functional magnetic resonance imaging [fMRI]) recorded brain activity during 30 mmHg lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) alone and combined with somatosensory stimulation (LBNP+SS) of the forearm (n = 14). Somatosensory processing was also assessed during increased sympathetic outflow via end-expiratory apnea. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), cardiac output (Q), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were recorded during the same protocols in a separate laboratory session. SS alone had no effect on any cardiovascular or MSNA variable at rest. Measures of HR, BP, and Q during LBNP were not different compared with LBNP+SS. The rise in MSNA burst frequency was attenuated during LBNP+SS versus LBNP alone (8 vs. 12 bursts/min, respectively, P < 0.05). SS did not affect the change in MSNA during apnea. Activations within the insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) observed during LBNP were not seen during LBNP+SS. Anterior insula and ACC activations occurring during apnea were not modified by SS. Thus, the absence of insular and dorsal ACC activity during LBNP+SS along with an attenuation of MSNA burst frequency suggest sympathoinhibitory effects of sensory stimulation during decreased baroreceptor input by a mechanism that includes conjoint insula-dorsal ACC regulation. These findings reveal that the level of baroreceptor input influences the forebrain organization of somatosensory afferents. PMID:22514285

  19. Plasma leptin inhibits the response of nucleus of the solitary tract neurons to aortic baroreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-08-01

    Leptin receptors have been identified within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and leptin injections into the caudal NTS inhibit the baroreceptor reflex. However, whether plasma leptin alters the discharge of NTS neurons mediating aortic baroreceptor reflex activity is not known. A series of electrophysiological single unit recording experiments was done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar and Zucker obese rat with either their neuroaxis intact or with mid-collicular transections. Single units in NTS antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of depressor sites in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) were found to display a cardiac cycle-related rhythmicity. These units were tested for their responses to stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) and intra-carotid injections of leptin (50-200ng/0.1ml). Of 63 single units tested in NTS, 33 were antidromically activated by stimulation of CVLM depressor sites and 18 of these single units responded with a decrease in discharge rate after intracarotid injections of leptin. Thirteen of these leptin responsive neurons (∼72%) were excited by ADN stimulation. Furthermore, the excitatory response of these single units to ADN stimulation was attenuated by about 50% after the intracarotid leptin injection. Intracarotid injections of leptin (200ng/0.1ml) in the Zucker obese rat did not alter the discharge rate of NTS-CVLM projecting neurons. These data suggest that leptin exerts a modulatory effect on brainstem neuronal circuits that control cardiovascular responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial baroreceptors. PMID:23792336

  20. Medullary raphe neurones and baroreceptor modulation of the respiratory motor pattern in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, B G; Arata, A; Morris, K F; Hernandez, Y M; Shannon, R

    1998-01-01

    Perturbations of arterial blood pressure change medullary raphe neurone activity and the respiratory motor pattern. This study sought evidence for actions of baroresponsive raphe neurones on the medullary respiratory network.Blood pressure was perturbed by intravenous injection of an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, unilateral pressure changes in the carotid sinus, or occlusion of the descending aorta in thirty-six Dial-urethane-anaesthetized, vagotomized, paralysed, artificially ventilated cats. Neurones were monitored with microelectrode arrays in two or three of the following domains: nucleus raphe obscurus-nucleus raphe pallidus, nucleus raphe magnus, and rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla. Data were analysed with cycle-triggered histograms, peristimulus time and cumulative sum histograms, cross-correlograms and spike-triggered averages of efferent phrenic nerve activity.Prolongation of the expiratory phase and decreased peak integrated phrenic amplitude were most frequently observed. Of 707 neurones studied, 310 had altered firing rates during stimulation; changes in opposite directions were monitored simultaneously in fifty-six of eighty-seven data sets with at least two baroresponsive neurones.Short time scale correlations were detected between neurones in 347 of 3388 pairs. Seventeen pairs of baroresponsive raphe neurones exhibited significant offset correlogram features indicative of paucisynaptic interactions. In correlated raphe-ventrolateral medullary neurone pairs with at least one baroresponsive neurone, six of seven ventrolateral medullary decrementing expiratory (E-Decr) neurones increased their firing rate during baroreceptor stimulation. Thirteen of fifteen ventrolateral medullary inspiratory neurones correlated with raphe cells decreased their firing rate during baroreceptor stimulation.The results support the hypothesis that raphe neuronal assemblies transform and transmit information from baroreceptors to neurones in the ventral

  1. Plasma leptin inhibits the response of nucleus of the solitary tract neurons to aortic baroreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-08-01

    Leptin receptors have been identified within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and leptin injections into the caudal NTS inhibit the baroreceptor reflex. However, whether plasma leptin alters the discharge of NTS neurons mediating aortic baroreceptor reflex activity is not known. A series of electrophysiological single unit recording experiments was done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar and Zucker obese rat with either their neuroaxis intact or with mid-collicular transections. Single units in NTS antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of depressor sites in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) were found to display a cardiac cycle-related rhythmicity. These units were tested for their responses to stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) and intra-carotid injections of leptin (50-200ng/0.1ml). Of 63 single units tested in NTS, 33 were antidromically activated by stimulation of CVLM depressor sites and 18 of these single units responded with a decrease in discharge rate after intracarotid injections of leptin. Thirteen of these leptin responsive neurons (∼72%) were excited by ADN stimulation. Furthermore, the excitatory response of these single units to ADN stimulation was attenuated by about 50% after the intracarotid leptin injection. Intracarotid injections of leptin (200ng/0.1ml) in the Zucker obese rat did not alter the discharge rate of NTS-CVLM projecting neurons. These data suggest that leptin exerts a modulatory effect on brainstem neuronal circuits that control cardiovascular responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial baroreceptors.

  2. Signal transduction of aortic and carotid sinus baroreceptors is not modified by central command during spontaneous motor activity in decerebrate cats.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Kadowaki, Akito; Ishida, Tomoko; Idesako, Mitsuhiro; Liang, Nan

    2014-05-15

    Our laboratory has suggested that central command provides selective inhibition of the cardiomotor component of aortic baroreflex at the start of exercise, preserving carotid sinus baroreflex. It is postulated that central command may modify the signal transduction of aortic baroreceptors, so as to decrease aortic baroreceptor input to the cardiovascular centers, and, thereby, can cause the selective inhibition of aortic baroreflex. To test the hypothesis, we directly analyzed the responses in multifiber aortic nerve activity (AoNA) and carotid sinus nerve activity (CsNA) during spontaneous motor activity in decerebrate, paralyzed cats. The increases of 62-104% in mean AoNA and CsNA were found during spontaneous motor activity, in proportion to a rise of 35 ± 3 mmHg (means ± SE) in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and had an attenuating tendency by restraining heart rate (HR) at the lower intrinsic frequency of 154 ± 6 beats/min. Brief occlusion of the abdominal aorta was conducted before and during spontaneous motor activity to produce a mechanically evoked increase in MAP and, thereby, to examine the stimulus-response relationship of arterial baroreceptors. Although the sensitivity of the MAP-HR baroreflex curve was markedly blunted during spontaneous motor activity, the stimulus-response relationships of AoNA and CsNA were not influenced by spontaneous motor activity, irrespective of the absence or presence of the HR restraint. Thus, it is concluded that aortic and carotid sinus baroreceptors can code beat-by-beat blood pressure during spontaneous motor activity in decerebrate cats and that central command is unlikely to modulate the signal transduction of arterial baroreceptors.

  3. Increase in sensitivity of the baroreceptor reflex following microinjection of carbachol into the posterior hypothalamic nucleus of awake rats.

    PubMed

    Newey, C R; Martin, J R

    2016-01-01

    In a rat model, the baroreceptor reflex can be assessed by graded infusions of either phenylephrine or sodium nitroprusside with continuous hemodynamic monitoring. Microinjection of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh) into the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PHN) evokes an increase in mean arterial pressure and a change in heart rate. Lower doses of CCh evoke only tachycardia, whereas middle and higher doses evoke a biphasic change in heart rate of tachycardia followed by bradycardia. The bradycardia following the microinjection of CCh into the PHN can be attenuated by the previous administration of the vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist [d(CH2 )5 Tyr(Me)] arginine vasopressin (AVPX). Circulating arginine vasopressin (AVP) has been shown to increase the sensitivity of the baroreceptor reflex by stimulating vasopressin V1 receptors in the area postrema. The attenuation by AVPX of the bradycardia that results following the high doses of CCh suggests that AVP is released into the circulation following stimulation of cholinergic systems within the PHN. Thus, microinjection of a high dose of CCh (11 nmol) into the PHN alters the sensitivity of the baroreceptor reflex by increasing peripheral levels of AVP. PMID:27555117

  4. [Arterial baroreflex--physiological role and assessment of functioning].

    PubMed

    Tkaczyszyn, Michał; Rydlewska, Agnieszka; Ponikowska, Beata; Borodulin-Nadzieja, Ludmiła; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2013-08-01

    Arterial baroreflex is one of the key mechanisms responsible for the homeostasis maintenance within the cardiovascular system. Through the modulation of sympathetic and parasympathetic drive within the autonomic nervous system, baroreflex enables to stabilize arterial blood pressure and maintain perfusion within critical organs (e.g. brain, heart). This review provides the physiological background of the baroreflex functioning and describes the methodology for assessing the arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Decreased BRS reflects autonomic imbalance and predicts unfavorable outcome in cardiovascular diseases accompanied by the autonomic dysfunction, such as arterial hypertension and heart failure. BRS assessment methods can be divided into those that are performed in resting conditions (the measurements of spontaneous BRS, e.g. the sequence or spectral analysis method) and methods with the application of the external stimuli, which may be either non-invasive (e.g. the controlled breathing method) or invasive (e.g. the phenylephrine method). PMID:24052991

  5. Renal artery stent in solitary functioning kidneys: 77% of benefit

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhenjiang; Liu, Liangshuai; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Wei; Yang, Jianyong; Li, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Solitary functioning kidney (SFK) is tough issue to address in clinical, mostly developed from renal artery stenosis (RAS) in adults. Although renal artery stent is widely used to help SFK patients, the efficacy of the stent is still disputable. This study is aimed at reviewing a series of SFK cases to draw a conclusion about the efficacy of renal artery stent. Methods: All related papers published in PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library were searched. Studies or subsets were included only if they satisfied certain criteria. The benefit rate which equaled the rate of improvement subjoining the rate of stabilization was calculated. All analyses were conducted with Stata version 12.0 (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX). Results: According to 7 papers on the efficacy of renal artery stent, 253 SFK patients were included. The result revealed that the renal artery stent could help SFK patients to improve or stabilize their renal function (RF). The benefit rate was 0.77, with 95% confidence interval between 0.72 and 0.83. Conclusions: With proper patient selection, renal artery stent could benefit SFK patients with a percentage odd of 0.77 to improve or stabilize the RF. PMID:27603380

  6. Arterial structure and function in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoli, Luca; Rastelli, Stefania; Inserra, Gaetano; Castellino, Pietro

    2015-10-28

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the result of a combination of environmental, genetic and immunologic factors that trigger an uncontrolled immune response within the intestine, which results in inflammation among genetically predisposed individuals. Several studies have reported that the prevalence of classic cardiovascular risk factors is lower among subjects with IBD than in the general population, including obesity, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and hypertension. Therefore, given the risk profile of IBD subjects, the expected cardiovascular morbidity and mortality should be lower in these patients than in the general population. However, this is not the case because the standardized mortality ratio is not reduced and the risk of coronary heart disease is increased in patients with IBD. It is reasonable to hypothesize that other factors not considered in the classical stratification of cardiovascular risk may be involved in these subjects. Therefore, IBD may be a useful model with which to evaluate the effects of chronic low-grade inflammation in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Arterial stiffness is both a marker of subclinical target organ damage and a cardiovascular risk factor. In diseases characterized by chronic systemic inflammation, there is evidence that the inflammation affects arterial properties and induces both endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffening. It has been reported that decreasing inflammation via anti tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy decreases arterial stiffness and restores endothelial function in patients with chronic inflammatory disorders. Consistent with these results, several recent studies have been conducted to determine whether arterial properties are altered among patients with IBD. In this review, we discuss the evidence pertaining to arterial structure and function and present the available data regarding arterial stiffness and endothelial function in patients with IBD.

  7. Superficial Femoral Artery Plaque and Functional Performance in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Liu, Kiang; Carroll, Timothy J.; Tian, Lu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Li, Debiao; Carr, James; Guralnik, Jack M.; Kibbe, Melina; Pearce, William H.; Yuan, Chun; McCarthy, Walter; Kramer, Christopher M.; Tao, Huimin; Liao, Yihua; Clark, Elizabeth Talley; Xu, Dongxiang; Berry, Jarett; Orozco, Jennifer; Sharma, Leena; Criqui, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We studied associations of magnetic resonance imaging measurements of plaque area and relative percent lumen reduction in the proximal superficial femoral artery with functional performance among participants with peripheral arterial disease. BACKGROUND The clinical significance of directly imaged plaque characteristics in lower extremity arteries is not well established. METHODS A total of 454 participants with an ankle brachial index <1.00 underwent magnetic resonance cross-sectional imaging of the proximal superficial femoral artery and completed a 6-min walk test, measurement of 4-m walking velocity at usual and fastest pace, and measurement of physical activity with a vertical accelerometer. RESULTS Adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking, statin use, comorbidities, and other covariates, higher mean plaque area (1st quintile [least plaque]: 394 m, 2nd quintile: 360 m, 3rd quintile: 359 m, 4th quintile: 329 m, 5th quintile [greatest plaque]: 311 m; p trend <0.001) and smaller mean percent lumen area (1st quintile [greatest plaque]: 319 m, 2nd quintile: 330 m, 3rd quintile: 364 m, 4th quintile: 350 m, 5th quintile: 390 m; p trend <0.001) were associated with shorter distance achieved in the 6-min walk test. Greater mean plaque area was also associated with slower usual-paced walking velocity (p trend = 0.006) and slower fastest-paced 4-m walking velocity (p trend = 0.003). Associations of mean plaque area and mean lumen area with 6-min walk distance remained statistically significant even after additional adjustment for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Among participants with peripheral arterial disease, greater plaque burden and smaller lumen area in the proximal superficial femoral artery are associated independently with poorer functional performance, even after adjusting for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. PMID:21757163

  8. Lateralization of expression of neural sympathetic activity to the vessels and effects of carotid baroreceptor stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, André; Porta, Alberto; Barbic, Franca; Brychta, Robert J.; Bonizzi, Pietro; Diedrich, Laura; Cerutti, Sergio; Robertson, David; Furlan, Raffaello

    2009-01-01

    Human studies suggest that cardiovascular neural sympathetic control is predominantly modulated by the right cerebral hemisphere. It is unknown whether post-ganglionic sympathetic activity [muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA)] shows any functional asymmetry. Eight right-handed volunteers (3 women and 5 men, 32 ± 2 yr of age) underwent ECG, beat-by-beat blood pressure, respiratory activity, and simultaneous right and left MSNA recordings during spontaneous and controlled breathing (CB, 15 breaths/min, 0.25 Hz). Dynamic carotid baroreceptor stimulation was obtained by 0.1-Hz sinusoidal suction, from 0 to −50 mmHg, randomly applied to the right, left, and combined right and left sides of the neck during CB. Laterality was assessed by changes in the MSNA burst rate (in bursts/min, and bursts/100 beats), strength [amplitude (A) and area (AA)], and the oscillatory component at 0.1 Hz during baroreceptor stimulation. Amplitude parameters were normalized by CB burst mean amplitude and area of the same side. At rest, the right and left MSNA burst rate and total MSNA activity were similar. Conversely, the right MSNA normalized burst AN (1.36 ± 0.18) and AAN (1.31 ± 0.16) were larger than the left MSNA AN (1.04 ± 0.09) and AAN (1.02 ± 0.08). Unilateral and bilateral carotid baroreflex stimulation abolished the right prevalence of AN and AAN. In conclusion, the right lateralization of sympathetic activity to the vessels is indicated by normalized burst strength parameters of bilateral MSNA recordings at rest during spontaneous breathing. Carotid baroreceptor stimulation disrupted such expression of MSNA lateralization possibly by disturbing the synchronizing action of right cerebral hemisphere. PMID:19363133

  9. [Effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on aortic baroreceptor activity in rats].

    PubMed

    Ma, X Y; Zhang, W Y; Ho, S Y

    1994-10-01

    Effects of atriopeptin III (AP III) on the aortic baroreceptor activity in rats were studied in the isolated aorta arch-aortic nerve preparation in situ. By perfusing the isolated aortic arch with AP III (2.0 micrograms/ml) in rats, at constant intra-aortic pressure (IAP) of 13.3 kPa, the integral of aortic nerve activity (IANA) was increased by 64 +/- 27% (P < 0.001), the stepwise increases and decreases of IAP were correspondingly accompanied by increase and decrease in IANA, while the saturation pressure (SP) and the operating range (OR) of aortic baroreceptor activity were decreased from 22.5 +/- 0.5 to 21.3 +/- 0.5 kPa (P < 0.05) and 12.1 +/- 0.4 to 10.6 +/- 0.4 (P < 0.05), respectively, and the threshold pressure (TP) did not show any changes. The function curve of aortic baroreceptor was shifted to left and upward, and the peak integral value (PIV) and the peak slope (PS) of the curve were increased from 508 +/- 66 to 730 +/- 52% (P < 0.05), 55.6 +/- 7.5 to 93.2 +/- 6.8%.kPa-1 (P < 0.05), respectively. After washing out of AP III, the IANA returned to the control level. By perfusing the aortic arch with sodium nitroprusside (NP, 1.0 microgram/ml), at constant intra-aortic pressure (IAP) of 13.3 kPa, although the IANA was decreased as compared with the control, there was no statistical significance (P > 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Renal Artery Stenting in Patients with a Solitary Functioning Kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Cioni, Roberto; Vignali, Claudio; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Neri, Emanuele; Caramella, Davide; Vagli, Paola; Bargellini, Irene; Napoli, Vinicio; Pinto, Stefania; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2001-12-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the results of renal artery stenting in patients with renovascular disease and a solitary functioning kidney.Methods: Palmazstents were placed in 16 patients with a solitary functioning kidney,renal artery stenosis, hypertension and renal failure. Stenoses were evaluated with color Doppler ultrasound, MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Indications for stenting were: recoil after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) (63%),arterial dissection after PTRA (13%) and primary stenting (25%).Immediate results were evaluated by DSA. On follow-up (6-36 months),patients underwent periodical evaluation of clinical conditions (blood pressure and serum creatinine level) and stent patency, by means of color Doppler ultrasound.Results: Stent placement was successful in all patients (100%). Cumulative primary patency rate was: 100% at 1 day, 93.75% at 6 months, 81.25% at 12 months and 75% at 24 months. A significant reduction in diastolic blood pressure occurred (mean {+-} SD 104 {+-} 6 vs 92 {+-} 3;p < 0.05); renal function improved or stabilized in over 80% of patients. However, there was no significant difference in the creatinine values before and after treatment (mean {+-} SD 200 {+-} 142 mmol/l vs 197 {+-} 182 mmol/l; p> 0.05).Conclusion: Renal artery stenting, both after PTRA and as primary stenting, represents a safe procedure, able to preserve renal function in patients with a solitary functioning kidney.

  11. Radial artery vasomotor function following transradial cardiac catheterisation

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, A J; Mills, N L; Newby, D E; Cruden, N L M

    2016-01-01

    Aims To determine the reproducibility of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and nitrate-mediated dilation (NMD) in the assessment of radial artery vasomotor function, and to examine the effect of transradial catheterisation on radial artery injury and recovery. Methods Radial artery FMD and NMD were examined in 20 volunteers and 20 patients on four occasions (two visits at least 24 hours apart, with two assessments at each visit). In a further 10 patients, radial artery FMD was assessed in the catheterised arm prior to, at 24 hours and 3 months following cardiac catheterisation. Results There were no differences in baseline radial artery diameter (2.7±0.4 mm vs 2.7±0.4 mm), FMD (13.4±6.4 vs 12.89±5.5%) or NMD (13.6±3.8% vs 10.1±4.3%) between healthy volunteers and patients (p>0.05 for all comparisons). Mean differences for within and between day FMD were 2.53% (95% CIs −15.5% to 20.5%) and −4.3% (−18.3% to 9.7%) in patients. Compared to baseline, radial artery FMD was impaired at 24 hours (8.7±4.1% vs 3.9±2.9%, p=0.015) but not 3 months (8.7±4.1% vs 6.2±4.4, p=0.34) following transradial catheterisation. Conclusions Radial FMD is impaired early after transradial catheterisation but appears to recover by 3 months. While test–retest variability was demonstrated, our findings suggest that transradial access for cardiac catheterisation may afford a potential model of vascular injury and repair in vivo in man. PMID:27752330

  12. Electrophysiological evidence for reciprocal insulo-insular connectivity of baroreceptor-related neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Oppenheimer, S M

    2000-04-28

    The recent indications of specialized lateralization of cardiovascular regulation within the right and left posterior insular cortex of the rat, suggest the possibility of transcallosal connectivity between these regions. This has not been previously demonstrated using physiological techniques. Extracellular neural recordings in 34 urethane anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats demonstrated reciprocal interinsular antidromic and orthodromic activation, elicited with similar median onset latencies (18 ms). The corresponding conduction velocity of these fibers (0.6 m/s) suggests that they may be unmyelinated. Many of the cells showing interhemispheric connectivity also responded to baroreceptor activation, further emphasizing the connectivity pattern in baroreceptor-related units. Both 1 and 25 Hz microstimulation of the contralateral insula indicated that the most frequent orthodromic response was inhibitory, either alone or as part of a biphasic pattern including activation. Chemical stimulation of the insula using L-glutamate was associated with both excitatory and inhibitory orthodromic activation of the contralateral posterior insula, confirming that the orthodromic electrical stimulation was not solely due to activation of fibers of passage. These data suggest that the two insulae may communicate with each other to integrate and balance cardiovascular function between hemispheres. PMID:10773190

  13. Leptin in nucleus of the solitary tract alters the cardiovascular responses to aortic baroreceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-06-01

    Recent data suggests that neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor form at least two distinct groups within the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS): a group within the lateral NTS (Slt) and one within the medial (Sm) and gelantinosa (Sg) NTS. Discrete injections of leptin into Sm and Sg, a region that receives chemoreceptor input, elicit increases in arterial pressure (AP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). However, the effect of microinjections of leptin into Slt, a region that receives baroreceptor input is unknown. Experiments were done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar or Zucker obese rat to determine leptin's effect in Slt on heart rate (HR), AP and RSNA during electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN). Depressor sites within Slt were first identified by the microinjection of l-glutamate (Glu; 0.25M; 10nl) followed by leptin microinjections. In the Wistar rat leptin microinjection (50ng; 20nl) into depressor sites within the lateral Slt elicited increases in HR and RSNA, but no changes in AP. Additionally, leptin injections into Slt prior to Glu injections at the same site or to stimulation of the ADN were found to attenuate the decreases in HR, AP and RSNA to both the Glu injection and ADN stimulation. In Zucker obese rats, leptin injections into NTS depressor sites did not elicit cardiovascular responses, nor altered the cardiovascular responses elicited by stimulation of ADN. Those data suggest that leptin acts at the level of NTS to alter the activity of neurons that mediate the cardiovascular responses to activation of the aortic baroreceptor reflex. PMID:23535030

  14. Mechanosensory transduction of vagal and baroreceptor afferents revealed by study of isolated nodose neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Snitsarev, Vladislav; Whiteis, Carol A; Abboud, Francois M; Chapleau, Mark W

    2002-06-28

    Changes in arterial pressure and blood volume are sensed by baroreceptor and vagal afferent nerves innervating aorta and heart with soma in nodose ganglia. The inability to measure membrane potential at the nerve terminals has limited our understanding of mechanosensory transduction. Goals of the present study were to: (1) Characterize membrane potential and action potential responses to mechanical stimulation of isolated nodose sensory neurons in culture; and (2) Determine whether the degenerin/epithelial sodium channel (DEG/ENaC) blocker amiloride selectively blocks mechanically induced depolarization without suppressing membrane excitability. Membrane potential of isolated rat nodose neurons was measured with sharp microelectrodes. Mechanical stimulation with buffer ejected from a micropipette (5, 10, 20 psi) depolarized 6 of 10 nodose neurons (60%) in an intensity-dependent manner. The depolarization evoked action potentials in 4 of the 6 neurons. Amiloride (1 microM) essentially abolished mechanically induced depolarization (15 +/- 4 mV during control vs. 1 +/- 2 mV during amiloride with 20-psi stimulation, n = 6) and action potential discharge. In contrast, amiloride did not inhibit the frequency of action potential discharge in response to depolarizing current injection (n = 6). In summary, mechanical stimulation depolarizes and triggers action potentials in a subpopulation of nodose sensory neurons in culture. The DEG/ENaC blocker amiloride at a concentration of 1 microM inhibits responses to mechanical stimulation without suppressing membrane excitability. The results support the hypothesis that DEG/ENaC subunits are components of mechanosensitive ion channels on vagal afferent and baroreceptor neurons. PMID:12144042

  15. Leptin in nucleus of the solitary tract alters the cardiovascular responses to aortic baroreceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-06-01

    Recent data suggests that neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor form at least two distinct groups within the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS): a group within the lateral NTS (Slt) and one within the medial (Sm) and gelantinosa (Sg) NTS. Discrete injections of leptin into Sm and Sg, a region that receives chemoreceptor input, elicit increases in arterial pressure (AP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). However, the effect of microinjections of leptin into Slt, a region that receives baroreceptor input is unknown. Experiments were done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar or Zucker obese rat to determine leptin's effect in Slt on heart rate (HR), AP and RSNA during electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN). Depressor sites within Slt were first identified by the microinjection of l-glutamate (Glu; 0.25M; 10nl) followed by leptin microinjections. In the Wistar rat leptin microinjection (50ng; 20nl) into depressor sites within the lateral Slt elicited increases in HR and RSNA, but no changes in AP. Additionally, leptin injections into Slt prior to Glu injections at the same site or to stimulation of the ADN were found to attenuate the decreases in HR, AP and RSNA to both the Glu injection and ADN stimulation. In Zucker obese rats, leptin injections into NTS depressor sites did not elicit cardiovascular responses, nor altered the cardiovascular responses elicited by stimulation of ADN. Those data suggest that leptin acts at the level of NTS to alter the activity of neurons that mediate the cardiovascular responses to activation of the aortic baroreceptor reflex.

  16. Arterial Compliance and Autonomic Functions in Adult Male Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Yogesh; Gupta, Rani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Smoking is known to augment sympathetic activity and may lead to increased arterial stiffness. Several studies have reported association of increased sympathetic activity and arterial stiffness to cardiovascular risks among smokers. Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) of peripheral arteries, instead of aorta can be used as a non-invasive indicator of arterial stiffness. Aim To measure non-invasively, the autonomic functions and peripheral arterial stiffness in smokers, and to find out whether the aforementioned factors are modified by the level of physical activity in these smokers. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, HIMS, Dehradun, over a period of 12 months (2013-2014) on 100 adult males (20-40 years); 50 smokers and 50 non-smokers. The parameters analysed include relevant anthropometric and cardiovascular parameters, Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV), sustained Hand Grip Test (HGT) and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) domains. Data interpretation and analysis was carried out using SPSS 17.0. Comparison of the above mentioned parameters amongst groups was done with unpaired t-test. The relationship of pack-years & physical activity with vascular functions was assessed by Pearson’s correlation. Interaction of various grades of smoking and physical activity with Cardiovascular System (CVS) parameters was assessed by one-way ANOVA. Results Smokers had higher values of PWV (5.7±0.5m/s) as compared to non-smokers (4.8±0.4m/s) (p<0.001). ΔDBP during HGT was lower (7±3.18mmHg) among smokers as compared to non-smokers (19.4±3.5mmHg) (p<0.001). Smoking (pack-years) was positively related to PWV (r= .03) but showed a weak negative relationship with change in Diastolic Blood Pressure (ΔDBP) (r= -0.084, p=0.56) showing that, more the frequency of smoking, the more was arterial stiffening and the lesser was the sympathetic response to the HGT. The smokers had significantly higher sympathetic activity; Low

  17. Chemoreceptors, baroreceptors, and autonomic deregulation in children with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Gozal, David; Hakim, Fahed; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent sleep disorder of breathing in both adults and children that is fraught with substantial cardiovascular morbidities, the latter being attributable to a complex interplay between intermittent hypoxia (IH), episodic hypercapnia, recurrent large intra-thoracic pressure swings, and sleep disruption. Alterations in autonomic nervous system function could underlie the perturbations in cardiovascular, neurocognitive, immune, endocrine and metabolic functions that affect many of the patients suffering from OSA. Although these issues have received substantial attention in adults, the same has thus far failed to occur in children, creating a quasi misperception that children are protected. Here, we provide a critical overview of the evidence supporting the presence of autonomic nervous system (ANS) perturbations in children with OSA, draw some parallel assessments to known mechanisms in rodents and adult humans, particularly, peripheral and central chemoreceptor and baroreceptor pathways, and suggest future research directions.

  18. High-density lipoprotein functionality in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kosmas, Constantine E; Christodoulidis, Georgios; Cheng, Jeh-wei; Vittorio, Timothy J; Lerakis, Stamatios

    2014-06-01

    The role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in cardiovascular atheroprotection is well established. Epidemiological data have clearly demonstrated an inverse relationship between HDL levels and the risk for coronary artery disease, which is independent of the low-density lipoprotein levels. However, more recent data provide evidence that high HDL levels are not always protective and that under certain conditions may even confer an increased risk. Thus, a new concept has arisen, which stresses the importance of HDL functionality, rather than HDL concentration per se, in the assessment of cardiovascular risk. HDL functionality is genetically defined but can also be modified by several environmental and lifestyle factors, such as diet, smoking or certain pharmacologic interventions. Furthermore, HDL is consisted of a heterogeneous group of particles with major differences in their structural, biological and functional properties. Recently, the cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages was proven to be an excellent metric of HDL functionality, because it was shown to have a strong inverse relationship with the risk of angiographically documented coronary artery disease, independent of the HDL and apolipoprotein A-1 levels, although it may not actually predict the prospective risk for cardiovascular events. Thus, improving the quality of HDL may represent a better therapeutic target than simply raising the HDL level, and assessment of HDL function may prove informative in refining our understanding of HDL-mediated atheroprotection.

  19. Baroreceptor unloading does not limit forearm sweat rate during severe passive heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Gagnon, Daniel; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Pearson, James; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-02-15

    This study tested the hypothesis that sweat rate during passive heat stress is limited by baroreceptor unloading associated with heat stress. Two protocols were performed in which healthy subjects underwent passive heat stress that elicited an increase in intestinal temperature of ∼1.8°C. Upon attaining this level of hyperthermia, in protocol 1 (n = 10, 3 females) a bolus (19 ml/kg) of warm (∼38°C) isotonic saline was rapidly (5-10 min) infused intravenously to elevate central venous pressure (CVP), while in protocol 2 (n = 11, 5 females) phenylephrine was infused intravenously (60-120 μg/min) to return mean arterial pressure (MAP) to normothermic levels. In protocol 1, heat stress reduced CVP from 3.9 ± 1.9 mmHg (normothermia) to -0.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (P < 0.001), while saline infusion returned CVP to normothermic levels (5.1 ± 1.7 mmHg; P > 0.999). Sweat rate was elevated by heat stress (1.21 ± 0.44 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)) but remained unchanged during rapid saline infusion (1.26 ± 0.47 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P = 0.5), whereas cutaneous vascular conductance increased from 77 ± 10 to 101 ± 20% of local heating max (P = 0.029). In protocol 2, MAP was reduced with heat stress from 85 ± 7 mmHg to 76 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.048). Although phenylephrine infusion returned MAP to normothermic levels (88 ± 7 mmHg; P > 0.999), sweat rate remained unchanged during phenylephrine infusion (1.39 ± 0.22 vs. 1.41 ± 0.24 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1); P > 0.999). These data indicate that both cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor unloading do not limit increases in sweat rate during passive heat stress.

  20. Building a functional artery: issues from the perspective of mechanics.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Rudolph L; Hu, Jin-Jia; Humphrey, Jay D

    2004-09-01

    Despite the many successes of arterial tissue engineering, clinically viable implants may be a decade or more away. Fortunately, there is much more that we can learn from native vessels with regard to designing for optimal structure, function, and properties. Herein, we examine recent observations in vascular biology from the perspective of nonlinear mechanics. Moreover, we use a constrained mixture model to study potential contributions of individual wall constituents. In both cases, the unique biological and mechanical roles of elastin come to the forefront, especially its role in generating and modulating residual stress within the wall, which appears to be key to multiple growth and remodeling responses.

  1. Blood pressure and mesenteric resistance arterial function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Chapman, Justin; Xue, Hong; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; McCarron, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Ground studies indicate that spaceflight may diminish vascular contraction. To examine that possibility, vascular function was measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats immediately after an 18-day shuttle flight. Isolated mesenteric resistance arterial responses to cumulative additions of norepinephrine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside were measured using wire myography within 17 h of landing. After flight, maximal contraction to norepinephrine was attenuated (P < 0.001) as was relaxation to acetylcholine (P < 0.001) and sodium nitroprusside (P < 0.05). At high concentrations, acetylcholine caused vascular contraction in vessels from flight animals but not in vessels from vivarium control animals (P < 0.05). The results are consistent with data from ground studies and indicate that spaceflight causes both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent alterations in vascular function. The resulting decrement in vascular function may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight.

  2. Reduction of blood pressure variability by amlodipine in baroreceptor denervated rats.

    PubMed

    Van Vliet, B N; Chafe, L L

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effect of the calcium blocker amlodipine on the variability of mean arterial pressure (MAP), amlodipine besylate was acutely administered to sino-aortic baroreceptor-denervated (SAD) rats (0, 1, 3, 10 mg/kg s.c.), and chronically administered to SAD and sham-denervated rats (0, 50, 150, 500, and 1,500 mg x kg(-1) feed, 4 days per dose). Acute amlodipine administration caused significant dose-dependent reductions of the mean MAP level and short-term MAP variability at the 3 and 10 mg/kg dose levels, respectively. Chronic administration produced dose-dependent reductions in short-term MAP variability, becoming significant at the 150 and 500 mg x kg(-1) feed dose level in SAD and Sham groups, respectively. Day-night differences in blood pressure were significantly attenuated or reversed at the 500 and 1,500 mg x kg(-1) feed dose levels. Amlodipine had little or no effect upon the 24 h MAP level, long-term MAP variability, and only modestly reduced the MAP response to hexamethonium. These results demonstrate that amlodipine can reduce MAP variability independent of changes in the mean blood pressure level.

  3. Women With Peripheral Arterial Disease Experience Faster Functional Decline Than Men With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Liu, Kiang; Guralnik, Jack M.; Tian, Lu; Kibbe, Melina; Liao, Yihua; Tao, Huimin; Criqui, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that women with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) would have greater mobility loss and faster functional decline than men with PAD. Background Whether rates of mobility loss or functional decline differ between men and women with PAD is currently unknown. Methods Three hundred eighty men and women with PAD completed the 6-min walk, were assessed for mobility disability, and underwent measures of 4-m walking velocity at baseline and annually for up to 4 years. Computed tomography-assessed calf muscle characteristics were measured biannually. Outcomes included becoming unable to walk for 6 min continuously among participants who walked continuously for 6 min at baseline. Mobility loss was defined as becoming unable to walk for a quarter mile or to walk up and down 1 flight of stairs without assistance among those without baseline mobility disability. Results were adjusted for age, race, body mass index, physical activity, the ankle brachial index, comorbidities, and other confounders. Results At 4 years of follow-up, women were more likely to become unable to walk for 6 min continuously (hazard ratio: 2.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.30 to 4.06, p = 0.004), more likely to develop mobility disability (hazard ratio: 1.79, 95% confidence interval: 1.30 to 3.03, p = 0.030), and had faster declines in walking velocity (p = 0.022) and the distance achieved in the 6-min walk (p = 0.041) compared with men. Sex differences in functional decline were attenuated after additional adjustment for baseline sex differences in calf muscle area. Conclusions Women with PAD have faster functional decline and greater mobility loss than men with PAD. These sex differences may be attributable to smaller baseline calf muscle area among women with PAD. PMID:21292130

  4. TRPC5 channels participate in pressure-sensing in aortic baroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lau, On-Chai; Shen, Bing; Wong, Ching-On; Tjong, Yung-Wui; Lo, Chun-Yin; Wang, Hui-Chuan; Huang, Yu; Yung, Wing-Ho; Chen, Yang-Chao; Fung, Man-Lung; Rudd, John Anthony; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure is maintained within a normal physiological range by a sophisticated regulatory mechanism. Baroreceptors serve as a frontline sensor to detect the change in blood pressure. Nerve signals are then sent to the cardiovascular control centre in the brain in order to stimulate baroreflex responses. Here, we identify TRPC5 channels as a mechanical sensor in aortic baroreceptors. In Trpc5 knockout mice, the pressure-induced action potential firings in the afferent nerve and the baroreflex-mediated heart rate reduction are attenuated. Telemetric measurements of blood pressure demonstrate that Trpc5 knockout mice display severe daily blood pressure fluctuation. Our results suggest that TRPC5 channels represent a key pressure transducer in the baroreceptors and play an important role in maintaining blood pressure stability. Because baroreceptor dysfunction contributes to a variety of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, heart failure and myocardial infarction, our findings may have important future clinical implications. PMID:27411851

  5. TRPC5 channels participate in pressure-sensing in aortic baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, On-Chai; Shen, Bing; Wong, Ching-On; Tjong, Yung-Wui; Lo, Chun-Yin; Wang, Hui-Chuan; Huang, Yu; Yung, Wing-Ho; Chen, Yang-Chao; Fung, Man-Lung; Rudd, John Anthony; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure is maintained within a normal physiological range by a sophisticated regulatory mechanism. Baroreceptors serve as a frontline sensor to detect the change in blood pressure. Nerve signals are then sent to the cardiovascular control centre in the brain in order to stimulate baroreflex responses. Here, we identify TRPC5 channels as a mechanical sensor in aortic baroreceptors. In Trpc5 knockout mice, the pressure-induced action potential firings in the afferent nerve and the baroreflex-mediated heart rate reduction are attenuated. Telemetric measurements of blood pressure demonstrate that Trpc5 knockout mice display severe daily blood pressure fluctuation. Our results suggest that TRPC5 channels represent a key pressure transducer in the baroreceptors and play an important role in maintaining blood pressure stability. Because baroreceptor dysfunction contributes to a variety of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, heart failure and myocardial infarction, our findings may have important future clinical implications. PMID:27411851

  6. Direct Characterization of Arterial Input Functions by Fluorescence Imaging of Exposed Carotid Artery to Facilitate Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose With the goal of facilitating tracer kinetic analysis in small-animal planar fluorescence imaging, an experimental method for characterizing tracer arterial input functions is presented. The proposed method involves exposing the common carotid arteries by surgical dissection, which can then be imaged directly during tracer injection and clearance. Procedures Arterial concentration curves of IRDye-700DX-carboxylate, IRDye-800CW-EGF, and IRDye-800CW conjugated to anti-EGFR Affibody are recovered from athymic female mice (n=12) by directly imaging exposed vessels. Images were acquired with two imaging protocols: a slow-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=45 s) to recover the arterial curves from two tracers simultaneously, and a fast-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=500 ms) to characterize the first-pass peak of a single tracer. Arterial input functions obtained by the carotid imaging technique, as well as plasma curves measured by blood sampling were fit with a biexponential pharmacokinetic model. Results Pharmacological fast- and slow-phase rate constants recovered with the proposed method were 0.37±0.26 and 0.007±0.001 min−1, respectively, for the IRDye700DX-C. For the IRDye800CW-EGF, the rate constants were 0.11±0.13 and 0.003±0.002 min−1. These rate constants did not differ significantly from those calculated previously by blood sampling, as determined by an F test; however, the between-subject variability was four times lower for arterial curves recovered using the proposed technique, compared with blood sampling. Conclusions The proposed technique enables the direct characterization of arterial input functions for kinetic analysis. As this method requires no additional instrumentation, it is immediately deployable in commercially available planar fluorescence imaging systems. PMID:24420443

  7. Characterizing Resting-State Brain Function Using Arterial Spin Labeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, J Jean; Jann, Kay; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an increasingly established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that is finding broader applications in studying the healthy and diseased brain. This review addresses the use of ASL to assess brain function in the resting state. Following a brief technical description, we discuss the use of ASL in the following main categories: (1) resting-state functional connectivity (FC) measurement: the use of ASL-based cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements as an alternative to the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) technique to assess resting-state FC; (2) the link between network CBF and FC measurements: the use of network CBF as a surrogate of the metabolic activity within corresponding networks; and (3) the study of resting-state dynamic CBF-BOLD coupling and cerebral metabolism: the use of dynamic CBF information obtained using ASL to assess dynamic CBF-BOLD coupling and oxidative metabolism in the resting state. In addition, we summarize some future challenges and interesting research directions for ASL, including slice-accelerated (multiband) imaging as well as the effects of motion and other physiological confounds on perfusion-based FC measurement. In summary, this work reviews the state-of-the-art of ASL and establishes it as an increasingly viable MRI technique with high translational value in studying resting-state brain function.

  8. Structural and functional analysis of small arteries from young spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Dickhout, J G; Lee, R M

    1997-03-01

    We studied structural and functional changes of small muscular arteries from the mesenteric vascular bed of young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) using a new morphometric protocol involving the use of confocal microscopy and a pressurized artery system. At 3 and 4 weeks of age, systolic pressure of SHR and WKY was similar; however, significant structural changes in the mesenteric vasculature were already present in SHR. Arteries fixed under pressure in vitro from SHR had a larger medial volume and increased number of smooth muscle cell layers but similar lumen size compared with arteries from WKY in maximally relaxed conditions. Functional studies showed that SHR arteries contracted more in response to stimulation by KCl and norepinephrine, resulting in a significantly smaller lumen size in these vessels than in those from WKY. SHR arteries precontracted with KCl were also able to maintain a smaller lumen diameter than WKY arteries when challenged with increasing pressure levels. No difference in the sensitivity of response of these arteries to norepinephrine stimulation was found. At 3 and 4 weeks of age, mesenteric arteries from some SHR and WKY were not responsive to periarterial nerve stimulation, and the number of responders was higher in the WKY than SHR. However, a greater degree of contraction was found in SHR arteries responding to field stimulation at 4 weeks than in WKY arteries. We conclude that there is a temporal difference in the rate of functional maturation of the innervation in SHR arteries compared with WKY arteries. Structural changes of the small muscular arteries, caused by an increase in the medial volume, and increased number of smooth muscle cell layers are primary changes that contribute to the development of hypertension in the SHR because these changes are present at the age when blood pressure is similar in SHR and WKY.

  9. SFAs do not impair endothelial function and arterial stiffness123

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Thomas AB; Lewis, Fiona J; Goff, Louise M; Chowienczyk, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is uncertain whether saturated fatty acids (SFAs) impair endothelial function and contribute to arterial stiffening. Objective: We tested the effects of replacing SFAs with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) or carbohydrates on endothelial function and arterial stiffness. Design: With the use of a parallel-designed randomized controlled trial in 121 insulin-resistant men and women, we measured vascular function after 1 mo of consumption of a high-SFA (HS) diet and after 24 wk after random assignment to the HS diet or diets that contained <10% SFAs and were high in either MUFAs or carbohydrates. The primary outcome was a change in flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and secondary outcomes were changes in carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and plasma 8-isoprostane F2α-III concentrations. Results: For 112 participants with data available for analysis on the specified outcomes, no significant differences were shown. FMD with the HS reference diet was 6.7 ± 2.2%, and changes (95% CIs) after 6 mo of intervention were +0.3 (−0.4, 1.1), −0.2 (−0.8, 0.5), and −0.1 (−0.6, 0.7) with HS, high-MUFA (HM), and high-carbohydrate (HC) diets, respectively. After consumption of the HS reference diet, the geometric mean (±SD) PWV was 7.67 ± 1.62 m/s, and mean percentages of changes (95% CIs) were −1.0 (−6.2, 4.3) with the HS diet, 2.7 (−1.4, 6.9) with the HM diet, and −1.0 (−5.5, 3.4) with the HC diet. With the HS reference diet, the geometric mean (±SD) plasma 8-isoprostane F2α-III concentration was 176 ± 85 pmol/L, and mean percentage of changes (95% CIs) were 1 (−12, 14) with the HS diet, 6 (−5, 16) with the HM diet, and 4 (−7, 16) with the HC diet. Conclusion: The replacement of SFAs with MUFAs or carbohydrates in healthy subjects does not affect vascular function. This trial was registered at Current Controlled Trials (http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN) as ISRCTN 29111298. PMID:23964054

  10. Hemodynamic, Functional, and Clinical Responses to Pulmonary Artery Denervation in Patients With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension of Different Causes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Xie, Du-Jiang; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Ling; Rothman, Alexander M.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background— The mechanisms underlying pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are multifactorial. The efficacy of pulmonary artery denervation (PADN) for idiopathic PAH treatment has been evaluated. This study aimed to analyze the hemodynamic, functional, and clinical responses to PADN in patients with PAH of different causes. Methods and Results— Between April 2012 and April 2014, 66 consecutive patients with a resting mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mm Hg treated with PADN were prospectively followed up. Target drugs were discontinued after the PADN procedure. Hemodynamic response and 6-minute walk distance were repeatedly measured within the 1 year post PADN follow-up. The clinical end point was the occurrence of PAH-related events at the 1-year follow-up. There were no PADN-related complications. Hemodynamic success (defined as the reduction in mean pulmonary arterial pressure by a minimal 10% post PADN) was achieved in 94% of all patients, with a mean absolute reduction in systolic pulmonary arterial pressure and mean pulmonary arterial pressure within 24 hours of −10 mm Hg and −7 mm Hg, respectively. The average increment in 6-minute walk distance after PADN was 94 m. Worse PAH-related events occurred in 10 patients (15%), mostly driven by the worsening of PAH (12%). There were 8 (12%) all-cause deaths, with 6 (9%) PAH-related deaths. Conclusions— PADN was safe and feasible for the treatment of PAH. The PADN procedure was associated with significant improvements in hemodynamic function, exercise capacity, and cardiac function and with less frequent PAH-related events and death at 1 year after PADN treatment. Further randomized studies are required to confirm the efficacy of PADN for PAH. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.chictr.trc.com.cn. Unique identifier: chiCTR-ONC-12002085. PMID:26553699

  11. Oxygen sensitivity of mitochondrial function in rat arterial chemoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Buckler, Keith J; Turner, Philip J

    2013-07-15

    The mechanism of oxygen sensing in arterial chemoreceptors is unknown but has often been linked to mitochondrial function. A common criticism of this hypothesis is that mitochondrial function is insensitive to physiological levels of hypoxia. Here we investigate the effects of hypoxia (down to 0.5% O2) on mitochondrial function in neonatal rat type-1 cells. The oxygen sensitivity of mitochondrial [NADH] was assessed by monitoring autofluorescence and increased in hypoxia with a P50 of 15 mm Hg (1 mm Hg = 133.3 Pa) in normal Tyrode or 46 mm Hg in Ca(2+)-free Tyrode. Hypoxia also depolarised mitochondrial membrane potential (m, measured using rhodamine 123) with a P50 of 3.1, 3.3 and 2.8 mm Hg in normal Tyrode, Ca(2+)-free Tyrode and Tyrode containing the Ca(2+) channel antagonist Ni(2+), respectively. In the presence of oligomycin and low carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP; 75 nm) m is maintained by electron transport working against an artificial proton leak. Under these conditions hypoxia depolarised m/inhibited electron transport with a P50 of 5.4 mm Hg. The effects of hypoxia upon cytochrome oxidase activity were investigated using rotenone, myxothiazol, antimycin A, oligomycin, ascorbate and the electron donor tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine. Under these conditions m is maintained by complex IV activity alone. Hypoxia inhibited cytochrome oxidase activity (depolarised m) with a P50 of 2.6 mm Hg. In contrast hypoxia had little or no effect upon NADH (P50 = 0.3 mm Hg), electron transport or cytochrome oxidase activity in sympathetic neurons. In summary, type-1 cell mitochondria display extraordinary oxygen sensitivity commensurate with a role in oxygen sensing. The reasons for this highly unusual behaviour are as yet unexplained.

  12. Outcomes of Anatomical versus Functional Testing for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela S.; Hoffmann, Udo; Patel, Manesh R.; Mark, Daniel B.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.; Cavanaugh, Brendan; Cole, Jason; Dolor, Rowena J.; Fordyce, Christopher B.; Huang, Megan; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Malhotra, Vinay; Picard, Michael H.; Udelson, James E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Yow, Eric; Cooper, Lawton S.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many patients have symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease (CAD) and are often evaluated with the use of diagnostic testing, although there are limited data from randomized trials to guide care. METHODS We randomly assigned 10,003 symptomatic patients to a strategy of initial anatomical testing with the use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or to functional testing (exercise electrocardiography, nuclear stress testing, or stress echocardiography). The composite primary end point was death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or major procedural complication. Secondary end points included invasive cardiac catheterization that did not show obstructive CAD and radiation exposure. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 60.8±8.3 years, 52.7% were women, and 87.7% had chest pain or dyspnea on exertion. The mean pretest likelihood of obstructive CAD was 53.3±21.4%. Over a median follow-up period of 25 months, a primary end-point event occurred in 164 of 4996 patients in the CTA group (3.3%) and in 151 of 5007 (3.0%) in the functional-testing group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 1.29; P = 0.75). CTA was associated with fewer catheterizations showing no obstructive CAD than was functional testing (3.4% vs. 4.3%, P = 0.02), although more patients in the CTA group underwent catheterization within 90 days after randomization (12.2% vs. 8.1%). The median cumulative radiation exposure per patient was lower in the CTA group than in the functional-testing group (10.0 mSv vs. 11.3 mSv), but 32.6% of the patients in the functional-testing group had no exposure, so the overall exposure was higher in the CTA group (mean, 12.0 mSv vs. 10.1 mSv; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS In symptomatic patients with suspected CAD who required noninvasive testing, a strategy of initial CTA, as compared with functional testing, did not improve clinical outcomes over a median follow-up of 2 years. (Funded by the

  13. Autocrine/paracrine modulation of baroreceptor activity after antidromic stimulation of aortic depressor nerve in vivo.

    PubMed

    Santana-Filho, Valter J; Davis, Greg J; Castania, Jaci A; Ma, Xiuying; Salgado, Helio C; Abboud, Francois M; Fazan, Rubens; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-02-01

    Activation of the sensory nerve endings of non-myelinated C-fiber afferents evokes release of autocrine/paracrine factors that cause localized vasodilation, neurogenic inflammation, and modulation of sensory nerve activity. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of antidromic electrical stimulation on afferent baroreceptor activity in vivo, and investigate the role of endogenous prostanoids and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in mediating changes in nerve activity. Baroreceptor activity was recorded from the left aortic depressor nerve (ADN) in anesthetized rats before and after stimulating the ADN for brief (5–20 s) periods. The rostral end of the ADN was crushed or sectioned beforehand to prevent reflex changes in blood pressure. Antidromic stimulation of ADN using parameters that activate both myelinated A-fibers and non-myelinated C-fibers caused pronounced and long-lasting (> 1 min) inhibition of baroreceptor activity (n = 9, P < 0.05), with the magnitude and duration of inhibition dependent on the duration of the stimulation period (n = 5). Baroreceptor activity was only transiently inhibited after selective stimulation of A-fibers. The inhibition of activity after antidromic stimulation of A and C fibers was prolonged after administration of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (5 mg/kg, IV, n = 7) and abolished after administration of PEG-catalase (104 units/kg, IV, n = 7), an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2 to water and oxygen. The results demonstrate a long-lasting inhibition of baroreceptor activity after antidromic stimulation of ADN and suggest that endogenous prostanoids and H2O2 oppose and mediate the inhibition, respectively. These mechanisms may contribute to rapid baroreceptor resetting during acute hypertension and be engaged during chronic baroreceptor activation therapy in patients with hypertension.

  14. Surgical neuroangiography. Vol. 1: Functional anatomy of craniofacial arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lasjaunias, P.; Berenstein, A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Arterial Anatomy: Introduction. - The Internal Maxillary System. - The Pharyngo-occipital System. - The Upper Cervical Vertebral Column: The Cervical Arteries. - The Musculocutaneous Elements of the Head and Mouth. - Thyrolaryngeal Arteries. - The Transosseous Peripheral Nervous System Arterial Supply. - Dangerous Vessels. - Collateral Circulation. - The Pharyngoocipital Collateral Pattern. - The Internal Maxillary Collateral Pattern. - The Linguofacial Collateral Pattern. - Multiple Constraints and Chronology of the Collateral Response. - Angiographic Protocols. - Angiographic Protocol of the Parasellar Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Posterior Base of the Skull. - Angiographic Protocol of the Carotid Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Nasomaxillaary Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Maxillomandibular Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Temporofacial and Scalp Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Thyrolaryngeal Region. - References. - Subject Index.

  15. Viscoelastic mechanisms of aortic baroreceptor resetting to hypotension and to hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xavier-Neto, J; Moreira, E D; Krieger, E M

    1996-10-01

    Viscoelastic and electrophysiological mechanisms have been implicated in the resetting of baroreceptors in hypertension, but resetting in response to hypotension has been less studied. To evaluate the temporal relationship between viscoelastic mechanisms and acute resetting, we examined the "in vivo" behavior of aortic caliber and aortic baroreceptor activity during step changes in pressure. Fifteen-minute hemorrhage in Wistar rats produced stable hypotension (30 mmHg) and viscoelastic contraction (111 +/- 14.2 microns systolic caliber; P < 0.01). Integrated aortic activity fell to 19.8 +/- 3.9% of control (P < 0.001) after 3 s of hypotension but recovered to 64 +/- 4.1% 15 min later (P < 0.01 from 3 s). Recovery of baroreceptor activity was linearly correlated to viscoelastic contraction (r = 0.963; P < 0.0001). Thirty-minute phenylephrine infusion (1.0-4.0 micrograms/min) produced stable hypertension (30 mmHg) and viscoelastic dilation (211 +/- 37.0 microns systolic caliber). Integrated aortic activity increased to 218.0 +/- 18% of control values (P < 0.001) 30 s after hypertension and was reduced to 164.0 +/- 12.0% (P < 0.001 from 3 s) within 30 min. Reduction of baroreceptor activity correlated linearly with viscoelastic relaxation (r = 0.963; P < 0.0001). The results indicate that in the in vivo rat aorta, viscoelastic mechanisms parallel and may contribute to the baroreceptor resetting during hypotension and hypertension.

  16. Chronic Hindlimb Ischemia Impairs Functional Vasodilation and Vascular Reactivity in Mouse Feed Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Trevor R.; Struthers, Kyle R.; Kesler, Thomas J.; Yocum, Matthew D.; Kurjiaka, David T.; Hoying, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Vasodilation of lower leg arterioles is impaired in animal models of chronic peripheral ischemia. In addition to arterioles, feed arteries are a critical component of the vascular resistance network, accounting for as much as 50% of the pressure drop across the arterial circulation. Despite the critical importance of feed arteries in blood flow control, the impact of ischemia on feed artery vascular reactivity is unknown. At 14 days following unilateral resection of the femoral–saphenous artery–vein pair, functional vasodilation of the profunda femoris artery was severely impaired, 11 ± 9 versus 152 ± 22%. Although endothelial and smooth muscle-dependent vasodilation were both impaired in ischemic arteries compared to control arteries (Ach: 40 ± 14 versus 81 ± 11%, SNP: 43 ± 12 versus and 85 ± 11%), the responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were similar, implicating impaired smooth muscle-dependent vasodilation. Conversely, vasoconstriction responses to norepinephrine were not different between ischemic and control arteries, −68 ± 3 versus −66 ± 3%, indicating that smooth muscle cells were functional following the ischemic insult. Finally, maximal dilation responses to acetylcholine, ex vivo, were significantly impaired in the ischemic artery compared to control, 71 ± 9 versus 97 ± 2%, despite a similar generation of myogenic tone to the same intravascular pressure (80 mmHg). These data indicate that ischemia impairs feed artery vasodilation by impairing the responsiveness of the vascular wall to vasodilating stimuli. Future studies to examine the mechanistic basis for the impact of ischemia on vascular reactivity or treatment strategies to improve vascular reactivity following ischemia could provide the foundation for an alternative therapeutic paradigm for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. PMID:22164145

  17. Impaired carotid artery elastic function in patients with tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    László, Andrea; Pintér, Alexandra; Horváth, Tamás; Kádár, Krisztina; Temesvári, András; Kollai, Márk; Studinger, Péter

    2011-09-01

    Complex congenital heart diseases with abnormal formation of the aorticopulmonary septum are also associated with defective large artery elastogenesis. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that carotid artery elastic function was impaired in patients with tetralogy of Fallot (ToF). The study included 45 Fallot-patients (male:female 27:18; age 21.0 ± 11.8 years) and 45 age- and gender-matched healthy control individuals. Carotid artery diameter, pulsatile distension, and intima-media thickness (IMT) were measured by echotracking device, and carotid blood pressure was determined using applanation tonometry. Carotid artery elasticity was characterized by compliance and distensibility coefficients, stiffness index β, and incremental elastic modulus. All carotid artery elastic parameters showed significant differences between groups. The compliance coefficient was 36%, and the distensibility coefficient was 33% smaller, whereas stiffness index β was 46% and incremental elastic modulus was 40% larger in Fallot-patients. Fallot-patients also had larger carotid artery IMT as compared to that of healthy individuals. Carotid artery is markedly stiffer in Fallot-patients suggesting that impaired elastogenesis is a component of the congenital abnormality. Increased large artery stiffness might contribute directly and indirectly (through impairment of baroreflex function) to the higher mortality found in ToF patients.

  18. Evidence for local relaxin ligand-receptor expression and function in arteries.

    PubMed

    Novak, Jacqueline; Parry, Laura J; Matthews, Julianna E; Kerchner, Laurie J; Indovina, Kimberly; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Doty, Ketah D; Debrah, Dan O; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Conrad, Kirk P

    2006-11-01

    Relaxin is a 6 kDa protein hormone produced by the corpus luteum and secreted into the blood during pregnancy in rodents and humans. Growing evidence indicates that circulating relaxin causes vasodilatation and increases in arterial compliance, which may be among its most important actions during pregnancy. Here we investigated whether there is local expression and function of relaxin and relaxin receptor in arteries of nonpregnant females and males. Relaxin-1 and its major receptor, Lgr7, mRNA are expressed in thoracic aortas, small renal and mesenteric arteries from mice and rats of both sexes, as well as in small renal arteries from female tammar wallabies (an Australian marsupial). Using available antibodies for rat and mouse Lgr7 receptor and rat relaxin, we also identified protein expression in arteries. Small renal arteries isolated from relaxin-1 gene-deficient mice demonstrate enhanced myogenic reactivity and decreased passive compliance relative to wild-type (WT) and heterozygous mice. Taken together, these findings reveal an arterial-derived, relaxin ligand-receptor system that acts locally to regulate arterial function.

  19. Shear stress, reactive oxygen species, and arterial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Matlung, Hanke L; Bakker, Erik N T P; VanBavel, Ed

    2009-07-01

    Shear stress is well known to be a key factor in the regulation of small-artery tone and structure. Although nitric oxide is a major endothelium-derived factor involved in short- and long-term regulation of vascular caliber, it is clear that other mechanisms also can be involved. This review discusses the evidence for endothelium-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) as mediators for shear-dependent arterial tone and remodeling. The work focuses on resistance vessels, because their caliber determines local perfusion. However, work on large vessels is included where needed. Attention is given to the shear-stress levels and profiles that exist in the arterial system and the differential effects of steady and oscillating shear on NO and ROS production. We furthermore address the relation between microvascular tone and remodeling and the effect of ROS and inflammation on the activity of remodeling enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases and transglutaminases. We conclude that future work should address the role of H(2)O(2) as an endothelium-derived factor mediating tone and influencing structure of small arteries over the long term.

  20. Influence of central venous pressure upon sinus node responses to arterial baroreflex stimulation in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Takeshita, A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Abboud, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements were made of sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation with phenylephrine injection or neck suction, before and during changes of central venous pressure provoked by lower body negative pressure or leg and lower truck elevation. Variations of central venous pressure between 1.1 and 9.0 mm Hg did not influence arterial baroreflex mediated bradycardia. Baroreflex sinus node responses were augmented by intravenous propranolol, but the level of responses after propranolol was comparable during the control state, lower body negative pressure, and leg and trunk elevation. Sinus node responses to very brief baroreceptor stimuli applied during the transitions of central venous pressure also were comparable in the three states. The authors conclude that physiological variations of central venous pressure do not influence sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation in man.

  1. Development of functional in vivo imaging of cerebral lenticulostriate artery using novel synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Mu, Zhihao; Jiang, Zhen; Lu, Yifan; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    The lenticulostriate artery plays a vital role in the onset and development of cerebral ischemia. However, current imaging techniques cannot assess the in vivo functioning of small arteries such as the lenticulostriate artery in the brain of rats. Here, we report a novel method to achieve a high resolution multi-functional imaging of the cerebrovascular system using synchrotron radiation angiography, which is based on spatio-temporal analysis of contrast density in the arterial cross section. This method provides a unique tool for studying the sub-cortical vascular elasticity after cerebral ischemia in rats. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the vascular elasticity of the lenticulostriate artery decreased from day 1 to day 7 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats and recovered from day 7 to day 28 compared to the controls (p < 0.001), which paralleled with brain edema formation and inversely correlated with blood flow velocity (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the change of vascular elasticity was related to the levels of brain edema and the velocity of focal blood flow, suggesting that reducing brain edema is important for the improvement of the function of the lenticulostriate artery in the ischemic brain.

  2. Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Artery Function in Humans: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Doltra, Adelina; Hartmann, Arthur; Stawowy, Philipp; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kuehne, Titus; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Gebker, Rolf; Schneeweis, Christopher; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Esler, Murray; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Aim To study the effects of RD on renal artery wall function non-invasively using magnetic resonance. Methods and Results 32 patients undergoing RD were included. A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance of the renal arteries was performed before RD and after 6-month. We quantified the vessel sharpness of both renal arteries using a quantitative analysis tool (Soap-Bubble®). In 17 patients we assessed the maximal and minimal cross-sectional area of both arteries, peak velocity, mean flow, and renal artery distensibility. In a subset of patients wall shear stress was assessed with computational flow dynamics. Neither renal artery sharpness nor renal artery distensibility differed significantly. A significant increase in minimal and maximal areas (by 25.3%, p = 0.008, and 24.6%, p = 0.007, respectively), peak velocity (by 16.9%, p = 0.021), and mean flow (by 22.4%, p = 0.007) was observed after RD. Wall shear stress significantly decreased (by 25%, p = 0.029). These effects were observed in blood pressure responders and non-responders. Conclusions RD is not associated with adverse effects at renal artery level, and leads to an increase in cross-sectional areas, velocity and flow and a decrease in wall shear stress. PMID:27003912

  3. Hemodynamic analysis of arterial pressure oscillations in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Julien, C; Zhang, Z Q; Cerutti, C; Barrès, C

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of rhythmic fluctuations of regional blood flow and vascular conductance to the genesis of low- (LF, 0.27-0.74 Hz) and high- (HF, 0.76-5 Hz) frequency oscillations of arterial pressure. In conscious 15-week-old male intact (n = 11), guanethidine-sympathectomized (n = 8) and chronically sinoaortic denervated (n = 7) rats, arterial pressure and regional blood flow velocities (pulsed Doppler probes) were simultaneously recorded. Indices of subdiaphragmatic aortic, hindquarters and superior mesenteric conductances were calculated on a beat-to-beat basis over a 60-min period. Spectral power was calculated in the LF and HF bands using a fast Fourier transform algorithm. Transfer function analysis was also performed to calculate coherence and phase between arterial pressure and regional flows and conductances. In the LF band, spectral power of arterial pressure was decreased by approx. 85% in sympathectomized and approx. 54% in sinoaortic denervated rats. In the HF band, spectral power did not differ between the groups. In the three groups of rats, relations between arterial pressure and blood flow were characterized by a significant coherence in the HF band with little or no phase delay (synchronous oscillations). Relations between arterial pressure and vascular conductance were characterized in intact rats by a significant coherence in the LF band and a phase delay tending to pi radians (opposite oscillations), whereas in both sympathectomized and sinoaortic denervated rats, coherence did not reach significance. It is concluded that LF oscillations of arterial pressure are mostly secondary to rhythmic fluctuations in the vasomotor sympathetic tone in several regional circulations. Part of these oscillations originate from the synchronizing influence of the baroreceptor reflex. The study also suggests that the respiratory (HF) oscillations of arterial pressure involve fluctuations in cardiac output of purely mechanical origin. PMID

  4. Growth hormone (GH) and atherosclerosis: changes in morphology and function of major arteries during GH treatment.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B

    1999-04-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have increased carotid artery intima-media thickness and reduced arterial distensibility. The effect of 2 years of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on these parameters was studied in 11 GH-deficient men (age range, 24-49 years) with hypopituitarism and compared with 12 healthy, age-matched men with no evidence of pituitary or vascular disease. Before treatment the intima-media of the common carotid arteries and the carotid bifurcations were significantly thicker in patients (P < 0.001) than in the control group. Treatment with GH normalized the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery within 6 months and of the carotid bifurcation within 3 months. The changes in intima-media thickness of the carotid artery were negatively correlated with changes in serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I during treatment. There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6, 18 and 24 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). Thus, GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient men reverses early morphological and functional atherosclerotic changes in major arteries, and may reduce rates of vascular morbidity and mortality.

  5. Interaction of semicircular canal stimulation with carotid baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    The carotid-cardiac baroreflex contributes to the prediction of orthostatic tolerance; experimental attenuation of the reflex response leads to orthostatic hypotension in humans and animals. Anecdotal observations indicate that rotational head movements about the vertical axis of the body can also induce orthostatic bradycardia and hypotension through increased parasympathetic activity. We therefore measured the chronotropic response to carotid baroreceptor stimulation in 12 men during varying conditions of vestibulo-oculomotor stimulation to test the hypothesis that stimulation of the semicircular canals associated with head movements in the yaw plane inhibits cardioacceleration through a vagally mediated baroreflex. Carotid-cardiac baroreflex response was assessed by plotting R-R intervals (ms) at each of 8 neck pressure steps with their respective carotid distending pressures (mmHg). Calculated baroreflex gain (maximal slope of the stimulus-response relationship) was measured under 4 experimental conditions: 1) sinusoidal whole-body yaw rotation of the subject in the dark without visual fixation (combined vestibular-oculomotor stimulation); 2) yaw oscillation of the subject while tracking a small head-fixed light moving with the subject (vestibular stimulation without eye movements); 3) subject stationary while fixating on a small light oscillating in yaw at the same frequency, peak acceleration, and velocity as the chair (eye movements without vestibular stimulation); and 4) subject stationary in the dark (no eye or head motion). Head motion alone and with eye movement reduced baseline baroreflex responsiveness to the same stimulus by 30%. Inhibition of cardioacceleration during rotational head movements may have significant impact on functional performance in aerospace environments, particularly in high-performance aircraft pilots during high angular acceleration in aerial combat maneuvers or in astronauts upon return from spaceflight who already have

  6. Age-associated pro-inflammatory remodeling and functional phenotype in the heart and large arteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyi; Shah, Ajay M

    2015-06-01

    The aging population is increasing dramatically. Aging-associated stress simultaneously drives proinflammatory remodeling, involving angiotensin II and other factors, in both the heart and large arteries. The structural remodeling and functional changes that occur with aging include cardiac and vascular wall stiffening, systolic hypertension and suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, features that are often clinically silent and thus termed a silent syndrome. These age-related effects are the result of responses initiated by cardiovascular proinflammatory cells. Local proinflammatory signals are coupled between the heart and arteries due to common mechanical and humoral messengers within a closed circulating system. Thus, targeting proinflammatory signaling molecules would be a promising approach to improve age-associated suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, a major predisposing factor for the pathogenesis of clinical cardiovascular events such as heart failure.

  7. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cranberry juice contains polyphenolic compounds that could improve endothelial function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. The objective was to examine the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. We completed an acute pilot study with no placebo...

  8. Hemodynamics and right-ventricle functional characteristics of a swine carotid artery-jugular vein shunt model of pulmonary arterial hypertension: An 18-month experimental study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Luo, Xiaoju; Huang, Yuanyuan; He, Yun; Li, Zhixian

    2015-10-01

    The continuous changes in pulmonary hemodynamic properties and right ventricular (RV) function in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have not been fully characterized in large animal model of PAH induced by a carotid artery-jugular vein shunt. A minipig model of PAH was induced by a surgical anastomosis between the left common carotid artery and the left jugular vein. The model was validated by catheter examination and pathologic analyses, and the hemodynamic features and right-ventricle functional characteristics of the model were continuously observed by Doppler echocardiography. Of the 45 minipigs who received the surgery, 27 survived and were validated as models of PAH, reflected by mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mmHg, and typical pathologic changes of pulmonary arterial remodeling and RV fibrosis. Non-invasive indices of pulmonary hemodynamics (pulmonary artery accelerating time and its ratio to RV ventricular ejection time) were temporarily increased, then reduced later, similar to changes in tricuspid annular displacement. The Tei index of the RV was elevated, indicating a progressive impairment in RV function. Surgical anastomosis between carotid artery and jugular vein in a minipig is effective to establish PAH, and non-invasive hemodynamic and right-ventricle functional indices measured by Doppler echocardiography may be used as early indicators of PAH. PMID:25595189

  9. Hemodynamics and right-ventricle functional characteristics of a swine carotid artery-jugular vein shunt model of pulmonary arterial hypertension: An 18-month experimental study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Luo, Xiaoju; Huang, Yuanyuan; He, Yun; Li, Zhixian

    2015-10-01

    The continuous changes in pulmonary hemodynamic properties and right ventricular (RV) function in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have not been fully characterized in large animal model of PAH induced by a carotid artery-jugular vein shunt. A minipig model of PAH was induced by a surgical anastomosis between the left common carotid artery and the left jugular vein. The model was validated by catheter examination and pathologic analyses, and the hemodynamic features and right-ventricle functional characteristics of the model were continuously observed by Doppler echocardiography. Of the 45 minipigs who received the surgery, 27 survived and were validated as models of PAH, reflected by mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mmHg, and typical pathologic changes of pulmonary arterial remodeling and RV fibrosis. Non-invasive indices of pulmonary hemodynamics (pulmonary artery accelerating time and its ratio to RV ventricular ejection time) were temporarily increased, then reduced later, similar to changes in tricuspid annular displacement. The Tei index of the RV was elevated, indicating a progressive impairment in RV function. Surgical anastomosis between carotid artery and jugular vein in a minipig is effective to establish PAH, and non-invasive hemodynamic and right-ventricle functional indices measured by Doppler echocardiography may be used as early indicators of PAH.

  10. Tetrahydrobiopterin improves endothelial function and decreases arterial stiffness in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Meditz, Amie; Deane, Kevin D.; Kohrt, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms mediating arterial stiffening with aging and menopause are not completely understood. We determined whether administration of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a critical cofactor for endothelial nitric oxide synthase to produce nitric oxide, would increase vascular endothelial-dependent vasodilatory tone and decrease arterial stiffness in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women. Additionally, we examined whether the beneficial effects of estrogen on vascular function were possibly related to BH4. Arterial stiffness (carotid artery compliance) and endothelial-dependent vasodilation [brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD)] were measured in postmenopausal (n = 24; 57 ± 1 yr, mean ± SE) and eumenorrheic premenopausal (n = 9; 33 ± 2 yr) women before and 3 h after the oral administration of BH4. Subsequently, in postmenopausal women, vascular testing (before and after BH4) was repeated following randomization to either 2 days of transdermal estradiol or placebo. Baseline carotid artery compliance and brachial artery FMD were lower in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women (P < 0.0001). BH4 administration increased carotid artery compliance (0.61 ± 0.05 to 0.73 ± 0.04 mm2·mmHg−1·10−1 vs. baseline, P < 0.0001) and brachial artery FMD (P < 0.001) in postmenopausal women but had no effect in premenopausal women (P = 0.62). Carotid artery compliance (0.59 ± 0.05 to 0.78 ± 0.06 mm2·mmHg−1·10−1, P < 0.001) and FMD increased in postmenopausal women in response to estradiol (P = 0.02) but were not further improved with the coadministration of BH4, possibly because estrogen increased BH4 bioavailability. Carotid artery compliance and FMD increased with BH4 in the placebo group (P = 0.02). Although speculative, these results suggest that reduced vascular BH4 may be an important contributor to arterial stiffening in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women, related in part to reduced endothelial-dependent vasodilatory tone. PMID:22245769

  11. Differential effect of central command on aortic and carotid sinus baroreceptor-heart rate reflexes at the onset of spontaneous, fictive motor activity.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Kadowaki, Akito; Liang, Nan; Ishida, Tomoko

    2012-08-15

    Our laboratory has reported that central command blunts the sensitivity of the aortic baroreceptor-heart rate (HR) reflex at the onset of voluntary static exercise in conscious cats and spontaneous contraction in decerebrate cats. The purpose of this study was to examine whether central command attenuates the sensitivity of the carotid sinus baroreceptor-HR reflex at the onset of spontaneous, fictive motor activity in paralyzed, decerebrate cats. We confirmed that aortic nerve (AN)-stimulation-induced bradycardia was markedly blunted to 26 ± 4.4% of the control (21 ± 1.3 beats/min) at the onset of spontaneous motor activity. Although the baroreflex bradycardia by electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve (CSN) was suppressed (P < 0.05) to 86 ± 5.6% of the control (38 ± 1.2 beats/min), the inhibitory effect of spontaneous motor activity was much weaker (P < 0.05) with CSN stimulation than with AN stimulation. The baroreflex bradycardia elicited by brief occlusion of the abdominal aorta was blunted to 36% of the control (36 ± 1.6 beats/min) during spontaneous motor activity, suggesting that central command is able to inhibit the cardiomotor sensitivity of arterial baroreflexes as the net effect. Mechanical stretch of the triceps surae muscle never affected the baroreflex bradycardia elicited by AN or CSN stimulation and by aortic occlusion, suggesting that muscle mechanoreflex did not modify the cardiomotor sensitivity of aortic and carotid sinus baroreflex. Since the inhibitory effect of central command on the carotid baroreflex pathway, associated with spontaneous motor activity, was much weaker compared with the aortic baroreflex pathway, it is concluded that central command does not force a generalized modulation on the whole pathways of arterial baroreflexes but provides selective inhibition for the cardiomotor component of the aortic baroreflex.

  12. Protocadherin-12 deficiency leads to modifications in the structure and function of arteries in mice.

    PubMed

    Philibert, C; Bouillot, S; Huber, P; Faury, G

    2012-02-01

    We studied the role of protocadherin-12 on arterial function. This protein belongs to the cadherin superfamily and is located at the intercellular junctions of endothelial cells where it promotes homotypic cellular adhesion. We previously showed that mice deficient for PCDH12 exhibited developmental growth retardation owing to placenta defects without altering neither survival nor fertility. Here, we investigated the effects of PCDH12 deficiency on the structural, mechanical properties and functionality of arteries from adult mice. Histological studies of the PCDH12(-/-) mouse arteries have shown age-independent modifications such as ramifications of medial elastic lamellae, accompanied by the appearance of radial fibers linking together two successive concentric elastic lamellae. Mechanical studies also revealed some age-independent modifications in the PCDH12(-/-) mice arteries such as an increase in inner-diameter and circumferential mid-wall stress. Moreover, the PCDH12(-/-) mice exhibited a mild reduction of blood pressure, thus maintaining the inner-diameter close to its normal value and a normal circumferential wall stress for vascular cells. This is likely a compensation mechanism enabling normal blood flow in the arteries. The vascular phenotypic differences observed between PCDH12(-/-) and wild type mice arteries did not seem to be age-dependent, except for some results regarding the carotid artery: the reactivity to acetylcholine and the circumferential mid-wall stress decreased with ageing in the PCDH12(-/-) mice, as opposed to the increase observed in the wild types. In conclusion, deficiency in one specific interendothelial junction component leads to significant changes in the structure and function of the vascular wall. Possible explanations for the observed modifications are discussed.

  13. Chronic Interactions Between Carotid Baroreceptors and Chemoreceptors in Obesity Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Cazan, Radu; Cates, Adam W; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Irwin, Eric D

    2016-07-01

    Carotid bodies play a critical role in protecting against hypoxemia, and their activation increases sympathetic activity, arterial pressure, and ventilation, responses opposed by acute stimulation of the baroreflex. Although chemoreceptor hypersensitivity is associated with sympathetically mediated hypertension, the mechanisms involved and their significance in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain unclear. We investigated the chronic interactions of these reflexes in dogs with sympathetically mediated, obesity-induced hypertension based on the hypothesis that hypoxemia and tonic activation of carotid chemoreceptors may be associated with obesity. After 5 weeks on a high-fat diet, the animals experienced a 35% to 40% weight gain and increases in arterial pressure from 106±3 to 123±3 mm Hg and respiratory rate from 8±1 to 12±1 breaths/min along with hypoxemia (arterial partial pressure of oxygen=81±3 mm Hg) but eucapnia. During 7 days of carotid baroreflex activation by electric stimulation of the carotid sinus, tachypnea was attenuated, and hypertension was abolished before these variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. After subsequent denervation of the carotid sinus region, respiratory rate decreased transiently in association with further sustained reductions in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (to 65±2 mm Hg) and substantial hypercapnia. Moreover, the severity of hypertension was attenuated from 125±2 to 116±3 mm Hg (45%-50% reduction). These findings suggest that hypoxemia may account for sustained stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors in obesity and that this activation leads to compensatory increases in ventilation and central sympathetic outflow that contributes to neurogenically mediated hypertension. Furthermore, the excitatory effects of chemoreceptor hyperactivity are abolished by chronic activation of the carotid baroreflex. PMID:27160198

  14. Radionuclide renography predicts functional changes in patients with renal artery involvement by Takayasu's arteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Cuocolo, A.; McCarthy, K.E.; Sandrock, D.; Miller, D.L.; Neumann, R.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension is a major complication of Takayasu's arteritis, which contributes to the high mortality associated with the disease. We studied 5 patients affected by different degrees of Takayasu's arteritis to assess the usefulness of radionuclide renography in evaluating renal perfusion and function, and to predict changes induced by the disease before and after therapeutic interventions. Computer-assisted dynamic renal imaging with Tc-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DPTA) and I-131 orthoiodohippurate (OIH), and renal arteriography were concurrently performed in all patients. Two patients with hemodynamically insignificant renal artery stenosis showed normal perfusion and function by renography. Three patients had significant renal artery stenosis and functional changes on renography. Subsequently, two of these patients had successful therapy (one had bilateral renal artery bypass grafts, and the other had renal artery angioplasty), and both showed functional improvement at renography. Our results demonstrate that radionuclide renography is valuable in the assessment of functional changes induced by Takayasu's arteritis as well as for determining the response to therapeutic interventions.

  15. Oral trehalose supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Hill, Sierra D.; Bispham, Nina Z.; Santos-Parker, Jessica R.; Nowlan, Molly J.; Snyder, Laura L.; Chonchol, Michel; LaRocca, Thomas J.; McQueen, Matthew B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation with trehalose, a disaccharide that reverses arterial aging in mice, would improve vascular function in middle-aged and older (MA/O) men and women. Thirty-two healthy adults aged 50-77 years consumed 100 g/day of trehalose (n=15) or maltose (n=17, isocaloric control) for 12 weeks (randomized, double-blind). In subjects with Δbody mass<2.3kg (5 lb.), resistance artery endothelial function, assessed by forearm blood flow to brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (FBFACh), increased ∼30% with trehalose (13.3±1.0 vs. 10.5±1.1 AUC, P=0.02), but not maltose (P=0.40). This improvement in FBFACh was abolished when endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production was inhibited. Endothelium-independent dilation, assessed by FBF to sodium nitroprusside (FBFSNP), also increased ∼30% with trehalose (155±13 vs. 116±12 AUC, P=0.03) but not maltose (P=0.92). Changes in FBFACh and FBFSNP with trehalose were not significant when subjects with Δbody mass≥2.3kg were included. Trehalose supplementation had no effect on conduit artery endothelial function, large elastic artery stiffness or circulating markers of oxidative stress or inflammation (all P>0.1) independent of changes in body weight. Our findings demonstrate that oral trehalose improves resistance artery (microvascular) function, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in MA/O adults, possibly through increasing NO bioavailability and smooth muscle sensitivity to NO. PMID:27208415

  16. Oral trehalose supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Kaplon, Rachelle E; Hill, Sierra D; Bispham, Nina Z; Santos-Parker, Jessica R; Nowlan, Molly J; Snyder, Laura L; Chonchol, Michel; LaRocca, Thomas J; McQueen, Matthew B; Seals, Douglas R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation with trehalose, a disaccharide that reverses arterial aging in mice, would improve vascular function in middle-aged and older (MA/O) men and women. Thirty-two healthy adults aged 50-77 years consumed 100 g/day of trehalose (n=15) or maltose (n=17, isocaloric control) for 12 weeks (randomized, double-blind). In subjects with Δbody mass less than 2.3kg (5 lb.), resistance artery endothelial function, assessed by forearm blood flow to brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (FBFACh), increased ~30% with trehalose (13.3±1.0 vs. 10.5±1.1 AUC, P=0.02), but not maltose (P=0.40). This improvement in FBFACh was abolished when endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production was inhibited. Endothelium-independent dilation, assessed by FBF to sodium nitroprusside (FBFSNP), also increased ~30% with trehalose (155±13 vs. 116±12 AUC, P=0.03) but not maltose (P=0.92). Changes in FBFACh and FBFSNP with trehalose were not significant when subjects with Δbody mass ≥ 2.3kg were included. Trehalose supplementation had no effect on conduit artery endothelial function, large elastic artery stiffness or circulating markers of oxidative stress or inflammation (all P>0.1) independent of changes in body weight. Our findings demonstrate that oral trehalose improves resistance artery (microvascular) function, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in MA/O adults, possibly through increasing NO bioavailability and smooth muscle sensitivity to NO. PMID:27208415

  17. Association of Hypertension With Erectile Function in Chronic Peripheral Arterial Insufficiency Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spessoto, Luis Cesar Fava; Facio, Fernando Nestor; de Arruda, Jose Germano Ferraz; Arruda, Pedro Francisco F.; Gatti, Marcio; Antoniassi, Thiago Silveira; Facio, Maria Fernanda Warick; de Godoy, Jose Maria Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk factors may influence the improvement or worsening of erectile dysfunction (ED). The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of systemic hypertension on ED in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Methods The effect of hypertension on ED was assessed in 125 consecutive patients in a cross-sectional quantitative study. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 88 years old (mean: 59.82 ± 10.48 years). The only exclusion criterion was the amputation of one or both legs. The ankle-arm index was assessed and the international index of ED questionnaire was applied to all participants in the study. Results Of the 125 patients, 22 (17.6%) had mild (grade 1), 50 (40.0%) had moderate (grade 2) and 53 (42.4%) had severe (grade 3) ED. Hypertensive patients have more ED, with ED in hypertensive patients being associated to chronic arterial disease. However, in comparison with normotensive patients, hypertension exerts an immediate protective effect on erectile function. Conclusions In conclusion, although erectile function is initially protected by systemic arterial hypertension in patients with chronic arterial disease, both chronic arterial disease and ED deteriorate over the long term in hypertensive patients. PMID:27429678

  18. Hemodynamics and right-ventricle functional characteristics of a swine carotid artery-jugular vein shunt model of pulmonary arterial hypertension: An 18-month experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaoju; Huang, Yuanyuan; He, Yun; Li, Zhixian

    2015-01-01

    The continuous changes in pulmonary hemodynamic properties and right ventricular (RV) function in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have not been fully characterized in large animal model of PAH induced by a carotid artery–jugular vein shunt. A minipig model of PAH was induced by a surgical anastomosis between the left common carotid artery and the left jugular vein. The model was validated by catheter examination and pathologic analyses, and the hemodynamic features and right-ventricle functional characteristics of the model were continuously observed by Doppler echocardiography. Of the 45 minipigs who received the surgery, 27 survived and were validated as models of PAH, reflected by mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mmHg, and typical pathologic changes of pulmonary arterial remodeling and RV fibrosis. Non-invasive indices of pulmonary hemodynamics (pulmonary artery accelerating time and its ratio to RV ventricular ejection time) were temporarily increased, then reduced later, similar to changes in tricuspid annular displacement. The Tei index of the RV was elevated, indicating a progressive impairment in RV function. Surgical anastomosis between carotid artery and jugular vein in a minipig is effective to establish PAH, and non-invasive hemodynamic and right-ventricle functional indices measured by Doppler echocardiography may be used as early indicators of PAH. PMID:25595189

  19. [Functional alterations of the arterial vessels in experimental models of type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Boleeva, G S; Mochalov, S V; Tarasova, O S

    2014-01-01

    The review analyzws the literature on the pathological alterations of endothelium, smooth muscle and vasomotor innervation of arterial vessels in animal modes of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Particular attention is paid t the analysis of mechanisms of diabetic abnormalities in the light of modern knowledge on the functioning of the main components of the vascular wall. PMID:25707261

  20. Correlation of CT cerebral vascular territories with function. 3. Middle cerebral artery

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.A.; Hayman, L.A.; Hinck, V.C.

    1984-05-01

    Schematic displays are presented of the cerebral territories supplied by branches of the middle cerebral artery as they would appear on axial and coronal computed tomographic (CT) scan sections. Companion diagrams of regional cortical function and a discussion of the fiber tracts are provided to simplify correlation of clinical deficits with coronal and axial CT abnormalities.

  1. The effects of quinapril and atorvastatin on artery structure and function in adult spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lufang; Gao, Yu-Jing; Lee, Robert M K W

    2005-08-22

    We studied the combined treatment effects of quinapril and atorvastatin on blood pressure and structure and function of resistance arteries from adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY rats). Apoptotic cells were identified by in situ end labeling using the terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. Vascular structure was measured using a morphometric protocol and confocal microscopy and a pressurized artery system was used to study vascular functions. We found that a combined treatment with quinapril and atorvastatin lowered systolic blood pressure in both adult SHR and WKY rats and decreased medial thickness and volume and the number of smooth muscle cell layers in mesenteric arteries, as well as media-to-lumen ratio in the interlobular arteries from SHR but not in those from WKY rats. The number of apoptotic smooth muscle cells was higher in the mesenteric arteries from control WKY rats than control SHR and treatment increased the number of apoptotic smooth muscle cells in the arteries from both SHR and WKY rats. Treatment with quinapril and atorvastatin reduced ventricular weight in SHR and normalized the augmented contractile responses to norepinephrine but did not alter the contraction to electric field stimulation. Relaxation responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were not affected by the treatment. We conclude that a combined treatment with quinapril and atorvastatin lowered blood pressure and improved cardiac and vessel hypertrophy and vessel function. An increase in apoptotic smooth muscle cells may be one of the mechanisms underlying the structural improvement.

  2. Effect of age on left ventricular function during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hakki, A.H.; DePace, N.L.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of age on left ventricular performance during exercise in 79 patients with coronary artery disease (greater than or equal to 50% narrowing of one or more major coronary arteries). Fifty patients under the age of 60 years (group I) and 29 patients 60 years or older (group II) were studied. Radionuclide angiograms were obtained at rest and during symptom-limited upright bicycle exercise. The history of hypertension, angina or Q wave myocardial infarction was similar in both groups. Multivessel coronary artery disease was present in 30 patients (60%) in group I and in 19 patients (66%) in group II (p . not significant). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the hemodynamic variables (at rest or during exercise) of left ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and cardiac index. Exercise tolerance was higher in group I than in group II (7.8 +/- 0.4 versus 5.7 +/- 0.4 minutes, p . 0.009), although the exercise heart rate and rate-pressure product were not significantly different between the groups. There was poor correlation between age and ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume at rest and during exercise. Abnormal left ventricular function at rest or an abnormal response to exercise was noted in 42 patients (84%) in group I and in 25 patients (86%) in group II (p . not significant). Thus, in patients with coronary artery disease, age does not influence left ventricular function at rest or response to exercise. Older patients with coronary artery disease show changes in left ventricular function similar to those in younger patients with corresponding severity of coronary artery disease.

  3. Device for rapid quantification of human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses.

    PubMed

    Sprenkle, J M; Eckberg, D L; Goble, R L; Schelhorn, J J; Halliday, H C

    1986-02-01

    We designed, constructed, and evaluated a new device to characterize the human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex response relation rapidly. We designed this system for study of reflex responses of astronauts before, during, and after space travel. The system comprises a new tightly sealing silicone rubber neck chamber, a stepping motor-driven electro-deposited nickel bellows pressure system, capable of delivering sequential R-wave-triggered neck chamber pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg, and a microprocessor-based electronics system for control of pressure steps and analysis and display of responses. This new system provokes classic sigmoid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses with threshold, linear, and saturation ranges in most human volunteers during one held expiration.

  4. Effect of posture on arterial baroreflex control of heart rate in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. H.; Rittenhouse, D.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of blood-volume redistribution induced by postural changes on baroreflex activity are investigated. The central blood volume and baroreceptor functions of ten males between 23-51 years old were examined while they were in the head-up tilt (HUT), head-down tilt (HDT), and supine positions. It is observed that during HDT at 15 deg the pulse interval over the first five cardiac cycles following neck suction onset is 51 + or - 18 ms longer, at 30 deg it is 61 + or - 20 ms longer, and at 45 deg it is 74 + or - 35 ms longer than at supine; during HUT at 15 deg the pulse interval is 25 + or - 9 ms shorter than when supine, but for the 30 and 45 deg there is no significant difference in pulse interval detected. The data reveal that posture does modify arterial baroreflex control of heart rate.

  5. Modification of sympathetic neuronal function in the rat tail artery by dietary lipid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, R.L.; Dixon, W.R.; Rutledge, C.O.

    1985-06-01

    The effect of dietary lipid treatment on sympathetic neuronal function was examined in isolated perfused tail arteries of adult rats. The hypothesis that dietary manipulations alter the lipid environment of receptor proteins which may result in the perturbation of specific membrane-associated processes that regulate peripheral adrenergic neurotransmission in the vasculature was the basis for this investigation. In the present study, rats were fed semisynthetic diets enriched in either 16% coconut oil (saturated fat) or 16% sunflower oil (unsaturated fat). The field stimulation-evoked release of endogenous norepinephrine and total /sup 3/H was decreased significantly in rats receiving the coconut oil diet when compared to either sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Norepinephrine content in artery segments from coconut oil-treated rats was significantly higher compared to either sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Tail arteries from rats receiving the coconut oil diet displayed significantly lower perfusion pressure responses to nerve stimulation at all frequencies tested when compared to the sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Vasoconstrictor responses of perfused tail arteries exposed to exogenous norepinephrine resulted in an EC50 for norepinephrine that was not changed by the dietary treatment, but adult rats receiving the sunflower oil diet displayed a significantly greater maximum response to exogenous norepinephrine (10(-5) M) compared to arteries from either coconut oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats.

  6. Functional assessment of sequential coronary artery fistula and coronary artery stenosis with fractional flow reserve and stress adenosine myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Yew, Kuan Leong; Ooi, Poh Siang; Law, Chiong Soon

    2015-10-01

    Coronary artery fistula is an abnormal connection between one coronary artery to another coronary artery or cardiac chambers. The coronary artery fistula may cause significant shunting of blood and cause "pseudo-stenosis" or "steal phenomenon". This will also accentuate pre-existing mild-moderate de novo coronary lesions with resultant greater pressure gradient difference across the lesions. Thus, fractional flow reserve can be a useful tool to guide intervention decision on the coronary artery fistula. There are very few published reports regarding the use of FFR to assess coronary artery fistula. In fact, there is no outcome data regarding the deferment of coronary artery fistula intervention when the FFR is not physiologically significant. This case highlighted the use of FFR to evaluate the functional significance of coronary fistula in the setting of ischemia evaluation and it was proven to be safe to defer intervention with good 3 year clinical outcome. Stress adenosine myocardial perfusion imaging correlated with the FFR result.

  7. Effect of electron radiation on vasomotor function of the left anterior descending coronary artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Billings, Paul C.; Wilson, Jolaine M.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Laughlin, Maurice H.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    The left anterior descending (LAD, interventricular) coronary artery provides the blood supply to the mid-region of the heart and is a major site of vessel stenosis. Changes in LAD function can have major effects on heart function. In this report, we examined the effect of electron simulated solar particle event (eSPE) radiation on LAD function in a porcine animal model. Vasodilatory responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 10-9-10-4 M), bradykinin (BK; 10-11-10-6 M), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 10-10-10-4 M) were assessed. The LAD arteries from Control (non-irradiated) and the eSPE (irradiated) animals were isolated and exhibited a similar relaxation response following treatment with either ADP or SNP. In contrast, a significantly reduced relaxation response to BK treatment was observed in the eSPE irradiated group, compared to the control group. These data demonstrate that simulated SPE radiation exposure alters LAD function.

  8. Automated Determination of Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI from Regions around Arteries Using Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jui-Jen; Chang, Chin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement using dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) MRI requires accurate estimation of the arterial input function (AIF). The present work utilized the independent component analysis (ICA) method to determine the AIF in the regions adjacent to the middle cerebral artery (MCA) by the alleviated confounding of partial volume effect. Materials and Methods. A series of spin-echo EPI MR scans were performed in 10 normal subjects. All subjects received 0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA contrast agent. AIFs were calculated by two methods: (1) the region of interest (ROI) selected manually and (2) weighted average of each component selected by ICA (weighted-ICA). The singular value decomposition (SVD) method was then employed to deconvolve the AIF from the tissue concentration time curve to obtain quantitative CBF values. Results. The CBF values calculated by the weighted-ICA method were 41.1 ± 4.9 and 22.1 ± 2.3 mL/100 g/min for cortical gray matter (GM) and deep white matter (WM) regions, respectively. The CBF values obtained based on the manual ROIs were 53.6 ± 12.0 and 27.9 ± 5.9 mL/100 g/min for the same two regions, respectively. Conclusion. The weighted-ICA method allowed semiautomatic and straightforward extraction of the ROI adjacent to MCA. Through eliminating the partial volume effect to minimum, the CBF thus determined may reflect more accurate physical characteristics of the T2⁎ signal changes induced by the contrast agent. PMID:27547451

  9. Assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness are reproducible in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Seigler, Nichole; Bass, Leon; Dillard, Thomas A; Harris, Ryan A

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated cardiovascular disease risk is observed in patients with COPD. Non-invasive assessments of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness have recently emerged to provide mechanistic insight into cardiovascular disease risk in COPD; however, the reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness has yet to be investigated in this patient population. Objectives This study sought to examine the within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. Methods Baseline diameter, peak diameter, flow-mediated dilation, augmentation index, augmentation index at 75 beats per minute, and pulse wave velocity were assessed three times in 17 patients with COPD (six males, eleven females, age range 47–75 years old; forced expiratory volume in 1 second =51.5% predicted). Session A and B were separated by 3 hours (within-day), whereas session C was conducted at least 7 days following session B (between-day). Reproducibility was assessed by: 1) paired t-tests, 2) coefficients of variation, 3) coefficients of variation prime, 4) intra-class correlation coefficient, 5) Pearson’s correlations (r), and 6) Bland–Altman plots. Five acceptable assessments were required to confirm reproducibility. Results Six out of six within-day criteria were met for endothelial function and arterial stiffness outcomes. Six out of six between-day criteria were met for baseline and peak diameter, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity, whereas five out of six criteria were met for flow-mediated dilation. Conclusion The present study provides evidence for within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. PMID:26396509

  10. Serial assessment of arterial structure and function in patients with coarctation of the aorta undergoing stenting.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Carlos A; Assef, Jorge E; Pedra, Simone R F F; Ferreira, Waldinai P; Davoglio, Tathiane A; Petisco, Ana Cláudia G P; Saleh, Mohamed H; Le Bihan, David C S; Barretto, Rodrigo B M; Pedra, Carlos A C

    2016-05-01

    Stenting for CoA has become an acceptable treatment modality in the last 20 years. However little is known about arterial changes after this procedure. To assess arterial structure and function including peripheral reactivity and stiffness and intima-media thickness (IMT) pre and post stenting for coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Twenty-one patients [median age: 15 years (8-39)] were studied at baseline, 1 day, 6 months and 1 year after stenting. Twenty-one healthy subjects (1:1 matched) were used as controls. Left ventricular (LV) mass, ejection fraction, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and nitrate-mediated dilation (NMD) of left brachial artery, common carotid (CC) and right subclavian artery (RSCA) IMT and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were assessed by echocardiography and vascular ultrasound. CoA patients had higher LV indexed mass (p < 0.0001), impaired FMD (p < 0.0001) and NMD (p < 0.0001), increased PWV (p < 0.0001), carotid and RSCA IMT (both p < 0.0001). All procedures were successful and resulted in significant gradient reduction (p < 0.001). One year after stenting there was improvement in LV function (p = 0.034) and although there was significant reduction of LV mass (103.29 ± 24.77 vs. 74.39 ± 22.07 g/m(2), p < 0.0001) values did not normalize. There was no significant change in FMD, NMD, PWV and CC or RSCA IMT. In patients with CoA, arterial reactivity is impaired and LV mass, arterial stiffness and thickness are increased. Although stenting is successful to relieve the obstruction resulting in better LV function and mass reduction, arterial structure and function remains abnormal after 1 year of follow-up.

  11. Serial assessment of arterial structure and function in patients with coarctation of the aorta undergoing stenting.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Carlos A; Assef, Jorge E; Pedra, Simone R F F; Ferreira, Waldinai P; Davoglio, Tathiane A; Petisco, Ana Cláudia G P; Saleh, Mohamed H; Le Bihan, David C S; Barretto, Rodrigo B M; Pedra, Carlos A C

    2016-05-01

    Stenting for CoA has become an acceptable treatment modality in the last 20 years. However little is known about arterial changes after this procedure. To assess arterial structure and function including peripheral reactivity and stiffness and intima-media thickness (IMT) pre and post stenting for coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Twenty-one patients [median age: 15 years (8-39)] were studied at baseline, 1 day, 6 months and 1 year after stenting. Twenty-one healthy subjects (1:1 matched) were used as controls. Left ventricular (LV) mass, ejection fraction, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and nitrate-mediated dilation (NMD) of left brachial artery, common carotid (CC) and right subclavian artery (RSCA) IMT and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were assessed by echocardiography and vascular ultrasound. CoA patients had higher LV indexed mass (p < 0.0001), impaired FMD (p < 0.0001) and NMD (p < 0.0001), increased PWV (p < 0.0001), carotid and RSCA IMT (both p < 0.0001). All procedures were successful and resulted in significant gradient reduction (p < 0.001). One year after stenting there was improvement in LV function (p = 0.034) and although there was significant reduction of LV mass (103.29 ± 24.77 vs. 74.39 ± 22.07 g/m(2), p < 0.0001) values did not normalize. There was no significant change in FMD, NMD, PWV and CC or RSCA IMT. In patients with CoA, arterial reactivity is impaired and LV mass, arterial stiffness and thickness are increased. Although stenting is successful to relieve the obstruction resulting in better LV function and mass reduction, arterial structure and function remains abnormal after 1 year of follow-up. PMID:26723574

  12. Impaired inhibitory function of presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Arribas, Silvia Magdalena; Fresco, Paula; González, Maria Carmen; Gonçalves, Jorge; Diniz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    In hypertension, vascular reactivity alterations have been attributed to numerous factors, including higher sympathetic innervation/adenosine. This study examined the modulation of adenosine receptors on vascular sympathetic nerves and their putative contribution to higher noradrenaline spillover in hypertension. We assessed adenosine receptors distribution in the adventitia through confocal microscopy, histomorphometry, and their regulatory function on electrically-evoked [(3)H]-noradrenaline overflow, using selective agonists/antagonists. We found that: i) A1-adenosine receptor agonist (CPA: 100 nM) inhibited tritium overflow to a lower extent in SHR (25% ± 3%, n = 14) compared to WKY (38% ± 3%, n = 14) mesenteric arteries; ii) A2A-adenosine receptor agonist (CGS 21680: 100 nM) induced a slight increase of tritium overflow that was similar in SHR (22% ± 8%, n = 8) and WKY (24% ± 5%, n = 8) mesenteric arteries; iii) A2B- and A3-adenosine receptors did not alter tritium overflow in either strain; iv) all adenosine receptors were present on mesenteric artery sympathetic nerves and/or some adventitial cells of both strains; and v) A1-adenosine receptor staining fractional area was lower in SHR than in WKY mesenteric arteries. We conclude that there is an impaired inhibitory function of vascular presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR, likely related to a reduced presence of these receptors on sympathetic innervation, which might lead to higher levels of noradrenaline in the synaptic cleft and contribute to hypertension in this strain.

  13. Impact of splenic artery ligation after major hepatectomy on liver function, regeneration and viability

    PubMed Central

    Carrapita, Jorge; Abrantes, Ana Margarida; Campelos, Sofia; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Cardoso, Dulce; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela; Rocha, Clara; Santos, Jorge Nunes; Botelho, Maria Filomena; Tralhão, José Guilherme; Farges, Olivier; Barbosa, Jorge Maciel

    2016-01-01

    It was reported that prevention of acute portal overpressure in small-for-size livers by inflow modulation results in a better postoperative outcome. The aim is to investigate the impact of portal blood flow reduction by splenic artery ligation after major hepatectomy in a murine model. Forty-eight rats were subjected to an 85% hepatectomy or 85% hepatectomy and splenic artery ligation. Both groups were evaluated at 24, 48, 72 and 120 post-operative hours: liver function, regeneration and viability. All methods and experiments were carried out in accordance with Coimbra University guidelines. Splenic artery ligation produces viability increase after 24 h, induces a relative decrease in oxidative stress during the first 48 hours, allows antioxidant capacity increment after 24 h, which is reflected in a decrease of half-time normalized liver curve at 48 h and at 72 h and in an increase of mitotic index between 48 h and 72 h. Splenic artery ligation combined with 85% hepatectomy in a murine model, allows portal inflow modulation, promoting an increase in hepatocellular viability and regeneration, without impairing the function, probably by inducing a less marked elevation of oxidative stress at first 48 hours. PMID:27725728

  14. Exercise interventions and peripheral arterial function: implications for cardio-metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Shane A; Mahmoud, Abeer M; Brown, Michael D; Haus, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for the development of obesity and other cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD). Vascular endothelial dysfunction is a key event in the development of CVD and is associated with a sedentary lifestyle in otherwise healthy adults. In addition, vascular endothelial dysfunction may be exacerbated in sedentary individuals who are obese and insulin resistant, since excess body fat is associated with elevated levels of pro-atherogenic inflammatory adipokines and cytokines that reduce the nitric oxide (NO) and other upstream paracrine signaling substances which reduces vascular health. Since blood flow-related shear stress is a major stimulus to NO release from the endothelium, disturbed flow or low shear stress is the likely mechanism by which vascular endothelial function is altered with inactivity. Evidence shows that regular physical exercise has beneficial effects on CVD and the risk factors that promote peripheral arterial function and health. Both aerobic and resistance exercise training are generally believed to improve endothelial function and are commonly recommended for CV health, including the management of obesity, hypertension, and insulin resistance. However, many factors including age, disease status, and race appear to influence these outcomes. Although evidence supporting the health benefits of exercise is compelling, the optimum prescription (volume and intensity) and the exact mechanism underlying the effects of exercise training on arterial function and cardiometabolic risk has yet to be identified. The focus of this review will be on the evidence supporting exercise interventions for peripheral arterial function. PMID:25529367

  15. Exercise interventions and peripheral arterial function: implications for cardio-metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Shane A; Mahmoud, Abeer M; Brown, Michael D; Haus, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for the development of obesity and other cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD). Vascular endothelial dysfunction is a key event in the development of CVD and is associated with a sedentary lifestyle in otherwise healthy adults. In addition, vascular endothelial dysfunction may be exacerbated in sedentary individuals who are obese and insulin resistant, since excess body fat is associated with elevated levels of pro-atherogenic inflammatory adipokines and cytokines that reduce the nitric oxide (NO) and other upstream paracrine signaling substances which reduces vascular health. Since blood flow-related shear stress is a major stimulus to NO release from the endothelium, disturbed flow or low shear stress is the likely mechanism by which vascular endothelial function is altered with inactivity. Evidence shows that regular physical exercise has beneficial effects on CVD and the risk factors that promote peripheral arterial function and health. Both aerobic and resistance exercise training are generally believed to improve endothelial function and are commonly recommended for CV health, including the management of obesity, hypertension, and insulin resistance. However, many factors including age, disease status, and race appear to influence these outcomes. Although evidence supporting the health benefits of exercise is compelling, the optimum prescription (volume and intensity) and the exact mechanism underlying the effects of exercise training on arterial function and cardiometabolic risk has yet to be identified. The focus of this review will be on the evidence supporting exercise interventions for peripheral arterial function.

  16. The biomechanical function of arterial elastin in solutes.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu; Zhang, Yanhang

    2012-07-01

    Elastin is essential to accommodate physiological deformation and provide elastic support for blood vessels. As a long-lived extracellular matrix protein, elastin can suffer from cumulative effects of exposure to chemical damage, which greatly compromises the mechanical function of elastin. The mechanical properties of elastin are closely related to its microstructure and the external chemical environments. The purpose of this study is to investigate the changes in the macroscopic elastic and viscoelastic properties of isolated porcine aortic elastin under the effects of nonenzymatic mediated in vitro elastin-lipid interactions and glycation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used for elastin-lipid interaction, while glucose was used for glycation of elastin. Elastin samples were incubated in SDS (20 mM) or glucose (2 M) solutions and were allowed to equilibrate for 48 h at room temperature. Control experiments were performed in 1  ×  Phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Biaxial tensile and stress relaxation experiments were performed to study the mechanical behavior of elastin with solute effects. Experimental results reveal that both the elastic and viscoelastic behaviors of elastin change in different biochemical solvents environments. The tangent stiffness of SDS treated elastin decreases to 63.57 ± 4.7% of the control condition in circumference and to 58.43 ± 2.65% in the longitude. Glucose treated elastin exhibits an increase in stiffness to 145.06 ± 1.48% of the control condition in the longitude but remains similar mechanical response in the circumferential direction. During stress relaxation experiments with a holding period of half an hour, elastin treated with SDS or glucose shows more prominent stress relaxation than the untreated ones.

  17. Impact of excess body weight on arterial structure, function, and blood pressure in firefighters.

    PubMed

    Fahs, Christopher A; Smith, Denise L; Horn, Gavin P; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Rossow, Lindy M; Echols, George; Heffernan, Kevin S; Fernhall, Bo

    2009-11-15

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among firefighters. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of excess body weight on arterial structure and function and blood pressure (BP) in relatively young, apparently healthy, firefighters. The body mass index, brachial BP, carotid BP, aortic BP, radial augmentation index, central pulse wave velocity, forearm blood flow, forearm vasodilatory capacity, carotid arterial compliance, carotid intima-media thickness, and brachial flow-mediated dilation were assessed in 110 firefighters (aged 29.7 +/- 8.0 years). The group was divided into equal tertiles according to the body mass index (<25.9, 25.9 to 29.4, and >or=29.5 kg/m(2)). Group differences in hemodynamics, anthropometrics, microvascular function, and macrovascular structure and function were tested using multivariate analysis of variance. The obese group was older, heavier, and had a larger waist circumference compared to the lean and overweight groups (p <0.05). The overweight group was also older, heavier, and had a larger waist circumference than the lean group (p <0.05). Compared to the lean group, the overweight and obese groups had a greater systolic BP (p <0.05). The obese group also had a significantly greater mean arterial BP and carotid systolic BP than the lean group (p <0.05). The obese group had greater beta stiffness and elastic modulus compared to the lean and overweight groups (p <0.05), but no group differences were found in endothelial function. In conclusion, in a population of relatively young firefighters, an increased body mass index was associated with elevated peripheral BP and arterial stiffness, with no apparent decrements in endothelial function.

  18. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Green, Daniel J; Eijsvogels, Thijs; Bouts, Yvette M; Maiorana, Andrew J; Naylor, Louise H; Scholten, Ralph R; Spaanderman, Marc E A; Pugh, Christopher J A; Sprung, Victoria S; Schreuder, Tim; Jones, Helen; Cable, Tim; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-08-15

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to exercise-induced changes in artery function. We pooled data from our laboratories involving 182 subjects who underwent supervised, large-muscle group, endurance-type exercise training interventions with pre-/posttraining measures of flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) to assess artery function. All studies adopted an identical FMD protocol (5-min ischemia, distal cuff inflation), contemporary echo-Doppler methodology, and observer-independent automated analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors contributing to changes in FMD%. We found that cardiopulmonary fitness improved, and weight, body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased after training, while FMD% increased in 76% of subjects (P < 0.001). Training-induced increase in FMD% was predicted by lower body weight (β = -0.212), lower baseline FMD% (β = -0.469), lower training frequency (β = -0.256), and longer training duration (β = 0.367) (combined: P < 0.001, r = 0.63). With the exception of a modest correlation with total cholesterol (r = -0.243, P < 0.01), changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly related to changes in FMD% (P > 0.05). In conclusion, we found that, while some subjects do not demonstrate increases following exercise training, improvement in FMD% is present in those with lower pretraining body weight and endothelial function. Moreover, exercise training-induced change in FMD% did not correlate with changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors, indicating that some cardioprotective effects of exercise training are independent of improvement in risk factors.

  19. Two functional polymorphisms of ROCK2 enhance arterial stiffening through inhibiting its activity and expression.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Chu; Liu, Ping-Yen; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Lin, Wen-Yi; Liao, James K; Juo, Suh-Hang H

    2015-02-01

    Derangement of Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) has been related to coronary artery disease and stroke. ROCK2, rather than ROCK1, plays a predominant role in vascular contractility. The present study aims to test (1) the associations between ROCK2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and arterial stiffness, and (2) the molecular mechanism accounting for their effects. Stiffness parameters including beta (β), elasticity modulus (Ep) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were obtained by carotid ultrasonography. Seven tagging SNPs of ROCK2 were initially genotyped in 856 subjects and significant SNPs were replicated in another group of 527 subjects. Two SNPs in complete linkage disequilibrium were found to be significantly associated with arterial stiffness. The major alleles of rs978906 (A allele) and rs9808232 (C allele) were associated with stiffer arteries. SNP rs978906 was predicted to influence microRNA(miR)-1183 binding to ROCK2, while rs9808232 causes amino acid substitution. To determine their functional impact, plasmid constructs carrying different alleles of the significant SNPs were created. Compared to rs978906G-allele constructs, cells transfected with rs978906A-allele constructs had higher baseline luciferase activities and were less responsive to miR-1183 changes. Oxidized-low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) suppressed miR-1183 levels and increased ROCK2 protein amounts. For rs9808232, cells transfected with C-allele constructs had significantly higher ROCK activities than those with A-allele constructs. Leukocyte ROCK activities were further measured in 52 healthy subjects. The average ROCK activity was highest in human subjects with CC genotype at rs9808232, followed by those with AC and lowest in AA. Taken together, the present study showed that two functional SNPs of ROCK2 increase susceptibility of arterial stiffness in the Chinese population. Non-synonymous SNP rs9808232 influences ROCK2 activity, while 3' UTR SNP rs978906 affects the ROCK2 protein

  20. Two functional polymorphisms of ROCK2 enhance arterial stiffening through inhibiting its activity and expression

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Chu; Liu, Ping-Yen; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Lin, Wen-Yi; Liao, James K.; Juo, Suh-Hang H.

    2016-01-01

    Derangement of Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) has been related to coronary artery disease and stroke. ROCK2, rather than ROCK1, plays a predominant role in vascular contractility. The present study aims to test (1) the associations between ROCK2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and arterial stiffness, and (2) the molecular mechanism accounting for their effects. Stiffness parameters including beta (β), elasticity modulus (Ep) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were obtained by carotid ultrasonography. Seven tagging SNPs of ROCK2 were initially genotyped in 856 subjects and significant SNPs were replicated in another group of 527 subjects. Two SNPs in complete linkage disequilibrium were found to be significantly associated with arterial stiffness. The major alleles of rs978906 (A allele) and rs9808232 (C allele) were associated with stiffer arteries. SNP rs978906 was predicted to influence microRNA(miR)-1183 binding to ROCK2, while rs9808232 causes amino acid substitution. To determine their functional impact, plasmid constructs carrying different alleles of the significant SNPs were created. Compared to rs978906G-allele constructs, cells transfected with rs978906A-allele constructs had higher baseline luciferase activities and were less responsive to miR-1183 changes. Oxidized-low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) suppressed miR-1183 levels and increased ROCK2 protein amounts. For rs9808232, cells transfected with C-allele constructs had significantly higher ROCK activities than those with A-allele constructs. Leukocyte ROCK activities were further measured in 52 healthy subjects. The average ROCK activity was highest in human subjects with CC genotype at rs9808232, followed by those with AC and lowest in AA. Taken together, the present study showed that two functional SNPs of ROCK2 increase susceptibility of arterial stiffness in the Chinese population. Non-synonymous SNP rs9808232 influences ROCK2 activity, while 3' UTR SNP rs978906 affects the ROCK2 protein

  1. Neural control of circulation and exercise: a translational approach disclosing interactions between central command, arterial baroreflex, and muscle metaboreflex.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Lisete C; O'Leary, Donal S; Raven, Peter B; Nóbrega, Antonio C L

    2015-08-01

    The last 100 years witnessed a rapid and progressive development of the body of knowledge concerning the neural control of the cardiovascular system in health and disease. The understanding of the complexity and the relevance of the neuroregulatory system continues to evolve and as a result raises new questions. The purpose of this review is to articulate results from studies involving experimental models in animals as well as in humans concerning the interaction between the neural mechanisms mediating the hemodynamic responses during exercise. The review describes the arterial baroreflex, the pivotal mechanism controlling mean arterial blood pressure and its fluctuations along with the two main activation mechanisms to exercise: central command (parallel activation of central somatomotor and autonomic descending pathways) and the muscle metaboreflex, the metabolic component of exercise pressor reflex (feedback from ergoreceptors within contracting skeletal muscles). In addition, the role of the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in modulating the resetting of arterial baroreflex is identified, and the mechanisms in the central nervous system involved with the resetting of baroreflex function during dynamic exercise are also described. Approaching a very relevant clinical condition, the review also presents the concept that the impaired arterial baroreflex function is an integral component of the metaboreflex-mediated exaggerated sympathetic tone in subjects with heart failure. This increased sympathetic activity has a major role in causing the depressed ventricular function observed during submaximal dynamic exercise in these patients. The potential contribution of a metaboreflex arising from respiratory muscles is also considered.

  2. Non-functioning posterior communicating arteries of circle of Willis in idiopathic sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    De Felice, C; De Capua, B; Tassi, R; Mencattini, G; Passàli, D

    2000-10-01

    Most cases of sudden hearing loss have no identifiable cause. A link between compensatory blood flow through the circle of Willis and recovery from sudden hearing loss has, however, been suggested. We assessed 22 patients with sudden hearing loss who had no cerebrovascular disease, and 41 controls matched for age and sex. We took ultrasonographic doppler flow measurements of the extracranial carotid and vertebrobasilar systems and independent audiological measurements. 12 patients with sudden hearing loss, compared with four controls had bilateral non-functioning posterior communicating arteries (p=0.00019). Our findings suggest a strong association between a non-functioning posterior communicating artery of the circle of Willis and sudden hearing loss.

  3. Platelet Consumption by Arterial Prostheses: The Effects of Endothelialization and Pharmacologic Inhibition of Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Harker, Laurence A.; Slichter, Sherrill J.; Sauvage, Lester R.

    1977-01-01

    The thrombogenic mechanism of arterial grafts has been studied by determining the relative utilization of platelets, fibrinogen and plasminogen by human arterial prostheses, and by direct examination of arterial grafts in a baboon model. Forty-one survival and turnover measurements of 51Crplatelets, 131I-fibrinogen and 125I-plasminogen in ten patients with aortofemoral knitted Dacron prostheses demonstrated platelet consumption after graft placement (platelet survival 4.2 days ± 0.5 and turnover 68,000 plat/ul/day ±10,000 compared with 8.2 days ± 0.3 and 35,000 plat/ul/day ± 5,000 respectively for control subjects with stable vascular disease, p < 0.01). In vitro platelet function test results were normal. Platelet consumption was interrupted by dipyridamole or a combination of dipyridamole and acetylsalicylic acid, and platelet survival normalized spontaneously during nine months postoperatively. No significantly increased consumption of fibrinogen or plasminogen was found in these patients with arterial grafts. Placement of impervious knitted Dacron velour aortic grafts in baboons reproduced platelet consumption that progressively normalized over six weeks postoperatively. Platelet survival measurements correlated directly with endothelial cell coverage of the graft luminal surface in these animals implying that endothelialization of the graft surface was also occurring postoperatively in patients. ImagesFig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:411428

  4. Ketoprofen combined with artery graft entubulization improves functional recovery of transected peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Mehrtash, Moein; Nikonam, Nima; Mehrtash, Moied; Amini, Keyvan

    2014-12-01

    The objective was to assess the local effect of ketoprofen on sciatic nerve regeneration and functional recovery. Eighty healthy male white Wistar rats were randomized into four experimental groups of 20 animals each: In the transected group (TC), the left sciatic nerve was transected and nerve cut ends were fixed in the adjacent muscle. In the treatment group the defect was bridged using an artery graft (AG/Keto) filled with 10 microliter ketoprofen (0.1 mg/kg). In the artery graft group (AG), the graft was filled with phosphated-buffer saline alone. In the sham-operated group (SHAM), the sciatic nerve was exposed and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into four subgroups of five animals each and regenerated nerve fibres were studied at 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks post operation. Behavioural testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass and morphometric indices showed earlier regeneration of axons in AG/Keto than in AG group (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemical study clearly showed more positive location of reactions to S-100 in AG/Keto than in AG group. When loaded in an artery graft, ketoprofen improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of the sciatic nerve. Local usage of this easily accessible therapeutic medicine is cost saving and avoids the problems associated with systemic administration.

  5. Relationship between occupational exposure to lead and local arterial stiffness and left ventricular diastolic function in individuals with arterial hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Poreba, Rafal; Gac, Pawel; Poreba, Malgorzata; Antonowicz-Juchniewicz, Jolanta; Andrzejak, Ryszard

    2011-08-01

    Relationship between occupational exposure to lead and frequency of complications in persons with arterial hypertension has been poorly investigated. This study aimed at evaluation of the relationship between occupational exposure to lead and manifestation of an increased local arterial stiffness and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The studies included 105 men (mean age: 44.47 {+-} 9.12 years) with arterial hypertension, treated with hypotensive drugs: group I - men occupationally exposed to lead (n = 53), and group II - men not exposed to lead (n = 52). In echocardiographic examination, the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was diagnosed significantly more frequently in group I than in group II. In eTracking examination mean values of stiffness parameter ({beta}), augmentation index (AI) and one-point pulse wave velocity (PWV-{beta}) were significantly higher and mean values of arterial compliance (AC) were significantly lower in group I than in group II. The logistic regression showed that in the group of persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead a more advanced age, higher blood lead concentration and higher mean values of augmentation index represent independent risk factors of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The multifactorial regression showed that amongst persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead higher blood zinc protoporphyrin concentration, a more advanced age and higher value of body mass index (BMI) represent independent risk factors of an increased local arterial stiffness. In summary, we should note that in the group of persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead the study has demonstrated a significantly more frequent manifestation of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and an increase in local arterial stiffness. - Highlights: > Amongst persons with AH exposed to Pb higher ZnPP represent independent risk factor of increased local arterial stiffness

  6. Acute effects of self-myofascial release using a foam roller on arterial function.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takanobu; Masuhara, Mitsuhiko; Ikuta, Komei

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility is associated with arterial distensibility. Many individuals involved in sport, exercise, and/or fitness perform self-myofascial release (SMR) using a foam roller, which restores muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and/or soft-tissue extensibility. However, the effect of SMR on arterial stiffness and vascular endothelial function using a foam roller is unknown. This study investigates the acute effect of SMR using a foam roller on arterial stiffness and vascular endothelial function. Ten healthy young adults performed SMR and control (CON) trials on separate days in a randomized controlled crossover fashion. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), blood pressure, heart rate, and plasma nitric oxide (NO) concentration were measured before and 30 minutes after both SMR and CON trials. The participants performed SMR of the adductor, hamstrings, quadriceps, iliotibial band, and trapezius. Pressure was self-adjusted during myofascial release by applying body weight to the roller and using the hands and feet to offset weight as required. The roller was placed under the target tissue area, and the body was moved back and forth across the roller. In the CON trial, SMR was not performed. The baPWV significantly decreased (from 1,202 ± 105 to 1,074 ± 110 cm·s-1) and the plasma NO concentration significantly increased (from 20.4 ± 6.9 to 34.4 ± 17.2 μmol·L-1) after SMR using a foam roller (both p < 0.05), but neither significantly differed after CON trials. These results indicate that SMR using a foam roller reduces arterial stiffness and improves vascular endothelial function.

  7. Acute effects of self-myofascial release using a foam roller on arterial function.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takanobu; Masuhara, Mitsuhiko; Ikuta, Komei

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility is associated with arterial distensibility. Many individuals involved in sport, exercise, and/or fitness perform self-myofascial release (SMR) using a foam roller, which restores muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and/or soft-tissue extensibility. However, the effect of SMR on arterial stiffness and vascular endothelial function using a foam roller is unknown. This study investigates the acute effect of SMR using a foam roller on arterial stiffness and vascular endothelial function. Ten healthy young adults performed SMR and control (CON) trials on separate days in a randomized controlled crossover fashion. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), blood pressure, heart rate, and plasma nitric oxide (NO) concentration were measured before and 30 minutes after both SMR and CON trials. The participants performed SMR of the adductor, hamstrings, quadriceps, iliotibial band, and trapezius. Pressure was self-adjusted during myofascial release by applying body weight to the roller and using the hands and feet to offset weight as required. The roller was placed under the target tissue area, and the body was moved back and forth across the roller. In the CON trial, SMR was not performed. The baPWV significantly decreased (from 1,202 ± 105 to 1,074 ± 110 cm·s-1) and the plasma NO concentration significantly increased (from 20.4 ± 6.9 to 34.4 ± 17.2 μmol·L-1) after SMR using a foam roller (both p < 0.05), but neither significantly differed after CON trials. These results indicate that SMR using a foam roller reduces arterial stiffness and improves vascular endothelial function. PMID:23575360

  8. Effect of periodontal therapy on arterial structure and function among aboriginal australians: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; Jamieson, Lisa M; Do, Loc G; O'Dea, Kerin; Brown, Alex; Cai, Tommy Y; Anstey, Nicholas M; Sullivan, David R; Wang, Hao; Celermajer, David S; Slade, Gary D; Skilton, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Observational studies and nonrandomized trials support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Both diseases occur frequently in Aboriginal Australians. We hypothesized that nonsurgical periodontal therapy would improve measures of arterial function and structure that are subclinical indicators of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This parallel-group, randomized, open label clinical trial enrolled 273 Aboriginal Australians aged ≥18 years with periodontitis. Intervention participants received full-mouth periodontal scaling during a single visit, whereas controls received no treatment. Prespecified primary end points measured 12-month change in carotid intima-media thickness, an indicator of arterial structure, and 3- and 12-month change in pulse wave velocity, an indicator of arterial function. ANCOVA used complete case data to evaluate treatment group differences. End points could be calculated for 169 participants with follow-up data at 3 months and 168 participants at 12 months. Intima-media thickness decreased significantly after 12 months in the intervention group (mean reduction=-0.023 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.038 to -0.008] mm) but not in the control group (mean increase=0.002 [95% CI, -0.017 to 0.022] mm). The difference in intima-media thickness change between treatment groups was statistically significant (-0.026 [95% CI, -0.048 to -0.003] mm; P=0.03). In contrast, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in pulse wave velocity at 3 months (mean difference, 0.06 [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.29] m/s; P=0.594) or 12 months (mean difference, 0.21 [95% CI, -0.01 to 0.43] m/s; P=0.062). Periodontal therapy reduced subclinical arterial thickness but not function in Aboriginal Australians with periodontal disease, suggesting periodontal disease and atherosclerosis are significantly associated.

  9. Effect of periodontal therapy on arterial structure and function among aboriginal australians: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; Jamieson, Lisa M; Do, Loc G; O'Dea, Kerin; Brown, Alex; Cai, Tommy Y; Anstey, Nicholas M; Sullivan, David R; Wang, Hao; Celermajer, David S; Slade, Gary D; Skilton, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Observational studies and nonrandomized trials support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Both diseases occur frequently in Aboriginal Australians. We hypothesized that nonsurgical periodontal therapy would improve measures of arterial function and structure that are subclinical indicators of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This parallel-group, randomized, open label clinical trial enrolled 273 Aboriginal Australians aged ≥18 years with periodontitis. Intervention participants received full-mouth periodontal scaling during a single visit, whereas controls received no treatment. Prespecified primary end points measured 12-month change in carotid intima-media thickness, an indicator of arterial structure, and 3- and 12-month change in pulse wave velocity, an indicator of arterial function. ANCOVA used complete case data to evaluate treatment group differences. End points could be calculated for 169 participants with follow-up data at 3 months and 168 participants at 12 months. Intima-media thickness decreased significantly after 12 months in the intervention group (mean reduction=-0.023 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.038 to -0.008] mm) but not in the control group (mean increase=0.002 [95% CI, -0.017 to 0.022] mm). The difference in intima-media thickness change between treatment groups was statistically significant (-0.026 [95% CI, -0.048 to -0.003] mm; P=0.03). In contrast, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in pulse wave velocity at 3 months (mean difference, 0.06 [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.29] m/s; P=0.594) or 12 months (mean difference, 0.21 [95% CI, -0.01 to 0.43] m/s; P=0.062). Periodontal therapy reduced subclinical arterial thickness but not function in Aboriginal Australians with periodontal disease, suggesting periodontal disease and atherosclerosis are significantly associated. PMID:24958498

  10. [Involvement of cross interaction between central cholinergic and histaminergic systems in the nucleus tractus solitarius in regulating carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex].

    PubMed

    Hu, Li-Xun; Zhang, Guo-Xing; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Zhao, Hong-Fen; Yu, Kang-Ying; Wang, Guo-Qing

    2013-12-25

    The carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex (CSR) is an important approach for regulating arterial blood pressure homeostasis instantaneously and physiologically. Activation of the central histaminergic or cholinergic systems results in CSR functional inhibitory resetting. However, it is unclear whether two systems at the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) level display cross interaction to regulate the CSR or not. In the present study, the left or right carotid sinus region was isolated from the systemic circulation in Sprague-Dawley rats (sinus nerve was reserved) anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. Respective intubation was conducted into one side isolated carotid sinus and into the femoral artery for recording the intracarotid sinus pressure (ISP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) simultaneously with pressure transducers connection in vivo. ISP was set at the level of 0 mmHg to eliminate the effect of initial internal pressure of the carotid sinus on the CSR function. To trigger CSR, the ISP was quickly elevated from 0 mmHg to 280 mmHg in a stepwise manner (40 mmHg) which was added at every step for over 4 s, and then ISP returned to 0 mmHg in similar steps. The original data of ISP and corresponding MAP were fitted to a modified logistic equation with five parameters to obtain the ISP-MAP, ISP-Gain relationship curves and the CSR characteristic parameters, which were statistically compared and analyzed separately. Under the precondition of no influence on the basic levels of the artery blood pressure, the effects and potential regulatory mechanism of preceding microinjection with different cholinoceptor antagonists, the selective cholinergic M1 receptor antagonist, i.e., pirenzepine (PRZ), the M2 receptor antagonist, i.e., methoctramine (MTR) or the N1 receptor antagonist, i.e., hexamethonium (HEX) into the NTS on the changes in function of CSR induced by intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v.) of histamine (HA) in rats were observed. Meanwhile, the actions and

  11. Can selective arterial clamping with fluorescence imaging preserve kidney function during robotic partial nephrectomy?

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Tyler R.; Bjurlin, Marc A.; Wysock, James S.; Borofsky, Michael S.; Marien, Tracy P.; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Stifelman, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare renal functional outcomes in robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) with selective arterial clamping guided by near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging to a matched cohort of patients who underwent RPN without selective arterial clamping and NIRF imaging. Methods From April 2011 to December 2012, NIRF imaging-enhanced RPN with selective clamping was utilized in 42 cases. Functional outcomes of successful cases were compared with a cohort of patients, matched by tumor size, preoperative eGFR, functional kidney status, age, sex, body mass index, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score, who underwent RPN without selective clamping and NIRF imaging. Results In matched-pair analysis, selective clamping with NIRF was associated with superior kidney function at discharge, as demonstrated by postoperative eGFR (78.2 vs 68.5 ml/min per 1.73m2; P=0.04), absolute reduction of eGFR (−2.5 vs −14.0 ml/min per 1.73m2; P<0.01) and percent change in eGFR (−1.9% vs −16.8%, P<0.01). Similar trends were noted at three month follow up but these differences became non-significant (P[eGFR]=0.07], P[absolute reduction of eGFR]=0.10, and P[percent change in eGFR]=0.07). In the selective clamping group, a total of four perioperative complications occurred in three patients, all of which were Clavien I-III. Conclusion Utilization of NIRF imaging was associated with improved short-term renal functional outcomes when compared to RPN without selective arterial clamping and NIRF imaging. With this effect attenuated at later follow-up, randomized prospective studies and long-term assessment of kidney-specific functional outcomes are needed to further assess the benefits of this technology. PMID:24909960

  12. Corrections of arterial input function for dynamic H215O PET to assess perfusion of pelvic tumours: arterial blood sampling versus image extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdemann, L.; Sreenivasa, G.; Michel, R.; Rosner, C.; Plotkin, M.; Felix, R.; Wust, P.; Amthauer, H.

    2006-06-01

    Assessment of perfusion with 15O-labelled water (H215O) requires measurement of the arterial input function (AIF). The arterial time activity curve (TAC) measured using the peripheral sampling scheme requires corrections for delay and dispersion. In this study, parametrizations with and without arterial spillover correction for fitting of the tissue curve are evaluated. Additionally, a completely noninvasive method for generation of the AIF from a dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) acquisition is applied to assess perfusion of pelvic tumours. This method uses a volume of interest (VOI) to extract the TAC from the femoral artery. The VOI TAC is corrected for spillover using a separate tissue TAC and for recovery by determining the recovery coefficient on a coregistered CT data set. The techniques were applied in five patients with pelvic tumours who underwent a total of 11 examinations. Delay and dispersion correction of the blood TAC without arterial spillover correction yielded in seven examinations solutions inconsistent with physiology. Correction of arterial spillover increased the fitting accuracy and yielded consistent results in all patients. Generation of an AIF from PET image data was investigated as an alternative to arterial blood sampling and was shown to have an intrinsic potential to determine the AIF noninvasively and reproducibly. The AIF extracted from a VOI in a dynamic PET scan was similar in shape to the blood AIF but yielded significantly higher tissue perfusion values (mean of 104.0 ± 52.0%) and lower partition coefficients (-31.6 ± 24.2%). The perfusion values and partition coefficients determined with the VOI technique have to be corrected in order to compare the results with those of studies using a blood AIF.

  13. Functional assessment of the stenotic carotid artery by CFD-based pressure gradient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Heye; Ren, Lijie; Xiong, Huahua; Gao, Zhifan; Xu, Pengcheng; Huang, Wenhua; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-09-01

    The functional assessment of a hemodynamic significant stenosis base on blood pressure variation has been applied for evaluation of the myocardial ischemic event. This functional assessment shows great potential for improving the accuracy of the classification of the severity of carotid stenosis. To explore the value of grading the stenosis using a pressure gradient (PG)-we had reconstructed patient-specific carotid geometries based on MRI images-computational fluid dynamics were performed to analyze the PG in their stenotic arteries. Doppler ultrasound image data and the corresponding MRI image data of 19 patients with carotid stenosis were collected. Based on these, 31 stenotic carotid arterial geometries were reconstructed. A combinatorial boundary condition method was implemented for steady-state computer fluid dynamics simulations. Anatomic parameters, including tortuosity (T), the angle of bifurcation, and the cross-sectional area of the remaining lumen, were collected to investigate the effect on the pressure distribution. The PG is highly correlated with the severe stenosis (r = 0.902), whereas generally, the T and the angle of the bifurcation negatively correlate to the pressure drop of the internal carotid artery stenosis. The calculation required <10 min/case, which made it prepared for the fast diagnosis of the severe stenosis. According to the results, we had proposed a potential threshold value for distinguishing severe stenosis from mild-moderate stenosis (PG = 0.88). In conclusion, the PG could serve as the additional factor for improving the accuracy of grading the severity of the stenosis.

  14. Characterization of endothelial function in the brachial artery via affine registration of ultrasonographic image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamata, Pablo; Laclaustra, Martin; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2003-05-01

    The assessment and characterization of the endothelial function is a current research topic as it may play an important role in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Flow mediated dilatation may be used to investigate endothelial function, and B-mode ultrasonography is a cheap and non-invasive way to assess the vasodilation response. Computerized analysis techniques are very desirable to give higher accuracy and objectivity to the measurements. A new method is presented that solves some limitations of existing methods, which in general depend on accurate edge detection of the arterial wall. This method is based on a global image analysis strategy. The arterial vasodilation between two frames is modeled by a superposition of a rigid motion model and a stretching perpendicular to the artery. Both transformation models are recovered using an image registration algorithm based on normalized mutual information and a multi-resolution search framework. Temporal continuity of in the variation of the registration parameters is enforced with a Kalman filter, since the dilation process is known to be a gradual and continuous physiological phenomenon. The proposed method presents a negligible bias when compared with manual assessment. It also eliminates artifacts introduced by patient and probe motion, thus improving the accuracy of the measurements. Finally, it is also robust to typical problems of ultrasound, like speckle noise and poor image quality.

  15. Functional assessment of the stenotic carotid artery by CFD-based pressure gradient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Heye; Ren, Lijie; Xiong, Huahua; Gao, Zhifan; Xu, Pengcheng; Huang, Wenhua; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-09-01

    The functional assessment of a hemodynamic significant stenosis base on blood pressure variation has been applied for evaluation of the myocardial ischemic event. This functional assessment shows great potential for improving the accuracy of the classification of the severity of carotid stenosis. To explore the value of grading the stenosis using a pressure gradient (PG)-we had reconstructed patient-specific carotid geometries based on MRI images-computational fluid dynamics were performed to analyze the PG in their stenotic arteries. Doppler ultrasound image data and the corresponding MRI image data of 19 patients with carotid stenosis were collected. Based on these, 31 stenotic carotid arterial geometries were reconstructed. A combinatorial boundary condition method was implemented for steady-state computer fluid dynamics simulations. Anatomic parameters, including tortuosity (T), the angle of bifurcation, and the cross-sectional area of the remaining lumen, were collected to investigate the effect on the pressure distribution. The PG is highly correlated with the severe stenosis (r = 0.902), whereas generally, the T and the angle of the bifurcation negatively correlate to the pressure drop of the internal carotid artery stenosis. The calculation required <10 min/case, which made it prepared for the fast diagnosis of the severe stenosis. According to the results, we had proposed a potential threshold value for distinguishing severe stenosis from mild-moderate stenosis (PG = 0.88). In conclusion, the PG could serve as the additional factor for improving the accuracy of grading the severity of the stenosis. PMID:27371686

  16. First-ever ischemic stroke in elderly patients: predictors of functional outcome following carotid artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Age is an important risk factor for stroke, and carotid artery stenosis is the primary cause of first-ever ischemic stroke. Timely intervention with stenting procedures can effectively prevent secondary stroke; however, the impact of stenting on various periprocedural physical functionalities has never been thoroughly investigated. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether prestenting characteristics were associated with long-term functional outcomes in patients presenting with first-ever ischemic stroke. The secondary aim was to investigate whether patient age was an important factor in outcomes following stenting, measured by the modified Rankin scale (mRS). In total, 144 consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who underwent carotid artery stenting from January 2010 to November 2014 were included. Clinical data were obtained by review of medical records. The Barthel index (BI) and mRS were used to assess disability before stenting and at 12-month follow-up. In total, 72/144 patients showed improvement (mRS[+]), 71 showed stationary and one showed deterioration in condition (mRS[−]). The prestenting parameters, ratio of cerebral blood volume (1.41 vs 1.2 for mRS[−] vs mRS[+]), BI (75 vs 85), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP 5.0 vs 3.99), differed significantly between the two outcome groups (P<0.05). The internal carotid artery/common carotid artery ratio (P=0.011), BI (P=0.019), ipsilateral internal carotid artery resistance index (P=0.003), and HbA1c (P=0.039) were all factors significantly associated with patient age group. There was no significant association between age and poststenting outcome measured by mRS with 57% of patients in the ≥75 years age group showing mRS(−) and 43% showing mRS(+) (P=0.371). Our findings indicate that in our elderly patient series, carotid artery stenting may benefit a significant proportion of carotid stenotic patients regardless of age. Ratio of cerebral blood volume, BI, and

  17. Distribution and functional effects of neuropeptide Y on equine ureteral smooth muscle and resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Prieto, D; Hernández, M; Rivera, L; García-Sacristán, A; Simonsen, U

    1997-04-30

    The distribution of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive (IR) nerves, as well as the functional effects of NPY and the Y1- and Y2-receptor agonists, [Leu31,Pro34]NPY and NPY(13-36), respectively, have been investigated in vitro in both visceral and arterial smooth muscle of the horse intravesical ureter. NPY-IR nerve fibres were widely distributed along the entire length of the ureter, although the intravesical part was the most richly innervated region, and the only one where NPY-IR ganglion cells were found. NPY (10(-7) M) did not affect either basal tone or spontaneous rhythmic contractions of the isolated intravesical ureter, but significantly enhanced the increases in both tone and frequency of phasic activity elicited by noradrenaline (10(-6) and 10(-5) M). The Y1-receptor agonist, [Leu31,Pro34]NPY (10(-7) and 10(-6) M) did not significantly alter either ureteral basal tone or the contractile activity induced by noradrenaline, whereas the Y2-receptor agonist, NPY(13-36) (10(-7) M), mimicked the potentiating effect of NPY on noradrenaline responses. In ureteral resistance arteries (effective lumen diameters of 130-300 microm), NPY (10(-10) to 10(-7) M) elicited concentration-dependent contractions, which were inversely correlated with the arterial lumen diameter. Submaximal concentrations of NPY (10(-8) M) significantly increased the sensitivity of ureteral arteries to noradrenaline. [Leu31,Pro34]NPY (10(-10) to 10(-7) M), but not NPY(13-36), induced a contractile effect of similar magnitude and potency as those of NPY, and also potentiated noradrenaline responses. The present results demonstrate a rich NPY-innervation in the intravesical ureter and reveal functional effects of the peptide enhancing motor activity in both ureteral and arterial smooth muscles, although the receptors mediating such effects seem to be different. Thus, NPY potentiates the phasic contractions and tone elicited by noradrenaline through Y2-receptors, whereas it both contracts and

  18. First-ever ischemic stroke in elderly patients: predictors of functional outcome following carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Age is an important risk factor for stroke, and carotid artery stenosis is the primary cause of first-ever ischemic stroke. Timely intervention with stenting procedures can effectively prevent secondary stroke; however, the impact of stenting on various periprocedural physical functionalities has never been thoroughly investigated. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether prestenting characteristics were associated with long-term functional outcomes in patients presenting with first-ever ischemic stroke. The secondary aim was to investigate whether patient age was an important factor in outcomes following stenting, measured by the modified Rankin scale (mRS). In total, 144 consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who underwent carotid artery stenting from January 2010 to November 2014 were included. Clinical data were obtained by review of medical records. The Barthel index (BI) and mRS were used to assess disability before stenting and at 12-month follow-up. In total, 72/144 patients showed improvement (mRS[+]), 71 showed stationary and one showed deterioration in condition (mRS[-]). The prestenting parameters, ratio of cerebral blood volume (1.41 vs 1.2 for mRS[-] vs mRS[+]), BI (75 vs 85), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP 5.0 vs 3.99), differed significantly between the two outcome groups (P<0.05). The internal carotid artery/common carotid artery ratio (P=0.011), BI (P=0.019), ipsilateral internal carotid artery resistance index (P=0.003), and HbA1c (P=0.039) were all factors significantly associated with patient age group. There was no significant association between age and poststenting outcome measured by mRS with 57% of patients in the ≥75 years age group showing mRS(-) and 43% showing mRS(+) (P=0.371). Our findings indicate that in our elderly patient series, carotid artery stenting may benefit a significant proportion of carotid stenotic patients regardless of age. Ratio of cerebral blood volume, BI, and

  19. Structural and Functional Coronary Artery Abnormalities in Patients With Vasospastic Angina Pectoris.

    PubMed

    Ong, Peter; Aziz, Ahmed; Hansen, Henrik Steen; Prescott, Eva; Athanasiadis, Anastasios; Sechtem, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Coronary spasm is involved in many clinical scenarios, such as stable angina, acute coronary syndrome, sudden cardiac death, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia and syncope. In recent years, imaging tools such as computerized tomographic angiography, intravascular ultrasound or optical coherence tomography have been applied to study the coronary pathology in patients with vasospastic angina. Patients with vasospastic angina represent a heterogeneous cohort of patients with regard to the extent of concomitant coronary atherosclerosis. They share the common pathophysiological phenomenon of vascular smooth muscle hyperreactivity leading to spasm caused by various factors that may also overlap. Focal coronary spasm is related to epicardial atherosclerosis and in the presence of obstructive coronary artery disease it may be useful to treat the lesion to prevent further spasm. The aim of this article is to review structural and functional coronary artery abnormalities in patients with vasospastic angina.

  20. Use of functional mass in renal scintigraphy to detect segmental arterial lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Stibolt, T.B. Jr.; Bacher, J.D.; Dunnick, N.R.; Lock, A.; Jones, A.E.; Bailey, J.J.

    1982-04-01

    Renography using a gamma camera, a minicomputer, (/sup 123/I)orthoiodohippurate ((/sup 123/I)OIH), and a canine model was employed to evaluate computer-generated maps of regional renal function. Renograms were obtained before and after ligations of the right renal arterial branch in four dogs, with subsequent angiographic and histologic confirmation of the lesions. Postoperative time-activity curves were normal. Washout and persistence index in three of four right kidneys showed regional abnormality. Functional renal mapping may provide a clinical technique for evaluating human renal vascular hypertension.

  1. Impact of Intensive Physiotherapy on Cognitive Function after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Elder dos Santos; Magario, Rosmeiri; Conforti, César Augusto; Cipriano Júnior, Gerson; Arena, Ross; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos C.; Buffolo, Enio; Luna Filho, Bráulio

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is a standard surgical option for patients with diffuse and significant arterial plaque. This procedure, however, is not free of postoperative complications, especially pulmonary and cognitive disorders. Objective This study aimed at comparing the impact of two different physiotherapy treatment approaches on pulmonary and cognitive function of patients undergoing CABG. Methods Neuropsychological and pulmonary function tests were applied, prior to and following CABG, to 39 patients randomized into two groups as follows: Group 1 (control) – 20 patients underwent one physiotherapy session daily; and Group 2 (intensive physiotherapy) – 19 patients underwent three physiotherapy sessions daily during the recovery phase at the hospital. Non-paired and paired Student t tests were used to compare continuous variables. Variables without normal distribution were compared between groups by using Mann-Whitney test, and, within the same group at different times, by using Wilcoxon test. The chi-square test assessed differences of categorical variables. Statistical tests with a p value ≤ 0.05 were considered significant. Results Changes in pulmonary function were not significantly different between the groups. However, while Group 2 patients showed no decline in their neurocognitive function, Group 1 patients showed a decline in their cognitive functions (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusion Those results highlight the importance of physiotherapy after CABG and support the implementation of multiple sessions per day, providing patients with better psychosocial conditions and less morbidity. PMID:25352459

  2. Effect of electron radiation on vasomotor function of the left anterior descending coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Billings, Paul C.; Wilson, Jolaine M.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Laughlin, M. H.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    The left anterior descending (LAD, interventricular) coronary artery provides the blood supply to the mid-region of the heart and is a major site of vessel stenosis. Changes in LAD function can have major effects on heart function. In this report, we examined the effect of electron simulated solar particle event (eSPE) radiation on LAD function in a porcine animal model. Vasodilatory responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 10−9 – 10−4 M), bradykinin (BK; 10−11 – 10−6 M), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 10−10 – 10−4 M) were assessed. The LAD arteries from Control (non-irradiated) and the eSPE (irradiated) animals were isolated and exhibited a similar relaxation response following treatment with either ADP or SNP. In contrast, a significantly reduced relaxation response to BK treatment was observed in the eSPE irradiated group, compared to the control group. These data demonstrate that simulated SPE radiation exposure alters LAD function. PMID:26072960

  3. Correlation of coronary artery stenosis evaluation with left heart structure and function by multi-slice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Song, L N; Cao, A D; Niu, Y J; Liu, N

    2014-08-07

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) evaluation of coronary artery stenosis on left heart structure and systolic function. Coronary artery CT angiography was performed in 200 patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease, and then according to the AHA coronary artery 17-segment fractionation method, the Gensini score (GS) was determined for every narrow segment, and one-stop assessment of the correlation between left heart structure and function was performed. After the grouping of GS quartiles from low to high, there were differences between different patients with regard to LVDD, LADD, LVEDV, LVESV, MM, LVEF, and FS, while no difference in SV and CO. GS showed linear negative correlation with LVEF and FS, and linear positive correlation with LVDD, LADD, LVEDV, LVESV, and MM, while no correlation with SV and CO. That is, GS of coronary artery stenosis was negatively correlated with left ventricular systolic function and positively correlated with myocardial mass. The narrower the coronary artery, the worse the cardiac function and the higher the myocardial hypertrophy. Coronary artery stenosis was one of the important causes of the decrease in left ventricular systolic function and cardiac remodeling.

  4. The physiologically relevant information regarding systemic blood pressure encoded in the carotid sinus baroreceptor discharge pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, J O; Morgenstern, J; Samodelov, L

    1977-01-01

    1. The objective was to find out what kind of informatioon regarding systemic blood pressure is transduced by baroreceptors in vivo and how this information is coded in the receptor discharge. 2. Carotid sinus pressure, e.c.g., and receptor action potentials were recorded for fifty-two single fibre carotid sinus receptors found in twenty decerebrated unanaesthetized cats. 3. The inflation and gradual deflation of an intraaortic catheter tip balloon manipulated the blood pressure in the carotid sinus in a way as to define the full in vivo stimulus-response curve for each receptor. 4. Correlation coefficients were computed between stimulus and response variables for several points on the response curve of each receptor and for every possible combination of stimulus and response variables defined. 5. Stimulus variables were (a) systolic, (b) diastolic,, (c) mean, (d) pulse pressures and (e) peak positive dP/dt. Response variables were (a) average discharge rat, (b) peak instantaneous frequency, and (c) average burst frequency. 6. For every fibre in the sample only the correlations between systolic, diastolic and mean pressures vs. average discharge rate were consistently high and positive. All other correlations were numerically low and/or negative. 7. It was concluded that in vivo baroreceptors signal mainly pressure level (systolic, diastolic or mean) as opposed to pulse pressure or dP/dt, and that the average discharge rate is their best index of information content. PMID:881647

  5. Contribution of baroreceptors and chemoreceptors to ventricular hypertrophy produced by sino-aortic denervation in rats.

    PubMed

    Van Vliet, B N; Chafe, L L; Montani, J P

    1999-05-01

    1. To test whether sino-aortic denervation (SAD)-induced right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) is a consequence of baroreceptor or chemoreceptor denervation, we compared the effects of aortic denervation (AD), carotid denervation (CD), SAD and a SAD procedure modified to spare the carotid chemoreceptors (mSAD), 6 weeks after denervation surgery in rats. A sham surgery group served as the control. 2. The blood pressure (BP) level was unaffected by AD, CD or SAD, but increased (9 %) following mSAD. The mean heart rate level was not affected. Short-term BP variability was elevated following AD (81 %), SAD (144 %) and mSAD (146 %), but not after CD. Baroreflex heart rate responses to phenylephrine were attenuated in all denervation groups. 3. Significant RVH occurred only following CD and SAD. These procedures also produced high mortality (CD and SAD) and significant increases in right ventricular pressures and haematocrit (CD). 4. Significant left ventricular hypertrophy occurred following CD, SAD and mSAD. Normalized left ventricular weight was significantly correlated with indices of BP variability. 5. These results suggest that SAD-induced RVH is a consequence of chemoreceptor, not baroreceptor, denervation. Our results also demonstrate that a mSAD procedure designed to spare the carotid chemoreceptors produced profound baroreflex dysfunction and significant left, but not right, ventricular hypertrophy.

  6. Identification of functionally segregated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jill H; Kinnear, Nicholas P; Kalujnaia, Svetlana; Cramb, Gordon; Fleischer, Sidney; Jeyakumar, Loice H; Wuytack, Frank; Evans, A Mark

    2010-04-30

    In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle, Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) may induce constriction and dilation in a manner that is not mutually exclusive. We show here that the targeting of different sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases (SERCA) and RyR subtypes to discrete SR regions explains this paradox. Western blots identified protein bands for SERCA2a and SERCA2b, whereas immunofluorescence labeling of isolated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells revealed striking differences in the spatial distribution of SERCA2a and SERCA2b and RyR1, RyR2, and RyR3, respectively. Almost all SERCA2a and RyR3 labeling was restricted to a region within 1.5 microm of the nucleus. In marked contrast, SERCA2b labeling was primarily found within 1.5 microm of the plasma membrane, where labeling for RyR1 was maximal. The majority of labeling for RyR2 lay in between these two regions of the cell. Application of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 induced global Ca(2+) waves in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, which were markedly attenuated upon depletion of SR Ca(2+) stores by preincubation of cells with the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin but remained unaffected after preincubation of cells with a second SERCA antagonist, cyclopiazonic acid. We conclude that functionally segregated SR Ca(2+) stores exist within pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. One sits proximal to the plasma membrane, receives Ca(2+) via SERCA2b, and likely releases Ca(2+) via RyR1 to mediate vasodilation. The other is located centrally, receives Ca(2+) via SERCA2a, and likely releases Ca(2+) via RyR3 and RyR2 to initiate vasoconstriction.

  7. Effects of dark chocolate and cocoa consumption on endothelial function and arterial stiffness in overweight adults.

    PubMed

    West, Sheila G; McIntyre, Molly D; Piotrowski, Matthew J; Poupin, Nathalie; Miller, Debra L; Preston, Amy G; Wagner, Paul; Groves, Lisa F; Skulas-Ray, Ann C

    2014-02-01

    The consumption of cocoa and dark chocolate is associated with a lower risk of CVD, and improvements in endothelial function may mediate this relationship. Less is known about the effects of cocoa/chocolate on the augmentation index (AI), a measure of vascular stiffness and vascular tone in the peripheral arterioles. We enrolled thirty middle-aged, overweight adults in a randomised, placebo-controlled, 4-week, cross-over study. During the active treatment (cocoa) period, the participants consumed 37 g/d of dark chocolate and a sugar-free cocoa beverage (total cocoa = 22 g/d, total flavanols (TF) = 814 mg/d). Colour-matched controls included a low-flavanol chocolate bar and a cocoa-free beverage with no added sugar (TF = 3 mg/d). Treatments were matched for total fat, saturated fat, carbohydrates and protein. The cocoa treatment significantly increased the basal diameter and peak diameter of the brachial artery by 6% (+2 mm) and basal blood flow volume by 22%. Substantial decreases in the AI, a measure of arterial stiffness, were observed in only women. Flow-mediated dilation and the reactive hyperaemia index remained unchanged. The consumption of cocoa had no effect on fasting blood measures, while the control treatment increased fasting insulin concentration and insulin resistance (P= 0·01). Fasting blood pressure (BP) remained unchanged, although the acute consumption of cocoa increased resting BP by 4 mmHg. In summary, the high-flavanol cocoa and dark chocolate treatment was associated with enhanced vasodilation in both conduit and resistance arteries and was accompanied by significant reductions in arterial stiffness in women.

  8. Characterization of anisotropic elastic properties of the arteries by exponential and polynomial strain energy functions.

    PubMed

    Hudetz, A G; Monos, E

    1981-01-01

    Three-dimensional quasi-static mechanical measurements were carried out on cylindrical segments of the dog carotid and iliac arteries for determination of the passive anisotropic elastic properties of the vessel wall. On the basis of passive characteristics of outer diameter vs. intraluminal pressure, and axial extending force vs. intraluminal pressure, picked up at various fixed initial vascular length values, the incremental Young moduli and poisson ratios of the vessel wall were calculated in the 0--33 kPa (0--250 mm Hg) pressure range. The strain energy function of the arteries was approximated by polynomial and exponential models. We found that an exponential energy function with 4-parameters gives more accurate results than the 7- or 12-parameter polynomial functions. According to the results the axial modulus reaches higher values than the tangential and radial moduli at a low tangential stretch level, while at high tangential stretch the tangential modulus is the highest in both carotid and iliac arteries. After elevation of the initial tangential stretch the increase in the tangential modulus is the most pronounced, while the values of radial and axial moduli increased less. A change in the initial axial stretch influences the axial and radial moduli to a similar extent, but has no substantial effect on the value of the tangential modulus. The values of corresponding poisson ratios depend in a similar way on the initial deformation state. The different behaviour of the two Poisson ratios characterizing the mechanical coupling between tangential and axial directions, indicates that the structural coupling between the two main directions is asymmetrical. It is assumed that this property of the passive vascular structure can be explained by the network arrangement of collagen fibres in the vessel wall.

  9. Effects of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin on Resistance Artery Endothelial Function in Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Briet, Marie; Barhoumi, Tlili; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Sierra, Cristina; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Davidman, Michael; Bercovitch, David; Nessim, Sharon J.; Frisch, Gershon; Paradis, Pierre; Lipman, Mark L.; Schiffrin, Ernesto L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have raised concern about the safety of erythropoiesis‐stimulating agents because of evidence of increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In the present study, we investigated the effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) on endothelial function of gluteal subcutaneous resistance arteries isolated from 17 stage 4 patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate 21.9±7.4 mL/min per 1.73 m2) aged 63±13 years. Methods and Results Arteries were mounted on a pressurized myograph. EPO impaired endothelium‐dependent relaxation in a concentration‐dependent manner. The maximal response to acetylcholine with EPO at 1, 10, and 20 IU/mL was reduced by 12%, 34%, and 43%, respectively, compared with the absence of EPO (P<0.001). EPO‐induced endothelial dysfunction was significantly associated with carotid stiffness and history of cardiovascular events. EPO had no effect on norepinephrine‐induced vasoconstriction or sodium nitroprusside–induced relaxation. ABT‐627, an endothelin type A receptor antagonist, and tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, partially reversed the altered endothelial function in the presence of EPO (P<0.01). Increased expression of endothelin‐1 was found in the vessel wall after incubation with EPO. Conclusions EPO alters endothelial function of resistance arteries in CKD patients via a mechanism involving in part oxidative stress and signaling through an endothelin type A receptor. EPO‐induced endothelial dysfunction could contribute to deleterious effects of EPO described in large interventional trials. PMID:23584809

  10. Physiological functions of transient receptor potential channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Ru; Lin, Mo-Jun; Sham, James S K

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) gene superfamily, which consists of 7 subfamilies with at least 28 mammalian homologues, is known to encode a wide variety of cation channels with diverse biophysical properties, activation mechanisms, and physiological functions. Recent studies have identified multiple TRP channel subtypes, belonging to the canonical (TRPC), melastatin-related (TRPM), and vanilloid-related (TRPV) subfamilies, in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). They operate as specific Ca(2+) pathways responsive to stimuli, including Ca(2+) store depletion, receptor activation, reactive oxygen species, growth factors, and mechanical stress. Increasing evidence suggests that these channels play crucial roles in agonist-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell proliferation, vascular remodeling, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. This chapter highlighted and discussed these putative physiological functions of TRP channels in pulmonary vasculatures. Since Ca(2+) ions regulate many cellular processes via specific Ca(2+) signals, future investigations of these novel channels will likely uncover more important regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary vascular functions in health and in disease states. PMID:20204726

  11. Progenitor cell release plus exercise to improve functional performance in peripheral artery disease: the PROPEL Study.

    PubMed

    Domanchuk, Kathryn; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Criqui, Michael H; Tian, Lu; Liu, Kiang; Losordo, Douglas; Stein, James; Green, David; Kibbe, Melina; Zhao, Lihui; Annex, Brian; Perlman, Harris; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Pearce, William; Taylor, Doris; McDermott, Mary M

    2013-11-01

    Functional impairment, functional decline, and mobility loss are major public health problems in people with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD). Few medical therapies significantly improve walking performance in PAD. We describe methods for the PROgenitor cell release Plus Exercise to improve functionaL performance in PAD (PROPEL) Study, a randomized controlled clinical trial designed to determine whether granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) combined with supervised treadmill walking exercise improves six-minute walk distance more than GM-CSF alone, more than supervised treadmill exercise alone, and more than placebo plus attention control in participants with PAD, respectively. PROPEL Study participants are randomized to one of four arms in a 2 by 2 factorial design. The four study arms are GM-CSF plus supervised treadmill exercise, GM-CSF plus attention control, placebo plus supervised exercise therapy, or placebo plus attention control. The primary outcome is change in six-minute walk distance at 12-week follow-up. Secondary outcomes include change in brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), change in maximal treadmill walking time, and change in circulating CD34+ cells at 12-week follow-up. Outcomes are also measured at six-week and six-month follow-up. Results of the PROPEL Study will have important implications for understanding mechanisms of improving walking performance and preventing mobility loss in the large and growing number of men and women with PAD.

  12. Impact of acute caffeine ingestion on endothelial function in subjects with and without coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Shechter, Michael; Shalmon, Guy; Scheinowitz, Mickey; Koren-Morag, Nira; Feinberg, Micha S; Harats, Dror; Sela, Ben Ami; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Chouraqui, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    Although coffee is a widely used, pharmacologically active beverage, its impact on the cardiovascular system is controversial. To explore the effect of acute caffeine ingestion on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in subjects without coronary artery disease (CAD; controls) and patients with CAD, we prospectively assessed brachial artery FMD in 40 controls and 40 age- and gender-matched patients with documented stable CAD on 2 separate mornings 1 week to 2 weeks apart. After overnight fasting, discontinuation of all medications for ≥12 hours, and absence of caffeine for >48 hours, participants received capsules with caffeine 200 mg or placebo. One hour after drug ingestion, participants underwent brachial artery FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NTG) using high-resolution ultrasound. As expected, patients with CAD were more often diabetic, hypertensive, obese, dyslipidemic, and smoked more than controls (p <0.01 for all comparisons). Aspirin, Clopidogrel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β blockers, and statins were significantly more common in patients with CAD than in controls (p <0.01 for all comparisons). At baseline, FMD, but not NTG, was significantly lower in patients with CAD compared to controls. Acute caffeine ingestion significantly increased FMD (patients with CAD 5.6 ± 5.0% vs 14.6 ± 5.0%, controls 8.4 ± 2.9% vs 18.6 ± 6.8%, p <0.001 for all comparisons) but not NTG (patients with CAD 13.0 ± 5.2% vs 13.8 ± 6.1%, controls 12.9 ± 3.9% vs 13.9 ± 5.8%, p = NS for all comparisons) and significantly decreased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (patients with CAD 2.6 ± 1.4 vs 1.4 ± 1.2 mg/L, controls 3.4 ± 3.0 vs 1.2 ± 1.0 mg/L, p <0.001 for all comparisons) in the 2 groups compared to placebo. In conclusion, acute caffeine ingestion significantly improved endothelial function assessed by brachial artery FMD in subjects with and without CAD and was associated with lower plasma markers of inflammation.

  13. Arterial Structure and Function in Women and Men Following Long Duration Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Martin, David S.; Platts, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is a well-recognized consequence of space flight and bed rest (BR), with a greater incidence reported in women. We hypothesized that leg, but not arm, arterial structure and function would be altered following prolonged BR, as a model of space flight, and that women would be more susceptible to BR-induced deconditioning than men. METHODS: Ten volunteers (5 males, 5 females) completed 90 d of 6 head-down BR. Subjects participated in tests of brachial (BA) and anterior tibial (AT) artery endothelium-dependent (flow mediated dilation [FMD] following 5-7 min of arterial occlusion) and endothelium-independent (0.4 mg sublingual nitroglycerin [SN]) vasodilation before BR (PRE) and on days 7 (BR7), 21 (BR21), and 90 (BR90) of BR. Vessel diameter and intimal medial thickness (IMT) were measured by ultrasound. IMT, baseline diameter, and percent change in diameter from baseline during FMD and SN tests were compared across BR and between genders using repeated measures two-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc tests in which PRE and women were control conditions. RESULTS: Baseline vessel diameter was lower in women than in men in both the BA (p=0.005) and AT (p=0.01) across all days. Baseline AT diameter decreased during BR (p=0.01) and tended to be more profound in women (interaction, p=0.06). AT diameter was reduced in women at BR21 and BR90 (p<0.01) but not in men. In contrast, there was no BR effect on baseline BA diameter. IMT also decreased in the AT (p<0.001) but not in the BA during BR; AT IMT was reduced by BR21 (p<0.05). As a group, there was no effect of BR on AT FMD, BA FMD, and AT SN-dilation, although BA SN-dilation was significantly reduced on BR21 (p=0.01). Across all BR days, women exhibited higher AT FMD (p=0.03), BA FMD (p=0.02), and BA SN-dilation (p=0.01) and tended to demonstrate greater AT SN-dilation (p=0.11). CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results suggest that arterial remodeling occurs during BR in the leg (decreased diameter

  14. Effects of repeated long duration +2Gz load on man's cardiovascular function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ken-ichi; Hirayanagi, Kaname; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kinoue, Takaaki; Ito, Masao; Miyamoto, Akira; Igarashi, Makoto; Yajima, Kazuyoshi

    Usefulness of a short-arm human centrifuge is expected when it is used in space as a countermeasure against cardiovascular deconditioning, problem of bone-calcium metabolism, etc. However, nothing is solidly established regarding the most desirable program for artificial G application. Accordingly, this study was designed to analytically evaluate the effects of repeated long duration +Gz load on human cardiovascular function. Recently heart rate spectral analysis has been recognized as a powerful tool for quantitatively evaluating parasympathetic and sympathetic activity separately in human. It is reported that power of the high frequency component (HF-p) is mediated selectively by parasympathetic activity and the power ratio of low to high frequency components(LF/HF) is indicative of cardiac sympathetic activity or cardiac sympathovagal balance. Sequence method is developed to examine spontaneous baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS). We studied cardiovascular control function by using these methods in 9 healthy men before and after 7 days of daily repeated 1hour +2Gz load. When compared with the data of pre-G load period, post-G load period, decrease of HR, increases of HF-p and BRS were statistically significant. SBP, DBP and LF/HF tended to decrease, however, these changes were not statistically significant. This results indicate that repeated +2Gz load increases parasympathetic activity and arterial baroreceptor-cardiac reflex sensitivity. In recent years, many investigators suggest that space flight and head-down bedrest leads to impaired baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses and decrease of parasympathetic activity, which may contribute to orthostatic intolerance. So our results suggest that daily repeated 1hour +2Gz load would be useful in preventing post-flight orthostatic intolerance.

  15. Effects of repeated long duration +2Gz load on man's cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, K; Hirayanagi, K I; Sasaki, T; Kinoue, T; Ito, M; Miyamoto, A; Igarashi, M; Yajima, K

    1998-01-01

    Usefulness of a short-arm human centrifuge is expected when it is used in space as a countermeasure against cardiovascular deconditioning, problem of bone-calcium metabolism, etc. However, nothing is solidly established regarding the most desirable program for artificial G application. Accordingly, this study was designed to analytically evaluate the effects of repeated long duration +Gz load on human cardiovascular function. Recently heart rate spectral analysis has been recognized as a powerful tool for quantitatively evaluating parasympathetic and sympathetic activity separately in human. It is reported that power of the high frequency component (HF-p) is mediated selectively by parasympathetic activity and the power ratio of low to high frequency components(LF/HF) is indicative of cardiac sympathetic activity or cardiac sympathovagal balance. Sequence method is developed to examine spontaneous baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS). We studied cardiovascular control function by using these methods in 9 healthy men before and after 7 days of daily repeated 1hour +2Gz load. When compared with the data of pre-G load period, post-G load period, decrease of HR, increases of HF-p and BRS were statistically significant. SBP, DBP and LF/HF tended to decrease, however, these changes were not statistically significant. This results indicate that repeated +2Gz load increases parasympathetic activity and arterial baroreceptor-cardiac reflex sensitivity. In recent years, many investigators suggest that space flight and head-down bedrest leads to impaired baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses and decrease of parasympathetic activity, which may contribute to orthostatic intolerance. So our results suggest that daily repeated 1hour +2Gz load would be useful in preventing post-flight orthostatic intolerance. PMID:11541601

  16. The Effect of Endovascular Revascularization of Common Iliac Artery Occlusions on Erectile Function

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Serkan; Ozkan, Ugur; Onder, Hakan; Tekbas, Gueven; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2013-02-15

    To determine the incidence of erectile dysfunction in patients with common iliac artery (CIA) occlusive disease and the effect of revascularization on erectile function using the sexual health inventory for males (SHIM) questionnaire. All patients (35 men; mean age 57 {+-} 5 years; range 42-67 years) were asked to recall their sexual function before and 1 month after iliac recanalization. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables effecting improvement of impotence. The incidence of impotence in patients with CIA occlusion was 74% (26 of 35) preoperatively. Overall 16 (46%) of 35 patients reported improved erectile function after iliac recanalization. The rate of improvement of impotence was 61.5% (16 of 26 impotent patients). Sixteen patients (46%), including seven with normal erectile function before the procedure, had no change. Three patients (8%) reported deterioration of their sexual function, two of whom (6%) had normal erectile function before the procedure. The median SHIM score increased from 14 (range 4-25) before the procedure to 20 (range 1-25) after the procedure (P = 0.005). The type of recanalization, the age of the patients, and the length of occlusion were related to erectile function improvement in univariate analysis. However, these factors were not independent factors for improvement of erectile dysfunction in multivariate analysis (P > 0.05). Endovascular recanalization of CIA occlusions clearly improves sexual function. More than half of the patients with erectile dysfunction who underwent endovascular recanalization of the CIA experienced improvement.

  17. Integrative functional genomics identifies regulatory mechanisms at coronary artery disease loci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Clint L.; Pjanic, Milos; Wang, Ting; Nguyen, Trieu; Cohain, Ariella; Lee, Jonathan D.; Perisic, Ljubica; Hedin, Ulf; Kundu, Ramendra K.; Majmudar, Deshna; Kim, Juyong B.; Wang, Oliver; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Schadt, Eric E.; Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity, driven by both genetic and environmental risk factors. Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies have identified >150 loci associated with CAD and myocardial infarction susceptibility in humans. A majority of these variants reside in non-coding regions and are co-inherited with hundreds of candidate regulatory variants, presenting a challenge to elucidate their functions. Herein, we use integrative genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic profiling of perturbed human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and tissues to begin to identify causal regulatory variation and mechanisms responsible for CAD associations. Using these genome-wide maps, we prioritize 64 candidate variants and perform allele-specific binding and expression analyses at seven top candidate loci: 9p21.3, SMAD3, PDGFD, IL6R, BMP1, CCDC97/TGFB1 and LMOD1. We validate our findings in expression quantitative trait loci cohorts, which together reveal new links between CAD associations and regulatory function in the appropriate disease context. PMID:27386823

  18. Transfer function for vital infrasound pressures between the carotid artery and the tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Furihata, Kenji; Yamashita, Masato

    2013-02-01

    While occupational injury is associated with numerous individual and work-related risk factors, including long working hours and short sleep duration, the complex mechanisms causing such injuries are not yet fully understood. The relationship between the infrasound pressures of the tympanic membrane [ear canal pressure (ECP)], detected using an earplug embedded with a low-frequency microphone, and the carotid artery [carotid artery pressure (CAP)], detected using a stethoscope fitted with the same microphone, can be quantitatively characterized using systems analysis. The transfer functions of 40 normal workers (19 to 57 years old) were characterized, involving the analysis of 446 data points. The ECP waveform exhibits a pulsatile character with a slow respiratory component, which is superimposed on a biphasic recording that is synchronous with the cardiac cycle. The respiratory ECP waveform correlates with the instantaneous heart rate. The results also revealed that various fatigue-related risk factors may affect the mean magnitudes of the measured pressures and the delay transfer functions between CAP and ECP in the study population; these factors include systolic blood pressure, salivary amylase activity, age, sleep duration, postural changes, chronic fatigue, and pulse rate. PMID:23363133

  19. Integrative functional genomics identifies regulatory mechanisms at coronary artery disease loci.

    PubMed

    Miller, Clint L; Pjanic, Milos; Wang, Ting; Nguyen, Trieu; Cohain, Ariella; Lee, Jonathan D; Perisic, Ljubica; Hedin, Ulf; Kundu, Ramendra K; Majmudar, Deshna; Kim, Juyong B; Wang, Oliver; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Assimes, Themistocles L; Montgomery, Stephen B; Schadt, Eric E; Björkegren, Johan L M; Quertermous, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity, driven by both genetic and environmental risk factors. Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies have identified >150 loci associated with CAD and myocardial infarction susceptibility in humans. A majority of these variants reside in non-coding regions and are co-inherited with hundreds of candidate regulatory variants, presenting a challenge to elucidate their functions. Herein, we use integrative genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic profiling of perturbed human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and tissues to begin to identify causal regulatory variation and mechanisms responsible for CAD associations. Using these genome-wide maps, we prioritize 64 candidate variants and perform allele-specific binding and expression analyses at seven top candidate loci: 9p21.3, SMAD3, PDGFD, IL6R, BMP1, CCDC97/TGFB1 and LMOD1. We validate our findings in expression quantitative trait loci cohorts, which together reveal new links between CAD associations and regulatory function in the appropriate disease context. PMID:27386823

  20. Implementation of quantitative perfusion imaging techniques for functional brain mapping using pulsed arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Wong, E C; Buxton, R B; Frank, L R

    1997-01-01

    We describe here experimental considerations in the implementation of quantitative perfusion imaging techniques for functional MRI using pulsed arterial spin labeling. Three tagging techniques: EPISTAR, PICORE, and FAIR are found to give very similar perfusion results despite large differences in static tissue contrast. Two major sources of systematic error in the perfusion measurement are identified: the transit delay from the tagging region to the imaging slice; and the inclusion of intravascular tagged signal. A modified technique called QUIPSS II is described that decreases sensitivity to these effects by explicitly controlling the time width of the tag bolus and imaging after the bolus is entirely deposited into the slice. With appropriate saturation pulses the pulse sequence can be arranged so as to allow for simultaneous collection of perfusion and BOLD data that can be cleanly separated. Such perfusion and BOLD signals reveal differences in spatial location and dynamics that may be useful both for functional brain mapping and for study of the BOLD contrast mechanism. The implementation of multislice perfusion imaging introduces additional complications, primarily in the elimination of signal from static tissue. In pulsed ASL, this appears to be related to the slice profile of the inversion tag pulse in the presence of relaxation, rather than magnetization transfer effects as in continuous arterial spin labeling, and can be alleviated with careful adjustment of inversion pulse parameters. PMID:9430354

  1. The Effects of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy on the Neurocognitive Functions in the Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting with Asymptomatic Carotid Artery Disease: A Randomized Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Erkin, Alper; Saclı, Hakan; Demirtas, Mucahit; Percin, Bilal; Diler, Mevriye Serpil; Kırali, Kaan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to research the use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) on the neurocognitive functions in the patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with asymptomatic carotid artery disease. Methods: The study design was carried out with the participation of 79 patients in a prospective, randomized and double blind control method. The patients were separated into two groups as NIRS (n = 43) and no NIRS (n = 36). A neurocognitive test was applied preoperatively and postoperatively to all patients before discharge. Cognitive functions were evaluated by applying the Montreal Cognitive Assessment test (MoCA). Results: The decrease in the postoperative score of mean MoCA in no NIRS group was statistically significant when compared to preoperatively (p <0.001). Postoperative mean MoCA score was found to be significantly higher in NIRS group (NIRS: 26.8 ± 1.9 vs. no NIRS: 23.6 ± 2.5, p <0.001). It has been determined that there was a moderately positive significant correlation between the increase in the NIRS used patients (%) and increase in the MoCA score of the patients (r = 0.59, p <0.001). Conclusion: Intraoperative NIRS usage in the patients undergoing CABG with carotid artery disease might be useful due to its postoperative positive effects on the cognitive functions. PMID:26133933

  2. TRPV3 expression and vasodilator function in isolated uterine radial arteries from non-pregnant and pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy V; Kanagarajah, Arjna; Toemoe, Sianne; Bertrand, Paul P; Grayson, T Hilton; Britton, Fiona C; Leader, Leo; Senadheera, Sevvandi; Sandow, Shaun L

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the expression and function of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-3 ion channels (TRPV3) in uterine radial arteries isolated from non-pregnant and twenty-day pregnant rats. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) suggested TRPV3 is primarily localized to the smooth muscle in arteries from both non-pregnant and pregnant rats. IHC using C' targeted antibody, and qPCR of TRPV3 mRNA, suggested pregnancy increased arterial TRPV3 expression. The TRPV3 activator carvacrol caused endothelium-independent dilation of phenylephrine-constricted radial arteries, with no difference between vessels from non-pregnant and pregnant animals. Carvacrol-induced dilation was reduced by the TRPV3-blockers isopentenyl pyrophosphate and ruthenium red, but not by the TRPA1 or TRPV4 inhibitors HC-030031 or HC-067047, respectively. In radial arteries from non-pregnant rats only, inhibition of NOS and sGC, or PKG, enhanced carvacrol-mediated vasodilation. Carvacrol-induced dilation of arteries from both non-pregnant and pregnant rats was prevented by the IKCa blocker TRAM-34. TRPV3 caused an endothelium-independent, IKCa-mediated dilation of the uterine radial artery. NO-PKG-mediated modulation of TRPV3 activity is lost in pregnancy, but this did not alter the response to carvacrol.

  3. Voxel-Wise Functional Connectomics Using Arterial Spin Labeling Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Role of Denoising.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyun; Connelly, Alan; Calamante, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate voxel-wise functional connectomics using arterial spin labeling (ASL) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Since ASL signal has an intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the role of denoising is evaluated; in particular, a novel denoising method, dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT) combined with the nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm is implemented and evaluated. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method in denoising images and in detecting functional networks from noisy data (including the accuracy and sensitivity of detection). In addition, denoising was applied to in vivo ASL datasets, followed by network analysis using graph theoretical approaches. Efficiencies cost was used to evaluate the performance of denoising in detecting functional networks from in vivo ASL fMRI data. Simulations showed that denoising is effective in detecting voxel-wise functional networks from low SNR data and/or from data with small total number of time points. The capability of denoised voxel-wise functional connectivity analysis was also demonstrated with in vivo data. We concluded that denoising is important for voxel-wise functional connectivity using ASL fMRI and that the proposed DT-CWT-NLM method should be a useful ASL preprocessing step.

  4. Lower extremity manifestations of peripheral artery disease: the pathophysiologic and functional implications of leg ischemia.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary McGrae

    2015-04-24

    Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is frequently underdiagnosed, in part because of the wide variety of leg symptoms manifested by patients with PAD and in part because of the high prevalence of asymptomatic PAD. In primary care medical practices, 30% to 60% of patients with PAD report no exertional leg symptoms and ≈45% to 50% report exertional leg symptoms that are not consistent with classic intermittent claudication. The prevalence and extent of functional impairment and functional decline in PAD may also be underappreciated. Functional impairment and functional decline are common in PAD, even among those who are asymptomatic. Lower extremity ischemia is also associated with pathophysiologic changes in calf skeletal muscle, including smaller calf muscle area, increased calf muscle fat content, impaired leg strength, and impaired metabolic function. People with severe PAD have poorer peroneal nerve conduction velocity compared with people with mild PAD or no PAD. The degree of ischemia-related pathophysiologic changes in lower extremity muscles and peripheral nerves of people with PAD are associated with the degree of functional impairment. New interventions are needed to improve functional performance and prevent mobility loss in the large number of patients with PAD, including in those who are asymptomatic or who have exertional leg symptoms other than claudication.

  5. Increase in Ultrasonic Intensity of Blood Speckle across Moderate Coronary Artery Stenosis Is an Independent Predictor of Functional Coronary Artery Stenosis Measured by Fractional Flow Reserve: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanno, Jun; Nakano, Shintaro; Kasai, Takatoshi; Ako, Junya; Nakamura, Sunao; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The degree of coronary artery stenosis should be assessed both anatomically and functionally. We observed that the intensity of blood speckle (IBS) on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is low proximal to a coronary artery stenosis, and high distal to the stenosis. We defined step-up IBS as the distal minus the proximal IBS, and speculated that this new parameter could be used for the functional evaluation of stenosis on IVUS. The aims of this study were to assess the relationships between step-up IBS and factors that affect coronary blood flow, and between step-up IBS and fractional flow reserve (FFR). Methods and Results This study enrolled 36 consecutive patients with angina who had a single moderate stenosis in the left anterior descending artery. All patients were evaluated by integrated backscatter IVUS and intracoronary pressure measurements. FFR was calculated from measurements using a coronary pressure wire during hyperemia. Conventional gray-scale IVUS images were recorded, and integrated backscatter was measured in three cross-sectional slices proximal and distal to the stenosis. Step-up IBS was calculated as (mean distal integrated backscatter value) − (mean proximal integrated backscatter value). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that the heart rate (r = 0.45, P = 0.005), ejection fraction (r = −0.39, P = 0.01), and hemoglobin level (r = −0.32, P = 0.04) were independently correlated with step-up IBS, whereas proximal and distal IBS were not associated with these factors. There was a strong inverse correlation between step-up IBS and FFR (r = −0.84, P < 0.001), which remained significant on stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Conclusions The newly defined parameter of step-up IBS is potentially useful for the functional assessment of coronary artery stenosis. PMID:25607986

  6. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Tison, Geoffrey H; Alley, Hugh F; Budinger, Thomas F; Owens, Christopher D; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, laboratory-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound flow-mediated dilation (uFMD). We find significant correlation (r = 0.55, p = 0.003, N = 27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5 min cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300-600%. This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. PMID:26393958

  7. Automated detection of arterial input function in DSC perfusion MRI in a stroke rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, M.-Y.; Lee, T.-H.; Yang, S.-T.; Kuo, H.-H.; Chyi, T.-K.; Liu, H.-L.

    2009-05-01

    Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimation requires deconvolution of the tissue concentration time curves with an arterial input function (AIF). However, image-based determination of AIF in rodent is challenged due to limited spatial resolution. We evaluated the feasibility of quantitative analysis using automated AIF detection and compared the results with commonly applied semi-quantitative analysis. Permanent occlusion of bilateral or unilateral common carotid artery was used to induce cerebral ischemia in rats. The image using dynamic susceptibility contrast method was performed on a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner with a spin-echo echo-planar-image sequence (TR/TE = 700/80 ms, FOV = 41 mm, matrix = 64, 3 slices, SW = 2 mm), starting from 7 s prior to contrast injection (1.2 ml/kg) at four different time points. For quantitative analysis, CBF was calculated by the AIF which was obtained from 10 voxels with greatest contrast enhancement after deconvolution. For semi-quantitative analysis, relative CBF was estimated by the integral divided by the first moment of the relaxivity time curves. We observed if the AIFs obtained in the three different ROIs (whole brain, hemisphere without lesion and hemisphere with lesion) were similar, the CBF ratios (lesion/normal) between quantitative and semi-quantitative analyses might have a similar trend at different operative time points. If the AIFs were different, the CBF ratios might be different. We concluded that using local maximum one can define proper AIF without knowing the anatomical location of arteries in a stroke rat model.

  8. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff

    PubMed Central

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Tison, Geoffrey H; Alley, Hugh F; Budinger, Thomas F; Owens, Christopher D; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, lab-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. Methods The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound FMD (uFMD). Results We find significant correlation (r=0.55, p = 0.003, N=27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5-minute cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300–600%. Conclusion This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. PMID:26393958

  9. [Left-ventricular function and physical exertion tolerance in patients with myocardial infarction with isolated lesion of the coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Golikov, A P; Levshunov, S P; Belozerov, G E

    1989-01-01

    Myocardial infarction area and left-ventricular myocardial contractility, determined by sectoral scanning, and exercise tolerance were assessed in 47 myocardial infarction patients with isolated coronary arterial lesions. The area under myocardial infarction was shown to be dependent on the site of the atherosclerotic process rather than the degree of stenosis in patients with isolated coronary arterial lesions. A relationship was established between the incidence of complications developing in the acute phase of infarction and the degree of stenosis. The disease was complicated more frequently in patients with coronary arterial occlusion as compared to those with severe coronary-arterial stenosis. High stress tolerance, irrespective of the site of myocardial infarction, is an evidence of great functional potentials in this category of patients.

  10. Environmentally persistent free radicals decrease cardiac function and increase pulmonary artery pressure

    PubMed Central

    Mahne, Sarah; Chuang, Gin C.; Pankey, Edward; Kiruri, Lucy; Kadowitz, Philip J.; Dellinger, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently linked inhalation of particulate matter (PM) to increased cardiac morbidity and mortality, especially in at risk populations. However, few studies have examined the effect of PM on baseline cardiac function in otherwise healthy individuals. In addition, airborne PM contain environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR) capable of redox cycling in biological systems. The purpose of this study was to determine whether nose-only inhalation of EPFRs (20 min/day for 7 days) could decrease baseline left ventricular function in healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats. The model EPFR tested was 1,2-dichlorobenzene chemisorbed to 0.2-μm-diameter silica/CuO particles at 230°C (DCB230). Inhalation of vehicle or silica particles served as controls. Twenty-four hours after the last exposure, rats were anesthetized (isoflurane) and ventilated (3 l/min), and left ventricular function was assessed using pressure-volume catheters. Compared with controls, inhalation of DCB230 significantly decreased baseline stroke volume, cardiac output, and stroke work. End-diastolic volume and end-diastolic pressure were also significantly reduced; however, ventricular contractility and relaxation were not changed. DCB230 also significantly increased pulmonary arterial pressure and produced hyperplasia in small pulmonary arteries. Plasma levels of C-reactive protein were significantly increased by exposure to DCB230, as were levels of heme oxygenase-1 and SOD2 in the left ventricle. Together, these data show that inhalation of EPFRs, but not silica particles, decreases baseline cardiac function in healthy rats by decreasing cardiac filling, secondary to increased pulmonary resistance. These EPFRs also produced systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress markers in the left ventricle. PMID:22942180

  11. [Arterial hypertension in menopausal women: Clinical, functional, and pharmaco-economical aspects].

    PubMed

    Gel'tser, B I; Kotel'nikov, V N; Khludeeva, T A

    2003-01-01

    The study was undertaken to define the specific features of daily variations of blood pressure (BP) and autonomic cardiac regulation (ACR), as well as the functional status of the myocardium and vascular endothelium in females with menopausal arterial hypertension (MPAH) and to assess the pharmacotherapeutic and economical aspects of the combined use of arifon retard and clinonorm. The study enrolled 30 reproductive females with mild and moderate arterial hypertension (AH) and 65 females with MPAH who were randomly divided into 2 groups according to the therapeutic model. MPAH was characterized by more unfavorable hemodynamic changes that AH in the presence of preserved fertile function: greater load on target organs, elevated BP, its inadequate nocturnal lowering, greater BP variations, the magnitude and rate of its morning elevation. In AH, the vasomotor function of the endothelium varies with the clinical form of the disease and with the functional status of the female reproductive system. By and large, in the group of patients with MPAH, the latter was characterized by a more significant decrease in endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDVD). Arifon retard monotherapy has an adequate antihypertensive effect in female patients with MPAH, by ensuring 24-hour control of BP and affecting its chronostructure. A combination of arifon retard and climonorm has no cumulative effect on the level of BP and on the parameters of pressure-induced load; however, this is a pathogenetically grounded combination that potentiates the positive effects of a diuretic in significantly improving EDVD and ACR. The use of arifon retard in combination with climonorm in MPAH is the most cost-effective for public health care facilities and effective for patients. The course of MPAH is of certain peculiarity, which should be taken into account in choosing a therapeutic model for this category of patients.

  12. Arterial Stiffening Provides Sufficient Explanation for Primary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pettersen, Klas H.; Bugenhagen, Scott M.; Nauman, Javaid; Beard, Daniel A.; Omholt, Stig W.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common age-related chronic disorders, and by predisposing individuals for heart failure, stroke, and kidney disease, it is a major source of morbidity and mortality. Its etiology remains enigmatic despite intense research efforts over many decades. By use of empirically well-constrained computer models describing the coupled function of the baroreceptor reflex and mechanics of the circulatory system, we demonstrate quantitatively that arterial stiffening seems sufficient to explain age-related emergence of hypertension. Specifically, the empirically observed chronic changes in pulse pressure with age and the impaired capacity of hypertensive individuals to regulate short-term changes in blood pressure arise as emergent properties of the integrated system. The results are consistent with available experimental data from chemical and surgical manipulation of the cardio-vascular system. In contrast to widely held opinions, the results suggest that primary hypertension can be attributed to a mechanogenic etiology without challenging current conceptions of renal and sympathetic nervous system function. PMID:24853828

  13. Bifurcations in a nonlinear model of the baroreceptor-cardiac reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, H.; Herzel, H.

    1998-04-01

    We investigate the dynamic properties of a nonlinear model of the human cardio-baroreceptor control loop. As a new feature we use a phase effectiveness curve to describe the experimentally well-known phase dependency of the cardiac pacemaker's sensitivity to neural activity. We show that an increase of sympathetic time delays leads via a Hopf bifurcation to sustained heart rate oscillations. For increasing baroreflex sensitivity or for repetitive vagal stimulation we observe period-doubling, toroidal oscillations, chaos, and entrainment between the rhythms of the heart and the control loop. The bifurcations depend crucially on the involvement of the cardiac pacemaker's phase dependency. We compare the model output with experimental data from electrically stimulated anesthetized dogs and discuss possible implications for cardiac arrhythmias.

  14. Functioning pancreas graft with thromboses of splenic and superior mesenteric arteries after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, I; Shinzeki, M; Asari, S; Goto, T; Shirakawa, S; Ajiki, T; Fukumoto, T; Ku, Y

    2014-04-01

    Graft thrombosis is the most common cause of early graft loss after pancreas transplantation. The grafted pancreas is difficult to salvage after complete thrombosis, especially arterial thrombosis, and graft pancreatectomy is required. We describe a patient presenting with a functioning pancreas graft with thromboses of the splenic artery (SA) and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK). A 37-year-old woman with a 20-year history of type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent SPK. The pancreaticoduodenal graft was implanted in the right iliac fossa with enteric drainage. A Carrel patch was anastomosed to the recipient's right common iliac artery, and the graft gastroduodenal artery was anastomosed to the common hepatic artery using an arterial I-graft. The donor portal vein was anastomosed to the recipient's inferior vena cava. Four days after surgery, graft thromboses were detected by Doppler ultrasound without increases in the serum amylase and blood glucose levels. Contrast enhanced computed tomography revealed thromboses in the SA, splenic vein and SMA. Selective angiography showed that blood flow was interrupted in the SA and SMA. However, pancreatic graft perfusion was maintained by the I-graft in the head of the pancreas and the transverse pancreatic artery in the body and tail of the pancreas. We performed percutaneous direct thrombolysis and adjuvant thrombolytic therapy. However, we had to stop the thrombolytic therapy because of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Thereafter, the postoperative course was uneventful and the pancreas graft was functioning with a fasting blood glucose level of 75 mg/dL, HbA1c of 5.1%, and serum C-peptide level of 1.9 ng/mL at 30 months post-transplantation.

  15. The predictive value of arterial stiffness on major adverse cardiovascular events in individuals with mildly impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Wang, Xiaona; Ye, Ping; Cao, Ruihua; Yang, Xu; Xiao, Wenkai; Zhang, Yun; Bai, Yongyi; Wu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite growing evidence that arterial stiffness has important predictive value for cardiovascular disease in patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, the predictive significance of arterial stiffness in individuals with mildly impaired renal function has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of arterial stiffness on cardiovascular disease in this specific population. Materials and methods We analyzed measurements of arterial stiffness (carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity [cf-PWV]) and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in 1,499 subjects from a 4.8-year longitudinal study. Results A multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis showed that in individuals with normal renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2), the baseline cf-PWV was not associated with occurrence of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.398, 95% confidence interval 0.748–2.613; P=0.293). In individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2), a higher baseline cf-PWV level was associated with a higher risk of MACEs (hazard ratio 2.334, 95% confidence interval 1.082–5.036; P=0.031). Conclusion Arterial stiffness is a moderate and independent predictive factor for MACEs in individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2). PMID:27621605

  16. The predictive value of arterial stiffness on major adverse cardiovascular events in individuals with mildly impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Wang, Xiaona; Ye, Ping; Cao, Ruihua; Yang, Xu; Xiao, Wenkai; Zhang, Yun; Bai, Yongyi; Wu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite growing evidence that arterial stiffness has important predictive value for cardiovascular disease in patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, the predictive significance of arterial stiffness in individuals with mildly impaired renal function has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of arterial stiffness on cardiovascular disease in this specific population. Materials and methods We analyzed measurements of arterial stiffness (carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity [cf-PWV]) and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in 1,499 subjects from a 4.8-year longitudinal study. Results A multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis showed that in individuals with normal renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2), the baseline cf-PWV was not associated with occurrence of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.398, 95% confidence interval 0.748–2.613; P=0.293). In individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2), a higher baseline cf-PWV level was associated with a higher risk of MACEs (hazard ratio 2.334, 95% confidence interval 1.082–5.036; P=0.031). Conclusion Arterial stiffness is a moderate and independent predictive factor for MACEs in individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2).

  17. Functional differences between the arteries perfusing gas exchange and nutritional membranes in the late chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Riazudin; Cavallaro, Giacomo; Kessels, Carolina G A; Villamor, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The chicken extraembryonic arterial system comprises the allantoic arteries, which irrigate the gas exchange organ (the chorioallantoic membrane, CAM) and the yolk sac (YS) artery, which irrigates the nutritional organ (the YS membrane). We compared, using wire myography, the reactivity of allantoic and YS arteries from 19-day chicken embryos (total incubation 21 days). The contractions induced by KCl, the adrenergic agonists norepinephrine (NE, nonselective), phenylephrine (α1), and oxymetazoline (α2), electric field stimulation (EFS), serotonin, U46619 (TP receptor agonist), and endothelin (ET)-1 and the relaxations induced by acetylcholine (ACh), sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor), forskolin (adenylate cyclase activator), and isoproterenol (β-adrenergic agonist) were investigated. Extraembryonic allantoic arteries did not show α-adrenergic-mediated contraction (either elicited by exogenous agonists or EFS) or ACh-induced (endothelium-dependent) relaxation, whereas these responses were present in YS arteries. Interestingly, the intraembryonic segment of the allantoic artery showed EFS- and α-adrenergic-induced contraction and ACh-mediated relaxation. Moreover, glyoxylic acid staining showed the presence of catecholamine-containing nerves in the YS and the intraembryonic allantoic artery, but not in the extraembryonic allantoic artery. Isoproterenol- and forskolin-induced relaxation and ET-1-induced contraction were higher in YS than in allantoic arteries, whereas serotonin- and U46619-induced contraction and SNP-induced relaxation did not significantly differ between the two arteries. In conclusion, our study demonstrates a different pattern of reactivity in the arteries perfusing the gas exchange and the nutritional membranes of the chicken embryo.

  18. Polymeric stent materials dysregulate macrophage and endothelial cell functions: implications for coronary artery stent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xintong; Zachman, Angela L.; Chun, Young Wook; Shen, Fang-Wen; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Background Biodegradable polymers have been applied as bulk or coating materials for coronary artery stents. The degradation of polymers, however, could induce endothelial dysfunction and aggravate neointimal formation. Here we use polymeric microparticles to simulate and demonstrate the effects of degraded stent materials on phagocytic activity, cell death and dysfunction of macrophages and endothelial cells. Methods Microparticles made of low molecular weight polyesters were incubated with human macrophages and coronary artery endothelial cells (ECs). Microparticle-induced phagocytosis, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, cytokine release and surface marker expression were determined by immunostaining or ELISA. Elastase expression was analyzed by ELISA and the elastase-mediated polymer degradation was assessed by mass spectrometry. Results We demonstrated poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) microparticles induced cytotoxicity in macrophages and ECs, partially through cell apoptosis. The particle treatment alleviated EC phagocytosis, as opposed to macrophages, but enhanced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM) along with decreased nitric oxide production, indicating ECs were activated and lost their capacity to maintain homeostasis. The activation of both cell types induced release of elastase or elastase-like protease, which further accelerated polymer degradation. Conclusions This study revealed that low molecule weight PLLA and PCL microparticles increased cytotoxicity and dysregulated endothelial cell function, which in turn enhanced elastase release and polymer degradation. These indicate polymer or polymer-coated stents impose a risk of endothelial dysfunction after deployment which can potentially lead to delayed endothelialization, neointimal hyperplasia and late thrombosis. PMID:24820736

  19. Integrative modeling of small artery structure and function uncovers critical parameters for diameter regulation.

    PubMed

    VanBavel, Ed; Tuna, Bilge Guvenc

    2014-01-01

    Organ perfusion is regulated by vasoactivity and structural adaptation of small arteries and arterioles. These resistance vessels are sensitive to pressure, flow and a range of vasoactive stimuli. Several strongly interacting control loops exist. As an example, the myogenic response to a change of pressure influences the endothelial shear stress, thereby altering the contribution of shear-dependent dilation to the vascular tone. In addition, acute responses change the stimulus for structural adaptation and vice versa. Such control loops are able to maintain resistance vessels in a functional and stable state, characterized by regulated wall stress, shear stress, matched active and passive biomechanics and presence of vascular reserve. In this modeling study, four adaptation processes are identified that together with biomechanical properties effectuate such integrated regulation: control of tone, smooth muscle cell length adaptation, eutrophic matrix rearrangement and trophic responses. Their combined action maintains arteries in their optimal state, ready to cope with new challenges, allowing continuous long-term vasoregulation. The exclusion of any of these processes results in a poorly regulated state and in some cases instability of vascular structure.

  20. Effect of coronary artery recanalization on right ventricular function in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S.; Tortoledo, F.E.; Batty, J.W.; Raizner, A.E.

    1985-05-01

    The effects of coronary artery recanalization by intracoronary administration of streptokinase on left ventricular function during acute myocardial infarction have received increasing attention in recent years. Although myocardial dysfunction is often more pronounced in the right ventricle than in the left ventricle in patients with acute inferior wall myocardial infarction, the effect of coronary artery recanalization on right ventricular dysfunction has not been previously addressed. Accordingly, in this investigation, 54 patients who participated in a prospective, controlled, randomized trial of recanalization during acute myocardial infarction were studied. Among 30 patients with inferior wall infarction, 19 had right ventricular dysfunction on admission; 11 of these 19 had positive uptake of technetium-99m pyrophosphate in the right ventricle, indicative of right ventricular infarction. Patients with successful recanalization exhibited improved right ventricular ejection fraction from admission to day 10. However, control patients and patients who did not undergo recanalization also exhibited improvement. These data indicate that the right ventricular dysfunction commonly associated with inferior wall infarction is often transient, and improvement is the rule, irrespective of early recanalization of the infarct vessel.

  1. Sirtuin 3 deficiency is associated with inhibited mitochondrial function and pulmonary arterial hypertension in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Roxane; Dromparis, Peter; Sutendra, Gopinath; Gurtu, Vikram; Zervopoulos, Sotirios; Bowers, Lyndsay; Haromy, Alois; Webster, Linda; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sebastien; Michelakis, Evangelos D

    2014-11-01

    Suppression of mitochondrial function promoting proliferation and apoptosis suppression has been described in the pulmonary arteries and extrapulmonary tissues in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the cause of this metabolic remodeling is unknown. Mice lacking sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), a mitochondrial deacetylase, have increased acetylation and inhibition of many mitochondrial enzymes and complexes, suppressing mitochondrial function. Sirt3KO mice develop spontaneous PAH, exhibiting previously described molecular features of PAH pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). In human PAH PASMC and rats with PAH, SIRT3 is downregulated, and its normalization with adenovirus gene therapy reverses the disease phenotype. A loss-of-function SIRT3 polymorphism, linked to metabolic syndrome, is associated with PAH in an unbiased cohort of 162 patients and controls. If confirmed in large patient cohorts, these findings may facilitate biomarker and therapeutic discovery programs in PAH.

  2. Material coefficients of the strain energy function of pulmonary arteries in normal and cigarette smoke-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q; Fung, Y C

    1993-11-01

    The effect of cigarette smoke on the stress-strain relationship of pulmonary arteries was studied in 2- and 3-month smoke-exposed rats. The animals were exposed to cigarette smoke in a smoke-generating system 10 times daily with one cigarette each time. The smoke density and the puffing duration and frequency of the system were regulated in accordance with reference values measured from human smokers. The mechanical properties of the pulmonary arteries about 450 microns in external diameter (at zero pressure) were determined in vitro by inflation and deflation tests. The average stress and middle-wall strain of the selected pulmonary arteries were determined on the basis of experimental data including inflation and deflation pressures during loading and unloading processes, respectively, and vessel diameter and length at various pressure levels, and vessel circumferential and longitudinal lengths at zero-stress state. A constitutive equation for the pulmonary arteries was derived from an energy function depending on circumferential and longitudinal Green's strains. The coefficients of the strain energy function of the pulmonary arteries were determined in both the smoke-exposed and control rats by fitting the experimental stress-strain data with the constitutive equation. It was found that the wall stress of the pulmonary arteries at a given strain and most of the coefficients of the strain energy function were increased in both the 2- and 3-month smoke-exposed rats in comparison with those in the corresponding controls. These results indicated that cigarette smoke induced an increase in the wall stiffness of the pulmonary arteries in the rats. PMID:8262988

  3. Radical retropubic prostatectomy: the influence of accessory pudendal arteries on the recovery of sexual function.

    PubMed

    Polascik, T J; Walsh, P C

    1995-07-01

    Arterial insufficiency is a major factor responsible for impotence in men following nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. Previously, accessory internal pudendal arteries have been identified traveling over the anterolateral surface of the prostate. Based on this observation, during the last 7 years we have consistently looked for the presence of these arteries and have developed a surgical technique for their preservation. Between 1987 and 1994, 835 potent men underwent radical prostatectomy and accessory pudendal arteries were identified in 33 (4%). Following the development of the surgical technique, it was possible to preserve arteries in 19 of 24 patients (79%). Followup evaluation of 1 year or longer was available for 22 men who did not undergo wide excision of a neurovascular bundle. Recovery of erection sufficient for unassisted intromission and orgasm occurred in 8 of 12 patients (67%) in whom the arteries were preserved and in 5 of 10 (50%) in whom the arteries were sacrificed. We conclude that 1) the presence of accessory internal pudendal arteries is rare (4%); 2) although these arteries were preserved in 79% of the patients, dissection of these arteries from the dorsal vein complex may be associated with excessive bleeding, and 3) because potency rates are similar in men with or without preservation of accessory arteries, routine preservation may not be productive.

  4. Selective down-regulation of KV2.1 function contributes to enhanced arterial tone during diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cintrón, Madeline; Nystoriak, Matthew A; Prada, Maria Paz; Johnson, Kenneth; Fayer, William; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Scott, John D; Navedo, Manuel F

    2015-03-20

    Enhanced arterial tone is a leading cause of vascular complications during diabetes. Voltage-gated K(+) (KV) channels are key regulators of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contractility and arterial tone. Whether impaired KV channel function contributes to enhance arterial tone during diabetes is unclear. Here, we demonstrate a reduction in KV-mediated currents (IKv) in VSMCs from a high fat diet (HFD) mouse model of type 2 diabetes. In particular, IKv sensitive to stromatoxin (ScTx), a potent KV2 blocker, were selectively reduced in diabetic VSMCs. This was associated with decreased KV2-mediated regulation of arterial tone and suppression of the KV2.1 subunit mRNA and protein in VSMCs/arteries isolated from HFD mice. We identified protein kinase A anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150), via targeting of the phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), and the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells c3 (NFATc3) as required determinants of KV2.1 suppression during diabetes. Interestingly, substantial reduction in transcript levels for KV2.1 preceded down-regulation of large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BKCa) channel β1 subunits, which are ultimately suppressed in chronic hyperglycemia to a similar extent. Together, our study supports the concept that transcriptional suppression of KV2.1 by activation of the AKAP150-CaN/NFATc3 signaling axis contributes to enhanced arterial tone during diabetes. PMID:25670860

  5. Endothelial function, arterial stiffness, and adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sauder, Katherine A.; Proctor, David N.; Chow, Mosuk; Troy, Lisa M.; Wang, Na; Vita, Joseph A.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Jacques, Paul F.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; West, Sheila G.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness are early predictors of cardiovascular disease. Intervention studies suggest that diet is related to vascular health, but most prior studies tested individual foods or nutrients and relied on small samples of younger adults. The purpose of this study was to examine relations between adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and vascular health in a large, cross-sectional analysis. In 5887 adults in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation cohorts, diet quality was quantified with the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Index (DGAI-2010). Endothelial function was assessed via brachial artery ultrasound and arterial stiffness via arterial tonometry. In age-, sex-, and cohort-adjusted analyses, higher DGAI-2010 score (greater adherence) was modestly associated with lower resting flow velocity, hyperemic response, mean arterial pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index, but not associated with resting arterial diameter or flow-mediated dilation. In multivariable models adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, only the association of higher DGAI-2010 with lower baseline flow and augmentation index persisted (β=−0.002, P=0.003 and β=−0.05 ± 0.02, P<0.001, respectively). Age-stratified multivariate-adjusted analyses suggested that the relation of higher DGAI-2010 scores with lower mean arterial pressure, pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index was more pronounced among adults younger than 50 years. Better adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, particularly in younger adults, is associated with lower peripheral blood flow velocity and arterial wave reflection but not flow-mediated dilation. Our results suggest a link between adherence to the Dietary Guidelines and favorable vascular health. PMID:25885520

  6. [Functional assessment of the hepatic arterial blood flow by pharmacoradiography (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stellamor, K; Hruby, W; Peschl, L

    1981-12-01

    By means of celiacography it was possible to demonstrate that parenteral medication with parathormone creates a selective dilatation of the liver vessels in man, provided that they are dilatable. This hemodynamic hormone effect could not be traced in the other mesenteric vessels. The increase of portal hypertension resulting from cirrhosis leads to a loss of the dilating ability of liver vessels. This regressive reaction is well demonstrated on the parathormon-celiaco-gram. Thus a functional assessment of the hepatic blood flow is possible. The extent of the dilatability of the liver artery seems to be of great importance for the prognosis and indication of the porto-systemic shunt-operation. Moreover we could show that an increase in the liver perfusion demonstrates pathologic liver processes in a better way. PMID:7323629

  7. Progressive right ventricular functional and structural changes in a mouse model of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijie; Schreier, David A; Hacker, Timothy A; Chesler, Naomi C

    2013-12-01

    Right ventricle (RV) dysfunction occurs with progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) due to persistently elevated ventricular afterload. A critical knowledge gap is the molecular mechanisms that govern the transition from RV adaptation to RV maladaptation, which leads to failure. Here, we hypothesize that the recently established mouse model of PAH, via hypoxia and SU5416 treatment (HySu), captures that transition from adaptive to maladaptive RV remodeling including impairments in RV function and decreases in the efficiency of RV interactions with the pulmonary vasculature. To test this hypothesis, we exposed C57BL6 male mice to 0 (control), 14, 21, and 28 days of HySu and then obtained synchronized RV pressure and volume measurements in vivo. With increasing HySu exposure duration, arterial afterload increased monotonically, leading to a continuous increase in RV stroke work, RV fibrosis, and RV wall stiffening (P < 0.05). RV contractility increased at 14 days of HySu exposure and then plateaued (P < 0.05). As a result, ventricular-vascular coupling efficiency tended to increase at 14 days and then decrease. Our results suggest that RV remodeling may begin to shift from adaptive to maladaptive with increasing duration of HySu exposure, which would mimic changes in RV function with PAH progression found clinically. However, for the duration of HySu exposure used here, no drop in cardiac output was found. We conclude that the establishment of a mouse model for overt RV failure due to PAH remains an important task. PMID:24744862

  8. [Cerebral blood flow disturbances after anterior choroidal artery infarcts. Anatomical and functional correlates].

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, M; Froger, J; Kozlowski, O; Steinling, M

    2001-02-01

    We have investigated the cortical and subcortical regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) disorders resulting from infarcts of the anterior choroidal artery (AChA), and correlations with the severity of lesions, the physical and cognitive deficits, and the functional impairment. Eighteen patients presenting with recent anterior choroidal artery infarct without any other brain injury were examined at the secondary phase post-stroke using the single photon emission computed tomography technique and 133 Xenon inhalation. The rCBF and asymmetry indexes (AI) were calculated for 12 symmetrical hemispheric areas, and the cerebellum. The AI values were compared with those of 24 control subjects. The severity of the lesions was evaluated from CT scans or MRI. The neurological status (Orgogozo scale, walking disorders, MMSE, attention impairment, aphasia) and disability (functional independance measure: FIM) were assessed for each patient at the same time period. The relationships between rCBF disorders and brain lesions, and between the results of clinical investigations and rCBF disorders and brain lesions were assessed by linear regression analyses (stepwise variable selections, p=0.05). The AI values were significantly increased in the cerebral hemispheres, and this was most severe in the internal capsule (direct effect of the lesion) and the dorsolateral hemispheric cortex (diaschisis). Individual evaluations showed that AI were significantly increased in 13 patients in at least one ROI of the cerebral hemispheres, and in 3 patients in the internal capsule. Stepwise variable selections revealed that AI were best explained by the severity of the lesions in the internal capsule and the internal temporal area. The AI of the external temporal area and the internal capsule also helped explain the clinical (physical and cognitive) deficits. Thus, AChA infarcts may have relatively large effects on the central part of the lateral and dorsal cortex of the ipsilateral hemisphere

  9. Mapping Long-Term Functional Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow by Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ssali, Tracy; Anazodo, Udunna C.; Bureau, Yves; MacIntosh, Bradley J.; Günther, Matthias; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Although arterial spin labeling (ASL) is appealing for mapping long-term changes in functional activity, inter-sessional variations in basal blood flow, arterial transit times (ATTs), and alignment errors, can result in significant false activation when comparing images from separate sessions. By taking steps to reduce these sources of noise, this study assessed the ability of ASL to detect functional CBF changes between sessions. ASL data were collected in three sessions to image ATT, resting CBF and CBF changes associated with motor activation (7 participants). Activation maps were generated using rest and task images acquired in the same session and from sessions separated by up to a month. Good agreement was found when comparing between-session activation maps to within-session activation maps with only a 16% decrease in precision (within-session: 90 ± 7%) and a 13% decrease in the Dice similarity (within-session: 0.75 ± 0.07) coefficient after a month. In addition, voxel-wise reproducibility (within-session: 4.7 ± 4.5%) and reliability (within-session: 0.89 ± 0.20) of resting grey-matter CBF decreased by less than 18% for the between-session analysis relative to within-session values. ATT variability between sessions (5.0 ± 2.7%) was roughly half the between-subject variability, indicating that its effects on longitudinal CBF were minimal. These results demonstrate that conducting voxel-wise analysis on CBF images acquired on different days is feasible with only modest loss in precision, highlighting the potential of ASL for longitudinal studies. PMID:27706218

  10. Multimarker assessment for the prediction of renal function improvement after percutaneous revascularization for renal artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Partovi, Sasan; Zeller, Thomas; Breidthardt, Tobias; Kaech, Max; Boeddinghaus, Jasper; Puelacher, Christian; Nestelberger, Thomas; Aschwanden, Markus; Mueller, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying patients likely to have improved renal function after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty and stenting (PTRA) for renal artery stenosis (RAS) is challenging. The purpose of this study was to use a comprehensive multimarker assessment to identify those patients who would benefit most from correction of RAS. Methods In 127 patients with RAS and decreased renal function and/or hypertension referred for PTRA, quantification of hemodynamic cardiac stress using B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), renal function using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), parenchymal renal damage using resistance index (RI), and systemic inflammation using C-reactive protein (CRP) were performed before intervention. Results Predefined renal function improvement (increase in eGFR ≥10%) at 6 months occurred in 37% of patients. Prognostic accuracy as quantified by the area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve for the ability of BNP, eGFR, RI and CRP to predict renal function improvement were 0.59 (95% CI, 0.48–0.70), 0.71 (95% CI, 0.61–0.81), 0.52 (95% CI, 0.41–0.65), and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.44–0.68), respectively. None of the possible combinations increased the accuracy provided by eGFR (lower eGFR indicated a higher likelihood for eGFR improvement after PTRA, P=ns for all). In the subgroup of 56 patients with pre-interventional eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, similar findings were obtained. Conclusions Quantification of renal function, but not any other pathophysiologic signal, provides at least moderate accuracy in the identification of patients with RAS in whom PTRA will improve renal function. PMID:27280085

  11. [Effect of sanatorium treatment on endothelial function in children with primary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ianina, T Iu

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of sanatorium treatment (ST) using sodium chloride baths and metabolic drug mildronat on the dynamics of the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), markers of endothelial function in children with primary arterial hypertension (PAH). ABPM and held defined level of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) in the serum of 114 children with PAH aged 12-17. The positive dynamics of ABPM in all groups, but significantly (P < 0.05) decrease in mean BP was noted in the group with combined ST using sodium chloride baths. When analyzing the level of NO a positive trend (P < 0.01) in the group was using metabolic therapy, but significantly (P < 0.001) pronounced effect was observed when it is combined balneotherapy and metabolic therapy. Analysis of ET-1 and ADMA at ST in conjunction with therapy and metabolic rate of sodium chloride baths there was a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in these parameters in comparison with those before treatment. In children with PAH have been identified violations of the functional activity of the endothelium, which is reflected in increased levels of ET-1, ADMA and reducing NO. Conducting rehabilitation inclusion complex balneotherapy and metabolic therapy helps to reduce average daily blood pressure, normalization of functional activity of the endothelium as a normalization of the synthesis of NO (P < 0.,001), a significant decrease of ET-1 (P < 0.01) and ADMA (P < 0.01). PMID:24908958

  12. Functional Real-Time Optoacoustic Imaging of Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Krieg, Sandro M.; Lehmberg, Jens; Lindauer, Ute; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Longitudinal functional imaging studies of stroke are key in identifying the disease progression and possible therapeutic interventions. Here we investigate the applicability of real-time functional optoacoustic imaging for monitoring of stroke progression in the whole brain of living animals. Materials and Methods The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was used to model stroke in mice, which were imaged preoperatively and the occlusion was kept in place for 60 minutes, after which optoacoustic scans were taken at several time points. Results Post ischemia an asymmetry of deoxygenated hemoglobin in the brain was observed as a region of hypoxia in the hemisphere affected by the ischemic event. Furthermore, we were able to visualize the penumbra in-vivo as a localized hemodynamically-compromised area adjacent to the region of stroke-induced perfusion deficit. Conclusion The intrinsic sensitivity of the new imaging approach to functional blood parameters, in combination with real time operation and high spatial resolution in deep living tissues, may see it become a valuable and unique tool in the development and monitoring of treatments aimed at suspending the spread of an infarct area. PMID:24776997

  13. Impact of the arterial input function on microvascularization parameter measurements using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Marianne; Pitre-Champagnat, Stéphanie; Tabarout, Farid; Leguerney, Ingrid; Polrot, Mélanie; Lassau, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the sources of variation influencing the microvascularization parameters measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCE-US). METHODS: Firstly, we evaluated, in vitro, the impact of the manual repositioning of the ultrasound probe and the variations in flow rates. Experiments were conducted using a custom-made phantom setup simulating a tumor and its associated arterial input. Secondly, we evaluated, in vivo, the impact of multiple contrast agent injections and of examination day, as well as the influence of the size of region of interest (ROI) associated with the arterial input function (AIF). Experiments were conducted on xenografted B16F10 female nude mice. For all of the experiments, an ultrasound scanner along with a linear transducer was used to perform pulse inversion imaging based on linear raw data throughout the experiments. Semi-quantitative and quantitative analyses were performed using two signal-processing methods. RESULTS: In vitro, no microvascularization parameters, whether semi-quantitative or quantitative, were significantly correlated (P values from 0.059 to 0.860) with the repositioning of the probe. In addition, all semi-quantitative microvascularization parameters were correlated with the flow variation while only one quantitative parameter, the tumor blood flow, exhibited P value lower than 0.05 (P = 0.004). In vivo, multiple contrast agent injections had no significant impact (P values from 0.060 to 0.885) on microvascularization parameters. In addition, it was demonstrated that semi-quantitative microvascularization parameters were correlated with the tumor growth while among the quantitative parameters, only the tissue blood flow exhibited P value lower than 0.05 (P = 0.015). Based on these results, it was demonstrated that the ROI size of the AIF had significant influence on microvascularization parameters: in the context of larger arterial ROI (from 1.17 ± 0.6 mm3 to 3.65 ± 0.3 mm3), tumor blood flow and

  14. Arterial Structure and Function in Ambulatory Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy Are Not Different from Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Audra A.; Cotie, Lisa M.; Timmons, Brian W.; Gorter, Jan Willem; MacDonald, Maureen J.

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity in youth with cerebral palsy (CP) places them at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The current study assessed indices of arterial health in adolescents with CP, classified as levels I-II of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) (n = 11, age 13.2 ± 2.1 yr), in comparison to age- and sex-matched controls (n = 11, age 12.4 ± 2.3 yr). Groups were similar in anthropometric measurements, resting blood pressures, and heart rates. There were no group differences in brachial flow-mediated dilation (11.1 ± 7.8 versus 6.1 ± 3.6), carotid intima-media thickness (0.42 ± 0.04 versus 0.41 ± 0.03 mm), and distensibility (0.008 ± 0.002 versus 0.008 ± 0.002 mmHg) or central (4.3 ± 0.6 versus 4.1 ± 0.9 m/s) and peripheral pulse wave velocity (7.1 ± 1.7 versus 7.6 ± 1.1 m/s); CP versus healthy controls, respectively. Vigorous intensity physical activity (PA) was lower in the CP group (CP: 38 ± 80 min versus controls: 196 ± 174 min); groups were similar in light and moderate intensity PA levels. Arterial health of ambulatory youth with CP is not different from a control group despite lower vigorous PA levels. Similar studies need to examine individuals with more pronounced mobility limitations (GMFCS level III–V). PMID:22778755

  15. Alterations in Perivascular Sympathetic and Nitrergic Innervation Function Induced by Late Pregnancy in Rat Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Caracuel, Laura; Callejo, María; Balfagón, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated whether pregnancy was associated with changed function in components of perivascular mesenteric innervation and the mechanism/s involved. Experimental Approach We used superior mesenteric arteries from female Sprague-Dawley rats divided into two groups: control rats (in oestrous phase) and pregnant rats (20 days of pregnancy). Modifications in the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were analysed in the presence/absence of phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) or L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase-NOS- non-specific inhibitor). Vasomotor responses to noradrenaline (NA), and to NO donor DEA-NO were studied, NA and NO release measured and neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression/activation analysed. Key Results EFS induced a lower frequency-dependent contraction in pregnant than in control rats. Phentolamine decreased EFS-induced vasoconstriction in segments from both experimental groups, but to a greater extent in control rats. EFS-induced vasoconstriction was increased by L-NAME in arteries from both experimental groups. This increase was greater in segments from pregnant rats. Pregnancy decreased NA release while increasing NO release. nNOS expression was not modified but nNOS activation was increased by pregnancy. Pregnancy decreased NA-induced vasoconstriction response and did not modify DEA-NO-induced vasodilation response. Conclusions and Implications Neural control of mesenteric vasomotor tone was altered by pregnancy. Diminished sympathetic and enhanced nitrergic components both contributed to the decreased vasoconstriction response to EFS during pregnancy. All these changes indicate the selective participation of sympathetic and nitrergic innervations in vascular adaptations produced during pregnancy. PMID:25951331

  16. An Inquiry-Based Teaching Tool for Understanding Arterial Blood Pressure Regulation and Cardiovascular Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Heidi L.; Rodenbaugh, David W.; Murphy, Todd P.; Kulics, Jennifer M.; Bailey, Cynthia M.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to the hemodynamic variables (heart rate, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, and compliance) that alter arterial pressure. (Author/CCM)

  17. Anomalous origin of the right coronary artery with aortopulmonary window: functional and surgical considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Luisi, S V; Ashraf, M H; Gula, G; Radley-Smith, R; Yacoub, M

    1980-01-01

    A rare case of anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery associated with a large aortopulmonary window in a 4-month-old boy is reported. The right coronary artery is exposed to systemic pressure and carries fairly well-oxygenated blood to the myocardium. Angiographic diagnosis could be difficult because of the simultaneous filling of both great arteries which obscures the origin of the anomalous vessel. Closure of the aortopulmonary window alone could result in acute myocardial ischaemia. A plastic procedure for correction of this association of defects, which should allow normal growth, is described. Images PMID:7434300

  18. Improvement of myocardial function by trifluoperazine, a calmodulin antagonist, after acute coronary artery occlusion and coronary revascularization.

    PubMed

    Otani, H; Engelman, R M; Rousou, J A; Breyer, R H; Clement, R; Prasad, R; Klar, J; Das, D K

    1989-02-01

    Activation of an intracellular calcium-calmodulin complex may play an important role in myocardial injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion. Trifluoperazine, a calmodulin antagonist, was used before ischemia to enhance myocardial preservation by preventing intracellular calcium accumulation. The experimental model used an isolated in situ pig heart (19 control animals and 15 trifluoperazine-treated animals) subjected to occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 60 minutes followed by 60 minutes of hypothermic potassium crystalloid cardioplegic arrest and 60 minutes of reperfusion. Myocardial segmental function measured by ultrasonic crystals showed that active systolic segment shortening was abolished in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery after 60 minutes of occlusion irrespective of the treatment, whereas that not in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery increased by about 15% in both groups of animals. Restoration of systolic segment shortening in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery 60 minutes after reperfusion was 12% and 42% of baseline levels in untreated and trifluoperazine-treated animals, respectively (p less than 0.01). This improvement in segmental function by trifluoperazine was reflected in significantly (p less than 0.05) better global myocardial contractility and compliance and in significantly (p less than 0.01) greater total coronary blood flow and myocardial oxygen consumption. Trifluoperazine also increased myocardial creatine phosphate content in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery (p less than 0.01) during reperfusion, and creatine kinase release was reduced (p less than 0.05). Our results suggest that trifluoperazine improved regional myocardial function after acute occlusion of the left anterior descending artery and reperfusion and that global cardiac performance was thereby improved. The beneficial effects of trifluoperazine may be exerted by

  19. [A brief history of the baroreceptor reflex: from Claude Bernard to Arthur C. Guyton. Illustrated with some classical experiments].

    PubMed

    Estañol, Bruno; Porras-Betancourt, Manuel; Padilla-Leyva, Miguel Ángel; Sentíes-Madrid, Horacio

    2011-01-01

    The baroreceptor reflex is poorly known by most physicians even though is fundamental in stabilizing the blood pressure on a beat to beat basis and is crucial for survival. Its fascinating history is briefly reviewed in this article. In 1852 Claude Bernard discovered that the sympathetic nerves of the neck innervate the blood vessels of the skin of the rabbit. Edgar Douglas Adrian in 1932 demonstrated that the sympathetic nerves that innervate the blood vessels discharge spontaneously at a rate of 4-6 per second and thus discovered the physiological basis of the vasomotor tone. In the XIX century Ludwig Traube and Karl Constantine Ewald Hering discovered that blood pressure fluctuates synchronously with respiratory movements and Sigmund Mayer observed that there are also slow non respiratory fluctuations of blood pressure. In 1921 Heinrich Ewald Hering found that high pressure baroreceptors are located in the carotid sinuses and demonstrated that the stimulation of the afferent nerve that innervates it induces bradycardia and hypotension. These studies were further advanced by Corneille Heymans who won the Nobel Prize for these studies in 1938. Later Cowley and Guyton produced sino-aortic denervation in dogs and thereby could demonstrate the fundamental importance of the baroreceptor reflex in the stabilization of blood pressure.

  20. Arterial blood gases, pulmonary function and pathology in rats exposed to 0. 75 or 1. 0 ppM ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Pepelko, W.E.; Mattox, J.K.; Yang, Y.Y.

    1980-06-01

    Arterial blood gases, residual lung volume (RV), deflation pressure volume (PV) curves, pulmonary pathology and body weight changes were studied in rats exposed up to 14 days to either 0.75 or 1.0 ppM ozone. Arterial PO2 and body weights decreased progressively with length of exposure while PaCO2 and RV increased. The slope of the PV curve decreased in all groups exposed to ozone. Pathological changes in the lung increased in severity with concentration and length of exposure. The present findings have shown that arterial blood gas measurements represent a sensitive index of altered lung function in rats, a species very sensitive to ozone exposure.

  1. [Brachial artery endothelial function in teenagers with obesity depending on severity of clinical, trophological and metabolic disorders].

    PubMed

    Maskova, G S; Chernaia, N L; Nagornova, E Iu; Fomina, O V; Byteva, T A

    2014-01-01

    We carried out complex examination of 68 adolescents aged 11-17 years with primary obesity which in addition to assessment of clinical-anamnestic, laboratory data and functional parameters of cardiovascular system included registration of reaction of brachial artery endothelium to reactive hyperemia. Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) was found in 66% of obese teenagers. Obesity in adolescents with VED was characterized by aggravated course with higher fat mass index (36.8 +/- 4.39%) and prevalence of hypothalamic (42%) and metabolic (8.8%) syndromes. Stable arterial hypertension (AH) found in 37% of examined adolescents was 1.5 times more often registered in those with VED. We distinguished 4 groups of adolescents with various degree of risk of development of cardiovascular disorders: with stable AH and VED (group I), with stable AH and normal function of vascular endothelium (group II), with normal or labile arterial pressure with VED (group III), with normal or labile arterial pressure with normal function of vascular endothelium. It is expedient to supplement examination of obese adolescents with assessment of the state of vascular endothelium aiming at determination of degree of risk of development of atherosclerosis and/or stable AH.

  2. Association between arterial stiffness, disease activity and functional impairment in ankylosing spondylitis patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Avram, Claudiu; Drăgoi, Răzvan Gabriel; Popoviciu, Horațiu; Drăgoi, Mihai; Avram, Adina; Amaricăi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular risk is an important factor for increased morbidity and mortality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The aim of this study is to assess arterial stiffness in relation to the disease activity and functional limitation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Twenty-four patients (mean age 45.8 ± 11.7 years) suffering of ankylosing spondylitis (disease duration 11.1 ± 5.1 years) and 24 gender and age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Clinical, biological, and functional status of ankylosing spondylitis patients was recorded. Arterial stiffness was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA) was performed using applanation tonometry. We found significant differences between ankylosing spondylitis patients and healthy controls in regard to PWV (p = 0.047), aortic augmentation pressure-AP (p = 0.028), augmentation index-AIx (p = 0.038) and aortic augmentation index adjusted for heart rate-AIx75 (p = 0.011). PWV and AIx75 were significantly associated with the disease functioning score-BASFI (p = 0.012, r = 0.504; p = 0.041, r = 0.421). Aortic AP and augmentation indexes (AIx and AIx75) were all associated to ASDAS score (p = 0.028, r = 0.448; p = 0.005, r = 0.549; p = 0.025, r = 0.455). Our study showed that ankylosing spondylitis patients have a higher arterial stiffness than the age-matched controls, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk. We found that arterial stiffness is positively associated with disease activity and functional impairment. Chronic spondiloarthropaties should be screened for arterial stiffness, even in the absence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, in order to benefit from primary prevention measures.

  3. Daily short-period gravitation can prevent functional and structural changes in arteries of simulated microgravity rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Biao; Zhang, Li-Fan; Gao, Fang; Ma, Xiao-Wu; Zhang, Miao-Li; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Le-Ning; Ma, Jin

    2004-09-01

    This study was designed to clarify whether simulated microgravity-induced differential adaptational changes in cerebral and hindlimb arteries could be prevented by daily short-period restoration of the normal distribution of transmural pressure across arterial vasculature by either dorsoventral or footward gravitational loading. Tail suspension (Sus) for 28 days was used to simulate cardiovascular deconditioning due to microgravity. Daily standing (STD) for 1, 2, or 4 h, or +45 degrees head-up tilt (HUT) for 2 or 4 h was used to provide short-period dorsoventral or footward gravitational loading as countermeasure. Functional studies showed that Sus alone induced an enhancement and depression in vasoconstrictor responsiveness of basilar and femoral arterial rings, respectively, as previously reported. These differential functional alterations can be prevented by either of the two kinds of daily gravitational loading treatments. Surprisingly, daily STD for as short as 1 h was sufficient to prevent the differential functional changes that might occur due to Sus alone. In morphological studies, the effectiveness of daily 4-h HUT or 1-h STD in preventing the differential remodeling changes in the structure of basilar and anterior tibial arteries induced by Sus alone was examined by histomorphometry. The results showed that both the hypertrophic and atrophic changes that might occur, respectively, in cerebral and hindlimb arteries due to Sus alone were prevented not only by daily HUT for 4 h but also by daily STD even for 1 h. These data indicate that daily gravitational loading by STD for as short as 1 h is sufficient to prevent differential adaptational changes in function and structure of vessels in different anatomic regions induced by a medium-term simulated microgravity.

  4. Regulation of sympathetic nervous system function after cardiovascular deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasser, E. M.; Moffitt, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans subjected to prolonged periods of bed rest or microgravity undergo deconditioning of the cardiovascular system, characterized by resting tachycardia, reduced exercise capability, and a predisposition for orthostatic intolerance. These changes in cardiovascular function are likely due to a combination of factors, including changes in control of body fluid balance or cardiac alterations resulting in inadequate maintenance of stroke volume, altered arterial or venous vascular function, reduced activation of cardiovascular hormones, and diminished autonomic reflex function. There is evidence indicating a role for each of these mechanisms. Diminished reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system and subsequent vasoconstriction appear to play an important role. Studies utilizing the hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rat, an animal model of deconditioning, evaluated the potential role of altered arterial baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. These studies indicate that HU results in blunted baroreflex-mediated activation of both renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in response to a hypotensive stimulus. HU rats are less able to maintain arterial pressure during hemorrhage, suggesting that diminished ability to increase sympathetic activity has functional consequences for the animal. Reflex control of vasopressin secretion appears to be enhanced following HU. Blunted baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation appears to involve altered central nervous system function. Baroreceptor afferent activity in response to changes in arterial pressure is unaltered in HU rats. However, increases in efferent sympathetic nerve activity for a given decrease in afferent input are blunted after HU. This altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor inputs appears to involve an effect at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Specifically, it appears that tonic GABAA-mediated inhibition of the RVLM is enhanced after HU. Augmented inhibition apparently

  5. Variability of residual platelet function despite clopidogrel treatment in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Schwonberg, Jan; Toennes, Stefan W; Mani, Helen; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2010-04-01

    Residual platelet function despite treatment with clopidogrel may predict an unfavourable cardiovascular outcome. The majority of studies have investigated the effects of clopidogrel administration in conjunction with aspirin in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the platelet response to clopidogrel in the absence of aspirin in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and to investigate whether non-responsiveness to clopidogrel is reproducible during long-term follow-up. Fifty-four clinically stable PAOD patients on a maintenance dose of 75 mg/d clopidogrel were enrolled in this study. Platelet function was assessed at baseline and after a median follow-up of 18 months using light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) with 2 microM ADP as an agonist. HPLC-coupled mass spectrometry was used to detect clopidogrel and clopidogrel carboxylic acid, the main metabolite of clopidogrel. Residual platelet function, as defined by late aggregation values within the reference range (i.e., >43%), was observed in 35.2% of patients at baseline and 17.6% during follow-up. During the observation period, 26.5% had switched from responder to non-responder status or vice versa. Among non-responders, either clopidogrel or its metabolite was detected in 89.5% and 83.3% of patients at baseline and at follow-up, respectively. We conclude that non-responsiveness to clopidogrel as determined by ADP-induced LTA is not stable over time. This phenomenon cannot be attributed to non-compliance alone. PMID:20153859

  6. Impaired Cerebrovascular Function in Coronary Artery Disease Patients and Recovery Following Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Anazodo, Udunna C.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Suskin, Neville; Ssali, Tracy; Wang, Danny J. J.; St. Lawrence, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) poses a risk to the cerebrovascular function of older adults and has been linked to impaired cognitive abilities. Using magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, we investigated changes in resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to hypercapnia in 34 CAD patients and 21 age-matched controls. Gray matter volume (GMV) images were acquired and used as a confounding variable to separate changes in structure from function. Compared to healthy controls, CAD patients demonstrated reduced CBF in the superior frontal, anterior cingulate (AC), insular, pre- and post-central gyri, middle temporal, and superior temporal regions. Subsequent analysis of these regions demonstrated decreased CVR in the AC, insula, post-central and superior frontal regions. Except in the superior frontal and precentral regions, regional reductions in CBF and CVR were identified in brain areas where no detectable reductions in GMV were observed, demonstrating that these vascular changes were independent of brain atrophy. Because aerobic fitness training can improve brain function, potential changes in regional CBF were investigated in the CAD patients after completion of a 6-months exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program. Increased CBF was observed in the bilateral AC, as well as recovery of CBF in the dorsal aspect of the right AC, where the magnitude of increased CBF was roughly equal to the reduction in CBF at baseline compared to controls. These exercise-related improvements in CBF in the AC is intriguing given the role of this area in cognitive processing and regulation of cardiovascular autonomic control. PMID:26779011

  7. Cardiovascular function in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.; Leach-Huntoon, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance and cardiac hemodynamics associated with manned space flight have been investigated on seven STS missions. Orthostatic heart rates appear to be influenced by the mission duration. The rates increase during the first 7-10 days of flight and recover partially after that. Fluid loading is used as a countermeasure to the postflight orthostatic intolerance. The carotid baroreceptor function shows only slight responsiveness to orthostatic stimulation. Plots of the baroreceptor function are presented. It is concluded that an early adaptation to the space flight conditions involves a fluid shift and that the subsequent alterations in the neutral controlling mechanisms contribute to the orthoststic intolerance.

  8. Impact of Intensive Physiotherapy on Cognitive Function after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Elder Dos Santos; Magario, Rosmeiri; Conforti, César Augusto; Cipriano Júnior, Gerson; Arena, Ross; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos C; Buffolo, Enio; Luna Filho, Bráulio

    2014-11-01

    Background: Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is a standard surgical option for patients with diffuse and significant arterial plaque. This procedure, however, is not free of postoperative complications, especially pulmonary and cognitive disorders. Objective: This study aimed at comparing the impact of two different physiotherapy treatment approaches on pulmonary and cognitive function of patients undergoing CABG. Methods: Neuropsychological and pulmonary function tests were applied, prior to and following CABG, to 39 patients randomized into two groups as follows: Group 1 (control) - 20 patients underwent one physiotherapy session daily; and Group 2 (intensive physiotherapy) - 19 patients underwent three physiotherapy sessions daily during the recovery phase at the hospital. Non-paired and paired Student t tests were used to compare continuous variables. Variables without normal distribution were compared between groups by using Mann-Whitney test, and, within the same group at different times, by using Wilcoxon test. The chi-square test assessed differences of categorical variables. Statistical tests with a p value ≤ 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Changes in pulmonary function were not significantly different between the groups. However, while Group 2 patients showed no decline in their neurocognitive function, Group 1 patients showed a decline in their cognitive functions (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusion: Those results highlight the importance of physiotherapy after CABG and support the implementation of multiple sessions per day, providing patients with better psychosocial conditions and less morbidity.Fundamento: A cirurgia de revascularização miocárdica (CRM) é a opção cirúrgica padrão para pacientes com placas arteriais difusas e significativas. Tal procedimento, no entanto, não é desprovido de complicações pós-operatórias, especialmente distúrbios pulmonares e cognitivos. Objetivo: Comparar o impacto de duas abordagens fisioterap

  9. Mutant LRP6 Impairs Endothelial Cell Functions Associated with Familial Normolipidemic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian; Li, Yang; Ren, Yi-Hong; Sun, Zhijun; Dong, Jie; Yan, Han; Xu, Yujun; Wang, Dao Wen; Zheng, Gu-Yan; Du, Jie; Tian, Xiao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the genes low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6) and myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) were reported in families with coronary artery disease (CAD). We intend to determine the mutational spectrum of these genes among hyperlipidemic and normolipidemic CAD families. Forty probands with early-onset CAD were recruited from 19 hyperlipidemic and 21 normolipidemic Chinese families. We sequenced all exons and intron-exon boundaries of LRP6 and MEF2A, and found a novel heterozygous variant in LRP6 from a proband with normolipidemic CAD. This variant led to a substitution of histidine to tyrosine (Y418H) in an evolutionarily conserved domain YWTD in exon 6 and was not found in 1025 unrelated healthy individuals. Co-segregated with CAD in the affected family, LRP6Y418H significantly debilitated the Wnt3a-associated signaling pathway, suppressed endothelial cell proliferation and migration, and decreased anti-apoptotic ability. However, it exhibited no influences on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, mutation Y418H in LRP6 likely contributes to normolipidemic familial CAD via impairing endothelial cell functions and weakening the Wnt3a signaling pathway. PMID:27455246

  10. Determination of arterial input function in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI using group independent component analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sharon; Liu, Ho-Ling; Yang, Yihong; Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Chuang, Keh-Shih

    2006-12-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires the determination of the arterial input function (AIF). The segmentation of surrounding tissue by manual selection is error-prone due to the partial volume artifacts. Independent component analysis (ICA) has the advantage in automatically decomposing the signals into interpretable components. Recently group ICA technique has been applied to fMRI study and showed reduced variance caused by motion artifact and noise. In this work, we investigated the feasibility and efficacy of the use of group ICA technique to extract the AIF. Both simulated and in vivo data were analyzed in this study. The simulation data of eight phantoms were generated using randomized lesion locations and time activity curves. The clinical data were obtained from spin-echo EPI MR scans performed in seven normal subjects. Group ICA technique was applied to analyze data through concatenating across seven subjects. The AIFs were calculated from the weighted average of the signals in the region selected by ICA. Preliminary results of this study showed that group ICA technique could not extract accurate AIF information from regions around the vessel. The mismatched location of vessels within the group reduced the benefits of group study.

  11. Pressure Myography to Study the Function and Structure of Isolated Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Schjørring, Olav L; Carlsson, Rune; Simonsen, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Small arteries play an important role in regulation of peripheral resistance and organ perfusion. Here we describe a series of methods allowing measurements in pressurized segments of small arteries from the systemic and coronary circulation of mice as well as other species. The pressure myography techniques described include measurements of wall structure, wall stress, strain, and myogenic tone. The pressurized perfused small arteries also allow evaluation of responses to increases in pressure, flow, and drugs, where the main readout is changes in vascular diameter.

  12. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V; Rooney, William D; Garzotto, Mark G; Springer, Charles S

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (K(trans)) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  13. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V; Rooney, William D; Garzotto, Mark G; Springer, Charles S

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (K(trans)) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  14. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V.; Rooney, William D.; Garzotto, Mark G.; Springer, Charles S.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (Ktrans) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  15. Arterial Input Function Placement for Accurate CT Perfusion Map Construction in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rafael M.; Lev, Michael H.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Kamalian, Shahmir; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Furie, Karen L.; Gonzalez, R. Gilberto; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of our study was to evaluate the effect of varying arterial input function (AIF) placement on the qualitative and quantitative CT perfusion parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS Retrospective analysis of CT perfusion data was performed on 14 acute stroke patients with a proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) clot. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) maps were constructed using a systematic method by varying only the AIF placement in four positions relative to the MCA clot including proximal and distal to the clot in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Two postprocessing software programs were used to evaluate the effect of AIF placement on perfusion parameters using a delay-insensitive deconvolution method compared with a standard deconvolution method. RESULTS One hundred sixty-eight CT perfusion maps were constructed for each software package. Both software programs generated a mean CBF at the infarct core of < 12 mL/100 g/min and a mean CBV of < 2 mL/100 g for AIF placement proximal to the clot in the ipsilateral hemisphere and proximal and distal to the clot in the contralateral hemisphere. For AIF placement distal to the clot in the ipsilateral hemisphere, the mean CBF significantly increased to 17.3 mL/100 g/min with delay-insensitive software and to 19.4 mL/100 g/min with standard software (p < 0.05). The mean MTT was significantly decreased for this AIF position. Furthermore, this AIF position yielded qualitatively different parametric maps, being most pronounced with MTT and CBF. Overall, CBV was least affected by AIF location. CONCLUSION For postprocessing of accurate quantitative CT perfusion maps, laterality of the AIF location is less important than avoiding AIF placement distal to the clot as detected on CT angiography. This pitfall is less severe with deconvolution-based software programs using a delay-insensitive technique than with those using a standard deconvolution

  16. Functional Expression Profile of Voltage-Gated K(+) Channel Subunits in Rat Small Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robert H; Fromme, Samantha

    2016-06-01

    Multiple K v channel complexes contribute to total K v current in numerous cell types and usually subserve different physiological functions. Identifying the complete compliment of functional K v channel subunits in cells is a prerequisite to understanding regulatory function. It was the goal of this work to determine the complete K v subunit compliment that contribute to functional K v currents in rat small mesenteric artery (SMA) myocytes as a prelude to studying channel regulation. Using RNA prepared from freshly dispersed myocytes, high levels of K v 1.2, 1.5, and 2.1 and lower levels of K v 7.4 α-subunit expressions were demonstrated by quantitative PCR and confirmed by Western blotting. Selective inhibitors correolide (K v 1; COR), stromatoxin (K v 2.1; ScTx), and linopirdine (K v 7.4; LINO) decreased K v current at +40 mV in SMA by 46 ± 4, 48 ± 4, and 6.5 ± 2 %, respectively, and K v current in SMA was insensitive to α-dendrotoxin. Contractions of SMA segments pretreated with 100 nmol/L phenylephrine were enhanced by 27 ± 3, 30 ± 8, and 7 ± 3 % of the response to 120 mmol/L KCl by COR, ScTX, and LINO, respectively. The presence of K v 6.1, 9.3, β1.1, and β1.2 was demonstrated by RT-PCR using myocyte RNA with expressions of K vβ1.2 and K v 9.3 about tenfold higher than K vβ1.1 and K v 6.1, respectively. Selective inhibitors of K v 1.3, 3.4, 4.1, and 4.3 channels also found at the RNA and/or protein level had no significant effect on K v current or contraction. These results suggest that K v current in rat SMA myocytes are dominated equally by two major components consisting of K v 1.2-1.5-β1.2 and K v 2.1-9.3 channels along with a smaller contribution from K v 7.4 channels but differences in voltage dependence of activation allows all three to provide significant contributions to SMA function at physiological voltages.

  17. Functional Expression Profile of Voltage-Gated K(+) Channel Subunits in Rat Small Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robert H; Fromme, Samantha

    2016-06-01

    Multiple K v channel complexes contribute to total K v current in numerous cell types and usually subserve different physiological functions. Identifying the complete compliment of functional K v channel subunits in cells is a prerequisite to understanding regulatory function. It was the goal of this work to determine the complete K v subunit compliment that contribute to functional K v currents in rat small mesenteric artery (SMA) myocytes as a prelude to studying channel regulation. Using RNA prepared from freshly dispersed myocytes, high levels of K v 1.2, 1.5, and 2.1 and lower levels of K v 7.4 α-subunit expressions were demonstrated by quantitative PCR and confirmed by Western blotting. Selective inhibitors correolide (K v 1; COR), stromatoxin (K v 2.1; ScTx), and linopirdine (K v 7.4; LINO) decreased K v current at +40 mV in SMA by 46 ± 4, 48 ± 4, and 6.5 ± 2 %, respectively, and K v current in SMA was insensitive to α-dendrotoxin. Contractions of SMA segments pretreated with 100 nmol/L phenylephrine were enhanced by 27 ± 3, 30 ± 8, and 7 ± 3 % of the response to 120 mmol/L KCl by COR, ScTX, and LINO, respectively. The presence of K v 6.1, 9.3, β1.1, and β1.2 was demonstrated by RT-PCR using myocyte RNA with expressions of K vβ1.2 and K v 9.3 about tenfold higher than K vβ1.1 and K v 6.1, respectively. Selective inhibitors of K v 1.3, 3.4, 4.1, and 4.3 channels also found at the RNA and/or protein level had no significant effect on K v current or contraction. These results suggest that K v current in rat SMA myocytes are dominated equally by two major components consisting of K v 1.2-1.5-β1.2 and K v 2.1-9.3 channels along with a smaller contribution from K v 7.4 channels but differences in voltage dependence of activation allows all three to provide significant contributions to SMA function at physiological voltages. PMID:27286858

  18. Translational informatics approach for identifying the functional molecular communicators linking coronary artery disease, infection and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    SHARMA, ANKIT; GHATGE, MADANKUMAR; MUNDKUR, LAKSHMI; VANGALA, RAJANI KANTH

    2016-01-01

    Translational informatics approaches are required for the integration of diverse and accumulating data to enable the administration of effective translational medicine specifically in complex diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD). In the current study, a novel approach for elucidating the association between infection, inflammation and CAD was used. Genes for CAD were collected from the CAD-gene database and those for infection and inflammation were collected from the UniProt database. The cytomegalovirus (CMV)-induced genes were identified from the literature and the CAD-associated clinical phenotypes were obtained from the Unified Medical Language System. A total of 55 gene ontologies (GO) termed functional communicator ontologies were identifed in the gene sets linking clinical phenotypes in the diseasome network. The network topology analysis suggested that important functions including viral entry, cell adhesion, apoptosis, inflammatory and immune responses networked with clinical phenotypes. Microarray data was extracted from the Gene Expression Omnibus (dataset: GSE48060) for highly networked disease myocardial infarction. Further analysis of differentially expressed genes and their GO terms suggested that CMV infection may trigger a xenobiotic response, oxidative stress, inflammation and immune modulation. Notably, the current study identified γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT)-5 as a potential biomarker with an odds ratio of 1.947, which increased to 2.561 following the addition of CMV and CMV-neutralizing antibody (CMV-NA) titers. The C-statistics increased from 0.530 for conventional risk factors (CRFs) to 0.711 for GGT in combination with the above mentioned infections and CRFs. Therefore, the translational informatics approach used in the current study identified a potential molecular mechanism for CMV infection in CAD, and a potential biomarker for risk prediction. PMID:27035874

  19. Lower Extremity Ischemia, Calf Skeletal Muscle Characteristics, and Functional Impairment in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Hoff, Frederick; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pearce, William H.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Tian, Lu; Liu, Kiang; Schneider, Joseph R.; Sharma, Leena; Tan, Jin; Criqui, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether lower ankle brachial index (ABI) levels are associated with lower calf skeletal muscle area and higher calf muscle percentage fat in persons with and without lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD). DESIGN Cross-sectional. SETTING Three Chicago-area medical centers. PARTICIPANTS Four hundred thirty-nine persons with PAD (ABI<0.90) and 265 without PAD (ABI 0.90–1.30). MEASUREMENTS Calf muscle cross-sectional area and the percentage of fat in calf muscle were measured using computed tomography at 66.7% of the distance between the distal and proximal tibia. Physical activity was measured using an accelerometer. Functional measures included the 6-minute walk, 4-meter walking speed, and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). RESULTS Adjusting for age, sex, race, comorbidities, and other potential confounders, lower ABI values were associated with lower calf muscle area (ABI<0.50, 5,193 mm2; ABI 0.50–0.90, 5,536 mm2; ABI 0.91–1.30, 5,941 mm2; P for trend <.001). These significant associations remained after additional adjustment for physical activity. In participants with PAD, lower calf muscle area in the leg with higher ABI was associated with significantly poorer performance in usual- and fast-paced 4-meter walking speed and on the SPPB, adjusting for ABI, physical activity, percentage fat in calf muscle, muscle area in the leg with lower ABI, and other confounders (P<.05 for all comparisons). CONCLUSION These data support the hypothesis that lower extremity ischemia has a direct adverse effect on calf skeletal muscle area. This association may mediate previously established relationships between PAD and functional impairment. PMID:17341243

  20. Absence of arterial baroreflex modulation of skin sympathetic activity and sweat rate during whole-body heating in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    1. Prior findings suggest that baroreflexes are capable of modulating skin blood flow, but the effects of baroreceptor loading/unloading on sweating are less clear. Therefore, this project tested the hypothesis that pharmacologically induced alterations in arterial blood pressure in heated humans would lead to baroreflex-mediated changes in both skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) and sweat rate. 2. In seven subjects mean arterial blood pressure was lowered (approximately 8 mmHg) and then raised (approximately 13 mmHg) by bolus injections of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively. Moreover, in a separate protocol, arterial blood pressure was reduced via steady-state administration of sodium nitroprusside. In both normothermia and heat-stress conditions the following responses were monitored: sublingual and mean skin temperatures, heart rate, beat-by-beat blood pressure, skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry), local sweat rate and SSNA (microneurography from peroneal nerve). 3. Whole-body heating increased skin and sublingual temperatures, heart rate, cutaneous blood flow, sweat rate and SSNA, but did not change arterial blood pressure. Heart rate was significantly elevated (from 74 +/- 3 to 92 +/- 4 beats x min(-1); P < 0.001) during bolus sodium nitroprusside-induced reductions in blood pressure, and significantly reduced (from 92 +/- 4 to 68 +/- 4 beats x min(-1); P < 0.001) during bolus phenylephrine-induced elevations in blood pressure, thereby demonstrating normal baroreflex function in these subjects. 4. Neither SSNA nor sweat rate was altered by rapid (bolus infusion) or sustained (steady-state infusion) changes in blood pressure regardless of the thermal condition. 5. These data suggest that SSNA and sweat rate are not modulated by arterial baroreflexes in normothermic or moderately heated individuals.

  1. Preservation of retinal structure and function after cilioretinal artery occlusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Brown, Craig J

    2016-01-01

    Cilioretinal artery occlusion is a cause of sudden, often catastrophic loss of central vision. There are no established effective treatments. Recently, a patient presented 24 hours after a cilioretinal artery occlusion, following a cardiac catheterization prior to which her blood thinners had been discontinued. Lacking an effective way to address the severe retinal ischemic oxidative stress, she was offered, under compassionate use, a multivitamin complex designed to address retinal ischemia and oxidative stress. Significant components of this product are L-methylfolate and n-acetyl cysteine. The patient experienced a rapid unexpected improvement in vision and preservation of retinal structure, suggesting that marked improvement in retinal artery occlusions outcomes may be possible as late as 24 hours postocclusion. This is the third reported case of cilioretinal artery occlusion associated with cardiac catheterization. PMID:26929671

  2. Evaluation of functional severity of coronary artery disease and fluid dynamics' influence on hemodynamic parameters: A review.

    PubMed

    Govindaraju, Kalimuthu; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Viswanathan, Girish N; Ramesh, S V; Badarudin, A

    2013-05-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is responsible for most of the deaths in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Diagnostic coronary angiography analysis offers an anatomical knowledge of the severity of the stenosis. The functional or physiological significance is more valuable than the anatomical significance of CAD. Clinicians assess the functional severity of the stenosis by resorting to an invasive measurement of the pressure drop and flow. Hemodynamic parameters, such as pressure wire assessment fractional flow reserve (FFR) or Doppler wire assessment coronary flow reserve (CFR) are well-proven techniques to evaluate the physiological significance of the coronary artery stenosis in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Between the two techniques mentioned above, the FFR is seen as a very useful index. The presence of guide wire reduces the coronary flow which causes the underestimation of pressure drop across the stenosis which leads to dilemma for the clinicians in the assessment of moderate stenosis. In such condition, the fundamental fluid mechanics is useful in the development of new functional severity parameters such as pressure drop coefficient and lesion flow coefficient. Since the flow takes place in a narrowed artery, the blood behaves as a non-Newtonian fluid. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) allows a complete coronary flow simulation to study the relationship between the pressure and flow. This paper aims at explaining (i) diagnostic modalities for the evaluation of the CAD and valuable insights regarding FFR in the evaluation of the functional severity of the CAD (ii) the role of fluid dynamics in measuring the severity of CAD. PMID:22704601

  3. Kinetic quantitation of cerebral PET-FDG studies without concurrent blood sampling: statistical recovery of the arterial input function.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, F; Kirrane, J; Muzi, M; O'Sullivan, J N; Spence, A M; Mankoff, D A; Krohn, K A

    2010-03-01

    Kinetic quantitation of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies via compartmental modeling usually requires the time-course of the radio-tracer concentration in the arterial blood as an arterial input function (AIF). For human and animal imaging applications, significant practical difficulties are associated with direct arterial sampling and as a result there is substantial interest in alternative methods that require no blood sampling at the time of the study. A fixed population template input function derived from prior experience with directly sampled arterial curves is one possibility. Image-based extraction, including requisite adjustment for spillover and recovery, is another approach. The present work considers a hybrid statistical approach based on a penalty formulation in which the information derived from a priori studies is combined in a Bayesian manner with information contained in the sampled image data in order to obtain an input function estimate. The absolute scaling of the input is achieved by an empirical calibration equation involving the injected dose together with the subject's weight, height and gender. The technique is illustrated in the context of (18)F -Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET studies in humans. A collection of 79 arterially sampled FDG blood curves are used as a basis for a priori characterization of input function variability, including scaling characteristics. Data from a series of 12 dynamic cerebral FDG PET studies in normal subjects are used to evaluate the performance of the penalty-based AIF estimation technique. The focus of evaluations is on quantitation of FDG kinetics over a set of 10 regional brain structures. As well as the new method, a fixed population template AIF and a direct AIF estimate based on segmentation are also considered. Kinetics analyses resulting from these three AIFs are compared with those resulting from radially sampled AIFs. The proposed penalty-based AIF extraction method is found to

  4. Automatic detection of local arterial input functions through Independent Component Analysis on Dynamic Contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Narvaez, Mario; Ruiz-Espana, Silvia; Arana, Estanislao; Moratal, David

    2015-08-01

    Arterial Input Function (AIF) is obtained from perfusion studies as a basic parameter for the calculus of hemodynamic variables used as surrogate markers of the vascular status of tissues. However, at present, its identification is made manually leading to high subjectivity, low repeatability and considerable time consumption. We propose an alternative method to automatically identify local AIF in perfusion images using Independent Component Analysis. PMID:26737244

  5. Direct binding and functional studies on muscarinic cholinoceptors in porcine coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Yamazawa, T; Nakayama, K

    1990-02-01

    The muscarinic cholinoceptors in porcine coronary artery were identified and characterized by a binding assay using (-)-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and also by pharmacological method. Specific (-)-[3H]QNB binding in the coronary artery was saturable and of high affinity (Kd = 0.08 nM), and it showed a pharmacological specificity as well as stereoselectivity which characterized muscarinic receptors. Muscarinic antagonists competed with the (-)-[3H]QNB binding in order: nonlabeled QNB greater than dexetimide greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116 greater than levetimide greater than gallamine. Dexetimide was approximately 2000 times as potent as levetimide. The potencies (pKi) of these muscarinic antagonists in competing for (-)-[3H]QNB binding sites in porcine coronary artery correlated well with their pharmacological potencies (pA2 for antagonistic effect of acetylcholine-induced contraction of coronary artery). The decrease in the (-)-[3H]QNB binding by atropine and pirenzepine was due to a reduction in the apparent affinity with little change in the number of maximal binding sites, suggesting a competitive antagonism. Specific (-)-[3H]QNB binding (Kd and maximal number of binding sites) in porcine coronary artery was not changed by the removal of endothelium. We conclude: 1) (-)-[3H]QNB selectively labels the physiologically relevant muscarinic receptors in porcine coronary artery and 2) the majority of these receptors is localized on vascular smooth muscles and the receptors mediate the acetylcholine-induced contractile response of coronary artery. PMID:2313599

  6. Right ventricular free wall pacing improves cardiac pump function in severe pulmonary arterial hypertension: a computer simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lumens, Joost; Arts, Theo; Broers, Bernard; Boomars, Karin A; van Paassen, Pieter; Prinzen, Frits W; Delhaas, Tammo

    2009-12-01

    In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), duration of myofiber shortening is prolonged in the right ventricular (RV) free wall (RVfw) compared with that in the interventricular septum and left ventricular free wall. This interventricular mechanical asynchrony eventually leads to right heart failure. We investigated by computer simulation whether, in PAH, early RVfw pacing may improve interventricular mechanical synchrony and, hence, cardiac pump function. A mathematical model of the human heart and circulation was used to simulate left ventricular and RV pump mechanics and myofiber mechanics. First, we simulated cardiovascular mechanics of a healthy adult at rest. Size and mass of heart and blood vessels were adapted so that mechanical tissue load was normalized. Second, compensated PAH was simulated by increasing mean pulmonary artery pressure to 32 mmHg while applying load adaptation. Third, decompensated PAH was simulated by increasing mean pulmonary artery pressure further to 79 mmHg without further adaptation. Finally, early RVfw pacing was simulated in severely decompensated PAH. Time courses of circumferential strain in the ventricular walls as simulated were similar to the ones measured in healthy subjects (uniform strain patterns) and in PAH patients (prolonged RVfw shortening). When simulating pacing in decompensated PAH, RV pump function was best upon 40-ms RVfw preexcitation, as evidenced by maximal decrease of RV end-diastolic volume, reduced RVfw myofiber work, and most homogeneous distribution of workload over the ventricular walls. Thus our simulations indicate that, in decompensated PAH, RVfw pacing may improve RV pump function and may homogenize workload over the ventricular walls.

  7. Cardioankle vascular index evaluations revealed that cotreatment of ARB Antihypertension medication with traditional Chinese medicine improved arterial functionality.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Yan, Hua; Yao, Min J; Ma, Jie; Jia, Jun M; Ruan, Fen X; Yao, Zeng C; Huang, Hua M; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Ting; Lv, Hua; Endler, Alexander M

    2013-05-01

    Qian Yang He Ji (QYHJ) is a traditional Chinese medicine composed of Digitalis purpurea, Uncaria gambir, Fructus tribuli terrestris, and Ligustrum lucidum. Here, we explored whether combining an antihypertensive angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) therapy with QYHJ can improve the arterial functionality of hypertensive patients. One hundred and eight hypertensive patients were randomized into 2 groups; 1 group (n = 53) was treated with ARB and the other group (n = 55) was treated with ARB combined with QYHJ. Each of the 2 groups included 3 subgroups (pure hypertension, hypertension with diabetes, and hypertension with coronary heart disease) and was further divided into patients with and without complications. The cardioankle vascular index and intima-media thickness and pulse pressure were the outcome evaluation parameter. Combined QYHJ and ARB treatment reduced the values of cardioankle vascular index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse pressure to significantly lower levels than ARB treatment alone did in hypertension patients after 6 months of treatment. ARB improves hypertension, but a combined QYHJ treatment can additionally ameliorate the arterial functionality not only in solely hypertensive patients but also in hypertensive patients with diabetes and coronary heart disease complications. QYHJ coapplication might be a choice to further improve the arterial functionality during an ARB hypertension treatment. PMID:23188130

  8. Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts. PMID:26587425

  9. KCa1.1 is potential marker for distinguishing Ah-type baroreceptor neurons in NTS and contributes to sex-specific presynaptic neurotransmission in baroreflex afferent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Yao; Yan, Zhen-Yu; Qu, Mei-Yu; Guo, Xin-Jing; Li, Guo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yang; Ban, Tao; Sun, Hong-Li; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-09-14

    Sexual-dimorphic neurocontrol of circulation has been described in baroreflex due largely to the function of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs, 1st-order) in nodose. However, it remains unclear if sex- and afferent-specific neurotransmission could also be observed in the central synapses within nucleus of solitary track (NTS, 2nd-order). According to the principle of no mixed neurotransmission among afferents and differentiation of Ah- and A-types to iberiotoxin (IbTX) observed in nodose, the 2nd-order Ah-type BRNs are highly expected. To test this hypothesis, the excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded in identified 2nd-order BRNs before and after IbTX using brain slice and whole-cell patch. These results showed that, in male rats, the dynamics of EPSCs in capsaicin-sensitive C-types were dramatically altered by IbTX, but not in capsaicin-insensitive A-types. Interestingly, near 50% capsaicin-insensitive neurons in females showed similar effects to C-types, suggesting the existence of Ah-types in NTS, which may be the likely reason why the females had lower blood pressure and higher sensitivity to aortic depressor nerve stimulation via KCa1.1-mediated presynaptic glutamate release from Ah-type afferent terminals.

  10. Influence of cigarette smoking on human autonomic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedermaier, O. N.; Smith, M. L.; Beightol, L. A.; Zukowska-Grojec, Z.; Goldstein, D. S.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although cigarette smoking is known to lead to widespread augmentation of sympathetic nervous system activity, little is known about the effects of smoking on directly measured human sympathetic activity and its reflex control. METHODS AND RESULTS. We studied the acute effects of smoking two research-grade cigarettes on muscle sympathetic nerve activity and on arterial baroreflex-mediated changes of sympathetic and vagal neural cardiovascular outflows in eight healthy habitual smokers. Measurements were made during frequency-controlled breathing, graded Valsalva maneuvers, and carotid baroreceptor stimulation with ramped sequences of neck pressure and suction. Smoking provoked the following changes: Arterial pressure increased significantly, and RR intervals, RR interval spectral power at the respiratory frequency, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Plasma nicotine levels increased significantly, but plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, and neuropeptide Y levels did not change. Peak sympathetic nerve activity during and systolic pressure overshoots after Valsalva straining increased significantly in proportion to increases of plasma nicotine levels. The average carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex relation shifted rightward and downward on arterial pressure and RR interval axes; average gain, operational point, and response range did not change. CONCLUSIONS. In habitual smokers, smoking acutely reduces baseline levels of vagal-cardiac nerve activity and completely resets vagally mediated arterial baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses. Smoking also reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity but augments increases of sympathetic activity triggered by brief arterial pressure reductions. This pattern of autonomic changes is likely to influence smokers' responses to acute arterial pressure reductions importantly.

  11. Effects of age and sex on cerebrovascular function in the rat middle cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of estrogen on cerebrovascular function are well known, the age-dependent deleterious effects of estrogen are largely unstudied. It was hypothesized that age and sex interact in modulating cerebrovascular reactivity to vasopressin (VP) by altering the role of prostanoids in vascular function. Methods Female (F) Sprague–Dawley rats approximating key stages of “hormonal aging” in humans were studied: premenopausal (mature multigravid, MA, cyclic, 5–6 months) and postmenopausal (reproductively senescent, RS, acyclic, 10–12 months). Age-matched male (M) rats were also studied. Reactivity to VP (10−12–10−7 M) was measured in pressurized middle cerebral artery segments in the absence or presence of selective inhibitors of COX-1 (SC560, SC, 1 μM) or COX-2 (NS398, NS, 10 μM). VP-stimulated release of PGI2 and TXA2 were measured using radioimmunoassay of 6-keto-PGF1α and TXB2 (stable metabolites, pg/mg dry wt/45 min). Results In M, there were no changes in VP-induced vasoconstriction with age. Further, there were no significant differences in basal or in low- or high-VP-stimulated PGI2 or TXA2 production in younger or older M. In contrast, there were marked differences in cerebrovascular reactivity and prostanoid release with advancing age in F. Older RS F exhibited reduced maximal constrictor responses to VP, which can be attributed to enhanced COX-1 derived dilator prostanoids. VP-induced vasoconstriction in younger MA F utilized both COX-1 and COX-2 derived constrictor prostanoids. Further, VP-stimulated PGI2 and TXA2 production was enhanced by endogenous estrogen and decreased with advancing age in F, but not in M rats. Conclusions This is the first study to examine the effects of age and sex on the mechanisms underlying cerebrovascular reactivity to VP. Interestingly, VP-mediated constriction was reduced by age in F, but was unchanged in M rats. Additionally, it was observed

  12. [The biological reaction of inflammation, methylglyoxal of blood plasma, functional and structural alterations in elastic type arteries at the early stage of hypertension disease].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Dmitriev, V A; Oshchepkov, E V; Balakhonova, T V; Tripoten', M I; Shiriaeva, Iu K

    2012-08-01

    The article deals with studying of the relationship between biologic reaction of inflammation with glycosylation reaction and content of methylglyoxal in blood serum. The positive correlation between pulse wave velocity and content of methylglyoxal, C-reactive protein in intercellular medium and malleolar brachial index value was established. This data matches the experimental results concerning involvement of biological reaction of inflammation into structural changes of elastic type arteries under hypertension disease, formation of arteries' rigidity and increase of pulse wave velocity. The arterial blood pressure is a biological reaction of hydrodynamic pressure which is used in vivo by several biological functions: biological function of homeostasis, function of endoecology, biological function of adaptation and function of locomotion. The biological reaction of hydrodynamic (hydraulic) pressure is a mode of compensation of derangement of several biological functions which results in the very high rate of hypertension disease in population. As a matter of fact, hypertension disease is a syndrome of lingering pathological compensation by higher arterial blood pressure of the biological functions derangements occurring in the distal section at the level of paracrine cenoses of cells. The arterial blood pressure is a kind of in vivo integral indicator of deranged metabolism. The essential hypertension disease pathogenically is a result of the derangement of three biological functions: biological function of homeostasis, biological function of trophology - nutrition (biological reaction of external feeding - exotrophia) and biological function of endoecology. In case of "littering" of intercellular medium in vivo with nonspecific endogenic flogogens a phylogenetically earlier activation of biological reactions of excretion, inflammation and hydrodynamic arterial blood pressure occur. In case of derangement of biological function of homeostasis, decreasing of

  13. [Structural and functional changes of external and intracranial arteries in elderly patients of different ethnic groups with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Fedorets, V N; Abramov, E A; Bartosh-Zelenaia, S Iu; Naĭden, T V

    2014-01-01

    The present article discusses the problem of structural and functional changes in extra-and intracranial arteries in elderly patients with ischemic heart disease (CHD) belonging to different ethnic groups before the upcoming coronary arteriography research and planned operative intervention. We examined 120 elderly patients with ischemic heart disease, including 50 patients of Korean nationality and 70 patients of Slavic ethnicity. Average values of IMT of the right and left CCA patients of South Asian group were significantly lower than those of Slavic ethnicity. Elderly patients with CHD the violation of cerebral circulation were due to atherosclerotic lesions of the extracranial vessels and local hemodynamic disturbances in their area of pathological tortuosity. Korean ethnicity elderly patients with CHD were observed more pronounced signs of stenosis and deformation of the main arteries of the neck, as well as lower collateral reserve of cerebral circulation.

  14. TNF-α impairs endothelial function in adipose tissue resistance arteries of mice with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Donato, Anthony J; Henson, Grant D; Morgan, R Garrett; Enz, Ryley A; Walker, Ashley E; Lesniewski, Lisa A

    2012-09-15

    inflammation in the visceral adipose tissue resulting from diet-induced obesity impairs endothelial function and NO bioavailability in the associated resistance arteries. This dysfunction may have important implications for adipose tissue blood flow and appropriate tissue function.

  15. Pulsatile diastolic increase and systolic decrease in arterial blood pressure: their mechanism of production and physiological role.

    PubMed

    Mandoki, Juan José; Casa-Tirao, Beatriz; Molina-Guarneros, Juan Arcadio; Jiménez-Orozco, Fausto Alejandro; García-Mondragón, María Juana; Maldonado-Espinoza, Amelia

    2013-08-01

    The diastolic pulsatile increase in arterial blood pressure is shown to occur earlier in the aorta than in other arteries. It is thus not a reflection of the systolic pressure wave, as has been generally assumed, but an independent pressure wave produced by the sequential contraction of the arterial tree. Conversely, a systolic pulsatile decrease in the rate of blood pressure rise is also produced by an active relaxation of the arterial tree. Simultaneously with the pulsatile changes in arterial blood pressure, there are corresponding changes in arterial blood flow. All these cyclic changes are reflex responses to decreasing diastolic and increasing systolic baroreceptor firing rates, respectively. The two reflexes contribute, together with the known compliance of the large arteries and the great arteriolar blood flow resistance, to the steadiness of capillary blood flow throughout the systolic and the much longer-lasting diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle.

  16. Relationship between endogenous concentrations of vasoactive substances and measures of peripheral vasodilator function in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Nichols, Wilmer W; Conti, C Richard; Braith, Randy W

    2010-01-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between plasma concentrations of nitrite/nitrate (NO(x)) and endothelin (ET)-1 and non-invasive measures of peripheral vasodilator function in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). 2. Twenty-two patients with angiographic CAD underwent non-invasive measurement of peripheral vasodilator function in the brachial conduit artery (flow-mediated dilation (FMD) testing via ultrasound) and in the forearm resistance arteries (via venous occlusion plethysmography) during reactive hyperaemia after 5 min ischaemia. In addition, plasma NO(x) and ET-1 concentrations were determined. 3. The plasma concentration of NO(x) was related to the peak brachial FMD response when expressed as either the relative (%) or absolute (mm) change in diameter (r = 0.73, P < 0.001; and r = 0.64, P < 0.01, respectively). Moreover, plasma concentrations of NO(x) demonstrated a relationship with forearm vasodilation estimated by total forearm blood flow following 5 min ischaemia (r = 0.63, P < 0.01) and the flow debt repayment of the forearm (r = 0.54, P < 0.01). Finally, ET-1 concentrations were inversely related to FMD% (r = -0.45, P < 0.05). 4. The findings of the present study demonstrate a relationship between the plasma concentrations of NO(x) and measures of vascular reactivity in conduit and resistance arteries in patients with CAD. Therefore, measurement of plasma NO(x) may serve as a reliable marker for peripheral vasodilator dysfunction in patients with CAD. PMID:19515062

  17. High dietary fructose does not exacerbate the detrimental consequences of high fat diet on basilar artery function.

    PubMed

    Toklu, H Z; Muller-Delp, J; Sakaraya, Y; Oktay, S; Kirichenko, N; Matheny, M; Carter, C S; Morgan, D; Strehler, K Y E; Tumer, N; Scarpace, P J

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of a high fat (HF) diet alone or with high fructose (HF/F) on functional and structural changes in the basilar arteries and cardiovascular health parameters in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a HF (30%) or HF/F (30/40%) diet for 12 weeks. The basilar artery was cannulated in a pressurized system (90 cm H2O) and vascular responses to KCl (30 - 120 mM), endothelin (10(-11) - 10(-7) M), acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-10) - 10(-4) M), diethylamine (DEA)-NONO-ate (10(-10) - 10(-4) M), and papaverine (10(-10) - 10(-4) M) were evaluated. Rats were also monitored for food intake, body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and heart rate. At death, asymmetrical dimethyl arginine level (ADMA) and leptin were assayed in serum. Although there was no significant difference in weight gain and food intake, HF and HF/F diets increased body fat composition and decreased the lean mass. HF/F diet accelerated the development of dyslipidemia. Although resting blood pressure remained unchanged, stress caused a significant elevation in blood pressure and a modest increase in heart rate in HF fed rats. Both HF and HF/F diet resulted in decreased response to endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation, whereas increased basilar artery wall thickness was observed only in HF group. Serum leptin levels positively correlated with wall thickness. Moreover serum ADMA was increased and eNOS immunofluorescence was significantly decreased with both diets. These data suggest that the presence of high fructose in a HF diet does not exacerbate the detrimental consequences of a HF diet on basilar artery function. PMID:27226180

  18. Exercise improves the dilatation function of mesenteric arteries in postmyocardial infarction rats via a PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youhua; Wang, Shengpeng; Wier, W Gil; Zhang, Quanjiang; Jiang, Hongke; Li, Qiuxia; Chen, Shengfeng; Tian, Zhenjun; Li, Youyou; Yu, Xiaojiang; Zhao, Ming; Liu, Jinjun; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Zang, Weijin

    2010-12-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) has been shown to induce endothelial dysfunction in peripheral resistance arteries and thus increase peripheral resistance. This study was designed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of post-MI-related dysfunctional dilatation of peripheral resistance arteries and, furthermore, to examine whether exercise may restore dysfunctional dilatation of peripheral resistance arteries. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated, MI, and MI + exercise. Ultrastructure and relaxation function of the mesenteric arteries, as well as phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Akt kinases (Akt), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, and phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and eNOS by ACh were determined. Post-MI rats exhibited pronounced ultrastructural changes in mesenteric artery endothelial cells and endothelial dysfunction. In addition, the activities of PI3K, Akt, and eNOS, and their phosphorylation by ACh were significantly attenuated in mesenteric arteries (P < 0.05-0.01). After 8 wk of exercise, not only did endothelial cells appeared more normal in structure, but also ameliorated post-MI-associated mesenteric arterial dysfunction, which were accompanied by elevated activities of PI3K, Akt, and eNOS, and their phosphorylation by ACh (P < 0.05-0.01). Importantly, inhibition of either PI3K or eNOS attenuated exercise-induced restoration of the dilatation function and blocked PI3K, Akt, and eNOS phosphorylation by ACh in the mesenteric arteries. These data demonstrate that MI induces dysfunctional dilation of peripheral resistance arteries by degradation of endothelial structural integrity and attenuating PI3K-Akt-eNOS signaling. Exercise may restore dilatation function of peripheral resistance arteries by protecting endothelial structural integrity and increasing PI3K-Akt-eNOS signaling cascades.

  19. Intrapericardial denervation - Radial artery blood flow and heart rate responses to LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrapericardial denervation on the radial artery blood flow velocity (RABFV) and heart rate (HR) responses to LBNP in rhesus monkeys were investigated by measuring the RABFV transcutaneously by a continuous-wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter in order to derive an index of forearm blood flow response to low (0 to -20 mm Hg) and high (0 to -60 mm Hg) ramp exposures during supine LBNP. Four of the eight subjects were subjected to efferent and afferent cardiac denervation. It was found that, during low levels of LBNP, monkeys with cardiac denervation exhibited no cardiopulmonary baroreceptor-mediated change in the RABFV or HR, unlike the intact animals, which showed steady decreases in RABFV during both high- and low-pressure protocols. It is suggested that forearm blood flow and HR responses to low-level LBNP, along with pharmacological challenge, are viable physiological tests for verifying the completeness of atrial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor denervation.

  20. Effects of propranolol on resting and postextrasystolic potentiated left ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M J; Temkin, L P; Goldman, S; Ovitt, T W

    1983-01-01

    The effect of propranolol on global and segmental left ventricular function at rest and after postextrasystolic potentiation was studied in 12 patients with chest pain. Heart rate was controlled with atrial pacing, and left ventricular cineangiograms were performed before and after 0.15 mg/kg of propranolol. During each ventriculogram a premature ventricular stimulus was introduced by means of a programmed stimulator. Propranolol decreased global left ventricular ejection fraction from 64 +/- 4.5 to 58 +/- 4.6 (p less than 0.03). Postextrasystolic potentiated global ejection fraction was not affected by propranolol (78 +/- 3.5 vs 73.6 +/- 3.4; p = NS). The area ejection fraction of the anteroapical region was decreased after propranolol (64 +/- 4.8 vs 52 +/- 6.5; p less than 0.01); however, the postextrasystolic potentiated area ejection fraction was not affected by propranolol (78 +/- 2.6 vs 71 +/- 4.6; p = NS). Frame by frame analysis of the ventriculograms demonstrated that propranolol depressed global and segmental left ventricular function by affecting the second one-third ejection fraction without influencing the first or third one-third ejection fraction. Propranolol has a small depressant effect on global and segmental left ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease. Postextrasystolic potentiated global and segmental left ventricular function and early systolic ejection phase indices are not altered by propranolol and therefore may be useful in assessing left ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease who are taking propranolol.

  1. Impact of age on the vasodilatory function of human skeletal muscle feed arteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Ives, Stephen J; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Hyngstrom, John R; Reese, Van; Layec, Gwenael; Bharath, Leena P; Symons, John D; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-01-15

    Although advancing age is often associated with attenuated skeletal muscle blood flow and skeletal muscle feed arteries (SMFAs) have been recognized to play a regulatory role in the vasculature, little is known about the impact of age on the vasodilatory capacity of human SMFAs. Therefore, endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation were assessed in SMFAs (diameter: 544 ± 63 μm) obtained from 24 (equally represented) young (33 ± 2 yr) and old (71 ± 2 yr) subjects in response to three stimuli: 1) flow-induced shear stress, 2) ACh, and 3) sodium nitropusside (SNP). Both assessments of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, flow (young subjects: 68 ± 1% and old subjects: 32 ± 7%) and ACh (young subjects: 92 ± 3% and old subjects: 73 ± 4%), were significantly blunted (P < 0.05) in SMFAs of old compared with young subjects, with no such age-related differences in endothelium-independent vasodilation (SNP). In response to an increase in flow-induced shear stress, vasodilation kinetics (time constant to reach 63% of the amplitude of the response: 55 ± 1 s in young subjects and 92 ± 7 s in old subjects) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation (phospho-eNOS(s1177)/total eNOS: 1.0 ± 0.1 in young subjects and 0.2 ± 0.1 in old subjects) were also significantly attenuated in old compared with young subjects (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the vessel superoxide concentration was greater in old subjects (old subjects: 3.9 ± 1.0 area under curve/mg and young subjects: 1.7 ± 0.1 area under the curve/mg, P < 0.05). These findings reveal that the endothelium-dependent vasodilatory capacity, including vasodilation kinetics but not smooth muscle function, of human SMFAs is blunted with age and may be due to free radicals. Given the potential regulatory role of SMFAs in skeletal muscle blood flow, these findings may explain, at least in part, the often observed attenuated perfusion of skeletal muscle with advancing age that may contribute to exercise

  2. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X.; Rios Piedra, Edgar A.; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  3. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X.; Rios Piedra, Edgar A.; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  4. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables.

    PubMed

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X; Rios Piedra, Edgar A; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  5. [The inversion of concepts about biological role of system rennin-angiotensin II- aldosterone and functions of arterial tension as a metabolism regulator].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2015-02-01

    The phylogenetic theory of general pathology postulates that in physiology and pathology the concepts of biological role of arterial tension had been subjected to inversion. The activation by nephron of synthesis of components rennin-angiotensin II and increasing of aldosterone secretion are directed not to increase arterial tension but to preserve volume of piece of third world ocean privatized by each entity as pool of intercellular medium where all cells continue to live as billions years before. In phylogenetic sense, early organs can't regulate effect of physical factor of regulation of metabolism the late one in phylogenesis of arterial tension. The cause of increasing of arterial tension is the vasomotor center but not the kidneys. The vasomotor center increases arterial tension in the proximal section and further hydrodynamic tension in the distal section of arterial stream and tends to resuscitate function of nephrons, biological function of endoecology and biological reaction of excretion. The arterial tension, besides the main role in biological function of locomotion, is a physical factor of compensation of disorders of biological functions of homeostasis, trophology, endoecology and adaptation. In phylogenesis, three levels of metabolism regulation has been developed The specific regulation of biochemical reactions occurs on autocrine level. In paracrin regulated cell cenosises, at distal section of arterial stream, metabolism is regulated by billions of local peristaltic pumps through compensation of biological reaction of endothelium-depended vasodilatation, micro-circulation, effect of humoral mediators and hormonal principles. In vivo, from the level of vasomotor center, metabolism non-specifically and systemic regulates physical factor-arterial tension through sympathetic activation of heart. The arterial tension in proximal section of arterial stream overcomes resistance and physically "forces through" arterioles with disordered micro

  6. Dark chocolate and vascular function in patients with peripheral artery disease: a randomized, controlled cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Alexandra; Koppensteiner, Renate; Steiner, Sabine; Niessner, Alexander; Goliasch, Georg; Gschwandtner, Michael; Hoke, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoid-rich dark chocolate has positive effects on vascular function in healthy subjects and in patients at risk of atherosclerosis. The impact of dark chocolate on endothelial and microvascular function in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) has not been investigated so far. In an investigator blinded, randomized, controlled, cross-over trial we assessed the effect of flavonoid-rich dark chocolate and cocoa-free control chocolate on flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery and on microvascular function (assessed by Laser Doppler fluxmetry) in 21 patients with symptomatic (Fontaine stage II) PAD. Measurements were done in each patient on 2 single days, with an interval of 7 days, at baseline and at 2 hours after ingestion of 50 g dark chocolate or 50 g white chocolate, respectively. FMD remained unchanged after intake of dark chocolate (baseline and 2 hours after ingestion, %: 5.1 [IQR 4.4 to 7.3] and 5.5 [IQR 3.9 to 10.4]; p = 0.57, and after intake of white chocolate (baseline and 2 hours after ingestion, %: 6.4 [IQR 4.5 to 11.4] and 4.4 [IQR 2.6 to 8.7]; p = 0.14. Similarly, microcirculatory parameters were not significantly altered after intake of any chocolate compared with the respective baseline values. In conclusion, a single consumption of 50 g dark chocolate has no effect on endothelial and microvascular function in patients with symptomatic PAD.

  7. Functional Relevance of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Cardiac Computed Tomography: Myocardial Perfusion and Fractional Flow Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Andreini, Daniele; Bertella, Erika; Mushtaq, Saima; Guaricci, Andrea Igoren; Pepi, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR) has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT), functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach. PMID:25692133

  8. Functional properties of the Kensey arterial recanalization catheter. In vitro investigations.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Rode, T; Günther, R W

    1990-06-01

    The properties of the Kensey catheter (Cordis Corp., Miami Lakes, FL), a new rotational device for recanalization of arterial occlusions, were studied in vitro. There was no effective centering of the catheter tip in the vessel and no measurable dilatation of the vessel lumen during rotation of the catheter tip. Flow studies confirmed recirculation and repeated exposure of particles at the catheter tip. The vortex induced by the rotating cam disappeared in stenotic segments. The maximum size of the pulverized specimen material was 20 microns for the normal arterial wall, 90 microns for the calcified and atheromatous plaque, and 900 microns for the fresh venous thrombus. For plaque material, an additional reduction of large particles to 30 microns was seen with a decrease in force and an increase in rotation speed. The size of thrombus particles decreased with an increase of rotation speed and the duration of treatment. PMID:2354924

  9. Dependence of BOLD signal fluctuation on arterial blood CO2 and O2: Implication for resting-state functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Yeow, Ling Yun; Biswal, Bharat; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2015-08-15

    Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI signal is known to be modulated by the CO2 level. Typically only end-tidal CO2, rather than the arterial partial pressure of CO2 (paCO2), was measured while the arterial partial pressure of O2 (paO2) level was not controlled due to free breathing, making their contribution not separable. Especially, the influences of paO2 and paCO2 on resting-state functional connectivity are not well studied. In this study, we investigated the relationship between paCO2 and resting as well as stimulus-evoked BOLD signals under hyperoxic and hypercapnic manipulation with tight control of arterial paO2. Rats under isoflurane anesthesia were subjected to six inspired gas conditions: 47% O2 in air (Normal), adding 1%, 2% or 5% CO2, carbogen (95% O2/5% CO2), and 100% O2. Somatosensory BOLD activation was significantly increased under 100% O2, while reduced with increased paCO2 levels. However, while resting BOLD connectivity pattern expanded and bilateral correlation increased under 100% O2, the correlation coefficient between the left and right somatosensory cortex was generally not dependent on paCO2 or paO2. Interestingly, the correlation in 0.04-0.07Hz range significantly increased with CO2 levels. Intracortical electrophysiological recordings showed a similar trend as the BOLD but the neurovascular coupling varied. The results suggest that paO2 and paCO2 together rather than paCO2 alone alter the BOLD signal. The response is not purely vascular in nature but has strong neuronal origins. This should be taken into consideration when designing calibrated BOLD experiment and interpreting functional connectivity data especially in aging, under drug, or neurological disorders.

  10. Functional and structural changes in the rabbit ear artery after sympathetic denervation.

    PubMed

    Bevan, R D; Tsuru, H

    1981-08-01

    We studied the tissue weight, dimensions, contractility, elasticity, and sensitivity to exogenous norepinephrine (NE) of denervated and innervated segments of the central ear arteries of white New Zealand rabbits. Three different age groups received unilateral superior cervical ganglionectomies, "growing" at 3-4 weeks, "young adult" at 9-11 weeks, and "mature" at 16-20 weeks. In the growing group, 8 weeks after ganglionectomy, the denervated arteries showed mean decreases in tissue weight (11%), total wall thickness (12+), cross-sectional area of media (17%), contractility (16%), and increases in the tangential modulus of elasticity and sensitivity to NE (2.3-fold) compared to the contralateral control vessels. The change in medial cross-sectional area was significant in the growing and young adult but not the mature animals. The other changes, however, although consistently seen, differed quantitatively among the groups. These results indicate that an intact innervation is necessary for normal development and maintenance of the artery wall. However, the precise consequences of this influence vary at different ages. Whether this influence involves a special trophic factor is not known.

  11. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel

    2007-11-01

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant η. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and η. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y η were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus η decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product η HR remained stable. The viscous modulus η increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of η when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

  12. SOD1 Overexpression Preserves Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate with an Increase of Aortic Depressor Nerve Function

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Jeffrey; Gu, He; Cheng, Zixi (Jack)

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical (O2∙−), is associated with diseases which compromise cardiac autonomic function. Overexpression of SOD1 may offer protection against ROS damage to the cardiac autonomic nervous system, but reductions of O2∙− may interfere with normal cellular functions. We have selected the C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse as a model to determine whether SOD1 overexpression alters cardiac autonomic function, as measured by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and aortic depressor nerve (ADN) recordings, as well as evaluation of baseline heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Under isoflurane anesthesia, C57 wild-type and SOD1 mice were catheterized with an arterial pressure transducer and measurements of HR and MAP were taken. After establishing a baseline, hypotension and hypertension were induced by injection of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and phenylephrine (PE), respectively, and ΔHR versus ΔMAP were recorded as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). SNP and PE treatment were administered sequentially after a recovery period to measure arterial baroreceptor activation by recording aortic depressor nerve activity. Our findings show that overexpression of SOD1 in C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse preserved the normal HR, MAP, and BRS but enhanced aortic depressor nerve function. PMID:26823951

  13. Impaired pulmonary artery contractile responses in a rat model of microgravity: role of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyhan, Daniel; Kim, Soonyul; Dunbar, Stacey; Li, Dechun; Shoukas, Artin; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2002-01-01

    Vascular contractile hyporesponsiveness is an important mechanism underlying orthostatic intolerance after microgravity. Baroreceptor reflexes can modulate both pulmonary resistance and capacitance function and thus cardiac output. We hypothesized, therefore, that pulmonary vasoreactivity is impaired in the hindlimb-unweighted (HLU) rat model of microgravity. Pulmonary artery (PA) contractile responses to phenylephrine (PE) and U-46619 (U4) were significantly decreased in the PAs from HLU vs. control (C) animals. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10(-5) M) enhanced the contractile responses in the PA rings from both C and HLU animals and completely abolished the differential responses to PE and U4 in HLU vs. C animals. Vasorelaxant responses to ACh were significantly enhanced in PA rings from HLU rats compared with C. Moreover, vasorelaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside were also significantly enhanced. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and soluble guanlyl cyclase expression were significantly enhanced in PA and lung tissue from HLU rats. In marked contrast, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was unchanged in lung tissue. These data support the hypothesis that vascular contractile responsiveness is attenuated in PAs from HLU rats and that this hyporesponsiveness is due at least in part to increased nitric oxide synthase activity resulting from enhanced eNOS expression. These findings may have important implications for blood volume distribution and attenuated stroke volume responses to orthostatic stress after microgravity exposure.

  14. Pulsed Intra-Arterial Drug Injection during Diastolic Phase of Cardiac Function Increases Drug Efficacy by Enhancing Pharmacological Exposure of Targeted Tissues.

    PubMed

    Rismanchi, M

    2016-06-01

    Diastolic phase of cardiac function is associated with lower arterial flow and hence higher concentration of intra arterially injected drug is achieved at the site of injection. It is herein postulated that drugs show higher efficacy when injected during the diastolic phase of cardiac function. It is also postulated that this benefit cannot be achieved when the drug is injected with higher rates thus producing the same high concentration at the site of injection. Pulsed intra arterial injection also benefits from the delayed therapeutic effect of the decaying drug before the next shot of injection resaturates the targeted tissue. Altogether, it is estimated that diastolic time-locked pulsed intra arterial injection will increase the drug efficacy up to 1.9 times the efficacy of injected drug with conventional methods. This is significant for drugs with limited dose of administration due to their disastrous side effects like tissue plasminogen activator or chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27672631

  15. Pulsed Intra-Arterial Drug Injection during Diastolic Phase of Cardiac Function Increases Drug Efficacy by Enhancing Pharmacological Exposure of Targeted Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rismanchi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Diastolic phase of cardiac function is associated with lower arterial flow and hence higher concentration of intra arterially injected drug is achieved at the site of injection. It is herein postulated that drugs show higher efficacy when injected during the diastolic phase of cardiac function. It is also postulated that this benefit cannot be achieved when the drug is injected with higher rates thus producing the same high concentration at the site of injection. Pulsed intra arterial injection also benefits from the delayed therapeutic effect of the decaying drug before the next shot of injection resaturates the targeted tissue. Altogether, it is estimated that diastolic time-locked pulsed intra arterial injection will increase the drug efficacy up to 1.9 times the efficacy of injected drug with conventional methods. This is significant for drugs with limited dose of administration due to their disastrous side effects like tissue plasminogen activator or chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27672631

  16. Pediatric Atorvastatin in Diabetes Trial (PADIT): A Pilot Study to Determine the Effect of Atorvastatin on Arterial Stiffness and Endothelial Function in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Michael J.; Stein, Jennifer M.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Theriaque, Douglas; Samyn, Margaret M.; Pepine, Carl; Silverstein, Janet H.

    2013-01-01

    Fifty-one children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) participated in a double blinded, randomized, cross-over pilot study to determine whether 12 weeks of daily atorvastatin (20 mg daily) would reduce arterial stiffness and improve endothelial function. Secondary analysis demonstrated potential reduction of arterial stiffness following atorvastatin therapy (p = 0.06). Additional long-term prospective studies with larger numbers of patients are needed. PMID:19344076

  17. Unique Expression of Angiotensin Type-2 Receptor in Sex-Specific Distribution of Myelinated Ah-Type Baroreceptor Neuron Contributing to Sex-Dimorphic Neurocontrol of Circulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jia-Ying; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Wu, Di; He, Jian-Li; Han, Li-Min; Liang, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Lu-Qi; Lu, Xiao-Long; Chen, Hanying; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Shou, Weinian; Li, Bai-Yan

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to understand the special expression patterns of angiotensin-II receptor (AT1R and AT2R) in nodose ganglia and nucleus of tractus solitary of baroreflex afferent pathway and their contribution in sex difference of neurocontrol of blood pressure regulation. In this regard, action potentials were recorded in baroreceptor neurons (BRNs) using whole-cell patch techniques; mRNA and protein expression of AT1R and AT2R in nodose ganglia and nucleus of tractus solitary were evaluated using real time-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry at both tissue and single-cell levels. The in vivo effects of 17β-estradiol on blood pressure and AT2R expression were also tested. The data showed that AT2R, rather than AT1R, expression was higher in female than age-matched male rats. Moreover, AT2R was downregulated in ovariectomized rats, which was restored by the administration of 17β-estradiol. Single-cell real time-polymerase chain reaction data indicated that AT2R was uniquely expressed in Ah-type BRNs. Functional study showed that long-term administration of 17β-estradiol significantly alleviated the blood pressure increase in ovariectomized rats. Electrophysiological recordings showed that angiotensin-II treatment increased the neuroexcitability more in Ah- than C-type BRNs, whereas no such effect was observed in A-types. In addition, angiotensin-II treatment prolonged action potential duration, which was not further changed by iberiotoxin. The density of angiotensin-II-sensitive K(+) currents recorded in Ah-types was equivalent with iberiotoxin-sensitive component. In summary, the unique, sex- and afferent-specific expression of AT2R was identified in Ah-type BRNs, and AT2R-mediated KCa1.1 inhibition in Ah-type BRNs may exert great impacts on baroreflex afferent function and blood pressure regulation in females. PMID:26883269

  18. Changes in the structure-function relationship of elastin and its impact on the proximal pulmonary arterial mechanics of hypertensive calves.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Steven R; Kao, Phil H; Qi, H Jerry; Hunter, Kendall; Lanning, Craig; Albietz, Joseph; Hofmeister, Stephen; Mecham, Robert; Stenmark, Kurt R; Shandas, Robin

    2008-10-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling has been proposed as one mechanism by which proximal pulmonary arteries stiffen during pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Although some attention has been paid to the role of collagen and metallomatrix proteins in affecting vascular stiffness, much less work has been performed on changes in elastin structure-function relationships in PAH. Such work is warranted, given the importance of elastin as the structural protein primarily responsible for the passive elastic behavior of these conduit arteries. Here, we study structure-function relationships of fresh arterial tissue and purified arterial elastin from the main, left, and right pulmonary artery branches of normotensive and hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertensive neonatal calves. PAH resulted in an average 81 and 72% increase in stiffness of fresh and digested tissue, respectively. Increase in stiffness appears most attributable to elevated elastic modulus, which increased 46 and 65%, respectively, for fresh and digested tissue. Comparison between fresh and digested tissues shows that, at 35% strain, a minimum of 48% of the arterial load is carried by elastin, and a minimum of 43% of the change in stiffness of arterial tissue is due to the change in elastin stiffness. Analysis of the stress-strain behavior revealed that PAH causes an increase in the strains associated with the physiological pressure range but had no effect on the strain of transition from elastin-dominant to collagen-dominant behavior. These results indicate that mechanobiological adaptations of the continuum and geometric properties of elastin, in response to PAH, significantly elevate the circumferential stiffness of proximal pulmonary arterial tissue. PMID:18660454

  19. Restoration of Failed Renal Graft Function After Successful Angioplasty of Pressure-Resistant Renal Artery Stenosis Using a Cutting Balloon: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peregrin, J. H.; Buergelova, M.

    2009-05-15

    This study is the report of a 37-year-old male with a transplanted kidney from a 3.5-year-old donor: the graft had two arteries transplanted with an aortic patch to an external iliac artery. Four months after transplantation, the graft function deteriorated, together with the development of hypertension. Stenosis of both graft arteries was detected and the patient was referred for angioplasty. The angiographic result was suboptimal, nevertheless, the graft function improved and was more or less stable (serum creatinine, 160-200 {mu}mol/l) for 4 years, along with persistently difficult-to-control hypertension. Five years after transplantation, the graft function deteriorated again and severe graft artery restenosis was detected. The restenosis did not respond to dilatation, graft function failed, hypertension decompensated, and left ventricular failure developed. The patient required dialysis. A cutting balloon angioplasty opened the artery, and kidney function was restored after a few days: the serum creatinine level dropped to 140-160 {mu}mol/l, and the glomerular filtration rate (creatinine clearance) to 0.65 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2}. The graft function has now been stable for more than 2 years, however, the hypertension is still difficult to control.

  20. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  1. A non-linear mixed effect modelling approach for metabolite correction of the arterial input function in PET studies.

    PubMed

    Veronese, Mattia; Gunn, Roger N; Zamuner, Stefano; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative PET studies with arterial blood sampling usually require the correction of the measured total plasma activity for the presence of metabolites. In particular, if labelled metabolites are found in the plasma in significant amounts their presence has to be accounted for, because it is the concentration of the parent tracer which is required for data quantification. This is achieved by fitting a Parent Plasma fraction (PPf) model to discrete metabolite measurements. The commonly used method is based on an individual approach, i.e. for each subject the PPf model parameters are estimated from its own metabolite samples, which are, in general, sparse and noisy. This fact can compromise the quality of the reconstructed arterial input functions, and, consequently, affect the quantification of tissue kinetic parameters. In this study, we proposed a Non-Linear Mixed Effect Modelling (NLMEM) approach to describe metabolite kinetics. Since NLMEM has been developed to provide robust parameter estimates in the case of sparse and/or noisy data, it has the potential to be a reliable method for plasma metabolite correction. Three different PET datasets were considered: [11C]-(+)-PHNO (54 scans), [11C]-PIB (22 scans) and [11C]-DASB (30 scans). For each tracer both simulated and measured data were considered and NLMEM performance was compared with that provided by individual analysis. Results showed that NLMEM provided improved estimates of the plasma parent input function over the individual approach when the metabolite data were sparse or contained outliers.

  2. Proximal Versus Distal Splenic Artery Embolisation for Blunt Splenic Trauma: What is the Impact on Splenic Immune Function?

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, P. T.; Kavnoudias, H.; Cameron, P. U.; Czarnecki, C.; Paul, E.; Lyon, S. M.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo compare the impact of proximal or distal splenic artery embolisation versus that of splenectomy on splenic immune function as measured by IgM memory B cell levels.Materials and MethodsPatients with splenic trauma who were treated by splenic artery embolisation (SAE) were enrolled. After 6 months splenic volume was assessed by CT, and IgM memory B cells in peripheral blood were measured and compared to a local normal reference population and to a post-splenectomy population.ResultsOf the 71 patients who underwent embolisation, 38 underwent proximal embolisation, 11 underwent distal embolisation, 22 patients were excluded, 1 had both proximal and distal embolisation, 5 did not survive and 16 did not return for evaluation. There was a significant difference between splenectomy and proximal or distal embolisation and a trend towards greater preservation of IgM memory B cell number in those with distal embolisation—a difference that could not be attributed to differences in age, grade of injury or residual splenic volume.ConclusionIgM memory B cell levels are significantly higher in those treated with SAE compared to splenectomy. Our data provide evidence that splenic embolisation should reduce immunological complications of spleen trauma and suggest that distal embolisation may maintain better function.

  3. Endogenous testosterone and brachial artery endothelial function in middle-aged men with symptoms of late-onset hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Juuso I; Perheentupa, Antti; Irjala, Kerttu; Pöllänen, Pasi; Mäkinen, Juha; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Raitakari, Olli T

    2011-12-01

    In aging men, serum endogenous testosterone is inversely associated with common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and directly with beneficial plasma lipid levels; however, the relationship to endothelial function is poorly characterized. We examined the association between serum testosterone and endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in middle-aged to elderly men. A group of 83 men aged 40?69 years (mean 55.9 ± 7.5 [SD]) with andropausal symptoms were studied. We measured their serum lipids, testosterone, luteinizing hormone, mean carotid IMT and brachial artery FMD by high resolution B-mode ultrasound. Brachial FMD correlated inversely with vessel diameter (r = -0.38, p = 0.0004), alcohol consumption (r = -0.22, p = 0.047) and serum testosterone (r = -0.27, p = 0.01), but not with luteinizing hormone. In multivariate analysis, FMD was explained by testosterone (β = -0.17, p = 0.0226), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (β = 4.17, p = 0.0312) and vessel diameter (β = -4.37, p < 0.0001) when adjusted for age, body mass index, triglycerides, blood pressure, carotid IMT, smoking, alcohol consumption, cardiovascular diseases and use of lipid lowering medication (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors). In middle-aged to elderly men, there is an inverse correlation between serum testosterone and brachial FMD. These data suggest that testosterone may have an adverse effect on systemic endothelial function.

  4. Effects of propranolol on resting and postextrasystolic potentiated left ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M J; Temkin, L P; Goldman, S; Ovitt, T W

    1983-01-01

    The effect of propranolol on global and segmental left ventricular function at rest and after postextrasystolic potentiation was studied in 12 patients with chest pain. Heart rate was controlled with atrial pacing, and left ventricular cineangiograms were performed before and after 0.15 mg/kg of propranolol. During each ventriculogram a premature ventricular stimulus was introduced by means of a programmed stimulator. Propranolol decreased global left ventricular ejection fraction from 64 +/- 4.5 to 58 +/- 4.6 (p less than 0.03). Postextrasystolic potentiated global ejection fraction was not affected by propranolol (78 +/- 3.5 vs 73.6 +/- 3.4; p = NS). The area ejection fraction of the anteroapical region was decreased after propranolol (64 +/- 4.8 vs 52 +/- 6.5; p less than 0.01); however, the postextrasystolic potentiated area ejection fraction was not affected by propranolol (78 +/- 2.6 vs 71 +/- 4.6; p = NS). Frame by frame analysis of the ventriculograms demonstrated that propranolol depressed global and segmental left ventricular function by affecting the second one-third ejection fraction without influencing the first or third one-third ejection fraction. Propranolol has a small depressant effect on global and segmental left ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease. Postextrasystolic potentiated global and segmental left ventricular function and early systolic ejection phase indices are not altered by propranolol and therefore may be useful in assessing left ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease who are taking propranolol. PMID:6849244

  5. Function and expression of ryanodine receptors and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in smooth muscle cells of murine feed arteries and arterioles.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Erika B; Goodwin, Erica L; Segal, Steven S; Jackson, William F

    2012-04-15

    We tested the hypothesis that vasomotor control is differentially regulated between feed arteries and downstream arterioles from the cremaster muscle of C57BL/6 mice. In isolated pressurized arteries, confocal Ca(2+) imaging of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) revealed Ca(2+) sparks and Ca(2+) waves. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists (ryanodine and tetracaine) inhibited both sparks and waves but increased global Ca(2+) and myogenic tone. In arterioles, SMCs exhibited only Ca(2+) waves that were insensitive to ryanodine or tetracaine. Pharmacological interventions indicated that RyRs are functionally coupled to large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK(Ca)) in SMCs of arteries, whereas BK(Ca) appear functionally coupled to voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in SMCs of arterioles. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) antagonists (xestospongin D or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate) or a phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122) attenuated Ca(2+) waves, global Ca(2+) and myogenic tone in arteries and arterioles but had no effect on arterial sparks. Real-time PCR of isolated SMCs revealed RyR2 as the most abundant isoform transcript; arteries expressed twice the RyR2 but only 65% the RyR3 of arterioles and neither vessel expressed RyR1. Immunofluorescent localisation of RyR protein indicated bright, clustered staining of arterial SMCs in contrast to diffuse staining in arteriolar SMCs. Expression of IP(3)R transcripts and protein immunofluorescence were similar in SMCs of both vessels with IP(3)R1>IP(3)R2>IP(3)R3. Despite similar expression of IP(3)Rs and dependence of Ca(2+) waves on IP(3)Rs, these data illustrate pronounced regional heterogeneity in function and expression of RyRs between SMCs of the same vascular resistance network. We conclude that vasomotor control is differentially regulated in feed arteries vs. downstream arterioles.

  6. Arterial stiffness, endothelial function and microcirculatory reactivity in healthy young males.

    PubMed

    Wright, C I; Scholten, H J; Schilder, J C M; Elsen, B M; Hanselaar, W; Kroner, C I; Draijer, R; Kastelein, J J P; Stok, W; Karemaker, J; de Groot, E

    2008-09-01

    Large (C1) and small (C2) arterial stiffness has been suggested to parallel endothelial reactivity and has led researchers to suggest parameters of arterial stiffness may be alternative measures to brachial sonographic assessments of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). However, past studies comparing these measures can be criticized. In addition to %FMD responses, we recorded concurrent hyperaemic responses of the microcirculation and both were compared with C1 and C2. Twenty-nine subjects 18-30 years of age were investigated. Radial blood pressure was recorded with a tonometer. Pulse waveform analysis was performed to calculate C1 and C2. These were compared with %FMD responses and responses of finger flux measured by laser Doppler fluxmetry (LDF); pulsatile finger volume measured by photoplethysmography (PPG); and palm skin temperature measured by infrared thermography (Tpalm) (i.e. microcirculatory responses). Responses were determined as % changes from control. We only found weak relationships between C1 and %FMD (r=0.4, P=0.04); C2 and %PPG (r=0.38, P=0.07); and C2 and %LDFdorsal (r=-0.38; P=0.04). Responses of %FMD weakly parallel those of C1. Neither C2 nor C1 are viable indicators of endothelial or microcirculatory reactivity (i.e. hyperaemic or venous constriction) in healthy, resting young males. These findings refute the claims that C1 and C2 are substitute measures to sonographic assessments of brachial FMD. PMID:18445071

  7. Left ventricular volumes and function during atrial pacing in coronary artery disease: a radionuclide angiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenman, Y.; Weiss, A.T.; Atlan, H.; Gotsman, M.S.

    1984-02-01

    This study set out to determine the pathophysiologic changes in the left ventricle during atrial pacing in 22 patients with coronary artery disease. Graduated right atrial pacing to a rate of 160 beats/min, or the induction of angina pectoris or significant ST depression was undertaken. Ventricular volumes were measured at rest and at rates of 100, 120, 140 and 160 beats/min using radionuclide angiography. The volumes at a pacing rate of 100 beats/min were used as a reference standard (100%). In the 22 patients with coronary artery disease, left ventricular end-diastolic volume decreased from 118 +/- 3% at rest to 80 +/- 5% at a rate of 160 beats/min; stroke volume from 121 +/- 3% to 54 +/- 5%; and ejection fraction (EF) from 49 +/- 3% to 37 +/- 5%. End-systolic volume decreased from 118 +/- 4% at rest, reached its minimal value of 94 +/- 5% at a rate of 120 beats/min and then increased slightly to 106 +/- 9% at 160 beats/min. Cardiac output and blood pressure did not change significantly. Compared to the control group of 10 normal subjects, the patients had a significantly smaller decrease in end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume than in normal control subjects. EF in the normal subjects did not change. Blood pressure, cardiac output and stroke volume were similar in both groups. Atrial pacing tachycardia induced reversible ventricular dysfunction with a decrease in EF. Stroke volume was maintained because of relative ventricular dilatation.

  8. Exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension in a patient with compensated cardiac disease: hemodynamic and functional response to sildenafil therapy.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Lazaros; Memon, Nabeel; O'Murchu, Brian

    2015-02-01

    We describe the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with exertional dyspnea and fatigue that had worsened over the preceding 2 years, despite a normally functioning bioprosthetic aortic valve and stable, mild left ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction, 0.45). His symptoms could not be explained by physical examination, an extensive biochemical profile, or multiple cardiac and pulmonary investigations. However, abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise test results and a right heart catheterization-combined with the use of a symptom-limited, bedside bicycle ergometer-revealed that the patient's exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension was out of proportion to his compensated left heart disease. A trial of sildenafil therapy resulted in objective improvements in hemodynamic values and functional class.

  9. Use of arterial blood gas analysis as a superior method for evaluating respiratory function in pet rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Eatwell, K; Mancinelli, E; Hedley, J; Benato, L; Shaw, D J; Self, I; Meredith, A

    A retrospective study compared invasive (arterial blood gas analysis) and non-invasive (capnography and pulse oximetry) methods of monitoring respiratory function in conscious rabbits. Arterial samples from 50 healthy dwarf lop rabbits, presenting for routine surgical neutering, were analysed on a point-of-care blood gas analysis machine. Reference intervals were obtained for pH (7.35-7.54), PaCO2 (mm Hg) (25.29-40.37), PaO2 (mm Hg) (50.3-98.2), base excess (mmol/l) (6.7-6.5), HCO3 (mmol/l) (17.96-29.41), TCO2 (mmol/l) (18.9-30.5). SaO2 (per cent) (88.8-98.0), Na (mmol/l) (137.6-145.2), K (mmol/l) (3.28-4.87), iCal (mmol/l) (1.64-1.94), glucose (mmol/l) (6.23-10.53), haematocrit (per cent) (23.3-40.2) and haemoglobin (mg/dl) (7.91-13.63). Pulse oximetry (SPO2) and capnography (ETCO2) readings were taken concurrently. There was no statistically significant relationship between SPO2 and SaO2 with a mean difference between SPO2 and SaO2 of 8.22 per cent. There was a statistically significant relationship between ETCO2 vs PaCO2, but a wide range of ETCO2 values were observed for a given PaCO2. The mean difference between these was 16.16 mm Hg. The study has provided reference intervals for arterial blood gas analysis in rabbits and demonstrated that capnography and pulse oximetry readings should not be relied upon in conscious rabbits as a guide to ventilation and oxygenation.

  10. The Function and Distribution of Apolipoprotein A1 in the Artery Wall are Markedly Distinct from those in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    DiDonato, Joseph A.; Huang, Ying; Aulak, Kulwant; Even-Or, Orli; Gerstenecker, Gary; Gogonea, Valentin; Wu, Yuping; Fox, Paul L.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Plow, Edward F.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Fisher, Edward A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies show apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) recovered from human atherosclerotic lesions is highly oxidized. Ex vivo oxidation of apoA1 or high density lipoprotein (HDL) cross-links apoA1 and impairs lipid binding, cholesterol efflux and lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities of the lipoprotein. Remarkably, no studies to date directly quantify either the function or HDL particle distribution of apoA1 recovered from the human artery wall. Methods and Results A monoclonal antibody (mAb 10G1.5) was developed that equally recognizes lipid-free and HDL-associated apoA1 in both native and oxidized forms. Examination of homogenates of atherosclerotic plaque-laden aorta showed >100-fold enrichment of apoA1 compared to normal aorta (P<0.001). Surprisingly, buoyant density fractionation revealed only a minority (<3% of total) of apoA1 recovered from either lesions or normal aorta resides within an HDL-like particle (1.063 ≤ d ≤ 1.21). In contrast, the majority (>90%) of apoA1 within aortic tissue (normal and lesions) was recovered within the lipoprotein-depleted fraction (d>1.21). Moreover, both lesion and normal artery wall apoA1 is highly cross-linked (50–70% of total), and functional characterization of apoA1 quantitatively recovered from aorta using mAb 10G1.5 showed ~80% lower cholesterol efflux activity and ~90% lower LCAT activity relative to circulating apoA1. Conclusions The function and distribution of apoA1 in human aorta are quite distinct from those found in plasma. The lipoprotein is markedly enriched within atherosclerotic-plaque, predominantly lipid-poor, not associated with HDL, extensively oxidatively cross-linked, and functionally impaired. PMID:23969698

  11. Short-term Heart Rate Turbulence Analysis Versus Variability and Baroreceptor Sensitivity in Patients With Dilated Cardiomyopathy1

    PubMed Central

    Bauernschmitt, Robert; Meyerfeldt, Udo; Schirdewan, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    New methods for the analysis of arrhythmias and their hemodynamic consequences have been applied in risk stratification, in particular to patients after myocardial infarction. This study investigates the suitability of short-term heart rate turbulence (HRT) analysis in comparison to heart rate and blood pressure variability as well as baroreceptor sensitivity analyses to characterise the regulatory differences between patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and healthy controls. In this study, 30 minutes data of non-invasive continuous blood pressure and ECGs of 37 DCM patients and 167 controls measured under standard resting conditions were analysed. The results show highly significant differences between DCM patients and controls in heart rate and blood pressure variability as well as in baroreceptor sensitivity parameters. Applying a combined heart rate-blood pressure trigger, ventricular premature beats were detected in 24.3% (9) of the DCM patients and 11.3% (19) of the controls. This fact demonstrates the limited applicability of short-term HRT analyses. However, the HRT parameters showed significant differences in this subgroup with ventricular premature beats (turbulence onset: DCM: 1.80±2.72, controls: - 4.34±3.10, p<0.001; turbulence slope: DCM: 6.75±5.50, controls: 21.30±17.72, p=0.021). Considering all (including HRT) parameters in the subgroup with ventricular beats, a discrimination rate between DCM patients and controls of 88.0% was obtained (max. 6 parameters). The corresponding value obtained for the total group was 86.3% (without HRT parameters). Comparable classification rates and high correlations between heart rate turbulence and variability and baroreflex parameters point to a more universal applicability of the latter methods. PMID:16943930

  12. Interactions between CO2 chemoreflexes and arterial baroreflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. A.; Lu, I. L.; Beightol, L. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    We studied interactions between CO2 chemoreflexes and arterial baroreflexes in 10 supine healthy young men and women. We measured vagal carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflexes and steady-state fast Fourier transform R-R interval and photoplethysmographic arterial pressure power spectra at three arterial pressure levels (nitroprusside, saline, and phenylephrine infusions) and three end-tidal CO2 levels (3, 4, and 5%, fixed-frequency, large-tidal-volume breathing, CO2 plus O2). Our study supports three principal conclusions. First, although low levels of CO2 chemoreceptor stimulation reduce R-R intervals and R-R interval variability, statistical modeling suggests that this effect is indirect rather than direct and is mediated by reductions of arterial pressure. Second, reductions of R-R intervals during hypocapnia reflect simple shifting of vagally mediated carotid baroreflex responses on the R-R interval axis rather than changes of baroreflex gain, range, or operational point. Third, the influence of CO2 chemoreceptor stimulation on arterial pressure (and, derivatively, on R-R intervals and R-R interval variability) depends critically on baseline arterial pressure levels: chemoreceptor effects are smaller when pressure is low and larger when arterial pressure is high.

  13. Radionuclide measurement of right ventricular function in atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect and complete transposition of the great arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.J.; Shubao, C.; Clarke, S.E.; Fogelman, I.; Maisey, M.N.; Tynan, M.

    1986-05-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function was assessed in 80 patients with congenital heart disease by first-pass and gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography. In 30 patients with a ventricular septal defect (VSD) the mean RV ejection fraction (+/- standard deviation) was 64 +/- 7%. In 30 patients with a secundum atrial septal defect it was 61 +/- 9% and in 20 patients with surgically corrected complete transposition of the great arteries it was 49 +/- 13%. These values are in close agreement with values established with cineangiography for similar groups of patients. The mean ejection fraction in the group with transposition of the great arteries was significantly less than in the group with VSD (p less than 0.001). Phase analysis of the equilibrium studies showed that there was delayed RV contraction in many patients in the absence of conduction abnormalities. This delay was significantly greater in patients with atrial septal defect than in those with VSD (p less than 0.05). There was a strong correlation between size of left-to-right shunt and phase delay in patients with VSD (r = -0.72). Thus, first-pass gated radionuclide angiography provides a valid measurement of RV ejection fraction, and delayed RV contraction on phase analysis may be a sensitive index of early RV dysfunction.

  14. Baroreflex control of arterial blood pressure during involuntary diving in ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var.).

    PubMed

    Smith, F M; Jones, D R

    1992-09-01

    The dynamic role of arterial baroreceptors in control of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), hindlimb vascular (HLVR) and total peripheral (TPR) resistance responses to forced dives was investigated in acutely and chronically barodenervated ducks. To activate the baroreflex, the proximal end of one aortic nerve was stimulated electrically with bipolar electrodes that had been implanted under pentobarbital sodium anesthesia. Predive nerve stimulation caused CO to fall (by reducing HR; stroke volume remained constant), producing a decrease in MAP to half the prestimulation level. During diving (for 2.5-min periods) nerve stimulation did not affect HR and MAP after the first minute of submersion. Neither HLVR nor TPR contributed to the fall in MAP during aortic nerve stimulation before or during diving. The effects of nerve stimulation on HR and MAP were maintained to the end of dives in animals given 100% O2 to breathe before diving. In separate experiments, increasing arterial chemoreceptor input by perfusing one vascularly isolated carotid body with venous blood caused a reduction in the effects of aortic nerve stimulation on MAP. Arterial baroreceptors may thus act on HR to alter MAP early in the dive, but as the dive progresses the baroreflex is attenuated by an increase in peripheral chemoreceptor drive. PMID:1415660

  15. A Comparison of Measures of Endothelial Function in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Age and Gender Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Richard B.; Vun, Simon V.; Spark, J. Ian

    2016-01-01

    This study compared flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), peripheral artery tonometry (PAT), and serum nitric oxide (NO) measures of endothelial function in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) against age/gender matched controls. 25 patients (mean age: 72.4 years, M : F 18 : 7) with established PAD and an age/gender matched group of 25 healthy controls (mean age: 72.4 years, M : F 18 : 7) were studied. Endothelial function was measured using the % FMD, reactive hyperemia index (RHI) using PAT and serum NO (μmol). Difference for each method between PAD and control patients and correlation between the methods were investigated. FMD and RHI were lower in patients with PAD (median FMD for PAD = 2.16% versus control = 3.77%, p = 0.034 and median RHI in PAD = 1.64 versus control = 1.92, p = 0.005). NO levels were not significantly different between the groups (PAD median = 7.70 μmol, control median = 13.05 μmol, p = 0.662). These results were obtained in elderly patients and cannot be extrapolated to younger individuals. FMD and PAT both demonstrated a lower hyperaemic response in patients with PAD; however, FMD results in PAD patients were unequivocally reduced whereas half the PAD patients had RHI values above the established threshold for endothelial dysfunction. This suggests that FMD is a more appropriate method for the measurement of NO-mediated endothelial function. PMID:26942010

  16. The Activation Function-1 of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Prevents Arterial Neointima Development Through a Direct Effect on Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Natalia F.; Fontaine, Coralie; Buscato, Mélissa; Lupieri, Adrien; Vinel, Alexia; Valera, Marie-Cécile; Guillaume, Maeva; Malet, Nicole; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Lenfant, Francoise; Gourdy, Pierre; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Laffargue, Muriel; Arnal, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: 17β-Estradiol (E2) exerts numerous beneficial effects in vascular disease. It regulates gene transcription through nuclear estrogen receptor α (ERα) via 2 activation functions, AF1 and AF2, and can also activate membrane ERα. The role of E2 on the endothelium relies on membrane ERα activation, but the molecular mechanisms of its action on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are not fully understood. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine which cellular target and which ERα subfunction are involved in the preventive action of E2 on neointimal hyperplasia. Methods and Results: To trigger neointimal hyperplasia of VSMC, we used a mouse model of femoral arterial injury. Cre-Lox models were used to distinguish between the endothelial- and the VSMC-specific actions of E2. The molecular mechanisms underlying the role of E2 were further characterized using both selective ERα agonists and transgenic mice in which the ERαAF1 function had been specifically invalidated. We found that (1) the selective inactivation of ERα in VSMC abrogates the neointimal hyperplasia protection induced by E2, whereas inactivation of endothelial and hematopoietic ERα has no effect; (2) the selective activation of membrane ERα does not prevent neointimal hyperplasia; and (3) ERαAF1 is necessary and sufficient to inhibit postinjury VSMC proliferation. Conclusions: Altogether, ERαAF1-mediated nuclear action is both necessary and sufficient to inhibit postinjury arterial VSMC proliferation, whereas membrane ERα largely regulates the endothelial functions of E2. This highlights the exquisite cell/tissue-specific actions of the ERα subfunctions and helps to delineate the spectrum of action of selective ER modulators. PMID:26316608

  17. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI.

  18. Functional Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome: Poorly Understood and Frequently Missed? A Review of Clinical Features, Appropriate Investigations, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Hislop, Matthew; Kennedy, Dominic; Cramp, Brendan; Dhupelia, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Functional popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) is an important and possibly underrecognized cause of exertional leg pain (ELP). As it is poorly understood, it is at risk of misdiagnosis and mismanagement. The features indicative of PAES are outlined, as it can share features with other causes of ELP. Investigating functional PAES is also fraught with potential problems and if it is performed incorrectly, it can result in false negative and false positive findings. A review of the current vascular investigations is provided, highlighting some of the limitations standard tests have in determining functional PAES. Once a clinical suspicion for PAES is satisfied, it is necessary to further distinguish the subcategories of anatomical and functional entrapment and the group of asymptomatic occluders. When definitive entrapment is confirmed, it is important to identify the level of entrapment so that precise intervention can be performed. Treatment strategies for functional PAES are discussed, including the possibility of a new, less invasive intervention of guided Botulinum toxin injection at the level of entrapment as an alternative to vascular surgery. PMID:26464888

  19. The effect of milrinone infusion on right ventricular function during coronary anastomosis and early outcomes in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hyong Rae; Lee, Woo Kyung; Kim, Yong Ho; Min, Jin Hye; Chae, Young Keun; Choi, In Gyu; Kim, Young Sin

    2010-01-01

    Background During coronary anastomosis in off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB), hemodynamic alternations can be induced by impaired diastolic function of the right ventricle. This study was designed to examine the effect of milrinone on right ventricular function and early outcomes in patients undergoing OPCAB. Methods Forty patients undergoing OPCAB were randomly assigned in a double-blind manner to receive either milrinone (milrinone group, n = 20) or normal saline (control group, n = 20). Hemodynamic variables were measured after pericardiotomy (T1), 5 min after stabilizer application for anastomosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD, T2), the obtuse marginalis branch (OM, T3), the right coronary artery (RCA, T4), 5 min after sternal closure (T5), and after ICU arrival. The right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and right ventricular volumetric parameters were also measured using the thermodilution technique. For evaluation of early outcomes, the 30-day operative mortality and morbidity risk models were used. Results There was no significant difference in hemodynamic variables, including mean arterial pressure, between the 2 groups, except for the cardiac index and RVEF. The cardiac index and RVEF were significantly greater at T3 in the milrinone group than in the control group. Conclusions Continuous infusion of milrinone demonstrated a beneficial effect on cardiac output and right ventricular function in patients undergoing OPCAB, especially during anastomosis of the graft to the OM artery, and it had no adverse effect on early outcomes. PMID:20740213

  20. Arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity under orthostatic stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masashi; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blood pressure is maintained against the orthostatic stress caused by gravity's effect on the fluid distribution within the body are important issues in physiology, especially in humans who usually adopt an upright posture. Peripheral vasoconstriction and increased heart rate (HR) are major cardiovascular adjustments to orthostatic stress and comprise part of the reflex response elicited via the carotid sinus and aortic baroreceptors (arterial baroreflex: ABR) and cardiopulmonary stretch receptors (cardiopulmonary baroreflex). In a series of studies, we have been characterizing the ABR-mediated regulation of cardiovascular hemodynamics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) while applying orthostatic stress in humans. We have found that under orthostatic stress, dynamic carotid baroreflex responses are modulated as exemplified by the increases in the MSNA, blood pressure, and HR responses elicited by carotid baroreflex unloading and the shorter period of MSNA suppression, comparable reduction and faster recovery of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and greater HR response to carotid baroreflex stimulation. Our results also show that ABR-mediated beat-to-beat control over burst incidence, burst strength and total MSNA is progressively modulated as orthostatic stress is increased until induction of syncope, and that the sensitivity of ABR control over the aforementioned MSNA variables is substantially reduced during the development of syncope. We suggest that in humans, the modulation of ABR function under orthostatic stress may be one of the mechanisms by which blood pressure is maintained and orthostatic hypotension limited, and impairment of ABR control over sympathetic vasomotor activity leads to the severe hypotension associated with orthostatic syncope.

  1. Fluid balance and pulmonary functions during and after coronary artery bypass surgery: Ringer's acetate compared with dextran, polygeline, or albumin.

    PubMed

    Tølløfsrud, S; Svennevig, J L; Breivik, H; Kongsgaard, U; Ozer, M; Hysing, E; Mohr, B; Seem, E; Geiran, O; Abdelnour, M

    1995-07-01

    The effects on fluid balance, pulmonary functions and economics were evaluated in a randomized comparison of one colloid free and three colloid containing fluid regimens, for 48 hours during and after coronary artery bypass (CAB) surgery. A standard regimen for anaesthesia, extracorporeal circulation and monitoring was used. Only Ringer's acetate (RAc) was used as priming solution for extracorporeal circulation. Forty patients were randomized to receive either RAc, polygeline 35 mg.ml-1 (Haemaccel), dextran 70 (Macrodex) 60 mg.ml-1, or albumin 40 mg.ml-1 in saline whenever fluid volume was needed to stabilize haemodynamics. At the end of the operation, fluid retention was significantly lower in patients receiving polygeline and dextran 70, compared with patients receiving RAc. At 48 hours, however, there were no differences in cumulative fluid balance. Patients in the colloid groups postoperatively had a higher serum colloid osmotic pressure (s-COP), but a higher net lung capillary filtration pressure (delta P) only on the second postoperative day than the RAc group. However, this did not adversely affect intrapulmonary venous admixture, arterial oxygen tension, or time on respirator in the RAc group compared with the colloid groups. The most expensive colloid fluid regimen (albumin) cost about 230 US$ more per patient than the RAc fluid regimen. We conclude that Ringer's acetate for volume replacement to stabilize haemodynamics during and after CAB surgery is associated with increased fluid retention only during the intraoperative period, compared with dextran 70 or polygeline, and with a lower serum colloid osmotic pressure and net lung capillary filtration pressure postoperatively, compared with all three colloid groups. This does not affect pulmonary functions adversely.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Maternal-infant interaction and autonomic function in healthy infants and infants with transposition of the great arteries.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tondi M; Ferree, Allison

    2014-12-01

    The quality of maternal-infant interaction is a critical factor in the development of infants' autonomic function and social engagement skills. In this secondary data analysis, relationships among infant and maternal affect and behavior and quality of dyadic interaction, as measured by the Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment, and infant autonomic function, as measured by heart rate variability, were examined during feeding at 2 weeks and 2 months of age in 16 healthy infants and in 15 infants with transposition of the great arteries (TGA). Contrary to previous research, at 2 weeks infant age, mothers of infants with TGA had significantly higher scores in affect and behavior than did mothers of healthy infants. The affect and behavior and quality of dyadic interaction of infants with TGA also did not differ from that of healthy infants. Although infants' social engagement skills did not differ by health condition (TGA or healthy), these skills did differ by parasympathetic nervous system function: infants better able to suppress vagal activity with challenge had more positive and less dysregulated affect and behavior, regardless of health status. These findings suggest that maternal-infant interactions for some cardiac disease subgroups may not differ from healthy dyads. Additional research is required to identify both healthy and ill infants with delayed autonomic maturation and to develop and test interventions to enhance critical interactive functions.

  3. Localization of the hand motor area by arterial spin labeling and blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Marco A F; Vilela, Pedro; Sousa, Inês; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2013-01-01

    The new clinically available arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion imaging sequences present some advantages relatively to the commonly used blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) method for functional brain studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In particular, regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes are thought to be more directly related with neuronal activation. In this study, we aimed to investigate the accuracy of the functional localization of the hand motor area obtained by simultaneous CBF and BOLD contrasts provided by ASL functional MRI (fMRI) and compare it with a standard BOLD fMRI protocol. For this purpose, we measured the distance between the center of gravity of the activation clusters obtained with each contrast (CBF, BOLD(ASL), and Standard BOLD) and 11 positions defined on a well-established anatomical landmark of the hand motor area (the omega in the axial plane of the precentral gyrus). We found that CBF measurements were significantly closer to the anatomical landmark than the ones obtained using either simultaneous BOLD(ASL) or standard BOLD contrasts. Moreover, we also observed reduced intersubject variability of the functional localization, as well as percent signal change, for CBF relative to both BOLD contrast measurements. In conclusion, our results add further evidence in support to the notion that CBF provides a more accurate localization of motor activation than BOLD contrast, indicating that ASL may be an appropriate technique for clinical fMRI studies. PMID:22121040

  4. [Effects of procaterol on arterial blood gas and pulmonary function in asthmatic children].

    PubMed

    Obata, T; Masaki, T; Iikura, Y

    1990-12-01

    We examined the changes in arterial blood gas, FEV1 and V50 after the inhalation of procaterol on 19 occasions in 16 asthmatic children. The initial value of PaO2 had statistically significant correlation with the initial values of %FEV1 and %V50. PaO2 fell down in 11 out of 19 (57.9%) and remarkably decreased more than 5 mmHg in 6 out of 19 (31.6%). The fall in PaO2 was most significant at 5 min after the inhalation in almost subjects. The changes in PaO2 after the inhalation had good correlation with the initial value of %FEV1 and %V50. The initial values were quite lower in the patients with decreased PaO2 more than 5 mmHg than those with increased PaO2. Severe patients showed statistically low values of the initial PaO2 and %V50 and showed a fall in PaO2 after inhalation compared with moderate patients. An increase in A-aDO2 elicited that deteriorations of V/Q ratio caused a decrease in PaO2 after inhalation. There were no significant changes in heart rates and no complaints of nausea, headache or tremor.

  5. Functional morphology analysis of the left anterior descending coronary artery in EBCT images.

    PubMed

    Kakadiaris, Ioannis A; Santamaría-Pang, Alberto; Pednekar, Amol

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we present a physics-based deformable model framework for morphological and motion analysis of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. The proposed model is designed to capture the complex motion that the LAD undergoes during the cardiac cycle. The key idea is to define a local coordinate system for the heart and to parameterize both the shape and motion of the LAD in a single framework. The shape of the LAD is modeled as a parametric generalized cylinder, and the motion during the heart cycle is modeled as a composite of three components, which are as follows: 1) longitudinal deformation, 2) radial displacement, and 3) angular displacement over the cardiac cycle. The proposed framework for the LAD shape-motion estimation is generic, since it does not assume any particular tubular shape. Results obtained for four human subjects using electron beam computed tomography data are in agreement with LAD shape-motion deformations reported in the literature. PMID:20176530

  6. [Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Musumeci, S; Iuppa, A; Beneventano, G; Rinella, P; Mammano, M; Cinquegrani, E

    1986-12-15

    Trapped popliteal artery syndrome is relatively uncommon: the literature reports some 60 cases. The clinical picture is linked to compression of the popliteal artery by the gastrocnemius as it contracts, thus distorting the arterial route. The result is an interruption in the blood flow distally to the area involved due to stenosis of the blood vessel that is at first functional but becomes organic. PMID:3808379

  7. Assessment of the physiologic contribution of right atrial function to total right heart function in patients with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Joseph A; Raina, Amresh; Forfia, Paul R

    2016-09-01

    Total right heart function requires normal function of both the right ventricle and the right atrium. However, the degree to which right atrial (RA) function and right ventricular (RV) function each contribute to total right heart function has not been quantified. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of RA function to total right heart function in a group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients compared to a cohort of normal controls without cardiovascular disease. The normal cohort comprised 35 subjects with normal clinical echocardiograms, while the PAH cohort included 37 patients, of whom 31 had echocardiograms before and after initiation of PAH-specific therapy. Total right heart function was measured via tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE). TAPSE was broken down into two components, the excursion occurring during RA contraction (TAPSERA) and that occurring before RA contraction (TAPSERV). RA fractional area change (RA-FAC) was also compared between the two groups. In the PAH cohort, more than half of the total TAPSE occurred during atrial systole, compared to less than one-third in the normal cohort (51.0% vs. 32.1%; P < 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between RA-FAC and TAPSE in the PAH cohort but not in the normal cohort. TAPSE improved significantly in the posttreatment cohort (1.7 vs. 2.1 cm), but TAPSERA continued to account for about half of the total TAPSE after treatment. RA function accounts for a significantly greater proportion of total right heart function in patients with PAH than in normal subjects. PMID:27683609

  8. Assessment of the physiologic contribution of right atrial function to total right heart function in patients with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Joseph A; Raina, Amresh; Forfia, Paul R

    2016-09-01

    Total right heart function requires normal function of both the right ventricle and the right atrium. However, the degree to which right atrial (RA) function and right ventricular (RV) function each contribute to total right heart function has not been quantified. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of RA function to total right heart function in a group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients compared to a cohort of normal controls without cardiovascular disease. The normal cohort comprised 35 subjects with normal clinical echocardiograms, while the PAH cohort included 37 patients, of whom 31 had echocardiograms before and after initiation of PAH-specific therapy. Total right heart function was measured via tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE). TAPSE was broken down into two components, the excursion occurring during RA contraction (TAPSERA) and that occurring before RA contraction (TAPSERV). RA fractional area change (RA-FAC) was also compared between the two groups. In the PAH cohort, more than half of the total TAPSE occurred during atrial systole, compared to less than one-third in the normal cohort (51.0% vs. 32.1%; P < 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between RA-FAC and TAPSE in the PAH cohort but not in the normal cohort. TAPSE improved significantly in the posttreatment cohort (1.7 vs. 2.1 cm), but TAPSERA continued to account for about half of the total TAPSE after treatment. RA function accounts for a significantly greater proportion of total right heart function in patients with PAH than in normal subjects.

  9. Assessment of the physiologic contribution of right atrial function to total right heart function in patients with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sivak, Joseph A.; Raina, Amresh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Total right heart function requires normal function of both the right ventricle and the right atrium. However, the degree to which right atrial (RA) function and right ventricular (RV) function each contribute to total right heart function has not been quantified. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of RA function to total right heart function in a group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients compared to a cohort of normal controls without cardiovascular disease. The normal cohort comprised 35 subjects with normal clinical echocardiograms, while the PAH cohort included 37 patients, of whom 31 had echocardiograms before and after initiation of PAH-specific therapy. Total right heart function was measured via tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE). TAPSE was broken down into two components, the excursion occurring during RA contraction (TAPSERA) and that occurring before RA contraction (TAPSERV). RA fractional area change (RA-FAC) was also compared between the two groups. In the PAH cohort, more than half of the total TAPSE occurred during atrial systole, compared to less than one-third in the normal cohort (51.0% vs. 32.1%; P < 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between RA-FAC and TAPSE in the PAH cohort but not in the normal cohort. TAPSE improved significantly in the posttreatment cohort (1.7 vs. 2.1 cm), but TAPSERA continued to account for about half of the total TAPSE after treatment. RA function accounts for a significantly greater proportion of total right heart function in patients with PAH than in normal subjects. PMID:27683609

  10. Alterations in perivascular innervation function in mesenteric arteries from offspring of diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    de Queiroz, D B; Sastre, E; Caracuel, L; Callejo, M; Xavier, F E; Blanco-Rivero, J; Balfagón, G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We have reported that exposure to a diabetic intrauterine environment during pregnancy increases blood pressure in adult offspring, but the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. This study was designed to analyse a possible role of perivascular sympathetic and nitrergic innervation in the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) in this effect. Experimental Approach Diabetes was induced in pregnant Wistar rats by a single injection of streptozotocin. Endothelium-denuded vascular rings from the offspring of control (O-CR) and diabetic rats (O-DR) were used. Vasomotor responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS), NA and the NO donor DEA-NO were studied. The expressions of neuronal NOS (nNOS) and phospho-nNOS (P-nNOS) and release of NA, ATP and NO were determined. Sympathetic and nitrergic nerve densities were analysed by immunofluorescence. Key Results Blood pressure was higher in O-DR animals. EFS-induced vasoconstriction was greater in O-DR animals. This response was decreased by phentolamine more in O-DR animals than their controls. L-NAME increased EFS-induced vasoconstriction more strongly in O-DR than in O-CR segments. Vasomotor responses to NA or DEA-NO were not modified. NA, ATP and NO release was increased in segments from O-DR. nNOS expression was not modified, whereas P-nNOS expression was increased in O-DR. Sympathetic and nitrergic nerve densities were similar in both experimental groups. Conclusions and Implications The activity of sympathetic and nitrergic innervation is increased in SMA from O-DR animals. The net effect is an increase in EFS-induced contractions in these animals. These effects may contribute to the increased blood pressure observed in the offspring of diabetic rats. PMID:26177571

  11. Functional mutations in 5'UTR of the BMPR2 gene identified in Chinese families with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Chenting; Liu, Chunli; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Nuofu; Hadadi, Cyrus; Huang, Junyi; Zhong, Nanshan; Lu, Wenju

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive pulmonary vasculopathy with significant morbidity and mortality. Bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) has been well recognized as the principal gene responsible for heritable and sporadic PAH. Four unrelated Chinese patients with PAH and their family members, both symptomatic and asymptomatic, were genetically evaluated by sequencing all exons and the flanking regions of BMPR2. Functionality of the aberrant mutations at the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of BMPR2 in the families with PAH was determined by site mutation, transient transfection, and promoter-reporter assays. Four individual mutations in the BMPR2 gene were identified in the 4 families, respectively: 10-GGC repeats, 13-GGC repeats, 4-AGC repeats in 5'UTR, and a novel missense mutation in exon 7 (c.961C>T; p.Arg321X). Moreover, we demonstrated that (1) these 5'UTR mutations decreased the transcription of BMPR2 and (2) the GGC repeats and AGC repeats in BMPR2 5'UTR bore functional binding sites of EGR-1 and MYF5, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of functional BMPR2 5'UTR mutations in familial patients with PAH and further indicating that EGR-1 and MYF5 are potential targets for correcting these genetic abnormalities for PAH therapy. PMID:27162618

  12. Influence of physical activity and gender on arterial function in type 2 diabetes, normal and impaired glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Maria J.; Fritz, Tomas; Nyberg, Gunnar; Östenson, Claes Göran; Krook, Anna; Zierath, Juleen R.; Caidahl, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether Nordic walking improves cardiovascular function in middle-aged women and men, we included 121 with normal glucose tolerance, 33 with impaired glucose tolerance and 47 with Type 2 diabetes mellitus in a randomized controlled study. The intervention group added Nordic walking 5 h/week for 4 months to their ordinary activities. Aortic pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, stiffness index, reflection index, intima–media thickness in the radial and carotid arteries, echogenicity of the carotid intima–media and systemic vascular resistance were measured. While baseline blood pressure did not differ by gender or diagnosis, aortic augmentation index was found to be higher in women in all groups. Vascular function was unchanged with intervention, without differences by gender or diagnosis. In conclusion, 4 months of Nordic walking is an insufficient stimulus to improve vascular function. Future studies should consider hard endpoints in addition to measures of vascular health, as well as larger population groups, long-term follow-up and documented compliance to exercise training. PMID:26092821

  13. Bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery.

    PubMed

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Totlis, Trifon; Tsikaras, Prokopios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2006-09-01

    The subscapular artery arises from the third part of the axillary artery and gives off the circumflex scapular and the thoracodorsal arteries. Although anatomical variations of the axillary artery are very common, the existence of a unilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery has been described in the literature only once. There are no reports of bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery, in the literature. In the present study, a bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery, originating on either side of the third part of the axillary artery, is described in a 68-year-old female cadaver. All the other branches of the axillary artery had a typical origin, course, distribution and termination. This extremely rare anatomical variation apart from the anatomical importance also has clinical significance for surgeons in this area. Especially, during the dissection or mobilization of the latissimus dorsi that is partly used for coverage problems in many regions of the body and also in dynamic cardiomyoplasty, any iatrogenic injury of this accessory artery may result in ischemia and functional loss of the graft.

  14. Executive Function and Theory of Mind in School-Aged Children after Neonatal Corrective Cardiac Surgery for Transposition of the Great Arteries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderon, Johanna; Bonnet, Damien; Courtin, Cyril; Concordet, Susan; Plumet, Marie-Helene; Angeard, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Cardiac malformations resulting in cyanosis, such as transposition of the great arteries (TGA), have been associated with neurodevelopmental dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to assess, for the first time, theory of mind (ToM), which is a key component of social cognition and executive functions in school-aged children with TGA.…

  15. Understanding How Space Travel Affects Blood Vessels: Arterial Remodeling and Functional Adaptations Induced by Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, Michael; Vasques, Marilyn; Aquilina, Rudy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ever rise quickly from the couch to get something from the kitchen and suddenly feel dizzy? With a low heart rate and relaxed muscles, the cardiovascular system does not immediately provide the resistance necessary to keep enough blood going to your head. Gravity wins, at least for a short time, before your heart and blood vessels can respond to the sudden change in position and correct the situation. Actually, the human cardiovascular system is quite well adapted to the constant gravitational force of the Earth. When standing, vessels in the legs constrict to prevent blood from collecting in the lower extremities. In the space environment, the usual head-to-foot blood pressure and tissue fluid gradients that exist during the upright posture on Earth are removed. The subsequent shift in fluids from the lower to the upper portions of the body triggers adaptations within the cardiovascular system to accommodate the new pressure and fluid gradients. In animal models that simulate microgravity, the vessels in the head become more robust while those in the lower limbs become thin and lax. Similar changes may also occur in humans during spaceflight and while these adaptations are appropriate for a microgravity environment, they can cause problems when the astronauts return to Earth or perhaps another planet. Astronauts often develop orthostatic intolerance which means they become dizzy or faint when standing upright. This dizziness can persist for a number of days making routine activities difficult. In an effort to understand the physiological details of these cardiovascular adaptations, Dr. Michael Delp at Texas A&M University, uses the rat as a model for his studies. For the experiment flown on STS-107, he will test the hypothesis that blood vessels in the rats' hindlimbs become thinner, weaker, and constrict less in response to pressure changes and to chemical signals when exposed to microgravity. In addition, he will test the hypothesis that arteries in the brain

  16. Chronic electroacupuncture of the ST36 point improves baroreflex function and haemodynamic parameters in heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Lima, J W; Hentschke, V S; Rossato, D D; Quagliotto, E; Pinheiro, L; Almeida, E; Dal Lago, P; Lukrafka, J L

    2015-12-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been used to treat many diseases, including heart failure (HF). This study aimed to evaluate the effects of chronic stimulation in the ST36 acupuncture point on haemodynamic parameters and baroreflex function in rats with HF. Cardiovascular parameters assessed were heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and the reflex cardiovascular response of HR triggered by stimulation of baroreceptors in animals with HF subsequent to acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: Sham Control - animals without HF and without EA; HF Control group - animals with HF and without EA; and HF EA group - animals with HF that received the EA protocol. Six weeks after surgical induction of AMI, the EA protocol (8 weeks, 5 times a week) was performed. The protocol was applied with EA at the ST36 point, frequency of 2 Hz, pulse of 0.3 ms and intensity of 1-3 mA for 30 min. Haemodynamic parameters and baroreceptor function were assessed. There was no difference between groups in the variables HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), which were evaluated with awake animals (p>0.05). There was an increase in the mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the HF EA group compared to the HF Control group (p<0.05). The maximum gain of the baroreflex heart rate response (Gain) was higher in the HF EA group than the HF Control and Sham Control groups. Chronic EA in the ST36 point increased the MAP and baroreflex sensitivity in rats with HF.

  17. Sequential modulation of cardiac autonomic control induced by cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, R.; Jacob, G.; Palazzolo, L.; Rimoldi, A.; Diedrich, A.; Harris, P. A.; Porta, A.; Malliani, A.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonhypotensive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) induces a reflex increase in forearm vascular resistance and muscle sympathetic neural discharge without affecting mean heart rate. We tested the hypothesis that a reflex change of the autonomic modulation of heartbeat might arise during low intensity LBNP without changes of mean heart rate. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten healthy volunteers underwent plasma catecholamine evaluation and a continuous recording of ECG, finger blood pressure, respiratory activity, and central venous pressure (CVP) during increasing levels of LBNP up to -40 mm Hg. Spectrum and cross-spectrum analyses assessed the changes in the spontaneous variability of R-R interval, respiration, systolic arterial pressure (SAP), and CVP and in the gain (alpha(LF)) of arterial baroreflex control of heart rate. Baroreceptor sensitivity was also evaluated by the SAP/R-R spontaneous sequences technique. LBNP began decreasing significantly: CVP at -10, R-R interval at -20, SAP at -40, and the indexes alpha(LF) and baroreceptor sensitivity at -30 and -20 mm Hg, compared with baseline conditions. Plasma norepinephrine increased significantly at -20 mm Hg. The normalized low-frequency component of R-R variability (LF(R-R)) progressively increased and was significantly higher than in the control condition at -15 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Nonhypotensive LBNP elicits a reflex increase of cardiac sympathetic modulation, as evaluated by LF(R-R), which precedes the changes in the hemodynamics and in the indexes of arterial baroreflex control.

  18. Effects of red wine on established markers of arterial structure and function in human studies: current knowledge and future research directions.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, Arduino A; Stockley, Creina S; Woodman, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Evidence from observational studies suggests that mild-to-moderate consumption of red wine is associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Various individual chemical components of red wine also show salutary effects on vascular homeostasis, that is, enhanced endothelial function and arterial distensibility, both in vitro and in animal studies. However, testing the beneficial potential of red wine in primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention on established surrogate cardiovascular markers requires further study with longer term intervention trials. This report reviews and critically appraises the published evidence for the effects of red wine on endothelium-dependent vasodilation, arterial stiffness and arterial wave reflections in healthy subjects and in patients with cardiovascular disease. Suggestions for future research directions are also provided.

  19. Arterial input function of an optical tracer for dynamic contrast enhanced imaging can be determined from pulse oximetry oxygen saturation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Wright, Eric A.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Diop, Mamadou; Morrison, Laura B.; Pogue, Brian W.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2012-12-01

    In many cases, kinetic modeling requires that the arterial input function (AIF)—the time-dependent arterial concentration of a tracer—be characterized. A straightforward method to measure the AIF of red and near-infrared optical dyes (e.g., indocyanine green) using a pulse oximeter is presented. The method is motivated by the ubiquity of pulse oximeters used in both preclinical and clinical applications, as well as the gap in currently available technologies to measure AIFs in small animals. The method is based on quantifying the interference that is observed in the derived arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) following a bolus injection of a light-absorbing dye. In other words, the change in SaO2 can be converted into dye concentration knowing the chromophore-specific extinction coefficients, the true arterial oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration. A simple error analysis was performed to highlight potential limitations of the approach, and a validation of the method was conducted in rabbits by comparing the pulse oximetry method with the AIF acquired using a pulse dye densitometer. Considering that determining the AIF is required for performing quantitative tracer kinetics, this method provides a flexible tool for measuring the arterial dye concentration that could be used in a variety of applications.

  20. The Effect of Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy on Right Ventricle Function and Pulmonary Artery Pressure by Using Doppler Echocardiography in Children

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Onur Çağlar; Üner, Abdurrahman; Garça, Mehmet Fatih; Ece, İbrahim; Epçaçan, Serdar; Turan, Mahfuz; Kalkan, Ferhat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study is to emphasize the efficacy of the myocardial performance index and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) in the determination of impaired cardiac functions and recovery period following the treatment in children with adenoid and/or tonsillar hypertrophy. Methods Fifty-three healthy children after routine laboratory, imaging and clinical examinations, with adenoid and/or tonsillar hypertrophy were evaluated before and 3 months after adenotonsillectomy for cardiac functions using M mode and Doppler echocardiography. Results The mean age of cases was 6.4±3.0 years, 34 (65%) were male, and 19 (35%) were female. Pulmonary hypertension was observed to be mild in 3 patients and moderate in 1 patient preoperatively. When the preoperative and postoperative echocardiographic measurements of the patients were compared, the tricuspid valve E wave velocity, the E/A ratio (E, early diastolic flow rate; A, late diastolic flow rate), and the TAPSE values were determined to be significantly higher postoperatively (P<0.05). The tricuspid valve deceleration time, the isovolumetric relaxation time and the systolic pulmonary artery pressure were found to be significantly lower compared to the preoperative values (P<0.05). Conclusion Adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy may prevent cardiac dysfunctions that can develop in the later periods due to adenoid and/or tonsil hypertrophy in children, before the appearance of the clinical findings of cardiac failure. PMID:27090272

  1. Quadratic function between arterial partial oxygen pressure and mortality risk in sepsis patients: an interaction with simplified acute physiology score

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Ji, Xuqing

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is widely used in emergency and critical care settings, while there is little evidence on its real therapeutic effect. The study aimed to explore the impact of arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) on clinical outcomes in patients with sepsis. A large clinical database was employed for the study. Subjects meeting the diagnostic criteria of sepsis were eligible for the study. All measurements of PaO2 were extracted. The primary endpoint was death from any causes during hospital stay. Survey data analysis was performed by using individual ICU admission as the primary sampling unit. Quadratic function was assumed for PaO2 and its interaction with other covariates were explored. A total of 199,125 PaO2 samples were identified for 11,002 ICU admissions. Each ICU stay comprised 18 PaO2 samples in average. The fitted multivariable model supported our hypothesis that the effect of PaO2 on mortality risk was in quadratic form. There was significant interaction between PaO2 and SAPS-I (p = 0.007). Furthermore, the main effect of PaO2 on SOFA score was nonlinear. The study shows that the effect of PaO2 on mortality risk is in quadratic function form, and there is significant interaction between PaO2 and severity of illness. PMID:27734905

  2. Abnormal aortic fatty acid composition and small artery function in offspring of rats fed a high fat diet in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, P; Bitsanis, D; Ghebremeskel, K; Crawford, M A; Poston, L

    2001-01-01

    Disturbances of the in utero environment are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. In this study we have determined whether abnormal vascular function in the adult offspring of rats fed a high saturated fat diet in pregnancy is associated with altered plasma lipids or vascular fatty acid content. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a breeding diet (4 % fat) or a diet high in saturated fat (20 % fat) for 10 days prior to and throughout pregnancy, and during weaning. Female offspring were then fed a maintenance diet (3 % fat) until 160 days of age. Endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by acetylcholine was blunted in isolated branches of the femoral artery from 160-day-old female offspring of dams fed the saturated fat diet when compared with female offspring of dams fed the breeding diet. These offspring exhibited elevated plasma triglyceride and reduced plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. The fatty acid composition of the aortas was abnormal, with a marked reduction in the content of arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids. This study demonstrates that a high fat diet in pregnant rats produces abnormal vascular function, plasma lipid disturbances and altered vascular fatty acid content in their female offspring during adulthood. PMID:11410637

  3. Multi-modal pharmacokinetic modelling for DCE-MRI: using diffusion weighted imaging to constrain the local arterial input function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamy, Valentin; Modat, Marc; Shipley, Rebecca; Dikaios, Nikos; Cleary, Jon; Punwani, Shonit; Ourselin, Sebastien; Atkinson, David; Melbourne, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The routine acquisition of multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging data in oncology yields the possibility of combined model fitting of traditionally separate models of tissue structure and function. In this work we hypothesise that diffusion weighted imaging data may help constrain the fitting of pharmacokinetic models to dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI data. Parameters related to tissue perfusion in the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) modelling of diffusion weighted MRI provide local information on how tissue is likely to perfuse that can be utilised to guide DCE modelling via local modification of the arterial input function (AIF). In this study we investigate, based on multi-parametric head and neck MRI of 8 subjects (4 with head and neck tumours), the benefit of incorporating parameters derived from the IVIM model within the DCE modelling procedure. Although we find the benefit of this procedure to be marginal on the data used in this work, it is conceivable that a technique of this type will be of greater use in a different application.

  4. Threshold Setting for Likelihood Function for Elasticity-Based Tissue Classification of Arterial Walls by Evaluating Variance in Measurement of Radial Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi; Ichiki, Masataka; Tezuka, Fumiaki

    2008-05-01

    Pathologic changes in arterial walls significantly influence their mechanical properties. We have developed a correlation-based method, the phased tracking method [H. Kanai et al.: IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 43 (1996) 791], for measurement of the regional elasticity of the arterial wall. Using this method, elasticity distributions of lipids, blood clots, fibrous tissue, and calcified tissue were measured in vitro by experiments on excised arteries (mean±SD: lipids 89±47 kPa, blood clots 131 ±56 kPa, fibrous tissue 1022±1040 kPa, calcified tissue 2267 ±1228 kPa) [H. Kanai et al.: Circulation 107 (2003) 3018; J. Inagaki et al.: Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 44 (2005) 4593]. It was found that arterial tissues can be classified into soft tissues (lipids and blood clots) and hard tissues (fibrous tissue and calcified tissue) on the basis of their elasticity. However, there are large overlaps between elasticity distributions of lipids and blood clots and those of fibrous tissue and calcified tissue. Thus, it was difficult to differentiate lipids from blood clots and fibrous tissue from calcified tissue by simply thresholding elasticity value. Therefore, we previously proposed a method by classifying the elasticity distribution in each region of interest (ROI) (not a single pixel) in an elasticity image into lipids, blood clots, fibrous tissue, or calcified tissue based on a likelihood function for each tissue [J. Inagaki et al.: Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 44 (2006) 4732]. In our previous study, the optimum size of an ROI was determined to be 1,500 µm in the arterial radial direction and 1,500 µm in the arterial longitudinal direction [K. Tsuzuki et al.: Ultrasound Med. Biol. 34 (2008) 573]. In this study, the threshold for the likelihood function used in the tissue classification was set by evaluating the variance in the ultrasonic measurement of radial strain. The recognition rate was improved from 50 to 54% by the proposed thresholding.

  5. Comparison of effect between nitrates and calcium channel antagonist on vascular function in patients with normal or mildly diseased coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Yuichi; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Saihara, Keishi; Ishida, Sanemasa; Kataoka, Tetsuro; Ogawa, Masakazu; Orihara, Koji; Oketani, Naoya; Fukudome, Tsuyoshi; Okui, Hideki; Ichiki, Tomoko; Shinsato, Takuro; Kubozono, Takuro; Mizoguchi, Etsuko; Ichiki, Hitoshi; Tei, Chuwa

    2008-03-01

    The comparative long-term antianginal efficacy of long-acting nitrates versus calcium channel antagonists remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to compare the coronary endothelial cell function and coronary artery vasoconstriction between patients with normal or mildly diseased coronary arteries treated with long-acting nitrates or calcium channel antagonists. Forty-two patients suspected to have angina pectoris and with normal or mildly diseased coronary arteries underwent Doppler flow study of the left anterior descending coronary artery. All patients were suspected to have angina pectoris and were receiving either long-acting nitrates (n = 18; Nitrates group) or calcium channel antagonists (n = 24; Ca-antagonists group) for at least 1 year. Vascular reactivity was assessed by intracoronary administration of papaverine, acetylcholine (Ach), and nitroglycerin using a Doppler guidewire. Segments that showed the greatest constrictive response to Ach were used for assessment of vasoconstriction. The percent increase in coronary blood flow (CBF) and coronary artery diameter (CAD) induced by Ach was significantly smaller in the Nitrates group than in the Ca-antagonists group (33% +/- 74% vs 83% +/- 77%, P < 0.05; -3% +/- 16% vs 11% +/- 12%, P < 0.01, respectively). The percent diameter reduction in the region of greatest constrictive response to Ach was significantly greater in the Nitrates group than in the Ca-antagonists group (44% +/- 39% vs 15% +/- 32%, P < 0.02). Long-term treatment with long-acting nitrates may produce less favorable effects on coronary endothelial function and the constrictive response to Ach when compared with long-acting calcium channel antagonists in patients with normal or mildly diseased coronary arteries.

  6. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Yuniadi, Yoga; Kusnadi, Yuyus; Sandhow, Lakshmi; Erika, Rendra; Hanafy, Dicky A.; Sardjono, Caroline; Kaligis, R. W. M.; Kasim, Manoefris; Harimurti, Ganesja M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC) which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4 ± 7.40 yo) preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5 ± 4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87 ± 0.41, 0.63 ± 0.66, 99.00 ± 2.60, and 3.22 ± 3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22 ± 5.68 versus 26.8 ± 7.93, p < 0.001) during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity. PMID:27148465

  7. Compliance Index, a Marker of Peripheral Arterial Stiffness, may Predict Renal Function Decline in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Te-Hui; Yang, Deng-Chi; Lin, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Chen, Ju-Yi; Ho, Chin-Shan; Cheng, Meng-Fu; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Wang, Ming-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Compliance index derived from digital volume pulse (CI-DVP), measuring the relationship between volume and pressure changes in fingertip, is a surrogate marker of peripheral arterial stiffness. This study investigated if CI-DVP can predict renal function deterioration, cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: In this prospective observational study, 149 CKD patients were included for final analysis. CI-DVP and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were measured, decline in renal function was assessed by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. Composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes were evaluated, including ≥50% eGFR decline, start of renal replacement therapy, and major adverse events. Results: Patients in CKD stages 3b to 5 had higher baPWV and lower CI-DVP values than those in patients with CKD stages 1 to 3a. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis showed that lower CI-DVP (p =0.0001) and greater proteinuria (p =0.0023) were independent determinants of higher eGFR decline rate. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that CI-DVP (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.46-1.00), baseline eGFR (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98) and serum albumin (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.07-0.42) were independent predictors for composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Conclusions: Compliance index, CI-DVP, was significantly associated with renal function decline in patients with CKD. A higher CI-DVP may have independent prognostic value in slower renal function decline and better composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:26180508

  8. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Yuniadi, Yoga; Kusnadi, Yuyus; Sandhow, Lakshmi; Erika, Rendra; Hanafy, Dicky A; Sardjono, Caroline; Kaligis, R W M; Kasim, Manoefris; Harimurti, Ganesja M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC) which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4 ± 7.40 yo) preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5 ± 4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87 ± 0.41, 0.63 ± 0.66, 99.00 ± 2.60, and 3.22 ± 3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22 ± 5.68 versus 26.8 ± 7.93, p < 0.001) during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity.

  9. Low-speed treadmill running exercise improves memory function after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Haruka; Hamakawa, Michiru; Ishida, Akimasa; Tamakoshi, Keigo; Nakashima, Hiroki; Ishida, Kazuto

    2013-04-15

    Physical exercise may enhance the recovery of impaired memory function in stroke rats. However the appropriate conditions of exercise and the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects are not yet known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect exercise intensity on memory function after cerebral infarction in rats. The animals were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 90 min to induce stroke and were randomly assigned to four groups; Low-Ex, High-Ex, Non-Ex and Sham. On the fourth day after surgery, rats in the Low-Ex and High-Ex groups were forced to exercise using a treadmill for 30 min every day for four weeks. Memory functions were examined during the last 5 days of the experiment (27-32 days after MCAO) by three types of tests: an object recognition test, an object location test and a passive avoidance test. After the final memory test, the infarct volume, number of neurons and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) immunoreactivity in the hippocampus were analyzed by histochemistry. Memory functions in the Low-Ex group were improved in all tests. In the High-Ex group, only the passive avoidance test improved, but not the object recognition or object location tests. Both the Low-Ex and High-Ex groups had reduced infarct volumes. Although the number of neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the Low-Ex and High-Ex groups was increased, the number for the Low-Ex group increased more than that for the High-Ex group. Moreover hippocampal MAP2 immunoreactivity in the High-Ex group was reduced compared to that in the Low-Ex group. These data suggest that the effects of exercise on memory impairment after cerebral infarction depend on exercise intensity.

  10. Functional assessment of coronary artery disease by intravascular ultrasound and computational fluid dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Carrizo, Sebastián; Xie, Xinzhou; Peinado-Peinado, Rafael; Sánchez-Recalde, Angel; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Galeote-Garcia, Guillermo; Moreno, Raúl

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials have shown that functional assessment of coronary stenosis by fractional flow reserve (FFR) improves clinical outcomes. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) complements conventional angiography, and is a powerful tool to assess atherosclerotic plaques and to guide percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation represents a novel method for the functional assessment of coronary flow. A CFD simulation can be calculated from the data normally acquired by IVUS images. A case of coronary heart disease studied with FFR and IVUS, before and after PCI, is presented. A three-dimensional model was constructed based on IVUS images, to which CFD was applied. A discussion of the literature concerning the clinical utility of CFD simulation is provided. PMID:25441999

  11. Functional assessment of coronary artery disease by intravascular ultrasound and computational fluid dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Carrizo, Sebastián; Xie, Xinzhou; Peinado-Peinado, Rafael; Sánchez-Recalde, Angel; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Galeote-Garcia, Guillermo; Moreno, Raúl

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials have shown that functional assessment of coronary stenosis by fractional flow reserve (FFR) improves clinical outcomes. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) complements conventional angiography, and is a powerful tool to assess atherosclerotic plaques and to guide percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation represents a novel method for the functional assessment of coronary flow. A CFD simulation can be calculated from the data normally acquired by IVUS images. A case of coronary heart disease studied with FFR and IVUS, before and after PCI, is presented. A three-dimensional model was constructed based on IVUS images, to which CFD was applied. A discussion of the literature concerning the clinical utility of CFD simulation is provided.

  12. Influence of circadian blood pressure profile on endothelial function in patients with and without arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rekhviashvili, A; Giorgobiani, T; Minashvili, A; Baganashvili, E

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the relationship between the circadian BP rhythm and endothelial function in patients with essential hypertension. Consequently, we have hypothesized, that hypertensive patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile have more deteriorated endothelial function, than those with dipper BP profile. 57 untreated hypertensive patients and 17 normotensive controls were undergone to the anthropometrical measurements, physical examinations, review of their medical histories, 24-hour ABPM and vascular doppler-echography with high resolution ultrasound. Circadian BP profile was not independent from the BP level; namely, dipper profile was more frequent in normotensives. Independent from hypertension, dipper patients had significantly higher FMD%. In the whole study population, FMD showed strong negative correlation with 24-hour SBP, DBP and PP. Our study confirms the presence of disturbed endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in AH. Furthermore, our study showed that non-dipper circadian BP rhythm is associated with the significant impairment of endothelial function. Consequently, we can suggest that patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile could be assessed as a high risk group, which might need permanent supervising for avoiding of future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. PMID:25879555

  13. Influence of circadian blood pressure profile on endothelial function in patients with and without arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rekhviashvili, A; Giorgobiani, T; Minashvili, A; Baganashvili, E

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the relationship between the circadian BP rhythm and endothelial function in patients with essential hypertension. Consequently, we have hypothesized, that hypertensive patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile have more deteriorated endothelial function, than those with dipper BP profile. 57 untreated hypertensive patients and 17 normotensive controls were undergone to the anthropometrical measurements, physical examinations, review of their medical histories, 24-hour ABPM and vascular doppler-echography with high resolution ultrasound. Circadian BP profile was not independent from the BP level; namely, dipper profile was more frequent in normotensives. Independent from hypertension, dipper patients had significantly higher FMD%. In the whole study population, FMD showed strong negative correlation with 24-hour SBP, DBP and PP. Our study confirms the presence of disturbed endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in AH. Furthermore, our study showed that non-dipper circadian BP rhythm is associated with the significant impairment of endothelial function. Consequently, we can suggest that patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile could be assessed as a high risk group, which might need permanent supervising for avoiding of future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications.

  14. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. Reduced blood flow through the renal artery ...

  15. High-density lipoproteins as modulators of endothelial cell functions: alterations in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Adelheid; Giral, Hector; Landmesser, Ulf

    2014-08-01

    Alteration of endothelial cell functions, including reduced endothelial nitric oxide (NO) availability, increased endothelial cell apoptosis, adhesion molecule/chemokine expression and pro-thrombotic activation are thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and coronary-artery-disease (CAD) with its clinical complications, such as acute coronary syndromes. High-density lipoproteins (HDL) from healthy subjects or reconstituted HDL have been observed to exert potential direct anti-atherogenic effects by modulating these endothelial cell functions. Importantly, endothelial effects of HDL have now been reported to be highly heterogeneous, and are modulated as part of immune responses. More recently, this has also been observed for HDL of patients with CAD, where HDL becomes potentially pro-inflammatory and endothelial-protective properties are markedly altered. Several mechanisms may lead to these altered endothelial effects of HDL in patients with CAD, including oxidative modification of HDL-associated lipids and proteins, such as apoA-I and paraoxonase-1, and alterations of HDL-proteome. These findings have to be considered with respect to interpretation of recent clinical studies failing to demonstrate reduced cardiovascular events by HDL-cholesterol raising strategies in patients with CAD. Both clinical and genetic studies suggest that HDL-cholesterol levels alone are not a sufficient therapeutic target in patients with CAD. The focus of this review is to summarize the role of HDL onto endothelial homeostasis and to describe recently characterized molecular pathways involved. We highlight how structural and functional modifications of HDL particles in patients with CAD may perturb the physiological homeostasis and lead to a loss of endothelial-protective properties of HDL in patients with CAD.

  16. Obesity-metabolic derangement exacerbates cardiomyocyte loss distal to moderate coronary artery stenosis in pigs without affecting global cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Li, Zi-Lun; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Zhang, Xin; Eirin, Alfonso; Woollard, John R; Tang, Hui; Lerman, Amir; Wang, Shen-Ming; Lerman, Lilach O

    2014-04-01

    Obesity associated with metabolic derangements (ObM) worsens the prognosis of patients with coronary artery stenosis (CAS), but the underlying cardiac pathophysiologic mechanisms remain elusive. We tested the hypothesis that ObM exacerbates cardiomyocyte loss distal to moderate CAS. Obesity-prone pigs were randomized to four groups (n = 6 each): lean-sham, ObM-sham, lean-CAS, and ObM-CAS. Lean and ObM pigs were maintained on a 12-wk standard or atherogenic diet, respectively, and left circumflex CAS was then induced by placing local-irritant coils. Cardiac structure, function, and myocardial oxygenation were assessed 4 wk later by computed-tomography and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) MRI, the microcirculation with micro-computed-tomography, and injury mechanisms by immunoblotting and histology. ObM pigs showed obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. The degree of CAS (range, 50-70%) was similar in lean and ObM pigs, and resting myocardial perfusion and global cardiac function remained unchanged. Increased angiogenesis distal to the moderate CAS observed in lean was attenuated in ObM pigs, which also showed microvascular dysfunction and increased inflammation (M1-macrophages, TNF-α expression), oxidative stress (gp91), hypoxia (BOLD-MRI), and fibrosis (Sirius-red and trichrome). Furthermore, lean-CAS showed increased myocardial autophagy, which was blunted in ObM pigs (downregulated expression of unc-51-like kinase-1 and autophagy-related gene-12; P < 0.05 vs. lean CAS) and associated with marked apoptosis. The interaction diet xstenosis synergistically inhibited angiogenic, autophagic, and fibrogenic activities. ObM exacerbates structural and functional myocardial injury distal to moderate CAS with preserved myocardial perfusion, possibly due to impaired cardiomyocyte turnover.

  17. Effect of Peripheral Arterial Disease on Functional and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Heart Failure From HF-ACTION

    PubMed Central

    Jones, W. Schuyler; Clare, Robert; Ellis, Stephen J.; Mills, James S.; Fischman, David L.; Kraus, William E.; Whellan, David J.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Patel, Manesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have lower functional capacity and worse clinical outcomes than age and gender matched patients. Few data exist on the relationship of PAD with functional and clinical outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients. We sought to compare HF patients with and without PAD for baseline functional capacity, response to exercise training, and clinical outcomes. HF-ACTION was a randomized controlled trial comparing usual care to structured exercise training plus usual care in HF patients with an ejection fraction ≤ 35% and NYHA class II – IV heart failure symptoms. Cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing occurred at enrollment, 3 months, and 1 year. Clinical follow-up occurred up to 4 years. Of the 2331 HF-ACTION patients, 157 (6.8%) had PAD. At baseline, HF patients with PAD had a lower exercise duration (8.0 vs. 9.8 minutes, p<0.001), lower peak oxygen consumption (VO2) (12.5 vs. 14.6 mL/kg/min, p<0.001), and shorter six minute walking distance (306 vs. 371 meters, p<0.001) compared to HF patients without PAD. At three months, HF patients with PAD had less improvement on CPX testing [exercise duration (0.5 vs. 1.1 minutes; p=0.002) and peak VO2 (mean change; 0.1 vs. 0.6 mL/kg/min; p=0.04)] compared to HF patients without PAD. PAD was an independent predictor of all-cause death or hospitalization [hazard ratio (95% CI); 1.31 (1.06 – 1.62), p=0.011]. PAD patients with HF have depressed baseline exercise capacity and decreased response to exercise training. In conclusion, PAD is an independent predictor of all-cause death or hospitalization in HF patients. PMID:21565325

  18. Metformin, arterial function, intima-media thickness and nitroxidation in metabolic syndrome: the mefisto study.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Eduardo; Vela, Agustín; Samaniego, Virginia; Meaney, Alejandra; Asbún, Juan; Zempoalteca, Juan-Carlos; Elisa, Zárate N; Emma, Mendoza N; Guzman, Martin; Hicks, Juan; Ceballos, Guillermo

    2008-08-01

    1. Metabolic syndrome (MS) is one of the greatest public health problems in Mexico, where more than 75% of adults in urban populations are overweight or obese. Metabolic syndrome has several comorbidities, which result in a high cardiometabolic risk. 2. Some of the vasopathogenic phenomena in MS are caused by nitroxidant stress, secondary to cardiometabolic dysfunction. 3. The action of metformin to diminish or control MS remains a matter of debate. 4. In the present study, 60 patients with at least three diagnostic criteria for MS were divided into two groups. Both groups received similar dietary counselling, but one group was given 850 mg metformin daily. 5. The variables assessed were body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP, respectively), total cholesterol (TC), high- and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), fasting glucose, nitroxidant metabolites (free carbonyls, malondialdehyde, dityrosines and advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP)), nitric oxide (NO), carotid vascular stiffness, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and C-reactive protein (CRP). 6. After 1 year follow up, both groups reported weight loss, as well as decreases in waist circumference, SBP and DBP. 7. Patients on metformin exhibited reductions in TC and IMT and there were marked changes in nitroxidation: levels of carbonyls, dityrosines and AOPP were reduced, whereas those of NO were increased, indicating better endothelial function. In addition, in patients given metformin, CRP levels decreased. 8. In conclusion, metformin has a considerable beneficial effect on nitroxidation, endothelial function and IMT in patients with MS.

  19. Assessment of in vivo fetal growth and placental vascular function in a novel intrauterine growth restriction model of progressive uterine artery occlusion in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Emilio A; Alegría, René; Farias, Marcelo; Díaz-López, Farah; Hernández, Cherie; Uauy, Ricardo; Regnault, Timothy R H; Casanello, Paola; Krause, Bernardo J

    2016-03-15

    Intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with short and long-term metabolic and cardiovascular alterations. Mice and rats have been extensively used to study the effects of IUGR, but there are notable differences in fetal and placental physiology relative to those of humans that argue for alternative animal models. This study proposes that gradual occlusion of uterine arteries from mid-gestation in pregnant guinea pigs produces a novel model to better assess human IUGR. Fetal biometry and in vivo placental vascular function were followed by sonography and Doppler of control pregnant guinea pigs and sows submitted to surgical placement of ameroid constrictors in both uterine arteries (IUGR) at mid-gestation (35 days). The ameroid constrictors induced a reduction in the fetal abdominal circumference growth rate (0.205 cm day(-1) ) compared to control (0.241 cm day(-1) , P < 0.001) without affecting biparietal diameter growth. Umbilical artery pulsatility and resistance indexes at 10 and 20 days after surgery were significantly higher in IUGR animals than controls (P < 0.01). These effects were associated with a decrease in the relative luminal area of placental chorionic arteries (21.3 ± 2.2% vs. 33.2 ± 2.7%, P < 0.01) in IUGR sows at near term. Uterine artery intervention reduced fetal (∼30%), placental (∼20%) and liver (∼50%) weights (P < 0.05), with an increased brain to liver ratio (P < 0.001) relative to the control group. These data demonstrate that the ameroid constrictor implantations in uterine arteries in pregnant guinea pigs lead to placental vascular dysfunction and altered fetal growth that induces asymmetric IUGR. PMID:26719023

  20. Fenofibrate improves endothelial function in the brachial artery and forearm resistance arterioles of statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Sandra J; Chew, Gerard T; Davis, Timothy M E; Watts, Gerald F

    2010-05-01

    Dyslipidaemia contributes to endothelial dysfunction and CVD (cardiovascular disease) in Type 2 diabetes mellitus. While statin therapy reduces CVD in these patients, residual risk remains high. Fenofibrate corrects atherogenic dyslipidaemia, but it is unclear whether adding fenofibrate to statin therapy lowers CVD risk. We investigated whether fenofibrate improves endothelial dysfunction in statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients. In a cross-over study, 15 statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients, with LDL (low-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol <2.6 mmol/l and endothelial dysfunction [brachial artery FMD (flow-mediated dilatation) <6.0%] were randomized, double-blind, to fenofibrate 145 mg/day or matching placebo for 12 weeks, with 4 weeks washout between treatment periods. Brachial artery FMD and endothelium-independent NMD (nitrate-mediated dilatation) were measured by ultrasonography at the start and end of each treatment period. PIFBF (post-ischaemic forearm blood flow), a measure of microcirculatory endothelial function, and serum lipids, lipoproteins and apo (apolipoprotein) concentrations were also measured. Compared with placebo, fenofibrate increased FMD (mean absolute 2.1+/-0.6 compared with -0.3+/-0.6%, P=0.04), but did not alter NMD (P=0.75). Fenofibrate also increased maximal PIFBF {median 3.5 [IQR (interquartile range) 5.8] compared with 0.3 (2.1) ml/100 ml/min, P=0.001} and flow debt repayment [median 1.0 (IQR 3.5) compared with -1.5 (3.0) ml/100 ml, P=0.01]. Fenofibrate lowered serum cholesterol, triacylgycerols (triglycerides), LDL-cholesterol, apoB-100 and apoC-III (P < or = 0.03), but did not alter HDL (high-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol or apoA-I. Improvement in FMD was inversely associated with on-treatment LDL-cholesterol (r=-0.61, P=0.02) and apoB-100 (r=-0.54, P=0.04) concentrations. Fenofibrate improves endothelial dysfunction in statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients. This may relate partly to enhanced reduction in LDL-cholesterol and

  1. Heart function in magnetic resonance imaging and the mesenteric artery reactivity in rats receiving lead-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Skoczynska, A; Skórka, T; Wojakowska, A; Nowacki, D; Turczyn, B; Poręba, R; Tyrankiewicz, U; Byk, K; Szuba, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lead (Pb)-contaminated drinking water on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-estimated cardiac function, vascular reactivity, and serum lipids in rats. For 3 months, male Wistar rats, aged 4-6 weeks, were given drinking water with the addition of lead acetate at a concentration of 100 ppm Pb (10 rats) or water free from Pb (8 control rats). The cardiac MRI was performed at rest and under β-adrenergic stimulation on a 4.7 T scanner using electrocardiogram-triggered gradient echo (FLASH) cine sequence. After 1-2 weeks of the MRI test, experiments were performed ex vivo. After stabilization of perfusion pressure (PP), norepinephrine at doses from 0.01 to 5.0 μg was dissolved in Krebs solution, injected in a volume of 100 μl, and next infused at a concentration of 0.5 μg/ml into the isolated mesenteric artery. In this manner, preconstricted mesenteric bed was used to determine PP changes induced by acetylcholine, given at doses from 0.05 to 5.0 μg, before and during the infusion of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (1.0 μg/ml). At the end, dobutamine (5 mg), followed by potassium chloride (10.5 mg), was injected. Lipid levels were determined enzymatically, blood Pb level was measured by the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. This study showed that Pb impairs the left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Pb-induced changes in response to resistance of vessels to vasoactive agents may be secondary to the reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. The high-density lipoprotein subfraction 2 (HDL2) is involved in the cardiovascular effect of Pb.

  2. Pharmacological neutropenia prevents endothelial dysfunction but not smooth muscle functions impairment induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Pétrault, Olivier; Ouk, Thavarak; Gautier, Sophie; Laprais, Maud; Gelé, Patrick; Bastide, Michèle; Bordet, Régis

    2005-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) activation and mobilization observed in acute cerebral infarction contribute to the brain tissue damage, but PMN could also be involved in postischemic functional injury of ischemied blood vessel. This study was undertaken to investigate whether pharmacological neutropenia could modify the postischemic endothelial dysfunction in comparison to smooth muscle whose impairment is likely more related to reperfusion and oxidative stress. A cerebral ischemia–reperfusion by endoluminal occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCA) was performed 4 days after intravenous administration of vinblastine or 12 h after RP-3 anti-rat neutrophils monoclonal antibody (mAb RP-3) injection into the peritoneal cavity, on male Wistar rats with 1-h ischemia then followed by 24-h reperfusion period. Brain infarct volume was measured by histomorphometric analysis and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle reactivity of MCA was analysed using Halpern myograph. Neutropenia induced a neuroprotective effect as demonstrated by a significant decrease of brain infarct size. In parallel to neuroprotection, neutropenia prevented postischemic impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxing response to acetylcholine. In contrast, smooth muscle functional alterations were not prevented by neutropenia. Ischemia–reperfusion-induced myogenic tone impairment remained unchanged in vinblastine and mAb RP-3-treated rats. Postischemic Kir2.x-dependent relaxation impairment was not prevented in neutropenic conditions. The fully relaxation of smooth muscle response to sodium nitroprusside was similar in all groups. Our results evidenced the dissociate prevention of pharmacologically induced neutropenia on postischemic vascular endothelial and smooth muscle impairment. The selective endothelial protection by neutropenia is parallel to a neuroprotective effect suggesting a possible relationship between the two phenomena. PMID:15700030

  3. Intravascular pressure enhances the abundance of functional Kv1.5 channels at the surface of arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Michael W; Leo, M Dennis; Bannister, John P; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2015-08-18

    Voltage-dependent potassium (K(v)) channels are present in various cell types, including smooth muscle cells (myocytes) of resistance-sized arteries that control systemic blood pressure and regional organ blood flow. Intravascular pressure depolarizes arterial myocytes, stimulating calcium (Ca(2+)) influx through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) (Ca(v)) channels that results in vasoconstriction and also K(+) efflux through K(v) channels that oppose vasoconstriction. We hypothesized that pressure-induced depolarization may not only increase the open probability of plasma membrane-resident K(v) channels but also increase the abundance of these channels at the surface of arterial myocytes to limit vasoconstriction. We found that K(v)1.5 and K(v)2.1 proteins were abundant in the myocytes of resistance-sized mesenteric arteries. K(v)1.5, but not K(v)2.1, continuously recycled between the intracellular compartment and the plasma membrane in contractile arterial myocytes. Using ex vivo preparations of intact arteries, we showed that physiological intravascular pressure through membrane depolarization or membrane depolarization in the absence of pressure inhibited the degradation of internalized K(v)1.5 and increased recycling of K(v)1.5 to the plasma membrane. Accordingly, by stimulating the activity of Ca(v)1.2, membrane depolarization increased whole-cell K(v)1.5 current density in myocytes and K(v)1.5 channel activity in pressurized arteries. In contrast, the total amount and cell surface abundance of K(v)2.1 were independent of intravascular pressure or membrane potential. Thus, our data indicate that intravascular pressure-induced membrane depolarization selectively increased K(v)1.5 surface abundance to increase K(v) currents in arterial myocytes, which would limit vasoconstriction.

  4. Role of NO in arterial vascular function of intertidal fish (Girella laevifrons) and marine fish (Isacia conceptionis).

    PubMed

    Moraga, F A; Urriola-Urriola, N

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies performed in intertidal fish (Girella laevifrons),as well as marine fish (Isacia conceptionis), showed that acetylcholine (ACh) produced contractions mediated by cyclooxygenases that were dependent on the area and potency of contraction in several arterial vessels. Given that the role of nitric oxide is poorly understood in fish, the objective of our study was to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in branchial afferent (ABA), branchial efferent (ABE), dorsal (DA) and mesenteric (MA) arterial vessels from both Girella laevifrons and Isacia conceptionis. We studied afferent and efferent branchial, dorsal and mesenteric arteries that were dissected from 6 juvenile specimens. Isometric tension studies were done using dose response curves (DRC) for Ach (10-13 to 10-3 M) and blockade with L-NAME (10-5 M), and DRC for sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a donor of NO). L-NAME produced an attenuation of the contractile response in the dorsal, afferent and efferent branchial arteries and a potentiation of the contraction in the MA. SNP caused 70% dilation in the mesenteric artery and 40% in the dorsal artery. Our results suggest that Ach promotes precarious dilatation in MA mediated by NO; data that is supported by the use of sodium nitroprusside. In contrast, in the vessels DA, ABA and EBA our results support that the pathway Ach-NO-relaxation is absent in both species. PMID:27058601

  5. Contrasting effects of simulated microgravity with and without daily -Gx gravitation on structure and function of cerebral and mesenteric small arteries in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Le-Jian; Gao, Fang; Bai, Yun-Gang; Bao, Jun-Xiang; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Ma, Jin; Zhang, Li-Fan

    2009-12-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that a 28-day tail suspension (SUS) could induce hypertrophy and enhanced myogenic and vasoconstrictor reactivity in middle cerebral arteries (MCAs), whereas atrophy and decreased myogenic and vasoconstrictor responses in mesenteric third-order arterioles (MSAs). Also, in addition to the functional enhancement in MCAs, structural changes in both kinds of arteries and functional decrement in MSAs could all be prevented by the intervention of daily 1-h dorsoventral (-G(x)) gravitation by restoring to standing posture. To test this hypothesis, vessel diameters to pressure alterations and nonreceptor- and receptor-mediated agonists were determined using a pressure arteriograph with a procedure to measure in vivo length and decrease hysteresis of vessel segments and longitudinal middlemost sections of vessels fixed at maximally dilated state were examined using electron microscopy and histomorphometry. Functional studies showed that 28-day tail-suspended, head-down tilt (SUS) resulted in enhanced and decreased myogenic tone and vasoconstrictor responses, respectively, in MCAs and MSAs. Histomorphometric data revealed that SUS-induced hypertrophic changes in MCAs characterized by increases in thickness (T) and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the media and the number of vascular smooth-muscle-cell layers (N(CL)), whereas in MSAs, it induced decreases in medial CSA and T and N(CL). Daily 1-h -G(x) over 28 days can fully prevent these differential structural changes in both kinds of small arteries and the functional decrement in MSAs, but not the augmented myogenic tone and increased vasoreactivity in the MCAs. These findings have revealed special features of small resistance arteries during adaptation to microgravity with and without gravity-based countermeasure.

  6. Conduit artery structure and function in lowlanders and native highlanders: relationships with oxidative stress and role of sympathoexcitation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nia C S; Bailey, Damian M; duManoir, Gregory R; Messinger, Laura; Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D; Donnelly, Joseph; McEneny, Jane; Young, Ian S; Stembridge, Mike; Burgess, Keith R; Basnet, Aparna S; Ainslie, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    Research detailing the normal vascular adaptions to high altitude is minimal and often confounded by pathology (e.g. chronic mountain sickness) and methodological issues. We examined vascular function and structure in: (1) healthy lowlanders during acute hypoxia and prolonged (∼2 weeks) exposure to high altitude, and (2) high-altitude natives at 5050 m (highlanders). In 12 healthy lowlanders (aged 32 ± 7 years) and 12 highlanders (Sherpa; 33 ± 14 years) we assessed brachial endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), endothelium-independent dilatation (via glyceryl trinitrate; GTN), common carotid intima–media thickness (CIMT) and diameter (ultrasound), and arterial stiffness via pulse wave velocity (PWV; applanation tonometry). Cephalic venous biomarkers of free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation (lipid hydroperoxides, LOOH), nitrite (NO2–) and lipid soluble antioxidants were also obtained at rest. In lowlanders, measurements were performed at sea level (334 m) and between days 3–4 (acute high altitude) and 12–14 (chronic high altitude) following arrival to 5050 m. Highlanders were assessed once at 5050 m. Compared with sea level, acute high altitude reduced lowlanders’ FMD (7.9 ± 0.4 vs. 6.8 ± 0.4%; P = 0.004) and GTN-induced dilatation (16.6 ± 0.9 vs. 14.5 ± 0.8%; P = 0.006), and raised central PWV (6.0 ± 0.2 vs. 6.6 ± 0.3 m s−1; P = 0.001). These changes persisted at days 12–14, and after allometrically scaling FMD to adjust for altered baseline diameter. Compared to lowlanders at sea level and high altitude, highlanders had a lower carotid wall:lumen ratio (∼19%, P ≤ 0.04), attributable to a narrower CIMT and wider lumen. Although both LOOH and NO2– increased with high altitude in lowlanders, only LOOH correlated with the reduction in GTN-induced dilatation evident during acute (n = 11, r = −0.53) and chronic (n = 7, r = −0.69; P

  7. Enhanced central and conduit pulmonary arterial reservoir function offsets reduced ductal systolic outflow during constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Smolich, Joseph J; Penny, Daniel J; Mynard, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    Constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus (DA) has disparate effects on mean and phasic hemodynamics, as mean DA blood flow is preserved until constriction is severe, but DA systolic and diastolic blood velocities change with only mild constriction. To determine the basis of this disparity and its physiological significance, seven anesthetized late-gestation fetal sheep were instrumented with pulmonary trunk (PT), DA, and left pulmonary artery (PA) micromanometer catheters and transit-time flow probes. Blood flow profile and wave intensity analyses were performed at baseline and during mild, moderate, and severe DA constriction (defined as pulmonary-aortic mean pressure differences of 4, 8, and 14 mmHg, respectively), produced with an adjustable snare. With DA constriction, mean DA flow was initially maintained but decreased with severe constriction (P < 0.05) in conjunction with a reduction (P < 0.05) in PT flow (i.e., right ventricular output). By contrast, DA systolic flow fell progressively during DA constriction (P < 0.001), due to decreased transmission of both early and midsystolic proximal flow-enhancing forward-running compression waves into the DA. However, DA constriction was also accompanied by greater systolic storage of blood in the PT and main PA (P < 0.025), and increased retrograde diastolic flow from compliant major branch PA (P < 0.001). Transductal discharge of these central and conduit PA blood reservoirs in diastole offset systolic DA flow reductions. These data suggest that, during DA constriction in the fetus, enhanced central and conduit PA reservoir function constitutes an important compensatory mechanism that contributes to preservation of mean DA flow via a systolic-to-diastolic redistribution of phasic DA flow.

  8. [Effects of intravenous nicardipine on blood pressure, hemorheology platelet function in arterial hypertension. Dose-effect relations].

    PubMed

    Zannad, F; Voisin, P; Sadoul, N; Marchal, C; Donetti, C; Stoltz, J F; Gilgenkrantz, J M

    1987-06-01

    In arterial hypertension, hyperviscosity with hemorheological disturbances and platelet dysfunction may play a role in the prognosis and complications of the disease. We studied the effects of Nicardipine (NIC) on these blood disturbances in a group of 21 untreated patients with essential hypertension, aged 25 to 70 years (SBP/DBP = 185 +/- 28/105 +/- 17 mmHg). During one hour before and 4 hours after the IV injection of single doses of 5, 7.5 or 10 mg NIC over 5 min, blood pressure was recorded automatically (Dinamap). Hemorheological variables and platelet function were studied before and 30 min, 3 h and 24 hours after the injection. NIC lowered blood pressure and increased heart rate significantly (At 5 min, SBP = -24 mmHg; DBP = -18 mmHg; HR = +22 b/min). These effects were dose-dependent with rapid onset and short duration (less than 2 hrs). NIC decreased plasma viscosity from 1.36 +/- 0.08 to 1.30 +/- 0.07 Cst; p less than 0.01, whole blood viscosity from 22.4 +/- 2.8 to 20.7 +/- 1.5 mPas; p less than 0.05 for gamma = 0.512 s-1, and erythrocyte filterability with the Ca++ ionophore A 23187 from 16.3 +/- 3.8 to 13.5 +/- 3.1; p less than 0.01. Platelet aggregation with ADP was unchanged, but aggregation with A 23187 decreased from 46.9 +/- 21.2 to 31.3 +/- 25.6; p less than 0.05, as well as plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin (71.2 +/- 29.8 to 55.4 +/- 24.3 ng/ml; p less than 0.02) and platelet generated malonaldehyde (7.2 +/- 1.8 to 6.7 +/- 1.4 nM/10(9) platelets; NS).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Efficiency of muscle strength training on motor function in patients with coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Jie; He, Xiao-Hua; Guo, Hai-Ying; Wang, Xue-Qiang; Zhu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Existing literature has shown that patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) can benefit greatly from the strength training; therefore, the strength training should play a more important role in cardiac rehabilitation. However, the medical community may still have conservation to apply the strength training owing to no comprehensive study so far to compare the effectiveness of the strength training to the other trainings, such as aerobic training. Objective: To evaluate the effect of strength training on motor function in patients with CAD. Methods: Published articles from the earliest date available to July 2015 were identified using electronic searches. Two reviewers selected independently relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating exercise program with strength training versus control interventions (exercise without strength training, including aerobic training and no exercise group) for the treatment of CAD patients. We examined effects of exercise with strength training versus control interventions on peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), duration of exercise test and muscle strength. Two reviewers extracted data independently. Results: Twenty seven trials that represented 1151 participants passed the selection criteria and were evaluated for the effects of strength training in CAD patients. For improving VO2peak [SMD (95%CI) = 0.58 (0.11, 1.06)] and muscle strength [upper limb, SMD (95% CI) =0.44 (0.34, 0.55); lower limb, SMD (95% CI) =0.33 (0.16, 0.50)], exercise program with strength training were significantly more effective than one without it. But there is no significantly difference on duration of exercise test [SMD (95%CI) = 0.17 (-0.04, 0.39)] in strength training group than in control group. Conclusions: We conclude strength training is effective in improving muscle strength and VO2peak, in CAD patients, when compared to patients with control group. Furthermore, our evaluations suggest that strength training does not compromise

  10. A combination of anatomical and functional evaluations improves the prediction of cardiac event in patients with coronary artery bypass

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Hideki; Sarai, Masayoshi; Motoyama, Sadako; Ito, Hajime; Takada, Kayoko; Harigaya, Hiroto; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Shuji; Takagi, Yasushi; Ando, Motomi; Anno, Hirofumi; Ishii, Junichi; Murohara, Toyoaki; Ozaki, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the usefulness of combined risk stratification of coronary CT angiography (CTA) and myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in patients with previous coronary-artery-bypass grafting (CABG). Design A retrospective, observational, single centre study. Setting and patients 204 patients (84.3% men, mean age 68.7±7.6) undergoing CTA and MPI. Main outcome measures CTA defined unprotected coronary territories (UCT; 0, 1, 2 or 3) by evaluating the number of significant stenoses which were defined as the left main trunk ≥50% diameter stenosis, other native vessel stenosis ≥70% or graft stenosis ≥70%. Using a cut-off value with receiver-operating characteristics analysis, all patients were divided into four groups: group A (UCT=0, summed stress score (SSS)<4), group B (UCT≥1, SSS<4), group C (UCT=0, SSS≥4) and group D (UCT≥1, SSS≥4). Results Cardiac events, as a composite end point including cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina requiring revascularisation and heart-failure hospitalisation, were observed in 27 patients for a median follow-up of 27.5 months. The annual event rates were 1.1%, 2%, 5.7% and 12.9% of patients in groups A, B, C and D, respectively (log rank p value <0.0001). Adding UCT or SSS to a model with significant clinical factors including left ventricular ejection fraction, time since CABG and Euro SCORE II improved the prediction of events, while adding UCT and SSS to the model improved it greatly with increasing C-index, net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement. Conclusions The combination of anatomical and functional evaluations non-invasively enhances the predictive accuracy of cardiac events in patients with CABG. PMID:24220113

  11. Low-Sodium DASH Diet Improves Diastolic Function and Ventricular-Arterial Coupling in Hypertensive Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L.; Seymour, E. Mitchell; Brook, Robert D.; Sheth, Samar S.; Ghosh, Erina; Zhu, Simeng; Weder, Alan B.; Kovács, Sándor J.; Kolias, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) involves failure of cardiovascular reserve in multiple domains. In HFPEF animal models, dietary sodium restriction improves ventricular and vascular stiffness and function. We hypothesized that the sodium-restricted Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet (DASH/SRD) would improve left ventricular diastolic function, arterial elastance, and ventricular-arterial (V-A) coupling in hypertensive HFPEF. Methods and Results Thirteen patients with treated hypertension and compensated HFPEF consumed the DASH/SRD (target sodium 50 mmol/2100 kcal) for 21 days. We measured baseline and post-DASH/SRD brachial and central BP (via radial arterial tonometry), and cardiovascular function with echocardiographic measures (all previously invasively validated). Diastolic function was quantified via the Parametrized Diastolic Filling formalism, which yields relaxation/viscoelastic (c) and passive/stiffness (k) constants through analysis of Doppler mitral inflow velocity (E-wave) contours. Effective arterial elastance (Ea) end-systolic elastance (Ees), and V-A coupling (defined as the ratio Ees:Ea) were determined using previously published techniques. Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests were used for pre-post comparisons. The DASH/SRD reduced clinic and 24-hour brachial systolic pressure (155±35 to 138±30 and 130±16 to 123±18 mmHg, both p=.02) and central end-systolic pressure trended lower (116±18 to 111±16 mmHg, p=.12). In conjunction, diastolic function improved (c, 24.3±5.3 to 22.7±8.1 s−1;p=.03; k, 252±115 to 170±37 s−1;p=.03), Ea decreased (2.0±0.4 to 1.7±0.4 mmHg/ml;p=.007), and V-A coupling improved (Ees:Ea, 1.5±0.3 to 1.7±0.4;p=.04). Conclusions In hypertensive HFPEF patients, the sodium-restricted DASH diet was associated with favorable changes in ventricular diastolic function, arterial elastance, and V-A coupling. PMID:23985432

  12. Smooth muscle filamin A is a major determinant of conduit artery structure and function at the adult stage.

    PubMed

    Retailleau, Kevin; Arhatte, Malika; Demolombe, Sophie; Jodar, Martine; Baudrie, Véronique; Offermanns, Stefan; Feng, Yuanyi; Patel, Amanda; Honoré, Eric; Duprat, Fabrice

    2016-07-01

    Human mutations in the X-linked FLNA gene are associated with a remarkably diverse phenotype, including severe arterial morphological anomalies. However, the role for filamin A (FlnA) in vascular cells remains partially understood. We used a smooth muscle (sm)-specific conditional mouse model to delete FlnA at the adult stage, thus avoiding the developmental effects of the knock-out. Inactivation of smFlnA in adult mice significantly lowered blood pressure, together with a decrease in pulse pressure. However, both the aorta and carotid arteries showed a major outward hypertrophic remodeling, resistant to losartan, and normally occurring in hypertensive conditions. Notably, arterial compliance was significantly enhanced in the absence of smFlnA. Moreover, reactivity of thoracic aorta rings to a variety of vasoconstrictors was elevated, while basal contractility in response to KCl depolarization was reduced. Enhanced reactivity to the thromboxane A2 receptor agonist U46619 was fully reversed by the ROCK inhibitor Y27632. We discuss the possibility that a reduction in arterial stiffness upon smFlnA inactivation might cause a compensatory increase in conduit artery diameter for normalization of parietal tension, independently of the ROCK pathway. In conclusion, deletion of smFlnA in adult mice recapitulates the vascular phenotype of human bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia, culminating in aortic dilatation. PMID:27023351

  13. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Natural Killer Cells in Uterine Artery Function and Pregnancy Outcome in the Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat

    PubMed Central

    Nosalski, Ryszard; Morgan, Hannah; Beattie, Elisabeth; Guzik, Tomasz J.; Graham, Delyth; Delles, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Women with chronic hypertension are at increased risk of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. We have previously characterized the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) as a model of deficient uterine artery function and adverse pregnancy outcome compared with the control Wistar–Kyoto. The activation of the immune system plays a role in hypertension and adverse pregnancy outcome. Therefore, we investigated the role of tumor necrosis factor-α in the SHRSP phenotype in an intervention study using etanercept (0.8 mg/kg SC) at gestational days 0, 6, 12, and 18 in pregnant SHRSP compared with vehicle-treated controls (n=6). Etanercept treatment significantly lowered systolic blood pressure after gestational day 12 and increased litter size in SHRSP. At gestational day 18, etanercept improved the function of uterine arteries from pregnant SHRSP normalizing the contractile response and increasing endothelium-dependent relaxation, resulting in increased pregnancy-dependent diastolic blood flow in the uterine arteries. We identified that the source of excess tumor necrosis factor-α in the SHRSP was a pregnancy-dependent increase in peripheral and placental CD3– CD161+ natural killer cells. Etanercept treatment also had effects on placental CD161+ cells by reducing the expression of CD161 receptor, which was associated with a decrease in cytotoxic granzyme B expression. Etanercept treatment improves maternal blood pressure, pregnancy outcome, and uterine artery function in SHRSP by antagonizing signaling from excess tumor necrosis factor-α production and the reduction of granzyme B expression in CD161+ natural killer cells in SHRSP. PMID:27733586

  14. Geomagnetic field modulates artificial static magnetic field effect on arterial baroreflex and on microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-03-01

    Spreading evidence suggests that geomagnetic field (GMF) modulates artificial magnetic fields biological effect and associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. To explore the underlying physiological mechanism we studied 350 mT static magnetic field (SMF) effect on arterial baroreflex-mediated skin microcirculatory response in conjunction with actual geomagnetic activity, reflected by K and K p indices. Fourteen experiments were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h). Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and the ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after 40 min of NdFeB magnets local exposure to sinocarotid baroreceptors. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. We found a significant positive correlation between SMF-induced increase in BRS and increment in microvascular blood flow (ΔBRS with ΔMPPG, r=0.7, p<0.009) indicated the participation of the arterial baroreflex in the regulation of the microcirculation and its enhancement after SMF exposure. Geomagnetic disturbance, as opposed to SMF, decreased both microcirculation and BRS, and counteracted SMF-induced increment in microcirculatory blood flow ( K-index with ΔMPPG; r s=-0.55, p<0.041). GMF probably affected central baroreflex pathways, diminishing SMF direct stimulatory effect on sinocarotid baroreceptors and on baroreflex-mediated vasodilatatory response. The results herein may thus point to arterial baroreflex as a possible physiological mechanism for magnetic-field cardiovascular effect. It seems that geomagnetic disturbance modifies artificial magnetic fields biological effect and should be taken into consideration in the assessment of the final effect.

  15. Geomagnetic field modulates artificial static magnetic field effect on arterial baroreflex and on microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-03-01

    Spreading evidence suggests that geomagnetic field (GMF) modulates artificial magnetic fields biological effect and associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. To explore the underlying physiological mechanism we studied 350 mT static magnetic field (SMF) effect on arterial baroreflex-mediated skin microcirculatory response in conjunction with actual geomagnetic activity, reflected by K and K ( p ) indices. Fourteen experiments were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h). Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and the ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after 40 min of NdFeB magnets local exposure to sinocarotid baroreceptors. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. We found a significant positive correlation between SMF-induced increase in BRS and increment in microvascular blood flow (DeltaBRS with DeltaMPPG, r=0.7, p<0.009) indicated the participation of the arterial baroreflex in the regulation of the microcirculation and its enhancement after SMF exposure. Geomagnetic disturbance, as opposed to SMF, decreased both microcirculation and BRS, and counteracted SMF-induced increment in microcirculatory blood flow (K-index with DeltaMPPG; r (s)=-0.55, p<0.041). GMF probably affected central baroreflex pathways, diminishing SMF direct stimulatory effect on sinocarotid baroreceptors and on baroreflex-mediated vasodilatatory response. The results herein may thus point to arterial baroreflex as a possible physiological mechanism for magnetic-field cardiovascular effect. It seems that geomagnetic disturbance modifies artificial magnetic fields biological effect and should be taken into consideration in the assessment of the final effect. PMID:16983578

  16. Emerging options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in Chinese patients: focus on arterial function and alogliptin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Jinbo; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has become a worldwide health problem, and the rate of it is growing greatly in the People's Republic of China every year. T2DM could cause macrovascular and microvascular complications that lead to an increase in arterial wall thickness, endothelial dysfunction, calcification, and - finally - to an increase in arterial stiffness and arterial dysfunction. Alogliptin, a new selective inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase 4, has shown its great antihyperglycemia effect in T2DM patients. The clinical trial data from the People's Republic of China was similar to other global and Asian trials. This could provide some choice for clinical physicians to the treatment of T2DM.

  17. [Clinical significance and functional outcomes of ligation of exterior carotid artery in surgical treatment of oropharyngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Klochikhin, A L; Trofimov, E I; Gamilovskaia, Iu V; Chistiakov, A L

    2010-01-01

    This work was designed to analyse outcomes of the treatment of 65 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer who had received combined treatment including radical resection of the tumour. Thirty three patients underwent surgery without ligation of exterior carotid artery while the remaining 32 (control group) were operated after preceding ligation of this vessel. The influence of ligation of exterior carotid artery on cerebral circulation was evaluated by the following methods: estimation of the intraoperative blood loss from A.T. Staroverov's formula, ultrasound dopplerography of extracranial carotid segments, electroencephalography, measurement of the fields of vision using statistical quantitative perimetry, evaluation of the patients' neurologic status. It was shown that ligation of exterior carotid artery has no apparent effect on the intraoperative blood loss during radical surgery for the management of oropharyngeal cancer nor does it influence healing of the postoperative wound and oncological outcome of this treatment. PMID:20436415

  18. Acidosis reduces the function and expression of α1D-adrenoceptor in superior mesenteric artery of Capra hircus

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Ipsita; Suklabaidya, Sujit; Parija, Subas Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to characterize the α1-adrenoceptor (α1-AR) subtypes and evaluate the effect of acidosis on α1-AR function and expression in goat superior mesenteric artery (GSMA). Materials and Methods: GSMA rings were mounted in a thermostatically controlled (37.0°C ± 0.5°C) organ bath containing 20 ml of modified Krebs-Henseleit solution, maintained at pHo of 7.4, 6.8, 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Noradrenaline (NA)- and phenylephrine (PE)-induced contractile response was elicited in the absence or presence of endothelium and prazosin at pHo of 7.4, 6.0, and 5.0. The responses were recorded isometrically by an automatic organ bath connected to PowerLab and analyzed using Labchart 7.1.3 software. Expression of α1D-AR was compared at physiological and acidic pHo using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: NA- and PE-induced contractile responses were attenuated proportionately with a decrease in extracellular pH (pHo), i.e. 7.4 → 6.8 → 6.0 → 5.5 → 5.0 → 4.5. Endothelium denudation increased the contractile response at both normal and acidic pHo. Prazosin (1 nM, 10 nM, and 0.1 μM) inhibited the NA- and PE-induced contractile response at pHo 7.4 and the blocking effect of prazosin was potentiated at pHo of 6.0 and 5.0. RT-PCR analysis for α1D-AR in GSMA showed that the mRNA expression of α1D-AR was decreased under acidic pHo as compared to physiological pHo. Conclusion: (i) Adrenergic receptor mediates vasoconstriction in GSMA under normal physiological pHo, and α1D is the possible subtype involved in this event (ii) acidosis attenuates the vasocontractile response due to reduced function and expression of α1D-AR and also increased the release of endothelial-relaxing factors. PMID:27756951

  19. Effects of carotid artery stenting on cognitive function in patients with mild cognitive impairment and carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yong; Wang, Yan Jiang; Yan, Jia Chuan; Zhou, Rui; Zhou, Hua Dong

    2013-04-01

    Carotid stenosis is known to be an independent risk factor in the transformation process of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia and is treated by carotid artery stenting (CAS); however, the effects of CAS on cognitive function are unclear. In this study, 240 patients were prospectively assigned to a CAS or control group according to patient preference and underwent detailed neuropsychological examinations (NPEs) before and 6 months after treatment. Cerebral perfusion was assessed with computed tomography perfusion (CTP). Among the 240 patients included in the study, 208 patients completed NPEs at baseline and 6 months after therapy. The patients in the two groups did not differ with regard to baseline characteristics, educational level, vascular risk factors (VRFs) and NPEs prior to therapy. Significant improvements in the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; before, 24.6±1.7 vs. after, 24.8±1.9; P=0.016), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA; before, 23.7±1.7 vs. after, 24.1±2.0; P=0.006), Fuld Object Memory Evaluation (FOME; before, 13.8±2.2 vs. after, 14.0±2.3; P=0.031) and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-digital span (WAIS-DS; before, 6.7±2.1 vs. after, 6.9±2.3; P=0.040) were observed in the CAS group; however, improvements were not observed in the control group. Of the 84 patients in the CAS group who received CTP follow-up, 72 (86%) presented improvements in ipsilateral brain perfusion 6 months after the procedure; however, no improvement was observed in the control group. Close correlations were identified between the change in perfusion and the change in MMSE (r=0.575) and MOCA (r=0.574). CAS improves global cognitive function in patients with carotid stenosis and MCI and the improvement of cognition is closely related to the improvement of cerebral perfusion. PMID:23596467

  20. Maternal alcohol consumption in pregnancy enhances arterial stiffness and alters vasodilator function that varies between vascular beds in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Parkington, Helena C; Kenna, Kelly R; Sozo, Foula; Coleman, Harold A; Bocking, Alan; Brien, James F; Harding, Richard; Walker, David W; Morley, Ruth; Tare, Marianne

    2014-06-15

    While the impact of alcohol consumption by pregnant women on fetal neurodevelopment has received much attention, the effects on the cardiovascular system are not well understood. We hypothesised that repeated exposure to alcohol (ethanol) in utero would alter fetal arterial reactivity and wall stiffness, key mechanisms leading to cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Ethanol (0.75 g (kg body weight)(-1)) was infused intravenously into ewes over 1 h daily for 39 days in late pregnancy (days 95-133 of pregnancy, term ∼147 days). Maternal and fetal plasma ethanol concentrations at the end of the hour were ∼115 mg dl(-1), and then declined to apparent zero over 8 h. At necropsy (day 134), fetal body weight and fetal brain-body weight ratio were not affected by alcohol infusion. Small arteries (250-300 μm outside diameter) from coronary, renal, mesenteric, femoral (psoas) and cerebral beds were isolated. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation sensitivity was reduced 10-fold in coronary resistance arteries, associated with a reduction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA (P = 0.008). Conversely, vasodilatation sensitivity was enhanced 10-fold in mesenteric and renal resistance arteries. Arterial stiffness was markedly increased (P = 0.0001) in all five vascular beds associated with an increase in elastic modulus and, in cerebral vessels, with an increase in collagen Iα mRNA. Thus, we show for the first time that fetal arteries undergo marked and regionally variable adaptations as a consequence of repeated alcohol exposure. These alcohol-induced vascular effects occurred in the apparent absence of fetal physical abnormalities or fetal growth restriction.

  1. Repair of Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm Anastomosed to Donor Renal Artery in a Renal Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Hiroshi; Kin, Keiwa; Maeda, Shuusaku

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a successful repair of an internal iliac artery aneurysm in a renal transplant patient. At renal transplantation, the main renal artery and accessory renal artery had been anastomosed to the right internal iliac artery and right external iliac artery, respectively. The patient underwent resection and graft replacement of the iliac artery aneurysm with reattachment of the main renal artery to the right external iliac artery through a midline laparotomy with repeated topical cold perfusion for renal protection. The postoperative course was uneventful, and no evidence of renal function impairment was present at discharge. PMID:27738467

  2. Functional ET(A)-ET(B) Receptor Cross-talk in Basilar Artery In Situ From ET(B) Receptor Deficient Rats.

    PubMed

    Yoon, SeongHun; Gariepy, Cheryl E; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Zuccarello, Mario; Rapoport, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    The role of endothelin (ET)(A)-ET(B) receptor cross-talk in limiting the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction is revealed by the partial or complete dependency of the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition on functional removal of the ET(B) receptor. Although functional removal of the ET(B) receptor is generally accomplished with ET(B) receptor antagonist, a novel approach using rats containing a naturally occurring deletion mutation in the ET(B) receptor [rescued "spotting lethal" (sl) rats; ET(B)(sl/sl)] demonstrated increased ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction in vena cava. We investigated whether this deletion mutation was also sufficient to remove the ET(B) receptor dependency of the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction in the basilar artery. Consistent with previous reports, ET-1 plasma levels were elevated in ET(B)(sl/sl) as compared with ET(B)(+/+) rats. ET(B) receptor antagonist failed to relax the ET-1 constricted basilar artery from ET(B)(+/+) and ET(B)(sl/sl) rats. Relaxation to combined ET(A) and ET(B) receptor antagonist was greater than relaxation to ET(A) receptor antagonist in the basilar artery from ET(B)(+/+) and, unexpectedly, ET(B)(sl/sl) rats. These findings confirm the presence of ET(A)-ET(B) receptor cross-talk in the basilar artery. We speculate that mutant ET(B) receptor expression produced by alternative splicing may be sufficient to allow cross-talk.

  3. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... rial line can provide valuable information to adjust oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilator (respirator; breathing machine) settings. The blood oxygen pres- sure measures from an arterial line give ...

  4. MPST but not CSE is the primary regulator of hydrogen sulfide production and function in the coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Maggie M; Kim, Dae Hee; Jandu, Sandeep; Bergman, Yehudit; Tan, Siqi; Wang, Huilei; Pandey, Deepesh R; Abraham, Theodore P; Shoukas, Artin A; Berkowitz, Dan E; Santhanam, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important gasotransmitter in the vasculature. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that H2S contributes to coronary vasoregulation and evaluated the physiological relevance of two sources of H2S, namely, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptypyruvate sulfertransferase (MPST). MPST was detected in human coronary artery endothelial cells as well as rat and mouse coronary artery; CSE was not detected in the coronary vasculature. Rat coronary artery homogenates produced H2S through the MPST pathway but not the CSE pathway in vitro. In vivo coronary vasorelaxation response was similar in CSE knockout mice, wild-type mice (WT), and WT mice treated with the CSE inhibitor propargylglycine, suggesting that CSE-produced H2S does not have a significant role in coronary vasoregulation in vivo. Ex vivo, the MPST substrate 3-mercaptopyruvate (3-MP) and H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) elicited similar coronary vasoreactivity responses. Pyruvate did not have any effects on vasoreactivity. The vasoactive effect of H2S appeared to be nitric oxide (NO) dependent: H2S induced coronary vasoconstriction in the presence of NO and vasorelaxation in its absence. Maximal endothelial-dependent relaxation was intact after 3-MP and NaHS induced an increase in preconstriction tone, suggesting that endothelial NO synthase activity was not significantly inhibited. In vitro, H2S reacted with NO, which may, in part explain the vasoconstrictive effects of 3-MP and NaHS. Taken together, these data show that MPST rather than CSE generates H2S in coronary artery, mediating its effects through direct modulation of NO. This has important implications for H2S-based therapy in healthy and diseased coronary arteries.

  5. Arterial stiffness, pressure and flow pulsatility and brain structure and function: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary F; van Buchem, Mark A; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Gotal, John D; Jonsdottir, Maria K; Kjartansson, Ólafur; Garcia, Melissa; Aspelund, Thor; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2011-11-01

    Aortic stiffness increases with age and vascular risk factor exposure and is associated with increased risk for structural and functional abnormalities in the brain. High ambient flow and low impedance are thought to sensitize the cerebral microcirculation to harmful effects of excessive pressure and flow pulsatility. However, haemodynamic mechanisms contributing to structural brain lesions and cognitive impairment in the presence of high aortic stiffness remain unclear. We hypothesized that disproportionate stiffening of the proximal aorta as compared with the carotid arteries reduces wave reflection at this important interface and thereby facilitates transmission of excessive pulsatile energy into the cerebral microcirculation, leading to microvascular damage and impaired function. To assess this hypothesis, we evaluated carotid pressure and flow, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, brain magnetic resonance images and cognitive scores in participants in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study who had no history of stroke, transient ischaemic attack or dementia (n = 668, 378 females, 69-93 years of age). Aortic characteristic impedance was assessed in a random subset (n = 422) and the reflection coefficient at the aorta-carotid interface was computed. Carotid flow pulsatility index was negatively related to the aorta-carotid reflection coefficient (R = -0.66, P<0.001). Carotid pulse pressure, pulsatility index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity were each associated with increased risk for silent subcortical infarcts (hazard ratios of 1.62-1.71 per standard deviation, P<0.002). Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was associated with higher white matter hyperintensity volume (0.108 ± 0.045 SD/SD, P = 0.018). Pulsatility index was associated with lower whole brain (-0.127 ± 0.037 SD/SD, P<0.001), grey matter (-0.079 ± 0.038 SD/SD, P = 0.038) and white matter (-0.128 ± 0.039 SD/SD, P<0.001) volumes. Carotid-femoral pulse

  6. Relations of Digital Vascular Function, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Arterial Stiffness: The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA‐Brasil) Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Brant, Luisa C. C.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Barreto, Sandhi M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Ribeiro, Antonio L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular dysfunction is an early expression of atherosclerosis and predicts cardiovascular (CV) events. Peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) evaluates basal pulse amplitude (BPA), endothelial function (PAT ratio), and wave reflection (PAT‐AIx) in the digital microvessels. In Brazilian adults, we investigated the correlations of PAT responses to CV risk factors and to carotid‐femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness. Methods and Results In a cross‐sectional study, 1535 participants of the ELSA‐Brasil cohort underwent PAT testing (52±9 years; 44% women). In multivariable analyses, more‐impaired BPA and PAT ratios were associated with male sex, higher body mass index (BMI), and total cholesterol/high‐density lipoprotein. Higher age and triglycerides were related to higher BPA, whereas lower systolic blood pressure, hypertension (HTN) treatment, and prevalent CV disease (CVD) were associated with lower PAT ratio. PAT‐AIx correlated positively with female sex, advancing age, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and smoking and inversely to heart rate, height, BMI, and prevalent CVD. Black race was associated with lower BPA, higher PAT ratio, and PAT‐AIx. Microvessel vasodilator function was not associated with PWV. Higher PAT‐AIx was modestly correlated to higher PWV and PAT ratio and inversely correlated to BPA. Conclusion Metabolic risk factors are related to impaired microvessel vasodilator function in Brazil. However, in contrast to studies from the United States, black race was not associated with an impaired microvessel vasodilator response, implying that vascular function may vary by race across populations. PAT‐AIx relates to HTN, may be a valid measure of wave reflection, and provides distinct information from arterial stiffness. PMID:25510401

  7. PAF-receptor is preferentially expressed in a distinct synthetic phenotype of smooth muscle cells cloned from human internal thoracic artery: Functional implications in cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Stengel, Dominique; O'Neil, Caroline; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Karabina, Sonia-Athina; Durand, Herve; Caplice, Noel M.; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Ninio, Ewa . E-mail: ninio@chups.jussieu.fr

    2006-08-04

    Platelet-activating-Factor (PAF) and its structural analogues formed upon low density lipoprotein oxidation are involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and may signal through PAF-receptor (PAF-R) expressed in human macrophages and in certain smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media, but rarely in the intima of human plaques. Our aim was to determine which SMC phenotype expresses PAF-R and whether this receptor is functional in cell migration. Circulating SMC progenitors and two phenotypically distinct clones of proliferative, epithelioid phenotype vs contractile, spindle-shaped SMCs from the media of adult internal thoracic artery were studied for the presence of PAF-receptor (PAF-R). The levels of specific mRNA were obtained by reverse transcription/real-time PCR, the protein expression was deduced from immunohistochemistry staining, and the functional transmigration assay was performed by Boyden chamber-type chemotaxis assay. Only SMCs of spindle-shape and synthetic phenotype expressed both mRNA and PAF-R protein and in the functional test migrated at low concentrations of PAF. Two unrelated, specific PAF-R antagonists inhibited PAF-induced migration, but did not modify the migration initiated by PDGF. The presence of functional PAF-R in arterial spindle-shaped SMCs of synthetic phenotype may be important for their migration from the media into the intima and atherosclerotic plaques formation.

  8. Recovery of Left Ventricular Function After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Compared to Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients with Multi-Vessel Coronary Disease and Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Andrea M; Davis, James; Kao, John

    2016-01-01

    Recovery of left ventricular (LV) function after revascularization has been described for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG); however, LV recovery after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and how it compares to CABG has not been well described in the literature. The aim of this single center retrospective study was to evaluate LV recovery in patients with severely reduced LV function undergoing PCI compared to those undergoing CABG. Patients with LV ejection fraction (LVEF) < 40% and multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing revascularization with either CABG (n=16) or PCI (n=176), and with 12 months of follow up data were included in the study. LVEF at baseline exhibited significant differences between PCI (28.5 ± 8.0) and CABG (24.2 ± 6.8) groups (P=.05). LVEF recovery at 6-month follow up showed no difference between PCI and CABG groups. LVEF recovery differences at one-year follow-up was significantly different between PCI (4.82) and CABG (15.25) groups (P=.005). Patients with severely reduced LV function undergoing multivessel PCI had a statistically significant increase in LVEF over time; however patients undergoing CABG demonstrated greater gains in LVEF over the same time period. Surgical revascularization with CABG may be a procedure of choice in patients with depressed LV function and multivessel CAD. PMID:27688953

  9. Recovery of Left Ventricular Function After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Compared to Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients with Multi-Vessel Coronary Disease and Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Andrea M; Davis, James; Kao, John

    2016-01-01

    Recovery of left ventricular (LV) function after revascularization has been described for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG); however, LV recovery after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and how it compares to CABG has not been well described in the literature. The aim of this single center retrospective study was to evaluate LV recovery in patients with severely reduced LV function undergoing PCI compared to those undergoing CABG. Patients with LV ejection fraction (LVEF) < 40% and multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing revascularization with either CABG (n=16) or PCI (n=176), and with 12 months of follow up data were included in the study. LVEF at baseline exhibited significant differences between PCI (28.5 ± 8.0) and CABG (24.2 ± 6.8) groups (P=.05). LVEF recovery at 6-month follow up showed no difference between PCI and CABG groups. LVEF recovery differences at one-year follow-up was significantly different between PCI (4.82) and CABG (15.25) groups (P=.005). Patients with severely reduced LV function undergoing multivessel PCI had a statistically significant increase in LVEF over time; however patients undergoing CABG demonstrated greater gains in LVEF over the same time period. Surgical revascularization with CABG may be a procedure of choice in patients with depressed LV function and multivessel CAD.

  10. Statins and Selective Inhibition of Rho Kinase Protect Small Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel Function (KCa2.3) in Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Altayo, Francesc; Cottrell, Graeme S.

    2012-01-01

    Background In rat middle cerebral and mesenteric arteries the KCa2.3 component of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) is lost following stimulation of thromboxane (TP) receptors, an effect that may contribute to the endothelial dysfunction associated with cardiovascular disease. In cerebral arteries, KCa2.3 loss is associated with NO synthase inhibition, but is restored if TP receptors are blocked. The Rho/Rho kinase pathway is central for TP signalling and statins indirectly inhibit this pathway. The possibility that Rho kinase inhibition and statins sustain KCa2.3 hyperpolarization was investigated in rat middle cerebral arteries (MCA). Methods MCAs were mounted in a wire myograph. The PAR2 agonist, SLIGRL was used to stimulate EDH responses, assessed by simultaneous measurement of smooth muscle membrane potential and tension. TP expression was assessed with rt-PCR and immunofluorescence. Results Immunofluorescence detected TP in the endothelial cell layer of MCA. Vasoconstriction to the TP agonist, U46619 was reduced by Rho kinase inhibition. TP receptor stimulation lead to loss of KCa2.3 mediated hyperpolarization, an effect that was reversed by Rho kinase inhibitors or simvastatin. KCa2.3 activity was lost in L-NAME-treated arteries, but was restored by Rho kinase inhibition or statin treatment. The restorative effect of simvastatin was blocked after incubation with geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate to circumvent loss of isoprenylation. Conclusions Rho/Rho kinase signalling following TP stimulation and L-NAME regulates endothelial cell KCa2.3 function. The ability of statins to prevent isoprenylation and perhaps inhibit of Rho restores/protects the input of KCa2.3 to EDH in the MCA, and represents a beneficial pleiotropic effect of statin treatment. PMID:23056429

  11. Evolution of myocardial ischemia and left ventricular function in patients with angina pectoris without myocardial infarction and total occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery and collaterals from other coronary arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Juilliere, Y.; Marie, P.Y.; Danchin, N.; Karcher, G.; Bertrand, A.; Cherrier, F. )

    1991-07-01

    Repeated episodes of myocardial ischemia might lead to progressive impairment of left ventricular (LV) function. This radionuclide study assessed myocardial ischemia and LV function several years after documented coronary occlusion without myocardial infarction. Over 5 years, 24 consecutive patients, who underwent cardiac catheterization for angina pectoris without myocardial infarction, had isolated total occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery with well-developed collateral vessels. Five patients were successfully treated by coronary bypass grafting and 3 by coronary angioplasty. Among the 16 medically treated patients, 1 was lost to follow-up and 1 died (extracardiac death). The mean (+/- standard deviation) follow-up (14 patients) was 48 +/- 15 months. At follow-up, 8 patients still had clinical chest pain, 11 received antianginal therapy, 4 patients had no stress ischemia and the other 10 had greater than or equal to 1 sign of stress ischemia. All patients had a normal LV ejection fraction at rest (mean 60 +/- 3%; range 55 to 65%). Collateral circulation preserves LV function at the time of occlusion and, in some cases, prevents the development of myocardial ischemia; in patients with persisting myocardial ischemia after well-collateralized coronary occlusion, LV function is not impaired at long-term follow-up.

  12. [Effect of lovastatin on adhesive and aggregation function of platelets in patients with arterial hypertension and dislipidemia].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, I N; Skoriatina, I A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate efficiency of correction of lipid profile disturbances and platelet dysfunction by lovastatin in patients with arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia. Lovastatin was given to 29 patients for 4 months. The main parameters measured included dynamics of blood lipid profile, lipid peroxidation in plasma and platelets, antioxidative protection of blood fluid and platelets, platelet activity. t-Students test was used to assess statistical significance of the results. It was shown that lovastatin has beneficial effect on dyslipoproteidemia and peroxidation syndrome. Moreover, it normalizes intraplatelet regulatory mechanisms and inhibits enhanced platelet activity. Effects of lovastatin in patients with arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia persist under conditions of long-term therapy.

  13. SPY Imaging Assessment Correlates With Transesophageal Echocardiogram Assessment of Ventricular Function During Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Curtis A; Kypson, Alan P; Hudson, Wes; Ferguson, Bruce; Rodriguez, Evelio

    2008-05-01

    Intraoperative assessment of graft anastomoses is commonly performed after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). The SPY imaging system allows intraoperative graft assessment. We document correlation between intraoperative SPY images and wall motion abnormality by transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) during OPCAB. A 79-year-old female underwent OPCAB. Intraoperative graft patency assessment was performed with the SPY and left ventricular wall motion was assessed by TEE. SPY imaging demonstrated poor flow trough the distal vein graft anastomosis to the posterior descending artery, which correlated with a new posterior wall motion hypokinesis. After graft revision, SPY imaging demonstrated good distal flow and the TEE demonstrated normalization of the left ventricular posterior wall motion. SPY technology allows the surgeon to accurately assess graft patency intraoperatively and allows immediate correction of a technical problem.

  14. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... the aorta, the main artery from the heart. Hardening of the arteries occurs when fat, cholesterol, and ...

  15. Arterial stiffness as a risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Josh; Farmer, John

    2014-02-01

    Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor, and clinical trials have demonstrated that successful reduction of elevated blood pressure to target levels translates into decreased risk for the development of coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, and renal failure. The arterial system had previously been regarded as a passive conduit for the transportation of arterial blood to peripheral tissues. The physiologic role the arterial system was greatly expanded by the recognition of the central role of the endothelial function in a variety of physiologic processes. The role of arterial function and structure in cardiovascular physiology was expanded with the development of a variety of parameters that evaluate arterial stiffness. Markers of arterial stiffness have been correlated with cardiovascular outcomes, and have been classified as an emerging risk factor that provides prognostic information beyond standard stratification strategies involving hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia and smoking. Multiple epidemiologic studies have correlated markers of arterial stiffness such as pulse-wave velocity, augmentation index and pulse pressure with risk for the development of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. Additionally, measurements of arterial stiffness had clarified the results of clinical trials that demonstrated differing impacts on clinical outcomes, despite similar reductions in blood pressure, as measured by brachial and sphygmomanometry.

  16. Vitrification of Carotid Artery Segments: An Integrated Study of Thermophysical Events and Functional Recovery Toward Scale-Up for Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    BAICU, S.; TAYLOR, M.J.; CHEN, Z.; RABIN, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, ice-free cryopreservation by vitrification has been demonstrated to provide superior preservation of tissues compared with conventional freezing methods. To date, this has been accomplished almost exclusively for small model systems, whereas cryopreservation of large tissue samples—of a clinically useful size—continues to be hampered by thermomechanical effects that compromise the structure and function of the tissue. Reduction of mechanical stress is an integral condition of successful cryopreservation of large specimens. The current study focuses on the impact of sample size on both the physical events, observed by cryomacroscopy, and on the outcome on tissue function. To this end, the current study sought to address the question of functional recovery of vitrified carotid artery segments, processed as either artery rings (3–4 mm long) or segments (25 mm long) as selected models; the latter model represents a significant increase in sample size for evaluating the effects of vitrification. Tissue vitrification using an 8.4 M cryoprotectant cocktail solution (VS55) was achieved in 1-ml samples by imposing either a high (50–70 °C/min) or a low (2–3 °C/min) cooling rate, between −40°C and −100°C, and a high rewarming rate between −100°C and −40°C. Following cryoprotectant removal, the artery segments were cut into 3 to 4-mm rings for function testing on a contractility apparatus by measuring isometric responses to four agonist and antagonists (norepinephrine, phenylepinephrine, calcium ionophore, and sodium nitroprusside). In addition, nonspecific metabolic function of the vessel rings was determined using the REDOX indicator alamarBlue. Contractile function in response to the agonists norepinephrine and phenylepinephrine was maintained at the same level (350%) for the segments as for the rings, when compared with noncryopreserved control samples. Relaxation in response to the antagonists calcium ionophore and sodium

  17. Regulation and function of an activation-dependent epitope of the beta 1 integrins in vascular cells after balloon injury in baboon arteries and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, N.; Seki, J.; Vergel, S.; Mattsson, E. J.; Yednock, T.; Kovach, N. L.; Harlan, J. M.; Clowes, A. W.

    1996-01-01

    Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) contribute to the response to injury in damaged and atherosclerotic vessels. These events might be regulated by cellular interactions with extracellular matrix through the expression and activation of integrins. To study the functions of beta 1 integrins in the vessel wall, we used monoclonal antibody (MAb) 15/7, which recognizes an activation epitope of beta 1 integrin subunits, and MAb 8A2, which induces a high affinity form of beta 1 integrins recognized by MAb 15/7. Immunohistochemical analyses were done on samples of normal baboon saphenous arteries and from arteries subjected to balloon injury. EC and SMC expressed the activation epitope of beta 1 integrin in uninjured arteries. By contrast, in balloon-injured arteries 6 weeks after injury, regenerating EC did not express the activation epitope, and there was no decrease in the expression of total beta 1 integrin, whereas SMC migrating into the intima exhibited decreased expression of the total and activated beta 1 integrin. Flow cytometer analysis of cultured cells indicated that baboon EC and SMC weakly express the activation epitope of beta 1 integrin. Next, we determined by utilizing MAb 8A2 the effects of increased expression of activation epitope of beta 1 integrin on the functions of SMC and EC. The activation of beta 1 integrins on SMC induced by MAb 8A2 enhanced SMC adhesion and suppressed SMC migration in a Boyden chamber assay. SMC proliferation was inhibited by MAb 8A2 dose-dependently. Similarly, MAb 8A2-induced activation of beta 1 integrins on EC suppressed EC migration into a wound. However, MAb 8A2 did not affect the basic fibroblast growth factor-induced proliferation of EC, although it blocked the decrease in EC number caused by the removal of basic fibroblast growth factor. These results suggest that activation of beta 1 integrins in vascular cells is regulated in a cell-type dependent manner and plays an

  18. Association of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II type 1 receptor genotypes with left ventricular function and mass in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, M.; Amant, C.; Bauters, C.; Richard, F.; Helbecque, N.; McFadden, E.; Lablanche, J. M.; Bertrand, M.; Amouyel, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse the potential association of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene polymorphisms on left ventricular function and mass in patients with normal coronary arteries. DESIGN: Consecutive sample. SETTING: University hospital. SUBJECTS: 141 consecutive white patients referred for coronary angiography and with angiographically normal coronary arteries. Patients with valvar diseases, cardiomyopathies, or a history of myocardial infarction were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Left ventricular variables were measured for all patients. The ACE and AT1R genotypes were determined with a polymerase chain reaction based protocol using DNA prepared from white blood cells. A general linear model was used to compare data according to the ACE and to the AT1R genotypes. RESULTS: A strong association was observed between left ventricular mass and systemic hypertension (mean (SD) hypertension: 114 (31) g/m2; no hypertension 98 (23) g/m2; P < 0.003). However, no influence of ACE and AT1R polymorphisms on left ventricular mass was found, regardless of systemic hypertension. The subjects homozygous for the AT1R CC mutation had a significantly lower ejection fraction than those with allele A (AC+AA) (mean (SD) 62(12)% and 68(10)%, respectively, P < 0.05). No synergistic interaction of ACE and AT1R gene polymorphisms on left ventricular function and mass was found. CONCLUSIONS: These data do not support an association of the ACE and AT1R genotypes on left ventricular hypertrophy in white patients with normal coronary arteries. PMID:9227291

  19. Functional linkage of Na+-Ca2+-exchanger to sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump in coronary artery: comparison of smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kim A; Samson, Sue E; Hammel, Kaitlin E; Kiss, Lorand; Fulop, Ferenc; Grover, Ashok K

    2009-08-01

    An increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in coronary artery smooth muscle causes a contraction but in endothelium it causes relaxation. Na(+)-Ca(2+)-exchanger (NCX) may play a role in Ca(2+) dynamics in both the cell types. Here, the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake was compared in Na(+)-loaded pig coronary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells. In both the cell types, this uptake was inhibited by KB-R7943, SEA 0400 and by monensin, but not by cariporide. Prior loading of the cells with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA increased the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake in smooth muscle but not in endothelial cells. In the presence or absence of BAPTA loading, the Na(+)-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake was greater in endothelial than in smooth muscle cells. In smooth muscle cells without BAPTA loading, thapsigargin diminished the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) entry. This effect was not observed in endothelial cells or in either cell type after BAPTA loading. The results in the smooth muscle cells are consistent with a limited diffusional space model in which the NCX-mediated (45)Ca(2+) uptake was enhanced by chelation of cytosolic Ca(2+) or by its sequestration by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump (SERCA). They suggest a functional linkage between NCX and SERCA in the smooth muscle but not in the endothelial cells. The concept of a linkage between NCX and SERCA in smooth muscle was also confirmed by similar distribution of NCX and SERCA2 proteins when detergent-treated microsomes were fractionated by flotation on sucrose density gradients. Thus, the coronary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells differ not only in the relative activities of NCX but also in its functional linkage to SERCA.

  20. Exploration of the Rapid Effects of Personal Fine Particulate Matter Exposure on Arterial Hemodynamics and Vascular Function during the Same Day

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Robert D.; Shin, Hwashin H.; Bard, Robert L.; Burnett, Richard T.; Vette, Alan; Croghan, Carry; Thornburg, Jonathan; Rodes, Charles; Williams, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Background Levels of fine particulate matter [≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)] are associated with alterations in arterial hemodynamics and vascular function. However, the characteristics of the same-day exposure–response relationships remain unclear. Objectives We aimed to explore the effects of personal PM2.5 exposures within the preceding 24 hr on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), brachial artery diameter (BAD), endothelial function [flow-mediated dilatation (FMD)], and nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation (NMD). Methods Fifty-one nonsmoking subjects had up to 5 consecutive days of 24-hr personal PM2.5 monitoring and daily cardiovascular (CV) measurements during summer and/or winter periods. The associations between integrated hour-long total personal PM2.5 exposure (TPE) levels (continuous nephelometry among compliant subjects with low secondhand tobacco smoke exposures; n = 30) with the CV outcomes were assessed over a 24-hr period by linear mixed models. Results We observed the strongest associations (and smallest estimation errors) between HR and TPE recorded 1–10 hr before CV measurements. The associations were not pronounced for the other time lags (11–24 hr). The associations between TPE and FMD or BAD did not show as clear a temporal pattern. However, we found some suggestion of a negative association with FMD and a positive association with BAD related to TPE just before measurement (0–2 hr). Conclusions Brief elevations in ambient TPE levels encountered during routine daily activity were associated with small increases in HR and trends toward conduit arterial vasodilatation and endothelial dysfunction within a few hours of exposure. These responses could reflect acute PM2.5-induced autonomic imbalance and may factor in the associated rapid increase in CV risk among susceptible individuals. PMID:21681997

  1. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Linagliptin Preserves Endothelial Function in Mesenteric Arteries from Type 1 Diabetic Rats without Decreasing Plasma Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Salheen, Salheen M.; Panchapakesan, Usha; Pollock, Carol A.; Woodman, Owen L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin on the mechanism(s) of endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries from STZ-induced diabetic rats. Both normal and diabetic animals received linagliptin (2 mg/kg) daily by oral gavage for a period of 4 weeks. To measure superoxide generation in mesenteric arteries, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence was used. ACh-induced relaxation of mesenteric arteries was assessed using organ bath techniques and Western blotting was used to investigate protein expression. Pharmacological tools (1μM TRAM-34, 1μM apamin, 100 nM Ibtx, 100 μM L-NNA, 10 μM ODQ) were used to distinguish between NO and EDH-mediated relaxation. Linagliptin did not affect plasma glucose, but did decrease vascular superoxide levels. Diabetes reduced responses to ACh but did not affect endothelium-independent responses to SNP. Linagliptin improved endothelial function indicated by a significant increase in responses to ACh. Diabetes impaired the contribution of both nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) to endothelium-dependent relaxation and linagliptin treatment significantly enhanced the contribution of both relaxing factors. Western blotting demonstrated that diabetes also increased expression of Nox2 and decreased expression and dimerization of endothelial NO synthase, effects that were reversed by linagliptin. These findings demonstrate treatment of type 1 diabetic rats with linagliptin significantly reduced vascular superoxide levels and preserved both NO and EDH-mediated relaxation indicating that linagliptin can improve endothelial function in diabetes independently of any glucose lowering activity. PMID:26618855

  2. [Interpretation and use of routine pulmonary function tests: Spirometry, static lung volumes, lung diffusion, arterial blood gas, methacholine challenge test and 6-minute walk test].

    PubMed

    Bokov, P; Delclaux, C

    2016-02-01

    Resting pulmonary function tests (PFT) include the assessment of ventilatory capacity: spirometry (forced expiratory flows and mobilisable volumes) and static volume assessment, notably using body plethysmography. Spirometry allows the potential definition of obstructive defect, while static volume assessment allows the potential definition of restrictive defect (decrease in total lung capacity) and thoracic hyperinflation (increase in static volumes). It must be kept in mind that this evaluation is incomplete and that an assessment of ventilatory demand is often warranted, especially when facing dyspnoea: evaluation of arterial blood gas (searching for respiratory insufficiency) and measurement of the transfer coefficient of the lung, allowing with the measurement of alveolar volume to calculate the diffusing capacity of the lung for CO (DLCO: assessment of alveolar-capillary wall and capillary blood volume). All these pulmonary function tests have been the subject of an Americano-European Task force (standardisation of lung function testing) published in 2005, and translated in French in 2007. Interpretative strategies for lung function tests have been recommended, which define abnormal lung function tests using the 5th and 95th percentiles of predicted values (lower and upper limits of normal values). Thus, these recommendations need to be implemented in all pulmonary function test units. A methacholine challenge test will only be performed in the presence of an intermediate pre-test probability for asthma (diagnostic uncertainty), which is an infrequent setting. The most convenient exertional test is the 6-minute walk test that allows the assessment of walking performance, the search for arterial desaturation and the quantification of dyspnoea complaint.

  3. Hypertensive Target Organ Damage and Longitudinal Changes in Brain Structure and Function: The Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease-Magnetic Resonance Study.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Pieternella H; Geerlings, Mirjam I; Visseren, Frank L J; Nathoe, Hendrik M; Mali, Willem P T M; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Muller, Majon

    2015-12-01

    Hypertension has been related to structural and functional brain changes. In high-risk populations, hypertensive target organ damage might better represent exposure to high blood pressure than the blood pressure measurement itself. We examined the association of hypertensive target organ damage with longitudinal changes in brain structure and function within the Second Manifestations of Arterial Disease-Magnetic Resonance (SMART-MR) study. Renal function, albuminuria, and left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiography were measured in 663 patients with manifest arterial disease (mean age, 57±9 years; 81% men). Automated brain segmentation was used to quantify progression of global brain atrophy (change in brain parenchymal fraction) and progression of cerebral small vessel disease on 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging, and memory and executive functioning were assessed at baseline and after on average 3.9 years of follow-up. Regression analyses showed that an increasing number of signs of target organ damage was associated with more progression of global brain atrophy and more rapid decline in memory performance. Compared with no target organ damage, mean differences in change in brain parenchymal fraction (95% confidence interval) for 1 and ≥2 signs of organ damage were -0.12 (-0.30; 0.06) and -0.41 (-0.77; -0.05) % intracranial volume, and mean (95% confidence interval) differences in change in memory performance (z score) were -0.15 (-0.29; -0.00) and -0.27 (-0.54; -0.01). Results were independent of blood pressure, antihypertensive treatment, and other confounders. Hypertension target organ damage was not associated with progression of cerebral small vessel disease or change in executive functioning. Routinely assessed signs of hypertensive target organ damage, and in particular impaired renal function, could be used to identify patients at the highest risk of cognitive decline.

  4. Comprehensive multi-modality assessment of regional and global arterial structure and function in adults born preterm

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Henry; Birse, Katherine; Davis, Esther F; Whitworth, Polly; Aggarwal, Veena; Lewandowski, Adam J; Leeson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with higher blood pressure, which could be because preterm birth alters early aortic elastin and collagen development to cause increased arterial stiffness. We measured central and conduit artery size and multiple indices of arterial stiffness to define the extent and severity of macrovascular changes in individuals born preterm. A total of 102 young adults born preterm and 102 controls who were born after an uncomplicated pregnancy underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance on a Siemens 1.5 T scanner to measure the aortic cross-sectional area in multiple locations. Ultrasound imaging with a Philips CX50 and linear array probe was used to measure carotid and brachial artery diameters. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the augmentation index were measured by SphygmoCor, brachial-femoral pulse wave velocity by Vicorder and aortic pulse wave velocity by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) was used as a measurement of global stiffness, and ultrasound was used to assess peripheral vessel distensibility. Adults born preterm had 20% smaller thoracic and abdominal aortic lumens (2.19±0.44 vs. 2.69±0.60 cm2, P<0.001; 1.25±0.36 vs. 1.94±0.45 cm2, P<0.001, respectively) but similar carotid and brachial diameters to adults born at term. Pulse wave velocity was increased (5.82±0.80 vs. 5.47±0.59 m s−1, P<0.01, 9.06±1.25 vs. 8.33±1.28 m s−1, P=0.01, 5.23±1.19 vs. 4.75±0.91 m s−1, P<0.01) and carotid distensibility was decreased (4.75±1.31 vs. 5.60±1.48 mm Hg−1103, P<0.001) in this group compared with the group born at term. However, the global and peripheral arterial stiffness measured by CAVI and brachial ultrasound did not differ (5.95±0.72 vs. 5.98±0.60, P=0.80 and 1.07±0.48 vs. 1.19±0.54 mm Hg−1103, P=0.12, respectively). Adults who are born preterm have significant differences in their aortic structure from adults born at term, but they have

  5. Noninvasive assessment of arterial compliance of human cerebral arteries with short inversion time arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Warnert, Esther A H; Murphy, Kevin; Hall, Judith E; Wise, Richard G

    2015-03-01

    A noninvasive method of assessing cerebral arterial compliance (AC) is introduced in which arterial spin labeling (ASL) is used to measure changes in arterial blood volume (aBV) occurring within the cardiac cycle. Short inversion time pulsed ASL (PASL) was performed in healthy volunteers with inversion times ranging from 250 to 850 ms. A model of the arterial input function was used to obtain the cerebral aBV. Results indicate that aBV depends on the cardiac phase of the arteries in the imaging volume. Cerebral AC, estimated from aBV and brachial blood pressure measured noninvasively in systole and diastole, was assessed in the flow territories of the basal cerebral arteries originating from the circle of Willis: right and left middle cerebral arteries (RMCA and LMCA), right and left posterior cerebral arteries (RPCA and LPCA), and the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Group average AC values calculated for the RMCA, LMCA, ACA, RPCA, and LPCA were 0.56%±0.2%, 0.50%±0.3%, 0.4%±0.2%, 1.1%±0.5%, and 1.1%±0.3% per mm Hg, respectively. The current experiment has shown the feasibility of measuring AC of cerebral arteries with short inversion time PASL.

  6. Sensitive cardiac troponins and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in stable coronary artery disease: correlation with left ventricular function as assessed by myocardial strain.

    PubMed

    Smedsrud, Marit Kristine; Gravning, Jørgen; Omland, Torbjørn; Eek, Christian; Mørkrid, Lars; Skulstad, Helge; Aaberge, Lars; Bendz, Bjørn; Kjekshus, John; Edvardsen, Thor

    2015-06-01

    N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and cardiac troponins (cTns) measured with sensitive assays provide strong prognostic information in patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the relationship between these biomarkers and myocardial contractile function, as well as infarct size, in this patient group, remains to be defined. The study population consisted of 160 patients referred to a follow-up echocardiography scheduled 1 year after coronary revascularization. Concentrations of NT-proBNP, high-sensitive cTnT (hs-cTnT) and sensitive cTnI assays were assessed. Left ventricular function was measured as global peak systolic longitudinal strain by speckle tracking echocardiography and infarct size was assessed by late-enhancement MRI. NT-proBNP and sensitive cTnI levels were significantly associated with left ventricular function by peak systolic strain (R-values 0.243 and 0.228, p = 0.002 and 0.004) as well as infarct size (R-values 0.343 and 0.366, p = 0.014 and p = 0.008). In contrast, hs-cTnT did not correlate with left ventricular function (R = 0.095, p = 0.231) and only marginally with infarct size (R = 0.237, p = 0.094). NT-proBNP and sensitive cTnI levels correlate with left ventricular function and infarct size in patients with stable coronary artery disease after revascularization. As opposed to hs-cTnT, NT-proBNP and cTnI seem to be indicators of incipient myocardial dysfunction and the extent of myocardial necrosis.

  7. Angiographic and Clinical Factors Related with Good Functional Outcome after Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hyuk; Han, Young Min; Jang, Kyeong Sool; Yoon, Wan Soo; Jang, Dong Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to investigate good prognostic factors for an acute occlusion of a major cerebral artery using mechanical thrombectomy. Methods Between January 2013 to December 2014, 37 consecutive patients with acute occlusion of a major cerebral artery treated by mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers were conducted. We analyzed clinical and angiographic factors retrospectively. The collateral flow and the result of recanalization were sorted by grading systems. Outcome was assessed by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 90 days. We compared the various parameters between good and poor angiographic and clinical results. Results Twenty seven patients demonstrated good recanalization [Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) 2b or 3] after thrombectomy. At the 90-day follow up, 19 patients had good (mRS, 0-2), 14 had moderate (3-4) and four had poor outcomes (5-6). The mRS of older patients (≥75 years) were poor than younger patients. Early recanalization, high Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction risk score, and low baseline NIHSS were closely related to 90-day mRS, whereas high TICI was related to both mRS and the decrease in the NIHSS. Conclusion NIHSS decreased markedly only when recanalization was successful. A good mRS was related to low initial NIHSS, good collateral, and early successful recanalization. PMID:26539260

  8. True arterial system compliance estimated from apparent arterial compliance.

    PubMed

    Quick, C M; Berger, D S; Hettrick, D A; Noordergraaf, A

    2000-03-01

    A new method has been developed to estimate total arterial compliance from measured input pressure and flow. In contrast to other methods, this method does not rely on fitting the elements of a lumped model to measured data. Instead, it relies on measured input impedance and peripheral resistance to calculate the relationship of arterial blood volume to input pressure. Generally, this transfer function is a complex function of frequency and is called the apparent arterial compliance. At very low frequencies, the confounding effect of pulse wave reflection disappears, and apparent compliance becomes total arterial compliance. This study reveals that frequency components of pressure and flow below heart rate are generally necessary to obtain a valid estimate of compliance. Thus, the ubiquitous practice of estimating total arterial compliance from a single cardiac cycle is suspect under most circumstances, since a single cardiac cycle does not contain these frequencies. PMID:10784093

  9. Ketamine-mediated afferent-specific presynaptic transmission blocks in low-threshold and sex-specific subpopulation of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons of rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Yin, Lei; Fan, Yao; Wang, Ye; Chen, Wei-Ran; Chen, Pei; Liu, Yang; Lu, Xiao-Long; Sun, Hong-Li; Shou, Weinian; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine enhances autonomic activity, and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptor afferents are more susceptible to be blocked by ketamine than myelinated A-types. However, the presynaptic transmission block in low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs) is not elucidated. Methods Action potentials (APs) and excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were investigated in BRNs/barosensitive neurons identified by conduction velocity (CV), capsaicin-conjugated with Iberiotoxin-sensitivity and fluorescent dye using intact nodose slice and brainstem slice in adult female rats. The expression of mRNA and targeted protein for NMDAR1 was also evaluated. Results Ketamine time-dependently blocked afferent CV in Ah-types in nodose slice with significant changes in AP discharge. The concentration-dependent inhibition of ketamine on AP discharge profiles were also assessed and observed using isolated Ah-type BRNs with dramatic reduction in neuroexcitability. In brainstem slice, the 2nd-order capsaicin-resistant EPSCs were identified and ∼50% of them were blocked by ketamine concentration-dependently with IC50 estimated at 84.4 μM compared with the rest (708.2 μM). Interestingly, the peak, decay time constant, and area under curve of EPSCs were significantly enhanced by 100 nM iberiotoxin in ketamine-more sensitive myelinated NTS neurons (most likely Ah-types), rather than ketamine-less sensitive ones (A-types). Conclusions These data have demonstrated, for the first time, that low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type BRNs in nodose and Ah-type barosensitive neurons in NTS are more susceptible to ketamine and may play crucial roles in not only mean blood pressure regulation but also buffering dynamic changes in pressure, as well as the ketamine-mediated cardiovascular dysfunction through sexual-dimorphic baroreflex afferent pathway. PMID:26675761

  10. Renal infarction resulting from traumatic renal artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Kim, Won; Jin, Gong Yong; Na, Ki Ryang; Yun, Il Yong; Park, Sung Kwang

    2008-06-01

    Renal artery dissection may be caused by iatrogenic injury, trauma, underlying arterial diseases such as fibromuscular disease, atherosclerotic disease, or connective tissue disease. Radiological imaging may be helpful in detecting renal artery pathology, such as renal artery dissection. For patients with acute, isolated renal artery dissection, surgical treatment, endovascular management, or medical treatment have been considered effective measures to preserve renal function. We report a case of renal infarction that came about as a consequence of renal artery dissection.

  11. High-resolution CT in simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis. Lack of correlation with pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas values

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.C.; Willing, S.; Bretz, R.; Harty, M.; Lane, E.; Anderson, W.H. )

    1993-10-01

    We examined 21 miners by means of standard chest radiography, high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT), pulmonary function tests, and resting arterial blood gas levels. Using the ILO/UC classification of pneumoconiosis, 7 miners had category 1/0 or 2/1 simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). By HRCT, nodules were identified in 12 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as category 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; 5 of 6, 1/0 CWP; and 1 of 1, 2/1 CWP by chest radiograph. Focal emphysema was identified by HRCT in 7 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; and 1 of 6, 1/0 CWP by standard chest radiography. Four miners with definite nodules confirmed by HRCT had focal emphysema, while three without nodules had focal emphysema. Pulmonary function testing was not different between miners with or without CWP by standard chest radiography, nor was it different between miners with or without definite nodules evidenced by HRCT. No difference in resting oxygenation was found between any group of miners. The presence of focal emphysema confirmed by HRCT did not significantly affect pulmonary function tests on resting arterial blood gas values. There was, however, a significantly lower FEV1 and mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of forced vital capacity with lifetime nonsmoking miners. The presence of CWP on chest radiography was significantly correlated with smoking cigarettes but not the years of mining. The presence of nodules on HRCT approached a significant correlation with cigarette smoking, but focal emphysema did not. For detecting evidence of coal dust accumulation in lung parenchyma and identifying focal emphysema, HRCT was more sensitive than standard chest radiography. However, despite earlier detection of parenchymal abnormalities, abnormal pulmonary function attributable to coal dust could not be identified.

  12. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  13. Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome reveals function of dehydroascorbic acid in collagen and elastin synthesis: Implications for skin care.

    PubMed

    Kitt, Douglas Q

    2016-02-01

    Some investigations in Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome (ATS) suggest that impaired intracellular transport of the oxidized form of vitamin C (dehydroascorbic acid, DHAA) is at the core of the pathogenesis. Lack of vitamin C for lysyl- and prolyl-hydroxylase activity may explain the defects in collagen and elastin formation found in ATS, and draws strong parallels between ATS and scurvy. Topically applied vitamin C has a well-established basis in the field of skin care, and part of its benefit is attributed to proper collagen formation in the skin. The ATS studies suggest that DHAA transport is necessary for normal skin collagen formation, and this has implications as to the forms of vitamin C best-suited for topical skin care. PMID:26826631

  14. Impaired Renal Function Further Increases Odds of 6-Year Coronary Artery Calcification Progression in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maahs, David M.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel; Johnson, Richard J.; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) independently predict coronary artery calcification (CAC) progression, and to determine how eGFR changes over 6 years in adults with type 1 diabetes compared with nondiabetic adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study participants (n = 1,066) with complete data for eGFR assessment at baseline and 6 years were included. Three Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations (serum creatinine, cystatin C, and both) were used to estimate eGFR. The association of baseline ACR and eGFR with CAC progression was analyzed using multiple logistic regression. RESULTS Increasing categorical baseline ACR (<10, 10–30, and >30 µg/mg) predicted CAC progression in participants with type 1 diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 2.15; 95% CI, 1.50–3.09; 7.19 [3.90–13.26]; and 18.09 [8.48–38.62]), respectively, compared with nondiabetic subjects. Baseline eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 also predicted CAC progression (OR, 5–7, compared with nondiabetic participants). ORs for CAC progression were higher in women than in men when using the cystatin C–based Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations. Participants with type 1 diabetes had greater eGFR decreases over 6 years than nondiabetic participants using cystatin C–based equations. CONCLUSIONS Although increasing ACR or decreasing eGFR predicts CAC progression, coronary atherosclerosis progresses faster in people with type 1 diabetes even in the absence of diabetic kidney disease. These findings emphasize the interaction between kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes and highlight the public health importance of lowering cardiorenal risk in people with type 1 diabetes. PMID:23835686

  15. Cigarette smoke exposure up-regulates endothelin receptor B in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells: molecular and functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Milara, J; Ortiz, JL; Juan, G; Guijarro, R; Almudever, P; Martorell, M; Morcillo, EJ; Cortijo, J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Pulmonary arteries from smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients show abnormal endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity. We studied the effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on endothelin receptor B (ETB) expression in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) and its role in endothelial dysfunction. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH ETB receptor expression was measured by real time RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence. Cell contraction, intracellular Ca2+, F/G-actin, RhoA activity, myosin light chain phosphorylation, ET, NO, thromboxane (Tx)A2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by traction microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, phalloidin fluorescence, colorimetric assay, Western blot, elisa and DCFDA fluorescence respectively. KEY RESULTS Cigarette smoke extract dose-dependently increased ETB receptor expression in HPAECs after 24 h incubation. CSE-induced ETB expression was attenuated by bosentan, the ETB receptor antagonist BQ788, the Rho kinase antagonist Y27632 and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. A monoclonal antibody to ET-1 prevented CSE-induced ETB receptor overexpression. Twenty-four hour exposure to ET-1 dose-dependently increased ETB receptor expression, mimicking the effect of CSE. CSE-induced ETB receptor overexpression caused greater cell contraction; increased intracellular Ca2+; increased F/G-actin and RhoA activity; increased myosin light chain phosphorylation; augmented TxA2 and ROS production; and decreased NO after acute ET-1 (10 nM). These effects were attenuated by bosentan, BQ788, Y27632 and N-acetylcysteine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATION Cigarette smoke extract induced ETB receptor overexpression by a feed forward mechanism mediated partly by ET release, promoting HPAEC dysfunction and attenuated by ETB receptor blockade, Rho kinase and ROS inhibition. These results provide support for the use of bosentan in CS-related endothelial dysfunction. PMID:20698855

  16. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A.; Gulaldi, Nedim C. M.; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The radioligand {sup 11}C-KR31173 has been introduced for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney in vivo. To study the biokinetics of {sup 11}C-KR31173 with a compartmental model, the input function is needed. Collection and analysis of arterial blood samples are the established approach to obtain the input function but they are not feasible in patients with renal diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative technique that can provide an accurate image-derived input function (ID-IF) to replace the conventional invasive arterial sampling and test the method in pigs with the goal of translation into human studies. Methods: The experimental animals were injected with [{sup 11}C]KR31173 and scanned up to 90 min with dynamic PET. Arterial blood samples were collected for the artery derived input function (AD-IF) and used as a gold standard for ID-IF. Before PET, magnetic resonance angiography of the kidneys was obtained to provide the anatomical information required for derivation of the recovery coefficients in the abdominal aorta, a requirement for partial volume correction of the ID-IF. Different image reconstruction methods, filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM), were investigated for the best trade-off between bias and variance of the ID-IF. The effects of kidney uptakes on the quantitative accuracy of ID-IF were also studied. Biological variables such as red blood cell binding and radioligand metabolism were also taken into consideration. A single blood sample was used for calibration in the later phase of the input function. Results: In the first 2 min after injection, the OS-EM based ID-IF was found to be biased, and the bias was found to be induced by the kidney uptake. No such bias was found with the FBP based image reconstruction method. However, the OS-EM based image reconstruction was found to reduce variance in the subsequent

  17. Diagnostic Performance of Intravascular Ultrasound-Derived Minimal Lumen Area to Predict Functionally Significant Non-Left Main Coronary Artery Disease: a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ho-Cheol; Bae, Jong Seok; Jin, Han-Young; Seo, Jeong-Sook; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Kyeong; Cho, Kyoung-Im; Kim, Bo-Hyun; Park, Yong Hyun; Je, Hyung-Gon; Kim, Dong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided percutaneous coronary intervention frequently results in unnecessary stenting due to the low positive predictive value of IVUS-derived minimal lumen area (MLA) for identification of functionally significant coronary stenosis. We appraised the diagnostic accuracy of IVUS-derived MLA compared with the fractional flow reserve (FFR) to assess intermediate coronary stenosis. Subjects and Methods We searched MEDLINE and Cochrane databases for studies using IVUS and FFR methods to establish the best MLA cut-off values to predict significant non-left main coronary artery stenosis. Summary estimates were obtained using a random-effects model. Results The 17 studies used in our analysis enrolled 3920 patients with 4267 lesions. The weighted overall mean MLA cut-off value was 2.58 mm2. The pooled MLA sensitivity that predicted functionally significant coronary stenosis was 0.75 (confidence interval [CI]: 0.72 to 0.77) and the specificity was 0.66 (CI: 0.64 to 0.68). The positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 2.33 (CI: 2.06 to 2.63) and LR (-) was 0.33 (CI: 0.26 to 0.42). The pooled diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) was 7.53 (CI: 5.26 to 10.76) and the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve for all the trials was 0.782 with a Q point of 0.720. Meta-regression analysis demonstrated that an FFR cut-off point of 0.75 was associated with a four times higher diagnostic accuracy compared to that of 0.80 (relative DOR: 3.92; 95% CI: 1.25 to 12.34). Conclusion IVUS-derived MLA has limited diagnostic accuracy and needs careful interpretation to correlate with functionally significant non-left main coronary artery stenosis. PMID:27721852

  18. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; ...

  19. Structure and functioning of a multidisciplinary 'Heart Team' for patients with coronary artery disease: rationale and recommendations from a joint BCS/BCIS/SCTS working group.

    PubMed

    Luckraz, Heyman; Norell, Michael; Buch, Mamta; James, Rachael; Cooper, Graham

    2015-10-01

    The decision-making process in the management of patients with ischaemic heart disease has historically been the responsibility of the cardiologist and encompasses medical management, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). Currently, there is significant geographical variability in the PCI:CABG ratio. There are now emerging recommendations that this decision-making process should be carried out through a multidisciplinary approach, namely the Heart Team. This work was carried out on behalf of The British Cardiovascular Society (BCS), Society for Cardiothoracic Surgery in Great Britain and Ireland (SCTS) and British Cardiovascular Intervention Society (BCIS). This manuscript sets out the principles for the functioning of the Heart Team. This work has been approved by the Executive Committees of BCS/BCIS/SCTS.

  20. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Borges, J P; Lopes, G O; Verri, V; Coelho, M P; Nascimento, P M C; Kopiler, D A; Tibirica, E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men. PMID:27599202

  1. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Borges, J.P.; Lopes, G.O.; Verri, V.; Coelho, M.P.; Nascimento, P.M.C.; Kopiler, D.A.; Tibirica, E.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men. PMID:27599202

  2. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Borges, J P; Lopes, G O; Verri, V; Coelho, M P; Nascimento, P M C; Kopiler, D A; Tibirica, E

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men.

  3. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  4. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation.

  5. Acute changes of left ventricular hemodynamics and function during percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Mi; Ahn, Chul-Min; Hong, Soon-Jun; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Jae-Hyoung; Shim, Wan-Joo; Lim, Do-Sun

    2015-07-01

    Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) are increasingly being used to treat unprotected left main coronary artery (ULMCA) lesions. However, research is sparse on the acute changes of left ventricular (LV) hemodynamics and function during PCI in patients with ULMCA stenosis. We aimed to assess the acute changes of LV function using speckle-tracking imaging during PCI in these patients. Fifteen consecutive patients who underwent elective PCI for ULMCA stenosis were enrolled. Echocardiographic studies and pressure measurement were performed at baseline, during PCI and after PCI. LMCA occlusion with a first balloon inflation induced a marked reduction in the peak positive derivative of LV pressure (dP/dt max), LV global longitudinal strain (GLS), and systolic and diastolic strain rates, and a marked increase in LV end-diastolic pressure (EDP) (all P < 0.01). During the second inflation, the degrees of LV hemodynamic and functional changes were similar to those of the first inflation, even with a higher inflation pressure. During the third inflation, the values of GLS and dP/dt max were higher than those of the second inflation (P = 0.03 and P = 0.05, respectively). After optimal PCI, dP/dt max, LVEDP, and strain parameters were improved to baseline values. LV hemodynamics and function were considerably impaired with the first ballooning during PCI for ULMCA stenosis. However, the degrees of LV hemodynamic and functional changes decreased with each successive balloon inflation, which can be explained by ischemic preconditioning. After all procedures were safely completed, LV systolic function was improved without LV diastolic stunning.

  6. Benefits of exercise training and the correlation between aerobic capacity and functional outcomes and quality of life in elderly patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Hsin; Chen, Yi-Jen; Tu, Hung-Pin; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Jhong, Jing-Hui; Lin, Ko-Long

    2014-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise training is beneficial to people with coronary artery disease (CAD). Nevertheless, the correlation between aerobic capacity, and functional mobility and quality of life in elderly CAD patients is less addressed. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the beneficial effects of exercise training in elderly people with CAD, integrating exercise stress testing, functional mobility, handgrip strength, and health-related quality of life. Elderly people with CAD were enrolled from the outpatient clinic of a cardiac rehabilitation unit in a medical center. Participants were assigned to the exercise training group (N = 21) or the usual care group (N = 15). A total of 36 sessions of exercise training, completed in 12 weeks, was prescribed. Echocardiography, exercise stress testing, the 6-minute walking test, Timed Up and Go test, and handgrip strength testing were performed, and the Short-Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) was administered at baseline and at 12-week follow-up. Peak oxygen consumption improved significantly after training. The heart rate recovery improved from 13.90/minute to 16.62/minute after exercise training. Functional mobility and handgrip strength also improved after training. Significant improvements were found in SF-36 physical function, social function, role limitation due to emotional problems, and mental health domains. A significant correlation between dynamic cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters, the 6-minute walking test, Timed Up and Go test, handgrip strength, and SF-36 physical function and general health domains was also detected. Twelve-week, 36-session exercise training, including moderate-intensity cardiopulmonary exercise training, strengthening exercise, and balance training, is beneficial to elderly patients with CAD, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters correlate well with balance and quality of life.

  7. Benefits of exercise training and the correlation between aerobic capacity and functional outcomes and quality of life in elderly patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Hsin; Chen, Yi-Jen; Tu, Hung-Pin; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Jhong, Jing-Hui; Lin, Ko-Long

    2014-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise training is beneficial to people with coronary artery disease (CAD). Nevertheless, the correlation between aerobic capacity, and functional mobility and quality of life in elderly CAD patients is less addressed. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the beneficial effects of exercise training in elderly people with CAD, integrating exercise stress testing, functional mobility, handgrip strength, and health-related quality of life. Elderly people with CAD were enrolled from the outpatient clinic of a cardiac rehabilitation unit in a medical center. Participants were assigned to the exercise training group (N = 21) or the usual care group (N = 15). A total of 36 sessions of exercise training, completed in 12 weeks, was prescribed. Echocardiography, exercise stress testing, the 6-minute walking test, Timed Up and Go test, and handgrip strength testing were performed, and the Short-Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) was administered at baseline and at 12-week follow-up. Peak oxygen consumption improved significantly after training. The heart rate recovery improved from 13.90/minute to 16.62/minute after exercise training. Functional mobility and handgrip strength also improved after training. Significant improvements were found in SF-36 physical function, social function, role limitation due to emotional problems, and mental health domains. A significant correlation between dynamic cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters, the 6-minute walking test, Timed Up and Go test, handgrip strength, and SF-36 physical function and general health domains was also detected. Twelve-week, 36-session exercise training, including moderate-intensity cardiopulmonary exercise training, strengthening exercise, and balance training, is beneficial to elderly patients with CAD, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters correlate well with balance and quality of life. PMID:25438684

  8. Functional Outcomes of Decompressive Craniectomy in Patients with Malignant Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction and Their Association with Preoperative Thalamus Deformation: An Analysis of 12 Patients.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Takuya; Hayashi, Takeshi; Ohira, Masayuki; Kato, Yuji; Deguchi, Ichiro; Maruyama, Hajime; Abe, Tetsuya; Sano, Hiroyasu; Mizuno, Satoko; Nagamine, Yuito; Kurita, Hiroki; Takao, Masaki; Tanahashi, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Objective Decompressive craniectomy (DC) in patients with malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction is known to decrease the mortality rate. However, the functional outcomes (communication and oral intake) of this procedure remain unclear. Most patients with malignant MCA infarction exhibit a loss of consciousness, which may be principally governed by the thalamus. We herein investigated the functional outcomes of DC at 90 days after the onset of malignant MCA infarction and their association with preoperative thalamus deformation, which can occur due to pressure and edema. Methods Twelve of 2,692 patients with acute cerebral infarction were diagnosed with malignant MCA infarction and underwent DC. We evaluated preoperative thalamus damage using brain computed tomography and its association with communication and oral intake abilities and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Barthel index scores at 90 days after stroke onset. Results The mRS score at 90 days was 0-4 in five patients. Seven patients could communicate immediately after surgery, while five could do so by 90 days. Five patients were able to resume the oral intake of food at 90 days. All patients with preoperative thalamus deformation showed a poor recovery, while those with absent or slight preoperative thalamus deformation showed a good recovery. Conclusion Patients with preoperative thalamus deformation caused by pressure and edema show a poor oral intake and communication abilities after DC, suggesting that preoperative thalamus deformation is a predictor of poor functional outcomes after DC in patients with malignant MCA infarction. PMID:27477404

  9. Relation of epicardial fat to central aortic pressure and left ventricular diastolic function in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Kenta; Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Wakami, Kazuaki; Goto, Toshihiko; Tani, Tomomitsu; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2014-10-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that epicardial fat may be associated with augmented central aortic pressure and impaired left ventricular (LV) function. We studied 134 consecutive patients undergoing left-sided cardiac catheterization for coronary artery disease (CAD) and examined the relation of epicardial fat volume measured by multi-detector computed tomography to ascending aortic pressure and LV ejection fraction determined by cardiac catheterization as well as indices of LV diastolic function assessed by Doppler echocardiography [early diastolic mitral annular velocity (e') and a ratio of early diastolic mitral inflow to annular velocities (E/e')]. Epicardial fat volume indexed to body surface area correlated positively with age (r = 0.24, P < 0.01), body mass index (r = 0.38, P < 0.001), systolic aortic pressure (r = 0.21, P < 0.05), aortic pulse pressure (r = 0.23, P < 0.01), LV ejection fraction (r = 0.22, P < 0.05) and E/e' (r = 0.24, P < 0.05) and did negatively with e' (r = -0.31, P < 0.05). In multivariate linear regression including potential confounders, increased epicardial fat volume index correlated with aortic systolic and pulse pressure and LV diastolic function indices, but not LV ejection fraction. In conclusion, we found that epicardial fat was associated with augmented central aortic pressure and LV diastolic dysfunction in patients with known or suspected CAD.

  10. Comprehensive Population-Averaged Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Contrast–Enhanced vMagnetic Resonance Imaging of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onxley, Jennifer D.; Yoo, David S.; Muradyan, Naira; MacFall, James R.; Brizel, David M.; Craciunescu, Oana I.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To generate a population-averaged arterial input function (PA-AIF) for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data in head and neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI during concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Imaging consisted of 2 baseline scans 1 week apart (B1/B2) and 1 scan after 1 week of chemoradiation therapy (Wk1). Regions of interest (ROIs) in the right and left carotid arteries were drawn on coronal images. Plasma concentration curves of all ROIs were averaged and fit to a biexponential decay function to obtain the final PA-AIF (AvgAll). Right-sided and left-sided ROI plasma concentration curves were averaged separately to obtain side-specific AIFs (AvgRight/AvgLeft). Regions of interest were divided by time point to obtain time-point-specific AIFs (AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1). The vascular transfer constant (K{sub trans}) and the fractional extravascular, extracellular space volume (V{sub e}) for primaries and nodes were calculated using the AvgAll AIF, the appropriate side-specific AIF, and the appropriate time-point-specific AIF. Median K{sub trans} and V{sub e} values derived from AvgAll were compared with those obtained from the side-specific and time-point-specific AIFs. The effect of using individual AIFs was also investigated. Results: The plasma parameters for AvgAll were a{sub 1,2} = 27.11/17.65 kg/L, m{sub 1,2} = 11.75/0.21 min{sup −1}. The coefficients of repeatability (CRs) for AvgAll versus AvgLeft were 0.04 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. For AvgAll versus AvgRight, the CRs were 0.08 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. When AvgAll was compared with AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1, the CRs were slightly higher: 0.32/0.19/0.78 min{sup −1}, respectively, for K{sub trans}; and 0.07/0.08/0.09 for V{sub e}. Use of a PA-AIF was not significantly different from use of individual AIFs. Conclusion: A PA-AIF for head and neck cancer

  11. Influence of Vascular Variant of the Posterior Cerebral Artery (PCA) on Cerebral Blood Flow, Vascular Response to CO2 and Static Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Emmert, Kirsten; Zöller, Daniela; Preti, Maria Giulia; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Haller, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The fetal origin of the posterior cerebral artery (fPCA) is a frequent vascular variant in 11–29% of the population. For the fPCA, blood flow in the PCA originates from the anterior instead of the posterior circulation. We tested whether this blood supply variant impacts the cerebral blood flow assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL), cerebrovascular reserve as well as resting-state static functional connectivity (sFC) in the sense of a systematic confound. Methods The study included 385 healthy, elderly subjects (mean age: 74.18 years [range: 68.9–90.4]; 243 female). Participants were classified into normal vascular supply (n = 296, 76.88%), right fetal origin (n = 23, 5.97%), left fetal origin (n = 16, 4.16%), bilateral fetal origin (n = 4, 1.04%), and intermediate (n = 46, 11.95%, excluded from further analysis) groups. ASL-derived relative cerebral blood flow (relCBF) maps and cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) maps derived from a CO2 challenge with blocks of 7% CO2 were compared. Additionally, sFC between 90 regions of interest (ROIs) was compared between the groups. Results CVR was significantly reduced in subjects with ipsilateral fPCA, most prominently in the temporal lobe. ASL yielded a non-significant trend towards reduced relCBF in bilateral posterior watershed areas. In contrast, conventional atlas-based sFC did not differ between groups. Conclusions In conclusion, fPCA presence may bias the assessment of cerebrovascular reserve by reducing the response to CO2. In contrast, its effect on ASL-assessed baseline perfusion was marginal. Moreover, fPCA presence did not systematically impact resting-state sFC. Taken together, this data implies that perfusion variables should take into account the vascularization patterns. PMID:27532633

  12. Anthocyanin Bioavailability from Acute Cranberry Juice Consumption and Evidence of Effects on Endothelial Function in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiologic studies suggest an inverse correlation between intake of flavonoidcontaining foods and cardiovascular risk. Multiple health beneficial effect of flavonoids have been proposed to account for this observation, including effects on endothelial function. Cranberries contain relatively high...

  13. Central command: control of cardiac sympathetic and vagal efferent nerve activity and the arterial baroreflex during spontaneous motor behaviour in animals.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Kanji

    2012-01-01

    Feedforward control by higher brain centres (termed central command) plays a role in the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system during exercise. Over the past 20 years, workers in our laboratory have used the precollicular-premammillary decerebrate animal model to identify the neural circuitry involved in the CNS control of cardiac autonomic outflow and arterial baroreflex function. Contrary to the traditional idea that vagal withdrawal at the onset of exercise causes the increase in heart rate, central command did not decrease cardiac vagal efferent nerve activity but did allow cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve activity to produce cardiac acceleration. In addition, central command-evoked inhibition of the aortic baroreceptor-heart rate reflex blunted the baroreflex-mediated bradycardia elicited by aortic nerve stimulation, further increasing the heart rate at the onset of exercise. Spontaneous motor activity and associated cardiovascular responses disappeared in animals decerebrated at the midcollicular level. These findings indicate that the brain region including the caudal diencephalon and extending to the rostral mesencephalon may play a role in generating central command. Bicuculline microinjected into the midbrain ventral tegmental area of decerebrate rats produced a long-lasting repetitive activation of renal sympathetic nerve activity that was synchronized with the motor nerve discharge. When lidocaine was microinjected into the ventral tegmental area, the spontaneous motor activity and associated cardiovascular responses ceased. From these findings, we conclude that cerebral cortical outputs trigger activation of neural circuits within the caudal brain, including the ventral tegmental area, which causes central command to augment cardiac sympathetic outflow at the onset of exercise in decerebrate animal models. PMID:21984731

  14. Association of Pulse Pressure, Arterial Elasticity, and Endothelial Function With Kidney Function Decline Among Adults With Estimated GFR > 60 mL/min/1.73 m2: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Carmen A.; Jacobs, David R.; Katz, Ronit; Ix, Joachim H.; Madero, Magdalena; Duprez, Daniel A.; Sarnak, Mark J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Kramer, Holly J.; Palmas, Walter; Herrington, David; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The association of subclinical vascular disease and early declines in kidney function has not been well studied. Study Design Prospective cohort study Setting & Participants MESA participants with eGFR ≥60 ml/min/1.73m2 with follow-up of 5 years Predictors Pulse pressure (pulse pressure), small and large arterial elasticity (SAE, LAE), and flow mediated dilation. Outcomes kidney function decline Measurements SAE and LAE were measured by pulse contour analysis of the radial artery. Kidney function was measured by serum creatinine- and cystatin C-based eGFR. Results Among 4,853 adults, higher pulse pressure and lower SAE and LAE had independent and linear associations with faster rates of kidney function decline. Compared to persons with pulse pressure 40–50mmHg, eGFRSCysC decline was 0.29 (p=0.006), 0.56 (p<0.001), and 0.91 (p<0.001) ml/min/1.73m2/year faster among persons with pulse pressure 50–60, 60–70, and >70mmHg, respectively. Compared to the highest quartile of SAE (most elastic), eGFRSCysC decline was 0.26 (p=0.009), 0.35 (p=0.001), and 0.70 (p<0.001) ml/min/1.73m2/year faster for the second, third and fourth quartiles respectively. For LAE, compared to the highest quartile, eGFRSCysC decline was 0.28 (p=0.004), 0.58 (p<0.001), and 0.83 (p<0.001) ml/min/1.73m2/year faster for each decreasing quartile of LAE. Findings were similar with creatinine-based eGFR. In contrast, among 2,997 adults with flow-mediated dilation and kidney function measures, flow-mediated dilation was not significantly associated with kidney function decline. For every 1-SD greater flow-mediated dilation, eGFRSCysC and eGFRSCr changed by 0.05 ml/min/1.73m2/year (p=0.3) and 0.06 ml/min/1.73m2/year (p=0.04), respectively. Limitations We had no direct measure of GFR, in common with nearly all large population based studies. Conclusions Higher pulse pressure and lower arterial elasticity, but not flow-mediated dilation, were linearly and independently associated with

  15. Cineangiography of the Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Gerard M.; Charland, Raymond; Roy, Paul; Primeau, Robert; Nadeau, Reginald

    1971-01-01

    Fifty French-Canadian patients presenting with typical or atypical anginal pain were studied by selective cinearteriography and coronary sinus catheterization, with measurement of myocardial function, oxygen and lactate extraction at rest and during isoproterenol infusion. In 28 of 42 patients all three coronary arteries were involved, but angina pectoris also occurred in patients with single mildly stenotic arterial lesions and even in eight patients with normal cinearteriograms. All patients with severe arterial lesions had typical angina, and the longer the duration of angina, the greater the extent, usually, of anatomic disease. Seventy-nine percent of resting electrocardiograms of patients with documented coronary artery disease were abnormal, with recognizable prior infarction in 18. Two-thirds of the patients experiencing pain during the stressful state had abnormal ventricular function. An abnormal arteriovenous lactate difference in response to isoproterenol occurred in patients in all groups. PMID:5563346

  16. Ankle-brachial index and inter-artery blood pressure differences as predictors of cognitive function in overweight and obese older adults with diabetes: Results from the Action for Health in Diabetes Movement and Memory Study

    PubMed Central

    Espeland, Mark A; Beavers, Kristen M; Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Johnson, Karen C; Hughes, Timothy M; Baker, Laura D; Jakicic, John; Korytkowski, Mary; Miller, Marsha; Bray, George A

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ankle-brachial index (ABI) and inter-artery systolic blood pressure differences, as markers of vascular disease, are plausible risk factors for deficits in cognitive function among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods ABI and maximum inter-artery differences (MIAD) in systolic blood pressures were assessed annually for five years among 479 participants assigned to the control condition in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral weight loss intervention. A battery of standardized cognitive function tests was administered four to five years later. Analyses of covariance were used to assess relationships that ABI, MIAD, and progression of ABI and MIAD had with cognitive function. Results There was a curvilinear relationship between ABI and a composite index of cognitive function (p=0.03), with lower ABI being associated with poorer function. In graded fashions, both greater MIAD and increases in MIAD over time also had modest relationships with poorer verbal memory (both p≤0.05), processing speed (both p≤0.05), and composite cognitive function (both p≤0.04). These relationships were independent of each other and remained evident after extensive covariate adjustment. Conclusions In overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, lower ABI and larger inter-artery systolic blood pressure differences have modest, independent, graded relationships with poorer cognitive function 4–5 year later. PMID:25546032

  17. Arterial input functions determined from MR signal magnitude and phase for quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the human pelvis.

    PubMed

    Cron, Greg O; Foottit, Claire; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Avruch, Leonard I; Schweitzer, Mark E; Cameron, Ian

    2011-08-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI is often used to measure the transfer constant (Ktrans) and distribution volume (ve) in pelvic tumors. For optimal accuracy and reproducibility, one must quantify the arterial input function (AIF). Unfortunately, this is challenging due to inflow and signal saturation. A potential solution is to use MR signal phase (ϕ), which is relatively unaffected by these factors. We hypothesized that phase-derived AIFs (AIFϕ) would provide more reproducible Ktrans and ve values than magnitude-derived AIFs (AIF|S|). We tested this in 27 prostate dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI studies (echo time=2.56 ms, temporal resolution=13.5 s), using muscle as a standard. AIFϕ peak amplitude varied much less as a function of measurement location (inferior-superior) than AIF|S| (5.6±0.6 mM vs. 2.6±1.5 mM), likely as a result of ϕ inflow insensitivity. However, our main hypothesis was not confirmed. The best AIF|S| provided similar reproducibility versus AIFϕ (interpatient muscle Ktrans=0.039±0.021 min(-1) vs. 0.037±0.025 min(-1), ve=0.090±0.041 vs. 0.062±0.022, respectively).

  18. Effects of verapamil and propranolol on left ventricular systolic function and diastolic filling in patients with coronary artery disease: radionuclide angiographic studies at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Bonow, R.O.; Leon, M.B.; Rosing, D.R.; Kent, K.M.; Lipson, L.C.; Bacharach, S.L.; Green, M.V.; Epstein, S.E.

    1982-06-01

    To determine the effects of verapamil on left ventricular (LV) systolic function and diastolic filling in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), researchers performed gated radionuclide angiography at rest and during exercise in 16 symptomatic patients before and during oral verapamil therapy (480 mg/day). Twelve patients were also studied during oral propranolol. LV ejection fraction at rest was normal in 13 patients, but abnormal diastolic filling at rest, defined as peak filling rate (PFR) less than 2.5 end-diastolic volumes (EDV)/sec or time to PFR greater than 180 msec, was present in 15. During verapamil, resting ejection fraction decreased, but resting diastolic filling improved: PFR increased and time to PFR decreased. Exercise ejection fraction did not change during verapamil, but exercise PFR increased, and exercise time to PFR decreased. In contrast, propranolol did not alter ejection fraction, PFR, or time to PFR at rest or during exercise. Thus, LV ejection fraction is decreased by verapamil at rest but is unchanged during exercise. While LV systolic function is not improved by verapamil, LV diastolic filling is enhanced by verapamil, both at rest and during exercise. These mechanisms may account in part for the symptomatic improvement in many patients during verapamil therapy.

  19. Effect of aspirin on acute changes in peripheral arterial stiffness and endothelial function following exertional heat stress in firefighters: The factorial group results of the Enhanced Firefighter Rehab Trial.

    PubMed

    Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Hostler, David; Winger, Daniel G; Wang, Li; Reis, Steven E

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral arterial stiffness and endothelial function, which are independent predictors of cardiac events, are abnormal in firefighters. We examined the effects of aspirin on peripheral arterial stiffness and endothelial function in firefighters. Fifty-two firefighters were randomized to receive daily 81 mg aspirin or placebo for 14 days before treadmill exercise in thermal protection clothing, and a single dose of 325 mg aspirin or placebo immediately following exertion. Peripheral arterial augmentation index adjusted for a heart rate of 75 (AI75) and reactive hyperemia index (RHI) were determined immediately before, and 30, 60, and 90 minutes after exertion. Low-dose aspirin was associated with lower AI75 (-15.25±9.25 vs -8.08±10.70, p=0.014) but not RHI. On repeated measures analysis, treatment with low-dose aspirin before, but not single-dose aspirin after exertion, was associated with lower AI75 following exertional heat stress (p=0.018). Low-dose aspirin improved peripheral arterial stiffness and wave reflection but not endothelial function in firefighters.

  20. Reactive oxygen species scavengers improve voltage-gated K+ channel function in pulmonary arteries of newborn pigs with progressive hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aschner, Judy L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Changes in voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel function contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Yet the mechanisms underlying Kv channel impairments in the pulmonary circulation remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROSs) contribute to the Kv channel dysfunction that develops in resistance-level pulmonary arteries (PRAs) of piglets exposed to chronic in vivo hypoxia. Piglets were raised in either room air (control) or hypoxia for 3 or 10 days. To evaluate Kv channel function, responses to the Kv channel antagonist 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) were measured in cannulated PRAs. To assess the influence of ROSs, PRAs were treated with the ROS-removing agent M40403 (which dismutates superoxide to hydrogen peroxide), plus polyethylene glycol catalase (which converts hydrogen peroxide to water). Responses to 4-AP were diminished in PRAs from both groups of hypoxic piglets. ROS-removing agents had no impact on 4-AP responses in PRAs from piglets exposed to 3 days of hypoxia but significantly increased the response to 4-AP in PRAs from piglets exposed to 10 days of hypoxia. Kv channel function is impaired in PRAs of piglets exposed to 3 or 10 days of in vivo hypoxia. ROSs contribute to Kv channel dysfunction in PRAs from piglets exposed to hypoxia for 10 days but are not involved with the Kv channel dysfunction that develops within 3 days of exposure to hypoxia. Therapies to remove ROSs might improve Kv channel function and thereby ameliorate the progression, but not the onset, of pulmonary hypertension in chronically hypoxic newborn piglets. PMID:24618540

  1. Macrophage depletion lowers blood pressure and restores sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic receptor function in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Thang, Loc V; Demel, Stacie L; Crawford, Robert; Kaminski, Norbert E; Swain, Greg M; Van Rooijen, Nico; Galligan, James J

    2015-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that vascular macrophage infiltration and O2 (-) release impairs sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic autoreceptor (α2AR) function in mesenteric arteries (MAs) of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Male rats were uninephrectomized or sham operated (sham). DOCA pellets were implanted subcutaneously in uninephrectomized rats who were provided high-salt drinking water or high-salt water with apocynin. Sham rats received tap water. Blood pressure was measured using radiotelemetry. Treatment of sham and DOCA-salt rats with liposome-encapsulated clodronate was used to deplete macrophages. After 3-5, 10-13, and 18-21 days of DOCA-salt treatment, MAs and peritoneal fluid were harvested from euthanized rats. Norepinephrine (NE) release from periarterial sympathetic nerves was measured in vitro using amperometry with microelectrodes. Macrophage infiltration into MAs as well as TNF-α and p22(phox) were measured using immunohistochemistry. Peritoneal macrophage activation was measured by flow cytometry. O2 (-) was measured using dihydroethidium staining. Hypertension developed over 28 days, and apocynin reduced blood pressure on days 18-21. O2 (-) and macrophage infiltration were greater in DOCA-salt MAs compared with sham MAs after day 10. Peritoneal macrophage activation occurred after day 10 in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophages expressing TNF-α and p22(phox) were localized near sympathetic nerves. Impaired α2AR function and increased NE release from sympathetic nerves occurred in MAs from DOCA-salt rats after day 18. Macrophage depletion reduced blood pressure and vascular O2 (-) while restoring α2AR function in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophage infiltration into the vascular adventitia contributes to increased blood pressure in DOCA-salt rats by releasing O2 (-), which disrupts α2AR function, causing enhanced NE release from sympathetic nerves.

  2. Poorer clock draw test scores are associated with greater functional impairment in peripheral artery disease: The Walking and Leg Circulation Study II

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Laura J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Liu, Kiang; Tian, Lu; Guralnik, Jack M; Criqui, Michael H; Liao, Yihua; McDermott, Mary M

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that, in the absence of clinically recognized dementia, cognitive dysfunction measured by the clock draw test (CDT) is associated with greater functional impairment in men and women with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Participants were men and women aged 60 years and older with Mini-Mental Status Examination scores ≥ 24 with PAD (n = 335) and without PAD (n = 234). We evaluated the 6-minute walk test, 4-meter walking velocity at usual and fastest pace, the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and accelerometer-measured physical activity. CDTs were scored using the Shulman system as follows: Category 1 (worst): CDT score 0–2; Category 2: CDT score 3; Category 3 (best): CDT score 4–5. Results were adjusted for age, sex, race, education, ankle–brachial index (ABI), and comorbidities. In individuals with PAD, lower CDT scores were associated with slower 4-meter usual-paced walking velocity (Category 1: 0.78 meters/second; Category 2: 0.83 meters/second; Category 3: 0.86 meters/second; p-trend = 0.025) and lower physical activity (Category 1: 420 activity units; Category 2: 677 activity units; Category 3: 701 activity units; p-trend = 0.045). Poorer CDT scores were also associated with worse functional performance in individuals without PAD (usual and fast-paced walking velocity and SPPB, p-trend = 0.022, 0.043, and 0.031, respectively). In conclusion, cognitive impairment identified with CDT is independently associated with greater functional impairment in older, dementia-free individuals with and without PAD. Longitudinal studies are necessary to explore whether baseline CDT scores and changes in CDT scores over time can predict long-term decline in functional performance in individuals with and without PAD. PMID:21636676

  3. Greater Sedentary Hours and Slower Walking Speed Outside the Home Predict Faster Declines in Functioning and Adverse Calf Muscle Changes in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Liu, Kiang; Ferrucci, Luigi; Tian, Lu; Guralnik, Jack M.; Liao, Yihua; Criqui, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In participants with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), we determined whether more sedentary behavior and slower outdoor walking speed were associated with faster functional decline and more adverse changes in calf muscle characteristics over time. Background Modifiable behaviors associated with faster functional decline in lower-extremity PAD are understudied. Methods Participants were 384 men and women with an ankle brachial index <0.90 followed for a median of 47 months. At baseline, participants reported the number of hours they spent sitting per day and their walking speeds outside their homes. Participants underwent baseline and annual measures of objective functional performance. Calf muscle characteristics were measured with computed tomography at baseline and every 2 years subsequently. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, race, comorbidities, ankle brachial index, and other confounders. Results Slower walking speed outside the home was associated with faster annual decline in calf muscle density (brisk/ striding pace −0.32 g/cm3, average pace −0.46 g/cm3, casual strolling −1.03 g/cm3, no walking at all −1.43 g/cm3, p trend <0.001). Greater hours sitting per day were associated with faster decline in 6-min walk (<4 h: −35.8 feet/year; 4 to <7 h: −41.1 feet/year; 8 to <11 h: −68.7 feet; ≥12 h: −78.0 feet; p trend = 0.008). Similar associations were observed for greater hours sitting per day and faster declines in fast-paced (p trend = 0.018) and usual-paced (p trend < 0.001) 4-m walking velocity. Conclusions Greater sedentary hours per day and slower outdoor walking speed are modifiable behaviors that are associated with faster functional decline and greater decline in calf muscle density, respectively, in patients with PAD. PMID:21636037

  4. The Effects of Acutely Administered 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine on Spontaneous Brain Function in Healthy Volunteers Measured with Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level–Dependent Resting State Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L.; Murphy, Kevin; Leech, Robert; Erritzoe, David; Wall, Matthew B.; Ferguson, Bart; Williams, Luke T.J.; Roseman, Leor; Brugger, Stefan; De Meer, Ineke; Tanner, Mark; Tyacke, Robin; Wolff, Kim; Sethi, Ajun; Bloomfield, Michael A.P.; Williams, Tim M.; Bolstridge, Mark; Stewart, Lorna; Morgan, Celia; Newbould, Rexford D.; Feilding, Amanda; Curran, H. Val; Nutt, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The compound 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a potent monoamine releaser that produces an acute euphoria in most individuals. Methods In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced-order study, MDMA was orally administered to 25 physically and mentally healthy individuals. Arterial spin labeling and seed-based resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) were used to produce spatial maps displaying changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and RSFC after MDMA administration. Participants underwent two arterial spin labeling and two blood oxygen level–dependent scans in a 90-minute scan session; MDMA and placebo study days were separated by 1 week. Results Marked increases in positive mood were produced by MDMA. Decreased CBF only was observed after MDMA, and this was localized to the right medial temporal lobe (MTL), thalamus, inferior visual cortex, and the somatosensory cortex. Decreased CBF in the right amygdala and hippocampus correlated with ratings of the intensity of global subjective effects of MDMA. The RSFC results complemented the CBF results, with decreases in RSFC between midline cortical regions, the medial prefrontal cortex, and MTL regions, and increases between the amygdala and hippocampus. There were trend-level correlations between these effects and ratings of intense and positive subjective effects. Conclusions The MTLs appear to be specifically implicated in the mechanism of action of MDMA, but further work is required to elucidate how the drug’s characteristic subjective effects arise from its modulation of spontaneous brain activity. PMID:24495461

  5. Exploring Heart and Lung Function in Space: ARMS Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Andre; Cork, Michael; LeGouic, Marine

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Respiratory Monitoring System (ARMS) is a suite of monitoring instruments and supplies used to study the heart, lungs, and metabolism. Many experiments sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA) will be conducted using ARMS during STS-107. The near-weightless environment of space causes the body to undergo many physiological adaptations, and the regulation of blood pressure is no exception. Astronauts also experience a decrease in blood volume as an adaptation to microgravity. Reduced blood volume may not provide enough blood pressure to the head during entry or landing. As a result, astronauts often experience light-headedness, and sometimes even fainting, when they stand shortly after returning to Earth. To help regulate blood pressure and heart rate, baroreceptors, sensors located in artery walls in the neck and near the heart, control blood pressure by sending information to the brain and ensuring blood flow to organs. These mechanisms work properly in Earth's gravity but must adapt in the microgravity environment of space. However, upon return to Earth during entry and landing, the cardiovascular system must readjust itself to gravity, which can cause fluctuation in the control of blood pressure and heart rate. Although the system recovers in hours or days, these occurrences are not easily predicted or understood - a puzzle investigators will study with the ARMS equipment. In space, researchers can focus on aspects of the cardiovascular system normally masked by gravity. The STS-107 experiments using ARMS will provide data on how the heart and lungs function in space, as well as how the nervous system controls them. Exercise will also be combined with breath holding and straining (the Valsalva maneuver) to test how heart rate and blood pressure react to different stresses. This understanding will improve astronauts' cardiopulmonary function after return to Earth, and may well help Earthbound patients who experience similar effects after long

  6. [Mitral valve replacement after previous coronary artery bypass grafting with functioning left internal thoracic artery graft: effectiveness of the method using a direct vision retrosternal approach; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Junichi; Saito, Tatsuya; Fujii, Akira; Tsukamoto, Masaru; Date, Osamu; Yokoyama, Hideo; Abe, Tomio; Nakase, Atsunobu; Ohori, Katsumi

    2014-08-01

    Performing a redo-sternotomy when a mammary artery graft is patent can be rather difficult. We previously reported a redo-sternotomy technique involving direct visualization with a retrosternal dissection (DR) method using a Kent's retractor. The DR method in detail is as follows: 1) A midline skin incision is extended to the abdomen about 5 cm. 2) The bilateral costal arches are divided from the rectal muscle. 3). A pair of retractors is placed under the costal arch. 4) A stainless steel wire is applied to the previous sternal wire at the center of the sternum. 5) The retractor and sternal wire are lifted up using the Kent's retractor to widen the retrosternal space. 6) The sternum and sub-sternal tissue are carefully divided using an electronic scalpel or metal retractor with an entirely sternal length. 7) Routine sternotomy is performed using a Stryker. Herein, we report a patient who had undergone cardiac surgery, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), using a left internal mammary artery and mitral annuloplasty 2 years previously, and then developed mitral regurgitation caused by infectious endocarditis. He successfully underwent redo-sternotomy and mitral valve replacement using the DR method. In a patient with a patent internal mammary artery, the DR method greatly reduces the risk of graft injury.

  7. Proinflammation: The Key to Arterial Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyi; Jiang, Liqun; Monticone, Robert E.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial aging is the major contributing factor to increases in the incidence and prevalence of cardiovascular disease, due mainly to the presence of chronic, low-grade, “sterile” arterial inflammation. Inflammatory signaling driven by the angiotensin II cascade perpetrates adverse age-associated arterial structural and functional remodeling. The aged artery is characterized by endothelial disruption, enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, elastin fracture, and matrix calcification/amyloidosis/glycation. Importantly, the molecular mechanisms of arterial aging are also relevant to the pathogenesis of hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Age-associated arterial proinflammation is, to some extent, mutable, and interventions to suppress or delay it may have the potential to ameliorate or retard age-associated arterial diseases. PMID:24365513

  8. Netrin-1 controls sympathetic arterial innervation

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Isabelle; Gordon, Emma; Han, Jinah; Cristofaro, Brunella; Broqueres-You, Dong; Liu, Chun; Bouvrée, Karine; Zhang, Jiasheng; del Toro, Raquel; Mathivet, Thomas; Larrivée, Bruno; Jagu, Julia; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Pardanaud, Luc; Machado, Maria J.C.; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Zhuang, Zhen; Simons, Michael; Levy, Bernard I.; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger; Eichmann, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic sympathetic nerves innervate peripheral resistance arteries, thereby regulating vascular tone and controlling blood supply to organs. Despite the fundamental importance of blood flow control, how sympathetic arterial innervation develops remains largely unknown. Here, we identified the axon guidance cue netrin-1 as an essential factor required for development of arterial innervation in mice. Netrin-1 was produced by arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) at the onset of innervation, and arterial innervation required the interaction of netrin-1 with its receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), on sympathetic growth cones. Function-blocking approaches, including cell type–specific deletion of the genes encoding Ntn1 in SMCs and Dcc in sympathetic neurons, led to severe and selective reduction of sympathetic innervation and to defective vasoconstriction in resistance arteries. These findings indicate that netrin-1 and DCC are critical for the control of arterial innervation and blood flow regulation in peripheral organs. PMID:24937433

  9. Developing crash modification functions to assess safety effects of adding bike lanes for urban arterials with different roadway and socio-economic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Park, Juneyoung; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Lee, Jaeyoung; Lee, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although many researchers have estimated crash modification factors (CMFs) for specific treatments (or countermeasures), there is a lack of studies that explored the heterogeneous effects of roadway characteristics on crash frequency among treated sites. Generally, the CMF estimated by before-after studies represents overall safety effects of the treatment in a fixed value. However, as each treated site has different roadway characteristics, there is a need to assess the variation of CMFs among the treated sites with different roadway characteristics through crash modification functions (CMFunctions). The main objective of this research is to determine relationships between the safety effects of adding a bike lane and the roadway characteristics through (1) evaluation of CMFs for adding a bike lane using observational before-after with empirical Bayes (EB) and cross-sectional methods, and (2) development of simple and full CMFunctions which are describe the CMF in a function of roadway characteristics of the sites. Data was collected for urban arterials in Florida, and the Florida-specific full SPFs were developed. Moreover, socio-economic parameters were collected and included in CMFunctions and SPFs (1) to capture the effects of the variables that represent volume of bicyclists and (2) to identify general relationship between the CMFs and these characteristics. In order to achieve better performance of CMFunctions, data mining techniques were used. The results of both before-after and cross-sectional methods show that adding a bike lane on urban arterials has positive safety effects (i.e., CMF<1) for all crashes and bike crashes. It was found that adding a bike lane is more effective in reducing bike crashes than all crashes. It was also found that the CMFs vary across the sites with different roadway characteristics. In particular, annual average daily traffic (AADT), number of lanes, AADT per lane, median width, bike lane width, and lane width are significant

  10. [The hyperiricosuria as an indicator of derangement of biologic functions of endoecology and adaptation, biologic reactions of excretion, inflammation and arterial tension].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Oshchepkova, E V; Dmitriev, V A; Gushchina, O V; Shiriaeva, Iu K; Iashin, A Ia

    2012-04-01

    --initiator of inflammation. The uric acid in the form of ion-capturers of active forms of oxygen is involved into in the formation of syndrome of compensatory anti-inflammatory defense. It may be assumed that simultaneously with post-secretory reabsorption of ions of urates in proximal tubules of nephron occurs intensification of philogenetically late post-secretory reabsorption of ions of sodium and activation of of biologic reaction of hydrodynamic and hydraulic pressure in local pool of intravascular medium i.e. arterial tension. The uric acid simultaneously participates in realization of biologic function of endoecology and adaptation, biologic reactions of excretion, inflammation and arterial tension.

  11. Structural and functional changes relevant to maxillary arterial flow observed during computed tomography and nonselective digital subtraction angiography in cats with the mouth closed and opened.

    PubMed

    Scrivani, Peter V; Martin-Flores, Manuel; van Hatten, Ruth; Bezuidenhout, Abraham J

    2014-01-01

    Some cats develop blindness during procedures with mouth gags, which possibly relates to maxillary arterial occlusion by opening the mouth. Our first aim was to use computed tomography (CT) to describe how vascular compression is possible based on morphologic differences between mouth positions. Our second aim was to use nonselective digital subtraction angiography to assess whether opening the mouth induces collateral circulation. Six healthy cats were examined. During CT, the maxillary artery coursed between the angular process of the mandible and the rostrolateral wall of the tympanic bulla. The median distance between these structures was shorter when the mouth was opened (left, 4.3 mm; right, 3.6 mm) vs. closed (left, 6.9 mm; right, 7.1 mm). Additionally, the distance was shorter on the side ipsilateral to the gag (P = 0.03). During nonselective angiography, with the mouth closed, there was strong sequential opacification of the external carotid arteries, maxillary arteries, maxillary retia mirabilia, cerebral arterial circle, and basilar artery. Additionally, there was uniform opacification of the cerebrum and cerebellum. With the mouth opened, opacification of the maxillary arteries (rostral to the angular processes) was reduced in all cats, the cerebral arterial circle and basilar artery had simultaneous opacification in four of six (67%) cats, and the cerebrum had reduced opacification compared to the cerebellum in four of six (67%). In conclusion, the maxillary arteries are situated such that they can be compressed when opening the mouth. Opening the mouth did not consistently induce collateral circulation sufficient to produce comparable cerebral opacification as when the mouth was closed.

  12. You're Only as Old as Your Arteries: Translational Strategies for Preserving Vascular Endothelial Function with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A.; LaRocca, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction develops with age and increases the risk of age-associated vascular disorders. Nitric oxide insufficiency, oxidative stress, and chronic low-grade inflammation, induced by upregulation of adverse cellular signaling processes and imbalances in stress resistance pathways, mediate endothelial dysfunction with aging. Healthy lifestyle behaviors preserve endothelial function with aging by inhibiting these mechanisms, and novel nutraceutical compounds that favorably modulate these pathways hold promise as a complementary approach for preserving endothelial health. PMID:24985329

  13. Nocturnal Blood Pressure in Young Adults and Cognitive Function in Midlife: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Hongyan; Muntner, Paul; Reis, Jared P.; Calhoun, David A.; Viera, Anthony J.; Levine, Deborah A.; Jacobs, David R.; Shimbo, Daichi; Liu, Kiang; Greenland, Philip; Lloyd-Jones, Donald

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nocturnal blood pressure (BP) is associated with risk for cardiovascular events. However, the relationship between nocturnal BP in young adults and cognitive function in midlife remains unclear. METHODS We used data from the ambulatory BP monitoring substudy of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study, including 224 participants (mean age 30 years, 45% men, 63% African Americans). At the 20-year follow-up, the Stroop test (executive function), Digit Symbol Substitution Test (psychomotor speed), and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (verbal memory) were assessed. RESULTS Baseline mean office, daytime, and nocturnal BP were 109/73, 120/74, and 107/59mm Hg, respectively. Nocturnal BP dipping, calculated as (nocturnal systolic BP [SBP] − daytime SBP) × 100/daytime SBP, was divided into quartiles (Q1: −39.3% to −16.9%; Q2: −16.8% to −13.2%, Q3 [reference]: −13.1% to −7.8%, and Q4: −7.7% to +56.4%). In multiple regression analyses, the least nocturnal SBP dipping (Q4 vs. reference) and higher nocturnal diastolic BP level were associated with worse Stroop scores, with adjustments for demographic and clinical characteristics, and cumulative exposure to office BP during follow-up (β [standard error]: 0.37 [0.18] and 0.19 [0.07], respectively; all P < 0.05). Digit Symbol Substitution Test and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test were not significantly associated with nocturnal SBP dipping or nocturnal SBP/diastolic BP levels. CONCLUSIONS Among healthy young adults, less nocturnal SBP dipping and higher nocturnal diastolic BP levels were associated with lower executive function in midlife, independent of multiple measures of office BP during long-term follow-up. PMID:25783740

  14. Algisyl-LVR™ with coronary artery bypass grafting reduces left ventricular wall stress and improves function in the failing human heart☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Wall, Samuel T.; Klepach, Doron; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Lee, Randall J.; Hinson, Andy; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.; Guccione, Julius M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Left ventricular (LV) wall stress reduction is a cornerstone in treating heart failure. Large animal models and computer simulations indicate that adding non-contractile material to the damaged LV wall can potentially reduce myofiber stress. We sought to quantify the effects of a novel implantable hydrogel (Algisyl-LVR™) treatment in combination with coronary artery bypass grafting (i.e. Algisyl-LVR™+CABG) on both LV function and wall stress in heart failure patients. Methods and results Magnetic resonance images obtained before treatment (n=3), and at 3 months (n=3) and 6 months (n=2) afterwards were used to reconstruct the LV geometry. Cardiac function was quantified using end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), regional wall thickness, sphericity index and regional myofiber stress computed using validated mathematical modeling. The LV became more ellipsoidal after treatment, and both EDV and ESV decreased substantially 3 months after treatment in all patients; EDV decreased from 264±91 ml to 146±86 ml and ESV decreased from 184±85 ml to 86±76 ml. Ejection fraction increased from 32±8% to 47±18% during that period. Volumetric-averaged wall thickness increased in all patients, from 1.06±0.21 cm (baseline) to 1.3±0.26 cm (3 months). These changes were accompanied by about a 35% decrease in myofiber stress at end-of-diastole and at end-of-systole. Post-treatment myofiber stress became more uniform in the LV. Conclusions These results support the novel concept that Algisyl-LVR™+CABG treatment leads to decreased myofiber stress, restored LV geometry and improved function. PMID:23394895

  15. A comparison of platelet function tests and thromboxane metabolites to evaluate aspirin response in healthy individuals and patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Johnsen, Helle Ladefoged; Hedegaard, Sofie Sommer; Pedersen, Susanne Bendesgaard; Mortensen, Jette; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2010-06-01

    Individualised antiplatelet therapy and platelet function testing have attracted considerable clinical interest, but several aspects of test performance have not been thoroughly evaluated. We investigated repeatability and concordance of light transmission aggregometry (LTA) induced with arachidonic acid (AA) 1.0 mM, PFA-100 induced with collagen/epinephrine, multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) induced with AA 0.5 or 0.75 mM and VerifyNow Aspirin. Patients with stable coronary artery disease (n=43) and healthy individuals (n=21) were included. All tests were performed in duplicate at baseline in healthy individuals and in duplicate for four days in all study participants during aspirin treatment. Serum and urinary thromboxane metabolites were measured several times to evaluate cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition by aspirin. MEA was most sensitive for aspirin as treatment induced a 12-fold difference in AA-induced platelet aggregation. Coefficients of variation for duplicate measurements at baseline (0.4-12%), during aspirin treatment (3-46%) and for day-to-day variability (3-37%) differed markedly between tests and were lowest for VerifyNow. The prevalence of aspirin low-responsiveness also differed between tests (0-9%) and the agreement was low: kappafunction test, whereas serum thromboxane correlated with VerifyNow Aspirin (r=0.41, p=0.001). Overall, repeatability was moderate and the correlation between tests was low. VerifyNow Aspirin proved most reproducible, and this was the only assay showing a significant positive correlation with serum thromboxane. This study demonstrated that conclusions based on platelet function testing strongly depend on the assay used. PMID:20352155

  16. Interhemispheric Cerebral Blood Flow Balance during Recovery of Motor Hand Function after Ischemic Stroke—A Longitudinal MRI Study Using Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Missimer, John; Schroth, Gerhard; Hess, Christian W.; Sturzenegger, Matthias; Wang, Danny J. J.; Weder, Bruno; Federspiel, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Unilateral ischemic stroke disrupts the well balanced interactions within bilateral cortical networks. Restitution of interhemispheric balance is thought to contribute to post-stroke recovery. Longitudinal measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes might act as surrogate marker for this process. Objective To quantify longitudinal CBF changes using arterial spin labeling MRI (ASL) and interhemispheric balance within the cortical sensorimotor network and to assess their relationship with motor hand function recovery. Methods Longitudinal CBF data were acquired in 23 patients at 3 and 9 months after cortical sensorimotor stroke and in 20 healthy controls using pulsed ASL. Recovery of grip force and manual dexterity was assessed with tasks requiring power and precision grips. Voxel-based analysis was performed to identify areas of significant CBF change. Region-of-interest analyses were used to quantify the interhemispheric balance across nodes of the cortical sensorimotor network. Results Dexterity was more affected, and recovered at a slower pace than grip force. In patients with successful recovery of dexterous hand function, CBF decreased over time in the contralesional supplementary motor area, paralimbic anterior cingulate cortex and superior precuneus, and interhemispheric balance returned to healthy control levels. In contrast, patients with poor recovery presented with sustained hypoperfusion in the sensorimotor cortices encompassing the ischemic tissue, and CBF remained lateralized to the contralesional hemisphere. Conclusions Sustained perfusion imbalance within the cortical sensorimotor network, as measured with task-unrelated ASL, is associated with poor recovery of dexterous hand function after stroke. CBF at rest might be used to monitor recovery and gain prognostic information. PMID:25191858

  17. [Significance of functional tests in investigation of arterial wall rigidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gel'tser, B I; Brodskaia, T A; Nevzorova, V A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to study mechanical properties of the aorta in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using functional tests. 60 patients with COPD and 25 healthy volunteers of comparable age were examined by non-invasive arteriography (Tensio Clinic TL 1 arteriograph, Tensiomed, Hungary) with physical exercise (PE) and nitroglycerin test (NT). Oxygen saturation and the basal serum concentration of nitric oxide were measured. The study found a significant decrease in aortal reactivity after PE in patients with II to III stage COPD vs. healthy persons. The degree of this decrease correlates with the duration and severity of the disease, the degree of ventilatory disturbances, hypoxemia and hyponitrooxidemia. According to non-invasive arteriography, the relative coronary perfusion index during NT was most sensitive to COPD severity when PE test was performed. It was 10 times worse in patients with COPD III vs. healthy persons. The degree of a decrease in the velocity of the spread of pulse wave in the aorta (VSPW) and augmentation index during NT was the same in COPD patients and healthy persons, while in COPD II the sensitivity of these parameters was higher. Study of the mechanic properties of aorta using functional tests substantially complements possibilities provided by conventional arteriography. For instance, some of COPD patients with "optimal" VSPW at rest display a significantly decreased response to PE. PMID:18494284